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  1. Routine HIV Testing of Family Members of Hospitalized Patients in Nigeria

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    Olusegun Busari

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV testing for family members of HIV-positive patients may enhance disclosure of status of spouses, encourage family social support and improve access to HIV services. Objective was to employ the approach of routine HIV testing to determine the prevalence of HIV among family members of both HIV positive and negative patients on admission in a federal HIV treatment designated hospital in Western Nigeria Methodology: This prospective study was conducted between January 2006 and June 2009. Ethical clearance was obtained from the Research and Ethics committee of the hospital prior to the study. Informed consent was obtained from each participant. HIV testing was offered to consenting family members of HIV positive and negative patients on admission. The family members included spouses, children of patients, parents of paediatric patients and other family members. Analysis was done in frequencies and percentages Results: 162 family members of 184 patients were tested. Spouses were, 81 (50.0%; fathers, 14 (8.6%; mothers, 20 (12.3%; children, 19 (11.7% and others family members, 28 (17.3%. 151 (93.2% of testers were first timers. Majority of those tested (82.1% had post-test counseling. The overall HIV prevalence was 12.3% (20/162. HIV prevalence within different family members was 14.8% (12/81, 20% (4/20, 7.1% (1/14, 10.5% (2/19 and 3.6% (1/28 for spouses, mothers, fathers, children and others respectively.In addition, the prevalence of HIV among family members of HIV positive and negative patients was 15.6% (14/90 and 8.3% (6/72 respectively. Of 12 spouses that were positive, 7 (13.5% were HIV-discordant; and in 71.4% (5/7 of discordant couples, the spouse was positive while the patient on admission was negative. Conclusion: The results indicate that routine HIV testing of family members of patients on admission is a strategy for identification of vast number of HIV infected persons. This method is not only innovative, but also a novel

  2. Yield of yearly routine physical examination in HIV-1 infected patients is limited : A retrospective cohort study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amsterdam, Marleen A.; van Assen, Sander; Sprenger, Herman G.; Wilting, Kasper R.; Stienstra, Ymkje; Bierman, Wouter F. W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Routine physical examinations might be of value in HIV-infected patients, but the yield is unknown. We determined the diagnoses that would have been missed without performing annual routine physical examinations in HIV-infected patients with stable disease. Methods Data were collected

  3. Routine HIV testing among hospitalized patients in Argentina. is it time for a policy change?

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    María Eugenia Socías

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The Argentinean AIDS Program estimates that 110,000 persons are living with HIV/AIDS in Argentina. Of those, approximately 40% are unaware of their status, and 30% are diagnosed in advanced stages of immunosuppression. Though studies show that universal HIV screening is cost-effective in settings with HIV prevalence greater than 0.1%, in Argentina, with the exception of antenatal care, HIV testing is always client-initiated. OBJECTIVE: We performed a pilot study to assess the acceptability of a universal HIV screening program among inpatients of an urban public hospital in Buenos Aires. METHODS: Over a six-month period, all eligible adult patients admitted to the internal medicine ward were offered HIV testing. Demographics, uptake rates, reasons for refusal and new HIV diagnoses were analyzed. RESULTS: Of the 350 admissions during this period, 249 were eligible and subsequently enrolled. The enrolled population was relatively old compared to the general population, was balanced on gender, and did not report traditional high risk factors for HIV infection. Only 88 (39% reported prior HIV testing. One hundred and ninety (76% patients accepted HIV testing. In multivariable analysis only younger age (OR 1.02; 95%CI 1.003-1.05 was independently associated with test uptake. Three new HIV diagnoses were made (undiagnosed HIV prevalence: 1.58%; none belonged to a most-at-risk population. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that universal HIV screening in this setting is acceptable and potentially effective in identifying undiagnosed HIV-infected individuals. If confirmed in a larger study, our findings may inform changes in the Argentinean HIV testing policy.

  4. Are routine tuberculosis programme data suitable to report on antiretroviral therapy use of HIV-infected tuberculosis patients?

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    Brouwer, Miranda; Gudo, Paula Samo; Simbe, Chalice Mage; Perdigão, Paula; van Leth, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is lifesaving for HIV-infected tuberculosis (TB) patients. ART-use by these patients lag behind compared to HIV-testing and co-trimoxazole preventive therapy. TB programmes provide the data on ART-use by HIV-infected TB patients, however often the HIV services provide

  5. Introducing routine HIV screening for patients on an internal medicine residency inpatient service: a quality improvement project.

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    Padrnos, Leslie J; Barr, Patrick J; Klassen, Christine L; Fields, Heather E; Azadeh, Natalya; Mendoza, Neil; Saadiq, Rayya A; Pauwels, Emanuel M; King, Christopher S; Chung, Andrew A; Sakata, Kenneth K; Blair, Janis E

    2016-01-01

    The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening for all persons aged 13 to 64 years who present to a health care provider. We sought to improve adherence to the CDC guidelines on the Internal Medicine Resident Hospital Service. We surveyed residents about the CDC guidelines, sent email reminders, provided education, and engaged them in friendly competition. Credit for guideline adherence was awarded if an offer of HIV screening was documented at admission, if a screening test was performed, or if a notation in the resident sign out sheet indicated why screening was not performed. We examined HIV screening of a postintervention group of patients admitted between August 8, 2012, and June 30, 2013, and compared them to a preintervention group admitted between August 1, 2011, and June 30, 2012. Postintervention offers of HIV screening increased significantly (7.9% [44/559] vs 55.5% [300/541]; P<.001), as did documentation of residents' contemplation of screening (8.9% [50/559] vs 67.5% [365/541]; P<.001). A significantly higher proportion of HIV screening tests was ordered postintervention (7.7% [43/559] vs 44.4% [240/541]; P<.001). Monthly HIV screening documentation ranged from 0% (0/53) to 17% (9/53) preintervention, whereas it ranged from 30.6% (11/36) to 100% (62/62) postintervention. HIV screening adherence can be improved through resident education, friendly competition, and system reminders. Barriers to achieving sustained adherence to the CDC guidelines include a heterogeneous patient population and provider discomfort with the subject.

  6. Mind the Gap: Gaps in Antidepressant Treatment, Treatment Adjustments, and Outcomes among Patients in Routine HIV Care in a Multisite U.S. Clinical Cohort.

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    Rushina Cholera

    Full Text Available Depression affects 20-30% of HIV-infected patients and is associated with worse HIV outcomes. Although effective depression treatment is available, depression is largely untreated or undertreated in this population.We quantified gaps in antidepressant treatment, treatment adjustments, and outcomes among US patients in routine HIV care in the nationally distributed CNICS observational clinical cohort. This cohort combines detailed clinical data with regular, self-reported depressive severity assessments (Patient Health Questionnaire-9, PHQ-9. We considered whether participants with likely depression received antidepressants, whether participants on antidepressants with persistently high depressive symptoms received timely dose adjustments, and whether participants achieved depression remission. We considered a cross-sectional analysis (6,219 participants in care in 2011-2012 and a prospective analysis (2,936 participants newly initiating CNICS care when PHQ-9 screening was active.The cross-sectional sample was 87% male, 53% Caucasian, 25% African American, and 18% Hispanic; the prospective sample was similar. In both samples, 39-44% had likely depression, with 44-60% of those receiving antidepressants. Of participants receiving antidepressants, 20-26% experienced persistently high depressive symptoms; only a small minority of those received antidepressant dose adjustments. Overall, 35-40% of participants on antidepressants achieved full depression remission. Remission among participants with persistently high depressive symptoms was rare regardless of dose adjustments.In this large, diverse cohort of US patients engaged in routine HIV care, we observed large gaps in antidepressant treatment, timely dose adjustment to address persistently high depressive symptoms, and antidepressant treatment outcomes. These results highlight the importance of more effective pharmacologic depression treatment models for HIV-infected patients.

  7. Comparative effectiveness of fish oil versus fenofibrate, gemfibrozil, and atorvastatin on lowering triglyceride levels among HIV-infected patients in routine clinical care.

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    Muñoz, Monica A; Liu, Wei; Delaney, Joseph A C; Brown, Elizabeth; Mugavero, Michael J; Mathews, W Chris; Napravnik, Sonia; Willig, James H; Eron, Joseph J; Hunt, Peter W; Kahn, James O; Saag, Michael S; Kitahata, Mari M; Crane, Heidi M

    2013-11-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the effectiveness of fish oil, fenofibrate, gemfibrozil, and atorvastatin on reducing triglyceride (TG) levels among a large cohort of HIV-infected patients in clinical care. Retrospective observational cohort study. The primary endpoint was absolute change in TG levels measured using the last TG value pretreatment and the first TG value posttreatment. A pre-post quasi-experimental design was used to estimate the change in TG because of initiating fish oil. Linear regression models examined the comparative effectiveness of treatment with fish oil versus gemfibrozil, fenofibrate, or atorvastatin for TG reduction. Models were adjusted for baseline differences in age, sex, race, CD4⁺ cell count, diabetes, body mass index, protease inhibitor use, and time between TG measures. A total of 493 patients (mean age, 46 years; 95% male) were included (46 patients receiving gemfibrozil; 80, fenofibrate; 291, atorvastatin; and 76, fish oil) with a mean baseline TG of 347 mg/dL. New use of fish oil decreased TG [ΔTG, -45 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval (CI): -80 to -11] in the pre-post study. Compared with fish oil (reference), fibrates were more effective (ΔTG, -66; 95% CI: -120 to -12) in reducing TG levels, whereas atorvastatin was not (ΔTG, -39; 95% CI: -86 to 9). In HIV-infected patients in routine clinical care, fish oil is less effective than fibrates (but not atorvastatin) at lowering TG values. Fish oil may still represent an attractive alternative for patients with moderately elevated TGs, particularly among patients who may not want or tolerate fibrates.

  8. Routine implementation of isoniazid preventive therapy in HIV-infected patients in seven pilot sites in Zimbabwe

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    Choto, R. C.; Harries, A. D.; Mutasa-Apollo, T.; Chakanyuka-Musanhu, C.

    2017-01-01

    Setting: Seven pilot sites in Zimbabwe implementing 6 months of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) for people living with the human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV). Objectives: To determine, among PLHIV started on IPT, the completion rates for a 6-month course of IPT and factors associated with non-adherence. Design: A retrospective cohort study. Results: Of 578 patients, 466 (81%) completed IPT. Of the 112 patients who failed to complete IPT, 69 (60%) were lost to follow-up, 30 (27%) stopped treatment with no documented reasons, 8 (7%) developed toxicity/adverse reactions, 5 (5%) were documented as having drug stock-outs and the remainder transferred out or refused to continue treatment. Currently being on antiretroviral therapy (ART) (aOR 0.09, 95%CI 0.03–0.28) and receiving a ⩾2 month supply of isoniazid at the start of treatment were associated with a lower risk of not completing IPT, while missing clinic visits prior to starting IPT (aOR 5.25, 95%CI 2.10–13.14) was associated with a higher risk of non-completion. Conclusion: IPT completion rates in seven pilot sites of Zimbabwe were comparatively high, showing that IPT roll-out in public health facilities is feasible. Enhanced adherence counselling or active tracing among pre-ART patients and those with a history of loss to follow-up may improve IPT completion rates, along with synchronising IPT and ART resupplies. PMID:28775944

  9. Dual-Routine HCV/HIV Testing: Seroprevalence and Linkage to Care in Four Community Health Centers in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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    Coyle, Catelyn; Kwakwa, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Despite common risk factors, screening for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV at the same time as part of routine medical care (dual-routine HCV/HIV testing) is not commonly implemented in the United States. This study examined improvements in feasibility of implementation, screening increase, and linkage to care when a dual-routine HCV/HIV testing model was integrated into routine primary care. National Nursing Centers Consortium implemented a dual-routine HCV/HIV testing model at four community health centers in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on September 1, 2013. Routine HCV and opt-out HIV testing replaced the routine HCV and opt-in HIV testing model through medical assistant-led, laboratory-based testing and electronic medical record modification to prompt, track, report, and facilitate reimbursement for tests performed on uninsured individuals. This study examined testing, seropositivity, and linkage-to-care comparison data for the nine months before (December 1, 2012-August 31, 2013) and after (September 1, 2013-May 31, 2014) implementation of the dual-routine HCV/HIV testing model. A total of 1,526 HCV and 1,731 HIV tests were performed before, and 1,888 HCV and 3,890 HIV tests were performed after dual-routine testing implementation, resulting in a 23.7% increase in HCV tests and a 124.7% increase in HIV tests. A total of 70 currently HCV-infected and four new HIV-seropositive patients vs. 101 HCV-infected and 13 new HIV-seropositive patients were identified during these two periods, representing increases of 44.3% for HCV antibody-positive and RNA-positive tests and 225.0% for HIV-positive tests. Linkage to care increased from 27 currently infected HCV--positive and one HIV-positive patient pre-dual-routine testing to 39 HCV--positive and nine HIV-positive patients post-dual-routine testing. The dual-routine HCV/HIV testing model shows that integrating dual-routine testing in a primary care setting is possible and leads to increased HCV and HIV screening

  10. Factors associated with willingness to accept a routine offer of HIV test in a large referral hospital in Western Kenya.

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    Mangeni, J N; Ballidawa, J B; Ndege, S

    2012-03-01

    Although Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) has existed for more than 10 years, majority of Kenyans still do not know their HIV status, thus necessitating the introduction of other testing strategies to increase the number of people taking the test. The routine offer of an HIV test to all patients in health-care settings has been proposed to increase access to care. The main objective of this study was to identify factors associated with willingness to accept a routine offer of an HIV test. This was a cross sectional study. The Setting was in the Outpatient department at a large Referral Hospital in Western Kenya. A total of 384 adult patients (both males and females) were recruited using systematic random sampling. Information was collected on basic socio demographic characteristics, knowledge about the routine offer of an HIV test, attitudes towards the testing and HIV testing practise. Of the 384 respondents, 64.3% were unaware about the routine offer of HIV testing in Health facilities. Multivariate analysis identified the main predictors of willingness to accept an HIV test offered in hospital as the age (OR 3.7, C.I 0.068-1.075), level of education (OR 3.4, C.I 0.186-62.602), Knowledge about the routine HIV testing (OR 4.6,C.I 2.118-9.847), self-perception of HIV risk (OR 8.4,C.I 3.424-20.496) and attitude towards routine offer of HIV testing (OR 9.2, C.I 0.042-0.284). There is a need to come up with tailored training on the routine offer of an HIV test and devising strategies to address the main factors that influence the decision for patients to test as identified above.

  11. Antiretroviral treatment outcome in HIV-1-infected patients routinely followed up in capital cities and remote areas of Senegal, Mali and Guinea-Conakry.

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    Diouara, Abou Abdallah Malick; Ndiaye, Halimatou Diop; Guindo, Ibrehima; Bangoura, Nestor; Cissé, Mohamed; Edmond, Tchiakpe; Bougoudogo, Flabou; Mboup, Souleymame; Peeters, Martine; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Kane, Ndèye Coumba Touré

    2014-01-01

    Access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) becomes more and more effective in resource-limited settings (RLS). However, this global effort would be even more profitable if the access to laboratory services especially in decentralized settings was strengthened. We report the virological outcome and HIV-1 drug resistance in three West African countries using dried blood spots (DBS) samples. We included HIV-1-infected adults on ART ≥6 months and followed up in capital cities and decentralized sites in Senegal, Mali and Guinea-Conakry. Patients were consecutively enrolled and DBS were collected in field conditions and kept at ambient temperature before transfer to the reference laboratory. Viral load (VL) was quantified using the NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 v1.2. Genotyping of HIV-1 pol gene was performed using in-house protocol. Of the 407 participants, 119, 152 and 136 were from Senegal, Mali and Guinea-Conakry, respectively. The median treatment duration was 36 months [IQR: 6-136]. Virological failure (VF) (VL≥3log10 copies/mL) was observed in 26% (95% confidence interval (CI), 18-35; n=31), 11% (95% CI, 6-17; n=16) and 24% (95% CI, 17-32; n=33) of patients in Senegal, Mali and Guinea-Conakry, respectively (p=0.001). Of samples presenting VL≥3log10 copies/mL (n=80), 70 were successfully genotyped. At least one drug resistance mutation (DRM) was detected in the following proportions: 70% (95% CI, 50-86; n=19), 93% (95% CI, 68-100; n=14) and 68% (95% CI, 48-84; n=19) in Senegal, Mali and Guinea-Conakry, respectively (p=0.22). Twenty-six per cent (26%; 95% CI, 16-38; n=18) of patients in VF harboured wild-type viruses, which is likely indicative of weak adherence. Phylogenetic analysis showed the predominance of CRF02_AG subtype (73%; 95% CI, 61-83; n=51). We describe the ART outcome in capital and rural settings of Senegal, Mali and Guinea-Conakry. Our results in all of the three countries highlight the need to reinforce the ART adherence in order to minimize the

  12. Routine monitoring and assessment of adults living with HIV: results of the British HIV Association (BHIVA) national audit 2015.

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    Molloy, A; Curtis, H; Burns, F; Freedman, A

    2017-09-13

    The clinical care of people living with HIV changed fundamentally as a result of the development of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). HIV infection is now a long-term treatable condition. We report a national audit to assess adherence to British HIV Association guidelines for the routine investigation and monitoring of adult HIV-1-infected individuals. All UK sites known as providers of adult HIV outpatient services were invited to complete a case-note review and a brief survey of local clinic practices. Participating sites were asked to randomly select 50-100 adults, who attended for specialist HIV care during 2014 and/or 2015. Each site collected data electronically using a self-audit spreadsheet tool. This included demographic details (gender, ethnicity, HIV exposure, and age) and whether 22 standardised and pre-defined clinical audited outcomes had been recorded. Data were collected on 8258 adults from 123 sites, representing approximately 10% of people living with HIV reported in public health surveillance as attending UK HIV services. Sexual health screening was provided within 96.4% of HIV services, cervical cytology and influenza vaccination within 71.4% of HIV services. There was wide variation in resistance testing across sites. Only 44.9% of patients on ART had a documented 10-year CVD risk within the past three years and fracture risk had been assessed within the past three years for only 16.7% patients aged over 50 years. There was high participation in the national audit and good practice was identified in some areas. However improvements can be made in monitoring of cardiovascular risk, bone and sexual health.

  13. Acute HIV Discovered During Routine HIV Screening With HIV Antigen-Antibody Combination Tests in 9 US Emergency Departments.

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    White, Douglas A E; Giordano, Thomas P; Pasalar, Siavash; Jacobson, Kathleen R; Glick, Nancy R; Sha, Beverly E; Mammen, Priya E; Hunt, Bijou R; Todorovic, Tamara; Moreno-Walton, Lisa; Adomolga, Vincent; Feaster, Daniel J; Branson, Bernard M

    2018-01-05

    Newer combination HIV antigen-antibody tests allow detection of HIV sooner after infection than previous antibody-only immunoassays because, in addition to HIV-1 and -2 antibodies, they detect the HIV-1 p24 antigen, which appears before antibodies develop. We determine the yield of screening with HIV antigen-antibody tests and clinical presentations for new diagnoses of acute and established HIV infection across US emergency departments (EDs). This was a retrospective study of 9 EDs in 6 cities with HIV screening programs that integrated laboratory-based antigen-antibody tests between November 1, 2012, and December 31, 2015. Unique patients with newly diagnosed HIV infection were identified and classified as having either acute HIV infection or established HIV infection. Acute HIV infection was defined as a repeatedly reactive antigen-antibody test result, a negative HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody differentiation assay, or Western blot result, but detectable HIV ribonucleic acid (RNA); established HIV infection was defined as a repeatedly reactive antigen-antibody test result and a positive HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody differentiation assay or Western blot result. The primary outcomes were the number of new HIV diagnoses and proportion of patients with laboratory-defined acute HIV infection. Secondary outcomes compared reason for visit and the clinical presentation of acute HIV infection. In total, 214,524 patients were screened for HIV and 839 (0.4%) received a new diagnosis, of which 122 (14.5%) were acute HIV infection and 717 (85.5%) were established HIV infection. Compared with patients with established HIV infection, those with acute HIV infection were younger, had higher RNA and CD4 counts, and were more likely to have viral syndrome (41.8% versus 6.5%) or fever (14.3% versus 3.4%) as their reason for visit. Most patients with acute HIV infection displayed symptoms attributable to acute infection (median symptom count 5 [interquartile range 3 to 6]), with fever often

  14. Daily medication routine of adolescents with HIV/AIDS

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    Cristiane Cardoso de Paula

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to describe the sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of the daily medication routine of adolescents with HIV/AIDS of ages 13 to 19 years, followed at a reference service. This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed with 23 adolescents, using a quantitative approach. Data were collected using a form during appointments at the outpatient clinic. Univariate analysis revealed: females, in the initial phase of adolescence, and vertical transmission. The highlights were: lack of assiduity to appointments; unprotected sex; and consumption of alcohol. Regarding the daily medication routine, subjects depend on their parents or guardians, use strategies to remember to take the medications, and are unaware about the laboratory test for disease management and treatment. There is a need for educative intervention using information and communication technology, such as the Internet, to promote health and autonomy among adolescents. Descriptors: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome; Adolescent Health; Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active; Nursing.

  15. Acceptability of routine offer of HIV testing (opt-out approach) among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: With the introduction of the opt out HIV testing policy in Ghana, the HIV test is offered routinely to all pregnant women unless they decline testing. Objective: To assess acceptability of the routine offer of HIV testing antenatal clinic (ANC) clients in the Wa municipality, Ghana. Design: Cross-sectional study of 270 ...

  16. Routine HIV screening in two health-care settings--New York City and New Orleans, 2011-2013.

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    Lin, Xia; Dietz, Patricia M; Rodriguez, Vanessa; Lester, Deborah; Hernandez, Paloma; Moreno-Walton, Lisa; Johnson, Grant; Van Handel, Michelle M; Skarbinski, Jacek; Mattson, Christine L; Stratford, Dale; Belcher, Lisa; Branson, Bernard M

    2014-06-27

    Approximately 16% of the estimated 1.1 million persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the United States are unaware of their infection and thus unable to benefit from effective treatment that improves health and reduces transmission risk. Since 2006, CDC has recommended that health-care providers screen for HIV all patients aged 13-64 years unless prevalence of undiagnosed HIV infection in their patients has been documented to be New York City and the Interim Louisiana Hospital (ILH) in New Orleans. Data were provided by the two programs. UHP screened a monthly average of 986 patients for HIV during January 2011-September 2013. Of the 32,534 patients screened, 148 (0.45%) tested HIV-positive, of whom 147 (99%) received their test result and 43 (29%) were newly diagnosed. None of the 148 patients with HIV infection were previously receiving medical care, and 120 (81%) were linked to HIV medical care. The ILH emergency department (ED) and the urgent-care center (UCC) screened a monthly average of 1,323 patients from mid-March to December 2013. Of the 12,568 patients screened, 102 (0.81%) tested HIV-positive, of whom 100 (98%) received their test result, 77 (75%) were newly diagnosed, and five (5%) had acute HIV infection. Linkage to HIV medical care was successful for 67 (74%) of 91 patients not already in care. Routine HIV screening identified patients with new and previously diagnosed HIV infection and facilitated their linkage to medical care. The two HIV screening programs highlighted in this report can serve as models that could be adapted by other health-care settings.

  17. Diagnostic accuracy, incremental yield and prognostic value of Determine TB-LAM for routine diagnostic testing for tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients requiring acute hospital admission in South Africa: a prospective cohort.

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    Lawn, Stephen D; Kerkhoff, Andrew D; Burton, Rosie; Schutz, Charlotte; Boulle, Andrew; Vogt, Monica; Gupta-Wright, Ankur; Nicol, Mark P; Meintjes, Graeme

    2017-03-21

    We previously reported that one-third of HIV-positive adults requiring medical admission to a South African district hospital had laboratory-confirmed tuberculosis (TB) and that almost two-thirds of cases could be rapidly diagnosed using Xpert MTB/RIF-testing of concentrated urine samples obtained on the first day of admission. Implementation of urine-based, routine, point-of-care TB screening is an attractive intervention that might be facilitated by use of a simple, low-cost diagnostic tool, such as the Determine TB-LAM lateral-flow rapid test for HIV-associated TB. Sputum, urine and blood samples were systematically obtained from unselected HIV-positive adults within 24 hours of admission to a South African township hospital. Additional clinical samples were obtained during hospitalization as clinically indicated. TB was defined by the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in any sample using Xpert MTB/RIF or liquid culture. The diagnostic yield, accuracy and prognostic value of urine-lipoarabinomannan (LAM) testing were determined, but urine-LAM results did not inform treatment decisions. Consecutive HIV-positive adult acute medical admissions not already receiving TB treatment (n = 427) were enrolled regardless of clinical presentation or symptoms. TB was diagnosed in 139 patients (TB prevalence 32.6%; median CD4 count 80 cells/μL). In the first 24 hours of admission, sputum (spot and/or induced) samples were obtained from 37.0% of patients and urine samples from 99.5% of patients (P < 0.001). The diagnostic yields from these specimens were 19.4% (n = 27/139) for sputum-microscopy, 26.6% (n = 37/139) for sputum-Xpert, 38.1% (n = 53/139) for urine-LAM and 52.5% (n = 73/139) for sputum-Xpert/urine-LAM combined (P < 0.01). Corresponding yields among patients with CD4 counts <100 cells/μL were 18.9%, 24.3%, 55.4% and 63.5%, respectively (P < 0.01). The diagnostic yield of urine-LAM was unrelated to respiratory symptoms, and

  18. Underutilisation of routinely collected data in the HIV programme in Zambia: a review of quantitatively analysed peer-reviewed articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munthali, Tendai; Musonda, Patrick; Mee, Paul; Gumede, Sehlulekile; Schaap, Ab; Mwinga, Alwyn; Phiri, Caroline; Kapata, Nathan; Michelo, Charles; Todd, Jim

    2017-06-13

    The extent to which routinely collected HIV data from Zambia has been used in peer-reviewed published articles remains unexplored. This paper is an analysis of peer-reviewed articles that utilised routinely collected HIV data from Zambia within six programme areas from 2004 to 2014. Articles on HIV, published in English, listed in the Directory of open access journals, African Journals Online, Google scholar, and PubMed were reviewed. Only articles from peer-reviewed journals, that utilised routinely collected data and included quantitative data analysis methods were included. Multi-country studies involving Zambia and another country, where the specific results for Zambia were not reported, as well as clinical trials and intervention studies that did not take place under routine care conditions were excluded, although community trials which referred patients to the routine clinics were included. Independent extraction was conducted using a predesigned data collection form. Pooled analysis was not possible due to diversity in topics reviewed. A total of 69 articles were extracted for review. Of these, 7 were excluded. From the 62 articles reviewed, 39 focused on HIV treatment and retention in care, 15 addressed prevention of mother-to-child transmission, 4 assessed social behavioural change, and 4 reported on voluntary counselling and testing. In our search, no articles were found on condom programming or voluntary male medical circumcision. The most common outcome measures reported were CD4+ count, clinical failure or mortality. The population analysed was children in 13 articles, women in 16 articles, and both adult men and women in 33 articles. During the 10 year period of review, only 62 articles were published analysing routinely collected HIV data in Zambia. Serious consideration needs to be made to maximise the utility of routinely collected data, and to benefit from the funds and efforts to collect these data. This could be achieved with government support

  19. Changes in depression in a cohort of Danish HIV-positive individuals: time for routine screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodkjaer, Lotte; Laursen, Tinne; Christensen, Nils B

    2011-01-01

    demonstrated a decline in depression scores over time and an association between the risk of depression and low medication adherence, stress and unsafe sex. We recommend routine screening for depression to be conducted regularly to provide full evaluations and relevant psychiatric treatment.......Background: The aim of this study was to follow a cohort of HIV-positive individuals for 3 years in order to assess changes in depression, adherence, unsafe sex and emotional strains from living with HIV. Methods: Participants were assessed for depression, adherence, emotional strain and unsafe sex......) in 24 (16%) individuals. Patients at risk of moderate to major depression were more likely to be non-adherent to medications, to practice unsafe sex and to suffer from emotional strains compared with patients not at risk of depression, both at baseline (2005) and follow-up (2008). Conclusion: This study...

  20. Implementing a routine, voluntary HIV testing program in a Massachusetts county prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Rebecca V; Zheng, Hui; Internicola, Jeanne; Werner, Barbara G; Kazianis, Arthur; Golan, Yoav; Rubinstein, Eric P; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Walensky, Rochelle P

    2006-11-01

    Although U.S. prison inmates have higher rates of HIV infection than the general population, most inmates are not routinely tested for HIV infection at prison entry. The study objective was to implement a routine, voluntary HIV testing program in a Massachusetts county prison. During admission, inmates were given group HIV pre-test counseling and were subsequently offered private HIV testing. This intervention was compared to a control period during which HIV testing was provided only upon inmate or physician request. Between November 2004 and April 2005, 1,004 inmates met inclusion criteria and were offered routine, voluntary HIV testing. Of these, 734 (73.1%) accepted, 2 (0.3%) were HIV-infected, and 457 (45.5%) had been tested for HIV in the previous year. The testing rate of 73.1% was significantly increased from the rate of 18.0% (318 of 1,723) during the control period (pprison setting. Careful attention should be paid to prevent redundancy of testing efforts in the prison population. Implementing a routine HIV testing program among prison inmates greatly increased testing rates compared to on-request testing.

  1. Strengthening Routine Data Systems to Track the HIV Epidemic and Guide the Response in Sub-Saharan Africa.

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    Rice, Brian; Boulle, Andrew; Baral, Stefan; Egger, Matthias; Mee, Paul; Fearon, Elizabeth; Reniers, Georges; Todd, Jim; Schwarcz, Sandra; Weir, Sharon; Rutherford, George; Hargreaves, James

    2018-04-03

    The global HIV response has entered a new phase with the recommendation of treating all persons living with HIV with antiretroviral therapy, and with the goals of reducing new infections and AIDS-related deaths to fewer than 500,000 by 2020. This new phase has intensive data requirements that will need to utilize routine data collected through service delivery platforms to monitor progress toward these goals. With a focus on sub-Saharan African, we present the following priorities to improve the demand, supply, and use of routine HIV data: (1) strengthening patient-level HIV data systems that support continuity of clinical care and document sentinel events; (2) leveraging data from HIV testing programs; (3) using targeting data collection in communities and among clients; and (4) building capacity and promoting a culture of HIV data quality assessment and use. When fully leveraged, routine data can efficiently provide timely information at a local level to inform action, as well as provide information at scale with wide geographic coverage to strengthen estimation efforts. ©Brian Rice, Andrew Boulle, Stefan Baral, Matthias Egger, Paul Mee, Elizabeth Fearon, Georges Reniers, Jim Todd, Sandra Schwarcz, Sharon Weir, George Rutherford, James Hargreaves. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (http://publichealth.jmir.org), 03.04.2018.

  2. Routine airway surveillance in pediatric tracheostomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergin, Ozgul; Adil, Eelam; Kawai, Kosuke; Watters, Karen; Moritz, Ethan; Rahbar, Reza

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to review airway findings in children with tracheostomies who underwent surveillance direct laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy (DLB) to determine the yield of routine airway evaluation in these patients. Retrospective chart review at tertiary referral children's hospital. A retrospective chart review was conducted of all of the children with tracheostomies who underwent DLB after tracheostomy between 1984 and 2015. A total of 303 patients met inclusion criteria. The median time interval between tracheostomy and first follow-up DLB was 12.0 months (IQR 4.8-28.9 months). There was no significant difference in the incidence of airway lesions between patients who underwent endoscopy tracheostomy versus those who had a longer time interval between tracheostomy and DLB (p = 0.16). One hundred sixty seven patients (55.1%) were diagnosed with lesions, with suprastomal granulation (39.9%) being the most common. Symptomatic patients were significantly more likely to have an airway lesion identified (69.9% versus 42.0%; p tracheostomy were significantly more likely to have an airway lesion (p = 0.01). The high incidence of airway lesions noted during surveillance DLB support the utility of routine airway endoscopy in pediatric tracheostomy patients. Symptomatic patients, those with ventilator dependence, or cardiopulmonary or trauma indications for tracheostomy are more likely to have airway lesions and should be monitored closely. The ideal time interval between surveillance endoscopies needs to be examined further. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. How Compliance Measures, Behavior Modification, and Continuous Quality Improvement Led to Routine HIV Screening in an Emergency Department in Brooklyn, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Jermel Kyri; Sanchez, Travis H; Brown, Emily H; Thompson, Gina; Sanchez, Christina; Fils-Aime, Stephany; Maria, Jose

    2016-01-01

    New York State adopted a new HIV testing law in 2010 requiring medical providers to offer an HIV test to all eligible patients aged 13-64 years during emergency room or ambulatory care visits. Since then, Wyckoff Heights Medical Center (WHMC) in Brooklyn, New York, began implementing routine HIV screening organization-wide using a compliance, behavior-modification, and continuous quality-improvement process. WHMC first implemented HIV screening in the emergency department (ED) and evaluated progress with the following monthly indicators: HIV tests offered, HIV tests accepted, HIV tests ordered (starting in December 2013), HIV tests administered, positive HIV tests, and linkage to HIV care. Compliance with the delivery of HIV testing was determined by the proportion of patients who, after accepting a test, received one. During August 2013 through July 2014, of 57,852 eligible patients seen in the WHMC ED, a total of 31,423 (54.3%) were offered an HIV test. Of those, 8,229 (26.2%) patients accepted a test. Of those, 6,114 (74.3%) underwent a test. A total of 26 of the 6,114 patients tested (0.4%) had a positive test, and 24 of the 26 HIV-positive patients were linked to HIV medical care. By July 2014, the monthly proportion of patients offered a test was 62%; the proportion of those offered a test who had a test ordered was 98%, and the proportion of those with a test ordered who were tested was 81%. Testing compliance increased substantially at the WHMC ED, from 77% in December 2013 to >98% in July 2014. Using compliance-monitoring, behavior-modification, and continuous quality-improvement processes produced substantial increases in offers and HIV test completion. WHMC is replicating this approach across departments, and other hospitals implementing routine HIV screening programs should consider this approach as well.

  4. Brief behavioural surveys in routine HIV sentinel surveillance: a new tool for monitoring the HIV epidemic in Viet Nam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duong Cong Thanh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report we describe a new approach in HIV sentinel surveillance that was piloted in Viet Nam in 2009 and is currently being rolled out in all provinces. It comprises a brief behavioural questionnaire added to the HIV sentinel surveillance surveys conducted routinely among people who inject drugs, female sex workers and men who have sex with men. Timely reporting of data from this system has resulted in improvements to HIV prevention efforts for most at-risk populations.

  5. Brief behavioural surveys in routine HIV sentinel surveillance: a new tool for monitoring the HIV epidemic in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Duong Cong; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Tuan, Nguyen Anh; Ha, Hoang Thi Thanh; Thang, Pham Hong; Ha, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Tuan, Le Anh; Quang, Tran Dai; Tram, Tran Hong; Le Hai, Nguyen; Huong, Phan Thi Thu; Son, Vo Hai; Duc, Bui Hoang; Nga, Nguyen Thien; Jacka, David; Sabin, Keith

    2015-01-01

    In this report we describe a new approach in HIV sentinel surveillance that was piloted in Viet Nam in 2009 and is currently being rolled out in all provinces. It comprises a brief behavioural questionnaire added to the HIV sentinel surveillance surveys conducted routinely among people who inject drugs, female sex workers and men who have sex with men. Timely reporting of data from this system has resulted in improvements to HIV prevention efforts for most at-risk populations.

  6. Dealing with a positive result: routine HIV testing of pregnant women in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhoff, P.; Hardon, A.P.; Nguyen, T.A.; Pham, N.Y.; Wright, P.

    2008-01-01

    HIV testing is an essential component of PMTCT. It can be offered to pregnant women through different testing models, ranging from voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) to routine and mandatory testing. This study was conducted in Hanoi, Vietnam, where HIV-prevalence is low among the general

  7. Hepatitis B infection in HIV-1-infected patients receiving highly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. No data are available on HIV/hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus coinfection in Togo, and patients are not routinely tested for HBV infection. Objectives. To determine the prevalence of HBV and the risk of HBV drug resistance during antiretroviral treatment in HIV-coinfected patients in Togo. Method.

  8. Perception of Routine HIV Counselling and Testing for Prevention of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    million adults living with the virus and a very high prevalence among young girls and women of the reproductive age groups. Introducing HIV counselling and testing services within existing maternal and child health care package is therefore, ...

  9. Living with HIV: Patients Perspective

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast showcases three people who are living with HIV. The patients share their experiences of being diagnosed with HIV, of the treatments they are undergoing, and on taking responsibility for their health.

  10. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among HIV patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-10-29

    Oct 29, 2010 ... Cryptosporidium species and I. belli were the opportunistic parasites observed in this study. Routine screening for intestinal parasites in. HIV-positive patients is advocated. Keywords: intestinal parasites; HIV; CD4 count; Demographics; Benin City. Received: 2 August 2010; Revised: 25 September 2010; ...

  11. Living with HIV: Patients Perspective

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-06-04

    This podcast showcases three people who are living with HIV. The patients share their experiences of being diagnosed with HIV, of the treatments they are undergoing, and on taking responsibility for their health.  Created: 6/4/2009 by Division of HIV and AIDS Prevention (DHAP), National Center for HIV, Hepatitis, STD, and Tuberculosis Prevention ( NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 6/4/2009.

  12. Need to improve routine HIV testing of U.S. Veterans in care: results of an Internet survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdiserri, Ronald O; Nazi, Kim; McInnes, D Keith; Ross, David; Kinsinger, Linda

    2010-06-01

    Late diagnosis of HIV infection contributes to poor medical outcomes and helps sustain continued transmission of virus. Published evidence suggests that despite current public health recommendations, patients receiving care in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) system are not being routinely tested for HIV infection. Using a sample of computer-literate veterans, we conducted a survey of recent testing experiences. My HealtheVet (MHV) is a secure website allowing registered Veterans to access limited personal VHA health information. Using the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Survey, an electronic questionnaire on "health screening" was conducted in late Fall/early winter 2008-2009. A random sample (4%) of MHV users were surveyed; approximately 17% completed the survey and responses ranged from 31,237 to 33,074. Only 9% of the respondents indicated that they had been offered a test for HIV in the last 12 months compared to 83% who had been offered cholesterol screening, 65% blood sugar screening and 19% who had been offered testing for Hepatitis C virus (HCV). Of those who had been offered HIV testing, 91% indicated that they'd had the test performed. Of note, the percentage of respondents who indicated that they would "very likely" accept a test, if offered, was similar for HIV (73%), HCV (79%), cholesterol (75%), and blood sugar (75%). Although these results cannot be generalized to all Veterans in care, they suggest that routine testing for HIV has not been taking place and support recent VHA policy changes to remove barriers to HIV testing.

  13. High Incidence of Asymptomatic Syphilis in HIV-Infected MSM Justifies Routine Screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Branger, Judith; van der Meer, Jan T. M.; van Ketel, Ruud J.; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Prins, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recently, the incidence of syphilis has risen, mainly among men having sex with men (MSM), many of whom are coinfected with HIV. Current guidelines recommend at least yearly syphilis testing in this group. In this study, we assessed the yield of routine syphilis screening in outpatient

  14. Routine functional assessment for hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tonny J; Lauritsen, Jens M

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - Pre-fracture functional level has been shown to be a consistent predictor of rehabilitation outcomes in older hip fracture patients. We validated 4 overall pre-fracture functional level assessment instruments in patients aged 65 or more, used the prediction of outcome at 4...... months post-fracture, and assessed cutoff values for decision making in treatment and rehabilitation. Patients and methods - 165 consecutive patients with acute primary hip fracture were prospectively included in the study. Pre-fracture Barthel-20, Barthel-100, cumulated ambulation score, and new...... investigation of usage for guidance of clinical and rehabilitation decisions concerning hip fracture patients is warranted....

  15. Compliance with recommendations for routine HIV screening during pregnancy in Halifax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Stephanie J; Halperin, Scott A

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The routine offering of testing for HIV during each pregnancy is recommended by various advisory bodies, including the Canadian Paediatric Society. OBJECTIVES: To determine the proportion of women in Nova Scotia who were counselled about HIV and HIV testing during their pregnancies and to determine the proportion of those who underwent the blood test after counselling. METHODS: A Self-administered survey at the IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia was performed. Questionnaires were distributed to 800 new mothers who delivered a child between March 10 and May 10, 2000. The questionnaire asked women for their ages, levels of education, history of previous deliveries, whether they had received counselling about HIV during their pregnancy, whether they were offered an HIV blood test and whether they underwent an HIV blood test. RESULTS: A total of 155 questionnaires were returned (response rate of 19.4%). The proportion of women who were counselled about HIV during their pregnancy was 65 of 155 (41.9%) (95% CI 34.1 to 49.7) and the proportion of those who were counselled who underwent the test was 47 of 65 (72.3%) (95% CI 65.3 to 79.3). There was a significant difference between the proportion counselled and history of previous deliveries (P=0.050), the proportion offered a test and their ages (P=0.028), and the proportion who had a test done and their ages (P=0.017). CONCLUSIONS: There is inadequate compliance with the recommendation that all women be offered HIV testing during each pregnancy at the IWK Health Centre. Health care professionals involved in obstetrics need to be reminded of the importance of HIV counselling and testing during pregnancy. Further evaluation throughout Canada of the effect of HIV screening recommendations during pregnancy is advisable. PMID:20046277

  16. Views of Medical Doctors Regarding the 2013 WHO Adult HIV Treatment Guidelines Indicate Variable Applicability for Routine Patient Monitoring, for Their Family Members and for Themselves, in South-Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem Daniel Francois Venter

    Full Text Available South African doctors (n = 211 experienced in antiretroviral therapy use were asked via an online questionnaire about the WHO 2013 adult antiretroviral integrated guidelines, as well as clinical and personal issues, in three hypothetical scenarios: directing the Minister of Health, advising a family member requiring therapy amidst unstable antiretroviral supplies, and where doctors themselves were HIV-positive. Doctors (54% favoured the 500 cells/μl WHO initiation threshold if advising the Minister; a third recommended retaining the 350 cells/μl threshold used at the time of the survey. However, they favoured a higher initiation threshold for their family member. Doctors were 4.9 fold more likely to initiate modern treatment, irrespective of their CD4 cell count, for themselves than for public-sector patients (95%CI odds ratio = 3.33-7.33; P<0.001, although lower if limited to stavudine-containing regimens. Doctors were equally concerned about stavudine-induced lactic acidosis and lipoatrophy. The majority (84% would use WHO-recommended first-line therapy, with concerns split between tenofovir-induced nephrotoxicity (55%, and efavirenz central nervous system effects (29%. A majority (61%, if HIV-positive, would pay for a pre-initiation resistance test, use influenza-prophylaxis (85%, but not INH-prophylaxis (61%, and treat their cholesterol and blood pressure concerns conventionally (63% and 60%. Over 60% wanted viral loads and creatinine measured six monthly. A third felt CD4 monitoring only necessary if clinically indicated or if virological failure occurred. They would use barrier prevention (83%, but not recommend pre-exposure prophylaxis, if their sexual partner was HIV-negative (68%. A minority would be completely open about their HIV status, but the majority would disclose to their sexual partners, close family and friends. Respondents were overwhelmingly in favour of continued antiretrovirals after breastfeeding. In conclusion, doctors

  17. Perceptions and experiences of pregnant women about routine HIV testing and counselling in Ghimbi town, Ethiopia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitiku, Israel; Addissie, Adamu; Molla, Mitike

    2017-02-16

    Ethiopia has implemented routine HIV testing and counselling using a provider initiated HIV testing ('opt-out' approach) to achieve high coverage of testing and prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. However, women's perceptions and experiences with this approach have not been well studied. We conducted a qualitative study to explore pregnant women's perceptions and experiences of routine HIV testing and counselling in Ghimbi town, Ethiopia, in May 2013. In-depth interviews were held with 28 women tested for HIV at antenatal clinics (ANC), as well as four health workers involved in routine HIV testing and counselling. Data were analyzed using the content analysis approach. We found that most women perceived routine HIV testing and counselling beneficial for women as well as unborn babies. Some women perceived HIV testing as compulsory and a prerequisite to receive delivery care services. On the other hand, health workers reported that they try to emphasise the importance HIV testing during pre-test counselling in order to gain women's acceptance. However, both health workers and ANC clients perceived that the pre-test counselling was limited. Routine HIV testing and counselling during pregnancy is well acceptable among pregnant women in the study setting. However, there is a sense of obligation as women felt the HIV testing is a pre-requisite for delivery services. This may be related to the limited pre-test counselling. There is a need to strengthen pre-test counselling to ensure that HIV testing is implemented in a way that ensures pregnant women's autonomy and maximize opportunities for primary prevention of HIV.

  18. Bone mineral density abnormalities in HIV infected patients and HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bone mineral density abnormalities in HIV infected patients and HIV ... Comprehensive Care Clinic (CCC) and a HIV negative control group seen at the ... Older patients had lower levels of BMD (i.e. more negative BMD. p-value = 0.032).

  19. Views of Medical Doctors Regarding the 2013 WHO Adult HIV Treatment Guidelines Indicate Variable Applicability for Routine Patient Monitoring, for Their Family Members and for Themselves, in South-Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Willem Daniel Francois; Fairlie, Lee; Feldman, Charles; Cleaton-Jones, Peter; Chersich, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    South African doctors (n = 211) experienced in antiretroviral therapy use were asked via an online questionnaire about the WHO 2013 adult antiretroviral integrated guidelines, as well as clinical and personal issues, in three hypothetical scenarios: directing the Minister of Health, advising a family member requiring therapy amidst unstable antiretroviral supplies, and where doctors themselves were HIV-positive. Doctors (54%) favoured the 500 cells/μl WHO initiation threshold if advising the Minister; a third recommended retaining the 350 cells/μl threshold used at the time of the survey. However, they favoured a higher initiation threshold for their family member. Doctors were 4.9 fold more likely to initiate modern treatment, irrespective of their CD4 cell count, for themselves than for public-sector patients (95%CI odds ratio = 3.33-7.33; Pfamily and friends. Respondents were overwhelmingly in favour of continued antiretrovirals after breastfeeding. In conclusion, doctors largely supported adult WHO guidelines as public policy, although would initiate treatment at higher CD4 counts for their family and themselves. Resistance to INH-prophylaxis is unexpected and warrants investigation.

  20. Routine HIV testing in Botswana: a population-based study on attitudes, practices, and human rights concerns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri D Weiser

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The Botswana government recently implemented a policy of routine or "opt-out" HIV testing in response to the high prevalence of HIV infection, estimated at 37% of adults.We conducted a cross-sectional, population-based study of 1,268 adults from five districts in Botswana to assess knowledge of and attitudes toward routine testing, correlates of HIV testing, and barriers and facilitators to testing, 11 months after the introduction of this policy. Most participants (81% reported being extremely or very much in favor of routine testing. The majority believed that this policy would decrease barriers to testing (89%, HIV-related stigma (60%, and violence toward women (55%, and would increase access to antiretroviral treatment (93%. At the same time, 43% of participants believed that routine testing would lead people to avoid going to the doctor for fear of testing, and 14% believed that this policy could increase gender-based violence related to testing. The prevalence of self-reported HIV testing was 48%. Adjusted correlates of testing included female gender (AOR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-1.9, higher education (AOR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.5-2.7, more frequent healthcare visits (AOR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.3-2.7, perceived access to HIV testing (AOR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.1-2.5, and inconsistent condom use (AOR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2-2.1. Individuals with stigmatizing attitudes toward people living with HIV and AIDS were less likely to have been tested for HIV/AIDS (AOR = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.5-0.9 or to have heard of routine testing (AOR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.45-0.76. While experiences with voluntary and routine testing overall were positive, 68% felt that they could not refuse the HIV test. Key barriers to testing included fear of learning one's status (49%, lack of perceived HIV risk (43%, and fear of having to change sexual practices with a positive HIV test (33%.Routine testing appears to be widely supported and may reduce barriers to testing in Botswana. As routine testing is

  1. Excellent adherence to antiretrovirals in HIV+ Zambian children is compromised by disrupted routine, HIV nondisclosure, and paradoxical income effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E Haberer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of pediatric antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence in sub-Saharan Africa is necessary to develop interventions to sustain high levels of adherence.Adherence among 96 HIV-infected Zambian children (median age 6, interquartile range [IQR] 2,9 initiating fixed-dose combination ART was measured prospectively (median 23 months; IQR 20,26 with caregiver report, clinic and unannounced home-based pill counts, and medication event monitoring systems (MEMS. HIV-1 RNA was determined at 48 weeks. Child and caregiver characteristics, socio-demographic status, and treatment-related factors were assessed as predictors of adherence. Median adherence was 97.4% (IQR 96.1,98.4% by visual analog scale, 94.8% (IQR 86,100% by caregiver-reported last missed dose, 96.9% (IQR 94.5,98.2% by clinic pill count, 93.4% (IQR 90.2,96.7% by unannounced home-based pill count, and 94.8% (IQR 87.8,97.7% by MEMS. At 48 weeks, 72.6% of children had HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/ml. Agreement among adherence measures was poor; only MEMS was significantly associated with viral suppression (p = 0.013. Predictors of poor adherence included changing residence, school attendance, lack of HIV disclosure to children aged nine to 15 years, and increasing household income.Adherence among children taking fixed-dose combination ART in sub-Saharan Africa is high and sustained over two years. However, certain groups are at risk for treatment failure, including children with disrupted routines, no knowledge of their HIV diagnosis among older children, and relatively high household income, possibly reflecting greater social support in the setting of greater poverty.

  2. Is routine measurement of TSH in hospitalized patients necessary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Bashkin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available TSH routine testing in hospitalized patients has low efficacy, but may be beneficial in a selected subgroup of patients. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of routine thyroid function tests among patients admitted to internal medicine departments. It is a retrospective study. A randomly selected cohort of hospitalized patients with abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH blood tests drawn as part of admission protocol. Patient data were collected from the electronic medical files and analyzed for its efficacy. TSH as a screening test was proven unnecessary in 75% (174 of the study population. Leading causes were non-thyroidal illness syndrome, drugs affecting the test results and subclinical disorders. TSH testing was found to be clinically helpful in only 9 patients; however, all of them had other clinical need for TSH testing. We found a clinically abnormal TSH in 20 patients, hypothyroidism in 11 patients and thyrotoxicosis in 9 patients. Low efficacy ascribed to TSH screening test by this study correlates with recent recommendations that indicate TSH screening in admitted patients only with accompanying clinical suspicion. Most probably, the majority of patients found by screening to have thyrotoxicosis have non-thyroidal illness or drug effects so the threshold for FT4 to diagnose overt thyrotoxicosis should be higher than that in ambulatory patients. In elderly patients, clinically relevant TSH disturbances are more frequent and are harder to diagnose, therefore, TSH screening in this group of patients might be beneficial.

  3. HIV screening among TB patients and co-trimoxazole preventive therapy for TB/HIV patients in Addis Ababa: facility based descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denegetu, Amenu Wesen; Dolamo, Bethabile Lovely

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative TB/HIV management is essential to ensure that HIV positive TB patients are identified and treated appropriately, and to prevent tuberculosis (TB) in HIV positive patients. The purpose of this study was to assess HIV case finding among TB patients and Co-trimoxazole Preventive Therapy (CPT) for HIV/TB patients in Addis Ababa. A descriptive cross-sectional, facility-based survey was conducted between June and July 2011. Data was collected by interviewing 834 TB patients from ten health facilities in Addis Ababa. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to summarize and analyze findings. The proportion of TB patients who (self reported) were offered for HIV test, tested for HIV and tested HIV positive during their anti-TB treatment follow-up were; 87.4%, 69.4% and 20.2%; respectively. Eighty seven HIV positive patients were identified, who knew their status before diagnosed for the current TB disease, bringing the cumulative prevalence of HIV among TB patients to 24.5%. Hence, the proportion of TB patients who knew their HIV status becomes 79.9%. The study revealed that 43.6% of those newly identified HIV positives during anti-TB treatment follow-up were actually treated with CPT. However, the commutative proportion of HIV positive TB patients who were ever treated with CPT was 54.4%; both those treated before the current TB disease and during anti-TB treatment follow-up. HIV case finding among TB patients and provision of CPT for TB/HIV co-infected patients needs boosting. Hence, routine offering of HIV test and provision of CPT for PLHIV should be strengthened in-line with the national guidelines.

  4. (HIV) seropositive Nigerian patients undergoing dialysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most dialysis centres in Nigeria currently do not accept HIV positive patients for dialysis therapy for many reasons. The prevailing high level of stigmatization of HIV positive patients and the lack of job security for infected staff are two major reasons for the non-acceptance of HIV infected patients for dialysis by these centres.

  5. Cryptococcosis infection among HIV patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zineb Tlamcani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcosis is commonly known as a central nervous system infection due to Cryptococcus neoformans. It is one of the most frequent infections in AIDS patients. Disseminated cryptococcosis appears in almost one third of these patients. In this review, we will discuss the clinical presentation of cryptococcal infections among HIV patients and various methods of diagnosis, such as India ink, latex agglutination test and culture.

  6. ORAL MANIFESTATIONS AMONG ROMANIAN HIV PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Manuela ARBUNE; Oana-Mirela POTÂRNICHIE; Silvia MARTU

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the oral health problems on HIV youth patients from Galati. Materials and method. A cross-sectional study assessed 102 patients with mean age 22. The most frequent oral manifestations on HIV infected youth under ART are erythema marginatum, periodontitis, candidosis and hypertrophia gingivalis. Results and discussion. Dental decay-missing-filled index on HIV patients is high. Viral HIV replication, long time pediatric exposu...

  7. Knowledge of HIV Testing Guidelines Among US Internal Medicine Residents: A Decade After the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Routine HIV Testing Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandachi, Dima; Dang, Bich N; Wilson Dib, Rita; Friedman, Harvey; Giordano, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Ten years after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended universal HIV screening, rates remain low. Internal medicine residents are the front-line medical providers for large groups of patients. We evaluated the knowledge of internal medicine residents about HIV testing guidelines and examined adherence to universal HIV testing in an outpatient setting. A cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents at four residency programs in Chicago was conducted from January to March 2016. Aggregate data on HIV screening were collected from 35 federally qualified community health centers in the Chicago area after inclusion of an HIV testing best practice alert in patients' electronic medical records. Of the 192 residents surveyed, 130 (68%) completed the survey. Only 58% were aware of universal HIV screening and 49% were aware that Illinois law allows for an opt-out HIV testing strategy. Most of the residents (64%) ordered no more than 10 HIV tests in 6 months. The most frequently reported barriers to HIV testing were deferral because of urgent care issues, lack of time, and the perception that patients were uncomfortable discussing HIV testing. From July 2015 to February 2016, the average HIV testing adherence rate in the 35 health centers was 18.2%. More effort is needed to change HIV testing practices among internal medicine residents so that they will adopt this approach in their future clinical practice. Improving knowledge about HIV testing and addressing other HIV testing barriers are essential for such a successful change.

  8. HIV/TB co-infection:perspectives of TB patients and providers on the integrated HIV/TB pilot program in Tamilnadu, India

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshminarayanan, Mahalakshmi

    2009-01-01

    The WHO recommends routine HIV testing among TB patients as a key strategy to combat the dual HIV/TB epidemic. India has integrated its HIV and TB control programs and is offering provider initiated HIV testing for all TB patients since 2007. Using a mixed methods approach, this study aims to understand the perspectives of TB patients and providers on the integrated HIV/TB pilot program in Tamilnadu, India. A survey conducted by the Tuberculosis Research Center, India on 300 TB patients is th...

  9. ORAL MANIFESTATIONS AMONG ROMANIAN HIV PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela ARBUNE

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to evaluate the oral health problems on HIV youth patients from Galati. Materials and method. A cross-sectional study assessed 102 patients with mean age 22. The most frequent oral manifestations on HIV infected youth under ART are erythema marginatum, periodontitis, candidosis and hypertrophia gingivalis. Results and discussion. Dental decay-missing-filled index on HIV patients is high. Viral HIV replication, long time pediatric exposure on HIV, male sex, smoking, and oral inflamation are related to dental poor condition. Exodontic therapy is comon among HIV youth. However, persistence of some associated oral infections is related to individual or behavioral risk factors, but also to some newly found mechanisms, such as disfunctional immune reconstruction. Seeing to antiretroviral treatment, the severity and frequency of oral manifestations decreased among HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment. Conclusions. Developing medical, social and educational programs is imperative for improving the oral health of HIV youth of Galati.

  10. Inflammation in HIV-Infected Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Anne; Petersen, Janne; Klausen, Henrik Hedegaard

    2012-01-01

    To examine mechanisms underlying the increased inflammatory state of HIV-infected patients, by investigating the association of HIV-related factors, demography, lifestyle, and body composition with the inflammatory marker soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR).......To examine mechanisms underlying the increased inflammatory state of HIV-infected patients, by investigating the association of HIV-related factors, demography, lifestyle, and body composition with the inflammatory marker soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR)....

  11. Monitoring patients with rheumatoid arthritis in routine care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund; Jensen, Dorte Vendelbo; Krogh, Niels Steen

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Advances in aggressive use of conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (csDMARDs) as well as biological DMARDs (bDMARDs) have improved the treatment armamentarium for rheumatologists, and modern treatment principles include a treat-to-target (T2T) strategy. However......, little is known about the feasibility of a T2T strategy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated in routine care. The aim of the present study was to (i) present the annual number of patients included in DANBIO between 2006 and 2013 and their disease characteristics and (ii) estimate coverage...

  12. Prevalence and management of intestinal helminthiasis among HIV-infected patients at Muhimbili National Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwambete, Kennedy D; Justin-Temu, Mary; Peter, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted at Muhimbili National Hospital (Tanzania) to determine prevalence of helminthiasis among in-patients with HIV/AIDS. After signing an informed consent form, participants answered a sociodemographic and risk factor questionnaire. Fecal specimens from patients with HIV-infected and uninfected patients were screened for intestinal helminthiasis (IHLs) using coprological methods. A total of 146 patients were recruited, of those 66 were HIV-negative while 80 were HIV-negative patients. Thirty-five patients (12 HIV/AIDS and 23 non-HIV/AIDS) had helminthic infections. Hookworms were the most frequently detected helminths among patients living with HIV/AIDS (13.6%) and HIV-negative patients (17.5%), followed by schistosomiasis (9%) detected among HIV-negative individuals only. Prevalence of helminthiases (HLs) was observed to be relatively lower among HIV-infected than uninfected patients, which is ascribable to prophylactic measures adopted for patients with HIV/AIDS. Thus, it is recommended that routine screening for HLs and prophylactic measures should be adopted for the improvement of patients' health status.

  13. Intestinal Parasitic Infections in HIV Infected and Non-Infected Patients in a Low HIV Prevalence Region, West-Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkenfou, Céline Nguefeu; Nana, Christelle Tafou; Payne, Vincent Khan

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of intestinal parasitic infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients requires careful consideration in the developing world where poor nutrition is associated with poor hygiene and several tropical diseases. However, there have been very few studies addressing this issue in Cameroon. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitosis in HIV/AIDS patients in Dschang -Cameroon. Stool and blood specimens from HIV/AIDS patients and control group were screened respectively for intestinal parasites and for HIV antibodies. Intestinal parasites were identified using direct microscopy, formalin-ether concentration and Ziehl Neelsen methods. Out of 396 participants recruited among patients consulting at hospital, 42 (10.6%) were HIV positive, thirty of them treatment naïve. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was 14.64%. Out of 42 HIV/AIDS patients, 59.5% (25/42) were infected with intestinal parasites, while only 9.32% (33/354) of the HIV negative patients were infected with intestinal parasites. The parasites detected in our study population included Crystosporidium parvum (2.53%), Entamoeba histolytica (7.52%), Entamoeba coli (4.04%), Giardia lamblia (0.25%), Trichuris trichura (0.25%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.25%) and Taenia spp. (0.25%). In the HIV infected group, Crystosporidium parvum (19.04%), Entamoeba histolytica (19.04%), Entamoeba coli (21.42%), Giardia lamblia (2.38%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.25%) and Taenia spp. (0.25%) were found. Crystosporidium parvum was found to be significantly higher in HIV/AIDS patients than in controls (Pintestinal parasitosis. Routine examinations of stool samples for parasites would significantly benefit the HIV patients by contributing in reducing morbidity and improving the efficiency of antiretroviral treatment. Even after the introduction of free anti-retroviral drugs, opportunistic intestinal infections are still a threat. HIV patients should be screened

  14. Evaluation of Routine HIV Opt-Out Screening and Continuum of Care Services Following Entry into Eight Prison Reception Centers--California, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Kimberley D; Eckert, Valorie; Behrends, Czarina N; Wheeler, Charlotte; MacGowan, Robin J; Mohle-Boetani, Janet C

    2016-02-26

    Early diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) improves health outcomes and prevents HIV transmission. Before 2010, HIV testing was available to inmates in the California state prison system upon request. In 2010, the California Correctional Health Care Services (CCHCS) integrated HIV opt-out screening into the health assessment for inmates entering California state prisons. Under this system, a medical care provider informs the inmate that an HIV test is routinely done, along with screening for sexually transmitted, communicable, and vaccine-preventable diseases, unless the inmate specifically declines the test. During 2012-2013, CCHCS, the California Department of Public Health, and CDC evaluated HIV screening, rates of new diagnoses, linkage to and retention in care, ART response, and post-release linkage to care among California prison inmates. All prison inmates are processed through one of eight specialized reception center facilities, where they undergo a comprehensive evaluation of their medical needs, mental health, and custody requirements for placement in one of 35 state prisons. Among 17,436 inmates who entered a reception center during April-September 2012, 77% were screened for HIV infection; 135 (1%) tested positive, including 10 (0.1%) with newly diagnosed infections. Among the 135 HIV-positive patient-inmates, 134 (99%) were linked to care within 90 days of diagnosis, including 122 (91%) who initiated ART. Among 83 who initiated ART and remained incarcerated through July 2013, 81 (98%) continued ART; 71 (88%) achieved viral suppression (care within 30 days of release were virally suppressed at that time. Only one of nine persons with a viral load test conducted between 91 days and 1 year post-release had viral suppression. Although high rates of viral suppression were achieved in prison, continuity of care in the community remains a challenge. An infrastructure for post

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of HIV Testing Referral Strategies among Tuberculosis Patients in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhler, Lauren M.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Saxena, Anjali; Losina, Elena; Muniyandi, Malaisamy; Stoler, Adam W.; Lu, Zhigang; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Flanigan, Timothy P.; Bender, Melissa A.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2010-01-01

    Background Indian guidelines recommend routine referral for HIV testing of all tuberculosis (TB) patients in the nine states with the highest HIV prevalence, and selective referral for testing elsewhere. We assessed the clinical impact and cost-effectiveness of alternative HIV testing referral strategies among TB patients in India. Methods and Findings We utilized a computer model of HIV and TB disease to project outcomes for patients with active TB in India. We compared life expectancy, cost, and cost-effectiveness for three HIV testing referral strategies: 1) selective referral for HIV testing of those with increased HIV risk, 2) routine referral of patients in the nine highest HIV prevalence states with selective referral elsewhere (current standard), and 3) routine referral of all patients for HIV testing. TB-related data were from the World Health Organization. HIV prevalence among TB patients was 9.0% in the highest prevalence states, 2.9% in the other states, and 4.9% overall. The selective referral strategy, beginning from age 33.50 years, had a projected discounted life expectancy of 16.88 years and a mean lifetime HIV/TB treatment cost of US$100. The current standard increased mean life expectancy to 16.90 years with additional per-person cost of US$10; the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was US$650/year of life saved (YLS) compared to selective referral. Routine referral of all patients for HIV testing increased life expectancy to 16.91 years, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of US$730/YLS compared to the current standard. For HIV-infected patients cured of TB, receiving antiretroviral therapy increased survival from 4.71 to 13.87 years. Results were most sensitive to the HIV prevalence and the cost of second-line antiretroviral therapy. Conclusions Referral of all patients with active TB in India for HIV testing will be both effective and cost-effective. While effective implementation of this strategy would require investment, routine

  16. Supply-side dimensions and dynamics of integrating HIV testing and counselling into routine antenatal care: a facility assessment from Morogoro Region, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Selena J; George, Asha S; LeFevre, Amnesty E; Mpembeni, Rose; Mosha, Idda; Mohan, Diwakar; Yang, Ann; Chebet, Joy; Lipingu, Chrisostom; Baqui, Abdullah H; Killewo, Japhet; Winch, Peter J; Kilewo, Charles

    2015-10-04

    Integration of HIV into RMNCH (reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health) services is an important process addressing the disproportionate burden of HIV among mothers and children in sub-Saharan Africa. We assess the structural inputs and processes of care that support HIV testing and counselling in routine antenatal care to understand supply-side dynamics critical to scaling up further integration of HIV into RMNCH services prior to recent changes in HIV policy in Tanzania. This study, as a part of a maternal and newborn health program evaluation in Morogoro Region, Tanzania, drew from an assessment of health centers with 18 facility checklists, 65 quantitative and 57 qualitative provider interviews, and 203 antenatal care observations. Descriptive analyses were performed with quantitative data using Stata 12.0, and qualitative data were analyzed thematically with data managed by Atlas.ti. Limitations in structural inputs, such as infrastructure, supplies, and staffing, constrain the potential for integration of HIV testing and counselling into routine antenatal care services. While assessment of infrastructure, including waiting areas, appeared adequate, long queues and small rooms made private and confidential HIV testing and counselling difficult for individual women. Unreliable stocks of HIV test kits, essential medicines, and infection prevention equipment also had implications for provider-patient relationships, with reported decreases in women's care seeking at health centers. In addition, low staffing levels were reported to increase workloads and lower motivation for health workers. Despite adequate knowledge of counselling messages, antenatal counselling sessions were brief with incomplete messages conveyed to pregnant women. In addition, coping mechanisms, such as scheduling of clinical activities on different days, limited service availability. Antenatal care is a strategic entry point for the delivery of critical tests and counselling messages

  17. Enteric parasitic infections in HIV-infected patients with low CD4 counts in Toto, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abaver, D.T.; Nwobegahay, J.M.; Goon, D.T.; Khoza, L.B

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Enteric parasites are a major cause of diarrhoea in HIV/AIDS patients with low CD4 counts. Parasitic infections in HIV-infected individuals can reduce their quality of life and life span, especially those who are severely immunosuppressed with a CD4 T-lymphocyte count 0.05). Conclusions: Low CD4 counts in HIV-infected patients can lead to enteric infections. This information strengthens the importance of monitoring CD4 counts and intestinal parasites. Routine CD4 testing will greatly improve the prognosis of HIV positive patients. (author)

  18. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Polycythemia in HIV-infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorkas, Charles Kyriakos; Vaamonde, Carlos M.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to assess testosterone use as a primary risk factor for polycythemia in 21 HIV-infected men. Any testosterone use within two months of first elevated hemoglobin was associated with polycythemia (matched odds ratio 6.55; 95% CI 1.83-23.4; P=0.004) and intramuscular administration demonstrated a stronger association than topical use. No adverse cardiovascular or thrombotic events were observed. HIV-infected patients taking testosterone should undergo routine hematologic monitoring with adjustment of therapy when appropriate. PMID:22008652

  19. Family Routines and Parental Monitoring as Protective Factors among Early and Middle Adolescents Affected by Maternal HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Debra A.; Marelich, William D.; Herbeck, Diane M.; Payne, Diana L.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of parenting skills on adolescent outcomes among children affected by maternal HIV/AIDS (N = 118, M age = 13) was investigated. Among families with more frequent family routines, over time adolescents showed lower rates of aggression, anxiety, worry, depression, conduct disorder, binge drinking, and increased self-concept. Among…

  20. Chronic kidney disease in HIV patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, S.; Rasyid, H.; Kasim, H.; Katu, S.

    2018-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a health problem in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) population. Prediction of CKD in HIV patients needsto have done. This study aimis to identify the prevalence of CKD in HIV patients.Thisis a cross-sectional studyofmale and female, age 18-60 years old, diagnosedHIVat Wahidin Sudirohusodo & Hasanuddin University Hospital Makassar. Diagnosed as CKD if estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) HIV patients included in the analyses. Distribution of CKD, showed 3 (3.5%) subjects with eGFRHIV populations in Makassar is still quite low.

  1. ''Routine'' brain CT in psychiatric patients - does it make sense?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickuth, D.; Heywang-Koebrunner, S.H.; Spielmann, R.P.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the spectrum of brain CT findings in psychiatric patients and to determine the number of patients that had an underlying cause for the symptoms. Patients and methods: Over a period of six months, 142 patients (78 males, 64 females; median age 61 [18-91] years) were referred for CT brain scans. Their scans were reviewed, along with the clinical information that was provided in the request form. All the hard copies were reviewed to assess areas of ischaemia, infarction, atrophy, tumours, and haematomas. The majority of requests were to exclude vascular event or space-occupying lesions. Clinical indications included mood disorders (depression, mania), schizophrenic disorders, dementia, personality and behavioural disorders. Results: 31 (22%) were normal. 111 (78%) had varying degrees of ischaemia, infarction and cerebral/cerebellar atrophy. 7 (4.9%) had space-occupying lesions which included two gliomas and five meningiomas. There were two chronic subdural haematomas and one arteriovenous malformation. Conclusion: 1. In our series, pathologic findings in 'routine' brain CT's were encountered in 78%. 2. The incidence of brain tumours was 4.9%, compared with 0.00005% of the general population. 3. CT scanning in psychiatric patients is cost-effective and especially indicated when there is an atypical presentation, or inadequate response to standard treatment. (orig.) [de

  2. Tuberculosis screening in patients with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Stephanie Mia Katrine; Bonsu, Frank; Hanson-Nortey, Nii Nortey

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis screening of people living with HIV (PLHIV) can contribute to early tuberculosis diagnosis and improved patient outcomes. Evidence-based guidelines for tuberculosis screening are available, but literature assessing their implementation and the quality of clinical practice...... is scarce. OBJECTIVES: To assess tuberculosis screening practices and the effectiveness of audit and performance feedback to improve quality of tuberculosis screening at HIV care clinics in Ghana. DESIGN: Healthcare providers at 10 large HIV care clinics prospectively registered patient consultations during...

  3. Expanded HIV Testing Strategy Leveraging the Electronic Medical Record Uncovers Undiagnosed Infection Among Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsen, Uriel R; Cunningham, Chinazo O; Heo, Moonseong; Futterman, Donna C; Weiss, Jeffrey M; Zingman, Barry S

    2017-05-01

    Routine HIV testing of hospitalized patients is recommended, but few strategies to expand testing in the hospital setting have been described. We assessed the impact of an electronic medical record (EMR) prompt on HIV testing for hospitalized patients. We performed a pre-post study at 3 hospitals in the Bronx, NY. We compared the proportion of admissions of patients 21-64 years old with an HIV test performed, characteristics of patients tested, and rate of new HIV diagnoses made by screening while an EMR prompt recommending HIV testing was inactive vs. active. The prompt appeared for patients with no previous HIV test or a high-risk diagnosis after their last HIV test. Among 36,610 admissions while the prompt was inactive, 9.5% had an HIV test performed. Among 18,943 admissions while the prompt was active, 21.8% had an HIV test performed. Admission while the prompt was active was associated with increased HIV testing among total admissions [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2.78, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.62 to 2.96], those without a previous HIV test (aOR 4.03, 95% CI: 3.70 to 4.40), and those with a previous negative test (aOR 1.52, 95% CI: 1.37 to 1.68) (P diversification of patients tested, and an increase in diagnoses made by screening.

  4. Transitioning from antenatal surveillance surveys to routine HIV testing: a turning point in the mother-to-child transmission prevention programme for HIV surveillance in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Gerson Fernando Mendes; Sabidó, Meritxell; Caruso, Alessandro; Benzaken, Adele Schwartz

    2017-07-05

    In Brazil, due to the rapid increase in programmes for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT), routine programme data are widely available. The objective of this study was to assess the utility of programmatic data to replace HIV surveillance based on the antenatal care (ANC) surveillance survey (SS). We analysed ANC SS data from 219 maternity service clinics. PMTCT variables were extracted from the ANC SS data collection form, which allowed us to capture and compare the ANC SS data and PMTCT HIV test results for each pregnant woman who completed the ANC SS. Both the PMTCT programme and the ANC SS tested for HIV using sequential ELISA and western blot for confirmation. We assessed the completeness (% missing) of the PMTC data included in the ANC SS. Of the 36,713 pregnant women who had ANC SS HIV tests performed, 30,588 also underwent PMTCT HIV testing. The HIV prevalence rate from routine PMTCT testing was 0.36%, compared to 0.38% from the ANC SS testing (relative difference -0.05%; absolute difference -0.02%). The relative difference in prevalence rates between pregnant women in northern Brazil and pregnant women central-west Brazil was -0.98 and 0.66, respectively. Of the 29,856 women who had HIV test results from both the PMTCT and ANC SS, the positive percent agreement of the PMTCT versus the surveillance test was 84.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 74.8-91.0), and the negative percent agreement was 99.9% (95% CI: 99.9-100.0). The PMTCT HIV testing uptake was 86.4%. The ANC SS HIV prevalence was 0.33% among PMTCT non-refusers and 0.59% among refusers, with a percent bias of -10.80% and a differential prevalence ratio of 0.56. Syphilis and HIV testing results were complete in 98% and 97.6% of PMTCT reports, respectively. The reported HIV status for the women at clinic entry was missing. Although there were consistent HIV prevalence estimates from the PMTCT data and the ANC SS, the overall positive percent agreement of 84.1% falls below the

  5. Translational HIV-1 research: from routine diagnostics to new virology insights in Amsterdam, the Netherlands during 1983-2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kuyl, Antoinette C.; Bakker, Margreet; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Back, Nicole K. T.; Pasternak, Alexander O.; Cornelissen, Marion; Berkhout, Ben

    2013-01-01

    An HIV-1 diagnostic laboratory was established in the Academic Medical Center (AMC) of the University of Amsterdam after the discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the cause of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The first AIDS patients were diagnosed here in 1981 and since

  6. Neurological complication in HIV patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritarwan, K.

    2018-03-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is neurotropic and immunotropic, making themassive destruction of both systems. Although their amount has been reduced, there is still neurological presentations and complications of HIV remain common in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Neurological opportunistic infections (OI) occur in advanced HIV diseases such as primary cerebral lymphoma, cryptococcal meningitis, cerebral toxoplasmosis, and progressive multifocal encephalopathy. Neurological problem directly related to HIV appear at any stage in the progress of HIV disease, from AIDS-associated dementia to the aseptic meningitis of primary HIV infection observed in subjects with an immune deficiency. The replication of peripheral HIV viral is able to be controlled in the era of effective antiretroviral therapy. Non-HIV-related neurological disease such as stroke increased important as the HIV population ages.

  7. [Unnecessary routine laboratory tests in patients referred for surgical services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Miranda, María del Pilar; Cano-Matus, Norberto; Rodriguez-Murrieta, Margarita; Guarneros-Zapata, Idalia; Ortiz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    To question the usefulness of the lab analysis considered routine testing for the identification of abnormalities in the surgical care. To determine the percentage of unnecessary laboratory tests in the preoperative assessment as well as to estimate the unnecessary expenses. A descriptive, cross-sectional study of patients referred for surgical evaluation between January 1st and March 31st 2013. The database of laboratory testing and electronic files were reviewed. Reference criteria from surgical services were compared with the tests requested by the family doctor. In 65% of the patients (n=175) unnecessary examinations were requested, 25% (n=68) were not requested the tests that they required, and only 10% of the patients were requested laboratory tests in accordance with the reference criteria (n=27). The estimated cost in unnecessary examinations was $1,129,552 in a year. The results were similar to others related to this theme, however, they had not been revised from the perspective of the first level of attention regarding the importance of adherence to the reference criteria which could prevent major expenditures. It is a priority for leaders and operational consultants in medical units to establish strategies and lines of action that ensure compliance with institutional policies so as to contain spending on comprehensive services, and which in turn can improve the medical care. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. HIV testing experience in New York City: offer of and willingness to test in the context of new legal support of routine testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Zoe R; Myers, Julie E; Cutler, Blayne H; Blum, Micheline; Muzzio, Douglas; Tsoi, Benjamin W

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, routine HIV testing is recommended for persons aged 13-64 years. In 2010, New York State passed a law mandating offer of testing in most health-care settings. We report on the consumer perspective in New York City (NYC) shortly after the law's enactment. We analyzed data from a 2011 telephone survey representative of NYC adults aged 18-64 years (n = 1,846). This analysis focused on respondents' report of HIV test offer at last clinical visit and of willingness to test if recommended by their doctor. Offer and willingness were estimated by age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, income, marital status, sexual identity, partner number, and HIV testing history; associations were examined using multivariable regression. Among NYC adults, 35.7% reported an HIV test in the past year and 31.8% had never tested. Among 86.7% with a clinical visit in the past year, 31.4% reported being offered a test at last visit. Offer was associated with younger age, race/ethnicity other than white, non-Hispanic, lower income, and previous testing. Only 6.7% of never-testers were offered a test at last clinical visit. Willingness to test if recommended was high overall (90.2%) and across factors examined. After a new law was enacted in support of routine HIV testing, approximately 1 in 3 New Yorkers aged 18-64 years were offered a test at last clinical visit; 9 in 10 were willing to test if recommended by their doctor. This suggests that patient attitudes will not be a barrier to complete implementation of the law.

  9. Computer-facilitated rapid HIV testing in emergency care settings: provider and patient usability and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberg, Freya; Kurth, Ann E; Severynen, Anneleen; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Moring-Parris, Daniel; Mackenzie, Sara; Rothman, Richard

    2011-06-01

    Providers in emergency care settings (ECSs) often face barriers to expanded HIV testing. We undertook formative research to understand the potential utility of a computer tool, "CARE," to facilitate rapid HIV testing in ECSs. Computer tool usability and acceptability were assessed among 35 adult patients, and provider focus groups were held, in two ECSs in Washington State and Maryland. The computer tool was usable by patients of varying computer literacy. Patients appreciated the tool's privacy and lack of judgment and their ability to reflect on HIV risks and create risk reduction plans. Staff voiced concerns regarding ECS-based HIV testing generally, including resources for follow-up of newly diagnosed people. Computer-delivered HIV testing support was acceptable and usable among low-literacy populations in two ECSs. Such tools may help circumvent some practical barriers associated with routine HIV testing in busy settings though linkages to care will still be needed.

  10. Uptake, outcomes, and costs of antenatal, well-baby, and prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV services under routine care conditions in Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callie A Scott

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zambia adopted Option A for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT in 2010 and announced a move to Option B+ in 2013. We evaluated the uptake, outcomes, and costs of antenatal, well-baby, and PMTCT services under routine care conditions in Zambia after the adoption of Option A. METHODS: We enrolled 99 HIV-infected/HIV-exposed (index mother/baby pairs with a first antenatal visit in April-September 2011 at four study sites and 99 HIV-uninfected/HIV-unexposed (comparison mother/baby pairs matched on site, gestational age, and calendar month at first visit. Data on patient outcomes and resources utilized from the first antenatal visit through six months postpartum were extracted from site registers. Costs in 2011 USD were estimated from the provider's perspective. RESULTS: Index mothers presented for antenatal care at a mean 23.6 weeks gestation; 55% were considered to have initiated triple-drug antiretroviral therapy (ART based on information recorded in site registers. Six months postpartum, 62% of index and 30% of comparison mother/baby pairs were retained in care; 67% of index babies retained had an unknown HIV status. Comparison and index mother/baby pairs utilized fewer resources than under fully guideline-concordant care; index babies utilized more well-baby resources than comparison babies. The average cost per comparison pair retained in care six months postpartum was $52 for antenatal and well-baby services. The average cost per index pair retained was $88 for antenatal, well-baby, and PMTCT services and increased to $185 when costs of triple-drug ART services were included. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-infected mothers present to care late in pregnancy and many are lost to follow up by six months postpartum. HIV-exposed babies are more likely to remain in care and receive non-HIV, well-baby care than HIV-unexposed babies. Improving retention in care, guideline concordance, and moving to Option B+ will result in

  11. Asymptomatic HIV positive patient presenting with myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatin Agrawal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide variety of disorders of diverse pathogenic mechanisms can trigger spinal cord dysfunction in HIV-1-infected patients. The most common such condition is HIV-1-associated myelopathy (HAM which characteristically seen during advanced HIV infection in patients with low CD4 cell counts and previous AIDS-defining diagnoses. Histologically seen in approximately 30% of AIDS patients, but only 10% have clinical symptoms related to the disease. We describe an unusual case of HAM in previously asymptomatic patient with relatively low CD4 cell count (78 cells/mm3. The patient unaware of her seropositive status presented with a clinically slowly progressive myelopathy with difficulty in walking without assistance. We discharged a patient on antiretroviral therapy. We also review the disorders reported to derange spinal cord function in previously asymptomatic HIV-1 infected patients with preserved counts.

  12. CLINICAL AND LABORATORY PROFILE OF SPUTUM POSITIVE PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS AMONG HIV SEROPOSITIVE AND HIV SERONEGATIVE PATIENTS- A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Govind Kamat

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The global impact of the converging dual epidemics of TB and HIV is one of the major public health challenges. The increasing rate of HIV infection in many countries has had an impact on TB epidemiology. As the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis is increasing among HIV seropositive patients with a wide range of immune status and clinical presentations, the present study was undertaken to assess the clinical and laboratory profile of sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis among HIV seropositive and HIV seronegative patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present one year cross-sectional study was conducted in the Department of Medicine, KLES Dr. Prabhakar Kore Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Belgaum on 104 patients with sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients during the period of January 2009 to December 2009. Routine investigations such as blood group, haemogram that is haemoglobin, total count, differential count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, sputum smears for AFB and chest x-ray were done. RESULTS Seroprevalence of HIV among pulmonary tuberculosis patients was 23.08%. On examination anaemia, undernourishment, lymphadenopathy and the presence of opportunistic infections like oral candidiasis, herpes zoster stain and genital lesions were more predominant among HIV seropositives compared to HIV seronegatives. Mean Hb and TLC were significantly low among HIV seropositives compared to HIV seronegatives. Chest x-ray showed varied presentation. Upper zone infiltration, cavitation and fibrosis were more commonly involved among HIV seronegatives compared to HIV seropositives. CONCLUSION HIV seropositive PTB patients commonly present with fever, weight loss and loss of appetite, while cough with expectoration, haemoptysis, breathlessness were more common with HIV seronegative patients. Cavitation, fibrosis and fibrocavitary lesions were predominantly seen among HIV seronegatives, while infiltration and miliary mottling was

  13. Routine antenatal HIV testing: the responses and perceptions of pregnant women and the viability of informed consent. A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zulueta, Paquita; Boulton, Mary

    2007-06-01

    This qualitative cross-sectional survey, undertaken in the antenatal booking clinics of a hospital in central London, explores pregnant women's responses to routine HIV testing, examines their reasons for declining or accepting the test, and assesses how far their responses fulfil standard criteria for informed consent. Of the 32 women interviewed, only 10 participants were prepared for HIV testing at their booking interview. None of the women viewed themselves as being particularly at risk for HIV infection. The minority (n = 6) of the participants who declined testing differed from those who accepted, by interpreting test acceptance as risky behaviour, privileging the negative outcomes of HIV positivity and expressing an inability to cope with these, should they occur. Troublingly, only a minority of women (n = 9) had a broad understanding of the rationale for the test, and none fulfilled the standard criteria for informed consent. This study suggests that, although routine screening combined with professional recommendation may be successful in increasing uptake, this may be at the cost of eroding informed consent. Protecting third parties (notably fetuses) from a preventable disease may outweigh the moral duty of respecting autonomy, enshrined in Western bioethical tradition. Nevertheless, such a policy should be made transparent, debated in the public domain and negotiated with women seeking antenatal care.

  14. Osteonecrosis in HIV-infected patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lama, E. de; Narvaez, J. A.; Roca, Y.; Pellicer, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We present two cases of avascular osteonecrosis, one involving the knees and the other the hips, in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who met the criteria for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We review the literature concerning this rare complication of HIV infection, focussing especially on the clinical and radiological features and its possible etiopathogenesis. (Author) 30 refs

  15. Cancer screening in patients infected with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigel, Keith; Dubrow, Robert; Silverberg, Michael; Crothers, Kristina; Braithwaite, Scott; Justice, Amy

    2011-09-01

    Non-AIDS-defining cancers are a rising health concern among HIV-infected patients. Cancer screening is now an important component of health maintenance in HIV clinical practice. The decision to screen an HIV-infected patient for cancer should include an assessment of individualized risk for the particular cancer, life expectancy, and the harms and benefits associated with the screening test and its potential outcome. HIV-infected patients are at enhanced risk of several cancers compared to the general population; anal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, and lung cancer all have good evidence demonstrating an enhanced risk in HIV-infected persons. A number of cancer screening interventions have shown benefit for specific cancers in the general population, but data on the application of these tests to HIV-infected persons are limited. Here we review the epidemiology and background literature relating to cancer screening interventions in HIV-infected persons. We then use these data to inform a conceptual model for evaluating HIV-infected patients for cancer screening.

  16. Stroke in a Patient With HIV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buse Rahime Hasırcı

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke which is a common complication in Human immumodeficiency virus type 1 positive patients is seen between 1% and 5% in clinical series. Vasculopathy and atherogenesis in HIV are the main pathologic mechanisms of stroke. We report a 63 year old man with sudden onset of a right hemiplegia and who was diagnosed as HIV-related stroke.

  17. Routine Self-administered, Touch-Screen Computer Based Suicidal Ideation Assessment Linked to Automated Response Team Notification in an HIV Primary Care Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Sarah T.; Willig, James H.; Crane, Heidi M.; Ye, Jiatao; Aban, Inmaculada; Lober, William; Nevin, Christa R.; Batey, D. Scott; Mugavero, Michael J.; McCullumsmith, Cheryl; Wright, Charles; Kitahata, Mari; Raper, James L.; Saag, Micheal S.; Schumacher, Joseph E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The implementation of routine computer-based screening for suicidal ideation and other psychosocial domains through standardized patient reported outcome instruments in two high volume urban HIV clinics is described. Factors associated with an increased risk of self-reported suicidal ideation were determined. Background HIV/AIDS continues to be associated with an under-recognized risk for suicidal ideation, attempted as well as completed suicide. Suicidal ideation represents an important predictor for subsequent attempted and completed suicide. We sought to implement routine screening of suicidal ideation and associated conditions using computerized patient reported outcome (PRO) assessments. Methods Two geographically distinct academic HIV primary care clinics enrolled patients attending scheduled visits from 12/2005 to 2/2009. Touch-screen-based, computerized PRO assessments were implemented into routine clinical care. Substance abuse (ASSIST), alcohol consumption (AUDIT-C), depression (PHQ-9) and anxiety (PHQ-A) were assessed. The PHQ-9 assesses the frequency of suicidal ideation in the preceding two weeks. A response of “nearly every day” triggered an automated page to pre-determined clinic personnel who completed more detailed self-harm assessments. Results Overall 1,216 (UAB= 740; UW= 476) patients completed initial PRO assessment during the study period. Patients were white (53%; n=646), predominantly males (79%; n=959) with a mean age of 44 (± 10). Among surveyed patients, 170 (14%) endorsed some level of suicidal ideation, while 33 (3%) admitted suicidal ideation nearly every day. In multivariable analysis, suicidal ideation risk was lower with advancing age (OR=0.74 per 10 years;95%CI=0.58-0.96) and was increased with current substance abuse (OR=1.88;95%CI=1.03-3.44) and more severe depression (OR=3.91 moderate;95%CI=2.12-7.22; OR=25.55 severe;95%CI=12.73-51.30). Discussion Suicidal ideation was associated with current substance abuse and

  18. Mucocutaneous disorders in Hiv positive patients

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    Kar H

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty eight HIV positive patients were included in this study. They were evaluated for their mucocutaneous disorders, sexually transmitted diseases and other systemic disorders between 1994-95 in the department of Dermatology and STD Dr R M L Hospital of New Delhi. The heterosexual contact with commercial sex workers (CSWs was the most common route of HIV transmission. Chancroid, syphilis and genital warts were common STDs found in HIV positive patients. Oral thrush (67.9% was the commonest mucocutaneous disorder found in these patients followed by herpes zoster (25% and seborrhoeic dermatitis (21.4%. There was no unusual clinical presentation seen in mucocutaneous disorders and STDs.

  19. Adrenal insufficiency in pakistani hiv infected patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afreen, B.; Khan, K.A.; Riaz, A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Adrenal insufficiency (AI) is the most common endocrine complication among patients with AIDS/HIV infection and there are number of causes of AI in HIV patients. Human immunodeficiency virus directly as well as indirectly destroys adrenal glands. The estimates of its prevalence and severity vary. AI is the most life threatening but readily correctable endocrine complication that occurs in persons with HIV infection. This study was carried out to determine the frequency of Adrenal Insufficiency in HIV patients and their clinical features as proper diagnosis and timely treatment have been shown to improve quality of life and long-term mortality in AIDS patients. Methods: It was a cross sectional survey conducted at HIV clinic and Jinnah Allama Iqbal Institute of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Jinnah Hospital Lahore. Sixty-four HIV positive patients, both male and female, aged above 15 years were included in the study. HIV patients who had recently taken steroids, ketoconazole or rifampicin, determined on history, were excluded from the study. The data was collected on a structured proforma and analysis was performed in SPSS-21.0. Frequency and percentages for adrenal insufficiency and its characteristics were calculated. Chi-square test was used with p<0.05 as statistically significant. Results: In this study, 9 (14.06%) HIV patients were diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency, male to female ratio was 3.5:1 and AI was found statistically significantly associated with fatigue (p<0.008) and weight loss (p<0.001). Conclusion: Adrenal insufficiency was high among the patients with HIV, it was not gender specific but it was found to be associated with fatigue and weight loss. (author)

  20. Diagnosing HIV “window phase” in routine laboratory: a teaching case

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    Roberta Valentina Marotta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. It is a retrovirus that inserts itself into the host’s DNA and use the host – cell’s replication mechanisms for its own perpetuation. Two distinct species of HIV (HIV 1 and HIV 2 have been identified and they have a different global distribution. In this paper we describe a case of HIV early infection in an italian man of fourty years old. From this example we want to stress the importance to consider with high attention the validation of a negative index of HIV antibodies.We advise to follow this procedure that allows to avoid the risk to report a false negative.

  1. Clinical presentation and opportunistic infections in HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Allan; Jespersen, Sanne; Katzenstein, Terese L

    2016-01-01

    HIV-2 is prevalent. In this study, we aimed to characterize the clinical presentations among HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, newly diagnosed HIV patients attending the HIV outpatient clinic at Hospital Nacional Sim~ao Mendes in Guinea......-Bissau were enrolled. Demographical and clinical data were collected and compared between HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients. Results: A total of 169 patients (76% HIV-1, 17% HIV-2 and 6% HIV 1/2) were included in the study between 21 March 2012 and 14 December 2012. HIV-1 seropositive...... antigen. Conclusion: HIV-1 and HIV-1/2 seropositive patients have lower CD4 cell counts than HIV-2 seropositive patients when diagnosed with HIV with only minor clinical and demographic differences among groups. Few patients were diagnosed with TB and cryptococcal disease was not found to be a major...

  2. Intestinal parasitic infections in HIV infected and non-infected patients in a low HIV prevalence region, West-Cameroon.

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    Céline Nguefeu Nkenfou

    Full Text Available The magnitude of intestinal parasitic infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients requires careful consideration in the developing world where poor nutrition is associated with poor hygiene and several tropical diseases. However, there have been very few studies addressing this issue in Cameroon. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitosis in HIV/AIDS patients in Dschang -Cameroon. Stool and blood specimens from HIV/AIDS patients and control group were screened respectively for intestinal parasites and for HIV antibodies. Intestinal parasites were identified using direct microscopy, formalin-ether concentration and Ziehl Neelsen methods. Out of 396 participants recruited among patients consulting at hospital, 42 (10.6% were HIV positive, thirty of them treatment naïve. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was 14.64%. Out of 42 HIV/AIDS patients, 59.5% (25/42 were infected with intestinal parasites, while only 9.32% (33/354 of the HIV negative patients were infected with intestinal parasites. The parasites detected in our study population included Crystosporidium parvum (2.53%, Entamoeba histolytica (7.52%, Entamoeba coli (4.04%, Giardia lamblia (0.25%, Trichuris trichura (0.25%, Strongyloides stercoralis (0.25% and Taenia spp. (0.25%. In the HIV infected group, Crystosporidium parvum (19.04%, Entamoeba histolytica (19.04%, Entamoeba coli (21.42%, Giardia lamblia (2.38%, Strongyloides stercoralis (0.25% and Taenia spp. (0.25% were found. Crystosporidium parvum was found to be significantly higher in HIV/AIDS patients than in controls (P<0.05. Multivariate analysis showed that the HIV status and the quality of water were the major risk factors for intestinal parasitosis. Routine examinations of stool samples for parasites would significantly benefit the HIV patients by contributing in reducing morbidity and improving the efficiency of antiretroviral treatment. Even after the introduction

  3. Absence of Decline of Kidney Function in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients Under Routine Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucquemont, Julie; Lawson-Ayayi, Sylvie; Rigothier, Claire; Bonnet, Fabrice; Proust-Lima, Cécile; Neau, Didier; Greib, Carine; Miremont-Salamé, Ghada; Dabis, François; Dupon, Michel; Dauchy, Frédéric-Antoine

    2017-01-01

    Since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients have a drastically improved prognosis but at the same time they are also more affected by non-HIV related complications, such as chronic kidney disease. The objective of our study was to investigate the effect of proteinuria and tenofovir (TDF)-containing ART regimens on the temporal evolution of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Between April 2008 and October 2012, we enrolled 395 patients with a complete renal evaluation among patients from the ANRS C03 Aquitaine cohort, a prospective hospital-based cohort of HIV-1-infected patients under routine clinical management in southwestern France. eGFR was estimated at each patient follow-up visit. A linear mixed model was used to analyze eGFR dynamics, accounting for change in TDF by modeling eGFR trajectory according to treatment periods. At inclusion, 56.7% of patients were treated with TDF-containing ART regimens; prevalence of glomerular and tubular proteinuria was 7.9 and 10.8% respectively. A 1-year increase of cumulative exposure to TDF was significantly associated with a mean eGFR decrease of 1.27 mL/min/1.73 m2 (95% CI [-2.14 to -0.41]). Only a urine protein to creatinine ratio >100 mg/mmol and/or a urine albumin to creatinine ratio >70 mg/mmol were associated with eGFR trajectory (mean slope 6.18 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year; 95% CI [2.71 to 9.65]), whereas TDF use was not associated with such eGFR temporal evolution. Decline in kidney function is limited under routine clinical management with monitoring of renal function and interventions including decision to continue or discontinue TDF. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Opportunities and challenges in conducting secondary analysis of HIV programmes using data from routine health information systems and personal health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloyd, Stephen; Wagenaar, Bradley H; Woelk, Godfrey B; Kalibala, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    HIV programme data from routine health information systems (RHIS) and personal health information (PHI) provide ample opportunities for secondary data analysis. However, these data pose unique opportunities and challenges for use in health system monitoring, along with process and impact evaluations. Analyses focused on retrospective case reviews of four of the HIV-related studies published in this JIAS supplement. We identify specific opportunities and challenges with respect to the secondary analysis of RHIS and PHI data. Challenges working with both HIV-related RHIS and PHI included missing, inconsistent and implausible data; rapidly changing indicators; systematic differences in the utilization of services; and patient linkages over time and different data sources. Specific challenges among RHIS data included numerous registries and indicators, inconsistent data entry, gaps in data transmission, duplicate registry of information, numerator-denominator incompatibility and infrequent use of data for decision-making. Challenges specific to PHI included the time burden for busy providers, the culture of lax charting, overflowing archives for paper charts and infrequent chart review. Many of the challenges that undermine effective use of RHIS and PHI data for analyses are related to the processes and context of collecting the data, excessive data requirements, lack of knowledge of the purpose of data and the limited use of data among those generating the data. Recommendations include simplifying data sources, analysis and reporting; conducting systematic data quality audits; enhancing the use of data for decision-making; promoting routine chart review linked with simple patient tracking systems; and encouraging open access to RHIS and PHI data for increased use.

  5. Evaluation of the Roche prototype 454 HIV-1 ultradeep sequencing drug resistance assay in a routine diagnostic laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Diaz, A; Guerrero-Ramos, A; McCormick, A L; Macartney, M; Conibear, T; Johnson, M A; Haque, T; Webster, D P

    2013-10-01

    Studies have shown that low-frequency resistance mutations can influence treatment outcome. However, the lack of a standardized high-throughput assay has precluded their detection in clinical settings. To evaluate the performance of the Roche prototype 454 UDS HIV-1 drug resistance assay (UDS assay) in a routine diagnostic laboratory. 50 plasma samples, previously characterized by population sequencing and that had shown ≥1 resistance associated mutation (RAM), were retrospectively tested by the UDS assay, including 18 B and 32 non-B subtypes; viral loads between 114-1,806,407 cp/ml; drug-naive (n=27) and drug-experienced (n=23) individuals. The UDS assay was successful for 37/50 (74%) samples. It detected all RAMs found by population sequencing at frequencies above 20%. In addition, 39 low-frequency RAMs were exclusively detected by the UDS assay at frequencies below 20% in both drug-naïve (19/26, 73%) and drug-experienced (9/18, 50%) individuals. UDS results would lead to changes from susceptible to resistant to efavirenz (EFV) in one drug-naive individual with suboptimal response to an EFV-containing regimen and from susceptible to resistance to lamivudine (3TC) in one drug naïve subject who subsequently failed a 3TC-containing regimen and in a treatment experienced subject who had failed a 3TC-containing regimen. The UDS assay performed well across a wide range of subtypes and viral loads; it showed perfect agreement with population sequencing for all RAMs analyzed. In addition, the UDS assay detected additional mutations at frequencies below 20% which correlate with patients' treatment history and had in some cases important prognostic implications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Daily life activity routine discovery in hemiparetic rehabilitation patients using topic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiter, J; Derungs, A; Schuster-Amft, C; Amft, O; Tröster, G

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring natural behavior and activity routines of hemiparetic rehabilitation patients across the day can provide valuable progress information for therapists and patients and contribute to an optimized rehabilitation process. In particular, continuous patient monitoring could add type, frequency and duration of daily life activity routines and hence complement standard clinical scores that are assessed for particular tasks only. Machine learning methods have been applied to infer activity routines from sensor data. However, supervised methods require activity annotations to build recognition models and thus require extensive patient supervision. Discovery methods, including topic models could provide patient routine information and deal with variability in activity and movement performance across patients. Topic models have been used to discover characteristic activity routine patterns of healthy individuals using activity primitives recognized from supervised sensor data. Yet, the applicability of topic models for hemiparetic rehabilitation patients and techniques to derive activity primitives without supervision needs to be addressed. We investigate, 1) whether a topic model-based activity routine discovery framework can infer activity routines of rehabilitation patients from wearable motion sensor data. 2) We compare the performance of our topic model-based activity routine discovery using rule-based and clustering-based activity vocabulary. We analyze the activity routine discovery in a dataset recorded with 11 hemiparetic rehabilitation patients during up to ten full recording days per individual in an ambulatory daycare rehabilitation center using wearable motion sensors attached to both wrists and the non-affected thigh. We introduce and compare rule-based and clustering-based activity vocabulary to process statistical and frequency acceleration features to activity words. Activity words were used for activity routine pattern discovery using topic models

  7. Assessment of renal function in routine care of people living with HIV on ART in a resource-limited setting in urban Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert, Andreas; Neuhann, Florian; Klose, Christina; Bruckner, Thomas; Beiersmann, Claudia; Haloka, John; Nsofwa, Mannie; Banda, Greg; Brune, Maik; Reutter, Helmut; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Zeier, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Data on renal impairment in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) remains scarce, determination of renal function is not part of routine assessments. We evaluated renal function and blood pressure in a cohort of people living with HIV (PLWH) on antiretroviral treatment (ART) in the Renal Care Zambia project (ReCaZa). Using routine data from an HIV outpatient clinic from 2011-2013, we retrospectively estimated the glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, CKD-Epi formula) of PLWH on ART in Lusaka, Zambia. Data were included if adults had had at least one serum creatinine recorded and had been on ART for a minimum of three months. We investigated the differences in eGFR between ART subgroups with and without tenofovir disproxil fumarate (TDF), and applied multivariable linear models to associate ART and eGFR, adjusted for eGFR before ART initiation. Among 1118 PLWH (63,3% female, mean age 41.8 years, 83% ever on TDF; median duration 1461 [range 98 to 4342] days) on ART, 28.3% had an eGFR ART had an initial eGFR lower 60ml/min. Nineteen percent had first-time hypertensive readings at their last visit. The multivariable models suggest that physicians acted according to guidelines and replaced TDF-containing ART if patients developed moderate/severe renal impairment. Assessment of renal function in SSA remains a challenge. The vast majority of PLWH benefit from long-term ART, including improved renal function. However, approximately 5% of PLWH on ART may have clinically relevant decreased eGFR, and 27% hypertension. While a routine renal assessment might not be feasible, strategies to identify patients at risk are warranted. Targeted monitoring prior and during ART is recommended, however, should not delay ART access.

  8. Hepatitis C prevalence among HIV-infected patients in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Jespersen, Sanne; Medina, Candida

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the prevalence and determine the clinical presentation of risk factors of hepatitis C virus (HCV) among HIV-infected patients in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we included individuals who had a routine blood analysis performed during...... the period April 28 to September 30, 2011. Patient samples were tested for HCV antibodies (anti-HCV) with a chemiluminescence test (Architect, Abbott, USA) and INNO-LIA HCV Score (Innogenetics, Belgium). HCV viral load and genotype were analyzed using an in-house real-time PCR method. Results: In total, 576...... patients were included (417 HIV-1, 104 HIV-2, and 55 HIV-1/2). Ten (1.7%) patients were anti-HCV-positive and eight (1.4%) patients had detectable HCV RNA; all were genotype 2. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, age >50 years was associated with anti-HCV reactivity (p

  9. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among HIV patients in Benin City, Nigeria

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    Frederick Olusegun Akinbo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the presence of intestinal parasites and their correlation with CD4+ T-cell counts and demographics among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive patients in Benin City, Nigeria. Stool specimens from 2,000 HIV-positive patients and 500 controls (HIV-negative individuals were examined for ova, cysts, or parasites, using standard procedures. In addition, patient's blood samples were analyzed for CD4 counts by flow cytometry. An overall prevalence rate of 15.3% was observed among HIV-positive patients while 6.2% was noted among non-HIV subjects. HIV status was a significant (P<0.0001 risk factor for acquiring intestinal parasitic infections. Male gender, CD4 count <200cell/µl, and diarrhea were significantly associated with an increased prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among HIV-positive patients. The level of education, occupation, and source of water among HIV patients significantly (P<0.0001 affected the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections. Ascaris lumbricoides was the most predominant parasite in both HIV-positive patients and controls. A CD4 count <200 cells/µl was significantly associated with only Isospora belli and Cryptosporidium infections. The presence of pathogenic intestinal parasites such as A. lumbricoides, hookworm, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Trichuris trichiura, and Taenia species among HIV-infected persons should not be neglected. Cryptosporidium species and I. belli were the opportunistic parasites observed in this study. Routine screening for intestinal parasites in HIV-positive patients is advocated.

  10. Training health care workers to promote HIV services for patients with tuberculosis in the Democratic Republic of Congo

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    Behets Frieda

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV counseling and testing, HIV prevention and provision of HIV care and support are essential activities to reduce the burden of HIV among patients with TB, and should be integrated into routine TB care. Methods The development of training materials to promote HIV services for TB patients involved the definition of target health care workers (HCWs; identification of required tasks, skills and knowledge; review of international guidelines; and adaptation of existing training materials for voluntary counseling and testing, prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, and management of opportunistic infections (OIs. Training effectiveness was assessed by means of questionnaires administered pre- and post-training, by correlating post-training results of HCWs with the centre's HIV testing acceptance rates, and through participatory observations at the time of on-site supervisory visits and monthly meetings. Results Pre-training assessment identified gaps in basic knowledge of HIV epidemiology, the link between TB and HIV, interpretation of CD4 counts, prevention and management of OIs, and occupational post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP. Opinions on patients' rights and confidentiality varied. Mean test results increased from 72% pre-training to 87% post-training (p Conclusion Many HCWs did not possess the knowledge or skills necessary to integrate HIV activities into routine care for patients with TB. A participatory approach resulted in training materials that fulfilled local needs.

  11. Brief Training of HIV Medical Providers Increases Their Frequency of Delivering Prevention Counselling to Patients at Risk of Transmitting HIV to Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shilpa N.; Marks, Gary; Gardner, Lytt; Golin, Carol E.; Shinde, Sanjyot; O'Daniels, Christine; Wilson, Tracey E.; Quinlivan, E. Byrd; Banderas, Julie W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine whether brief training of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) medical providers increased the frequency with which they routinely delivered prevention counselling to patients, and whether patient characteristics were associated with receipt of that counselling. Design: Longitudinal. Setting: Seven HIV…

  12. Lost opportunities to identify and treat HIV-positive patients: results from a baseline assessment of provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling (PITC) in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Saeed; Schwarz, Monica; Flick, Robert J; Rees, Chris A; Harawa, Mwelura; Simon, Katie; Robison, Jeff A; Kazembe, Peter N; Kim, Maria H

    2016-04-01

    To assess implementation of provider-initiated testing and counselling (PITC) for HIV in Malawi. A review of PITC practices within 118 departments in 12 Ministry of Health (MoH) facilities across Malawi was conducted. Information on PITC practices was collected via a health facility survey. Data describing patient visits and HIV tests were abstracted from routinely collected programme data. Reported PITC practices were highly variable. Most providers practiced symptom-based PITC. Antenatal clinics and maternity wards reported widespread use of routine opt-out PITC. In 2014, there was approximately 1 HIV test for every 15 clinic visits. HIV status was ascertained in 94.3% (5293/5615) of patients at tuberculosis clinics, 92.6% (30,675/33,142) of patients at antenatal clinics and 49.4% (6871/13,914) of patients at sexually transmitted infection clinics. Reported challenges to delivering PITC included test kit shortages (71/71 providers), insufficient physical space (58/71) and inadequate number of HIV counsellors (32/71) while providers from inpatient units cited the inability to test on weekends. Various models of PITC currently exist at MoH facilities in Malawi. Only antenatal and maternity clinics demonstrated high rates of routine opt-out PITC. The low ratio of facility visits to HIV tests suggests missed opportunities for HIV testing. However, the high proportion of patients at TB and antenatal clinics with known HIV status suggests that routine PITC is feasible. These results underscore the need to develop clear, standardised PITC policy and protocols, and to address obstacles of limited health commodities, infrastructure and human resources. © 2016 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Legionellosis in patients with HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Jensen, B N; Friis-Møller, A

    1990-01-01

    During the five-year period 1984-1988 we received 192 specimens from 180 patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) for investigation of Legionella infection. The majority of specimens were bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids (84%), but tracheal suctions and lung tissue from...... specimens additionally for Pneumocystis carinii and mycobacteria. Legionellosis was not found to be common among HIV-infected patients, as only six specimens (3%) from six patients were found positive by DFA, and no specimens were culture-positive for Legionella species. Dual infection with Legionella and P...

  14. Short communication prevalence of susceptibility to etravirine by genotype and phenotype in samples received for routine HIV type 1 resistance testing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picchio, Gaston; Vingerhoets, Johan; Tambuyzer, Lotke; Coakley, Eoin; Haddad, Mojgan; Witek, James

    2011-12-01

    Abstract The prevalence of susceptibility to etravirine was investigated among clinical samples submitted for routine clinical testing in the United States using two separate weighted genotypic scoring systems. The presence of etravirine mutations and susceptibility to etravirine by phenotype of clinical samples from HIV-1-infected patients, submitted to Monogram Biosciences for routine resistance testing between June 2008 and June 2009, were analyzed. Susceptibility by genotype was determined using the Monogram and Tibotec etravirine-weighted genotypic scoring systems, with scores of ≤3 and ≤2, respectively, indicating full susceptibility. Susceptibility by phenotype was determined using the PhenoSense HIV assay, with lower and higher clinical cut-offs of 2.9 and 10, respectively. The frequency of individual etravirine mutations and the impact of the K103N mutation on susceptibility to etravirine by genotype were also determined. Among the 5482 samples with ≥1 defined nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations associated with resistance, 67% were classed as susceptible to etravirine by genotype by both scoring systems. Susceptibility to etravirine by phenotype was higher (76%). The proportion of first-generation NNRTI-resistant samples with (n=3598) and without (n=1884) K103N with susceptibility to etravirine by genotype was 77% and 49%, respectively. Among samples susceptible to first-generation NNRTIs (n=9458), >99% of samples were susceptible to etravirine by phenotype (FC <2.9); the remaining samples had FC ≥2.9-10. In summary, among samples submitted for routine clinical testing in the United States, a high proportion of samples with first-generation NNRTI resistance was susceptible to etravirine by genotype and phenotype. A higher proportion of NNRTI-resistant samples with K103N than without was susceptible to etravirine.

  15. Cutaneous Manifestations in HIV Infected Libyan Patients

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    Aljehawi Nabil A.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV disease may result from HIV infection itself, or from opportunistic disorders secondary to the declined immunocompetence due to the disease. A total of 220 HIV positive patients, treated in the Benghazi Center of Infectious Diseases and Immunology over a period of 14 years (January 2003 to November 2016, were included in a retrospective study. The patients' age ranged from 7 to 46 years. The study was conducted by reviewing the patients' records using the management information system (MIS. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out by the t-test and Chi square test. Among the studied patients, 119 (54.1% were males and 101 (45.9% were females, and most of them (78.6% were 10 – 19 years of age. The predominant mode of transmission was parenteral transmission, in 95% of patients, and positive family history was observed in 12% of patients. Among the total number of visits to dermatologists, 93% of patients had a single disease. Of the total number of skin diseases diagnosed during the visits, parasitic infestations were seen in 92 patients (21.0%, eczematous and related disorders in 78 patients (17.8%, viral infections in 71 patients (16.2%, bacterial infections in 41 patients (9.3%, and fungal infections in 35 patients (7.9%. Dermatophyte infections were the most common fungal infections recorded in 19 patients (4.3%, followed by Candida infection in 11 patients (2.5%. Warts were found in 5.9% of viral infections, followed by herpes zoster (4.1%. HIV positive patients should be examined for skin disorders, because early diagnosis and management of such problems improves the quality of life in these patients.

  16. Assessment of patient radiation doses during routine diagnostic radiography examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Asim Karam Aldden Adam

    2015-11-01

    Medical applications of radiation represent the largest source of exposure to general population. Accounting for 3.0 mSv against an estimated 2.4 mSv from a natural back ground in United States. The association of ionizing radiation an cancer risk is assumed to be continuos and graded over the entire range of exposure, The objective of this study is to evaluate the patient radiation doses in radiology departments in Khartoum state. A total of 840 patients ? during two in the following hospitals Khartoum Teaching Hospital (260 patients), Fedail specialized hospital ( 261 patients). National Ribat University hospital ( 189 patients) and Engaz hospital (130 patients). Patient doses were measured for 9 procedures. The Entrance surface Air Kerma (ESAK) was quantified using x-ray unit output by Unifiers xi dose rate meter( Un fore inc. Billdal. Sweden) and patient exposure parameters. The mean patient age. Weight and Body Mass index (BMI) were 42.6 year 58/4 kg and 212 kg/m respectively. The mean patient doses, kv and MAS and E.q was 0.35 mGy per procedures 59.9 volt 19.8 Ampere per second 0.32 Sv . Patient doses were comparable with previous studies. Patient radiation doses showed considerable difference between hospitals due to x- ray systems exposure settings and patient weight. Patient are exposed to unnecessary radiation.(Author)

  17. Compromiso renal en pacientes HIV+ Renal abnormalities in HIV infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Marta Pernasetti

    2010-06-01

    agents and/or drugs. Little is known about the prevalence of renal diseases that may occur as a complication of or related to HIV infection in asymptomatic patients. This is a single center cross-sectional study of asymptomatic HIV+ patients referred to a nefrology care service at an Argentine hospital to look for the presence of renal abnormalities. Fifty two consecutive patients were studied between April and November 2008. Patients underwent plasma and urine analysis, ultrasound, and kidney biopsy as needed. Mean age was 39.9 ± 10.6 years, 88% were male, time from HIV diagnosis 53.2 ± 41.2 months (2-127; 71% had HIV-disease and 77% were on antiretroviral therapy. Mean plasma HIV-RNA copies number was 7.043 ± 3.322 and CD4+ cell count: 484 ± 39. Pathologic findings in urine analysis were present in 30.7% of patients: albuminuria 16.6%, microscopic hematuria 11.5%, hypercalciuria 10.8% and crystalluria 6%. Mean glomerular filtration rate was 102.2 ± 22.95 ml/min (34-149 and 41% of patients could be classified in stages 1 to 3 of chronic kidney disease. Renal abnormalities prevaled in older patients without relationship with presence of HIV-disease. Two patients were biopsied and the findings included: tubulointerstitial nephritis with presence of crystal deposition in one and IgA nephropathy in the other. No HIV-associated nephropathy was detected. The broad spectrum and the high prevalence of lesions found in this series suggest that asymptomatic HIV-infected patients should routinely undergo renal evaluation.

  18. Brucella Infection in HIV Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SeyedAhmad SeyedAlinaghi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the possible correlation between Brucella and HIV infections. Iran is a country where HIV infection is expanding and Brucellosis is prevalent. In the present study, 184 HIV infected patients were assigned and for all of them HIV infection was confirmed by western blot test. In order to identify the prevalence rate of Brucella infection and systemic brucellosis in these subjects, sera samples were obtained and Brucella specific serological tests were performed to reveal antibody titers. Detailed history was taken and physical examination was carried out for all of patients. 11 (6% subjects had high titers but only 3 of them were symptomatic. Most of these subjects were injection drug user (IDU men and one was a rural woman. Considering both prevalence rates of Brucella infection (3% and symptomatic brucellosis (0.1% in Iran, our HIV positive patients show higher rates of Brucella infection and systemic brucellosis. Preserved cellular immunity of participants and retention of granulocytes activity may explain this poor association; whereas other explanations such as immunological state difference and non-overlapping geographical distribution of the 2 pathogens have been mentioned by various authors.

  19. Analysis of Hepatitis B Transmission Risk Factors in HIV Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Ghasemzadeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Co-infection with Hepatitis B (HBV virus and HIV is common due to similarity of their transmission methods. However, the prevalence of concurrent infection in different societies, shows the crucial role of various risk factors in different populations. Therefore, the present study was performed to examine risk factors of transmission of HBV in patients with HIV in a care center for AIDS patients in Rasht City. This case-control study was carried out on 60 HIV positive patients, who visited the Infectious Diseases Center of Razi Hospital of Rasht from November, 2015 to March, 2016. Participants were assigned to two 30-member experiment and control groups. They were adjusted in terms of age group (18-30, 30-40, 40-50, and 50-60, gender (male and female, and marital status (married, single, divorced, and widowed and visited by an infectious diseases specialist according to routine examinations. Data was recorded in a questionnaire for each subject. The mean age for the experimental group was 35±6.1, and for control group was 36.6± 5.7 years. Both univariate and multivariate analyses of development of HBV infection and variables including Illegitimate sexual intercourse, use of intravenous injection drugs, positive history of imprisonment, and tattooing (p value < 0.05 showed existence of significant relationships. Injection of illegal intravenous drugs, history of imprisonment, illegitimate sexual intercourse, and tattooing are four important risk factors for transmission of HBV infection to HIV patients. In addition, the master risk reduction program may include provision of clean disposable tools for intravenous injection of drugs and tattooing.

  20. Patient Satisfaction with Collection of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Routine Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recinos, Pablo F; Dunphy, Cheryl J; Thompson, Nicolas; Schuschu, Jesse; Urchek, John L; Katzan, Irene L

    2017-02-01

    Systematic collection of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) during ambulatory clinic visits can enhance communication between patient and provider, and provide the ability to evaluate outcomes of care. Little is known about patient satisfaction of PROM data collection in routine clinical care. To evaluate patient reaction to the routine collection of PROMs in the ambulatory setting. Before all ambulatory clinic visits at our neurological institute, patients electronically complete health status questionnaires. We administered an 8-question patient satisfaction survey to a sample of patients seen across the institute after their clinical visit. Of 343 patients approached, 323 agreed to participate. The majority responded that the questionnaire system was easy to use, was an appropriate length, and benefited their care overall (strongly agree or agree = 92.3%, 87.6%, and 77.3%, respectively). Provider review of the PROMs with the patient during the clinic visit was associated with significantly higher positive responses to all questions, even those regarding logistical aspects of the collection process. There were significant age and race differences in response to perceived benefit: those in the Black/other race category had a markedly lower probability of viewing the process favorably with increasing age. Systematic collection of PROMs via an electronic questionnaire appears to be well accepted by patients. A minority of patients did not feel the questionnaire content applied to their appointment or that the system was a beneficial feature of the clinical practice. The provider can significantly improve the patient's perception of PROM collection and the patient-physician encounter by reviewing the questionnaire results with the patient.

  1. Monitoring patients with rheumatoid arthritis in routine care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund; Jensen, Dorte Vendelbo; Krogh, Niels Steen

    2014-01-01

    disease activity, less disability and radiographic damage. By 2013, 19% of csDMARD (15% of bDMARD) patients were in ACR/Boolean remission. Coverage had increased to between 41% and 79% for patients with RA, for the bDMARD group it was 94%. CONCLUSIONS: Systematic monitoring of RA patients with real....../moderate/high disease activity (i.e. DAS28 (CRP-based, 4 variables) was calculated for each calendar year. RESULTS: From 2006-2013 the number of patients increased from 2,395 to 14,249. By 2013, 29.8% of patients were receiving bDMARD. Patients in the csDMARD group were older, had shorter disease duration, lower...

  2. Concerns of stem cell transplant patients during routine ambulatory assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lisa Kennedy Sheldon,1 Maryum Kazmi,1 Cynthia Klein,2 Donna L Berry31University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA, 2Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA, 3Phyllis Cantor Center for Research in Nursing and Patient Care Services, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USABackground: Stem cell transplant (SCT is a treatment choice for many hematological malignancies. There is currently a lack of evidence regarding the self-reported concerns of SCT patients before and after SCT.Aim and design: This exploratory study performed a secondary analysis of self-reported, written concerns of SCT patients before and after transplant to determine patients' concerns.Methods: Content analysis of text box entries of SCT patients collected between 2005 and 2007 at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. Text box entries were collected as part of symptom assessment using the Electronic Self-Report Assessment – Cancer instrument. The assessment was presented to 137 patients undergoing SCT at two time points: prior to ambulatory visits before any therapy had begun (T1 and at the first visit after hospital discharge following SCT (T2.Results: Text box entries were made before (n = 52 and after (n = 87 the transplant, resulting in 139 text box entries made by 137 patients representing 133 concerns. Using content analysis, the entries were categorized and ranked according to frequency. After symptom concerns, patients ranked work and financial issues the most frequent concerns prior to SCT. After SCT, symptoms remained the most frequently entered area of concern, followed by survival.Conclusion: Oncology providers need to assess SCT patients for work and financial concerns before and after transplant. Appropriate and timely referrals may ease the burden of these concerns for patients. Thus, assessment of financial and work concerns by the oncology team should be an integral part of quality health care for patients undergoing SCT.Keywords: self-report, electronic

  3. Tuberculosis screening in patients with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrrum, Stephanie; Bonsu, Frank; Hanson-Nortey, Nii Nortey

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis screening of people living with HIV (PLHIV) can contribute to early tuberculosis diagnosis and improved patient outcomes. Evidence-based guidelines for tuberculosis screening are available, but literature assessing their implementation and the quality of clinical practice...... is scarce. OBJECTIVES: To assess tuberculosis screening practices and the effectiveness of audit and performance feedback to improve quality of tuberculosis screening at HIV care clinics in Ghana. DESIGN: Healthcare providers at 10 large HIV care clinics prospectively registered patient consultations during...... May and October 2014, before and after a performance feedback intervention in August 2014. The outcomes of interest were overall tuberculosis suspicion rate during consultations and provider adherence to the International Standards for Tuberculosis Care and the World Health Organizations' guidelines...

  4. An evaluation of routine specialist palliative care for patients on the Liverpool Care Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Jo; Brown, Jayne; Davies, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This report describes a service evaluation of the 'added value' of routine specialist palliative care team (SPCT) involvement with patients on the Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient (LCP). Methods: In the authors' hospital, patients that are commenced on the LCP are routinely referred to the SPCT. They are reviewed on the day of referral and then at least every other day, depending on the clinical situation. The data for this report was obtained by reviewing the S...

  5. Is Routine Preoperative Chest X-ray Indicated in Elderly Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In our hospital pre-operative chest x-ray (CXR) are routinely requested without prior establishment of any medical indication for patients of 70 or more years of age who are undergoing elective surgery. The aim of this study was to determine if routine preoperative chest x-rays are justifiably indicated for elderly ...

  6. Clinical relevance of routinely measured vital signs in hospitalized patients: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storm-Versloot, Marja N.; Verweij, Lotte; Lucas, Cees; Ludikhuize, Jeroen; Goslings, J. Carel; Legemate, Dink A.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2014-01-01

    Conflicting evidence exists on the effectiveness of routinely measured vital signs on the early detection of increased probability of adverse events. To assess the clinical relevance of routinely measured vital signs in medically and surgically hospitalized patients through a systematic review.

  7. CANDIDURIA AMONG HIV- INFECTED PATIENTS ATTENDING A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    colonization and infection or between upper or lower urinary tract infections. Objective: This ... important public health problem of modern times (1). HIV/AIDS ... contamination of urine specimen, colonization of bladder due ... patients and do not require antifungal medication. (24). ... Emergent yeast colonies were stored for.

  8. MANAGEMENT OF CANCER IN PATIENTS WITH HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    populations of patients with HIV infection that a causal relationship is difficult to exclude. These cancers are associated with declining immune function and are considered to be ... the chemotherapy or radiotherapy is strongly associated with response rates. ... organ dysfunction such as hepatitis, renal failure and respiratory ...

  9. Upper gastrointestinal Kaposi's sarcoma in HIV-infected patients: ten years of endoscopy observation at a single Brazilian center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosamar Eulira Fontes Rezende

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: GI KS is an infrequent finding in patients with HIV infection. Among those with GI KS, 80% had concomitant skin lesions. Immunohistochemical methods for CD31, CD34, and LNA-1 were important tools in the diagnostic assessment of lesions suggestive of KS in the GI tract. Further studies are required to confirm these data, and the need for routine endoscopic investigation of the GI tract in HIV-infected patients with cutaneous KS should be assessed.

  10. Use of routine computed tomography brain scanning of psychiatry patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agzarian, M.J.; Chryssidis, S.; Davies, R.P.; Pozza, C.H.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of CT of the brain in patients presenting with a psychiatric condition without focal neurological signs. The reports of 397 consecutive CT brain scans of patients presenting to two acute tertiary hospital psychiatric services over a 2-year period were assessed retrospectively. Of the 397 patients, 241 had psychosis, 87 had depression, 44 had bipolar affective disorder, seven had alcohol dependence, five had dementia, and the remaining 13 had a variety of diagnoses including personality disorder and transient ischaemic attack. Findings on 377 (95%) of the CT scans showed no abnormality. Specific abnormalities were described in 20 (5%) of the CT scans. Three scans showed non-specific minor abnormalities, which, when followed up by MRI, showed no relevant abnormality. All the abnormalities shown on CT were considered to be clinically unrelated to the patient's psychiatric condition. In conclusion, the pretest probability of finding a space-occupying lesion or other pertinent abnormality in patients presenting with psychiatric illnesses in this retrospective study appears not to be greater than that of the general population. The outcome of this study could be implemented to develop a clinical pathway for limiting assessment by CT for possible organic pathology in acute psychiatric illness. Copyright (2006) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  11. Molecular HIV screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourlet, Thomas; Memmi, Meriam; Saoudin, Henia; Pozzetto, Bruno

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear acid testing is more and more used for the diagnosis of infectious diseases. This paper focuses on the use of molecular tools for HIV screening. The term 'screening' will be used under the meaning of first-line HIV molecular techniques performed on a routine basis, which excludes HIV molecular tests designed to confirm or infirm a newly discovered HIV-seropositive patient or other molecular tests performed for the follow-up of HIV-infected patients. The following items are developed successively: i) presentation of the variety of molecular tools used for molecular HIV screening, ii) use of HIV molecular tools for the screening of blood products, iii) use of HIV molecular tools for the screening of organs and tissue from human origin, iv) use of HIV molecular tools in medically assisted procreation and v) use of HIV molecular tools in neonates from HIV-infected mothers.

  12. Family correlates of depression among hiv positive patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background information: HIV infection may impact negatively on family relationship and vice versa. Members of the family of HIV positive patients may become frustrated because of the stigma of having a family member with HIV infection, and the burden of having to care for the patient. This can result into the family ...

  13. Knowledge of Hypertensive Patients With or Without HIV on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The study assessed the knowledge of both HIV and non-HIV hypertensive patients on hypertension and the role of pharmacists in their pharmaceutical care. Methods: The study was conducted at the hypertension and HIV clinics in government hospitals in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Patients were interviewed using ...

  14. Clinical Profile and HIV/AIDS Prevalence of Patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Clinical features of HIV/AIDS and various malignancies are similar. Clinical profiles and HIV/AIDS prevalence in Nigerian cancer patients have been poorly documented. Aim: To identify the patterns of clinical presentations in patients with malignancies and to determine the prevalence of HIV infection in cancer ...

  15. Detection of HIV-1 and Human Proteins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles from HIV+ Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel I. Anyanwu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are membrane bound, secreted by cells, and detected in bodily fluids, including urine, and contain proteins, RNA, and DNA. Our goal was to identify HIV and human proteins (HPs in urinary EVs from HIV+ patients and compare them to HIV− samples. Methods. Urine samples were collected from HIV+ (n=35 and HIV− (n=12 individuals. EVs were isolated by ultrafiltration and characterized using transmission electron microscopy, tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS, and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA. Western blots confirmed the presence of HIV proteins. Gene ontology (GO analysis was performed using FunRich and HIV Human Interaction database (HHID. Results. EVs from urine were 30–400 nm in size. More EVs were in HIV+ patients, P<0.05, by NTA. HIV+ samples had 14,475 HPs using LC/MS/MS, while only 111 were in HIV−. HPs in the EVs were of exosomal origin. LC/MS/MS showed all HIV+ samples contained at least one HIV protein. GO analysis showed differences in proteins between HIV+ and HIV− samples and more than 50% of the published HPs in the HHID interacted with EV HIV proteins. Conclusion. Differences in the proteomic profile of EVs from HIV+ versus HIV− samples were found. HIV and HPs in EVs could be used to detect infection and/or diagnose HIV disease syndromes.

  16. Relationship between ever reporting depressive symptoms and all-cause mortality in a cohort of HIV-infected adults in routine care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtson, Angela M; Pence, Brian W; Moore, Richard; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Mathews, William Christopher; Heine, Amy; Gaynes, Bradley N; Napravnik, Sonia; Christopoulos, Katerina; Crane, Heidi M; Mugavero, Michael J

    2017-04-24

    The aim of this study was to assess whether ever reporting depressive symptoms affects mortality in the modern HIV treatment era. A cohort study of HIV-infected adults in routine clinical care at seven sites in the USA. We examined the effect of ever reporting depressive symptoms on all-cause mortality using data from the Centers for AIDS Research Network of Integrated Clinical Systems cohort. We included individuals with at least one depression measure between 2005 and 2014. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9. We used weighted Kaplan-Meier curves and marginal structural Cox models with inverse probability weights to estimate the effect of ever reporting depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 ≥10) on all-cause mortality. A total of 10 895 individuals were included. Participants were followed for a median of 3.1 years (35 621 total person-years). There were 491 (4.5%) deaths during the follow-up period (crude incidence rate 13.8/1000 person-years). At baseline, 28% of the population reported depressive symptoms. In the weighted analysis, there was no evidence that ever reporting depressive symptoms increased the hazard of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.55-1.24). In a large cohort of HIV-infected adults in care in the modern treatment era, we observed no evidence that ever reporting depressive symptoms increased the likelihood of all-cause mortality, controlling for a range of time-varying factors. Antiretroviral therapy that is increasingly robust to moderate adherence and improved access to depression treatment may help to explain changes in the relationship between depressive symptoms and mortality in the modern treatment era.

  17. Opportunistic infection of HIV/AIDS patients in West Papua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witaningrum, A. M.; Khairunisa, S. Q.; Yunifiar, M. Q.; Bramanthi, R.; Rachman, B. E.; Nasronudin

    2018-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) had a major impact on health problemin Indonesia. HIV type 1 (HIV-1) epidemic is currently infected with HIV viruses developing rapidly in Indonesia.Papua provinces have the highest prevalence rate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in Indonesia; however, data on opportunistic infection of HIV-1 are limited. The study using medical records as a research sample was conducted among HIV patients from January 2013 - December 2014 in Sele be Solu hospital among 49 patients. Opportunistic infections commonly occur in HIV-infected patients. The aim of the study was to know theprevalence of opportunistic infection among HIV positive patients in West Papua. Forty-nine HIV-1 patients were collected in Sele be Solu Hospital, West Papua.Opportunistic infection was identified such as tuberculosis, tuberculosis Pulmo, tuberculosis and candidiasis, candidiasis and diarrhea. The clinical sign appeared in HIV infected patients such as itchy, cough and loss weight. The prevalence of opportunistic infection indicated the necessity of monitoring the opportunistic infection of HIV/AIDS patients in Indonesia.

  18. Are daily routine chest radiographs useful in critically ill, mechanically ventilated patients? A randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clec'h, Christophe; Simon, Paul; Hamdi, Aïcha; Hamza, Lilia; Karoubi, Philippe; Fosse, Jean-Philippe; Gonzalez, Frédéric; Vincent, François; Cohen, Yves

    2008-02-01

    Whether chest radiographs (CXRs) in mechanically ventilated patients should be routinely obtained or only when an abnormality is anticipated remains debated. We aimed to compare the diagnostic, therapeutic and outcome efficacy of a restrictive prescription of CXRs with that of a routine prescription, focusing on delayed diagnoses and treatments potentially related to the restrictive prescription. Randomized controlled trial. Intensive care unit of the Avicenne Teaching Hospital, Bobigny, France. All consecutive patients mechanically ventilated for > or = 48h between January and June 2006. Patients were randomly assigned to have daily routine CXRs (routine prescription group) or clinically indicated CXRs (restrictive prescription group). For each CXR, a questionnaire was completed addressing the reason for the CXR, the new findings, and any subsequent therapeutic intervention. The endpoints were the rates of new findings, the rates of new findings that prompted therapeutic intervention, the rate of delayed diagnoses, and mortality. Eighty-four patients were included in the routine prescription group and 81 in the restrictive prescription group. The rates of new findings and the rates of new findings that prompted therapeutic intervention in the restrictive prescription group and in the routine prescription group were 66% vs. 7.2% (p < 0.0001), and 56.4% vs. 5.5% (p < 0.0001) respectively. The rate of delayed diagnoses in the restrictive prescription group was 0.7%. Mortality was similar. Restrictive use of CXRs in mechanically ventilated patients was associated with better diagnostic and therapeutic efficacies without impairing outcome.

  19. Profile of HIV-1 RNA viral load among HIV-TB co-infected patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Profile of HIV-1 RNA viral load among HIV-TB co-infected patients in a tertiary health facility in Maiduguri, Northeastern Nigeria. ... This study aims to estimate the HIV-1 RNA viral load and impact of anti TB therapy (ATT) ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  20. Hiv/hbv, hiv/hcv and hiv/htlv-1 co infection among injecting drug user patients hospitalized at the infectious disease ward of a training hospital in iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, S.M.; Etemadi, A.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the prevalence and risk factors for HBV, HCV and HTLV-I co-infection in the Iranian HIV positive Injecting Drug Users (IDU) patients admitted in hospital. Analyses were based on 154 male IDU patients admitted in Infectious disease ward of Razi Hospital, Ahwaz, Iran, from April 2001 to March 2003. All of them had been tested for HIV infection (Elisa-antibody and Western blot), HBV surface antigen, HCV antibody and HTLV-1 antibody. One hundred and four patients (67.53%) were identified as HIV infected. Among HIV infected, HB surface antigen, HCV antibody and HTLV-I antibody were positive in 44.23% and 74.04% and 16.33% patients respectively. HCV/HBV/HIV and HCV/HBV/HIV/HTLV-1 co-infection were 20.20% and 8.65% respectively. Co-infection with HBV or HCV or HTLV-1 is common among hospitalized HIV-infected IDU patients in the region of study. HIV disease outcomes appear to be adversely affected by HBV/HCV/HTLV-I co-infection, so identification of these viral infections is recommended as routine tests for this population. (author)

  1. Implementation and outcomes of an active defaulter tracing system for HIV, prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT), and TB patients in Kibera, Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Kerry A; Cheti, Erastus O; Reid, Tony

    2011-06-01

    Retention of patients in long term care and adherence to treatment regimens are a constant challenge for HIV, prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT), and TB programmes in sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes the implementation and outcomes of an active defaulter tracing system used to reduce loss to follow-up (LTFU) among HIV, PMTCT, TB, and HIV/TB co-infected patients receiving treatment at three Médecins Sans Frontières clinics in the informal settlement of Kibera, Nairobi, Kenya. Patients are routinely contacted by a social worker via telephone, in-person visit, or both very soon after they miss an appointment. Patient outcomes identified through 1066 tracing activities conducted between 1 April 2008 and 31 March 2009 included: 59.4% returned to the clinic, 9.0% unable to return to clinic, 6.3% died, 4.7% refused to return to clinic, 4.5% went to a different clinic, and 0.8% were hospitalized. Fifteen percent of patients identified for tracing could not be contacted. LTFU among all HIV patients decreased from 21.2% in 2006 to 11.5% in 2009. An active defaulter tracing system is feasible in a resource poor setting, solicits feedback from patients, retains a mobile population of patients in care, and reduces LTFU among HIV, PMTCT, and TB patients. Copyright © 2011 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Limited utility of routine surveillance imaging for classical Hodgkin lymphoma patients in first complete remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingali, Sai Ravi; Jewell, Sarah W; Havlat, Luiza; Bast, Martin A; Thompson, Jonathan R; Eastwood, Daniel C; Bartlett, Nancy L; Armitage, James O; Wagner-Johnston, Nina D; Vose, Julie M; Fenske, Timothy S

    2014-07-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the outcomes of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) who achieved complete remission with frontline therapy and then underwent either clinical surveillance or routine surveillance imaging. In total, 241 patients who were newly diagnosed with cHL between January 2000 and December 2010 at 3 participating tertiary care centers and achieved complete remission after first-line therapy were retrospectively analyzed. Of these, there were 174 patients in the routine surveillance imaging group and 67 patients in the clinical surveillance group, based on the intended mode of surveillance. In the routine surveillance imaging group, the intended plan of surveillance included computed tomography and/or positron emission tomography scans; whereas, in the clinical surveillance group, the intended plan of surveillance was clinical examination and laboratory studies, and scans were obtained only to evaluate concerning signs or symptoms. Baseline patient characteristics, prognostic features, treatment records, and outcomes were collected. The primary objective was to compare overall survival for patients in both groups. For secondary objectives, we compared the success of second-line therapy and estimated the costs of imaging for each group. After 5 years of follow-up, the overall survival rate was 97% (95% confidence interval, 92%-99%) in the routine surveillance imaging group and 96% (95% confidence interval, 87%-99%) in the clinical surveillance group (P = .41). There were few relapses in each group, and all patients who relapsed in both groups achieved complete remission with second-line therapy. The charges associated with routine surveillance imaging were significantly higher than those for the clinical surveillance strategy, with no apparent clinical benefit. Clinical surveillance was not inferior to routine surveillance imaging in patients with cHL who achieved complete remission with frontline therapy. Routine

  3. Correlation of CD4 counts with microalbuminuria in HIV patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, S.; Haerani, R.; Hasyim, K.; Sudirman, K.; Tarukallo, N.

    2018-03-01

    One of the manifestations of kidney disease is Microalbuminuria (MA). CD4 T cells are cells that play a central role in immune protection, wherein HIV infections, they are the primary target of the virus. CD4 cells counts is an indirect reflection of the activity and viral load of HIV. This study aimed to determine the correlation of CD4 counts with MA in HIV patients. A cross-sectional with thedescriptive analytical study was in HIV patients >18 years old without a history of Diabetes Mellitus. The result of thestatistical test is significant if the value of p HIV patients.

  4. Hepatitis B virus prevalence, risk factors and genotype distribution in HIV infected patients from West Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibriani, Azzania; Wisaksana, Rudi; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Indrati, Agnes; Schutten, Martin; van Crevel, Reinout; van der Ven, Andre; Boucher, Charles A B

    2014-04-01

    Indonesia currently faces both an increasing HIV incidence and a high hepatitis B virus (HBV) burden. The objective of our study is to examine the prevalence, risk factors, and genotypic distribution of HBV infection among HIV infected patients in West Java, Indonesia. A cross sectional study was conducted among a cohort of HIV infected patients in 2008. Demographic and disease related variables were compared between HBV negative and positive patients. Logistic regression was applied to determine risk factors for HBV co-infection. HBV and HIV genotyping was performed in co-infected patients. Of 636 HIV-infected patients, the rate of HBV co-infection was 7%. The proportion of males was higher in HBV/HIV co-infected patients than in HIV mono-infected patients (93% vs. 72%, P=0.001). A history of injecting drug use (IDU), but not tattooing, was associated with HBV co-infection [P=0.035 OR 2.41 (95% CI 1.06-5.47)]. In the HIV and HBV treatment naive patients, CD4 cells counts Java. However, an increased prevalence was observed in men with a history of IDU, underlining the need for routine HBV screening and monitoring. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cerebral perfusion imaging in HIV positive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundley, Kshama; Chowdhury, D.; Lele, V.R.; Lele, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Twelve human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients were studied by SPECT cerebral perfusion imaging 1 hour post injection of 15 mCi of 99m Tc-ECD under ideal conditions with a triple head gamma camera (Prism 3000 X P LEUHR), fanbeam collimators followed by Folstein Mini Mental Status Examination (FMMSE) and AIDS dementia complex (ADC) staging on the same day. All 12 patients were male, in the age range of 23-45 y (mean 31 y). The infected status was diagnosed by ELISA (10 patients) or Western blot (5 patients). The interval between diagnosis and imaging ranged from 1 month - 35 months (mean 15.3 months). Two patients were alcoholic and 2 were smokers. None of them had CNS disorder clinically. ADC staging and FMMSE could be performed in 4 patients. Two patients were normal (stage 0) and 2 were subclinical (stage 0.5) on ADC staging. FMMSE revealed normal or near normal status (mean score 35; maximum score 36). Cerebral perfusion images were interpreted simultaneously by 3 observers blind towards history and examination using semi-quantitative and quantitative methods by consensus. It revealed multiple areas of hypoperfusion, viz. temporal (11 patients (91 %), parietal 10 patients (83%), frontal 9 patients (75%, pre and post central gyrus 7 patients (58%), occipital 6 patients (50%) cingulate gyrus and cerebellum 5 patients (41%) and thalamic in 2 patients (16%). Hyper perfusion in caudate nuclei was noted in 10 patients (83%). The study reveals presence of multiple perfusion abnormalities on cerebral perfusion imaging in HIV positive patients who have normal/near normal mental status suggesting precedence of perfusion abnormality over clinically apparent mental deficit

  6. Endocrine alterations in HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Kumar Tripathy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objectives: To study the frequency of thyroid, adrenal and gonadal dysfunction in newly diagnosed HIV-infected patients and to correlate them at different levels of CD4 cell counts. Materials and Methods: Forty-three HIV-positive cases were included in the study group. Cases were divided into three groups on the basis of CD4 cell count. Serum free T3, free T4, TSH, Cortisol, FSH, LH, testosterone and estradiol were estimated by the radioimmunoassay method. Hormone levels between cases were compared and their correlation with CD4 count was analyzed. Results: Prevalence of gonadal dysfunction (88.3% was the most common endocrine dysfunction followed by thyroid (60.4% and adrenal dysfunction (27.9%. Secondary hypogonadism (68.4% was more common than primary (31.6%. Low T3 syndrome, that is, isolated low free T3, was the most common (25.6% thyroid dysfunction followed by secondary hypothyroidism (16.2% and subclinical hypothyroidism (11.6%. Adrenal excess (16.3% was more common than adrenal insufficiency (11.6%. The difference in hormonal dysfunction between male and female was statistically insignificant (P > 0.05. 27.9% of patients had multiple hormone deficiency. There was negligible or no correlation between CD4 count and serum hormone level. Conclusion: In our study, endocrine dysfunction was quite common among HIV-infected patients but there was no correlation between hormone levels and CD4 count. Endocrine dysfunctions and role of hormone replacement therapy in HIV-infected patient needs to be substantiated by large longitudinal study, so that it will help to reduce morbidity, improve quality of life.

  7. Management of mental health disorders in HIV-positive patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mental Health Guidelines Committee, Southern African HIV Clinicians Society, ... triple diagnosis (HIV/mental disorder/substance use disorder), or mental .... fatigue or loss of energy .... between 20% and 60% of HIV-positive adults suffer from some form ... patients on complex regimens should be reviewed regularly with a.

  8. Sepsis in HIV-infected patients; epidemiology and host response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huson, M.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, we examined the impact of HIV infection on the epidemiology (Part I) of sepsis, and host response (Part II) to sepsis. We studied sepsis patients in Gabon, a setting with a high prevalence of HIV, and in Dutch intensive care units (ICUs). In Part I, we found that HIV positive

  9. Mental health problem in HIV/AIDS patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camellia, V.

    2018-03-01

    People with HIV positive have risk increased mental health problem than the general population. It associated with psychosocial factors, direct neurological effects of the HIV infection and medication. Overall it can make increased morbidity and mortality in HIV positive patients. The more common mental problem in HIV/AIDS people is dementia, delirium, depression, and mania, suicide, psychotic, sleep problem. Both psychopharmacologic and psychotherapeutic treatment strategies often indicate.

  10. CD4 cell count response to first-line combination ART in HIV-2+ patients compared with HIV-1+ patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittkop, Linda; Arsandaux, Julie; Trevino, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Background: CD4 cell recovery following first-line combination ART (cART) is poorer in HIV-2+ than in HIV-1+ patients. Only large comparisons may allow adjustments for demographic and pretreatment plasma viral load (pVL). Methods: ART-naive HIV+ adults from two European multicohort collaborations...

  11. Routine transesophageal echocardiography for the diagnosis of aortic disruption in trauma patients without enlarged mediastinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignon, P; Lagrange, P; Boncoeur, M P; Francois, B; Gastinne, H; Lang, R M

    1996-03-01

    To assess the value of routine transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in diagnosing traumatic disruption of the aorta (TDA) in trauma patients presenting without enlarged mediastinum on chest x-ray films. Prospective study. TEE was routinely performed to exclude the presence of TDA in patients who sustained severe trauma secondary to abrupt deceleration collisions and presented with an upper mediastinum of fewer than 8 cm on supine chest x-ray films. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence (group I) or absence (group II) of mediastinal hematoma diagnosed during TEE examination. Radiographic signs regarded as indicators of the presence of TDA were evaluated in both groups. Among the 40 consecutive patients studied, TEE demonstrated two cases of TDA associated with a mediastinal hematoma that were confirmed by both aortography and surgery. One of the patients had a normal mediastinum on presentation chest x-ray films, and the other only exhibited a blurred aortic knob. Radiographic mediastinal abnormalities suggestive of TDA were observed in 13 patients, but chest x-ray films were unremarkable in 12 patients. Twenty patients had multiple rib fractures. The frequency of chest radiographic abnormalities was not significantly higher in group I (n = 6) when compared with group II patients (n = 34). TEE examination demonstrated a normal thoracic aorta in 35 patients and was nondiagnostic in 3 patients (normal aortography). TEE should be routinely performed in victims of violent deceleration collisions, even in patients presenting apparently normal mediastinum on supine chest radiography.

  12. Pattern of neuropsychological performance among HIV positive patients in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons Thomas D

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have examined cognitive functioning of HIV positive patients in sub-Saharan Africa. It cannot be assumed that HIV positive patients in Africa exhibit the same declines as patients in high-resource settings, since there are differences that may influence cognitive functioning including nutrition, history of concomitant disease, and varying HIV strains, among other possibilities. Part of the difficulty of specifying abnormalities in neuropsychological functioning among African HIV positive patients is that there are no readily available African normative databases. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the pattern of neuropsychological performance in a sample of HIV positive patients in comparison to HIV negative control subjects in Uganda. Methods The neuropsychological test scores of 110 HIV positive patients (WHO Stage 2, n = 21; WHO Stage 3, n = 69; WHO Stage 4, n = 20 were contrasted with those of 100 control subjects on measures of attention/concentration, mental flexibility, learning/memory, and motor functioning. Results Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA revealed significant group differences on measures of verbal learning and memory, speed of processing, attention and executive functioning between HIV seropositive and seronegative subjects. Conclusion Ugandan patients with HIV demonstrated relative deficits on measures of verbal learning and memory, speed of processing, attention, and executive functioning compared to HIV negative controls. These results from a resource limited region where clades A and D are prevalent are consistent with previous findings in the developed world where clade B predominates.

  13. The relationship of reported HIV risk and history of HIV testing among emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Roland C; Freelove, Sarah M; Langan, Thomas J; Clark, Melissa A; Mayer, Kenneth H; Seage, George R; DeGruttola, Victor G

    2010-01-01

    Among a random sample of emergency department (ED) patients, we sought to determine the extent to which reported risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is related to ever having been tested for HIV. A random sample of patients (aged 18-64 years) from an adult, urban, northeastern United States, academic ED were surveyed about their history of ever having been tested for HIV and their reported HIV risk behaviors. A reported HIV risk score was calculated from the survey responses and divided into 4 levels, based on quartiles of the risk scores. Pearson's X(2) testing was used to compare HIV testing history and level of reported HIV risk. Logistic regression models were created to investigate the association between level of reported HIV risk and the outcome of ever having been tested for HIV. Of the 557 participants, 62.1% were female. A larger proportion of females than males (71.4% vs 60.6%; P history of injection-drug use, were associated with prior HIV testing for both genders. In the logistic regression analyses, there was no relationship between increasing level of reported HIV risk and a history of ever having been tested for HIV for males. For females, a history of ever having been tested was related to increasing level of reported risk, but not in a linear fashion. The relationship between reported HIV risk and history of testing among these ED patients was complex and differed by gender. Among these patients, having greater risk did not necessarily mean a higher likelihood of ever having been tested for HIV.

  14. Peripheral neuropathy in patients with HIV infection: consider dual pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R F; Bunting, S; Sadiq, S T; Manji, H

    2002-12-01

    Two HIV infected patients presented with peripheral neuropathy, in one patient this was originally ascribed to HIV associated mononeuritis multiplex and in the other to stavudine. Investigations confirmed these diagnoses and in both cases genetic analysis identified a second hereditary aetiology: in the first patient hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies and in the second hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy.

  15. Antiretroviral treatment uptake in patients with HIV associated TB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Delivery of integrated care for patients with HIV-associated TB is challenging. We assessed the uptake and timing of antiretroviral treatment (ART) among eligible patients attending a primary care service with co-located ART and TB clinics. Methods. In a retrospective cohort study, all HIV-associated TB patients ...

  16. Contextualising renal patient routines: Everyday space-time contexts, health service access, and wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuoid, Julia; Jowsey, Tanisha; Talaulikar, Girish

    2017-06-01

    Stable routines are key to successful illness self-management for the growing number of people living with chronic illness around the world. Yet, the influence of chronically ill individuals' everyday contexts in supporting routines is poorly understood. This paper takes a space-time geographical approach to explore the everyday space-time contexts and routines of individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We ask: what is the relationship between renal patients' space-time contexts and their ability to establish and maintain stable routines, and, what role does health service access play in this regard? We draw from a qualitative case study of 26 individuals with CKD in Australia. Data comprised self-reported two day participant diaries and semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis of interview transcripts was guided by an inductive-deductive approach. We examined the embeddedness of routines within the space-time contexts of participants' everyday lives. We found that participants' everyday space-time contexts were highly complex, especially for those receiving dialysis and/or employed, making routines difficult to establish and vulnerable to disruption. Health service access helped shape participants' everyday space-time contexts, meaning that incidences of unpredictability in accessing health services set-off 'ripple effects' within participants' space-time contexts, disrupting routines and making everyday life negotiation more difficult. The ability to absorb ripple effects from unpredictable health services without disrupting routines varied by space-time context. Implications of these findings for the deployment of the concept of routine in health research, the framing of patient success in self-managing illness, and health services design are discussed. In conclusion, efforts to understand and support individuals in establishing and maintaining routines that support health and wellbeing can benefit from approaches that contextualise and de

  17. Yellow fever vaccine for patients with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barte, Hilary; Horvath, Tara H; Rutherford, George W

    2014-01-23

    Yellow fever (YF) is an acute viral haemorrhagic disease prevalent in tropical Africa and Latin America. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that there are 200,000 cases of YF and 30,000 deaths worldwide annually. Treatment for YF is supportive, but a live attenuated virus vaccine is effective for preventing infection. WHO recommends immunisation for all individuals > 9 months living in countries or areas at risk. However, the United States Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) advises that YF vaccine is contraindicated in individuals with HIV. Given the large populations of HIV-infected individuals living in tropical areas where YF is endemic, YF vaccine may be an important intervention for preventing YF in immunocompromised populations. To assess the risk and benefits of YF immunisation for people infected with HIV. We used standard Cochrane methods to search electronic databases and conference proceedings with relevant search terms without limits to language. Randomised controlled trials and cohort studies of individuals with HIV infection who received YF vaccine (17DD or 17D-204). Two authors screened abstracts of references identified by electronic or bibliographic searches according to inclusion and exclusion criteria as detailed in the protocol. We identified 199 references and examined 19 in detail for study eligibility. Data were abstracted independently using a standardised abstraction form. Three cohort studies were included in the review. They examined 484 patients with HIV infection who received YF immunisation. Patients with HIV infection developed significantly lower concentrations of neutralising antibodies in the first year post immunisation compared to uninfected patients, though decay patterns were similar for recipients regardless of HIV infection. No study patient with HIV infection suffered serious adverse events as a result of YF vaccination. YF vaccination can produce protective levels of neutralising antibodies in

  18. Trends in Decline of Antiretroviral Resistance among ARV-Experienced Patients in the HIV Outpatient Study: 1999–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Buchacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Little is known about temporal trends in frequencies of clinically relevant ARV resistance mutations in HIV strains from U.S. patients undergoing genotypic testing (GT in routine HIV care. Methods. We analyzed cumulative frequency of HIV resistance among patients in the HIV Outpatient Study (HOPS who, during 1999–2008 and while prescribed antiretrovirals, underwent GT with plasma HIV RNA >1,000 copies/mL. Exposure ≥4 months to each of three major antiretroviral classes (NRTI, NNRTI and PI was defined as triple-class exposure (TCE. Results. 906 patients contributed 1,570 GT results. The annual frequency of any major resistance mutations decreased during 1999–2008 (88% to 79%, P=0.05. Resistance to PIs decreased among PI-exposed patients (71% to 46%, P=0.010 as exposure to ritonavir-boosted PIs increased (6% to 81%, P<0.001. Non-significant declines were observed in resistance to NRTIs among NRTI-exposed (82% to 67%, and triple-class-resistance among TCE patients (66% to 41%, but not to NNRTIs among NNRTI-exposed. Conclusions. HIV resistance was common but declined in HIV isolates from subgroups of ARV-experienced HOPS patients during 1999–2008. Resistance to PIs among PI-exposed patients decreased, possibly due to increased representation of patients whose only PI exposures were to boosted PIs.

  19. Prevalence of HIV infection among trauma patients admitted to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of HIV infection among trauma patients admitted to Bugando Medical Centre, ... This was a descriptive cross sectional study involving trauma patients aged 11 years and ... A total of 250 trauma patients were recruited and studied.

  20. Risk of skin cancer in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Silje Haukali; Ahlström, Magnus Glinvad; Gerstoft, Jan

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk of skin cancer in HIV-infected patients has not been extensively studied. OBJECTIVE: To determine the risk of skin cancer in HIV-infected patients and compare it with the risk in the background population. METHODS: In a matched, nationwide population-based cohort study we...... compared the risk of skin cancer in 4280 HIV-infected patients from the Danish HIV cohort study with a background population cohort, according to the level of immunosuppression and route of transmission. Primary outcomes were time to first basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC...

  1. Thai dental practitioners' knowledge and attitudes regarding patients with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungsiyanont, Sorasun; Lam-Ubol, Aroonwan; Vacharotayangul, Piamkamon; Sappayatosok, Kraisorn

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the knowledge and attitudes of Thai dental practitioners regarding patients with HIV, a cross-sectional study using self-administered questionnaires was conducted. The questionnaires requested demographic information and included questions evaluating the knowledge and attitude of dental practitioners towards HIV. The results were analyzed using Scheffe method for multiple comparisons at the 95 percent confidence level. Out of 1,200 questionnaires sent, 446 questionnaires were returned (response rate 37.2 percent). The subjects included final (sixth)-year dental students (11.9 percent), general dentists (29.1 percent), specialist dentists (15.5 percent), dental hygienists (30.5 percent), and dental assistants (13 percent). More than 80 percent of the dental practitioners correctly answered the questions testing their basic knowledge of HIV such as routes of transmission and common opportunistic infections. However, knowledge about HIV pathogenesis, complications, and advances in HIV management was lacking. Dental hygienists and dental assistants had statistically significant lower scores in knowledge about HIV than other groups. Sixty-seven percent of dental practitioners said they feel worried when treating patients with HIV, and 20.4 percent said they would deny treatment for patients with HIV if possible. While knowledge about HIV may be adequate among dental practitioners in Thailand, greater effort should be put into emphasizing positive attitudes towards patients with HIV.

  2. Prevalence of etravirine mutations and impact on response to treatment in routine clinical care: the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, A U; Hasse, B; von Wyl, V; Yerly, S; Böni, J; Bürgisser, P; Klimkait, T; Bucher, H C; Ledergerber, B; Günthard, H F

    2009-11-01

    Etravirine (ETV) is a novel nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) with reduced cross-resistance to first-generation NNRTIs, which has been primarily studied in randomized clinical trials and not in routine clinical settings. ETV resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) were investigated by analysing 6072 genotypic tests. The antiviral activity of ETV was predicted using different interpretation systems: International AIDS Society-USA (IAS-USA), Stanford, Rega and Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le Sida et les hépatites virales (ANRS). The prevalence of ETV RAMs was higher in NNRTI-exposed patients [44.9%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 41.0-48.9%] than in treatment-naïve patients (9.6%, 95% CI 8.5-10.7%). ETV RAMs in treatment-naïve patients mainly represent polymorphism, as prevalence estimates in genotypic tests for treatment-naïve patients with documented recent (IAS-USA mutations (L100I, K101E/H/P and Y181C/I/V) reduced the treatment response at week 24. Most ETV RAMs in drug-naïve patients are polymorphisms rather than transmitted RAMs. Uncertainty regarding predictions of antiviral activity for ETV in NNRTI-treated patients remains high. The lowest activity was predicted for patients harbouring extensive multidrug-resistant viruses, thus limiting ETV use in those who are most in need.

  3. Oral candidiasis as clinical manifestation of HIV/AIDS infection in Airlangga University hospital patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putranti, A.; Asmarawati, T. P.; Rachman, B. E.; Hadi, U.; Nasronudin

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of HIV/AIDS patients with oral candidiasis as its clinical manifestation at Airlangga University Hospital Surabaya. This is a descriptive analytic research with cross-sectional design using Chi-Square statistic test. Samples of this study consist of 34 patients using total sampling methods. Those patients were all HIV/AIDS infected patients with oral candidiasis clinical manifestations, who were admitted to Airlangga University Hospital Surabaya from January 2016 to September 2017. Results showed that mostly HIV/AIDS patients with oral candidiasis are male (79.4%), old age (40-75years) total amounted to 58.8%, heterosexual as main risk factor (70%), clinical stadium mostly in stage IV (61.8%), 26% of patients with chronic diarrhea and 56% with pulmonary TB, clinical stages of patients have a significant relation to the incidence of oral candidiasis infection (p=0.024). The most common oral lesions found in people with HIV are Candidiasis. The best management is through routine dental examination and dental precautions to maintain health and achieve a better quality of life.

  4. Barium swallow study in routine clinical practice: a prospective study in patients with chronic cough

    OpenAIRE

    Nin, Carlos Shuler; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Paludo, Artur de Oliveira; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Hochhegger, Daniela Reis; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the routine use of barium swallow study in patients with chronic cough.METHODS: Between October of 2011 and March of 2012, 95 consecutive patients submitted to chest X-ray due to chronic cough (duration > 8 weeks) were included in the study. For study purposes, additional images were obtained immediately after the oral administration of 5 mL of a 5% barium sulfate suspension. Two radiologists systematically evaluated all of the images in order to identify any pathological...

  5. Interleukin-2 therapy in patients with HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, D; Lévy, Y; Losso, M H

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-2 in HIV-Infected Patients with Low CD4+ Counts under Active Antiretroviral Therapy (SILCAAT) study and the Evaluation of Subcutaneous Proleukin in a Randomized International Trial (ESPRIT). In each, patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who had CD4+ cell counts of either...

  6. A CLINICAL STUDY OF OCULAR MANIFESTATIONS IN HIV PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND HIV/AIDS is a multi system disorder with ocular involvement is about 70-80% of HIV patient occupational exposure to HIV is a significant health hazard for the treating clinicians including Eye Surgeons. AIM To study and evaluation of ocular manifestation in HIV patients attending out patient. MATERIALS AND METHODS It is observational study of 104 HIV+ve cases for a period of 1 year those patients who attended ophthalmic out patient department. RESULTS 73 were males (70.19% and 31 were females (29.80%. Majority of the patients belongs to age group of 15-50 years. Out of 104 patients 83(79.80% were married and 21(20.20% were unmarried. HIV was predominantly seen in labourers 41(32.42%. The predominant mode of transmission of sexual (Hetero Sexual transmission. HIV infection was predominantly seen in uneducated patients 64(61.53%. Total No. of ocular findings in 51 cases out of 75 with anterior Uveitis, Conjunctival microvasculopathy, Herpes Simplex Keratitis and Conjunctivitis are the most common anterior segment manifestation. CMV retinitis, HIV Microvasculopathy are the most common posterior segment manifestation. CONCLUSIONS Ophthalmologists should be familiar with common and uncommon ocular manifestations of AIDS+ve cases and their diagnosis and treatment, as early and proper treatment can Salvage their vision and improve the quality of life.

  7. Prevalence of HIV infection among trauma patients admitted to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tanzania Journal of Health Research Volume 12, Number 4, October 2010 ... Thus, all trauma health care workers in this region need to practice universal barrier ... of HIV in trauma patients is vital for education and post-exposure prophylaxis. ... of HIV among trauma patients admitted at Bugando Medical Centre in Mwanza, ...

  8. Oral candida infection among HIV patients at Kilimanjaro Christian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    candida infection in HIV positive patients and investigate the relationship between oral manifestations ... and prescription at Child Centred Family Care Clinic at KCMC for a period of 12 months. .... et al., 2013) compared candida colonization in asymptomatic HIV patients and control. .... Journal of Dental Research, Dental.

  9. Dialysis and renal transplantation in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trullas, Joan Carles; Mocroft, Amanda; Cofan, Federico

    2010-01-01

    To determine prevalence and characteristics of end-stage renal diseases (ESRD) [dialysis and renal transplantation (RT)] among European HIV-infected patients.......To determine prevalence and characteristics of end-stage renal diseases (ESRD) [dialysis and renal transplantation (RT)] among European HIV-infected patients....

  10. Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms Among a Population of HIV-Infected Men and Women in Routine HIV Care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtson, Angela M; Pence, Brian W; Powers, Kimberly A; Weaver, Mark A; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Gaynes, Bradley N; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Christopoulos, Katerina; Christopher Mathews, W; Crane, Heidi; Mugavero, Michael

    2018-04-06

    Depressive symptoms vary in severity and chronicity. We used group-based trajectory models to describe trajectories of depressive symptoms (measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9) and predictors of trajectory group membership among 1493 HIV-infected men (84%) and 292 HIV-infected women (16%). At baseline, 29% of women and 26% of men had depressive symptoms. Over a median of 30 months of follow-up, we identified four depressive symptom trajectories for women (labeled "low" [experienced by 56% of women], "mild/moderate" [24%], "improving" [14%], and "severe" [6%]) and five for men ("low" [61%], "mild/moderate" [14%], "rebounding" [5%], "improving" [13%], and "severe" [7%]). Baseline antidepressant prescription, panic symptoms, and prior mental health diagnoses were associated with more severe or dynamic depressive symptom trajectories. Nearly a quarter of participants experienced some depressive symptoms, highlighting the need for improved depression management. Addressing more severe or dynamic depressive symptom trajectories may require interventions that additionally address mental health comorbidities.

  11. Elevated Plasma Soluble CD14 and Skewed CD16+ Monocyte Distribution Persist despite Normalisation of Soluble CD163 and CXCL10 by Effective HIV Therapy: A Changing Paradigm for Routine HIV Laboratory Monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castley, Alison; Berry, Cassandra; French, Martyn; Fernandez, Sonia; Krueger, Romano; Nolan, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective We investigated plasma and flow cytometric biomarkers of monocyte status that have been associated with prognostic utility in HIV infection and other chronic inflammatory diseases, comparing 81 HIV+ individuals with a range of treatment outcomes to a group of 21 healthy control blood donors. Our aim is to develop and optimise monocyte assays that combine biological relevance, clinical utility, and ease of adoption into routine HIV laboratory practice. Design Cross-sectional evaluation of concurrent plasma and whole blood samples. Methods A flow cytometry protocol was developed comprising single-tube CD45, CD14, CD16, CD64, CD163, CD143 analysis with appropriately matched isotype controls. Plasma levels of soluble CD14 (sCD14), soluble CD163 (sCD163) and CXCL10 were measured by ELISA. Results HIV status was associated with significantly increased expression of CD64, CD143 and CD163 on CD16+ monocytes, irrespective of the virological response to HIV therapy. Plasma levels of sCD14, sCD163 and CXCL10 were also significantly elevated in association with viremic HIV infection. Plasma sCD163 and CXCL10 levels were restored to healthy control levels by effective antiretroviral therapy while sCD14 levels remained elevated despite virological suppression (p<0.001). Conclusions Flow cytometric and plasma biomarkers of monocyte activation indicate an ongoing systemic inflammatory response to HIV infection, characterised by persistent alterations of CD16+ monocyte expression profiles and elevated sCD14 levels, that are not corrected by antiretroviral therapy and likely to be prognostically significant. In contrast, sCD163 and CXCL10 levels declined on antiretroviral therapy, suggesting multiple activation pathways revealed by these biomarkers. Incorporation of these assays into routine clinical care is feasible and warrants further consideration, particularly in light of emerging therapeutic strategies that specifically target innate immune activation in HIV

  12. Elevated plasma soluble CD14 and skewed CD16+ monocyte distribution persist despite normalisation of soluble CD163 and CXCL10 by effective HIV therapy: a changing paradigm for routine HIV laboratory monitoring?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Castley

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We investigated plasma and flow cytometric biomarkers of monocyte status that have been associated with prognostic utility in HIV infection and other chronic inflammatory diseases, comparing 81 HIV+ individuals with a range of treatment outcomes to a group of 21 healthy control blood donors. Our aim is to develop and optimise monocyte assays that combine biological relevance, clinical utility, and ease of adoption into routine HIV laboratory practice. DESIGN: Cross-sectional evaluation of concurrent plasma and whole blood samples. METHODS: A flow cytometry protocol was developed comprising single-tube CD45, CD14, CD16, CD64, CD163, CD143 analysis with appropriately matched isotype controls. Plasma levels of soluble CD14 (sCD14, soluble CD163 (sCD163 and CXCL10 were measured by ELISA. RESULTS: HIV status was associated with significantly increased expression of CD64, CD143 and CD163 on CD16+ monocytes, irrespective of the virological response to HIV therapy. Plasma levels of sCD14, sCD163 and CXCL10 were also significantly elevated in association with viremic HIV infection. Plasma sCD163 and CXCL10 levels were restored to healthy control levels by effective antiretroviral therapy while sCD14 levels remained elevated despite virological suppression (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Flow cytometric and plasma biomarkers of monocyte activation indicate an ongoing systemic inflammatory response to HIV infection, characterised by persistent alterations of CD16+ monocyte expression profiles and elevated sCD14 levels, that are not corrected by antiretroviral therapy and likely to be prognostically significant. In contrast, sCD163 and CXCL10 levels declined on antiretroviral therapy, suggesting multiple activation pathways revealed by these biomarkers. Incorporation of these assays into routine clinical care is feasible and warrants further consideration, particularly in light of emerging therapeutic strategies that specifically target innate immune

  13. Morphological aspects of liver CT in patients with HIV infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schedel, H.; Wicht, L.; Roegler, G.; Langer, R.; Felix, R.

    1994-01-01

    CT examinations of the liver in HIV-infected patients show more frequent pathological findings. The extended spectrum of differential diagnosis and atypical manifestations of disorders in immunodeficient patients needs to be considered in the interpretation of CT scans. Difficulties in the differential diagnosis of focal hepatic lesions in HIV-infected patients are demonstrated in the following. Besides the relatively common findings in HIV-infection such as hepato- or hepatosplenomegalia, lymphoma, and inflammatory changes of the bowel an infection with Cryptococcus neoformans, hepatitis, and local steatosis of the liver are discussed as the rare causes for suspect computertomographic findings in the live of HIV-infected patients. The examinations were obtained consecutively in 76 HIV-infected patients during abdominal CT staging. (orig.) [de

  14. Pregnancy in HIV-Positive Patients: Effects on Vaginal Flora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Vallone

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A high proportion of HIV-infected pregnant women present pathogenic organisms in their lower genital tract. This has been associated with the development of postpartum morbility, HIV transmission to the partner and offspring, and other gynaecological conditions, such as cervical dysplasia or cancer. Vaginal flora alterations can range from 47% in Western countries to 89% in Africa in pregnant HIV-positive patients, much higher than about 20% of the general population. Pathogen organism retrieval is high. As peripartum complications due to vaginal infections seem higher in HIV-positive patients, accurate investigation and treatment of such infections are strongly mandatory.

  15. Tubuloreticular inclusions in skin biopsies from patients with HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C; Horn, T; Junge, Jette

    1989-01-01

    Skin biopsies obtained from apparently normal skin from 15 HIV infected patients and 6 anti-HIV negative patients were examined by electron microscopy. Tubuloreticular inclusions (TRI) were detected within the cytoplasm of capillary endothelial cells in 5/5 AIDS patients and in 2/5 patients...... of the patients without TRI, interferon activity was below detection level. The occurrence of TRI was not dependent on the presence of free p24 antigen in serum. It is concluded that the occurrence of TRI in entothelial cells of skin capillaries is associated with late stages of HIV infection and this may...

  16. Lack of hygiene routines among patients and family members at patient hotels--a possible route for transmitting puerperal fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starlander, Gustaf; Lytsy, Birgitta; Melhus, Asa

    2010-07-01

    The use of patient hotels for ambulatory care of women with uncomplicated deliveries has become a routine in Sweden. This report describes a minor outbreak of a group A Streptococcus strain in 2 newly delivered mothers and their newborn babies at a patient hotel.

  17. Quality in practice: integrating routine collection of patient language data into hospital practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudelson, Patricia; Dominicé Dao, Melissa; Durieux-Paillard, Sophie

    2013-09-01

    Timely identification of patients' language needs can facilitate the provision of language-appropriate services and contribute to quality of care, clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. At the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland, timely organization of interpreter services was hindered by the lack of systematic patient language data collection. We explored the feasibility and acceptability of a procedure for collecting patient language data at the first point of contact, prior to its hospital-wide implementation. During a one-week period, receptionists and triage nurses in eight clinical services tested a new procedure for collecting patient language data. Patients were asked to identify their primary language and other languages they would be comfortable speaking with their doctor. Staff noted patients' answers on a paper form and provided informal feedback on their experience with the procedure. Registration staff encountered few difficulties collecting patient language data and thought that the two questions could easily be incorporated into existing administrative routines. Following the pilot test, two language fields with scroll-down language menus were added to the electronic patient file, and the subsequent filling-in of these fields has been rapid and hospital wide. Our experience suggests that routine collection of patient language data at first point of contact is both feasible and acceptable and that involving staff in a pilot project may facilitate hospital-wide implementation. Future efforts should focus on exploring the sensitivity and specificity of the proposed questions, as well as the impact of data collection on interpreter use.

  18. [Prevalence and related factors of HIV/HBV coinfection among HIV/AIDS patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, D; Yao, T; Cheng, Y P; Pan, M H; Li, C X; Wang, J; Feng, Y L; Shi, J; Huang, H L; Lu, H Y; Lan, G H; Wang, S P; Zhang, Y W

    2017-12-10

    Objective: To reveal the prevalence and the related factors of hepatitis B (HepB) virus infection among HIV/AIDS patients. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study in two HIV clinics, affiliated to local Centers of Disease Control and Prevention in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Regional. A face-to-face interview, with questionnaire was conducted to collect information on socio-demographic characteristics, drug use, and sexual behavior. Blood samples were used to test HBsAg. χ (2) test or Fisher's exact test and unconditional logistic regression models were used to identify the influencing factors. Results: The prevalence of HBV and HIV co-infection was 13.85% (113/816). Results from multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that age (25-45), family history of HBV and history of HepB vaccination were independent influencing factors for HBV and HIV coinfection, with OR (95% CI ) as 1.738 (1.031-2.931), 2.898 (1.678-5.005) and 1.744 (1.052-2.892), respectively. Conclusion: The prevalence of HBV among HIV/AIDS patients was significantly higher than that in general population. HIV/AIDS patients aged between 25 and 45 and with family history of HBV were more likely to be infected with HBV, while HepB vaccination was associated with the reduction of HIV/HBV coinfection. Specific comprehensive prevention and treatment programs on HIV/AIDS patients need to be set up.

  19. HIV-positive patients' and their families' comprehension of HIV- and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV-positive patients' and their families' comprehension of HIV- and AIDS-related information. ... perceived that pre- and post-counselling provided an opportunity for information sharing, but that they need health care workers to spend more time with them, to be non-judgemental and to make more use of visual aids.

  20. The significance of routine thoracic computed tomography in patients with blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çorbacıoğlu, Seref Kerem; Er, Erhan; Aslan, Sahin; Seviner, Meltem; Aksel, Gökhan; Doğan, Nurettin Özgür; Güler, Sertaç; Bitir, Aysen

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the use of thoracic computed tomography (TCT) as part of nonselective computed tomography (CT) guidelines is superior to selective CT during the diagnosis of blunt chest trauma. This study was planned as a prospective cohort study, and it was conducted at the emergency department between 2013 and 2014. A total of 260 adult patients who did not meet the exclusion criteria were enrolled in the study. All patients were evaluated by an emergency physician, and their primary surveys were completed based on the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) principles. Based on the initial findings and ATLS recommendations, patients in whom thoracic CT was indicated were determined (selective CT group). Routine CTs were then performed on all patients. Thoracic injuries were found in 97 (37.3%) patients following routine TCT. In 53 (20%) patients, thoracic injuries were found by selective CT. Routine TCT was able to detect chest injury in 44 (16%) patients for whom selective TCT would not otherwise be ordered based on the EP evaluation (nonselective TCT group). Five (2%) patients in this nonselective TCT group required tube thoracostomy, while there was no additional treatment provided for thoracic injuries in the remaining 39 (15%). In conclusion, we found that the nonselective TCT method was superior to the selective TCT method in detecting thoracic injuries in patients with blunt trauma. Furthermore, we were able to demonstrate that the nonselective TCT method can change the course of patient management albeit at low rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Knowledge, attitudes and practices towards patients with HIV/AIDS in staff nurses in one university hospital in Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Marranzano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: nurses’ knowledge, attitudes and practices towards patients with HIV/AIDS are of ongoing interest, especially in developing countries. Nothing or very little is known about Italian nurses.Methods: HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of the nurses (n=107 from one university hospital inCatania,Sicily, were documented. Comparisons among nurses belonging to different Operative Units (O.U. were conducted by the chi-square test (P<0.05.Results: although HIV was nurses’ main concern in regard to contracting infections in the workplace (54%, the vast majority of them (98% had never refused an HIV/AIDS patient care assignment. Moreover, despite their concern of being more at risk of contracting HIV than the general population (41%, a not negligible percentage of nurses did not use gloves routinely (21% and only a few treated all patients as potentially HIV-positive (9%. The vast majority of the respondents knew the meaning of AIDS (87% and of a positive serological test (78%. On the contrary, a relatively low percentage of them knew what is the ‘window period’ (62% and were acquainted with HIV pathophysiology (65%. No statistically significant differences in terms of risk perception were found between nurses who had previously attended an HIV/AIDS workshop, lecture or specific course (43% and nurses who did not (57%. Level of knowledge was positively associated to age (P=0.000 and to education (P=0.016, and it was found higher in nurses working in a O.U. of Infectious Diseases.Conclusions: data from our study show that also in developed countries, such as Italy, nurses could have some misconceptions and concerns about HIV/AIDS. The importance of examining the impact of continuing education on nurses’ preparedness to care for patients with HIV/AIDS and to prevent the risks of occupational HIV transmission is discussed. 

  2. Why HIV Positive Patients on Antiretroviral Treatment and/or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Why HIV Positive Patients on Antiretroviral Treatment and/or Cotrimoxazole Prophylaxis Use Traditional Medicine: Perceptions of Health Workers, Traditional Healers and Patients: A Study in Two Provinces of South Africa.

  3. FEATURES OF PNEUMONIA IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Vatutin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the clinical, diagnostic and treatment features of pneumocystis pneumonia in HIV-infected patients. The clinical case of diagnosis verification in a patient 58 years old with severe respiratory failure is described.

  4. Croatian Recommendations for Dialysis of HIV-Positive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulin Marijana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection may be associated with renal impairment since about 0.4% of all HIV-positive patients develop end-stage renal disease. The share of patients with HIV infection in hemodialysis centers throughout the world ranges from 0.3% to as high as 38%. In Croatia, renal replacement therapy was needed by 1% of all the HIV-positive patients from 1985 until the end of 2014. Healthcare professionals (HP should be aware of the risks of occupational exposure to blood-borne infections in their daily work. Performing dialysis in HIV-positive patients increases the risk of exposure to HIV during the extracorporeal circulation of the infected blood. However, post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP with effective antiretroviral drugs significantly reduces the risk of infection after occupational exposure. On behalf of the Croatian Society of Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, the authors of this paper have proposed recommendations for the management of HIVpositive patients on dialysis, which aim to prevent the transmission of HIV among patients and HPs. The important recommendations include the following: 1. when the need arises, it is necessary to provide HIV-positive patients with dialysis in the vicinity of their place of residence. 2. HIV-positive patients should be dialyzed with a separate hemodialysis machine in an isolated area. Alternatively, they can be dialyzed in an area for the hemodialysis of HCV-positive and/or HBVpositive patients. 3. Specialized and trained personnel should be provided during the hemodialysis procedure, together with strict compliance with the standard precautions for the prevention of blood-borne infections. 4. There should be a good and prompt cooperation with the National Referral Center for HIV infection.

  5. Is systematic screening and treatment for latent tuberculosis infection in HIV patients useful in a low endemic setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniewski, Ula; Payen, Marie-Christine; Delforge, Marc; De Wit, Stephane

    2017-08-01

    A decreasing incidence of tuberculosis (TB) among HIV patients has been documented in high-income settings and screening for tuberculosis is not systematically performed in many clinics (such as ours). Our objectives are to evaluate whether a same decline of incidence was seen in our Belgian tertiary center and to evaluate whether systematic screening and prophylaxis of tuberculosis should remain part of routine practice. Between 2005 and 2012, the annual incidence of tuberculosis among adult HIV patients was measured. The impact of demographic characteristics and CD 4 nadir on the incidence of active TB was evaluated. Among the 1167 patients who entered the cohort, 42 developed active TB with a significant decrease of annual incidence from 28/1000 patient-years in 2005 to 3/1000 patient-years in 2012. Among the 42 cases, 83% were of sub-Saharan origin. Median CD4 cell count upon HIV diagnosis was significantly lower in TB cases and 60% had a nadir CD4 below 200/μl. Thirty-six percent of incident TB occurred within 14 days after HIV diagnosis. A significant decline of TB incidence in HIV patients was observed. Incident TB occurred mainly in African patients, with low CD4 upon HIV diagnosis. A significant proportion of TB cases were discovered early in follow-up which probably reflects TB already present upon HIV diagnosis. In a low endemic setting, exclusion of active TB upon HIV diagnosis remains a priority and screening for LTBI should focus on HIV patients from high risk groups such as migrants from endemic regions, especially in patients with low CD4 nadir.

  6. HIV-infected mental health patients: characteristics and comparison with HIV-infected patients from the general population and non-infected mental health patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schade, A.; Grootheest, G.; Smit, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: HIV-infected patients are at increased risk of developing mental health symptoms, which negatively influence the treatment of the HIV-infection. Mental health problems in HIV-infected patients may affect public health. Psychopathology, including depression and substance abuse, can

  7. Mortality after myocardial infarction in HIV-infected patients who have initiated HAART

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Line D; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    We identified all Danish HIV patients registered with myocardial infarction (MI) when on HAART (44 patients) and compared their mortality with that of matched patients with MI and no HIV and patients with HIV and no MI. Mortality in HIV-infected MI patients was not significantly different...... to that of MI only patients in the first 90 days post-MI and thereafter was not significantly different to that of HIV patients without MI. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Apr-23...

  8. Leprosy in a patient infected with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtrey, Clare M; Modarres, Hamid; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Brandner, Sebastian; Rossor, Alexander M; Lockwood, Diana Nj; Reilly, Mary M; Manji, Hadi; Schon, Fred

    2017-04-01

    A 60-year-old Nigerian man, who had lived in Europe for 30 years but had returned home frequently, presented with right frontalis muscle weakness and right ulnar nerve palsy, without skin lesions. Neurophysiology showed a generalised neuropathy with demyelinating features. Blood tests were positive for HIV, with a normal CD4 count. There was nerve thickening both clinically and on MRI. Nerve biopsy showed chronic endoneuritis and perineuritis (indicating leprosy) without visible mycobacteria. His neuropathy continued to deteriorate (lepra reaction) before starting treatment with WHO multidrug therapy, highly active antiretroviral therapy and corticosteroids. There are 10 new cases of leprosy diagnosed annually in the UK. Coinfection with HIV is rare but paradoxically does not usually adversely affect the outcome of leprosy or change treatment. However, permanent nerve damage in leprosy is common despite optimal therapy. Leprosy should be considered in patients from endemic areas who present with mononeuritis multiplex. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Clinical value of determination HIV viral load in the cerebrospinal fluid of HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Musatov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze the concentration of HIV RNA in the cerebrospinal fluid and to evaluate its significance in the pathology of the central nervous system among HIV infected persons.Materials: We examined 36 patients with HIV infection with signs of pathology of the central nervous system. All patients was done completed a standard investigation of cerebrospinal fluid, cytological examination and detection viral load of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum.Results. A different of opportunistic and HIV-related disease was diagnosed in 29 patients. The most frequent pathology of the nervous system (12 cases is a diffuse HIV-associated brain damage occurring in 7 patients in the form of aseptic non purulent meningitis and in 5 patients in the form of encephalitis. The average value of the absolute and relative count of CD4-lymphocytes in patients amounted 147,0 cells/μl (40,0; 408,75 and 10.0% (4,00; 18,50. Pathological changes in cellular composition and protein concentration of cerebrospinal fluid detected in 19 cases. Replication of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid are detected in 31 of 32 patients not receiving antiretroviral therapy, including 17 patients with normal values of cerebrospinal fluid. The average HIV viral load in the cerebrospinal fluid was 15 133,0 copies/ml (2501,0; 30624,0 or 4,18 (3,35; 4,48 lg HIV RNA, average HIV viral load in serum – 62 784,0 copies/ml (6027,5; 173869,0 or 4,80 4,80 (3,7; 5,2 lg HIV RNA. The concentration of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid was significantly lower than in serum (4,18 and 4,80 lg HIV RNA, p=0.027. 4 patients with severe, multietiology damage of the central nervous system viral, microbial and fungal etiology, there was an inverse relationship between the concentration of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid and in serum, the concentrations of HIV was higher in the cerebrospinal fluid.Conclusion: Among the majority of HIV-infected patients with signs of the central

  10. Trauma activation patients: evidence for routine alcohol and illicit drug screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Michael Dunham

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Statistics from the National Trauma Data Bank imply that discretionary blood alcohol and urine drug testing is common. However, there is little evidence to determine which patients are appropriate for routine testing, based on information available at trauma center arrival. In 2002, Langdorf reported alcohol and illicit drug rates in Trauma Activation Patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This is a retrospective investigation of alcohol and illicit drug rates in consecutive St. Elizabeth Health Center (SEHC trauma patients. SEHC Trauma Activation Patients are compared with the Langdorf Activation Patients and with the SEHC Trauma Nonactivation Patients. Minimum Rates are positive tests divided by total patients (tested and not tested. Activation patients: The minimum alcohol rates were: SEHC 23.1%, Langdorf 28.2%, combined 24.8%. The minimum illicit drug rates were: SEHC 15.7%, Langdorf 23.5, combined 18.3%. The minimum alcohol and/or illicit drug rates were: SEHC 33.4%, Langdorf 41.8%, combined 36.2%. Nonactivation patients: The SEHC minimum alcohol rate was 4.7% and the minimum illicit drug rate was 6.0%. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol and illicit drug rates were significantly greater for Trauma Activation Patients, when compared to Nonactivation Patients. At minimum, Trauma Activation Patients are likely to have a 1-in-3 positive test for alcohol and/or an illicit drug. This substantial rate suggests that Trauma Activation Patients, a readily discernible group at trauma center arrival, are appropriate for routine alcohol and illicit drug testing. However, discretionary testing is more reasonable for Trauma Nonactivation Patients, because minimum rates are low.

  11. Real-time patient survey data during routine clinical activities for rapid-cycle quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, James Lucius; Campos, Claudia L; Jones, Robert E; Stevens, Sheila F

    2015-03-12

    Surveying patients is increasingly important for evaluating and improving health care delivery, but practical survey strategies during routine care activities have not been available. We examined the feasibility of conducting routine patient surveys in a primary care clinic using commercially available technology (Web-based survey creation, deployment on tablet computers, cloud-based management of survey data) to expedite and enhance several steps in data collection and management for rapid quality improvement cycles. We used a Web-based data management tool (survey creation, deployment on tablet computers, real-time data accumulation and display of survey results) to conduct four patient surveys during routine clinic sessions over a one-month period. Each survey consisted of three questions and focused on a specific patient care domain (dental care, waiting room experience, care access/continuity, Internet connectivity). Of the 727 available patients during clinic survey days, 316 patients (43.4%) attempted the survey, and 293 (40.3%) completed the survey. For the four 3-question surveys, the average time per survey was overall 40.4 seconds, with a range of 5.4 to 20.3 seconds for individual questions. Yes/No questions took less time than multiple choice questions (average 9.6 seconds versus 14.0). Average response time showed no clear pattern by order of questions or by proctor strategy, but monotonically increased with number of words in the question (30 words)-8.0, 11.8, 16.8, seconds, respectively. This technology-enabled data management system helped capture patient opinions, accelerate turnaround of survey data, with minimal impact on a busy primary care clinic. This new model of patient survey data management is feasible and sustainable in a busy office setting, supports and engages clinicians in the quality improvement process, and harmonizes with the vision of a learning health care system.

  12. .\tA Study on Cervical Pap Smear Examination in Patient Living with HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Devanshi Gosai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extensive screening programme of cervical Pap smear examination can detect the precancerous and cancerous lesions at an early stage and mortality & morbidity due to these lesions can be reduced. HPV infection is a known etiological agent for cervical cancer. HIV infected women are at higher risk of contracting HPV infection due to immune compromised status. Objective: Present study has been undertaken mainly to detect precancerous & cancerous lesions as well as inflammatory lesions in female patients living with HIV & to emphasize the fact that Pap smear examination should be established as a part of routine protocol for examination in HIV infected women. Methods: The study was carried out on 369 HIV infected females attending Integrated Counselling &Testing Centre of government institute. As controls, 142 females (not falling under high risk category, attending the Obstetrics& Gynaecology OPD with various gynaecological complaints were taken & results were compared. Results: Squamous cell abnormalities were found about four times high as compared to control group. High incidences of squamous cell abnormalities were noted in patients with high parity (parity three or more. Conclusion: Regular gynaecological examination including Pap smear examinations is highly recommended for HIV infected females. Pap smear examination is a simple, cheap, safe & practical diagnostic tool for early detection of cervical cancer in high risk population.

  13. Patients' Perceptions and Experiences of Shared Decision-Making in Primary HIV Care Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Shannon M; Koester, Kimberly A; Guinness, Ryan R; Steward, Wayne T

    Shared decision-making (SDM) is considered best practice in health care. Prior studies have explored attitudes and barriers/facilitators to SDM, with few specific to HIV care. We interviewed 53 patients in HIV primary care clinics in California to understand the factors and situations that may promote or hinder engagement in SDM. Studies in other populations have found that patients' knowledge about their diseases and their trust in providers facilitated SDM. We found these features to be more nuanced for HIV. Perceptions of personal agency, knowledge about one's disease, and trust in provider were factors that could work for or against SDM. Overall, we found that participants described few experiences of SDM, especially among those with no comorbidities. Opportunities for SDM in routine HIV care (e.g., determining antiretroviral therapy) may arise infrequently because of treatment advances. These findings yield considerations for adapting SDM to fit the context of HIV care. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An evaluation of routine specialist palliative care for patients on the Liverpool Care Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jo; Brown, Jayne; Davies, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a service evaluation of the 'added value' of routine specialist palliative care team (SPCT) involvement with patients on the Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient (LCP). In the authors' hospital, patients that are commenced on the LCP are routinely referred to the SPCT. They are reviewed on the day of referral and then at least every other day, depending on the clinical situation. The data for this report was obtained by reviewing the SPCT's clinical database and the patients' LCP proformas. The SPCT intervened in the care of 80% of 158 newly referred patients, e.g. for alteration of continuous subcutaneous infusion (23%) or alteration of use of non-pharmacological interventions (21%). Furthermore, 11% of patients were taken off the LCP, around one quarter of whom were later put back on. The authors' model of care could overcome many of the issues relating to the LCP and would ameliorate the developing vacuum of care for patients at the end of life.

  15. Breast Gangrene in an HIV-Positive Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatramani, V; Pillai, S; Marathe, S; Rege, SA; Hardikar, JV

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Breast gangrene has been reported as a complication following puerperal sepsis, breast surgery, nipple piercings, warfarin toxicity, etc. We report a case of primary breast gangrene in an HIV-positive individual which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first of its kind. Case report A 40-year-old previously healthy woman presented with fulminating left breast gangrene. She was detected to be HIV positive. Mastectomy was performed. The detailed management of the condition is discussed. Conclusion Severe necrotising infections may be initial manifestations of HIV infection and patients with such infections should be screened for HIV. PMID:19622255

  16. Epidemiology of tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Ulrik Bak; Bauer, J; Poulsen, S

    1999-01-01

    increased in the younger age groups, indicating more newly infected persons. This study was performed in order to assess the impact of the HIV epidemic and immigration on TB incidence among native Danes. The study was also designed to reveal transmission patterns of TB among HIV-positive patients. Data from......Denmark is an area of low incidence of HIV and tuberculosis (TB). The number of newly reported cases of HIV has been stable during the 1990s, whereas the number of TB cases has doubled in Denmark in the past decade, mainly due to immigration. However, among native Danes the incidence of TB has...... HIV-TB co-infected patients identified in the national registers of TB and AIDS from 1992-95 were collected retrospectively from medical records. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses of TB isolates from co-infected patients were compared with all patterns registered...

  17. Epidemiological and Clinical profile of HIV-infected patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Treatment and care services for HIV patients in Tanzania began 2004 with free access to anti-retroviral therapy (ART). More than 1000 HIV clinics have been established to-date. Each clinic is obliged to provide statistical and clinical feedback for further improvement. Broad objective: The objective of this study ...

  18. Strongyloides stercoralis infestation in HIV seropositive patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A contemporary surge in diarrhoeal illnesses due to parasitic infestations is believed to be a synergy between endemicity and HIV seropositivity. Aim: To determine the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis infestation among HIV seropositive patients at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital.

  19. Patient and provider perspectives on improving the linkage of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined barriers and facilitators to the linkage of HIV-positive pregnant women from antenatal care (ANC) to long-term HIV care from patient and provider perspectives, following the implementation of a collaborative quality improvement project in Eastern Uganda. It also solicited recommendations for improving ...

  20. HIV status disclosure and ARV adherence among patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV status disclosure and ARV adherence among patients attending Jomo Kenyatta University comprehensive care clinic. ... Failure to daily intake of Anti Retrovirals (ARV) not only prevents treatment failure but may also lead to viral development of resistance to the drugs. The fact that HIV is mainly sexually transmitted ...

  1. Glomerular Filtration Rate among HIV/AIDS Patients at Jos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Accurate assessment of renal function is important in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients in order to adjust dosages of drugs excreted by the kidney. Furthermore, a number of commonly used antiretroviral drugs are potentially nephrotoxic. However, in most HIV clinics in Nigeria it is not ...

  2. Baseline CD4 lymphocyte count among HIV patients in Kano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    macrophages), the devastating effect of HIV on the immune system is not surprising. Given that HIV induced immunodeficiency is largely due to infection and gradual depletion of. CD4+ T-helper cells, CD4 count has become a useful indicator of immune function in infected patients. Hence CD4 count along with viral load ...

  3. Antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of Salmonella: comparison of isolates from HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolday, D; Erge, W

    1998-07-01

    A retrospective analysis of all cases of Salmonella infections occurring between 1991 and 1995 was undertaken in order to evaluate the antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of the isolates from both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected and uninfected Ethiopian patients. During the 5-year study period, we identified 147 cases of Salmonella infections. Only in 49 cases was the HIV serostatus known; 22 (44.9%) of the infections were in HIV seronegative patients while 27 (55.9%) were in HIV seropositive patients. The strains were isolated from blood (71.4%), urine (18.4%) and stool (8.2%). Salmonella infection was found to be more frequent (55.15% versus 44.9%) among HIV positive than HIV-negative patients. Moreover, Salmonella isolates recovered from HIV-seropositive patients were significantly resistant to many of the antibiotics tested when compared to the isolates from HIV-seronegative patients. The only chloramphenicol resistant Salmonella typhi occurred in a patient who was seropositive for HIV. According to these results, Ethiopian patients infected with HIV may be at risk of acquiring infections, especially non-typhoidal salmonellas, that are multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains than HIV-uninfected subjects. The emergence of MDR Salmonella infection among HIV-positive patients requires reassessment of chemotherapeutic approaches in this patient population, and warrants continued laboratory surveillance.

  4. Upper Gastrointestinal Symptoms Predictive of Candida Esophagitis and Erosive Esophagitis in HIV and Non-HIV Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuta; Nagata, Naoyoshi; Shimbo, Takuro; Nishijima, Takeshi; Watanabe, Koji; Aoki, Tomonori; Sekine, Katsunori; Okubo, Hidetaka; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Yokoi, Chizu; Mimori, Akio; Oka, Shinichi; Uemura, Naomi; Akiyama, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are common in both HIV and non-HIV-infected patients, but the difference of GI symptom severity between 2 groups remains unknown. Candida esophagitis and erosive esophagitis, 2 major types of esophagitis, are seen in both HIV and non-HIV-infected patients, but differences in GI symptoms that are predictive of esophagitis between 2 groups remain unknown. We aimed to determine whether GI symptoms differ between HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected patients, and identify specific symptoms of candida esophagitis and erosive esophagitis between 2 groups. We prospectively enrolled 6011 patients (HIV, 430; non-HIV, 5581) who underwent endoscopy and completed questionnaires. Nine upper GI symptoms (epigastric pain, heartburn, acid regurgitation, hunger cramps, nausea, early satiety, belching, dysphagia, and odynophagia) were evaluated using a 7-point Likert scale. Associations between esophagitis and symptoms were analyzed by the multivariate logistic regression model adjusted for age, sex, and proton pump inhibitors. Endoscopy revealed GI-organic diseases in 33.4% (2010/6.011) of patients. The prevalence of candida esophagitis and erosive esophagitis was 11.2% and 12.1% in HIV-infected patients, respectively, whereas it was 2.9% and 10.7 % in non-HIV-infected patients, respectively. After excluding GI-organic diseases, HIV-infected patients had significantly (P symptom scores for heartburn, hunger cramps, nausea, early satiety, belching, dysphagia, and odynophagia than non-HIV-infected patients. In HIV-infected patients, any symptom was not significantly associated with CD4 cell count. In multivariate analysis, none of the 9 GI symptoms were associated with candida esophagitis in HIV-infected patients, whereas dysphagia and odynophagia were independently (P HIV-infected patients. However, heartburn and acid regurgitation were independently (P symptom scores were reliable in both HIV (α, 0.86) and non-HIV-infected patients

  5. Detection of HIV-RNA-positive monocytes in peripheral blood of HIV-positive patients by simultaneous flow cytometric analysis of intracellular HIV RNA and cellular immunophenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, B K; Mosiman, V L; Cantarero, L; Furtado, M; Bhattacharya, M; Goolsby, C

    1998-04-01

    Determinations of plasma HIV viral RNA copy numbers help to define the kinetics of HIV-1 infection in vivo and to monitor antiretroviral therapy. However, questions remain regarding the identity of various infected cell types contributing to this free virus pool and to the in vivo lifecycle of HIV during disease progression. Characterization of a novel fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay employing a pool of labeled oligonucleotide probes directed against HIV RNA was done followed by coupling of the FISH assay with simultaneous surface immunophenotyping to address these questions. In vitro characterizations of this assay using tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulated and unstimulated ACH-2 cells demonstrated the ability to detect < 5% HIV RNA positive cells with a sensitivity of < 30 RNA copies per cell. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 39 HIV-seropositive patients on no, single, combination, or triple drug therapy and 8 HIV-seronegative patients were examined. The majority of HIV-positive patients (24/39) harbored monocytes positive for HIV RNA and a significantly higher fraction of patients with high plasma viral load carried positive monocytes (13/16) than did patients in the low plasma viral load group (11/23). These results demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel FISH assay for identifying and monitoring HIV-infected cell populations in the peripheral blood of HIV-positive patients. In addition, monocytes are a major source of cellular HIV virus in the peripheral blood of HIV patients, even with progression of disease.

  6. Acute retroviral syndrome in Slovenian patients infected with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Pirš

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Two to six weeks after primary infection with HIV 50 to 90 percent of patients develop an acute retroviral syndrome which usually presents with mononucleosis or flu-like illness. Due to nonspecific symptoms ARS is frequently misdiagnosed.Patients and methods: Data of Slovenian patients with acute retroviral syndrome is shown, as well as their symptoms, approaches to management and diagnostic particularities of primary HIV infection.Conclusions: The combination of particular symptoms and epidemiological data should lead us to consider the possibility of an early HIV infection.

  7. Epidemiology of hepatitis C virus in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Klein, Marina B

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review will give an update on the prevalence of HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection, and describe recent trends in all-cause and cause-specific mortality. The focus is mainly on patients followed in clinics in high-income countries and their heterogeneity in terms...... of risk factors and clinical outcomes. RECENT FINDINGS: In countries that have introduced comprehensive preventive strategies for injection drug users, the prevalence of HIV/HCV coinfection has declined. Compared with HIV monoinfected patients, the mortality among HCV-coinfected patients remains markedly...

  8. Radiation Measurement And Risk Estimation For Pediatric Patients During Routine Diagnostic Examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushra, E.; Sulieman, A.; Osman, H.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate Entrance Surface Dose (ESD) to the patient using Thermo luminescence dosimeters (TLD) during some common routine pediatrics X-ray examinations in main pediatrics hospitals in Sudan. ESD and Effective Dose (E) for pediatrics have been carried out for 250 patients undergoing five different examinations. The mean ESD ranged for neonates ranged between 0.17 mGy-0.30 mGy per radiograph with scattered thyroid dose 0.01 to 0.19 mGy. The risk of radiation induced cancer of was 0.13 x 10-6.

  9. Routine studies of swallowed radionuclide transit in pediatrics: experience with 400 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillet, J.; Basse-Cathalinat, B.; Christophe, E.; Blanquet, P.; Ducassou, D.; Wynchank, S.

    1984-02-01

    Scintigraphic studies of swallowed 99m Tc-sulphur colloid mixed with a few millilitres of liquid, performed on 400 pediatric patients of all ages, allowed visualisation of foregut function and measurement of oesophageal transit time and gastric emptying proportions. This non-invasive and physiological procedure requires a standard gamma camera with computing facilities and was performed as an outpatient routine. It proved very effective for the detection of gastro-oesophageal reflux and aspiration of refluxed liquid in patients of all ages but especially in neonates. The relevance of these scintigraphic results to oesophagitis, repeated respiratory problems, cyanotic and apnoeic spells and alternative methods of investigation is described.

  10. Routine studies of swallowed radionuclide transit in paediatrics: experience with 400 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, J.; Basse-Cathalinat, B.; Christophe, E.; Blanquet, P.; Wynchank, S.

    1984-01-01

    Scintigraphic studies of swallowed 99 m Tc-sulphur colloid mixed with a few millilitres of liquid, performed on 400 paediatric patients of all ages, allowed visualisation of foregut function and measurement of oesophageal transit time and gastric emptying proportions. This non-invasive and physiological procedure requires a standard gamma camera with computing facilities and was performed as an outpatient routine. It proved very effective for the detection of gastro-oesophageal reflux and aspiration of refluxed liquid in patients of all ages but especially in neonates. The relevance of these scintigraphic results to oesophagitis, repeated respiratory problems, cyanotic and apnoeic spells and alternative methods of investigation is described. (orig.)

  11. 96 Week Follow-Up of HIV-Infected Patients in Rescue with Raltegravir Plus Optimized Backbone Regimens: A Multicentre Italian Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Capetti, Amedeo; Landonio, Simona; Meraviglia, Paola; Di Biagio, Antonio; Lo Caputo, Sergio; Sterrantino, Gaetana; Ammassari, Adriana; Menzaghi, Barbara; Franzetti, Marco; De Socio, Giuseppe Vittorio; Pellicanò, Giovanni; Mazzotta, Elena; Soria, Alessandro; Meschiari, Marianna; Trezzi, Michele

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long term efficacy of raltegravir (RAL)-including regimens in highly pre-treated HIV-1-infected patients has been demonstrated in registration trials. However, few studies have assessed durability in routine clinical settings. METHODS: Antiretroviral treatment-experienced patients initiating a RAL-containing salvage regimen were enrolled. Routine clinical and laboratory follow-up was performed at baseline, week 4, 12, and every 12 weeks thereafter. Data were censored at week 96. R...

  12. Study of dosimetric quantities applied to patient undergoing routine chest examinations by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzaga, Natalia Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    The radiological protection system has established a standard to protect persons against the harmful effects caused by ionizing radiation that is based on the justification, optimization and dose limitation principles. The increasing use of radiation in medicine and the related risks have stressed the discussion on patient radiation protection. The computed tomography (CT) is the diagnostic radiology technique that most contributes to patient doses and it requires optimization efforts. Diagnostic reference levels (DRL) has been established in many countries in terms of CT dosimetric quantities; in Brazil, the DRLs are still under investigation since the culture of patient protection is not very strong yet. The objective of this work was to investigate the dosimetric and protection quantities related to patients undergoing CT routine chest examinations. The ImPACT CT, CT Expo and ImpactDose softwares were used for calculations of the weight and volumetric air-kerma indexes (CW and CVOL), the air kerma - length product (P K,L ), organ equivalent dose (H T ) and the effective dose (E) for CT routine chest protocols in 19 tomographs in Belo Horizonte city. The CT Expo was selected to be validated against experimental measurements in three hospitals with thermoluminescent dosimeters and CT pencil ionization chamber in anthropomorphic and standard CT body phantoms. Experimental and calculated results indicated differences up to 97% for H T and E and acceptable agreement for C W ,C VOL and P K,L . All data from 19 tomographs showed that local DRLs for CT routine chest examinations may be chosen smaller than DRLs adopted in other countries; this would contribute to increase the radiological protection of patients. (author)

  13. Barium swallow study in routine clinical practice: a prospective study in patients with chronic cough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Shuler Nin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the routine use of barium swallow study in patients with chronic cough.METHODS: Between October of 2011 and March of 2012, 95 consecutive patients submitted to chest X-ray due to chronic cough (duration > 8 weeks were included in the study. For study purposes, additional images were obtained immediately after the oral administration of 5 mL of a 5% barium sulfate suspension. Two radiologists systematically evaluated all of the images in order to identify any pathological changes. Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test for categorical data were used in the comparisons.RESULTS: The images taken immediately after barium swallow revealed significant pathological conditions that were potentially related to chronic cough in 12 (12.6% of the 95 patients. These conditions, which included diaphragmatic hiatal hernia, esophageal neoplasm, achalasia, esophageal diverticulum, and abnormal esophageal dilatation, were not detected on the images taken without contrast. After appropriate treatment, the symptoms disappeared in 11 (91.6% of the patients, whereas the treatment was ineffective in 1 (8.4%. We observed no complications related to barium swallow, such as contrast aspiration.CONCLUSIONS: Barium swallow improved the detection of significant radiographic findings related to chronic cough in 11.5% of patients. These initial findings suggest that the routine use of barium swallow can significantly increase the sensitivity of chest X-rays in the detection of chronic cough-related etiologies.

  14. Barium swallow study in routine clinical practice: a prospective study in patients with chronic cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nin, Carlos Shuler; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Paludo, Artur de Oliveira; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Hochhegger, Daniela Reis; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    To assess the routine use of barium swallow study in patients with chronic cough. Between October of 2011 and March of 2012, 95 consecutive patients submitted to chest X-ray due to chronic cough (duration > 8 weeks) were included in the study. For study purposes, additional images were obtained immediately after the oral administration of 5 mL of a 5% barium sulfate suspension. Two radiologists systematically evaluated all of the images in order to identify any pathological changes. Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test for categorical data were used in the comparisons. The images taken immediately after barium swallow revealed significant pathological conditions that were potentially related to chronic cough in 12 (12.6%) of the 95 patients. These conditions, which included diaphragmatic hiatal hernia, esophageal neoplasm, achalasia, esophageal diverticulum, and abnormal esophageal dilatation, were not detected on the images taken without contrast. After appropriate treatment, the symptoms disappeared in 11 (91.6%) of the patients, whereas the treatment was ineffective in 1 (8.4%). We observed no complications related to barium swallow, such as contrast aspiration. Barium swallow improved the detection of significant radiographic findings related to chronic cough in 11.5% of patients. These initial findings suggest that the routine use of barium swallow can significantly increase the sensitivity of chest X-rays in the detection of chronic cough-related etiologies.

  15. HIV positive patient with GBS-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Samantha J; Black, Heather; Thomson, Emma C; Gunson, Rory N

    2017-08-01

    Introduction. Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) is an acute demyelinating polyneuropathy which can occur post-infection. Criteria of diagnosis of GBS include areflexia with progressive bilateral weakness in arms and legs. GBS can lead to severe respiratory and cardiac complications. The fatality rate can be up to 5 % in patients, depending on the severity of the symptoms. HIV can cause a range of neurological disorders including, on rare occasions, GBS. GBS can occur at any stage of HIV infection, highlighting the complexity of diagnosis of GBS within HIV patients. Case presentation. A 57 year old female with lumbar back pain radiating to the legs, poor mobility and tiredness, with reports of a viral-like illness four days previously, was initially diagnosed with a lower respiratory tract infection and discharged. Seventeen days later the patient was readmitted to hospital with progressive lower and upper limb weakness, areflexia and sensory loss. She was diagnosed with GBS and was unexpectedly discovered to be HIV-positive. HIV avidity was low indicating a recently acquired HIV infection. The patient was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin for five days for the GBS and commenced antriretrovirals for HIV. The patient was discharge from hospital 53 days after admission with walking aids and regular physiotherapy follow-up. . This case highlighted the need for all clinicians to be aware that patients with symptoms of GBS, regardless of clinical history should be offered an HIV test. GBS can be the first sign a patient is HIV-positive.

  16. Neuropsychological performance in patients with asymptomatic HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Banfi, Martha; Vélez, Jorge I; Perea, M Victoria; García, Ricardo; Puentes-Rozo, Pedro J; Mebarak Chams, Moises; Ladera, Valentina

    2018-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) lead to neurocognitive disorders; however, there is still much knowledge to be gained regarding HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. The purpose of this study was to assess the cognitive performance, instrumental activities of daily living, depression, and anxiety in patients with asymptomatic HIV-1 infections compared with seronegative participants without neurocognitive impairment. We studied a sample consisted of 60 patients with asymptomatic HIV-1 infections and 60 seronegative participants without neurocognitive impairment from the city of Barranquilla, Colombia, with a mean age of 36.07 years. A protocol of neuropsychological and psychopathological tests was applied to the participants. The group of patients with asymptomatic HIV infections significantly underperformed on tasks that assessed global cognitive screening, attention span, learning, phonemic verbal fluency, auditory-verbal comprehension, information processing speed, cognitive flexibility, and motor skills compared to the group of seronegative participants. No significant differences were found in memory, visual confrontation naming, vocabulary, inhibition, and instrumental activities of daily living. Additionally, the patients with asymptomatic HIV-1 infection had a higher anxiety index than the seronegative participants, but no significant difference was found in depression. A correlation was found between depression and anxiety. In conclusion, the patients with asymptomatic HIV-1 infection had lower cognitive performances than the seronegative participants in the cognitive functions mentioned above and more anxiety but still performed the instrumental activities of daily living.

  17. HIV-infected mental health patients: characteristics and comparison with HIV-infected patients from the general population and non-infected mental health patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schadé Annemiek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives HIV-infected patients are at increased risk of developing mental health symptoms, which negatively influence the treatment of the HIV-infection. Mental health problems in HIV-infected patients may affect public health. Psychopathology, including depression and substance abuse, can increase hazardous sexual behaviour and, with it, the chance of spreading HIV. Therefore, it is important to develop an optimal treatment plan for HIV-infected patients with mental health problems. The majority of HIV-infected patients in the Netherlands (almost 60% are homosexual men. The main objectives of this study were to describe the clinical and demographic characteristics of patients with HIV who seek treatment for their mental health symptoms in the Netherlands. Secondly, we tested whether HIV infected and non-infected homosexual patients with a lifetime depressive disorder differed on several mental health symptoms. Methods We compared a cohort of 196 patients who visited the outpatient clinic for HIV and Mental Health with HIV-infected patients in the general population in Amsterdam (ATHENA-study and with non-HIV infected mental health patients (NESDA-study. DSM-IV diagnoses were determined, and several self-report questionnaires were used to assess mental health symptoms. Results Depressive disorders were the most commonly occurring diagnoses in the cohort and frequent drug use was common. HIV-infected homosexual men with a depressive disorder showed no difference in depressive symptoms or sleep disturbance, compared with non-infected depressive men. However, HIV-positive patients did express more symptoms like fear, anger and guilt. Although they showed significantly more suicidal ideation, suicide attempts were not more prevalent among HIV-infected patients. Finally, the HIV-infected depressive patients displayed a considerably higher level of drug use than the HIV-negative group. Conclusion Habitual drug use is a risk factor for

  18. HIV testing and burden of HIV infection in black cancer patients in Johannesburg, South Africa: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengayi, Mazvita; Babb, Chantal; Egger, Matthias; Urban, Margaret I

    2015-03-18

    HIV infection is a known risk factor for cancer but little is known about HIV testing patterns and the burden of HIV infection in cancer patients. We did a cross-sectional analysis to identify predictors of prior HIV testing and to quantify the burden of HIV in black cancer patients in Johannesburg, South Africa. The Johannesburg Cancer Case-control Study (JCCCS) recruits newly-diagnosed black cancer patients attending public referral hospitals for oncology and radiation therapy in Johannesburg . All adult cancer patients enrolled into the JCCCS from November 2004 to December 2009 and interviewed on previous HIV testing were included in the analysis. Patients were independently tested for HIV-1 using a single ELISA test . The prevalence of prior HIV testing, of HIV infection and of undiagnosed HIV infection was calculated. Multivariate logistic regression models were fitted to identify factors associated with prior HIV testing. A total of 5436 cancer patients were tested for HIV of whom 1833[33.7% (95% CI=32.5-35.0)] were HIV-positive. Three-quarters of patients (4092 patients) had ever been tested for HIV. The total prevalence of undiagnosed HIV infection was 11.5% (10.7-12.4) with 34% (32.0-36.3) of the 1833 patients who tested HIV-positive unaware of their infection. Men >49 years [OR 0.49(0.39-0.63)] and those residing in rural areas [OR 0.61(0.39-0.97)] were less likely to have been previously tested for HIV. Men with at least a secondary education [OR 1.79(1.11-2.90)] and those interviewed in recent years [OR 4.13(2.62 - 6.52)] were likely to have prior testing. Women >49 years [OR 0.33(0.27-0.41)] were less likely to have been previously tested for HIV. In women, having children associated with previous HIV testing. In a study of newly diagnosed black cancer patients in Johannesburg, over a third of HIV-positive patients were unaware of their HIV status. In South Africa black cancer patients should be targeted for opt-out HIV testing.

  19. Profile of the HIV epidemic in Cape Verde: molecular epidemiology and drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected patients from distinct islands of the archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pina-Araujo, Isabel Inês M; Guimarães, Monick L; Bello, Gonzalo; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Morgado, Mariza G

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 have been detected in Cape Verde since 1987, but little is known regarding the genetic diversity of these viruses in this archipelago, located near the West African coast. In this study, we characterized the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 and HIV-2 and described the occurrence of drug resistance mutations (DRM) among antiretroviral therapy naïve (ARTn) patients and patients under treatment (ARTexp) from different Cape Verde islands. Blood samples, socio-demographic and clinical-laboratory data were obtained from 221 HIV-positive individuals during 2010-2011. Phylogenetic and bootscan analyses of the pol region (1300 bp) were performed for viral subtyping. HIV-1 and HIV-2 DRM were evaluated for ARTn and ARTexp patients using the Stanford HIV Database and HIV-GRADE e.V. Algorithm Homepage, respectively. Among the 221 patients (169 [76.5%] HIV-1, 43 [19.5%] HIV-2 and 9 [4.1%] HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infections), 67% were female. The median ages were 34 (IQR = 1-75) and 47 (IQR = 12-84) for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively. HIV-1 infections were due to subtypes G (36.6%), CRF02_AG (30.6%), F1 (9.7%), URFs (10.4%), B (5.2%), CRF05_DF (3.0%), C (2.2%), CRF06_cpx (0.7%), CRF25_cpx (0.7%) and CRF49_cpx (0.7%), whereas all HIV-2 infections belonged to group A. Transmitted DRM (TDRM) was observed in 3.4% (2/58) of ARTn HIV-1-infected patients (1.7% NRTI, 1.7% NNRTI), but not among those with HIV-2. Among ARTexp patients, DRM was observed in 47.8% (33/69) of HIV-1 (37.7% NRTI, 37.7% NNRTI, 7.4% PI, 33.3% for two classes) and 17.6% (3/17) of HIV-2-infections (17.6% NRTI, 11.8% PI, 11.8% both). This study indicates that Cape Verde has a complex and unique HIV-1 molecular epidemiological scenario dominated by HIV-1 subtypes G, CRF02_AG and F1 and HIV-2 subtype A. The occurrence of TDRM and the relatively high level of DRM among treated patients are of concern. Continuous monitoring of patients on ART, including genotyping, are public policies to be implemented.

  20. Changes in Liver Function Enzymes of HIV/AIDS Patients Treated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    on liver enzyme markers (Aspartate aminotransferase, Alanine aminotransferase ... the diagnosis and advanced infection of the liver cells by HIV. ... recommended guideline for the treatment of HIV ... HIV-positive patients not on treatment and.

  1. Predictors of dropout from care among HIV-infected patients initiating antiretroviral therapy at a public sector HIV treatment clinic in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiimwe, Stephen B; Kanyesigye, Michael; Bwana, Bosco; Okello, Samson; Muyindike, Winnie

    2016-02-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), antiretroviral therapy (ART) can prolong life for HIV-infected patients. However, patients initiating ART, especially in routine treatment programs, commonly dropout from care either due to death or loss to follow-up. In a cohort of HIV-infected patients initiating ART at a public sector clinic in Uganda, we assessed predictors of dropout from care (a composite outcome combining death and loss to follow-up). From a large set of socio-demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables routinely collected at ART initiation, we selected those predicting dropout at P dropout at P dropout was 26.9% (established cumulative mortality = 2.3%, loss to follow-up = 24.6%), 5.6% were transferred to other service providers, and 67.5% were retained in care. A diagnosis of Kaposi's sarcoma (hazard ratio (HR) = 3.3, 95% CI 2.5 to 4.5); HIV-associated dementia (HR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.5 to 4.6); history of cryptococcosis (HR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.4 to 3.3); and reduced hemoglobin concentration (dropout. Other independent predictors of dropout were: year of ART initiation; weight loss ≥10%; reduced total lymphocyte count; chronic diarrhea; male sex; young age (≤28 years); and marital status. Among HIV-infected patients initiating ART at a public sector clinic in SSA, biological factors that usually predict death were especially predictive of dropout. As most of the dropouts were lost to follow-up, this observation suggests that many losses to follow-up may have died. Future studies are needed to identify appropriate interventions that may improve both individual-level patient outcomes and outcome ascertainment among HIV-infected ART initiators in this setting.

  2. Pneumococcal pneumonia: clinical features, diagnosis and management in HIV-infected and HIV noninfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Giordano; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Pirina, Pietro; Mura, Maria Stella

    2009-05-01

    In this review, we focus on the clinical features, diagnosis and management of pneumococcal pneumonia in HIV-infected and noninfected patients, with particular attention to the most recent advances in this area. Classical clinical features are found in young adults, whereas atypical forms occur in immunocompromised patients including HIV-infected individuals. Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia is more frequently observed in HIV-infected and also in low-risk patients, according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). Pneumococcal pneumonia diagnostic process includes physical examination, radiologic findings and microbiologic diagnosis. However, etiologic diagnosis using traditional culture methods is difficult to obtain. In this setting, urinary antigen test, which recognizes Streptococcus pneumoniae cell wall C-polysaccharide, increases the probability of etiologic diagnosis. A correct management approach is crucial in reducing pneumococcal pneumonia mortality. The use of the PSI helps clinicians in deciding between inpatient and outpatient management in immunocompetent individuals, according to Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)-American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines. Recent findings support PSI utility also in HIV-infected patients. Recently, efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine in reducing pneumococcal disease incidence has been evidenced in both HIV-infected and noninfected individuals. Rapid diagnosis and correct management together with implementation of preventive measures are crucial in order to reduce pneumococcal pneumonia related incidence and mortality in HIV-infected and noninfected patients.

  3. Biomarker evidence of axonal injury in neuroasymptomatic HIV-1 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Jessen Krut

    Full Text Available Prevalence of neurocognitive impairment in HIV-1 infected patients is reported to be high. Whether this is a result of active HIV-related neurodegeneration is unclear. We examined axonal injury in HIV-1 patients by measuring the light subunit of neurofilament protein (NFL in CSF with a novel, sensitive method.With a cross-sectional design, CSF concentrations of neurofilament protein light (NFL (marker of neuronal injury, neopterin (intrathecal immunoactivation and CSF/Plasma albumin ratio (blood-brain barrier integrity were analyzed on CSF from 252 HIV-infected patients, subdivided into untreated neuroasymptomatics (n = 200, HIV-associated dementia (HAD (n = 14 and on combinations antiretroviral treatment (cART (n = 85, and healthy controls (n = 204. 46 HIV-infected patients were included in both treated and untreated groups, but sampled at different timepoints. Furthermore, 78 neuroasymptomatic patients were analyzed before and after treatment initiation.While HAD patients had the highest NFL concentrations, elevated CSF NFL was also found in 33% of untreated neuroasymptomatic patients, mainly in those with blood CD4+ cell counts below 250 cells/μL. CSF NFL concentrations in the untreated neuroasymptomatics and treated groups were equivalent to controls 18.5 and 3.9 years older, respectively. Neopterin correlated with NFL levels in untreated groups while the albumin ratio correlated with NFL in both untreated and treated groups.Increased CSF NFL indicates ongoing axonal injury in many neuroasymptomatic patients. Treatment decreases NFL, but treated patients retain higher levels than controls, indicating either continued virus-related injury or an aging-like effect of HIV infection. NFL correlates with neopterin and albumin ratio, suggesting an association between axonal injury, neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier permeability. NFL appears to be a sensitive biomarker of subclinical and clinical brain injury in HIV and warrants further

  4. Chronic diarrhoea in HIV patients: Prevalence of coccidian parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites in HIV patients with or without diarrhoea and to see an association between diarrhoea and the coccidian parasites in our setting. Stool samples from 113 HIV patients, 34 chronic diarrhoea and 79 without any history of diarrhoea were collected and examined for enteric parasites by microscopy. One hundred and thirteen control samples from HIV negative patients complaining of prolonged diarrhoea were also collected and analysed. Prevalence of coccidian parasites in HIV and non-HIV patients; with and without diarrhoea was compared using chi-square tests. Enteric parasites were detected in 55.8% HIV patients with diarrhoea compared to 16.4% in patients without diarrhoea ( P < 0.001. Isospora belli was found in 41.1% (14/34 of chronic diarrhoea and 6.3% (5/79 in non-diarrhoeal cases ( P < 0.001. Cryptosporidium was detected in 20.6% (7/34 of chronic diarrhoea and 2.5% (2/79 in non-diarrhoeal cases ( P < 0.01. Cyclospora cayetanensis associated diarrhoea was detected in only one case of chronic diarrhoea (2.9%. CD4+ T-cell count was lower (180 cells/μl0 in diarrhoeal HIV patients as compared to non-diarrhoeal patients. Coccidian parasites were seen at a mean CD4+ T-cell count of 186.3 cells/μL. This study concluded that Isospora belli was the predominant parasite followed by Cryptosporidium spp. and both were strongly associated with diarrhoea among HIV patients.

  5. Improved quality of patient care through routine second review of histopathology specimens prior to multidisciplinary meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers, Chantal C H J; Burger, Gerard; Al-Janabi, Shaimaa; Willems, Stefan M; van Diest, Paul J; Jiwa, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    Double reading may be a valuable tool for improving quality of patient care by identifying diagnostic errors before final sign-out, but standard double reading would significantly increase costs of pathology. We assessed the added value of intradepartmental routine double reading of histopathology specimens prior to multidisciplinary meetings. Diagnoses, treatment plans and prognoses of patients are often discussed at multidisciplinary meetings. As part of the daily routine, all pathology specimens to be discussed at upcoming multidisciplinary meetings undergo prior intradepartmental double reading. We identified all histopathology specimens from 2013 that underwent such double reading and determined major and minor discordance rates based on clinical relevance between the initial and consensus sign-out diagnoses. We included 6796 histopathology specimens that underwent double reading, representing approximately 8% of all histopathology cases at our institution in 2013. Double reading diagnoses were concordant in 6566 specimens (96.6%). Major and minor discordances were observed in 60 (0.9%) and 170 (2.5%) specimens, respectively. Urology specimens had significantly more discordances than other tissues of origin, Gleason grading of prostate cancer biopsies being the most frequent diagnostic problem. Furthermore, premalignant and malignant cases showed significantly higher discordance rates than the rest. The vast majority (90%) of discordances represented changes within the same diagnostic category (eg, malignant to malignant). Routine double reading of histopathology specimens prior to multidisciplinary meetings prevents diagnostic errors. It resulted in about 1% discordant diagnoses of potential clinical significance, indicating that second review is worthwhile in terms of patient safety and quality of patient care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Routine viral load monitoring in HIV-infected infants and children in low- and middle-income countries: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpadi, Stephen M; Shiau, Stephanie; De Gusmao, Eduarda Pimentel; Violari, Avy

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this commentary is to review considerations for implementing routine viral load (VL) monitoring programmes for HIV-infected infants and children living in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Since 2013, the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines recommend VL testing as the preferred monitoring approach for all individuals treated with ART in order to assess treatment response, detect treatment failure and determine the need to switch to a second-line regimen in a timely manner. More recently, WHO guidelines from 2016 identify HIV-infected infants and children as a priority group for routine VL monitoring. There are a number of reasons why HIV-infected infants and children should be prioritized for routine VL monitoring. Data from national VL monitoring programmes as well as systematic reviews and meta-analyses from LMIC indicate rates of viral suppression are lower for infants and children compared to adults. The number of antiretroviral drugs and palatable formulations suitable for young children are limited. In addition, emotional and developmental issues particular to children can make daily medication administration difficult and pose a challenge to adherence and achievement of sustained viral suppression. VL monitoring can be instrumental for identifying those in need of additional adherence support, reducing regimen switches and preserving treatment options. The needs of infants and children warrant consideration in all aspects of VL monitoring services. If capacity for paediatric venipuncture is not assured, platforms that accept dried blood spot specimens are necessary in order for infants and children to have equitable access. Healthcare systems also need to prepare to manage the substantial number of infants and children identified with elevated VL, including adherence interventions that are appropriate for children. Establishing robust systems to evaluate processes and outcomes of routine VL monitoring services and to support

  7. Do health care providers discuss HIV with older female patients?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-08

    Mar 8, 2010 ... as vaginal dryness and thinning, increase the risk of HIV infection through tears and abrasions during unprotected sex. .... size was required to obtain a two-sided 95% confidence .... patients about safer sex and disclosure?

  8. Kaposi’s sarcoma in an HIV-negative patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Georgina Garcia Lahera

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma is a vascular tumour of the skin, most frequently seen in men over 50 years of age, of long-term progress and low mortality. It is related to the infection caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; it appears in the advanced stages of the disease and with immunosuppression, affecting approximately 20 % of the people with HIV who do not take antiretroviral drugs. This is a case of an urban female patient who did not have a history of disease and who began to have squamous erythematous lesions on the right foot and on the thighs. A skin biopsy was performed and the patient was diagnosed with a Kaposi’s sarcoma. The patient was HIV-negative. This case is presented as it is a rare condition in an HIV-negative patient.

  9. 17 Smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis among HIV patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conducted in February 2009 to assess the effect of the level of CD4 lymphocyte ... development of smear positive pulmonary TB (PTB) among HIV patients before ..... (2000) Impact of combination antiretroviral therapy on the risk of tuberculosis.

  10. Community Based Organizations in HIV/AIDS Prevention, Patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community Based Organizations in HIV/AIDS Prevention, Patient. ... behavioral change communication methods that may contribute significantly to overcoming ... Towards that objective, CBOs need both internal strengthening of programs and ...

  11. Bone scanning as a routine examination of patients with mammary carcinoma; a critical consideration. [Preoperative scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heslinga, J M; Pauwels, E K.J.; Zwaveling, A [Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis

    1982-06-05

    The usefulness of bone scanning as a routine examination was evaluated in 136 female patients with mammary carcinoma of whom 81 were staged as Columbia A and 55 as Columbia B/C. The preoperative bone scanning was positive in only 4 patients (2.9%). Consequently, bone scanning is no longer performed in the authors clinic for the preoperative detection of skeletal metastases. Bone scanning as a routine examination at 6-month intervals does not appear to be useful for the first 4 years of the follow-up, either. Most of the patients with a positive bone scan displayed other signs of skeletal metastases at the same time, such as ostealgia and a raised serum alkaline phosphatase level. Further increase of the frequency of bone scanning during the follow-up period would increase the costs considerably, almost prohibitively, even apart from the question whether such a measure might indeed significantly influence the patient's prognosis. The authors conclude that bone scanning should only be performed on the basis of the anamnesis, physical and laboratory findings, both prior to operation and during the follow-up period.

  12. Bone scanning as a routine examination of patients with mammary carcinoma; a critical consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heslinga, J.M.; Pauwels, E.K.J.; Zwaveling, A.

    1982-01-01

    The usefulness of bone scanning as a routine examination was evaluated in 136 female patients with mammary carcinoma of whom 81 were staged as Columbia A and 55 as Columbia B/C. The preoperative bone scanning was positive in only 4 patients (2.9%). Consequently, bone scanning is no longer performed in the authors clinic for the preoperative detection of skeletal metastases. Bone scanning as a routine examination at 6-month intervals does not appear to be useful for the first 4 years of the follow-up, either. Most of the patients with a positive bone scan displayed other signs of skeletal metastases at the same time, such as ostealgia and a raised serum alkaline phosphatase level. Further increase of the frequency of bone scanning during the follow-up period would increase the costs considerably, almost prohibitively, even apart from the question whether such a measure might indeed significantly influence the patient's prognosis. The authors conclude that bone scanning should only be performed on the basis of the anamnesis, physical and laboratory findings, both prior to operation and during the follow-up period. (Auth.)

  13. Routine Urine Culture at the Time of Percutaneous Urinary Drainage: Does Every Patient Need One?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brody, L.A.; Brown, K.T.; Covey, A.M.; Brown, A.E.; Getrajdman, G.I.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the clinical variables associated with bacteriuria in patients undergoing primary percutaneous antegrade urinary drainage procedures in order to predict the utility of routinely obtaining urine cultures at the time of the procedure. Methods. Between October 1995 and March 1998 urine cultures were prospectively obtained in all patients undergoing a primary percutaneous antegrade urinary drainage procedure. One hundred and eighty-seven patients underwent 264 procedures. Results were available in 252 cases. Culture results were correlated with clinical, laboratory, and demographic variables. Anaerobic cultures were not uniformly performed. Results. Urine cultures were positive in 24 of 252 (9.5%) cases. An indwelling or recently removed ipsilateral device (catheter or stent) and a history of previous cystectomy with urinary diversion were significant predictors of a positive culture. Patients without either of these predictors, and without clinical or laboratory evidence of infection, were rarely found to have positive cultures. Conclusion. The likelihood of a positive urine culture can be predicted on the basis of the aforementioned clinical variables. In the absence of these clinical indicators routine urine cultures are neither useful nor cost-effective

  14. Assessing barriers to adherence in routine clinical care for pediatric kidney transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnell, Charles D; Rich, Kristin L; Nichols, Melissa; Dahale, Devesh; Goebel, Jens W; Pai, Ahna L H; Hooper, David K; Modi, Avani C

    2017-11-01

    Patient-identified barriers to immunosuppressive medications are associated with poor adherence and negative clinical outcomes in transplant patients. Assessment of adherence barriers is not part of routine post-transplant care, and studies regarding implementing such a process in a reliable way are lacking. Using the Model for Improvement and PDSA cycles, we implemented a system to identify adherence barriers, including patient-centered design of a barriers assessment tool, identification of eligible patients, clear roles for clinic staff, and creating a culture of non-judgmental discussion around adherence. We performed time-series analysis of our process measure. Secondary analyses examined the endorsement and concordance of adherence barriers between patient-caregiver dyads. After three methods of testing, the most reliable delivery system was an EHR-integrated tablet that alerted staff of patient eligibility for assessment. Barriers were endorsed by 35% of caregivers (n=85) and 43% of patients (n=60). The most frequently patient-endorsed barriers were forgetting, poor taste, and side effects. Caregivers endorsed forgetting and side effects. Concordance between patient-caregiver dyads was fair (k=0.299). Standardized adherence barriers assessment is feasible in the clinical care of pediatric kidney transplant patients. Features necessary for success included automation, redundant systems with designated staff to identify and mitigate failures, aligned reporting structures, and reliable measurement approaches. Future studies will examine whether barriers predict clinical outcomes (eg, organ rejection, graft loss). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Use of traditional complementary and alternative medicine for HIV patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Preez, Natalie Friend-du; Ramlagan, Shandir; Fomundam, Henry

    2008-07-24

    Traditional medicine use has been reported is common among individuals with moderate and advanced HIV disease. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the use of Traditional Complementary and Alternative Medicine (TCAM) for HIV patients prior to initiating antiretroviral therapy in three public hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Using systematic sampling, 618 HIV-positive patients were selected from outpatient departments from three hospitals and interviewed with a questionnaire. TCAM was commonly used for HIV in the past six months by study participants (317, 51.3%) and herbal therapies alone (183, 29.6%). The use of micronutrients (42.9%) was excluded from TCAM since mostly vitamins were provided by the health facility. Herbal therapies were the most expensive, costing on average 128 Rand (US$16) per patient per month. Most participants (90%) indicated that their health care provider was not aware that they were taking herbal therapies for HIV (90%). Herbal therapies were mainly used for pain relief (87.1%) and spiritual practices or prayer for stress relief (77.6%). Multivariate logistic regression with use of herbs for HIV as the dependent variable identified being on a disability grant and fewer clinic visits to be associated with use of herbs, and TCAM use for HIV identified being on a disability grant, number of HIV symptoms and family members not contributing to main source of household income to be associated with TCAM use. Traditional herbal therapies and TCAM are commonly used by HIV treatment naïve outpatients of public health facilities in South Africa. Health care providers should routinely screen patients on TCAM use when initiating ART and also during follow-up and monitoring keeping in mind that these patients may not fully disclose other therapies.

  16. Use of traditional complementary and alternative medicine for HIV patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramlagan Shandir

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional medicine use has been reported is common among individuals with moderate and advanced HIV disease. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the use of Traditional Complementary and Alternative Medicine (TCAM for HIV patients prior to initiating antiretroviral therapy in three public hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods Using systematic sampling, 618 HIV-positive patients were selected from outpatient departments from three hospitals and interviewed with a questionnaire. Results TCAM was commonly used for HIV in the past six months by study participants (317, 51.3% and herbal therapies alone (183, 29.6%. The use of micronutrients (42.9% was excluded from TCAM since mostly vitamins were provided by the health facility. Herbal therapies were the most expensive, costing on average 128 Rand (US$16 per patient per month. Most participants (90% indicated that their health care provider was not aware that they were taking herbal therapies for HIV (90%. Herbal therapies were mainly used for pain relief (87.1% and spiritual practices or prayer for stress relief (77.6%. Multivariate logistic regression with use of herbs for HIV as the dependent variable identified being on a disability grant and fewer clinic visits to be associated with use of herbs, and TCAM use for HIV identified being on a disability grant, number of HIV symptoms and family members not contributing to main source of household income to be associated with TCAM use. Conclusion Traditional herbal therapies and TCAM are commonly used by HIV treatment naïve outpatients of public health facilities in South Africa. Health care providers should routinely screen patients on TCAM use when initiating ART and also during follow-up and monitoring keeping in mind that these patients may not fully disclose other therapies.

  17. Patient decision aids in routine maternity care: Benefits, barriers, and new opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Gabrielle; Thompson, Rachel; Watson, Bernadette; Miller, Yvette D

    2016-02-01

    Participation in decision-making, supported by comprehensive and quality information provision, is increasingly emphasised as a priority for women in maternity care. Patient decision aids are tools that can offer women greater access to information and guidance to participate in maternity care decision-making. Relative to their evaluation in controlled settings, the implementation of patient decision aids in routine maternity care has received little attention and our understanding of which approaches may be effective is limited. This paper critically discusses the application of patient decision aids in routine maternity care and explores viable solutions for promoting their successful uptake. A range of patient decision aids have been developed for use within maternity care, and controlled trials have highlighted their positive impact on the decision-making process for women. Nevertheless, evidence of successful patient decision aid implementation in real world health care settings is lacking due to practical and ideological barriers that exist. Patient-directed social marketing campaigns are a relatively novel approach to patient decision aid delivery that may facilitate their adoption in maternity care, at least in the short-term, by overcoming common implementation barriers. Social marketing may also be particularly well suited to maternity care, given the unique characteristics of this health context. The potential of social marketing campaigns to facilitate patient decision aid adoption in maternity care highlights the need for pragmatic trials to evaluate their effectiveness. Identifying which sub-groups of women are more or less likely to respond to these strategies will further direct implementation. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTICS OF TUBERCULOSIS AND MYCOBACTERIOSIS IN HIV PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Panteleev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the differences in clinical and laboratory manifestations of tuberculosis and mycobacteriosis in HIV patients. It was found out that mycobacteriosis developed mostly in the socially well patients at the advanced stages of HIV infection. In case of mycobacteriosis, lesions were mostly located in the abdomen with limited inflammation in the chest, while in case of tuberculosis pulmonary lesions dominated. A negative result of sputum PCR assays for tuberculosis mycobacteria with a positive result of the test for AFB is an important sign for differential diagnostics. The obtained results allow performing differential diagnostics of these diseases in those HIV infected.

  19. HIV-related symptoms and patient clusters among Chileans living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, A X; Norr, K F; Pérez, C M; Levy, J A; Park, C G; Kim, M J

    2013-01-01

    Identifying both Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related and co-morbid symptoms experienced by people living with HIV (PLWH) who are receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment is a major challenge for healthcare providers globally. Yet, little research to date has examined the symptoms of illness experienced by PLWH including patients living in Central and South American. To address this gap, this study was designed to identify symptoms of HIV by socio-demographic and/or clinical characteristics among Chilean patients living with the virus. A convenience sample of 209 Chilean PLWH was recruited from an outpatient clinic in Santiago, Chile. A structured interview was used to elicit socio-demographic information and HIV symptoms status. Additional clinical information was obtained through a review of the participants' medical records. Results show that patients' most commonly reported HIV-related symptoms were fear/worries (66%), anxiety (52%), gas/bloating (50%), and thirst (50%). Multivariate analysis revealed a positive association between the number of reported HIV-related symptoms and number of years living with HIV. Having completed college was negatively associated with number of symptoms. Latent class analysis indicated that PLWH in the sample who had completed college were two times more likely to experience a mild intensity of HIV-related symptoms than their lesser educated counterparts. Similarly, logistic regression revealed that college-educated PLWH were twice as likely to be classified in the subgroup reporting mild intensity of symptoms than those who lacked a college degree. Overall, the study's results reveal that many Chilean PLWH, even those with high CD4 counts and low or undetectable viral loads, are not symptom free. The findings point to the need for clinicians to tailor a plan of care for individuals living with HIV that is based on their symptomatology.

  20. Lipid Profile of Anti Retroviral Treatment Naive HIV Infected Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hypercholesterolemia [22.4% (22/98) vs. 10.4% (11/106), P = 0.02]. Lower HDL.C was associated with CD4+ cell count < 200 cells/ƒÊL (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Lipid abnormalities are common in treatment.naive HIV.infected patients even in the absence of major host.related risk factors for dyslipidemia. HIV.infected patients ...

  1. [Renal transplantation in HIV-infected patients in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuecos, A; Pascual, J; Gómez, E; Sola, E; Cofán, F; López, F; Puig-Hooper, C E; Baltar, J M; González-Molina, M; Oppenheimer, F; Marcén, R; Rivero, M

    2006-01-01

    HIV infection has experienced dramatic improvement in morbidity and mortality with the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). This prompted a reevaluation of organ-solid transplantation as a treatment option for HIV-infected patients. Some trials in the United States have shown that one- and 2-year graft and patient survival is comparable to HIV-negative transplant population. In Europe the experience is still scarce. The aim of this study is to analyse the outcome and the clinical characteristics of HIV-infected patients who received kidney transplantation in Spain in the HAART era. Ten patients were transplanted in our country since 2001. Only one patient was black. The main cause of end-stage renal disease reported was glomerulonephritis. Six of the recipients were coinfected by hepatitis C virus. Inclusion criteria included undetectable HIV viral load and CD4 counts greater than 200/pL. Immunosuppression consisted of steroids, tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil, with antibody induction in 4 cases. The median and mean follow-up was 11 and 16.3+/-15.6 (3-46) months, respectively. One recipient lost his graft because of early renal venous thrombosis. The remaining patients are functioning graft with mean serum creatinina level of 1.5 +/- 0.5 mg/dl. Biopsy-proven acute rejection was diagnosed in 4 recipients and was reversed in all cases with antirejection treatment. The plasma HIV RNA levels have remained controlled and CD4 counts have been stable in excess of 200 cell/microL. None of patients have developed AIDS complications. Recipients receiving protease inhibitor-based HAART regimens required significant dosing modification to maintain appropriate tacrolimus levels. Our results show that renal transplantation can be a safe and effective treatment in select HIV-infected patients. Like other series, the acute rejection rate was higher than in non-HIV recipients. The reasons of this rejection incidence remain unknown.

  2. Liver stiffness is not associated with short- and long-term plasma HIV RNA replication in immunocompetent patients with HIV infection and with HIV/HCV coinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Saverio Giuseppe; Basso, Monica; Mengoli, Carlo; Scaggiante, Renzo; Andreis, Samantha; Franzetti, Marzia Maria; Cattelan, Anna Maria; Zago, Daniela; Cruciani, Mario; Andreoni, Massimo; Piovesan, Sara; Palù, Giorgio; Alberti, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may be directly responsible for liver damage but there are contrasting data regarding the influence of detectable plasma viremia. We analyzed the influence of plasma HIV RNA (pHIV) detectability and of other clinical and viro-immunological variables on liver stiffness (LS) measurement in adult immunocompetent HIV-monoinfected patients and in patients coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Methods Logistic regression analysis was performed using the value of LS>7.1 kPa as the dependent variable. A linear regression model was applied using LS measurement after log10 transformation (lkpa) as the dependent variable and we analyzed the predicted values versus the observed lkpa values; pHIV was classified as detectable or undetectable in the 12- and 36-month study periods before LS measurement. Results We studied 251 patients (178 with HIV monoinfection), most of whom were on antiviral treatment; 36-month study time was available for 154 subjects. The mean CD4+ cell count was 634 cells/mm3 in HIV-monoinfected patients and 606 cells/mm3 in coinfected patients. No difference in LS was found between patients with detectable or undetectable pHIV in either the 12- or the 36-month study period before transient elastography. The mean LS was higher in HIV/HCV coinfected patients (P<0.0001) than in the HIV-monoinfected subjects; lkpa was positively correlated with HCV coinfection (P<0.0001) and aspartate aminotransferase levels (P<0.0001). Detectable pHIV failed to reach significance. Eight HIV-monoinfected patients had a predicted LS measurement lower than the observed one, while eight patients had the opposite result. Conclusion LS was not correlated with ongoing HIV replication during the 12- and 36-month study periods in immunocompetent HIV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. PMID:28845109

  3. Low-dose intranasal versus oral midazolam for routine body MRI of claustrophobic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschirch, Frank T.C.; Goepfert, Kerstin; Brunner, Genevieve; Weishaupt, Dominik [University Hospital Zuerich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Klus-Apotheke, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess prospectively the potential of low-dose intranasal midazolam compared to oral midazolam in claustrophobic patients undergoing routine body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventy-two adult claustrophobic patients referred for body MRI were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups (TG1 and TG2). The 36 patients of TG1 received 7.5 mg midazolam orally 15 min before MRI, whereas the 36 patients of TG2 received one (or, if necessary, two) pumps of a midazolam nasal spray into each nostril immediately prior to MRI (in total, 1 or 2 mg). Patients' tolerance, anxiety and sedation were assessed using a questionnaire and a visual analogue scale immediately before and after MRI. Image quality was evaluated using a five-point-scale. In TG1, 18/36 MRI examinations (50%) had to be cancelled, the reduction of anxiety was insufficient in 12/18 remaining patients (67%). In TG2, 35/36 MRI examinations (97%) were completed successfully, without relevant adverse effects. MRI image quality was rated higher among patients of TG2 compared to TG1 (p<0.001). Low-dose intranasal midazolam is an effective and patient-friendly solution to overcome anxiety in claustrophobic patients in a broad spectrum of body MRI. Its anxiolytic effect is superior to that of the orally administrated form. (orig.)

  4. [Travel medicine for HIV-infected patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, M; Furrer, H

    2001-06-01

    Many HIV-infected persons travel from temperate zones to (sub)tropical destinations. HIV-specific immigration issues, medical resources abroad and problems regarding travelling with multiple medications have to be anticipated. When prescribing immunizations and specific chemoprophylaxis, the stage of immunodeficiency as well as drug interactions with antiretrovirals and medicaments against opportunistic infections have to be taken into account. Live vaccines may be contraindicated. Immunocompromised HIV-infected travellers have a higher risk for serious courses of diseases by enteropathogens. Therefore a good information about food hygiene is important and a prescription of an antibiotic to take in case of severe diarrhea may be indicated. A new antiretroviral combination therapy should not be started immediately before travelling to the tropics. The possibility to continue an established HIV treatment during travel has to be evaluated cautiously. With good pre-travel advice the risk of severe health problems is low for most HIV-infected travellers.

  5. Assessing the accessibility of HIV care packages among tuberculosis patients in the Northwest Region, Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel San

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV co-infection is a major source of morbidity and mortality globally. The World Health Organization (WHO has recommended that HIV counselling and testing be offered routinely to TB patients in order to increase access to HIV care packages. We assessed the uptake of provider-initiated testing and counselling (PITC, antiretroviral (ART and co-trimoxazole preventive therapies (CPT among TB patients in the Northwest Region, Cameroon. Methods A retrospective cohort study using TB registers in 4 TB/HIV treatment centres (1 public and 3 faith-based for patients diagnosed with TB between January 2006 and December 2007 to identify predictors of the outcomes; HIV testing/serostatus, ART and CPT enrolment and factors that influenced their enrolment between public and faith-based hospitals. Results A total of 2270 TB patients were registered and offered pre-HIV test counselling; 2150 (94.7% accepted the offer of a test. The rate of acceptance was significantly higher among patients in the public hospital compared to those in the faith-based hospitals (crude OR 1.97; 95% CI 1.33 - 2.92 and (adjusted OR 1.92; 95% CI 1.24 - 2.97. HIV prevalence was 68.5% (1473/2150. Independent predictors of HIV-seropositivity emerged as: females, age groups 15-29, 30-44 and 45-59 years, rural residence, previously treated TB and smear-negative pulmonary TB. ART uptake was 50.3% (614/1220 with 17.2% (253/1473 of missing records. Independent predictors of ART uptake were: previously treated TB and extra pulmonary TB. Finally, CPT uptake was 47.0% (524/1114 with 24% (590/1114 of missing records. Independent predictors of CPT uptake were: faith-based hospitals and female sex. Conclusion PITC services are apparently well integrated into the TB programme as demonstrated by the high testing rate. The main challenges include improving access to ART and CPT among TB patients and proper reporting and monitoring of

  6. Safety and immunogenicity of HIV-1 Tat toxoid in immunocompromised HIV-1-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gringeri, A; Santagostino, E; Muça-Perja, M; Mannucci, P M; Zagury, J F; Bizzini, B; Lachgar, A; Carcagno, M; Rappaport, J; Criscuolo, M; Blattner, W; Burny, A; Gallo, R C; Zagury, D

    1998-01-01

    To antagonize the deleterious effects of the HIV-1 toxin extracellular Tat on uninfected immune cells, we developed a new strategy of anti-HIV-1 vaccine using an inactivated but immunogenic Tat (Tat toxoid). Tat toxoid has been assayed for safety and immunogenicity in seropositive patients. The phase I vaccine clinical trial testing Tat toxoid preparation in Seppic Isa 51 oil adjuvant was performed on 14 HIV-1-infected asymptomatic although biologically immunocompromised individuals (500-200 CD4+ cells/mm3). Following as many as 8 injections, no clinical defects were observed. All patients exhibited an antibody (Ab) response to Tat, and some had cell-mediated immunity (CMI) as evaluated by skin test in vivo and T-cell proliferation in vitro. These results provide initial evidence of safety and potency of Tat toxoid vaccination in HIV-1-infected individuals.

  7. A review of patient safety measures based on routinely collected hospital data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Carmen; Palmer, William; Bottle, Alex; Majeed, Azeem; Aylin, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The literature on patient safety measures derived from routinely collected hospital data was reviewed to inform indicator development. MEDLINE and Embase databases and Web sites were searched. Of 1738 citations, 124 studies describing the application, evaluation, or validation of hospital-based medical error or complication of care measures were reviewed. Studies were frequently conducted in the United States (n = 88) between 2005 and 2009 (n = 77) using Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality patient safety indicators (PSIs; n = 79). The most frequently cited indicators included "postoperative hemorrhage or hematoma" and "accidental puncture and laceration." Indicator refinement is supported by international coding algorithm translations but is hampered by data issues, including coding inconsistencies. The validity of PSIs and similar adverse event screens beyond internal measurement and the effects of organizational factors on patient harm remain uncertain. Development of PSIs in ambulatory care settings, including general practice and psychiatric care, needs consideration.

  8. Problem of routine photofluorography of the lungs of patients and medical personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtinen, E; Pakkanen, J; Geiger, U [Zentralkrankenhaus, Tampere (Finland). Roentgendiagnostische Abteilung

    1978-02-01

    In the years 1974 and 1975 4,248 staff members of the hospital and 12,880 patients have been examined by photofluorography of the Central Hospital in Tampere. At the time of the examination no actual pulmonary or cardiac diseases were known to these patients. Among the staff two new cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis were found. Among the patients seven cases of reactivated pulmonary tuberculosis were found. Altogether there were 17 remarkable radiological results leading to treatment or follow-up examinations. A malignant pulmonary tumour was not found. The low number of positive results is not in a reasonable relation to the radiation risk; thus routine photofluorography is not indicated. Serial examinations of the staff should be continued. These examinations, however, should be made with large-size pictures, so that the radiation dose is reduced to about 20%.

  9. [Nasal leishmaniasis in an HIV-positive patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasa, J M; Lorente, J; Crego, F; Naches, S; Subirana, F X; Calderón, J R; Pollán, C; Encarnación, L F; Quesada, P

    2000-03-01

    Leishmania is currently one of the most clinically important protozoa in otorhinolaryngology. Mediterranean countries, including Spain, have endemic HIV and L. infantum. Dogs are the most important Leishmania reservoir. Leishmaniasis is transmitted basically by the bite of infected female Phlebotomus sandflies. Its clinical development depends mainly on the host's cellular immunity (TCD4+ lymphocyte count). About 400 cases of HIV-visceral leishmaniasis have been reported in Spain. However, exclusively cutaneous presentation of HIV-leishmaniasis coinfection has been observed in only 2-3% of cases. We report the case of a female HIV+ patient who developed cutaneous leishmaniasis of the nasal vestibule by L. infantum. The patient was treated satisfactorily with a combination of parenteral Pentostam (sodium stilbogluconate) and periodic intralesional injections of Pentostam. The patient was included in a secondary prophylaxis protocol for visceral leishmaniasis with a monthly dose of Glucantime (meglumine antimoniate) for life.

  10. Tuberculous iliopsoas abscess in a HIV positive female patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elenkov, I.; Tomov, T.; Stefanov, P.; Genov, P.; Dineva, S.; Alexiev, I.; Nikolova, M.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with HIV can often present a diagnostic challenge and may have atypical presentations of more common diseases. This case demonstrates a HIV (+) patient with an advanced immunosuppression with tuberculosis complaining about 2 months before admission to the hospital of backache, anorexia and weight loss. On investigation she was found to have unilateral tuberculous psoas abscesses, diagnosed microbiologically and with a CT scan. Complex treatment (surgical, tuberculostatics, antiretroviral) was performed with a good effect. A review of the literature shows that this is a rare presentation of an already unusual problem, with subtle signs requiring a high index of clinical suspicion. However, with HIV-positive patients more likely to present with extrapulmonary tuberculosis, there is need for increased awareness of this diagnosis. (authors) Key words: HIV. TUBERCULOUS PSOAS ABSCESS

  11. Artificial neural networks to predict presence of significant pathology in patients presenting to routine colorectal clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslekar, S; Gardiner, A B; Monson, J R T; Duthie, G S

    2010-12-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are computer programs used to identify complex relations within data. Routine predictions of presence of colorectal pathology based on population statistics have little meaning for individual patient. This results in large number of unnecessary lower gastrointestinal endoscopies (LGEs - colonoscopies and flexible sigmoidoscopies). We aimed to develop a neural network algorithm that can accurately predict presence of significant pathology in patients attending routine outpatient clinics for gastrointestinal symptoms. Ethics approval was obtained and the study was monitored according to International Committee on Harmonisation - Good Clinical Practice (ICH-GCP) standards. Three-hundred patients undergoing LGE prospectively completed a specifically developed questionnaire, which included 40 variables based on clinical symptoms, signs, past- and family history. Complete data sets of 100 patients were used to train the ANN; the remaining data was used for internal validation. The primary output used was positive finding on LGE, including polyps, cancer, diverticular disease or colitis. For external validation, the ANN was applied to data from 50 patients in primary care and also compared with the predictions of four clinicians. Clear correlation between actual data value and ANN predictions were found (r = 0.931; P = 0.0001). The predictive accuracy of ANN was 95% in training group and 90% (95% CI 84-96) in the internal validation set and this was significantly higher than the clinical accuracy (75%). ANN also showed high accuracy in the external validation group (89%). Artificial neural networks offer the possibility of personal prediction of outcome for individual patients presenting in clinics with colorectal symptoms, making it possible to make more appropriate requests for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy. © 2010 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2010 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  12. Late HIV Testing in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Patients in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tossas-Milligan, Katherine Y; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F; Mayor, Angel M; Fernández-Santos, Diana M; Dworkin, Mark S

    2015-09-01

    Late HIV testing (LT), defined as receiving an AIDS diagnosis within a year of one's first positive HIV test, is associated with higher HIV transmission, lower HAART effectiveness, and worse outcomes. Latinos represent 36% of LT in the US, yet research concerning LT among HIV cases in Puerto Rico is scarce. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with LT, and a Cochran‒Armitage test was used to determine LT trends in an HIV-infected cohort followed at a clinic in Puerto Rico specialized in the management and treatment of HIV. From 2000 to 2011, 47% of eligible patients were late testers, with lower median CD4 counts (54 vs. 420 cells/mm3) and higher median HIV viral load counts (253,680 vs. 23,700 copies/mL) than non-LT patients. LT prevalence decreased significantly, from 47% in 2000 to 37% in 2011. In a mutually adjusted logistic regression model, males, older age at enrollment and past history of IDU significantly increased LT odds, whereas having a history of amphetamine use decreased LT odds. When the data were stratified by mode of transmission, it became apparent that only the category men who have sex with men (MSM) saw a significant reduction in the proportion of LT, falling from 67% in 2000 to 33% in 2011. These results suggest a gap in early HIV detection in Puerto Rico, a gap that decreased only among MSM. An evaluation of the manner in which current HIV-testing guidelines are implemented on the island is needed.

  13. Neurological manifestations in HIV positive patients in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Mohraz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the neurological complications among Iranian HIV-positive patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 428 patients diagnosed with HIV infection between 2006 and 2009 at Imam Khomeini hospital, Tehran, Iran. Demographic and clinical variables as well as laboratory tests were extracted and analyzed. Also, another 100 patients refereed to Voluntary Counseling and Testing center of the hospital were visited and evaluated for neurological complications. Results: Among the patients, neurologic manifestations were observed in 34 (7.94% patients. Twenty three percent of the patients received antiretroviral therapy. Identified causes included brain toxoplasmosis (14.7%, progressive multi-focal leuko encephalopathy (5.9%, HIV encephalopathy (5.9%, TB meningitis (5% and unknown etiologies (11.8%. Also, among 100 patients who were admitted and visited at the Voluntary Counseling and Testing center, no one was diagnosed for any neurological manifestations. Conclusions: According to our results, toxoplasmosis is the most frequent cause of neurological conditions among Iranian HIV infected patients and should be considered in any HIV/AIDS patient with neurological manifestations.

  14. Patients in palliative care-Development of a predictive model for anxiety using routine data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Sonja; Hess, Stephanie; Klein, Carsten; Lindena, Gabriele; Radbruch, Lukas; Ostgathe, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the most common psychological symptoms in patients in a palliative care situation. This study aims to develop a predictive model for anxiety using data from the standard documentation routine. Data sets of palliative care patients collected by the German quality management benchmarking system called Hospice and Palliative Care Evaluation (HOPE) from 2007 to 2011 were randomly divided into a training set containing two-thirds of the data and a test set with the remaining one-third. We dichotomized anxiety levels, proxy rated by medical staff using the validated HOPE Symptom and Problem Checklist, into two groups with no or mild anxiety versus moderate or severe anxiety. Using the training set, a multivariable logistic regression model was developed by backward stepwise selection. Predictive accuracy was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) based on the test set. An analysis of 9924 data sets suggests a predictive model for anxiety in patients receiving palliative care which contains gender, age, ECOG, living situation, pain, nausea, dyspnea, loss of appetite, tiredness, need for assistance with activities of daily living, problems with organization of care, medication with sedatives/anxiolytics, antidepressants, antihypertensive drugs, laxatives, and antibiotics. It results in a fair predictive value (AUC = 0.72). Routinely collected data providing individual-, disease- and therapy-related information contain valuable information that is useful for the prediction of anxiety risks in patients receiving palliative care. These findings could thus be advantageous for providing appropriate support for patients in palliative care settings and should receive special attention in future research.

  15. Does routinely collected patient-reported outcome data represent the actual case-mix of elective coronary revascularization patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oinasmaa, Salla; Heiskanen, Jari; Hartikainen, Juha; Hippeläinen, Mikko; Miettinen, Heikki; Martikainen, Janne; Roine, Risto P; Tolppanen, Anna-Maija

    2018-04-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are valuable for effectiveness evaluation, but it is unknown whether the patient views obtained represent the actual case mix. We studied the representativeness of the responses obtained to a routinely administered health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaire in a cardiology unit. Elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG; n = 404) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI; n = 738) patients operated during June 2012 to August 2014 in the Heart Center, Kuopio University Hospital. The characteristics of the patients with a baseline (n = 260 and 290 for CABG and PCI, respectively) or both baseline and follow-up HRQoL measurements (n = 203 and 189 for CABG and PCI, respectively) were compared with those who did not respond (n = 144 and 448 for CABG and PCI). Baseline questionnaires were less likely obtained from older CABG patients (odds ratio 0.51, 95% confidence interval 0.28-0.91) and those with more severe disease (0.20, 0.05-0.79). Among PCI patients, women (0.64, 0.45-0.91), smokers (0.74, 0.53-1.04), and those with more severe disease (0.26, 0.13-0.52) or more hospital days were underrepresented. Routinely collected PROs in cardiac patients may be biased towards younger and healthier patients. This needs to be recognized when evaluating the representativeness of such data. The routine collection of these data should be adequately resourced.

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 pol gene: first subgenomic evidence of CRF29-BF among Iranian HIV-1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Baesi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the dominant subtype among the HIV-1 strains circulation in Iran. Methods: In this cross sectional study 100 HIV positive patients participated. HIV-1 RNA was extracted from plasma. RT nested-PCR was performed and the final products were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed; reference sequences were downloaded from Los Alamos, aligned with Iranian pol sequences in the study and analyzed by neighbor-joining method. Results: The results of the phylogenetic analysis showed that HIV-1 subtype CRF-35AD was the dominant subtype among HIV-1 infected patients in Iran; this analysis also suggested a new circulating recombinant form that had not previously been identified in Iran: CRF-29BF. Conclusions: The impact of HIV diversity on pathogenesis, transmission and clinical management have been discussed in different studies; therefore, analyses of HIV genetic diversity is required to design effective antiretroviral strategies for different HIV subtypes.

  17. Transitioning couple's voluntary HIV counseling and testing (CVCT from stand-alone weekend services into routine antenatal and VCT services in government clinics in Zambia's two largest cities.

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    Mubiana Inambao

    Full Text Available Most HIV infections in Africa are acquired by married/cohabiting adults and WHO recommends couple's voluntary HIV counseling and testing (CVCT for prevention. The handover from NGO-sponsored weekend CVCT to government-sponsored services in routine weekday antenatal care (ANC and individual voluntary testing and counseling (VCT services in Zambia's two largest cities from 2009-2015 is described.Government clinic counselors were trained to provide CVCT, and along with community health workers they promoted CVCT services in their clinic and surrounding areas. When client volume exceeded the capacity of on-duty staff in ANC and VCT, non-governmental organization (NGO subsidies were offered for overtime pay.Implementation of routine CVCT services varied greatly by clinic and city. The 12 highest volume clinics were examined further, while 13 clinics had CVCT numbers that were too low to warrant further investigation. In Lusaka, the proportion of pregnant women whose partners were tested rose from 2.6% in 2009 to a peak of 26.2% in 2012 and 24.8% in 2015. Corresponding reports in Ndola were 2.0% in 2009, 17.0% in 2012 and 14.5% in 2015. Obstacles to CVCT included: limited space and staffing, competing priorities, record keeping not adapted for couples, and few resources for promotion and increasing male involvement. Conflicting training models for 'partner testing' with men and women separately vs. CVCT with joint post-test counseling led to confusion in reporting to district health authorities.A focused and sustained effort will be required to reach a meaningful number of couples with CVCT to prevent heterosexual and perinatal HIV transmission. Establishing targets and timelines, funding for dedicated and appropriately trained staff, adoption of standardized data recording instruments with couple-level indicators, and expansion of community and clinic-based promotions using proven models are recommended.

  18. Impaired production of cytokines is an independent predictor of mortality in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Gerstoft, Jan; Pedersen, Bente K

    2003-01-01

    With regard to the natural history of HIV-1 infection this study investigated whether whole-blood culture cytokine production was associated with mortality in HIV-1-infected patients.......With regard to the natural history of HIV-1 infection this study investigated whether whole-blood culture cytokine production was associated with mortality in HIV-1-infected patients....

  19. Prospective use of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor to screen TB co-infected with HIV patient among TB patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Yudani Mardining Raras

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Plasma suPAR level of TB patients co-infected with HIV showed significantly difference from that of TB-AFB(+ patients suggested its potential to screen the TB/HIV among pulmonary TB-AFB(+ patients.

  20. Antiretroviral Resistance in HIV/AIDS Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manosuthi, W.; MD

    2018-03-01

    The higher prevalence of HIV drug resistance was observed in areas with greater ART coverage. The HIV resistance-associated mutations occur when people have inadequate levels of antiretroviral drugs as well as inadequate potency, inadequate adherence, and preexisting resistance. The degree to drug cross-resistance is observed depends on the specific mutations and number of mutation accumulation. In the Southeast Asia region, the challenging of people with treatment failure is the availability and accessibility to subsequent new antiretroviral drugs to construct he second and salvage regimen. Genotypic resistance testing is a useful tool because it can identify the existing drug resistance-associated mutations under the selective drug pressure. Thus, understanding the basic interpretation of HIV drug resistance- associated mutation is useful in guiding clinical decisions for treatment-experienced people living with HIV.

  1. Routine X-ray of the chest is not justified in staging of cutaneous melanoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjorup, Caroline Asirvatham; Hendel, Helle Westergren; Pilegaard, Rita Kaae

    2016-01-01

    -up was 34 months (range: 13-75 months). Of the 603 patients, 25 (4%) had a positive CXR and 578 (96%) had a negative CXR. Four (0.7%) patients had lung metastases of whom two had a true positive and two a false negative CXR, respectively. The sensitivity was 50%, specificity was 96%, the positive predictive...... received funding from the Department of Plastic Surgery, the Research Council at Herlev Gentofte Hospital and the Danish Cancer Society. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The Danish Regional Committee on Biomedical Research Ethics (r. no.: H-4-2014-127), the Danish Data Protection Agency (2012-58-0004, local record no......INTRODUCTION: The incidence of cutaneous melanoma is increasing in Denmark and worldwide. However, the prevalence of distant metastases at the time of diagnosis has decreased to 1%. We therefore questioned the value of routine preoperative chest X-ray (CXR) for staging asymptomatic melanoma...

  2. Exploring the impact of staff absenteeism on patient satisfaction using routine databases in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclay, E; Hardouin, J B; Sébille, V; Anthoine, E; Moret, L

    2015-10-01

    To explore the influence of staff absenteeism on patient satisfaction using the indicators available in management reports. Among factors explaining patient satisfaction, human resource indicators have been studied widely in terms of burnout or job satisfaction, but there have not been many studies related to absenteeism indicators. A multilevel analysis was conducted using two routinely compiled databases from 2010 in the clinical departments of a university hospital (France). The staff database monitored absenteeism for short-term medical reasons (5 days or less), non-medical reasons and absences starting at the weekend. The patient satisfaction database was established at the time of discharge. Patient satisfaction related to relationships with staff was significantly and negatively correlated with nurse absenteeism for non-medical reasons (P absenteeism starting at weekends (P absenteeism for short-term medical reasons (P absenteeism and should lead to a better understanding of the impact of human resources on patient satisfaction. To enhance patient satisfaction, managers need to find a way to reduce staff absenteeism, in order to avoid burnout and to improve the atmosphere in the workplace. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Upper Gastrointestinal Symptoms Predictive of Candida Esophagitis and Erosive Esophagitis in HIV and Non-HIV Patients: An Endoscopy-Based Cross-Sectional Study of 6011 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuta; Nagata, Naoyoshi; Shimbo, Takuro; Nishijima, Takeshi; Watanabe, Koji; Aoki, Tomonori; Sekine, Katsunori; Okubo, Hidetaka; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Yokoi, Chizu; Mimori, Akio; Oka, Shinichi; Uemura, Naomi; Akiyama, Junichi

    2015-11-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are common in both HIV and non-HIV-infected patients, but the difference of GI symptom severity between 2 groups remains unknown. Candida esophagitis and erosive esophagitis, 2 major types of esophagitis, are seen in both HIV and non-HIV-infected patients, but differences in GI symptoms that are predictive of esophagitis between 2 groups remain unknown. We aimed to determine whether GI symptoms differ between HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected patients, and identify specific symptoms of candida esophagitis and erosive esophagitis between 2 groups.We prospectively enrolled 6011 patients (HIV, 430; non-HIV, 5581) who underwent endoscopy and completed questionnaires. Nine upper GI symptoms (epigastric pain, heartburn, acid regurgitation, hunger cramps, nausea, early satiety, belching, dysphagia, and odynophagia) were evaluated using a 7-point Likert scale. Associations between esophagitis and symptoms were analyzed by the multivariate logistic regression model adjusted for age, sex, and proton pump inhibitors.Endoscopy revealed GI-organic diseases in 33.4% (2010/6.011) of patients. The prevalence of candida esophagitis and erosive esophagitis was 11.2% and 12.1% in HIV-infected patients, respectively, whereas it was 2.9% and 10.7 % in non-HIV-infected patients, respectively. After excluding GI-organic diseases, HIV-infected patients had significantly (P symptom scores for heartburn, hunger cramps, nausea, early satiety, belching, dysphagia, and odynophagia than non-HIV-infected patients. In HIV-infected patients, any symptom was not significantly associated with CD4 cell count. In multivariate analysis, none of the 9 GI symptoms were associated with candida esophagitis in HIV-infected patients, whereas dysphagia and odynophagia were independently (P HIV-infected patients. However, heartburn and acid regurgitation were independently (P symptom scores were reliable in both HIV (α, 0.86) and non-HIV-infected patients (α, 0.85).This

  4. Hiv infection in patients of sexually transmitted disease

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    Sayal S

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 1027 male patients suffering from sexually transmitted diseases (STD during 1990 to 1996 were screened for HIV infection. All cases were in the age group 17 years to 48 years. One hundred and sixty-seven STD cases (16.3% were found to have HIV infection. A rising trend in incidence of HIV infection in STD patients from 1990 (2.8% to 1996 (27.8% was noticed countrary to declining trend of STDs from 213 cases in 1990 to 79 cases in 1996. The incidence of HIV infection was 30.3% in lymphogranuloma venereum, 19.5% in chancroid, 13.5% in syphilis, 17.6% in herpes genitatis, 6.7% in gonorrhoea and 11.2% in other STD cases.

  5. Outcome of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients with brain metastases in a routine clinical setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lekic, Mirko; Kovac, Viljem; Triller, Nadja; Knez, Lea; Sadikov, Aleksander; Cufer, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) represents approximately 13 to 18% of all lung cancers. It is the most aggressive among lung cancers, mostly presented at an advanced stage, with median survival rates of 10 to12 months in patients treated with standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In approximately 15-20% of patients brain metastases are present already at the time of primary diagnosis; however, it is unclear how much it influences the outcome of disease according the other metastatic localisation. The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the median survival of SCLC patients treated by specific therapy (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy) with regard to the presence or absence of brain metastases at the time of diagnosis. All SCLC patients have been treated in a routine clinical practice and followed up at the University Clinic Golnik in Slovenia. In the retrospective study the medical files from 2002 to 2007 were review. All patients with cytological or histological confirmed disease and eligible for specific oncological treatment were included in the study. They have been treated according to the guidelines valid at the time. Chemotherapy and regular followed-up were carried out at the University Clinic Golnik and radiotherapy at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana. We found 251 patients eligible for the study. The median age of them was 65 years, majority were male (67%), smokers or ex-smokers (98%), with performance status 0 to 1 (83%). At the time of diagnosis no metastases were found in 64 patients (25.5%) and metastases outside the brain were presented in 153 (61.0%). Brain metastases, confirmed by a CT scan, were present in 34 patients (13.5%), most of them had also metastases at other localisations. All patients received chemotherapy and all patients with confirmed brain metastases received whole brain irradiation (WBRT). The radiotherapy with radical dose at primary tumour was delivered to 27 patients with limited disease and they got 4–6 cycles of

  6. Clinical Improvement by Switching to an Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitor in Hemophiliac Patients with HIV: The Japan Cohort Study of HIV Patients Infected through Blood Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawado, Miyuki; Hashimoto, Shuji; Oka, Shin-Ichi; Fukutake, Katsuyuki; Higasa, Satoshi; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Ogane, Miwa; Okamoto, Manabu; Shirasaka, Takuma

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine improvement in HIV RNA levels and the CD4 cell count by switching to an antiretroviral regimen with an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) in patients with HIV. This study was conducted on Japanese patients with HIV who were infected by blood products in the 1980s. Data were collected between 2007 and 2014. Data of 564 male hemophiliac patients with HIV from the Japan Cohort Study of HIV Patients Infected through Blood Products were available. Changes in antiretroviral regimen use, HIV RNA levels, and the CD4 cell count between 2007 and 2014 were examined. From 2007 to 2014, the proportion of use of a regimen with an INSTI increased from 0.0% to 41.0%. For patients with HIV who used a regimen, including an INSTI, the proportion of HIV RNA levels products. This suggests that performing this switch in clinical practice will lead to favorable effects.

  7. Early Warning Indicators for Population-Based Monitoring of HIV Drug Resistance in 6 African Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigaloff, Kim C. E.; Hamers, Raph L.; Menke, Jack; Labib, Moheb; Siwale, Margaret; Ive, Prudence; Botes, Mariette E.; Kityo, Cissy; Mandaliya, Kishor; Wellington, Maureen; Osibogun, Akin; Geskus, Ronald B.; Stevens, Wendy S.; van Vugt, Michèle; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA testing and HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) testing are not routinely available for therapeutic monitoring of patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings. World Health Organization HIVDR early warning indicators (EWIs) assess ART

  8. Pleurisy in tuberculosis and HIV-infected patients

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    A. K. Ivanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A clinical and epidemiological study for 14 years was conducted. Among TB patients, the percentage of persons with mixed infection (TB+HIV infection increased during the observation period from 10 up to 64%. About one third of them had a pleura reaction with an accumulation of fluid between pleura’s petals. Pleuritis in patients with mixed infection were characterized by special features: pleurisy complicated another form of tuberculosis more often, in one-third of patients (29,8% pleural liquid had hemorrhagic type, Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the pleural fluid was detected six times more often. The level of activity of adenosine deaminase and neopterin in the exudate of patients with tuberculosis and HIV infection remained significantly higher than in the control group of persons. These data can be useful in the diagnostics of specific diseases in HIV-infected patients.

  9. Effectiveness of Psycho-Educational Intervention in HIV Patients? Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Clarisse; Sarmento e Castro, Rui; Dinis-Ribeiro, M?rio; Fernandes, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) is the main prognostic factor associated with HIV disease progression and death. The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a psycho-educational program to promote adherence to HAART in HIV patients. A longitudinal study (n=102) over 9 months in an Infectious Diseases Hospital was carried out. Adherence to HAART was measured with standardized scales and values of viral load. Two groups were defined: adherents and non-adherents. In th...

  10. Access to CD4 Testing for Rural HIV Patients: Findings from a Cohort Study in Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Vogt

    Full Text Available CD4 cell count measurement remains an important diagnostic tool for HIV care in developing countries. Insufficient laboratory capacity in rural Sub-Saharan Africa is frequently mentioned but data on the impact at an individual patient level are lacking. Urban-rural discrepancies in CD4 testing have not been quantified to date. Such evidence is crucial for public health planning and to justify new yet more expensive diagnostic procedures that could circumvent access constraints in rural areas.To compare CD4 testing among rural and urban HIV patients during the first year of treatment.Records from 2,145 HIV positive adult patients from a Médecins sans Frontières (Doctors without Borders HIV project in Beitbridge, Zimbabwe, during 2011 and 2012 were used for a retrospective cohort analysis. Covariate-adjusted risk ratios were calculated to estimate the effects of area of residence on CD4 testing at treatment initiation, six and 12 months among rural and urban patients.While the proportion of HIV patients returning for medical consultations at six and 12 months decreased at a similar rate in both patient groups, CD4 testing during consultations dropped to 21% and 8% for urban, and 2% and 1% for rural patients at six and 12 months, respectively. Risk ratios for missing CD4 testing were 0.8 (95% CI 0.7-0.9, 9.2 (95% CI 5.5-15.3, and 7.6 (95% 3.7-17.1 comparing rural versus urban patients at treatment initiation, six and 12 months, respectively.CD4 testing was low overall, and particularly poor in rural patients. Difficulties with specimen transportation were probably a major factor underlying this difference and requires new diagnostic approaches. Our findings point to severe health system constraints in providing CD4 testing overall that need to be addressed if effective monitoring of HIV patients is to be achieved, whether by alternative CD4 diagnostics or newly-recommended routine viral load testing.

  11. Osteonecrosis en pacientes infectados por HIV Osteonecrosis in HIV-infected patients

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    Edgardo G. Bottaro

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Según la literatura, la osteonecrosis tiene una mayor incidencia en los pacientes infectados con HIV que en la población general. Ello sería resultado de la confluencia de factores de riesgo clásicos y de otros propios de esta población o más prevalentes en ella, como el tratamiento con inhibidores de proteasa, la dislipemia producto de su consumo, la presencia de anticuerpos anticardiolipina séricos, la hipercoagulabilidad, la restauración inmune y las vasculitis. Presentamos una serie de 13 pacientes infectados con HIV con osteonecrosis. El motivo de consulta fue dolor en grandes articulaciones. Cuatro eran alcoholistas, 8 tabaquistas y 9 tenían dislipemia. Once habían recibido esteroides en algún momento de la vida aunque sólo uno estaba recibiéndolos al momento del inicio del dolor. En 2 se detectaron anticuerpos anticardiolipina séricos. Doce tenían sida y recibían tratamiento antirretroviral de alta eficacia (11 con inhibidores de proteasa. Ellos lograron una adecuada recuperación inmunológica. Consideramos necesario incluir la osteonecrosis como diagnóstico diferencial de artralgia persistente en pacientes infectados con HIV e investigar infección por HIV en todo paciente con osteonecrosis sin claros factores predisponentes.Osteonecrosis, also known as avascular necrosis, is chiefly characterized by death of bone caused by vascular compromise. The true incidence of osteonecrosis in HIV-infected patients is not well known and the pathogenesis remains undefined. Hypothetical risk factors peculiar to HIV-infected individuals that might play a role in the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis include the introduction of protease inhibitors and resulting hyperlipidemia, the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies in serum leading to a hypercoagulable state, immune recovery and vasculitis. Hereby we present a series of 13 HIV-infected patients with osteonecrosis. The most common symptom upon presentation was arthralgia. The majority

  12. Correlates of Prevalent Disability Among HIV-Infected Elderly Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila-Funes, José Alberto; Belaunzarán-Zamudio, Pablo Francisco; Tamez-Rivera, Oscar; Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Navarrete-Reyes, Ana Patricia; Cuellar-Rodríguez, Jennifer; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Amieva, Hélène

    2016-02-01

    The growing elderly population of HIV-infected patients is leading to a significant epidemiological transition and HIV infection has been proposed as a premature and accelerated aging model rending the individual more susceptible to premature disability. However, the determinants of disability among this emergent population are still lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine the correlates of prevalent disability in adults ≥50 years with HIV infection. A cross-sectional study of 184 HIV-infected adults receiving ambulatory care in an HIV clinic of a tertiary care, university-affiliated hospital in Mexico City was conducted. Disability for instrumental (IADL) and basic activities of daily living (ADL) was established. Sociodemographic factors, clinical variables, current CD4(+) cell count, and HIV viral load (VL) were tested as potential determinants of disability. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify the correlates of both types of disability. The mean age was 59.3 years. All participants were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. Of participants 17.9% had disability for IADL and 26.1% for ADL. Multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated that being older; having a lower CD4(+) cell count, and having a detectable HIV VL were independently associated with both types of disability. In addition, educational level was also independently associated with ADL disability. Age, educational level, low CD4(+) cell count, and detectable HIV VL were independently associated with disability. Whether effective and timely antiretroviral therapy will reduce the risk of disability in HIV-infected elderly patients needs to be evaluated.

  13. High prevalence of oral colonization by Candida dubliniensis in HIV-positive patients in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binolfi, Andrés; Biasoli, Marisa S; Luque, Alicia G; Tosello, María E; Magaró, Hortensia M

    2005-08-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a recently described yeast species, closely related to Candida albicans. This work represents the first general survey of the carriage of C. dubliniensis in the oral cavities of HIV-positive patients in Argentina. We studied 133 strains isolated from 162 HIV-positive patients, using the following identification tests: chlamydospore production on corn meal agar with Tween 80; colony color on CHROMagar Candida media; differential growth at 45 degrees C on potato dextrose agar; D-xylose assimilation; chlamydospore formation on sunflower seed agar (SSA); carbohydrate assimilation profiles using the API 20 C Aux commercial kit and PCR using primers that hybridize to the class IV intron of the ACT1 gene. Out of the 133 strains, 21 were identified as C. dubliniensis, representing approximately 13% of the 162 patients in this study. From these data, we conclude that although the PCR assay is the most reliable method, clamydospore formation on SSA is an easier and less expensive test for the screening of C. dubliniensis in the routine laboratory. Our results show that C. dubliniensis has a high prevalence among HIV-positive patients in Argentina.

  14. Prevalence of HIV Infection Among Tuberculosis Patients in Bali, Indonesia

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    Partha Muliawan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: During 1998-2007, TB and HIV cases in Bali had shown a significant increase respectively. In general, both of these diseases are chronic diseases that need long term treatment, and together they could worsen the patients’ condition. To prevent the double burden of those patients, we need to know HIV infection prevalence among TB cases in Bali. Method: One thousands of TB cases diagnosed at TB health services unit (UPK at primary health centers (puskesmas and public hospitals in Bali, in September-November 2008, were given information and their blood samples were taken for HIV tests. Samples were chosen proportionally according to the number of TB cases registered in each UPK. Five milliliters of blood sample were taken from each eligible patient by laboratory staff or nurse at the UPK for HIV tests which were conducted at Bali Health Laboratory. HIV test used in this study were the two types of rapid test in accordance with WHO standard. Discussion: Thirty-nine out of 1,000 blood samples were found HIV positive. The highest HIV prevalence among TB cases was in the Buleleng District (11.5% and followed by Denpasar City (5.1%. This prevalence showed a different figure from the HIV/AIDS cases in VCT clinics registered at Bali Provincial Health Agency, where the highest prevalence found in Denpasar, followed by Buleleng and Badung. If we compare, the difference in figure between Badung and Buleleng, might be due to the difference in routes of HIV transmission. In Buleleng, most of the cases (90% were sexually transmitted, while in Badung 48% transmission were through injecting drug users. The IDUs seek health services at private health centers and rarely utilize public/government services such as puskesmas and hospitals. Conclusion: The HIV prevalence among TB patients in Bali was 3.9%. The characteristics of the patients showed that they are mostly male, aged between 31-40 years old, have junior high school-university education

  15. Tiotropium bromide in the routine care of GOLD stage II COPD patients: a pharmaeconomic evaluation

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    Orietta Zaniolo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: a secondary pre-specified analysis of the UPLIFT cohort demonstrated that the inclusion of tiotropium bromide in the routine care of GOLD stage II (moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients is associated with stronger improvements of survival, quality of life, and exacerbation rate than those shown in the total cohort; in this subgroup, tiotropium furthermore induces a significant reduction in the rate of FEV1 decline.Objective: to adapt the Spiriva® model, originally built to evaluate cost-effectiveness of tiotropium inclusion in the general COPD population, to GOLD II patients.Methods: the Spiriva® model is a probabilistic Markov patient-level simulation developed over a lifetime horizon to compare outcomes associated with the inclusion of tiotropium in routine care (RC for COPD treatment with those obtained with RC alone. Patients are characterised by gender, age, height, smoking status and FEV1. Model structure and sources have been maintained unvaried, except for demographic characteristics, specific for GOLD II patients, as extrapolated from an Italian observational study, and tiotropium efficacy, based on the secondary analysis of GOLD II UPLIFT patients. As in the original model, only direct health care costs are considered.Results: patients treated with tiotropium on average (95% CI gain 0.70 (0.00/7.23 LYs or 0.77 (0.02/4.67 QALYs compared to RC. The incremental lifetime cost is € 3,520 (-6,391/26,686, meaning that the incremental cost required to gain a QALY (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio – ICER is equal to € 4,548. Sensitivity analysis shows that tiotropium has a 50% probability of being cost-effective for a willingness-to-pay (WTP around 4,600 €/QALY; 100% probability is achieved with a WTP of € 9,300.Conclusions: the adoption of a strategy based on the inclusion of tiotropium from the early COPD stages represents good value for money in Italy, as the ICER estimated for GOLD II

  16. Routine Troponin Measurements Are Unnecessary to Exclude Asymptomatic Coronary Events in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Farwa; Young, Jimmy; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Flemming, Kelly D; Fugate, Jennifer E

    2016-05-01

    Obtaining serum troponin levels in every patient with acute stroke is recommended in recent stroke guidelines, but there is no evidence that these contribute positively to clinical care. We sought to determine the clinical significance of measuring troponin levels in acute ischemic stroke patients. We reviewed 398 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke at a large academic institution from 2010 to 2012. Troponin levels were measured as a result of protocol in place during part of the study period. The mean age was 70 years (standard deviation ±16 years) and 197 (49.5%) were men. Chronic kidney disease was present in 78 (19.6%), coronary artery disease in 107 (26.9%), and atrial fibrillation in 107 (26.9%). Serum troponin T was measured in 246 of 398 patients (61.8%). Troponin was elevated (>.01 ng/mL) at any point in 38 of 246 patients (15.5%) and was elevated in 28 patients at all 3 measurements (11.3% of those with troponin measured). Only 4 of 246 patients (1.6%) had a significant uptrend. Two were iatrogenic in the setting of hemodynamic augmentation using vasopressors to maintain cerebral perfusion. One case was attributed to stroke and chronic kidney disease and another case to heart failure from inflammatory fibrocalcific mitral valvular heart disease. Serum troponin elevation in patients with ischemic stroke is not usually caused by clinically significant acute myocardial ischemia unless iatrogenic in the setting of vasopressor administration. Serum troponin levels should be measured judicially, based on clinical context, rather than routinely in all stroke patients. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Impaired Urine Dilution Capability in HIV Stable Patients

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    Waldo H. Belloso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal disease is a well-recognized complication among patients with HIV infection. Viral infection itself and the use of some antiretroviral drugs contribute to this condition. The thick ascending limb of Henle’s loop (TALH is the tubule segment where free water clearance is generated, determining along with glomerular filtration rate the kidney’s ability to dilute urine. Objective. We analyzed the function of the proximal tubule and TALH in patients with HIV infection receiving or not tenofovir-containing antiretroviral treatment in comparison with healthy seronegative controls, by applying a tubular physiological test, hyposaline infusion test (Chaimowitz’ test. Material & Methods. Chaimowitz’ test was performed on 20 HIV positive volunteers who had normal renal functional parameters. The control group included 10 healthy volunteers. Results. After the test, both HIV groups had a significant reduction of serum sodium and osmolarity compared with the control group. Free water clearance was lower and urine osmolarity was higher in both HIV+ groups. Proximal tubular function was normal in both studied groups. Conclusion. The present study documented that proximal tubule sodium reabsorption was preserved while free water clearance and maximal urine dilution capability were reduced in stable HIV patients treated or not with tenofovir.

  18. A Patient Friendly Corifollitropin Alfa Protocol without Routine Pituitary Suppression in Normal Responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huai-Ling; Lai, Hsing-Hua; Chuang, Tzu-Hsuan; Shih, Yu-Wei; Huang, Shih-Chieh; Lee, Meng-Ju; Chen, Shee-Uan

    2016-01-01

    The release of corifollitropin alfa simplifies daily injections of short-acting recombinant follicular stimulating hormone (rFSH), and its widely-used protocol involves short-acting gonadotropins supplements and a fixed GnRH antagonist regimen, largely based on follicle size. In this study, the feasibility of corifollitropin alfa without routine pituitary suppression was evaluated. A total of 288 patients were stimulated by corifollitropin alfa on cycle day 3 following with routine serum hormone monitoring and follicle scanning every other day after 5 days of initial stimulation, and a GnRH antagonist (0.25 mg) was only used prophylactically when the luteinizing hormone (LH) was ≧ 6 IU/L (over half of the definitive LH surge). The incidence of premature LH surge (≧ 10 IU/L) was 2.4% (7/288) before the timely injection of a single GnRH antagonist, and the elevated LH level was dropped down from 11.9 IU/L to 2.2 IU/L after the suppression. Two hundred fifty-one patients did not need any antagonist (87.2% [251/288]) throughout the whole stimulation. No adverse effects were observed regarding oocyte competency (fertilization rate: 78%; blastocyst formation rate: 64%). The live birth rate per OPU cycle after the first cryotransfer was 56.3% (161/286), and the cumulative live birth rate per OPU cycle after cyrotransfers was 69.6% (199/286). Of patients who did and did not receive GnRH antagonist during stimulation, no significant difference existed in the cumulative live birth rates (78.4% vs. 68.3%, p = 0.25). The results demonstrated that the routine GnRH antagonist administration is not required in the corifollitropin-alfa cycles using a flexible and hormone-depended antagonist regimen, while the clinical outcome is not compromised. This finding reveals that the use of a GnRH antagonist only occasionally may be needed.

  19. A Patient Friendly Corifollitropin Alfa Protocol without Routine Pituitary Suppression in Normal Responders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Ling Wang

    Full Text Available The release of corifollitropin alfa simplifies daily injections of short-acting recombinant follicular stimulating hormone (rFSH, and its widely-used protocol involves short-acting gonadotropins supplements and a fixed GnRH antagonist regimen, largely based on follicle size. In this study, the feasibility of corifollitropin alfa without routine pituitary suppression was evaluated. A total of 288 patients were stimulated by corifollitropin alfa on cycle day 3 following with routine serum hormone monitoring and follicle scanning every other day after 5 days of initial stimulation, and a GnRH antagonist (0.25 mg was only used prophylactically when the luteinizing hormone (LH was ≧ 6 IU/L (over half of the definitive LH surge. The incidence of premature LH surge (≧ 10 IU/L was 2.4% (7/288 before the timely injection of a single GnRH antagonist, and the elevated LH level was dropped down from 11.9 IU/L to 2.2 IU/L after the suppression. Two hundred fifty-one patients did not need any antagonist (87.2% [251/288] throughout the whole stimulation. No adverse effects were observed regarding oocyte competency (fertilization rate: 78%; blastocyst formation rate: 64%. The live birth rate per OPU cycle after the first cryotransfer was 56.3% (161/286, and the cumulative live birth rate per OPU cycle after cyrotransfers was 69.6% (199/286. Of patients who did and did not receive GnRH antagonist during stimulation, no significant difference existed in the cumulative live birth rates (78.4% vs. 68.3%, p = 0.25. The results demonstrated that the routine GnRH antagonist administration is not required in the corifollitropin-alfa cycles using a flexible and hormone-depended antagonist regimen, while the clinical outcome is not compromised. This finding reveals that the use of a GnRH antagonist only occasionally may be needed.

  20. Aberrant paramagnetic signals outside the tumor volume on routine surveillance MRI of brain tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Inbar, Edna; Michaeli, Natalia; Limon, Dror; Siegal, Tali

    2017-09-01

    Late complications of cerebral radiation therapy (RT) involve vascular injury with acquired cavernous malformation, telangiectasias and damage to vascular walls which are well recognized in children. Its incidence in adults is unknown. Blood products and iron deposition that accompany vascular injury create paramagnetic effects on MRI. This study retrospectively investigated the frequency of paramagnetic lesions on routine surveillance MRI of adult brain tumor patients. MRI studies of 115 brain tumor patients were reviewed. Only studies containing sequences of either susceptibility weighted images or gradient echo or blood oxygenation level dependent imaging were included. Lesions inside the tumor volume were not considered. 68 studies fulfilled the above criteria and included 48 patients with previous RT (35 followed for >2 years and 13 for 1 year) and 20 patients who were not treated with RT. The median age at time of irradiation was 47 years. Aberrant paramagnetic lesions were found in 23/35 (65%) patients followed for >2 years after RT and in only 1/13 (8%) patients followed for 1-year after radiation (p = 0.03). The 1-year follow-up group did not differ from the control group [2/20 (9%)]. Most lesions were within the radiation field and none of the patients had related symptomatology. The number and incidence of these lesions increased with time and amounted to 75% over 3 years post RT. MRI paramagnetic signal aberrations are common findings in adult brain tumor patients that evolve over time after RT. The clinical significance of these lesions needs further investigation.

  1. Reversible Thrombocytopenia after Gabapentin in an HIV-Positive Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Basith

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gabapentin has become increasingly used in psychiatric practice specifically for anxiety disorders. Even though gabapentin is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat anxiety, physicians sometimes use it as an alternative to benzodiazepines in patients with a history of substance abuse. Gabapentin is also prescribed when individuals are at risk of thrombocytopenia which is not considered a side effect. Among patients at risk of thrombocytopenia are those positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Here we present a case of an HIV-positive man who presented for inpatient psychiatric care with severe anxiety and a history of alcohol and benzodiazepine abuse. In this patient, gabapentin worsened thrombocytopenia after repeated exposure to this medication. We suggest caution when considering gabapentin for patients with preexisting low platelet counts, as there seems to be a risk for worsening thrombocytopenia with this antiepileptic in the presence of HIV infection.

  2. Breast-axillary complex in HIV/AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eni, U E; Naaya, H U; Yawe, K D T; Lawan, M A; Bakari, A A

    2010-01-01

    HIV/AIDS have not only increased the health care burden especially in developing countries, it equally complicates the presentation of many diseases. Some well known disease entities now occur in fulminant complexities not previously described or known as such. The objective of this article is to report an unusual presentation of HIV/AIDS patients to the surgeon with Axillary and ipsilateral breast swelling. This is a report of three cases seen and managed by the authors. Three adult female patients presented with progressively increasing axillary and ipsilateral breast swellings. They also had associated fevers and weight loss. Their main concern had been development of breast cancer. One of the patients was a known retroviral positive on Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART). Examination revealed axillary abscess and ipsilateral breast oedema in two cases. The patient on HAART had a hard breast-axillary mass complex. Biopsy (FNAB) revealed inflammatory cells and no malignancy in all three cases. HIV screening was positive in all cases. One of the patients had excision of breast-axillary mass complex, and the histology showed features of chronic inflammation, with no malignant cells. The other two had incision and drainage of their axillary abscess. This shows the ubiquitous presentation of HIV/AIDS in our environment and surgeons should be aware of the breast axillary complex in HIV/AIDS. Medical practitioners should be careful to obtain accurate diagnosis before embarking on treatment especially mutilating surgical procedures.

  3. Malignant Fibrohisticytoma of the Knee in a Patient with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Gomes Gobbi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes a patient presenting with anterior knee pain (extensor mechanism pain, a poorly studied complaint in the HIV population. The final diagnosis was malignant fibrohistiocytoma, a rare condition among knee pathologies, successfully treated with endoprosthesis after tumor resection. This article focuses on what the authors learned after treating this patient, particularly on the difficulty in making a correct diagnosis of this group of patients due to lack of adequate epidemiological characterization. By assuming that the pathology was related to long-term infection and treatment of HIV (knee hoffitis, the authors underestimated the gravity of the case, almost compromising the result of treatment.

  4. Neurologic emergencies in HIV-negative immunosuppressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-De-Villoria, J A; Fernández-García, P; Borrego-Ruiz, P J

    HIV-negative immunosuppressed patients comprise a heterogeneous group including transplant patients, patients undergoing treatment with immunosuppressors, uremic patients, alcoholics, undernourished patients, diabetics, patients on dialysis, elderly patients, and those diagnosed with severe or neoplastic processes. Epileptic seizures, focal neurologic signs, and meningoencephalitis are neurologic syndromes that require urgent action. In most of these situations, neuroimaging tests are necessary, but the findings can be different from those observed in immunocompetent patients in function of the inflammatory response. Infectious disease is the first diagnostic suspicion, and the identification of an opportunistic pathogen should be oriented in function of the type and degree of immunosuppression. Other neurologic emergencies include ischemic stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, neoplastic processes, and pharmacological neurotoxicity. This article reviews the role of neuroimaging in HIV-negative immunodepressed patients with a neurologic complication that requires urgent management. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Measurement and analysis of the thoracic patient setup deviations in routine radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Mingxuan; Zou Huawei; Wu Rong; Sun Jian; Dong Xiaoqi

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the magnitude of the setup deviations of the thoracic patients in routine radiotherapy. Methods: Altogether 408 films for 21 thoracic patients were recorded using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID), and comparison with reference CT simulator digitally-reconstructed radiograph (DRR) for anterior-posterior fields was performed. The deviation of setup for 21 patients in the left-right (RL), superior-inferior (SI) directions and rotation about the anterior-posterior (AP) axis were measured and analyzed. Results: Without immobilization device, the mean translational and rotational setup deviations were (0.7±3.1) mm and (1.5±4.1) mm in the RL and SI directions, respectively, and (0.3±2.4) degree about AP axis. With immobilization device, the mean translational and rotational setup deviations were (0.5±2.4) mm and (0.8±2.7) mm in the RL and SI directions respectively, and (0.2±1.6) degree about AP axis. Conclusion: The setup deviations in thoracic patients irradiation may be reduced with the use of the immobilization device. The setup deviation in the SI direction is greater than that in the RL direction. The setup deviations are mainly random errors

  6. Value of routine immediate postoperative brain computerized tomography in pediatric neurosurgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jong-myung; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Phi, Ji Hoon; Kim, Seung-Ki; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-One; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2012-05-01

    Routine immediate postoperative brain CT (RIPO CT) has advantages and disadvantages. The present study was performed to know the extent of gain by RIPO CT in the aspect of immediate postoperative patient care in pediatric patient population and according to the disease entity and surgical procedure. We reviewed 910 cases of pediatric brain surgery performed from January 2008 to March 2010 who had RIPO CT. The value of each examination was graded according to the impact of the CT findings on the decision making processes on postoperative patient care or on the understanding of postoperative patient's status: level I (urgent surgical procedures are necessary), level II (high level of attention should be paid because of possible urgent surgical procedure in near future), level III (RIPO CT is useful for understanding of postoperative change of patient's status), and level IV (no significant gain). The number of patients in each level was evaluated, and proportions of levels according to disease entity and surgical procedure were compared. In total, the proportion of each level of I to IV was 0.4%, 4.9%, 3.5%, and 91.2%, respectively. The group of brain tumors, especially those who have malignant or highly vascular tumors, showed significantly higher value of RIPO CT. Cases of traumatic epidural hematoma and intracerebral hemorrhage revealed significantly high proportion of level II although no case underwent reoperation. The results of present study may be useful for making policy of "selective" application of immediate postoperative brain CT according to the patient conditions. Also the use of immediate postoperative brain CT can be decided in individual cases by considering disease entity and surgical procedure.

  7. Rapid learning in practice: A lung cancer survival decision support system in routine patient care data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekker, Andre; Vinod, Shalini; Holloway, Lois; Oberije, Cary; George, Armia; Goozee, Gary; Delaney, Geoff P.; Lambin, Philippe; Thwaites, David

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: A rapid learning approach has been proposed to extract and apply knowledge from routine care data rather than solely relying on clinical trial evidence. To validate this in practice we deployed a previously developed decision support system (DSS) in a typical, busy clinic for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Material and methods: Gender, age, performance status, lung function, lymph node status, tumor volume and survival were extracted without review from clinical data sources for lung cancer patients. With these data the DSS was tested to predict overall survival. Results: 3919 lung cancer patients were identified with 159 eligible for inclusion, due to ineligible histology or stage, non-radical dose, missing tumor volume or survival. The DSS successfully identified a good prognosis group and a medium/poor prognosis group (2 year OS 69% vs. 27/30%, p < 0.001). Stage was less discriminatory (2 year OS 47% for stage I–II vs. 36% for stage IIIA–IIIB, p = 0.12) with most good prognosis patients having higher stage disease. The DSS predicted a large absolute overall survival benefit (∼40%) for a radical dose compared to a non-radical dose in patients with a good prognosis, while no survival benefit of radical radiotherapy was predicted for patients with a poor prognosis. Conclusions: A rapid learning environment is possible with the quality of clinical data sufficient to validate a DSS. It uses patient and tumor features to identify prognostic groups in whom therapy can be individualized based on predicted outcomes. Especially the survival benefit of a radical versus non-radical dose predicted by the DSS for various prognostic groups has clinical relevance, but needs to be prospectively validated

  8. Patient characteristics associated with measurement of routine diabetes care: an observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arna L Van Doorn-Klomberg

    Full Text Available Non-modifiable patient characteristics, including age, gender, ethnicity as well as the occurrence of multi-morbidities, are associated with processes and outcomes of diabetes care. Information on these factors can be used in case mix adjustment of performance measures. However, the practical relevance of such adjustment is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the strength of associations between patient factors and diabetes care processes and outcomes.We performed an observational study based on routinely collected data of 12,498 diabetes patients in 59 Dutch primary care practices. Data were collected on patient age, gender, whether the patient lived in a deprived area, body mass index and the co-occurrence of cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, depression or anxiety. Outcomes included 6 dichotomous measures (3 process and 3 outcome related regarding glycosylated hemoglobin, systolic blood pressure and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol. We performed separate hierarchical logistic mixed model regression models for each of the outcome measures.Each of the process measure models showed moderate effect sizes, with pooled areas under the curve that varied between 0.66 and 0.76. The frequency of diabetes related consultations as a measure of patient compliance to treatment showed the strongest association with all process measures (odds ratios between 5.6 and 14.5. The effect sizes of the outcome measure models were considerably smaller than the process measure models, with pooled areas under the curve varying from 0.57 to 0.61.Several non-modifiable patient factors could be associated with processes and outcomes of diabetes care. However, associations were small. These results suggest that case-mix correction or stratification in assessing diabetes care has limited practical relevance.

  9. Microbial translocation is correlated with HIV evolution in HIV-HCV co-infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Jacques Tudesq

    Full Text Available Microbial translocation (MT is characterized by bacterial products passing into the blood through the gut barrier and is a key phenomenon in the pathophysiology of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection. MT is also associated with liver damage in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV patients. The aim of the study was to assess MT in plasma of HIV-HCV co-infected patients. 16S rDNA (16 S Ribosomal DNA subunit marker and other markers of MT such as Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-binding protein (LBP, soluble CD14 (sCD14, intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP were used. Clinical, biological and immunological characteristics of the population were studied in order to correlate them with the intensity of the MT. We demonstrate that indirect markers of MT, LBP and CD14s, and a marker of intestinal permeability (I-FABP are significantly higher in HIV-HCV co-infected patients than in healthy controls (17.0 vs 2.6 μg/mL, p < 0.001; 1901.7 vs 1255.0 ng/mL, p = 0.018; 478.3 vs 248.1 pg/mL, p < 0.001, respectively, while a direct marker of MT (16S rDNA copies is not different between these two populations. However, plasma 16S rDNA was significantly higher in co-infected patients with long-standing HIV infections (RGM = 1.47 per 10 years, CI95% = [1.04:2.06], p = 0.03. Our findings show that in HIV-HCV co-infected patients, plasma 16S rDNA levels, directly reflecting MT, seem to be linked to the duration of HIV infection, while elevated levels of LBP and sCD14 reflect only a persistence of immune activation. The levels of these markers were not correlated with HCV evolution.

  10. Sero-prevalance of anti-R7V antibody in HIV infected patients in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The seroprevalence of Anti-R7V antibody was therefore investigated in HIV patients attending clinic within the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) and compared with HIV negative patients. Correlation between the presence of the antibody and the clinical status of patients was also investigated. The HIV positive patients were ...

  11. Helicobacter pylori gastritis in HIV-infected patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Daniel T; Morgan, Christopher J; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M

    2014-10-01

    The risk factors for acquiring Helicobacter pylori and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infections are different: H. pylori is transmitted by gastro- or fecal-oral routes and is associated with low socioeconomic conditions, while HIV is transmitted through sexual intercourse, infected body fluids, and transplacentally. If the host responses to these infections were independent, the prevalence of H. pylori should be similar in HIV-infected and non-infected patients. Yet, several studies have detected a lower prevalence of H. pylori in patients with HIV infection, whereas other studies found either no differences or greater rates of H. pylori infection in HIV-positive subjects. To review studies that addressed the issue of these two simultaneous infections and attempt to determine whether reliable conclusions can be drawn from this corpus of often contrasting evidence. Electronic literature search for relevant publications, followed by manual search of additional citations from extracted articles. The initial search yielded 44 publications; after excluding case reports, reviews, narrowly focused articles, and duplicate reports, there remained 29 articles, which are the corpus of this review. With one exception, all studies reported higher rates of H. pylori infection in HIV-negative subjects. Five studies also examined the CD4 lymphocyte counts and found an inverse correlation between the degree of immunosuppression and the prevalence of active H. pylori infection. Current evidence suggests that it is likely that H. pylori needs a functional immune system to successfully and persistently colonize the human gastric mucosa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Assessing Physician-Patient Dialogues About Chronic Migraine During Routine Office Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Dawn C; Gillard, Patrick; Arctander, Kaitlyn; Kuang, Amy W; Lipton, Richard B

    2018-05-04

    To assess physician-patient communication and identify the frequency of use of specific communication techniques by analyzing recordings of routinely scheduled medical encounters for patients with clinician-identified chronic migraine. Chronic migraine is an under-diagnosed, under-treated, and highly burdensome disease. Effective medical communication is integral to optimal medical care, including providing accurate diagnoses, creating effective treatment plans, and enhancing patient adherence. Communication patterns during office visits may be a target for intervention to improve outcomes for people with chronic migraine. This was a prospective, observational study based on analysis of audio recordings collected during neurologist-patient chronic migraine dialogues. Twenty neurologists from a US neurology panel maintained by Verilogue, Inc., a research organization specializing in healthcare dialogues, were invited to identify patients with chronic migraine and record clinical encounters with their patients. Both new patient visits and follow-up visits were included in this analysis. Neurologist-patient dialogues were audio-recorded, anonymized, transcribed, and analyzed by a sociolinguist for the presence of prespecified communication parameters, strategies, and specific language indicative of optimal migraine-related medical care. Fourteen out of the 20 invited neurologists (70.0%) accepted the study invitation and recorded 35 encounters with patients eligible for the study. The patient sample was 91.4% female (n = 32/35), with a mean age of 46 years. On average, there were 17 headache-related questions per visit; 82.0% of questions were closed-ended (n = 369/450). Headache/migraine frequency was elicited in 77.1% of the dialogues (n = 27/35), but headache days per month was assessed in only a single dialogue. Only one neurologist utilized the ask-tell-ask technique. Headache-related disability was discussed in 22.9%of the dialogues (n = 8

  13. Oxidative Stress in Patients with HIV-Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Moroz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the study we investigated the frequency and depth of liver injury in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, depending on age, sex, duration of disease, effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. It is found that in patients with HIV-infection with the III degree of hepatotoxicity, antioxidant defense system is more depleted under the influence of HAART.

  14. Upper Abdominal Ultra-Sonography Findings in HIV Patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital and the Defence Forces Memorial Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. Subjects: HIV infected patients referred for upper abdominal sonography within the study duration of eight months. Results: Two hundred and seventy three (273) patients were ...

  15. Cryptosporidiosis and Isosporiasis among HIV/AIDS patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objectives: Cryptosporidosis and isosporiasis are becoming common in subjects with AIDS. Thus a cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the magnitude of Cryptosporidium parvum and Isospora belli infections among HIV/AIDS patients in Jimma, Southwest Ethiopia. Patients and methods: One ...

  16. Malarial infection among HIV Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy (ART)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malarial infection among patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) attending Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, Benue State was investigated between April and August 2008 to determine the level of malaria infection in HIV/AIDS patients on ART and those not on ART with respect to CD4+ counts, age and gender. A total of ...

  17. Seroprevalence occurrence of viral hepatitis and HIV among hemodialysis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Inass Mahmood; Mutar Mahdi, Batool

    2018-05-01

    Background: Patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) were on maintenance invasive haemodialysis (HD) procedure. This procedure by itself affects immunity of the patients and became more susceptible to viral infections. Aim of the study: to investigate the occurrence of HBV, HCV and HIV infections in patients with hemodialysis. Patients and methods: A retrospective study of 430 end-stage renal failure patients, referred to hemodialysis department at Al-Kindy Teaching Hospital, Baghdad-Iraq from Junuary-2015 to Junuary-2017. Patients were investigated for HBs-Ag using enzyme-labeled antigen test (Foresight-EIA-USA ), HCV- Abs (IgG) specific immunoglobulin using a HCV enzyme-labeled antigen test (Foresight-EIA-USA) and anti HIV Abs (IgG) using enzyme-labeled antigen test (Foresight-EIA-USA). Results: The frequency of HBV infection in the first year was not significant between males (1.11%) and females (0.00%)(P = 0.295). About HCV also there are no significant differences between males (12.63%) and females (9.31%)(P = 0.347). After one year of follow up the frequencies of HBV and HCV were not significant between two sexes. Additionally, no any one of the patients had HIV infection. Conclusions: This study brings a light on that HBV and HCV were having the same frequencies in both genders and lower occurrence with time. Furthermore, HIV was not detected in those patients.

  18. HIV and parasitic co-infections in tuberculosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Range, N.; Magnussen, Pascal; Mugomela, A.

    2007-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in Mwanza, Tanzania, to determine the burden of HIV and parasitic co-infections among patients who were confirmed or suspected cases of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Of the 655 patients investigated, 532 (81.2%) had been confirmed as PTB cases, by microscopy...

  19. Seroprevalence occurrence of viral hepatitis and HIV among hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inass Mahmood Abid Kamal

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with chronic renal failure (CRF were on maintenance invasive hemodialysis (HD procedure. This procedure by itself affects immunity of the patients and became more susceptible to viral infections. Aim of the study: to investigate the occurrence of HBV, HCV and HIV infections in patients with hemodialysis. Patients and methods: A retrospective study of 430 end-stage renal failure patients, referred to hemodialysis department at XXXX Teaching Hospital, Baghdad-Iraq from January-2015 to January-2017. Patients were investigated for HBs-Ag using enzyme-labeled antigen test (Foresight-EIA-USA, HCV- Abs (IgG specific immunoglobulin using an HCV enzyme-labeled antigen test (Foresight-EIA-USAand anti - HIV Abs (IgG using enzyme-labeled antigen test (Foresight-EIA-USA. Results: The frequency of HBV infection in the first year was not significant between males (1.11% and females (0.00% (P = 0.295. About HCV also there are no significant differences between males (12.63% and females (9.31% (P = 0.347. After one year of follow up the frequencies of HBV and HCV were not significant between two sexes. Additionally, no any one of the patients had HIV infection. Conclusions: This study brings a light on that HBV and HCV were having the same frequencies in both genders and lower occurrence with time. Furthermore, HIV was not detected in those patients. Keywords: Virus, Hemodialysis, Infection

  20. Headache among patients with HIV disease: prevalence, characteristics, and associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Kale E; Kirkland, Karl; Many, W J; Smitherman, Todd A

    2012-03-01

    Headache is one of the most common medical complaints reported by individuals suffering from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), but limited and conflicting data exist regarding their prevalence, prototypical characteristics, and relationship to HIV disease variables in the current era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The aims of the present cross-sectional study were to characterize headache symptoms among patients with HIV/AIDS and to assess relations between headache and HIV/AIDS disease variables. Two hundred HIV/AIDS patients (49% female; mean age = 43.22 ± 12.30 years; 74% African American) from an internal medicine clinic and an AIDS outreach clinic were administered a structured headache diagnostic interview to assess headache characteristics and features consistent with International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD)-II diagnostic semiologies. They also completed 2 measures of headache-related disability. Prescribed medications, most recent cluster of differentiation (CD4) cell count, date of HIV diagnosis, possible causes of secondary headache, and other relevant medical history were obtained via review of patient medical records. One hundred seven patients (53.5%) reported headache symptoms, the large majority of which were consistent with characteristics of primary headache disorders after excluding 4 cases attributable to secondary causes. Among those who met criteria for a primary headache disorder, 88 (85.44%) met criteria for migraine, most of which fulfilled ICHD-II appendix diagnostic criteria for chronic migraine. Fifteen patients (14.56%) met criteria for episodic or chronic tension-type headache. Severity of HIV (as indicated by CD4 cell counts), but not duration of HIV or number of prescribed antiretroviral medications, was strongly associated with headache severity, frequency, and disability and also distinguished migraine from TTH. Problematic headache is highly prevalent

  1. HIV-Specific B Cell Frequency Correlates with Neutralization Breadth in Patients Naturally Controlling HIV-Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline Rouers

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available HIV-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs have been isolated from patients with high viremia but also from HIV controllers that repress HIV-1 replication. In these elite controllers (ECs, multiple parameters contribute to viral suppression, including genetic factors and immune responses. Defining the immune correlates associated with the generation of bnAbs may help in designing efficient immunotherapies. In this study, in ECs either positive or negative for the HLA-B*57 protective allele, in treated HIV-infected and HIV-negative individuals, we characterized memory B cell compartments and HIV-specific memory B cells responses using flow cytometry and ELISPOT. ECs preserved their memory B cell compartments and in contrast to treated patients, maintained detectable HIV-specific memory B cell responses. All ECs presented IgG1+ HIV-specific memory B cells but some individuals also preserved IgG2+ or IgG3+ responses. Importantly, we also analyzed the capacity of sera from ECs to neutralize a panel of HIV strains including transmitted/founder virus. 29% and 21% of HLA-B*57+ and HLA-B*57− ECs, respectively, neutralized at least 40% of the viral strains tested. Remarkably, in HLA-B*57+ ECs the frequency of HIV-Env-specific memory B cells correlated positively with the neutralization breadth suggesting that preservation of HIV-specific memory B cells might contribute to the neutralizing responses in these patients.

  2. Harm reduction interventions in HIV care: a qualitative exploration of patient and provider perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Carlberg-Racich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. A culture of stringent drug policy, one-size-fits-all treatment approaches, and drug-related stigma has clouded clinical HIV practice in the United States. The result is a series of missed opportunities in the HIV care environment. An approach which may address the broken relationship between patient and provider is harm reduction—which removes judgment and operates at the patient’s stage of readiness. Harm reduction is not a routine part of care; rather, it exists outside clinic walls, exacerbating the divide between compassionate, stigma-free services and the medical system. Methods. Qualitative, phenomenological, semi-structured, individual interviews with patients and providers were conducted in three publicly-funded clinics in Chicago, located in areas of high HIV prevalence and drug use and serving African-American patients (N = 38. A deductive thematic analysis guided the process, including: the creation of an index code list, transcription and verification of interviews, manual coding, notation of emerging themes and refinement of code definitions, two more rounds of coding within AtlasTi, calculation of Cohen’s Kappa for interrater reliability, queries of major codes and analysis of additional common themes. Results. Thematic analysis of findings indicated that the majority of patients felt receptive to harm reduction interventions (safer injection counseling, safer stimulant use counseling, overdose prevention information, supply provision from their provider, and expressed anticipated gratitude for harm reduction information and/or supplies within the HIV care visit, although some were reluctant to talk openly about their drug use. Provider results were mixed, with more receptivity reported by advanced practice nurses, and more barriers cited by physicians. Notable barriers included: role-perceptions, limited time, inadequate training, and the patients themselves. Discussion. Patients are willing to receive harm

  3. Retinitis due to opportunistic infections in Iranian HIV infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abdollahi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We tried to evaluate prevalence and characteristics of Iranian HIV infected patients with retinitis due to opportunistic infections. In this cross sectional study, we evaluated 106 HIV infected patients via indirect ophthalmoscopy and slit lamp examination by 90 lens to find retinitis cases. General information and results of ophthalmologic examination were analyzed. Prevalence of retinitis due to opportunistic infections was 6.6%: cytomegalovirus (CMV retinitis 1.88%, toxoplasmosis retinochoroiditis 1.88% and tuberculosis chorioretinitis 2.83%. CD4 count was higher than 50 cell/µlit in both cases with CMV retinitis. Along with increasing survival in the HIV infected patients, the prevalence of complications such as ocular manifestation due to opportunistic infections are increasing and must be more considered.

  4. Recurrent pneumococcal meningitis in a splenectomised HIV-infected patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quesne Gilles

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of human disease, especially in pre-school children and elderly people, as well as in special risk groups such as asplenic, antibody deficient patients, or presenting disruption of natural barriers. The occurrence of pneumococcal disease has increased with the onset of the HIV epidemic and the emergence of drug-resistance. Case presentation We report the case of an HIV-1-infected patient who experienced three episodes of recurrent pneumococcal meningitis over a 4-year period, despite chemoprophylaxis and capsular vaccination. Conclusions Efficacy of anti-pneumococcal chemoprophylaxis and vaccination in HIV-infected patients are discussed in the light of this particular case.

  5. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of hepatitis B virus in HIV-infected patients in Guangdong, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S M; Cai, W P; Hu, F Y; Lan, Y; Liao, B L; Chen, Y P; Tang, X P

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in HIV-infected adults at the time of antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in Guangdong province, China. A total of 2793 HIV-infected adults were enrolled between January 2004 and September 2011. Demographic data and laboratory parameters were collected, HBV-DNA levels were measured, and HBV genotypes were identified before ART initiation. The prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in HIV-infected patients was 13.2%. A total of 266 HIV/HBV co-infected patients and 1469 HIV mono-infected patients were recruited. The median alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels of HIV/HBV co-infected patients were higher than HIV mono-infected patients (32 U/L vs. 22 U/L, p HIV/HBV co-infected patients was lower than HIV mono-infected patients (59 cells/mm(3) vs. 141 cells/mm(3), p study indicates a high prevalence of HBsAg in HIV-infected adults in Guangdong. The level of CD4 cell count in HIV/HBV co-infected patients was much lower than HIV mono-infected patients, especially in patients who were HBeAg-positive and had a high level of HBV-DNA. The predominant HBV genotype in HIV/HBV co-infected patients is genotype B. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Anal carcinoma in HIV-infected patients in the period 1995-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Rebecca; Helleberg, Marie; Kronborg, Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Several studies have demonstrated an increased risk of non-AIDS cancers in HIV patients and, for some cancers, also in relatives of HIV patients. We aimed to estimate (1) the risk of anal carcinoma among HIV patients and their parents, and (2) the mortality after a diagnosis...... 1995-2009, and (2) parents of HIV patients compared with parents of controls for the period 1978-2009. Cancer diagnoses were identified from The Danish Cancer Registry. We further estimated the mortality rate ratios (MRR) of HIV patients compared with controls after the diagnosis of anal carcinoma....... Results: Thirty-six HIV patients versus 8 population controls were diagnosed with anal carcinoma. HIV patients had an increased risk of anal carcinoma (IRR 77.9, 95% CI 36.2-167.7), especially among men who have sex with men (MSM) (IRR 101.4, 95% CI 39.3-261.5). Fathers of HIV patients had an increased...

  7. Seroprevalence occurrence of viral hepatitis and HIV among hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Inass Mahmood Abid; Mahdi, Batool Mutar

    2018-05-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) were on maintenance invasive hemodialysis (HD) procedure. This procedure by itself affects immunity of the patients and became more susceptible to viral infections. to investigate the occurrence of HBV, HCV and HIV infections in patients with hemodialysis. A retrospective study of 430 end-stage renal failure patients, referred to hemodialysis department at XXXX Teaching Hospital, Baghdad-Iraq from January-2015 to January-2017. Patients were investigated for HBs-Ag using enzyme-labeled antigen test (Foresight-EIA-USA), HCV- Abs (IgG) specific immunoglobulin using an HCV enzyme-labeled antigen test (Foresight-EIA-USA)and anti - HIV Abs (IgG) using enzyme-labeled antigen test (Foresight-EIA-USA). The frequency of HBV infection in the first year was not significant between males (1.11%) and females (0.00%) (P = 0.295). About HCV also there are no significant differences between males (12.63%) and females (9.31%) (P = 0.347). After one year of follow up the frequencies of HBV and HCV were not significant between two sexes. Additionally, no any one of the patients had HIV infection. This study brings a light on that HBV and HCV were having the same frequencies in both genders and lower occurrence with time. Furthermore, HIV was not detected in those patients.

  8. Drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in a national referral hospital, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Genevieve; Bulifon, Sophie; Breysse, Serge; Daneth, Thol; Bonnet, Maryline; Hurtado, Northan; Molfino, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    There are no recent data on the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR TB) in Cambodia. We aim to describe TB drug resistance amongst adults with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection in a national referral hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Between 22 November 2007 and 30 November 2009, clinical specimens from HIV-infected patients suspected of having TB underwent routine microscopy, Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture, and drug susceptibility testing. Laboratory and clinical data were collected for patients with positive M. tuberculosis cultures. M. tuberculosis was cultured from 236 HIV-infected patients. Resistance to any first-line TB drug occurred in 34.7% of patients; 8.1% had multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB). The proportion of MDR TB amongst new patients and previously treated patients was 3.7 and 28.9%, respectively (pCambodia may be higher than previously recognised, particularly amongst HIV-infected patients. Additional prevalence studies are needed. This study also illustrates the feasibility and utility of analysis of non-respiratory specimens in the diagnosis of TB, even in low-resource settings, and suggests that extra-pulmonary specimens should be included in TB diagnostic algorithms.

  9. High prevalence of pain among adult HIV-infected patients at University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azagew AW

    2017-10-01

    : 2.1–16.7 were significantly associated with pain.Conclusion: Adult HIV patients in this sample reported a high level of chronic pain. Health-care providers should better implement a routine pain assessment among HIV-positive patients to alleviate their suffering. Keywords: human immunodeficiency virus, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, sub-saharan Africa, Ethiopia, pain, prevalence 

  10. High prevalence of pain among adult HIV-infected patients at University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azagew, Abere Woretaw; Woreta, Hiwot Kassa; Tilahun, Ambaye Dejen; Anlay, Degefaye Zelalem

    2017-01-01

    HIV/AIDS are pressing global health problems. Pain is a common symptom reported by patients living with HIV/AIDS. The exact cause of pain in HIV patients has not been thoroughly described, but it may, due to a symptom of HIV itself, result from opportunistic infections, as a side effect of antiretroviral drugs, concurrent neoplasia or other causes. In addition, pain perception of HIV-infected patients is highly variable and may vary based on cultural context and patient demographics. In Ethiopia, there is insufficient evidence on the prevalence and factors associated with HIV-related pain. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 422 adult HIV-infected patients at Gondar University Hospital antiretroviral care clinic from March 1 to May 1, 2016. Systematic random sampling was used to select study participants. A pretested interviewer-administered questionnaire and a standardized medical record data abstraction tool were used to collect data. A short form brief pain inventory tool was used to measure the outcome. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were fitted to identify factors associated with pain among adult HIV patients. The prevalence of pain was found to be 51.2% (95% CI: 46.4%-55.9%). Headache (17.9%), abdominal pain (15.6%), and backache (13.3%) were the most common symptoms of study participants. Being female (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=1.8, 95% CI: 1.1-2.9); regular alcohol intake (aOR=3.3, 95% CI: 1.5-7.2); baseline World Health Organization clinical disease stage: II (aOR=2.5, 95% CI: 1.2-4.9), III (aOR=2, 95%, CI: 1.1-3.6), and IV (aOR=2.4, 95% CI: 1.1-5.3); and the presence of a chronic comorbid condition (aOR=5.9, 95% CI: 2.1-16.7) were significantly associated with pain. Adult HIV patients in this sample reported a high level of chronic pain. Healthcare providers should better implement a routine pain assessment among HIV-positive patients to alleviate their suffering.

  11. HIV and intestinal parasites in adult TB patients in a teaching hospital in Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassu, Afework; Mengistu, Getahun; Ayele, Belete; Diro, Ermias; Mekonnen, Firew; Ketema, Dereje; Moges, Feleke; Mesfin, Tsehay; Getachew, Assefa; Ergicho, Bahiru; Elias, Daniel; Wondmikun, Yared; Aseffa, Abraham; Ota, Fusao

    2007-10-01

    The level of HIV infection and intestinal parasitoses among TB patients was assessed in a hospital-based cross-sectional study involving 257 patients in Gondar, Ethiopia. In TB patients, our study reported co-infection with HIV (52.1%) and intestinal parasites (40.9%) The high prevalence of HIV and intestinal parasites indicates an increased morbidity inTB patients and emphasized the importance of continued HIV sero-surveillance, stool analysis and treatment.

  12. Health care index score and risk of death following tuberculosis diagnosis in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, D N; Grint, D; Post, F A

    2013-01-01

    To assess health care utilisation for patients co-infected with TB and HIV (TB-HIV), and to develop a weighted health care index (HCI) score based on commonly used interventions and compare it with patient outcome.......To assess health care utilisation for patients co-infected with TB and HIV (TB-HIV), and to develop a weighted health care index (HCI) score based on commonly used interventions and compare it with patient outcome....

  13. Frequency of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Brazilian HIV-Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmazo, Péricles Sidnei; Bazan, Silméia Garcia Zanati; Shiraishi, Flávio Gobbis; Bazan, Rodrigo; Okoshi, Katashi; Hueb, João Carlos

    2018-04-09

    AIDS as well as atherosclerosis are important public health problems. The longer survival among HIV-infected is associated with increased number of cardiovascular events in this population, and this association is not fully understood. To identify the frequency of subclinical atherosclerosis in HIV-infected patients compared to control subjects; to analyze associations between atherosclerosis and clinical and laboratory variables, cardiovascular risk factors, and the Framingham coronary heart disease risk score (FCRS). Prospective cross-sectional case-control study assessing the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis in 264 HIV-infected patients and 279 controls. Clinical evaluation included ultrasound examination of the carotid arteries, arterial stiffness by pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx), laboratory analysis of peripheral blood, and cardiovascular risk according to FCRS criteria. The significance level adopted in the statistical analysis was p media thickness was higher in the HIV group than in controls (p media thickness, was not associated with carotid plaque frequency, and did not alter the mechanical characteristics of the arterial system (PWV and AIx). HIV-infected patients are at increased risk of atherosclerosis in association with classical cardiovascular risk factors. Treatment with protease inhibitors does not promote functional changes in the arteries, and shows no association with increased frequency of atherosclerotic plaques in carotid arteries. The FCRS may be inappropriate for this population.

  14. Stroke in a patient with tuberculous meningitis and HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bruna Pasticci

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Tuberculous meningitis (TBM is a devastating disease. TBM occurs more commonly in HIV infected patients. The influence of HIV co-infection on clinical manifestations and outcome of TBM is not well defined. Yet, some differences have been observed and stroke has been recorded to occur more frequently. This study reports on an HIV infected Caucasian female with lung, meningeal tuberculosis and stroke due to a cortical sub-cortical ischemic lesion.TBM was documented in the absence of neurologic symptoms. At the same time, miliary lung TB caused by multi-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed. Anti-TB therapy consisting of a combination of four drugs was administered. The patient improved and was discharged five weeks later. In conclusion, TBM and multiple underling pathologies including HIV infection, as well as other risk factors can lead to a greater risk of stroke. Moreover, drug interactions and their side effects add levels of complexity. TBM must be included in the differential diagnosis of HIV infected patients with stroke and TBM treatment needs be started as soon as possible before the onset of vasculopathy.

  15. Positron emission tomography in patients suffering from HIV-1 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathekge, Mike [University Hospital of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Goethals, Ingeborg; Wiele, Christophe van de [University Hospital Ghent, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Maes, Alex [AZ Groening, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2009-07-15

    This paper reviews currently available PET studies performed either to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection or to assess the value of PET imaging in the clinical decision making of patients infected with HIV-1 presenting with AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies. FDG PET has shown that HIV-1 infection progresses by distinct anatomical steps, with involvement of the upper torso preceding involvement of the lower part of the torso, and that the degree of FDG uptake relates to viral load. The former finding suggests that lymphoid tissues are engaged in a predictable sequence and that diffusible mediators of activation might be important targets for vaccine or therapeutic intervention strategies. In lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients, limited available data support the hypothesis that stavudine-related lipodystrophy is associated with increased glucose uptake by adipose tissue as a result of the metabolic stress of adipose tissue in response to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Finally, in early AIDS-related dementia complex (ADC), striatal hypermetabolism is observed, whereas progressive ADC is characterized by a decrease in subcortical and cortical metabolism. In the clinical setting, PET has been shown to allow the differentiation of AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies, and to allow monitoring of side effects of HAART. However, in patients suffering from HIV infection and presenting with extracerebral lymphoma or other human malignancies, knowledge of viraemia is essential when interpreting FDG PET imaging. (orig.)

  16. Positron emission tomography in patients suffering from HIV-1 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathekge, Mike; Goethals, Ingeborg; Wiele, Christophe van de; Maes, Alex

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews currently available PET studies performed either to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection or to assess the value of PET imaging in the clinical decision making of patients infected with HIV-1 presenting with AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies. FDG PET has shown that HIV-1 infection progresses by distinct anatomical steps, with involvement of the upper torso preceding involvement of the lower part of the torso, and that the degree of FDG uptake relates to viral load. The former finding suggests that lymphoid tissues are engaged in a predictable sequence and that diffusible mediators of activation might be important targets for vaccine or therapeutic intervention strategies. In lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients, limited available data support the hypothesis that stavudine-related lipodystrophy is associated with increased glucose uptake by adipose tissue as a result of the metabolic stress of adipose tissue in response to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Finally, in early AIDS-related dementia complex (ADC), striatal hypermetabolism is observed, whereas progressive ADC is characterized by a decrease in subcortical and cortical metabolism. In the clinical setting, PET has been shown to allow the differentiation of AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies, and to allow monitoring of side effects of HAART. However, in patients suffering from HIV infection and presenting with extracerebral lymphoma or other human malignancies, knowledge of viraemia is essential when interpreting FDG PET imaging. (orig.)

  17. Hepatitis C virus infection in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkowski, Mark S

    2007-10-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a spherical enveloped RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family, classified within the Hepacivirus genus. Since its discovery in 1989, HCV has been recognized as a major cause of chronic hepatitis and hepatic fibrosis that progresses in some patients to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In the United States, approximately 4 million people have been infected with HCV, and 10,000 HCVrelated deaths occur each year. Due to shared routes of transmission, HCV and HIV co-infection are common, affecting approximately one third of all HIV-infected persons in the United States. In addition, HIV co-infection is associated with higher HCV RNA viral load and a more rapid progression of HCV-related liver disease, leading to an increased risk of cirrhosis. HCV infection may also impact the course and management of HIV disease, particularly by increasing the risk of antiretroviral drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Thus, chronic HCV infection acts as an opportunistic disease in HIV-infected persons because the incidence of infection is increased and the natural history of HCV infection is accelerated in co-infected persons. Strategies to prevent primary HCV infection and to modify the progression of HCV-related liver disease are urgently needed among HIV/HCV co-infected individuals.

  18. Comparing the Ability of Anthropometric Indicators in Identifying Metabolic Syndrome in HIV Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Antunes Beraldo

    Full Text Available Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART can cause side effects in HIV patients, as the metabolic syndrome. Early identification of risk for development of cardiovascular diseases using available reliable and practical methods is fundamental. On this basis, the aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of anthropometric indicators to identify metabolic syndrome in HIV patients on HAART.It is a cross-sectional study. A number of 280 stable HIV patients were studied. It measured weight, height, waist circumference (WC, hip circumference (HP, thigh circumference (TC and calculated body mass index (BMI, body adiposity index (BAI, waist to hip ratio (WHR and waist to thigh ratio (WTR. There was also a performance of biochemical tests of lipid profile and fasting glucose. Systemic blood pressure was measured. The criteria proposed by the National Cholesterol Education Program III (NCEP-ATP III to metabolic syndrome classification was used. Individuals were divided in groups with or without metabolic alterations and their anthropometric indicators were compared. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were designed for each anthropometric indicator using the metabolic syndrome classification to identify sensitivity and specificity.WC was a good tool to identify each metabolic disorder separately: total cholesterol (only females, p<0.05, triglycerides (only males, p<0.001, HDL cholesterol (p<0.05, LDL cholesterol (p<005 and fasting glycemic (p<005. WC also showed the best performance to identify metabolic syndrome in both genders (areas under the curve (AUCs: 0.79 and 0.76 for male and female, respectively, while BAI proved to be an inadequate indicator (AUCs: 0.63 and 0.67 for males and females, respectively, in this population.The central adiposity measure (WC had the best performance to identify metabolic syndrome, and it is a convenient, cheap and reliable tool that can be used in clinical practice routinely to prevent

  19. Subsolid pulmonary nodule morphology and associated patient characteristics in a routine clinical population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mets, Onno M.; Jong, Pim A. de; Scholten, Ernst T.; Chung, Kaman; Ginneken, Bram van; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the presence and morphology of subsolid pulmonary nodules (SSNs) in a non-screening setting and relate them to clinical and patient characteristics. A total of 16,890 reports of clinically obtained chest CT (06/2011 to 11/2014, single-centre) were searched describing an SSN. Subjects with a visually confirmed SSN and at least two thin-slice CTs were included. Nodule volumes were measured. Progression was defined as volume increase exceeding the software interscan variation. Nodule morphology, location, and patient characteristics were evaluated. Fifteen transient and 74 persistent SSNs were included (median follow-up 19.6 [8.3-36.8] months). Subjects with an SSN were slightly older than those without (62 vs. 58 years; p = 0.01), but no gender predilection was found. SSNs were mostly located in the upper lobes. Women showed significantly more often persistent lesions than men (94 % vs. 69 %; p = 0.002). Part-solid lesions were larger (1638 vs. 383 mm"3; p < 0.001) and more often progressive (68 % vs. 38 %; p = 0.02), compared to pure ground-glass nodules. Progressive SSNs were rare under the age of 50 years. Logistic regression analysis did not identify additional nodule parameters of future progression, apart from part-solid nature. This study confirms previously reported characteristics of SSNs and associated factors in a European, routine clinical population. (orig.)

  20. Subsolid pulmonary nodule morphology and associated patient characteristics in a routine clinical population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mets, Onno M.; Jong, Pim A. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Scholten, Ernst T.; Chung, Kaman; Ginneken, Bram van [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Diagnostic Imaging Analysis Group, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Diagnostic Imaging Analysis Group, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meander Medical Center, Radiology, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2017-02-15

    To determine the presence and morphology of subsolid pulmonary nodules (SSNs) in a non-screening setting and relate them to clinical and patient characteristics. A total of 16,890 reports of clinically obtained chest CT (06/2011 to 11/2014, single-centre) were searched describing an SSN. Subjects with a visually confirmed SSN and at least two thin-slice CTs were included. Nodule volumes were measured. Progression was defined as volume increase exceeding the software interscan variation. Nodule morphology, location, and patient characteristics were evaluated. Fifteen transient and 74 persistent SSNs were included (median follow-up 19.6 [8.3-36.8] months). Subjects with an SSN were slightly older than those without (62 vs. 58 years; p = 0.01), but no gender predilection was found. SSNs were mostly located in the upper lobes. Women showed significantly more often persistent lesions than men (94 % vs. 69 %; p = 0.002). Part-solid lesions were larger (1638 vs. 383 mm{sup 3}; p < 0.001) and more often progressive (68 % vs. 38 %; p = 0.02), compared to pure ground-glass nodules. Progressive SSNs were rare under the age of 50 years. Logistic regression analysis did not identify additional nodule parameters of future progression, apart from part-solid nature. This study confirms previously reported characteristics of SSNs and associated factors in a European, routine clinical population. (orig.)

  1. Impact of tuberculosis treatment on CD4 cell count, HIV RNA, and p24 antigen in patients with HIV and tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejse, Christian; Furtado, A.; Camara, C.

    2013-01-01

    To describe HIV RNA levels during tuberculosis (TB) infection in patients co-infected with TB and HIV. Moreover, to examine the p24 antigen profile during TB treatment.......To describe HIV RNA levels during tuberculosis (TB) infection in patients co-infected with TB and HIV. Moreover, to examine the p24 antigen profile during TB treatment....

  2. Is Routine Duodenal Biopsy Necessary for the Detection of Celiac Disease in Patients Presenting with Iron Deficiency Anemia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Emami

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: CD should be considered in any adult patient presenting with unexplained IDA, even if not accompanied with gastrointestinal symptoms. Routine duodenal biopsy performed during diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is worthwhile in order to investigate for CD as an underlying cause of IDA in adult patients.

  3. HIV infection among tuberculosis patients in Vietnam: prevalence and impact on tuberculosis notification rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, D H; Sy, D N; Linh, N D; Hoan, T M; Dien, H T; Thuy, T B; Hoa, N P; Tung, L B; Cobelens, F

    2010-08-01

    Vietnam has an emerging human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic (estimated population prevalence 0.5%), but valid data on HIV prevalence among tuberculosis (TB) patients are limited. Recent increases in TB notification rates among young adults may be related to HIV. To assess the prevalence of HIV infection among smear-positive TB patients in six provinces with relatively high HIV population prevalence in Vietnam. All patients who registered for treatment of smear-positive TB during the fourth quarter of 2005 were offered HIV testing. Of the 1217 TB patients included in the study, 100 (8.2%) tested HIV-positive. HIV prevalence varied between 2% and 17% in the provinces, and was strongly associated with age Vietnam, HIV infection is concentrated in drug users, as well as in specific geographic areas where it has considerable impact on TB notification rates among men aged 15-34 years.

  4. Management of oral lesions in HIV-positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccaglini, Lorena; Atkinson, Jane C; Patton, Lauren L; Glick, Michael; Ficarra, Giuseppe; Peterson, Douglas E

    2007-03-01

    HIV/AIDS is currently the leading cause of death in Africa and the fourth leading cause of death worldwide. This systematic review of the literature was conducted to evaluate the evidence for treatment of the most common oral lesions associated with HIV: oral candidiasis with or without oropharyngeal involvement (OPC), oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL), recurrent aphthous-like ulcerations (RAU), oral Kaposi's sarcoma (OKS), orolabial herpes simplex infection (HSV), oral herpes zoster infection (VZV), intraoral or perioral warts (HPV), and HIV-associated periodontal diseases. Treatment of HIV-associated salivary gland disease is addressed in a different section of this World Workshop. We found the largest body of evidence for treatment of OPC in HIV patients. Future trials will be needed to test drugs currently in development for treatment of Candida strains that are resistant to existing therapies. There were no double blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials (RCT) for topical treatment of OHL, and only one RCT for systemic treatment of the lesion with desciclovir. Systemic thalidomide was the only drug tested in RCT for treatment or prevention of RAU. Only 1 double-blind RCT comparing vinblastine and sodium tetradecyl sulfate was identified for localized treatment of OKS. Three drugs (famciclovir, acyclovir, and valaciclovir) were shown to be effective in randomized, double-blind trials for treatment or suppression of mucocutaneous HSV lesions in HIV patients. In all 3 trials, the effects of these medications on orolabial HSV lesions were not reported separately. There were no double-blind, placebo-controlled RCT testing topical treatments for orolabial HSV lesions in HIV patients. No trials testing treatments of oral VZV were identified. There were no double-blind, placebo-controlled RCT for treatment of HIV-associated intraoral or perioral warts or periodontal diseases. In conclusion, there is a need for well-designed RCTs to assess the safety and

  5. Hepatitis B virus treatment in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Chloe L

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is common in HIV-infected persons and is associated with increased risk of liver-related morbidity and mortality. Agents available to treat HBV infection in coinfected patients include lamivudine, entecavir, emtricitabine, adefovir, peginterferon alfa, and the recently approved telbivudine. Treatment decisions should take into account a number of factors, including antiretroviral therapy status, HBV genotype, prior experience of lamivudine, and the need to avoid drug resistance in both HIV- and HBV-infected persons. This article summarizes a presentation on treatment and management of HBV infection in HIV-infected patients made by Chloe L. Thio, MD, at the 9th Annual Ryan White CARE Act Update in Washington, DC. The original presentation is available as a Webcast at www.iasusa.org.

  6. A Home Integral Telecare System for HIV/AIDS Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Cesar; Gomez, Enrique J; Garcia, Felipe; Chausa, Paloma; Guzman, Jorge; Del Pozo, Francisco; Gatell, Jose Maria

    2005-01-01

    VIHrtual Hospital is a telemedicine web system for improving home integral care of chronic HIV patients through the Internet. Using the videoconference, chat or messaging tools included in the system, patients can visit their healthcare providers (physician, psychologist, nurse, psychiatrist, pharmacist, and social worker), having these access to the Electronic Patient Record. The system also provides a telepharmacy service that controls treatment adherence and side effects, sending the medication to the patient's home by courier. A virtual community has been created, facilitating communication between patients and improving the collaboration between professionals, creating a care plan for each patient. As a complement, there is a virtual library where users can find validated HIV/AIDS information helping to enhance prevention. This system has been developed using low cost technologies in order to extend the number of patients involved in its trial. Thus, VIHrtual Hospital is now on trial in the Hospital Clinic (Barcelona, Spain) involving a hundred patients and twenty healthcare professionals during two years.Although we are still waiting for the final results of the trial, we can already say that the use of telemedicine systems developed ad hoc for a chronic disease, like HIV/AIDS, improve the quality of care of the patients and their care team. The system described is a good example of the possibilities that technologies are offering to create new chronic patient care models based on telemedicine.

  7. HIV-2 integrase polymorphisms and longitudinal genotypic analysis of HIV-2 infected patients failing a raltegravir-containing regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco-Silva, Joana; Abecasis, Ana; Miranda, Ana Cláudia; Poças, José; Narciso, Jorge; Águas, Maria João; Maltez, Fernando; Almeida, Isabel; Germano, Isabel; Diniz, António; Gonçalves, Maria de Fátima; Gomes, Perpétua; Cunha, Celso; Camacho, Ricardo Jorge

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the HIV-2 integrase gene polymorphisms and the pathways to resistance of HIV-2 patients failing a raltegravir-containing regimen, we studied 63 integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTI)-naïve patients, and 10 heavily pretreated patients exhibiting virological failure while receiving a salvage raltegravir-containing regimen. All patients were infected by HIV-2 group A. 61.4% of the integrase residues were conserved, including the catalytic motif residues. No INSTI-major resistance mutations were detected in the virus population from naïve patients, but two amino acids that are secondary resistance mutations to INSTIs in HIV-1 were observed. The 10 raltegravir-experienced patients exhibited resistance mutations via three main genetic pathways: N155H, Q148R, and eventually E92Q - T97A. The 155 pathway was preferentially used (7/10 patients). Other mutations associated to raltegravir resistance in HIV-1 were also observed in our HIV-2 population (V151I and D232N), along with several novel mutations previously unreported. Data retrieved from this study should help build a more robust HIV-2-specific algorithm for the genotypic interpretation of raltegravir resistance, and contribute to improve the clinical monitoring of HIV-2-infected patients.

  8. Predictive markers of survival in HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative Tanzanian patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richter, C.; Koelemay, M. J.; Swai, A. B.; Perenboom, R.; Mwakyusa, D. H.; Oosting, J.

    1995-01-01

    Prediction of survival in Tanzanian patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB). To evaluate the prognostic value of clinical and laboratory parameters on survival in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive and HIV seronegative patients with extrapulmonary TB. Over an 8-month period 192

  9. Characterization of mycobacteria in HIV/AIDS patients of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungana, G P; Ghimire, P; Sharma, S; Rijal, B P

    2008-01-01

    Besides Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a number of other Mycobacterium species are also occasional human pathogens. Tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and Mycobacterium kansasii is particularly prevalent in AIDS patients as compared to the normal population. A cross-sectional study was carried out during January 2004 to August 2005 in 100 HIV-infected persons visiting Tribhuvan University, Teaching Hospital, and about a dozen of HIV/AIDS care centers of Kathmandu with the objectives to characterize the different mycobacterial species in HIV/AIDS patients. Three sputum specimens from each person were used to investigate tuberculosis by Ziehl-Neelsen staining, culture and identification tests. Among the 100 HIV-infected cases, 66 (66%) were males and 34 (34%) were females. Sixty percent of the cases were in the age group of 21-30 years. Mycobacteria were detected in 23 (23%) HIV cases of which 15 (65.2%) were in the age group of 21-30 years ; 17(74%) were males and 6 (26 %) were females. Among 23 co-infected cases, 22 were culture positive for mycobacteria. Among these, the predominant one was Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), 9 (41%), followed by M. tuberculosis, 6 (27%), M .kansasii, 4 (18%), M. fortuitum, 2 (10%) and M. chelonae 1 (4%). Significant relationship was established between smoking/alcoholism and the subsequent development of tuberculosis (chi(2)=7.24, p<0.05 for smoking habit and chi(2)=4.39, p<0.05 for alcoholism). Fourteen (61%) co-infected cases presented with weight loss and cough whereas diarrhea was presented only by those patients with atypical mycobacterial co-infection, which was as high as 5 (56%) in patients with MAC co-infection. This study demonstrated the predominance of atypical mycobacteria, mainly MAC, in HIV/AIDS cases and most of them were from sputum smear-negative cases.

  10. Patient's needs and preferences in routine follow-up after treatment for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bock, GH; Bonnema, J; Zwaan, RE; de Velde, CJH; Kievit, J; Stiggelbout, AM

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the needs of women who participated in a routine follow-up programme after treatment for primary breast cancer. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a postal questionnaire among women without any sign of relapse during the routine follow-up period. The

  11. Extraspinal incidental findings on routine MRI of lumbar spine: Prevalence and reporting Rates in 1278 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuncel, Sedat Alpaslan; Cagli, Bekir; Tekatas, Aslan; Kirici, Yadigar Mehmet; Unlu, Ercument; Genchellac, Haken [Trakya University Faculty of Medicine, Balkan Campus, Edirne (Turkmenistan)

    2015-08-15

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and reporting rate of incidental findings (IF) in adult outpatients undergoing lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Re-evaluation of a total of 1278 lumbar MRI images (collected from patients with a mean age of 50.5 years, range 16-91 years) captured between August 2010-August 2011 was done by a neuroradiologist and a musculoskeletal radiologist. IFs were classified according to organ or system (liver, gallbladder, kidney, bladder, uterus, ovary, lymph node, intestine and aorta). The rate of reporting of a range of IF was examined. The outcome of each patient's treatment was evaluated based on review of hospital records and by telephone interviews. A total of 253 IFs were found in 241 patients (18.8% of 1278). Among these, clinically significant IFs (n = 34) included: 2 renal masses (0.15%), 2 aortic aneurysms (0.15%), 2 cases of hydronephrosis (0.15%), 11 adrenal masses (0.86%), 7 lymphadenopathies (0.55%), 6 cases of endometrial or cervical thickening (0.47%), 1 liver hemangioma (0.08%), 1 pelvic fluid (0.08%) and 2 ovarian dermoid cysts (0.15%). Overall, 28% (71/253) of IFs were included in the clinical reports, while clinically significant findings were reported in 41% (14/34) of cases. Extraspinal IFs are commonly detected during a routine lumbar MRI, and many of these findings are not clinically significant. However, IFs including clinically important findings are occasionally omitted from formal radiological reports.

  12. Enhancing patient safety with an electronic results checking system in a large HIV outpatient service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, D B; Uthayakumar, N; Ferrand, R A; Edwards, S G; Miller, R; Benn, P

    2013-08-01

    To establish whether an automated electronic tracker system for reporting blood results would expedite clinician review of abnormal results in HIV-positive outpatients and to pilot the use of this system in routine clinical practice. An outpatient service in central London providing specialist HIV-related care to 3900 HIV positive patients. A comparison of the time taken from sampling to identification and clinician review of abnormal blood results for biochemical tests between the original paper-based checking system and an automated electronic system during a 3-week pilot. Of 513 patients undergoing one or more blood tests, 296 (57%) had one or more biochemical abnormalities identified by electronic checking system. Out of 371 biochemical abnormalities, 307 (82.7%) were identified simultaneously by the paper-based system. Of the 307, 33 (10.7%) were classified as urgent, 130 (42.3%) as non-urgent and 144 (46.9%) as not clinically significant. The median interval between sampling and receipt of results was 1 (interquartile range 1-2) vs 4 days ( interquartile range 3-5), P interquartile range 1-4) vs 3 days (interquartile range 3-6), Pinterquartile range 1-4) vs 10 days ( interquartile range 9-12), P=0.136, for electronic and paper-based systems respectively. Seven (11%) of the missing paper-based system results were classified as urgent. The electronic system missed three abnormalities as a result of a software processing error which was subsequently corrected. The electronic tracker system allows faster identification of biochemical abnormalities and allowed faster review of these results by clinicians. The pilot study allowed for a software error to be identified and corrected before full implementation. The system has since integrated successfully into routine clinical practice.

  13. Drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in a national referral hospital, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve Walls

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: There are no recent data on the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR TB in Cambodia. We aim to describe TB drug resistance amongst adults with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV co-infection in a national referral hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Design: Between 22 November 2007 and 30 November 2009, clinical specimens from HIV-infected patients suspected of having TB underwent routine microscopy, Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture, and drug susceptibility testing. Laboratory and clinical data were collected for patients with positive M. tuberculosis cultures. Results: M. tuberculosis was cultured from 236 HIV-infected patients. Resistance to any first-line TB drug occurred in 34.7% of patients; 8.1% had multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB. The proportion of MDR TB amongst new patients and previously treated patients was 3.7 and 28.9%, respectively (p<0.001. The diagnosis of MDR TB was made after death in 15.8% of patients; in total 26.3% of patients with MDR TB died. The diagnosis of TB was established by culture of extra-pulmonary specimens in 23.6% of cases. Conclusions: There is significant resistance to first-line TB drugs amongst new and previously treated TB–HIV co-infected patients in Phnom Penh. These data suggest that the prevalence of DR TB in Cambodia may be higher than previously recognised, particularly amongst HIV-infected patients. Additional prevalence studies are needed. This study also illustrates the feasibility and utility of analysis of non-respiratory specimens in the diagnosis of TB, even in low-resource settings, and suggests that extra-pulmonary specimens should be included in TB diagnostic algorithms.

  14. Diagnostic Value of Culture and Serological Tests in the Diagnosis of Histoplasmosis in HIV and non-HIV Colombian Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango-Bustamante, Karen; Restrepo, Angela; Cano, Luz Elena; de Bedout, Catalina; Tobón, Angela Maria; González, Angel

    2013-01-01

    We determined the value of culture and serological tests used to diagnose histoplasmosis. The medical records of 391 histoplasmosis patients were analyzed. Diagnosis of the mycosis was assessed by culture, complement fixation, and immunodiffusion tests; 310 patients (79.5%) were male, and 184 patients (47.1%) were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Positivity value for cultures was 35.7% (74/207), reactivity of serological tests was 95.2% (160/168), and a combination of both methodologies was 16.9% (35/207) for non-HIV patients. Positivity value for cultures was 75.0% (138/184), reactivity of serological tests was 92.4% (85/92), and a combination of both methodologies was 26.0% (48/184) for HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients; 48.1% (102/212) of extrapulmonary samples from HIV/AIDS patients yielded positive cultures compared with 23.1% (49/212) in non-HIV patients. Lymphocyte counts made for 33.1% (61/184) of HIV/AIDS patients showed a trend to low CD4+ numbers and higher proportion of positive cultures. These results indicate that culture is the most reliable fungal diagnostic method for HIV/AIDS patients, and contrary to what is generally believed, serological assays are useful for diagnosing histoplasmosis in these patients. PMID:24043688

  15. Opportunistic and other intestinal parasitic infections in AIDS patients, HIV seropositive healthy carriers and HIV seronegative individuals in southwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariam, Zelalem T; Abebe, Gemeda; Mulu, Andargachew

    2008-12-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and major causes of morbidity and mortality of such patients are opportunistic infections caused by viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic pathogens. To determine the magnitude of opportunistic and non-opportunistic intestinal parasitic infections among AIDS patients and HIV positive carrier individuals. Cross-sectional study was conducted among AIDS patients, HIV positive healthy carriers and HIV negative individuals in Jimma University Hospital, Mother Theresa Missionary Charity Centre, Medan Acts Projects and Mekdim HIV positive persons and AIDS orphans' national association from January to May, 2004. Convenient sampling technique was employed to identify the study subjects and hence a total of 160 subjects were included. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic data of the patients. Stool samples were examined by direct saline, iodine wet mount, formol-ether sedimentation concentration, oocyst concentration and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining technique. Out of 160 persons enrolled in this study 100 (62.5%) (i.e. 65 male and 35 female) were infected with one or more intestinal parasites. The highest rate 36 (69.2%) of intestinal parasites were observed among HIV/AIDS patients, followed by HIV positive healthy carriers 35 (61.4%) of and HIV negative individuals (29 (56.9%). Isospora belli 2 (3.9%), Cryptosporidum parvum 8 (15.4%), Strongyloides stercoralis 6 (11.5%) and Blastocystis 2 (3.9%) were found only in HIV/AIDS groups I. belli, C. parvum, S. stercoralis and Blastocystis are the major opportunistic intestinal parasites observed in HIV/AIDS patients. Therefore, early detection and treatment of these parasites are important to improve the quality of life of HIV/AIDS patients with diarrhoea.

  16. Hypertension and obesity among HIV patients in a care programme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of hypertension and obesity among HIV patients enrolled in the Sex Worker Outreach Programme (SWOP), Nairobi, Kenya. Design: A retrospective a study. Setting: SWOP managed by the University of Manitoba, Nairobi team. Subjects: We selected clinic visit records from HIV ...

  17. Antiretroviral treatment uptake in patients with HIV- associated TB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ART results in a 64 - 95% reduction in mortality risk 5 and is an essential component of care. How soon to start. ART after TB treatment initiation has become clearer from randomised controlled trials. These show that integration of ART and TB treatment in all HIV-associated TB patients regardless of CD4 count significantly.

  18. Effects of micronutrients on oxidative stress in HIV positive patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Micronutrient supplementation was therefore shown to reduce oxidative stress in HIV positive patients on HAART and could possibly be very helpful as an adjunct in the treatment of this disease. Key Words: Antiretroviral, micronutrients, malondialdehyde, ART naïve, reactive oxygen species, supplementation.

  19. Nodular Lymphangitis in HIV-Infected Patients in Tanzania | Mapesi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Early diagnosis, biopsy or culture of skin lesions and treatment are essential for improving outcomes. However, this is challenging in resource-limited settings. We present two HIV-infected patients with nodular lymphangitis treated with ketoconazole in the absence of itraconazole or amphotericin B with good initial response ...

  20. Physiotherapy management of patients with HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Love, Michael O; Shrader, Joseph A

    2004-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is the most common form of cancer in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Although Kaposi sarcoma lesions may contribute to significant physical impairments, there is a lack of scientific literature detailing the role of physiotherapy in the treatment of HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma. The present Case Report includes two males, aged 36 and 39 years, seropositive for HIV with invasive Kaposi's sarcoma. Patient A was evaluated for bilateral foot pain caused by plantar surface Kaposi s sarcoma lesions that rendered him unable to walk. He progressed to walking 400feet after a treatment regimen of gait training with the use of custom plastazote sandals. Patient B was evaluated for right lower extremity lymphoedema secondary to invasive Kaposi's sarcoma. He experienced an 18% reduction in limb volume, a 38% reduction in pain and a 20 degrees increase in terminal knee flexion after therapeutic exercise and the use of compressive bandaging and garments. This Case Report suggests that physiotherapy interventions may be valuable in the conservative management of patients with HIV-associated Kaposi s sarcoma.

  1. Evaluation of liver function tests of HIV positive patients on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Liver enzymes-alanine and aspartate aminotransferases and alkaline phosphatase (AST, ALT and ALP), bilirubin and serum proteins were determined using standard laboratory methods and these parameters were used to evaluate the liver function of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)- positive patients receiving ...

  2. Maximizing HIV partner notification opportunities for index patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the large burden of HIV/AIDS in Africa, many people remain unaware ... Data from a large programme ... patients were asked to inform their sexual partner(s) and, .... in the home; they always wait for the man to make all the decisions.”.

  3. Testicular tuberculosis in an HIV positive patient mimicking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B.A. Ojo

    Abstract. With the upsurge of tuberculosis infection compounded by the pandemic Human Immune Deficiency Virus. (HIV), isolated testicular tuberculosis though a rarity, should be a differential diagnosis especially in the atypical age group of patients presenting with testicular swelling and in areas with high prevalence rate ...

  4. Youngsters with HIV/AIDS may be your patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, H Barry; Waldman, Michael E

    2004-01-01

    Advances in pharmaceutical "cocktails" are prolonging the lives of hundreds of thousands of US residents, including thousands of children who are infected with HIV/AIDS. The demographic characteristics of the increasing number of these children who are surviving and reside in communities were reviewed to alert pediatric dental practitioners to the reality that these children may be their patients.

  5. Ovarian pregnancy in an HIV positive patient: Case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ovarian pregnancy in an HIV positive patient: Case report. A Mohammed, AG Adesiyun, AA Mayun, CA Ameh. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  6. Prevalence of cryptococcosis among HIV-infected patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of cryptococcosis among HIV infected patients in Yaounde. Methods: In a hospital-based surveillance study of cryptococcosis, the colonization of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF), urine and blood sample by C. neoformans was evaluated by direct microscopic examination and culture ...

  7. cryptococcus meningitis in a cohort of hiv positive kenyan patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. N. Engl. J. Med. 1997; 337:15-21. 7. Khanna N., Chandramuki A., Desai A., et al. Cryptococcol infections of the central nervous system: An analysis of predisposing factors, laboratory findings and outcome in patients from South India with special reference to HIV infection. J. Med.

  8. Relations of pursuance taking drug of HIV patients with the success of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART in Poli Serunai Hospital Dr. Achmad Muchtar Bukittinggi Year 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YELMI RENI PUTRI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Relations of pursuance taking drug of HIV patients with the success of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART in Poli Serunai Hospital Dr. Achmad Muchtar Bukittinggi Year 2014 Yelmi Reni Putri, AdrianiProgram Studi Ilmu Keperawatan STIKes Fort De Kock BukittinggiEmail : Yelmi.reni@gmail.com ABSTRACT1st of of December is the day each year is celebrated as a day of HIV / AIDS this year themed "prevent HIV / AIDS, protect workers, families and the nation", this is when the right moment for us health workers give a good contribution to overcome or provide suggestions for improving services to patients with HIV / AIDS. The increasing number of patients with HIV / AIDS today is not only to make our health care workers need to be vigilant, even patients and families also need to work together to overcome this proble.The purpose of this study was to identify the level of compliance of patients taking antiretroviral drugs and HIV-positive people do with the success of antiretroviral therapy, the study sample taken in accident sampling with the number of respondents 40 patients idODHA of the month from May to October 2014. The study design using qualitative and quantitative method Mix , measuring instrument used in this research is a questionnaire that contains the characteristics of patients living with HIV, guided interviews to assess the role of the KPA, manager of HIV RSAM, and people living with HIV patients themselves.The result showed 57.5% of patients did not obey, and as much as 52.5% of patients successfully in HIV treatment, but there is no relationship between adherence with therapy success with value value 0.583 and 0.677 OR it is associated with the patient's anxiety and fear to know the results of which he repeated CD4 CD4 is one measure of the success of therapy. The conclusion of this study is important to know the patients' adherence PLWHA still low this will impact on the occurrence of resistance will even increase mortality, it is recommended

  9. Patient's experience with blended video- and internet based cognitive behavioural therapy service in routine care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Etzelmueller

    2018-06-01

    included that some patients felt overwhelmed by the service, e.g. by working with the content of the OTM as they forced them to address their problems. Within the combination of OTM and VTS, both components were rated as equally important and patients felt that the combination depicted a treatment at least equal to regular face-to-face treatment regarding the perceived effectiveness. Other identified themes included patient's individual factors, reactions in their social environment and suggestions for improvement of the service. Discussion: Predominantly, patients reported positive experiences with the blended iCBT service and rate the treatment as adequate and effective to treat their condition. The importance of the VTS is highlighted. Following this approach might be an option to make affordable and effective evidence-based CBT available independent from regional barriers. Keywords: Blended therapy, Patient's experience, Depression, Routine care, Video-based psychotherapy, Internet-based self-help

  10. Training clinicians in how to use patient-reported outcome measures in routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Maria J; Haverman, Lotte; Absolom, Kate; Takeuchi, Elena; Feeny, David; Grootenhuis, Martha; Velikova, Galina

    2015-07-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROs) were originally developed for comparing groups of people in clinical trials and population studies, and the results were used to support treatment recommendations or inform health policy, but there was not direct benefit for the participants providing PROs data. However, as the experience in using those measures increased, it became obvious the clinical value in using individual patient PROs profiles in daily practice to identify/monitor symptoms, evaluate treatment outcomes and support shared decision-making. A key issue limiting successful implementation is clinicians' lack of knowledge on how to effectively utilize PROs data in their clinical encounters. Using a change management theoretical framework, this paper describes the development and implementation of three programs for training clinicians to effectively use PRO data in routine practice. The training programs are in three diverse clinical areas (adult oncology, lung transplant and paediatrics), in three countries with different healthcare systems, thus providing a rare opportunity to pull out common approaches whilst recognizing specific settings. For each program, we describe the clinical and organizational setting, the program planning and development, the content of the training session with supporting material, subsequent monitoring of PROs use and evidence of adoption. The common successful components and practical steps are identified, leading to discussion and future recommendations. The results of the three training programs are described as the implementation. In the oncology program, PRO data have been developed and are currently evaluated; in the lung transplant program, PRO data are used in daily practice and the integration with electronic patient records is under development; and in the paediatric program, PRO data are fully implemented with around 7,600 consultations since the start of the implementation. Adult learning programs teaching clinicians

  11. iTRAQ based investigation of plasma proteins in HIV infected and HIV/HBV coinfected patients - C9 and KLK are related to HIV/HBV coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Liu, Li; Wu, Ao; Zhang, Yujiao; Jia, Xiaofang; Yin, Lin; Lu, Hongzhou; Zhang, Lijun

    2017-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) share similar routes of transmission, and rapid progression of hepatic and immunodeficiency diseases has been observed in coinfected individuals. Our main objective was to investigate the molecular mechanism of HIV/HBV coinfections. We selected HIV infected and HIV/HBV coinfected patients with and without Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART). Low abundance proteins enriched using a multiple affinity removal system (MARS) were labeled with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) kits and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The differential proteins were analyzed by Gene Ontology (GO) database. A total of 41 differential proteins were found in HIV/HBV coinfected patients as compared to HIV mono-infected patients with or without HAART treatment, including 7 common HBV-regulated proteins. The proteins involved in complement and coagulation pathways were significantly enriched, including plasma kallikrein (KLK) and complement component C9 (C9). C9 and KLK were verified to be down-regulated in HIV/HBV coinfected patients through ELISA analysis. The present iTRAQ based proteomic analyses identified 7 proteins that are related to HIV/HBV coinfection. HBV might influence hepatic and immune functions by deregulating complement and coagulation pathways. C9 and KLK could potentially be used as targets for the treatment of HIV/HBV coinfections. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Routine measurement of serum calcitonin in patients with nodular thyroid disorders?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Schmidt, M.; Schicha, H.; Wieler, H.; Schwab, R.; Goretzki, P.E.

    2008-01-01

    In spite of the fact that the German Society of Endocrinology has recommended calcitonin as screening-parameter the majority of physicians in Germany do not routinely use calcitonin in patients with thyroid nodules to exclude medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). The future revision of the recommendation should describe reference values for each commercially available assay, separately for men and women (basal and after pentagastrin-stimulation), and should define sonomorphological inclusion criteria. The epidemiological database of the prevalence of MTC is controversial and the specificity of basal elevated calcitonin levels is limited up to the 5-fold of the upper reference level. If renal insufficiency, bacterial infection, and an alcohol- or druginduced stimulation of calcitonin is excluded, hypercalcitoninaemia should be confirmed by a second measurement (if necessary using another assay). Stimulation of calcitonin by use of pentagastrin is mandatory prior to the decision on thyroidectomy. A stimulated calcitonin level < 100 pg/ml justifies 'wait and see'. If stimulated calcitonin levels range between 100 and 200 pg/ml or higher, the differentiation between C-cell hyperplasia and MTC remains uncertain, especially in men. The implementation of calcitonin- screening requires the definition of sonographic inclusion criteria and validation of each assay. Additional prerequisites are excellent logistic (short period between blood sampling and start of the laboratory test), knowledge of differential diagnoses, knowledge of the consumption of drugs and alcohol, availability of pentagastrin-testing and of moleculargenetic testing with full information to the patients and sufficient time before the decision on surgery is made. All this and the choice of a skilled surgeon, experienced in thyroidectomy and lymphadenectomy with a low rate of local complications are the rationale to recommend calcitonin-screening primarily in centers for thyroid disorders. (orig.)

  13. Brand-to-generic levetiracetam switch in patients with epilepsy in a routine clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markoula, Sofia; Chatzistefanidis, Dimitrios; Gatzonis, Stylianos; Siatouni, Anna; Siarava, Eleftheria; Verentzioti, Anastasia; Kyritsis, Athanassios P; Patsalos, Philip N

    2017-05-01

    The therapeutic equivalence of generic and brand antiepileptic drugs, based on studies performed on healthy volunteers, has been questioned. We compare, in a routine clinical setting, brand versus generic levetiracetam (LEV) bioequivalence in patients with epilepsy and also the clinical efficacy and tolerability of the substitution. A prospective, open-label, non-randomized, steady-state, multiple-dose, bioequivalence study was conducted in 12 patients with epilepsy (5 females), with a mean age of 38.4±16.2 years. Patients treated with the brand LEV (Keppra; UCB Pharma) were closely followed for a four-week period and subsequently switched to a generic LEV (Pharmaten) and followed for another four-week period. Blood samples were collected at the end of each 4-week period, during a dose interval for each formulation, for LEV concentration measurements by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Steady-state area under the curve (AUC) and peak plasma concentration (Cmax) data were subjected to conventional average bioequivalence analysis. Secondary clinical outcomes, including seizure frequency and adverse events, were recorded. Patients had epilepsy for a mean period of 14.1±10.6years and the mean daily LEV dose was 2583.3±763.7mg. The mean AUC±SD and Cmax±SD was 288.4±86.3(mg/L)h and 37.8±10.4mg/L respectively for brand LEV and 319.2±104.7(mg/L)h and 41.6±12.3mg/L respectively for the generic LEV. Statistic analysis showed no statistical significant difference in bioequivalence. Also, no change in seizures frequency and/or adverse events was recorded. In our clinical setting, generic LEV was determined to be bioequivalent to brand LEV. Furthermore, seizures frequency or/and adverse events were not affected upon switching from brand to generic LEV. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Family physicians and HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, N; Crochette, N; Blanchi, S; Lavoix, A; Billaud, E; Baron, C; Abgueguen, P; Perré, P; Rabier, V

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to describe the current and desired involvement of family physicians (FPs) in the treatment of HIV patients (screening practices, potential training and patient follow-up) to reduce the duration and frequency of their hospital treatment. We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional survey between 2011 and 2012 with the support of COREVIH (Regional Coordinating Committee on HIV). We sent a self-assessment questionnaire to all FPs of the Pays de la Loire region to enquire about their HIV screening practices and expectations for the management of HIV patients. A total of 871 FPs completed the questionnaire (response rate: 30.4%). A total of 54.2% said to provide care to HIV patients; the mean number of HIV patients per FP was estimated at 1.4. With regard to HIV screening, 12.2% systematically suggest an HIV serology to their patients and 72.7% always suggest it to pregnant women. About 45.4% of responding FPs said to be willing to manage HIV patients (clinical and biological monitoring, compliance checks and prescription renewal). FPs mainly reported the lack of training and the low number of HIV patients as a barrier to their further involvement in the management of HIV patients. The responding FPs provide care to very few HIV patients. They are, however, willing to be more involved in the routine care of these patients. Medical training provided by COREVIH would help improve HIV screening. The management of HIV patients could thus be handed over to willing FPs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  15. Activation of HIV Transcription with Short-Course Vorinostat in HIV-Infected Patients on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Ajantha; Ghneim, Khader; Ahlers, Jeffrey; Cameron, Mark J.; Smith, Miranda Z.; Spelman, Tim; McMahon, James; Velayudham, Pushparaj; Brown, Gregor; Roney, Janine; Watson, Jo; Prince, Miles H.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Chomont, Nicolas; Fromentin, Rémi; Procopio, Francesco A.; Zeidan, Joumana; Palmer, Sarah; Odevall, Lina; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Martin, Ben P.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Deeks, Steven G.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Cameron, Paul U.; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence in latently infected resting memory CD4+ T-cells is the major barrier to HIV cure. Cellular histone deacetylases (HDACs) are important in maintaining HIV latency and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) may reverse latency by activating HIV transcription from latently infected CD4+ T-cells. We performed a single arm, open label, proof-of-concept study in which vorinostat, a pan-HDACi, was administered 400 mg orally once daily for 14 days to 20 HIV-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). The primary endpoint was change in cell associated unspliced (CA-US) HIV RNA in total CD4+ T-cells from blood at day 14. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01365065). Vorinostat was safe and well tolerated and there were no dose modifications or study drug discontinuations. CA-US HIV RNA in blood increased significantly in 18/20 patients (90%) with a median fold change from baseline to peak value of 7.4 (IQR 3.4, 9.1). CA-US RNA was significantly elevated 8 hours post drug and remained elevated 70 days after last dose. Significant early changes in expression of genes associated with chromatin remodeling and activation of HIV transcription correlated with the magnitude of increased CA-US HIV RNA. There were no statistically significant changes in plasma HIV RNA, concentration of HIV DNA, integrated DNA, inducible virus in CD4+ T-cells or markers of T-cell activation. Vorinostat induced a significant and sustained increase in HIV transcription from latency in the majority of HIV-infected patients. However, additional interventions will be needed to efficiently induce virus production and ultimately eliminate latently infected cells. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01365065 PMID:25393648

  16. Activation of HIV transcription with short-course vorinostat in HIV-infected patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian H Elliott

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV persistence in latently infected resting memory CD4+ T-cells is the major barrier to HIV cure. Cellular histone deacetylases (HDACs are important in maintaining HIV latency and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi may reverse latency by activating HIV transcription from latently infected CD4+ T-cells. We performed a single arm, open label, proof-of-concept study in which vorinostat, a pan-HDACi, was administered 400 mg orally once daily for 14 days to 20 HIV-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART. The primary endpoint was change in cell associated unspliced (CA-US HIV RNA in total CD4+ T-cells from blood at day 14. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01365065. Vorinostat was safe and well tolerated and there were no dose modifications or study drug discontinuations. CA-US HIV RNA in blood increased significantly in 18/20 patients (90% with a median fold change from baseline to peak value of 7.4 (IQR 3.4, 9.1. CA-US RNA was significantly elevated 8 hours post drug and remained elevated 70 days after last dose. Significant early changes in expression of genes associated with chromatin remodeling and activation of HIV transcription correlated with the magnitude of increased CA-US HIV RNA. There were no statistically significant changes in plasma HIV RNA, concentration of HIV DNA, integrated DNA, inducible virus in CD4+ T-cells or markers of T-cell activation. Vorinostat induced a significant and sustained increase in HIV transcription from latency in the majority of HIV-infected patients. However, additional interventions will be needed to efficiently induce virus production and ultimately eliminate latently infected cells.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01365065.

  17. Effect of Corbrin Capsule combined with routine western medicine on the airway remodeling process in patients with stable COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Li Song

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of Corbrin Capsule combined with routine western medicine on the airway remodeling process in patients with stable COPD. Methods: A total of 120 patients with stable COPD who were treated in the hospital between May 2014 and December 2016 were collected and divided into control group and observation group according to the random number table method, 60 cases in each group. The control group received routine western medicine treatment, and the observation group received Corbrin Capsule combined with routine western medicine treatment. The differences in serum levels of inflammatory factors, growth factors and fibrosis indexes were compared between the two groups before and after treatment. Results: Before treatment, difference in serum levels of inflammatory factors, growth factors and fibrosis indexes were not statistically significant between the two groups of patients. After 8 weeks of treatment, serum IL-2, IL-4, IL-8, IL-18, VEGF, b-FGF, NGF, LN, HA, PⅢNP and C-Ⅳ levels of both groups of patients were significantly lower than those before treatment, and serum IL-2, IL-4, IL-8, IL-18, VEGF, b-FGF, NGF, LN, HA, PⅢNP and C-Ⅳ levels of observation group were lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Corbrin Capsule combined with routine western medicine treatment can effectively inhibit the fibrosis process in patients with stable COPD.

  18. Effects of nutritional supplementation for HIV patients starting antiretroviral treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mette Frahm; Abdissa, Alemseged; Kæstel, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effects of lipid based nutritional supplements with either whey or soy protein in patients with HIV during the first three months of antiretroviral treatment (ART) and to explore effects of timing by comparing supplementation at the start of ART and after three months....../µL (−2 to 53 cells/µL) were CD4. Effects of the soy containing supplement on immune recovery were not significant. The effects of the two supplements, however, were not significantly different in direct comparison. Exploratory analysis showed that relatively more lean body mass was gained by patients...... with undetectable viral load at three months. Patients receiving delayed supplementation had higher weight gain but lower gains in functional outcomes. Conclusions: Lipid based nutritional supplements improved gain of weight, lean body mass, and grip strength in patients with HIV starting ART. Supplements...

  19. Patient characteristics and perceived health status of individuals with HIV and tuberculosis coinfection in Guangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yujia; Wu, Jizhou; Feng, Xue; Chen, Huanhuan; Lu, Huaxiang; Chen, Li; Luo, Liuhong; Rui, Chao

    2017-04-01

    To explore demographics, clinical and medication profiles, patients' social support, and perceived health status in HIV/TB coinfected patients in Guangxi, China.We performed a cross-sectional study in the HIV clinic of the Guigang City People's Hospital (N = 150). Health professionals conducted face-to-face interviews and collected data from patients' electronic medical records regarding patients' demographic, clinical, and medication information, as well as their social support and perceived health status. We classified all HIV/AIDS patients into HIV monoinfected and TB coinfected, at a ratio of 2:1.Compared with the HIV monoinfected, patients with HIV/TB coinfection were more likely to be older, male, less educated, unemployed, carrying health insurance, having advanced stage of HIV infection, longer history with HIV, and other opportunistic infections. Patients coinfected with TB were also more likely to hold a negative belief that their HIV treatment could prevent exacerbations, and reported significantly worse emotional/informational support, social interaction, and perceived health status. Better social support and better self-efficacy to the HIV treatment adherence was significantly associated with better perceived health status among patients with HIV and TB coinfection.Having HIV/TB coinfection was associated with poorer perceived general well-being and mental health, particularly in those undergoing TB therapy. Our findings suggest the need for mental health referrals and medication management for coinfected individuals, as well as further efforts and policies to improve coordinated care.

  20. Effect of Routine Surveillance Imaging on the Outcomes of Patients With Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma After Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapke, Jonathan T; Epperla, Narendranath; Shah, Namrata; Richardson, Kristin; Carrum, George; Hari, Parameswaran N; Pingali, Sai R; Hamadani, Mehdi; Karmali, Reem; Fenske, Timothy S

    2017-07-01

    Patients with relapsed and refractory classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) are often treated with autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT). After auto-HCT, most transplant centers implement routine surveillance imaging to monitor for disease relapse; however, there is limited evidence to support this practice. In this multicenter, retrospective study, we identified cHL patients (n = 128) who received auto-HCT, achieved complete remission (CR) after transplantation, and then were followed with routine surveillance imaging. Of these, 29 (23%) relapsed after day 100 after auto-HCT. Relapse was detected clinically in 14 patients and with routine surveillance imaging in 15 patients. When clinically detected relapse was compared with to radiographically detected relapse respectively, the median overall survival (2084 days [range, 225-4161] vs. 2737 days [range, 172-2750]; P = .51), the median time to relapse (247 days [range, 141-3974] vs. 814 days [range, 96-1682]; P = .30) and the median postrelapse survival (674 days [range, 13-1883] vs. 1146 days [range, 4-2548]; P = .52) were not statistically different. In patients who never relapsed after auto-HCT, a median of 4 (range, 1-25) surveillance imaging studies were performed over a median follow-up period of 3.5 years. A minority of patients with cHL who achieve CR after auto-HCT will ultimately relapse. Surveillance imaging detected approximately half of relapses; however, outcomes were similar for those whose relapse was detected using routine surveillance imaging versus detected clinically in between surveillance imaging studies. There appears to be limited utility for routine surveillance imaging in cHL patients who achieve CR after auto-HCT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Increased incidence of cancer observed in HIV/hepatitis C virus-coinfected patients versus HIV-monoinfected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijide, Héctor; Pértega, Sonia; Rodríguez-Osorio, Iria; Castro-Iglesias, Ángeles; Baliñas, Josefa; Rodríguez-Martínez, Guillermo; Mena, Álvaro; Poveda, Eva

    2017-05-15

    Cancer is a growing problem in persons living with HIV infection (PLWH) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection could play an additional role in carcinogenesis. Herein, all cancers in an HIV-mono and HIV/HCV-coinfected cohort were evaluated and compared to identify any differences between these two populations. A retrospective cohort study was conducted including all cancers in PLWH between 1993 and 2014. Cancers were classified in two groups: AIDS-defining cancer (ADC) and non-AIDS-defining cancer (NADC). Cancer incidence rates were calculated and compared with that observed in the Spanish general population (GLOBOCAN, 2012), computing the standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). A competing risk approach was used to estimate the probability of cancer after HIV diagnosis. Cumulative incidence in HIV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV-coinfected patients was also compared using multivariable analysis. A total of 185 patients (117 HIV-monoinfected and 68 HIV/HCV) developed cancer in the 26 580 patient-years cohort, with an incidence rate of 696 cancers per 100 000 person-years, higher than in the general population (SIR = 3.8). The incidence rate of NADC in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients was 415.0 (SIR = 3.4), significantly higher than in monoinfected (377.3; SIR = 1.8). After adjustments, HIV/HCV-coinfected patients had a higher cumulative incidence of NADC than HIV-monoinfected (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.80), even when excluding hepatocellular carcinomas (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.26). PLWH have a higher incidence of NADC than the general population and HCV-coinfection is associated with a higher incidence of NADC. These data justify the need for prevention strategies in these two populations and the importance of eradicating HCV.

  2. Value of routine blood tests for prediction of mortality risk in hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosfeldt, Mathias; Pedersen, Ole Birger Vesterager; Riis, Troels

    2012-01-01

    There is a 5- to 8-fold increased risk of mortality during the first 3 months after a hip fracture. Several risk factors are known. We studied the predictive value (for mortality) of routine blood tests taken on admission.......There is a 5- to 8-fold increased risk of mortality during the first 3 months after a hip fracture. Several risk factors are known. We studied the predictive value (for mortality) of routine blood tests taken on admission....

  3. Systolic function evaluated with cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Scholtz

    2016-11-01

    Objectives: To ascertain whether there were any morphological abnormalities or systolic functional impairments on CMR in untreated asymptomatic HIV-infected patients, compared with HIV-uninfected control individuals. Methods: The CMR studies were performed using a 1.5-T whole-body clinical magnetic resonance 16-channel scanner (Achieva, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands, using a cardiac five-element phased-array receiver coil (SENSE coil. Functional assessment was performed on 36 HIV-infected patients and the findings compared with 35 HIV-uninfected control patients who were matched for age and sex. Results: There was no significant difference in systolic function between the HIV-uninfected and the HIV-infected patients. The left ventricular end diastolic mass (LVEDM was slightly higher in the HIV-infected group, but this was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: No significant differences were found regarding the CMR systolic functional analysis and morphological parameters between the HIV-infected and the healthy volunteers.

  4. Personality disorders in heart failure patients requiring psychiatric management: comorbidity detections from a routine depression and anxiety screening protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Phillip J; Selkow, Terina

    2014-12-30

    Several international guidelines recommend routine depression screening in cardiac disease populations. No previous study has determined the prevalence and comorbidities of personality disorders in patients presenting for psychiatric treatment after these screening initiatives. In the first stage 404 heart failure (HF) patients were routinely screened and 73 underwent structured interview when either of the following criteria were met: (a) Patient Health Questionnaire ≥10; (b) Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire ≥7); (c) Response to one item panic-screener. Or (d) Suicidality. Patients with personality disorders were compared to the positive-screen patients on psychiatric comorbidities. The most common personality disorders were avoidant (8.2%), borderline (6.8%) and obsessive compulsive (4.1%), other personality disorders were prevalent in less than patients. Personality disorder patients had significantly greater risk of major depression (risk ratio (RR) 1.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-13.3), generalized anxiety disorder (RR 3.2; 95% CI 1.0-10.0), social phobia (RR 3.8; 95% CI 1.3-11.5) and alcohol abuse/dependence (RR 3.2; 95% 1.0-9.5). The findings that HF patients with personality disorders presented with complex psychiatric comorbidity suggest that pathways facilitating the integration of psychiatric services into cardiology settings are warranted when routine depression screening is in place. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Collaborative activities and treatment outcomes in patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyen, T T T; Nhung, N V; Shewade, H D; Hoa, N B; Harries, A D

    2016-03-21

    The National Tuberculosis (TB) Programme in Viet Nam and Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC). To determine 1) at national level between 2011 and 2013, the relationship between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing, uptake of TB-HIV interventions and adverse treatment outcomes among TB-HIV patients; and 2) in HCMC in 2013, patient characteristics associated with adverse outcomes. An ecological study reviewing aggregate nationwide data and a retrospective cohort review in HCMC. Nationwide, from 2011 to 2013, HIV testing increased in TB patients from 58% to 68% and antiretroviral therapy (ART) increased in TB-HIV patients from 54% to 63%. Adverse treatment outcomes in TB-HIV patients increased from 24% to 27%, largely due to transfer out (5-9% increase) and death. The Northern and Highland regions showed poor uptake of TB-HIV interventions. In HCMC, 303 (27%) of 1110 TB-HIV patients had adverse outcomes, with higher risks observed in those with previously treated TB, those diagnosed as HIV-positive before TB onset and those never placed on cotrimoxazole or ART. Despite improving HIV testing rates and TB-HIV interventions, adverse outcomes in TB-HIV patients remain at about 26%. Characteristics predicting higher risk of adverse outcomes must be addressed if Viet Nam wishes to end the TB epidemic by 2030.

  6. Revenue, relationships and routines: the social organization of acute myocardial infarction patient transfers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinot, Tiffany C; Bosk, Emily A; Unnikrishnan, K P; Iwashyna, Theodore J

    2012-11-01

    Heart attack, or acute myocardial infarction (AMI), is a leading cause of death in the United States (U.S.). The most effective therapy for AMI is rapid revascularization: the mechanical opening of the clogged artery in the heart. Forty-four percent of patients with AMI who are admitted to a non-revascularization hospital in the U.S. are transferred to a hospital with that capacity. Yet, we know little about the process by which community hospitals complete these transfers, and why publicly available hospital quality data plays a small role in community hospitals' choice of transfer destinations. Therefore, we investigated how community hospital staff implement patient transfers and select destinations. We conducted a mixed methods study involving: interviews with staff at three community hospitals (n = 25) in a Midwestern state and analysis of U.S. national Medicare records for 1996-2006. Community hospitals in the U.S., including our field sites, typically had longstanding relationships with one key receiving hospital. Community hospitals addressed the need for rapid AMI patient transfers by routinizing the collective, interhospital work process. Routinization reduced staff uncertainty, coordinated their efforts and conserved their cognitive resources for patient care. While destination selection was nominally a physician role, the decision was routinized, such that staff immediately contacted a "usual" transfer destination upon AMI diagnosis. Transfer destination selection was primarily driven at an institutional level by organizational concerns and bed supply, rather than physician choice or patient preference. Transfer routinization emerged as a form of social order that invoked tradeoffs between process speed and efficiency and patient-centered, quality-driven decision making. We consider the implications of routinization and institutional imperatives for health policy, quality improvement and health informatics interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd

  7. Cauda equina enhancing lesion in a HIV-positive patient. Case report and literature revision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale De Bonis

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case a spinal cord localization of neurological toxoplasmosis in a HIV-positive patient with Burkitt lymphoma, previously treated with chemotherapy and immunotherapy. This complication occurred while patient was in complete remission of lymphoma, with CD4+ T cell count of 270 /ml, undetectable HIV viremia, and despite the trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis. Indeed, we hypothesize that in our patient neurologic toxoplasmosis has been fostered more by previous immuno-chemotherapy than by HIV- related immunodeficiency. On the whole, this case suggests that parameters usually employed to predict the risk for opportunistic infections in HIV-positive people might not apply to patients with HIV-related lymphomas.

  8. Left ventricular mass in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olalla, J; Pombo, M; Del Arco, A; de la Torre, J; Urdiales, D; García-Alegría, J

    2013-01-01

    The HIV infection has been associated with an increased incidence of vascular events. Left ventricular mass (LVM) is independently associated with greater overall mortality. Various studies have shown that patients with HIV infection have higher LVM than the uninfected population. We aim to describe the distribution of LVM in an extensive series of patients with HIV infection, and the factors associated with its increase. A cross-sectional study was performed in HIV-infected patients followed in our center from 1 December 2009 to 28 February 2011. A transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) was performed in all patients who gave their consent. Demographic variables, viroimmunological status, cardiovascular risk factors, vascular risk at 10 years (VR10) and history of exposure to antiretroviral drugs were collected. LVM was considered to be the quantitative dependent variable. A univariate analysis was performed, including in the multivariate analysis those variables with P<,05. A TTE was performed in 400 patients, and the LVM was calculated in 388. Mean age was 45 years, 75.5 males. Mean LVM was 39.54g/m(2.7)(95% CI: 38.35-40.73). Age, height, body mass index, VR10, hypertension, dyslipidemia, different medications within the cardiovascular area and having taken nevirapine have been used in the history of the patient were associated to greater LVM. In the multivariate analysis, use of nevirapine in the history of the patient and VR10 remained in the model. VR10 may be associated with greater LVM. The relationship with nevirapine may respond to an indication bias. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. HIV and antiretroviral therapy: lipid abnormalities and associated cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Donald P

    2008-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy are at increased risk for developing metabolic abnormalities that include elevated levels of serum triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and reduced levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. This dyslipidemia is similar to that seen in the metabolic syndrome, raising the concern that highly active antiretroviral therapy also potentially increases the risk for cardiovascular complications. This paper reviews the contribution of both HIV infection and the different components of highly active antiretroviral therapy to dyslipidemia and the role of these abnormalities toward increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients; therapeutic strategies to manage these risks are also considered.

  10. Physician-patient communication in HIV disease: the importance of patient, physician, and visit characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, I B; Kaplan, S

    2000-12-15

    Although previous work that considered a variety of chronic conditions has shown that higher quality physician-patient communication care is related to better health outcomes, the quality of physician-patient communication itself for patients with HIV disease has not been well studied. To determine the relationship of patient, visit, physician, and physician practice characteristics to two measures of physician-patient communication for patients with HIV disease. Cross-sectional survey of physicians and patients. Cohort study enrolling patients from throughout eastern Massachusetts. 264 patients with HIV disease and their their primary HIV physicians (n = 69). Two measures of physician-patient communication were used, a five-item general communication measure (Cronbach's alpha = 0.93), and a four-item HIV-specific communication measure that included items about alcohol, drug use, and sexual behaviors (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92). The mean age of patients was 39. 5 years, 24% patients were women, 31.1% were nonwhite, and 52% indicated same-sex contact as their principal HIV risk factor. The mean age of physicians was 39.1 years, 33.3% were female, 39.7% were specialists, and 25.0% self-identified as gay, lesbian, or bisexual. In multivariable models relating patient and visit characteristics to general communication, longer reported visit length (pbetter communication. The interaction of patient gender and visit length was also significant (p =.02); longer visit length was more strongly associated with better general communication for male than female patients. In similar models relating patient and visit characteristics to HIV-specific communication, longer visit length (p better communication. In multivariable models relating physician and practice characteristics to general communication no variables were significant. However, both female physician gender (p =.002) and gay/lesbian/bisexual sexual preference (p =.003) were significantly associated with better HIV

  11. Living in rural New England amplifies the risk of depression in patients with HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen Paul T; Sheth Siddharth H; Lahey Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The importance of depression as a complication of HIV infection is increasingly understood, and people living in rural areas are at increased risk for depression. However, it is not known whether living in rural areas amplifies the risk of depression in patients with HIV. Methods We compared the prevalence of depression between rural and metropolitan HIV patients seen at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock HIV Program in a retrospective cohort study. Using the validated Rural-Urban Co...

  12. Adapting and Implementing a Community Program to Improve Retention in Care among Patients with HIV in Southern Haiti: “Group of 6”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Naslund

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In Mozambique, a patient-led Community ART Group model developed by Médecins Sans Frontières improved retention in care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART among persons with HIV. We describe the adaptation and implementation of this model within the HIV clinic located in the largest public hospital in Haiti’s Southern Department. Methods. Our adapted model was named Group of 6. Hospital staff enabled stable patients with HIV receiving ART to form community groups with 4–6 members to facilitate monthly ART distribution, track progress and adherence, and provide support. Implementation outcomes included recruitment success, participant retention, group completion of monthly monitoring forms, and satisfaction surveys. Results. Over one year, 80 patients from nine communities enrolled into 15 groups. Six participants left to receive HIV care elsewhere, two moved away, and one died of a non-HIV condition. Group members successfully completed monthly ART distribution and returned 85.6% of the monthly monitoring forms. Members reported that Group of 6 made their HIV management easier and hospital staff reported that it reduced their workload. Conclusions. We report successful adaptation and implementation of a validated community HIV-care model in Southern Haiti. Group of 6 can reduce barriers to ART adherence, and will be integrated as a routine care option.

  13. Liver function tests in HIV-1 infected asymptomatic patients and HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean ± SEM serum ALB concentration of 23.5 ± 1.2 g/L in AIDS patients was significantly lower (p < 0.001) than those of HIV-1 infected asymptomatic patients and healthy controls; 38.9 ± 3.1g/L and 39.4 ± 2.8g/L respectively. The mean ± SEM TB concentration of 17.8 ± 1.3 μmol/L in AIDS patients was significantly ...

  14. Prevalence of Hypertension in HIV/AIDS Patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART Compared with HAART-Naive Patients at the Limbe Regional Hospital, Cameroon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Akem Dimala

    Full Text Available Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has greatly reduced the morbidity and mortality of HIV/AIDS patients but has also been associated with increased metabolic complications and cardiovascular diseases. Data on the association between HAART and hypertension (HTN in Africa are scarce.Primarily to compare the prevalence of HTN in HIV/AIDS patients on HAART and HAART-naïve patients in Limbe, Cameroon; and secondarily to assess other socio-demographic and clinical factors associated with HTN in this population.A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Limbe Regional Hospital HIV treatment center between April and June 2013, involving 200 HIV/AIDS patients (100 on first-line HAART regimens for at least 12 months matched by age and sex to 100 HAART-naïve patients. HTN was defined as a systolic blood pressure (BP ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mmHg.The prevalence of HTN in patients on HAART was twice (38%; 95% CI: 28.5-48.3 that of the HAART-naïve patients (19%; 95% CI, 11.8-28.1, p = 0.003. In multivariate analyses adjusted for age, gender, smoking, family history of HTN, and BMI-defined overweight, HAART was associated with HTN, the adjusted odds ratio of the HAART-treated versus HAART-naïve group was 2.20 (95% CI: 1.07-4.52, p = 0.032. HTN was associated with older age and male gender, in the HAART group and with BMI-defined overweight in the HAART-naïve group.The prevalence of hypertension in HIV/AIDS patients in Limbe stands out to be elevated, higher in patients on HAART compared to those not on treatment. Blood pressure and cardiovascular risk factors should be routinely monitored. Other factors such as diet, weight control and physical exercise should also be considered.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of duloxetine versus routine treatment for U.S. patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Eric Q; Birnbaum, Howard G; Mareva, Milena N; Le, T Kim; Robinson, Rebecca L; Rosen, Amy; Gelwicks, Steve

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of duloxetine versus routine treatment in management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP). Two hundred thirty-three patients with DPNP who completed a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, multicenter duloxetine trial were re-randomized into a 52-week, open-label trial of duloxetine 60 mg twice daily versus routine treatment. Routine treatment included pain management therapies. Effectiveness was measured by using the bodily pain domain (BP) of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36). Costs were analyzed from 3 perspectives: third party payer (direct medical costs), employer (direct and indirect medical costs), and societal (patient's out-of-pocket costs and total medical costs). Costs of study medications were not included because of limited data. Bootstrap method was applied to calculate statistical inference of the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Routine treatment most frequently used included gabapentin (56%), venlafaxine (36%), and amitripytline (15%). From employer and societal perspectives, duloxetine was cost-effective (ICER= -342 dollars and -429 dollars, respectively, per unit of SF-36 BP; both P routine DPNP treatment (both P < .05). From payer perspective, duloxetine trended toward cost-effectiveness (ICER= -249 dollars per unit of SF-36 BP; P patient's out-of-pocket costs), this study demonstrated that duloxetine was more cost-effective than routine treatment in management of DPNP.

  16. Primary care staff's views and experiences related to routinely advising patients about physical activity. A questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meloni Serena

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background United Kingdom public health policy has recently re-emphasised the role of primary health care professionals in tackling increasing levels of physical inactivity within the general population. However, little is known about the impact that this has had in practice. This study explores Scottish primary care staff's knowledge, attitudes and experiences associated with advising patients about physical activity during routine consultations. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of general practitioners (or family physicians, practice nurses and health visitors based in four health regions was conducted during 2004. The main outcome measures included: (i health professionals' knowledge of the current physical activity recommendations; (ii practice related to routine physical activity advising; and (iii associated attitudes. Results Questionnaires were returned by 757 primary care staff (response rate 54%. Confidence and enthusiasm for giving advice was generally high, but knowledge of current physical activity recommendations was low. In general, respondents indicated that they routinely discuss and advise patients about physical activity regardless of the presenting condition. Health visitors and practice nurses were more likely than general practitioners to offer routine advice. Lack of time and resources were more likely to be reported as barriers to routine advising by general practitioners than other professional groups. However, health visitors and practice nurses were also more likely than general practitioners to believe that patients would follow their physical activity advice giving. Conclusion If primary health care staff are to be fully motivated and effective in encouraging and supporting the general population to become more physically active, policymakers and health professionals need to engage in efforts to: (1 improve knowledge of current physical activity recommendations and population trends amongst

  17. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head in HIV infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Almeida Matos

    Full Text Available Avascular necrosis (AVN of the femoral head is an emerging complication in HIV infected patients. It has been suggested that the increased incidence of AVN in this population may be caused by an increased prevalence of predisposing factors for osteonecrosis, including protease inhibitors, hyperlipidemia, corticosteroid use, alcohol and intravenous drug abuse. The aim of this study was to assess the risk factors for avascular necrosis developing in the femoral head of HIV infected individuals. This study consisted of meta-analysis of the secondary data extracted from current literature. The selected articles allowed two study groups to be drawn up for comparison. Group 1 comprised 324 individuals infected by the HIV virus, who did not present femoral head AVN. Group 2 comprised 32 HIV positive patients, who presented femoral head AVN. The parameters used for analysis were as follows: age, gender, sexual preference, use of intravenous drugs, time of diagnosis, CD4+ cell count, use of antiretroviral agents and duration, serum cholesterol and serum triglycerides. The present study found a statistically significant association between hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, sexual preference and intravenous drug abuse. The authors concluded that femoral head osteonecrosis is associated with hyperlipidemia (hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia and intravenous drug abuse. This study supports the hypothesis that protease inhibitors play a role in the development of osteonecrosis through a tendency to cause hyperlipidemia.

  18. Examining the link between patient satisfaction and adherence to HIV care: a structural equation model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bich N Dang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Analogous to the business model of customer satisfaction and retention, patient satisfaction could serve as an innovative, patient-centered focus for increasing retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, and ultimately HIV suppression. OBJECTIVE: To test, through structural equation modeling (SEM, a model of HIV suppression in which patient satisfaction influences HIV suppression indirectly through retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of adults receiving HIV care at two clinics in Texas. Patient satisfaction was based on two validated items, one adapted from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey ("Would you recommend this clinic to other patients with HIV? and one adapted from the Delighted-Terrible Scale, ("Overall, how do you feel about the care you got at this clinic in the last 12 months?". A validated, single-item question measured adherence to HAART over the past 4 weeks. Retention in HIV care was based on visit constancy in the year prior to the survey. HIV suppression was defined as plasma HIV RNA <48 copies/mL at the time of the survey. We used SEM to test hypothesized relationships. RESULTS: The analyses included 489 patients (94% of eligible patients. The patient satisfaction score had a mean of 8.5 (median 9.2 on a 0- to 10- point scale. A total of 46% reported "excellent" adherence, 76% had adequate retention, and 70% had HIV suppression. In SEM analyses, patient satisfaction with care influences retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, which in turn serve as key determinants of HIV suppression (all p<.0001. CONCLUSIONS: Patient satisfaction may have direct effects on retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Interventions to improve the care experience, without necessarily targeting objective clinical performance measures, could serve as an innovative method for optimizing HIV outcomes.

  19. [Improvement of parodontitis therapy of patients with HIV-infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboleva, L A; Oseeva, A O; Shul'diakov, A A; Bulkina, N V

    2010-01-01

    For the purpose to determine the clinic-pathogenetic efficacy of cycloferon liniment in the combined therapy of periodontitis of patients with subclinical stage of HIV-infection medical examination and treatment of 40 patients was carried out. It was established that use of liniment cycloferon in the combined treatment of patients with subclinical stage of HIV-infection allowed to accelerate process of normalization of lipid peroxidation parameters and antioxidant potential of blood, to decrease infection load (herpes symplex virus I, Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus) in parodontal recess and evidence of local inflammation with reduction of activity of the tumours necrosis factor and interleukin 1beta, what provided acceleration of recuperation processes, lowering the frequency of parodontitis relapses.

  20. Modern approaches to parodontitis therapy in HIV patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuldyakov A.A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to determine the clinical pathogenetic efficacy of Cycloferon liniment in the combined therapy of periodontitis in patients with subclinical stage of HIV-infection. Medical examination and treatment of 40 patients has been carried out. It is established that use of liniment Cycloferon in the combined treatment of patients with subclinical stage of HIV-infection allows to accelerate process of normalization of lipid peroxidation parameters and antioxidant potential of blood and to decrease infection (herpes symplex virus I, Candida albicans, staphylococcus aureus in par-odontal recess and evidence of local inflammation. The considered method of therapy has been proved to improve convalescence period and to decrease frequency of parodontitis recurrences

  1. A methodology to extract outcomes from routine healthcare data for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Swee-Ling; Ricketts, Kate; Royle, Gary; Williams, Matt; Mendes, Ruheena

    2018-04-11

    Outcomes for patients in UK with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA NSCLC) are amongst the worst in Europe. Assessing outcomes is important for analysing the effectiveness of current practice. However, data quality is inconsistent and regular large scale analysis is challenging. This project investigates the use of routine healthcare datasets to determine progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients treated with primary radical radiotherapy for LA NSCLC. All LA NSCLC patients treated with primary radical radiotherapy in a 2 year period were identified and paired manual and routine data generated for an initial pilot study. Manual data was extracted information from hospital records and considered the gold standard. Key time points were date of diagnosis, recurrence, death or last clinical encounter. Routine data was collected from various data sources including, Hospital Episode Statistics, Personal Demographic Service, chemotherapy data, and radiotherapy datasets. Relevant event dates were defined by proxy time points and refined using backdating and time interval optimization. Dataset correlations were then tested on key clinical outcome indicators to establish if routine data could be used as a reliable proxy measure for manual data. Forty-three patients were identified for the pilot study. The manual data showed a median age of 67 years (range 46- 89 years) and all patients had stage IIIA/B disease. Using the manual data, the median PFS was 10.78 months (range 1.58-37.49 months) and median OS was 16.36 months (range 2.69-37.49 months). Based on routine data, using proxy measures, the estimated median PFS was 10.68 months (range 1.61-31.93 months) and estimated median OS was 15.38 months (range 2.14-33.71 months). Overall, the routine data underestimated the PFS and OS of the manual data but there was good correlation with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.94 for PFS and 0.97 for OS. This is a novel approach

  2. The HIV care cascade in Switzerland: reaching the UNAIDS/WHO targets for patients diagnosed with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Philipp; Schmidt, Axel J; Cavassini, Matthias; Furrer, Hansjakob; Calmy, Alexandra; Battegay, Manuel; Bernasconi, Enos; Ledergerber, Bruno; Vernazza, Pietro

    2015-11-28

    To describe the HIV care cascade for Switzerland in the year 2012. Six levels were defined: (i) HIV-infected, (ii) HIV-diagnosed, (iii) linked to care, (iv) retained in care, (v) on antiretroviral treatment (ART), and (vi) with suppressed viral load. We used data from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS) complemented by a nationwide survey among SHCS physicians to estimate the number of HIV-patients not registered in the cohort. We also used Swiss ART sales data to estimate the number of patients treated outside the SHCS network. Based on the number of patients retained in care, we inferred the estimates for levels (i) to (iii) from previously published data. We estimate that (i) 15 200 HIV-infected individuals lived in Switzerland in 2012 (margins of uncertainty, 13 400-19 300). Of those, (ii) 12 300 (81%) were diagnosed, (iii) 12 200 (80%) linked, and (iv) 11 900 (79%) retained in care. Broadly based on SHCS network data, (v) 10 800 (71%) patients were receiving ART, and (vi) 10 400 (68%) had suppressed (Switzerland is substantially lower than previously reported, halving previous national HIV prevalence estimates to 0.2%. In Switzerland in 2012, 91% of patients in care were receiving ART, and 96% of patients on ART had suppressed viral load, meeting recent UNAIDS/WHO targets.

  3. Association between oral candidiasis and low CD4+ count among HIV positive patients in Hoima Regional Referral Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanteza, Martina; Tusiime, Jayne B; Kalyango, Joan; Kasangaki, Arabat

    2014-11-28

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Human Immune Virus (HIV) related oral lesions and their association with Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4+) count among treatment naïve HIV positive patients. This was a descriptive and analytical cross sectional study. Participants were 346 treatment naïve HIV positive adult patients. These were consecutively recruited from Hoima Regional Referral hospital between March and April 2012. Data collection involved interviews, oral examinations and laboratory analysis. A total of 168(48.6%) participants had oral lesions. The four commonest lesions were oral candidiasis (24.9%, CI = 20.6-29.7%), melanotic hyperpigmentation (17.3%, CI = 13.7-21.7%), kaposi sarcoma (9.3%, CI = 6.6-12.8%) and Oral Hairy Leukoplakia (OHL) (5.5%, CI = 3.5-8.4%). There was significant association between oral candidiasis and immunosuppression measured as CD4+ less than 350 cells/mm3 (OR = 2.69, CI = 1.608-4.502, p Oral candidiasis was the only oral lesion significantly predictive of immunosuppression (OR = 2.56, CI = 1.52-4.30, p Oral candidiasis can be considered as a marker for immunesuppression, making routine oral examinations essential in the management of HIV positive patients.

  4. Predictive and prognostic properties of TB-LAM among HIV-positive patients initiating ART in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Elia, Alexander; Evans, Denise; McNamara, Lynne; Berhanu, Rebecca; Sanne, Ian; Lönnermark, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    While the diagnostic properties of the TB LAM urine assay (LAM) have been well-described, little is known about its predictive and prognostic properties at ART initiation in a routine clinic setting. We describe the predictive and prognostic properties of LAM in HIV-positive patients initiating ART at an urban hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa. Retrospective study of HIV-positive adults (>18 years) who initiated standard first-line ART between February 2012 and April 2013 and had a LAM test at initiation. In HIV-positive patients with no known TB at ART initiation, we assessed the sensitivity, specificity and positive/negative likelihood ratios of LAM to predict incident TB within 6 months of ART initiation. In addition, in patients with a TB diagnosis and on TB treatment ART initiation, we measured the CD4 response at 6 months on ART. Of the 274 patients without TB at ART initiation, 65% were female with median CD4 count of 213 cells/mm(3). Among the 14 (5.1%) patients who developed active TB, none were urine LAM +ve at baseline. LAM had poor sensitivity (0.0% 95% CI 0.00-23.2) to predict incident TB within 6 months of initiation. We analyzed 22 patients with a confirmed TB diagnosis at initiation separately. Of these, LAM +ve patients (27%) showed lower CD4 gains compared to LAM negative patients (median increase 103 vs 199 cells/mm(3); p = 0.08). LAM has limited value for accurately predicting incident TB in patients with higher CD4 counts after ART initiation. LAM may help identify TB/HIV co-infected patients at ART initiation who respond more slowly to treatment and require targeted interventions to improve treatment outcomes. Larger studies with longer patient follow-up are needed.

  5. Ocular surface squamous neoplasia in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients and response to 5-fluorouracil in Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutt RJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Robert J Nutt,1 John L Clements,2 William H Dean3 1Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; 2Boa Vista Eye Clinic, Benguela, Angola; 3Bristol Eye Hospital, Bristol, UK Background: Ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN is becoming increasingly prevalent and aggressive in Sub-Saharan Africa. It is a phenomenon linked with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, although association rates in Angola are currently unknown. A topical treatment that is effective in HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals may be preferable to surgery in some contexts. We aimed to estimate the proportion of OSSN associated with HIV in Angola and to report on the success of topical 5-fluorouracil as a primary treatment in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients.Methods: Photographs of OSSNs taken at presentation and following treatment with 5-fluorouracil in patients presenting to Boa Vista Eye Clinic, Angola, between October 2011 and July 2013 were grouped into HIV-positive and HIV-negative groups and analyzed to compare presenting features and treatment response. Eighty-one OSSNs were analyzed for clinical features and 24 met the inclusion criteria for analysis of treatment response.Results: Eighty-two patients presented with OSSN between October 2011 and July 2013. Twenty-one (26% were HIV-positive and typically had OSSNs that exhibited more pathological features than those in HIV-negative patients. Twenty-four (29% patients met the inclusion criteria for analysis of treatment response; of these, 26 (91% OSSNs in both groups displayed at least partial resolution after one treatment course. In the HIV-positive group, five of eight patients displayed complete resolution, two showed partial resolution, and one failed. In the HIV-negative group, five of 16 showed complete resolution, ten of 16 had partial resolution, and one failed.Conclusion: Individuals presenting with OSSN in Angola are more likely to have HIV infection compared

  6. SLEEVE GASTRECTOMY IN PATIENTS WITH MORBID OBESITY AND HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, José Máximo Costa; Lima, Marianna Gomes Cavalcanti Leite de; Almeida, Ana Luiza Melo Cavalcanti de; Sousa, Marcelo Gonçalves

    It is estimated that there are nearly 40 million people with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) worldwide. Due to the advent of antiretroviral drugs, it has been observed increasing in obesity and metabolic rates among patients undergoing treatment. Thus, numerous surgical therapies for weight loss are proposed for continuous improvement in health of patients with HIV, being the vertical gastrectomy an option for intact intestinal transit. To evaluate the applicability of the vertical gastrectomy in patients with morbid obesity and HIV. Was conducted a systematic review of the literature, in the electronic databases Scopus, Pubmed, Cinahl, Scielo, Cochrane and Lilacs, from 1998 to 2015. MeSH headings used in data collection were "Gastrectomy" and "Morbid obesity" being combined with the descriptor "HIV". Were found 2148 articles in Scopus, 1234 in PubMed and 784 in Cinahl. The articles were analyzed by the Jadad Quality Scale, being reduced to 40 articles, subsequently reassessed using an elaborated form by the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP), reaching 12 articles in the end. It was found that vertical gastrectomy constitutes a safe and effective method, with low mortality and low rate of postoperative complications, being recommended as surgical technique in patients with obesity, HIV and comorbidities. Estima-se que haja quase 40 milhões de pessoas com o vírus da imunodeficiência adquirida (HIV) no mundo. Com o advento dos antirretrovirais, observou-se aumento da obesidade e de taxas metabólicas nos pacientes em tratamento. Assim, inúmeras terapias cirúrgicas para a perda de peso estão sendo estudadas para a melhoria contínua da saúde dos pacientes com HIV, sendo a gastrectomia vertical uma opção de trânsito íntegro. Avaliar a aplicabilidade da gastrectomia vertical em pacientes com obesidade mórbida e HIV. Foi realizada revisão sistemática de literatura, de artigos publicados nas bases eletrônicas de dados Scopus, Pubmed, Cinahl

  7. Adrenaline-induced mobilization of T cells in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, S R; Cozzi-Lepri, A; Ullum, H

    2000-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate lymphocyte mobilization from peripheral cell reservoirs in HIV-infected patients. Nine HIV-infected patients on stable highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), eight treatment-naive HIV-infected patients and eight HIV- controls received a 1-h adrenaline...... infusion. The adrenaline infusion induced a three-fold increase in the concentration of lymphocytes in all three groups. All HIV-infected patients mobilized significantly higher numbers of CD8+ cells but less CD4+ cells. All subjects mobilized CD45RA+CD62L+ and CD8+CD28+ cells to a lesser extent than CD45......RO+CD45RA- and CD8+CD28-cells. Furthermore, high numbers of CD8+CD38+ cells were mobilized only in the HIV-infected patients. It was therefore predominantly T cells with an activated phenotype which were mobilized after adrenaline stimulation. It is concluded that the HIV-associated immune defect...

  8. The incidence of ocular candidiasis and evaluation of routine opthalmic examination in critically ill patients with candidaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, S; Headdon, W G; Tang, Dws; Bastian, I B; Goggin, M J; Deane, A M

    2015-11-01

    Despite a paucity of data regarding both the incidence of ocular candidiasis and the utility of ophthalmic examination in critically ill patients, routine ophthalmic examination is recommended for critically ill patients with candidaemia. The objectives were to estimate the incidence of ocular candidiasis and evaluate whether ophthalmic examination influenced subsequent management of these patients. We conducted a ten-year retrospective observational study. Data were extracted for all ICU patients who were blood culture positive for fungal infection. Risk factors for candidaemia and eye involvement were quantified and details regarding ophthalmic examination were reviewed. Candida species were cultured in 93 patients. Risk factors for ocular candidiasis were present in 57% of patients. Forty-one percent of patients died prior to ophthalmology examination and 2% of patients were discharged before candidaemia was identified. During examination, signs of ocular candidiasis were only present in one (2.9%) patient, who had a risk factor for ocular candidiasis. Based on these findings, the duration of antifungal treatment for this patient was increased. Ocular candidiasis occurs rarely in critically ill patients with candidaemia, but because treatment regimens may be altered when diagnosed, routine ophthalmic examination is still indicated.

  9. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from HIV- and HIV+ chancroid patients by Haemophilus ducreyi antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Laer, L; Vingerhoets, J; Vanham, G; Kestens, L; Bwayo, J; Otido, J; Piot, P; Roggen, E

    1995-11-01

    The cellular immune responses to fractionated Haemophilus ducreyi antigens, coated on latex beads, were assessed in patients with chancroid and in controls, using an in vitro lymphocyte proliferation assay. Several fractions of H. ducreyi antigen revealed stimulating activity. However, only the molecular size ranges 91-78 kD, 59-29 kD, and 25-21 kD induced proliferation that may be specifically related to H. ducreyi infection. Lymphocytes from four HIV- patients, successfully treated for chancroid, were not stimulated by H. ducreyi antigen. In general, lymphocytes from HIV+ chancroid patients were less responsive to H. ducreyi antigen compared with those from HIV- chancroid patients. However, two HIV-infected patients showed exceptionally strong responses to high molecular weight fractions. To our knowledge this is the first report demonstrating that H. ducreyi contains specific T cell-stimulating antigens. Based on this work, further identification and purification of the T cell antigens is feasible.

  10. 1 Patient acceptability and feasibility of HIV testing in emergency departments in the UK - a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungu, Nicola

    2017-12-01

    NICE 2016 HIV testing guidelines now include the recommendation to offer HIV testing in Emergency Departments, in areas of high prevalence, 1 to everyone who is undergoing blood tests. 23% of England's local authorities are areas of high HIV prevalence (>2/1000) and are therefore eligible. 2 So far very few Emergency Departments have implemented routine HIV testing. This systematic review assesses evidence for two implementation considerations: patient acceptability (how likely a patient will accept an HIV test when offered in an Emergency Department), and feasibility, which incorporates staff training and willingness, and department capacity, (how likely Emergency Department staff will offer an HIV test to an eligible patient), both measured by surrogate quantitative markers. Three medical databases were systematically searched for reports of non-targeted HIV testing in UK Emergency Departments. A total of 1584 unique papers were found, 9 full text articles were critically appraised, and 7 studies included in meta-analysis. There is a combined patient sample of 1 01 975. The primary outcome, patient acceptability of HIV testing in Emergency Departments (number of patients accepting an HIV test, as a proportion of those offered) is 54.1% (CI 40.1, 68.2). Feasibility (number of tests offered, as a proportion of eligible patients) is 36.2% (CI 9.8, 62.4). For an Emergency Department considering introducing routine HIV testing, this review suggests an opt-out publicity-lead strategy. Utilising oral fluid and blood tests would lead to the greatest proportion of eligible patients accepting an HIV test. For individual staff who are consenting patients for HIV testing, it may be encouraging to know that there is >50% chance the patient will accept an offer of testing.emermed;34/12/A860-a/T1F1T1Table 1Summary table of data extracted from final 7 studies, with calculated acceptability and feasibility if appropriate, and GRADE score. Studies listed in chronological

  11. Examining the Link between Patient Satisfaction and Adherence to HIV Care: A Structural Equation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Bich N.; Westbrook, Robert A.; Black, William C.; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Giordano, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Analogous to the business model of customer satisfaction and retention, patient satisfaction could serve as an innovative, patient-centered focus for increasing retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, and ultimately HIV suppression. Objective To test, through structural equation modeling (SEM), a model of HIV suppression in which patient satisfaction influences HIV suppression indirectly through retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of adults receiving HIV care at two clinics in Texas. Patient satisfaction was based on two validated items, one adapted from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey (“Would you recommend this clinic to other patients with HIV?) and one adapted from the Delighted-Terrible Scale, (“Overall, how do you feel about the care you got at this clinic in the last 12 months?”). A validated, single-item question measured adherence to HAART over the past 4 weeks. Retention in HIV care was based on visit constancy in the year prior to the survey. HIV suppression was defined as plasma HIV RNA patient satisfaction score had a mean of 8.5 (median 9.2) on a 0- to 10- point scale. A total of 46% reported “excellent” adherence, 76% had adequate retention, and 70% had HIV suppression. In SEM analyses, patient satisfaction with care influences retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, which in turn serve as key determinants of HIV suppression (all pPatient satisfaction may have direct effects on retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Interventions to improve the care experience, without necessarily targeting objective clinical performance measures, could serve as an innovative method for optimizing HIV outcomes. PMID:23382948

  12. Pituitary abscess in an HIV-1-infected patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Yamazaki

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Pituitary abscess is a rare occurrence among pituitary conditions, but one which carries life-threatening potential. An immunocompromised status is a risk factor for the development of a pituitary abscess; however, literature describes only one case among HIV-infected patients. Methods and results: We present here a case of pituitary abscess in an HIV-1-positive patient, who demonstrated a shock status, disturbance of consciousness and generalized skin rash with laboratory findings of hypovolemia, acute inflammatory reaction and blood electrolyte abnormality. We first diagnosed the dermal manifestation as atypical generalized zoster, however, the other clinical findings could not be explained by VZV infection only. Combination with anamnesis, head magnetic resonance imaging scan and endocrine function test helped us to diagnose pituitary abscess. Although the etiology of the pituitary abscess could not be detected, the patient was successfully treated with antibiotics but followed by panhypopituitarism as sequela. Conclusion: A pituitary abscess should be considered in HIV-infected patients with endocrinological abnormalities, visual field defects, and central nervous system infection signs or symptoms, regardless of CD4 T-cell counts.

  13. Xerostomy, dental caries and periodontal disease in HIV+ patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio César Cavasin Filho

    Full Text Available We studied xerostomy and its correlation with periodontal and dental cavity diseases in HIV patients, through measurement of salivary flow and through variables such as saliva buffer capacity, salivary pH, periodontal index, MDF index, dental carie risk and risk of periodontal disease. One hundred patients were analyzed. They were distributed into two groups: Group I (test - 50 patients evidently HIV+, from whom information was collected and analyzed regarding age, gender, skin color, habits, general and oral diseases, levels of T-CD4 lymphocytes, viral load and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART; and Group II - (control 50 HIV- patients, from whom information was collected and analyzed regarding age, gender, skin color, habits, general and oral diseases. In both groups, measurement of salivary flow, pH and buffer capacity was made. Group I presented high MDF, bacteria plaque and bleeding, with a greater susceptibility to the risks of oral cavities and periodontal disease. The salivary flow and the buffering capacity of the saliva were low, indicating a high level of xerostomy. Two important modifying factors influence these pathologies in an incisive way: one is immunossuppression and the other is HAART therapy. The control exhibited results that are closer to normality; it had better oral-health conditions.

  14. Extracutaneous atypical syphilis in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Paula; Imaz, Arkaitz; Calatayud, Laura; García, Olga; Saumoy, María; Podzamczer, Daniel

    2017-12-07

    We describe a series of cases of syphilis with atypical extracutaneous clinical presentation diagnosed in HIV-infected patients. Retrospective observational study. All cases of syphilis diagnosed in HIV-infected patients during the period between June 2013 and June 2016 in a tertiary hospital of the Barcelona metropolitan area were analysed. A total of 71 cases of syphilis were diagnosed, 32 of them presenting with clinical signs or symptoms. Seven of these cases (9.8% of the total and 21.8% of the symptomatic cases) had atypical presentations with extracutaneous involvement: ocular (4), gastric (1), multiple hepatic abscesses (1) and generalised adenopathies (1). Patients were treated with intramuscular or intravenous penicillin and the clinical and serological evolution was good in all of them. Extracutaneous atypical clinical presentations were observed in 21.8% of symptomatic cases of syphilis in HIV+ patients with ocular involvement being the most freqent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Routine administration of standardized questionnaires that assess aspects of patients quality of life in medical oncology clinics: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsaleh, Kh.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Increasing interest in the Quality of Life outcomes in cancer patients led to increase implementation of their use in routine clinical practice. The aim of this systemic review is to review the scientific evidence behind recommending the use of quality of life (QoL) scales routinely in outpatient evaluation. Methods: Systematic review for all published randomized controlled trials in English language between January 1, 1990 till December 31, 2012. Out of 487 articles (476 identified by electronic search + 11 articles identified by manual search), six trials satisfied the eligibility criteria: (1) the study was a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with randomization of patients or health care providers; (2) the findings of the administered questionnaire or scale (the intervention) were given to health care provider, and compared to standard care with no questionnaire administered (the control); (3) study was conducted in outpatient oncology clinics; and (4) an outcome was measured that related to (i) QoL improvement, (ii) reduction in morbidity, (iii) reduction in stress for the patients, (iv) improvement in communication between patients and health care provider, or (v) improved patient satisfaction. Assessment for the quality of the study was done using the GRADE methodology. Results: Serious methodological issues were affecting most of the trials. Overall the evaluation of the quality of the evidence from these identified trials suggests that there is a weak recommendation to use QoL scales in routine oncology practice to improve communication between physicians and patients. Conclusion: The routine use of such tools in the outpatient settings at improving the patient outcome or satisfaction cannot be recommended based on the available evidence. The potential harm with the excess use of resources needed to implement, collect, store, analyse, and present such data to health care providers should be also considered. Further research and better designed

  16. Mortality in siblings of patients coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a poor prognostic factor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. We examined whether the increased mortality in these patients is partly explained by a familial excess risk of death. METHODS: Danish HIV-infected patients who...... had had at least 1 HCV test were included (n=3531). In addition, 336,652 population control subjects matched for sex, age, and residency were identified from the Danish Civil Registration System. For both HIV-infected patients and population control subjects, we identified all siblings born after 1951......, with dates of death or emigration. Siblings of HIV-infected patients were classified according to the patients' HCV serostatus. Survival after age 20 years was compared among the groups of siblings. RESULTS: We identified 437 siblings of HIV/HCV-coinfected patients, 1856 siblings of HIV-monoinfected patients...

  17. Spirituality and religion in patients with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Sian; Puchalski, Christina M; Sherman, Susan N; Mrus, Joseph M; Peterman, Amy H; Feinberg, Judith; Pargament, Kenneth I; Justice, Amy C; Leonard, Anthony C; Tsevat, Joel

    2006-12-01

    Spirituality and religion are often central issues for patients dealing with chronic illness. The purpose of this study is to characterize spirituality/religion in a large and diverse sample of patients with HIV/AIDS by using several measures of spirituality/religion, to examine associations between spirituality/religion and a number of demographic, clinical, and psychosocial variables, and to assess changes in levels of spirituality over 12 to 18 months. We interviewed 450 patients from 4 clinical sites. Spirituality/religion was assessed by using 8 measures: the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spirituality-Expanded scale (meaning/peace, faith, and overall spirituality); the Duke Religion Index (organized and nonorganized religious activities, and intrinsic religiosity); and the Brief RCOPE scale (positive and negative religious coping). Covariates included demographics and clinical characteristics, HIV symptoms, health status, social support, self-esteem, optimism, and depressive symptoms. The patients' mean (SD) age was 43.3 (8.4) years; 387 (86%) were male; 246 (55%) were minorities; and 358 (80%) indicated a specific religious preference. Ninety-five (23%) participants attended religious services weekly, and 143 (32%) engaged in prayer or meditation at least daily. Three hundred thirty-nine (75%) patients said that their illness had strengthened their faith at least a little, and patients used positive religious coping strategies (e.g., sought God's love and care) more often than negative ones (e.g., wondered whether God has abandoned me; Pself-esteem, greater life satisfaction, and lower overall functioning (R2=.16 to .74). Mean levels of spirituality did not change significantly over 12 to 18 months. Most patients with HIV/AIDS belonged to an organized religion and use their religion to cope with their illness. Patients with greater optimism, greater self-esteem, greater life satisfaction, minorities, and patients who drink less alcohol tend

  18. Usefulness of the HIV dementia scale in nigerian patients with HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saharan Africa, where statistics on HIV are alarming, is sparse because of lack of validated cognitive tools. This study assessed the usefulness and predictive validity of the HIV Dementia Scale (HDS) as a screening tool in HIV-positive Nigerians.

  19. 9G4 autoreactivity is increased in HIV-infected patients and correlates with HIV broadly neutralizing serum activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Kobie

    Full Text Available The induction of a broadly neutralizing antibody (BNAb response against HIV-1 would be a desirable feature of a protective vaccine. Vaccine strategies thus far have failed to elicit broadly neutralizing antibody responses; however a minority of HIV-infected patients do develop circulating BNAbs, from which several potent broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs have been isolated. The findings that several BNmAbs exhibit autoreactivity and that autoreactive serum antibodies are observed in some HIV patients have advanced the possibility that enforcement of self-tolerance may contribute to the rarity of BNAbs. To examine the possible breakdown of tolerance in HIV patients, we utilized the 9G4 anti-idiotype antibody system, enabling resolution of both autoreactive VH4-34 gene-expressing B cells and serum antibodies. Compared with healthy controls, HIV patients had significantly elevated 9G4+ serum IgG antibody concentrations and frequencies of 9G4+ B cells, a finding characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients, both of which positively correlated with HIV viral load. Compared to the global 9G4-IgD--memory B cell population, the 9G4+IgD--memory fraction in HIV patients was dominated by isotype switched IgG+ B cells, but had a more prominent bias toward "IgM only" memory. HIV envelope reactivity was observed both in the 9G4+ serum antibody and 9G4+ B cell population. 9G4+ IgG serum antibody levels positively correlated (r = 0.403, p = 0.0019 with the serum HIV BNAbs. Interestingly, other serum autoantibodies commonly found in SLE (anti-dsDNA, ANA, anti-CL did not correlate with serum HIV BNAbs. 9G4-associated autoreactivity is preferentially expanded in chronic HIV infection as compared to other SLE autoreactivities. Therefore, the 9G4 system provides an effective tool to examine autoreactivity in HIV patients. Our results suggest that the development of HIV BNAbs is not merely a consequence of a general breakdown in

  20. Lipodystrophy in HIV patients: its challenges and management approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhania R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rohit Singhania, Donald P KotlerDepartment of Medicine, St Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: HIV-associated lipodystrophy is a term used to describe a constellation of body composition (lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy and metabolic (dyslipidemia and insulin resistance alterations that accompany highly active antiretroviral therapy. These changes, which resemble metabolic syndrome, have been associated with a variety of adverse outcomes including accelerated cardiovascular disease. The body composition and metabolic changes appear to cluster in HIV infection, although they are distinct alterations and do not necessarily coexist. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated multiple pathogenic influences associated with host, disease, and treatment-related factors. The adverse treatment effects were more prominent in early regimens; continued drug development has led to the application of metabolically safer regimens with equal or greater potency than the regimens being replaced. Disease-related factors include HIV infection as well as inflammation, immune activation, and immune depletion. The body composition changes promote anxiety and depression in patients and may affect treatment adherence. Treatment of dyslipidemia and alterations in glucose metabolism is the same as in non-HIV-infected individuals. Lipoatrophy is managed by strategic choice of antivirals or by antiviral switching, and in some cases by plastic/reconstructive surgery. Lipohypertrophy has been managed mainly by lifestyle modification, ie, a hypocaloric diet and increased exercise. A growth hormone releasing factor, which reduces central fat, has recently become available for clinical use.Keywords: lipoatrophy, lipohypertrophy, body composition, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance

  1. Lipodystrophy in HIV patients: its challenges and management approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhania, Rohit; Kotler, Donald P

    2011-01-01

    HIV-associated lipodystrophy is a term used to describe a constellation of body composition (lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy) and metabolic (dyslipidemia and insulin resistance) alterations that accompany highly active antiretroviral therapy. These changes, which resemble metabolic syndrome, have been associated with a variety of adverse outcomes including accelerated cardiovascular disease. The body composition and metabolic changes appear to cluster in HIV infection, although they are distinct alterations and do not necessarily coexist. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated multiple pathogenic influences associated with host, disease, and treatment-related factors. The adverse treatment effects were more prominent in early regimens; continued drug development has led to the application of metabolically safer regimens with equal or greater potency than the regimens being replaced. Disease-related factors include HIV infection as well as inflammation, immune activation, and immune depletion. The body composition changes promote anxiety and depression in patients and may affect treatment adherence. Treatment of dyslipidemia and alterations in glucose metabolism is the same as in non-HIV-infected individuals. Lipoatrophy is managed by strategic choice of antivirals or by antiviral switching, and in some cases by plastic/reconstructive surgery. Lipohypertrophy has been managed mainly by lifestyle modification, ie, a hypocaloric diet and increased exercise. A growth hormone releasing factor, which reduces central fat, has recently become available for clinical use.

  2. Understanding patient acceptance and refusal of HIV testing in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopoulos Katerina A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Despite high rates of patient satisfaction with emergency department (ED HIV testing, acceptance varies widely. It is thought that patients who decline may be at higher risk for HIV infection, thus we sought to better understand patient acceptance and refusal of ED HIV testing. Methods In-depth interviews with fifty ED patients (28 accepters and 22 decliners of HIV testing in three ED HIV testing programs that serve vulnerable urban populations in northern California. Results Many factors influenced the decision to accept ED HIV testing, including curiosity, reassurance of negative status, convenience, and opportunity. Similarly, a number of factors influenced the decision to decline HIV testing, including having been tested recently, the perception of being at low risk for HIV infection due to monogamy, abstinence or condom use, and wanting to focus on the medical reason for the ED visit. Both accepters and decliners viewed ED HIV testing favorably and nearly all participants felt comfortable with the testing experience, including the absence of counseling. While many participants who declined an ED HIV test had logical reasons, some participants also made clear that they would prefer not to know their HIV status rather than face psychosocial consequences such as loss of trust in a relationship or disclosure of status in hospital or public health records. Conclusions Testing for HIV in the ED as for any other health problem reduces barriers to testing for some but not all patients. Patients who decline ED HIV testing may have rational reasons, but there are some patients who avoid HIV testing because of psychosocial ramifications. While ED HIV testing is generally acceptable, more targeted approaches to testing are necessary for this subgroup.

  3. Colonic leishmaniasis in a patient with HIV: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Soria-López

    Full Text Available Background: To describe an unusual clinical presentation of visceral leishmaniasis affecting the colon. Case report: We report the case of an HIV-positive patient with visceral leishmaniasis. We describe the clinical case, the procedures performed, the treatment provided and the patient's evolution. A comparative table of previously reported similar cases is shown. Discussion: Visceral leishmaniasis with intestinal involvement is an uncommon process. Nevertheless, this possibility should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis of immunosuppressed patients with symptoms of diarrhea, as a favorable prognosis depends on early diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  4. Neurocognitive function in HIV infected patients on antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Winston

    Full Text Available To describe factors associated with neurocognitive (NC function in HIV-positive patients on stable combination antiretroviral therapy.We undertook a cross-sectional analysis assessing NC data obtained at baseline in patients entering the Protease-Inhibitor-Monotherapy-Versus-Ongoing-Triple therapy (PIVOT trial.NC testing comprised of 5 domains. Raw results were z-transformed using standard and demographically adjusted normative datasets (ND. Global z-scores (NPZ-5 were derived from averaging the 5 domains and percentage of subjects with test scores >1 standard deviation (SD below population means in at least two domains (abnormal Frascati score calculated. Patient characteristics associated with NC results were assessed using multivariable linear regression.Of the 587 patients in PIVOT, 557 had full NC results and were included. 77% were male, 68% Caucasian and 28% of Black ethnicity. Mean (SD baseline and nadir CD4+ lymphocyte counts were 553(217 and 177(117 cells/µL, respectively, and HIV RNA was <50 copies/mL in all. Median (IQR NPZ-5 score was -0.5 (-1.2/-0 overall, and -0.3 (-0.7/0.1 and -1.4 (-2/-0.8 in subjects of Caucasian and Black ethnicity, respectively. Abnormal Frascati scores using the standard-ND were observed in 51%, 38%, and 81%, respectively, of subjects overall, Caucasian and Black ethnicity (p<0.001, but in 62% and 69% of Caucasian and Black subjects using demographically adjusted-ND (p = 0.20. In the multivariate analysis, only Black ethnicity was associated with poorer NPZ-5 scores (P<0.001.In this large group of HIV-infected subjects with viral load suppression, ethnicity but not HIV-disease factors is closely associated with NC results. The prevalence of abnormal results is highly dependent on control datasets utilised.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01230580.

  5. Osseous Kaposi sarcoma in an HIV-positive patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thanos, Loukas; Mylona, Sofia; Kalioras, Vasilios; Pomoni, Maria; Batakis, Nikolaos

    2004-01-01

    A case of osseous Kaposi sarcoma in a 35-year-old man is described. The patient (HIV-positive for 8 years) suffered from cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma and presented with right-sided chest pain. He underwent a chest CT scan that revealed three osteolytic lesions involving rib and vertebra with large soft tissue masses, without cutaneous lesions at these sites. CT-guided core needle biopsy led to a histological diagnosis of Kaposi sarcoma. (orig.)

  6. Dermatological manifestations in patients with HIV/AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Sahily De la Paz Peña; Leonides Rojas Barly; Reynaldo Hugo Remond Vázquez; Maira Lozano Lavernia

    2015-01-01

    In view of the frequency of the dermatological manifestations in patients who suffer from AIDS/HIV, and with the objective of describing their behaviour, a descriptive,observational, and cross sectional investigation was carried out in the cases of the AIDS provincial consultation at Ernesto Guevara General Teaching Hospital of Las Tunas from January, 2007 to June, 2008. The information was obtained from the survey, the dermatological examination, and the clinical charts. The sample was made ...

  7. Differential effects of sex in a West African cohort of HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients: men are worse off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Sanne; Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Esbjörnsson, Joakim; Medina, Candida; da Silva Té, David; Correira, Faustino Gomes; Laursen, Alex Lund; Østergaard, Lars; Andersen, Andreas; Aaby, Peter; Erikstrup, Christian; Wejse, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Several studies have reported conflicting effects of sex on HIV-1 infection. We describe differences in baseline characteristics and assess the impact of sex on HIV progression among patients at a clinic with many HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients. This study utilised a retrospective cohort of treatment-naïve adults at the largest HIV clinic in Guinea-Bissau from 6 June 2005 to 1 December 2013. Baseline characteristics were assessed and the patients followed until death, transfer, loss to follow-up, or 1 June 2014. We estimated the time from the first clinic visit until initiation of ART, death or loss to follow-up using Cox proportional hazard models. A total of 5694 patients were included in the study, 3702 women (65%) and 1992 men (35%). Women were more likely than men to be infected with HIV-2 (19% vs. 15%, P < 0.01) or dually infected with HIV-1/2 (11% vs. 9%, P = 0.02). For all HIV types, women were younger (median 35 vs. 40 years), less likely to have schooling (55% vs. 77%) or to be married (46% vs. 67%), and had higher baseline CD4 cell counts (median 214 vs. 178 cells/μl). Men had a higher age-adjusted mortality rate (hazard rate ratio (HRR) 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.52) and were more often lost to follow-up (HRR 1.27, 95% CI 1.17-1.39). Significant differences exist between HIV-infected men and women regardless of HIV type. Men seek treatment at a later stage and, despite better socio-economic status, have higher mortality and loss to follow-up than women. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in HIV-infected patients: report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwita, Julius Chacha; Baliki, Kgomotso; Tema, Ludo

    2013-01-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with increased risk of cerebrovascular disease; however Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis (CVST) is rarely associated with HIV-related cerebrovascular events. We describe two cases of HIV-positive patients who, at the same time, presented to our hospital with deep cerebral venous thrombosis and stroke.

  9. Pulmonary candidiasis and CD4 count in HIV positive patients seen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pulmonary candidiasis and CD4 count in HIV positive patients seen in Jos, north central Nigeria. YJ Peter, AH Isa, AS Anzaku, MI Builders. Abstract. Background: Accurate and reliable diagnosis of HIV opportunistic infections plays a central role in effective HIV intervention programmes. Pulmonary infections are the leading ...

  10. HIV infection among tuberculosis patients in Vietnam: prevalence and impact on tuberculosis notification rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thanh, D. H.; Sy, D. N.; Linh, N. D.; Hoan, T. M.; Dien, H. T.; Thuy, T. B.; Hoa, N. P.; Tung, L. B.; Cobelens, F.

    2010-01-01

    Vietnam has an emerging human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic (estimated population prevalence 0.5%), but valid data on HIV prevalence among tuberculosis (TB) patients are limited. Recent increases in TB notification rates among young adults may be related to HIV. To assess the prevalence of

  11. Cerebral FDG-PET scanning abnormalities in optimally treated HIV patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Åse Bengård; Law, Ian; Krabbe, Karen Suarez

    2010-01-01

    The long-term neurological consequences of HIV infection and treatment are not yet completely understood. In this study we examined the prevalence of cerebral metabolic abnormalities among a cohort of neurologically intact HIV patients with fully suppressed HIV viral loads. Concomitant analyses...

  12. Altered brain functions in HIV positive patients free of HIV- associated neurocognitive disorders: A MRI study during unilateral hand movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to investigate the brain activity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive patients with normal cognition during unilateral hand movement and whether highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART could affect the brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was performed for 60 HIV positive (HIV+ subjects and −42 healthy age-matched right-handed control subjects. Each subject was evaluated by the neuropsychological test and examined with fMRI during left and right hand movement tasks. HIV+ subjects showed greater activation in anterior cingulum, precuneus, occipital lobes, ipsilateral postcentral gyrus and contralateral cerebellum compared with control group during right hand movement task. However, during left hand movement no statistically significant difference was detected between these two groups. HAART medication for HIV+ subjects lowered the increased activity to normal level. Meanwhile patients receiving the regimen of zidovudine, lamivudine and efavirenz showed lower activity at bilateral caudate and ipsilateral inferior frontal gyrus in comparison with subjects receiving other HAART regimens. Therefore, HIV+ subjects demonstrated brain asymmetry in motor cortex, with increased activity present during right hand movement but absent during left hand movement. HAART proves effective in HIV+ subjects even with normal cognition and the specific regimen of HAART could prevent cerebral abnormal functions. Meanwhile, this study validates that during motor tasks, fMRI can detect the brain signal changes prior to the occurrences of other HIV- associated dysfunctions.

  13. Role of routine pre-operative screening venous duplex ultrasound in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Praveen Raj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: It is well established that obesity is a strongly associated risk factor for post-operative deep vein thrombosis (DVT. Physical effects and pro-thrombotic, pro-inflammatory and hypofibrinolytic effects of severe obesity may predispose to idiopathic DVT (pre-operatively because of which bariatric patients are routinely screened before surgery. The aim of this study was to audit the use of routine screening venous duplex ultrasound in morbidly obese patients before undergoing bariatric surgery. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 180 patients who underwent bariatric surgery from August 2013 to August 2014 who had undergone pre-operative screening bilateral lower-extremity venous duplex ultrasound for DVT. Data were collected on patient's demographics, history of venous thromboembolism, prior surgeries and duplex ultrasound details of the status of the deep veins and superficial veins of the lower limbs. Results: No patients had symptoms or signs of DVT pre-operatively. No patient gave history of DVT. No patient was found to have iliac, femoral or popliteal vein thrombosis. Superficial venous disease was found in 17 (8%. One patient had a right lower limb venous ulcer. Conclusion: Thromboembolic problems in the morbidly obese before bariatric surgery are infrequent, and screening venous duplex ultrasound can be done in high-risk patients only.

  14. ''Routine'' brain CT in psychiatric patients - does it make sense?; ''Routine''-Schaedel-CT in der psychiatrischen Diagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickuth, D.; Heywang-Koebrunner, S.H.; Spielmann, R.P. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    1999-11-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the spectrum of brain CT findings in psychiatric patients and to determine the number of patients that had an underlying cause for the symptoms. Patients and methods: Over a period of six months, 142 patients (78 males, 64 females; median age 61 [18-91] years) were referred for CT brain scans. Their scans were reviewed, along with the clinical information that was provided in the request form. All the hard copies were reviewed to assess areas of ischaemia, infarction, atrophy, tumours, and haematomas. The majority of requests were to exclude vascular event or space-occupying lesions. Clinical indications included mood disorders (depression, mania), schizophrenic disorders, dementia, personality and behavioural disorders. Results: 31 (22%) were normal. 111 (78%) had varying degrees of ischaemia, infarction and cerebral/cerebellar atrophy. 7 (4.9%) had space-occupying lesions which included two gliomas and five meningiomas. There were two chronic subdural haematomas and one arteriovenous malformation. Conclusion: 1. In our series, pathologic findings in 'routine' brain CT's were encountered in 78%. 2. The incidence of brain tumours was 4.9%, compared with 0.00005% of the general population. 3. CT scanning in psychiatric patients is cost-effective and especially indicated when there is an atypical presentation, or inadequate response to standard treatment. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Bei psychiatrischen Patienten wird vielerorts routinemaessig eine kraniale Computertomographie (CCT) durchgefuehrt. Ob der Nutzen die Kosten rechtfertigt, wurde im Rahmen einer Prospektivstudie untersucht. Patienten und Methode: In einem Zeitraum von 6 Monaten wurde bei 142 psychiatrischen Patienten (78 Maenner, 64 Frauen, 18-91 Jahre, Median 61 Jahre) ein CCT angefertigt. Die Untersuchung erfolgt nativ in 5-mm-Schichtdicke, bei klinischem Verdacht auf eine intrakraniale Raumforderung auch kontrastverstaerkt. Ueberweisungsdiagnosen waren v

  15. Factors associated with urinary tract infections among HIV-1 infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Skrzat-Klapaczyńska

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections remain an important yet underinvestigated clinical problem among HIV infected patients. Here we analyze factors associated with its occurrence and the spectrum of bacterial pathogens identified in the group of patients followed at the HIV Out-Patient Clinic in Warsaw.Clinic database collected all medical information on patients routinely followed since 1994 to 2015. All patients with available urine culture were included into analyses, only the first culture was included. In statistical analyses logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with positive culture.In total 608 patients had urine culture performed, 176 (28.9% were females and 432 (71,1% were males, 378 (62.2% registered in care before/in 2007, 258 (42.4% infected through homosexual contact. Median baseline lymphocyte CD4+ count was 385 (IQR:204-565 cells/μl and median nadir lymphocyte CD4+ count 197 (86-306 cells/μl. One hundred and eighteen patients were actively infected with HCV, as defined by positive real-time PCR. In total 141 (23.2% patients had positive urine culture, the most common bacterial pathogen was E.coli (58.2% and E. faecalis (12.8%. Patients with urinary tract infection were more likely to be female (51.8% vs. 22.1%, p<0.0001, infected through other than homosexual mode (80.1% vs. 50.7%, p<0.0001, with lower nadir CD4 count (139 vs. 221 cells/μl, p<0.0001 and lower baseline HIV RNA (4.02 vs. 4.35 log copies/ml, p = 0.01 and less likely to be HCV RNA positive (26.9% vs. 49.2%, p = 0.01. In multivariate regression model being registered before/in 2007 (OR = 2.10; [95%CI: 1.24-3.56], infected through other than homosexual mode (2.05;[1.18-3.56] and female gender (2.14;[1.33-3.44] were increasing and higher nadir CD4+ count decreasing (0.92;[0.85-0.99] the odds of urinary tract infection.We have identified that almost one third of patients had urinary tract infections with non-typical bacterial pathogens. Population

  16. Examining the link between patient satisfaction and adherence to HIV care: a structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Bich N; Westbrook, Robert A; Black, William C; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Giordano, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    Analogous to the business model of customer satisfaction and retention, patient satisfaction could serve as an innovative, patient-centered focus for increasing retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, and ultimately HIV suppression. To test, through structural equation modeling (SEM), a model of HIV suppression in which patient satisfaction influences HIV suppression indirectly through retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. We conducted a cross-sectional study of adults receiving HIV care at two clinics in Texas. Patient satisfaction was based on two validated items, one adapted from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey ("Would you recommend this clinic to other patients with HIV?) and one adapted from the Delighted-Terrible Scale, ("Overall, how do you feel about the care you got at this clinic in the last 12 months?"). A validated, single-item question measured adherence to HAART over the past 4 weeks. Retention in HIV care was based on visit constancy in the year prior to the survey. HIV suppression was defined as plasma HIV RNA satisfaction score had a mean of 8.5 (median 9.2) on a 0- to 10- point scale. A total of 46% reported "excellent" adherence, 76% had adequate retention, and 70% had HIV suppression. In SEM analyses, patient satisfaction with care influences retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, which in turn serve as key determinants of HIV suppression (all psatisfaction may have direct effects on retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Interventions to improve the care experience, without necessarily targeting objective clinical performance measures, could serve as an innovative method for optimizing HIV outcomes.

  17. Patients with discordant responses to antiretroviral therapy have impaired killing of HIV-infected T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekar Natesampillai

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In medicine, understanding the pathophysiologic basis of exceptional circumstances has led to an enhanced understanding of biology. We have studied the circumstance of HIV-infected patients in whom antiretroviral therapy results in immunologic benefit, despite virologic failure. In such patients, two protease mutations, I54V and V82A, occur more frequently. Expressing HIV protease containing these mutations resulted in less cell death, caspase activation, and nuclear fragmentation than wild type (WT HIV protease or HIV protease containing other mutations. The impaired induction of cell death was also associated with impaired cleavage of procaspase 8, a requisite event for HIV protease mediated cell death. Primary CD4 T cells expressing I54V or V82A protease underwent less cell death than with WT or other mutant proteases. Human T cells infected with HIV containing these mutations underwent less cell death and less Casp8p41 production than WT or HIV containing other protease mutations, despite similar degrees of viral replication. The reductions in cell death occurred both within infected cells, as well as in uninfected bystander cells. These data indicate that single point mutations within HIV protease which are selected in vivo can significantly impact the ability of HIV to kill CD4 T cells, while not impacting viral replication. Therefore, HIV protease regulates both HIV replication as well as HIV induced T cell depletion, the hallmark of HIV pathogenesis.

  18. CD4 cell count recovery in HIV/TB co-infected patients versus TB uninfected HIV patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanchu A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is lack of data comparing the improvement in CD4 count following antitubercular (ATT and antiretroviral therapy (ART in patients presenting with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Tuberculosis (HIV/TB dual infection compared with CD4 matched cohort of TB uninfected HIV patients initiated on ART. We sought to test the hypothesis; TB additionally contributes to reduction in CD4 count in HIV/TB co-infected patients and this would result in greater improvement in count following treatment compared with CD4 matched TB uninfected individuals. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective cohort study design we studied the change in CD4 cell counts in two groups of patients - those with CD4 cell count >100 cells / mm 3 (Group 1 and <100/mm 3 (Group 2 at presentation. In each group the change in CD4 cell count in dually infected patients following six-month ATT and ART was compared to cohorts of CD4 matched TB uninfected patients initiated on ART. Results: In Group 1 (52 patients dually infected subjects′ CD4 count improved from 150 cells/ mm 3 to 345 cells/mm 3 (P=0.001. In the control TB uninfected patients, the change was from 159 cells/mm 3 to 317 cells/mm 3 (P=0.001. Additional improvement in dually infected patients compared to the control group was not statistically significant (P=0.24. In Group 2 (65 patients dually infected subjects count improved from 49 cells/mm3 to 249 cells/mm 3 (P=0.001 where as in control TB uninfected patients improvement was from 50 cells/ mm 3 to 205 cells/mm 3 (P=0.001, there being statistically significant additional improvement in dually infected subjects (P=0.01. Conclusion: Greater increment in CD4 counts with ATT and ART in dually infected patients suggests that TB additionally influences the reduction of CD4 counts in HIV patients.

  19. Determinants of survival in adult HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy in Oromiyaa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andinet Worku Alemu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The antiretroviral treatment (ART scale-up service has been a recent development in Ethiopia, but its impact on mortality has not been well investigated. The aim of this study was to assess the early survival outcome of the scale-up service by utilizing routine hospital data. Methods: All adult HIV/AIDS patients who started on antiretroviral treatment in Shashemene and Assela hospitals from January 1, 2006 to May 31, 2006 were included and followed up for 2 years. Data were extracted from standard patient medical registrations. Kaplan–Meier curves were used to estimate survival probability and the Cox proportional hazard model was applied to determine predictors of mortality. Two alterative assumptions (real case and worst case were made in determining predictors of mortality. Results: The median age of patients was 33 years and 57% were female. Eighty-five percent had CD4 <200 cells/µL with a median CD4 count of 103 cells/µL. The median survival time was 104.4 weeks. A total of 28 (10.3% deaths were observed during the 2-year period and 48 patients (18% were lost to follow up. The majority of deaths occurred in the first 4 months of treatment. In multivariate analysis, 2-year survival was significantly associated with the clinical stage of the disease, baseline hemoglobin, and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis therapy (CPT at or before ART initiation in both assumptions. The median CD4 count and body weight showed a marked improvement during the first 6 months of treatment, followed by stagnation thereafter. Conclusion: The study has shown an overall low mortality but a high loss to follow-up rate of the cohort. Advanced clinical stage, anemia, low body weight, and lack of CPT initiation were independent predictors of mortality – but not gender. CPT initiation should be encouraged in routine HIV care services, and patient retention mechanisms have to be strengthened. Stagnation in immunological and weight recovery after the first 6

  20. The Cost of Ankylosing Spondylitis in the UK Using Linked Routine and Patient-Reported Survey Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne Cooksey

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a chronic inflammatory arthritis which typically begins in early adulthood and impacts on healthcare resource utilisation and the ability to work. Previous studies examining the cost of AS have relied on patient-reported questionnaires based on recall. This study uses a combination of patient-reported and linked-routine data to examine the cost of AS in Wales, UK.Participants in an existing AS cohort study (n = 570 completed questionnaires regarding work status, out-of-pocket expenses, visits to health professionals and disease severity. Participants gave consent for their data to be linked to routine primary and secondary care clinical datasets. Health resource costs were calculated using a bottom-up micro-costing approach. Human capital costs methods were used to estimate work productivity loss costs, particularly relating to work and early retirement. Regression analyses were used to account for age, gender, disease activity.The total cost of AS in the UK is estimated at £19016 per patient per year, calculated to include GP attendance, administration costs and hospital costs derived from routine data records, plus patient-reported non-NHS costs, out-of-pocket AS-related expenses, early retirement, absenteeism, presenteeism and unpaid assistance costs. The majority of the cost (>80% was as a result of work-related costs.The major cost of AS is as a result of loss of working hours, early retirement and unpaid carer's time. Therefore, much of AS costs are hidden and not easy to quantify. Functional impairment is the main factor associated with increased cost of AS. Interventions which keep people in work to retirement age and reduce functional impairment would have the greatest impact on reducing costs of AS. The combination of patient-reported and linked routine data significantly enhanced the health economic analysis and this methodology that can be applied to other chronic conditions.

  1. The Cost of Ankylosing Spondylitis in the UK Using Linked Routine and Patient-Reported Survey Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooksey, Roxanne; Husain, Muhammad J; Brophy, Sinead; Davies, Helen; Rahman, Muhammad A; Atkinson, Mark D; Phillips, Ceri J; Siebert, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis which typically begins in early adulthood and impacts on healthcare resource utilisation and the ability to work. Previous studies examining the cost of AS have relied on patient-reported questionnaires based on recall. This study uses a combination of patient-reported and linked-routine data to examine the cost of AS in Wales, UK. Participants in an existing AS cohort study (n = 570) completed questionnaires regarding work status, out-of-pocket expenses, visits to health professionals and disease severity. Participants gave consent for their data to be linked to routine primary and secondary care clinical datasets. Health resource costs were calculated using a bottom-up micro-costing approach. Human capital costs methods were used to estimate work productivity loss costs, particularly relating to work and early retirement. Regression analyses were used to account for age, gender, disease activity. The total cost of AS in the UK is estimated at £19016 per patient per year, calculated to include GP attendance, administration costs and hospital costs derived from routine data records, plus patient-reported non-NHS costs, out-of-pocket AS-related expenses, early retirement, absenteeism, presenteeism and unpaid assistance costs. The majority of the cost (>80%) was as a result of work-related costs. The major cost of AS is as a result of loss of working hours, early retirement and unpaid carer's time. Therefore, much of AS costs are hidden and not easy to quantify. Functional impairment is the main factor associated with increased cost of AS. Interventions which keep people in work to retirement age and reduce functional impairment would have the greatest impact on reducing costs of AS. The combination of patient-reported and linked routine data significantly enhanced the health economic analysis and this methodology that can be applied to other chronic conditions.

  2. STIGMA, SOCIAL SUPPORT, AND TREATMENT ADHERENCE AMONG HIV-POSITIVE PATIENTS IN CHIANG MAI, THAILAND

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Michael Jonathan; Murray, Jordan Keith; Suwanteerangkul, Jiraporn; Wiwatanadate, Phongtape

    2014-01-01

    Our study assessed the influence of HIV-related stigma on treatment adherence among people living with HIV in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and whether social support had a moderating effect on this relationship. We recruited 128 patients living with HIV from Sansai Hospital, a community hospital in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and collected data through structured interviews. All forms of HIV-related stigma considered in this study (personalized experience, disclosure, negative self-image, and public attit...

  3. Are routine visits to oncology clinics the most appropriate way to follow-up breast cancer patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkbride, Peter; Vallis, Katherine

    1997-01-01

    Purpose The routine follow-up at oncology clinics, of patients treated for breast cancer is believed to serve two purposes: to facilitate early detection of loco-regional recurrences and new primary tumors, and to provide psychological support for patients. Since it does not translate into improved survival, early detection of distant metastatic disease is not a priority. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of routine clinic review in detecting loco-regional relapse following treatment for breast cancer. Materials and Methods The charts of all 579 patients with stage I, II and III breast cancer seen for the first time at our institution in 1982 were reviewed. Treatment consisted of mastectomy (367 cases), lumpectomy alone (53), or lumpectomy plus radiotherapy (159). Follow-up policy stipulated that patients were seen every 3 months for the first 2 years after primary treatment, every 6 months for the next 3 years and annually thereafter. Annual mammograms were performed. Results Thirteen patients were lost to follow-up during the 14 year study period. Loco-regional recurrence was diagnosed in 184 patients. Recurrent disease were detected by the patient (79 cases, 45%), at routine mammography (13 cases, 7%), at visits to physicians other than oncologists(40 cases, 22%). In 18 cases, the method of detection was unknown and only 34 (18%) loco-regional recurrences were detected at routine visits to oncology clinics. It is calculated that this group of patients attended approximately 11,000 follow-up clinic appointments over the period in question. Even if we assume that the 18 cases in which the method of detection was unknown were in fact detected at a visit to an oncology clinic, then the rate of detection is only 1 local recurrence per 212 visits. Conclusion Given the apparent limitations of routine follow-up, other methods of surveillance such as open access to a Breast Cancer Resource Centre merit investigation. It is imperative that non

  4. Mesa en cuello por Mycobacterium tuberculosis en un paciente infectado por HIV A case of cervical mass due to mycobacterium tuberculosis in an HIV infected patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Soto

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente de sexo masculino con diagnóstico de infección por HIV quien presentó una masa en cuello de 7 x 10 cm, dolorosa, de consistencia dura, adherida, no pulsátil, con edema de la piel adyacente y sin otros signos asociados. La evolución fue de 6 meses. Los estudios de la masa y el esputo dieron como resultado el aislamiento de M. tuberculosis, lo que permitió un adecuado enfoque terapéutico y por consiguiente una respuesta clínica satisfactoria

    We report on the case of an HIV-infected male with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, manifested as both pulmonary involvement and a cervical mass; lung infection was proven by culture; pathological study of the mass revealed both chronic granulomatous infection and acidfast bacilli. Response to treatment was favorable
    and rapid. We suggest that every fluid and tissue obtained from HIV-positive patients be routinely stained and cultured for mycobacteria.

  5. Oral manifestations of anemia in HIV/AIDS patients without ARV treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Hidayat

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS is  a set of symptoms caused by decreases of the immune system that was infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Blood disorders often found in patient with HIV and associated with HIV infection. Mostly found disorders is anemia of chronic disease. The prevalence of anemia in HIV/AIDS patients reaches 70%. Oral manifestations of anemia are atrophy of the papillae on tongue, glossodynia, pallor, angular cheilitis, glossitis, aphthous ulcers/erosive lesions, candidiasis, and geographic tongue. There are many publications that uses anemia as indicator to determine the prognosis of HIV infection, thus the description of oral manifestation of anemia in the non-ARV HIV/AIDS patients is a necessity. The purpose of this study was to describe the oral manifestation of anemia in the non-ARV HIV/AIDS patients. Methods: The methods used were purposive random sampling. Samples were new HIV/AIDS patients who have not got antiretroviral (ARV treatment. The study included 40 patients in Teratai Clinic Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung. Results: Oral manifestations of anemia were found amongst non-ARV HIV/AIDS patients, which were candidiasis in  37 patients, glossodynia in 28 patients, glossitis in 10 patients, and angular cheilitis in 1 patient. Conclusion: From the study found that oral manifestations of anemia that found in non-ARV HIV/AIDS patients were candidiasis, glossodynia, glossitis and angular cheilitis. HIV/AIDS patients with anemia needed to treat more intensive for better prognosis and quality of life. Keywords: Anemia, HIV/AIDS, Candidiasis, Glossitis, Glossodynia

  6. Clinical outcomes and cost effectiveness of accelerated diagnostic protocol in a chest pain center compared with routine care of patients with chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Elad; Reuveni, Haim; Shlomo, Nir; Gerber, Yariv; Beigel, Roy; Narodetski, Michael; Eldar, Michael; Or, Jacob; Hod, Hanoch; Shamiss, Arie; Matetzky, Shlomi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare in patients presenting with acute chest pain the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of an accelerated diagnostic protocol utilizing contemporary technology in a chest pain unit versus routine care in an internal medicine department. Hospital and 90-day course were prospectively studied in 585 consecutive low-moderate risk acute chest pain patients, of whom 304 were investigated in a designated chest pain center using a pre-specified accelerated diagnostic protocol, while 281 underwent routine care in an internal medicine ward. Hospitalization was longer in the routine care compared with the accelerated diagnostic protocol group (pdiagnostic protocol patients (98%) vs. 57 (20%) routine care patients underwent non-invasive testing, (pdiagnostic imaging testing was performed in 125 (44%) and 26 (9%) patients in the routine care and accelerated diagnostic protocol patients, respectively (pdiagnostic protocol patients compared with those receiving routine care was associated with a lower incidence of readmissions for chest pain [8 (3%) vs. 24 (9%), pdiagnostic protocol remained a predictor of lower acute coronary syndromes and readmissions after propensity score analysis [OR = 0.28 (CI 95% 0.14-0.59)]. Cost per patient was similar in both groups [($2510 vs. $2703 for the accelerated diagnostic protocol and routine care group, respectively, (p = 0.9)]. An accelerated diagnostic protocol is clinically superior and as cost effective as routine in acute chest pain patients, and may save time and resources.

  7. Characteristics and Outcome of Patients Diagnosed With HIV at Older Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Ilan; Guri, Keren Mahlab; Elbirt, Daniel; Bezalel, Shira Rosenberg; Maldarelli, Frank; Mor, Orna; Grossman, Zehava; Sthoeger, Zev M

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the clinical, virological, and immunological status at presentation as well as the outcome of patients diagnosed with HIV above the age of 50. A retrospective study of 418 patients newly diagnosed with HIV in 1 Israeli center, between the years 2004 and 2013. Patients with new HIV diagnosis ≥ 50 years of age defined as "older' and < 50 defined as "younger.' Patients were evaluated every 1 to 3 months (mean follow-up 53 ± 33 months). Patients with < 2 CD4/viral-load measurements or with < 1 year of follow-up were excluded. Time of HIV infection was estimated by HIV sequence ambiguity assay. Ambiguity index ≤ 0.43 indicated recent (≤ 1 year) HIV infection. Eighty nine (21%) patients were diagnosed with HIV at an older age. Those older patients presented with significant lower CD4 cell counts and higher viral-load compared with the younger patients. At the end of the study, the older patients had higher mortality rate (21% vs 3.5%; P < 0.001) and lower CD4 cell counts (381 ± 228 vs 483 ± 26 cells/μL; P < 0.001) compared with the younger patients. This difference was also observed between older and younger patients with similar CD4 cell counts and viral load at the time of HIV diagnosis and among patients with a recent (≤ 1 year) HIV infection. One-fifth of HIV patients are diagnosed at older age (≥ 50 years). Those older patients have less favorable outcome compared with the younger patients. This point to the need of educational and screening programs within older populations and for a closer follow-up of older HIV patients.

  8. Disease management programs for patients with COPD in Germany: a longitudinal evaluation of routinely collected patient records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehring, Michael; Donnachie, Ewan; Fexer, Johannes; Hofmann, Frank; Schneider, Antonius

    2014-07-01

    The primary aim of the disease management program (DMP) for patients with COPD is to improve health outcomes and thereby to reduce overall costs. Six years after its introduction in Germany, no consensus has yet been reached as to whether the DMP has been effective in reaching these goals. The objective of the study was an evaluation of the DMP for COPD in Bavaria using routinely collected subject medical records. A longitudinal population-based study, comparing the total DMP population of up to 86,560 patients with a stable cohort of 17,549 subjects over a period of 5 years. The effect of subject dropout in the cohort is further estimated by means of inverse probability weighting. The proportion of subjects in the total population who were prescribed and received treatment with oral corticosteroids declined at a constant rate of 1.0% per year (P management education. While the proportion of smokers in the total population remained constant because of the effect of newly enrolled subjects, the proportion of smokers decreased significantly even after dropout adjustment, from 29% to 21%. The occurrence of exacerbations decreased steadily at a rate of 0.9% (total population) or 0.7% (cohort) per year. While the occurrence of emergency hospital admissions decreased in the total population, an increase was observed within the cohort. Summarizing all results leads to the suggestion that the German DMP for COPD has been effective in enhancing the quality of care in regard to an improved adherence to guidelines, pharmacotherapy, exacerbations, and self-management education. However, the DMP was not able to prevent an increase in emergency hospital admissions for the stable population in the cohort. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  9. [Effect of Vimang in HIV/AIDS patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil del Valle, Lizette; Serrano López, Teresita; Calderón Fuentes, Odalys; Núñez Sánchez, Felicita; Tápanes Peraza, Rolando D; Pérez Avila, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    the oxidative stress (OS) has been recognized as a co-factor of HIV infection evolution to AIDS condition. to evaluate the possible antioxidant effect and the impact on the functioning of several systems in the body, resulting in the toxicological safety of Vimang use. sixty eight HIV-seropositive patients were double-blind randomized in two groups; the first was supplied with Vimang during six months and the other with placebo. Redox condition and the biochemical indexes of the hematological, renal and hepatic functions were measured. Also, dietary intake was assessed through surveys administered for 7 days at the beginning and at the end of the study. there were statistically significant differences between the groups regarding positive change in redox figures in Vimang group compared to those of the placebo group. No significant difference was found either in the evaluated dietary intake indexes or in the biochemical indexes of the renal, hematological and hepatic functions at the end of the study. Vimang antioxidant effect was shown, without any toxic influence during the six month-study conducted in HIV/AIDS patients.

  10. Patients' perceptions of sharing in decisions: a systematic review of interventions to enhance shared decision making in routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, France; Turcotte, Stéphane; Stacey, Dawn; Ratté, Stéphane; Kryworuchko, Jennifer; Graham, Ian D

    2012-01-01

    Shared decision making is the process in which a healthcare choice is made jointly by the health professional and the patient. Little is known about what patients view as effective or ineffective strategies to implement shared decision making in routine clinical practice. This systematic review evaluates the effectiveness of interventions to improve health professionals' adoption of shared decision making in routine clinical practice, as seen by patients. We searched electronic databases (PubMed, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO) from their inception to mid-March 2009. We found additional material by reviewing the reference lists of the studies found in the databases; systematic reviews of studies on shared decision making; the proceedings of various editions of the International Shared Decision Making Conference; and the transcripts of the Society for Medical Decision Making's meetings. In our study selection, we included randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before-and-after studies, and interrupted time series analyses in which patients evaluated interventions to improve health professionals' adoption of shared decision making. The interventions in question consisted of the distribution of printed educational material; educational meetings; audit and feedback; reminders; and patient-mediated initiatives (e.g. patient decision aids). Two reviewers independently screened the studies and extracted data. Statistical analyses considered categorical and continuous process measures. We computed the standardized effect size for each outcome at the 95% confidence interval. The primary outcome of interest was health professionals' adoption of shared decision making as reported by patients in a self-administered questionnaire. Of the 6764 search results, 21 studies reported 35 relevant comparisons. Overall, the quality of the studies ranged from 0% to 83%. Only three of the 21 studies reported a clinically significant effect

  11. Polyomavirus JCV excretion and genotype analysis in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednicky, John A.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; White, Zoe S.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of shedding of polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) genotypes in urine of HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: Single samples of urine and blood were collected prospectively from 70 adult HIV-infected patients and 68 uninfected volunteers. Inclusion criteria for HIV-infected patients included an HIV RNA viral load < 1000 copies, CD4 cell count of 200-700 x 106 cells/l, and stable HAART regimen. PCR assays and sequence analysis were carried out using JCV-specific primers against different regions of the virus genome. RESULTS: JCV excretion in urine was more common in HIV-positive patients but not significantly different from that of the HIV-negative group [22/70 (31%) versus 13/68 (19%); P = 0.09]. HIV-positive patients lost the age-related pattern of JCV shedding (P = 0.13) displayed by uninfected subjects (P = 0.01). Among HIV-infected patients significant differences in JCV shedding were related to CD4 cell counts (P = 0.03). Sequence analysis of the JCV regulatory region from both HIV-infected patients and uninfected volunteers revealed all to be JCV archetypal strains. JCV genotypes 1 (36%) and 4 (36%) were the most common among HIV-infected patients, whereas type 2 (77%) was the most frequently detected among HIV-uninfected volunteers. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that JCV shedding is enhanced by modest depressions in immune function during HIV infection. JCV shedding occurred in younger HIV-positive persons than in the healthy controls. As the common types of JCV excreted varied among ethnic groups, JCV genotypes associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy may reflect demographics of those infected patient populations.

  12. Are we meeting the American Diabetes Association goals for HIV-infected patients with diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Oluwatoyin; Vibhakar, Sonia; Max, Blake

    2009-09-01

    We determined rates of achieving the American Diabetes Association goals among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected diabetic patients. American Diabetes Association goals (for hemoglobin A1c, blood pressure, and lipid levels) were defined by 2008 American Diabetes Association guidelines. HIV-infected diabetic patients achieved American Diabetes Association goals at rates similar to those in general medicine clinic patients. A multidisciplinary approach is needed to improve diabetes management in HIV clinics.

  13. Do HIV care providers appropriately manage hepatitis B in coinfected patients treated with antiretroviral therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mamta K; Opio, Christopher K; Osuagwu, Chukwuma C; Pillai, Rathi; Keiser, Philip; Lee, William M

    2007-04-01

    The common occurrence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in patients who carry the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) demands that both viruses be recognized, evaluated, and treated when appropriate. We identified 357 HIV- and hepatitis B surface antigen-positive patients who underwent testing from 1999 to 2003; 155 patients who were new to our clinic and who initiated therapy for HIV and HBV coinfection were considered for inclusion in the study. The frequency of HIV testing (to determine HIV load and CD4+ cell count) performed during the first year of therapy was compared with the frequency of HBV measurements (to determine hepatitis B e antigen, antibody to hepatitis B e antigen, and HBV load), abdominal ultrasound examination, and measurement of levels of alpha-fetoprotein in serum. HBV load data were obtained for only 16% of patients before initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART), whereas HIV load was determined for 99% of patients before initiation of ART. The total number of HIV load measurements obtained during the first year after ART initiation was 497 (median number of HIV load measurements per patient, 3.0), compared with 85 measurements of HBV load (median number of HBV load measurements per patient, <1; P<.001). The percentage of patients who received any level of HBV monitoring (i.e., tests to determine hepatitis B e antigen, antibody to hepatitis B e antigen, and HBV load) after ART initiation increased from 7% in 1999 to 52% in 2001 (P<.001), whereas the percentage of patients who underwent HIV load testing remained at 80%-90% during the same period. Health care providers treating patients with HIV infection during the period 1999-2003 infrequently monitored HBV response in coinfected patients, but they systematically monitored HIV response after ART initiation. Improved physician adherence to guidelines that better delineate HBV treatment and monitoring for patients with HIV-HBV coinfection is needed.

  14. The Effect Of Extrinsic Motivation On Adversity Quotient In Patients With HIV/AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Nursalam, Nursalam; Misutarno, Misutarno; Puspitawati, Yulia Dewi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with HIV/AIDS may have various types of psychological responses. It was very difficult situation for them. Difficulty can measured by using Adversity Quotient. As a nurse, we can give extrinsic motivation to bring back the patient HIV/AIDS’s quality of life. The objective of this study was to identify the presence effect of extrinsic motivation on Adversity Quotient in patients with HIV/AIDS in Infectious Disease Intermediateatery Treatment Unit, Dr. Soetomo Hospital, S...

  15. The Effect of Extrinsic Motivation on Adversity Quotient in Patients with Hiv/aids

    OpenAIRE

    Nursalam, Nursalam; Misutarno, Misutarno; Puspitawati, Yulia Dewi

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with HIV/AIDS may have various types of psychological responses. It was very difficult situation for them. Difficulty can measured by using Adversity Quotient. As a nurse, we can give extrinsic motivation to bring back the patient HIV/AIDS’s quality of life. The objective of this study was to identify the presence effect of extrinsic motivation on Adversity Quotient in patients with HIV/AIDS in Infectious Disease Intermediateatery Treatment Unit, Dr. Soetomo Hospital, S...

  16. Erectile Dysfunction Among HIV Patients Undergoing Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy: Dyslipidemia as a Main Risk Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Romero‐Velez, MD

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: ED is highly prevalent in HIV patients. Dyslipidemia should be considered as a risk factor for ED in HIV patients. Romero‐Velez G, Lisker‐Cervantes A, Villeda‐Sandoval CI, Sotomayor de Zavaleta M, Olvera‐Posada D, Sierra‐Madero JG, Arreguin‐Camacho LO, and Castillejos‐Molina RA. Erectile dysfunction among HIV patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy: Dyslipidemia as a main risk factor. Sex Med 2014;2:24–30.

  17. The prevalence of secondary diseases of the HIV patients in the Omsk region: cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Pasechnik, Oksana; Pitsenko, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of secondary diseases of the HIV infected patients who were under observation in medical organizations of Omsk region in 2013 has been studied. 16, 8% of HIV-infected patients had a wide spectrum of secondary diseases, mainly infectious etiology. In the structure of secondary infections the leading position was occupied by tuberculosis (32, 3%), candidiasis (24,4%), bacterial diseases (23,7%). The average risk of tuberculosis diseases is 24 cases for 1000 HIV-infected patients.

  18. There is a Need to Request Cervical Spine Routine Radiographs for Patients with Down's Syndrome Before Carrying out Otorhinolaryngologic Surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szpak, Andrea Marçal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Down's Syndrome (DS is a genetic syndrome characterized by several changes and the Atlanto-axial Instability is critical for the otorhinolaryngologist. Objective: Check the prevalence of atlanto-axial instability in patients with Down's Syndrome who undergo service follow-up in the Clinical Hospital of the UFPR [Federal University of Paraná] and review the need to carry out routine cervical radiography in the patients with prescription to otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Method: Prospective study of patients with the syndrome who undergo CH/UFPR's follow up, through questionnaire and cervical X-ray. Results: No case of IAA was found in the population studied. Discussion: we consider there's a high frequency of AAI in patients with DS, and for all patients who will take part in sports activities that involve motion of the region, or who are submitted to surgeries, an investigation with clinical and radiological exam is recommended. However, as the incidence has many variable findings we question the real validity of this research for all patients, even the asymptomatic ones. Conclusion: In spite of a DS's peculiar change, there are no evidences of the need to research the AAI as a routine in asymptomatic patients and the symptomatology should guide the investigation. But more studies are required to evaluate the importance of the radiological exams in such cases.

  19. Viral hepatitis and rapid diagnostic test based screening for HBsAg in HIV-infected patients in rural Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian C Franzeck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV is highly prevalent in people living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa. Screening for HBV surface antigen (HBsAg before initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART is recommended. However, it is not part of diagnostic routines in HIV programs in many resource-limited countries although patients could benefit from optimized antiretroviral therapy covering both infections. Screening could be facilitated by rapid diagnostic tests for HBsAg. Operating experience with these point of care devices in HIV-positive patients in Sub-Saharan Africa is largely lacking. We determined the prevalence of HBV and Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection as well as the diagnostic accuracy of the rapid test device Determine HBsAg in an HIV cohort in rural Tanzania. METHODS: Prospectively collected blood samples from adult, HIV-1 positive and antiretroviral treatment-naïve patients in the Kilombero and Ulanga antiretroviral cohort (KIULARCO in rural Tanzania were analyzed at the point of care with Determine HBsAg, a reference HBsAg EIA and an anti-HCV EIA. RESULTS: Samples of 272 patients were included. Median age was 38 years (interquartile range [IQR] 32-47, 169/272 (63% subjects were females and median CD4+ count was 250 cells/µL (IQR 97-439. HBsAg was detected in 25/272 (9.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.2-13.0% subjects. Of these, 7/25 (28% were positive for HBeAg. Sensitivity of Determine HBsAg was rated at 96% (95% CI 82.8-99.6% and specificity at 100% (95% CI, 98.9-100%. Antibodies to HCV (anti-HCV were found in 10/272 (3.7%, 95% CI 2.0-6.4% of patients. CONCLUSION: This study reports a high prevalence of HBV in HIV-positive patients in a rural Tanzanian setting. The rapid diagnostic test Determine HBsAg is an accurate assay for screening for HBsAg in HIV-1 infected patients at the point of care and may further help to guide cART in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  20. Cotrimoxazole-Induced Hypoglycemia in an HIV-Infected Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine A Hughes

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of cotrimoxazole-induced hypoglycemia is described in a male patient infected with HIV. Ten days after initiating high dose cotrimoxazole for suspected Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, the patient developed neuroglycopenic symptoms and diaphoresis. Blood glucose levels were repeatedly low, with elevated insulin and C-peptide levels despite multiple intravenous bolus doses and infusions of dextrose. Hypoglycemia resolved after approximately 36 h of treatment with dextrose and discontinuation of cotrimoxazole. A review of reported cases of hypoglycemia associated with cotrimoxazole is provided, including information about onset, risk factors and possible mechanism.

  1. Prognosis of HIV-1-infected patients up to 5 years after initiation of HAART: collaborative analysis of prospective studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, M; Sterne, JAC; Sabin, C

    2007-01-01

    of AIDS or death (death alone) from the start of HAART ranged from 5.6 to 77% (1.8-65%), depending on age, CD4 cell count, HIV-1-RNA level, clinical stage, and history of injection drug use. From 6 months the corresponding figures were 4.1-99% for AIDS or death and 1.3-96% for death alone. CONCLUSION......: On the basis of data collected routinely in HIV care, prognostic models with high discriminatory power over 5 years were developed for patients starting HAART in industrialized countries. A risk calculator that produces estimates for progression rates at years 1 to 5 after starting HAART is available from www.art-cohort-collaboration.org....

  2. Head and neck cancer in HIV patients and their parents: a Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig, Frederik N; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism for the increased risk of head and neck cancer (HNC) observed in HIV patients is controversial. We hypothesized that family-related risk factors increase the risk of HNC why we estimated the risk of this type of cancer in both HIV patients and their parents.......The mechanism for the increased risk of head and neck cancer (HNC) observed in HIV patients is controversial. We hypothesized that family-related risk factors increase the risk of HNC why we estimated the risk of this type of cancer in both HIV patients and their parents....

  3. Morbidity and mortality of black HIV-positive patients with end-stage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods. This retrospective study compared the incidences of vascular and infectious morbidity and mortality in black HIV-positive patients with those in a group of HIV-negative patients matched for ethnicity, age and gender. All the patients were receiving chronic haemodialysis in the medically insured healthcare sector of ...

  4. Contribution of HIV infection to mortality among cancer patients in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghill, Anna E; Newcomb, Polly A; Madeleine, Margaret M; Richardson, Barbra A; Mutyaba, Innocent; Okuku, Fred; Phipps, Warren; Wabinga, Henry; Orem, Jackson; Casper, Corey

    2013-11-28

    HIV infection is associated with cancer risk. This relationship has resulted in a growing cancer burden, especially in resource-limited countries where HIV is highly prevalent. Little is known, however, about how HIV affects cancer survival in these settings. We therefore investigated the role of HIV in cancer survival in Uganda. Retrospective cohort (N = 802). Eligible cancer patients were residents of Kyadondo County, at least 18 years of age at cancer diagnosis, and diagnosed between 2003 and 2010 with one of the following: breast cancer, cervical cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, or esophageal cancer. Patients were classified as HIV-infected at cancer diagnosis based on a documented positive HIV antibody test, medical history indicating HIV infection, or an HIV clinic referral letter. The primary outcome, vital status at 1 year following cancer diagnosis, was abstracted from the medical record or determined through linkage to the national hospice database. The risk of death during the year after cancer diagnosis was compared between cancer patients with and without evidence of HIV infection using Cox proportional hazards regression. HIV-infected cancer patients in Uganda experienced a more than two-fold increased risk of death during the year following cancer diagnosis compared to HIV-uninfected cancer patients [hazard ratio 2.28; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.61-3.23]. This association between HIV and 1-year cancer survival was observed for both cancers with (hazard ratio 1.56; 95% CI 1.04-2.34) and without (hazard ratio 2.68; 95% CI 1.20-5.99) an infectious cause. This study demonstrates the role of HIV in cancer survival for both cancers with and without an infectious cause in a resource-limited, HIV-endemic setting.

  5. Prevalence and prognostic significance of ECG abnormalities in HIV-infected patients: results from the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Elsayed Z; Prineas, Ronald J; Roediger, Mollie P

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It remains debated whether to include resting electrocardiogram (ECG) in the routine care of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. METHODS: This analysis included 4518 HIV-infected patients (28% women and 29% blacks) from the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral...... Therapy study, a clinical trial aimed to compare 2 HIV treatment strategies. ECG abnormalities were classified using the Minnesota Code. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to examine the association between baseline ECG abnormalities and incident cardiovascular disease (CVD). RESULTS: More than...... half of the participants (n = 2325, or 51.5%) had either minor or major ECG abnormalities. Minor ECG abnormalities (48.6%) were more common than major ECG abnormalities (7.7%). During a median follow-up of 28.7 months, 155 participants (3.4%) developed incident CVD. After adjusting for the study...

  6. A CASE OF RENAL DISEASE IN HIV INFECTED PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Vina Septiani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Kidney diseases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected patients has been been fourth leading cause of death after sepsis, pneumonia, and liver disease. HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN is the most common. We report a case, a male patient, 48 years, who experienced shortness of breath, cough and intermittent fever and has been reported as HIV positive, without previous antiretroviral treatment and last CD4+ count is 89 cells/mm3. There are elevated BUN and SC from day to day during treatment and proteinuria +2 as a sign of kidney disease with normal blood pressure and there was no edema. Patients given an antibiotic and ACE inhibitors as antiproteinuria. Patients with suspicion of HIVAN in this case can progress very rapidly and causes progressive decline in renal function. Prognosis of patients with HIVAN if not handled properly will develop end stage renal disease (ESRD in 1-4 months and had a mortality rate 4.7 times higher than HIV patients without renal impairment. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  7. Assessment of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infections and associated risk factors in HIV infected patients at Debretabor hospital, South Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melashu Balew

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infections and associated risk factors among HIV infected patients at Debretabor hospital. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among HIV/AIDS patients attending Debretabor hospital from February to April, 201 2. Venous blood samples were collected from study participants for HBsAg and anti HCV antibody tests. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify associated variables with HBsAg and anti HCV positivity. Variables having P<0.05 was taken as statistically significant association. Results: From a total of 395 HIV infected patients included in this study, 234 (59.2% were females and 161 (40.8% males with mean (依SD age of 36.31 (依9.91 years. The prevalence of HBsAg and anti HCV antibody was 6.1% and 1.3%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, multiple sexual partner (AOR=8.1, 95% CI=1.8-33.97 and history of opportunistic infections (AOR=3.17, 95% CI=1.3-7.7 were statistically associated with HBsAg positivity. History of blood transfusion (AOR=5.61, 95% CI= 1.03-36.59 was associated with presence of anti-HCV antibody. Conclusions: The prevalence of HBsAg and anti HCV antibodies in HIV coinfected patients was intermediate. However, it is relevant for HIV infected patients since viral hepatitis co-infections in HIV patients can cause multiple complications. Therefore, routine HBV and HCV screening with reliable diagnostic markers need to be carried out for close monitoring and better management in HIV patients.

  8. Operational research in malawi: making a difference with cotrimoxazole preventive therapy in patients with tuberculosis and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background In Malawi, high case fatality rates in patients with tuberculosis, who were also co-infected with HIV, and high early death rates in people living with HIV during the initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) adversely impacted on treatment outcomes for the national tuberculosis and ART programmes respectively. This article i) discusses the operational research that was conducted in the country on cotrimoxazole preventive therapy, ii) outlines the steps that were taken to translate these findings into national policy and practice, iii) shows how the implementation of cotrimoxazole preventive therapy for both TB patients and HIV-infected patients starting ART was associated with reduced death rates, and iv) highlights lessons that can be learnt for other settings and interventions. Discussion District and facility-based operational research was undertaken between 1999 and 2005 to assess the effectiveness of cotrimoxazole preventive therapy in reducing death rates in TB patients and subsequently in patients starting ART under routine programme conditions. Studies demonstrated significant reductions in case fatality in HIV-infected TB patients receiving cotrimoxazole and in HIV-infected patients about to start ART. Following the completion of research, the findings were rapidly disseminated nationally at stakeholder meetings convened by the Ministry of Health and internationally through conferences and peer-reviewed scientific publications. The Ministry of Health made policy changes based on the available evidence, following which there was countrywide distribution of the updated policy and guidelines. Policy was rapidly moved to practice with the development of monitoring tools, drug procurement and training packages. National programme performance improved which showed a significant decrease in case fatality rates in TB patients as well as a reduction in early death in people with HIV starting ART. Summary Key lessons for moving this research endeavour

  9. Factors Associated with Length of Hospital Stay among HIV Positive and HIV Negative Patients with Tuberculosis in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Maria Jacirema Ferreira; Ferreira, Alaidistania A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Identify and analyze the factors associated to length of hospital stay among HIV positive and HIV negative patients with tuberculosis in Manaus city, state of Amazonas, Brazil, in 2010. Methods Epidemiological study with primary data obtained from monitoring of hospitalized patients with tuberculosis in Manaus. Data were collected by interviewing patients and analyzing medical records, according to the following study variables age, sex, co-morbidities, education, race, income, lifestyle, history of previous treatment or hospitalization due to tuberculosis, treatment regimen, adverse reactions, smear test, clinical form, type of discharge, and length of hospital stay. The associated factors were identified through chi-square or t-Student test at a 5% significance level. Results Income from 1 to 3 minimum wages (P = 0.028), pulmonary tuberculosis form (P = 0.011), negative smear test or no information in this regard (P = 0.014), initial 6-month treatment scheme (P = 0.029), and adverse drug reactions (P = 0.021) were associated to prolonged hospital stay in HIV positive patients. Conclusion We found out that although there were no significant differences in the length of hospital stay in HIV positive patients, all factors significantly associated to prolonged hospital stay occurred in this group of patients. This finding corroborates other studies indicating the severity of tuberculosis in HIV patients, which may also contribute to lengthen their hospital stay. PMID:23593227

  10. Effectiveness of Psycho-Educational Intervention in HIV Patients' Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Clarisse; Sarmento E Castro, Rui; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Fernandes, Lia

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) is the main prognostic factor associated with HIV disease progression and death. The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a psycho-educational program to promote adherence to HAART in HIV patients. A longitudinal study (n = 102) over 9 months in an Infectious Diseases Hospital was carried out. Adherence to HAART was measured with standardized scales and values of viral load. Two groups were defined: adherents and non-adherents. In the latter, a psycho-educational program was implemented and 6 months later measured adherence to HAART. Knowledge about the infection, CD4 T lymphocytes and HIV-ribonucleic acid values were measured before and after this program. The sample was predominantly male (70%), heterosexual (78%), with a mean age of 49 (SD = 12.7) years, and 48% of participants were not adhering to HAART. After the program, non-adherence decreased to 21.6%. Knowledge about the infection increased from 79 to 97%. A significant increase in CD4 T lymphocytes (mean 540-580) and a decrease in viral load (mean 5411-3052) were observed, the latter of statistical significance. This program seems to be feasible and efficient, improving adherence to HAART.

  11. An estimate of the magnitude and trend of HIV/AIDS epidemic using data from the routine VCT services as an alternative data source to ANC sentinel surveillance in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getachew, Yehenew; Gotu, Butte; Enquselassie, Fikre

    2010-10-01

    Since early 1980s when AIDS was first recognized, there has been uncertainty about the future trend and the ultimate dimensions of the pandemic. This uncertainty persists because of difficulties in measuring HIV incidence and prevalence with a substantial degree of precision in a given population. One of the many factors for the lack of precision is the problem of obtaining representative data sources that can be extrapolated to the general population. National and regional HIV estimates for Ethiopia are derived from ANC based HIV surveillance data. Alternative data sources have not been exhaustively explored as potential tools to monitor the trend of HIV/ AIDS epidemic in the country. To estimate the magnitude and trend of HIV/AIDS epidemic using data from the routine VCT services as an alternative data source to ANC sentinel surveillance data. The study used secondary data sources from all government, private and NGO VCT centers, of the period of 2003-2005 in Addis Ababa. For the purpose of making comparative analysis of the VCT based estimations and projections, records of all five sentinel sites in Addis Ababa for the period 1983-2003 were reviewed. Both ANC and VCT data sources showed similar and regular trends from the beginning of the HIV epidemic till the year 1995 where the ANC showed a relatively higher prevalence rates than VCT data, with a maximum difference in HIV prevalence of 1.06% in 1993. However, a higher HIV prevalence was noted for the VCT than the ANC data source for the period of 1996-2002, with a maximum difference of 1.4% in 1998, the year when both the ANC and VCT modeled HIV prevalence reached the highest peak in Addis Ababa. On the contrary, the ANC based prevalence was higher than the VCT data for the period 2004-2010, with a maximum difference of 2.2%. This study suggests that VCT based HIV prevalence data closely approximates the ANC based data. Therefore VCT data source can be valuable to complement the ANC data in monitoring the HIV

  12. Optimal management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ntekim, Atara; Campbell, Oladapo; Rothenbacher, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    The clinical management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients has challenges mainly due to the concerns on immune status. At present, their mode of management is similar to HIV-seronegative patients involving the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy concurrently as indicated. HIV infection, cancer, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy lower immunity through reduction in CD4 cell counts. At present there are no treatment guidelines for HIV-positive patients. This study was done to systematically review the literature on cervical cancer management in HIV-positive patients and treatment outcomes. A systematic literature search was done in the major databases to identify studies on the management of HIV-positive patients with cervical cancer. Identified studies were assessed for eligibility and inclusion in the review following the guidelines of The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews and CRD's (Centre for Reviews and Dissemination) guidance for undertaking reviews in health care. Eight eligible studies were identified from the literature. Three of them were prospective while five were retrospective studies. Notably, the average age at diagnosis of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients was a decade lower than in seronegative patients. There was no difference in distribution of stages of disease at presentation between HIV-positive and negative patients. Mild acute toxicity (Grades 1 and 2) was higher in HIV-positive patients than in HIV-negative patients in hematopoietic system. In the grades 3 and 4 reactions, anemia was reported in 4% versus 2% while gastrointestinal reactions were reported in 5% versus 2% respectively. In general, patients who were started early on HAART had higher rates of treatment completion. The study supports the suggestion that HAART should be commenced early at cervical cancer diagnosis in HIV-positive patients diagnosed with cervical cancer to ensure less toxicity and better treatment compliance

  13. Low prevalence of H. pylori Infection in HIV-Positive Patients in the Northeast of Brazil

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    Silva Cícero IS

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study conducted in Northeastern Brazil, evaluated the prevalence of H. pylori infection and the presence of gastritis in HIV-infected patients. Methods There were included 113 HIV-positive and 141 age-matched HIV-negative patients, who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for dyspeptic symptoms. H. pylori status was evaluated by urease test and histology. Results The prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly lower (p H. pylori status and gender, age, HIV viral load, antiretroviral therapy and the use of antibiotics. A lower prevalence of H. pylori was observed among patients with T CD4 cell count below 200/mm3; however, it was not significant. Chronic active antral gastritis was observed in 87.6% of the HIV-infected patients and in 780.4% of the control group (p = 0.11. H. pylori infection was significantly associated with chronic active gastritis in the antrum in both groups, but it was not associated with corpus chronic active gastritis in the HIV-infected patients. Conclusion We demonstrated that the prevalence of H. pylori was significantly lower in HIV-positive patients compared with HIV-negative ones. However, corpus gastritis was frequently observed in the HIV-positive patients, pointing to different mechanisms than H. pylori infection in the genesis of the lesion.

  14. A cohort pilot study on HIV-associated neuropsychological impairments in haemophilia patients

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    Silvia eRiva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in the management of HIV infection with the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART, it is well known that HIV can directly infect the central nervous system (CNS and, as a result of such infection, neuropsychological impairments can be manifested. In this study we tried to determine whether seropositivity was associated with a poor neuropsychological performance in patients with hemophilia and HIV. Such a cohort of patients is very often underrepresented and understudied in the HIV literature. To amend such a gap, we carried out an extensive neuropsychological evaluation on these patients, and compared their performance with that of a group of seronegative hemophilia patients. The results revealed that HIV infection in HIV seropositive (HIV+ hemophilia patients was associated with deficits in attention, short-term memory, abstraction and visual recognition. Such results are still preliminary and explorative due to the small cohort of patients enrolled. However, the results do seem to have some important implications for day-to-day functioning, as the level of impairment detected may cause difficulties in completing common everyday tasks such as maintaining adherence to complex medication regimens, or maintaining social life activities. Continued research into the mechanisms related to HIV and neurocognitive dysfunction may provide targets for interventions that could have meaningful consequences in the real world for HIV hemophilia patients.

  15. Effciency of HIV-infected patients detection in neurological hospitals of large industrial center

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    Shmelev V.V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Aim of the study: to evaluate the effciency of detection for HIV-infection in patients of neurological departments of Saratov. Materials and methods. We retrospectively analyzed 25 250 medical histories of patients hospitalized into neurological departments of Saratov hospitals between January 2007 and April 2012. Results. Blood samples of 2010 patients (7,96 % were tested for the presence of HIV-antibodies. 37 patients were HIV-positive (1,84 % of examined patients and 0,15 % of the total number of patients. Conclusion. Increasing popularity and variety of clinical manifestations of HIV-infection requires the expansion of neurological patients whom serum test for antibodies against HIV is needed.

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of Dolutegravir in HIV-1 Treatment-Experienced (TE Patients in France.

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    Gilles Pialoux

    Full Text Available To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a new generation integrase inhibitor (INI, dolutegravir (DTG, in France, in treatment-experienced (TE and INI-naïve HIV-infected adults with at least two classes resistance compared to raltegravir (RAL, by adapting previously published Anti-Retroviral Analysis by Monte Carlo Individual Simulation (ARAMIS model.ARAMIS is a microsimulation Markov model with a lifetime time horizon and a monthly cycle length. Health states are defined as with or without opportunistic infection and death. In the initial cohort, efficacy and safety data were derived from a phase III study comparing DTG to RAL. Antiretroviral treatment algorithms, accounting for patient history, were based on French guidelines and experts opinion. Costs are mainly including treatment costs, routine HIV and opportunistic infection care, and death. Utilities depend on CD4+ cell count and the occurrence of opportunistic infections.The ARAMIS model indicates in the TE population that DTG compared to RAL over a life time is associated with 0.35 additional quality-adjusted life years (QALY; 10.75 versus 10.41 and additional costs of €7,266 (€390,001 versus €382,735. DTG increased costs are mainly related to a 9.1-month increase in life expectancy for DTG compared with RAL, and consequently a longer time spent on ART. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER for DTG compared with RAL is €21,048 per QALY gained. About 83% and 14% of total lifetime costs are associated with antiretroviral therapy and routine HIV care respectively. Univariate deterministic sensitivity analyses demonstrate the robustness of the model.DTG is cost-effective in the management of TE INI naive patients in France, from a collective perspective. These results could be explained by the superior efficacy of DTG in this population and its higher genetic barrier to resistance compared to RAL. These data need to be confirmed with longer-term real life data.

  17. Study of bone metabolism in patients with chronic HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coaccioli, S; Del Giorno, R; Crapa, G; Sabatini, C; Panaccione, A; Di Cato, L; Lavagna, A; Fatati, G; Paladini, A; Frongillo, R; Puxeddu, A

    2009-01-01

    Various studies have confirmed the high incidence of skeletal homeostasis modifications in subjects who are carriers of chronic HIV infections, and specific pharmacological treatments, which modify the metabolism and condition both the weight loss and the reshaping of the bones. The presence of a reduction in body mass index seems to contribute to the progressive deterioration of the skeletal framework. The aim of this study was to see whether the presence of HIV-seropositivity could constitute a risk factor for the development of osteoporosis/osteopenia, even in the light of the fact that our group was composed of patients with a concentrated age span well under the limit for both post-menopausal and senile osteoporosis, and with a median age superimposable for both sexes. Our study involved 26 HIV+ patients with an average duration of infection equal to 6.7 +/- 4.8 years, and a range of seropositive duration between 6 months to 16 years. The prominent ultrasonometrical parameters are as follows: Broadband Ultrasound Attenuation, Speed of Sound, Stiffness Index or Quantitative Ultra-sound Index, Bone Mineral Density, and T-score. The biochemical study was carried out by assessing a marker of neoformation such as seric osteocalcine, and uninary pyridinoline and deoxipyridonoline as resorption markers. The results confirmed the presence of osteoporosis/osteopenia in 46% of the samples (11%, and 35%, respectively), with a progressive reduction in bone mineral density in relation to the duration of HIV infection. Assessment of the marker for bone metabolism showed a significant increase in osteocalcine in the female population compared to the males, without any significant variations in the normal values. Extreme variability in the morphological appearance at bone level during the course of HIV infection would lead us to believe that in the genesis of various forms, depending on the mechanisms and the time involved only in the parts defined, other attributable factors

  18. A STUDY OF DYSLIPIDAEMIA IN HIV PATIENTS RECEIVING HAART

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    Chepuri Venkata Ravikumar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV was discovered in 1986 in Chennai (India amongst female sex workers by Dr. Suniti Solomon. Since then, HIV has spread to all parts of the country from the high-risk group to the antepartum population in many states at an alarming rate. The prevalence of dyslipidaemia and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease is significant in HIV/AIDS patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, ranging from 20% to 80%. In view of the high prevalence of dyslipidaemia and the increased risk for cardiovascular diseases among patients with HIV/AIDS, this is a matter of concern for public health. MATERIALS AND METHODS 143 patients who had been receiving HAART for a minimum of two years from Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Kadapa, during the period of January 2015 to September 2016 were studied. They were divided into 4 regimens groups 1 TEL (Tenofovir, Efavirenz, Lamivudine 2 TLAR (Tenofovir, Lamivudine, Atazanavir, Ritonavir 3 ZLE (Zidovudine, Lamivudine, Efavirenz 4 ZLN (Zidovudine, Lamivudine, Nevirapine. Detailed history, demographic data, anthropometric measurements, serum lipid profile obtained and analysed. RESULTS Out of 143 patients, 90 (62.9% were males and 53 (37.1% were females. 68 (47.6% were in the 30-39 years age group accounted for maximum percentage of groups. Based on BMI only 3 (2.1% were obese, 24 (16.8% were of overweight. WaistHip ratio was abnormal in 117 (81.8% and 26 (18.2% were normal. The mean values for patients on TEL regimen are TC is 195.4 mg%, LDL 122.1 mg%, HDL 34.96 mg%, TG 194.02 mg% and TC/HDL is 5.5714. In patients treated with TLAR regimen the mean values of TC are 172.15 mg%, LDL 99.15 mg %, HDL 36.35 mg%, TG 183.35 mg% and TC/HDL is 4.8. In patients treated with ZLE regimen, TC is 201.64 mg%, LDL 123.27 mg%, HDL 35.68 mg%, TG 212.27 mg% and TC/HDL is 5.6364. In patients treated with ZLN regimen, TC is 162.1 mg%, LDL 91.94 mg%, HDL 35.98 mg%, TG

  19. Health status in routine clinical practice: validity of the clinical COPD questionnaire at the individual patient level

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    de Vos Barbara

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a growing interest to use health status or disease control questionnaires in routine clinical practice. However, the validity of most questionnaires is established using techniques developed for group level validation. This study examines a new method, using patient interviews, to validate a short health status questionnaire, the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ, at the individual patient level. Methods Patients with COPD who visited an outpatient clinic completed the CCQ before the consultation, and the specialist physician completed it after the consultation. After the consultation all patients had a semi-structured in-depth interview. The patients' CCQ scores were compared with those of the treating clinician, and with mean scores from 5 clinicians from a pool of 20 who scored the CCQ after reading the transcript of the in-depth interviews only. Agreement was assessed using Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (CCC, and Blant and Altman plots. Interviews with patients with low agreement were reviewed for possible explanations. Results A total of 44 COPD patients (32 male, mean age 66 years, FEV1 45% of predicted participated. Agreement between the patients' CCQ scores and those of the treating clinicians (CCC = 0.87 and the mean score of the reviewing clinicians (CCC = 0.86 was very high. No systematic error was detected. No explanation for individuals with low agreement was found. Conclusion The validity of the CCQ on the individual patient level, as assessed by these methods, is good. Individual health status assessment with the CCQ is therefore sufficiently accurate to be used in routine clinical practice.

  20. MULTIFOCAL RETINAL INFILTRATES WITH PHLEBITIS AND OPTIC NEUROPATHY IN AN HIV-POSITIVE PEDIATRIC PATIENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasi, Sundeep K; Vora, Robin A; Martin, Taliva; Cunningham, Emmett T

    2015-01-01

    To describe an unusual presentation of bilateral HIV-associated multifocal retinal infiltrates with phlebitis and optic neuropathy in a pediatric patient from Zimbabwe, Africa. Retrospective case report of a 15-year-old boy from Zimbabwe, Africa. The patient was found to have bilateral vitritis, multifocal retinitis with phlebitis, and optic neuropathy in the setting of previously unrecognized HIV infection. Vision improved and the clinical findings resolved after treatment with intravenous corticosteroids and highly active retroviral therapy (HAART). The authors describe the occurrence and treatment of bilateral, HIV-associated multifocal retinal infiltrates with phlebitis and HIV-associated optic neuropathy in a pediatric patient from Zimbabwe, Africa.

  1. Treating depression in HIV-positive patients affects adherence

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    M Y H Moosa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine changes in adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV-positive patients with depression, following treatment with an antidepressant or psychotherapy. Methods. The study was prospective, randomised and controlled. Consenting volunteers aged ≥18 years and stable on ART for ≥6 months were included in the study. Sociodemographic data were obtained, and a clinical diagnostic evaluation and the Hamilton Depression rating scale (HAMD were performed on all subjects at entry to and at the end of the study. Participants found to be depressed were randomly assigned antidepressant treatment (20 mg citalopram or interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT (5 sessions. Medication was dispensed at each visit and patients were asked to return all unused medication to determine ART adherence. The study was approved by the University of the Witwatersrand. Results. Sixty-two HIV-positive persons receiving ART participated; 30 were not depressed (control group and 32 were depressed (patient group. No significant differences in demographic characteristics existed between the control and patient groups. Mean ART adherence at the start of the study was 99.5% (standard error (SE ±0.46 and 92.1% (SE ±1.69 in the control and patients groups, respectively. Mean ART adherence at the end of the study changed marginally in the control group (99.7%; SE ±0.46 and increased significantly in the patient group (99.5%; SE± 0.13 (p>0.05. The mean ART adherence rate of patients who received pharmacotherapy increased from 92.8% to 99.5%, and of those who received psychotherapy increased from 91.1% to 99.6% (p>0.05. There was no significant association between the increased adherence in the patient group and baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, irrespective of antidepressant therapy or IPT (p>0.05. Conclusion. Successful treatment of depression with an antidepressant or psychotherapy was associated with improved ART adherence, independent of the type

  2. Symptom Status Predicts Patient Outcomes in Persons with HIV and Comorbid Liver Disease

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    Wendy A. Henderson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are living longer; therefore, they are more likely to suffer significant morbidity due to potentially treatable liver diseases. Clinical evidence suggests that the growing number of individuals living with HIV and liver disease may have a poorer health-related quality of life (HRQOL than persons living with HIV who do not have comorbid liver disease. Thus, this study examined the multiple components of HRQOL by testing Wilson and Cleary’s model in a sample of 532 individuals (305 persons with HIV and 227 persons living with HIV and liver disease using structural equation modeling. The model components include biological/physiological factors (HIV viral load, CD4 counts, symptom status (Beck Depression Inventory II and the Medical Outcomes Study HIV Health Survey (MOS-HIV mental function, functional status (missed appointments and MOS-HIV physical function, general health perceptions (perceived burden visual analogue scale and MOS-HIV health transition, and overall quality of life (QOL (Satisfaction with Life Scale and MOS-HIV overall QOL. The Wilson and Cleary model was found to be useful in linking clinical indicators to patient-related outcomes. The findings provide the foundation for development and future testing of targeted biobehavioral nursing interventions to improve HRQOL in persons living with HIV and liver disease.

  3. No Value for Routine Chest Radiography in the Work-Up of Early Stage Cervical Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogendam, Jacob P.; Zweemer, Ronald P.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; de Jong, Pim A.; van den Bosch, Maurice A. A. J.; Verheijen, René H. M.; Veldhuis, Wouter B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Evidence supporting the recommendation to include chest radiography in the work-up of all cervical cancer patients is limited. We investigated the diagnostic value of routine chest radiography in cervical cancer staging. Methods All consecutive cervical cancer patients who presented at our tertiary referral center in the Netherlands (January 2006 – September 2013), and for whom ≥6 months follow-up was available, were included. As part of the staging procedure, patients underwent a routine two-directional digital chest radiograph. Findings were compared to a composite reference standard consisting of all imaging studies and histology obtained during the 6 months following radiography. Results Of the 402 women who presented with cervical cancer, 288 (71.6%) underwent chest radiography and had ≥6 months follow-up. Early clinical stage (I/II) cervical cancer was present in 244/288 (84.7%) women, while 44 (15.3%) presented with advanced disease (stage III/IV). The chest radiograph of 1 woman – with advanced pre-radiograph stage (IVA) disease – showed findings consistent with pulmonary metastases. Radiographs of 7 other women – 4 early, 3 advanced stage disease – were suspicious for pulmonary metastases which was confirmed by additional imaging in only 1 woman (with pre-radiograph advanced stage (IIIB) disease) and excluded in 6 cases, including all women with early stage disease. In none of the 288 women were thoracic skeletal metastases identified on imaging or during 6 months follow up. Radiography was unremarkable in 76.4% of the study population, and showed findings unrelated to the cervical carcinoma in 21.2%. Conclusion Routine chest radiography was of no value for any of the early stage cervical cancer patients presenting at our tertiary center over a period of 7.7 years. PMID:26135733

  4. Knowledge, attitudes and acceptability to provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling: patients' perspectives in Moshi and Rombo Districts, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manongi, Rachel; Mahande, Michael; Njau, Bernard

    2014-10-01

    Provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling (PITC) is referred to as routine testing in a clinical setting as part of a standard programme of medical services. PITC is initiated in order to avoid missed opportunities for people to get tested for HIV. While advocated as a strategy, there is dearth of information on patients' views on PITC in a number of districts in Tanzania. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude and acceptability to PITC services among patients attending health care facilities in rural and urban settings in Kilimanjaro region A total of 12 focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted with 99 (73 female and 26 male) patients enrolled into out-patient clinics in 8 (2 hospitals and 6 primary care centers) health facilities in Moshi Urban and Rombo districts in northern Tanzania. The study explored on knowledge, attitudes and acceptability of PITC, perceived benefits and barriers of PITC, and ethical issues related to PITC. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed, translated, and analyzed using Non-numerical Unstructured Data Indexing and Theorizing (NUDIST) software. Knowledge about PITC services was generally low. Compared to men, women had a more positive attitude towards PITC services, because of its ability to identify and treat undiagnosed HIV cases. HIV stigma was regarded as a major barrier to patients' uptake of PITC. Institutional factors such as lack of supplies and human resources were identified as barriers to successful provision of PITC. In conclusion, the findings highlight both opportunities and potential barriers in the successful uptake of PITC, and underscore the importance of informed consent, counseling and confidentiality and the need for specific strategies on advocacy for the service.

  5. Occult Hepatitis B Virus infection in ART-Naive HIV-Infected Patients seen at a Tertiary Care Centre in North India

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    Singh Sarman

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-infections of hepatitis B and C viruses are frequent with HIV due to shared routes of transmission. In most of the tertiary care health settings, HIV reactive patients are routinely tested for HBsAg and anti-HCV antibodies to rule out these co-infections. However, using the routine serological markers one can only detect active HBV infection while the occult HBV infection may be missed. There is insufficient data from India on HIV-HBV co-infection and even scarce on occult HBV infection in this group. Methods We estimated the burden of HBV infection in patients who were tested positive for HIV at a tertiary care centre in north India. We also attempted to determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of occult HBV infection among these treatment-naïve patients and compare their demographic features with other HIV patients. During a period of 6 years between January 2002 to December 2007, 837 HIV positive patients (631 males and 206 females (M: F :: 3.06:1 were tested for serological markers of HBV (HBsAg and HCV (anti-HCV antibodies infections in our laboratory. For comparison 1000 apparently healthy, HIV-negative organ donors were also included in the study. Data on demographics, sexual behaviour, medical history, laboratory tests including the serum ALT and CD4 count of these patients were recorded. A sub-group of 53 HBsAg negative samples from HIV positive patients were assessed for anti-HBs, anti-HBc total (IgG+IgM and HBV-DNA using a highly sensitive qualitative PCR and analysed retrospectively. Results Overall, 7.28% of HIV positive patients showed presence of HBsAg as compared to 1.4% in the HIV negative control group. The prevalence of HBsAg was higher (8.55% in males than females (3.39%. The study revealed that occult HBV infection with detectable HBV-DNA was prevalent in 24.5% of patients positive for anti-HBc antibodies; being 45.5% in HBsAg negative patients. Most importantly the occult infection was

  6. Early microstructural white matter changes in patients with HIV: A diffusion tensor imaging study

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    Stubbe-Drger Bianca

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have reported white matter (WM brain alterations in asymptomatic patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Methods We compared diffusion tensor imaging (DTI derived WM fractional anisotropy (FA between HIV-patients with and without mild macroscopic brain lesions determined using standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We furthermore investigated whether WM alterations co-occurred with neurocognitive deficits and depression. We performed structural MRI and DTI for 19 patients and 19 age-matched healthy controls. Regionally-specific WM integrity was investigated using voxel-based statistics of whole-brain FA maps and region-of-interest analysis. Each patient underwent laboratory and neuropsychological tests. Results Structural MRI revealed no lesions in twelve (HIV-MRN and unspecific mild macrostructural lesions in seven patients (HIV-MRL. Both analyses revealed widespread FA-alterations in all patients. Patients with HIV-MRL had FA-alterations primarily adjacent to the observed lesions and, whilst reduced in extent, patients with HIV-MRN also exhibited FA-alterations in similar regions. Patients with evidence of depression showed FA-increase in the ventral tegmental area, pallidum and nucleus accumbens in both hemispheres, and patients with evidence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder showed widespread FA-reduction. Conclusion These results show that patients with HIV-MRN have evidence of FA-alterations in similar regions that are lesioned in HIV-MRL patients, suggesting common neuropathological processes. Furthermore, they suggest a biological rather than a reactive origin of depression in HIV-patients.

  7. Patient attrition from the HIV antiretroviral therapy program at two hospitals in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttkammer, Nancy H; Zeliadt, Steven B; Baseman, Janet G; Destiné, Rodney; Wysler Domerçant, Jean; Labbé Coq, Nancy Rachel; Atwood Raphael, Nernst; Sherr, Kenneth; Tegger, Mary; Yuhas, Krista; Barnhart, Scott

    2014-10-01

    To identify factors associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) attrition among patients initiating therapy in 2005-2011 at two large, public-sector department-level hospitals, and to inform interventions to improve ART retention. This retrospective cohort study used data from the iSanté electronic medical record (EMR) system. The study characterized ART attrition levels and explored the patient demographic, clinical, temporal, and service utilization factors associated with ART attrition, using time-to-event analysis methods. Among the 2 023 patients in the study, ART attrition on average was 17.0 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI): 15.8-18.3). In adjusted analyses, risk of ART attrition was up to 89% higher for patients living in distant communes compared to patients living in the same commune as the hospital (hazard ratio: 1.89, 95%CI: 1.54-2.33; P Hospital site, earlier year of ART start, spending less time enrolled in HIV care prior to ART initiation, receiving a non-standard ART regimen, lacking counseling prior to ART initiation, and having a higher body mass index were also associated with attrition risk. The findings suggest quality improvement interventions at the two hospitals, including: enhanced retention support and transportation subsidies for patients accessing care from remote areas; counseling for all patients prior to ART initiation; timely outreach to patients who miss ART pick-ups; "bridging services" for patients transferring care to alternative facilities; routine screening for anticipated interruptions in future ART pick-ups; and medical case review for patients placed on non-standard ART regimens. The findings are also relevant for policymaking on decentralization of ART services in Haiti.

  8. Patient attrition from the HIV antiretroviral therapy program at two hospitals in Haiti

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    Nancy H. Puttkammer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART attrition among patients initiating therapy in 2005-2011 at two large, public-sector department-level hospitals, and to inform interventions to improve ART retention. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study used data from the iSanté electronic medical record (EMR system. The study characterized ART attrition levels and explored the patient demographic, clinical, temporal, and service utilization factors associated with ART attrition, using time-to-event analysis methods. RESULTS: Among the 2 023 patients in the study, ART attrition on average was 17.0 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI: 15.8-18.3. In adjusted analyses, risk of ART attrition was up to 89% higher for patients living in distant communes compared to patients living in the same commune as the hospital (hazard ratio: 1.89, 95%CI: 1.54-2.33; P < 0.001. Hospital site, earlier year of ART start, spending less time enrolled in HIV care prior to ART initiation, receiving a non-standard ART regimen, lacking counseling prior to ART initiation, and having a higher body mass index were also associated with attrition risk. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest quality improvement interventions at the two hospitals, including: enhanced retention support and transportation subsidies for patients accessing care from remote areas; counseling for all patients prior to ART initiation; timely outreach to patients who miss ART pick-ups; "bridging services" for patients transferring care to alternative facilities; routine screening for anticipated interruptions in future ART pick-ups; and medical case review for patients placed on non-standard ART regimens. The findings are also relevant for policymaking on decentralization of ART services in Haiti.

  9. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Danish patients with HIV infection: the effect of antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B R; Petersen, J; Haugaard, S B

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is a subject of debate. We investigated the prevalence of MS in a cohort of Danish HIV-infected patients and estimated the effect of the various classes of antiretroviral...

  10. Proliferation and telomere length in acutely mobilized blood mononuclear cells in HIV infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, S R; Essen, M V; Schjerling, P

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the mobilization of T cells in response to a stressful challenge (adrenalin stimulation), and to access T cells resided in the peripheral lymphoid organs in HIV infected patients. Seventeen patients and eight HIV seronegative controls received an adrenalin...

  11. Rates of cardiovascular disease following smoking cessation in patients with HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petoumenos, K; Worm, S; Reiss, P

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events after stopping smoking in patients with HIV infection.......The aim of the study was to estimate the rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events after stopping smoking in patients with HIV infection....

  12. Prevalence of intestinal parasites in HIV-infected adult patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Parasitic infection of the intestinal tract is a major source of disease in patients with HIV particularly in the tropics, where diarrhea is a common complaint with variable severity and specific pathogens are be identified in more than half of the HIV/AIDS patients with persistent diarrhea. Objective: The objective of ...

  13. Non-invasive ventilation in HIV positive patients with sepsis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: We conducted an observational prospective cohort study for the NIV arm (in the first half of 2016) with a retrospective chart review for the controls that focused on HIV positive patients with sepsis and hypoxaemic respiratory failure. 77 consecutive HIV positive patients with sepsis and respiratory distress meeting the ...

  14. Severe manifestation of psoriasis in a HIV infected patient: a case report

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    Alper Gunduz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV epidemic in Turkey reveals a slow progression and at the end of November 2015, the total official number was reported to be 11,109 cases. Approximately 90% of HIV patients develop some type of skin disease. Especially patients with psoriasis and HIV infection often present with more severe and treatment-refractory cutaneous disease. Herein, we describe a case of a patient with previously known psoriasis worsened by HIV infection. A 37-year-old housewife was admitted to our clinic with previously known psoriasis worsened during the last two years with conversion to erythrodermic psoriasis which was not controlled even by PUVA, methotrexate and systemic cyclosporine. The patient had positive HIV antibody test. HIV RNA viral load was 120.000 copy/ml and CD4 count 88/ mm3 . She also had oral candidiasis and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. The patient received antiretroviral treatment including tenofovir/emtricitabine and lopinavir/ritonavir. Symptoms resolved gradually within one month with almost complete impovement of her erythrodermic psoriasis. . Four years later the patient was still on tenofovir/emtricitabine and lopinavir/ritonavir without concomitant spesific psoriasis treatment. Psoriasis manifestations can be severe in AIDS patients. Clinicians face diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties when psoriasis coexists with HIV infection. The HIV test should be considered in patients affected by severe erythrodermic psoriasis and resistant to conventional and biological treatments. [Dis Mol Med 2015; 3(4.000: 43-45

  15. Protein carbonyl content: a novel biomarker for aging in HIV/AIDS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Kolgiri

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Carbonyl content may has a role as a biomarker for detecting oxidative DNA damage induced ART toxicity and/or accelerated aging in HIV/AIDS patients. Larger studies are warranted to elucidate the role of carbonyl content as a biomarker for premature aging in HIV/AIDS patients.

  16. Are Nigerian dentists willing to treat patients with HIV infection ? | Uti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: HIV/AIDS is a modern day plague, which is a challenge to dentistry. The willingness of dentists to treat HIV positive patients is crucial in the provision of oral health care to this increasing population of patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the willingness of dentists and factors that influence willingness ...

  17. The prevalence and clinical significance of intestinal parasites in HIV-infected patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensvold, Christen Rune; Nielsen, Susanne Dam; Badsberg, Jens Henrik

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and clinical significance of intestinal parasites in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, faecal specimens from 96 HIV-infected patients were submitted to microbiological analyses, including microscopy and polymerase chain reaction for protozoa and e...

  18. Evaluation of the clinical management of HIV-infected patients by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although private sector doctors are the backbone of treatment service in many countries, caring for patients with HIV entails a whole new set of challenges and difficulties. The few studies done on the quality of care of HIV patients, in the private sector in developing countries, have highlighted some problems ...

  19. Clinical evolution of chronic renal patients with HIV infection in replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Saracho

    2015-09-01

    Despite the use of HAART, the incidence of HIV+ patients on dialysis has increased; their mortality still exceeds non-HIV patients, and they have a very low rate of transplantation. It is necessary to further our knowledge of this disease in order to improve results.

  20. Persistent Inflammation and Endothelial Activation in HIV-1 Infected Patients after 12 Years of Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönsholt, Frederikke F; Ullum, Henrik; Katzenstein, Terese L

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in HIV infected patients after 12 years of successful combination antiretroviral treatment (cART).......The study investigated markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in HIV infected patients after 12 years of successful combination antiretroviral treatment (cART)....

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in spinal tuberculosis: Comparison of HIV positive and negative patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Michael Anley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is an increasing incidence of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and tuberculosis (TB co-infection. This has led to an increasing number of atypical features on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We postulated that the type 4 hypersensitivity response causing granulomatous inflammation may be disrupted by the HIV resulting in less vertebral body destruction. This study compares the MRI features of spinal tuberculosis in HIV positive and negative patients. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with confirmed spinal tuberculosis, HIV status and available MRI scans at a single institution from 2003-2009 were identified. HIV status was positive in 20 and negative in 30. Females were predominant (34:16. The HIV positive group was younger at 32.4 versus 46 years (P=0.008. Blood parameters (WCC, ESR, Hb, Lymphocyte count were not significantly different between the HIV groups. MRI scans were reviewed by a radiologist who was blinded to the HIV status. Site, extent of disease, body collapse, abscess location and volume, kyphotic deformity and cord signal were reported. Results: There was no difference between the number of vertebral bodies affection with TB involvement, presence of cord signal or incidence of non-contiguous lesions. The HIV negative group had significantly more total vertebral collapse (P=0.036 and greater kyphosis (P=0.002. The HIV positive group had a trend to larger anterior epidural pus collection (P=0.2. Conclusion: HIV negative patients demonstrate greater tuberculous destruction in terms of total percentage body collapse and resultant kyphosis. There is no difference in the incidence of cord signal or presence of non-contiguous lesions. HIV positive patients show a trend to a greater epidural abscess volume. This difference may be explained by the reduced autoimmune response of the type