WorldWideScience

Sample records for routine albedo thermoluminescent

  1. Operational comparison of bubble (super heated drop) dosimetry results with routine albedo thermoluminescent dosimetry for a selected group of Pu-238 workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, L.L.; Hoffman, J.M.; Foltyn, E.M.; Buhl, T.E.

    1999-03-01

    This paper is an operational study that compares the use of albedo thermoluminescent dosimeters with bubble dosimeters to determine whether bubble dosimeters do provide a useful daily ALARA tool that can yield measurements close to the dose-of-record. A group of workers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) working on the Radioactive Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) for the NASA Cassini space mission wore both bubble dosimeters and albedo dosimeters over a period from 1993 through 1996. The bubble dosimeters were issued and read on a daily basis and the data were used as an ALARA tool. The personnel albedo dosimeter was processed on monthly basis and used as the dose-of-record. The results of this study indicated that cumulative bubble dosimetry results agreed with whole-body albedo dosimetry results within about 37% on average. However it was observed that there is a significant variability of the results on an individual basis both month-to-month and from one individual to another.

  2. Verification analysis of thermoluminescent albedo neutron dosimetry at MOX fuel facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Takahiro; Takada, Chie; Tsujimura, Norio

    2011-07-01

    Radiation workers engaging in the fabrication of MOX fuels at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency-Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories are exposed to neutrons. Accordingly, thermoluminescent albedo dosemeters (TLADs) are used for individual neutron dosimetry. Because dose estimation using TLADs is susceptible to variation of the neutron energy spectrum, the authors have provided TLADs incorporating solid-state nuclear tracks detectors (SSNTDs) to selected workers who are routinely exposed to neutrons and have continued analysis of the relationship between the SSNTD and the TLAD (T/R(f)) over the past 6 y from 2004 to 2009. Consequently, the T/R(f) value in each year was less than the data during 1991-1993, although the neutron spectra had not changed since then. This decrease of the T/R(f) implies that the ratio of operation time nearby gloveboxes and the total work time has decreased.

  3. Operational comparison of bubble (super heated drop) dosimetry with routine albedo TLD for a selected group of Pu-238 workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, L.L.; Hoffman, J.M.; Foltyn, E.M.; Buhl, T.E.

    1998-09-01

    Personnel neutron dosimetry continues to be a difficult science due to the lack of availability of robust passive dosimeters that exhibit tissue- or near-tissue- equivalent response. This paper is an operational study that compares the use of albedo thermoluminescent dosimeters with bubble dosimeters to determine whether bubble dosimeters do provide a useful daily ALARA tool that can yield measurements close to the dose-of-record. A group of workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) working on the Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) for the NASA Cassini space mission wore both bubble dosimeters and albedo dosimeters over a period from 1993 through 1996. The personal albedo dosimeter was processed on a monthly basis and used as the dose-of-record. The results of this study indicated that cumulative daily bubble dosimetry results agreed with whole-body albedo dosimetry results within about 37% on average.

  4. A glow curve analyzer (GCA) for routine analysis of personnel thermoluminescent dosemeter results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, W.J. [Health Physics Department, Ontario Power Generation, Whitby, Ont. (Canada)], E-mail: john.chase@opg.com; Bezaire, M.D. [Department of Applied Health Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont. (Canada); Vanderzwet, F.P. [Bruce Power, P.O. Box 1540, Building B13, Tiverton, Ont., N0G 2T0 (Canada); Taylor, C.E. [Health Physics Department, Ontario Power Generation, Whitby, Ont. (Canada)

    2008-02-15

    A glow curve analyzer (GCA) spreadsheet has been developed using Microsoft Excel to perform glow curve analysis on thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) data from a personnel dosimetry system. The TLD data come from cards with four LiF:Mg,Ti chips that have been annealed and therefore have a simple glow peak structure. GCA removes spikes in the glow curve data, and then smoothes it. After select start and end points for the glow peak, it fits a Boltzmann function to represent the glow curve signal background under the glow peak. The Boltzmann function is subtracted and two Weibull curves are fit to the remaining net signal between the start and end points. The first Weibull curve is fit to peak 5, and the second one to any small remaining contribution from peaks 3 and 4 or from contaminants. The sum of the two Weibull curves is the glow curve signal result. GCA provides rapid review and correction of all glow curves, improving the quality of the results and reducing the time required for complete processing of official dose results.

  5. Development and characterization of two-component albedo based neutron individual monitoring system using thermoluminescent detectors; Desenvolvimento e caracterizacao de um sistema de monitoracao individual de neutrons tipo albedo de duas componentes usando detectores termoluminescentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Marcelo Marques

    2008-07-01

    A TLD-albedo based two-component neutron individual monitoring system was developed and characterized in this work. The monitor consists of a black plastic holder, an incident neutron boron loaded shield, a moderator polyethylene body (to increase its response), two pairs of TLD-600 and TLD-700 (one pair to each component) and an adjustable belt. This monitoring system was calibrated in thermal neutron fields and in 70 keV, 144 keV, 565 keV, 1.2 MeV and 5 MeV monoenergetic neutron fields. In addition, it was calibrated in {sup 252C}f(D{sub 2}O), {sup 252}Cf, {sup 241}Am-B, {sup 241}Am-Be and {sup 238}Pu-Be source fields. For the latter, the lower detection levels are, respectively, 0.009 mSv, 0.06 mSv, 0.12 mSv, 0.09 mSv and 0.08 mSv. The participation in an international intercomparison sponsored by IAEA with simulated workplace fields validated the system. The monitoring system was successfully characterized in the ISO 21909 standard and in an IRD - the Brazilian Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry - technical regulation draft. Nowadays, the neutron individual system is in use by IRD for whole body individual monitoring of five institutions, which comprehend several activities. (author)

  6. Unraveling thermoluminescence

    CERN Document Server

    Sunta, C M

    2014-01-01

    The book is essentially about the theoretical aspects of thermoluminescence (TL). It is structured and written in a manner which will specially be of interest to the fresh undergraduate students and young researchers planning to take up work in the field of thermoluminescence. It is arranged into seven chapters, starting with the historical growth of the subject of TL and an overview of the luminescence phenomena. A Physical model involving thermally disconnected deep traps is specially described. Using this model expressions are derived for the TL intensity growth curve, the supralinearity fa

  7. THERMOLUMINESCENT DOSIMETRY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-10-20

    Oct 20, 2005 ... abo area of the city has the least radiation dose rate while Obantoku area has the upper limit. aking this as ... 'n Abeokuta. eywords: Environmental radiation, thermoluminescent dosimetry, Abeokuta, outdoor ... Both 238U and 232Th have long decay series with ... effects of radiation exposure (Hanson and.

  8. THERMOLUMINESCENT DOSIMETRY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-10-20

    Oct 20, 2005 ... abo area of the city has the least radiation dose rate while Obantoku area has the upper limit. aking this as ... “n Abeokuta. eywords: Environmental radiation, thermoluminescent dosimetry, Abeokuta, outdoor ... Both 238U and 232Th have long decay series with ... effects of radiation exposure (Hanson and.

  9. Neutron Albedo

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatovich, V K

    2005-01-01

    A new, algebraic, method is applied to calculation of neutron albedo from substance to check the claim that use of ultradispersive fuel and moderator of an active core can help to gain in size and mass of the reactor. In a model of isotropic distribution of incident and reflected neutrons it is shown that coherent scattering on separate grains in the case of thermal neutrons increases transport cross section negligibly, however it decreases albedo from a wall of finite thickness because of decrease of substance density. A visible increase of albedo takes place only for neutrons with wave length of the order of the size of a single grain.

  10. Handbook of thermoluminescence

    CERN Document Server

    Furetta, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    This second edition of the Handbook of Thermoluminescence enlarges on all the subjects which were treated in the first edition and adds further arguments, including the theory of thermoluminescent dose measurement, several examples concerning the kinetics parameters determination using various methods such as peak shape, isothermal decay, and so on. A special section is devoted to food irradiation, an important subject at the present time, and to the thermoluminescent characterization of the minerals extracted from the irradiated food. Another new section is devoted to the thermoluminescent ph

  11. Thermoluminescence of pyramid stones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomaa, M.A.; Eid, A.M. (Atomic Energy Establishment, Cairo (Egypt))

    1982-01-01

    It is the aim of the present study to investigate some thermoluminescence properties of pyramid stones. Using a few grammes of pyramid stones from Pyramids I and II, the TL glow peaks were observed at 250 and 310/sup 0/C, respectively. The TL glow peaks of samples annealed at 600/sup 0/C, then exposed to /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays were observed at 120, 190 and 310/sup 0/C, respectively. The accumulated dose of natural samples is estimated to be around 310 Gray (31 krad). By assuming an annual dose is 1 mGy, the estimated age of pyramid stones is 0.31 M year.

  12. Mars surface albedo and changes

    CERN Document Server

    Vincendon, Mathieu; Altieri, Francesca; Ody, Anouck

    2014-01-01

    The pervasive Mars dust is continually transported between surface and atmosphere. When on the surface, dust increases the albedo of darker underlying rocks and regolith, which modifies climate energy balance and must be quantified. Remote observation of surface albedo absolute value and albedo change is however complicated by dust itself when lifted in the atmosphere. Here we present a method to calculate and map the bolometric solar hemispherical albedo of the Martian surface using the 2004 - 2010 OMEGA imaging spectrometer dataset. This method takes into account aerosols radiative transfer, surface photometry, and instrumental issues such as registration differences between visible and near-IR detectors. Resulting albedos are on average 17% higher than previous estimates for bright surfaces while similar for dark surfaces. We observed that surface albedo changes occur mostly during the storm season due to isolated events. The main variations are observed during the 2007 global dust storm and during the fol...

  13. Thermoluminescence spectra measured with a Michelson interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschberger, P. (Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Elektrische Messtechnik)

    1991-01-01

    A Michelson interferometer was redesigned to prove its capabilities in the measurement of short-lived, low-intensity thermoluminescence spectra. Interferograms are collected during heating up the thermoluminescent probe in a heater plate. A personal computer controls the data acquisition and processes the Fourier transform. As the results show, even a comparatively simple and limited setup leads to relevant and reproducible spectra. (author).

  14. A kinetic model of zircon thermoluminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkin, A.A.; Es, H.J. van; Vainshtein, D.I.; Hartog, H.W. den

    A kinetic model of zircon thermoluminescence (TL) has been constructed to simulate the processes and stages relevant to thermoluminescent dating such as: filling of electron and hole traps during the excitation stage both for natural and laboratory irradiation; the time dependence of fading after

  15. Thermoluminescence Dosimetry Applied to Radiation Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul; Bøtter-Jensen, Lars; Majborn, Benny

    1982-01-01

    This is a general review of the present state of the development and application of thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) for radiation protection purposes. A description is given of commonly used thermoluminescent dosimeters and their main dosimetric properties, e.g. energy response, dose range...

  16. Thermoluminescent Detectors in Mixed Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Mala, P; Biskup, B; Roeed, K

    2012-01-01

    This note reports on using of thermoluminescent detectors for radiation monitoring in the LHC tunnel and in the shielded areas around the tunnel. The accumulated annual doses in these areas vary a lot so a dosimeter used there should cover a large dose range. TL detectors can measure dose from 0.1 mGy to few kGy (with a recently proposed new technique which needs more studies up to 1 MGy). This report presents studies of these detectors in mixed fields similar to radiation field in the LHC and the possible usage of their results for calculation of high energy hadron and thermal neutron fluence.

  17. Proposal of requirements for performance in Brazil for systems of external individual monitoring for neutrons applying the TLD-albedo technique; Proposta de requisitos de desempenho no Brasil para sistemas de monitoracao individual externa para neutrons empregando a tecnica TLD-albedo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Marcelo M.; Mauricio, Claudia L.P.; Pereira, Walsan W.; Fonseca, Evaldo S. da, E-mail: marcelo@ird.gov.b, E-mail: claudia@ird.gov.b, E-mail: walsan@ird.gov.b, E-mail: evaldo@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil).

    2009-07-01

    This work presents a criteria and conditions proposal for the regulations in Brazil of individual monitoring systems for neutrons applying the albedo technique with thermoluminescent detectors. Tests are proposed for the characterization performance of the system based on the Regulation ISO 21909 and on the experience of the authors

  18. The Response of an Albedo Neutron Dosimeter to Moderated AmBe and 252(Cf) Neutron Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    neutrons is deter- mined by making multiple integrations on the glow curves from the detectors [41, or by computer analysis of the glow curves [5-61...Falk, "A Personnel Neutron Dosimeter Using Lithium Fluoride Thermoluminescent Dosim- eters," Report No. RFP-1581, Dow Chemical Co., Golden CO (1971...Addison Wesley, Reading, MA, 1953). 18. D.E. Hankins, "Factors Affecting the Design of Albedo Neutron Dosimeters Containing Lithium Fluoride

  19. Thermoluminescence (TL) of Egyptian Blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schvoerer, M.; Delavergne, M.-C.; Chapoulie, R.

    1988-01-01

    Egyptian Blue is a synthesized crystalline pictorial pigment with formula CaCuSi/sub 4/O/sub 10/. It has been used in Egypt and Mesopotamia from the 3rd millenium B.C. A preliminary experiment on a recently synthesized sample showed that this pigment is thermoluminescent after ..beta.. irradiation (/sup 90/Sr). As the signal intensity grows linearly with the administered dose within the temperature range commonly used in TL dating, we have been looking for this phenomenon from archaeological pigments. It was encountered with two samples found in excavation. From its intensity and stability we concluded that Egyptian Blue can be dated using TL. This first and positive result encouraged us to extend the method to other types of mineral pigments synthesized by early man, and to suggest that it may be used for direct dating of ancient murals.

  20. Restored thermoluminescence in oxide crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakov, A.F., E-mail: afrakov@hotmail.co [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, Tashkent, 700132 (Uzbekistan); Salikhbaev, U.S.; Islamov, A.K. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, Tashkent, 700132 (Uzbekistan); Bartram, R.H. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3046 (United States); Melcher, C.L. [Scintillation Materials Research Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2000 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    In this paper, we present the results of a thermoluminescence study on several oxide crystals, including Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YAG), Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Nd (YAG:Nd), Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce (LSO:Ce), Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce (YSO:Ce), Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce (GSO:Ce), PbWO (PWO), and PbWO:La (PWO:La). A phenomenon involving restoration of thermoluminescence (TL) glow peaks is found to occur in some of the crystals investigated; crystals {gamma}-irradiated at room temperature and subsequently stored for some time in the dark at 77 K exhibit TL glow peaks in the range below room temperature. This phenomenon is caused not by a thermally or optically stimulated process, but rather as a by-product of a tunneling process. The intensity of the restored TL glow peaks measured in LSO:Ce crystals is found to be proportional both to the radiation dose and to the storage-time at low temperature. A phenomenological theoretical model is proposed, in which tunneling recombination occurs between deep electron and hole traps accompanied by the simultaneous ejection of an electron to the conduction band; some of these conduction electrons then repopulate shallow traps. An oxygen vacancy with two trapped electrons is assumed to be the deep electron trap in this model. The role of oxygen vacancies is confirmed by heating in air at 1000 {sup o}C. This model is applied specifically to LSO:Ce, and several possible candidates are suggested for shallow traps in that material.

  1. Direct determination of surface albedos from satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekler, Y.; Joseph, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    An empirical method to measure the spectral surface albedo of surfaces from Landsat imagery is presented and analyzed. The empiricism in the method is due only to the fact that three parameters of the solution must be determined for each spectral photograph of an image on the basis of independently known albedos at three points. The approach is otherwise based on exact solutions of the radiative transfer equation for upwelling intensity. Application of the method allows the routine construction of spectral albedo maps from satelite imagery, without requiring detailed knowledge of the atmospheric aerosol content, as long as the optical depth is less than 0.75, and of the calibration of the satellite sensor.

  2. The Low Albedo of Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, B. J.; Choukroun, M.; Bauer, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Comets are among the handful of objects with very low albedos, in the 0.02-0.06 range. Dark material is common in the outer Solar System, but analysis of the spectra and albedo of this material by spacecraft including Cassini and New Horizons shows that it is diverse, covering a range of compositions. Some is neutral-colored in the visible, such as that found on Phoebe, while some is very red, such as that on the surfaces of D-type asteroids or the low-albedo side of Iapetus. The different types of low-albedo material may reflect both compositional diversity, including contamination by volatiles or darkening agents, and divergent alteration histories. The key question is whether a particular sub-type of low albedo material is pristine - an unprocessed accumulation of interstellar dust - or an end product of polymerization and photolysis into ever more complex materials. Comets have albedos similar to the leading hemisphere of Iapetus, the surface of Titan, and the lowest-albedo C-type and D-type asteroids. Observations by the WISE and NEOWISE cameras show that comets have consistently low albedos (1). The first quantitative measurement of low-albedo material in the Kuiper Belt, from which comets such as Jupiter Family Comets including 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko come, shows that even this material is not as dark as that found on comets (2). Results from both Stardust (3) and more recently Rosetta (4, 5) show that cometary surfaces contain prebiotic molecules, including the amino acid glycine. Other very low albedo objects have also been connected to complex organic molecules: on Iapetus, PAHs have been detected (6), and Titan's surface is believed to be covered with hydrocarbons produced in its haze layer (7). The presence of organic molecules, including complex ones, could be the unique characteristic of the very darkest material. The delivery of pre-biotic material from comets to the young Earth could represent a key link in the origins of terrestrial life. (1

  3. Thermoluminescence measurement technique using millisecond temperature pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfred, Michael E; Gabriel, Nicholas T; Yukihara, Eduardo G; Talghader, Joseph J

    2010-06-01

    A measurement technique, pulsed thermoluminescence, is described which uses short thermal pulses to excite trapped carriers leading to radiative recombination. The pulses are obtained using microstructures with approximately 500 micros thermal time constants. The technique has many of the advantages of pulsed optically stimulated luminescence without the need for optical sources and filters to isolate the luminescent signal. Charge carrier traps in alpha-Al(2)O(3):C particles on microheaters were filled using 205 nm light. Temperature pulses of 10 and 50 ms were applied to the heaters and compared with a standard thermoluminescence curve taken at a ramp rate of 5 K s(-1). This produced curves of intensity verses temperature similar to standard thermoluminescence except shifted to higher temperatures. The luminescence of single particles was read multiple times with negligible loss of population. The lower limit of the duration of useful pulses appears to be limited by particle size and thermal contact between the particle and heater.

  4. Thermoluminescence: Potential Applications in Forensic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, J. D.; Lawson, D. D.

    1973-01-01

    In crime laboratories one of the most difficult operations is to determine unequivocally whether or not two samples of evidence of the same type were originally part of the same thing or were from the same source. It has been found that high temperature thermoluminescence (room temperature to 723 K) can be used for comparisons of this type, although work to date indicates that there is generally a finite probability for coincidental matching of glass or soil samples. Further work is required to determine and attempt to minimize these probabilities for different types of materials, and to define more clearly the scope of applicability of thermoluminescence to actual forensic situations.

  5. Thermoluminescence of zircon : a kinetic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkin, AA; van Es, HJ; Vainshtein, DI; den Hartog, HW

    2003-01-01

    The mineral zircon, ZrSiO4, belongs to a class of promising materials for geochronometry by means of thermoluminescence (TL) dating. The development of a reliable and reproducible method for TL dating with zircon requires detailed knowledge of the processes taking place during exposure to ionizing

  6. Mineral zircon : A novel thermoluminescence geochronometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Es, HJ; Vainshtein, DI; De Meijer, RJ; Den Hartog, HW; Donoghue, JF; Rozendaal, A

    2002-01-01

    Mineral zircon contains trace amounts (typically 10-1000 ppm) of the alpha-emitters uranium and thorium, which irradiate this mineral internally. This outstanding feature of zircon turns out to be extremely useful when this mineral is applied as a thermoluminescence (TL) dating medium, because the b

  7. Breaking Routines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Jørgensen, Frances

    2010-01-01

    On some level, innovation begins when the current way of doing things is questioned and alternatives are sought. In cognitive terms, this can be conceptualized as the point at which an agent breaks with existing routine and returns to planning and decision-making. Thus far, however, very little...

  8. Thermoluminescence properties of Chile Guajillo (paprika) Mexicano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitis, G. [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)]. E-mail: gkitis@auth.gr; Cruz Zaragoza, E. [Institute of Nuclear Science, UNAM, PO Box 70-753, Mexico DF (Mexico); Furetta, C. [Physics Department, University La Sapienza, P.le A. Moro 2. 00187 Rome (Italy)

    2005-08-01

    The thermoluminescence properties of the inorganic dust extracted from the Chile Guajillo (paprika) Mexicano, were studied in order to verify the possibility of using the TL technique to discriminate between irradiated and non irradiated peppers. The inorganic dust was found to consist of quartz 60%, albite (NaAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}) 30%, and ortose (KAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}) 10%. Its thermoluminescence dose response covers the wide dose range of 1Gy-10kGy, which was attributed mainly to feldspars. Its high sensitivity and its stability over 10 irradiation-readout cycles allow the application of a single grain-single aliquot regeneration dosimetry in Chile Guajillo (paprika). Evaluations based on trapping parameters show that thermal fading at room temperature for glow-peaks above 180 deg.. C, is not a problem in the dosimetry of paprika.

  9. Reactor Gamma Heat Measurements with Calorimeters and Thermoluminescence Dosimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack, Karsten; Majborn, Benny

    1973-01-01

    Intercomparison measurements of reactor γ-ray heating were carried out with calorimeters and thermoluminescence dosimeters. Within the measurement uncertainties the two methods yield coincident results. In the actual measurement range thermoluminescence dosimeters are less accurate than calorimet...... calorimeters, but possess advantages such as a small probe size and the possibility of making simultaneous measurements at many different positions. Hence, thermoluminescence dosimeters may constitute a valuable supplement to calorimeters for reactor γ-ray heating measurements....

  10. Spectral study on feldspar thermoluminescence process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG GeLian; LIU ShunSheng; XIA Bin; SUN WeiDong; HUANG BaoLin

    2008-01-01

    Feldspar thermoluminescence fading phenomena were investigated here by using newly-constructed thermoluminescence spectrometer on the basis of charge-cou-pled detector, and thereafter the discussion and explanation on feldspar TL fading mechanism were presented.The experimental results show that the fading rate of feldspar TL depends on both wavelength and stimulated temperature, and normally the feldspar TL in every region of wavelength and temperature shows different traits, namely the low temperature TL (170℃-190℃) fading at the rate of logarith-mic function and furthermore the TL of different wavelengths fading at approxi-mately the same rate on the condition of 160℃ preheating.While the medium and high temperature TLs (290℃-400℃) do not show much thermal fading, their fading rate at room temperature invariably correlates well with their wavelength, namely the longer TL wavelength, the slower TL fading rate.The thermal instability of traps and the quantum-mechanical tunneling effects can explain the above fading phe-nomena respectively.It is recognized that feldspar TL fading depends on its wave-length, and furthermore new aspects of the solid thermoluminescence process can be displayed by the combination of three-dimensional TL spectral analysis and thermal fading or anomalous fading of TL for feldspar.

  11. Spectral study on feldspar thermoluminescence process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Feldspar thermoluminescence fading phenomena were investigated here by using newly-constructed thermoluminescence spectrometer on the basis of charge-cou-pled detector,and thereafter the discussion and explanation on feldspar TL fading mechanism were presented. The experimental results show that the fading rate of feldspar TL depends on both wavelength and stimulated temperature,and normally the feldspar TL in every region of wavelength and temperature shows different traits,namely the low temperature TL (170℃-190℃) fading at the rate of logarith-mic function and furthermore the TL of different wavelengths fading at approxi-mately the same rate on the condition of 160℃ preheating. While the medium and high temperature TLs (290℃-400℃) do not show much thermal fading,their fading rate at room temperature invariably correlates well with their wavelength,namely the longer TL wavelength,the slower TL fading rate. The thermal instability of traps and the quantum-mechanical tunneling effects can explain the above fading phe-nomena respectively. It is recognized that feldspar TL fading depends on its wave-length,and furthermore new aspects of the solid thermoluminescence process can be displayed by the combination of three-dimensional TL spectral analysis and thermal fading or anomalous fading of TL for feldspar.

  12. Observations on the activation energy determination through the peak temperature at the maximum in thermoluminescence (Tl) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furetta, C.; Azorin, J.; Rivera, T. [Physics Department, UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this work is to give, for practical purposes in routine works, an easy way for obtaining approximated values of E which can be useful for testing, in a very quick way, the stability of the trap levels corresponding to the dosimetric peak in thermoluminescent materials used for environmental, personnel and clinical dosimetry applications. Furthermore, the E values obtained with this method can be used as input data for deconvolution procedure. (Author)

  13. Intelligent Routines

    CERN Document Server

    Anastassiou, George A

    “Intelligent Routines II: Solving Linear Algebra and Differential Geometry with Sage” contains numerous of examples and problems as well as many unsolved problems. This book extensively applies the successful software Sage, which can be found free online http://www.sagemath.org/. Sage is a recent and popular software for mathematical computation, available freely and simple to use. This book is useful to all applied scientists in mathematics, statistics and engineering, as well for late undergraduate and graduate students of above subjects. It is the first such book in solving symbolically with Sage problems in Linear Algebra and Differential Geometry. Plenty of SAGE applications are given at each step of the exposition.

  14. The temporal scale research of MODIS albedo product authenticity verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yongxing; Xue, Zhihang; Cheng, Hui; Xiong, Yajv; Chen, Yunping; Tong, Ling

    2016-06-01

    This study introduces a method that normalizes the inversed ETM+ albedo to the local solar noon albedo for the temporal scale of the MODIS albedo validation. Firstly, the statistical relation model between the surface albedo and the solar elevation angle was set up, and then deducing relationship between ETM+ albedo and the solar elevation angle, so the ETM+ albedo at local solar noon could be got. Secondly, the ground measurement albedo at the local solar noon was used to assess the inversed ETM+ albedo and the normalized albedo. The experiment results show that the method can effectively improve the accuracy of product certification.

  15. Dose measurements in dental radiology using thermoluminescent dosimetry;Medicoes de dose em radiodiagnostico odontologico utilizando dosimetria termoluminescente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiara, Ana Claudia M. de; Costa, Alessandro M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras; Pardini, Luiz Carlos [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FORP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work was the implementation of a code of practice for dosimetry in dental radiology using the technique of thermoluminescent dosimetry. General principles for the use of thermoluminescent dosimeters were followed. The irradiations were performed using ten X-ray equipment for intra-oral radiography and an X-ray equipment for panoramic radiography. The incident air kerma was evaluated for five different exposure times used in clinical practice for intra-oral radiographs. Using a backscatter factor of 1.2, it was observed that approximately 40% of the entrance skin dose values found for intra-oral radiographs are above the diagnostic reference level recommended in national regulation. Different configurations of voltage and current were used representing the exposure as a child, woman and man for panoramic radiographs. The results obtained for the air kerma area product were respectively 53.3 +- 5.2 mGy.cm{sup 2}, 101.5 +- 9.5 mGy.cm{sup 2} and 116.8 +- 10.4 mGy.cm{sup 2}. The use of thermoluminescent dosimetry requires several procedures before a result is recorded. The use of dosimeters with ionization chambers or semiconductors provides a simple and robust method for routine measurements. However, the use of thermoluminescent dosimetry can be of great value to large-scale surveys to establish diagnostic reference levels. (author)

  16. Master schedule for CY-1977 Hanford Environmental Surveillance Routine Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumer, P.J.; Myers, D.A.; Fix, J.J.

    1976-12-01

    Data are presented from the routine environmental surveillance program at the Hanford Site as conducted by the Environmental Evaluation Section of Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory for ERDA. Tables are presented to show levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollution in the Columbia River, sanitary water, surface water, ground water, foods, wildlife, soil, and vegetation. Data are also presented for external radiation measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters, results of portable instrument surveys, and monitoring of waste disposal sites. (HLW)

  17. Thermoluminescent characteristic of MWCVD diamond films exposed to gamma dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastelum, S.; Chernov, V.; Melendrez, R.; Barboza F, M. [Centro de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, A.P. 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Cruz Z, E. [ICN-UNAM, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The thermoluminescence measurements of microwave plasma assisted CVD diamond of 6 and 12 {mu}m thick films grown on (100) silicon substrates indicated the existence of a suitable thermoluminescence dosimetric peak around 310 C. The range of linearity of the 6 {mu}m diamond sample exposed to 0.67 Gy/min {sup 60} Co gamma radiation is observed up to 125 Gy being non -linear for higher doses. The 12 {mu} m displayed lower thermoluminescence efficiency as compared to the 6 {mu}m specimen. The discrepancy was attributed to the non uniform distribution- of nucleated diamond on the substrate as revealed by SEM micrograph of the samples. The thermoluminescence behaviour of the samples exhibited very low thermal fading and show a good reproducibity of the thermoluminescence signal. The kinetics parameters were calculated by Initial Rise and Chen methods. (Author)

  18. Thermoluminescence sensitivity of ulexite after UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topaksu, M., E-mail: mats@cu.edu.tr [Cukurova University, Arts-Sciences Faculty, Physics Department, 01330 Adana (Turkey); CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Correcher, V. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Guinea, J. [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, (CSIC), C/José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •UV-induced thermoluminescence emission of Turkish ulexite was studied. •There are three groups of components. •The UV exposures were performed at controlled temperatures. -- Abstract: The effects of UV radiation on the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of natural materials, in contrast to synthetic materials, have been scarcely studied. We report on the UV-induced thermoluminescence emission of a Turkish ulexite (NaCaB{sub 5}O{sub 6}(OH){sub 6}·5H{sub 2}O) that displays very complex TL glow curves, with at least three groups of components peaked at 130–140 °C, 240 °C and, 340 °C, wherein the last group is weaker. Such emission could be associated with structural changes in the lattice as well as alkali self-diffusion processes. The UV exposure performed at controlled temperatures (at room temperature (RT), 50 °C and 100 °C) produced a (i) different evolutions of the intensities of each maximum, which are directly related to the controlled thermal treatment; (ii) different intensity ratios among the groups of components; (iii) different activation energies (E{sub a}) (1.13 eV for RT, 0.99 eV for 50 °C and 0.49 eV for 100 °C) calculated using the initial rise method; and (iv) similar scattering values (12.4%, 8.2% and 12.8%), which were not a function of the controlled temperature. The thermal stability tests conducted on this borate at different temperatures, based on the T{sub stop} protocol, confirm the presence of a continuum in the distribution of the trap system with progressively increasing E{sub a} (from 0.60 to 0.90 eV)

  19. Empirical models of monthly and annual surface albedo in managed boreal forests of Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Ryan M.; Astrup, Rasmus; Strømman, Anders H.

    2013-04-01

    As forest management activities play an increasingly important role in climate change mitigation strategies of Nordic regions such as Norway, Sweden, and Finland -- the need for a more comprehensive understanding of the types and magnitude of biogeophysical climate effects and their various tradeoffs with the global carbon cycle becomes essential to avoid implementation of sub-optimal policy. Forest harvest in these regions reduces the albedo "masking effect" and impacts Earth's radiation budget in opposing ways to that of concomitant carbon cycle perturbations; thus, policies based solely on biogeochemical considerations in these regions risk being counterproductive. There is therefore a need to better understand how human disturbances (i.e., forest management activities) affect important biophysical factors like surface albedo. An 11-year remotely sensed surface albedo dataset coupled with stand-level forest management data for a variety of stands in Norway's most productive logging region are used to develop regression models describing temporal changes in monthly and annual forest albedo following clear-cut harvest disturbance events. Datasets are grouped by dominant tree species and site indices (productivity), and two alternate multiple regression models are developed and tested following a potential plus modifier approach. This resulted in an annual albedo model with statistically significant parameters that explains a large proportion of the observed variation, requiring as few as two predictor variables: i) average stand age - a canopy modifier predictor of albedo, and ii) stand elevation - a local climate predictor of a forest's potential albedo. The same model structure is used to derive monthly albedo models, with models for winter months generally found superior to summer models, and conifer models generally outperforming deciduous. We demonstrate how these statistical models can be applied to routine forest inventory data to predict the albedo

  20. Thermoluminescence of Tequila-based nanodiamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, J; Bernal, R; Cruz-Vazquez, C; Salcido-Romero, E G; Castaño, V M

    2010-06-01

    Nanodiamond thin films were deposited onto Si (100) substrates using Tequila as precursor by pulsed-liquid injection chemical vapour deposition at 850 degrees C. Some samples were exposed to beta particle irradiation in the dose range from 100 to 1600 Gy, and it was found that the thermoluminescence (TL) response is a linear function of dose. The glow curve displays two maxima centred at 170 and 350 degrees C, which does not shift when dose changes, indicating that first-order kinetics processes are involved. From the results, it is concluded that the new nanodiamond films are promising high-dose TL dosimeters.

  1. Entrance surface dose measurements in mammography using thermoluminescence technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, T. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada Unidad Legaria del IPM Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E [Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Azorin, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-lztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Gonzalez, P.R. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico Toluca, 52045 Salazar Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    Full text: Of the various techniques that can be used for personnel dosimetry, thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) has emerged as a superior technique due to its manifold advantages over other methods of dose estimation. Various phosphors have been therefore investigated regarding their suitability for dosimetry. In this paper, a dosimetry system based on thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) from zirconium oxide phosphors embedded in polytetrafluorethylene (ZrO{sub 2}+PTFE) was developed for entrance surface doses (ES) measurements in mammography. Small ZrO{sub 2} pellets of 5 mm in diameter and 0.8 mm in thickness were used. The reproducibility of measurements and linearity of ZrO{sub 2} were also studied. The results were compared with those obtained from LiF:Mg,Cu,P usually used for the determination of absorbed dose in mammography. Measurements both per unit air kerma and In vivo were performed using a mammography unit model DMR (General Electric). The results showed that ZrO{sub 2} TLDs can be used for the same X-ray dosimetry applications as LiF:Mg,Cu,P, with each type having the disadvantage of a response dependent on energy, particularly at low energies. These results indicate a considerable potential for use in routine control and In vivo ES measurements in mammography. (Author)

  2. Areal-Averaged Spectral Surface Albedo from Ground-Based Transmission Data Alone: Toward an Operational Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgueni Kassianov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present here a simple retrieval of the areal-averaged spectral surface albedo using only ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission under fully overcast conditions. Our retrieval is based on a one-line equation. The feasibility of our retrieval for routine determinations of albedo is demonstrated for different landscapes with various degrees of heterogeneity using three sets of measurements: (1 spectral atmospheric transmission from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673, and 870 nm; (2 tower-based measurements of local surface albedo at the same wavelengths; and (3 areal-averaged surface albedo at four wavelengths (470, 560, 670 and 860 nm from collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS observations. These integrated datasets cover both temporally long (2008–2013 and short (April–May 2010 periods at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Southern Great Plains site and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA Table Mountain site, respectively. The calculated root mean square error (RMSE, defined here as the root mean squared difference between the MODIS-derived surface albedo and the retrieved areal-averaged albedo, is quite small (RMSE ≤ 0.015 and comparable with that obtained previously by other investigators for the shortwave broadband albedo. Good agreement between tower-based measurements of daily-averaged surface albedo for completely overcast and non-overcast conditions is also demonstrated.

  3. Thermoluminescence method for detection of irradiated food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnioja, S

    1998-12-31

    A method of thermoluminescence (TL) analysis was developed for the detection of irradiated foods. The TL method is based on the determination of thermoluminescence of adhering or contaminating minerals separated from foods by wet sieving and treatment with high density liquid. Carbon tetrachloride provided a suitable alternative for foods that form gels with water. Thermoluminescence response of minerals in a first TL measurement is normalised with a second TL measurement of the same mineral sample after calibration irradiation to a dose of 5 kGy. The decision about irradiation is made on the basis of a comparison of the two TL spectra: if the two TL glow curves match in shape and intensity the sample has been irradiated, and if they are clearly different it has not been irradiated. An attractive feature of TL analysis is that the mineral material itself is used for calibration; no reference material is required. Foods of interest in the investigation were herbs, spices, berries and seafood. The presence of minerals in samples is a criterion for application of the method, and appropriate minerals were found in all herbs, spices and berries. The most common minerals in terrestrial food were tecto-silicates - quartz and feldspars - which with their intense and stable thermoluminescence were well suited for the analysis. Mica proved to be useless for detection purposes, whereas carbonate in the form of calcite separated from intestines of seafood was acceptable. Fading of the TL signal is considerable in the low temperature part of the glow curve during a storage of several months after irradiation. However, spices and herbs could easily be identified as irradiated even after two years storage. Conditions for seafood, which is stored in a freezer, are different, and only slight fading was observed after one year. The effect of mineral composition and structure on TL was studied for feldspars. Feldspars originating from subtropical and tropical regions exhibit lower TL

  4. Differential thermoluminescence (DTL) -a new instrument for measurement of thermoluminescence with suppression of blackbody radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manche, E P

    1978-06-01

    A new instrumental technique for the determination of thermoluminescent glow curves, especially useful for investigation at high temperatures, is described. Two samples, identical in all respects except that one is preheated, are simultaneously heated. The light outputs from the samples are individually modulated at two different frequencies, fed to a single photomultiplier tube the output of which is amplified by two lock-in amplifiers. The selectively amplified signals are further fed to a differential amplifier which cancels out the undesirable blackbody radiation to give a signal due only to the luminophor. This technique conveniently extends the temperature range of thermoluminescence and further allows high-temperature investigation of emissions in the red region of the spectrum.

  5. Albedo evolution of seasonal Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovich, Donald K.; Polashenski, Christopher

    2012-04-01

    There is an ongoing shift in the Arctic sea ice cover from multiyear ice to seasonal ice. Here we examine the impact of this shift on sea ice albedo. Our analysis of observations from four years of field experiments indicates that seasonal ice undergoes an albedo evolution with seven phases; cold snow, melting snow, pond formation, pond drainage, pond evolution, open water, and freezeup. Once surface ice melt begins, seasonal ice albedos are consistently less than albedos for multiyear ice resulting in more solar heat absorbed in the ice and transmitted to the ocean. The shift from a multiyear to seasonal ice cover has significant implications for the heat and mass budget of the ice and for primary productivity in the upper ocean. There will be enhanced melting of the ice cover and an increase in the amount of sunlight available in the upper ocean.

  6. Thermoluminescence of alkali halides and its implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gartia, R.K., E-mail: rkgartia02@yahoo.in [Physics Department, Manipur University, Imphal 795003 (India); Rey, L. [Aerial-CRT-parc d' Innovation, B.P. 40443, F-67412 Illkirch Cedex (France); Tejkumar Singh, Th. [Physics Department, Manipur University, Imphal 795003 (India); Basanta Singh, Th. [Luminescence Dating Laboratory, Manipur University, Imphal 795003 (India)

    2012-03-01

    Trapping levels present in some alkali halides namely NaCl, KCl, KBr, and KI are determined by deconvolution of the thermoluminescence (TL) curves. Unlike most of the studies undertaken over the last few decades, we have presented a comprehensive picture of the phenomenon of TL as an analytical technique capable of revealing the position of the trapping levels present in the materials. We show that for all practical purposes, TL can be described involving only the three key trapping parameters, namely, the activation energy (E), the frequency factor (s), and the order of kinetics (b) even for complex glow curves having a number of TL peaks. Finally, based on these, we logically infer the importance of TL in development and characterization of materials used in dosimetry, dating and scintillation.

  7. Thermoluminescence properties of AlN ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkler, L.; Christensen, P.; Agersnap Larsen, N.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes thermoluminescence (TL) properties of AlN:Y2O3 ceramics irradiated with ionising radiation. A high TL sensitivity of AlN:Y2O3 ceramics to radiation encouraged a study of the AlN ceramics for application as a dosimetric material. The paper presents experimental data on: glow...... curve, emission spectrum, dose response, energy dependence, influence of heating rate and fading rate. The measured TL characteristics were compared with those of well-known, widely used TLDs, i.e. LiF:Mg,Ti, LiF:Mg,Cu,P and Al2O3:C. It is concluded that AlN:Y2O3 ceramics showing a radiation sensitivity...

  8. Thermoluminescence of natural and synthetic diopside

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano, N.F. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: nilocano@dfn.if.usp.br; Yauri, J.M. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); University of Alas Peruanas, Environmental Engineering, Arequipa (Peru); Watanabe, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Mittani, J.C.R. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078-3072 (United States); Blak, A.R. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2008-07-15

    Diopside, a natural silicate mineral of formula CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, has been investigated concerning its thermoluminescence (TL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) properties. Glow curves and TL vs. {gamma}-dose were obtained irradiating natural samples to additional dose varying from 50 to 10,000 Gy. Except for a 410 deg. C peak found in the Al-doped artificial diopside, all the other peaks grow linearly with radiation dose, but saturate beyond {approx}1 kGy. To investigate high-temperature effect before irradiation, measurements of TL intensity in samples annealed at 500-900 deg. C and then irradiated to 1 kGy {gamma}-dose were carried out. Also the TL emission spectrum has been obtained. To compare with natural diopside, a synthetic pure polycrystal was produced and further those doped with iron, aluminum and manganese were also produced.

  9. Thermoluminescence properties of irradiated chickpea and corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necmeddin Yazici, A.; Bedir, Metin; Bozkurt, Halil; Bozkurt, Hüseyin

    2008-02-01

    A study was carried out to establish a detection method for irradiated chickpea and corn by thermoluminescence (TL) method. The leguminous were packed in polyethylene bags and then the packets were irradiated at room temperature at different doses by 60Co gamma source at 1, 4, 8 and 10 kGy. Minerals extracted from the leguminous were deposited onto a clean aluminum disc and TL intensities of the minerals were measured by TL. It was observed that the extracted samples from both leguminous exhibit good TL Intensity and the TL intensity of glow curves of them increased proportionally to irradiation doses. The TL glow curve of both irradiated leguminous presents a single broad peak below 400 °C. The TL trapping parameters glow peaks were estimated by the additive dose (AD), Tm(Ea)-Tstop and computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) methods. The fading characteristics of glow curves were also recorded up to 6 months.

  10. Thermoluminescence dating of the british coversand deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, M. D.

    Coversand deposits, thought to be of Lateglacial age are found in Britain in North Lincolnshire, South-West Lancashire and Central East Anglia. A comprehensive dating study of them, using thermoluminescence (TL) techniques, is currently underway in an attempt to link the British coversand deposits to the European coversand chronology. Initial results from four of the British coversand sites sampled are presented. The 26 TL dates from 14 samples show that in Lincolnshire aeolian deposition took place from 12.5 ka to I1 ka. Cessation of the initial sand deposition was synchronous with this in Lancashire, but sand deposition occurred significantly earlier in East Anglia. The upper layers of aeolian sand in Lancashire are much younger and are attributed to Holocene reworking. On the basis of these dates, Lincolnshire and Lancashire coversand deposition occurred at a similar time to the Younger Coversand II, whilst East Anglian coversand deposition coincided with the Younger Coversand I phase in the European coversand chronology.

  11. Thermoluminescent dosimetric properties of Descalvado sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, M.I.; Caldas, L.V.E

    2006-07-01

    Sand samples proceeding from Descalvado, Sao Paulo, were studied with regard to their dosimetric properties using the thermoluminescence technique (TL) for high doses. These sand samples present steady physical and chemical characteristics to the end items, and they are used in the glass industry and for casting. The TL curves of the samples were obtained after an irradiation at the Gamma-Cell system ({sup 60} Co), of IPEN. The glow curves present two peaks at 80 C and 220 C approximately. Calibration curves were obtained for doses between 50 Gy and 5 kGy. The results indicate that the sand samples can be used for high-doses dosimetry in several areas of applications of ionizing radiation. (Author)

  12. Trace element geochemistry and thermoluminescence (TL) of quartz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    *

    Key words: Cyprinoid otoliths, thermoluminescence, water environment, typomorphic mineral. .... times) with water, and dried under a laminar flow hood at 70°C for 48 h, then .... distribution and partitioning characteristics of polycyclic aromatic.

  13. 128 slice computed tomography dose profile measurement using thermoluminescent dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehhon, N.; Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Ang, W. C.; Musa, Y.; Bahruddin, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    The increasing use of computed tomography (CT) in clinical practice marks the needs to understand the dose descriptor and dose profile. The purposes of the current study were to determine the CT dose index free-in-air (CTDIair) in 128 slice CT scanner and to evaluate the single scan dose profile (SSDP). Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) were used to measure the dose profile of the scanner. There were three sets of CT protocols where the tube potential (kV) setting was manipulated for each protocol while the rest of parameters were kept constant. These protocols were based from routine CT abdominal examinations for male adult abdomen. It was found that the increase of kV settings made the values of CTDIair increased as well. When the kV setting was changed from 80 kV to 120 kV and from 120 kV to 140 kV, the CTDIair values were increased as much as 147.9% and 53.9% respectively. The highest kV setting (140 kV) led to the highest CTDIair value (13.585 mGy). The p-value of less than 0.05 indicated that the results were statistically different. The SSDP showed that when the kV settings were varied, the peak sharpness and height of Gaussian function profiles were affected. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of dose profiles for all protocols were coincided with the nominal beam width set for the measurements. The findings of the study revealed much information on the characterization and performance of 128 slice CT scanner.

  14. SURFACE ALBEDO AND SPECTRAL VARIABILITY OF CERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Reddy, Vishnu; Corre, Lucille Le; Sykes, Mark V.; Prettyman, Thomas H. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 E. Ft. Lowell Road, Suite 106, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Nathues, Andreas; Hoffmann, Martin; Schaefer, Michael [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Göttingen (Germany); Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A. [University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Carsenty, Uri; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Schröder, Stefan E. [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Planetary Research, Berlin (Germany); Castillo-Rogez, Julie C. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Schenk, Paul [Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Williams, David A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Smith, David E. [Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Zuber, Maria T. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); and others

    2016-02-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active, but possibly sporadic, water outgassing as well as possibly varying spectral characteristics over a timescale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as the newly acquired images by the Dawn  Framing Camera, to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, on both a global scale and in local regions, particularly the bright spots inside the Occator crater, over timescales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in the Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over the various timescales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun–Ceres–Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km{sup 2}, too small to cause global albedo and spectral variations detectable in our data. Impact ejecta due to impacting projectiles of tens of meters in size like those known to cause observable changes to the surface albedo on Asteroid Scheila cannot cause detectable albedo change on Ceres due to its relatively large size and strong gravity. The water vapor activity on Ceres is independent of Ceres’ heliocentric distance, ruling out the possibility of the comet-like sublimation process as a possible mechanism driving the activity.

  15. Thermoluminescence dating of Brazilian indigenous ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, T M B; Gennari, R F; Etchevarne, C; Watanabe, S

    2009-08-01

    Two indigenous ceramics fragments, one from Lagoa Queimada (LQ) and another from Barra dos Negros (BN), both sites located on Bahia state (Brazil), were dated by thermoluminescence (TL) method. Each fragment was physically prepared and divided into two fractions, one was used for TL measurement and the other for annual dose determination. The TL fraction was chemically treated, divided in sub samples and irradiated with several doses. The plot extrapolation from TL intensities as function of radiation dose enabled the determination of the accumulated dose (D(ac)), 3.99 Gy and 1.88 Gy for LQ and BN, respectively. The annual dose was obtained through the uranium, thorium and potassium determination by ICP-MS. The annual doses (D(an)) obtained were 2.86 and 2.26 mGy/year. The estimated ages were approximately 1375 and 709 y for BN and LQ ceramics, respectively. The ages agreed with the archaeologists' estimation for the Aratu and Tupi tradition periods, respectively.

  16. Thermoluminescence of zircon: a kinetic model

    CERN Document Server

    Turkin, A A; Vainshtein, D I; Hartog, H W D

    2003-01-01

    The mineral zircon, ZrSiO sub 4 , belongs to a class of promising materials for geochronometry by means of thermoluminescence (TL) dating. The development of a reliable and reproducible method for TL dating with zircon requires detailed knowledge of the processes taking place during exposure to ionizing radiation, long-term storage, annealing at moderate temperatures and heating at a constant rate (TL measurements). To understand these processes one needs a kinetic model of TL. This paper is devoted to the construction of such a model. The goal is to study the qualitative behaviour of the system and to determine the parameters and processes controlling TL phenomena of zircon. The model considers the following processes: (i) Filling of electron and hole traps at the excitation stage as a function of the dose rate and the dose for both (low dose rate) natural and (high dose rate) laboratory irradiation. (ii) Time dependence of TL fading in samples irradiated under laboratory conditions. (iii) Short time anneali...

  17. Thermoluminescence properties of irradiated chickpea and corn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Necmeddin Yazici, A. [University of Gaziantep, Department of Engineering, Physics, 27310 Gaziantep (Turkey)], E-mail: yazici@gantep.edu.tr; Bedir, Metin; Bozkurt, Halil [University of Gaziantep, Department of Engineering, Physics, 27310 Gaziantep (Turkey); Bozkurt, Hueseyin [University of Gaziantep, Department of Food Engineering, 27310 Gaziantep (Turkey)

    2008-02-15

    A study was carried out to establish a detection method for irradiated chickpea and corn by thermoluminescence (TL) method. The leguminous were packed in polyethylene bags and then the packets were irradiated at room temperature at different doses by {sup 60}Co gamma source at 1, 4, 8 and 10 kGy. Minerals extracted from the leguminous were deposited onto a clean aluminum disc and TL intensities of the minerals were measured by TL. It was observed that the extracted samples from both leguminous exhibit good TL Intensity and the TL intensity of glow curves of them increased proportionally to irradiation doses. The TL glow curve of both irradiated leguminous presents a single broad peak below 400 degC. The TL trapping parameters glow peaks were estimated by the additive dose (AD), T{sub m}(E{sub a})-T{sub stop} and computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) methods. The fading characteristics of glow curves were also recorded up to 6 months.

  18. UV albedo of arctic snow in spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Meinander

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of snow for climate studies is based on its physical properties, such as high surface reflectivity. Surface ultraviolet (UV albedo is an essential parameter for various applications based on radiative transfer modeling. Here, new continuous measurements of the local UV albedo of natural Arctic snow were made at Sodankylä (67.37° N, 26.63° E, 179 m a.s.l. during the spring of 2007. The data were logged at 1-min intervals. The accumulation of snow was up to 68 cm. The surface layer thickness varied from 0.5 to 35 cm with the snow grain size between 0.2 and 2.5 mm. The midday erythemally weighted UV albedo ranged from 0.6 to 0.8 in the accumulation period and 0.5–0.7 during melting. During the snow melt period, under cases of an almost clear sky and variable cloudiness, an unexpected diurnal decrease of 0.05 in albedo soon after midday, and recovery thereafter, was detected. This diurnal decrease in albedo was found to be asymmetric with respect to solar midday, thus indicating a change in the properties of the snow. Independent UV albedo results with two different types of instruments confirm these findings. The measured temperature of the snow surface was below 0°C on the following mornings. Hence, the reversible diurnal change, evident for ~1–2 h, could be explained by the daily metamorphosis of the surface of the snowpack, in which the temperature of the surface increases, melting some of the snow to liquid water, after which the surface freezes again.

  19. Radiation induced defects and thermoluminescence mechanism in aluminum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atobe, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Awata, T. [Naruto Univ. of Education, Tokushima (Japan); Okada, M. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Nakagawa, M. [Kagawa Univ., Faculty of Education, Takamatsu, Kagawa (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    The thermoluminescence of the irradiated aluminum oxides were measured to study the radiation induced defects and their behaviors. Neutron and {gamma}-ray irradiation were performed for a shingle crystal of the high purity aluminum oxide. The thermoluminescence glow curve and its activation energy were measured. The spectroscopy measurement on the thermoluminescence and the absorption are also carried out. The observed 430 and 340 nm peaks are discussed relating to the F{sup +} and F centers, respectively. Activation state of the F center transits to 3P state through 1P state by emitting phonons. Trapped electron on 3P state emits phonon of 2.9 eV (430 nm) during transition to the ground state. The above reaction can be written by the equation. F{sup +} + e {yields} (F){sup *} {yields} F + h{nu}(2.9 eV, 470 nm). (Katsuta, H.)

  20. Surface Albedo and Spectral Variability of Ceres

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jian-Yang; Nathues, Andreas; Corre, Lucille Le; Izawa, Matthew R M; Clouts, Edward A; Sykes, Mark V; Carsenty, Uri; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C; Hoffmann, Martin; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Prettyman, Thomas H; Schaefer, Michael; Schenk, Paul; Schröder, Stefan E; Williams, David A; Smith, David E; Zuber, Maria T; Konopliv, Alexander S; Park, Ryan S; Raymond, Carol A; Russell, Christopher T

    2016-01-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active but possibly sporadic water outgassing, and possibly varying spectral characteristics in a time scale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, and the newly acquired images by Dawn Framing Camera to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, in both a global scale and local regions, particularly the bright spots inside Occator crater, over time scales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over various time scales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun-Ceres-Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km$^2...

  1. The low energy atmospheric antiproton albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J. B.; Ormes, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The flux of albedo antiprotons in the 100-1000 MeV kinetic energy range produced by the cosmic ray primaries in the atmosphere is calculated. It is shown that this is not a significant background to measurements of the low energy anti-proton cosmic ray flux.

  2. Thermoluminescent characteristics of nano-structure hydroxyapatite:Dy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziaie, F. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application Research School; Moein, N. Farhadi [Islamic Azad Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Central Tehran Branch; Shafaei, M. [Islamic Azad Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Science and Research Branch

    2014-12-15

    The thermoluminescence response of Dysprosium doped hydroxyapatite samples with different mol percentage of 0.5, 1 and 2 were studied and compared with the pure hydroxyapatite. The samples were objected to {sup 60}Co gamma rays irradiation with doses of 100 mGy to 10 Gy. The main peak in the sample glow curves were obtained at 310 C. The sensitivity of the 1 mol% Dy doped hydroxyapatite samples show the highest thermoluminescence response. Fading behavior of the irradiated samples was also studied. The experimental results show that the synthetic Dy-doped hydroxyapatite obtained by the hydrolysis method may be used in gamma radiation dosimetry.

  3. Areal-averaged and Spectrally-resolved Surface Albedo from Ground-based Transmission Data Alone: Toward an Operational Retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Riihimaki, Laura D.; Michalsky, Joseph; Hodges, G. B.

    2014-08-22

    We present here a simple retrieval of the areal-averaged and spectrally resolved surface albedo using only ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission under fully overcast conditions. Our retrieval is based on a one-line equation and widely accepted assumptions regarding the weak spectral dependence of cloud optical properties in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. The feasibility of our approach for the routine determinations of albedo is demonstrated for different landscapes with various degrees of heterogeneity using three sets of measurements:(1) spectrally resolved atmospheric transmission from Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) at wavelength 415, 500, 615, 673, and 870 nm, (2) tower-based measurements of local surface albedo at the same wavelengths, and (3) areal-averaged surface albedo at four wavelengths (470, 560, 670 and 860 nm) from collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations. These integrated datasets cover both long (2008-2013) and short (April-May, 2010) periods at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site and the NOAA Table Mountain site, respectively. The calculated root mean square error (RMSE), which is defined here as the root mean squared difference between the MODIS-derived surface albedo and the retrieved area-averaged albedo, is quite small (RMSE≤0.01) and comparable with that obtained previously by other investigators for the shortwave broadband albedo. Good agreement between the tower-based daily averages of surface albedo for the completely overcast and non-overcast conditions is also demonstrated. This agreement suggests that our retrieval originally developed for the overcast conditions likely will work for non-overcast conditions as well.

  4. Thermoluminescence of ice and its implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, L., E-mail: louis.rey@bluewin.c [Chemin de Verdonnet, 2 CH-1010 Lausanne (Switzerland); Aerial-CRT-Parc d' Innovation, B.P. 40443, F 67412 Illkirch Cedex (France); Gartia, R.K., E-mail: rkgartia02@yahoo.i [Physics Department, Manipur University, Imphal 795003 (India); Bishal Singh, K. [Physics Department, Manipur University, Imphal 795003 (India); Basanta Singh, Th. [Luminescence Dating Laboratory, Manipur University, Imphal 795003 (India)

    2009-12-15

    A set of six glow curves of hexagonal ice irradiated at 77 K with various doses of gamma-rays have been subjected to rigorous analysis. It shows the presence of as many as 11 thermoluminescence (TL) peaks at 108.2 +- 1.7 K, 115.5 +- 1.4 K, 123.4 +- 3.6 K, 131.8 +- 2.5 K, 138.9 +- 2.2 K, 149.8 +- 1.2 K, 161.3 +- 0.9 K, 168.4 +- 0.8 K, 178.0 +- 0.8 K, 194.1 +- 0.8 K and 203.8 +- 3.9 K (for a heating rate of 0.05 K/s) with thermal activation energies of 0.29 +- 0.01 eV, 0.31 +- 0.01 eV, 0.34 +- 0.01 eV, 0.40 +- 0.00 eV, 0.40 +- 0.01 eV, 0.41 +- 0.01 eV, 0.69 +- 0.01 eV, 0.70 +- 0.00 eV, 0.70 +- 0.01 eV, 0.70 +- 0.01 eV and 0.70 +- 0.01 eV, respectively. The lifetime of electrons in the trap giving rise to the most intense TL peak of ice (161.3 +- 0.9 K) estimated from TL data at 273 K is approx55 ns, while that at 77 K is approx2.0 x 10{sup +18} years i.e. ice can be used for TL dating of icy bodies in the solar system. The physical basis of these findings have been provided keeping in mind the formation of H{sup 0}, O{sup -}, OH{sup -}, HO{sub 2}{sup -} and trapped electrons that are known to be produced by irradiation of ice. The implications of these findings have been discussed.

  5. Thermoluminescent (TL) trap characteristics in irradiated oregano herb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furetta, C.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.

    The aim of this article is to investigate in a very simple way the trap characteristics of the irradiated oregano herb. The preparation of the polymineral dust obtained from the herb is described and then, through a fading experiment, the characteristics of the trapping levels responsible of the thermoluminescent emission are discussed.

  6. Spatially-resolved thermoluminescence from snail opercula using an EMCCD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Kook, Myung Ho; Stirling, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years opercula of the snail species Bithynia tentaculata have been shown to emit thermoluminescence (TL) signals that can be used to determine equivalent dose, and may be capable of dating events throughout the entire Quaternary period. Concentric growth lines are a notable feature...

  7. Thermoluminescence study of the terrestrial ages of antarctic meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Akio [Shiga Univ., Otsu (Japan)

    1994-04-01

    The terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites were estimated from the thermoluminescence (TL) intensity of the fusion crust. It was found that there is a good correlation between the TL intensities and terrestrial ages which had been previously determined by cosmogenic radionuclide abundance. (Author).

  8. Albedo decline on Greenland's Mittivakkat Gletscher in a warming climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mernild, Sebastian H.; Malmros, Jeppe K.; Yde, Jacob C.

    2015-01-01

    Albedo is one of the parameters that govern energy availability for snow and ice surface ablation, and subsequently the surface mass balance conditions of temperate glaciers and ice caps (GIC). Here, we document snow and ice albedo changes for Mittivakkat Gletscher (MG) in Southeast Greenland (20.......10. The greatest decline in albedo, of 0.25, occurred near the equilibrium line altitude (ELA), an important surface cover and albedo transitional zone. The EBY albedo correlates significantly with ELA and net winter and summer glacier mass balance records....

  9. Lunar Regolith Albedos Using Monte Carlos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T. L.; Andersen, V.; Pinsky, L. S.

    2003-01-01

    The analysis of planetary regoliths for their backscatter albedos produced by cosmic rays (CRs) is important for space exploration and its potential contributions to science investigations in fundamental physics and astrophysics. Albedos affect all such experiments and the personnel that operate them. Groups have analyzed the production rates of various particles and elemental species by planetary surfaces when bombarded with Galactic CR fluxes, both theoretically and by means of various transport codes, some of which have emphasized neutrons. Here we report on the preliminary results of our current Monte Carlo investigation into the production of charged particles, neutrons, and neutrinos by the lunar surface using FLUKA. In contrast to previous work, the effects of charm are now included.

  10. Consuming technologies - developing routines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    Routines in daily life are crucial for consumption by households of energy and water and therefore knowledge of how routines develop and change is extremely relevant from a sustainable consumption perspective. Routines emerge, develop and change in close relation with different kinds of everyday ...

  11. Revisiting Routine Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Rebecca; Monaghan, John; Shingadia, Eisha; Vaughan, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    What is a routine question? The focus of this paper is routine questions and time (in years) since a hitherto routine question was last attempted by the solver. The data comes from undergraduate students' work on solving two calculus questions. The data was selected for reporting purposes because it is well documented and because it threw up…

  12. Modeling Earth Albedo for Satellites in Earth Orbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan; Bak, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Many satellite are influences by the Earthøs albedo, though very few model schemes exist.in order to predict this phenomenon. Earth albedo is often treated as noise, or ignored completely. When applying solar cells in the attitude hardware, Earth albedo can cause the attitude estimate to deviate...... with as much as 20 deg. Digital Sun sensors with Earth albedo correction in hardware exist, but are expensive. In addition, albedo estimates are necessary in thermal calculations and power budgets. We present a modeling scheme base4d on Eartht reflectance, measured by NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer......, in which the Earth Probe Satellite has recorded reflectivity data daily since mid 1996. The mean of these data can be used to calculate the Earth albedo given the positions of the satellite and the Sun. Our results show that the albedo varies highly with the solar angle to the satellite's field of view...

  13. Routines and Organizational Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Sangyoon; Becker, Markus; Knudsen, Thorbjørn

    2014-01-01

    Routines have been perceived as a source of inertia in the process of organizational change. In this study, we suggest an overlooked, but prevalent, mechanism by which the inertial nature of routines helps, rather than hinders, organizational adaptation. Routine-level inertia plays a hidden role...... of generating and retaining useful variations in the process of organization-level adaptation. We demonstrate this mechanism by using a simple theoretical model which formalizes an organization as a configuration of inertial, interdependent routines, and the managerial process by which this configuration adapts...... by discussing how this advanced understanding of the role of routines helps elaborate the theory of economic evolution....

  14. Albedo and transmittance of inhomogeneous stratus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuev, V.E.; Kasyanov, E.I.; Titov, G.A. [Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    A highly important topic is the study of the relationship between the statistical parameters of optical and radiative charactertistics of inhomogeneous stratus clouds. This is important because the radiation codes of general circulation models need improvement, and it is important for geophysical information. A cascade model has been developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center to treat stratocumulus clouds with the simplest geometry and horizontal fluctuations of the liquid water path (optical thickness). The model evaluates the strength with which the stochastic geometry of clouds influences the statistical characteristics of albedo and the trnasmittance of solar radiation.

  15. The Spherical Bolometric Albedo of Planet Mercury

    OpenAIRE

    Mallama, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Published reflectance data covering several different wavelength intervals has been combined and analyzed in order to determine the spherical bolometric albedo of Mercury. The resulting value of 0.088 +/- 0.003 spans wavelengths from 0 to 4 {\\mu}m which includes over 99% of the solar flux. This bolometric result is greater than the value determined between 0.43 and 1.01 {\\mu}m by Domingue et al. (2011, Planet. Space Sci., 59, 1853-1872). The difference is due to higher reflectivity at wavelen...

  16. Study on carbonated hydroxyapatite as a thermoluminescence dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafaei, M.; Sardari, D. [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Medical Radiation Engineering; Ziaie, F.; Larijani, M.M. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application Research School

    2015-03-15

    In this study, carbonated hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were used for thermoluminescence dosimetry. The nano-structure carbonated hydroxyapatite synthesized via hydrolysis of CaHPO{sub 4} and CaCO{sub 3}. The obtained nano powders were characterized by XRD technique and FTIR spectroscopy system. The carbonated hydroxyapatite samples were irradiated at different doses using {sup 60}Co gamma rays, and were subjected to thermoluminescence measurement system, consequently. The TL glow curve exhibited two distinguishable peaks centered at around of 165 C and 310 C. The TL response of carbonated hydroxyapatite samples as a function of absorbed dose was linear in the range of 25-1000 Gy. Other dosimetric features of the carbonated hydroxyapatite nanoparticles including fading and reproducibility were also investigated.

  17. Thermoluminescence authentication of T`ang and Han Dynasty pottery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, D.M. [Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia). School of Geosciences

    1997-12-31

    More than 80 pieces of T`ang Dynasty and 40 Han Dynasty style ceramic wares have been analysed to determine the amount of thermoluminescence (TL) accumulated since the initial firing of the object and the level of the radiation flux which has created the TL. This paper presents a summary of the thermoluminescence analysis results. Approximately 60% of Han ceramics and 45% of the T`ang pottery authenticated have been shown to belong to periods other than that stylistically suggested. Items which have been found not to be of the anticipated antiquity generally fall into distinct age groups. Of the T`ang wares the most commonly copied item is found to be the horse and for the Han pieces, human figures and ewers/pots/vases represent the most frequently reproduced wares.

  18. Ten years of personnel neutron dosimetry with Albedo dosemeters in the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draaisma, F.S.; Verhagen, H.W

    2002-07-01

    Since 1987, the dosimetry service of the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation has been certified by the Dutch government to perform personal dosimetry, using thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs). Performing neutron personal dosimetry requires a rather large investment in readers, TLDs and personnel to operate the service. About 800 persons are subjected to routine neutron monitoring in the Netherlands and their annual neutron doses are a relatively small fraction (less than 10%) of the annual H{sub p}(10). In general, the measured neutron dose values are low (on average 93% of the users receive an annual neutron dose <0.2 mSv). The collective annual (neutron) dose has tended to decrease since 1992, but incidentally high doses have been observed. Leaving these incidents out, the average collective annual neutron doses for the different users of neutron sources are about the same. (author)

  19. Properties of sintered amethyst pellets as thermoluminescent dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, F.D.G.; Oliveira, M.L.; Cecatti, Sonia G.P.; Caldas, Linda V.E. E-mail: lcaldas@net.ipen.br

    2003-01-01

    The main dosimetric characteristics of amethyst, Brazilian natural semi-precious stone, were investigated in this work, in order to verify the possibility of its use for gamma-radiation detection using the thermoluminescent (TL) technique. The samples were tested in X- and gamma-radiation beams, and their TL glow curves, dependences of the response on the absorbed dose and radiation energy, and the response reproducibility were investigated. The preliminary results show the usefulness of this material in dosimetry for radiation processing.

  20. Thermoluminescence glow curve of {gamma}-irradiated calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.D.; Ingotombi, S. [Manipur Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics

    1995-07-14

    The trapping parameters, namely the activation energy E, frequency factor s and b order of kinetics of the thermoluminescence (TL) peaks of calcites (brown and colourless varieties) irradiated with 4.08 kGy of {gamma}-rays, are determined using the least-squares curve-fitting technique. The electron lifetime {tau} of the peaks of calcite are calculated in order to estimate the upper limit of their utility in TL dating. (author).

  1. Application of fast Fourier transformation in thermoluminescence thermogram reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, C.; Podgorsak, E. B.

    1984-03-01

    A thermoluminescence (TL) thermogram reconstruction technique based on fast Fourier transformation (FFT) techniques is presented. Only the first few terms of the real and imaginary ``frequency arrays,'' representing the thermogram in the frequency domain, are used for thermogram reconstruction by an inverse transformation. A method to determine the optimum number of FFT terms is discussed and a reconstruction study performed on six commonly used TL materials.

  2. Thermoluminescence and dielectric response of gamma irradiated muscovite mica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Sukhnandan, E-mail: sukhnandanphy@gmail.com; Singh, Surinder, E-mail: sukhnandanphy@gmail.com; Singh, Lakhwant, E-mail: sukhnandanphy@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar-143005 (India); Lochab, S. P. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi-110067 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The effect of gamma radiation dose on the thermoluminescence (TL) and dielectric properties of muscovite mica was studied. TL glow curves exhibited a single peak around 141 {sup 0}C and its activation energy was estimated to be about 0.89 eV. Different dielectric parameters like dielectric constant, dielectric loss and ac conductivity have been calculated in both pristine and gamma irradiated samples. These dielectric parameters have been studied as a function of irradiation dose.

  3. Spacecraft Attitude Determination with Earth Albedo Corrected Sun Sensor Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    This thesis focuses on advanced modeling of the Earth albedo experienced by satellites in Earth orbit. The model of the Earth albedo maintains directional information of the Earth albedo irradiance from each partition on the Earth surface. This allows enhanced modeling of Sun sensor current outputs......-Method, Extended Kalman Filter, and Unscented Kalman Filter algorithms are presented and the results are compared. Combining the Unscented Kalman Filter with Earth albedo and enhanced Sun sensor modeling allows for three-axis attitude determination from Sun sensor only, which previously has been perceived...

  4. LUNAR TERRAIN AND ALBEDO RECONSTRUCTION FROM APOLLO IMAGERY

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — LUNAR TERRAIN AND ALBEDO RECONSTRUCTION FROM APOLLO IMAGERY ARA V NEFIAN*, TAEMIN KIM, MICHAEL BROXTON, AND ZACH MORATTO Abstract. Generating accurate three...

  5. Surface Albedo Variations Across Opportunity's Traverse in Meridiani Planum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer-Ellis, G. L.; Rice, M. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Bell, J. F., III

    2015-12-01

    Surface albedo measurements from the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity mission can be used to help understand surface-atmosphere interactions at Meridiani Planum. Opportunity has acquired 117 albedo panoramas with the Pancam instrument as of sol 3870, across the first 40 km of its traverse. To date, only the first 32 panoramas have been reported upon in previous studies [1]. Here we present an analysis of the full set of PDS-released albedo observations from Opportunity and correlate our measurements with terrain type and known atmospheric events. To acquire a 360-degree albedo observation, Pancam's L1 ("clear") filter is used to take 27 broad-spectrum images, which are stitched into a mosaic. Pancam images are calibrated to reflectance factor (R*), which is taken as an approximation of the Lambertian albedo. Areas of interest are selected and average albedo calculations are applied to all of the selections. Results include the average albedo of each scene, as well as equal-area corrections where applicable, in addition to measurements of specific classes of surface features (e.g., outcrops, dusty terrain, and rover tracks). Average scene albedo measurements range from 0.11 ± 0.04 to 0.30 ± 0.04, with the highest value observed on sol 1290 (immediately after the planet-encircling dust storm of 2007). We compare these results to distance traveled, surface morphologies, local wind driven events, and dust opacity measurements. Future work will focus on correlating Pancam albedo values with orbital data from cameras such as HiRISE, CTX, MOC, THEMIS-VIS, and MARCI, and completion of the same analysis for the full Pancam albedo dataset from Spirit. References: [1] Bell, J. F., III, M. S. Rice, J. R. Johnson, and T. M. Hare (2008), Surface albedo observations at Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum, Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E06S18, doi:10.1029/2007JE002976.

  6. Routines and Organizational Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Sangyoon; Becker, Markus; Knudsen, Thorbjørn

    2014-01-01

    Routines have been perceived as a source of inertia in the process of organizational change. In this study, we suggest an overlooked, but prevalent, mechanism by which the inertial nature of routines helps, rather than hinders, organizational adaptation. Routine-level inertia plays a hidden role...... to cope with its task environment. In our nuanced perspective, inertia is not only a consequence of adaptation but also a source of adaptation. This logic is helpful to understand why reliable but apparently inertial organizations keep surviving and often exhibit outstanding performance. We conclude...

  7. Cloud albedo increase from carbonaceous aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. Leaitch

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Airborne measurements from two consecutive days, analysed with the aid of an aerosol-adiabatic cloud parcel model, are used to study the effect of carbonaceous aerosol particles on the reflectivity of sunlight by water clouds. The measurements, including aerosol chemistry, aerosol microphysics, cloud microphysics, cloud gust velocities and cloud light extinction, were made below, in and above stratocumulus over the northwest Atlantic Ocean. On the first day, the history of the below-cloud fine particle aerosol was marine and the fine particle sulphate and organic carbon mass concentrations measured at cloud base were 2.4 μg m−3 and 0.9 μg m−3 respectively. On the second day, the below-cloud aerosol was continentally influenced and the fine particle sulphate and organic carbon mass concentrations were 2.3 μg m−3 and 2.6 μg m−3 respectively. Over the range 0.06–0.8 μm diameter, the shapes of the below-cloud size distributions were similar on both days and the number concentrations were approximately a factor of two higher on the second day. The cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC on the second day were approximately three times higher than the CDNC measured on the first day. Using the parcel model to separate the influence of the differences in gust velocities, we estimate from the vertically integrated cloud light scattering measurements a 6% increase in the cloud albedo principally due to the increase in the carbonaceous components on the second day. Assuming no additional absorption by this aerosol, a 6% albedo increase translates to a local daytime radiative cooling of ∼12 W m−2. This result provides observational evidence that the role of anthropogenic carbonaceous components in the cloud albedo effect can be much larger than that of anthropogenic sulphate, as some global simulations have indicated.

  8. Measurements of spectral snow albedo at Neumayer, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wuttke

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Spectral albedo in high resolution, from 290 to 1050 nm, has been measured at Neumayer, Antarctica, (70°39' S, 8°15' W during the austral summer 2003/2004. At 500 nm, the spectral albedo nearly reaches unity, with slightly lower values below and above 500 nm. Above 600 nm, the spectral albedo decreases to values between 0.45 and 0.75 at 1000 nm. For one cloudless case an albedo up to 1.01 at 500 nm could be determined. This can be explained by the larger directional component of the snow reflectivity for direct incidence, combined with a slightly mislevelled sensor and the snow surface not being perfectly horizontal. A possible explanation for an observed decline in albedo is an increase in snow grain size. The theoretically predicted increase in albedo with increasing solar zenith angle (SZA could not be observed. This is explained by the small range of SZA during albedo measurements, combined with the effect of changing snow conditions outweighing the effect of changing SZA. The measured spectral albedo serves as input for radiative transfer models, describing radiation conditions in Antarctica.

  9. The effect of pulverization on the albedo of lunar rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnaert, Marcel Gilles Jozef

    1969-01-01

    Measures of the albedo under full-moon conditions have been made on two samples of very dark rocks, pulverized and sieved so as to obtain powders of different grain size. Below a size of 0.05 mm the albedo suddenly increases, obviously because the individual grains become transparent. By a rough cal

  10. Narrowband to broadband conversion of Landsat TM glacier albedos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.; Knap, W.H.; Reijmer, C.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present an empirical relationship between the broadband glacier albedo (alpha) and the narrowband glacier albedos in Landsat TM bands 2 and 4 (alpha2 and alpha4, respectively). The relationship was established on the basis of multiple linear regression analysis of 112 ground-based s

  11. Narrowband to broadband conversion of Landsat TM glacier albedos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.; Knap, W.H.; Reijmer, C.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present an empirical relationship between the broadband glacier albedo (alpha) and the narrowband glacier albedos in Landsat TM bands 2 and 4 (alpha2 and alpha4, respectively). The relationship was established on the basis of multiple linear regression analysis of 112 ground-based

  12. The Albedo of Pervious Cement Concrete Linearly Decreases with Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pervious pavements have been advocated as a potential countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. To understand if pervious pavements stay cooler than conventional pavements, the albedo of the pervious concrete must be understood. This study measured the albedo of pervious concrete with different porosity. Four Portland cement concrete mixes were casted, using designed amounts of sand to vary the porosity of the pervious concrete samples. The samples were sliced and the spectral reflectance and albedo of the sliced samples were measured and analyzed. It is found that the albedo of pervious concrete decreases linearly with the increase of the porosity. The albedo of a pervious Portland concrete varies from 0.25 to 0.35, which is 0.05~0.15 lower than the albedo of conventional cement concrete. Due to this lower albedo, it should be cautious to develop pervious concrete to battle with urban heat island unless the evaporation of pervious concrete is promoted to compensate the additional solar absorption caused by the low albedo.

  13. Greenland surface albedo changes 1981-2012 from satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant melt over Greenland has been observed during the last several decades associated with extreme warming events over the northern Atlantic Ocean. An analysis of surface albedo change over Greenland is presented, using a 32-year consistent satellite albedo product from the Global Land Surfac...

  14. The effect of pulverization on the albedo of lunar rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnaert, Marcel Gilles Jozef

    Measures of the albedo under full-moon conditions have been made on two samples of very dark rocks, pulverized and sieved so as to obtain powders of different grain size. Below a size of 0.05 mm the albedo suddenly increases, obviously because the individual grains become transparent. By a rough

  15. Anthropogenic desertification by high-albedo pollution Observations and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterman, J.; Rosenberg, N. W.; Rosenberg, E.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 MSS albedo data of Western Negev, Sinai and the Gaza strip are presented. A sharp contrast in albedo exists across the Negev-Sinai and Negev-Gaza strip borders. Anthropogenic desertification has occurred on the Arab side due to overgrazing and Bedouin agriculture, whereas natural vegetation grows much more abundantly on the Israeli side.

  16. Importance of Family Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Structure Your Child's Nighttime Routine . Weekends: Weekends are good times for family togetherness. You might go grocery shopping as a family, visit museums and zoos, do chores​ that everyone participates in, go on ...

  17. Routine sputum culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sputum culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Culture, routine. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, ... . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:409- ...

  18. NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year Two: Asteroid Diameters and Albedos

    CERN Document Server

    Nugent, C R; Bauer, J; Cutri, R M; Kramer, E A; Grav, T; Masiero, J; Sonnett, S; Wright, E L

    2016-01-01

    The Near-Earth Object Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) mission continues to detect, track, and characterize minor planets. We present diameters and albedos calculated from observations taken during the second year since the spacecraft was reactivated in late 2013. These include 207 near-Earth asteroids and 8,885 other asteroids. $84\\%$ of the near-Earth asteroids did not have previously measured diameters and albedos by the NEOWISE mission. Comparison of sizes and albedos calculated from NEOWISE measurements with those measured by occultations, spacecraft, and radar-derived shapes shows accuracy consistent with previous NEOWISE publications. Diameters and albedos fall within $ \\pm \\sim20\\%$ and $\\pm\\sim40\\%$, 1-sigma, respectively, of those measured by these alternate techniques. NEOWISE continues to preferentially discover near-Earth objects which are large ($>100$ m), and have low albedos.

  19. The solar zenith angle dependence of desert albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Barlage, Michael; Zeng, Xubin; Dickinson, Robert E.; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2005-03-01

    Most land models assume that the bare soil albedo is a function of soil color and moisture but independent of solar zenith angle (SZA). However, analyses of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) and albedo data over thirty desert locations indicate that bare soil albedo does vary with SZA. This is further confirmed using the in situ data. In particular, bare soil albedo normalized by its value at 60° SZA can be adequately represented by a one-parameter formulation (1 + C)/(1 + 2C * cos(SZA)) or a two-parameter formulation (1 + B1 * f1(SZA) + B2 * f2(SZA)). Using the MODIS and in situ data, the empirical parameters C, B1, and B2 are taken as 0.15, 0.346 and 0.063. The SZA dependence of soil albedo is also found to significantly affect the modeling of land surface energy balance over a desert site.

  20. Numerical analysis of thermoluminescence glow curves; Analisis numerico de las cruvas de termoluminiscencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Ros, J. M.; Delgado, A.

    1989-07-01

    This report presents a method for the numerical analysis of complex thermoluminescence glow curves resolving the individual glow peak components. The method employs first order kinetics analytical expressions and is based In a Marquart-Levenberg minimization procedure. A simplified version of this method for thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) is also described and specifically developed to operate whit Lithium Fluoride TLD-100. (Author). 36 refs.

  1. Soil Albedo in Relation to Soil Color, Moisture and Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Adan Fimbres

    Land surface albedo is the ratio of reflected to incident solar radiation. It is a function of several surface parameters including soil color, moisture, roughness and vegetation cover. A better understanding of albedo and how it changes in relation to variations in these parameters is important in order to help improve our ability to model the effects of land surface modifications on climate. The objectives of this study were (1) To determine empirical relationships between smooth bare soil albedo and soil color, (2) To develop statistical relationships between albedo and ground-based thematic mapper (TM) measurements of spectral reflectances, (3) To determine how increased surface roughness caused by tillage reduces bare soil albedo and (4) To empirically relate albedo with TM data and other physical characteristics of mixed grass/shrubland sites at Walnut Gulch Watershed. Albedos, colors and spectral reflectances were measured by Eppley pyranometer, Chroma Meter CR-200 and a Spectron SE-590, respectively. Measurements were made on two field soils (Gila and Pima) at the Campus Agricultural Center (CAC), Tucson, AZ. Soil surface roughness was measured by a profile meter developed by the USDA/ARS. Additional measurements were made at the Maricopa Agricultural Center (MAC) for statistical model testing. Albedos of the 15 smooth, bare soils (plus silica sand) were determined by linear regression to be highly correlated (r^2 = 0.93, p > 0.01) with color values for both wet and dry soil conditions. Albedos of the same smooth bare soils were also highly correlated (r^2>=q 0.86, p > 0.01) with spectral reflectances. Testing of the linear regression equations relating albedo to soil color and spectral reflectances using the data from MAC showed a high correlation. A general nonlinear relationship given by y = 8.366ln(x) + 37.802 r^2 = 0.71 was determined between percent reduction in albedo (y) and surface roughness index (x) for wet and dry Pima and Gila field soils

  2. Thermoluminescence dosimetry of rare earth doped calcium aluminate phosphors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Madhukumar; K Rajendra Babu; K C Ajith Prasad; J James; T S Elias; V Padmanabhan; C M K Nair

    2006-04-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of calcium aluminate (CaAl2O4) doped with different rare earth ions have been studied and their suitability for radiation dosimetry applications is discussed. It is observed that monocalcium aluminate doped with cerium is a good dosimeter having linear response up to about 4 kGy of radiation doses. Dopant concentration of 0.25 mol% cerium gives maximum TL emission. The well-defined single peak observed at 295°C can be advantageously used for high temperature dosimetry applications.

  3. Scintillation, Afterglow and Thermoluminescence of CsI:Tl,Sm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappers, L. A.; Bartram, R. H.; Hamilton, D. S.; Lempicki, A.; Brecher, C.; Gaysinskiy, V.; Ovechkina, E. E.; Nagarkar, V. V.

    2010-11-01

    Experiments on co-doped CsI:Tl,Sm suggest that samarium electron traps scavenge electrons from thallium traps and that electrons subsequently released by samarium recombine non-radiatively with trapped holes, thus suppressing afterglow. These experiments support the inference that electrons tunnel freely between samarium ions and are trapped preferentially as substitutional Sm+ near VKA(Tl+) centers where non-radiative recombination is the rate-limiting step. Combined radioluminescence, afterglow and thermoluminescence on single-crystal samples of CsI:Tl and CsI:Tl,Sm, recorded sequentially at adjusted gain settings following low-temperature irradiation, reveal reversible radiation damage as well.

  4. CHARACTERISTICS OF VEGETATION COVER, ROUGHNESS AND ALBEDO DISTRIBUTION OVER CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张正秋; 周秀骥; 李维亮; 徐兴奎

    2001-01-01

    To build land surface dataset for climate model, with application of remote sensing technique as well as the Geographic Information System (GIS), the data of surface type, roughness and albedo over China in 1997 were retrieved, resolutions being 10 km× 10 km. Based on these data,an analysis is conducted on the geographic distributions and seasonal variations of surface vegetation cover and roughness as well as albedo over China. Results show that surface vegetation cover is mainly located to the south of Yangtze River, in Southwest and Northeast China and sparse vegetation cover is in the Northwest. The variation of land surface cover affects the variations of land surface roughness and albedo. High albedo occurred in the north of Xinjiang Autonomous Region, the north of Northeast China and the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau in winter, in correspondence with the location of snow cover.For most part of China, surface roughness decreases and albedo increases in winter, while the roughness increases and the albedo decreases in summer, which could mainly result from land surface cover (snow cover and vegetation cover) and soil moisture changes. This shows that the geographic distribution and seasonal variation of the albedo are alnost opposite to those of the roughness, in agreement with theoretical results. Temporally, the amplitude of surface roughness change is quite small in comparison with the roughness itself.

  5. Surface albedo measurements in Mexico City metropolitan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, T; Mar, B; Longoria, R; Ruiz Suarez, L. G [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Morales, L [Instituto de Geografia, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-04-01

    Optical and thermal properties of soils are important input data for the meteorological and photochemical modules of air quality models. As development of these models increase on spatial resolution good albedo data become more important. In this paper measurements of surface albedo of UV (295-385 nm) and visible (450-550 nm) radiation are reported for different urban and rural surfaces in the vicinity of Mexico City. It was found for the downtown zone and average albedo value of 0.05 which is in very good agreement with reported values for urban surfaces. Our albedo values measured in UV region for grey cement and green grass are of 0.10 and 0.009, respectively, and quite similar to those found at the literature of 0.11 and 0.008 for those type of surfaces. [Spanish] Las propiedades opticas y termicas de suelos son datos importantes para los modulos meteorologicos y fotoquimicos de los modelos de calidad del aire. Conforme aumenta la resolucion espacial del modelo se vuelve mas importante contar con buenos datos de albedo. En este articulo se presentan mediciones de albedo superficial de radiacion Ultravioleta (295-385 nm) y visible (450-550 nm) para diferentes superficies urbanas. Los valores medidos de albedo en la region UV para cemento gris y pasto verde son de 0.10 y 0.009, respectivamente, y son muy similares a los reportados en la literatura, 0.11 y 0.008 para este tipo de superficies.

  6. The Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; /Stanford U., HEPL; Porter, Troy A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-09-28

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

  7. Greenland ice sheet albedo feedback: thermodynamics and atmospheric drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Box

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Greenland ice sheet mass loss has accelerated in the past decade responding to combined glacier discharge and surface melt water runoff increases. During summer, absorbed solar energy, modulated at the surface primarily by albedo, is the dominant factor governing surface melt variability in the ablation area. Using satellite-derived surface albedo with calibrated regional climate modeled surface air temperature and surface downward solar irradiance, we determine the spatial dependence and quantitative impact of the ice sheet albedo feedback over 12 summer periods beginning in 2000. We find that, while albedo feedback defined by the change in net solar shortwave flux and temperature over time is positive over 97% of the ice sheet, when defined using paired annual anomalies, a second-order negative feedback is evident over 63% of the accumulation area. This negative feedback damps the accumulation area response to warming due to a positive correlation between snowfall and surface air temperature anomalies. Positive anomaly-gauged feedback concentrated in the ablation area accounts for more than half of the overall increase in melting when satellite-derived melt duration is used to define the timing when net shortwave flux is sunk into melting. Abnormally strong anticyclonic circulation, associated with a persistent summer North Atlantic Oscillation extreme since 2007, enabled three amplifying mechanisms to maximize the albedo feedback: (1 increased warm (south air advection along the western ice sheet increased surface sensible heating that in turn enhanced snow grain metamorphic rates, further reducing albedo; (2 increased surface downward shortwave flux, leading to more surface heating and further albedo reduction; and (3 reduced snowfall rates sustained low albedo, maximizing surface solar heating, progressively lowering albedo over multiple years. The summer net infrared and solar radiation for the high elevation accumulation area approached

  8. Effect of thermal decomposition of hydroxyapatite on the thermoluminescent response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval C, K. J.; Zarate M, J.; Lemus R, J. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Instituto de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, Ciudad Universitaria, Edificio U, 58060 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Rivera M, T., E-mail: karlasandovalc@gmail.com [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    In this work, a study on the thermoluminescence (Tl) induced by gamma radiation in synthetic hydroxyapatite (Hap) annealed at different temperatures obtained by the precipitation method is presented. Synthesis of hydroxyapatite Hap was carried out starting from inorganic precursors [Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4}]. The precipitate was filtered, washed, dried and then the powder was calcined at different temperatures until the Hap decomposition. The structural and morphological characterization was carried out using both X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (Sem) techniques. Thermoluminescent (Tl) properties of Hap powders were irradiated at different gamma radiation doses. According to X ray diffraction patterns, the tricalcium diphosphate phase (Tcp) appear when the Hap was calcined at 900 grades C. Tl glow curve showed two peaks located at around 200 and 300 grades C, respectively. Tl response as a function of gamma radiation dose was in a wide range from 25 to 100 Gy. The fading of the Tl response at 134 days after irradiation was measured. Experimental results showed that the synthetic hydroxyapatite obtained by precipitation technique may have dosimetric applications when is annealed at temperature of 900 grades C, where the Tcp phase appears and contributes to Tl response, which opens the possibility of using this biomaterials in the area of dosimetry, as they are generally used for biomedical implants. (author)

  9. A preliminary approach to identify irradiated foods by thermoluminescence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Choonshik, E-mail: maggic7@korea.kr [Gyeong-In Regional Korea Food and Drug Administration, Juan-Dong 120, Nam-Gu, Incheon 402-835 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Hwayang-Dong 1, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung-Ook [Gyeong-In Regional Korea Food and Drug Administration, Juan-Dong 120, Nam-Gu, Incheon 402-835 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Yoongho [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Hwayang-Dong 1, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Thermoluminescence (TL) is one of the physical methods for the identification of irradiated foods. Among the currently developed methods, TL is the most widely used method for the identification of irradiated foods. However, in order to use this method, silicate minerals should be isolated from food samples. The process for the isolation of silicate minerals is time consuming and laborious. In this work, we have investigated the applicability of the TL method using iron-containing minerals instead of silicate minerals. In the TL analyses of dried spices, TL glow curves of iron-containing minerals showed maximum temperatures between 150 and 250 Degree-Sign C which were the same as those of silicate minerals. The process for the mineral separation of the proposed method is simple, fast, easy, and reliable. Moreover, the analysis results including TL ratio have not shown significant differences compared with the silicate minerals method. As a result, the TL measurements using the iron-containing minerals could be an excellent method for the identification of the irradiated foods, including dried spices. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A thermoluminescence method using iron-containing minerals is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Current method using silicate minerals is time consuming and laborious. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer However, the proposed method is simple, fast, easy, and reliable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis results are similar to those of the silicate minerals method.

  10. Highly sensitive thermoluminescent carbon doped nanoporous aluminium oxide detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevedo, W M; de Oliveira, G B; da Silva, E F; Khoury, H J; Oliveira de Jesus, E F

    2006-01-01

    In this work we present the synthesis, characterisation and the thermoluminescence (TL) response of nanoporous carbon doped aluminium oxide Al2O3:C produced by anodic oxidation of aluminium in organic and inorganic solvents. The X-ray and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements reveal that the synthesised samples are amorphous and present highly ordered structures with uniform pore distribution with diameter of the order 50 nm. The photoluminescence and spectroscopic analysis in the visible and infrared regions show that the luminescence properties presented by the samples prepared in organic acid are due to carboxylate species, incorporated in anodic alumina films during the synthesis process. After an annealing treatment, part of the incorporated species decomposes and is incorporated into the structure of the aluminium oxide yielding a highly thermoluminescent detector (TL) . The results for X-ray irradiation in the range from 21 to 80 keV indicate a linear TL response with the dose in the range from 5 mGy to 1 Gy, suggesting that nanoporous aluminium oxide produced in the present route of synthesis is a suitable detector for radiation measurements.

  11. Preparation and thermoluminescence properties of aluminium oxide doped with europium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorín, J; Esparza, A; Falcony, C; Rivera, T; García, M; Martínez, E

    2002-01-01

    There is little information concerning the use of rare earths as dopants of Al2O3. This paper presents the preparation method and the results of studying the thermoluminescence characteristics of Al2O3:Eu exposed to ultraviolet light. Phosphor powder was obtained by the evaporation method. Optimum dopant concentration was 10% at an evaporation temperature of 700 degrees C. The powder obtained was submitted to thermal treatments at high temperatures in order to stabilise the traps. Diffraction patterns showed amorphous powder up to 500 degrees C; as the temperature was raised crystalline phases of Al2O3 appeared. The photoluminescence spectrum induced by 250 nm UV light exhibited four well defined peaks characteristic of the Eu3+ ion. The glow curve exhibited two peaks at 180 and 350 degrees C. The sensitivity of Al2O3:Eu was 10 times lower than Al2O3:C. The thermoluminescence response was linear from 2.4 to 3000 microJ.cm(-2) of spectral irradiance, and the fading 2% in a month. From these results it can be concluded that Al2O3:Eu has potential as an UV dosemeter.

  12. Thermoluminescence properties of zinc oxide obtained by solution combustion synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orante B, V. R.; Escobar O, F. M.; Cruz V, C. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Polimeros y Materiales, Apdo. Postal 130, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Bernal, R., E-mail: victor.orante@polimeros.uson.mx [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Apdo. Postal 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    High-dose thermoluminescence dosimetry properties of novel zinc oxide obtained by solution combustion synthesis in a glycine-nitrate process, with a non-stoichiometric value of the elemental stoichiometric coefficient (Φ{sub c}) are presented in this work. Zn O powder samples obtained were annealed afterwards at 900 grades C during 2 h in air. Sintered particles of sizes between ∼ 0.5 and ∼ 2 μm were obtained, according to scanning electron microscopy results. X-ray diffraction indicates the presence of the hexagonal phase of Zn O for the powder samples obtained, before and after thermal annealing, without any remaining nitrate peaks observed. Thermoluminescence glow curves of Zn O obtained after being exposed to beta radiation consists of two maxima; one located at ∼ 149 grades C and another at ∼ 308 grades C, being the latter the dosimetric component of the curve. Dosimetric characterization of non-stoichiometric zinc oxide provided experimental evidence like asymptotic behavior of the Tl signal fading for times greater than 16 h between irradiation and the corresponding Tl readout, as well as the linear behaviour of the dose response without saturation in the dose interval studied (from 12.5 up to 400 Gy). Such characteristics place Zn O phosphors obtained in this work as a promising material for high-dose radiation dosimetry applications (e.g., radiotherapy and food industry). (author)

  13. Motivation through Routine Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koth, Laurie J.

    2016-01-01

    This informed commentary article offers a simple, effective classroom management strategy in which the teacher uses routine documentation to motivate students both to perform academically and to behave in a manner consistent with established classroom rules and procedures. The pragmatic strategy is grounded in literature, free to implement,…

  14. Learning from Homeschooling Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a rare opportunity to look inside the homeschool and to observe the routines of homeschooling families from across the United States. With more than 1000 survey participants, and nine parents selected for interviews, the compiled data were analyzed through open coding techniques. Meaningful aspects that arose from the routines…

  15. Routine neonatal circumcision?

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, P. T.; Giacomantonio, M.

    1996-01-01

    Routine neonatal circumcision is still a controversial procedure. This article attempts to clarify some of the advantages and disadvantages of neonatal circumcision. The increased rate of penile cancer among uncircumcised men appears to justify the procedure, but that alone is not sufficient justification. The final decision on neonatal circumcision should be made by parents with balanced counsel from attending physicians.

  16. Memory for Routines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galambos, James A.; Rips, Lance J.

    1982-01-01

    Presents experiments which compare two theories of memory for routine events, one emphasizing temporal sequence of events, the other focusing on events' hierarchical structure or centrality. Findings suggest that sequence and centrality information may be computed as needed, rather than precompiled. (Author/BK)

  17. The Albedo Distribution of Near Earth Asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Edward L; Masiero, Joseph; Grav, Tommy; Bauer, James

    2016-01-01

    The cryogenic WISE mission in 2010 was extremely sensitive to asteroids and not biased against detecting dark objects. The albedos of 428 Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) observed by WISE during its fully cryogenic mission can be fit quite well by a 3 parameter function that is the sum of two Rayleigh distributions. The Rayleigh distribution is zero for negative values, and follows $f(x) = x \\exp[-x^2/(2\\sigma^2)]/\\sigma^2$ for positive x. The peak value is at x=\\sigma, so the position and width are tied together. The three parameters are the fraction of the objects in the dark population, the position of the dark peak, and the position of the brighter peak. We find that 25.3% of the NEAs observed by WISE are in a very dark population peaking at $p_V = 0.03$, while the other 74.7% of the NEAs seen by WISE are in a moderately dark population peaking at $p_V = 0.168$. A consequence of this bimodal distribution is that the Congressional mandate to find 90% of all NEAs larger than 140 m diameter cannot be satisfied by...

  18. An algorithm to determine backscattering ratio and single scattering albedo

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Desa, E.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Nayak, S.R.; Naik, P.

    Algorithms to determine the inherent optical properties of water, backscattering probability and single scattering albedo at 490 and 676 nm from the apparent optical property, remote sensing reflectance are presented here. The measured scattering...

  19. MCNP simulation of the incident and Albedo neutron response of the IRD Albedo Neutron Dosemeter for {sup 241}Am-Be moderated sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Bruno M.; Martins, Marcelo M.; Mauricio, Claudia L.P.; Mauricio, Claudia L.P. da, E-mail: claudia@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Ademir X. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The IRD TLD Albedo dosemeter measures both incident and albedo neutron component. The incident to Albedo ratio is used to take into account the energy dependence of its response. In this paper, the behavior of the IRD Albedo dosemeter response as a function of the incident to Albedo ratio for {sup 241}Am-Be sources was simulated to improve its algorithm. The simulation was performed in MCNPX transport code and presents a good agreement with experimental measurements. The results obtained in this work are very useful to improve the accuracy of the IRD Albedo dosemeter at real neutron workplace. (author)

  20. IAU nomenclature for albedo features on the planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollfus, A.; Chapman, C. R.; Davies, M. E.; Gingerich, O.; Goldstein, R.; Guest, J.; Morrison, D.; Smith, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    The International Astronomical Union has endorsed a nomenclature for the albedo features on Mercury. Designations are based upon the mythological names related to the god Hermes; they are expressed in Latin form. The dark-hued albedo features are associated with the generic term Solitudo. The light-hued areas are designated by a single name without generic term. The 32 names adopted are allocated on the Mercury map.

  1. Global albedo particles: a new approach from loss cone distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, K; Huang, Ming-Huey A.; Wang, Kaiti

    2006-01-01

    Global distributions of albedo particles measured by Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) are investigated by modeling loss cones derived from adiabatic invariants. Particles can be immediately determined as being loss to the atmosphere in a bounce period, or a drift period, or being trapped, without any computing-time consumption on particle trajectories. The results suggest this new approach is a faster tool to categorize the observed albedo particles and it can be applied to particles with energies up to GeV.

  2. IAU nomenclature for albedo features on the planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollfus, A.; Chapman, C. R.; Davies, M. E.; Gingerich, O.; Goldstein, R.; Guest, J.; Morrison, D.; Smith, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    The International Astronomical Union has endorsed a nomenclature for the albedo features on Mercury. Designations are based upon the mythological names related to the god Hermes; they are expressed in Latin form. The dark-hued albedo features are associated with the generic term Solitudo. The light-hued areas are designated by a single name without generic term. The 32 names adopted are allocated on the Mercury map.

  3. Decadal to seasonal variability of Arctic sea ice albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, S.; Moon, W.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2011-10-01

    A controlling factor in the seasonal and climatological evolution of the sea ice cover is its albedo α. Here we analyze Arctic data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder and assess the seasonality and variability of broadband albedo from a 23 year daily record. We produce a histogram of daily albedo over ice covered regions in which the principal albedo transitions are seen; high albedo in late winter and spring, the onset of snowmelt and melt pond formation in the summer, and fall freezeup. The bimodal late summer distribution demonstrates the combination of the poleward progression of the onset of melt with the coexistence of perennial bare ice with melt ponds and open water, which then merge to a broad peak at α $\\gtrsim$ 0.5. We find the interannual variability to be dominated by the low end of the α distribution, highlighting the controlling influence of the ice thickness distribution and large-scale ice edge dynamics. The statistics obtained provide a simple framework for model studies of albedo parameterizations and sensitivities.

  4. Albedo as a modulator of climate response to tropical deforestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Shukla, J.

    1994-01-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model with land surface properties represented by the simplified Simple Biosphere model is used to investigate the effects on local climate due to tropical deforestation for the Amazon basin. One control and three anomaly integrations of 4 years' duration are performed. In the anomaly integrations, rain forest in South America is replaced by degraded grassland. The anomaly integrations differ only in the optical properties of the grassland vegetation, with net surface albedos ranging from the same as to 0.09 lighter than that of rain forest. It is found that the change in climate, particularly rainfall, is strongly dependent on the change in surface albedo that accompanies deforestation. Replacement of forest by grass causes a reduction in transpiration and reduces frictional convergence by decreasing surface roughness. However, precipitation averaged over the deforested area is not necessarily reduced. Average precipitation decreases when the increase in albedo is greater than 0.03. If surface albedo is not increased appreciably as a result of deforestation, moisture flux convergence driven by the increase in surface temperature can offset the other effects, and average precipitation increases. As albedo is increased, surface temperature does not change, but surface latent and sensible heat flux decreases due to reduced radiational energy absorbed at the surface, resulting in a reduction in convection and precipitation. A change in the distribution of precipitation due to deforestation that appears to be independent of the albedo is observed.

  5. Top-of-Atmosphere Albedo Estimation from Angular Distribution Models using Scene Identification from Satellite Cloud Property Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, N. G.; Parol, F.; Buriez, J.-C.; Vanbauce, C.

    2000-01-01

    The next generation of Earth radiation budget satellite instruments will routinely merge estimates of global top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes with cloud properties. This information will offer many new opportunities for validating radiative transfer models and cloud parameterizations in climate models. In this study, five months of POLarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances (POLDER) 670 nm radiance measurements are considered in order to examine how satellite cloud property retrievals can be used to define empirical Angular Distribution Models (ADMs) for estimating top-of-atmosphere (TOA) albedo. ADMs are defined for 19 scene types defined by satellite retrievals of cloud fraction and cloud optical depth. Two approaches are used to define the ADM scene types: The first assumes there are no biases in the retrieved cloud properties and defines ADMs for fixed discrete intervals of cloud fraction and cloud optical depth (fixed-tau approach). The second approach involves the same cloud fraction intervals, but uses percentile intervals of cloud optical depth instead (percentile-tau approach). Albedos generated using these methods are compared with albedos inferred directly from the mean observed reflectance field. Albedos based on ADMs that assume cloud properties are unbiased (fixed-tau approach) show a strong systematic dependence on viewing geometry. This dependence becomes more pronounced with increasing solar zenith angle, reaching approximately equals 12% (relative) between near-nadir and oblique viewing zenith angles for solar zenith angles between 60 deg and 70 deg. The cause for this bias is shown to be due to biases in the cloud optical depth retrievals. In contrast, albedos based on ADMs built using percentile intervals of cloud optical depth (percentile-tau approach) show very little viewing zenith angle dependence and are in good agreement with albedos obtained by direct integration of the mean observed reflectance field (less than 1

  6. High-albedo materials for reducing building cooling energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taha, H.; Sailor, D.; Akbari, H.

    1992-01-01

    One simple and effective way to mitigate urban heat islands, i.e., the higher temperatures in cities compared to those of the surrounds, and their negative impacts on cooling energy consumption is to use high-albedo materials on major urban surfaces such as rooftops, streets, sidewalks, school yards, and the exposed surfaces of parking lots. High-albedo materials can save cooling energy use by directly reducing the heat gain through a building`s envelope (direct effect) and also by lowering the urban air temperature in the neighborhood of the building (indirect effect). This project is an attempt to address high-albedo materials for buildings and to perform measurements of roof coatings. We search for existing methods and materials to implement fighter colors on major building and urban surfaces. Their cost effectiveness are examined and the possible related technical, maintenance, and environmental problems are identified. We develop a method for measuring albedo in the field by studying the instrumentation aspects of such measurements. The surface temperature impacts of various albedo/materials in the actual outdoor environment are studied by measuring the surface temperatures of a variety of materials tested on an actual roof. We also generate an albedo database for several urban surfaces to serve as a reference for future use. The results indicate that high-albedo materials can have a large impact on the surface temperature regime. On clear sunny days, when the solar noon surface temperatures of conventional roofing materials were about 40{degrees}C (72{degrees}F) warmer than air, the surface temperature of high-albedo coatings were only about 5{degrees}C warmer than air. In the morning and in the late afternoon, the high-albedo materials were as cool as the air itself. While conventional roofing materials warm up by an average 0.055{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}), the high-albedo surfaces warm up by an average 0.015{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}).

  7. High-albedo materials for reducing building cooling energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taha, H.; Sailor, D.; Akbari, H.

    1992-01-01

    One simple and effective way to mitigate urban heat islands, i.e., the higher temperatures in cities compared to those of the surrounds, and their negative impacts on cooling energy consumption is to use high-albedo materials on major urban surfaces such as rooftops, streets, sidewalks, school yards, and the exposed surfaces of parking lots. High-albedo materials can save cooling energy use by directly reducing the heat gain through a building's envelope (direct effect) and also by lowering the urban air temperature in the neighborhood of the building (indirect effect). This project is an attempt to address high-albedo materials for buildings and to perform measurements of roof coatings. We search for existing methods and materials to implement fighter colors on major building and urban surfaces. Their cost effectiveness are examined and the possible related technical, maintenance, and environmental problems are identified. We develop a method for measuring albedo in the field by studying the instrumentation aspects of such measurements. The surface temperature impacts of various albedo/materials in the actual outdoor environment are studied by measuring the surface temperatures of a variety of materials tested on an actual roof. We also generate an albedo database for several urban surfaces to serve as a reference for future use. The results indicate that high-albedo materials can have a large impact on the surface temperature regime. On clear sunny days, when the solar noon surface temperatures of conventional roofing materials were about 40{degrees}C (72{degrees}F) warmer than air, the surface temperature of high-albedo coatings were only about 5{degrees}C warmer than air. In the morning and in the late afternoon, the high-albedo materials were as cool as the air itself. While conventional roofing materials warm up by an average 0.055{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}), the high-albedo surfaces warm up by an average 0.015{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}).

  8. Thermoluminescent kinetics parameters of inorganic dust from camomile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furetta, C.; Cruz Z, E. [ICN-UNAM, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Favalli, A. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and Security of Citizen, TP800, Via E. Fermi 21020, Ispra VA (Italy); Gomez R, J.M. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kitis, G. [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Thessaloniky (Greece)

    2006-07-01

    The poly mineral dust extracted from camomile herb was exposed to gamma radiation. The glow curves from these poly minerals show a large, single TL peak, centred at about 440 K. Because the large structure of the glow curves, it seems that the TL signal could be produced by a trap distribution instead of a single level. The thermoluminescent kinetic parameters of the glow curves have been accurately analysed using the Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution (CGCD) applied at different steps during fading experiment at room temperature (RT). Deconvolution has been performed using a continuous distribution of trapping levels, uniformly distributed, including one additional peak in the high temperature region. This peak has been modelled with second-order kinetics. (Author)

  9. Thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence properties of natural barytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitis, G; Kiyak, N G; Polymeris, G S

    2010-12-01

    Heavy, baryte-loaded, concrete is commonly used as radiation shielding material around high energy particle accelerators. Concrete samples received from a shielding block located at CERN cite contain many crystalline inclusions which were identified as barytes by X-ray diffraction analysis and separated by their color, classified as white, orange and green. Basic properties of thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signals of these barytes samples such as thermal and optical stability, repeatability and mainly the linearity of both their luminescence responses were investigated as a function of beta dose. These results are also discussed regarding detailed investigation on the correlation between TL and OSL signals and their implications for retrospective dosimetry.

  10. Thermoluminescence properties of -irradiated Bi doped BaS nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surender Singh; Ankush Vij; S P Lochab; Ravi Kumar; Nafa Singh

    2011-07-01

    Bismuth doped barium sulphide nanocrystallities were prepared and characterized by XRD. Thermoluminescence (TL) studies of these samples after exposure to gamma radiation were carried out. The TL glow curve of the phosphors have two peaks at 403 K and 658 K while in their bulk counterparts these peaks were reported at 486 K and 570 K (Rao 1986). We noted that TL intensity increases with gamma exposure time in the range 30 min – 41 h which may be explained on the basis of track interaction model (TIM) and a high surface to volume ratio for the nanostructures. The kinetic parameters at various heating rates namely activation energy (E), order of kinetics (b) and frequency factor (s) of BaS : Bi (0.4 mol%) sample was determined using Chen’s method. The deconvolution of curve was done using the GCD function suggested by Kitis. The effect of different heating rates and different amount of dose has also been discussed.

  11. Hydrothermally synthesized barium fluoride nanocubes for thermoluminescence dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadane, Mahesh S.; Dahiwale, S. S.; Bhoraskar, V. N.; Dhole, S. D.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report a hydrothermally synthesized Dy doped BaF2 (BaF2:Dy) nanocubes and its Thermoluminescence studies. The synthesized BaF2:Dy samples was found to posses FCC structure and having average size ~ 60-70 nm, as revealed through X-Ray Diffraction. Cubical morphology having size ~90 nm was observed from TEM analysis. The 60Co γ- ray irradiated BaF2:Dy TL dosimetric experiments shows a pre-dominant single glow peak at 153 °C, indicating a single level trap present as a metastable state. Furthermore, BaF2:Dy nanophosphor shows a sharp linear response from 10 Gy to 3 kGy, thus it can be applicable as a gamma dosimeter.

  12. Thermoluminescence properties of copper doped zirconium oxide for UVR dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, T. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-Legaria, IPN, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: trivera@ipn.mx; Olvera, L. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Martinez, A.; Molina, D. [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Habana (Cuba); Azorin, J.; Barrera, M.; Soto, A.M.; Sosa, R. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Furetta, C. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-Legaria, IPN, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    The synthesized ZrO{sub 2}:Cu particles were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) to determine the nanocrystallite size and crystal structure, respectively. The ZrO{sub 2}:Cu powder with a crystallite size of 30-40 nm has a monoclinic structure and exhibit a thermoluminescent (TL) glow curve with two peaks centered at 130 and 180{sup 0}C. The TL response of ZrO{sub 2}:Cu as a function of wavelength exhibited two maxima at 260 and 290 nm. The TL response of ZrO{sub 2}:Cu as a function of the UV light spectral irradiance was linear in the range from 10 to 2300mJ/cm{sup 2}. Fading and reusability of the phosphor were also studied. The results showed that ZrO{sub 2}:Cu nanopowder has potential to be used as a UV dosimeter in UV radiation monitoring.

  13. Thermoluminescence in medical dosimetry; Termoluminiscencia en dosimetria medica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, T., E-mail: trivera@ipn.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    The dosimetry by thermoluminescence (Tl) is applied in the entire world for the dosimetry of ionizing radiations specially to personal and medical dosimetry. This dosimetry method has been very interesting for measures in vivo because the Tl dosimeters have the advantage of being very sensitive in a very small volume and they are also equivalent to tissue and they do not need additional accessories (for example, cable, electrometer, etc.) The main characteristics of the diverse Tl materials to be used in the radiation measures and practical applications are: the Tl curve, the share homogeneity, the signal stability after the irradiation, precision and exactitude, the response in function with the dose and the energy influence. In this work a brief summary of the advances of the radiations dosimetry is presented by means of the thermally stimulated luminescence and its application to the dosimetry in radiotherapy. (Author)

  14. Thermoluminescence of photostimulable materials after X irradiation below room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, S.; Iwasa, H.; Kurobori, T.; Inabe, K

    2002-07-01

    Thermoluminescence glow peaks in the temperature range 100 to 400 K are investigated for BaFX (X=Cl, Br) crystals after X irradiation at 100 K. A prominent glow peak of BaFCl around 210 K is found to be composed of a few recombination roots, that is, the peak corresponds to the recombination of hole trapped centers such as an O{sup -} center and a dissociated Cl{sub 2}{sup -} center with the F (F{sup -}) center and the O{sup 2-}-F(Cl{sup -}) pair defect. Another small glow peak around 270 K is likely to occur from thermal dissociation of the O{sup 2-}-F(Cl{sup -}) pair defect. Main glow peak of BaFBr:O{sup 2-} at 170 K may be attributed to a recombination of an O{sup -} center with the F(Br{sup -}) center. (author)

  15. Photon and fast neutron dosimetry using aluminium oxide thermoluminescence dosemeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J P; Fernandes, A C; Gonçalves, I C; Marques, J G; Carvalho, A F; Santos, L; Cardoso, J; Osvay, M

    2006-01-01

    Al(2)O(3):Mg,Y thermoluminescence (TL) dosemeters were used to measure photon and fast neutron doses in a fast neutron beam recently implemented at the Portuguese Research Reactor, Nuclear and Technological Institute, Portugal. The activation of Al(2)O(3):Mg,Y by fast neutrons provides information about the fast neutron component by measuring the activity of the reaction products and the self-induced TL signal. Additionally, the first TL reading after irradiation determines the photon dose. The elemental composition of the dosemeters was determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis and by particle induced X-ray emission. Results demonstrate that Al(2)O(3):Mg,Y is an adequate material to discriminate photon and fast neutron fields for reactor dosimetry purposes.

  16. Scintillation, Afterglow and Thermoluminescence of CsI:Tl,Sm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappers, L A; Bartram, R H; Hamilton, D S; Lempicki, A; Brecher, C; Gaysinskiy, V; Ovechkina, E E; Nagarkar, V V, E-mail: lawrence.kappers@uconn.edu

    2010-11-15

    Experiments on co-doped CsI:Tl,Sm suggest that samarium electron traps scavenge electrons from thallium traps and that electrons subsequently released by samarium recombine non-radiatively with trapped holes, thus suppressing afterglow. These experiments support the inference that electrons tunnel freely between samarium ions and are trapped preferentially as substitutional Sm{sup +} near V{sub KA}(Tl{sup +}) centers where non-radiative recombination is the rate-limiting step. Combined radioluminescence, afterglow and thermoluminescence on single-crystal samples of CsI:Tl and CsI:Tl,Sm, recorded sequentially at adjusted gain settings following low-temperature irradiation, reveal reversible radiation damage as well.

  17. Record of thermoluminescence in sea sediments in the last millennia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cini Castagnoli, G.; Bonino, G.; Della Monica, P.; Taricco, C. [Turin, Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Cosmogeofisica. Dipt. di Fisica generale

    1997-01-01

    The profile of thermoluminescence (TL) has been measured in the Ionian shallow-water core GT89-3 with a resolution of 3.096 years (corresponding to a sampling interval of 2 mm) during the last 1800 years. A similar TL record was previously obtained in the core GM14, taken from the same area, with a resolution of 3.87 years (corresponding to a sampling interval of 2.5 mm). The authors present here the comparison of the TL profiles. They confirm the presence of the centennial and the decennial cycles earlier identified in the TL signal, corresponding to cyclicities appearing to exist in the solar-activity records. It discusses the origin of the TL signal by comparison with the cosmogenic isotopes {sup 14}C and {sup 10}Be records.

  18. Thermoluminescence response of gamma-irradiated sesame with mineral dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez L, Y. [CSIC, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Calle Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Correcher, V. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garcia G, J. [CSIC, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Calle Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Cruz Z, E., E-mail: y.r.l@csic.es [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    The thermoluminescence (Tl) emission of minerals isolated from Mexican and Indian sesame seeds appear as a good tool to discern between irradiated and non-irradiated samples. According to the X-ray diffraction and environmental scanning microscope, the adhered dust in both samples is mainly composed by different amounts of quartz and feldspars. These mineral phases exhibit (i) enough sensitivity to ionizing radiation inducing good Tl intensity, (ii) high stability of the Tl signal during the storage of the material (i.e. low fading) and (iii) are thermally and chemically stable. Blind tests performed under laboratory conditions, but simulating industrial preservation processes (similar temperature and moisture, and presence of white light), allows to distinguish between 1 KGy gamma-irradiated and non-irradiated samples even 11000 hours (15 months) after the irradiation proceeding. (Author)

  19. Detection of irradiated mushrooms and kiwi fruits by thermoluminescence measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangl, Th.; Leitner-Wild, E.; Hille, P.; Nowotny, R.

    1993-03-01

    Control methods for the detection of irradiated food are needed since exposure to ionizing radiation is a new technique of commercial food processing applied in many countries. A simple and rapid method for the identification of irradiated fresh kiwi fruits and mushrooms is presented. Thermoluminescence (TL) signals of irradiated dried herbs and spices are known to be due to inorganic dust particles adherent to the surface and may be used for the detection of radiation exposure. In the technique described here the discrimination between radiation exposed food samples and unirradiated samples was improved by the preparation of TL samples enriched in extraneous inorganic material and further by the determination of the optimal integration interval giving the highest signal to background ratios. This method yields a more reliable discrimination than whole sample TL techniques.

  20. Thermoluminescence characterisation of chemical vapour deposited diamond films

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzocchi, S; Bucciolini, M; Cuttone, G; Pini, S; Sabini, M G; Sciortino, S

    2002-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of a set of six chemical vapour deposited diamond films have been studied with regard to their use as off-line dosimeters in radiotherapy. The structural characterisation has been performed by means of Raman spectroscopy. Their TL responses have been tested with radiotherapy beams ( sup 6 sup 0 Co photons, photons and electrons from a linear accelerator (Linac), 26 MeV protons from a TANDEM accelerator) in the dose range 0.1-7 Gy. The dosimetric characterisation has yielded a very good reproducibility, a very low dependence of the TL response on the type of particle and independence of the radiation energy. The TL signal is not influenced by the dose rate and exhibits a very low thermal fading. Moreover, the sensitivity of the diamond samples compares favourably with that of standard TLD100 dosimeters.

  1. The natural thermoluminescence of meteorites. III - Lunar and basaltic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Derek W. G.; Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Hazel; Batchelor, J. D.; Symes, Steve

    1991-01-01

    Natural thermoluminescence (TL) data were obtained to investigate recent thermal and radiation histories of the lunar meteorite MacAlpine Hills 88104/5 and 65 eucrites, howardites, diogenites, and mesosiderites. All these meteorites have low levels of natural TL compared to chondrites, which is primarily because they display anomalous fading. Some meteorites have especially low natural TL which must reflect heating within the last 100,000-1,000,000 y. The parameters for TL decay were determined assuming plausible values for cosmic ray dose rate and that the natural TL of MAC88104/5 was totally drained by ejection from the moon. The obtained parameters for TL decay suggest that the moon-earth transit times for MAC88104 and MAC88105 were 2,000 and 1,800 y, respectively, compared with 19,000 and 2,500 y for Y791197 and ALHA81005, respectively.

  2. Thermoluminescence measurements of neutron streaming through JET Torus Hall ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obryk, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.obryk@ifj.edu.pl [Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland); Batistoni, Paola [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); EURATOM–CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Conroy, Sean [EURATOM-VR Association, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); EURATOM–CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Syme, Brian D.; Popovichev, Sergey [EURATOM–CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Stamatelatos, Ion E.; Vasilopoulou, Theodora [Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences, Energy, Technology and Safety, NCSR “Demokritos”, Athens (Greece); Bilski, Paweł [Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •Thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs) were used for dose measurements at JET. •Pairs of {sup 6}LiF/{sup 7}LiF TLDs allow to measure thermal neutron component of a radiation field. •For detection of neutrons of higher energy, polyethylene (PE-300) moderators were used. •TLDs were installed at eleven positions in the JET hall and the hall labyrinth. •The experimental results are compared with calculations using the MCNP code. -- Abstract: Thermoluminescence detectors (TLD) were used for dose measurements at JET. Several hundreds of LiF detectors of various types, standard LiF:Mg,Ti and highly sensitive LiF:Mg,Cu,P were produced. LiF detectors consisting of natural lithium are sensitive to slow neutrons, their response to neutrons being enhanced by {sup 6}Li-enriched lithium or suppressed by using lithium consisting entirely of {sup 7}Li. Pairs of {sup 6}LiF/{sup 7}LiF detectors allow distinguishing between neutron/non-neutron components of a radiation field. For detection of neutrons of higher energy, polyethylene (PE-300) moderators were used. TLDs, located in the centre of cylindrical moderators, were installed at eleven positions in the JET hall and the hall labyrinth in July 2012, and exposure took place during the last two weeks of the experimental campaign. Measurements of the gamma dose were obtained for all positions over a range of about five orders of magnitude variation. As the TLDs were also calibrated in a thermal neutron field, the neutron fluence at the experimental position could be derived. The experimental results are compared with calculations using the MCNP code. The results confirm that the TLD technology can be usefully applied to measurements of neutron streaming through JET Torus Hall ducts.

  3. Thermoluminescence in alkali halides irradiated at 80K; Termoluminiscencia en haluros alcalinos irradiados a 80K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez de Castro, M.

    1978-07-01

    The thermoluminescence, the thermally stimulated currents and the thermal stability of the F centres induced in pure NaCl and KC1 crystals by X irradiation at 80K have been studied in detail, In the range between 80 and 300K. The thermoluminescent processes induced by illumination at 80K with F light in samples previously irradiated at room temperature has also been studied. It has been clearly observed the existence of thermoluminescent processes due to electrons and holes thermally released from traps, in which the F centres are not involved. The existence of hole-F centre recombination has not been observed. There are several thermoluminescent processes in both materials which are scribed to the recombination of F centres with mobile interstitial halogen atoms thermally released from traps, which are likely monovalent impurities in this temperature interval. The light emitting stage in these processes is originated by the formation of self trapped excitons. (Author) 66 refs.

  4. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  5. CHR -- Character Handling Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, A. C.; Rees, P. C. T.; Chipperfield, A. J.; Jenness, T.

    This document describes the Character Handling Routine library, CHR, and its use. The CHR library augments the limited character handling facilities provided by the Fortran 77 standard. It offers a range of character handling facilities: from formatting Fortran data types into text strings and the reverse, to higher level functions such as wild card matching, string sorting, paragraph reformatting and justification. The library may be used simply for building text strings for interactive applications or as a basis for more complex text processing applications.

  6. Thermoluminescence characteristics of Sm3+ doped NaYF4 crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M V Ramana Reddy; Ch Gopal Reddy; K Narasimha Reddy

    2007-02-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of NaYF4 crystals doped with Sm3+ have been studied after -ray irradiation. Dependence of luminescence efficiency on Sm3+ concentration and radiation dose has been measured and possible applications of NaYF4 : Sm3+ as a novel phosphor for TL dosimetry have been investigated. The efficiency of 0.3 mole% Sm3+ doped NaYF4 crystal has been found to be maximum and comparable with commercial thermoluminescence dosimetric (TLD) materials.

  7. A Continental United States High Resolution NLCD Land Cover – MODIS Albedo Database to Examine Albedo and Land Cover Change Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface albedo influences climate by affecting the amount of solar radiation that is reflected at the Earth’s surface, and surface albedo is, in turn, affected by land cover. General Circulation Models typically use modeled or prescribed albedo to assess the influence of land co...

  8. Thermoluminescence system CaF sub 2 Tm models, dosimetric properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Summerer, L M

    2002-01-01

    In parallel with the increasing level of exposure to ionizing radiation in modern society, dosimeters to measure absorbed doses were developed and studied. One of the most widespread systems are thermoluminescence crystals. The history of thermoluminescence dosimetry is a history of success. Since decades, hundreds of publications appear every year on the large topic of thermoluminescence dosimetry. A majority of them deals with LiF:Mg,Ti, the by far most widely used and studied thermoluminescent crystal. In this work, we are going to analyze in detail the properties of a different thermoluminescence dosimetry system, CaF sub 2 :Tm, rarely used and scarcely described. Most of the theoretical models explaining the physical processes involved in thermoluminescence are based on LiF:Mg,Ti crystals. The major models are reviewed and their applicability to CaF sub 2 :Tm is examined. On the basis of results, obtained with the spectral analysis of the TL light after irradiation with different heavy ions, a new theore...

  9. Improvement of Surface Albedo Simulations over Arid Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Yan; L(U) Shihua; ZHANG Yu; MENG Xianhong; YANG Shengpeng

    2008-01-01

    To improve the simulation of the surface radiation budget and related thermal processes in arid regions, three sophisticated surface albedo schemes designed for such regions were incorporated into the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS). Two of these schemes are functions of the solar zenith angle (SZA), where the first one has one adjustable parameter defined as SZA1 scheme, and the second one has two empir-ical parameters defined as SZA2 scheme. The third albedo scheme is a function of solar angle and soil water that were developed based on arid-region observations from the Dunhuang field experiment (DHEX) (defined as DH scheme). We evaluated the performance of the original and newly-incorporated albedo schemes within BATS using the in-situ data from the Oasis System Energy and Water Cycle Field Experiment that was carried out in JinTa, Gansu arid area (JTEX). The results indicate that a control run by the original version of the BATS generates a constant albedo, while the SZA1 and SZA2 schemes basically can reproduce the observed diurnal cycle of surface albedo, although these two schemes still underestimate the albedo when SZA is high in the early morning and late afternoon, and overestimate it when SZA is low during noontime. The SZA2 scheme has a better overall performance than the SZA1 scheme. In addition, BATS with the DH scheme slightly improves the albedo simulation in magnitude as compared to that from the control run, but a diurnal cycle of albedo is not produced by this scheme. The SZAl and SZA2 schemes significantly increase the surface absorbed solar radiation by nearly 70 W m~2, which further raises the ground temperature by 6 K and the sensible heat flux by 35 W m~2. The increased solar radiation, heat flux, and temperature are more consistent with the observations that those from the control run. However, a significant improvement in these three variables is not found in BATS with the DH scheme due to the neglect of the diurnal cycle of

  10. Potential effects of forest management on surface albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, J.; Bréon, F.-M.; Schelhaas, M.-J.; Pinty, B.; Luyssaert, S.

    2012-04-01

    Currently 70% of the world's forests are managed and this figure is likely to rise due to population growth and increasing demand for wood based products. Forest management has been put forward by the Kyoto-Protocol as one of the key instruments in mitigating climate change. For temperate and boreal forests, the effects of forest management on the stand-level carbon balance are reasonably well understood, but the biophysical effects, for example through changes in the albedo, remain elusive. Following a modeling approach, we aim to quantify the variability in albedo that can be attributed to forest management through changes in canopy structure and density. The modelling approach chains three separate models: (1) a forest gap model to describe stand dynamics, (2) a Monte-Carlo model to estimate the probability density function of the optical path length of photons through the canopy and (3) a physically-based canopy transfer model to estimate the interaction between photons and leaves. The forest gap model provides, on a monthly time step the position, height, diameter, crown size and leaf area index of individual trees. The Monte-Carlo model computes from this the probability density function of the distance a photon travels through crown volumes to determine the direct light reaching the forest floor. This information is needed by the canopy transfer model to calculate the effective leaf area index - a quantity that allows it to correctly represent a 3D process with a 1D model. Outgoing radiation is calculated as the result of multiple processes involving the scattering due to the canopy layer and the forest floor. Finally, surface albedo is computed as the ratio between incident solar radiation and calculated outgoing radiation. The study used two time series representing thinning from below of a beech and a Scots pine forest. The results show a strong temporal evolution in albedo during stand establishment followed by a relatively stable albedo once the canopy

  11. Occurrence of lower cloud albedo in ship tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-C. Chen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of geoengineering by marine cloud brightening is based on seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with sub-micrometer sea-salt particles to enhance the cloud droplet number concentration and cloud albedo, thereby producing a climate cooling effect. The efficacy of this as a strategy for global cooling rests on the extent to which aerosol-perturbed marine clouds will respond with increased albedo. Ship tracks, cloud regions impacted by ship exhaust, are a well-known manifestation of the effect of aerosol injection on marine clouds. We present here an analysis of the albedo responses in ship tracks, based on in situ aircraft measurements and three years of satellite observations of 589 individual ship tracks. It is found that the sign (increase or decrease and magnitude of the albedo response in ship tracks depends on the mesoscale cloud structure, the free tropospheric humidity, and cloud top height. In a closed cell structure (cloud cells ringed by a perimeter of clear air, nearly 30% of ship tracks exhibited a decreased albedo. Detailed cloud responses must be accounted for in global studies of the potential efficacy of sea-spray geoengineering as a means to counteract global warming.

  12. Occurrence of lower cloud albedo in ship tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-C. Chen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of geoengineering by marine cloud brightening is based on seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with sub-micrometer sea-salt particles to enhance the cloud droplet number concentration and cloud albedo, thereby producing a climate cooling effect. The efficacy of this as a strategy for global cooling rests on the extent to which aerosol-perturbed marine clouds will respond with increased albedo. Ship tracks, quasi-linear cloud features prevalent in oceanic regions impacted by ship exhaust, are a well-known manifestation of the effect of aerosol injection on marine clouds. We present here an analysis of the albedo responses in ship tracks, based on in situ aircraft measurements and three years of satellite observations of 589 individual ship tracks. It is found that the sign (increase or decrease and magnitude of the albedo response in ship tracks depends on the mesoscale cloud structure, the free tropospheric humidity, and cloud top height. In a closed cell structure (cloud cells ringed by a perimeter of clear air, nearly 30% of ship tracks exhibited a decreased albedo. Detailed cloud responses must be accounted for in global studies of the potential efficacy of sea-spray geoengineering as a means to counteract global warming.

  13. Effective UV surface albedo of seasonally snow-covered lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanskanen, A.; Manninen, T.

    2007-05-01

    At ultraviolet wavelengths the albedo of most natural surfaces is small with the striking exception of snow and ice. Therefore, snow cover is a major challenge for various applications based on radiative transfer modelling. The aim of this work was to determine the characteristic effective UV range surface albedo of various land cover types when covered by snow. First we selected 1 by 1 degree sample regions that met three criteria: the sample region contained dominantly subpixels of only one land cover type according to the 8 km global land cover classification product from the University of Maryland; the average slope of the sample region was less than 2 degrees according to the USGS's HYDRO1K slope data; the sample region had snow cover in March according to the NSIDC Northern Hemisphere weekly snow cover data. Next we generated 1 by 1 degree gridded 360 nm surface albedo data from the Nimbus-7 TOMS Lambertian equivalent reflectivity data, and used them to construct characteristic effective surface albedo distributions for each land cover type. The resulting distributions showed that each land cover type experiences a characteristic range of surface albedo values when covered by snow. The result is explained by the vegetation that extends upward beyond the snow cover and masks the bright snow covered surface.

  14. Decadal to seasonal variability of Arctic sea ice albedo

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, S; Wettlaufer, J S

    2011-01-01

    A controlling factor in the seasonal and climatological evolution of the sea ice cover is its albedo $\\alpha$. Here we analyze Arctic data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder and assess the seasonality and variability of broadband albedo from a 23 year daily record. We produce a histogram of daily albedo over ice covered regions in which the principal albedo transitions are seen; high albedo in late winter and spring, the onset of snow melt and melt pond formation in the summer, and fall freeze up. The bimodal late summer distribution demonstrates the combination of the poleward progression of the onset of melt with the coexistence of perennial bare ice with melt ponds and open water, which then merge to a broad peak at $\\alpha \\gtrsim $ 0.5. We find the interannual variability to be dominated by the low end of the $\\alpha$ distribution, highlighting the controlling influence of the ice thickness distribution and large-scale ice edge dynamics. The statistics obtained pro...

  15. Influência da irrigação sobre o albedo Influence of irrigation on albedo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário de Miranda V.B.R. Leitão

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Uma análise dos efeitos e da influência da irrigação sobre o albedo de uma cultura de amendoim, ao longo do ciclo de desenvolvimento e, em particular, durante um dia em que houve irrigação, é realizada neste estudo, cuja pesquisa de campo foi desenvolvida no perímetro irrigado da Estação Experimental da CODEVASF, no município de Rodelas, BA, no período de setembro a dezembro de 1996. Os resultados mostraram que o albedo variou significativamente nos dias em que foram efetuadas irrigações e nos dias imediatamente posteriores. Sob condições normais, o albedo variou de um máximo de 29,8% na fase inicial do experimento, com o solo ainda descoberto, a um mínimo de 18,6% no final da fase de desenvolvimento de vagem; contudo, nos dias de irrigação, dependendo da hora em que esta foi efetuada, houve influência diferenciada no valor do albedo médio diário, que chegou a reduzi-lo em até 6,4%, quando as irrigações ocorreram nas primeiras horas da manhã.The influence of irrigation on the albedo of a peanut crop during its development cycle, and in particular on the day when irrigation took place, is analyzed in this study. The field research was conducted in the irrigated perimeter of the Experimental Station of CODEVASF, in the municipal district of Rodelas, BA, during the period of September to December of 1996. The results showed that the albedo suffered significant variations on the days of irrigation as well as on the day after irrigation. Under normal conditions, the albedo varied from a maximum of 29.8% in the initial phase of the experiment with the soil still uncovered, to a minimum of 18.6% at the end of the kernel development phase. However, on the days of irrigation, the albedo varied with the time of irrigation. The daily mean value of the albedo reduced by 6.4% when the irrigations took place in the early hours of the morning.

  16. Albedo control of seasonal South Polar cap recession on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frédéric; Douté, Sylvain; Schmitt, Bernard; Vincendon, Mathieu; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Langevin, Yves; Omega Team

    2009-04-01

    Over the last few decades, General Circulation Models (GCM) have been used to simulate the current martian climate. The calibration of these GCMs with the current seasonal cycle is a crucial step in understanding the climate history of Mars. One of the main climatic signals currently used to validate GCMs is the annual atmospheric pressure cycle. It is difficult to use changes in seasonal deposits on the surface of Mars to calibrate the GCMs given the spectral ambiguities between CO 2 and H 2O ice in the visible range. With the OMEGA imaging spectrometer covering the near infra-red range, it is now possible to monitor both types of ice at a spatial resolution of about 1 km. At global scale, we determine the change with time of the Seasonal South Polar Cap (SSPC) crocus line, defining the edge of CO 2 deposits. This crocus line is not symmetric around the geographic South Pole. At local scale, we introduce the snowdrop distance, describing the local structure of the SSPC edge. Crocus line and snowdrop distance changes can now be used to calibrate GCMs. The albedo of the seasonal deposits is usually assumed to be a uniform and constant parameter of the GCMs. In this study, albedo is found to be the main parameter controlling the SSPC recession at both global and local scale. Using a defrost mass balance model (referred to as D-frost) that incorporates the effect of shadowing induced by topography, we show that the global SSPC asymmetry in the crocus line is controlled by albedo variations. At local scale, we show that the snowdrop distance is correlated with the albedo variability. Further GCM improvements should take into account these two results. We propose several possibilities for the origin of the asymmetric albedo control. The next step will be to identify and model the physical processes that create the albedo differences.

  17. Detailed spatiotemporal albedo observations at Greenland's Mittivakkat Gletscher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernild, Sebastian H.; Knudsen, Niels T.; Yde, Jacob C.; Malmros, Jeppe K.

    2015-04-01

    Surface albedo is defined as the reflected fraction of incoming solar shortwave radiation at the surface. On Greenland's Mittivakkat Gletscher the mean glacier-wide MODIS-estimated albedo dropped by 0.10 (2000-2013) from 0.43 to 0.33 by the end of the mass balance year (EBY). Hand-held albedo measurements as low as 0.10 were observed over debris-covered ice at the glacier margin at the EBY: these values were slightly below observed values for proglacial bedrock (~0.2). The albedo is highly variable in space - a significant variability occurred within few meters at the glacier margin area ranging from 0.10 to 0.39 due to variability in debris-cover thickness and composition, microbial activity (including algae and cyanobacteria), snow grain crystal metamorphism, bare ice exposure, and meltwater ponding. Huge dark-red-brown-colored ice algae colonies were observed. Albedo measurements on snow patches and bare glacier ice changed significant with increasing elevations (180-600 m a.s.l.) by lapse rates of 0.04 and 0.03 per 100 m, respectively, indicating values as high as 0.82 and 0.40 on the upper part of the glacier. Over a period of two weeks from early August to late August 2014 the hand-held observed mean glacier-wide albedo changed from 0.40 to 0.30 indicating that on average 10% more incoming solar shortwave radiation became available for surface ablation at the end of the melt season.

  18. Diurnal variations in the UV albedo of arctic snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Meinander

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of snow for climate studies is based on its physical properties, such as high surface reflectivity. Surface ultraviolet (UV albedo is an essential parameter for various applications based on radiative transfer modeling. Here, new continuous measurements of the local UV albedo of natural Arctic snow were made at Sodankylä (67°22'N, 26°39'E, 179 m a.s.l. during the spring of 2007. The data were logged at 1-min intervals. The accumulation of snow was up to 68 cm. The surface layer thickness varied from 0.5 to 35 cm with the snow grain size between 0.2 and 2.5 mm. The midday erythemally weighted UV albedo ranged from 0.6 to 0.8 in the accumulation period, and from 0.5 to 0.7 during melting. During the snow melt period, under cases of an almost clear sky and variable cloudiness, an unexpected diurnal decrease of 0.05 in albedo soon after midday, and recovery thereafter, was detected. This diurnal decrease in albedo was found to be asymmetric with respect to solar midday, thus indicating a change in the properties of the snow. Independent UV albedo results with two different types of instruments confirm these findings. The measured temperature of the snow surface was below 0°C on the following mornings. Hence, the reversible diurnal change, evident for ~1–2 h, could be explained by the daily metamorphosis of the surface of the snowpack, in which the temperature of the surface increases, melting some of the snow to liquid water, after which the surface freezes again.

  19. NEOWISE REACTIVATION MISSION YEAR ONE: PRELIMINARY ASTEROID DIAMETERS AND ALBEDOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, C. R.; Cutri, R. M. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Kramer, E.; Sonnett, S.; Stevenson, R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Grav, T. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ (United States); Wright, E. L., E-mail: cnugent@ipac.caltech.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We present preliminary diameters and albedos for 7956 asteroids detected in the first year of the NEOWISE Reactivation mission. Of those, 201 are near-Earth asteroids and 7755 are Main Belt or Mars-crossing asteroids. 17% of these objects have not been previously characterized using the Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or “NEOWISE” thermal measurements. Diameters are determined to an accuracy of ∼20% or better. If good-quality H magnitudes are available, albedos can be determined to within ∼40% or better.

  20. Validation of response simulation methodology of Albedo dosemeter; Validacao da metodologia de simulacao de resposta de dosimetro de Albedo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, B.M.; Silva, A.X. da, E-mail: bfreitas@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao do Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Mauricio, C.L.P. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria developed and runs a neutron TLD albedo individual monitoring service. To optimize the dose calculation algorithm and to infer new calibration factors, the response of this dosemeter was simulated. In order to validate this employed methodology, it was applied in the simulation of the problem of the QUADOS (Quality Assurance of Computational Tools for Dosimetry) intercomparison, aimed to evaluate dosimetric problems, one being to calculate the response of a generic albedo dosemeter. The obtained results were compared with those of other modeling and the reference one, with good agreements. (author)

  1. tgcd: An R package for analyzing thermoluminescence glow curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jun; Dong, ZhiBao; Han, FengQing

    Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves are widely used in dosimetric studies. Many commercial and free-distributed programs are used to deconvolute TL glow curves. This study introduces an open-source R package tgcd to conduct TL glow curve analysis, such as kinetic parameter estimation, glow peak simulation, and peak shape analysis. TL glow curves can be deconvoluted according to the general-order empirical expression or the semi-analytical expression derived from the one trap-one recombination center (OTOR) model based on the Lambert W function by using a modified Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm from which any of the parameters can be constrained or fixed. The package provides an interactive environment to initialize parameters and offers an automated "trial-and-error" protocol to obtain optimal fit results. First-order, second-order, and general-order glow peaks (curves) are simulated according to a number of simple kinetic models. The package was developed using a combination of Fortran and R programming languages to improve efficiency and flexibility.

  2. Blue thermoluminescence emission of annealed lithium rich aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correcher, V.; Rodriguez-Lazcano, Y., E-mail: v.correcher@ciemat.e [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Guinea, J.; Crespo-Feo, E. [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    The blue thermoluminescence (TL) emission of different thermally annealed {beta}-eucryptite (LiAlSiO{sub 4}), virgilite-petalite (LiAlSi{sub 5}O{sub 12}) and virgilite-petalite-bikitaite (LiAlSi{sub 10}O{sub 22}) mixed crystals have been studied. The observed changes in the TL glow curves could be linked to simultaneous processes taking place in the lithium aluminosilicate lattice structure (phase transitions, consecutive breaking linking of bonds, alkali self-diffusion, redox reactions, etc). The stability of the TL signal after four months of storage performed at RT under red light, shows big differences between annealed (12 hours at 1200 deg C) and non-annealed samples. The fading process in non-annealed samples can be fitted to a first-order decay mathematical expression; however preheated samples could not be reasonably fitted due to the highly dispersion detected. The changes observed in the X-ray diffractograms are in the intensity of the peaks that denote modifications in the degree of crystallinity and, in addition, there are some differences in the appearance of new peaks that could suppose new phases (e.g. b-spodumene). (author)

  3. Radioluminescence and thermoluminescence of albite at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Can, N., E-mail: cannurdogan@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Celal Bayar University, 45140 Muradiye-Manisa (Turkey); Garcia-Guinea, J. [Museo Nacional Ciencias Naturales, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Kibar, R.; Cetin, A.; Ayvacikli, M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Celal Bayar University, 45140 Muradiye-Manisa (Turkey); Townsend, P.D. [Science and Technology, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH, England (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    Feldspar as an archaeological and geological natural material for dating and retrospective dosimetry is receiving more and more attention because of its useful luminescence properties. In this study, the 25-280 K thermoluminescence (TL) and radioluminescence (RL) spectra in albite, which is a component of the two main feldspar series, the alkali feldspar (Na, K)AlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8} and the plagioclases (NaAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}-CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}) have been presented for aliquots along (001) and (010) crystallographic orientations. There are four main emission bands that are considered to arise from complexes of intrinsic defects linked in larger complexes with impurities such as Na{sup +}, Mn{sup 2+} or Fe{sup 3+} ions. The consequence of their association is to produce different luminescence efficiencies that produce wavelength sensitive TL curves. Radioluminescence data at low temperature for albites is distorted by contributions from the TL sites, even when the RL is run in a cooling cycle. This indicates the potential for a far more general problem for analysis of low temperature RL in insulating materials. - Highlights: > TL and RL spectra in albite were presented for different orientations. > There are 4 emission bands that are considered to arise from complexes of intrinsic. > RL data at low temperature for albite is distorted by contributions from TL sites. > This indicates the potential problem for analysis of low temperature RL.

  4. Dose-response of thermoluminescence in natural kaolinite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correcher, V., E-mail: v.correcher@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense, 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Garcia-Guinea, J.; Crespo-Feo, E. [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, C. Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Rodriguez-Lazcano, Y. [UCM, Dpto. Fisica de Materiales. Fac. CC. Fisicas. Av. Complutense, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Prado-Herrero, P. [MICINN, Albacete 5, Madrid 28027 (Spain)

    2010-05-20

    The thermal effect on the luminescence emission of a well-characterized natural kaolinite has been investigated by means of differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermoluminescence (TL) to determine, respectively, the modifications of the material due to the thermal treatments up to 1000 {sup o}C and its potential use in the field of dating and retrospective dosimetry. The DTA detects water loss starting at 100-120 {sup o}C, a dehydroxylation process in the range of 400-500 {sup o}C and the transformation of kaolinite into metakaolinite at 570 {sup o}C. The dose dependence of the 400 nm TL intensity of kaolinite exhibits an excellent linearity in the range of 50 mGy to 8 Gy. In addition, the stability of the induced TL signal after six months of storage shows an initial rapid decay (ca. 60%) followed by a mild slope reaching the stability longer than six months. The tests of thermal stability at different temperatures allow us to speculate in a continuum of trap distribution with progressive changes in the glow curve shape, intensity and temperature position of the maximum peak. According to this thermal behavior, some physical parameters have been estimated using the initial rise method.

  5. Effect of the radiation in the thermoluminescent properties of lava

    CERN Document Server

    Correcher, V; García, J

    2003-01-01

    Blue thermoluminescence (Tl) emission from different lavas of many places (Costa Rica, Canary Islands, Hawaii Islands, Iceland and Italy) corresponding to different eruptions has been studied to know its potential use in the field of dating and retrospective dosimetry. Due to the light emission is linked to the point defects of the crystalline lattice structure, X-ray diffraction analyses were performed to determine the components of this poly mineral material that mostly are cristobalite, plagioclase and phyllosilicates. Exposures to different doses (in a range of 1-25 Gy) were given to each sample to determine the evolution of the Tl signal with the irradiation under laboratory conditions. In all cases, a linear response could be observed and no saturation has been detected in this range of doses. Both natural (NTL) and induced (ITL) Tl signal exhibit a complex glow curve structure associated to a continuous trap distribution over 100 C that could be attributed to the formation-annihilation [Al0 sub 4 /alka...

  6. Thermoluminescence characterization of the irradiated minerals extracted from nopal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Furetta, C.; Kitis, G.; Gomez, B. T.; Polymeris, G. S.; Tsirliganis, N.; Loukou, Z.

    2006-05-01

    The mineral fraction from dehydrated nopal leaves (Opuntia ficus indica ) belonging to the Cactaceae family was extracted and selected by sizes of 10 and 74 mu m and exposed to 60 Co gamma radiation at different doses in the range 70 Gy-20 kGy. The glow-curves from these polyminerals show a thermoluminescence (TL) band with one very intense peak at a temperature around 150 degrees C and a second one emerging in the high temperature region, moving in a large zone of temperature values according to the preparation used and the level of irradiation. The XRD analysis shows a composition of both biominerals as whewellite and weddellite and a mineral fraction as anorthoclase and quartz. The main TL characteristics of the polymineral content of the nopal was analyzed, i.e . the TL response at different doses and fading during storage at room temperature. The activation energy of the traps responsible for the TL emission was also investigated and a possible continuous distribution of traps is discussed. A review of the scientific literature shows that this is the first time that a TL study on nopal ionized by irradiation has been carried out.

  7. Paleothermometry of NaCl as evidenced from thermoluminescence data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gartia, R.K. [Physics Department, Manipur University, Imphal 795003 (India)], E-mail: rkgartia02@yahoo.in

    2009-09-01

    The firing temperature of ancient ceramic artifacts, i.e. the paleothermometry of these materials has been estimated by various techniques including thermoluminescence (TL) and, more recently, Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) where the OSL response of quartz to firing temperature is used. In this work we report the paleothermometry of sodium chloride (NaCl) by studying the TL response of the material as a function of annealing temperatures in the range of 100-500 deg. C. Annealing/measurement has been done in a commercial TL/OSL reader (Model No. Riso TL/OSL reader TL-DA-15) in a nitrogen atmosphere. Sodium chloride (NaCl) has been selected as the candidate to test the feasibility of the technique since in this system TL peaks are correlated with the thermal annealing of F-centers unlike the case of quartz where a one to one correlation with all the glow peaks and thermal annealing of defects has not been possible.

  8. Method of computerized glow curve deconvolution for analysing thermoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, T [Division of General Education, Ashikaga Institute of Technology, Omae-cho 268-1, Ashikaga, Tochigi 326-8558 (Japan); Gartia, R K [Luminescence Dating Laboratory, Manipur University, Imphal 795003 (India)

    2003-11-07

    The conventional worldwide accepted method of computerized glow curve deconvolution based on the general order kinetics formalism has two fatal defects in systems where the trapping levels (two or more) have non-zero retrapping probability. The first one is ignoring the thermal connectivity between thermoluminescence (TL) peaks. This arises from the fact that under such a situation electrons trapped at one trapping level, once activated, can be retrapped in another thermally connected level via the conduction band during the recording of the glow curve. The other is the impossibility of obtaining a global minimum, in fitting the experimental TL with the theoretical one with existing techniques. This paper aims to provide answers to these defects. The first one can be overcome by resorting to rigorous analysis using appropriate mathematical rate equations describing the flow of charge carriers. Though the second defect cannot be overcome completely, one can obtain a reasonable fit, which may not be unique. The algorithm is tested for synthetic as well as experimental glow curves.

  9. Thermoluminescence dosimetry in quality imaging in CR mammography systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaona, E.; Franco E, J.G. [UAM-Xochimilco, 04960 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Azorin N, J. [UAM-Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Diaz G, J.A.I. [CICATA, Unidad Legaria, Av. Legaria 694, 11599 mexico D.F. (Mexico); Arreola, M. [Department of Radiology, Shands Hospital at UF, PO Box 100374, Gainesville, FL 32610-0374 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this work is to estimate the average glandular dose with Thermoluminescence Dosimetry (TLD) and comparison with quality imaging in CR mammography. For measuring dose, FDA and ACR use a phantom, so that dose and image quality are assessed with the same test object. The mammography is a radiological image to visualize early biological manifestations of breast cancer. Digital systems have two types of image-capturing devices, Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) and CR mammography. In Mexico, there are several CR mammography systems in clinical use, but only one CR mammography system has been approved for use by the FDA. Mammography CR uses a photostimulable phosphor detector (PSP) system. Most CR plates are made of 85% BaFBr and 15% BaFI doped with europium (Eu) commonly called barium fluoro halide. We carry out an exploratory survey of six CR mammography units from three different manufacturers and six dedicated x-ray mammography units with fully automatic exposure. The results show three CR mammography units (50%) have a dose that overcomes 3.0 mGy and it doesn't improve the image quality and dose to the breast will be excessive. The differences between doses averages from TLD system and dosimeter with ionization chamber are less than 10%. TLD system is a good option for average glandular dose measurement. (Author)

  10. Thermoluminescent analysis of archaeological ceramic from Teotenango, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez R, R. [Centro INAH Estado de Mexico, Morelos Ote. 502, Col. San Sebastian, 50090 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Mondragon, M. [Museo Roman Pina Chan, Teotenango 1024 (Mexico); Villa S, G.; Gonzalez M, P.R.; Mendoza A, D. [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Of all the kind of artifacts which may be found at archaeological sites, ceramics are surely among the most important. A ceramic material is highly durable, and virtually unchanged after hundred of years from its date of manufacture. Because of this, a ceramic will always be an important object for serious studies to determine which culture produced it, to date cultures, reconstruct economic patterns and social organization, and establish routes of trade or simply to classify the different types of ceramics. The aim of this paper was to perform a thermoluminescent analysis of archaeological ceramic samples belonging to Teotenango, Mexico. The analysis is complemented with a physicochemical characterization by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). TL analysis shows some differences when the samples are exposed to ionizing radiation field, while SEM analysis shows a porous and granular structure in all samples, EDS analysis shows oxygen (O), aluminum (Al), silicon (Si), iron (Fe), sodium (Na), phosphorus (P), potassium (K) and calcium (Ca) in significant amounts. These results allow establishing differences among ceramic samples belonging to the same place. (Author)

  11. Thermal quenching of thermoluminescence in quartz samples of various origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subedi, B. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 54124-Thessaloniki (Greece); Oniya, E. [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute (C.E.T.I.), R.C. ' Athena' , Tsimiski 58, 67100 Xanthi (Greece); Physics and Electronics Department, Adekunle Ajasin University, PMB 01, Akungba Akoko (Nigeria); Polymeris, G.S. [ISIK University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science and Arts, 34980-Sile, Istanbul (Turkey); Afouxenidis, D.; Tsirliganis, N.C. [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute (C.E.T.I.), R.C. ' Athena' , Tsimiski 58, 67100 Xanthi (Greece); Kitis, G., E-mail: gkitis@auth.g [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 54124-Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2011-03-15

    The effect of thermal quenching stands among the most important properties in the thermoluminescence (TL) of quartz on which many applications of TL are based. Since the quartz samples used in various applications are all of different origin it is useful to investigate whether the values of the thermal quenching parameters, i.e. the activation energy for thermal quenching W and a parameter C which describes the ratio of non-radiative to radiative luminescence transitions, evaluated mainly in specific quartz samples can be extrapolated to quartz samples of unknown origin as well as to quartz samples which are annealed at high temperatures. In the present work the TL glow curve of a series of un-annealed and annealed natural and synthetic quartz samples were studied as a function of the heating rate between 0.25 K/s and 16 K/s. Using an indirect fitting method it was found that the thermal quenching parameters W and C in most of the quartz samples are very similar to the values accepted in the literature. Furthermore, in some cases the thermal quenching parameters W and C are not the same for all TL glow-peaks in the same glow-curve. Finally, the strong external treatment of annealing the quartz samples at very high temperature can also influence at least one of the thermal quenching parameters.

  12. Thermoluminescence and EPR studies on natural petalite crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, S.O.; Chubaci, J.F.D.; Watanabe, S. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Christopher Selvin, P. [NGM College, Pollachi, Tamil Nadu (India); Sastry, M.D. [Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Bombay (India)

    2002-07-07

    Thermally stimulated luminescence of natural mineral petalite (LiAlSi{sub 4}O{sub 10}) crystals was investigated and the possible electron/hole traps responsible for thermoluminescence (TL) emission were identified using optical absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. The glow curves for natural samples, obtained with a heating rate of 4C s{sup -1}, show two glow peaks at 160 deg. C and 330 deg. C. Pre-annealed and subsequently irradiated samples give rise to three glow peaks at 175 deg. C, 340 deg. C and 435 deg. C. An isochronal thermal study established correlation between the first glow peak and Ti{sup 3+}-like trap centre and E'{sub 1}-centre and Al-O{sup -}-Al-like recombination centres. The second TL peak at 340 deg. C may be related to the E{sub 1}' centres formed on irradiation. A mechanism for the observed TL is suggested. (author)

  13. Luminescence spectra of lead tungstate, spodumene and topaz crystals Thermoluminescence

    CERN Document Server

    Ramachandran, V

    2002-01-01

    A detailed set of thermoluminescence, cathodoluminescence and radioluminescence (TL, CLTL and RLTL) data of lead tungstate, Spodumene and Topaz have been reported for the first time over a wide temperature range from 25 to 500K. Lead tungstate (PbWO sub 4), a widely known scintillating material, gives TL glow peaks which are related to complex defect centres. Doping of this crystal with trivalent rare earth ions (La sup 3 sup + , Y sup 3 sup +) reduces the slow component of the emission thereby making it more suitable for its applications. The pentavalent dopants on the other hand, enhance the green emission and quench the blue emission at temperatures 100K. The origin and the irradiation temperature definitely have an effect on the spectrum. No strong relationship could be derived from the dose dependence data. Two less studied minerals, Spodumene and Topaz have also been investigated with the luminescence techniques. The glow peak near 250degC is thought to have originated from Mn sup 2 sup + centres. As th...

  14. Multisphere neutron spectrometric system with thermoluminescence dosemeters: sensitive improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, B; Papadópulos, S; Cruzate, J; Kunst, J J

    2002-01-01

    In this work, a neutron spectrometric system based on a set of moderating spheres with thermoluminescence detectors (TLD) is presented. The system at the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) Dosimetry Laboratory consists of 12 solid spheres made of high-density polyethylene (p = 0.95 g x cm(-3)), with diameters ranging from 2" to 12" and TLD sensitive to thermal and gamma radiation, namely TLD-600 and TLD-700, located at the centre of the spheres. The neutron response matrix for this Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS) was calculated using the MCNP-IVB code and the library ENDF/B-VI in the energy range between thermal neutrons and 100 MeV. The neutron spectrum was obtained using the LOUH182 unfolding code. The improvement in sensitivity of the system is based on the election of a different heating cycle of the TLD that allows an increase in sensitivity by a factor of 2.6 compared with the standard laboratory treatment. The system response for the calibration with an Am-Be source is presented.

  15. The effects of high ambient radon on thermoluminescence dosimetry readings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, John A; Kearfott, Kimberlee J

    2011-11-01

    The effect of a high level of ambient (222)Rn gas on thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) is examined. Groups of LiF:Mg,Ti and CaF(2):Dy TLDs were exposed to (222)Rn under controlled environmental conditions over ∼7 d using a luminous (226)Ra aircraft dial. LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs were tested bare, and both types were tested mounted in cards used for environmental dosimetry and mounted in cards enclosed in plastic badges. A passive continuous radon monitor was used to measure the (222)Rn level in the small chamber during the experiments. The data were analysed to determine the relationship between the integrated (222)Rn level and the TLD response. Although both LiF:Mg,Ti and CaF(2):Dy TLDs showed a strong response to (222)Rn, the badges prevented measurable radon detection by the TLDs within. The TLDs were not used to directly measure the radon concentration; rather, a correction for its influence was desired.

  16. Thermoluminescence dosimetry in quality imaging in CR mammography systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaona, E.; Franco E, J.G. [UAM-Xochimilco, 04960 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Azorin N, J. [UAM-Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Diaz G, J.A.I. [CICATA, Unidad Legaria, Av. Legaria 694, 11599 mexico D.F. (Mexico); Arreola, M. [Department of Radiology, Shands Hospital at UF, PO Box 100374, Gainesville, FL 32610-0374 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this work is to estimate the average glandular dose with Thermoluminescence Dosimetry (TLD) and comparison with quality imaging in CR mammography. For measuring dose, FDA and ACR use a phantom, so that dose and image quality are assessed with the same test object. The mammography is a radiological image to visualize early biological manifestations of breast cancer. Digital systems have two types of image-capturing devices, Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) and CR mammography. In Mexico, there are several CR mammography systems in clinical use, but only one CR mammography system has been approved for use by the FDA. Mammography CR uses a photostimulable phosphor detector (PSP) system. Most CR plates are made of 85% BaFBr and 15% BaFI doped with europium (Eu) commonly called barium fluoro halide. We carry out an exploratory survey of six CR mammography units from three different manufacturers and six dedicated x-ray mammography units with fully automatic exposure. The results show three CR mammography units (50%) have a dose that overcomes 3.0 mGy and it doesn't improve the image quality and dose to the breast will be excessive. The differences between doses averages from TLD system and dosimeter with ionization chamber are less than 10%. TLD system is a good option for average glandular dose measurement. (Author)

  17. Evaluation for the paleodose in thermoluminescence dating of porcelain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Sources, components and calibration of paleodose were studied for proper evalua- tion of the paleodose of porcelain in thermoluminescence (TL) dating. In the TL dating of porcelain using the pre-dose technique, the β dose from the internal natural radiation in the body of porcelain is the first, the environmental dose the second, and the α dose negligible. Sample thickness of 0.2―0.5 mm was used in the paleodose calibration. For a porcelain sample of such thickness, the distribu- tion of β dose inside the sample was nonlinear when the sample (aluminium re- places porcelain in this experiment) was irradiated by a laboratory 90Sr-90Y β source. Therefore, the β dose used was only an average value. A distribution curve of β dose and the calculation of average β dose in the sample were obtained, according to the build-up and attenuation effects of β dose in the sample. The results showed that a sample thickness of 200 μm resulted in an average dose increment of about 4% compared to the surface whereas for a sample with a thickness of 400 μm, the average dose reduced by the same percentage, and that for a sample of 300 μm in thickness the average dose is equal to surface dose approximately. The average β dose in samples with various thickness can be obtained by the provided equations.

  18. Evaluation for the paleodose in thermoluminescence dating of porcelain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG WeiDa

    2008-01-01

    Sources,components and calibration of paleodose were studied for proper evaluation of the paleodose of porcelain in thermoluminescence (TL) dating. In the TL dating of porcelain using the pre-dose technique,the β dose from the internal natural radiation in the body of porcelain is the first,the environmental dose the second,and the α dose negligible. Sample thickness of 0.2-0.5 mm was used in the paleodose calibration. For a porcelain sample of such thickness,the distribution of 13 dose inside the sample was nonlinear when the sample (aluminium replaces porcelain in this experiment) was irradiated by a laboratory 90Sr-90Y βsource. Therefore,the β dose used was only an average value. A distribution curve of β dose and the calculation of average β dose in the sample were obtained,according to the build-up and attenuation effects of β dose in the sample. The results showed that a sample thickness of 200 μm resulted in an average dose increment of about 4% compared to the surface whereas for a sample with a thickness of 400 μm,the average dose reduced by the same percentage,and that for a sample of 300 μm in thickness the average dose is equal to surface dose approximately. The average β dose in samples with various thickness can be obtained by the provided equations.

  19. Systematic development of new thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukihara, E.G., E-mail: eduardo.yukihara@okstate.edu [Physics Department, 145 Physical Sciences II, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Milliken, E.D.; Oliveira, L.C. [Physics Department, 145 Physical Sciences II, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Orante-Barron, V.R. [Departamento de Investigacion en Polimeros y Materiales, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000, Mexico (Mexico); Jacobsohn, L.G. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Blair, M.W. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    This paper presents an overview of a systematic study to develop new thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) materials using solution combustion synthesis (SCS) for applications such as personal OSL dosimetry, 2D dose mapping, and temperature sensing. A discussion on the material requirements for these applications is included. We present X-ray diffraction (XRD) data on single phase materials obtained with SCS, as well as radioluminescence (RL), TL and OSL data of lanthanide-doped materials. The results demonstrate the possibility of producing TL and OSL materials with sensitivity similar to or approaching those of commercial TL and OSL materials used in dosimetry (e.g., LiF:Mg,Ti and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) using SCS. The results also show that the luminescence properties can be improved by Li co-doping and annealing. The presence of an atypical TL background and anomalous fading are discussed and deserve attention in future investigations. We hope that these preliminary results on the use of SCS for production of TL and OSL materials are helpful to guide future efforts towards the development of new luminescence materials for different applications. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TL and OSL material produced with sensitivity similar to commercial materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Luminescence properties improved by Li co-doping and annealing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The presence of atypical TL background and anomalous fading observed.

  20. The retrieval of land surface albedo in rugged terrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, B.; Jia, L.; Menenti, M.

    2012-01-01

    Land surface albedo may be derived from the satellite data through the estimation of a bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model and angular integration. However many BRDF models do not consider explicitly the topography. In rugged terrain, the topography influences the observed s

  1. The UV-Optical Albedo of Broad Emission Line Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Korista, K T; Korista, Kirk; Ferland, Gary

    1997-01-01

    We explore the effective UV-optical albedos of a variety of types of broad emission line clouds, as well as their possible effects on the observed spectra of AGN. An important albedo source in moderately ionized ionization-bounded clouds is that due to neutral hydrogen: Rayleigh scattering of continuum photons off the extreme damping wings of Lya. The photons resulting from this scattering mechanism may contribute significantly to the Lya emission line, especially in the very broad wings. In addition, line photons emitted near 1200 Angstroms (e.g., N V 1240) that stream toward the neutral portion of the cloud may be reflected off this Rayleigh scattering mirror, so that they preferentially escape from the illuminated face. Inclusion of this effect can alter predicted emission line strengths and profiles. In more highly-ionized ionization-bounded clouds, Thompson scattering dominates the UV-optical albedo, but this albedo is lessened by the hydrogen gas opacity. These clouds are most reflective on the long wav...

  2. Size and Albedo of Irregular Saturnian Satellites from Spitzer Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Michael; Grav, T.; Trilling, D.; Stansberry, J.; Sykes, M.

    2008-01-01

    Using MIPS onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, we observed the thermal emission (24 and, for some targets, 70 um) of eight irregular satellites of Saturn: Albiorix, Siarnaq, Paaliaq, Kiviuq, Ijiraq, Tarvos, Erriapus, and Ymir. We determined the size and albedo of all targets. An analysis of archive

  3. Size and Albedo of Irregular Saturnian Satellites from Spitzer Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Michael; Grav, T.; Trilling, D.; Stansberry, J.; Sykes, M.

    2008-01-01

    Using MIPS onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, we observed the thermal emission (24 and, for some targets, 70 um) of eight irregular satellites of Saturn: Albiorix, Siarnaq, Paaliaq, Kiviuq, Ijiraq, Tarvos, Erriapus, and Ymir. We determined the size and albedo of all targets. An analysis of archive

  4. Size and Albedo of Irregular Saturnian Satellites from Spitzer Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Michael; Grav, T.; Trilling, D.; Stansberry, J.; Sykes, M.

    2008-01-01

    Using MIPS onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, we observed the thermal emission (24 and, for some targets, 70 um) of eight irregular satellites of Saturn: Albiorix, Siarnaq, Paaliaq, Kiviuq, Ijiraq, Tarvos, Erriapus, and Ymir. We determined the size and albedo of all targets. An analysis of

  5. The high albedo of the hot Jupiter Kepler-7b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demory, B.-O.; Seager, S.; Madhusudhan, N.

    2011-01-01

    . The NASA Kepler mission provides a means to widen the sample and to assess the extent to which hot Jupiter albedos are low. We present a global analysis of Kepler-7 b based on Q0-Q4 data, published radial velocities, and asteroseismology constraints. We measure an occultation depth in the Kepler bandpass...

  6. Albedo changes of the Arctic sea ice cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovich, D. K.; Light, B.; Jones, K. F.; Eicken, H.; Runciman, K.; Nghiem, S. V.; Stroeve, J.; Markus, T.

    2008-12-01

    The summer extent of the Arctic sea ice cover has decreased in recent decades and there have been alterations in the timing and duration of the summer melt season. This has resulted in changes in the evolution of albedo of the Arctic sea ice cover, and consequently in the partitioning of solar energy. These changes are examined on a pan-Arctic scale on a 25 x 25 km Equal Area Scalable Earth Grid for the years 1979 - 2007. Daily values of incident solar irradiance are obtained from ERA-40 reanalysis products and ice concentrations are determined from passive microwave satellite data. The albedo of the ice is modeled by a five-phase process that includes dry snow, melting snow, melt pond formation, melt pond evolution, and freezeup. The timing of these phases is governed by the onset dates of summer melt and fall freezeup, which are determined from satellite observations. Results indicate a general trend of increasing solar heat input to the Arctic ice-ocean system due to reductions in ice concentration and longer melt seasons. This trend may accelerate the loss of sea ice through the ice-albedo feedback. The evolution of albedo, and hence the total solar heating of the ocean, is more sensitive to the date of melt onset than the date of fall freezeup.

  7. Design and Fabrication of an Albedo Insensitive Analog Sun Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, H.; Emadi, A.; De Graaf, G.; Leijtens, J.; Wolffenbuttel, R.F.

    2011-01-01

    A sun sensor is usually included in a satellite for optically measuring the position relative to the sun. The accuracy of a conventional sun sensor is affected by reflected sunlight at the nearby earth atmosphere: the albedo radiation. The part of the spectrum at near IR (1.5 μm) is not included in

  8. Asteroid magnitudes, UBV colors, and IRAS albedos and diameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper lists absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for known asteroids numbered through 3318. The values presented are those used in reducing asteroid IR flux data obtained with the IRAS. U-B colors are given for 938 asteroids, and B-V colors are given for 945 asteroids. The IRAS albedos and diameters are tabulated for 1790 asteroids.

  9. Albedo and color maps of the Saturnian satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Mosher, Joel A.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses the production of maps of the albedos and colors of Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, and Rhea over the full range of their imaged surfaces. Voyager images were used to prepare maps of the normal reflectances and color ratios (0.58/0.41 micron) of these satelites.

  10. Albedo and color maps of the Saturnian satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buratti, B.J.; Mosher, J.A.; Johnson, T.V. (JPL, Pasadena, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The paper discusses the production of maps of the albedos and colors of Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, and Rhea over the full range of their imaged surfaces. Voyager images were used to prepare maps of the normal reflectances and color ratios (0.58/0.41 micron) of these satelites. 67 refs.

  11. Forests, nitrogen and albedo, a very interesting trio indeed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borghetti M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A short comment is made on a recent paper (Ollinger et al. 2008 which shows that forest ecosystem carbon uptake in temperate and boreal forests is directly related to canopy nitrogen concentration and that both carbon uptake capacity and canopy nitrogen concentration are positively correlated with shortwave surface albedo measured with broad-band satellite sensors.

  12. Summertime canopy albedo is sensitive to forest thinning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, J.; Berveiller, D.; Bréon, F.M.; Delpierre, N.; Geppert, G.; Granier, A.; Jans, W.W.P.; Knohl, A.; Moors, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an emerging body of literature linking canopy albedo to forest management, understanding of the process is still fragmented. We combined a stand-level forest gap model with a canopy radiation transfer model and satellite-derived model parameters to quantify the effects of forest thinning,

  13. The retrieval of land surface albedo in rugged terrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, B.; Jia, L.; Menenti, M.

    2012-01-01

    Land surface albedo may be derived from the satellite data through the estimation of a bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model and angular integration. However many BRDF models do not consider explicitly the topography. In rugged terrain, the topography influences the observed s

  14. Effective single scattering albedo estimation using regional climate model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tesfaye, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, by modifying the optical parameterization of Regional Climate model (RegCM), the authors have computed and compared the Effective Single-Scattering Albedo (ESSA) which is a representative of VIS spectral region. The arid, semi...

  15. The retrieval of land surface albedo in rugged terrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, B.; Jia, L.; Menenti, M.

    2012-01-01

    Land surface albedo may be derived from the satellite data through the estimation of a bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model and angular integration. However many BRDF models do not consider explicitly the topography. In rugged terrain, the topography influences the observed

  16. In vivo dosimetry with semiconductor and thermoluminescent detectors applied to head and neck cancer treatment; Dosimetria in vivo com uso de detectores semicondutores e termoluminescentes aplicada ao tratamento de cancer de cabeca e pescoco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viegas, Claudio Castelo Branco

    2003-03-15

    In vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy, i. e, the assessment of the doses received by patients during their treatments, permits a verification of the therapy quality. A routine of in vivo dosimetry is, undoubtedly, a direct benefit for the patient. Unfortunately, in Brazil and in Latin America this procedure is still a privilege for only a few patients. This routine is of common application only in developed countries. The aim of this work is to show the viability and implementation of a routine in vivo dosimetry, using diodes semiconductors and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), at the radiotherapy section of the National Institute of Cancer in Brazil, in the case of head and neck cancer treatment. In order to reach that aim, the characteristics of the response of diodes ISORAD-p and LiF:Mg;Ti (TLD-100) thermoluminescent detectors in powder form were determined. The performance of those detectors for in vivo dosimetry was tested using an RANDO Alderson anthropomorfic phantom and, once their adequacy proved for the kind of measurements proposed, they were used for dose assessment in the case of tumour treatments in the head and neck regions, for Cobalt-60 irradiations. (author)

  17. NLCD - MODIS land cover- albedo dataset for the continental United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The NLCD-MODIS land cover-albedo database integrates high-quality MODIS albedo observations with areas of homogeneous land cover from NLCD. The spatial resolution...

  18. MISR Level 2 FIRSTLOOK TOA/Cloud Albedo parameters V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the Level 2 FIRSTLOOK TOA/Cloud Albedo Product. It contains local,restrictive, and expansive albedo, with associated data, produced using ancillary inputs...

  19. A statistics-based temporal filter algorithm to map spatiotemporally continuous shortwave albedo from MODIS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Liu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Land-surface albedo plays a critical role in the earth's radiant energy budget studies. Satellite remote sensing provides an effective approach to acquire regional and global albedo observations. Owing to cloud coverage, seasonal snow and sensor malfunctions, spatiotemporally continuous albedo datasets are often inaccessible. The Global LAnd Surface Satellite (GLASS project aims at providing a suite of key land surface parameter datasets with high temporal resolution and high accuracy for a global change study. The GLASS preliminary albedo datasets are global daily land-surface albedo generated by an angular bin algorithm (Qu et al., 2013. Like other products, the GLASS preliminary albedo datasets are affected by large areas of missing data; beside, sharp fluctuations exist in the time series of the GLASS preliminary albedo due to data noise and algorithm uncertainties. Based on the Bayesian theory, a statistics-based temporal filter (STF algorithm is proposed in this paper to fill data gaps, smooth albedo time series, and generate the GLASS final albedo product. The results of the STF algorithm are smooth and gapless albedo time series, with uncertainty estimations. The performance of the STF method was tested on one tile (H25V05 and three ground stations. Results show that the STF method has greatly improved the integrity and smoothness of the GLASS final albedo product. Seasonal trends in albedo are well depicted by the GLASS final albedo product. Compared with MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS product, the GLASS final albedo product has a higher temporal resolution and more competence in capturing the surface albedo variations. It is recommended that the quality flag should be always checked before using the GLASS final albedo product.

  20. Effect of land cover change on snow free surface albedo across the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land cover changes (e.g., forest to grassland) affect albedo, and changes in albedo can influence radiative forcing (warming, cooling). We empirically tested albedo response to land cover change for 130 locations across the continental United States using high resolution (30 m-&t...

  1. Effect of land cover change on snow free surface albedo across the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land cover changes (e.g., forest to grassland) affect albedo, and changes in albedo can influence radiative forcing (warming, cooling). We empirically tested albedo response to land cover change for 130 locations across the continental United States using high resolution (30 m-&t...

  2. A CR-39 track dosemeter for routine individual neutron monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Alberts, W.G.; Dietz, E.; Guldbakke, S.; Matzke, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); d`Errico, F. [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Costruzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari DCMN]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy)

    1994-12-31

    A personal neutron dosemeter for routine individual monitoring is proposed. It is based on a CR-39 track detector covered on three separate areas by converters with different boron contents and inserted into a commercial TLD albedo dosemeter capsule. The dose readings from three areas of the electrochemically etched CR-39 detector are combined to yield a dose equivalent response which is almost independent of the incident neutron energy in the range from thermal neutrons up to 20 MeV. In addition, the dose contributions of thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons can be determined separately. Unlike the TLD albedo dosemeter, which in general requires prior in-field calibration and whose use is then restricted to that field, this dosemeter can be used in neutron fields without any knowledge of the spectral distribution with the same calibration factor. The angular dependence of the dosemeter`s response has been measured and compared with that of the directional dose equivalent H`(10). The lower limit of detection is 0.15 mSv. It is possible to obtain an independent, second dose reading from the same Cr-39 detector for neutron energies above 100 keV. The dosemeter has also been successfully tested for use in accident dosimetry applying chemical etching and an optical density reading of the CR-39 detector. (author).

  3. Thermoluminescence of thin films deposited by laser ablation; Termoluminiscencia de peliculas delgadas depositadas por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar A, L.; Camps, E.; Arrieta, A.; Romero, S.; Gonzalez, P.R.; Olea M, O.; Diaz E, R. [Depto. de Fisica, ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    Materials in thin film form have received great attention in the last few years mainly because of their singular properties, which may differ significantly from their bulk attributes making them attractive for a wide variety of applications. In particular, thermoluminescence (Tl) properties of thin films have been studied recently owing to their potential applications in detection for both ionizing and non ionizing radiation. The aim of the present work is to report the synthesis and characterization of C Nx, aluminum oxide and titanium oxide thin films. Thermoluminescence response of the obtained thin films was studied after subject thin films to UV radiation (254 nm) as well as to gamma radiation (Co-60). Thermoluminescence glow curves exhibited a peak centered at 150 C for CN{sub x} whereas for titanium oxide the glow curve shows a maximum peaking at 171 C. Characterization of the physical properties of the deposited materials is presented. (Author)

  4. Thermoluminescent analysis of amorphous and crystalline SiO{sub 2} exposed to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa S, G.; Mendoza A, D.; Gonzalez, P.R.; Espinosa P, M.E. [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, EStado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Silicon oxide (SiO{sub 2}) has been used in electroluminescence and thermoluminescence (TL) devices. However, its emission mechanism have not been yet clearly explained. The crystalline and amorphous SiO{sub 2} luminescent analyses are important to compare their behaviour in order to understand the emission mechanism. For this reason, the present work has the goal to show and compare the thermoluminescent analysis of obsidian and quartz: amorphous and crystalline SiO{sub 2}, respectively. According to the results, quartz shows two TL peaks located at 145 and 215 C, while obsidian shows three TL peaks at 125, 195 and 298 C. Moreover, TL intensity was higher for quartz than obsidian samples. Nonetheless, both signals shown a linear correlation in the interval of radiation dose from 50 to 400 Gy. These facts suggest that the atomic array plays a very important role in the thermoluminescent behaviour of the SiO{sub 2} materials. (Author)

  5. Thermoluminescent response of aluminium oxide thin films subject to gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrieta, A.; Escobar A, L.; Camps, E.; Villagran, E.; Gonzalez, P.R

    2006-07-01

    The thermoluminescent (TL) properties of amorphous aluminium oxide thin films (thicknesses as low as 0.3 {mu}m) subjected to gamma (Co-60) irradiation are reported. Aluminium oxide thin films were prepared by laser ablation from an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} target using a Nd: YAG laser with emission at the fundamental line. The films were exposed to gamma radiation (Co-60) in order to study their TL response. Thermoluminescence glow curves exhibited two peaks at 110 and 176 C. The high temperature peak shows good stability and 30% fading in the first 5 days after irradiation. A linear relationship between absorbed dose and the thermoluminescent response for doses span from 150 mGy to 100 Gy was observed. These results suggest that aluminium oxide thin films are suitable for detection and monitoring of gamma radiation. (Author)

  6. Synthesis and thermoluminescence properties of CaF2:Tm,Ce nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zahedifar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Calcium fluoride nanoparticles doped with thulium and cerium were synthesized as a novel nanostructure by using the hydrothermal method. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS. The crystallite size of about 36 nm was estimated employing Scherer’s formula. Its shape and size were also observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM. Computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD technique revealed two overlapping thermoluminescence glow peaks at around 402 and 457 K in the complex thermoluminescence glow curve of this phosphor. Other thermoluminescence characteristics of this phosphor such as fading, reuseability and dose response recommend it as a good candidate for high dose dosimetry.

  7. New numerical model for thermal quenching mechanism in quartz based on two-stage thermal stimulation of thermoluminescence model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Kadari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermal quenching plays an important role in the thermoluminescence (TL of quartz on which many applications of TL are based. The studies of the stability and kinetics of the 325 °C thermoluminescence peak in quartz are described by Wintle (1975, which show the occurrence of thermal quenching, the decrease in luminescence efficiency with rise in temperature. The thermal quenching of thermoluminescence in quartz was studied experimentally by several authors. The simulations work presented in the literature is based on the single-stage thermal stimulation model of thermoluminescence, in spite of that the mechanisms of this effect remain incomplete. This paper presents a new numerical model for thermal quenching in quartz, using the previously published two-stage thermal stimulation of thermoluminescence model.

  8. Thermoluminescent response of LaAlO{sub 3}:Pr; Respuesta termoluminiscente de LaAlO{sub 3}:Pr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales H, A.; Zarate M, J. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Instituto de Investigacion en Metalurgia y Materiales, Ciudad Universitaria, Edif. U, 58060 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Azorin N, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Rivera M, T., E-mail: feyo_yo@hotmail.com [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, the thermoluminescence response of doped lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO{sub 3}) with praseodymium ion (Pr) obtained by the Pechini method and drying by the spraying technique Spry Dryer was studied. The obtained powders were analyzed structurally by the X-ray diffraction technique; the morphological characterization was by the scanning electron microscopy technique. The obtained powders at 800 degrees C presented crystallinity and showed a Rhombohedral crystal structure, this phase was observed by X-ray diffraction patterns. Thermoluminescence response of LaAlO{sub 3}:Pr showed a brightness curve with a peak centered at 157 degrees C. The sensitivity of the doped samples was improved about 90 times in comparison with the undoped sample. Thermoluminescence response in function of the wavelength showed a maximum at 230 nm, reproducibility of thermoluminescence response was ±50%. Also the fading in thermoluminescence response was studied. (Author)

  9. Thermoluminescence measurements of liquid crystal azomethines and poly(azomethines) with different shapes as thermo-detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwan, Agnieszka, E-mail: a.iwan@iel.wroc.p [Electrotechnical Institute, Division of Electrotechnology and Materials Science, M. Sklodowskiej-Curie 55/61 Street, 50-369 Wroclaw (Poland); Bilski, Pawel; Klosowski, Mariusz [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152 Street, 31-342 Krakow (Poland)

    2010-12-15

    We have explored the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of a few series of liquid crystal unsymmetrical and symmetrical azomethines and poly(azomethines) with different shapes. Rod-, bent- and star-shaped compounds were investigated as thermoluminescent detectors. All of the investigated compounds, except ASB3, AG2 and PAZ2, exhibited mesomorphic behavior. The thermoluminescence studies have shown that molecular structure of the compound along with shape influenced the TL properties of azomethines and poly(azomethines). Thermoluminescence intensity (I), temperature of maximum TL (T), activation energy values (E) and frequency factor (s) were detected. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, thermoluminescence properties of liquid crystalline azomethines and polyazomethines were described and compared in this article.

  10. Thermoluminescence of cerium and terbium -doped calcium pyrophosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman L, J.; Cruz Z, E. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Lozano R, I. B.; Diaz G, J. A. I., E-mail: jesus.roman@nucleares.unam.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria No. 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this work is to report the thermoluminescence (Tl) response of Calcium Pyrophosphate phosphor doped with Cerium and Terbium impurities (Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Ce{sup 3+},Tb{sup 3+}). The phosphors were synthesized using the co-precipitation method and annealed at 900 degrees C by two hours for obtain the β phase. The intentional doping with Ce and Tb ions was 1 at.% and 0.1 at.%, whereas in the EDS results the concentration of impurities was 0.39 at.% and 0.05 at.%, respectively. The superficial morphology of phosphor is mainly composed by thin wafers of different size. All samples were exposed to gamma rays from {sup 60}Co in the Gammacell-200 irradiator. The Tl response of the phosphor was measured from Rt up to 350 degrees C and under nitrogen atmosphere in a Harshaw TLD 3500 reader. The glow curves of the Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Ce{sup 3+},Tb{sup 3+} powders showed a broad intense Tl peak centered at 165 degrees C and a shoulder at approximate 260 degrees C was observed. A linear Tl response in the range of absorbed dose of 0.2 to 10 Gy was obtained. Tl glow curves were analyzed using the initial rise (IR)and computerized glow curve deconvolution methods to evaluate the kinetics parameters such as activation energy (E), frequency factor (s) and kinetic order (b). (Author)

  11. Thermoluminescence study of aluminum oxide doped with therbium and thulium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, V.S.M., E-mail: vdbarros@terra.com.b [Laboratorio de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes, DEN, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire 1000, 50740-540, Recife, PE (Brazil); Azevedo, W.M. de [Laboratorio de Quimica do Estado Solido, CCEN, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, BR101 s/n, 50670-901, Recife-PE (Brazil); Khoury, H.J.; Andrade, M.E.A. [Laboratorio de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes, DEN, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire 1000, 50740-540, Recife, PE (Brazil); Filho, P. Linhares [Curso de Ciencia dos Materiais, CCEN, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, BR101 s/n, 50670-901, Recife-PE (Brazil)

    2010-03-15

    In this work, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped either with Tb{sup 3+} or Tm{sup 3+} was prepared by combustion synthesis techniques for thermoluminescent (TL) ionizing radiation dosimetry applications. In this method, the reactants (aluminum nitrate, urea and therbium or thulium nitrate) are ignited in a muffle furnace at temperatures as low as 500 {sup o}C. This synthesis route is an alternative technique to the conventional fabrication methods of materials based on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Czochralsky, Vernuil), where high melting temperatures and reducing atmospheres are required. After combustion, the samples were annealed at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1400 {sup o}C for 4 h in order to obtain the pure {alpha}-phase structure and were then irradiated with a Co-60 gamma radiation source. The annealed samples present a well defined TL glow peak with a maximum at approximately 200 {sup o}C and linear TL response in the dose range 0.5-5 Gy. It was observed that a 0.1 mol% concentration of Tb{sup 3+} or Tm{sup 3+} and annealing at 1400 {sup o}C optimize the TL sensitivity. The highest sensitivity was found for Tm{sup 3+} doped samples which were approximately 25 times more sensitive than Tb{sup 3+} doped samples. These results strongly suggest that combustion synthesis is a suitable technique to prepare doped aluminum oxide material and that Tm{sup 3+} doped aluminum oxide is a potential material for TL radiation dosimetry.

  12. Some thermoluminescence ages in Queensland: a problem resolved

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, J.R. [Adelaide Univ., SA (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    In a previous paper (Tejan-Kella et al Aust J. Soil Res. 28, 465, 1990), thermoluminescence (TL) dates were presented for a soil horizon at five sites in a chronosequence of freely-drained podzols at Cooloola and North Stradbroke Island, Queensland. The TL ages followed the expected order based on geomorphological evidence; and the TL age of 120 {+-}11 ka for the Amity dune on North Stradbroke Island agreed with uranium series dates for underlying coral recovered during sand mining. Nevertheless, several features of the TL results gave rise to some concern and were noted in the above mentioned paper. Specifically, the apparent TL age of 11 {+-} 2 ka for the Kings Bore site was widely at variance with the inferred age of about 0.5 ka based on geomorphological and soil profile evidence. Further, an apparent TL age of about 8 ka was found for samples from the Carlo sand blow. The Carlo samples were taken at mean depths of 1.0 m and 1.5 m from within the advancing toe of the dune, which is obviously mobile since it is encroaching on living vegetation. The time since last exposure to sunlight could scarcely exceed a decade. New measurements are reported, designed to resolve the former discrepancies. All sites have been re-dated, together with a new one, CA5S/1 (Chalambar) and a reduced value have been obtained. The fact that the TL age is somehow smaller than the U-series age may reflect the expectation that the summit of the dune be younger than the base. Paper no. 14; 1 tab., 1 fig.

  13. Study of the thermoluminescence dosimetric properties of window glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engin, Birol; Aydaş, Canan; Demirtaş, Hayrünnisa

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the main thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetric characteristics of commercial Turkish transparent window glass. The structure of the glow curves, including the number of peaks, was found to be dose-dependent. A low-temperature glow peak that at 160 °C shifts to higher temperatures was also observed with increasing storage time at room temperature. This result suggests that this TL glow peak is actually made up of two or more overlapping peaks. These we have attributed to the glow peaks at lower temperatures, which decay faster than the ones at higher temperatures with storage time. The thermal fading of the window glass sample at room temperature showed a relatively sharp decay of about 60% occurring over a period of 28 days, after which the decay rate is small for a measured period of 250 days. In order to the improve the post-irradiation stability of the glow curve, the glass samples were heated after irradiation. To remove the unstable TL peaks responsible for the initial rapid fading, post-irradiation heating at 160 °C for 10 min was found to be the most suitable procedure. The dosimetric characteristics of the post-irradiation heated window glass examined in this study include fading, gamma photon dose-response, reproducibility, batch sensitivity, humidity influence, a dose-rate effect and photon energy response. Dose-response was found to be appropriate for dosimetry in the range 5 Gy to 10 kGy. The post-irradiation heating procedure did not affect the main dosimetric characteristics of the window glass samples. The results in this work suggest that the materials could, by using the TL technique, be a suitable candidate for alternative dose measurements in radiation processing, provided that a judicious choice of the post-irradiation heat temperature is made to minimize fading.

  14. Thermoluminescent analyses of mean photon energy of a field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalieri, T. A.; De Paiva, F.; Fonseca, G.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H., E-mail: tassio.cavalieri@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Nowadays a common method of dosimetry is utilize the thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) of LiF, where for pure gamma field is typically used the LiF or CaF{sub 2} TLDs and for mixed neutron and gamma field dosimetry is used the pair TLD-600/TLD-700. The difference between these three LiF TLDs is the amount of isotope {sup 6}Li in their composition. The isotope {sup 6}Li has a great cross section for thermal neutrons, making the TLD-600 sensitive to thermal neutrons beyond the radiation gamma. Whereas the TLD-700 is considered sensitive only for radiation gamma. Some studies showed an energetic dependence of these TLDs for gammas rays. So the goal of this work was study these energetic dependence of TLDs from the angular coefficient of their response versus dose calibration curves when they were irradiated in four fields with photons of different energies: 43 keV, 662 keV, 1.2 MeV, 3 MeV. In order to create the calibration curves TLD, it was performed three irradiations with distinct exposure times for each photon energy. These studies showed a different angular coefficient to each curve; demonstrate the energetic dependence of these TLDs. By simulation with Monte Carlo based code, MCNP-5, it was observed the deposited photon dose due to different photons energies. From these simulations, it was also possible to observe a difference of dose deposition in TLDs when they were exposed to the same dose provided from different photons energies. These work showed the previously study of photon energetic dependence of LiF TLDs. (Author)

  15. Multiplatform observations enabling albedo retrievals with high temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihelä, Aku; Manninen, Terhikki; Key, Jeffrey; Sun, Qingsong; Sütterlin, Melanie; Lattanzio, Alessio; Schaaf, Crystal

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we show that combining observations from different polar orbiting satellite families (such as AVHRR and MODIS) is physically justifiable and technically feasible. Our proposed approach will lead to surface albedo retrievals at higher temporal resolution than the state of the art, with comparable or better accuracy. This study is carried out in the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Sustained and coordinated processing of Environmental Satellite data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM) project SCM-02 (http://www.scope-cm.org/projects/scm-02/). Following a spectral homogenization of the Top-of-Atmosphere reflectances of bands 1 & 2 from AVHRR and MODIS, both observation datasets are atmospherically corrected with a coherent atmospheric profile and algorithm. The resulting surface reflectances are then fed into an inversion of the RossThick-LiSparse-Reciprocal surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model. The results of the inversion (BRDF kernels) may then be integrated to estimate various surface albedo quantities. A key principle here is that the larger number of valid surface observations with multiple satellites allows us to invert the BRDF coefficients within a shorter time span, enabling the monitoring of relatively rapid surface phenomena such as snowmelt. The proposed multiplatform approach is expected to bring benefits in particular to the observation of the albedo of the polar regions, where persistent cloudiness and long atmospheric path lengths present challenges to satellite-based retrievals. Following a similar logic, the retrievals over tropical regions with high cloudiness should also benefit from the method. We present results from a demonstrator dataset of a global combined AVHRR-GAC and MODIS dataset covering the year 2010. The retrieved surface albedo is compared against quality-monitored in situ albedo observations from the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). Additionally, the combined retrieval

  16. Generalised expression for the determination of activation energy of a thermoluminescence peak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.J.; Gartia, R.K.; Mazumdar, P.S.

    1989-03-14

    A new set of expressions has been derived for the determination of the activation energy E of a thermoluminescence (TL) peak. Unlike those previously existing in the literature, the present expressions take into account the variation of the symmetry factor ..mu..g(x) with u/sub m/=(E/kT/sub m/) where x is the fractional intensity, k the Boltzmann constant and T/sub m/ the peak temperature and prior knowledge of the order of kinetics b is not required. The applicability of the present expressions have been tested using both numerically generated and experimental thermoluminescence peaks.

  17. A practical and transferable methodology for dose estimation in irradiated spices, based on thermoluminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Oca, M.C. [Dipartimento Farmacochimico, Tossicologico e Biologico, Universita di Palermo, Via M.Cipolla 74d, 90123 Palermo (Italy)], E-mail: cristinadoca@libero.it; Bartolotta, A.; Cammilleri, C.; Giuffrida, S. [Dipartimento Farmacochimico, Tossicologico e Biologico, Universita di Palermo, Via M.Cipolla 74d, 90123 Palermo (Italy); Parlato, A. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Nucleare, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 6, 90100 Palermo (Italy); Di Stefano, V. [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie Farmaceutiche, Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi 32, 90123 Palermo (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    The thermoluminescence technique is recommended by the European Committee for Standardization for the detection of irradiated food containing silicates as contaminants. In this work, the applicability of the thermoluminescence technique as a quantitative method to assess the original dose in irradiated oregano was studied; the additive-dose method was used, with reirradiation doses up to 600 Gy. The proposed new procedure allows to clearly discriminate irradiated from unirradiated samples, even after one year storage, and it gives an acceptable estimation of the original dose; the overall modified procedure requires only one day to be completed.

  18. Microfoundations of Routines and Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felin, Teppo; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Heimriks, Koen H.

    We discuss the microfoundations of routines and capabilities, including why a microfoundations view is needed and how it may inform work on organizational and competitive heterogeneity. Building on extant research, we identify three primary categories of micro-level components underlying routines...

  19. Evaluation of unconstrained optimization routines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazareth, L.; Schlick, F.

    1977-01-01

    Different approaches to evaluating optimization routines are discussed, and a particular method which uses parameterized test problems is described. This approach is illustrated through a simple case study of three well-known unconstrained optimization routines applied to three parameterized test problems. The results are displayed as a set of graphs. 3 figures.

  20. Exogenic and endogenic albedo and color patterns on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    New global and high-resolution multispectral mosaics of Europa have been produced from the Voyager imaging data. Photometric normalizations are based on multiple-image techniques that explicitly account for intrinsic albedo variations through pixel-by-pixel solutions. The exogenic color and albedo pattern on Europa is described by a second-order function of the cosine of the angular distance from the apex of orbital motion. On the basis of this second-order function and of color trends that are different on the leading and trailing hemispheres, the exogenic pattern is interpreted as being due to equilibrium between two dominant processes: (1) impact gardening and (2) magnetospheric interactions, including sulfur-ion implantation and sputtering redistribution. Removal of the model exogenic pattern in the mosaics reveals the endogenic variations, consisting of only two major units: darker (redder) and bright materials. Therefore Europa's visual spectral reflectivity is simple, having one continuous exogenic pattern and two discrete endogenic units.

  1. PAMELA's measurements of geomagnetically trapped and albedo protons

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, A; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bravar, U; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Christian, E C; De Donato, C; de Nolfo, G A; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Lee, M; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergè, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Ryan, J M; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stochaj, S; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01

    Data from the PAMELA satellite experiment were used to perform a detailed measurement of under-cutoff protons at low Earth orbits. On the basis of a trajectory tracing approach using a realistic description of the magnetosphere, protons were classified into geomagnetically trapped and re-entrant albedo. The former include stably-trapped protons in the South Atlantic Anomaly, which were analyzed in the framework of the adiabatic theory, investigating energy spectra, spatial and angular distributions; results were compared with the predictions of the AP8 and the PSB97 empirical trapped models. The albedo protons were classified into quasi-trapped, concentrating in the magnetic equatorial region, and un-trapped, spreading over all latitudes and including both short-lived (precipitating) and long-lived (pseudo-trapped) components. Features of the penumbra region around the geomagnetic cutoff were investigated as well. PAMELA observations significantly improve the characterization of the high energy proton populat...

  2. Albedo decreasing trend. White cars proposal and new urban scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niccolò Casiddu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Global warming caused the decrease of the albedo. Emission reduction is the most widely proposed response to this problem. However simple ideas such as cool roofs and cool pavements seem successful remedies to counter the threat. However in Italy another strategy appears more effective. By changing from dark to pastel bright automotive colours a considerable increase of the albedo can be hypothesized: the effect should be from 32% to 50% of the results obtained with an extensive application of the “cool roofs” strategy. Such a proposal involves the creation of new, unexpected cityscapes. The city is a place where the perception of space changes. The car, by definition is an object in motion, but still present, sometimes redundant in the urban landscape. What will be the perceived relationship with buildings, streets, squares where the cars are all white or pastel colour?

  3. NEOWISE diameters and albedos: now available on PDS!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, Amy K.; Bauer, James M.; Cutri, Roc M.; Grav, Tommy; Kramer, Emily A.; Nugent, Carolyn; Sonnett, Sarah M.; Stevenson, Rachel; Wright, Edward L.

    2016-10-01

    We present the recent PDS release of minor planet physical property data from the WISE/NEOWISE fully cryogenic, 3-band cryo, and post-cryo surveys as well as the first year of the NEOWISE-Reactivation survey. This release includes 165,865 diameters, visible albedos, near-infrared albedos, and/or beaming parameters for 140,493 unique minor planets. The published data include near-Earth asteroids, Main Belt asteroids, Hildas, Jupiter Trojans, Centaurs, active Main Belt objects and irregular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. We provide an overview of the available data and discuss the key features of the PDS data set. The data are available online at: http://sbn.psi.edu/pds/resource/neowisediam.html.

  4. Measuring the influence of aerosols and albedo on sky polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuter, A; Emde, C; Blumthaler, M

    2010-11-01

    All-sky distributions of the polarized radiance are measured using an automated fish-eye camera system with a rotating polarizer. For a large range of aerosol and surface albedo situations, the influence on the degree of polarization and sky radiance is investigated. The range of aerosol optical depth and albedo is 0.05-0.5 and 0.1-0.75, respectively. For this range of parameters, a reduction of the degree of polarization from about 0.7 to 0.4 was observed. The analysis is done for 90° scattering angle in the principal plane under clear sky conditions for a broadband channel of 450 ± 25 nm and solar zenith angles between 55° and 60°. Radiative transfer calculations considering three different aerosol mixtures are performed and and agree with the measurements within the statistical error.

  5. Effect of land cover change on snow free surface albedo across the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, J.; Nash, M. S.; Barnes, C. A.

    2016-11-01

    Land cover changes (e.g., forest to grassland) affect albedo, and changes in albedo can influence radiative forcing (warming, cooling). We empirically tested albedo response to land cover change for 130 locations across the continental United States using high resolution (30 m-×-30 m) land cover change data and moderate resolution (~ 500 m-×-500 m) albedo data. The land cover change data spanned 10 years (2001 - 2011) and the albedo data included observations every eight days for 13 years (2001 - 2013). Empirical testing was based on autoregressive time series analysis of snow free albedo for verified locations of land cover change. Approximately one-third of the autoregressive analyses for woody to herbaceous or forest to shrub change classes were not significant, indicating that albedo did not change significantly as a result of land cover change at these locations. In addition, ~ 80% of mean differences in albedo arising from land cover change were less than ± 0.02, a nominal benchmark for precision of albedo measurements that is related to significant changes in radiative forcing. Under snow free conditions, we found that land cover change does not guarantee a significant albedo response, and that the differences in mean albedo response for the majority of land cover change locations were small.

  6. Durability of high-albedo roof coatings and implications for cooling energy savings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretz, S.E.; Akbari, H.

    1994-06-01

    Twenty-six spot albedo measurements of roofs were made using a calibrated pyranometer. The roofs were surfaced with either an acrylic elastomeric coating, a polymer coating with an acrylic base, or a cementitious coating. Some of the roofs` albedos were measured before and after washing to determine whether the albedo decrease was permanent. Data indicated that most of the albedo degradation occurred within the first year, and even within the first two months. On one roof, 70% of one year`s albedo degradation occurred in the first two months. After the first year, the degradation slowed, with data indicating small losses in albedo after the second year. Measurements of seasonal cooling energy savings by Akbari et al. (1993) included the effects of over two months of albedo degradation. We estimated {approximately}20% loss in cooling-energy savings after the first year because of dirt accumulation. For most of the roofs we cleaned, the albedo was restored to within 90% of its initial value. Although washing is effective at restoring albedo, the increase in energy savings is temporary and labor costs are significant in comparison to savings. By our calculations, it is not cost-effective to hire someone to clean a high-albedo roof only to achieve energy savings. Thus, it would be useful to develop and identify dirt-resistant high-albedo coatings.

  7. MISR Level 2 TOA/Cloud Albedo parameters (MIL2TCAL_V2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, David J. (Principal Investigator)

    The TOA/Cloud Albedo data contain albedo values, including finely-sampled or local (2.2 km) TOA albedos registered to the RLRA, and two coarsely-sampled (35.2 km resolution) TOA albedos projected to 30-km altitude. The local (2.2 km) albedos do not take the obscuration of cloud features into account, so they should only be treated as traditional albedos when the number of obscured pixels is low. The restrictive and expansive albedos are both available at 35.2 km resolution: the restrictive albedos are only calculated using the radiation upwelling from the pixel under consideration, whereas the expansive albedos use all the radiation emanating from the surrounding area. Therefore, the expansive albedo is closer to the traditional definition of top-of-atmosphere albedos. [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=2000-02-24; Stop_Date=] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180] [Data_Resolution: Latitude_Resolution=1.1 km; Longitude_Resolution=1.1 km; Temporal_Resolution=about 15 orbits/day].

  8. Colour, albedo and nucleus size of Halley's comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Tholen, D. J.; Hartmann, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    Photometry of Halley's comet in the B, J, V, and K broadband filters during a time when the coma was very weak and presumed to contribute negligibly to the broadband photometry is reported. The V-J and J-K colors suggest that the color of the nucleus of Halley's comet is similar to that of the D-type asteroids, which in turn suggests that the surface of the nucleus has an albedo less than 0.1.

  9. A new dating method by thermoluminescence of carved megalithic stone building. Une nouvelle methode de datation par la thermoluminescence des pierres sculptees megalithique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedro, G. (Athens Univ. (Greece))

    1994-09-08

    A first attempt to develop a new Thermoluminescence (TL) dating method of carved megalithic limestone stones from 'Mycenae' and 'Helleniko' buildings, Peloponnese, Greece, is shown to be encouraging. Based upon the principle of optical bleaching, total TL doses have been measured between 11-17 Gy, while the age of the Mycenean wall, c. 1280 BC, is compatible with the estimated by the new method. (author). 11 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Signatures of volatiles in the lunar proton albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Wilson, J. K.; Looper, M. D.; Jordan, A. P.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Case, A. W.; Iwata, Y.; Kasper, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Lawrence, D. J.; Livadiotis, G.; Mazur, J.; Petro, N.; Pieters, C.; Robinson, M. S.; Smith, S.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C.

    2016-07-01

    We find evidence for hydrated material in the lunar regolith using "albedo protons" measured with the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Fluxes of these albedo protons, which are emitted from the regolith due to steady bombardment by high energy radiation (Galactic Cosmic Rays), are observed to peak near the poles, and are inconsistent with the latitude trends of heavy element enrichment (e.g., enhanced Fe abundance). The latitudinal distribution of albedo protons anti-correlates with that of epithermal or high energy neutrons. The high latitude enhancement may be due to the conversion of upward directed secondary neutrons from the lunar regolith into tertiary protons due to neutron-proton collisions in hydrated regolith that is more prevalent near the poles. The CRaTER instrument may thus provide important measurements of volatile distributions within regolith at the Moon and potentially, with similar sensors and observations, at other bodies within the Solar System.

  11. Signatures of Volatiles in the Lunar Proton Albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Wilson, J. K.; Looper, M. D.; Jordan, A. P.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Case, A. W.; Iwata, Y.; Kasper, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; hide

    2015-01-01

    We find evidence for hydrated material in the lunar regolith using "albedo protons" measured with the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Fluxes of these albedo protons, which are emitted from the regolith due to steady bombardment by high energy radiation (Galactic Cosmic Rays), are observed to peak near the poles, and are inconsistent with the latitude trends of heavy element enrichment (e.g., enhanced Fe abundance). The latitudinal distribution of albedo protons anti-correlates with that of epithermal or high energy neutrons. The high latitude enhancement may be due to the conversion of upward directed secondary neutrons from the lunar regolith into tertiary protons due to neutron-proton collisions in hydrated regolith that is more prevalent near the poles. The CRaTER instrument may thus provide important measurements of volatile distributions within regolith at the Moon and potentially, with similar sensors and observations, at other bodies within the Solar System.

  12. Albedo and Reflection Spectra of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Sudarsky, D; Pinto, P A; Sudarsky, David; Burrows, Adam; Pinto, Philip

    1999-01-01

    We generate theoretical albedo and reflection spectra for a full range of extrasolar giant planet (EGP) models, from Jovian to 51-Pegasi class objects. Our albedo modeling utilizes the latest atomic and molecular cross sections, a Mie theory treatment of extinction by condensates, a variety of particle size distributions, and an extension of the Feautrier radiative transfer method which allows for a general treatment of the scattering phase function. We find that due to qualitative similarities in the compositions and spectra of objects within each of four broad effective temperature ranges, it is natural to establish four representative EGP albedo classes: a ``Jovian'' class (T$_{\\rm eff} \\lesssim 150$ K; Class I) with tropospheric ammonia clouds, a ``water cloud'' class (T$_{\\rm eff} \\sim 250$ K; Class II) primarily affected by condensed H$_2$O, a ``clear'' class (T$_{\\rm eff} \\gtrsim 350$ K; Class III) which lacks clouds, and a high-temperature class (T$_{\\rm{eff}}$ $\\gtrsim$ 900 K; Class IV) for which alk...

  13. Gamma-ray Albedo of Small Solar System Bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskalenko, I.V.

    2008-03-25

    We calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo flux from cosmic-ray (CR) interactions with the solid rock and ice in Main Belt asteroids and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) using the Moon as a template. We show that the {gamma}-ray albedo for the Main Belt and KBOs strongly depends on the small-body mass spectrum of each system and may be detectable by the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). If detected, it can be used to derive the mass spectrum of small bodies in the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt and to probe the spectrum of CR nuclei at close-to-interstellar conditions. The orbits of the Main Belt asteroids and KBOs are distributed near the ecliptic, which passes through the Galactic center and high Galactic latitudes. Therefore, the {gamma}-ray emission by the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt has to be taken into account when analyzing weak {gamma}-ray sources close to the ecliptic. The asteroid albedo spectrum also exhibits a 511 keV line due to secondary positrons annihilating in the rock. This may be an important and previously unrecognized celestial foreground for the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) observations of the Galactic 511 keV line emission including the direction of the Galactic center. For details of our calculations and references see [1].

  14. Albedo polarimétrico de asteroides del grupo Hungaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Hutton, R.; Benavidez, P.

    La región del cinturón de asteroides en donde se encuentra el grupo de los Hungarias (a= 1.79 a 1.98 UA, i=15 a 40 grados) es la única zona donde es común encontrar objetos de tipo taxonómico E, caracterizados por altos albedos, colores relativamente neutros y espectros sin detalles. Este tipo de asteroides está relacionado espectralmente con ciertos meteoritos (aubritas) que indican la existencia de episodios de gran calentamiento que ocurrieron durante la formación del Sistema Solar. Como el espectro de los asteroides de tipo E es idéntico a los de tipo M y P, la única forma de clasificar un asteroide en alguno de estos tres tipos taxonómicos es mediante el albedo. En este trabajo se presentan resultados preliminares sobre la determinación polarimétrica de albedos para objetos de este grupo utilizando el polarímetro CASPROF de CASLEO.

  15. Signatures of Volatiles in the Lunar Proton Albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Wilson, J. K.; Looper, M. D.; Jordan, A. P.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Case, A. W.; Iwata, Y.; Kasper, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Petro, N.

    2015-01-01

    We find evidence for hydrated material in the lunar regolith using "albedo protons" measured with the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Fluxes of these albedo protons, which are emitted from the regolith due to steady bombardment by high energy radiation (Galactic Cosmic Rays), are observed to peak near the poles, and are inconsistent with the latitude trends of heavy element enrichment (e.g., enhanced Fe abundance). The latitudinal distribution of albedo protons anti-correlates with that of epithermal or high energy neutrons. The high latitude enhancement may be due to the conversion of upward directed secondary neutrons from the lunar regolith into tertiary protons due to neutron-proton collisions in hydrated regolith that is more prevalent near the poles. The CRaTER instrument may thus provide important measurements of volatile distributions within regolith at the Moon and potentially, with similar sensors and observations, at other bodies within the Solar System.

  16. The institutionalization of a routine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian

    2008-01-01

    The theoretical ambition in this paper is to contribute to institutionalism, and the literature on organizational routines, by allotting a precise role to the context and the material. Through a theoretical discussion of several perspectives on organizational routines, I argue that materiality-wh...... of production. I argue that the negotiation of these changes during test production is the fulcrum in the routinization of the production procedure. It is through these identity shifts that the valve is both reified, and rendered producible and applicable in the customer world....

  17. Nano-barium–strontium sulfate as a new thermoluminescence dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboelezz, E., E-mail: eslam_genius@hotmail.com [Department of Ionizing Radiation, National Institute for Standards, El-Giza (Egypt); Sharaf, M.A.; Hassan, G.M. [Department of Ionizing Radiation, National Institute for Standards, El-Giza (Egypt); El-Khodary, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University (Egypt)

    2015-10-15

    A sensitive thermoluminescence (Ba{sub 0.88}Sr{sub 0.12}SO{sub 4}){sub 99.8%}:Eu{sub 0.2%} (B88) nano-phosphor has been prepared using the chemical co-precipitation method. A comparative study of B88 nanophosphor with its corresponding prepared micro-crystalline form has been made. The dose response of nano-B88, to γ-ray in low and intermediate ranges, was studied in comparison with micro-phase and reference material (TL-700H). The supralinearity factors for nano/micro-B88 and TL-700H are calculated and compared between them along both low and intermediate dose ranges. The lower detection limit of dose calculation (D{sub LDL}) method is compared with the detection limit (D{sub DL}) and critical level (D{sub CL}) of dose calculation algorithm. According to B88 energy dependence study, it is energy dependent for all photon energies except from 0.8 to 4 MeV due to their high value of effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}=43.5). Nano-B88 is sensitive to light, so the nano-B88 should be stored in dark region away from any source of visible and UV-light. The fading and reusability studies of both nano/micro-B88 samples are also included. The combined and expanded uncertainties that accompanied the radiation dose measurements are calculated. - Highlights: • A comparative study of nano/micro-B88 form has been made. • The sensitivity of both phases for B88 in low range of dose is ≈50 times TL-700H. • The lower detection limit of dose calculation was found to be ≈135 μGy for nano-B88. • B88 is energy independent for photon energies ranging from 0.8 to 4 MeV. • Nano-B88 can be used as a good TL dosimeter in radiation dosimetry.

  18. Multidecadal analysis of forest growth and albedo in boreal Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeš, Petr; Stenberg, Pauline; Mõttus, Matti; Manninen, Terhikki; Rautiainen, Miina

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that forests serve as carbon sinks. However, the balancing effect of afforestation and increased forest density on global warming due to carbon storage may be lost by low albedo (thus high absorption) of the forests. In the last 30 years, there has been a steady increase in the growing stock of Finnish forests by nearly a quarter while the area of the forests has remained virtually unchanged. Such increase in forest density together with the availability of detailed forest inventories provided by the Multi-Source National Forest Inventory (MS-NFI) in high spatial resolution makes Finland an ideal candidate for exploring the effects of increased forest density on satellite derived estimates of bio-geochemical products e.g. albedo (directional-hemispherical reflectance, DHR), fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by canopies (fAPAR), leaf area index (LAI) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) in both current and long-term perspective. In this study, we first used MODIS-based vegetation satellite products for Finnish forests to study their seasonal patterns and interrelations. Next, the peak growing season observations are linked to the MS-NFI database to yield the generic relationships between forest density and the satellite-derived vegetation indicators. Finally, long-term GIMMS3g datasets between 1982 and 2011 (2008 for DHR) are analyzed and interpreted using forest inventory data. The vegetation peak growing season NIR DHR and VIS DHR showed weak to moderate negative correlation with fAPAR, whereas there was no correlation between NIR DHR and fAPAR. Next, we show that the spectral albedos in the near-infrared region (NIR DHR) showed weak negative correlation with forest biomass, basal area or canopy cover whereas, as expected, the spectral albedo in the visible region (VIS DHR) correlated negatively with these measures of forest density. Interestingly, the increase in forest density (biomass per ha) of Finnish

  19. Activation energy of thermoluminescence glow curves in a hyperbolic heating scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shambhunath Singh, W. [Manipur College, Imphal (India). Dept. of Physics; Dorendrajit Singh, S.; Mazumdar, P.S. [Manipur Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics; Deb, N.C. [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta (India). Dept. of Theoretical Physics

    1997-04-07

    We present a set of expressions for the determination of the activation energy of a thermoluminescence peak recorded with a hyperbolic heating scheme. It is demonstrated that the order of kinetics can be estimated from the fractional intensities at the points of inflection of the peak. (author).

  20. Linear heating system for measurement of thermoluminescence using 8031/51 microcontroller

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Neelamegam; A Rajendran

    2003-08-01

    A linear heating system is developed using a 8031/51 microcontroller for the measurement of thermoluminescence (TL) in alkali halides and other related compounds. This system also measures the temperature and the amount of light emitted by the sample for TL studies.

  1. Thermally stimulated conductivity and thermoluminescence from Al2O3 : C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersnap Larsen, N.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; McKeever, S.W.S.

    1999-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of thermoluminescence (TL) and thermally stimulated conductivity (TSC) are reported on single-crystal dosimetry-quality Al2O3:C following gamma irradiation at room temperature. Analysis of the data reveals a superposition of several first-order TL and TSC peaks caused...

  2. Year 2000 compliance concerns with the ISA Thermoluminescent Dosimetry Data Processing (TL-DP) software system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saviz, K.

    1998-05-26

    The year 2000 is rapidly approaching, and there is a good chance that computer systems that utilize two digit year dates will experience problems in retrieval of date information. The ISA Thermoluminescent Dosimetry Data Processing (TL-DP) software and computer system has been reviewed for Year 2000 compliance issues.

  3. Thermoluminescence of zirconium oxide nanostructured to mammography X-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, L.L. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-Legaria, IPN. Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rivera, T., E-mail: trivera@ipn.mx [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-Legaria, IPN. Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Roman, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-Legaria, IPN. Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Azorin, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa. Av. San Rafael Atlixco 187, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Gaona, E. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco. Calz. Del Hueso 1100, 04960 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2012-07-15

    In the present work thermoluminescent (TL) response of zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) nanostructured induced by mammography X-ray radiation was investigated. Measurements were made of the response per unit air kerma of ZrO{sub 2} with mammography equipment parameters (semiautomatic exposure control, 24 kVp and 108 mAs). The calibration curves were obtained by simultaneously irradiating ZrO{sub 2} samples and ion chamber. Samples of ZrO{sub 2} showed a linear response as a function of entrance skin air kerma. The observed results in TL properties suggest that ZrO{sub 2} nanostructured could be considered as an effective material for X-ray beams dosimetry if appropriate calibration procedures are performed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray low energy thermoluminescent of ZrO{sub 2} dosimeter is developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Air kerma measurements were made by thermoluminescent dosimeter ZrO{sub 2} using mammography equipment parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Entrance surface skin doses were made using thermoluminescent dosimeter of ZrO{sub 2} to X-ray beam quality control.

  4. Authenticity test in ceramics and archaeological figures by thermoluminescence; Prueba de Autenticidad en ceramicas y figuras arqueologicas por termoluminiscencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez L, A.; Schaaf, P. [Laboratorio de Termoluminiscencia, Instituto de Geofisica-UNAM (Mexico); Filloy, L. [Museo Nacional de Antropologia e Historia, Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    At present exists quite a lot of false archaeological pieces which provokes doubts about the legitimacy of the pieces. In this work it is presented the Authenticity test by Thermoluminescence realized at the urn of the goddess 13 serpent of the zapotec culture of Oaxaca which is exposed in Mexico City. The original piece contains crystalline structures which present hardly the thermoluminescence phenomena by the presence of {sup 238} U, {sup 232} Th, and {sup 40} K getting with this the form and intensity of the natural thermoluminescence curve of an archaeological piece which shows a Tl peak and allows to know so if it was made recently or not. (Author)

  5. On the determination of the activation energy of a thermoluminescence peak by using the points of inflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gartia, R.K.; Singh, S.J.; Singh, T.S.C.; Mazumdar, P.S. (Manipur Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-08-14

    It has been shown that the points of inflection of a thermoluminescence peak can indicate its order of kinetics. Also a new set of expressions is derived to evaluate the thermal activation energy of a thermoluminescence peak of any order of kinetics using the points of inflection. The validity of these expressions is discussed by calculating the thermal activation energy of a number of numerically computed thermoluminescence peaks using the present sets of expressions and comparing them with those calculated using the formulae of a previous author. (author).

  6. Time-Dependent and Light-Induced Fading in Victoreen Model 2600-80 Aluminum Oxide Thermoluminescence Dosemeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    2600-80 Aluminium Oxide Thermoluminescence Dosemeters ":"TIC,7 • :+ " 7-t-•CTE S , E 1P 1993 F’ t LEA l E J. H. Musk AFRRI TR93-6 Cleared for Public...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Time-Dependent and Light-Induced Fading in Victoreen0 Model 2600-80 Aluminium Oxide Thermoluminescence PE: QAXM...MODEL 2600-80 ALUMINIUM OXIDE THERMOLUMINESCENCE DOSEMETERS J. H. Musk Accesion For NTIS CRA&I DTIC TAB U.,announced D Justification ........ -.. By

  7. Robust estimation of albedo for illumination-invariant matching and shape recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Soma; Aggarwal, Gaurav; Chellappa, Rama

    2009-05-01

    We present a nonstationary stochastic filtering framework for the task of albedo estimation from a single image. There are several approaches in the literature for albedo estimation, but few include the errors in estimates of surface normals and light source direction to improve the albedo estimate. The proposed approach effectively utilizes the error statistics of surface normals and illumination direction for robust estimation of albedo, for images illuminated by single and multiple light sources. The albedo estimate obtained is subsequently used to generate albedo-free normalized images for recovering the shape of an object. Traditional Shape-from-Shading (SFS) approaches often assume constant/piecewise constant albedo and known light source direction to recover the underlying shape. Using the estimated albedo, the general problem of estimating the shape of an object with varying albedo map and unknown illumination source is reduced to one that can be handled by traditional SFS approaches. Experimental results are provided to show the effectiveness of the approach and its application to illumination-invariant matching and shape recovery. The estimated albedo maps are compared with the ground truth. The maps are used as illumination-invariant signatures for the task of face recognition across illumination variations. The recognition results obtained compare well with the current state-of-the-art approaches. Impressive shape recovery results are obtained using images downloaded from the Web with little control over imaging conditions. The recovered shapes are also used to synthesize novel views under novel illumination conditions.

  8. [Temporal and Spatial Characteristics of Lake Taihu Surface Albedo and Its Impact Factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang; Li, Xu-hui; Zhang, Mi; Liu, Shou-dong; Xiao, Wei; Xiao, Qi-tao; Xu, Jia-ping

    2015-10-01

    Lake surface albedo determines energy balance of water-atmospheric interface and water physical environment. Solar elevation angle, cloudiness, wind speed, water quality and other factors can affect lake surface albedo. Using solar radiation, wind speed, and water quality data (turbidity and chlorophyll-a concentration) which were observed in four eddy covariance sites (Meiliangwan, Dapukou, Bifenggang and Xiaoleishan i. e. MLW, DPK, BFG and XLS) in Lake Taihu and clearness index (k(t)), the influence of these factors on Lake Taihu surface albedo and the reasons that led to its spatial difference were investigated. The results showed that solar elevation angle played a leading role in the diurnal and seasonal change of lake surface albedo; lake surface albedo reached two peaks in 0 BFG > DPK > MLW. XLS and BFG belonged to the higher albedo group, while DPK and MLW belonged to the lower albedo group. The different biological environments caused by aquatic macrophytes and algae resulting in the spatial variation of Lake Taihu surface albedo. The relationship between albedo and chlorophyll-a concentration was not a very sensitive factor for indicating the outbreak of algae. This study can provide theoretical reference for lake albedo parameterization.

  9. Routines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    Melser and Michie (1970), 135-151. Sacerdoti, Earl D, [1977], A structure for plans and behavior, Elsevier. * Sartre , Jean - Paul , [1976], Critique of...theorem proving to problem solving," Artificial Intelligence, 2 (3) 189-208. Fitts, Paul M and Michael I Posner, [1967], Human performance, Brooks/Cole...Laing, R D and A Esterson, [1964], Sanity, Madness, and the Family, Tavistock. Laird, John E, Paul Rosenbloom, and Allen Newell, [1984], Towards

  10. Climatic Benefit of Swiss Forest Cover Change: Including Albedo Change into Net Carbon Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaab, J.; Lehning, M.; Bebi, P.

    2012-12-01

    Forests influence climate through physical, chemical and biological processes. It has been shown that warming caused by the comparatively low albedo of forests (albedo-effect), can reduce or even exceed cooling caused by carbon storage in forests (CO2-effect). Although warming caused by albedo and the amount of carbon storage depend on local characteristics, studies are lacking that investigate the combined local patterns of albedo and CO2-effect. Our study area, Switzerland, provides a variety of geographical features and thus the possibility to show how different geographical variables influence the two effects. We used the concept of radiative forcing to compare the effect of a changing albedo and a change in atmospheric CO2 concentration due to land cover change in the past. The change of forest cover was analysed over a period of 12 years based on aerial photographs. We estimate the albedo-effect by combining albedo data derived from the satellite sensor MODIS and data on snow cover derived from the satellite sensor AVHRR. Changes in carbon storage were calculated as differences in biomass and soil stocks of specific land cover classes. We found carbon storage induced cooling to be higher than albedo induced warming everywhere in Switzerland. However, especially in altitudes over 1200 m the albedo-effect reduced the benefits of carbon storage by more than 50%. In lower altitudes the albedo change was less important. The albedo-effect in altitudes above 1200 m was more relevant because of a more persistent snow-cover, a slightly higher global radiation and less additional carbon storage. The relevance of warming caused by an albedo change did not only depend on altitude, but also on the characteristics of forest cover change. While transitions from open land to open forest were accompanied by high albedo changes, the albedo change was only marginal if open forest turned into closed forest. Since snow cover has a large influence on the albedo effect, we included

  11. Using albedo to reform wind erosion modelling, mapping and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Webb, Nicholas P.

    2016-12-01

    Wind erosion and dust emission models are used to assess the impacts of dust on radiative forcing in the atmosphere, cloud formation, nutrient fertilisation and human health. The models are underpinned by a two-dimensional geometric property (lateral cover; L) used to characterise the three-dimensional aerodynamic roughness (sheltered area or wakes) of the Earth's surface and calibrate the momentum it extracts from the wind. We reveal a fundamental weakness in L and demonstrate that values are an order of magnitude too small and significant aerodynamic interactions between roughness elements and their sheltered areas have been omitted, particularly under sparse surface roughness. We describe a solution which develops published work to establish a relation between sheltered area and the proportion of shadow over a given area; the inverse of direct beam directional hemispherical reflectance (black sky albedo; BSA). We show direct relations between shadow and wind tunnel measurements and thereby provide direct calibrations of key aerodynamic properties. Estimation of the aerodynamic parameters from albedo enables wind erosion assessments over areas, across platforms from the field to airborne and readily available satellite data. Our new approach demonstrated redundancy in existing wind erosion models and thereby reduced model complexity and improved fidelity. We found that the use of albedo enabled an adequate description of aerodynamic sheltering to characterise fluid dynamics and predict sediment transport without the use of a drag partition scheme (Rt) or threshold friction velocity (u∗t). We applied the calibrations to produce global maps of aerodynamic properties which showed very similar spatial patterns to each other and confirmed the redundancy in the traditional parameters of wind erosion modelling. We evaluated temporal patterns of predicted horizontal mass flux at locations across Australia which revealed variation between land cover types that would not

  12. Can increasing albedo of existing ship wakes reduce climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Julia A.; Jackson, Lawrence S.; Forster, Piers M.

    2016-02-01

    Solar radiation management schemes could potentially alleviate the impacts of global warming. One such scheme could be to brighten the surface of the ocean by increasing the albedo and areal extent of bubbles in the wakes of existing shipping. Here we show that ship wake bubble lifetimes would need to be extended from minutes to days, requiring the addition of surfactant, for ship wake area to be increased enough to have a significant forcing. We use a global climate model to simulate brightening the wakes of existing shipping by increasing wake albedo by 0.2 and increasing wake lifetime by ×1440. This yields a global mean radiative forcing of -0.9 ± 0.6 Wm-2 (-1.8 ± 0.9 Wm-2 in the Northern Hemisphere) and a 0.5°C reduction of global mean surface temperature with greater cooling over land and in the Northern Hemisphere, partially offsetting greenhouse gas warming. Tropical precipitation shifts southward but remains within current variability. The hemispheric forcing asymmetry of this scheme is due to the asymmetry in the distribution of existing shipping. If wake lifetime could reach ~3 months, the global mean radiative forcing could potentially reach -3 Wm-2. Increasing wake area through increasing bubble lifetime could result in a greater temperature reduction, but regional precipitation would likely deviate further from current climatology as suggested by results from our uniform ocean albedo simulation. Alternatively, additional ships specifically for the purpose of geoengineering could be used to produce a larger and more hemispherically symmetrical forcing.

  13. Albedo and laser threshold of a diffusive Raman gain medium

    CERN Document Server

    Selden, Adrian C

    2010-01-01

    The diffuse reflectance (albedo) and transmittance of a Raman random gain medium are calculated via semi-analytic two-stream equations with power-dependent coefficients. The results show good qualitative agreement with the experimental data for barium nitrate powder. A divergence in reflectance at a critical gain is interpreted as the threshold for diffusive Raman laser generation. The dependence of the generation threshold on the scattering parameters is analysed and the feedback effect of Fresnel reflection at the gain boundaries evaluated. The addition of external mirrors, particularly at the pumped surface, significantly reduces the threshold gain.

  14. Oceanic phytoplankton, atmospheric sulphur, cloud albedo and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlson, Robert J.; Warren, Stephen G.; Lovelock, James E.; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    1987-04-01

    The major source of cloud-condensation nuclei (CCN) over the oceans appears to be dimethylsulphide, which is produced by planktonic algae in sea water and oxidizes in the atmosphere to form a sulphate aerosol. Because the reflectance (albedo) of clouds (and thus the earth's radiation budget) is sensitive to CCN density, biological regulation of the climate is possible through the effects of temperature and sunlight on phytoplankton population and dimethylsulphide production. To counteract the warming due to doubling of atmospheric CO2, an approximate doubling of CCN would be needed.

  15. Albedo parametrization and reversibility of sea ice decay

    OpenAIRE

    M. Müller-Stoffels; R. Wackerbauer

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic's sea ice cover has been receding rapidly in recent years, and global climate models typically predict a further decline over the next century. It is an open question whether a possible loss of Arctic sea ice is reversible. We study the stability of Arctic model sea ice in a conceptual, two-dimensional energy-based regular network model of the ice-ocean layer that considers ARM's longwave radiative budget data and SHEBA albedo measurements. Seasonal ice cover, perennial ice and per...

  16. Land Surface Albedos Computed from BRF Measurements with a Study of Conversion Formulae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aku Riihelä

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Land surface hemispherical albedos of several targets have been resolved using the bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF library of the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI. The library contains BRF data measured by FGI during the years 2003–2009. Surface albedos are calculated using selected BRF datasets from the library. Polynomial interpolation and extrapolation have been used in computations. Several broadband conversion formulae generally used for satellite based surface albedo retrieval have been tested. The albedos were typically found to monotonically increase with increasing zenith angle of the Sun. The surface albedo variance was significant even within each target category / surface type. In general, the albedo estimates derived using diverse broadband conversion formulas and estimates obtained by direct integration of the measured spectra were in line.

  17. Earth's albedo variations 1998-2014 as measured from ground-based earthshine observations

    CERN Document Server

    Palle, E; Montanes-Rodriguez, P Pilar; Shumko, A; Gonzalez-Merino, B; Lombilla, C Martinez; Jimenez-Ibarra, F; Shumko, S; Sanroma, E; Hulist, A; Miles-Paez, P; Murgas, F; Nowak, G; Koonin, SE

    2016-01-01

    The Earth's albedo is a fundamental climate parameter for understanding the radiation budget of the atmosphere. It has been traditionally measured from space platforms, but also from the ground for sixteen years from Big Bear Solar Observatory by observing the Moon. The photometric ratio of the dark (earthshine) to the bright (moonshine) sides of the Moon is used to determine nightly anomalies in the terrestrial albedo, with the aim is of quantifying sustained monthly, annual and/or decadal changes. We find two modest decadal scale cycles in the albedo, but with no significant net change over the sixteen years of accumulated data. Within the evolution of the two cycles, we find periods of sustained annual increases, followed by comparable sustained decreases in albedo. The evolution of the earthshine albedo is in remarkable agreement with that from the CERES instruments, although each method measures different slices of the Earth's Bond albedo.

  18. Earth's albedo variations 1998-2014 as measured from ground-based earthshine observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palle, E.; Goode, P. R.; Montañés-Rodríguez, P.; Shumko, A.; Gonzalez-Merino, B.; Lombilla, C. Martinez; Jimenez-Ibarra, F.; Shumko, S.; Sanroma, E.; Hulist, A.; Miles-Paez, P.; Murgas, F.; Nowak, G.; Koonin, S. E.

    2016-05-01

    The Earth's albedo is a fundamental climate parameter for understanding the radiation budget of the atmosphere. It has been traditionally measured not only from space platforms but also from the ground for 16 years from Big Bear Solar Observatory by observing the Moon. The photometric ratio of the dark (earthshine) to the bright (moonshine) sides of the Moon is used to determine nightly anomalies in the terrestrial albedo, with the aim of quantifying sustained monthly, annual, and/or decadal changes. We find two modest decadal scale cycles in the albedo, but with no significant net change over the 16 years of accumulated data. Within the evolution of the two cycles, we find periods of sustained annual increases, followed by comparable sustained decreases in albedo. The evolution of the earthshine albedo is in remarkable agreement with that from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System instruments, although each method measures different slices of the Earth's Bond albedo.

  19. Detecting Low-Contrast Features in the Cosmic Ray Albedo Proton Map of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. K.; Schwadron, N.; Spence, H. E.; Golightly, M. J.; Case, A. W.; Smith, S.; Blake, J. B.; Kasper, J.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C.; Stubbs, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    High energy cosmic rays constantly bombard the lunar regolith, producing (via nuclear evaporation) secondary 'albedo' or 'splash' particles like protons and neutrons, some of which escape back to space. Lunar Prospector and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), have shown that the energy distribution of albedo neutrons is modulated by the elemental composition of the lunar regolith, and by ice deposits in permanently shadowed polar craters. Here we investigate an analogous phenomenon with high energy ((is) approximately 100 MeV) lunar albedo protons.

  20. Hole traps in Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu ceramic scintillators. II. Radioluminescence and thermoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartram, R.H. E-mail: rhbartram2@aol.com; Lempicki, A.; Kappers, L.A.; Hamilton, D.S

    2004-03-01

    A sample of Eu{sup 3+}-activated lutetium sesquioxide transparent ceramic has been investigated by combined scintillation and thermoluminescence excited by prolonged gamma-ray irradiation. The thermoluminescence glow curve partially confirms and extends a previous model for afterglow following pulsed X-ray excitation. The initial concentration of hole traps, tentatively attributed to anion Frenkel defects in thermodynamic equilibrium, is found to be substantially augmented by reversible radiation damage.

  1. A Tailorable Structural Composite for GCR and Albedo Neutron Protection on the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A tailorable structural composite that will provide protection from the lunar radiation environment, including GCR and albedo neutrons will be developed. This...

  2. Investigating the spread in surface albedo for snow-covered forests in CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libo; Cole, Jason N. S.; Bartlett, Paul; Verseghy, Diana; Derksen, Chris; Brown, Ross; Salzen, Knut

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the role of leaf/plant area index (LAI/PAI) specification on the large spread of winter albedo simulated by climate models. To examine the sensitivity of winter albedo to LAI, we perform a sensitivity analysis using two methods commonly used to compute albedo in snow-covered forests as well as diagnostic calculations within version 4.2 of the Canadian Atmospheric Model for which PAI is systematically varied. The results show that the simulated albedo is very sensitive to negative PAI biases, especially for smaller PAI values. The LAI and surface albedo of boreal forests in the presence of snow simulated by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models are evaluated using satellite observations. The evaluation of CMIP5 models suggest that inaccurate tree cover fraction due to improper plant functional type specification or erroneous LAI parameterization in some models explains, in part, an observed positive bias in winter albedo over boreal forest regions of the Northern Hemisphere. This contributes to a large intermodel spread in simulated surface albedo in the presence of snow over these regions and is largely responsible for uncertainties in simulated snow-albedo feedback strength. Errors are largest (+20-40%) in models with large underestimation of LAI but are typically within ±15% when simulated LAI is within the observed range. This study underscores the importance of accurate representation of vegetation distribution and parameters in realistic simulation of surface albedo.

  3. Modeling Earth Albedo Currents on Sun Sensors for Improved Vector Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Earth albedo influences vector measurements of the solar line of sight vector, due to the induced current on in the photo voltaics of Sun sensors. Although advanced digital Sun sensors exist, these are typically expensive and may not be suited for satellites in the nano or pico-class. Previously...... data, showing significant improvement in the Earth albedo induced current estimates. Additionally an algorithm for utilizing the Earth albedo model in obtaining a vector observation pair which is superior to the solar line of sight vector pair. It is concluded that the Earth albedo model is valid...

  4. Investigating the spread of surface albedo in snow covered forests in CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libo; Cole, Jason; Bartlett, Paul; Verseghy, Diana; Derksen, Chris; Brown, Ross; von Salzen, Knut

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the role of leaf/plant area index (LAI/PAI) specification on the large spread of winter albedo simulated by climate models. To examine the sensitivity of winter albedo to LAI, we perform a sensitivity analysis using two methods commonly used to compute albedo in snow-covered forests as well as diagnostic calculations within version 4.2 of the Canadian Atmospheric Model for which PAI is systematically varied. The results show that the simulated albedo is very sensitive to negative PAI biases, especially for smaller PAI values. The LAI and surface albedo of boreal forests in the presence of snow simulated by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models are evaluated using satellite observations. The evaluation of CMIP5 models suggest that inaccurate tree cover fraction due to improper plant functional type specification or erroneous LAI parameterization in some models explains, in part, an observed positive bias in winter albedo over boreal forest regions of the Northern Hemisphere. This contributes to a large intermodel spread in simulated surface albedo in the presence of snow over these regions and is largely responsible for uncertainties in simulated snow-albedo feedback strength. Errors are largest (+20-40 %) in models with large underestimation of LAI but are typically within ±15% when simulated LAI is within the observed range. This study underscores the importance of accurate representation of vegetation distribution and parameters in realistic simulation of surface albedo.

  5. Lunar Proton Albedo Anomalies: Soil, Surveyors, and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. K.; Schwadron, N.; Spence, H. E.; Case, A. W.; Golightly, M. J.; Jordan, A.; Looper, M. D.; Petro, N. E.; Robinson, M. S.; Stubbs, T. J.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Blake, J. B.; Kasper, J. C.; Mazur, J. E.; Smith, S. S.; Townsend, L. W.

    2014-12-01

    Since the launch of LRO in 2009, the CRaTER instrument has been mapping albedo protons (~100 MeV) from the Moon. These protons are produced by nuclear spallation, a consequence of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) bombardment of the lunar regolith. Just as spalled neutrons and gamma rays reveal elemental abundances in the lunar regolith, albedo protons may be a complimentary method for mapping compositional variations. We presently find that the lunar maria have an average proton yield 0.9% ±0.3% higher than the average yield in the highlands; this is consistent with neutron data that is sensitive to the regolith's average atomic weight. We also see cases where two or more adjacent pixels (15° × 15°) have significantly anomalous yields above or below the mean. These include two high-yielding regions in the maria, and three low-yielding regions in the far-side highlands. Some of the regions could be artifacts of Poisson noise, but for completeness we consider possible effects from compositional anomalies in the lunar regolith, including pyroclastic flows, antipodes of fresh craters, and so-called "red spots". We also consider man-made landers and crash sites that may have brought elements not normally found in the lunar regolith.

  6. Tackling regional climate change by leaf albedo bio-geoengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgwell, Andy; Singarayer, Joy S; Hetherington, Alistair M; Valdes, Paul J

    2009-01-27

    The likelihood that continuing greenhouse-gas emissions will lead to an unmanageable degree of climate change has stimulated the search for planetary-scale technological solutions for reducing global warming ("geoengineering"), typically characterized by the necessity for costly new infrastructures and industries. We suggest that the existing global infrastructure associated with arable agriculture can help, given that crop plants exert an important influence over the climatic energy budget because of differences in their albedo (solar reflectivity) compared to soils and to natural vegetation. Specifically, we propose a "bio-geoengineering" approach to mitigate surface warming, in which crop varieties having specific leaf glossiness and/or canopy morphological traits are specifically chosen to maximize solar reflectivity. We quantify this by modifying the canopy albedo of vegetation in prescribed cropland areas in a global-climate model, and thereby estimate the near-term potential for bio-geoengineering to be a summertime cooling of more than 1 degrees C throughout much of central North America and midlatitude Eurasia, equivalent to seasonally offsetting approximately one-fifth of regional warming due to doubling of atmospheric CO(2). Ultimately, genetic modification of plant leaf waxes or canopy structure could achieve greater temperature reductions, although better characterization of existing intraspecies variability is needed first.

  7. Albedo parametrization and reversibility of sea ice decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Stoffels, M.; Wackerbauer, R.

    2012-02-01

    The Arctic's sea ice cover has been receding rapidly in recent years, and global climate models typically predict a further decline over the next century. It is an open question whether a possible loss of Arctic sea ice is reversible. We study the stability of Arctic model sea ice in a conceptual, two-dimensional energy-based regular network model of the ice-ocean layer that considers ARM's longwave radiative budget data and SHEBA albedo measurements. Seasonal ice cover, perennial ice and perennial open water are asymptotic states accessible by the model. We show that the shape of albedo parameterization near the melting temperature differentiates between reversible continuous sea ice decrease under atmospheric forcing and hysteresis behavior. Fixed points induced solely by the surface energy budget are essential for understanding the interaction of surface energy with the radiative forcing and the underlying body of ice/water, particularly close to a bifurcation point. Future studies will explore ice edge stability and reversibility in this lattice model, generalized to a latitudinal transect with spatiotemporal lateral atmospheric heat transfer and high spatial resolution.

  8. Albedo parametrization and reversibility of sea ice decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Müller-Stoffels

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic's sea ice cover has been receding rapidly in recent years, and global climate models typically predict a further decline over the next century. It is an open question whether a possible loss of Arctic sea ice is reversible. We study the stability of Arctic model sea ice in a conceptual, two-dimensional energy-based regular network model of the ice-ocean layer that considers ARM's longwave radiative budget data and SHEBA albedo measurements. Seasonal ice cover, perennial ice and perennial open water are asymptotic states accessible by the model. We show that the shape of albedo parameterization near the melting temperature differentiates between reversible continuous sea ice decrease under atmospheric forcing and hysteresis behavior. Fixed points induced solely by the surface energy budget are essential for understanding the interaction of surface energy with the radiative forcing and the underlying body of ice/water, particularly close to a bifurcation point. Future studies will explore ice edge stability and reversibility in this lattice model, generalized to a latitudinal transect with spatiotemporal lateral atmospheric heat transfer and high spatial resolution.

  9. Thermoluminescence of LaAlO{sub 3}; Termoluminescencia de LaAlO{sub 3}:Dy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales H, A.; Zarate M, J. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Instituto de Investigacion en Metalurgia y Materiales, Ciudad Universitaria, Edif. U, 58060 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin N, J., E-mail: feyo_yo@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper the thermoluminescent properties of doped lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO{sub 3}) with dysprosium ion (Dy) were studied. The thermoluminescence characteristics in the samples were obtained using an ultraviolet radiation of 220 nm. The LaAlO{sub 3}:Dy samples were prepared by the modified Pechini method (Spray Dryer). The structural and morphological characterization was obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (Sem) techniques respectively. The size particle composing the agglomerate was determined by Sem, agglomerated particles composed size of 2μm were observed. The thermoluminescence response of LaAlO{sub 3}:Dy was compared with that obtained with the undoped sample. Thermoluminescence brightness curves of LaAlO{sub 3}:Dy showed a peak centered at 185 grades C. Sensitivity of doped sample was greater, about 100 times compared with the undoped sample. Thermoluminescence response in function of the wavelength showed a maximum at 220 nm. Also the fading in thermoluminescence response was studied. (Author)

  10. Microfoundations of Routines and Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felin, Tippo; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Heimericks, Koen H.;

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the Special Issue and discusses the microfoundations of routines and capabilities, including why a microfoundations view is needed and how it may inform work on organizational and competitive heterogeneity. Building on extant research, we identify three primary categories...

  11. Thermoluminescence of sulfated zircon exposed to gamma radiation; Termoluminiscencia de circonia sulfatada expuesta a radiacion gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio, E.; Castano, V.M. [Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, UNAM, A.P. 1-1010, 76000 Queretaro (Mexico); Mendoza A, E.; Gonzalez, P.R. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In this work, the thermoluminescent (Tl) signal induced by gamma radiation in zirconia and sulfated zirconia samples embedded in Ptfe pellets is reported and discussed. In this case, samples were obtained through sol-gel method using zirconium n-propoxide and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} as precursors, and later were subjected to thermal treatment at 600 C to obtain, the tetragonal phase accordingly to X-ray diffraction analysis. Experimental results show that the thermoluminescent glow peak depends on both, the crystalline structure and sulfate concentration. Two maximum peaks were observed located at 147 C and 274 C arising from the electronic transitions. Tl response as a function of the absorbed dose shows a linear increase for a wide of range exposure as well as good stability in time. The high sensitivity, dose linearity and signal stability of this material open the potential possibility to be used for the dosimetry applications. (Author)

  12. Thermoluminescent dosemeter in a X-ray diffractometer; Dosimetria termoluminiscente en un difractometro de rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza A, D.; Gonzalez M, P.; Falcon B, T. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Castano, V.M. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Laboratorio Juriquilla, A.P. 1-1010, C.P. 76001, Queretaro (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    In this work it was presented the results obtained of the dosimetry which was realized in a X-ray diffractometer for powders, trademark Siemens D5000, using the thermoluminescent signal generated by the X-rays in the commercial dosemeter TLD-100 of Harshaw, US. In according to the results obtained, the radiation quantity received by an analysed material in the diffractometer, will be proportional to exposure time and it can vary from unities until tenths of grays. These results are very outstanding when are analysed crystalline materials in a diffractometer, for knowing the present crystalline phases, mainly if these are highly sensitive to the ionizing radiation, as it is the case of the thermoluminescent materials. (Author)

  13. The initial rise method extended to multiple trapping levels in thermoluminescent materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furetta, C; Guzmán, S; Ruiz, B; Cruz-Zaragoza, E

    2011-02-01

    The well known Initial Rise Method (IR) is commonly used to determine the activation energy when only one glow peak is presented and analysed in the phosphor materials. However, when the glow peak is more complex, a wide peak and some holders appear in the structure. The application of the Initial Rise Method is not valid because multiple trapping levels are considered and then the thermoluminescent analysis becomes difficult to perform. This paper shows the case of a complex glow curve structure as an example and shows that the calculation is also possible using the IR method. The aim of the paper is to extend the well known Initial Rise Method (IR) to the case of multiple trapping levels. The IR method is applied to minerals extracted from Nopal cactus and Oregano spices because the thermoluminescent glow curve's shape suggests a trap distribution instead of a single trapping level.

  14. The initial rise method extended to multiple trapping levels in thermoluminescent materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furetta, C. [CICATA-Legaria, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Guzman, S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ruiz, B. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Departamento de Agricultura y Ganaderia, Universidad de Sonora, A.P. 305, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Cruz-Zaragoza, E., E-mail: ecruz@nucleares.unam.m [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-02-15

    The well known Initial Rise Method (IR) is commonly used to determine the activation energy when only one glow peak is presented and analysed in the phosphor materials. However, when the glow peak is more complex, a wide peak and some holders appear in the structure. The application of the Initial Rise Method is not valid because multiple trapping levels are considered and then the thermoluminescent analysis becomes difficult to perform. This paper shows the case of a complex glow curve structure as an example and shows that the calculation is also possible using the IR method. The aim of the paper is to extend the well known Initial Rise Method (IR) to the case of multiple trapping levels. The IR method is applied to minerals extracted from Nopal cactus and Oregano spices because the thermoluminescent glow curve's shape suggests a trap distribution instead of a single trapping level.

  15. Photoluminescence and thermoluminescence studies of CaAl2O4:Dy(3+) phosphor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziyauddin, Mohammad; Tigga, Shalinta; Brahme, Nameeta; Bisen, D P

    2016-02-01

    Calcium aluminate phosphors activated by Dy(3+) have been prepared by a combustion method at a temperature of 600°C. Photoluminescence (PL) and thermoluminescence (TL) properties of gamma-irradiated Dy-doped calcium aluminate were investigated. The PL spectrum shows a broad peak around 488 nm and 573 nm, under 347 nm excitation. Thermoluminescence studies were performed for different concentrations of Dy. Optimum intensity of photoluminescence was found for 0.02 mol% concentration of Dy. It was found that initially the peak TL intensity increases with increasing concentration of Dy in the CaAl2O4 host, attains a maximum value for 0.05 mol% concentration and decreases with further increase in the doping concentration due to concentration quenching. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Irradiation for dating Brazilian fish fossil by thermoluminescence and EPR technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullasi, H.S.; Andrade, M.B.; Ayta, W.E.F.; Frade, M.; Sastry, M.D.; Watanabe, S

    2004-01-01

    Fish fossil from Ceara State, Brazil has been investigated using thermoluminescence and EPR method. In both cases, additive method has been used by irradiating fossil samples to very high doses (tens of kGy). In the case of thermoluminescence, 360 deg. C peak was used for dating. Since the fish fossil contains relatively high concentration of Mn, the EPR Mn{sup 2+}-lines cover carbonate and sulfate radicals signal (sulfur is also present in large amount), therefore 50 mW microwave power was used for EPR measurements. At this high power region Mn{sup 2+}-lines become very little intense and SO{sub 2}{sup -} and CO{sub 2}{sup -} can be detected. Both TL and EPR dating presented an age around 8 Ma. Correction due to spontaneous decay of 360 deg. C peak at ambient temperature gives rise to about {approx}24 Ma of age.

  17. Natural thermoluminescence of fossil foraminiferals as a potential proxy for deep-sea temperature changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Haisheng; FANG Nianqiao; HOU Shengli; CHEN Yexun

    2008-01-01

    Foraminiferal shells from two piston cores separately located at the Ninetyeast Ridge and the Bengal Fan of the Indian Ocean were selected and purified for measurements of natural thermoluminescence (NTL) intensity by a high precision thermoluminescence meter ( RGD-3 ).Variations of the NTL intensity along the two core sequences both spanning the last two glacial-interglacial cycles displayed a strong,identical signal of the global ice volume cycles,which matched well with their corresponding oxygen isotope data.As higher NTL intensity occurred within interglacial periods and changes in an NTL signal were most likely influ-enced by the temperature of ambient seawater in which the planktonic foraminiferal shells long existed,the NTL signal could be considered as a potential proxy for orbital scale temperature changes of bottom seawater in the tropical Indian Ocean.

  18. Thermoluminescence investigations in X-ray irradiated CaS phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikary, S. [Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines University, Dhanbad 826004 (India); Choubey, A., E-mail: anjani_physics@yahoo.co [Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines University, Dhanbad 826004 (India); Das, S.; Sharma, S.K.; Manam, J. [Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines University, Dhanbad 826004 (India)

    2010-01-07

    We report the thermoluminescence studies of X-ray irradiated CaS phosphor. The CaS phosphor was prepared by solid-state diffusion method and characterized by X-ray diffraction technique (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) glow curves of X-ray irradiated CaS sample have two glow peaks at temperatures 100 and 130 {sup o}C. A reliable dosimetric study of a thermoluminescence material is based on good knowledge of its trapping parameters. The trapping parameters namely activation energy, order of kinetics and frequency factor associated with the prominent glow peak (130 {sup o}C) of CaS phosphor were calculated by using isothermal decay and glow curve shape (Chen's) methods.

  19. Absorbed dose measurements on external surface of Kosmos-satellites with glass thermoluminescent detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akatov YuA; Arkhangelsky, V V; Kovalev, E E; Spurny, F; Votochkova, I

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we present absorbed dose measurements with glass thermoluminescent detectors on external surface of satellites of Kosmos-serie flying in 1983-87. Experiments were performed with thermoluminescent aluminophosphate glasses of thicknesses 0.1, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 1 mm. They were exposed in sets of total thickness between 5 and 20 mm, which were protected against sunlight with thin aluminized foils. In all missions, extremely high absorbed dose values were observed in the first layers of detectors, up to the thickness of 0.2 to 0.5 gcm-2. These experimental results confirm that, during flights at 250 to 400 km, doses on the surface of the satellites are very high, due to the low energy component of the proton and electron radiation.

  20. Influence of the alumina microstructure and composition in thermoluminescence for using in dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, M R

    2001-01-01

    Among its various applications alumina may be used in thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) to radiations. The TLD are commonly used to determine the absorbed doses of radiation received in many application fields as nuclear installations, radiodiagnostic and radiotherapy in medicine. In this work it was developed a study of the influence of the microstructure, grain size and composition on the thermoluminescent properties in alumina (pure and carbon doped). The alumina and carbon powders used as starting materials were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), chemical analysis, particle size distribution and surface area were determined by and BET analysis, respectively. The Al sub 2 O sub 3 samples were sintered at 1650 deg C in air for one, three, five, seven and ten hours. The carbon doped samples were sintered using the same temperature for one hour, in a graphite resistance furnace in argon. Sintered materials were further characterised for phase composition and microstructure by XRD and scanning electron...

  1. Thermoluminescent properties of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy prepared by precipitation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, J.; Rivera, T. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, IPN, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)], e-mail: holand_jeos@hotmail.com

    2009-10-15

    This paper reports the synthesis and thermoluminescent (Tl) characterization of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy obtained by the precipitation method. Thermoluminescent CaSO{sub 4}:Dy powder and Teflon (PTFE) were mixed in order to obtain samples in pellets form. Samples of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy were exposed to a radiation gamma source of {sup 60}Co and {sup 90}Sr beta particles. Tl response of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy showed a glow curve with two peaks centered at around 164 and 302 C. Tl phosphor showed a good linearity in the range from 0.5 to 30 Gy. Fading of the Tl information was 5.19 % in 37 days and presented a standard deviation of 4% for reproducibility. (Author)

  2. Thermo-transferred thermoluminescence (TTTl) in potassium-yttrium double fluoride doped with terbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, A.; Rivera, T.; Diaz G, J. A. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin, J. C. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias-Campus Leon, Lomas del Bosque No. 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37000 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Licona, R.; Rivas, F.; Hernandez C, G. [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, 14 Sur y San Claudio, Ciudad Universitaria, Puebla de Zaragoza, Puebla (Mexico); Khaidukov, N. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Lenin SK 11 Prospect 31, Moscow 117907 (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents results of studying the thermo-transferred thermoluminescence (TTTl) phenomenon in potassium-yttrium double fluoride doped with terbium (K{sub 2}YF{sub 5:}Tb) at different impurity concentrations (0.8%, 0.95% and 0.99%). Previously to study the TTTl phenomenon, structural characterization and chemical composition of the materials were determined. The structural studies were conducted using a scanning electron microscope; meanwhile, chemical composition was analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thermoluminescence kinetics was studied irradiating the samples with {sup 137}Cs gamma rays as well as with {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y beta rays, analyzing the glow curves by the deconvolution method for obtaining the kinetic parameters. (Author)

  3. Heating rate effect on thermoluminescence glow curves of LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Zaragoza, E. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-543, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Gonzalez, P.R., E-mail: pedro.gonzalez@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca S/N, C.P. 52750, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Azorin, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Furetta, C. [Touro University Rome, Division of Touro College New York, Circne Gianicolense 15-17, 00153 Rome (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    The influence of heating rate on the thermoluminescence (TL) property of LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE was analyzed. The activation energy and the frequency factor as a function of the heating rate were determined. The kinetic parameters and their dependence on the heating rate were evaluated using the sequential quadratic programming glow curve deconvolution (SQPGCD). The results showed that as the heating rate increases, the peak intensity at the maximum (I{sub M}) decreases and shifts to higher temperature; similar behavior of the kinetics parameters was observed. - Highlights: >Heating rate influence on the thermoluminescence (TL) property of LiF:Mg,Cu,P was analyzed. > The kinetic parameters, activation energy and frequency factor were evaluated using the sequential quadratic programming glow curve deconvolution. > The peak intensity at the maximum (I{sub M}) of the glow curves decreases. > Shifts to higher temperature were observed as the heating rate increased. > Similar behavior of the kinetics parameters was noticed.

  4. Linking glacier annual mass balance and glacier albedo retrieved from MODIS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dumont

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Albedo is one of the variables controlling the mass balance of temperate glaciers. Multispectral imagers, such as MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS on board the TERRA and AQUA satellites, provide a means to monitor glacier surface albedo. In this study, different methods to retrieve broadband glacier surface albedo from MODIS data are compared. The effect of multiple reflections due to the rugged topography and of the anisotropic reflection of snow and ice are particularly investigated. The methods are tested on the Saint Sorlin Glacier (Grandes Rousses area, French Alps. The accuracy of the retrieved albedo is estimated using both field measurements, at two automatic weather stations located on the glacier, and albedo values derived from terrestrial photographs. For summers 2008 and 2009, the root mean square deviation (RMSD between field measurements and the broadband albedo retrieved from MODIS data at 250 m spatial resolution was found to be 0.052 or about 10% relative error. The RMSD estimated for the MOD10 daily albedo product is about three times higher. One decade (2000–2009 of MODIS data were then processed to create a time series of albedo maps of Saint Sorlin Glacier during the ablation season. The annual mass balance of Saint Sorlin Glacier was compared with the minimum albedo value (average over the whole glacier surface observed with MODIS during the ablation season. A strong linear correlation exists between the two variables. Furthermore, the date when the average albedo of the whole glacier reaches a minimum closely corresponds to the period when the snow line is located at its highest elevation, thus when the snow line is a good indicator of the glacier equilibrium line. This indicates that this strong correlation results from the fact that the minimal average albedo values of the glacier contains considerable information regarding the relative share of areal surfaces between the ablation zone (i.e. ice with generally

  5. Linking glacier annual mass balance and glacier albedo retrieved from MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, M.; Gardelle, J.; Sirguey, P.; Guillot, A.; Six, D.; Rabatel, A.; Arnaud, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Albedo is one of the variables controlling the mass balance of temperate glaciers. Multispectral imagers, such as MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the TERRA and AQUA satellites, provide a means to monitor glacier surface albedo. In this study, different methods to retrieve broadband glacier surface albedo from MODIS data are compared. The effect of multiple reflections due to the rugged topography and of the anisotropic reflection of snow and ice are particularly investigated. The methods are tested on the Saint Sorlin Glacier (Grandes Rousses area, French Alps). The accuracy of the retrieved albedo is estimated using both field measurements, at two automatic weather stations located on the glacier, and albedo values derived from terrestrial photographs. For summers 2008 and 2009, the root mean square deviation (RMSD) between field measurements and the broadband albedo retrieved from MODIS data at 250 m spatial resolution was found to be 0.052 or about 10% relative error. The RMSD estimated for the MOD10 daily albedo product is about three times higher. One decade (2000-2009) of MODIS data were then processed to create a time series of albedo maps of Saint Sorlin Glacier during the ablation season. The annual mass balance of Saint Sorlin Glacier was compared with the minimum albedo value (average over the whole glacier surface) observed with MODIS during the ablation season. A strong linear correlation exists between the two variables. Furthermore, the date when the average albedo of the whole glacier reaches a minimum closely corresponds to the period when the snow line is located at its highest elevation, thus when the snow line is a good indicator of the glacier equilibrium line. This indicates that this strong correlation results from the fact that the minimal average albedo values of the glacier contains considerable information regarding the relative share of areal surfaces between the ablation zone (i.e. ice with generally low albedo

  6. Linking glacier annual mass balance and glacier albedo retrieved from MODIS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dumont

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Albedo is one of the variables controlling the mass balance of temperate glaciers. Multispectral imagers, such as MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS on board the TERRA and AQUA satellites, provide a means to monitor glacier surface albedo. In this study, different methods to retrieve broadband glacier surface albedo from MODIS data are compared. The effect of multiple reflections due to the rugged topography and of the anisotropic reflection of snow and ice are particularly investigated. The methods are tested on the Saint Sorlin Glacier (Grandes Rousses area, French Alps. The accuracy of the retrieved albedo is estimated using both field measurements, at two automatic weather stations located on the glacier, and albedo values derived from terrestrial photographs. For summers 2008 and 2009, the Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD between field measurements and the broadband albedo retrieved from MODIS data at 250 m spatial resolution was found to be 0.052 or about 10% relative error. The RMSD estimated for the MOD10 daily albedo product is about three times higher. One decade (2000–2009 of MODIS data were then processed to create a time series of albedo maps of Saint Sorlin Glacier during the ablation season. The annual mass balance of Saint Sorlin Glacier was compared with the minimum albedo value (average over the whole glacier surface observed with MODIS during the ablation season. A strong linear correlation exists between the two variables. Furthermore, the date when the average albedo of the whole glacier reaches a minimum closely corresponds to the period when the snowline is located at its highest elevation, thus when the snowline is a good indicator of the glacier equilibrium line. This indicates that this strong correlation results from the fact that the minimal average albedo values of the glacier contains a considerable information regarding the relative share of areal surfaces between the ablation zone (i.e. ice with generally

  7. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    Full Text Available Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the

  8. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Peng, Shushi; Krinner, Gerhard; Ryder, James; Li, Yue; Dantec-Nédélec, Sarah; Ottlé, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation) into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms) and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May) snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the magnitude of

  9. Implications of albedo changes following afforestation on the benefits of forests as carbon sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, M. U. F.; Whitehead, D.; Dean, S. M.; Beets, P. N.; Shepherd, J. D.; Ausseil, A.-G. E.

    2011-12-01

    Increased carbon storage with afforestation leads to a decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and thus decreases radiative forcing and cools the Earth. However, afforestation also changes the reflective properties of the surface vegetation from more reflective pasture to relatively less reflective forest cover. This increase in radiation absorption by the forest constitutes an increase in radiative forcing, with a warming effect. The net effect of decreased albedo and carbon storage on radiative forcing depends on the relative magnitude of these two opposing processes. We used data from an intensively studied site in New Zealand's Central North Island that has long-term, ground-based measurements of albedo over the full short-wave spectrum from a developing Pinus radiata forest. Data from this site were supplemented with satellite-derived albedo estimates from New Zealand pastures. The albedo of a well-established forest was measured as 13 % and pasture albedo as 20 %. We used these data to calculate the direct radiative forcing effect of changing albedo as the forest grew. We calculated the radiative forcing resulting from the removal of carbon from the atmosphere as a decrease in radiative forcing of -104 GJ tC-1 yr-1. We also showed that the observed change in albedo constituted a direct radiative forcing of 2759 GJ ha-1 yr-1. Thus, following afforestation, 26.5 tC ha-1 needs to be stored in a growing forest to balance the increase in radiative forcing resulting from the observed albedo change. Measurements of tree biomass and albedo were used to estimate the net change in radiative forcing as the newly planted forest grew. Albedo and carbon-storage effects were of similar magnitude for the first four to five years after tree planting, but as the stand grew older, the carbon storage effect increasingly dominated. Averaged over the whole length of the rotation, the changes in albedo negated the benefits from increased carbon storage by 17-24 %.

  10. Quantifying the missing link between forest albedo and productivity in the boreal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovi, Aarne; Liang, Jingjing; Korhonen, Lauri; Kobayashi, Hideki; Rautiainen, Miina

    2016-11-01

    Albedo and fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FAPAR) determine the shortwave radiation balance and productivity of forests. Currently, the physical link between forest albedo and productivity is poorly understood, yet it is crucial for designing optimal forest management strategies for mitigating climate change. We investigated the relationships between boreal forest structure, albedo and FAPAR using a radiative transfer model called Forest Reflectance and Transmittance model FRT and extensive forest inventory data sets ranging from southern boreal forests to the northern tree line in Finland and Alaska (N = 1086 plots). The forests in the study areas vary widely in structure, species composition, and human interference, from intensively managed in Finland to natural growth in Alaska. We show that FAPAR of tree canopies (FAPARCAN) and albedo are tightly linked in boreal coniferous forests, but the relationship is weaker if the forest has broadleaved admixture, or if canopies have low leaf area and the composition of forest floor varies. Furthermore, the functional shape of the relationship between albedo and FAPARCAN depends on the angular distribution of incoming solar irradiance. We also show that forest floor can contribute to over 50 % of albedo or total ecosystem FAPAR. Based on our simulations, forest albedos can vary notably across the biome. Because of larger proportions of broadleaved trees, the studied plots in Alaska had higher albedo (0.141-0.184) than those in Finland (0.136-0.171) even though the albedo of pure coniferous forests was lower in Alaska. Our results reveal that variation in solar angle will need to be accounted for when evaluating climate effects of forest management in different latitudes. Furthermore, increasing the proportion of broadleaved trees in coniferous forests is the most important means of maximizing albedo without compromising productivity: based on our findings the potential of controlling forest

  11. Thermoluminescence as a complementary technique for the toxicological evaluation of chemicals in photosynthetic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repetto, Guillermo, E-mail: grepkuh@upo.es [Departamento de Biología Molecular e Ingeniería Bioquímica, Área de Toxicología, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Carretera de Utrera km. 1, 41013 Seville (Spain); Zurita, Jorge L. [Departamento de Biología Molecular e Ingeniería Bioquímica, Área de Toxicología, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Carretera de Utrera km. 1, 41013 Seville (Spain); Roncel, Mercedes; Ortega, José M. [Instituto de Bioquímica Vegetal y Fotosíntesis, Universidad de Sevilla-CSIC, Américo Vespucio 49, 41092 Seville (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • There are very few toxicological applications of thermoluminescence. • It is a luminescence emission induced by heating the sample in the dark. • It is useful for study the photosystem II function and the level of lipid peroxidation. - Abstract: Thermoluminescence is a simple technique very useful for studying electron transfer reactions on photosystem II (standard thermoluminescence) or the level of lipid peroxidation in membranes (high temperature thermoluminescence) in photosynthetic organisms. Both techniques were used to investigate the effects produced on Chlorella vulgaris cells by six compounds: the chemical intermediates bromobenzene and diethanolamine, the antioxidant propyl gallate, the semiconductor indium nitrate, the pesticide sodium monofluoroacetate and the antimalarial drug chloroquine. Electron transfer activity of the photosystem II significantly decreased after the exposure of Chlorella cells to all the six chemicals used. Lipid peroxidation was slightly decreased by the antioxidant propyl gallate, not changed by indium nitrate and very potently stimulated by diethanolamine, chloroquine, sodium monofluoroacetate and bromobenzene. For five of the chemicals studied (not bromobenzene) there is a very good correlation between the cytotoxic effects in Chlorella cells measured by the algal growth inhibition test, and the inhibition of photosystem II activity. The results suggest that one very important effect of these chemicals in Chlorella cells is the inhibition of photosynthetic metabolism by the blocking of photosystem II functionality. In the case of sodium monofluoroacetate, diethanolamine and chloroquine this inhibition seems to be related with the induction of high level of lipid peroxidation in cells that may alter the stability of photosystem II. The results obtained by both techniques supply information that can be used as a supplement to the growth inhibition test and allows a more complete assessment of the effects of

  12. A new interpretation of the thermoluminescence and isothermal decay of LiF TLD-100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorendrajit Singh, S.; Gartia, R.K. (Manipur Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics)

    1993-01-14

    Some of the published experimental results on the thermoluminescence and isothermal decay of LiF TLD-100 have been explained on the basis of a continuous uniform trap distribution within a finite range ([Delta]E) assuming first-order kinetics. This provides credibility to the results of two rival groups of workers who, in the recent past, have severely criticized the conclusions of each other in a number of publications. (Author).

  13. Evidence for a new type of regenerated thermoluminescence in an albite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gartia, R.K. (Manipur Univ., Imphal (India). Dept. of Physics); Robertson, G.B. (Adelaide Univ. (Australia))

    1989-01-01

    While recording the natural thermoluminescence (TL) of a feldspar (Amelia albite) it has been found that if the heating is not sufficient to clean out the high-temperature peak which occurs around 550-575{sup 0}C, a new peak at about 300{sup 0}C occurs on the next heating. This new observation of regeneration of TL is different from the regenerated TL reported in the literature, and seems to be due to a localized, thermally assisted mechanism. (author).

  14. X-ray imaging using the thermoluminescent properties of commercial Al2O3 ceramic plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinsho, Kiyomitsu; Kawaji, Yasuyuki; Yanagisawa, Shin; Otsubo, Keisuke; Koba, Yusuke; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Matsumoto, Kazuki; Ushiba, Hiroaki

    2016-05-01

    This research demonstrated that commercially available alumina is well-suited for use in large area X-ray detectors. We discovered a new radiation imaging device that has a high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, large imaging area, repeatable results, and low operating costs. The high thermoluminescent (TL) properties of Al2O3 ceramic plates make them useful for X-ray imaging devices.

  15. Effect of the interaction among traps on the shape of thermoluminescence glow curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcazzo, J. [IFAS, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Santiago, M. [IFAS, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil (Argentina) and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: msantiag@exa.unicen.edu.ar; Spano, F. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. del Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lester, M. [IFAS, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ortega, F. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Av. del Valle 5737, 7400 Olavarria (Argentina); Molina, P. [IFAS, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Caselli, E. [IFAS, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CICPBA), calle 526 entre 10 y 11, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2007-09-15

    The effect of the interaction among traps on the structure of thermoluminescence glow curves has been investigated by generating numerically simulated glow curves for a wide range of trap parameters. The results reported in this paper provide useful insights which assist in the analysis of experimental glow curves. The most important result shows that it is incorrect to assume beforehand that each peak is related to a specific trapping state. The validity of the quasiequilibrium approximation is briefly discussed.

  16. Dating the Morasko meteorite fall by natural thermoluminescence of the fusion crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorowicz, Stanisław; Stankowski, Wojciech T. J.

    2016-09-01

    The date of fall of the Morasko iron meteorite was determined by means of thermoluminescence measurements of the fusion crust and related local materials. Three small pieces, commonly referred to as `shrapnel', were used. The results obtained are 4.5-5.0 ka, which is in good agreement with previous estimates of 4-6 ka on the basis of radiometric, do-simetric and palynological methods.

  17. Dating the Morasko meteorite fall by natural thermoluminescence of the fusion crust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorowicz Stanisław

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The date of fall of the Morasko iron meteorite was determined by means of thermoluminescence measurements of the fusion crust and related local materials. Three small pieces, commonly referred to as ‘shrapnel’, were used. The results obtained are 4.5-5.0 ka, which is in good agreement with previous estimates of 4-6 ka on the basis of radiometric, do-simetric and palynological methods.

  18. Monitoring land surface albedo and vegetation dynamics using high spatial and temporal resolution synthetic time series from Landsat and the MODIS BRDF/NBAR/albedo product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuosen; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Sun, Qingsong; Kim, JiHyun; Erb, Angela M.; Gao, Feng; Román, Miguel O.; Yang, Yun; Petroy, Shelley; Taylor, Jeffrey R.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Papuga, Shirley A.

    2017-07-01

    Seasonal vegetation phenology can significantly alter surface albedo which in turn affects the global energy balance and the albedo warming/cooling feedbacks that impact climate change. To monitor and quantify the surface dynamics of heterogeneous landscapes, high temporal and spatial resolution synthetic time series of albedo and the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) were generated from the 500 m Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) operational Collection V006 daily BRDF/NBAR/albedo products and 30 m Landsat 5 albedo and near-nadir reflectance data through the use of the Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM). The traditional Landsat Albedo (Shuai et al., 2011) makes use of the MODIS BRDF/Albedo products (MCD43) by assigning appropriate BRDFs from coincident MODIS products to each Landsat image to generate a 30 m Landsat albedo product for that acquisition date. The available cloud free Landsat 5 albedos (due to clouds, generated every 16 days at best) were used in conjunction with the daily MODIS albedos to determine the appropriate 30 m albedos for the intervening daily time steps in this study. These enhanced daily 30 m spatial resolution synthetic time series were then used to track albedo and vegetation phenology dynamics over three Ameriflux tower sites (Harvard Forest in 2007, Santa Rita in 2011 and Walker Branch in 2005). These Ameriflux sites were chosen as they are all quite nearby new towers coming on line for the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), and thus represent locations which will be served by spatially paired albedo measures in the near future. The availability of data from the NEON towers will greatly expand the sources of tower albedometer data available for evaluation of satellite products. At these three Ameriflux tower sites the synthetic time series of broadband shortwave albedos were evaluated using the tower albedo measurements with a Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) less than 0.013 and a

  19. Thermoluminescence response of sodalime glass irradiated with proton and neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrale, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); INFN Gruppo V, Via Santa Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Longo, A., E-mail: anna.longo@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); INFN Gruppo V, Via Santa Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Bartolotta, A. [Dipartimento STEMBIO, Via delle Scienze, Ed. 16, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Basile, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); INFN Gruppo V, Via Santa Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); D' Oca, M.C. [Dipartimento STEMBIO, Via delle Scienze, Ed. 16, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Tomarchio, E. [Dipartimento dell' Energia, Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 6, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud INFN, Via Santa Sofia 65, 95123 Catania (Italy); Di Rosa, F. [Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale N 2, Pres. Osped. ' M. Raimondi' , Via Forlanini 5, S. Cataldo (Italy); Romano, F. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud INFN, Via Santa Sofia 65, 95123 Catania (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche ' E. Fermi' Compendio del Viminale, Piazza del Viminale 1, 00184 Roma (Italy); Cuttone, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud INFN, Via Santa Sofia 65, 95123 Catania (Italy); Brai, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); INFN Gruppo V, Via Santa Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2012-12-01

    In the research field of emergency dosimeters to be used in case of accidental radiation exposure of the population, watch glass has been considered as a possible fortuitous dosimetric material. This paper reports on results obtained by thermoluminescence of glass samples exposed to neutron and proton beams. Thermoluminescent glow curves have been analyzed for each irradiation studying the modifications induced by the irradiation as a function of proton dose or neutron fluence. The glow curve in a specific temperature range has been used as dosimetric parameter. The thermoluminescence response of samples exposed to protons has been found to be linear in the dose range between 2 and 20 Gy and the lowest detectable dose for this radiation beam is estimated to be smaller than than 1 Gy. In case of exposure with thermal neutrons the TL signal linearly increases with neutron fluence (up to about 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}) and the lowest detectable fluence has been found to be of the order of magnitude of 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}. These results could be of interest for accidental retrospective dosimetry.

  20. Influence of thermoluminescent dosimeters energy dependence on the measurement of entrance skin dose in radiographic procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Mercia Liane de; Galindo, Renata Sales; Hazin, Clovis Abrahao, E-mail: mercial@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN/NE-CNEN/PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Maia, Ana Figueiredo [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Nascimento, Natalia Cassia do Espirito Santo; Fragoso, Maria da Conceicao de Farias [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2010-04-15

    Objective: this study was aimed at evaluating the influence of the energy dependence of thermoluminescent materials on the determination of entrance skin dose in patients submitted to conventional radiographic studies (general radiology, mammography and dental radiology). Materials and methods: three different thermoluminescent materials were utilized: LiF:Mg,Ti, LiF:Mg,Cu,P and CaSO{sub 4}:Dy. These materials were exposed to standardized sources of X and gamma radiation and clinical X-ray beams. Results: calibration and energy dependence curves were obtained. All the materials showed a linear response as a function of the air kerma. As far as energy dependence is concerned, the CaSO{sub 4}:Dy and LiF:Mg,Ti samples showed the greatest variation on thermoluminescent responses as a function of the effective radiation beam. Conclusion: the tested materials showed an appropriate performance for detecting X radiation on standard and clinical X-ray beams. Although CaSO{sub 4}:Dy and LiF:Mg,Ti samples present a significant energy dependence in the considered energy range, these materials can be utilized for measuring entrance skin doses, provided appropriate correction factors are applied (author)

  1. Thermoluminescence studies of calcite extracted from natural sand used in making roasted chickpea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toktamiş, Hüseyin, E-mail: toktamis@gantep.edu.tr; Toktamiş, Dilek; Necmeddin Yazici, A.

    2014-09-15

    In this study, thermoluminescence (TL) properties of the calcite extracted from natural sand which is used in making roasted chickpeas were investigated. And also the effects of different thermal treatments on thermoluminescence glow curve were observed. Two distinct TL peaks were observed at ∼130 °C and ∼230 °C. The annealing of sample, especially at 900 °C, causes a huge enhancement in sensitization of TL. Linearity in dose response is observed for the values up to 0.6 kGy and above 0.6 kGy linearity is not preserved and dose response becomes sublinear. The best reproducibility is obtained when the samples are annealed between 400°C and 600 °C. - Highlights: • The natural sand sample used in making roasted chickpea shows thermoluminescence properties. • Annealing at 900 °C for about 15 min gives best TL output. • A good sensitization of about 70 factor was observed in annealed samples when they were compared with no annealed samples. • At doses lower than 0.6 kGy, dose response is linear and sublinear at doses higher than 0.6 kGy. • The best reproducibility is obtained when the samples are annealed between 400 °C and 600 °C.

  2. Synthesis of aluminum nitride thin films and their potential applications in solid state thermoluminescence dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, R.K., E-mail: rupeshkr@barc.gov.in [Materials Processing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Soni, A. [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mishra, P. [Materials Processing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mishra, D.R.; Kulkarni, M.S. [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-11-15

    In this work, aluminum nitride thin films were deposited on Si (1 1 1) substrate by magnetron sputtering. The obtained film was studied for thermoluminescence after irradiating it to various doses of γ-rays. Thermoluminescence measurement showed photon emission at an irradiation dose of 100 Gy or higher. Deconvolution of the experimental glow curve indicated that recombination centers in AlN were present below 2 eV trap depth. Irradiated AlN films showed less than 2% fading of TL signals on storage for 1 month in dark conditions and for the same period, light induced fading was also less than 4%. A linear variation of integrated thermoluminescence counts with absorbed dose has been observed up to an irradiation dose of 10 kGy. The deposited film was also characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction measurement of the obtained film has shown formation of polycrystalline wurtzite AlN having preferred orientation along (1 0 0) plane. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis revealed the presence of oxygen in the film. - Highlights: • TL emission in sputter deposited AlN thin films when irradiated to gamma rays. • Linear dose–response up to 10 kGy irradiation dose. • Negligible fading of TL signals on storage. • Nominal light induced TL fading. • AlN thin films found potentially suitable for high dose dosimetry applications.

  3. Thermoluminescence as a complementary technique for the toxicological evaluation of chemicals in photosynthetic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Guillermo; Zurita, Jorge L; Roncel, Mercedes; Ortega, José M

    2015-01-01

    Thermoluminescence is a simple technique very useful for studying electron transfer reactions on photosystem II (standard thermoluminescence) or the level of lipid peroxidation in membranes (high temperature thermoluminescence) in photosynthetic organisms. Both techniques were used to investigate the effects produced on Chlorella vulgaris cells by six compounds: the chemical intermediates bromobenzene and diethanolamine, the antioxidant propyl gallate, the semiconductor indium nitrate, the pesticide sodium monofluoroacetate and the antimalarial drug chloroquine. Electron transfer activity of the photosystem II significantly decreased after the exposure of Chlorella cells to all the six chemicals used. Lipid peroxidation was slightly decreased by the antioxidant propyl gallate, not changed by indium nitrate and very potently stimulated by diethanolamine, chloroquine, sodium monofluoroacetate and bromobenzene. For five of the chemicals studied (not bromobenzene) there is a very good correlation between the cytotoxic effects in Chlorella cells measured by the algal growth inhibition test, and the inhibition of photosystem II activity. The results suggest that one very important effect of these chemicals in Chlorella cells is the inhibition of photosynthetic metabolism by the blocking of photosystem II functionality. In the case of sodium monofluoroacetate, diethanolamine and chloroquine this inhibition seems to be related with the induction of high level of lipid peroxidation in cells that may alter the stability of photosystem II. The results obtained by both techniques supply information that can be used as a supplement to the growth inhibition test and allows a more complete assessment of the effects of a chemical in photosynthetic organisms of aquatic ecosystems.

  4. High dose thermoluminescence dosimetry performance of Sol-gel synthesized TiO{sub 2} phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas J, Ch. J.; Cruz V, C. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Polimeros y Materiales, Apdo. Postal 130, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Castillo U, D. M.; Flores M, K. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Ciencias Quimico Biologicas, Apdo. Postal 130, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Bernal, R. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Apdo. Postal 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Castano, V. M., E-mail: castillouzeta@gmail.com [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Apdo. Postal 1-1010, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: TiO{sub 2} is a ceramic material with many applications due to their different crystalline phases (rutile, anatase and brookite). It has attracted attention in several fields because their high mechanical strength, chemical stability and ion-conducting properties. Moreover, in recent years, some research groups gained interest in the thermoluminescence features of TiO{sub 2} concerning their potential use as thermoluminescence dosimeter. In this work, we present experimental results obtained in the first stage of a long-term research project focused in the synthesis of TiO{sub 2} phosphors for dosimetric applications. The thermoluminescent characterization of samples was carried out after being exposed to beta particle irradiation. TiO{sub 2} was prepared by alkoxide sol-gel route using titanium tetrabutoxide as precursor, ethanol, water and ammonia as catalyst. Pellet-shaped samples were annealed at 700 degrees C for 6 h in air atmosphere followed by slow cooling, and then were exposed to radiation doses from 25 to 400 Gy. The glow curves display maxima located at 103 and 238 degrees C when a 5 C/s heating rate is used. From the experimental results here presented, we conclude that TiO{sub 2} is a promising material to develop high dose Tl dosimeters. (Author)

  5. Routine Design for Mechanical Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkop, Axel; Laudwein, Norbert; Maasen, Rudiger

    1995-01-01

    COMIX (configuration of mixing machines) is a system that assists members of the EKATO Sales Department in designing a mixing machine that fulfills the requirements of a customer. It is used to help the engineer design the requested machine and prepare an offer that's to be submitted to the customer. comix integrates more traditional software techniques with explicit knowledge representation and constraint propagation. During the process of routine design, some design decisions have to be mad...

  6. ExploreNEOs: Average albedo by taxonomic complex in the near-Earth asteroid population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, C. A.; Trilling, D. E.; Emery, J. P.; Mueller, M.; Hora, J. L.; Benner, L. A. M.; Bhattacharya, B.; Bottke, W. F.; Chesley, S.; Delbo, M.; Fazio, G.; Harris, A. W.; Mainzer, A.; Mommert, M.; Morbidelli, A.; Penprase, B.; Smith, H. A.; Spahr, T. B.; Stansberry, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the albedo distribution of the Near- Earth Object (NEO) population allows for a better understanding of the relationship between absolute magnitude and size, which impacts calculations of size frequency distribution and impact hazards. Examining NEO albedos also sheds light on the diff

  7. Assimilation of satellite observed snow albedo in a land surface model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malik, M.J.; Velde, van der R.; Vekerdy, Z.; Su, Z.

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of assimilating satellite-observed snow albedo on the Noah land surface model (LSM)-simulated fluxes and snow properties. A direct insertion technique is developed to assimilate snow albedo into Noah and is applied to three intensive study areas in North Park (Colorado

  8. Assimilation of satellite observed snow albedo in a land surface model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malik, M.J.; van der Velde, R.; Vekerdy, Z.; Su, Zhongbo

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of assimilating satellite-observed snow albedo on the Noah land surface model (LSM)-simulated fluxes and snow properties. A direct insertion technique is developed to assimilate snow albedo into Noah and is applied to three intensive study areas in North Park

  9. Assimilation of satellite observed snow albedo in a land surface model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malik, M.J.; van der Velde, R.; Vekerdy, Z.; Su, Zhongbo

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of assimilating satellite-observed snow albedo on the Noah land surface model (LSM)-simulated fluxes and snow properties. A direct insertion technique is developed to assimilate snow albedo into Noah and is applied to three intensive study areas in North Park (Colorado

  10. Time-variable Earth's albedo model characteristics and applications to satellite sampling errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartman, F. L.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics of the time variable Earth albedo model are described. With the cloud cover multiplying factor adjusted to produce a global annual average albedo of 30.3, the global annual average cloud cover is 45.5 percent. Global annual average sunlit cloud cover is 48.5 percent; nighttime cloud cover is 42.7 percent. Month-to-month global average albedo is almost sinusoidal with maxima in June and December and minima in April and October. Month-to-month variation of sunlit cloud cover is similar, but not in all details. The diurnal variation of global albedo is greatest from November to March; the corresponding variation of sunlit cloud cover is greatest from May to October. Annual average zonal albedos and monthly average zonal albedos are in good agreement with satellite-measured values, with notable differences in the polar regions in some months and at 15 S. The albedo of some 10 deg by 10 deg. areas of the Earth versus zenith angle are described. Satellite albedo measurement sampling effects are described in local time and in Greenwich mean time.

  11. ExploreNEOs: Average albedo by taxonomic complex in the near-Earth asteroid population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, C. A.; Trilling, D. E.; Emery, J. P.; Mueller, M.; Hora, J. L.; Benner, L. A. M.; Bhattacharya, B.; Bottke, W. F.; Chesley, S.; Delbo, M.; Fazio, G.; Harris, A. W.; Mainzer, A.; Mommert, M.; Morbidelli, A.; Penprase, B.; Smith, H. A.; Spahr, T. B.; Stansberry, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the albedo distribution of the Near- Earth Object (NEO) population allows for a better understanding of the relationship between absolute magnitude and size, which impacts calculations of size frequency distribution and impact hazards. Examining NEO albedos also sheds light on the

  12. Splenic rupture following routine colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasul, Tabraze; Leung, Edmund; McArdle, Kirsten; Pathak, Rajiv; Dalmia, Sanjay

    2010-10-01

    Splenic rupture is a life-threatening condition characterized by internal hemorrhage, often difficult to diagnose. Colonoscopy is a gold standard routine diagnostic test to investigate patients with gastrointestinal symptoms as well as to those on the screening program for colorectal cancer. Splenic injury is seldomly discussed during consent for colonoscopy, as opposed to colonic perforation, as its prevalence accounts for less than 0.1%. A 66-year-old Caucasian woman with no history of collagen disorder was electively admitted for routine colonoscopy for surveillance of adenoma. She was admitted following the procedure for re-dosing of warfarin, which was stopped prior to the colonoscopy. The patient was found collapsed on the ward the following day with clinical shock and anemia. Computed tomography demonstrated grade 4 splenic rupture. Immediate blood transfusion and splenectomy was required. Splenic rupture following routine colonoscopy is extremely rare. Awareness of it on this occasion saved the patient's life. Despite it being a rare association, the seriousness warrants inclusion in all information leaflets concerning colonoscopy and during its consent.

  13. Radiative Albedo from a Linearly Fibered Half Space

    CERN Document Server

    Grzesik, J A

    2016-01-01

    A growing acceptance of fiber reinforced composite materials imparts some relevance to exploring the effects which a predominantly linear scattering lattice may have upon interior radiant transport. Indeed, a central feature of electromagnetic wave propagation within such a lattice, if sufficiently dilute, is ray confinement to cones whose half-angles are set by that between lattice and the incident ray. When such propagation is subordinated to a viewpoint of photon transport, one arrives at a somewhat simplified variant of the Boltzmann equation with spherical scattering demoted to its cylindrical counterpart. With a view to initiating a hopefully wider discussion of such phenomena, we follow through in detail the half-space albedo problem. This is done first along canonical lines that harness the Wiener-Hopf technique, and then once more in a discrete ordinates setting via flux decomposition along the eigenbasis of the underlying attenuation/scattering matrix. Good agreement is seen to prevail. We further s...

  14. Global Monitoring of Martian Surface Albedo Changes from Orbital Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, P.; Enga, M.; Mukherjee, P.

    2013-12-01

    Martian surface changes were first observed from orbit during the Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter missions. They were found to be caused by eolian processes, produced by deposition of dust during regional and global dust storms and subsequent darkening of the surface through erosion and transportation of dust and sand. The albedo changes accumulated in the 20 years between Viking and Mars Global Surveyor were sufficient to alter the global circulation of winds and the climate of Mars according to model calculations (Fenton et al., Nature 2007), but little was known about the timing or frequency of the changes. Since 1999, we have had the benefit of continuous monitoring by a series of orbiting spacecraft that continues today with Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Odyssey, and Mars Express. Daily synoptic observations enable us to determine whether the surface albedo changes are gradual or episodic in nature and to record the seasons that the changes take place. High resolution images of surface morphology and atmospheric phenomena help identify the physical mechanisms responsible for the changes. From these data, we hope to learn the combinations of atmospheric conditions and sediment properties that produce surface changes on Mars and possibly predict when they will take place in the future. Martian surface changes are particularly conspicuous in low albedo terrain, where even a thin layer of bright dust brightens the surface drastically. Equatorial dark areas are repeatedly coated and recoated by dust, which is later shed from the surface by a variety of mechanisms. An example is Syrtis Major, suddenly buried in bright dust by the global dust storm of 2001. Persistent easterly winds blew much of the dust cover away over the course of the next Martian year, but episodic changes continue today, particularly during southern summer when regional dust storms are rife. Another such region is Solis Planum, south of the Valles Marineris, where changes take place

  15. Multi-modal albedo distributions in the ablation area of the southwestern Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, S. E.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Smith, L. C.; Miller, M. A.; Mioduszewski, J. R.; Koenig, L. S.; Hom, M. G.; Shuman, C. A.

    2015-05-01

    Surface albedo is a key variable controlling solar radiation absorbed at the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface and, thus, meltwater production. Recent decline in surface albedo over the GrIS has been linked to enhanced snow grain metamorphic rates, earlier snowmelt, and amplified melt-albedo feedback from atmospheric warming. However, the importance of distinct surface types on ablation area albedo and meltwater production is still relatively unknown. In this study, we analyze albedo and ablation rates using in situ and remotely sensed data. Observations include (1) a new high-quality in situ spectral albedo data set collected with an Analytical Spectral Devices Inc. spectroradiometer measuring at 325-1075 nm along a 1.25 km transect during 3 days in June 2013; (2) broadband albedo at two automatic weather stations; and (3) daily MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) albedo (MOD10A1) between 31 May and 30 August 2012 and 2013. We find that seasonal ablation area albedos in 2013 have a bimodal distribution, with snow and ice facies characterizing the two peaks. Our results show that a shift from a distribution dominated by high to low albedos corresponds to an observed melt rate increase of 51.5% (between 10-14 July and 20-24 July 2013). In contrast, melt rate variability caused by albedo changes before and after this shift was much lower and varied between ~10 and 30% in the melting season. Ablation area albedos in 2012 exhibited a more complex multimodal distribution, reflecting a transition from light to dark-dominated surface, as well as sensitivity to the so called "dark-band" region in southwest Greenland. In addition to a darkening surface from ice crystal growth, our findings demonstrate that seasonal changes in GrIS ablation area albedos are controlled by changes in the fractional coverage of snow, bare ice, and impurity-rich surface types. Thus, seasonal variability in ablation area albedos appears to be regulated primarily as a function

  16. The influence of inter-annually varying albedo on regional climate and drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, X. H.; Evans, J. P.; McCabe, M. F.

    2014-02-01

    Albedo plays an important role in land-atmosphere interactions and local climate. This study presents the impact on simulating regional climate, and the evolution of a drought, when using the default climatological albedo as is usually done in regional climate modelling, or using the actual observed albedo which is rarely done. Here, time-varying satellite derived albedo data is used to update the lower boundary condition of the Weather Research and Forecasting regional climate model in order to investigate the influence of observed albedo on regional climate simulations and also potential changes to land-atmosphere feedback over south-east Australia. During the study period from 2000 to 2008, observations show that albedo increased with an increasingly negative precipitation anomaly, though it lagged precipitation by several months. Compared to in-situ observations, using satellite observed albedo instead of the default climatological albedo provided an improvement in the simulated seasonal mean air temperature. In terms of precipitation, both simulations reproduced the drought that occurred from 2002 through 2006. Using the observed albedo produced a drier simulation overall. During the onset of the 2002 drought, albedo changes enhanced the precipitation reduction by 20 % on average, over locations where it was active. The area experiencing drought increased 6.3 % due to the albedo changes. Two mechanisms for albedo changes to impact land-atmosphere drought feedback are investigated. One accounts for the increased albedo, leading to reduced turbulent heat flux and an associated decrease of moist static energy density in the planetary boundary layer; the other considers that enhanced local radiative heating, due to the drought, favours a deeper planetary boundary layer, subsequently decreasing the moist static energy density through entrainment of the free atmosphere. Analysis shows that drought related large-scale changes in the regional climate favour a

  17. Linking glacier annual mass balance and glacier albedo from MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, M.; Gardelle, J.; Arnaud, Y.; Guillot, A.; Sirguey, P.; Six, D.

    2012-04-01

    The albedo is one of the variables controlling the mass balance of temperate glaciers. Multispectral imagers, such as MODIS on board TERRA and AQUA, provide a means to monitor glacier albedo. In this study, different methods to retrieve broadband glacier albedo from MODIS data are compared. In particular, the effect of the multiple reflections due to the rugged topography and that of the anisotropic reflection of snow and ice are investigated. The methods are tested on the Saint Sorlin glacier (Grandes Rousses area, French Alps). The accuracy of the retrieved albedo is estimated using both field measurements and albedo derived from terrestrial photographs. The root mean square deviation between field measurements and the broadband albedo retrieved from MODIS pixels at 250m spatial resolution was found to be less than 0.06. One decade (2000-2010) of MODIS data were then processed to create a time series of albedo maps of Saint Sorlin glacier during the ablation season. It appears that the albedo in the ablation area of the glacier does not exhibit any marked decreasing trend during the decade under study. This contrasts with the situation observed on other glaciers in the Alps. In addition, the annual mass balance of Saint Sorlin Glacier was compared with the minimum albedo value (spatial averaged over the whole glacier) observed with MODIS during the ablation season. A high linear correlation exists between the two variables. Furthermore, the day on which the albedo reaches a minimum over the glacier closely corresponds to the day on which the snowline is found to be at its highest elevation, thus close to the glacier's equilibrium line. This indicates that the high correlation can be explained by the fact that this minimal albedo contains a high degree of information regarding the relative share of areal surfaces between the ablation zone (i.e., ice with a generally lower albedo) and the accumulation zone (i.e., snow with a relatively high albedo). This implies

  18. The influence of inter-annually varying albedo on regional climate and drought

    KAUST Repository

    Meng, Xianhong

    2013-05-05

    Albedo plays an important role in land-atmosphere interactions and local climate. This study presents the impact on simulating regional climate, and the evolution of a drought, when using the default climatological albedo as is usually done in regional climate modelling, or using the actual observed albedo which is rarely done. Here, time-varying satellite derived albedo data is used to update the lower boundary condition of the Weather Research and Forecasting regional climate model in order to investigate the influence of observed albedo on regional climate simulations and also potential changes to land-atmosphere feedback over south-east Australia. During the study period from 2000 to 2008, observations show that albedo increased with an increasingly negative precipitation anomaly, though it lagged precipitation by several months. Compared to in-situ observations, using satellite observed albedo instead of the default climatological albedo provided an improvement in the simulated seasonal mean air temperature. In terms of precipitation, both simulations reproduced the drought that occurred from 2002 through 2006. Using the observed albedo produced a drier simulation overall. During the onset of the 2002 drought, albedo changes enhanced the precipitation reduction by 20 % on average, over locations where it was active. The area experiencing drought increased 6.3 % due to the albedo changes. Two mechanisms for albedo changes to impact land-atmosphere drought feedback are investigated. One accounts for the increased albedo, leading to reduced turbulent heat flux and an associated decrease of moist static energy density in the planetary boundary layer; the other considers that enhanced local radiative heating, due to the drought, favours a deeper planetary boundary layer, subsequently decreasing the moist static energy density through entrainment of the free atmosphere. Analysis shows that drought related large-scale changes in the regional climate favour a

  19. Surface Albedo in Cities: Case Study in Sapporo and Tokyo, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Hirofumi; Takamura, Tamio

    2014-12-01

    The surface albedo of two large cities in Japan was measured using a pyranometer mounted on a helicopter to avoid the bidirectional reflectance distribution. The daytime albedo was 0.12 in the cities, which was less than that of a nearby forest (0.16). The albedo was dependent on building structure in the cities; the albedo was lower in areas with more buildings, and decreased as the aspect ratio of street canyons increased. There are two reasons for this dependency: the multiple reflection of radiation in the building canopy, as has been shown in many previous studies, and the sparse vegetation in urban areas. These two factors concurrently determine the albedo in a real city, where the vegetation amount decreases as the plan roof ratio increases.

  20. ARM Climate Research Facility Spectral Surface Albedo Value-Added Product (VAP) Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, S; Gaustad, K; Long, C; Mlawer, E

    2011-07-15

    This document describes the input requirements, output data products, and methodology for the Spectral Surface Albedo (SURFSPECALB) value-added product (VAP). The SURFSPECALB VAP produces a best-estimate near-continuous high spectral resolution albedo data product using measurements from multifilter radiometers (MFRs). The VAP first identifies best estimates for the MFR downwelling and upwelling shortwave irradiance values, and then calculates narrowband spectral albedo from these best-estimate irradiance values. The methodology for finding the best-estimate values is based on a simple process of screening suspect data and backfilling screened and missing data with estimated values when possible. The resulting best-estimate MFR narrowband spectral albedos are used to determine a daily surface type (snow, 100% vegetation, partial vegetation, or 0% vegetation). For non-snow surfaces, a piecewise continuous function is used to estimate a high spectral resolution albedo at 1 min temporal and 10 cm-1 spectral resolution.

  1. ARM Climate Research Facility Spectral Surface Albedo Value-Added Product (VAP) Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, S; Gaustad, K; Long, C; Mlawer, E

    2011-07-15

    This document describes the input requirements, output data products, and methodology for the Spectral Surface Albedo (SURFSPECALB) value-added product (VAP). The SURFSPECALB VAP produces a best-estimate near-continuous high spectral resolution albedo data product using measurements from multifilter radiometers (MFRs). The VAP first identifies best estimates for the MFR downwelling and upwelling shortwave irradiance values, and then calculates narrowband spectral albedo from these best-estimate irradiance values. The methodology for finding the best-estimate values is based on a simple process of screening suspect data and backfilling screened and missing data with estimated values when possible. The resulting best-estimate MFR narrowband spectral albedos are used to determine a daily surface type (snow, 100% vegetation, partial vegetation, or 0% vegetation). For non-snow surfaces, a piecewise continuous function is used to estimate a high spectral resolution albedo at 1 min temporal and 10 cm-1 spectral resolution.

  2. Study of thermoluminescence response of purple to violet amethyst quartz from Balikesir, Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nur, N., E-mail: nnur@adiyaman.edu.tr [Adiyaman University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, 02040 Adiyaman (Turkey); Yeğingil, Z.; Topaksu, M. [Cukurova University, Art and Sciences Faculty, Physics Department, 01330 Adana (Turkey); Kurt, K. [University of Mersin, Science and Art Faculty, Physics Department, 33343 Mersin (Turkey); Doğan, T. [Cukurova University, Vocational School of Imamoglu, Department of Technical Programs, 01700 Adana (Turkey); Sarıgül, N. [Institute of Nuclear Science, Hacettepe University, 06532 Ankara (Turkey); Yüksel, M.; Altunal, V.; Özdemir, A.; Güçkan, V. [Cukurova University, Art and Sciences Faculty, Physics Department, 01330 Adana (Turkey); Günay, I. [Cukurova University, Medicine Faculty, Biophysics Department, Adana (Turkey)

    2015-09-01

    Highlights: • We reported on dosimetric characterisation of natural amethyst quartz specimens from Turkey, using TL technique. • The thermoluminescence characterisation tests were performed under the beta radiation exposure. • The IT peaks ∼230 °C show superlinear dose response behavior (g(D) > 1) between 1 Gy and 5 kGy. The HT peaks ∼300 °C show linear behavior (g(D) = 1) at low dose levels (1 < D < 20 Gy) and superlinearity (g(D) > 1) between 20 Gy < D < 2 kGy. • Deviations were determined for recycling measurements for various dose values of 0.1, 0.5, 0.8 and 1 kGy. • Amethyst quartz has great potential to be investigated for dosimetry purpose. - Abstract: In thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry, the phosphor amethyst quartz as a thermoluminescent, appears to be one of the materials arousing the highest interest. In this study the dosimetric characteristics of natural amethyst quartz crystals collected from Balikesir–Dursunbey (Turkey) were investigated for the purpose of determination of the general properties that phosphors should have in order to be useful for thermoluminescence dosimetry. The natural thermoluminescence was drained by annealing the powder samples at 450 °C for 1.5 h. The effects of high temperature annealing, dose response curves, glow curves after a postirradiation annealing, reusability of the samples and storage of trapped electrons in dark at room temperature were clarified through irradiating the samples with the desired exposures by {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y beta particles. Isothermal annealing before and after irradiation was found to have a definite effect upon the TL glow curve of amethyst crystal powder. The same sample varied in sensitivity depending upon its previous thermal and radiation history. The peak heights of the glow peaks were examined with respect to dose response at dose levels between 1 Gy and 5 kGy. The intermediate temperature (IT) and high temperature (HT) peaks of 230 °C and 300 °C, respectively

  3. Mars: Correcting surface albedo observations for effects of atmospheric dust loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. W.; Clancy, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a radiative transfer model which allows the effects of atmospheric dust loading on surface albedo to be investigated. This model incorporates atmospheric dust opacity, the single scattering albedo and particle phase function of atmospheric dust, the bidirectional reflectance of the surface, and variable lighting and viewing geometry. The most recent dust particle properties are utilized. The spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric opacity (Tan) strongly influences the radiative transfer modelling results. We are currently using the approach described to determine Tan for IRTM mapping sequences of selected regions. This approach allows Tan to be determined at the highest spatial and temporal resolution supported by the IRTM data. Applying the radiative transfer modelling and determination of Tan described, IRTM visual brightness observations can be corrected for the effects of atmospheric dust loading a variety of locations and times. This approach allows maps of 'dust-corrected surface albedo' to be constructed for selected regions. Information on the variability of surface albedo and the amount of dust deposition/erosion related to such variability results. To date, this study indicates that atmospheric dust loading has a significant effect on observations of surface albedo, amounting to albedo corrections of as much as several tens of percent. This correction is not constant or linear, but depends upon surface albedo, viewing and lighting geometry, the dust and surface phase functions, and the atmospheric opacity. It is clear that the quantitative study of surface albedo, especially where small variations in observed albedo are important (such as photometric analyses), needs to account for the effects of the atmospheric dust loading. Maps of 'dust-corrected surface albedo' will be presented for a number of regions.

  4. Examining Trends in Foliar N and Albedo in Response to Disturbance in Canadian Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plourde, L. C.; Ollinger, S. V.; Martin, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    Disturbance in forest ecosystems bears relevance to the climate system through changes in CO2, water and energy exchange. Recent work revealed a strong link among canopy albedo, nitrogen concentrations and carbon assimilation, suggesting a potential feedback in the climate system involving foliar N as it relates to vegetation reflectance and shortwave surface energy exchange. Nevertheless, how disturbance affects canopy chemistry and albedo over space and time has not been widely studied, and general patterns have yet to emerge. Many questions remain, including: What is the effect of disturbance on albedo over time—how does albedo change over time after fire? Do canopy N and albedo decline over time from harvesting to stand recovery? What effect do altered N inputs have on albedo? Examining the N-albedo relationship in the context of gradients in disturbance and recovery may provide a better understanding of how disturbance impacts the climate system. Here, we examine the degree to which canopy albedo and N concentrations are affected by fire and harvest events, as well as elevated inputs of nitrogen. Our investigation makes use of data from remote sensing, field measurements and eddy flux towers at sites that are part of the Canadian Carbon Program. Specifically, we explore variability in canopy N and albedo along disturbance-recovery chronosequences in Quebec and Saskatchewan, as well as in response to N fertilization at a forested site in British Columbia. Results are discussed with respect to local variation at these sites as a means of understanding disturbance-linked changes in albedo and foliar N.

  5. Development of a high spectral resolution surface albedo product for the ARM Southern Great Plains Central Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Gaustad, Krista L.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Long, Charles N.; Delamere, Jennifer

    2011-09-01

    We present a method for identifying dominant surface type and estimating high spectral resolution surface albedo at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) facility at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma for use in radiative transfer calculations. Given a set of 6-channel narrowband visible and near-infrared irradiance measurements from upward and downward looking multi-filter radiometers (MFRs), four different surface types (snow-covered, green vegetation, partial vegetation, non-vegetated) can be identified. A normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is used to distinguish between vegetated and non-vegetated surfaces, and a scaled NDVI index is used to estimate the percentage of green vegetation in partially vegetated surfaces. Based on libraries of spectral albedo measurements, a piecewise continuous function is developed to estimate the high spectral resolution surface albedo for each surface type given the MFR albedo values as input. For partially vegetated surfaces, the albedo is estimated as a linear combination of the green vegetation and non-vegetated surface albedo values. The estimated albedo values are evaluated through comparison to high spectral resolution albedo measurements taken during several Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs) and through comparison of the integrated spectral albedo values to observed broadband albedo measurements. The estimated spectral albedo values agree well with observations for the visible wavelengths constrained by the MFR measurements, but have larger biases and variability at longer wavelengths. Additional MFR channels at 1100 nm and/or 1600 nm would help constrain the high resolution spectral albedo in the near infrared region.

  6. Using Remote Sensing to Quantify Roof Albedo in Seven California Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban-Weiss, G. A.; Woods, J.; Millstein, D.; Levinson, R.

    2013-12-01

    Cool roofs reflect sunlight and therefore can reduce cooling energy use in buildings. Further, since roofs cover about 20-25% of cities, wide spread deployment of cool roofs could mitigate the urban heat island effect and partially counter urban temperature increases associated with global climate change. Accurately predicting the potential for increasing urban albedo using reflective roofs and its associated energy use and climate benefits requires detailed knowledge of the current stock of roofs at the city scale. Until now this knowledge has been limited due to a lack of availability of albedo data with sufficient spatial coverage, spatial resolution, and spectral information. In this work we use a novel source of multiband aerial imagery to derive the albedos of individual roofs in seven California cities: Los Angeles, Long Beach, San Diego, Bakersfield, Sacramento, San Francisco, and San Jose. The radiometrically calibrated, remotely sensed imagery has high spatial resolution (1 m) and four narrow (less than 0.1 μm wide) band reflectances: blue, green, red, and near-infrared. To derive the albedo of roofs in each city, we first locate roof pixels within GIS building outlines. Next we use laboratory measurements of the solar spectral reflectances of 190 roofing products to empirically relate solar reflectance (albedo) to reflectances in the four narrow bands; the root-mean-square of the residuals for the albedo prediction is 0.016. Albedos computed from remotely sensed reflectances are calibrated to ground measurements of roof albedo in each city. The error (both precision and accuracy) of albedo values is presented for each city. The area-weighted mean roof albedo (× standard deviation) for each city ranges from 0.17 × 0.08 (Los Angeles) to 0.29 × 0.15 (San Diego). In each city most roofs have low albedo in the range of 0.1 to 0.3. Roofs with albedo greater than 0.4 comprise less than 3% of total roofs and 7% of total roof area in each city. The California

  7. Albedo Properties of Small (0.5 to 20 km) Main Belt Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Erin L.; Woodward, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    Serendipitous observations of main belt asteroids by the Spitzer Space Telescope have enabled determination of main belt asteroid albedos and diameters for targets as small as 0.5 km (eg., Ryan et al. 2009, AJ, 137, 5134). We have used multi-epoch data at 5.8, 8.0 and 24 microns from the MIPSGAL and Taurus Legacy Surveys to obtain diameters and albedos for a sample of approximately 2000 main belt asteroids. Using STM and NEATM, we have obtained diameters ranging from 0.5 to 30 km and albedos ranging from 0.02 to 0.5. Results of this program reveal an albedo distribution that is more diverse in range than the albedo distribution seen in the IRAS and MSX surveys. This diversity may reflect effects of space weathering reddening which is selectively reddening larger asteroids. This reddening effect may reinforce the findings from accretion models that indicate that asteroids in the early solar system were 100 km and larger (Morbidelli et al., 2009, Icarus, in press), by suggesting that the larger asteroids are indeed the oldest members of the main belt. We will present results on the albedo distribution as a function of semi-major axis and new analysis of the mean albedo of dynamical families within the main belt. Support for this work provided in part by a National Science Foundation grant AST-0706980 to the University of Minnesota.

  8. Variation in foliar nitrogen and albedo in response to nitrogen fertilization and elevated CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklein, Haley F; Ollinger, Scott V; Martin, Mary E; Hollinger, David Y; Lepine, Lucie C; Day, Michelle C; Bartlett, Megan K; Richardson, Andrew D; Norby, Richard J

    2012-08-01

    Foliar nitrogen has been shown to be positively correlated with midsummer canopy albedo and canopy near infrared (NIR) reflectance over a broad range of plant functional types (e.g., forests, grasslands, and agricultural lands). To date, the mechanism(s) driving the nitrogen–albedo relationship have not been established, and it is unknown whether factors affecting nitrogen availability will also influence albedo. To address these questions, we examined variation in foliar nitrogen in relation to leaf spectral properties, leaf mass per unit area, and leaf water content for three deciduous species subjected to either nitrogen (Harvard Forest, MA, and Oak Ridge, TN) or CO(2) fertilization (Oak Ridge, TN). At Oak Ridge, we also obtained canopy reflectance data from the airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) to examine whether canopy-level spectral responses were consistent with leaf-level results. At the leaf level, results showed no differences in reflectance or transmittance between CO(2) or nitrogen treatments, despite significant changes in foliar nitrogen. Contrary to our expectations, there was a significant, but negative, relationship between foliar nitrogen and leaf albedo, a relationship that held for both full spectrum leaf albedo as well as leaf albedo in the NIR region alone. In contrast, remote sensing data indicated an increase in canopy NIR reflectance with nitrogen fertilization. Collectively, these results suggest that altered nitrogen availability can affect canopy albedo, albeit by mechanisms that involve canopy-level processes rather than changes in leaf-level reflectance.

  9. Near-ground cooling efficacies of trees and high-albedo surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, R M [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-05-01

    Daytime summer urban heat islands arise when the prevalence of dark-colored surfaces and lack of vegetation make a city warmer than neighboring countryside. Two frequently-proposed summer heat island mitigation measures are to plant trees and to increase the albedo (solar reflectivity) of ground surfaces. This dissertation examines the effects of these measures on the surface temperature of an object near the ground, and on solar heating of air near the ground. Near-ground objects include people, vehicles, and buildings. The variation of the surface temperature of a near-ground object with ground albedo indicates that a rise in ground albedo will cool a near-ground object only if the object`s albedo exceeds a critical value. This critical value of object albedo depends on wind speed, object geometry, and the height of the atmospheric thermal boundary layer. It ranges from 0.15 to 0.37 for a person. If an object has typical albedo of 0.3, increasing the ground albedo by.

  10. Estimation of Instantaneous TOA Albedo at 670 nm over Ice Clouds from POLDER Multidirectional Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Loeb, N. G.; Kato, S.

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm that determines the 670-nm top-of-atmosphere (TOA) albedo of ice clouds over ocean using Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectance ( POLDER) multidirectional measurements is developed. A plane-parallel layer of ice cloud with various optical thicknesses and light scattering phase functions is assumed. For simplicity, we use a double Henyey-Greenstein phase function to approximate the volume-averaged phase function of the ice clouds. A multidirectional reflectance best-fit match between theoretical and POLDER reflectances is used to infer effective cloud optical thickness, phase function and TOA albedo. Sensitivity tests show that while the method does not provide accurate independent retrievals of effective cloud optical depth and phase function, TOA albedo retrievals are accurate to within similar to 3% for both a single layer of ice clouds or a multilayer system of ice clouds and water clouds. When the method is applied to POLDER measurements and retrieved albedos are compared with albedos based on empirical angular distribution models (ADMs), zonal albedo differences are generally smaller than similar to 3%. When albedos are compared with those on the POLDER-I ERB and Cloud product, the differences can reach similar to 15% at small solar zenith angles.

  11. Mapping Surface Broadband Albedo from Satellite Observations: A Review of Literatures on Algorithms and Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Qu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface albedo is one of the key controlling geophysical parameters in the surface energy budget studies, and its temporal and spatial variation is closely related to the global climate change and regional weather system due to the albedo feedback mechanism. As an efficient tool for monitoring the surfaces of the Earth, remote sensing is widely used for deriving long-term surface broadband albedo with various geostationary and polar-orbit satellite platforms in recent decades. Moreover, the algorithms for estimating surface broadband albedo from satellite observations, including narrow-to-broadband conversions, bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF angular modeling, direct-estimation algorithm and the algorithms for estimating albedo from geostationary satellite data, are developed and improved. In this paper, we present a comprehensive literature review on algorithms and products for mapping surface broadband albedo with satellite observations and provide a discussion of different algorithms and products in a historical perspective based on citation analysis of the published literature. This paper shows that the observation technologies and accuracy requirement of applications are important, and long-term, global fully-covered (including land, ocean, and sea-ice surfaces, gap-free, surface broadband albedo products with higher spatial and temporal resolution are required for climate change, surface energy budget, and hydrological studies.

  12. Climate implications of including albedo effects in terrestrial carbon policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. D.; Collins, W.; Torn, M. S.; Calvin, K. V.

    2012-12-01

    Proposed strategies for managing terrestrial carbon in order to mitigate anthropogenic climate change, such as financial incentives for afforestation, soil carbon sequestration, or biofuel production, largely ignore the direct effects of land use change on climate via biophysical processes that alter surface energy and water budgets. Subsequent influences on temperature, hydrology, and atmospheric circulation at regional and global scales could potentially help or hinder climate stabilization efforts. Because these policies often rely on payments or credits expressed in units of CO2-equivalents, accounting for biophysical effects would require a metric for comparing the strength of biophysical climate perturbation from land use change to that of emitting CO2. One such candidate metric that has been suggested in the literature on land use impacts is radiative forcing, which underlies the global warming potential metric used to compare the climate effects of various greenhouse gases with one another. Expressing land use change in units of radiative forcing is possible because albedo change results in a net top-of-atmosphere radiative flux change. However, this approach has also been critiqued on theoretical grounds because not all climatic changes associated with land use change are principally radiative in nature, e.g. changes in hydrology or the vertical distribution of heat within the atmosphere, and because the spatial scale of land use change forcing differs from that of well-mixed greenhouse gases. To explore the potential magnitude of this discrepancy in the context of plausible scenarios of future land use change, we conduct three simulations with the Community Climate System Model 4 (CCSM4) utilizing a slab ocean model. Each simulation examines the effect of a stepwise change in forcing relative to a pre-industrial control simulation: 1) widespread conversion of forest land to crops resulting in approximately 1 W/m2 global-mean radiative forcing from albedo

  13. Tests of thermoluminescence dating of the Menez-Dregan site (Brittany, France); Essais de datation par thermoluminescence du site de Menez-Dregan (Bretagne, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanzelle, S.; Montret, M.; Pilleyre, T.; Miallier, D.; Fain, J. [Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire

    1997-12-31

    This paper reports on tests of thermoluminescence datings of quartz samples of the Paleolithic site of Menez Dregan in Brittany (France). The archaeological site comprises 3 fossil beaches in rocky shelters. The layer under study is on the top of the most recent fossil beach and contains built fireplaces associated with a Colombanian industry. Samples have received a dose comprised between natural irradiation and 6.8 kGy to 10.5 kGy additional doses. Paleo-doses obtained with different methods (between 1 to 3.5 kGy) are not compatible with each others and do not allow the determination of a precise age. (J.S.) 5 refs.

  14. Thermoluminescent response of LiF before variation of the heating rate; Respuesta termoluminiscente de LiF ante variacion de la tasa de calentamiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrios, R. [Facultad de Quimica, UAEM, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Avila, O. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    Comparisons of glow curves of lithium fluoride dosemeters TLD-100 measured to two heating rates with the purpose of quantifying the change in the temperature of the peaks 5 and 7 for the thermoluminescent reader equipment Harshaw 4000 of the thermoluminescence laboratory of the ININ were carried out. (Author)

  15. Global albedos of Pluto and Charon from LORRI New Horizons observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, B. J.; Hofgartner, J. D.; Hicks, M. D.; Weaver, H. A.; Stern, S. A.; Momary, T.; Mosher, J. A.; Beyer, R. A.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Zangari, A. M.; Young, L. A.; Lisse, C. M.; Singer, K.; Cheng, A.; Grundy, W.; Ennico, K.; Olkin, C. B.

    2017-05-01

    The exploration of the Pluto-Charon system by the New Horizons spacecraft represents the first opportunity to understand the distribution of albedo and other photometric properties of the surfaces of objects in the Solar System's ;Third Zone; of distant ice-rich bodies. Images of the entire illuminated surface of Pluto and Charon obtained by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) camera provide a global map of Pluto that reveals surface albedo variegations larger than any other Solar System world except for Saturn's moon Iapetus. Normal reflectances on Pluto range from 0.08-1.0, and the low-albedo areas of Pluto are darker than any region of Charon. Charon exhibits a much blander surface with normal reflectances ranging from 0.20-0.73. Pluto's albedo features are well-correlated with geologic features, although some exogenous low-albedo dust may be responsible for features seen to the west of the area informally named Tombaugh Regio. The albedo patterns of both Pluto and Charon are latitudinally organized, with the exception of Tombaugh Regio, with darker regions concentrated at the Pluto's equator and Charon's northern pole. The phase curve of Pluto is similar to that of Triton, the large moon of Neptune believed to be a captured Kuiper Belt Object (KBO), while Charon's is similar to that of the Moon. Preliminary Bond albedos are 0.25 ± 0.03 for Charon and 0.72 ± 0.07 for Pluto. Maps of an approximation to the Bond albedo for both Pluto and Charon are presented for the first time. Our work shows a connection between very high albedo (near unity) and planetary activity, a result that suggests the KBO Eris may be currently active.

  16. Deriving albedo maps for HAPEX-Sahel from ASAS data using kernel-driven BRDF models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lewis

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the application and testing of a method for deriving spatial estimates of albedo from multi-angle remote sensing data. Linear kernel-driven models of surface bi-directional reflectance have been inverted against high spatial resolution multi-angular, multi- spectral airborne data of the principal cover types within the HAPEX-Sahel study site in Niger, West Africa. The airborne data are obtained from the NASA Airborne Solid-state Imaging Spectrometer (ASAS instrument, flown in Niger in September and October 1992. The maps of model parameters produced are used to estimate integrated reflectance properties related to spectral albedo. Broadband albedo has been estimated from this by weighting the spectral albedo for each pixel within the map as a function of the appropriate spectral solar irradiance and proportion of direct and diffuse illumination. Partial validation of the results was performed by comparing ASAS reflectance and derived directional-hemispherical reflectance with simulations of a millet canopy made with a complex geometric canopy reflectance model, the Botanical Plant Modelling System (BPMS. Both were found to agree well in magnitude. Broadband albedo values derived from the ASAS data were compared with ground-based (point sample albedo measurements and found to agree extremely well. These results indicate that the linear kernel-driven modelling approach, which is to be used operationally to produce global 16 day, 1 km albedo maps from forthcoming NASA Earth Observing System spaceborne data, is both sound and practical for the estimation of angle-integrated spectral reflectance quantities related to albedo. Results for broadband albedo are dependent on spectral sampling and on obtaining the correct spectral weigthings.

  17. Migration of Frosts from High-Albedo Regions of Pluto: what New Horizons Reveals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, Hal A.; Young, Leslie A.; Olkin, Cathy B.; Ennico, Kimberly; Binzel, Richard P.; Zangari, Amanda; Earle, Alissa M.

    2015-11-01

    With its high eccentricity and obliquity, Pluto should exhibit seasonal volatile transport on its surface. Several lines of evidence support this transport: doubling of Pluto’s atmospheric pressure over the past two decades (Young et al., 2013, Ap. J. 766, L22; Olkin et al., 2015, Icarus 246, 230); changes in its historical rotational light curve, once all variations due to viewing geometry have been modelled (Buratti et al., 2015; Ap. J. 804, L6); and changes in HST albedo maps (Buie et al., 2010, Astron. J. 139, 1128). New Horizons LORRI images reveal that the region of greatest albedo change is not the polar cap(s) of Pluto, but the feature informally named Tombaugh Regio (TR). This feature has a normal reflectance as high as ~0.8 in some places, and it is superposed on older, lower-albedo pre-existing terrain with an albedo of only ~0.10. This contrast is larger than any other body in the Solar System, except for Iapetus. This albedo dichotomy leads to a complicated system of cold-trapping and thermal segregation, beyond the simple picture of seasonal volatile transport. Whatever the origin of TR, it initially acted as a cold trap, as the temperature differential between the high and low albedo regions could be enormous, possibly approaching 20K, based on their albedo differences and assuming their normalized phase curves are similar. This latter assumption will be refined as the full New Horizons data set is returned.Over six decades of ground-based photometry suggest that TR has been decreasing in albedo over the last 25 years. Possible causes include changing insolation angles, or sublimation from the edges where the high-albedo material impinges on a much warmer substrate.Funding by the NASA New Horizons Project acknowledged.

  18. Nitrogen Availability and Forest Canopy Albedo from Leaf to Regional Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollinger, S. V.; Plourde, L. C.; Martin, M.; Wicklein, H. F.; Haddad, D. M.; Richardson, A. D.; Hollinger, D.

    2009-12-01

    CO2 uptake capacity in temperate and boreal forests has been shown to scale directly with whole-canopy nitrogen concentrations, mirroring a leaf-level trend that has been observed for woody plants worldwide. Recent work has also demonstrated that both CO2 uptake capacity and canopy %N are strongly and positively correlated with shortwave surface albedo. This suggests that variation in nitrogen availability may play an additional, and previously overlooked, role in the climate system via its influence on surface energy exchange as well as via its better-known influence on carbon assimilation. Thus far, the carbon-nitrogen-albedo relationship has been demonstrated at relatively coarse spatial scales that cover broad gradients in climate and forest type. It is unclear whether similar trends occur within local landscapes and within ecosystems other than forests. It is also unclear whether N deposition and N fertilization can cause a shift in albedo stemming from changes in foliar %N. Examining finer-scale patterns in the N-albedo relationship is necessary before we can establish the generality of the observed trends and understand their implications for carbon-nutrient-climate interactions. Here, we expand on the C-N-albedo relationship in several important ways: (1) using fine-scale remote sensing data from the U.S. and Canada, we examined albedo in relation to foliar N and canopy structure at local scales for several well characterized landscapes; (2) we examined changes in both foliar N and albedo along a regional-scale nitrogen deposition gradient; (3) we examined leaf-level changes in %N and albedo in response to experimental N additions, and (4) we conducted a global synthesis of data from FLUXNET to examine the C-N-albedo relationship over a broader range of ecosystems. Results are discussed in the context of improving our understanding of interactions between terrestrial biogeochemistry and climate.

  19. Albedo enhancement over land to counteract global warming: impacts on hydrological cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bala, Govindasamy; Nag, Bappaditya [Indian Institute of Science, Divecha Center for Climate Change and Center for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Bangalore (India)

    2012-09-15

    A recent modelling study has shown that precipitation and runoff over land would increase when the reflectivity of marine clouds is increased to counter global warming. This implies that large scale albedo enhancement over land could lead to a decrease in runoff over land. In this study, we perform simulations using NCAR CAM3.1 that have implications for Solar Radiation Management geoengineering schemes that increase the albedo over land. We find that an increase in reflectivity over land that mitigates the global mean warming from a doubling of CO{sub 2} leads to a large residual warming in the southern hemisphere and cooling in the northern hemisphere since most of the land is located in northern hemisphere. Precipitation and runoff over land decrease by 13.4 and 22.3%, respectively, because of a large residual sinking motion over land triggered by albedo enhancement over land. Soil water content also declines when albedo over land is enhanced. The simulated magnitude of hydrological changes over land are much larger when compared to changes over oceans in the recent marine cloud albedo enhancement study since the radiative forcing over land needed (-8.2 W m{sup -2}) to counter global mean radiative forcing from a doubling of CO{sub 2} (3.3 W m{sup -2}) is approximately twice the forcing needed over the oceans (-4.2 W m{sup -2}). Our results imply that albedo enhancement over oceans produce climates closer to the unperturbed climate state than do albedo changes on land when the consequences on land hydrology are considered. Our study also has important implications for any intentional or unintentional large scale changes in land surface albedo such as deforestation/afforestation/reforestation, air pollution, and desert and urban albedo modification. (orig.)

  20. Measurement of the Absolute Hohlraum Wall Albedo Under Ignition Foot Drive Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, O S; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; Turner, R E; Campbell, K M; Dewald, E L; Hammel, B A; Kauffman, R L; Landen, O L; Rosen, M D; Wallace, R J; Weber, F A

    2003-08-26

    We present the first measurements of the absolute albedos of hohlraums made from gold or from high-Z mixtures. The measurements are performed over the range of radiation temperatures (70-100 eV) expected during the foot of an indirect-drive temporally-shaped ignition laser pulse, where accurate knowledge of the wall albedo (i.e. soft x-ray wall re-emission) is most critical for determining capsule radiation symmetry. We find that the gold albedo agrees well with calculations using the super transition array opacity model, potentially providing additional margin for ICF ignition.

  1. Measurement of the absolute hohlraum wall albedo under ignition foot drive conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, L J; Wallace, R J; Hammel, B A; Weber, F A; Landen, O L; Campbell, K M; DeWald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Rosen, M D; Jones, O S; Turner, R E; Kauffmann, R L; Hammer, J H

    2003-11-25

    We present the first measurements of the absolute albedos of hohlraums made from gold or from high-Z mixtures. The measurements are performed over the range of radiation temperatures (70-100 eV) expected during the foot of an indirect-drive temporally-shaped ignition laser pulse, where accurate knowledge of the wall albedo (i.e. soft x-ray wall re-emission) is most critical for determining capsule radiation symmetry. We find that the gold albedo agrees well with calculations using the super transition array opacity model, potentially providing additional margin for ICF ignition.

  2. Quantifying the missing link between albedo and productivity of boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovi, Aarne; Liang, Jingjing; Korhonen, Lauri; Kobayashi, Hideki; Rautiainen, Miina

    2016-04-01

    Albedo and fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FAPAR) determine the shortwave radiation balance and productivity of forests. Several studies have examined the relation between forest structure and albedo in the boreal zone. Studies regarding FAPAR are fewer and the relations between albedo and FAPAR are still poorly understood. To study these relations we simulated shortwave black sky albedo and canopy FAPAR, using the FRT forest reflectance model. We used two sets of field plots as input data. The plots were located in Alaska, USA (N = 584) and in Finland (N = 506) between Northern latitudes of 60° and 68° , and they represent naturally grown and more intensively managed (regularly thinned) forests, respectively. The simulations were carried out with sun zenith angles (SZA) typical to the biome, ranging from 40° to 80° . The simulated albedos in coniferous plots decreased with increasing tree height, whereas canopy FAPAR showed an opposite trend. The albedo of broadleaved plots was notably higher than that of coniferous plots. No species differences in canopy FAPAR were seen, except for pine forests in Finland that showed lowest FAPAR among species. Albedo and canopy FAPAR were negatively correlated (r ranged from -0.93 to -0.69) in coniferous plots. The correlations were notably weaker (r ranged from -0.64 to 0.05) if plots with broadleaved trees were included. To show the influence of forest management, we further examined the response of albedo and FAPAR to forest density (basal area) and fraction of broadleaved trees. Plots with low basal area showed high albedos but also low canopy FAPAR. When comparing the sparse plots to dense ones, the relative decrease in canopy FAPAR was larger than the relative increase in albedo. However, at large SZAs the basal area could be lowered to approx. 20 m2 ha-1 before FAPAR was notably reduced. Increasing the proportion of broadleaved trees from 0% to 100% increased the albedos to approximately

  3. Albedo protons and electrons at ISS - an important contribution to astronaut dose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, R. B.; Slaba, T. C.; Badavi, F. F.; Mertens, C. J.; Blattnig, S.

    2015-12-01

    Albedo particles, which are created by cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere and are moving upwards away from the surface of the earth, are often considered a negligible contribution to astronaut radiation exposure on the International Space Station (ISS). Models of astronaut exposure, however, consistently underestimate measurements onboard ISS when these albedo particles are neglected. Recent measurements by instruments on ISS (AMS, PAMELA, and SEDA-AP) hint that there are high energy protons and electrons which are not being modeled and that may contribute to radiation exposure on ISS. Estimates of the contribution of radiation exposure on ISS due to albedo particles, along with open questions, will be discussed.

  4. Angular response performance study of a new Harshaw neutron albedo TLD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.C.; Sims, C.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); West, L.; Welty, T. (Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, AK (USA). Southwest Radiation Calibration Center)

    1990-01-01

    The angular response of a new Harshaw albedo neutron TLD was studied with two sources: a bare {sup 252}Cf source and a {sup 252}Cf source moderated by a 15 cm D{sub 2}O sphere covered with a cadmium shell. The effect of photon angular dependence on the neutron response of the albedo TLD was examined with {sup 137}Cs and X rays. The angular response performance of the albedo TLD was also evaluated in terms of the directional dose equivalent quantity. The results of these studies are presented and discussed. (author).

  5. Thermoluminescence characterization of LiMgF{sub 3}: DyF{sub 3} phosphors exposed to beta radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernal, R.; Alday S, K.R.; Brown, F.; Cruz V, C. [Universidad de Sonora, A.P. 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Furetta, C.; Cruz Z, E. [ICN-UNAM, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Kitis, G. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

    2006-07-01

    LiMgF{sub 3}: DyF{sub 3} phosphors were obtained as polycrystalline solids from the melting of component salts, with two DyF{sub 3} concentrations, 2.02 % mol, and 4.04 % mol. In order to guarantee the homogeneity of composition, the samples were crushed and the resulting powder was pressed to form pellet-shaped phosphors, some of which were sintered at 700 C for 5 h under air atmosphere. Thermoluminescence measurements of beta irradiated samples show that these phosphors exhibit adequate properties to be considered for development of thermoluminescence dosimeters. Integrated thermoluminescence as a function of dose displays a linear dependence with dose for doses below 20.0 Gy. (Author)

  6. Measuring thermo-luminescence efficiency of TLD-2000 detectors to different energy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wei Min; Chen, Bao Wei; Han, Yi; Yang, Zhong Jian [China Institute for Radiation Protection, Taiyuan (China)

    2016-06-15

    As an important detecting device, TLD is a widely used in the radiation monitoring. It is essential for us to study the property of detecting element. The aim of this study is to calculate the thermo-luminescence efficiency of TL elements. A batch of thermo-luminescence elements were irradiated by the filtered X-ray beams of average energies in the range 40-200 kVp, 662 keV {sup 137}Cs gamma rays and then the amounts of lights were measured by the TL reader. The deposition energies in elements were calculated by theory formula and Monte Carlo simulation. The unit absorbed dose in elements by photons with different energies corresponding to the amounts of lights was calculated, which is called the thermo luminescent efficiency (η(E)). Because of the amounts of lights can be calculated by the absorbed dose in elements multiply η(E), the η(E) can be calculated by the experimental data (the amounts of lights) divided by absorbed dose. The deviation of simulation results compared with theoretical calculation results were less than 5%, so the absorbed dose in elements was calculated by simulation results in here. The change range of η(E) value, relative to 662 keV {sup 137}Cs gamma rays, is about 30% in the energy range of 33 keV to 662 keV, is in accordance by the comparison with relevant foreign literatures. The η(E) values can be used for updating the amounts of lights that are got by the direct ratio assumed relations with deposition energy in TL elements, which can largely reduce the error of calculation results of the amounts of lights. These data can be used for the design of individual dosimeter which used TLD-2000 thermo-luminescence elements, also have a certain reference value for manufacturer to improve the energy-response performance of TL elements by formulation adjustment.

  7. Thermoluminescence property of LiMgF{sub 3} erbium activated phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, I.C. [Departamento de Ciencias Quimico Biologicas, Universidad de Sonora, A.P. 130, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000 (Mexico); Cruz-Zaragoza, E., E-mail: ecruz@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-543, Mexico 04510 D.F. (Mexico); Favalli, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Furetta, C. [Touro University Rome, Division of Touro College New York, Circne Gianicolense 15-17, 00153 Rome (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    The perovskite-like LiMgF{sub 3}:ErF{sub 3} pellets were obtained from the melt formed by LiF and MgF{sub 2} mixed salts in the stoichiometric ratio. The perovskite material was doped with 1, 2 and 4 mol% of ErF{sub 3} impurity. The pellets samples were {sup 60}Co gamma irradiated and their thermoluminescence (TL) properties were analyzed, i.e., dose-response, fading at RT and under UV irradiation, TL signal reproducibility, and kinetic parameters. The intensity of the TL response against irradiation dose was increased remarkably by the high concentration of impurity, and a linear dose-response was observed in the range of 1-10 Gy. The fading observed at RT was about 10-30% after 24 h from irradiation. All samples were exposed from 1 to 200 Gy gamma dose range. The TL glow peaks were found around 367-376, 438-447, 509-521, and 594-611 K, when the doped samples were 1, 2 and 4 mol% of the erbium impurity concentration. The thermoluminescence kinetics parameters of the glow curves have been analyzed using the Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution (CGCD) method. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perovskite-like LiMgF{sub 3} pellets were doped with 1, 2, and 4 mol% of ErF{sub 3} impurity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermoluminescence properties and kinetics parameters were analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dose-response, fading at RT and under UV irradiation and reproducibility are reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four TL glow peaks were observed between 367 and 611 K, for all samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glow curves have been analyzed using the CGCD method.

  8. Physical, morphological and dosimetric characterization of the Teflon agglutinator to thermoluminescent dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Amorim, R.A.P.O., E-mail: raquelalinepe@gmail.com [Departamento de Física-CCET, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Teixeira, M.I., E-mail: miteixeira@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Professor Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Caldas, L.V.E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Professor Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Souza, S.O., E-mail: susanasouzalalic@gmail.com [Departamento de Física-CCET, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil)

    2013-04-15

    In preparing of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) it is common to use as agglutinator the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), called Teflon{sup ®}. In this paper the physical, morphological and dosimetric characteristics of Teflon{sup ®} were evaluated aiming its application in thermoluminescent dosimetry. The differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermogravimetry (TG) results showed that the Teflon glass transition and melting points are of about 48 °C and 340 °C, respectively. By means of the X-ray diffraction technique, the crystallinity index K{sub c} was estimated as 94%. Micrographs of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) showed a cohesive surface in spodumene–Teflon pellets, as required for thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), leading to the conclusion that Teflon acts as binder, providing greater mechanical resistance to the TL pellets. However, Teflon may influence high doses dosimetry when it is applied as an agglutinator. Preliminary results of Teflon pellets dosimetric properties, with their dose–response curve between 50 Gy and 60 kGy, TL response reproducibility and minimum detectable dose, indicate the possibility of use of pure Teflon TLD in high-dose dosimetry. -- Highlights: ► Pure Teflon{sup ®} pellets can be exploited for high-dose dosimetry. ► Pure Teflon{sup ®} pellets showed two TL peaks. ► Low dose limits of Teflon{sup ®} pellets were 7.0 and 4.0 Gy for the first and second TL peaks respectively. ► The reproducibility of TL response of Teflon{sup ®} pellets is 2.9%.

  9. Routine screening for postpartum depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiopoulos, A M; Bryan, T L; Wollan, P; Yawn, B P

    2001-02-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common and often overlooked condition. Validated screening tools for PPD exist but are not commonly used. We present the 1-year outcome of a project to implement universal PPD screening at the 6-week postpartum visit. Universal screening with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) was implemented in all community postnatal care sites. One-year outcome assessments (diagnosis and treatment of PPD) were completed for a sample of the women screened using medical record review of all care they received during the first year postpartum. Sixty-eight (20%) of the 342 women whose medical records were reviewed had been given a documented diagnosis of postpartum depression, resulting in an estimated population rate of 10.7%. Depression was diagnosed in 35% of the women with elevated EPDS scores (> or =10) compared with 5% of the women with low EPDS scores (<10) in the first year postpartum. Treatment was provided for all women diagnosed with depression, including drug therapy for 49% and counseling for 78%. Four women were hospitalized for depression. Some degree of suicidal ideation was noted on the EPDS by 48 women but acknowledged in the chart of only 10 women, including 1 with an immediate hospitalization. The rate of diagnosis of postpartum depression in this community increased from 3.7% before the routine use of EPDS screening to 10.7% following screening. A high EPDS score was predictive of a diagnosis of postpartum depression, and the implementation of routine EPDS screening at 6 weeks postpartum was associated with an increase in the rate of diagnosed postpartum depression in this community.

  10. Sizes, shapes, and albedos of the inner satellites of Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkoschka, Erich

    2003-04-01

    Based on 87 resolved Voyager images of the five innermost satellites of Neptune, their shapes were measured and fit by tri-axial ellipsoids with the semi-axes of 48 × 30 × 26 km for Naiad, 54 × 50 × 26 km for Thalassa, 90 × 74 × 64 km for Despina, 102 × 92 × 72 km for Galatea, and 108 × 102 × 84 km for Larissa. Thomas and Veverka published a similar shape for Larissa (104 × 89 km, J. Geophys. Res. 96, 19261-19268, 1991). The other satellites had no published shapes. Using Voyager photometry of the six inner satellites by the same authors and the revised sizes, including the published size of Proteus, the reflectivity within this inner system was found to vary by about 30%. Geometric albedos in the visible are estimated between 0.07 for Naiad and 0.10 for Proteus. The rotational lightcurves of these satellites seem to be due to satellite shapes.

  11. Constraining the instantaneous aerosol influence on cloud albedo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryspeerdt, Edward; Quaas, Johannes; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Gettelman, Andrew; Ghan, Steven; Lohmann, Ulrike; Morrison, Hugh; Neubauer, David; Partridge, Daniel G.; Stier, Philip; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Kai

    2017-04-26

    Much of the uncertainty in estimates of the anthropogenic forcing of climate change comes from uncertainties in the instantaneous effect of aerosols on cloud albedo, known as the Twomey effect or the radiative forcing from aerosol–cloud interactions (RFaci), a component of the total or effective radiative forcing. Because aerosols serving as cloud condensation nuclei can have a strong influence on the cloud droplet number concentration (Nd), previous studies have used the sensitivity of the Nd to aerosol properties as a constraint on the strength of the RFaci. However, recent studies have suggested that relationships between aerosol and cloud properties in the present-day climate may not be suitable for determining the sensitivity of the Nd to anthropogenic aerosol perturbations. Using an ensemble of global aerosol–climate models, this study demonstrates how joint histograms between Nd and aerosol properties can account for many of the issues raised by previous studies. It shows that if the anthropogenic contribution to the aerosol is known, the RFaci can be diagnosed to within 20% of its actual value. The accuracy of different aerosol proxies for diagnosing the RFaci is investigated, confirming that using the aerosol optical depth significantly underestimates the strength of the aerosol–cloud interactions in satellite data.

  12. Lightcurves of Stars & Exoplanets: Estimating Inclination, Obliquity, and Albedo

    CERN Document Server

    Cowan, Nicolas B; Haggard, Hal M

    2013-01-01

    [Abridged] It is possible to determine a star or planet's brightness markings by analyzing its disk-integrated brightness variations, in either thermal or reflected light. We compute the "harmonic lightcurves" resulting from spherical harmonic maps of intensity or albedo. These convolutions often contain a nullspace: a class of non-zero maps that have no lightcurve signature. We derive harmonic thermal lightcurves for both equatorial and inclined observers. The nullspace for these two viewing geometries is significantly different, with odd modes being present in the latter case, but not the former. We therefore suggest that the Fourier spectrum of a thermal lightcurve is sufficient to determine the orbital inclination of non-transiting short-period planets, the rotational inclination of stars and brown dwarfs, and the obliquity of directly imaged planets. In the best-case scenario of a nearly edge-on rotator, factor-of-two measurements of the amplitudes of odd modes in the thermal lightcurve provide an inclin...

  13. Constraining the instantaneous aerosol influence on cloud albedo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryspeerdt, Edward; Quaas, Johannes; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Gettelman, Andrew; Ghan, Steven; Lohmann, Ulrike; Morrison, Hugh; Neubauer, David; Partridge, Daniel G; Stier, Philip; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Kai

    2017-05-09

    Much of the uncertainty in estimates of the anthropogenic forcing of climate change comes from uncertainties in the instantaneous effect of aerosols on cloud albedo, known as the Twomey effect or the radiative forcing from aerosol-cloud interactions (RFaci), a component of the total or effective radiative forcing. Because aerosols serving as cloud condensation nuclei can have a strong influence on the cloud droplet number concentration (Nd ), previous studies have used the sensitivity of the Nd to aerosol properties as a constraint on the strength of the RFaci. However, recent studies have suggested that relationships between aerosol and cloud properties in the present-day climate may not be suitable for determining the sensitivity of the Nd to anthropogenic aerosol perturbations. Using an ensemble of global aerosol-climate models, this study demonstrates how joint histograms between Nd and aerosol properties can account for many of the issues raised by previous studies. It shows that if the anthropogenic contribution to the aerosol is known, the RFaci can be diagnosed to within 20% of its actual value. The accuracy of different aerosol proxies for diagnosing the RFaci is investigated, confirming that using the aerosol optical depth significantly underestimates the strength of the aerosol-cloud interactions in satellite data.

  14. Thermoluminescence glow curve involving any extent of retrapping or any order of kinetics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jai Prakash

    2013-09-01

    Adirovitch set of equations has been modified to explain the mechanisms involved in thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve. A simple model is proposed which explains the occurrence of TL glow curve involving any extent of retrapping or any order of kinetics. It has been observed that the extents of recombination and simultaneous rewrapping decide the order of kinetics involved. TL decay parameters, order of kinetics and initial concentration of trapped electrons per unit volume are evaluated easily and conveniently. It has been observed that retrapping increases with increasing order of kinetics.

  15. The determination of intrinsic trapping parameters of a thermoluminescence peak of BeO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Takao [Ashikaga Inst. of Technology, Tochigi (Japan). Div. of General Education; Gartia, R.K. [Manipur Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics

    1996-10-14

    It has been shown that a thermoluminescence (TL) peak of BeO cannot be fitted with a numerically generated glow peak involving only three trapping parameters, namely trap depth, frequency factor and order of kinetics. The peak can be fitted with a TL peak numerically generated by the exact solutions of the basic differential equations. This enables one to determine the five important intrinsic trapping parameters: trap depth, frequency factor, retrapping probability, recombination probability and the concentration of a disconnected trap, an impossible feat under the kinetics formalism. (author).

  16. In vivo dosimetry thermoluminescence dosimeters during brachytherapy with a 370 GBq {sup 192}Ir source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuepers, S.; Piessens, M.; Verbeke, L.; Roelstraete, A. [Onze-Lieve-Vrouw Hospitaal, Aalst (Belgium). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology

    1995-12-01

    When using LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters in brachytherapy, we have to take into account the properties of a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir source (energy spectrum ranging form 9 to 885 keV, steep dose gradient in the vicinity of the source) and these of the dosimeters themselves (supralinearity, reproducibility, size). All these characteristics combine into a set of correction factors which have been determined during in phantom measurements. These results have then been used to measure the dose delivered to organs at risk (e.g. rectum, bladder, etc.) during high dose rate brachytherapy with a 370 GBq {sup 192}Ir source for patients with gynaecological tumors.

  17. Energy absorption buildup factors for thermoluminescent dosimetric materials and their tissue equivalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2010-01-01

    -absorption buildup factor data have been studied as a function of penetration depth and incident photon energy. Buildup factors determined in the present work should be useful in radiation dosimetry, diagnostics and therapy. The tissue equivalence of TLD materials is also discussed.......Gamma ray energy-absorption buildup factors were computed using the five-parameter geometric progression (G-P) fitting formula for seven thermoluminescent dosimetric (TLD) materials in the energy range 0.015-15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp (mean free path). The generated energy...

  18. Cooling rate effects in thermoluminescence dosimetry grade lithium flouride. Implications for practical dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, E W; McKinlay, A F; Clark, I

    1976-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the effects of cooling rates in the range of 10(-1) to 2 X 10(5) degrees C min-1 applied to TLD-700, LiF thermoluminescence dosemeters has shown that the 'transfer sensitivity' effect observed by Booth, Johnson and Attix (1972) is only of importance for cooling rates greater than 10(3) degrees C min-1. Although it is concluded that for practical dosimetry purposes the effect may be ignored it is not clear why Booth et al. observed such large changes and until this discrepancy is explained it is recommended that a low temperature pre-irradiation anneal should be used.

  19. Study of Residual TL of CaSO4:Dy-based Thermoluminescence Dosemeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Manish K; Pradhan, S M; Bakshi, A K; Datta, D

    2017-04-27

    Thermoluminescence (TL) signal obtained during second readout of a TL dosemeter disc previously exposed to ionising radiation is termed as residual TL. The origin of residual TL has not been discussed in detail so far in the literature. In this work, experimentally obtained residual TL signal and its origin is studied for CaSO4:Dy-based TL dosemeter through numerical simulation and role of deeper traps has been discussed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Simultaneous analysis of the glow curves of thermoluminescence and thermally stimulated exo-electron emission

    CERN Document Server

    Sakurai, T; Fukuda, Y

    1999-01-01

    A new method to analyse the glow curves of thermoluminescence (TL) and thermally stimulated exo-electron emission (TSEE) simultaneously is proposed. The method is based on a model consisting of one trap-one recombination centre for TL and thermionic emission for TSEE. A set of coupled differential equations, describing the charge flow, is numerically solved without any approximation, using the integrated experimental glow curves, maximum conditions and boundary conditions of TL and TSEE. The computer simulation is carried out in the two following cases: the case of correlation between TL and TSEE; and the case of no correlation between TL and TSEE. (author)

  1. Afterglow, low-temperature radioluminescence and thermoluminescence of Lu 2O 3:Eu ceramic scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappers, L. A.; Bartram, R. H.; Hamilton, D. S.; Brecher, C.; Lempicki, A.

    2005-01-01

    Comparison of thermoluminescence (TL) and scintillation light outputs with continuous gamma-ray excitation reveals that the concentration of deep hole traps in ceramic Lu2O3:Eu, tentatively attributed to anion Frenkel defects, is enhanced by reversible radiation damage. Shallow electron and hole traps are tentatively attributed to surface states at grain boundaries. Electrons in shallow traps serve as non-radiative recombination centers. A model for anomalously persistent afterglow following pulsed X-ray excitation is based on a continuous distribution of hole traps inferred from TL following extended gamma-ray irradiation at -135 °C.

  2. New thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD): optimization and characterization of TLD threads sterilizable by autoclave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarnet, D; Denizot, B; Hindré, F; Venier-Julienne, M C; Lisbona, A; Bardiès, M; Jallet, P

    2004-05-07

    To improve the performance of mono-extruded TLD threads as a dosimetric thermoluminescent tool (French Patent 9903729), a new process was developed by co-extrusion methodology leading to threads of 600 microm diameter with a 50 microm homogeneous polypropylene sheath. In this optimization work, study of parameters such as LiF:Mg,Cu,P powder granulometry, load rate and proportion of components led to an increased sensitivity of around 40%. Moreover, the co-extrusion technique allowed the threads to be sterilized by humid steam (134 degrees C/18 min) without significant variation of the linearity response between 0 and 30 Gy after gamma irradiation (60Co).

  3. Areal-Averaged Spectral Surface Albedo in an Atlantic Coastal Area: Estimation from Ground-Based Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgueni Kassianov

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tower-based data combined with high-resolution satellite products have been used to produce surface albedo at various spatial scales over land. Because tower-based albedo data are available at only a few sites, surface albedos using these combined data are spatially limited. Moreover, tower-based albedo data are not representative of highly heterogeneous regions. To produce areal-averaged and spectrally-resolved surface albedo for regions with various degrees of surface heterogeneity, we have developed a transmission-based retrieval and demonstrated its feasibility for relatively homogeneous land surfaces. Here, we demonstrate its feasibility for a highly heterogeneous coastal region. We use the atmospheric transmission measured during a 19-month period (June 2009–December 2010 by a ground-based Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR at five wavelengths (0.415, 0.5, 0.615, 0.673 and 0.87 µm at the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Mobile Facility (AMF site located on Graciosa Island. We compare the MFRSR-retrieved areal-averaged surface albedo with albedo derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS observations, and also a composite-based albedo. We demonstrate that these three methods produce similar spectral signatures of surface albedo; however, the MFRSR-retrieved albedo, is higher on average (≤0.04 than the MODIS-based areal-averaged surface albedo and the largest difference occurs in winter.

  4. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a program...

  5. Evolutionary Dynamics of Digitized Organizational Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation explores the effects of increased digitization on the evolutionary dynamics of organizational routines. Do routines become more flexible, or more rigid, as the mix of digital technologies and human actors changes? What are the mechanisms that govern the evolution of routines? The dissertation theorizes about the effects of…

  6. Routines Are the Foundation of Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Robin Rawlings; Allanson, Patricia Bolton; Notar, Charles E.

    2017-01-01

    Classroom management is the key to learning. Routines are the foundation of classroom management. Students require structure in their lives. Routines provide that in all of their life from the time they awake until the time they go to bed. Routines in a school and in the classroom provide the environment for learning to take place. The paper is…

  7. An evaluation of high-resolution regional climate model simulations of snow cover and albedo over the Rocky Mountains, with implications for the simulated snow-albedo feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minder, Justin R.; Letcher, Theodore W.; Skiles, S. McKenzie

    2016-08-01

    The snow-albedo feedback (SAF) strongly influences climate over midlatitude mountainous regions. However, over these regions the skill of regional climate models (RCMs) at simulating properties such as snow cover and surface albedo is poorly characterized. These properties are evaluated in a pair of 7 year long high-resolution RCM simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting model over the central Rocky Mountains. Key differences between the simulations include the computational domain (regional versus continental) and land surface model used (Noah versus Noah-MP). Simulations are evaluated against high-resolution satellite estimates of snow cover and albedo from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer. Both simulations generally reproduce the observed seasonal and spatial variability of snow cover and also exhibit important biases. One simulation substantially overpredicts subpixel fractional snow cover over snowy pixels (by up to 0.4) causing large positive biases in surface albedo, likely due in part to inadequate representation of canopy effects. The other simulation exhibits a negative bias in areal snow extent (as much as 19% of the analysis domain). Surface measurements reveal large positive biases in snow albedo (exceeding 0.2) during late spring caused by neglecting radiative effects of impurities deposited onto snow. Semi-idealized climate change experiments show substantially different magnitudes of SAF-enhanced warming in the two simulations that can be tied to the differences in snow cover in their control climates. More confident projections of regional climate change over mountains will require further work to evaluate and improve representation of snow cover and albedo in RCMs.

  8. Comparison between Snow Albedo Obtained from Landsat TM, ETM+ Imagery and the SPOT VEGETATION Albedo Product in a Mediterranean Mountainous Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pimentel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Albedo plays an important role in snow evolution modeling quantifying the amount of solar radiation absorbed and reflected by the snowpack, especially in mid-latitude regions with semiarid conditions. Satellite remote sensing is the most extensive technique to determine the variability of snow albedo over medium to large areas; however, scale effects from the pixel size of the sensor source may affect the results of snow models, with different impacts depending on the spatial resolution. This work presents the evaluation of snow albedo values retrieved from (1 Landsat images, L (16-day frequency with 30 × 30 m pixel size and (2 SPOT VEGETATION albedo products, SV (10-day frequency with 1 × 1 km pixel size in the Sierra Nevada mountain range in South Spain, a Mediterranean site representative of highly heterogeneous conditions. Daily snow albedo map series were derived from both sources, and used as input for the snow module in the WiMMed (Watershed Integrated Management in Mediterranean Environment hydrological model, which was operational at the study area for snow monitoring for two hydrological years, 2011–2012 and 2012–2013, in the Guadalfeo river basin in Sierra Nevada. The results showed similar albedo trends in both data sources, but with different values, the shift between both sources being distributed in space according to the altitude. This difference resulted in lower snow cover fraction values in the SV-simulations that affected the rest of snow variables included in the simulation. This underestimation, mainly due to the effects of mixed pixels composed by both snow and snow-free areas, produced higher divergences from both sources during the melting periods when the evapo-sublimation and melting fluxes are more relevant. Therefore, the selection of the albedo data source in these areas, where snow evapo-sublimation plays a very important role and the presence of snow-free patches is very frequent, can condition the final

  9. MISR Level 3 FIRSTLOOK Component Global Albedo product covering a day V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MISR Level 3 FIRSTLOOK Component Global Albedo publicly available product covering a day to be used starting with MISR Release V4.2. (Suggested Usage: This file...

  10. The extreme ultraviolet albedos of the planet Mercury and of the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H. H.; Broadfoot, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The albedo of the moon in the far UV was measured by Mariner 10 at a solar phase angle of 74 deg, and the geometric albedo of Mercury was measured in same wavelength range (584-1657 A) at solar phase angles ranging from 50 to 120 deg. For both the moon and Mercury there is a general increase in albedo for wavelengths decreasing from 1657 to 584 A. The ratio of the albedos of Mercury and the moon increases from about 0.6 to 0.8 in the range 600-1600 A. This merely points to a difference in the surfaces of the moon and Mercury, there being insufficient data to make any conclusions regarding the nature of the difference.

  11. Energy and Angular Spectra of Albedo Protons and Neutrons Emitted from Hydrated Layers of Lunar Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, L. W.; Zaman, F.; Schwadron, N. A.; Wilson, J. K.; Spence, H. E.; Case, A. W.; Kasper, J. C.; Mazur, J. E.; Looper, M. D.

    2016-11-01

    Energy and angular yields of albedo protons and neutrons emitted from the lunar surface as a function of hydration layer thickness in the lunar regolith using the MCNP computer code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory are presented.

  12. The extreme ultraviolet albedos of the planet Mercury and of the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H. H.; Broadfoot, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The albedo of the moon in the far UV was measured by Mariner 10 at a solar phase angle of 74 deg, and the geometric albedo of Mercury was measured in same wavelength range (584-1657 A) at solar phase angles ranging from 50 to 120 deg. For both the moon and Mercury there is a general increase in albedo for wavelengths decreasing from 1657 to 584 A. The ratio of the albedos of Mercury and the moon increases from about 0.6 to 0.8 in the range 600-1600 A. This merely points to a difference in the surfaces of the moon and Mercury, there being insufficient data to make any conclusions regarding the nature of the difference.

  13. Spatially Complete Surface Albedo Data Sets: Value-Added Products Derived from Terra MODIS Land Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Eric G.; King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Gao, Feng

    2004-01-01

    Spectral land surface albedo is an important parameter for describing the radiative properties of the Earth. Accordingly it reflects the consequences of natural and human interactions, such as anthropogenic, meteorological, and phenological effects, on global and local climatological trends. Consequently, albedos are integral parts in a variety of research areas, such as general circulation models (GCMs), energy balance studies, modeling of land use and land use change, and biophysical, oceanographic, and meteorological studies. Recent observations of diffuse bihemispherical (white-sky) and direct beam directional hemispherical (black-sky ) land surface albedo included in the MOD43B3 product from MODIS instruments aboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellite platforms have provided researchers with unprecedented spatial, spectral, and temporal characteristics. Cloud and seasonal snow cover, however, curtail retrievals to approximately half the global land surfaces on an annual equal-angle basis, precluding MOD43B3 albedo products from direct inclusion in some research projects and production environments.

  14. MODIS/COMBINED MCD43B3 Albedo 16-Day L3 Global 1km

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF/Albedo Model Parameters product (MCD43A1) contains three-dimensional (3D) data sets providing users...

  15. On the calibration of the polarimetric slope - albedo relation for asteroids: Work in progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cellino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Asteroid polarimetry is known to be an excellent tool to derive information on the geometric albedo of these objects. This is made possible by the existence of a relation between the albedo and the morphology of the curve which describes the variation of the degree of linear polarization of asteroid light as a function of the illumination conditions. A major problem is that the calibration of the commonly accepted form of the polarization - albedo relation includes numerical coefficients which are affected by fairly high uncertainties. Following some recommendations issued by IAU Commission 15, we are trying to improve the albedo - polarization relation by taking advantage of new polarimetric data obtained in dedicated observation campaigns. We present here some very preliminary results.

  16. On the calibration of the relation between geometric albedo and polarimetric properties for the asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Cellino, A; Gil-Hutton, R; Tanga, P; Canada-Assandri, M; Tedesco, E F

    2015-01-01

    We present a new extensive analysis of the old problem of finding a satisfactory calibration of the relation between the geometric albedo and some measurable polarization properties of the asteroids. To achieve our goals, we use all polarimetric data at our disposal. For the purposes of calibration, we use a limited sample of objects for which we can be confident to know the albedo with good accuracy, according to previous investigations of other authors. We find a new set of updated calibration coefficients for the classical slope - albedo relation, but we generalize our analysis and we consider also alternative possibilities, including the use of other polarimetric parameters, one being proposed here for the first time, and the possibility to exclude from best-fit analyzes the asteroids having low albedos. We also consider a possible parabolic fit of the whole set of data.

  17. Atmospheric effects on the mapping of Martian thermal inertia and thermally derived albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Joan N.; Jakosky, Bruce M.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    We examine the effects of a dusty CO2 atmosphere on the thermal inertia and thermally derived albedo of Mars and we present a new map of thermal inertias. This new map was produced using a coupled surface atmosphere (CSA) model, dust opacities from Viking infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) data, and CO2 columns based on topography. The CSA model thermal inertias are smaller than the 2% model thermal inertias, with the difference largest at large thermal inertia. Although the difference between the thermal inertias obtained with the two models is moderate for much of the region studied, it is largest in regions of either high dust opacity or of topographic lows, including the Viking Lander 1 site and some geologically interesting regions. The CSA model thermally derived albedos do not acurately predict the IRTM measured albedos and are very similar to the thermally derived albedos obtained with models making the 2% assumption.

  18. MODIS/COMBINED MCD43A3 Albedo 16-Day L3 Global 500m

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF/Albedo Model Parameters product (MCD43A1) contains three-dimensional (3D) data sets providing users...

  19. Implications of albedo changes following afforestation on the benefits of forests as carbon sinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. U. F. Kirschbaum

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Increased carbon storage with afforestation leads to a decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and thus decreases radiative forcing and cools the Earth. However, land-use change also changes the reflective properties of the surface vegetation from more reflective pasture to relatively less reflective forest cover. This increase in radiation absorption by the forest constitutes an increase in radiative forcing, with a warming effect. The net effect of decreased albedo and carbon storage on radiative forcing depends on the relative magnitude of these two opposing processes.

    We used data from an intensively studied site in New Zealand's Central North Island that has long-term, ground-based measurements of albedo over the full short-wave spectrum from a developing Pinus radiata forest. Data from this site were supplemented with satellite-derived albedo estimates from New Zealand pastures. The albedo of a well-established forest was measured as 13 % and pasture albedo as 20 %. We used these data to calculate the direct radiative forcing effect of changing albedo as the forest grew.

    We calculated the radiative forcing resulting from the removal of carbon from the atmosphere as a decrease in radiative forcing of −104 GJ tC−1 yr−1. We also showed that the observed change in albedo constituted a direct radiative forcing of 2759 GJ ha−1 yr−1. Thus, following afforestation, 26.5 tC ha−1 needs to be stored in a growing forest to balance the increase in radiative forcing resulting from the observed albedo change. Measurements of tree biomass and albedo were used to estimate the net change in radiative forcing as the newly planted forest grew. Albedo and carbon-storage effects were of similar magnitude for the first four to five years after tree planting, but as the stand grew older, the carbon storage effect increasingly dominated. Averaged over the whole

  20. Implications of albedo changes following afforestation on the benefits of forests as carbon sinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. U. F. Kirschbaum

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased carbon storage with afforestation leads to a decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and thus decreases radiative forcing and cools the Earth. However, afforestation also changes the reflective properties of the surface vegetation from more reflective pasture to relatively less reflective forest cover. This increase in radiation absorption by the forest constitutes an increase in radiative forcing, with a warming effect. The net effect of decreased albedo and carbon storage on radiative forcing depends on the relative magnitude of these two opposing processes.

    We used data from an intensively studied site in New Zealand's Central North Island that has long-term, ground-based measurements of albedo over the full short-wave spectrum from a developing Pinus radiata forest. Data from this site were supplemented with satellite-derived albedo estimates from New Zealand pastures. The albedo of a well-established forest was measured as 13 % and pasture albedo as 20 %. We used these data to calculate the direct radiative forcing effect of changing albedo as the forest grew.

    We calculated the radiative forcing resulting from the removal of carbon from the atmosphere as a decrease in radiative forcing of −104 GJ tC−1 yr−1. We also showed that the observed change in albedo constituted a direct radiative forcing of 2759 GJ ha−1 yr−1. Thus, following afforestation, 26.5 tC ha−1 needs to be stored in a growing forest to balance the increase in radiative forcing resulting from the observed albedo change. Measurements of tree biomass and albedo were used to estimate the net change in radiative forcing as the newly planted forest grew. Albedo and carbon-storage effects were of similar magnitude for the first four to five years after tree planting, but as the stand grew older, the carbon storage effect increasingly dominated. Averaged over the whole

  1. Surface Albedo Darkening from wildfires in Northern Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Ichoku, C. M.; Poudal, R.; Roman, M. O.; Wilcox, E.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfires are recognized as a key physical disturbance of terrestrial ecosystems and a major source of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. They are known to produce changes in landscape patterns and lead to changes in surface albedo that can persist for long periods. Here, we estimate the darkening of surface albedo due to wildfires in different land cover ecosystems in the Northern Sub-Saharan Africa using data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We determined a decrease in albedo after fires over most land cover types (e.g. woody savannas: (-0.00352 0.00003) and savannas: (- 0.003910.00003), which together accounted for >86% of the total MODIS fire count between 2003 and 2011). Grasslands had a higher value (-0.00454 0.00003) than the savannas, but accounted for only about 5% of the total fire count. A few other land cover types (e.g. Deciduous broad leaf: (0.00062 0.00015), and barren: 0.00027 0.00019), showed an increase in albedo after fires, but accounted for less than 1% of the total fires. Albedo change due to wildfires is more important during the fire season (October-February). The albedo recovery progresses rapidly during the first year after fires, where savannas show the greatest recovery (>77%) within one year, while deciduous broadleaf, permanent wetlands and barren lands show the least one-year recovery (56%). The persistence of surface albedo darkening in most land cover types is limited to about six to seven years, after which at least 98% of the burnt pixels recover to their pre-fire albedo.

  2. Global analysis of radiative forcing from fire-induced shortwave albedo change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. López-Saldaña

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Land surface albedo, a key parameter to derive Earth's surface energy balance, is used in the parameterization of numerical weather prediction, climate monitoring and climate change impact assessments. Changes in albedo due to fire have not been fully investigated at continental and global scale. The main goal of this study therefore, is to quantify the changes in albedo produced by biomass burning activities and their associated shortwave radiative forcing. The study relies on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS MCD64A1 burned area product to create an annual composite of areas affected by fire and the MCD43C2 BRDF-Albedo snow-free product to compute a bihemispherical reflectance time series. The approximate day of burn is used to calculate the instantaneous change in shortwave Albedo. Using the corresponding National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP monthly mean downward solar radiation flux at the surface, the global radiative forcing associated to fire was computed. The analysis reveals a mean decrease in shortwave albedo of −0.023 (1σ = 0.018 causing a mean positive radiative forcing of 6.31 W m–2 (1σ = 5.04 over the 2002–2012 time period in areas affected by fire. The greatest drop in mean shortwave albedo change occurs in 2002, which corresponds to the highest total area burnt (3.66 Mha observed in the same year and produces the highest mean radiative forcing (6.75 W m–2. Africa is the main contributor in terms of burned area but forests globally are giving the highest radiative forcing per unit area, thus give detectable changes in shortwave albedo. The global mean radiative forcing for the whole studied period ~ 0.04 W m–2 shows that the contribution of fires into the Earth system is not insignificant.

  3. New spectral functions of the near-ground albedo derived from aircraft diffraction spectrometer observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Varotsos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The airborne spectral observations of the upward and downward irradiances are revisited to investigate the dependence of the near-ground albedo as a function of wavelength in the entire solar spectrum for different surfaces (sand, water, snow and in different conditions (clear or cloudy sky. The radiative upward and downward fluxes were determined by a diffraction spectrometer flown on a research aircraft that was performing multiple flight paths near ground. The results obtained show that the near-ground albedo does not generally increase with increasing wavelengths for all kinds of surfaces as is widely believed today. Particularly, in the case of water surfaces we found that the albedo in the ultraviolet region is more or less independent of the wavelength on a long-term basis. Interestingly, in the visible and near-infrared spectra the water albedo obeys an almost constant power-law relationship with wavelength. In the case of sand surfaces we found that the sand albedo is a quadratic function of wavelength, which becomes more accurate, if the ultraviolet wavelengths are neglected. Finally, we found that the spectral dependence of snow albedo behaves similarly to that of water, i.e. both decrease from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared wavelengths by 20–50%, despite of the fact that their values differ by one order of magnitude (water albedo being lower. In addition, the snow albedo versus ultraviolet wavelength is almost constant, while in the visible-near infrared spectrum the best simulation is achieved by a second-order polynomial, as in the case of sand, but with opposite slopes.

  4. The Extraordinary Albedo Variations on Pluto Detected by New Horizons and Implications for Dwarf Planet Eris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Hofgartner, Jason D.; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Ennico, Kimberly; Olkin, Catherine B.; Young, Leslie; New Horizons Geology and Geophysics Team

    2016-10-01

    The New Horizons mission returned stunning observations of active geology on the surface of Pluto (Stern et al., 2015, Science 350, 292). One of the markers for activity on planets or moons is normal albedos approaching 1.0, as is the case for Enceladus (Buratti et al., 1984, Icarus 58, 254; Verbiscer et al., 2005, Icarus 173, 66). When all corrections for viewing geometry are made for Pluto, it has normal albedos that approach unity in the regions that show evidence for activity by a lack of craters, notably the region informally named Sputnik Planum. On the other hand, Pluto also has a very dark (normal albedo ~0.10) equatorial belt.The geometric albedo of Eris, another large dwarf planet in the Kuiper Belt, is 0.96 (Sicardy et al., 2011, Nature 478, 493), close to that of Enceladus. Coupled with a high density of 2.5 gm/cc (Sicardy et al., ibid.), implying an even larger amount of radiogenic heating than that for Pluto (with a density near 1.9 gm/cc), we find it highly likely that Eris is also active with some type of solid state convection or cryovolcanism on its surface. Alternate explanations such as complete condensation of methane frost onto its surface in the colder environment at nearly 100 AUs would not lead to the high albedo observed.Another implication of the extreme albedo variations on Pluto is that the temperature varies by at least 20K on its surface, spawning possible aeolian processes and associated features such as wind streaks and dunes, which are currently being sought on New Horizons images. Finally, low albedo regions on Pluto, with normal reflectances less than 0.10, provide possible evidence for dust in the Kuiper Belt that is accreting onto the surface of Pluto. Another - or additional - explanation for this low-albedo dust is native material created in Pluto's hazy atmosphere.New Horizons funding by NASA is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Sunlight, Sea Ice, and the Ice Albedo Feedback in a Changing Arctic Sea Ice Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ice age, and iv) onset dates of melt and freezeup . 4. Assess the magnitude of the contribution from ice-albedo feedback to the observed decrease of...the impact on albedo evolution of ice concentration and melt and freezeup onset dates. This effort will expand on previous work by i) examining...radiation, ice concentration, ice type, and melt and freezeup onset dates on a 25 x 25 km equal area scalable grid. We have daily values of these parameters

  6. The GAC-SAL: A new 27-year surface albedo data record from AVHRR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihelä, A.; Manninen, T.; Andersson, K.; Laine, V.

    2012-04-01

    Studies on the Earth's climate require knowledge on the interactions between solar radiation and the Earth's atmosphere-surface system. One of the key variables that govern those interactions is the surface albedo, the ratio of reflected to incoming solar radiation at Earth's surface. Recent studies (Holland et al, 2010, Fletcher et al., 2009) point to surface albedo and its variations being especially important for the climate of the Arctic. Against this background, there is a clear and growing need for robust long-term timeseries of surface albedo on a global scale. The Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF), a project of EUMETSAT, answers this need by releasing the first edition of the GAC-SAL surface albedo data record. The GAC-SAL describes the directional-hemispherical reflectance (or black-sky albedo) of the Earth's surface. The data record covers 27 years (1982-2009), is fully global with 0.25 degree spatial resolution, and implements published algorithms for the calculation of surface albedo over land, snow, sea ice and water. The product also incorporates a correction for topography-induced effects on image geolocation and radiometric accuracy. The data is available for all interested users, free of charge. Of special interest is the Arctic sea ice area, for which this is the first long time series reaching present day. We present an overall description of the albedo retrieval scheme and present some results from an extensive validation effort, where GAC-SAL data was compared against in situ observations of surface albedo at 10 different Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) and Greenland Climate Network (GC-Net) sites, each validation period spanning ~15 years. We have also performed comparisons between GAC-SAL, CERES FSW, and MODIS 43C3 products. Some results of these comparisons are presented. The achieved mean accuracy over all validation results was ~10% (in relative terms). Stability of the data record will also be

  7. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Ice-Albedo Feedback Processes in the Arctic Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    collectively make up the ice-albedo feedback mechanism. OBJECTIVES To achieve this goal, we must first determine how shortwave radiation is distributed...information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 30 SEP 1999 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-1999...surface temperature, and surface reflectivity (Figure 1). Significant findings to date include: 1. Changes in albedo are a combination of a gradual

  8. Changes in the Albedo of the Pegasus and Phoenix Runways, 2000-2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-18

    albedo, increase solar energy absorption in the ice shelf, and significantly alter the energy balance, resulting in in- creased melting , snow density...a snow or ice surface also lowers the surface albedo, increasing solar energy absorp- tion. This increased energy uptake can initiate melting of the...further reducing pavement strength and promoting more melting . To prevent or delay reaching the melt tipping point, it is critical to maintain the

  9. Impact of Dust on Mars Surface Albedo and Energy Flux with LMD General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D.; Flanner, M.; Millour, E.; Martinez, G.

    2015-12-01

    Mars, just like Earth experience different seasons because of its axial tilt (about 25°). This causes growth and retreat of snow cover (primarily CO2) in Martian Polar regions. The perennial caps are the only place on the planet where condensed H2O is available at surface. On Mars, as much as 30% atmospheric CO2 deposits in each hemisphere depending upon the season. This leads to a significant variation on planet's surface albedo and hence effecting the amount of solar flux absorbed or reflected at the surface. General Circulation Model (GCM) of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) currently uses observationally derived surface albedo from Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument for the polar caps. These TES albedo values do not have any inter-annual variability, and are independent of presence of any dust/impurity on surface. Presence of dust or other surface impurities can significantly reduce the surface albedo especially during and right after a dust storm. This change will also be evident in the surface energy flux interactions. Our work focuses on combining earth based Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) model with current state of GCM to incorporate the impact of dust on Martian surface albedo, and hence the energy flux. Inter-annual variability of surface albedo and planet's top of atmosphere (TOA) energy budget along with their correlation with currently available mission data will be presented.

  10. The dependence of the ice-albedo feedback on atmospheric properties

    CERN Document Server

    von Paris, P; Kitzmann, D; Rauer, H

    2013-01-01

    The ice-albedo feedback is a potentially important de-stabilizing effect for the climate of terrestrial planets. It is based on the positive feedback between decreasing surface temperatures, an increase of snow and ice cover and an associated increase in planetary albedo, which then further decreases surface temperature. A recent study shows that for M stars, the strength of the ice-albedo feedback is reduced This study investigates the influence of the atmosphere (in terms of surface pressure and atmospheric composition) for this feedback. A plane-parallel radiative transfer model is used for the calculation of planetary albedos. We varied CO2 partial pressures as well as the H2O, CH4, and O3 content in the atmosphere for planets orbiting Sun-like and M-type stars. Results suggest that for planets around M stars, the ice-albedo effect is significantly reduced, compared to planets around Sun-like stars. Including the effects of an atmosphere further suppresses the sensitivity to the ice-albedo effect. Atmosph...

  11. Estimate the influence of snow grain size and black carbon on albedo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhongMing Guo; NingLian Wang; XiaoBo Wu; HongBo Wu; YuWei Wu

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of the influence of snow grain size and black carbon on albedo is essential in obtaining the accurate albedo. In this paper, field measurement data, including snow grain size, snow depth and density was obtained. Black carbon samples were collected from the snow surface. A simultaneous observation using Analytical Spectral Devices was employed in the Qiyi Glacier located in the Qilian Mountain. Analytical Spectral Devices spectrum data were used to analyze spectral re-flectance of snow for different grain size and black carbon content. The measurements were compared with the results obtained from the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation model, and the simulation was found to correlate well with the ob-served data. However, the simulated albedo was near to 0.98 times of the measured albedo, so the other factors were as-sumed to be constant using the corrected Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation model to estimate the influence of measured snow grain size and black carbon on albedo. Field measurements were controlled to fit the relationship between the snow grain size and black carbon in order to estimate the influence of these factors on the snow albedo.

  12. Retrieval of snow albedo and grain size using reflectance measurements in Himalayan basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Negi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, spectral reflectance measurements of Himalayan seasonal snow were carried out and analysed to retrieve the snow albedo and effective grain size. The asymptotic radiative transfer (ART theory was applied to retrieve the plane and spherical albedo. The retrieved plane albedo was compared with the measured spectral albedo and a good agreement was observed with ±10% differences. Retrieved integrated albedo was found within ±6% difference with ground observed broadband albedo. The retrieved snow grain sizes using different models based on the ART theory were compared for various snow types and it was observed that the grain size model using two channel method (one in visible and another in NIR region can work well for the Himalayan seasonal snow and it was found consistent with temporal changes in grain size. This method can work very well for clean, dry snow as in the upper Himalaya, but sometimes, due to the low reflectances (<20% using wavelength 1.24 μm, the ART theory cannot be applied, which is common in lower and middle Himalayan old snow. This study is important for monitoring the Himalayan cryosphere using air-borne or space-borne sensors.

  13. Experimental evidence that microbial activity lowers the albedo of glacier surfaces: the cryoconite casserole experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, M.; Tranter, M.; Takeuchi, N.; Anesio, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Darkened glacier and ice sheet surfaces have lower albedos, absorb more solar radiation and consequently melt more rapidly. The increase in glacier surface darkening is an important positive feedback to warming global temperatures, leading to ever growing world-wide ice mass loss. Most studies focus primarily on glacial albedo darkening caused by the physical properties of snow and ice surfaces, and the deposition of dark impurities on glaciers. To date, however, the important effects of biological activity have not been included in most albedo reduction models. This study provides the first experimental evidence that microbial activity can significantly decrease the albedo of glacier surfaces. An original laboratory experiment, the cryoconite casserole, was designed to test the microbial darkening of glacier surface debris (cryoconite) under simulated Greenlandic summer conditions. It was found that minor fertilisation of the cryoconite (at nutrient concentrations typical of glacial ice melt) stimulated extensive microbial activity. Microbes intensified their organic carbon fixation and even mined phosphorous out of the glacier surface sediment. Furthermore, the microbial organic carbon production, accumulation and transformation caused the glacial debris to darken further by 17.3% reflectivity (albedo analogue). These experiments are consistent with the hypothesis that enhanced fertilisation by anthropogenic inputs results in substantial amounts of organic carbon fixation, debris darkening and ultimately to a considerable decrease in the ice albedo of glacier surfaces on global scales. The sizeable amounts of microbially produced glacier surface organic matter and nutrients can thus be a vital source of bioavailable nutrients for subglacial and downstream environments.

  14. Near-infrared spectra of high-albedo outer main-belt asteroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasuga, Toshihiro; Shirahata, Mai [National Institutes of Natural Science, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Usui, Fumihiko [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kuroda, Daisuke [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 3037-5 Honjo, Kamogata-cho, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Ootsubo, Takafumi [Department of Earth Science and Astronomy, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 153-8902 (Japan); Okamura, Natsuko [Department of Complexity Science and Engineering, The University of Tokyo Kiban Bldg. 408, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Hasegawa, Sunao, E-mail: toshi.kasuga@nao.ac.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    Most outer main-belt asteroids have low albedos because of their carbonaceouslike bodies. However, infrared satellite surveys have revealed that some asteroids have high albedos, which may suggest the presence of unusual surface minerals for those primitive objects. We present new near-infrared (1.1–2.5 μm) spectra of four outer main-belt asteroids with albedos ≥ 0.1. The C-complex asteroids (555) Norma and (2542) Calpurnia are featureless and have (50%–60%) amorphous Mg pyroxenes that might explain the high albedos. Asteroids (701) Oriola (which is a C-complex asteroid) and (2670) Chuvashia (a D/T-type or M-type asteroid) show possible broad absorption bands (1.5–2.1 μm). The feature can be reproduced by either Mg-rich amorphous pyroxene (with 50%–60% and 80%–95% Mg, respectively) or orthopyroxene (crystalline silicate), which might be responsible for the high albedos. No absorption features of water ice (near 1.5 and 2.0 μm) are detected in the objects. We discuss the origin of high albedo components in the outer main-belt asteroids and their physical relations to comets.

  15. Retrieval of snow albedo and grain size using reflectance measurements in Himalayan basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Negi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper spectral reflectance measurements of Himalayan seasonal snow were carried out and analysed to retrieve the snow albedo and effective grain size. The asymptotic radiative transfer (ART theory was applied to retrieve the plane and spherical albedo. The retrieved plane albedo was compared with the measured spectral albedo and a good agreement was observed with ±10% measured error accuracy. Retrieved integrated albedo was found within ±6% difference with ground observed broadband albedo. The snow grain sizes retrieved using different models based on ART theory are compared for different snow types and it was observed that presently grain size model using two channel method (one in visible and another in NIR region can work well for Himalayan seasonal snow and it was found consistence with temporal increased grain size. This method can work very well for clean dry snow like in upper Himalaya but sometime due to low reflectances (<0.2 using wavelength 1.24 μm ART theory can not be applied, which is common in lower and middle Himalayan old snow. This study is of importance for monitoring the Himalayan cryosphere using air-borne or space-borne sensors.

  16. Albedo impact on the suitability of biochar systems to mitigate global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sebastian; Bright, Ryan M; Fischer, Daniel; Schulz, Hardy; Glaser, Bruno

    2012-11-20

    Biochar application to agricultural soils can change the surface albedo which could counteract the climate mitigation benefit of biochar systems. However, the size of this impact has not yet been quantified. Based on empirical albedo measurements and literature data of arable soils mixed with biochar, a model for annual vegetation cover development based on satellite data and an assessment of the annual development of surface humidity, an average mean annual albedo reduction of 0.05 has been calculated for applying 30-32 Mg ha(-1) biochar on a test field near Bayreuth, Germany. The impact of biochar production and application on the carbon cycle and on the soil albedo was integrated into the greenhouse gas (GHG) balance of a modeled pyrolysis based biochar system via the computation of global warming potential (GWP) characterization factors. The analysis resulted in a reduction of the overall climate mitigation benefit of biochar systems by 13-22% due to the albedo change as compared to an analysis which disregards the albedo effect. Comparing the use of the same quantity of biomass in a biochar system to a bioenergy district heating system which replaces natural gas combustion, bioenergy heating systems achieve 99-119% of the climate benefit of biochar systems according to the model calculation.

  17. Global Albedos of Pluto and Charon from LORRI New Horizons Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Buratti, B J; Hicks, M D; Weaver, H A; Stern, S A; Momary, T; Mosher, J A; Beyer, R A; Young, L A; Ennico, K; Olkin, C B

    2016-01-01

    The exploration of the Pluto-Charon system by the New Horizons spacecraft represent the first opportunity to understand the distribution of albedo and other photometric properties of the surfaces of objects in the Solar System's "Third Zone" within the context of a geologic world. Images of the entire illuminated surface of Pluto and Charon obtained by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) camera provide a global map of Pluto that revealed surface albedo variegations larger than any other world except for Saturn's moon Iapetus. Normal reflectances on Pluto range from 0.08-1.0. Charon exhibits a much blander surface with normal reflectances ranging from 0.20-0.73. Pluto's albedo features are well-correlated with geologic features, although some exogenous low-albedo dust may be responsible for features seen to the west of the area informally named Tombaugh Regio. The albedo patterns of both Pluto and Charon are latitudinally organized, with the exception of Tombaugh Regio. The low-albedo areas of Pluto a...

  18. Influence of process parameters on the color and texture of passion fruit albedo preserved in syrup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Pereira Figueiredo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The industrialization of passion fruit in the form of juice produces considerable amounts of residue that could be used as food. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of the volume of passion fruit juice added to the syrup and the cooking time on the color and texture of passion fruit albedo preserved in syrup. Multi-linear models were well fit to describe the value for a* (for the albedo the values for b* (for the albedo and syrup, which exhibited high correlation coefficients of 98%, 84%, and 88%, respectively. The volume of passion fruit juice added and the cooking time of the albedos in the syrup, involved in the processing of passion fruit albedo preserves in syrup, significantly affected color analyses. The texture was not affected by the parameters studied. Therefore, the use of larger volumes of passion fruit juice and longer cooking time is recommended for the production of passion fruit albedo preserves in syrup to achieve the characteristic yellow color of the fruit.

  19. Infrared luminescence and thermoluminescence of lithium borate glasses doped with Sm3+ ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjaiah J.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermoluminescence (TL characteristics of X-ray irradiated pure and doped with Sm3+ ions Li2O-MO-B2O3 (where MO=ZnO, CaO, CdO glasses have been studied in the temperature range of 303 to 573 K. All the pure glasses exhibited single TL peaks at 382 K, 424 K and 466 K. When these glasses were doped with Sm3+ ions no additional peaks have been observed but the glow peak temperature of the existing glow peak shifted gradually towards higher temperatures with gain in intensity of TL light output. The area under the glow curve was found to be maximum for Sm3+ doped glasses mixed with cadmium oxide as a modifier. The trap depth parameters associated with the observed TL peaks have been evaluated using Chen’s formulae. The possible use of these glasses in radiation dosimetry has been described. The results clearly showed that samarium doped cadmium borate glass has a potential to be considered as a thermoluminescence dosimeter.

  20. Photoluminescence, thermoluminescence and Raman studies of CdS nanocrystalline phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chawla, Puja, E-mail: ranu.puja@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119 (India); Lochab, S.P. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Singh, Nafa [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119 (India)

    2010-03-04

    This paper reports on the photoluminescence (PL), thermoluminescence (TL) and Raman spectra of cadmium sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles prepared by solid-state reaction. The structures and morphologies of the products were characterized by XRD, HRTEM and EDAX. XRD confirmed the single-phase formation of CdS nanoparticles. TEM micrograph revealed the formation of nearly spherical nanoparticles with a diameter of 3.5 nm. PL emission of CdS:Bi nanoparticles is at 413 nm with a shoulder at 438 nm in addition to CdS peak at 550 nm. This may correspond to transition from {sup 3}P{sub 1} state to {sup 1}S{sub 0} states of Bi{sup 3+}. Thermoluminescence and Raman studies have also been carried out on CdS nanophosphor. The Raman spectrum of CdS nanoparticles clearly shows first, second and third order LO Raman peaks when excited using the wavelength of 488 nm. The red shift of the Raman peaks in nanoparticles compared to that of bulk CdS may be attributed to optical phonon confinement.

  1. Photoluminescence and thermoluminescence properties of tricalcium phosphate phosphors doped with dysprosium and europium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Madhukumar; H K Varma; Manoj Komath; T S Elias; V Padmanabhan; C M K Nair

    2007-10-01

    The suitability of calcium phosphate crystals for thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) applications is investigated, owing to their equivalence to bone mineral. The and phases of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) were synthesized through wet precipitation and high temperature solid state routes and doped with Dy and Eu. The photoluminescence and thermoluminescence studies of the phosphors have been carried out. The TL properties were found to be highly dependent on the method of preparation of the material. Eu doping gave good PL emission, whereas Dy doping was more efficient in TL emission. -TCP was found to be less TL sensitive than -TCP, yet it was identified as a better phosphor material owing to its better fading characteristics. The dependence of TL of -TCP : Dy on the energy and dose of radiation, and on the doping concentration were studied. The TL intensity was observed to fade exponentially during a storage period of 20 days, but it stabilized at 70% of the initial value after 30 days. The optimum doping concentration was found to be 0.5 mol%.

  2. Dosimetric study of thermoluminescent detectors in clinical photon beams using liquid water and PMMA phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushima, Luciana C., E-mail: lmatsushima@ipen.br [Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes (GMR) - Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Veneziani, Glauco R. [Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes (GMR) - Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sakuraba, Roberto K. [Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes (GMR) - Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sociedade Beneficente Israelita Brasileira - Hospital Albert Einstein (HAE), Avenida Albert Einstein, 665, Morumbi, CEP: 05652-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruz, Jose C. da [Sociedade Beneficente Israelita Brasileira - Hospital Albert Einstein (HAE), Avenida Albert Einstein, 665, Morumbi, CEP: 05652-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    The purpose of this study was the dosimetric evaluation of thermoluminescent detectors of calcium sulphate doped with dysprosium (CaSO{sub 4}:Dy) produced by IPEN compared to the TL response of lithium fluoride doped with magnesium and titanium (LiF:Mg,Ti) dosimeters and microdosimeters produced by Harshaw Chemical Company to clinical photon beams dosimetry (6 and 15 MV) using liquid water and PMMA phantoms. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dosimetric study of thermoluminescent detectors of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy, LiF:Mg,Ti and {mu}LiF:Mg,Ti. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Clinical (6 and 15 MV) photon beams dosimetry using liquid water and PMMA phantom. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Linear behavior to the dose range (0.1 to 5 Gy). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TL response reproducibility better than {+-}4.34%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaSO{sub 4}:Dy represent a cheaper alternative to the TLD-100.

  3. Sand of Colombian beaches as low cost thermoluminescent dosimeter for radiotherapy title

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogollo P, R.; Ricaurte A, D.; Alvarino B, G., E-mail: rrcogollo@sinu.unicordoba.edu.co [University of Cordoba, Materials and Applied Physics Group, Carrera 6 No. 76-103, Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia)

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the thermoluminescent characteristics of the sand coming from Colombian beaches (Covenas and Monitos), for its use as dosimeter in therapeutic dose. The selected samples, annealed at 400 C per 1 hour, were irradiated under different doses using a unity of {sup 60}Co Theratron 780 C on air at room temperature. The reading was carried out in a Harshaw TLD 4500. The main dosimetric properties of the material (glow curve, response reproducibility, reuse, linearity and thermal decay) have been in detail studied. The results show a lineal response to the dose from 50 c Gy to 1000 c Gy, in the material. The studied samples of sand can be used as thermoluminescent dosimeters for applications in different fields. The importance of this work is that the sand is a natural low cost substance, available in large quantities, and can be used in clinical physics in order to make assessments about the received dose by the patient during the medical treatment. (Author)

  4. Thermoluminescence of double fluorides doped with rare earths; Termoluminiscencia de fluoruros dobles dopados con tierras raras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azorin N, J.; Sanchez R, A. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Khaidukov, N.M. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    In this work the thermoluminescent characteristics of double fluorides K{sub 2}YF{sub 5}, K{sub 2}GdF{sub 5} and K{sub 2}LuF{sub 5} doped are presented with Tb{sup 3+}, studied in the interval of temperature from 30 to 400 C. The materials that presented better answer to the irradiation with particles beta and with ultraviolet light they were the K{sub 2}YF{sub 5}: Tb (1% at. Tb{sup 3+}) and the K{sub 2}LuF{sub 5}: Tb (1% at. Tb{sup 3+}); while the K{sub 2}YF{sub 5}: Tb to high concentrations (10% and 20% at. Tb{sup 3+}) and the K{sub 2}LuF{sub 5}: Tb (1% at. Tb{sup 3+}) and the K{sub 2}LuF{sub 5}: Tb (1% at. Tb{sup 3+}) they presented an acceptable answer in front of the gamma radiation. The intensity of the Tl answer induced in these materials is a decisive factor to continue studying its dosimetric characteristics, what allows to consider them as the base for the development of potential materials to use them in the dosimetry of beta particles, of the UV light of the gamma radiation using the thermoluminescence method. (Author)

  5. Thermoluminescence properties of lithium magnesium borate glasses system doped with dysprosium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhareb, M H A; Hashim, S; Ghoshal, S K; Alajerami, Y S M; Saleh, M A; Razak, N A B; Azizan, S A B

    2015-12-01

    We report the impact of dysprosium (Dy(3+)) dopant and magnesium oxide (MgO) modifier on the thermoluminescent properties of lithium borate (LB) glass via two procedures. The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves reveal a single prominent peak at 190 °C for 0.5 mol% of Dy(3+). An increase in MgO contents by 10 mol% enhances the TL intensity by a factor of 1.5 times without causing any shift in the maximum temperature. This enhancement is attributed to the occurrence of extra electron traps created via magnesium and the energy transfer to trivalent Dy(3+) ions. Good linearity in the range of 0.01-4 Gy with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.998, fading as low as 21% over a period of 3 months, excellent reproducibility without oven annealing and tissue equivalent effective atomic numbers ~8.71 are achieved. The trap parameters, including geometric factor (μg), activation energy (E) and frequency factor (s) associated with LMB:Dy are also determined. These favorable TL characteristics of prepared glasses may contribute towards the development of Li2O-MgO-B2O3 radiation dosimeters.

  6. Thermoluminescence glow curve deconvolution functions by continued fractions for different orders of kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Llamas, H.; Gutiérrez-Tapia, C.

    2013-03-01

    The shape of the peaks in thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry can be represented by the so-called temperature integral. In this paper, we present a very efficient method, based on a continued fraction approach to the incomplete gamma function, intended to calculate the overall temperature integral which includes the frequency factor ∝ T a . The single glow-peak algorithm for linear and exponential heating rates is derived. In the first case, the method provides a good approximation with a maximum relative error of 1.1×10-5 within the 0.1≤E/kT≤90 range in the case of a=0. It is shown that, in general, the method is efficient, converges quickly and can be adopted in the numerical fitting of glow lines in order to obtain the parameters relevant to TL. The utility of this approach is exemplified by adjusting the standard lithium flouride doped with magnesium and titanium (LiF): Mg, Ti (TLD-100) using five and six thermoluminescent peaks, determining that peak 6 is present and observable in the analysed spectrum. Finally, methods such as asymptotic expansion of the temperature integral by the asymptotic series approximation, the convergent series approximation, the Lagrange continued fraction approximation and a new obtained continued fraction approximation are compared with the method proposed here in the case of linear heating.

  7. Two types of F-centres and thermoluminescence in BaFCl crystals. [Gamma irradiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somaiah, K.; Babu, V.H. (Osmania Univ., Hyderabad (India). Dept. of Physics)

    1984-09-16

    Thermoluminescence and optical absorption studies are employed to identify two types of F-centres in BaFCl crystals, being formed at fluorine and chlorine ion vacancies. Four glow peaks at 345, 365, 385, and 410 K and two prominent optical absorption bands at 440 and 550 nm are obtained. The assignment of the 440 and 550 nm absorption bands to F(anti F) and F(anti Cl) centres, respectively, is confirmed by the thermal stability of the absorption bands and glow curves. High-temperature irradiation glow curves and absorption bands suggest that the glow peaks at 365 and 385 K correspond to the absorption band at 550 nm and are caused by F(anti Cl) centres, while the high-temperature 410 K peak correspond to 440 nm absorption band caused by F(anti F) centres. The F(anti Cl) centres are found to be less stable than the F(anti F) centres. Thermoluminescence emission spectra at all near glow peak temperatures show only one emission band at 390 nm.

  8. New thermoluminescence age estimates for the Nyos maar eruption (Cameroon Volcanic Line).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christoph; Tchouankoue, Jean Pierre; Nkouamen Nemzoue, Peguy Noel; Ayaba, Félicité; Nformidah-Ndah, Siggy Signe; Nformi Chifu, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Nyos maar is located in the Cameroon Volcanic Line and generates a multitude of primary and secondary hazards to the local population. For risk assessment and hazard mitigation, the age of the Nyos maar eruption provides some vital information. Since previous dating efforts using a range of techniques resulted in vastly varying eruption ages, we applied thermoluminescence (TL) methods to obtain independent and direct chronological constraints for the time of maar formation. Target minerals were granitic quartz clasts contained in pyroclastic surge deposits. Thermoluminescence plateau results prove that heat and/or pressure during the phreatomagmatic eruption was sufficient to reset the inherited luminescence signal of granitic bedrock quartz. Parallel application of three TL measurement protocols to one of the two samples gave consistent equivalent doses for the quartz ultra-violet emission. Despite the robustness of our dose estimates, the assessment of the dose rate was accompanied by methodological challenges, such as estimation of the original size distribution of quartz grains in the pyroclastic deposits. Considering results from additional laboratory analyses to constrain these uncertainties, we calculate an average maximum TL age of 12.3 ± 1.5 ka for the Nyos maar eruption. Based on these new data, a more solid risk assessment can be envisaged.

  9. Effect of gamma irradiation on opto-structural, dielectric, and thermoluminescence properties of natural phlogopite mica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Sukhnandan; Singh, Surinder; Singh, Lakhwant [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005, Punjab (India); Lochab, S. P. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2013-09-07

    Gamma ray induced modifications in natural phlogopite mica have been studied in the dose range of 1–2000 kGy. These modifications were monitored using different techniques viz: ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, dielectric measurements, X-ray diffraction, and thermoluminescence dosimeter. The analysis of the results reveals that the dose of 100 kGy produces significant change in the natural phlogopite mica as compared to pristine and other exposed samples. Ultraviolet-visible analysis provides the value of optical indirect, direct band gap, and Urbach energy. Cody model was used to calculate structural disorder from Urbach energy. Different dielectric parameters such as dielectric constant, dielectric loss, ac conductivity, and real and imaginary parts of electric modulus were calculated for pristine and irradiated samples at room temperature. Williamson Hall analysis was employed to calculate crystallite size and micro-strain of pristine and irradiated sheets. No appreciable changes in characteristic bands were observed after irradiation, indicating that natural phlogopite mica is chemically stable. The natural phlogopite mica may be recommended as a thermoluminescent dosimeter for gamma dose within 1 kGy–300 kGy.

  10. Thermoluminescence of novel zinc oxide nano phosphors obtained by glycine-based solution combustion synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orante B, V. R.; Escobar O, F. M.; Cruz V, C. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Polimeros y Materiales, Apdo. Postal 130, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Bernal, R., E-mail: victor.orante@polimeros.uson.mx [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Apdo. Postal 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: High-dose thermoluminescence dosimetry properties of novel zinc oxide nano phosphors synthesized by a solution combustion method in a glycine-nitrate process are presented for the very first time in this work. Sintered particles with sizes ranging between ∼500 nm and ∼2 μm were obtained by annealing the synthesized Zn O at 900 degrees C during 2 h in air. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate the presence of the Zn O hexagonal phase, without any remaining nitrate peaks observed. Thermoluminescence glow curves of Zn O obtained after being exposed to beta radiation consists of two maxima: one located at ∼ 149 degrees C and another at ∼ 308 degrees C, the latter being the dosimetric component of the curve. The integrated Tl fading displays an asymptotic behaviour for times longer than 16 h between irradiation and the corresponding Tl readout, as well as a linear behaviour of the dose response without saturation in the studied dose interval (from 12.5 up to 400 Gy). Such features place synthesized Zn O as a promising material for high-dose radiation dosimetry applications. (Author)

  11. Thermoluminescence studies on γ-irradiated CaF2:Dy:Pb:Na single crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Masilla Moses Kennedy

    2009-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) glow, thermoluminescence emission (TLE) and thermal decay (TD) of optical absorption (OA) bands were studied on γ-irradiated CaF2:Dy (0.010at.%):Pb (0.188at.%):Na (0.026at.%) single crystals (hereafter called crystal-I). The TL glow ex-hibited four glow peaks in the temperature region 300-600 K. The TL response with dose was studied up to ~7.5 kGy. The total glow showed linear, supra linear and exponential growth with dose. The TLE showed bands characteristic of Dy3+ ions (around 1.65, 1.87, 2.18 and 2.63 eV) and sodium associated (SA) colour centres (CCs) such as MNa (around 1.67 eV) and XNa (a new SA CC, with an emission band around 2.63 eV). The OA bands of MNa CC around 3.23 and 2.07 eV were found to decrease with temperature almost in accordance with the TL glow. The R+A centre absorption around 2.48 eV was found to grow with temperature initially and then decayed. The formation/growth of the CCs R+A and XNa might be from the conversion of the irradiation produced CC MNa- An attempt was made to explain the TL mechanism in the present system.

  12. Modified ferrous ammonium sulfate benzoic acid xyelenol orange (MFBX) and thermoluminescent dosimeters--a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindha, S; Rose, J V R; Sathyan, S; Singh I, Rabi Raja; Ravindran, B Paul

    2002-06-07

    Radiation dosimetry deals with the determination of absorbed dose to the medium exposed to ionizing radiation. Chemical dosimetry depends on oxidation or reduction of chemicals by ionizing radiation. A ferrous ammonium sulfate benzoic acid xyelenol orange (FBX) dosimeter based on this principle is being used as a clinical dosimeter at present. Certain modifications were carried out in the preparation and storage of the FBX dosimeter to increase its shelf life. The resulting dosimeter was called a modified FBX (MFBX) dosimeter and has been used in our department for the past few years. An extensive study of the dose, dose rate and energy response of the dosimeter was carried out and compared with a thermoluminescent (LiF7) dosimeter. The results obtained were found to be comparable to the thermoluminescent (LiF7) dosimeter. Hence it was concluded that the MFBX dosimeter could be used for phantom dosimetry, data collection and in vivo measurements. Easier preparation and availability of the reagents are added advantages of using MFBX as a clinical dosimeter in small radiotherapy departments.

  13. Identification of a gamma-irradiated ingredient (garlic powder) in Korean barbeque sauce by thermoluminescence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae-Jun; Akram, Kashif; Lee, Jeongeun; Kim, Kyong-Su; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2012-04-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) analysis was applied to identify gamma-irradiated garlic powder in Korean barbeque sauce before and after pasteurization (85 °C, 30 min), when blended in different ratios (1%, 3%, and 5%). The sauce sample with nonirradiated garlic powder gave a background glow curve. However, the sample blended with irradiated ingredient (1 and 10 kGy) showed typical TL glow curves at temperatures of 150 to 200 °C. The identification properties of sauce samples were more influenced by blending ratios than by irradiation doses, showing that 3% and 5% added samples produced glow curves at 150 to 250 °C. After pasteurization of the samples containing the irradiated ingredient, TL glow intensity decreased but did not change its shape or temperature range. As a result, the pasteurization of Barbeque sauces containing irradiated ingredients had reduced TL glow intensity, but the shape and temperature range of glow curve were still able to provide information required for confirming irradiation treatment. To monitor the irradiated food in international market, thermoluminescence (TL) analysis is considered most promising identification technique because of its sensitivity and long-term stability. In this study the applicability of TL analysis to detect an irradiated ingredient (garlic powder) added in low quantity to a food matrix (sauce) was investigated. The effect of processing (pasteurization) on TL results was also evaluated. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. The Alpine snow-albedo feedback in regional climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Kevin J.-P. M.; Kotlarski, Sven; Scherrer, Simon C.; Schär, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    The effect of the snow-albedo feedback (SAF) on 2m temperatures and their future changes in the European Alps is investigated in the ENSEMBLES regional climate models (RCMs) with a focus on the spring season. A total of 14 re-analysis-driven RCM experiments covering the period 1961-2000 and 10 GCM-driven transient climate change projections for 1950-2099 are analysed. A positive springtime SAF is found in all RCMs, but the range of the diagnosed SAF is large. Results are compared against an observation-based SAF estimate. For some RCMs, values very close to this estimate are found; other models show a considerable overestimation of the SAF. Net shortwave radiation has the largest influence of all components of the energy balance on the diagnosed SAF and can partly explain its spatial variability. Model deficiencies in reproducing 2m temperatures above snow and ice and associated cold temperature biases at high elevations seem to contribute to a SAF overestimation in several RCMs. The diagnosed SAF in the observational period strongly influences the estimated SAF contribution to twenty first century temperature changes in the European Alps. This contribution is subject to a clear elevation dependency that is governed by the elevation-dependent change in the number of snow days. Elevations of maximum SAF contribution range from 1500 to 2000 m in spring and are found above 2000 m in summer. Here, a SAF contribution to the total simulated temperature change between 0 and 0.5 °C until 2099 (multi-model mean in spring: 0.26 °C) or 0 and 14 % (multi-model mean in spring: 8 %) is obtained for models showing a realistic SAF. These numbers represent a well-funded but only approximate estimate of the SAF contribution to future warming, and a remaining contribution of model-specific SAF misrepresentations cannot be ruled out.

  15. Aerosol single-scattering albedo retrieval over North Africa using critical reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Kelley C.

    The sign and magnitude of the aerosol radiative forcing over bright surfaces is highly dependent on the absorbing properties of the aerosol. Thus, the determination of aerosol forcing over desert regions requires accurate information about the aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA). However, the brightness of desert surfaces complicates the retrieval of aerosol optical properties using passive space-based measurements. The aerosol critical reflectance is one parameter that can be used to relate top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance changes over land to the aerosol absorption properties, without knowledge of the underlying surface properties or aerosol loading. Physically, the parameter represents the TOA reflectance at which increased aerosol scattering due to increased aerosol loading is balanced by increased absorption of the surface contribution to the TOA reflectance. It can be derived by comparing two satellite images with different aerosol loading, assuming that the surface reflectance and background aerosol are similar between the two days. In this work, we explore the utility of the critical reflectance method for routine monitoring of spectral aerosol absorption from space over North Africa, a region that is predominantly impacted by absorbing dust and biomass burning aerosol. We derive the critical reflectance from Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Level 1B reflectances in the vicinity of two Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations: Tamanrasset, a site in the Algerian Sahara, and Banizoumbou, a Sahelian site in Niger. We examine the sensitivity of the critical reflectance parameter to aerosol physical and optical properties, as well as solar and viewing geometry, using the Santa Barbara DISORT Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model, and apply our findings to retrieve SSA from the MODIS critical reflectance values. We compare our results to AERONET-retrieved estimates, as well as to measurements of the TOA albedo and surface fluxes from the

  16. Kinetic and isotherm studies of bisphenol A adsorption onto orange albedo(Citrus sinensis): Sorption mechanisms based on the main albedo components vitamin C, flavones glycosides and carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamgaing, Theophile; Doungmo, Giscard; Melataguia Tchieno, Francis Merlin; Gouoko Kouonang, Jimmy Julio; Mbadcam, Ketcha Joseph

    2017-07-03

    Orange albedo and its adsorption capacity towards bisphenol A (BPA) were studied. Adsorption experiments were conducted in batch mode at 25-55°C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to characterise the biosorbent. The effects of various parameters including adsorption time, equilibrium pH, adsorbent dosage and initial adsorbate concentration were investigated. The optimum contact time and pH for the removal of BPA were 60 min and 2, respectively. It was found that the adsorption isotherms best matched the Freundlich model, the adsorption of BPA being multilayer and that of the albedo surface heterogeneous. From the kinetic studies, it was found that the removal of BPA best matched the pseudo-second order kinetic model. An adsorption mechanism based on the albedo surface molecules is proposed and gives a good account of π-π interactions and hydrogen bonding. Orange albedo, with a maximum BPA loading capacity of 82.36 mg g(-1) (significantly higher than that of most agricultural residues), is a good candidate for BPA adsorption in aqueous media.

  17. Deconvolution of the thermoluminescent emission curve. Second order kinetics; Deconvolucion de la curva de emision termoluminiscente. Cinetica de segundo orden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno y M, A. [Departamento de Apoyo en Ciencias Aplicadas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Sur 104 Col. Centro, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Moreno B, A. [Facultad de Quimica, Ciudad Universitaria, UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    In this work it is described the Randall and Wilkins second order kinetics in Microsoft Excel language, which allows its expression as the sum of Gaussian and the correction factors corresponding. These factors are obtained of the differences between the real thermoluminescent curve and the Gaussian proposed. The results obtained justify the Gaussian expression added to the correction factor. (Author)

  18. The thermoluminescent curve as parameter to compare archaeological ceramics; La curva termoluminiscente como parametro para comparar ceramica arqueologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez R, I.R.; Ramirez C, G.A. [Centro INAH Estado de Mexico. Morelos Ote. 502, Col. San Sebastian, 50090 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Gonzalez M, P.R.; Mendoza A, D. [lNIN, Carr. Mexico-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Martinez C, G. [Coordinacion Nacional de Conservacion del Patrimonio Cultural, INAH, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Most mineral materials, including the constituents of pottery, have the property of thermoluminescence (TL), where part of the energy from radioactive decay in the mineral is stored and later released as light upon strong heating. The intensity of emitted light as a function of temperature is the thermoluminescence glow curve. However, it is well-know the thermoluminescence glow curve form depends of several factors associates with the incident radiation and type of materials. Between the factors associated with the materials, it can be mentioned the quantity and type of crystalline phases, and quantity and type of impurities that they could be present in the material. That is to say, materials with different physicochemical characteristics will produce different thermoluminescence glow curve, although, they have been irradiated under the same conditions. In accordance with the above mentioned, it is possible to identified differences between pre hispanic ceramic belonging to a same site and other sites. In this work a discussion about advantages and disadvantages is presented. Some specific examples in ceramic artifacts belonging to the Matlatzinca and Teotihuacan cultures are included. (Author)

  19. Issues in the reconstruction of environmental doses on the basis of thermoluminescence measurements in the Techa riverside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougrov, N. G.; Goksu, H. Y.; Haskell, E.; Degteva, M. O.; Meckbach, R.; Jacob, P.; Neta, P. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The potential of thermoluminescence measurements of bricks from the contaminated area of the Techa river valley, Southern Urals, Russia, for reconstructing external exposures of affected population groups has been studied. Thermoluminescence dating of background samples was used to evaluate the age of old buildings available on the river banks. The anthropogenic gamma dose accrued in exposed samples is determined by subtracting the natural radiation background dose for the corresponding age from the accumulated dose measured by thermoluminescence. For a site in the upper Techa river region, where the levels of external exposures were extremely high, the depth-dose distribution in bricks and the dependence of accidental dose on the height of the sampling position were determined. For the same site, Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport were performed for different source configurations corresponding to the situation before and after the construction of a reservoir on the river and evacuation of the population in 1956. A comparison of the results provides an understanding of the features of the measured depth-dose distributions and height dependencies in terms of the source configurations and shows that bricks from the higher sampling positions are likely to have accrued a larger fraction of anthropogenic dose from the time before the construction of the reservoir. The applicability of the thermoluminescent dosimetry method to environmental dose reconstruction in the middle Techa region, where the external exposure was relatively low, was also investigated.

  20. Issues in the reconstruction of environmental doses on the basis of thermoluminescence measurements in the Techa riverside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougrov, N. G.; Goksu, H. Y.; Haskell, E.; Degteva, M. O.; Meckbach, R.; Jacob, P.; Neta, P. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The potential of thermoluminescence measurements of bricks from the contaminated area of the Techa river valley, Southern Urals, Russia, for reconstructing external exposures of affected population groups has been studied. Thermoluminescence dating of background samples was used to evaluate the age of old buildings available on the river banks. The anthropogenic gamma dose accrued in exposed samples is determined by subtracting the natural radiation background dose for the corresponding age from the accumulated dose measured by thermoluminescence. For a site in the upper Techa river region, where the levels of external exposures were extremely high, the depth-dose distribution in bricks and the dependence of accidental dose on the height of the sampling position were determined. For the same site, Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport were performed for different source configurations corresponding to the situation before and after the construction of a reservoir on the river and evacuation of the population in 1956. A comparison of the results provides an understanding of the features of the measured depth-dose distributions and height dependencies in terms of the source configurations and shows that bricks from the higher sampling positions are likely to have accrued a larger fraction of anthropogenic dose from the time before the construction of the reservoir. The applicability of the thermoluminescent dosimetry method to environmental dose reconstruction in the middle Techa region, where the external exposure was relatively low, was also investigated.

  1. Application of numerical analysis methods to thermoluminescence dosimetry; Aplicacion de metodos de analisis numerico a la dosimetria por termoluminiscencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Ros, J. M.; Delgado, A.

    1989-07-01

    This report presents the application of numerical methods to thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD), showing the advantages obtained over conventional evaluation systems. Different configurations of the analysis method are presented to operate in specific dosimetric applications of TLD, such as environmental monitoring and mailed dosimetry systems for quality assurance in radiotherapy facilities. (Author) 10 refs.

  2. Parental employment, family routines and childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Patricia M

    2012-12-01

    Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey-Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K) data from kindergarten through eighth grade, this paper investigate the relationships among maternal employment, family routines and obesity. More hours worked by the mother tend to be negatively related to positive routines like eating meals as a family or at regular times, or having family rules about hours of television watched. Many of these same routines are significantly related to the probability of being obese, implying that family routines may be a mechanism by which maternal employment intensity affects children's obesity. However, inclusion of family routines in the obesity regression does not appreciably change the estimated effect of maternal employment hours. Thus, the commonly estimated deleterious effect of maternal employment on children's obesity cannot be explained by family routines, leaving the exact mechanisms an open question for further exploration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Photoluminescence, trap states and thermoluminescence decay process study of Ca2MgSi2O7 : Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravi Shrivastava; Jagjeet Kaur; Vikas Dubey; Beena Jaykumar

    2014-06-01

    Europium and dysprosium-doped calcium magnesium silicate powder with different concentrations of dysprosium were synthesized using solid-state reaction. The Fourier transform infrared (FT–IR) spectra confirmed the proper preparation of the sample. The prepared phosphors were characterized using photoluminescence excitation and emission spectra. Prominent green colour emission was obtained under ultraviolet excitation. The thermoluminescence glow curves of the samples were measured at various delay times. With increased delay time, the intensity of the thermoluminescence peak decays and the position of the thermoluminescence peak shifts towards higher temperature, indicating the considerable retrapping associated with general order kinetics.

  4. Thermoluminescent Dates of the Ancient Ceramics Unearthed from Changsha%长沙出土古代陶瓷器的热释光年代

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚革联; 彭格林; 刘顺生

    2003-01-01

    Determining the absolute dates of specimens by means of thermoluminescent analysis is an important method to the dating of cultural relics unearthed from archaeological explorations. Using the fine-grain thermoluminescent method, the authors analyzed ancient ceramics unearthed from two sites of capital construction in Changsha City. They obtained 15 dates, of which the relative errors account for 8% and two data are unacceptable. Research on the factors of the errors indicates that the application of thermoluminescent analysis in the dating of specimens requires some preconditions and that the fine-grain method, therefore, has its limitations.

  5. Spatiotemporal variation of surface shortwave forcing from fire-induced albedo change in interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengli; Dahal, Devendra; Liu, Heping; Jin, Suming; Young, Claudia J.; Liu, Shuang; Liu, Shu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    The albedo change caused by both fires and subsequent succession is spatially heterogeneous, leading to the need to assess the spatiotemporal variation of surface shortwave forcing (SSF) as a component to quantify the climate impacts of high-latitude fires. We used an image reconstruction approach to compare postfire albedo with the albedo assuming fires had not occurred. Combining the fire-caused albedo change from the 2001-2010 fires in interior Alaska and the monthly surface incoming solar radiation, we examined the spatiotemporal variation of SSF in the early successional stage of around 10 years. Our results showed that while postfire albedo generally increased in fall, winter, and spring, some burned areas could show an albedo decrease during these seasons. In summer, the albedo increased for several years and then declined again. The spring SSF distribution did not show a latitudinal decrease from south to north as previously reported. The results also indicated that although the SSF is usually largely negative in the early successional years, it may not be significant during the first postfire year. The annual 2005-2010 SSF for the 2004 fire scars was -1.30, -4.40, -3.31, -4.00, -3.42, and -2.47 Wm-2. The integrated annual SSF map showed significant spatial variation with a mean of -3.15 Wm-2 and a standard deviation of 3.26 Wm-2, 16% of burned areas having positive SSF. Our results suggest that boreal deciduous fires would be less positive for climate change than boreal evergreen fires. Future research is needed to comprehensively investigate the spatiotemporal radiative and non-radiative forcings to determine the effect of boreal fires on climate.

  6. Global warming and climate forcing by recent albedo changes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, L.K.; Geissler, P.E.; Haberle, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    For hundreds of years, scientists have tracked the changing appearance of Mars, first by hand drawings and later by photographs. Because of this historical record, many classical albedo patterns have long been known to shift in appearance over time. Decadal variations of the martian surface albedo are generally attributed to removal and deposition of small amounts of relatively bright dust on the surface. Large swaths of the surface (up to 56 million km2) have been observed to darken or brighten by 10 per cent or more. It is unknown, however, how these albedo changes affect wind circulation, dust transport and the feedback between these processes and the martian climate. Here we present predictions from a Mars general circulation model, indicating that the observed interannual albedo alterations strongly influence the martian environment. Results indicate enhanced wind stress in recently darkened areas and decreased wind stress in brightened areas, producing a positive feedback system in which the albedo changes strengthen the winds that generate the changes. The simulations also predict a net annual global warming of surface air temperatures by ???0.65 K, enhancing dust lifting by increasing the likelihood of dust devil generation. The increase in global dust lifting by both wind stress and dust devils may affect the mechanisms that trigger large dust storm initiation, a poorly understood phenomenon, unique to Mars. In addition, predicted increases in summertime air temperatures at high southern latitudes would contribute to the rapid and steady scarp retreat that has been observed in the south polar residual ice for the past four Mars years. Our results suggest that documented albedo changes affect recent climate change and large-scale weather patterns on Mars, and thus albedo variations are a necessary component of future atmospheric and climate studies. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  7. Radiative forcing and temperature response to changes in urban albedos and associated CO2 offsets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, Surabi; Akbari, Hashem; Mahanama, Sarith; Sednev, Igor; Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-02-12

    The two main forcings that can counteract to some extent the positive forcings from greenhouse gases from pre-industrial times to present-day are the aerosol and related aerosol-cloud forcings, and the radiative response to changes in surface albedo. Here, we quantify the change in radiative forcing and land surface temperature that may be obtained by increasing the albedos of roofs and pavements in urban areas in temperate and tropical regions of the globe by 0.1. Using the catchment land surface model (the land model coupled to the GEOS-5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model), we quantify the change in the total outgoing (outgoing shortwave+longwave) radiation and land surface temperature to a 0.1 increase in urban albedos for all global land areas. The global average increase in the total outgoing radiation was 0.5 Wm{sup -2}, and temperature decreased by {approx}0.008 K for an average 0.003 increase in surface albedo. These averages represent all global land areas where data were available from the land surface model used and are for the boreal summer (June-July-August). For the continental U.S. the total outgoing radiation increased by 2.3 Wm{sup -2}, and land surface temperature decreased by {approx}0.03 K for an average 0.01 increase in surface albedo. Based on these forcings, the expected emitted CO{sub 2} offset for a plausible 0.25 and 0.15 increase in albedos of roofs and pavements, respectively, for all global urban areas, was found to be {approx} 57 Gt CO{sub 2}. A more meaningful evaluation of the impacts of urban albedo increases on global climate and the expected CO{sub 2} offsets would require simulations which better characterizes urban surfaces and represents the full annual cycle.

  8. Global warming and climate forcing by recent albedo changes on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Lori K; Geissler, Paul E; Haberle, Robert M

    2007-04-05

    For hundreds of years, scientists have tracked the changing appearance of Mars, first by hand drawings and later by photographs. Because of this historical record, many classical albedo patterns have long been known to shift in appearance over time. Decadal variations of the martian surface albedo are generally attributed to removal and deposition of small amounts of relatively bright dust on the surface. Large swaths of the surface (up to 56 million km2) have been observed to darken or brighten by 10 per cent or more. It is unknown, however, how these albedo changes affect wind circulation, dust transport and the feedback between these processes and the martian climate. Here we present predictions from a Mars general circulation model, indicating that the observed interannual albedo alterations strongly influence the martian environment. Results indicate enhanced wind stress in recently darkened areas and decreased wind stress in brightened areas, producing a positive feedback system in which the albedo changes strengthen the winds that generate the changes. The simulations also predict a net annual global warming of surface air temperatures by approximately 0.65 K, enhancing dust lifting by increasing the likelihood of dust devil generation. The increase in global dust lifting by both wind stress and dust devils may affect the mechanisms that trigger large dust storm initiation, a poorly understood phenomenon, unique to Mars. In addition, predicted increases in summertime air temperatures at high southern latitudes would contribute to the rapid and steady scarp retreat that has been observed in the south polar residual ice for the past four Mars years. Our results suggest that documented albedo changes affect recent climate change and large-scale weather patterns on Mars, and thus albedo variations are a necessary component of future atmospheric and climate studies.

  9. Characterization of the high-albedo NEA 3691 Bede

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lederer, Susan M.; Jehin, Emmanuel; Rozitis, Benjamin; Jefferson, Jeffrey D.; Nelson, Tyler W.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Ryan, Erin L.; Howell, Ellen S.; Fernandez, Yanga R.; Lovell, Amy J.; Woodward, Charles E.; Harker, David Emerson

    2016-10-01

    Characterization of NEAs provides important inputs to models for atmospheric entry, risk assessment and mitigation. Diameter is a key parameter because diameter translates to kinetic energy in atmospheric entry. Diameters can be derived from the absolute magnitude, H(PA=0deg), and from thermal modeling of observed IR fluxes. For both methods, the albedo (pv) is important – high pv surfaces have cooler temperatures, larger diameters for a given Hmag, and shallower phase curves (larger slope parameter G). Thermal model parameters are coupled, however, so that a higher thermal inertia also results in a cooler surface temperature. Multiple parameters contribute to constraining the diameter.Observations made at multiple observing geometries can contribute to understanding the relationships between and potentially breaking some of the degeneracies between parameters. We present data and analyses on NEA 3691 Bede with the aim of best constraining the diameter and pv from a combination of thermal modeling and light curve analyses. We employ our UKIRT+Michelle mid-IR photometric observations of 3691 Bede's thermal emission at 2 phase angles (27&43 deg 2015-03-19 & 04-13), in addition to WISE data (33deg 2010-05-27, Mainzer+2011).Observing geometries differ by solar phase angles and by moderate changes in heliocentric distance (e.g., further distances produce somewhat cooler surface temperatures). With the NEATM model and for a constant IR beaming parameter (eta=constant), there is a family of solutions for (diameter, pv, G, eta) where G is the slope parameter from the H-G Relation. NEATM models employing Pravec+2012's choice of G=0.43, produce D=1.8 km and pv≈0.4, given that G=0.43 is assumed from studies of main belt asteroids (Warner+2009). We present an analysis of the light curve of 3691 Bede to constrain G from observations. We also investigate fitting thermophysical models (TPM, Rozitis+11) to constrain the coupled parameters of thermal inertia (Gamma) and surface

  10. Thermoluminescence survey of 12 meteorites collected by the European 1988 Antarctic meteorite expedition to Allan Hills and the importance of acid washing for thermoluminescence sensitivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, P. H.; Sears, H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1991-01-01

    Natural and induced thermoluminescence (TL) data are reported for 12 meteorites recovered from the Allan Hills region of Antarctica by the European field party during the 1988/1989 field season. The samples include one with extremely high natural TL, ALH88035, suggestive of exposure to unusually high radiation doses (i.e., low degrees of shielding), and one, ALH88034, whose low natural TL suggests reheating within the last 100,000 years. The remainder have natural TL values suggestive of terrestrial ages similar to those of other meteorites from Allan Hills. ALH88015 (L6) has induced TL data suggestive of intense shock. TL sensitivities of these meteorites are generally lower than observed falls of their petrologic types, as is also observed for Antarctic meteorites in general. Acid-washing experiments indicate that this is solely the result of terrestrial weathering rather than a nonterrestrial Antarctic-non-Antarctic difference. However, other TL parameters, such as natural TL and induced peak temperature-width, are unchanged by acid washing and are sensitive indicators of a meteorite's metamorphic and recent radiation history.

  11. Photon albedo for water, concrete, and iron at normal incidence, and dependence on the thickness of reflecting material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Vladimir M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Total number and angular albedo were calculated for commonly used shielding materials, water, concrete, and iron, for photons with initial energies from 10 keV up to 10 MeV and normal incident angle. Influence of material thickness on total number albedo was also investigated. Double differential albedo was determined from simulation of photon transport through materials by using PENELOPE and MCNP software. Backscattered photons were scored and grouped in equal intervals of energy and angle. Analytical expressions for angular and total number albedo as a function of initial energy were obtained. It was shown that angular albedo can be determined with the same formula for three examined materials. Corresponding analytical expressions for number albedo as a function of material thickness were presented in this paper. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 171021

  12. Change in Urban Albedo in London: A Multi-scale Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susca, T.; Kotthaus, S.; Grimmond, S.

    2013-12-01

    Urbanization-induced change in land use has considerable implications for climate, air quality, resources and ecosystems. Urban-induced warming is one of the most well-known impacts. This directly and indirectly can extend beyond the city. One way to reduce the size of this is to modify the surface atmosphere exchanges through changing the urban albedo. As increased rugosity caused by the morphology of a city results in lower albedo with constant material characteristics, the impacts of changing the albedo has impacts across a range of scales. Here a multi-scale assessment of the potential effects of the increase in albedo in London is presented. This includes modeling at the global and meso-scale informed by local and micro-scale measurements. In this study the first order calculations are conducted for the impact of changing the albedo (e.g. a 0.01 increase) on the radiative exchange. For example, when incoming solar radiation and cloud cover are considered, based on data retrieved from NASA (http://power.larc.nasa.gov/) for ~1600 km2 area of London, would produce a mean decrease in the instantaneous solar radiative forcing on the same surface of 0.40 W m-2. The nature of the surface is critical in terms of considering the impact of changes in albedo. For example, in the Central Activity Zone in London pavement and building can vary from 10 to 100% of the plan area. From observations the albedo is seen to change dramatically with changes in building materials. For example, glass surfaces which are being used increasingly in the central business district results in dramatic changes in albedo. Using the documented albedo variations determined across different scales the impacts are considered. For example, the effect of the increase in urban albedo is translated into the corresponding amount of avoided emission of carbon dioxide that produces the same effect on climate. At local scale, the effect that the increase in urban albedo can potentially have on local

  13. Bipolar high temporal resolution measurements of snow UV albedo in Sodankylä and Marambio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinander, Outi; Kontu, Anna; Asmi, Eija; Sanchez, Ricardo; Mei, Miguel; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    In this presentation we will give an overview of our high temporal resolution polar snow UV albedo data from Arctic Sodankylä, and from Marambio, Antarctica. These both are WMO GAW stations with many measurement parameters relevant to the albedo data usage. We will also describe our campaign based polar albedo data (SNORTEX and SOS campaigns), and an important data set of light absorbing impurities (BC) in the Arctic snow. The black carbon (BC) has been estimated to be the second most important human emission after carbon dioxide, in terms of its climate forcing in the present-day atmosphere. The reflectance effect of BC deposited on snow surface is the bigger the smaller the wavelength, i.e. the albedo effect of BC is the biggest at UV. This is also shown in SNICAR-model simulated albedo values. In Sodankylä, our bipolar snow ultraviolet (UV) albedo research started within the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008. In 2007, the continuous Sodankylä snow UV albedo measurements were installed in Sodankylä, in the operational albedo field of the Finnish Meteorological Institute Arctic Research Center (FMI-ARC). These Sodankylä 1-min data during snow time were soon compared with the German Antarctic Neumayer Station UV albedo data, also with the same sensor type. In both data we found an up to 10 % decrease in albedo as a function of time within a day, ranging from 0.77 to 0.67 in Sodankylä and from 0.96 to 0.86 in Neumeyer. Physical explanations to asymmetry were found for cases with high relative humidity and low surface temperature during the previous night, favorable to frost and higher albedo on the next morning; new snow on the previous night; snow melting during day time and refreezing during night. In Marambio, in the beginning of 2013, our new continuous Finnish-Argentinian co-operation snow UV albedo measurements were installed and started as part of a larger continuous meteorological and environmental instrumentation. These new UV radiation data

  14. A minimal, statistical model for the surface albedo of Vestfonna ice cap, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Möller

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The ice cap Vestfonna is located in Northeastern Svalbard and forms one of the largest ice bodies of the Eurasian Arctic. Its surface albedo plays a key role in understanding and modelling of its energy and mass balance. The principle governing factors for albedo evolution, i.e. precipitation and air temperature and therewith snowdepth and melt duration, were found to vary almost exclusively with terrain elevation throughout the ice cap. Hence, surface albedo can be expected to develop a comparable pattern. A new statistical model is presented that estimates this mean altitudinal albedo profile of the ice cap on the basis of a minimal set of meteorological variables on a monthly resolution. Model calculations are based on a logistic function of the artificial quantity rain-snow ratio and a linear function of cumulative snowfall and cumulative positive degree days. Surface albedo fields of the MODIS snow product MOD10A1 of the period March to October of the years 2001–2008 serve as a basis for both calibration and cross-validation of the model. The meteorological model input covers the period September 2000 until October 2008 and is based on ERA-Interim data of a grid point located close to the ice cap. The albedo model shows a good performance. The root mean square error between observed and modelled albedo values along the altitudinal profile is 0.057 ± 0.028 (mean ± one standard deviation. The area weighted mean even reduces to a value of 0.053. Distinctly higher deviations (0.07–0.09 are only present throughout the very lowest and uppermost parts of the ice cap that are either small in area or hardly affected by surface melt. Thus, the new, minimal, statistical albedo model presented in this study is found to reproduce the albedo evolution on Vestfonna ice cap on a high level of accuracy and is thus suggested to be fully suitable for further application in broader energy or mass-balance studies of the ice cap.

  15. A minimal, statistical model for the surface albedo of Vestfonna ice cap, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Möller

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ice cap Vestfonna is located in northeastern Svalbard and forms one of the largest ice bodies of the Eurasian Arctic. Its surface albedo plays a key role in the understanding and modelling of its energy and mass balance. The principle governing factors for albedo evolution, i.e. precipitation and air temperature and therewith snow depth and melt duration, were found to vary almost exclusively with terrain elevation throughout the ice cap. Hence, surface albedo can be expected to develop a comparable pattern. A new statistical model is presented that estimates this mean altitudinal albedo profile of the ice cap on the basis of a minimal set of meteorological variables on a monthly resolution. Model calculations are based on a sigmoid function of the artificial quantity rain-snow ratio and a linear function of cumulative snowfall and cumulative positive degree days. Surface albedo fields of the MODIS snow product MOD10A1 from the period March to October in the years 2001–2008 serve as a basis for both calibration and cross-validation of the model. The meteorological model input covers the period September 2000 until October 2008 and is based on ERA-Interim data of a grid point located close to the ice cap. The albedo model shows a good performance. The root mean square error between observed and modelled albedo values along the altitudinal profile is 0.057±0.028 (mean ± one standard deviation. The area weighted mean even reduces to a value of 0.054. Distinctly higher deviations (0.07–0.09 are only present throughout the very lowest and uppermost parts of the ice cap that are either small in area or hardly affected by surface melt. Thus, the new, minimal, statistical albedo model presented in this study is found to reproduce the albedo evolution on Vestfonna ice cap on a high level of accuracy and is thus suggested to be fully suitable for further application in broader energy or mass-balance studies of the ice cap.

  16. Changes in blast zone albedo patterns around new martian impact craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daubar, I. J.; Dundas, C. M.; Byrne, S.; Geissler, P.; Bart, G. D.; McEwen, A. S.; Russell, P. S.; Chojnacki, M.; Golombek, M. P.

    2016-03-01

    "Blast zones" (BZs) around new martian craters comprise various albedo features caused by the initial impact, including diffuse halos, extended linear and arcuate rays, secondary craters, ejecta patterns, and dust avalanches. We examined these features for changes in repeat images separated by up to four Mars years. Here we present the first comprehensive survey of the qualitative and quantitative changes observed in impact blast zones over time. Such changes are most likely due to airfall of high-albedo dust restoring darkened areas to their original albedo, the albedo of adjacent non-impacted surfaces. Although some sites show drastic changes over short timescales, nearly half of the sites show no obvious changes over several Mars years. Albedo changes are more likely to occur at higher-latitude sites, lower-elevation sites, and at sites with smaller central craters. No correlation was seen between amount of change and Dust Cover Index, relative halo size, or historical regional albedo changes. Quantitative albedo measurements of the diffuse dark halos relative to their surroundings yielded estimates of fading lifetimes for these features. The average lifetime among sites with measurable fading is ∼15 Mars years; the median is ∼8 Mars years for a linear brightening. However, at approximately half of sites with three or more repeat images, a nonlinear function with rapid initial fading followed by a slow increase in albedo provides a better fit to the fading behavior; this would predict even longer lifetimes. The predicted lifetimes of BZs are comparable to those of slope streaks, and considered representative of fading by global atmospheric dust deposition; they last significantly longer than dust devil or rover tracks, albedo features that are erased by different processes. These relatively long lifetimes indicate that the measurement of the current impact rate by Daubar et al. (Daubar, I.J. et al. [2013]. Icarus 225, 506-516. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j

  17. Development of a high spectral resolution surface albedo product for the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Delamere

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a method for identifying dominant surface type and estimating high spectral resolution surface albedo at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM facility at the Southern Great Plains (SGP site in Oklahoma for use in radiative transfer calculations. Given a set of 6-channel narrowband visible and near-infrared irradiance measurements from upward and downward looking multi-filter radiometers (MFRs, four different surface types (snow-covered, green vegetation, partial vegetation, non-vegetated can be identified. A normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI is used to distinguish between vegetated and non-vegetated surfaces, and a scaled NDVI index is used to estimate the percentage of green vegetation in partially vegetated surfaces. Based on libraries of spectral albedo measurements, a piecewise continuous function is developed to estimate the high spectral resolution surface albedo for each surface type given the MFR albedo values as input. For partially vegetated surfaces, the albedo is estimated as a linear combination of the green vegetation and non-vegetated surface albedo values. The estimated albedo values are evaluated through comparison to high spectral resolution albedo measurements taken during several Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs and through comparison of the integrated spectral albedo values to observed broadband albedo measurements. The estimated spectral albedo values agree well with observations for the visible wavelengths constrained by the MFR measurements, but have larger biases and variability at longer wavelengths. Additional MFR channels at 1100 nm and/or 1600 nm would help constrain the high resolution spectral albedo in the near infrared region.

  18. Albedo Neutron Dosimetry in a Deep Geological Disposal Repository for High-Level Nuclear Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Bo; Becker, Frank

    2016-06-24

    Albedo neutron dosemeter is the German official personal neutron dosemeter in mixed radiation fields where neutrons contribute to personal dose. In deep geological repositories for high-level nuclear waste, where neutrons can dominate the radiation field, it is of interest to investigate the performance of albedo neutron dosemeter in such facilities. In this study, the deep geological repository is represented by a shielding cask loaded with spent nuclear fuel placed inside a rock salt emplacement drift. Due to the backscattering of neutrons in the drift, issues concerning calibration of the dosemeter arise. Field-specific calibration of the albedo neutron dosemeter was hence performed with Monte Carlo simulations. In order to assess the applicability of the albedo neutron dosemeter in a deep geological repository over a long time scale, spent nuclear fuel with different ages of 50, 100 and 500 years were investigated. It was found out, that the neutron radiation field in a deep geological repository can be assigned to the application area 'N1' of the albedo neutron dosemeter, which is typical in reactors and accelerators with heavy shielding.

  19. Strength of forest-albedo feedback in mid-Holocene climate simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Otto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructions of the mid-Holocene climate, 6000 years before present, suggest that spring temperatures were higher at high northern latitudes compared to the pre-industrial period. A positive feedback between expansion of forest and climate presumably contributed to this warming. In the presence of snow, forests have a lower albedo than grass land. Therefore, the expansion of forest likely favoured a warming in spring, counteracting the lower insolation at the mid-Holocene.

    We investigate the sensitivity of the vegetation-atmosphere interaction under mid-Holocene orbital forcing with respect to the strength of the forest-albedo feedback by using a comprehensive coupled atmosphere-vegetation model (ECHAM5/JSBACH. We perform two sets of model simulations: a first set of simulations with a relatively weak reduction of albedo of snow by forest; and a second set of simulations with a relatively strong reduction of the albedo of snow by forest.

    We show that the parameterisation of the albedo of snow leads to uncertainties in the temperature signal. Compared to the set with weak snow masking, the simulations with strong snow masking reveal a spring warming that is three times higher, by 0.34 °C north of 60° N. This warming is related to a forest expansion of only 13%.

  20. Observational determination of albedo decrease caused by vanishing Arctic sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistone, Kristina; Eisenman, Ian; Ramanathan, V

    2014-03-04

    The decline of Arctic sea ice has been documented in over 30 y of satellite passive microwave observations. The resulting darkening of the Arctic and its amplification of global warming was hypothesized almost 50 y ago but has yet to be verified with direct observations. This study uses satellite radiation budget measurements along with satellite microwave sea ice data to document the Arctic-wide decrease in planetary albedo and its amplifying effect on the warming. The analysis reveals a striking relationship between planetary albedo and sea ice cover, quantities inferred from two independent satellite instruments. We find that the Arctic planetary albedo has decreased from 0.52 to 0.48 between 1979 and 2011, corresponding to an additional 6.4 ± 0.9 W/m(2) of solar energy input into the Arctic Ocean region since 1979. Averaged over the globe, this albedo decrease corresponds to a forcing that is 25% as large as that due to the change in CO2 during this period, considerably larger than expectations from models and other less direct recent estimates. Changes in cloudiness appear to play a negligible role in observed Arctic darkening, thus reducing the possibility of Arctic cloud albedo feedbacks mitigating future Arctic warming.

  1. NASA Airborne Snow Observatory: Measuring Spatial Distribution of Snow Water Equivalent and Snow Albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, M.; Painter, T. H.; Mattmann, C. A.; Ramirez, P.; Laidlaw, R.; Bormann, K. J.; Skiles, M.; Richardson, M.; Berisford, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    The two most critical properties for understanding snowmelt runoff and timing are the spatial and temporal distributions of snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow albedo. Despite their importance in controlling volume and timing of runoff, snowpack albedo and SWE are still largely unquantified in the US and not at all in most of the globe, leaving runoff models poorly constrained. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in partnership with the California Department of Water Resources, has developed the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO), an imaging spectrometer and scanning LiDAR system, to quantify SWE and snow albedo, generate unprecedented knowledge of snow properties for cutting edge cryospheric science, and provide complete, robust inputs to water management models and systems of the future. This poster will describe the NASA Airborne Snow Observatory, its outputs and their uses and applications, along with recent advancements to the system and plans for the project's future. Specifically, we will look at how ASO uses its imaging spectrometer to quantify spectral albedo, broadband albedo, and radiative forcing by dust and black carbon in snow. Additionally, we'll see how the scanning LiDAR is used to determine snow depth against snow-free acquisitions and to quantify snow water equivalent when combined with in-situ constrained modeling of snow density.

  2. Spatially Complete Global Spectral Surface Albedos: Value-Added Datasets Derived from Terra MODIS Land Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Eric G.; King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Gao, Feng

    2004-01-01

    Land surface albedo is an important parameter in describing the radiative properties of the earth s surface as it represents the amount of incoming solar radiation that is reflected from the surface. The amount and type of vegetation of the surface dramatically alters the amount of radiation that is reflected; for example, croplands that contain leafy vegetation will reflect radiation very differently than blacktop associated with urban areas. In addition, since vegetation goes through a growth, or phenological, cycle, the amount of radiation that is reflected changes over the course of a year. As a result, albedo is both temporally and spatially dependant upon global location as there is a distribution of vegetated surface types and growing conditions. Land surface albedo is critical for a wide variety of earth system research projects including but not restricted to remote sensing of atmospheric aerosol and cloud properties from space, ground-based analysis of aerosol optical properties from surface-based sun/sky radiometers, biophysically-based land surface modeling of the exchange of energy, water, momentum, and carbon for various land use categories, and surface energy balance studies. These projects require proper representation of the surface albedo s spatial, spectral, and temporal variations, however, these representations are often lacking in datasets prior to the latest generation of land surface albedo products.

  3. Aerosol single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter from MFRSR observations during the ARM Aerosol IOP 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Kassianov

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSRs provide routine measurements of the aerosol optical depth (τ at six wavelengths (0.415, 0.5, 0.615, 0.673, 0.870 and 0.94 μm. The single-scattering albedo0 is typically estimated from the MFRSR measurements by assuming the asymmetry parameter (g. In most instances, however, it is not easy to set an appropriate value of g due to its strong temporal and spatial variability. Here, we introduce and validate an updated version of our retrieval technique that allows one to estimate simultaneously ϖ0 and g for different types of aerosol. We use the aerosol and radiative properties obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (IOP to validate our retrieval in two ways. First, the MFRSR-retrieved optical properties are compared with those obtained from independent surface, Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET and aircraft measurements. The MFRSR-retrieved optical properties are in reasonable agreement with these independent measurements. Second, we perform radiative closure experiments using the MFRSR-retrieved optical properties. The calculated broadband values of the direct and diffuse fluxes are comparable (~5 W/m2 to those obtained from measurements.

  4. Aerosol single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter from MFRSR observations during the ARM Aerosol IOP 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Kassianov

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSRs provide routine measurements of the aerosol optical depth (τ at six wavelengths (0.415, 0.5, 0.615, 0.673, 0.870 and 0.94 μm. The single-scattering albedo0 is typically estimated from the MFRSR measurements by assuming the asymmetry parameter (g. In most instances, however, it is not easy to set an appropriate value of g due to its strong temporal and spatial variability. Here, we introduce and validate an updated version of our retrieval technique that allows one to estimate simultaneously π0 and g for different types of aerosol. We use the aerosol and radiative properties obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Program's Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (IOP to validate our retrieval in two ways. First, the MFRSR-retrieved optical properties are compared with those obtained from independent surface, Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET, and aircraft measurements. The MFRSR-retrieved optical properties are in reasonable agreement with these independent measurements. Second, we perform radiative closure experiments using the MFRSR-retrieved optical properties. The calculated broadband values of the direct and diffuse fluxes are comparable (~5 W/m2 to those obtained from measurements.

  5. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in fluoroscopy of pediatric patients; Dosimetria termoluminiscente en fluoroscopia de pacientes pediatricos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia V, E.; Azorin N, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Departamento de Fisica, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Hidalgo T, S.; Dies S, P., E-mail: azorin@xanum.uam.mx [Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez, Dr. Marquez 162, Col. Doctores, 06720 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    The use of thermoluminescent dosimeters in the area of medical physics and especially in radiology is of paramount importance to guarantee the quality of a particular study, which for this reason the need to verify by means of measurements of peripheral dose in studies of esophagogastroduodenal series by fluoroscopy using TLD of LiF:Mg, Ti. For this the necessary measurements were carried out directly in patients of the Children s Hospital of Mexico Federico Gomez. Previously characterized the dosimeters were used the graphs of the linear equation to obtain the absorbed dose of each dosimeter and was found that the values of the absorbed dose in each patient changes for various reasons like the anatomy, thickness of the tissues, age and exposure time during the study and was verify that none of the studies performed on patients exceeded dose levels that could affect healthy organs. (Author)

  6. Peripheral dose measurement in breast cancer patients submitted to Tomotherapy using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina A, O.; Medrano S, A. C.; Azorin N, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Mora G, L. C., E-mail: omedina@xanum.uam.mx [IMSS, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI, Av. Cuauhtemoc 330, 06725 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) has been one of the most important techniques in medical radiation applications over many years, creating opportunities of advancing in novel radiotherapy techniques particularly in Tomotherapy with photons. LiF:Mg,Ti TLD is one kind of TLD which can be used in Tomotherapy because of having suitable properties such as good sensitivity, small size and tissue equivalence. Hypo fractionation is a radiotherapeutic technique, widely accepted as an important treatment for breast cancer patients, characterized by high doses at which they are exposed for treatment of cancerous tumors that are irradiated precisely with photons from a helical accelerator and aims to decrease the number of sessions from 3 - 6 weeks to 1 - 3 weeks. Results of measuring the peripheral dose (Pd) in breast cancer patients submitted to Tomotherapy with high-energy photons are presented. (Author)

  7. Fading prediction in thermoluminescent materials using computerised glow curve deconvolution (CGCD)

    CERN Document Server

    Furetta, C; Weng, P S

    1999-01-01

    The fading of three different thermoluminescent (TL) materials, CaF sub 2 : Tm (TLD-300), manocrystalline LiF : Mg,Ti (DTG-4) and MgB sub 4 O sub 7 : Dy,Na has been studied at room temperature and at 50 deg. C of storage. The evolution as a function of the elapsed time of the whole glow curve as well as of the individual peaks has been analysed using the Computerised Glow Curve Deconvolution (CGCD) program developed at the NTHU. The analysis allows to predict the loss of the dosimetric information and to make any correction is necessary for using the TL dosimeters in practical applications. Furthermore, it is well demonstrated that using CGCD it is not necessary to anneal the peaks having a rapid fading to avoid, then, any interfering effect on the more stable peaks.

  8. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in computed tomography for pediatric patients; Dosimetria termoluminiscente en tomografia computada para pacientes pediatricos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medrano S, A. C.; Medina A, O.; Hidalgo T, S.; Azorin N, J., E-mail: alicesar1993@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) in conjunction with interventional radiology, is considered as high-dose radiological procedure, so the optimization of the dose is necessary. Exposure to ionizing radiation in pediatric CT is of particular interest because the children are up to 10 times more sensitive to radiation than adults, the late somatic and genetic effects of radiation. The exposure and risk associated with ionizing radiation in CT is best characterized by the absorbed dose to each organ. Thermoluminescent dosimeters of LiF: Mg, Ti are best suited for this purpose due to its characteristics such as high sensitivity, small size and its equivalence with the tissue. The results of dose measurements -in vivo- to the three types of CT studies (skull, thorax and abdomen) are presented. These results indicate that lower doses were obtained in skull study, while the highest was one of abdomen. (Author)

  9. Mixed field personnel dosimetry using a nearly tissue-equivalent multi-element thermoluminescence dosemeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moscovitch, M.; Velbeck, K.J.; Bencke, G.M. (Engelhard Corp., Harshaw Crystal and Electronic Products, Solon, OH (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The method of response interpretation for determining dose equivalents of a new multi-element thermoluminescence dosemeter in mixed photon-beta and photon-neutron fields is described. The four TL chips are LiF:Mg,Ti, each covered by its own unique filter. Experiments to determine the response of the dosemeter and to test the dose calculation algorithm were performed according to the standard established by the US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP). It has been shown that the dosemeter response can be used to identify the mixture type. The accuracy of the system has been proven in blind testing to be well within DOELAP tolerance limits in all test categories. (author).

  10. Intercontinental quantum liaisons between entangled electrons in ion traps of thermoluminescent crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Desbrandes, R; Desbrandes, Robert; Gent, Daniel Van

    2006-01-01

    The experiments reported in this paper were carried out with space-separated entangled thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) crystals in Baton Rouge, Louisiana (USA) and Givarlais (France) at 8,182 km between entangled samples. Samples consisted of doped lithium fluoride TLD's that were simultaneously irradiated in pairs together at one location by Bremsstrahlung radiation generated by a Varian CLINAC unit. One of the paired TLD crystals was then mailed to Baton Rouge and its entangled counterpart remained in Givarlais. The crystal in Baton Rouge (master) was then subjected to thermal stimulation which elicited a measurable light emission response in the counterpart (slave) under a photomultiplier in Givarlais. Highly correlated passive light emissions were observed in the nonheated slave TLD while the master TLD was ramped up in temperature and then allowed to cool to ambient temperature. Maximum correlations in the slave TLD light emissions were observed at the turn around temperature which is the point where t...

  11. Dose dependence and thermal stability of the thermoluminescence emission in inorganic dust from mint and camomile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Ros, J.M. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: jm.gomezros@ciemat.es; Furetta, C. [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares UNAM, P.O. Box 70-543, 04510 Mexico DF (Mexico); Cruz-Zaragoza, E. [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares UNAM, P.O. Box 70-543, 04510 Mexico DF (Mexico); Lis, M. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Torres, A. [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares UNAM, P.O. Box 70-543, 04510 Mexico DF (Mexico); Monsivais, G. [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares UNAM, P.O. Box 70-543, 04510 Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2006-10-15

    The inorganic phase extracted from mint and camomile samples obtained from commercial products in Mexico was selected according to different grain sizes and exposed to {sup 60}Co gamma radiation at different doses in the range 0.5-12 kGy. Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves show a single broad peak, centred around 175 deg. C for prompt readouts. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates the inorganic dust is mainly composed by quartz, Na,K-feldspars and amphiboles, which use to be characterized by TL emissions associated to continuous distribution of trapping centres. The high fading of the TL signal during the first days of storage at room temperature can be related to the shallowest part of the distribution while the deepest traps originate the asymptotic behaviour for longer storage times. The TL intensity also increases significatively with the grain size, being linear with the absorbed dose at least up to 10 kGy.

  12. A new thermoluminescence mixed order model for continuous and uniform distribution of trapping centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zahedifar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A mixed order model is proposed for describing thermoluminescence (TL glow peaks with continuous and uniform distribution of trapping states. It is shown that the presented function reduces to the simple known models at the limiting cases. The function for TL intensity has been introduced in terms of intensity and temperature of the peak maximum. These parameters can easily be estimated from the shape of the glow peak as initial guesstimate for the curve fitting procedure. Considering the direct relation between the parameters entered in the proposed model and the physics of TL phenomenon, it is deduced that it is more appropriate for describing TL peaks with continuous distribution of trapping states.

  13. Thermoluminescence of thallium-doped BaFCl. [Gamma and x radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somaiah, K.; Babu, V.H. (Osmania Univ., Hyderabad (India). Dept. of Physics)

    1983-09-16

    The effect of doping of Tl upon thermoluminescence, its emission and optical absorption in flux grown BaFCl crystals is investigated. Besides an increase in luminescence output, X/..gamma..-irradiations of BaFCl:Tl crystals produce three additional glow peaks at 450, 465, and 500 K and a TL emission spectrum at 460 nm. Optical absorption studies reveal two small bands at 340 and 650 nm. Room temperature annealing studies indicate that the three glow peaks at 450, 465, 500 K and the optical absorption band at 650 nm are more stable than others present in undoped crystals. Thus the additional glow peaks are attributed to the detrapping of electrons from the substantial number of metastable energy levels as populated by the thallium impurity and subsequent radiative recombination with holes. The trap depth and frequency factor are calculated employing various methods.

  14. On the solar origin of the 200 y Suess wiggles: Evidence from thermoluminescence in sea sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cini Castagnoli, G.; Bonino, G.; Della Monica, P.; Procopio, S.; Taricco, C. [Turin Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Generale]|[CNR, Turin (Italy). Ist. di Cosmogeofisica

    1998-03-01

    In order to understand the origin of the Suess wiggles, present in the tree ring {sup 14}C record, the authors have studied the thermoluminescence (TL) of a shallow-water Ionian sea core, in an attempt to provide a record of an indicator responding to the solar output more promptly than {sup 14}C in tree rings. The spectral content of the TL and radiocarbon records is very similar; nevertheless, in addition to the 207 y Suess wave (A = 3.6%), the TL record shows the second harmonic (103.5 y; A = 2.4%), in phase with the envelope of the 11 y solar cycles. This results, obtained by different spectral methods, in particular by Superposition of Epochs (SE) and by Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA), strongly supports the solar origin of the 200 y Suess wiggles.

  15. Thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence dating of bricks from the Thung Tuk archaeological site, Southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santi Pailoplee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermoluminescence (TL and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL based dating were applied to ancient fired bricks to derive the chronology of the Thung Tuk archaeological site (TT, southern Thailand. In order to test the feasibility of brick dating, the inside and outside portions of the brick mass were dated separately. From the obtained results, the outside portion of the brick mass was found to be more suitable for luminescence dating than the inside portion since the inside might be incompletely fired during the production process. Among the brick ages obtained using the outside portion, both the TL and OSL (with a minimum model analyses were all in agreement with the known ages of the TT, except for one sample that appeared to be much younger. This likely represents a subsequent renovation brick. Thus, the assessment of renovation and other imports into sites should be carefully considered in future luminescence dating.

  16. Chemical and physical studies of type 3 chondrites. VIII - Thermoluminescence and metamorphism in the CO chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Bradly D.; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1987-01-01

    A possible relationship between the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of CO chondrites and their metamorphic history was investigated by measuring the TL properties of seven normal CO chondrites and of the Colony and the Allan Hills A77307 (ALHA 77307) CO-related chondrites. With the exception of Colony and ALHA 77307, whose maximum induced TL emission is at approximately 350 C, the CO chondrites were found to exhibit two TL peaks: a 130 C and a 250 C peaks. Among the CO chondrites, the 130 C peak showed a 100-fold range in TL sensitivity and was found to correlate with various metamorphism-related phenomena, such as silicate heterogeneity, metal composition, and McSween's metamorphic subtypes. The peak at 250 did not show these correlations and, with exception of Colony, showed little variation.

  17. Magnetic manifestations of thermoluminescence excitation in CaF{sub 2}:Mn (TLD-400)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilkin, Mikhail [University of Tartu, Faculty of Physics and Chemistry, Taehe 4-101, Tartu 51010 (Estonia)], E-mail: danilkin@ut.ee; Kirillov, Aleksei [University of Tartu, Faculty of Physics and Chemistry, Taehe 4-101, Tartu 51010 (Estonia); Klimonsky, Sergei; Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav [Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Miusskaya Sqr. 9, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lust, Aime; Maendar, Hugo [University of Tartu, Faculty of Physics and Chemistry, Taehe 4-101, Tartu 51010 (Estonia); Nikiforov, Vladimir [Moscow State University, Department of Low-Temperature Physics and Superconductivity, 119899, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ratas, Arno [University of Tartu, Faculty of Physics and Chemistry, Taehe 4-101, Tartu 51010 (Estonia); Ruchkin, Aleksandr [Moscow State University, Department of Low-Temperature Physics and Superconductivity, 119899, Moscow (Russian Federation); Seeman, Viktor [University of Tartu, Faculty of Physics and Chemistry, Taehe 4-101, Tartu 51010 (Estonia)

    2007-04-15

    Magnetic susceptibility as a function of temperature (4-250K) and EPR spectra at room temperature were studied for thermoluminescence detectors (TLD) CaF{sub 2}:Mn with either stored dose information or cleaned dose by annealing. No essential variations of Mn{sup 2+} number in detectors were found due to dose storage; however, the exchange interactions between manganese ions are observed as deviations from Curie-Weiss law. These deviations are removed when samples are irradiated with high doses (250-500Gy) and appear again after dose annealing. The effect is regarded as indirect evidence of trapped exciton formation in the close vicinity of Mn{sup 2+} impurity, with the exchange interaction being destroyed by fluorine displacement from regular lattice position. The unusually high stability of trapped impurity excitons is explained by partial relaxation of lattice distortion caused by substitution of Ca{sup 2+} with a smaller Mn{sup 2+}.

  18. CVD diamond wafers as large-area thermoluminescence detectors for measuring the spatial distribution of dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczewska, B.; Bilski, P.; Olko, P.; Olko, P.; Nesládek, M.; Bergonzo, P.; Rbisz, M.; Waligórski, M. P. R.

    2003-09-01

    The applicability of large-area CVD diamond wafers (diameter about 5 cm, thickness about 0.1 mm), read out as thermoluminescence (TL) detectors, for assessing two-dimensional (2-D) dose distribution over their area, was investigated. To obtain 2-D TL images, a special TL reader equipped with large-area planchet and a CCD camera instead of the usual PM tube was developed. Several 2-D TL images: of an alpha source (Am-241), a Ra-226 needle source and a Ru-106 ophthalmic applicator, were measured and high-resolution digital images obtained. Our preliminary results demonstrate the potential capability of large-area CVD diamond wafers, read out as TL detectors, in 2-D dosimetry for medical applications. (

  19. Estimation of eye absorbed doses in head & neck radiotherapy practices using thermoluminescent detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh Bagheri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  Determination of eye absorbed dose during head & neck radiotherapy is essential to estimate the risk of cataract. Dose measurements were made in 20 head & neck cancer patients undergoing 60Co radiotherapy using LiF(MCP thermoluminescent dosimeters. Head & neck cancer radiotherapy was delivered by fields using SAD & SSD techniques. For each patient, 3 TLD chips were placed on each eye. Head & neck dose was about 700-6000 cGy in 8-28 equal fractions. The range of eye dose is estimated to be (3.49-639.1 mGy with a mean of maximum dose (98.114 mGy, which is about 3 % of head & neck dose. Maximum eye dose was observed for distsnces of about 3 cm from edge of the field to eye.

  20. Study and progress of the thermoluminescence dating of the ancient pottery and porcelain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG WeiDa

    2009-01-01

    Two standard methods, the "fine-grain technique" and the "quartz inclusion technique", and a new method, the pre-dose saturation exponential technique in thermoluminescence (TL) dating of ancient pottery and porcelain were reviewed, especially for the measurement of the paleodose and the annual dose. The two standard methods have been acknowledged in domain of TL dating and are used widely for age determination in archaeology and geology. As a dating tool the TL technique has been of great success in authentication of ancient ceramic art objects. However, a few complicated factors limit the precision and accuracy in age determination. These complicated factors are analyzed and discussed. Therefore, although ceramic TL dating can in general solve the problem of authentication of ancient ceramics, there are still complexities that require further research and study.

  1. Study and progress of the thermoluminescence dating of the ancient pottery and porcelain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Two standard methods,the "fine-grain technique" and the "quartz inclusion technique",and a new method,the pre-dose saturation exponential technique in thermoluminescence(TL)dating of ancient pottery and porcelain were reviewed,especially for the measurement of the paleodose and the annual dose.The two standard methods have been acknowledged in domain of TL dating and are used widely for age determination in archaeology and geology.As a dating tool the TL technique has been of great success in authentication of ancient ceramic art objects.However,a few complicated factors limit the precision and accuracy in age determination.These complicated factors are analyzed and discussed.Therefore,although ceramic TL dating can in general solve the problem of authentication of ancient ceramics,there are still complexities that require further research and study.

  2. Irradiation of dates: insect disinfestation, microbial and chemical assessments, and use of thermoluminescence technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kahtani, Hassan A.; Abu-Tarboush, Hamza M.; Ahmed, Mohamed A.; Bajaber, Adnan S. [Food Science and Nutrition Department, College of Agriculture, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Dryhim, Yousif N.; Adam, El-Shami E. [Plant Protection Department, College of Agriculture, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); El-Mojaddidi, Mohamed A. [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1998-08-01

    Irradiation of dates (Khalas variety) at 0.9 kGy was sufficient to eliminate single insect infestation (Oryzaephilus surinamensis) and mixed infestation (O. surinamensis and Tribolium castaneum), whereas 0.3 kGy was effective only in controlling single infestation. Sensory properties were not affected but irradiation contributed to some reduction in microbial counts immediately after irradiation and counts remained low till the end of 6 months storage period. All sugars were significantly reduced immediately after irradiation but they increased gradually with increasing storage time. Thermoluminescence (TL) technique was useful in discriminating between irradiated and unirradiated dates during the entire storage period but was less sensitive as far as the dose estimation is concerned.

  3. Adjustment model of thermoluminescence experimental data; Modelo de ajuste de datos experimentales de termoluminiscencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno y Moreno, A. [Departamento de Apoyo en Ciencias Aplicadas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, 4 Sur 104, Centro Historico, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Moreno B, A. [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    This model adjusts the experimental results for thermoluminescence according to the equation: I (T) = I (a{sub i}* exp (-1/b{sub i} * (T-C{sub i})) where: a{sub i}, b{sub i}, c{sub i} are the i-Th peak adjusted to a gaussian curve. The adjustments of the curve can be operated manual or analytically using the macro function and the solver.xla complement installed previously in the computational system. In this work it is shown: 1. The information of experimental data from a LiF curve obtained from the Physics Institute of UNAM which the data adjustment model is operated in the macro type. 2. A LiF curve of four peaks obtained from Harshaw information simulated in Microsoft Excel, discussed in previous works, as a reference not in macro. (Author)

  4. Thermoluminescence response of a mixed ternary alkali halide crystals exposed to gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez M, R.; Perez S, R. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Apdo. Postal 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Vazquez P, G.; Riveros, H. [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Apdo. Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gonzalez M, P., E-mail: mijangos@cifus.uson.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    Ionic crystals, mainly alkali halide crystals have been the subject of intense research for a better understanding of the luminescence properties of defects induced by ionizing radiation. The defects in crystals can be produced in appreciable concentration due to elastic stresses, radiation, and addition of impurities. These defects exhibit remarkable thermoluminescence properties. This work is concerned with the Tl properties of a ternary alkali halide crystal after being irradiated with gamma and beta rays. It has been found that the Tl glow peak of the crystal follows a rule of average associated to the Tl Temperatures of the components of the mixture, similarly to the response of europium doped binary mixed crystals KCl{sub x}KBr{sub 1-x} and KBr{sub x}RbBr{sub 1-x}. (Author)

  5. Analysis Of Zapotec Ceramics Of The Caxonos River Basin, Oaxaca, Mexico By Thermoluminescence (Tl)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, A.; Schaaf, P.; Ortiz, E.

    One of the most common materials that appear in archaeological excavations is the ceramics. Ceramic is an evidence for different activities and cultural periods. Thermoluminescence (TL) has been shown to be a very effective method for dating of archaeological ceramics. In this paper, we present the results of 18 Zapotec ceramics from different archaeological sites of the Caxonos River Basin, Northern Sierra of Oaxaca, Mexico, analyzed by TL. Based on these results, we established the first chronological data set of this important Mesoamerica site. Our new data give evidence for the existence of a trade route through the Caxonos River Basin used since 500 AD between the central valley of Oaxaca and the Gulf of Mexico. Methodologically we used the fine grain technique (4-11μm) and for the determination of the paleodose the additive method was applied.

  6. Dosimetric characteristics of ultraviolet and x-ray-irradiated KBr:Eu{sup 2+} thermoluminescence crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendrez, R.; Perez-Salas, R. [Programa de Posgrado en Fisica de Materiales, Centro de Investigacion, Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Apartado Postal 2681, Ensenada, Baja California, 22800 (Mexico); Aceves, R.; Piters, T.M.; Barboza-Flores, M. [Centro de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, Hermosillo, Sonora, 83190 (Mexico)

    1996-08-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of KBr:Eu{sup 2+} (150 ppm) previously exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light (200{endash}300 nm) and x-ray radiation at room temperature have been determined. The TL glow curve of UV-irradiated samples is composed of six peaks located at 337, 384, 402, 435, 475, and 510 K. The TL glow curves of x-irradiated samples show mainly a TL peak around 384 K. The TL intensities of UV-irradiated (402 and 510 K glow peaks) and x-irradiated specimens present a linear dependence as a function of radiation dose as well as fading stability 300 s after irradiation. These results further enhance the possibilities of using europium-doped materials in nonionizing (actinic region) and ionizing radiation detection and dosimetry applications. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Modeling the thermoluminescent response of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy by the MCNPX method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furetta, C.; Roman, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Legaria-IPN, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, Mexico D.F. 11500 (Mexico); Rivera, T. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Legaria-IPN, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, Mexico D.F. 11500 (Mexico)], E-mail: trivera@ipn.mx; Azorin, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina. 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Azorin, C.G. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Legaria-IPN, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, Mexico D.F. 11500 (Mexico); Vega-Carrillo, H.R. [UaEN de la Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2010-04-15

    This work describes an algorithm for absorbed dose evaluation in the region of X-ray diagnostic energy based on the response of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy thermoluminescence powder detectors. The absorbed dose was calculated using Monte Carlo simulation code (MCSC) and then compared to the experimental TLD results for X-rays effective energies {sup 60}Co gamma radiation. In order to study the photon interaction in the matter, a cylindrical model of 1 cm{sup 3} was used. The gamma radiation source was placed at 100 cm to the object; the source is considered as an isotropic source of {sup 60}Co. The energy deposited into the cylindrical model was determined by the Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNPX) method. Measurements of the TL phosphors were obtained by irradiating the powder by gamma radiation. TL glow curve of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy after gamma irradiated at a 1 Gy of absorbed dose was then obtained.

  8. Radiation transfer in an anisotropically scattering plane-parallel medium with space dependent albedo, omega(x)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengel, Y. A.; Ozisik, M. N.

    1984-08-01

    An analytical model is developed for radiation transfer in a plane-parallel slab geometry with anisotropic scattering, spatially varying albedo, reflecting and emitting boundaries, and energy sources within the medium. The albedo is defined in terms of Legendre polynomials and account is taken of the effects of spatial albedo variation on reflectivity and transmissivity of the medium after formulating generalized incident radiation equation. Forward and backward radiation fluxes are then obtained. It is noted that the Legendre polynomials permit inclusion of sufficient numbers of terms to achieve any desired level of accuracy for the albedo.

  9. Generalization and Alternatives of Kaprekar's Routine

    CERN Document Server

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2010-01-01

    We extend Kaprekar's Routine for a large class of applications. We also give particular examples of this generalization as alternatives to Kaprekar's Routine and Number. Some open questions about the length of the iterations until reaching either zero or a constant or a cycle, and about the length of the cycles are asked at the end.

  10. Organisational sensemaking, strategy, structuring and routines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Renate

    2001-01-01

    my focus will, more specifically, be on how sensemaking processes are transformed into strategy and policies to be applied in daily routines, especially sales/marketing strategy routines. By acquiring a broader comprehension of the structuring and strategising processes the intent is to improve...

  11. 10 CFR 1017.20 - Routine access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Routine access. 1017.20 Section 1017.20 Energy DEPARTMENT... INFORMATION Access to Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information § 1017.20 Routine access. (a) Authorized... access to the UCNI, subject to limitations in paragraph (b) of this section, and who may...

  12. Unlearning Established Organizational Routines--Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiol, Marlena; O'Connor, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this two-part paper is to develop a process model of unlearning established organizational routines. The model traces the interactions among three unlearning sub-processes: ostensive aspects of initial destabilization of an established routine; performative aspects of ongoing discarding-from-use of old behaviors and…

  13. Evaluation of dose variation during total skin electron irradiation using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, R.D.; Gerbi, B.J.; Dusenbery, K.E. [Univ. of Minnesota Hospital, Minneaspolis, MN (United States)

    1995-09-30

    The purpose of this study was to determine acceptable dose variation using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) in the treatment of Mycosis Fungoides with total skin electron beam (TSEB) irradiation. From 1983 to 1993, 22 patients were treated with total skin electron beam therapy in the standing position. A six-field technique was used to deliver 2 Gy in two days, treating 4 days per week, to a total dose of 35 to 40 Gy using a degraded 9 MeV electron beam. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were placed on several locations of the body and the results recorded. The variations in these readings were analyzed to determine normal dose variation for various body location during TSEB. The dose to flat surfaces of the body was essentially the same as the dose to the prescription point. The dose to tangential surfaces was within {plus_minus} 10% of the prescription dose, but the readings showed much more variation (up to 24%). Thin areas of the body showed large deviations from the prescription dose along with a large amount of variation in the readings (up to 22%). Special areas of the body, such as the perineum and eyelid, showed large deviations from the prescription dose along with very large (up to 40%) variations in the readings. The TLD results of this study will be used as a quality assurance check for all new patients treated with TSEB. The results of the TLDs will be compared with this baseline study to determine if the delivered dose is within acceptable ranges. If the TLD results fall outside the acceptable limits established above, then the patient position can be modified or the technique itself evaluated. 4 refs., 5 tabs.

  14. Detection of ionizing radiations by studying ceramic tiles materials using thermoluminescence technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandavia, H. C.; Murthy, K. V. R.; Purohit, R. U.

    2017-05-01

    Natural background radiation comes from two primary sources: cosmic radiation and terrestrial sources. Our natural environment has both livings and non-livings like - Sun, Moon, Sky, Air, Water, Soil, Rivers, Mountains, Forests, besides plants and animals. The worldwide average background dose for a human being is about 2.4 millisievert (mSv) per year. This exposure is mostly from cosmic radiation and natural radionuclides in the environment. The Earth, and all living things on it, are constantly bombarded by radiation from outer space. This radiation primarily consists of positively charged ions from protons to iron and larger nuclei derived sources outside our solar system. This radiation interacts with atoms in the atmosphere to create secondary radiation, including X-rays, muons, protons, alpha particles, pions, electrons, and neutrons. The present study discusses the utility of ceramic tiles as radiation dosimeters in case of nuclear fallout. Many flooring materials most of them are in natural form are used to manufacture floor tiles for household flooring purpose. Many natural minerals are used as the raw materials required for the manufacturing ceramic ware. The following minerals are used to manufacturing the ceramic tiles i.e. Quartz, Feldspar, Zircon, Talc, Grog, Alumina oxide, etc. Most of the minerals are from Indian mines of Gujarat and Rajasthan states, some of are imported from Russian subcontinent. The present paper reports the thermoluminescence dosimetry Study of Feldspar and Quartz minerals collected from the ceramic tiles manufacturing unit, Morbi. The main basis in the Thermoluminescence Dosimetry (TLD) is that TL output is directly proportional to the radiation dose received by the phosphor and hence provides the means of estimating unknown radiations from environment.

  15. Thermoluminescence and defect centres in Tb doped lithium magnesium borate phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, S.N., E-mail: sanju_n_m@yahoo.com [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Kadam, Sonal [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Watanabe, S.; Gundu Rao, T.K. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, 05508-090 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kulkarni, M.S.; Babu, D.A.R. [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    2015-11-15

    Terbium doped lithium magnesium borate phosphor exhibits thermoluminescence (TL) peaks at about 140 °C, 200 °C, 225 °C and 370 °C. The phosphor was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and photoluminescence studies. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) studies were carried out to identify the defect centres responsible for the TL peaks. Room temperature ESR spectrum of irradiated phosphor appears to be a superposition of two distinct centres. One of the centres (centre I) with principal g-value 2.0108 is identified as an O{sup −} ion and the centre correlates with the TL peak at 200 °C. Centre II with an isotropic g-factor 2.0029 is assigned to an F{sup +}-type centre (singly ionized oxygen vacancy) and is the likely recombination centre for the TL peaks at 200 °C and 225 °C. An additional defect centre is observed during thermal annealing experiments and this centre (assigned to F{sup +} centre) seems to originate from an F centre (oxygen vacancy with two electrons). This F centre may be related to the observed high temperature 370 °C TL peak in LiMgBO{sub 3}:Tb phosphor. - Highlights: • Powder phosphor of LiMgBO{sub 3}:Tb{sup 3+} was prepared by solid state diffusion method. • The phosphor exhibits a dominant emission at 545 nm ({sup 5}D{sub 4}→{sup 7}F{sub 5}) of the Tb{sup 3+} ion. • Electron Spin Resonance studies have been carried out to identify the defect centres responsible for the observed thermoluminescence peaks.

  16. Thermoluminescence response of the poly mineral fraction from hibiscus sabdariffa L foodstuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz Z, E.; Guzman, S. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Brown, F. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Polimeros y Materiales, Apdo. Postal 130, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Chernov, V.; Barboza F, M., E-mail: ecruz@nucleares.unam.m [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Apdo. Postal 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2011-02-15

    Food processed by ionizing irradiation is a safe technology and has been recognized by the FAO/Who Codes Alimentarius Commission. It is an excellent method to prevent food spoilage and food borne diseases by inhibiting the growth of microorganisms and slowing down ripening. The widespread use of food irradiation treatments that include spices, dry vegetables, grains and fruits make relevant the developing of methods for identification and analyses of foodstuffs processed by irradiation. The present work focuses on the thermoluminescence property of Mexican Roselle flower previously irradiated for detection purposes. The poly mineral content of irradiated commercial Roselle flower (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) was extracted and analyzed by thermoluminescence (Tl). The X-ray diffraction analyses showed that quartz and albite composition for the poly mineral fraction. Different grain sizes; 10, 53, 74 and 149 {mu}m, were selected for the Tl analyses. The Tl glow curves depended on the grain sizes. The glow curves depicted two peaks around 92 and 120 C. The first peak was ascribed to quartz and the broad part of the glow curves (120-250 C) seems to correspond to the albite. Because the complex structure of the Tl glow curves from poly minerals the kinetic parameters were calculated by a fitting process using a deconvolution method based on a non-linear least-squares Levenberg-Ma quart. The values of the activation energy were found to be at 0.79-1.05 eV and 0.79-1.04 for 53 {mu}m and 250 {mu}m, respectively. The Tl properties of the samples were determined including dose response, reproducibly, fading and UV light bleaching. (Author)

  17. Induced thermoluminescence as a method for dating recent volcanism: Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Derek W. G.; Sears, Hazel; Sehlke, Alexander; Hughes, Scott S.

    2017-02-01

    The induced thermoluminescence properties of 24 samples of basalts from volcanoes in the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho, were measured as part of an investigation into the possibility of using this technique for dating purposes. The volcanic flows sampled ranged in age from 2200 years to 400,000 years. The thermoluminescence (TL) sensitivity values obtained, i.e., maximum induced TL normalized to that of the Dhajala meteorite (where Dhajala = 1000), ranged from 1.6 ± 0.3 to 226 ± 15 and showed a correlation between log TL and age with an r2 value of 0.47. Thus, TL sensitivity values correlate with age in the manner expected, although there is a high level of scatter. We discuss various mechanisms for the correlation and scatter, particularly (1) the role of primary (igneous processes) and secondary (solid state processes), (2) composition of the plagioclase feldspar, and (3) weathering. The induced TL signal from feldspars, the mineral responsible for the TL, is strongly dependent on their composition, and correcting for this improved the correlation (r2 = 0.7). Variations in primary feldspar are affecting the data, but we find no evidence that weathering of the samples is important. Further work is required to explore the remaining causes for the scatter and the TL-age trend. However, it is clear from the present study that induced TL has the potential for dating volcanism on the 2200 to 400,000 year time frame. This dating method, if successful, would be well-suited to spacecraft use since it requires low mass and low power instruments with a low data demand.

  18. Thermoluminescent dosimetric properties of CaF{sub 2}:Tm produced by combustion synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, D.A.A. de; Khoury, H.J.; Asfora, V.K.; Barros, V.S.M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Oliveira, R.A.P. [Universidade Federal do Vale do Sao Francisco (IPCM/UNIVASF), Juazeiro, BA (Brazil). Instituto de Pesquisa em Ciencias dos Materiais. Departamento de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    Calcium Fluoride is one of the oldest known thermoluminescent materials and is considered to be one of the most sensitive. In particular for thulium doped CaF{sub 2}, since it was introduced in 1977 by Lucas and Kapsar, besides gamma radiation dosimetry, there have been several attempts for its use in application involving mixed radiation fields (ex.: neutron and gamma; alpha and beta), low energy photons, π- dosimetry and neutrino detection. Research for novel improved methods of fabrication are ongoing. This work presents the dosimetric properties results of CaF{sub 2}:Tm produced by combustion synthesis. The X-ray diffraction (Brucker D2 Phaser) confirmed that CaF{sub 2} was successfully produced. Samples were irradiated in a Co-60 (Gammacell 220 Nordion) and Cs-137 (STS/OB-85) gamma sources for high and low doses, respectively. TL emission spectra, obtained using a Hammamatsu optical spectrometer, has the same lines of commercial CaF{sub 2}:Tm, although transitions {sup 3}P{sub 0} → {sup 3}F{sub 4} (455 nm) and {sup 1}G{sub 4}→ {sup 3}H{sub 6} (482 nm) are shown to be proportionally more intense. The dose response lower limit is in the range of 100 μGy. Thermoluminescence glow curves were obtained in a Harshaw 3500 TL reader. The deconvolution technique was employed and seven glow peaks were found as well as its kinetic parameters, similar to the commercial CaF{sub 2}:Tm. A linear dose response curve was obtained for the range 0.1 mGy to 50 Gy, with the onset of a supralinear behavior at 50 Gy up to 100 Gy. The minimum measurable dose for gamma (Cs- 137) was around 100 μGy for a 6.0 mm diameter by 1.0 mm in thickness pellet. Variation of the dose response due to fading was within 6% in 60 days. (author)

  19. Thermoluminescence of kunzite: A study of kinetic processes and dosimetry characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogundare, F.O., E-mail: ogun_dare@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University of Ibadan, Ibadan (Nigeria); Alatishe, M.A. [Department of Physics, University of Ibadan, Ibadan (Nigeria); Chithambo, M.L. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, PO BOX 94, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Costin, G. [Department of Earth Science, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Since the use of natural minerals for dating and dose reconstruction using luminescence techniques is well-established and always of interest, we present thermoluminescence characteristics of kunzite, a gem variety of spodumene. The chemical composition of the sample was determined using an Electron Probe MicroAnalyzer to be (Li{sub 0.996}Na{sub 0.009}Mn{sub 0.006}){sub ∑} {sub =} {sub 1.016}(Al{sub 0.981}Cr{sub 0.003}Fe{sup 2+}{sub 0.001}){sub ∑} {sub =} {sub 0.995}[(Si{sub 1.993}Al{sub 0.008}){sub ∑} {sub =} {sub 2.000}O{sub 6}]. Thermoluminescence glow curves measured at 0.5 K/s after laboratory irradiation consist of three prominent peaks at 338 K (labelled as peak I), 454 K (peak II) and 681 K (peak III). The dose response of these three peaks is linear in the range 20–308 Gy studied. The position of each of the peaks is independent of dose, an archetypical feature of first order behaviour. However, detailed kinetic analyses showed that in fact, the peaks are not subject to first order kinetics. Each of the three peaks is affected by thermal quenching with an associated activation energy of thermal quenching estimated to be 0.70, 1.35 and 0.54 eV for peaks I, II and III respectively. In terms of dosimetry use, only peak III was found to be reliable for possible use in luminescence dating and dose reconstruction.

  20. Synthesis of CaF{sub 2}: dy for thermoluminescent dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamato, M.E.P.; Vasconcelos, D.A.A. de; Asfora, V.K.; Khoury, H.J.; Santos, R.A.; Barros, V.S.M., E-mail: mepyamato@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    Calcium Fluoride doped with dysprosium is a known thermoluminescent material for applications that require highly sensitive dosimeters. Research in novel methods such as Combustion Synthesis (CS) has been ongoing for several years at the University of Pernambuco. The method uses the heat of the oxi-redox reaction a between nitrate and a fuel. This work presents results of CaF{sub 2}:Dy produced by combustion synthesis under different fabrication conditions. Samples were prepared by mixing stoichiometric amounts of calcium nitrate, urea and ammonium nitrate in a beaker under vigorous stirring. The resulting gel was transferred to a pre-heated muffle furnace were the combustion reaction occurred after a few minutes. For comparison, a variation of the production method with the same amounts of nitrate, ammonium fluoride and dopant, but without using the fuel was prepared. For both methods the resulting powder was pelleted and irradiated with Co-60 gamma radiation. The reproducibility and sensitivity for gamma dose irradiation was tested and results showed that optimum TL sample reproducibility was without the urea as fuel. Samples were then prepared with 0.05, 0.10, 0.15 and 0.20 mol% Dy concentration. The highest TL sensitivity was found for samples with 0.15 mol% Dy and sintered at 400 deg C for 3.5 h in air. The TL emission spectra, obtained using a Hammamatsu optical spectrometer, was comparable with commercial CaF{sub 2}:Dy. Thermoluminescence was measured in a Harshaw-Bicron 3500 TL Reader. The glow curve showed stable dosimetric peaks at around 200, 235 and 300 deg C were a linear dose response curve was obtained for the range 100 mGy to 1000 mGy. (author)

  1. Modeling Earth Albedo Currents on Sun Sensors for Improved Vector Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Earth albedo influences vector measurements of the solar line of sight vector, due to the induced current on in the photo voltaics of Sun sensors. Although advanced digital Sun sensors exist, these are typically expensive and may not be suited for satellites in the nano or pico-class. Previously...... for modeling Sun sensor output by incorporating the Earth albedo model is presented. This model utilizes the directional information of in the Earth albedo model, which is achieved by Earth surface partitioning. This allows accurate simulation of the Sun sensor output and the results are consistent with Ørsted...... and useful for space environment simulations, and may be utilized to improve attitude estimation algorithms applying Sun sensor vector observations....

  2. Characteristics of albedo particles generated in interactions of cosmic-ray hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, V.V.; Azaryan, M.O.; Grigoryan, S.A.; Kazaryan, S.S.; Mamidzhanyan, E.A.; Oganyan, G.Z.; Ter-Antonyan, S.V.

    1986-11-01

    The Pion installation, which combines a multimodule detector of x-ray transition radiation with an ionization calorimeter, has been used to investigate the characteristics of particles traveling backward in the lab: albedo particles, generated by cosmic-ray hadrons with energy 0.5--5.0 TeV in interactions with nuclei of lead and iron. The principal features of the albedo effect are as follows: the angular distribution of the backward-traveling particles has a tendency to rise at angles near 180/sup 0/; albedo particles from great depths in matter (>100 g/cm/sup 2/) have a hadronic nature; the intensity of the particles depends on the sign of the charge of the primary hadron; the average multiplicity of the particles increases with increase of the energy of the primary hadron.

  3. Active Amplification of the Terrestrial Albedo to Mitigate Climate Change: An Exploratory Study

    CERN Document Server

    Hamwey, R M

    2005-01-01

    This study explores the potential to enhance the reflectance of solar insolation by the human settlement and grassland components of the Earth's terrestrial surface as a climate change mitigation measure. Preliminary estimates derived using a static radiative transfer model indicate that such efforts could amplify the planetary albedo enough to offset the current global annual average level of radiative forcing caused by anthropogenic greenhouse gases by as much as 30 percent or 0.76 W/m2. Terrestrial albedo amplification may thus extend, by about 25 years, the time available to advance the development and use of low-emission energy conversion technologies which ultimately remain essential to mitigate long-term climate change. However, additional study is needed to confirm the estimates reported here and to assess the economic and environmental impacts of active land-surface albedo amplification as a climate change mitigation measure.

  4. High-albedo C-complex outer-belt asteroids: The near-infrared spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, T.; Usui, F.; Ootsubo, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Kuroda, D.; Shirahata, M.; Okamura, N.

    2014-07-01

    Primitive, outer-belt asteroids are generally of low albedo, reflecting carbonaceous compositions like those of CI and CM meteorites. However, a few outer-belt asteroids having high albedos are known, suggesting the presence of unusually reflective surface minerals or, conceivably, even exposed water ice. Here, we present near-infrared (1.1--2.5 micron) spectra of four outer-belt C-complex asteroids with albedos > 0.1. We find no absorption features characteristic of water ice (near 1.5 and 2.0 micron) in the objects. Intimate mixture models set limits to the water ice by weight Journal, Volume 146, Issue 1, article id. 1, 6 pp. (2013).

  5. The Far-UV Albedo of the Moon Determined from Dayside LAMP Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Mark A.; Retherford, K. D.; Gladstone, R.; Greathouse, T. K.; Mandt, K. E.; Hendrix, A. R.; Feldman, P. D.; Miles, P. F.; Egan, A. F.

    2013-10-01

    The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has been recording far-UV photons reflected from the lunar surface almost continuously since December 2009 (Gladstone et al., 2010). One photon at a time, LAMP builds up spectra from 575 to 1965 Å with a resolution of 26 Å. We will present 3 years of accumulated LAMP lunar dayside spectral maps and derive the lunar geometric albedo spectrum for a range of phase angles. These LAMP observations can thus be used to reconstruct the lunar far-UV photometric function and refine photometric models of the lunar surface (Hapke, 1963; Lucke et al., 1976). We will also compare LAMP lunar dayside albedo with the albedo from 820-1840 Å obtained by the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) on the March 1995 Astro-2 Space Shuttle mission (Henry et al., 1995). The improved lunar photometric functions from our analysis of LAMP albedo spectra will enable a better quantitative assessment of how phase angle and composition affect the Moon’s reflectance in the far-UV. Gladstone, G. R., Stern, S. A., Retherford, K. D., Black, R. K., Slater, D. C., Davis, M. W., Versteeg, M. H., Persson, K. B., Parker, J. W., Kaufmann, D. E., Egan, A. F., Greathouse, T. K., Feldman, P. D., Hurley, D., Pryor, W. R., Hendrix, A. R., 2010. LAMP: The lyman alpha mapping project on NASA's lunar reconnaissance orbiter mission. Space Science Reviews. 150, 161-181. Hapke, B. W., 1963. A theoretical photometric function for the lunar surface. Journal of Geophysical Research. 68, 4571-4586. Henry, R. C., Feldman, P. D., Kruk, J. W., Davidsen, A. F., Durrance, S. T., 1995. Ultraviolet Albedo of the Moon with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope. The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 454, L69. Lucke, R. L., Henry, R. C., Fastie, W. G., 1976. Far-ultraviolet albedo of the moon. The Astronomical Journal. 81, 1162-1169.

  6. The price of snow: albedo valuation and a case study for forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, David A.; Howarth, Richard B.

    2015-06-01

    Several climate frameworks have included the role of carbon storage in natural landscapes as a potential mechanism for climate change mitigation. This has resulted in an incentive to grow and maintain intact long-lived forest ecosystems. However, recent research has suggested that the influence of albedo-related radiative forcing can impart equal and in some cases greater magnitudes of climate mitigation compared to carbon storage in forests where snowfall is common and biomass is slow-growing. While several methodologies exist for relating albedo-associated radiative forcing to carbon storage for the analysis of the tradeoffs of these ecosystem services, they are varied, and they have yet to be contrasted in a case study with implications for future forest management. Here we utilize four methodologies for calculating a shadow price for albedo radiative forcing and apply the resulting eight prices to an ecological and economic forest model to examine the effects on optimal rotation periods on two different forest stands in the White Mountain National Forest in New Hampshire, USA. These pricing methodologies produce distinctly different shadow prices of albedo, varying from a high of 9.36 × 10-4 and a low of 1.75 × 10-5 w-1yr-1 in the initial year, to a high of 0.019 and a low of 3.55 × 10-4 w-1yr-1 in year 200 of the simulation. When implemented in the forest model, optimal rotation periods also varied considerably, from a low of 2 to a high of 107 years for a spruce-fir stand and from 35 to 80 years for a maple-beech-birch stand. Our results suggest that the choice of climate metrics and pricing methodologies for use with forest albedo alter albedo prices considerably, may substantially adjust optimal rotation period length, and therefore may have consequences with respect to forest land cover change.

  7. Titan-Like Exoplanets: Variations in Geometric Albedo and Effective Transit Height with Haze Production Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checlair, Jade; McKay, Christopher P.; Imanaka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Extensive studies characterizing Titan present an opportunity to study the atmospheric properties of Titan-like exoplanets. Using an existing model of Titan's atmospheric haze, we computed geometric albedo spectra and effective transit height spectra for six values of the haze production rate (zero haze to twice present) over a wide range of wavelengths (0.2-2 microns). In the geometric albedo spectra, the slope in the UV-visible changes from blue to red when varying the haze production rate values from zero to twice the current Titan value. This spectral feature is the most effective way to characterize the haze production rates. Methane absorption bands in the visible-NIR compete with the absorbing haze, being more prominent for smaller haze production rates. The effective transit heights probe a region of the atmosphere where the haze and gas are optically thin and that is thus not effectively probed by the geometric albedo. The effective transit height decreases smoothly with increasing wavelength, from 376 km to 123 km at 0.2 and 2 microns, respectively. When decreasing the haze production rate, the methane absorption bands become more prominent, and the effective transit height decreases with a steeper slope with increasing wavelength. The slope of the geometric albedo in the UV-visible increases smoothly with increasing haze production rate, while the slope of the effective transit height spectra is not sensitive to the haze production rate other than showing a sharp rise when the haze production rate increases from zero. We conclude that geometric albedo spectra provide the most sensitive indicator of the haze production rate and the background Rayleigh gas. Our results suggest that important and complementary information can be obtained from the geometric albedo and motivates improvements in the technology for direct imaging of nearby exoplanets.

  8. Persistent spread in seasonal albedo change radiative forcings linked to forest cover changes at northern latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, R. M.; Myhre, G.; Astrup, R. A.; Antón-Fernández, C.; Strømman, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale land use and land cover change (LULCC) can significantly affect regional climates from changes in surface biogeophysics, and a substantial part of historical LULCC from forest to crop or pasture occurred in the mid- and high-latitudes of North America and Eurasia where the snow-masking effect of forests often leads to a negative radiative forcing from albedo changes linked to deforestation. Results from several recent historical LULCC modeling studies, however, reveal an order of magnitude spread in climate forcing from the snow-masking effect by forests. This is likely because, in months with snow cover, the interactions between vegetation and snow significantly complicate the relationship between the change in forest cover fraction and albedo, thus accurate characterizations of land surface-albedo dynamics are essential given the importance of albedo feedbacks when ground or canopy surfaces are covered in snow Here, we evaluate snow masking parameterization schemes of seven prominent climate models in greater detail in order to pinpoint major sources of the persistent variability in albedo predictions across models. Using a comprehensive dataset of forest structure, meteorology, and daily MODIS albedo observations spanning three winter-spring seasons in three regions of boreal Norway, we estimate radiative forcings connected to canopy snow masking and compare it to the observed forcings. We develop a physically-based regression model and compare its performance to existing modeling schemes, concluding with a discussion on the utility of purely empirical parameterizations relative to those rooted in radiative transfer theory and/or process-based modeling.

  9. Global Cooling: Increasing World-Wide Urban Albedos to Offset CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2008-01-14

    Modification of urban albedos reduces summertime urban temperatures, resulting in a better urban air quality and building air-conditioning savings. Furthermore, increasing urban albedos has the added benefit of reflecting some of the incoming global solar radiation and countering to some extent the effects of global warming. In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). Using reflective materials, both roof and the pavement albedos can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60% (a U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills). On a global basis, our preliminary estimate is that increasing the world-wide albedos of urban roofs and paved surfaces will induce a negative radiative forcing on the earth equivalent to removing {approx} 22-40 Gt of CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. Since, 55% of the emitted CO{sub 2} remains in the atmosphere, removal of 22-40 Gt of CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere is equivalent to reducing global CO{sub 2} emissions by 40-73 Gt. At {approx} $25/tonne of CO{sub 2}, a 40-73 Gt CO{sub 2} emission reduction from changing the albedo of roofs and paved surfaces is worth about $1,000B to 1800B. These estimated savings are dependent on assumptions used in this study, but nevertheless demonstrate considerable benefits that may be obtained from cooler roofs and pavements.

  10. Quality assessment and improvement of the EUMETSAT Meteosat Surface Albedo Climate Data Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzio, A.; Fell, F.; Bennartz, R.; Trigo, I. F.; Schulz, J.

    2015-10-01

    Surface albedo has been identified as an important parameter for understanding and quantifying the Earth's radiation budget. EUMETSAT generated the Meteosat Surface Albedo (MSA) Climate Data Record (CDR) currently comprising up to 24 years (1982-2006) of continuous surface albedo coverage for large areas of the Earth. This CDR has been created within the Sustained, Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM) framework. The long-term consistency of the MSA CDR is high and meets the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) stability requirements for desert reference sites. The limitation in quality due to non-removed clouds by the embedded cloud screening procedure is the most relevant weakness in the retrieval process. A twofold strategy is applied to efficiently improve the cloud detection and removal. The first step consists of the application of a robust and reliable cloud mask, taking advantage of the information contained in the measurements of the infrared and visible bands. Due to the limited information available from old radiometers, some clouds can still remain undetected. A second step relies on a post-processing analysis of the albedo seasonal variation together with the usage of a background albedo map in order to detect and screen out such outliers. The usage of a reliable cloud mask has a double effect. It enhances the number of high-quality retrievals for tropical forest areas sensed under low view angles and removes the most frequently unrealistic retrievals on similar surfaces sensed under high view angles. As expected, the usage of a cloud mask has a negligible impact on desert areas where clear conditions dominate. The exploitation of the albedo seasonal variation for cloud removal has good potentialities but it needs to be carefully addressed. Nevertheless it is shown that the inclusion of cloud masking and removal strategy is a key point for the generation of the next MSA CDR release.

  11. Quality assessment and improvement of the EUMETSAT Meteosat Surface Albedo Climate Data Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lattanzio

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Surface albedo has been identified as an important parameter for understanding and quantifying the Earth's radiation budget. EUMETSAT generated the Meteosat Surface Albedo (MSA Climate Data Record (CDR currently comprising up to 24 years (1982–2006 of continuous surface albedo coverage for large areas of the Earth. This CDR has been created within the Sustained, Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM framework. The long-term consistency of the MSA CDR is high and meets the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS stability requirements for desert reference sites. The limitation in quality due to non-removed clouds by the embedded cloud screening procedure is the most relevant weakness in the retrieval process. A twofold strategy is applied to efficiently improve the cloud detection and removal. The first step consists of the application of a robust and reliable cloud mask, taking advantage of the information contained in the measurements of the infrared and visible bands. Due to the limited information available from old radiometers, some clouds can still remain undetected. A second step relies on a post-processing analysis of the albedo seasonal variation together with the usage of a background albedo map in order to detect and screen out such outliers. The usage of a reliable cloud mask has a double effect. It enhances the number of high-quality retrievals for tropical forest areas sensed under low view angles and removes the most frequently unrealistic retrievals on similar surfaces sensed under high view angles. As expected, the usage of a cloud mask has a negligible impact on desert areas where clear conditions dominate. The exploitation of the albedo seasonal variation for cloud removal has good potentialities but it needs to be carefully addressed. Nevertheless it is shown that the inclusion of cloud masking and removal strategy is a key point for the generation of the next MSA CDR release.

  12. Relationships between MODIS black-sky shortwave albedo and airborne lidar based forest canopy structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Lauri; Rautiainen, Miina; Arumäe, Tauri; Lang, Mait; Flewelling, James; Tokola, Timo; Stenberg, Pauline

    2016-04-01

    Albedo is one of the essential climate variables affecting the Earth's radiation balance. It is however not well understood how changes in forest canopy structure influence the albedo. Canopy structure can be mapped consistently for fairly large areas using airborne lidar sensors. Our objective was to study the relationships between MODIS shortwave black sky albedo product and lidar-based estimates of canopy structure in different biomes ranging from arctic to tropical. Our study is based on six structurally different forest sites located in Finland, Estonia, USA and Laos. Lidar-based mean height of the canopy, canopy cover and their transformations were used as predictor variables to describe the canopy structure. Tree species composition was also included for the three sites where it was available. We noticed that the variables predicting albedo best were different in open and closed canopy forests. In closed canopy forests, the species information was more important than canopy structure variables (R2=0.31-0.32) and using only structural variables resulted in poor R2 (0.13-0.15). If the 500 m MODIS pixel contained a mixture of forests and other land cover types, the albedo was strongly related to the forest area percent. In open canopy forests, structural variables such as canopy cover or height explained albedo well, but species information still improved the models (R2=0.27-0.52). We obtained the highest R2=0.52 using only structural variables in Laos on a partially degraded tropical forest with large variation in canopy cover. The different canopy structure variables were often correlated and the one that provided the best model changed from site to site.

  13. Quality assessment and improvement of the EUMETSAT Meteosat Surface Albedo Climate Data Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lattanzio

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface albedo has been identified as an important parameter for understanding and quantifying the Earth's radiation budget. EUMETSAT generated the Meteosat Surface Albedo (MSA Climate Data Record (CDR currently comprising up to 24 years (1982–2006 of continuous surface albedo coverage for large areas of the Earth. This CDR has been created within the Sustained and Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM framework. The long-term consistency of the MSA CDR is high and meets the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS stability requirements for desert reference sites. The limitation in quality due to non removed clouds by the embedded cloud screening procedure is the most relevant weakness in the retrieval process. A twofold strategy is applied to efficiently improve the cloud detection and removal. A first step consists on the application of a robust and reliable cloud mask taking advantage of the information contained in the measurements of the infrared and visible bands. Due to the limited information available from old radiometers some clouds can still remain undetected. A second step relies on a post processing analysis of the albedo seasonal variation together with the usage of a background albedo map in order to detect and screen out such outliers. The usage of a reliable cloud mask has a double effect. It enhances the number of high quality retrievals for tropical forest areas sensed under low view angles and removes the most frequently unrealistic retrievals on similar surfaces sensed under high view angles. As expected, the usage of a cloud mask has a negligible impact on desert areas where clear conditions dominate. The exploitation of the albedo seasonal variation for cloud removal has good potentialities but it needs to be carefully addressed. Nevertheless it is shown that the inclusion of cloud masking and removal strategy is a key point for the generation of the next MSA CDR Release.

  14. 77 FR 41993 - Privacy Act of 1974; Proposed New Routine Use-HUD's Routine Use Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-17

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Privacy Act of 1974; Proposed New Routine Use--HUD's Routine Use Inventory AGENCY... routine uses; and (3) reduce cost and duplication of effort in the publication and maintenance of HUD's.../DEPT-63 Secretary's Correspondence Control System. HUD/DEPT-64 Congregate Housing Services Program Data...

  15. Thermoluminescent behavior of diamond thin films exposed to ultraviolet radiation; Comportamiento termoluminiscente de peliculas delgadas de diamante expuestas a radiacion ultravioleta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza F, M.; Gastelum, S.; Melendrez, R.; Chernov, V.; Bernal, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Fisica de la Universidad de Sonora, Apdo. Postal 5-088, Hermosillo, Sonora, 83190 (Mexico); Cruz V, C.; Brown, F. [Departamento de Investigacion en Polimeros y Materiales de la Universidad de Sonora, Apdo. Postal 130, Hermosillo, Sonora, 83000 (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    In this work the thermoluminescent properties of diamond thin films are discussed which are grown up through the chemical vapor method exposed to ultraviolet radiation of 200-280 nm. The films with thickness 3, 6, 9, 12, 180 and 500 microns were grown up using a precursor gas formed of H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4}-CO excited through microwave energy or hot filament.The structure and morphology of the films were examined through scanning electron microscopy, indicating the formation of different diamond polycrystal structures which depend on the type of heating of the precursor gas used as well as the film dimensions. In general, the brilliance curve depends on the sample and the wavelength of the irradiation ultraviolet light, however it presents clearly thermoluminescence bands in 148, 160, 272, 304, 320 and 324 C degrees. The maximum of the thermoluminescence efficiency is obtained for the case of sample exposure with light of 214 nm. The sample of 500 microns is what exhibits greater thermoluminescent efficiency of those studied samples. The thermoluminescent behavior in function of radiation dose presents regions of linearity and supra linearity for higher and small doses respectively. The disappearance of the thermoluminescent signal depends on the characteristics of the film and it can reach until a 30 % of loss before to reach the stability. (Author)

  16. Re-Entrant Albedo Proton Fluxes Measured by the PAMELA Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; De Donato, C; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergé, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N

    2015-01-01

    We present a precise measurement of downward-going albedo proton fluxes for kinetic energy above $\\sim$ 70 MeV performed by the PAMELA experiment at an altitude between 350 and 610 km. On the basis of a trajectory tracing simulation, the analyzed protons were classified into quasi-trapped, concentrating in the magnetic equatorial region, and un-trapped spreading over all latitudes, including both short-lived (precipitating) and long-lived (pseudo-trapped) components. In addition, features of the penumbra region around the geomagnetic cutoff were investigated in detail. PAMELA results significantly improve the characterization of the high energy albedo proton populations at low Earth orbits.

  17. Opposition polarimetry and photometry of the low albedo asteroid 419 Aurelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belskaya, I. N.; Shevchenko, V. G.; Efimov, Yu. S.; Shakhovskoj, N. M.; Shkuratov, Yu. G.; Gaftonyuk, N. M.; Gil-Hutton, R.; Krugly, Yu. N.; Chiorny, V. G.

    2002-11-01

    Simultaneous photometric and polarimetric observations at small phase angles were carried out for the low albedo asteroid 419 Aurelia. Two interesting observational features were found: (1) a noticeable very narrow opposition surge in the asteroid magnitude phase curve at phase angles less than 0.6 deg; and (2) a decrease of both the depth and width of the negative polarization branch as compared to other dark asteroids with higher albedo. The significance of these results and their correspondence to available laboratory and theoretical studies are discussed.

  18. Impact of dust deposition on the albedo of Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Monika; Dorothea Groot Zwaaftink, Christine; Steffensen Schmidt, Louise; Guðmundsson, Sverrir; Pálsson, Finnur; Arnalds, Olafur; Björnsson, Helgi; Thorsteinsson, Throstur; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Deposition of small amounts of airborne dust on glaciers causes positive radiative forcing and enhanced melting due to the reduction of surface albedo. To study the effects of dust deposition on the mass balance of Brúarjökull, an outlet glacier of the largest ice cap in Iceland, Vatnajökull, a study of dust deposition events in the year 2012 was carried out. The dust-mobilisation module FLEXDUST was used to calculate spatio-temporally resolved dust emissions from Iceland and the dispersion model FLEXPART was used to simulate atmospheric dust dispersion and deposition. We used albedo measurements at two automatic weather stations on Brúarjökull to evaluate the dust impacts. Both stations are situated in the accumulation area of the glacier, but the lower station is close to the equilibrium line. For this site ( ˜ 1210 m a.s.l.), the dispersion model produced 10 major dust deposition events and a total annual deposition of 20.5 g m-2. At the station located higher on the glacier ( ˜ 1525 m a.s.l.), the model produced nine dust events, with one single event causing ˜ 5 g m-2 of dust deposition and a total deposition of ˜ 10 g m-2 yr-1. The main dust source was found to be the Dyngjusandur floodplain north of Vatnajökull; northerly winds prevailed 80 % of the time at the lower station when dust events occurred. In all of the simulated dust events, a corresponding albedo drop was observed at the weather stations. The influence of the dust on the albedo was estimated using the regional climate model HIRHAM5 to simulate the albedo of a clean glacier surface without dust. By comparing the measured albedo to the modelled albedo, we determine the influence of dust events on the snow albedo and the surface energy balance. We estimate that the dust deposition caused an additional 1.1 m w.e. (water equivalent) of snowmelt (or 42 % of the 2.8 m w.e. total melt) compared to a hypothetical clean glacier surface at the lower station, and 0.6 m w.e. more melt (or 38 % of

  19. Observation of iron-rich coating on lunar grains and a relation to low albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, T.; Bilson, E.; Baron, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The outermost few atomic layers of lunar soil samples were studied by Auger spectroscopy and were found to contain in each case two to three times more iron than the mean bulk composition of the sample. The amount of excess iron is found to be closely correlated with the optical albedo in the manner that would be theoretically expected if the iron provided absorption centers. Crushed lunar rocks of similar mean composition, but lacking the extra iron coating of the soil grains, have a much higher albedo than most lunar soils sampled or observed on the lunar surface.

  20. Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kušnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil

    2012-09-01

    We obtained estimates of the Johnson V absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) for 583 main-belt and near-Earth asteroids observed at Ondřejov and Table Mountain Observatory from 1978 to 2011. Uncertainties of the absolute magnitudes in our sample are estimates reported by asteroid surveys. With our photometric H and G data, we revised the preliminary WISE albedo estimates made by Masiero et al. (Masired, J.R. et al. [2011]. Astrophys. J. 741, 68-89) and Mainzer et al. (Mainzer, A. et al. [2011b]. Astrophys. J. 743, 156-172) for asteroids in our sample. We found that the mean geometric albedo of Tholen/Bus/DeMeo C/G/B/F/P/D types with sizes of 25-300 km is pV = 0.057 with the standard deviation (dispersion) of the sample of 0.013 and the mean albedo of S/A/L types with sizes 0.6-200 km is 0.197 with the standard deviation of the sample of 0.051. The standard errors of the mean albedos are 0.002 and 0.006, respectively; systematic observational or modeling errors can predominate over the quoted formal errors. There is apparent only a small, marginally significant difference of 0.031 ± 0.011 between the mean albedos of sub-samples of large and small (divided at diameter 25 km) S/A/L asteroids, with the smaller ones having a higher albedo. The difference will have to be confirmed and explained; we speculate that it may be either a real size dependence of surface properties of S type asteroids or a small size-dependent bias in the data (e.g., a bias towards higher albedos in the optically-selected sample of asteroids). A trend of the mean of the preliminary WISE albedo estimates increasing with asteroid size decreasing from D ∼ 30 down to ∼5 km (for S types) showed in Mainzer et al. (Mainzer, A. et al. [2011a]. Astrophys. J. 741, 90-114) appears to be mainly due to the systematic bias in the MPCORB absolute magnitudes that progressively increases with H in the corresponding range H = 10-14.