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Sample records for rough topography wave

  1. Scholte waves generated by seafloor topography

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Yingcai; Liu, Jing; Fehler, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Seafloor topography can excite strong interface waves called Scholte waves that are often dispersive and characterized by slow propagation but large amplitude. This type of wave can be used to invert for near seafloor shear wave velocity structure that is important information for multi-component P-S seismic imaging. Three different approaches are taken to understand excitation of Scholte waves and numerical aspects of modeling Scholte waves, including analytical Cagniard-de Hoop analysis, the boundary integral method and a staggered grid finite difference method. For simple media for which the Green's function can be easily computed, the boundary element method produces accurate results. The finite difference method shows strong numerical artifacts and stagnant artificial waves can be seen in the vicinity of topography at the fluid-solid interface even when using fine computational grids. However, the amplitude of these artificial waves decays away from the seafloor. It is sensible to place receivers away fr...

  2. Nonlinear surface waves over topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, T.T.

    2006-01-01

    As ocean surface waves radiate into shallow coastal areas and onto beaches, their lengths shorten, wave heights increase, and the wave shape transforms from nearsinusoidal to the characteristic saw-tooth shapes at the onset of breaking; in the ensuing breaking process the wave energy is cascaded to

  3. Interpretation of Lunar Topography: Impact Cratering and Surface Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenburg, Margaret A.

    This work seeks to understand past and present surface conditions on the Moon using two different but complementary approaches: topographic analysis using high-resolution elevation data from recent spacecraft missions and forward modeling of the dominant agent of lunar surface modification, impact cratering. The first investigation focuses on global surface roughness of the Moon, using a variety of statistical parameters to explore slopes at different scales and their relation to competing geological processes. We find that highlands topography behaves as a nearly self-similar fractal system on scales of order 100 meters, and there is a distinct change in this behavior above and below approximately 1 km. Chapter 2 focuses this analysis on two localized regions: the lunar south pole, including Shackleton crater, and the large mare-filled basins on the nearside of the Moon. In particular, we find that differential slope, a statistical measure of roughness related to the curvature of a topographic profile, is extremely useful in distinguishing between geologic units. Chapter 3 introduces a numerical model that simulates a cratered terrain by emplacing features of characteristic shape geometrically, allowing for tracking of both the topography and surviving rim fragments over time. The power spectral density of cratered terrains is estimated numerically from model results and benchmarked against a 1-dimensional analytic model. The power spectral slope is observed to vary predictably with the size-frequency distribution of craters, as well as the crater shape. The final chapter employs the rim-tracking feature of the cratered terrain model to analyze the evolving size-frequency distribution of craters under different criteria for identifying "visible" craters from surviving rim fragments. A geometric bias exists that systematically over counts large or small craters, depending on the rim fraction required to count a given feature as either visible or erased.

  4. Wave scattering from statistically rough surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bass, F G; ter Haar, D

    2013-01-01

    Wave Scattering from Statistically Rough Surfaces discusses the complications in radio physics and hydro-acoustics in relation to wave transmission under settings seen in nature. Some of the topics that are covered include radar and sonar, the effect of variations in topographic relief or ocean waves on the transmission of radio and sound waves, the reproduction of radio waves from the lower layers of the ionosphere, and the oscillations of signals within the earth-ionosphere waveguide. The book begins with some fundamental idea of wave transmission theory and the theory of random processes a

  5. Generation of Solitary Rossby Waves by Unstable Topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hong-Wei; YIN Bao-Shu; DONG Huan-He

    2012-01-01

    The effect of topography on generation of the solitary Rossby waves is researched. Here, the topography, as a forcing for waves generation, is taken as a function of longitude variable x and time variable t, which is called unstable topography. With the help of a perturbation expansion method, a forced mKdv equation governing the evolution of amplitude of the solitary Rossby waves is derived from quasi-geostrophic vortieity equation and is solved by the pseudo-spectral method. Basing on the waterfall plots, the generational features of the solitary Rossby waves under the influence of unstable topography and stable topography are compared and some conclusions are obtained.

  6. Interactions between roughness and topography in hydraulic models

    OpenAIRE

    Casas Planes, María Ángeles

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of river flow using hydraulic modelling and its implications in derived environ-mental applications are inextricably connected with the way in which the river boundary shape is represented. This relationship is scale-dependent upon the modelling resolution which in turn determines the importance of a subscale performance of the model and the way subscale (surface and flow) processes are parameterised. Commonly, the subscale behaviour of the model relies upon a roughness parameterisat...

  7. Characterization of Fault Roughness at Various Scales: Implications of Three-Dimensional High Resolution Topography Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Candela, Thibault; Bouchon, Michel; Marsan, David; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Voisin, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Accurate description of the topography of active faults surfaces represents an important geophysical issue because this topography is strongly related to the stress distribution along fault planes, and therefore to processes implicated in earthquake nucleation, propagation, and arrest. With the recent development of Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) apparatus, it is now possible to measure accurately the 3D topography of rough surfaces with a comparable resolution in all directions, both at field and laboratory scales. In the present study, we have investigated the scaling properties including possible anisotropy properties of several outcrops of two natural fault surfaces (Vuache strike-slip fault, France, and Magnola normal fault, Italy) in limestones.

  8. Rossby waves with linear topography in barotropic fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Rossby waves are the most important waves in the atmosphere and ocean, and are parts of a large-scale system in fluid. The theory and observation show that, they satisfy quasi-geostrophic and quasi-static equilibrium approximations. In this paper, solitary Rossby waves induced by linear topography in barotropic fluids with a shear flow are studied. In order to simplify the problem, the topography is taken as a linear function of latitude variable y, then employing a weakly nonlinear method and a perturbation method, a KdV (Korteweg-de Vries) equation describing evolution of the amplitude of solitary Rossby waves induced by linear topography is derived. The results show that the variation of linear topography can induce the solitary Rossby waves in barotropic fluids with a shear flow, and extend the classical geophysical theory of fluid dynamics.

  9. Topography-induced focusing of random waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, P.B.; Janssen, T.T.; Herbers, T.H.C.

    2012-01-01

    Refraction of narrow-band surface waves in coastal areas can result in wave-focal zones where due to interference, wave statistics vary rapidly and on similar length scales as those of individual waves. However such interference patterns, or wave coherence, are not accounted for in conventional stoc

  10. Determination of surface roughness and topography of dental resin-based nanocomposites using AFM analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainović, Tijana; Vilotić, Marko; Blažić, Larisa; Kakaš, Damir; Marković, Dubravka; Ivanišević, Aljoša

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine surface roughness and topography of polished dental resin-based nanocomposites. Four representative dental resin-based nanocomposites were tested in the study: two nanohybrids (Filtek Z550 and Tetric EvoCeram) and two nanofilled (Filtek Ultimate Body and Filtek Ultimate Translucent); and two reference materials: one microfilled (Gradia Direct) and one microhybrid (Filtek Z250). Polymerized cylindrical specimens (4 mm x 2 mm) were polished with multi-step polishing system- Super Snap. Immediately after the polishing, topography of each specimen was examined by Veeco di CP-II Atomic Force Microscope. Specimen's surface has been scanned in 6 points in contact mode with CONT20A-CP tips. 1 Hz scan rate and 256 × 256 resolution were used to obtain topography on a 90 µm × 90 µm scanning area. Measured topography data were processed by Image Processing and Data Analysis v2.1.15 software. Following parameters were compared among specimens: average roughness and maximum peak-to-valley distance. All of the tested materials had similar average surface roughness after finishing and polishing procedure. The lowest values occurred in the material Filtek Ultimate Body, and the highest in the Filtek Z550. When interpreting maximum peak-to-valley distance the larger differences in values (up to 100%) occurred in Filtek Z550, Filtek Z250 and Filtek Ultimate Body, which is a result of the deep polishing channels and tracks. Type, size, distribution of fillers and filler loading in tested materials, didn't influence average roughness values, but had an impact on maximum peak-to-valley distance values.

  11. Ocean and laboratory observations on waves over topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, F.P. A.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis addresses the observation, analysis and dynamics of waves as being trapped, generated and focused by sloping topography. ---Shelf waves with diurnal tidal frequency off Greenland--- Tidal analysis has been carried out on current measurements at a “cross-shelf” transect off Greenland at 7

  12. Approaches for Controlled Ag(+) Ion Release: Influence of Surface Topography, Roughness, and Bactericide Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhorukova, I V; Sheveyko, A N; Shvindina, N V; Denisenko, E A; Ignatov, S G; Shtansky, D V

    2017-02-01

    Silver is the most famous bactericidal element known from ancient times. Its antibacterial and antifungal effects are typically associated with the Ag ionization and concentration of Ag(+) ions in a bacterial culture. Herein we thoroughly studied the influence of surface topography and roughness on the rate of Ag(+) ion release. We considered two types of biocompatible and bioactive TiCaPCON-Ag films with 1 and 2 at. % of Ag and nine types of Ti surfaces with an average roughness varying in the range from 5.4 × 10(-2) to 12.6 μm and different topographic features obtained through polishing, sandblasting, laser treatment, and pulsed electrospark deposition. It is demonstrated that the Ag(+) ion release rates do not depend on the Ag content in the films as the main parameter, and it is other factors, such as the state of Ag agglomeration, surface topography and roughness, as well as kinetics of surface oxidation, that play a critical role. The obtained results clearly show a synergistic effect of the Ag content in the film and surface topography and roughness on Ag(+) ion release. By changing the surface topographical features at a constant content of bactericidal element, we showed that the Ag(+) ion release can be either accelerated by 2.5 times or almost completely suppressed. Despite low Ag(+) ion concentration in physiological solution (<40 ppb), samples with specially fabricated surface reliefs (flakes or holes) showed a pronounced antibacterial effect already after 3 h of immersion in E. coli bacterial culture. Thus, our results open up new possibilities for the production of cost-effective, scalable, and biologically safe implants with pronounced antibacterial characteristics for future applications in the orthopedic field.

  13. Effect of Streambed Roughness and Topography on the Solute Transport and Hyporheic Exchanges: Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaobing; Zhao, Jian; Chen, Li

    2013-04-01

    Hyporheic zones are critical for maintaining river ecosystem as they provide hyporheic and riparian organisms critical solutes, including nutrients and dissolved gases from bedforms to watershed scales. Among the hyporheic driving factors, the streambed topogaraphy is considered as a significant driving factor for hydraulic process in hyporheic zone that has been well documented in the past few decades. Previous research has implied that the rough streambed impact the flow resistance and continuously affect the hydraulic gradient between the river and the streambed. Recent research works focused more on the realistic pressure distribution along the bedform interface (eg. triangular-shaped sand dunes) on a macro level scale, while only few works related to the hyporheic exchanges induced by pore size scaled topography. How and to what extent that pore size scaled bedform would contribute to the total hyporheic discharge is still unclear. Indeed, the mesoscopic uneven topography can disturb the flow regime that near the water-sand interface, for example, it brings turbulent eddies and fluctuating pressure distribution along a rough gravel bed. In our study, a set of flume experiments were setup to examine the pore size roughness impacts on the solute transport and hyporheic exchanges in surface-subsurface system. Six kinds of riverbed sediments with median diameter range from 1.1 mm to 50.2 mm were chosen for comparative analyses. Also, three kinds of triangular shaped bedforms represented by the ratio α (=δ/?, δ is the amplitude and ? is the wavelength) with value of 0.125, 0.17 and 0.25 were considered as the macro-topography driver variation in our experiments. Our tests revealed that under a flat riverbed condition, the vertical diffusion is the main factor for the solute transport in hyporheic zone, however, the hyporheic exchange rate (represented by the decrease rate in concentration of surface water) is significantly enhanced as the growth of gravel grain

  14. A model for Faraday pilot-waves over variable topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Luiz

    2016-11-01

    In 2005 Yves Couder and co-workers discovered that droplets walking on a vibrating bath posses certain features previously thought to be exclusive to quantum systems. These millimetric droplets synchronize with their Faraday wavefield, creating a macroscopic pilot-wave system. In this talk we exploit the fact that the waves generated are nearly monochromatic and propose a hydrodynamic model capable of capturing the interaction between bouncing drops and a variable topography. We show that our model is able to reproduce some important experiments involving the drop-topography interaction, such as non-specular reflection and single-slit diffraction.

  15. A model for Faraday pilot waves over variable topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Luiz M.

    2017-01-01

    Couder and Fort discovered that droplets walking on a vibrating bath possess certain features previously thought to be exclusive to quantum systems. These millimetric droplets synchronize with their Faraday wavefield, creating a macroscopic pilot-wave system. In this paper we exploit the fact that the waves generated are nearly monochromatic and propose a hydrodynamic model capable of quantitatively capturing the interaction between bouncing drops and a variable topography. We show that our reduced model is able to reproduce some important experiments involving the drop-topography interaction, such as non-specular reflection and single-slit diffraction.

  16. Comparative investigation of optical techniques for topography measurement of rough plastic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Arlø, Uffe Rolf

    2003-01-01

    polypropylene parts manufactured by injection moulding. The mould was equipped with inserts with EDM machined surfaces (Sa  3.5 µm) in order to represent a typical tool surface for injection moulding. A focus detection laser scanning profiler, a confocal scanning laser microscope, a white light interferometer...... and, in addition, a scanning electron microscope, have been used in the analysis of plastic surfaces. This investigation has shown that topography assessment of rough plastic surfaces is critical to both white light interference microscope and confocal microscope while the focus detection laser...

  17. Comparative investigation of optical techniques for topography measurement of rough plastic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Arlø, Uffe Rolf

    2003-01-01

    polypropylene parts manufactured by injection moulding. The mould was equipped with inserts with EDM machined surfaces (Sa  3.5 µm) in order to represent a typical tool surface for injection moulding. A focus detection laser scanning profiler, a confocal scanning laser microscope, a white light interferometer...... and, in addition, a scanning electron microscope, have been used in the analysis of plastic surfaces. This investigation has shown that topography assessment of rough plastic surfaces is critical to both white light interference microscope and confocal microscope while the focus detection laser...

  18. Stresses in a submarine topography under ocean waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, C.C.; McTigue, D.F.

    1984-09-01

    The problem of submarine slope stability is of interest to both offshore engineering and geology. In an uneven topography, the weight above a horizontal plane induces two-dimensional variation in the static stress field. The action of wave pressure, which changes with depth, further introduces excess pore pressure and dynamic stresses in the sea bottom. In the present paper, we combine a simple analytical theory for the static stress by the present authors, and the recent solution by Mei and Foda for wave-induced stresses in a plane poro-elastic sea bed to account for mild bottom slope and wave shoaling, and obtain the effective stress field in a submarine topography under sea waves. Sample results are given for a ridge and a canyon. In particular, the dynamic pore pressure and the combined static and dynamic effective stresses are presented.

  19. Stresses in a submarine topography under ocean waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, C.C.; McTigue, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of submarine slope stability is of interest to both offshore engineering and geology. In an uneven topography, the weight above a horizontal plane induces two-dimensional variation in the static stress field. The action of wave pressure, which changes with depth, further introduces excess pore pressure and dynamic stresses in the sea bottom. In the present paper, we combine a simple analytical theory for the static stress by the present authors, and the recent solution by Mei and Foda for wave-induced stresses in a plane poro-elastic sea bed to account for mild bottom slope and wave shoaling, to obtain the effective stress field in a submarine topography under sea waves. Sample results are given for a ridge and a canyon. In particular the dynamic pore pressure and the combined static and dynamic effective stresses are presented. 10 references, 11 figures.

  20. Scattering of Rossby and Poincare waves off rough lateral boundaries

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Prahalad, Y.S.; Sengupta, D.

    be represented by an Ito-Wiener-Hermite series. To study the reflection of Rossby and Poincare waves from continental edges is used. The presence of new, roughness-generated trapped waves is predicted in both cases. An incoming Rossby wave is shown to transfer...

  1. Effect of Polishing Systems on Surface Roughness and Topography of Monolithic Zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, C L; Yap, Auj; Tan, Kbc; Fawzy, A S

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different chairside polishing systems on the surface roughness and topography of monolithic zirconia. Thirty-five monolithic zirconia specimens (Lava PLUS, 3M ESPE) were fabricated and divided into five groups of seven and polished with the following: Group 1 (WZ)-Dura white stone followed by Shofu zirconia polishing kit; Group 2 (SZ)-Shofu zirconia polishing kit; Group 3 (CE)-Ceramiste porcelain polishers; Group 4 (CM)-Ceramaster porcelain polishers; and Group 5 (KZ)-Komet ZR zirconia polishers. All specimens were ground with a fine-grit diamond bur prior to polishing procedures to simulate clinical finishing. Baseline and post-polishing profilometric readings were recorded and delta Ra values (difference in mean surface roughness before and after polishing) were computed and analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Scheffe post hoc test (ppolished specimens were acquired. Delta Ra values ranged from 0.146 for CE to 0.400 for KZ. Delta Ra values for KZ, WZ, and SZ were significantly greater than for CE. Significant differences in delta Ra values were also observed between KZ and CM. The SEM images obtained were consistent with the profilometric findings. Diamond-impregnated polishing systems were more effective than silica carbide-impregnated ones in reducing the surface roughness of ground monolithic zirconia.

  2. AFM Surface Roughness and Topography Analysis of Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pantić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is presenting AFM analysis of surface roughness of Lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max CAD under different finishing procedure (techniques: polishing, glazing and grinding. Lithium disilicate glass ceramics is all-ceramic dental system which is characterized by high aesthetic quality and it can be freely said that properties of material provide all prosthetic requirements: function, biocompatibility and aesthetic. Experimental tests of surface roughness were investigated on 4 samples with dimensions: 18 mm length, 14 mm width and 12 mm height. Contact surfaces of three samples were treated with different finishing procedure (polishing, glazing and grinding, and the contact surface of the raw material is investigated as a fourth sample. Experimental measurements were done using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM of NT-MDT manufacturers, in the contact mode. All obtained results of different prepared samples are presented in the form of specific roughness parameters (Rа, Rz, Rmax, Rq and 3D surface topography.

  3. High resolution ice thickness, bed topography, and roughness of a land terminating section of the western Greenland Ice Sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindback, K.; Pettersson, R.; Doyle, S. H.

    the spectral roughness. We see a strong correlation of low roughness values with the ice flow direction; this makes it important to assess the direction of the radar profiles in relation to the flow direction when calculating effective subglacial roughness for an area. Low roughness values and high surface......We present ice thickness and bed topography maps with high spatial resolution (250-500 m) of a large land terminating section of the western Greenland Ice Sheet. The maps cover the Isunnguata Sermia, Russell, and Leverett outlet glaciers and their catchment areas up to an elevation of ~1,700 m...... above sea level. The bed topography shows an intricate subglacial trough system, resembling the landscape in the proglacial area. We also calculate the hydraulic potential to get a proxy of the subglacial routing of water in the area. To analyse the geomorphological conditions of the bed, we calculated...

  4. Accurate source location from P waves scattered by surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.; Shen, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate source locations of earthquakes and other seismic events are fundamental in seismology. The location accuracy is limited by several factors, including velocity models, which are often poorly known. In contrast, surface topography, the largest velocity contrast in the Earth, is often precisely mapped at the seismic wavelength (> 100 m). In this study, we explore the use of P-coda waves generated by scattering at surface topography to obtain high-resolution locations of near-surface seismic events. The Pacific Northwest region is chosen as an example. The grid search method is combined with the 3D strain Green's tensor database type method to improve the search efficiency as well as the quality of hypocenter solution. The strain Green's tensor is calculated by the 3D collocated-grid finite difference method on curvilinear grids. Solutions in the search volume are then obtained based on the least-square misfit between the 'observed' and predicted P and P-coda waves. A 95% confidence interval of the solution is also provided as a posterior error estimation. We find that the scattered waves are mainly due to topography in comparison with random velocity heterogeneity characterized by the von Kάrmάn-type power spectral density function. When only P wave data is used, the 'best' solution is offset from the real source location mostly in the vertical direction. The incorporation of P coda significantly improves solution accuracy and reduces its uncertainty. The solution remains robust with a range of random noises in data, un-modeled random velocity heterogeneities, and uncertainties in moment tensors that we tested.

  5. Accurate source location from waves scattered by surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nian; Shen, Yang; Flinders, Ashton; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Accurate source locations of earthquakes and other seismic events are fundamental in seismology. The location accuracy is limited by several factors, including velocity models, which are often poorly known. In contrast, surface topography, the largest velocity contrast in the Earth, is often precisely mapped at the seismic wavelength (>100 m). In this study, we explore the use of P coda waves generated by scattering at surface topography to obtain high-resolution locations of near-surface seismic events. The Pacific Northwest region is chosen as an example to provide realistic topography. A grid search algorithm is combined with the 3-D strain Green's tensor database to improve search efficiency as well as the quality of hypocenter solutions. The strain Green's tensor is calculated using a 3-D collocated-grid finite difference method on curvilinear grids. Solutions in the search volume are obtained based on the least squares misfit between the "observed" and predicted P and P coda waves. The 95% confidence interval of the solution is provided as an a posteriori error estimation. For shallow events tested in the study, scattering is mainly due to topography in comparison with stochastic lateral velocity heterogeneity. The incorporation of P coda significantly improves solution accuracy and reduces solution uncertainty. The solution remains robust with wide ranges of random noises in data, unmodeled random velocity heterogeneities, and uncertainties in moment tensors. The method can be extended to locate pairs of sources in close proximity by differential waveforms using source-receiver reciprocity, further reducing errors caused by unmodeled velocity structures.

  6. Propagation of elastic waves in a plate with rough surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Shuwu; ZHANG Hailan

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of Lamb wave propagating in a solid plate with rough surfacesare studied on the basis of small perturbation approximation. The Rayleigh-Lamb frequencyequation expressed with SA matrix is presented. The Rayleigh-Lamb frequency equation fora rough surface plate is different from that for a smooth surface plate, resulting in a smallperturbation Ak on Lamb wave vector k. The imaginary part of Ak gives the attenuationcaused by wave scattering. An experiment is designed to test our theoretical predications.By using wedge-shape pipes, different Lamb wave modes are excited. The signals at differentpositions are received and analyzed to get the dispersion curves and attenuations of differentmodes. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical predications.

  7. Effects of topography and surface roughness in analyses of landscape structure –

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hoechstetter

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Topography and relief variability play a key role in ecosystem functioning and structuring. However, the most commonly used concept to relate pattern to process in landscape ecology, the so-called patch-corridor-matrix model, perceives the landscape as a planimetric surface. As a consequence, landscape metrics, used as numerical descriptors of the spatial arrangement of landscape mosaics, generally do not allow for the examination of terrain characteristics and may even produce erroneous results, especially in mountainous areas. This brief methodological study provides basic approaches to include relief properties into large-scale landscape analyses, including the calculation of standard landscape metrics on the basis of “true” surface geometries and the application of roughness parameters derived from surface metrology. The methods are tested for their explanatory power using neutral landscapes and simulated elevation models. The results reveal that area and distance metrics possess a high sensitivity to terrain complexity, while the values of shape metrics change only slightly when surface geometries are considered for their calculation. In summary, the proposed methods prove to be a valuable extension of the existing set of metrics mainly in “rough” landscape sections, allowing for a more realistic assessment of the spatial structure

  8. Wave-equation dispersion inversion of surface waves recorded on irregular topography

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2017-08-17

    Significant topographic variations will strongly influence the amplitudes and phases of propagating surface waves. Such effects should be taken into account, otherwise the S-velocity model inverted from the Rayleigh dispersion curves will contain significant inaccuracies. We now show that the recently developed wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD) method naturally takes into account the effects of topography to give accurate S-velocity tomograms. Application of topographic WD to demonstrates that WD can accurately invert dispersion curves from seismic data recorded over variable topography. We also apply this method to field data recorded on the crest of mountainous terrain and find with higher resolution than the standard WD tomogram.

  9. Influence of bottom topography roughness on the jet and inertial recirculation of a mid-latitude gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnier, Bernard; Le Provost, Christian

    1993-06-01

    Several numerical experiments are conducted to examine the influence of mesoscale, bottom topography roughness on the inertial circulation of a wind-driven, mid-latitude ocean gyre. The ocean model is based on the quasi-geostrophic formulation, and is eddy-resolving as it features high vertical and horizontal resolutions (six layers and a 10 km grid). An antisymmetrical double-gyre wind stress curl forces the baroclinic modes and generates a strong surface jet. In the case of a flat bottom, inertia and inverse energy cascade force the barotropic mode, and the resulting circulation features strong, barotropic, inertial gyres. The sea-floor roughness inhibits the inertial circulation in the deep layers; the barotropic component of the flow is then forced by eddy-topography interactions, and its energy concentrates at the scales of the topography. As a result, the baroclinicity of the flow is intesified: the barotropic mode is reduced with regard to the baroclinic modes, and the bottom flow (constrained by the mesoscale sea-floor roughness) is decoupled from the surface flow (forced by the gyre-scale wind). Rectified, mesoscale bottom circulation induces an interfacial form stress at the thermocline, which enhances horizontal shear instability and opposes the eastward penetration of the jet. The mean jet is consequently shortened, but the instantaneous jet remains very turbulent, with meanders of large meridional extent. The sea-floor roughness modifies the energy pathways, and the eddies have an even more important role in the establishment of the mean circulation: below the thermocline, rectification processes are dominant, and eddies transfer energy toward permanent mesoscale circulations strongly correlated with topography, whereas above the thermocline mean flow and eddy generation are influenced by the mean bottom circulation through interfacial stress. The topography modifies the vorticity of the barotropic and highest baroclinic modes. Vorticity accumulates at

  10. Evaluating the Surface Topography of Pyrolytic Carbon Finger Prostheses through Measurement of Various Roughness Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Naylor

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The articulating surfaces of four different sizes of unused pyrolytic carbon proximal interphalangeal prostheses (PIP were evaluated though measuring several topographical parameters using a white light interferometer: average roughness (Sa; root mean-square roughness (Sq; skewness (Ssk; and kurtosis (Sku. The radii of the articulating surfaces were measured using a coordinate measuring machine, and were found to be: 2.5, 3.3, 4.2 and 4.7 mm for proximal, and 4.0, 5.1, 5.6 and 6.3 mm for medial components. ANOVA was used to assess the relationship between the component radii and each roughness parameter. Sa, Sq and Ssk correlated negatively with radius (p = 0.001, 0.001, 0.023, whilst Sku correlated positively with radius (p = 0.03. Ergo, the surfaces with the largest radii possessed the better topographical characteristics: low roughness, negative skewness, high kurtosis. Conversely, the surfaces with the smallest radii had poorer topographical characteristics.

  11. Evaluating the Surface Topography of Pyrolytic Carbon Finger Prostheses through Measurement of Various Roughness Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Andrew; Talwalkar, Sumedh C; Trail, Ian A; Joyce, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    The articulating surfaces of four different sizes of unused pyrolytic carbon proximal interphalangeal prostheses (PIP) were evaluated though measuring several topographical parameters using a white light interferometer: average roughness (Sa); root mean-square roughness (Sq); skewness (Ssk); and kurtosis (Sku). The radii of the articulating surfaces were measured using a coordinate measuring machine, and were found to be: 2.5, 3.3, 4.2 and 4.7 mm for proximal, and 4.0, 5.1, 5.6 and 6.3 mm for medial components. ANOVA was used to assess the relationship between the component radii and each roughness parameter. Sa, Sq and Ssk correlated negatively with radius (p = 0.001, 0.001, 0.023), whilst Sku correlated positively with radius (p = 0.03). Ergo, the surfaces with the largest radii possessed the better topographical characteristics: low roughness, negative skewness, high kurtosis. Conversely, the surfaces with the smallest radii had poorer topographical characteristics.

  12. Deriving hydraulic roughness from camera-based high resolution topography in field and laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Neugirg, Fabian; Ebert, Louisa; Haas, Florian; Schmidt, Jürgen; Becht, Michael; Schindewolf, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    The hydraulic roughness, represented by Manning's n, is an essential input parameter in physically based soil erosion modeling. In order to acquire the roughness values for certain areas, on-site flow experiments have to be carried out. These results are influenced by the selection of the location of the test plot and are thereby based on the subjectiveness of the researchers. The study aims on the methodological development to acquire Manning's n by creating very high-resolution surface models with structure-from-motion approaches. Data acquisition took place during several field experiments in the Lainbach valley, southern Germany, and on agricultural sites in Saxony, eastern Germany, and in central Brazil. Rill and interrill conditions were simulated by flow experiments. In order to validate our findings stream velocity as an input for the manning equation was measured with coloured dye. Grain and aggregate sizes were derived by measuring distances from a best fit line to the reconstructed soil surface. Several diameters from D50 to D90 were tested with D90 showing best correlation between tracer experiments and photogrammetrically acquired data. A variety of roughness parameters were tested (standard deviation, random roughness, Garbrecht's n and D90). Best agreement in between the particle size and the hydraulic roughness was achieved with a non-linear sigmoid function and D90 rather than with the Garbrecht equation or statistical parameters. To consolidate these findings a laboratory setup was created to reproduce field data under controlled conditions, excluding unknown influences like infiltration and changes in surface morphology by erosion.

  13. Roughness-induced streaming in turbulent wave boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    -averaged streaming characteristics induced by bottom roughness variations are systematically assessed. The effects of variable roughness ratio, gradual roughness transitions, as well as changing flow orientation in plan are all considered. As part of the latter, roughness-induced secondary flows are predicted...

  14. Energy dissipation rate limits for flow through rough channels and tidal flow across topography

    CERN Document Server

    Kerswell, R R

    2016-01-01

    An upper bound on the energy dissipation rate per unit mass, $\\epsilon$, for pressure-driven flow through a channel with rough walls is derived for the first time. For large Reynolds numbers, $Re$, the bound - $\\epsilon \\,\\leq \\, c\\, U^3/h$ where $U$ is the mean flow through the channel, $h$ the channel height and $c$ a numerical prefactor - is independent of $Re$ (i.e. the viscosity) as in the smooth channel case but the numerical prefactor $c$, which is only a function of the surface heights and surface gradients (i.e. not higher derivatives), is increased. Crucially, this new bound captures the correct scaling law of what is observed in rough pipes and demonstrates that while a smooth pipe is a singular limit of the Navier-Stokes equations (data suggests $\\epsilon \\, \\sim \\, 1/(\\log Re)^2\\, U^3/h$ as $Re \\rightarrow \\infty$), it is a regular limit for current bounding techniques. As an application, the bound is extended to oscillatory flow to estimate the energy dissipation rate for tidal flow across botto...

  15. Quality factor due to roughness scattering of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves in nanoresonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this work we study the quality factor associated with dissipation due to scattering of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves by random self-affine roughness. It is shown that the quality factor is strongly influenced by both the surface roughness exponent H and the roughness amplitude w to late

  16. Study on the shadowing effect for optical wave scattering from randomly rough surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lixin Guo(郭立新); Yunhua Wang(王运华); Zhensen Wu(吴振森)

    2004-01-01

    Based on the Kirchhoff approximation for rough surface scattering and by calculating the shadowing function of the rough surface, the formula of the scattering cross section of the dielectric rough surface is presented with consideration of the shadowing effect for the optical wave incidence. It is obtained that in comparison with the conventional Kirchhoff solution, the shadowing effect should not be neglected for the optical wave scattering from the rough surface. The influence of the shadowing effect for different incidence angle, surface root mean square slope, and surface roughness on the scattering cross section is discussed in detail.

  17. Short wave stability of homogeneous shear flows with variable topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    窦华书; V. GANESH

    2014-01-01

    For the stability problem of homogeneous shear flows in sea straits of arbitrary cross section, a sufficient condition for stability is derived under the condition of inviscid flow. It is shown that there is a critical wave number, and if the wave number of a normal mode is greater than this critical wave number, the mode is stable.

  18. Effect of Two Polishing Systems on Surface Roughness, Topography, and Flexural Strength of a Monolithic Lithium Disilicate Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadibassir, Mahshid; Rezvani, Mohammad Bagher; Golzari, Hossein; Moravej Salehi, Elham; Fahimi, Mohammad Amin; Kharazi Fard, Mohammad Javad

    2017-03-08

    To evaluate the effect of overglazing and two polishing procedures on flexural strength and quality and quantity of surface roughness of a monolithic lithium disilicate ceramic computer-aided design (CAD) after grinding. This in vitro study was conducted on 52 partially crystalized bar-shaped specimens (16 × 4 × 1.6 mm) of monolithic lithium disilicate ceramic. The specimens were wet polished with 600-, 800-, and 1200-grit silicon carbide papers for 15 seconds using a grinding/polishing machine at a speed of 300 rpm. Then, the specimens were crystalized and glaze-fired in one step simultaneously and randomly divided into four groups of 13: (I) Glazing group (control); (II) Grinding-glazing group, subjected to grinding with red band finishing diamond bur (46 μm) followed by glazing; (III) Grinding-D+Z group, subjected to grinding and then polishing by coarse, medium, and fine diamond rubber points (D+Z); and (IV) Grinding-OptraFine group, subjected to grinding and then polishing with a two-step diamond rubber polishing system followed by a final polishing step with an OptraFine HP brush and diamond polishing paste. The surface roughness (Ra and Rz) values (μm) were measured by a profilometer, and the mean values were compared using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane's test (post hoc comparison). One specimen of each group was evaluated under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) for surface topography. The three-point flexural strength values of the bars were measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed and recorded. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane's test (α = 0.05). Statistically significant differences were noted among the experimental groups for Ra, Rz (p quality of roughness compared to glazing. The flexural strength of lithium disilicate ceramic after polishing with the OptraFine system was similar to that after glazing (p = 0.86). Despite similar surface roughness after polishing with the two systems, the D

  19. Steep waves in free-surface flow past narrow topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Stephen L.; Binder, Benjamin J.; Mattner, Trent W.; Denier, James P.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we compute steep forced solitary wave solutions for the problem of free-surface flow over a localised topographic disturbance in an otherwise flat horizontal channel bottom. A single forced solitary wave and a double-crested forced solitary wave solution are shown to exist, both of which approach the Stokes limiting configuration of an included angle of 12 0° and a stagnation point at the wave crests. The solution space for the topographically forced problem is compared to that found in Wade et al. ["On the free-surface flow of very steep forced solitary waves," J. Fluid Mech. 739, 1-21 (2014)], who considered forcing due to a localised distribution of pressure applied to the free surface. The main feature that differentiates the two types of forcing is an additional solution that exists in the pressure-forced problem, a steep wave with a cusp at a single wave crest. Our numerical results suggest that this cusped-wave solution does not exist in the topographically forced problem.

  20. Study of the relationship between non-dimensional roughness length and wave age, effected by wave directionality

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Naoya Suzuki; Naoto Ebuchi; Chaofang Zhao; Isao Watabe; Yasuhiro Sugimori

    2002-09-01

    Relationship between the non-dimensional roughness length and inverse of wave age has been discussed without consideration of wave directions, though wind wave field consists of various directional component waves. In this study we observe wave heights by an array of four wave gauges at the Hiratsuka Tower of (Independent Administrative Institution) National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED), Japan, and discuss the effect of wave directionality. As a result, the data sets were classified into two different groups according to the directional wave spectrum distribution. In case 1 only swell and wind waves exist and in case 2 there exist wave components from several directions. It is shown that the case of multiple- directional component waves (case 2) may affect the non-dimensional roughness length and friction velocity.

  1. A preliminary study on sea wave packet equations on slowly varying topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱首贤; 丁平兴; 孔亚珍; 沙文钰

    2001-01-01

    There is a common hypothesis for the presently popular mild-slope equations that wave particle motion is irrotational. In this paper, an attempt is made to abandon the irrotational assumption and to set up new sea wave packet equations on slowly varying topography by use of the WKBJ method. To simplify the deduction, the two-dimensional shallow water equations are used to describe the sea wave particle motion in the very shallow nearshore area. The established equations can give some characteristics of wave propagation near shore.

  2. Propagation of bottom-trapped waves over variable topography

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.

    wavelength can be. When the wavelength exceeds this critical value, the planetary beta-effect dominates over the topographic effect, and bottom-trapping is no more sustained. For k 2 and to which satisfy relations (12a and b), there are two solutions of k... theoretically a simple analog of the above situation. Our approach is as follows. A quasi-geostrophic model (second section) is used to construct solutions (third section) for bottom-trapped waves over an east-west topo- graphic slope (meant to mimic a...

  3. X-ray topography analysis of acoustic wave fields in the SAW-resonator structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry V; Roshchupkina, Helen D; Irzhak, Dmitry V

    2005-11-01

    The formation of fields of standing surface acoustic waves (SAW) in LiNbO3 and La3Ga5SiO14 (LGS) crystals was studied by high-resolution topography method on a laboratory X-ray source. The fields of standing SAW were formed using SAW-resonator structures consisting of interdigital transducer (IDT) and reflecting gratings. The SAW amplitudes and power flow angles were measured by X-ray topography, diffraction in acoustic beam was visualized, and the SAW interaction with the crystal structure defects was studied.

  4. Wave scattering by undulating bed topography in a two-layer ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P. MAITI; B. N. MANDAL; U. BASU

    2009-01-01

    The problem of wave scattering by undulating bed topography in a two-layer ocean is investigated on the basis of linear theory. In a two-layer fluid with the upper layer having a free surface, there exist two modes of waves propagating at both the free surface of the upper layer and the interface between the two layers. Due to a wave train of a particular mode incident on an obstacle which is bottom-standing on the lower layer, reflected and transmitted waves of both modes are created by the obstacle. For small undulations on the bottom of the lower layer, a perturbation method is employed to obtain first-order reflection and transmission coefficients of both modes for incident wave trains of again both modes in terms of integrals involving the bed-shape function. For sinusoidal undulations, numerical results are presented graphically to illustrate the energy transfer between the waves of different modes by the undulating bed.

  5. Wave scattering by a permeable barrier over undulating bed topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, A.; Martha, S. C.

    2016-06-01

    The scattering of surface water waves by bottom undulation in the presence of a permeable vertical barrier is investigated for its solution. A mixed boundary value problem (BVP) arises here in a natural way while examining this physical problem. Regular perturbation analysis is employed to determine the solution of the BVP. By utilizing this analysis the given BVP reduces to two different BVPs up to first order. The solution of the zeroth order BVP is obtained with the aid of eigenfunction expansion method in conjunction with least-squares approximation. The first order BVP is solved with the help of the Green's integral theorem and the physical quantities, namely the reflection and transmission coefficients, are obtained in the form of integrals which involve the bottom undulation and the solution of the zeroth order BVP. A particular form of the bottom undulation which closely resembles to some obstacles made by nature due to sedimentation and ripple growth of sand, is considered to evaluate these integrals. The variation of these coefficients is examined for different values of the porous effect parameter, barrier length, number of ripples and ripple amplitude.

  6. Classification of regimes of internal solitary waves transformation over a shelf-slope topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terletska, Kateryna; Maderich, Vladimir; Talipova, Tatiana; Brovchenko, Igor; Jung, Kyung Tae

    2015-04-01

    The internal waves shoal and dissipate as they cross abrupt changes of the topography in the coastal ocean, estuaries and in the enclosed water bodies. They can form near the coast internal bores propagating into the shallows and re-suspend seabed pollutants that may have serious ecological consequences. Internal solitary waves (ISW) with trapped core can transport masses of water and marine organisms for some distance. The transport of cold, low-oxygen waters results in nutrient pumping. These facts require development of classification of regimes of the ISWs transformation over a shelf-slope topography to recognize 'hot spots' of wave energy dissipation on the continental shelf. A new classification of regimes of internal solitary wave interaction with the shelf-slope topography in the framework of two-layer fluid is proposed. We introduce a new three-dimensional diagram based on parameters α ,β , γ. Here α is the nondimensional wave amplitude normalized on the thermocline thickness α = ain/h1 (α > 0), β is the blocking parameter introduced in (Talipova et al., 2013) that is the ratio of the height of the bottom layer on the the shelf step h2+ to the incident wave amplitude ain, β = h2+/ain (β > -3), and γ is the parameter inverse to the slope inclination (γ > 0.01). Two mechanisms are important during wave shoaling: (i) wave breaking resulting in mixing and (ii) changing of the polarity of the initial wave of depression on the slope. Range of the parameters at which wave breaking occurs can be defined using the criteria, obtained empirically (Vlasenko and Hutter, 2002). In the three-dimensional diagram this criteria is represented by the surface f1(β,γ) = 0 that separates the region of parameters where breaking takes place from the region without breaking. The polarity change surface f2(α,β) = 0 is obtained from the condition of equality of the depth of upper layer h1 to the depth of the lower layer h2. In the two-layer stratification waves of

  7. Plane-Wave Least-Squares Reverse Time Migration for Rugged Topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianping Huang; Chuang Li; Rongrong Wang; Qingyang Li

    2015-01-01

    We present a method based on least-squares reverse time migration with plane-wave encod-ing (P-LSRTM) for rugged topography. Instead of modifying the wave field before migration, we modify the plane-wave encoding function and fill constant velocity to the area above rugged topography in the model so that P-LSRTM can be directly performed from rugged surface in the way same to shot domain reverse time migration. In order to improve efficiency and reduce I/O (input/output) cost, the dynamic en-coding strategy and hybrid encoding strategy are implemented. Numerical test on SEG rugged topography model show that P-LSRTM can suppress migration artifacts in the migration image, and compensate am-plitude in the middle-deep part efficiently. Without data correction, P-LSRTM can produce a satisfying image of near-surface if we could get an accurate near-surface velocity model. Moreover, the pre-stack P-LSRTM is more robust than conventional RTM in the presence of migration velocity errors.

  8. A three dimensional Dirichlet-to-Neumann map for surface waves over topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbin, Andre; Andrade, David

    2016-11-01

    We consider three dimensional surface water waves in the potential theory regime. The bottom topography can have a quite general profile. In the case of linear waves the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator is formulated in a matrix decomposition form. Computational simulations illustrate the performance of the method. Two dimensional periodic bottom variations are considered in both the Bragg resonance regime as well as the rapidly varying (homogenized) regime. In the three-dimensional case we use the Luneburg lens-shaped submerged mound, which promotes the focusing of the underlying rays. FAPERJ Cientistas do Nosso Estado Grant 102917/2011 and ANP/PRH-32.

  9. Oblique wave transmission through rough impermeable rubble mound submerged breawaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanLishout, V.; Verhagen, H.J.; Troch, P.

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the application of submerged rubble mound breakwaters as coastal defence structures. As their defensive ability highly depends on the amount of wave energy remaining at their lee side, the accurate prediction of the energy in the lee of such structures is of utmost imp

  10. Oblique wave transmission through rough impermeable rubble mound submerged breakwaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanlishout, V.; Verhagen, H.J.; Troch, P.

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the application of submerged rubble mound breakwaters as coastal defence structures. As their defensive ability highly depends on the amount of wave energy remaining at their lee side, the accurate prediction of the energy in the lee of such structures is of utmost imp

  11. On the dependence of sea surface roughness on wind waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, H.K.; Højstrup, J.; Vested, H.J.;

    1998-01-01

    The influence of wind waves on the momentum transfer (wind stress) between the atmosphere and sea surface was studied using new measured data from the RASEX experiment and other datasets compiled by Donelan et al. Results of the data analysis indicate that errors in wind friction velocity u...

  12. A New Integro-Differential Equation for Rossby Solitary Waves with Topography Effect in Deep Rotational Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Yang

    2013-01-01

    solitary waves generated by topography, especially in the resonant case; a large amplitude nonstationary disturbance is generated in the forcing region. This condition may explain the blocking phenomenon which exists in the atmosphere and ocean and generated by topographic forcing.

  13. Study on the double transmission of ultrasonic waves through statistic rough surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ziqiang; CHEN Ligong; NI Chunzhen; WANG Yuwen

    2002-01-01

    A model evaluating the signal loss of the double transmitted acoustic beams through random rough surfaces was established based on the Fresnel approximation and phasescreen approximation. A simple analytical solution was achieved using the exponential substitution approach to remove the nonlinear integral terms. The factors that affect the signal of double transmissions from random rough surfaces were analyzed. The research results demonstrated that the signal loss is not only related to the root-mean-squire height of the roughness,but also to the distance of wave traveling in the materials. The model can be very helpful for improving the reliability of NDT (Non-Destructive Testing).

  14. Transformation and disintegration of strongly nonlinear internal waves by topography in stratified lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Vlasenko

    Full Text Available For many lakes the nonlinear transfer of energy from basin-scale internal waves to short-period motions, such as solitary internal waves (SIW and wave trains, their successive interaction with lake boundaries, as well as over-turning and breaking are important mechanisms for an enhanced mixing of the turbulent benthic boundary layer. In the present paper, the evolution of plane SIWs in a variable depth channel, typical of a lake of variable depth, is considered, with the basis being the Reynolds equations. The vertical fluid stratification, wave amplitudes and bottom parameters are taken close to those observed in Lake Constance, a typical mountain lake. The problem is solved numerically. Three different scenarios of a wave evolution over variable bottom topography are examined. It is found that the basic parameter controlling the mechanism of wave evolution is the ratio of the wave amplitude to the distance from the metalimnion to the bottom d. At sites with a gentle sloping bottom, where d is small, propagating (weak or strong internal waves adjust to the local ambient conditions and preserve their form. No secondary waves or wave trains arise during wave propagation from the deep part to the shallow water. If the amplitude of the propagating waves is comparable with the distance between the metalimnion and the top of the underwater obstacle ( d ~ 1, nonlinear dispersion plays a key role. A wave approaching the bottom feature splits into a sequence of secondary waves (solitary internal waves and an attached oscillating wave tail. The energy of the SIWs above the underwater obstacle is transmitted in parts from the first baroclinic mode, to the higher modes. Most crucially, when the internal wave propagates from the deep part of a basin to the shallow boundary, a breaking event can arise. The cumulative effects of the nonlinearity lead to a steepening and

  15. Measurement of corneal topography through Hartmann-Shack wave-front sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinsheng; Rao, Xuejun; Rao, Changhui

    2008-12-01

    A corneal topography based on Hartmann-Shack Sensor is presented in this paper. In the system, the focus of an objective lens is precisely positioned on cornea's curve center. Wave-front of the reflecting beam can be measured by the Hartmann-Shack sensor which is conjugate to the cornea plane. If the corneal surface is a perfect sphere, wave-front detected by the Hartmann-Shack sensor is a plane. As a result, data measured by Hartmann-Shacks sensor is the deviation between the sphere and the real cornea surface. This paper describes a methodology for designing instrument based on Hartmann-Shack sensor. Then, applying this method, an instrument is developed for accurate measurement of corneal topography. In addition, measuring principle of Hartmann-Shack sensor which determined system parameters is also introduced. Repeatability is demonstrated by a series of data. The instrument was able to accurately measure simulative cornea's reflective aberrations, from which corneal topography and corneal refractive aberrations were derived.

  16. Dispersion Relation of a Surface Wave at a Rough Metal-Air Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Kotelnikov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    We derived a dispersion relation of a surface wave at a rough metal-air interface. In contrast to previous publications, we assumed that an intrinsic surface impedance due to a finite electric conductivity of the metal can be of the same order as the roughness-induced impedance. We then applied our results to the analysis of a long-standing problem of the discrepancy between the experimental data on the propagation of surface waves in the terahertz range of frequencies and the classical Drude theory.

  17. Scattering of high-frequency seismic waves caused by irregular surface topography and small-scale velocity inhomogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Shunsuke; Furumura, Takashi; Maeda, Takuto

    2015-04-01

    Based on 3-D finite difference method simulations of seismic wave propagation, we examined the processes by which the complex, scattered high-frequency (f > 1 Hz) seismic wavefield during crustal earthquakes is developed due to heterogeneous structure, which includes small-scale velocity inhomogeneity in subsurface structure and irregular surface topography on the surface, and compared with observations from dense seismic networks in southwestern Japan. The simulations showed the process by which seismic wave scattering in the heterogeneous structure develops long-duration coda waves and distorts the P-wave polarization and apparent S-wave radiation pattern. The simulations revealed that scattering due to irregular topography is significant only near the station and thus the topographic scattering effects do not accumulate as seismic waves propagate over long distances. On the other hand, scattering due to velocity inhomogeneity in the subsurface structure distorts the seismic wavefield gradually as seismic waves propagate. The composite model, including both irregular topography and velocity inhomogeneity, showed the combined effects. Furthermore, by introducing irregular topography, the effects of seismic wave scattering on both body and coda waves were stronger than in the model with velocity inhomogeneity alone. Therefore, to model the high-frequency seismic wavefield, both topography and velocity inhomogeneity in the subsurface structure should be taken into account in the simulation model. By comparing observations with the simulations including topography, we determined that the most preferable small-scale velocity heterogeneity model for southwestern Japan is characterized by the von Kármán power spectral density function with correlation distance a = 5 km, rms value of fluctuation ɛ = 0.07 and decay order κ = 0.5. We also demonstrated that the relative contribution of scattering due to the topography of southwestern Japan is approximately 12 per cent.

  18. Interaction of a mode-2 internal solitary wave with narrow isolated topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepwell, David; Stastna, Marek; Carr, Magda; Davies, Peter A.

    2017-07-01

    Numerical and experimental studies of the transit of a mode-2 internal solitary wave over an isolated ridge are presented. All studies used a quasi-two-layer fluid with a pycnocline centred at the mid-depth. The wave amplitude and total fluid depth were both varied, while the topography remained fixed. The strength of the interaction between the internal solitary waves and the hill was found to be characterized by three regimes: weak, moderate, and strong interactions. The weak interaction exhibited negligible wave modulation and bottom surface stress. The moderate interaction generated weak and persistent vorticity in the lower layer, in addition to negligible wave modulation. The strong interaction clearly showed material from the trapped core of the mode-2 wave extracted in the form of a thin filament while generating a strong vortex at the hill. A criterion for the strength of the interaction was found by non-dimensionalizing the wave amplitude by the lower layer depth, a /ℓ . A passive tracer was used to measure the conditions for resuspension of boundary material due to the interaction. The speed and prevalence of cross boundary layer transport increased with a /ℓ .

  19. Wave-driven Hydrodynamics for Different Reef Geometries and Roughness Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, G. L.; Marino-Tapia, I.; Torres-Freyermuth, A.

    2013-05-01

    In fringing reef systems where a shallow lagoon is present behind the reef crest, wave breaking appears to dominate circulation, controlling numerous key processes such as the transport and dispersion of larvae, nutrients and sediments. Despite their importance, there is a need for more detailed knowledge on the hydrodynamic processes that take place within the surf zone of these systems and the effects different combinations of geometries and roughness have on them. The present study focuses on the use of two-dimensional (2DV) numerical model simulations and data obtained during a field campaign in Puerto Morelos, Quintana Roo, Mexico to better understand the detailed surf zone processes that occur over a fringing reef. The model used is Cornell Breaking Wave and Structures (COBRAS), which solves Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. Reef geometries implemented in the model include a reef flat and two different reef crests. The effect of roughness on wave setup, radiation stress, mean flows, and cross-shore spectral evolution for the model results was studied using different roughness coefficients (Nikuradse) and a bathymetric profile obtained in the field using the bottom track option of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler. Field data were also analysed for the configuration and roughness of Puerto Morelos. Model results reveal that for all profiles wave setup increased significantly (~22%) with increasing bed roughness, in agreement with previous findings for sandy beaches.For all wave heights and periods studied, increasing roughness also affected spectral wave evolution across the reef, with a significant reduction in energy, particularly at infragravity frequencies. The presence of a reef crest in the profile resulted in differences in behaviour at infragravity frequencies. For example, preliminary results suggest that there is a shift towards higher frequencies as waves progress into the lagoon when a crest is present, something that does not

  20. Individual IOL Surface Topography Analysis by the WaveMaster Reflex UV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Kannengießer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In order to establish inspection routines for individual intraocular lenses (IOLs, their surfaces have to be measured separately. Currently available measurement devices lack this functionality. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new topography measurement device based on wavefront analysis for measuring individual regular and freeform IOL surfaces, the “WaveMaster Reflex UV” (Trioptics, Wedel, Germany. Methods. Measurements were performed on IOLs with increasingly complex surface geometries: spherical surfaces, surfaces modelled by higher-order Zernike terms, and freeform surfaces from biometrical patient data. Two independent parameters were measured: the sample’s radius of curvature (ROC and its residual (difference of sample topography and its best-fit sphere. We used a quantitative analysis method by calculating the residuals’ root-mean-square (RMS and peak-to-Valley (P2V values. Results. The sample’s best-fit ROC differences increased with the sample’s complexity. The sample’s differences of RMS values were 80 nm for spherical surfaces, 97 nm for higher-order samples, and 21 nm for freeform surfaces. Graphical representations of both measurement and design topographies were recorded and compared. Conclusion. The measurements of spherical surfaces expectedly resulted in better values than those of freeform surfaces. Overall, the wavefront analysing method proves to be an effective method for evaluating individual IOL surfaces.

  1. Probability Density Function for Waves Propagating in a Straight PEC Rough Wall Tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pao, H

    2004-11-08

    The probability density function for wave propagating in a straight perfect electrical conductor (PEC) rough wall tunnel is deduced from the mathematical models of the random electromagnetic fields. The field propagating in caves or tunnels is a complex-valued Gaussian random processing by the Central Limit Theorem. The probability density function for single modal field amplitude in such structure is Ricean. Since both expected value and standard deviation of this field depend only on radial position, the probability density function, which gives what is the power distribution, is a radially dependent function. The radio channel places fundamental limitations on the performance of wireless communication systems in tunnels and caves. The transmission path between the transmitter and receiver can vary from a simple direct line of sight to one that is severely obstructed by rough walls and corners. Unlike wired channels that are stationary and predictable, radio channels can be extremely random and difficult to analyze. In fact, modeling the radio channel has historically been one of the more challenging parts of any radio system design; this is often done using statistical methods. In this contribution, we present the most important statistic property, the field probability density function, of wave propagating in a straight PEC rough wall tunnel. This work only studies the simplest case--PEC boundary which is not the real world but the methods and conclusions developed herein are applicable to real world problems which the boundary is dielectric. The mechanisms behind electromagnetic wave propagation in caves or tunnels are diverse, but can generally be attributed to reflection, diffraction, and scattering. Because of the multiple reflections from rough walls, the electromagnetic waves travel along different paths of varying lengths. The interactions between these waves cause multipath fading at any location, and the strengths of the waves decrease as the distance

  2. Numerical Simulation of Non-Linear Wave Propagation in Waters of Mildly Varying Topography with Complicated Boundary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洪生; 洪广文; 丁平兴; 曹振轶

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristics of different forms of mild slope equations for non-linear wave are analyzed, and new non-linear theoretic models for wave propagation are presented, with non-linear terms added to the mild slope equations for non-stationary linear waves and dissipative effects considered. Numerical simulation models are developed of non-linear wave propagation for waters of mildly varying topography with complicated boundary, and the effects are studied of different non-linear corrections on calculation results of extended mild slope equations. Systematical numerical simulation tests show that the present models can effectively reflect non-linear effects.

  3. Constraints on the Small Scale Heterogeneity in D" from Precursors to Short Distance PcP Wave and Implication for Roughness of Core-Mantle Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, S.; Zhang, B.

    2016-12-01

    Volumetric heterogeneity in D" layer and topography variation of the Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) are well established on large scales (thousand kms) to intermediate scales with seismological approaches. However, there are controversies regarding the level of heterogeneity in D" layer at small scales ( a few km - 10 km), with lower bound estimate of 0.1% to a few percent. And there are very limited reports of small scale topography of CMB. We take advantage of the small amplitude PcP waves at near podal distances (0-10 degree), and use the ratio of short period (1 Hz) PcP and its precursors to constrain level of small scale heterogeneity in the D" layer. We computed short period synthetic seismograms with 2D finite code for a series of volumetric heterogeneity models in the crust and in D", and find that PcP is not observable if the heterogeneity in D" is above 2%. We will present evidences of clearly observed PcP at short distances and argue for weak small scale heterogeneity in D". Assuming topography of CMB is related to isostasy, the volumetric heterogeneity in D" can be used to estimate CMB roughness.

  4. ON THE RESONANT GENERATION OF WEAKLY NONLINEAR STOKES WAVES IN REGIONS WITH FAST VARYING TOPOGRAPHY AND FREE SURFACE CURRENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄虎; 周锡礽

    2001-01-01

    The effect of nonlinearity on the free surface wave resonated by an incident flow over rippled beds, which consist of fast varying topography superimposed on an otherwise slowly varying mean depth, is studied using a WKBJ-type perturbation approach. Synchronous, superharmonic and in particular subharmonic resonance were selectively excited over the fast varying topography with corresponding wavelengths. For a steady current the dynamical system is autonomous and the possible nonlinear steady states and their stability were investigated. When the current has a small oscillatory component the dynamical system becomes non-autonomous, chaos is now possible.

  5. Diagnostics of elastic properties of a planar interface between two rough media using surface acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokshaiskii, A. I.; Korobov, A. I.; Shirgina, N. V.

    2017-03-01

    The results of experimental studies on the nonlinear elastic properties of a planar interface between two media are presented—an optically polished glass substrate and flat samples with different degrees of roughness. The nonlinear elastic properties of the interfaces between two media were investigated by the spectral method using surface acoustic waves (SAWs). The effect of external pressure applied to the interface on the efficiency of the generation of the second SAW harmonic was studied. Using the measured amplitudes of the first and second harmonics of the SAW that passes along the interface, the second-order nonlinear acoustic parameter was calculated as a function of the external pressure applied to the sample at a fixed amplitude of a probing wave. It was revealed that the nonlinear parameter of the SAW is a nonmonotonic function of the pressure at the boundary. The results were analyzed on the basis of an elastic contact nonlinearity, and it is concluded that these results can be used in nondestructive testing for roughness and waviness of surfaces of flat solids.

  6. Forced ILW-Burgers Equation as a Model for Rossby Solitary Waves Generated by Topography in Finite Depth Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an investigation of the generation, evolution of Rossby solitary waves generated by topography in finite depth fluids. The forced ILW- (Intermediate Long Waves- Burgers equation as a model governing the amplitude of solitary waves is first derived and shown to reduce to the KdV- (Korteweg-de Vries- Burgers equation in shallow fluids and BO- (Benjamin-Ono- Burgers equation in deep fluids. By analysis and calculation, the perturbation solution and some conservation relations of the ILW-Burgers equation are obtained. Finally, with the help of pseudospectral method, the numerical solutions of the forced ILW-Burgers equation are given. The results demonstrate that the detuning parameter α holds important implications for the generation of the solitary waves. By comparing with the solitary waves governed by ILW-Burgers equation and BO-Burgers equation, we can conclude that the solitary waves generated by topography in finite depth fluids are different from that in deep fluids.

  7. Oblique wave scattering by a semi-infinite elastic plate with finite draft floating on a step topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yunxia; LIU Yong; MENG Xun

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of a potential theory and Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, an analytical solution for oblique wave scattering by a semi-infinite elastic plate with finite draft floating on a step topography is developed using matched eigenfunction expansions. Different from previous studies, the effects of a wave incident angle, a plate draft, three different plate edge conditions (free, simply supported and built-in) and a sea-bottom topography are all taken into account. Moreover, the plate edge conditions are directly incorporated into linear algebraic equations for determining unknown expansion coefficients in velocity potentials, which leads to a simple and efficient solving procedure. Numerical results show that the convergence of the present solution is good, and an energy conservation relation is well satisfied. Also, the present predictions are in good agreement with known results for special cases. The effects of the wave incident angle, the plate draft, the plate edge conditions and the sea-bottom topography on various hydrodynamic quantities are analyzed. Some useful results are presented for engineering designs.

  8. Water-waves modes trapped in a canal by a body with the rough surface

    CERN Document Server

    Cardone, G; Nazarov, S A

    2009-01-01

    The problem about a body in a three dimensional infinite channel is considered in the framework of the theory of linear water-waves. The body has a rough surface characterized by a small parameter $\\epsilon>0$ while the distance of the body to the water surface is also of order $\\epsilon$. Under a certain symmetry assumption, the accumulation effect for trapped mode frequencies is established, namely, it is proved that, for any given $d>0$ and integer $N>0$, there exists $\\epsilon(d,N)>0$ such that the problem has at least $N$ eigenvalues in the interval $(0,d)$ of the continuous spectrum in the case $\\epsilon\\in(0,\\epsilon(d,N)) $. The corresponding eigenfunctions decay exponentially at infinity, have finite energy, and imply trapped modes.

  9. Connections Between the Spring Breakup of the Southern Hemisphere Polar Vortex, Stationary Waves, and Air-sea Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkel, Chaim I.; Oman, Luke David; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Hurwitz, Margaret H.; Molod, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    A robust connection between the drag on surface-layer winds and the stratospheric circulation is demonstrated in NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOSCCM). Specifically, an updated parameterization of roughness at the air-sea interface, in which surface roughness is increased for moderate wind speeds (4ms to 20ms), leads to a decrease in model biases in Southern Hemispheric ozone, polar cap temperature, stationary wave heat flux, and springtime vortex breakup. A dynamical mechanism is proposed whereby increased surface roughness leads to improved stationary waves. Increased surface roughness leads to anomalous eddy momentum flux convergence primarily in the Indian Ocean sector (where eddies are strongest climatologically) in September and October. The localization of the eddy momentum flux convergence anomaly in the Indian Ocean sector leads to a zonally asymmetric reduction in zonal wind and, by geostrophy, to a wavenumber-1 stationary wave pattern. This tropospheric stationary wave pattern leads to enhanced upwards wave activity entering the stratosphere. The net effect is an improved Southern Hemisphere vortex: the vortex breaks up earlier in spring (i.e., the spring late-breakup bias is partially ameliorated) yet is no weaker in mid-winter. More than half of the stratospheric biases appear to be related to the surface wind speed biases. As many other chemistry climate models use a similar scheme for their surface layer momentum exchange and have similar biases in the stratosphere, we expect that results from GEOSCCM may be relevant for other climate models.

  10. Analysis of pupil and corneal wave aberration data supplied by the SN CT 1000 topography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comastri, S. A.; Martin, G.; Pfortner, T.

    2006-11-01

    Ocular aberrations depend on pupil size and centring and the retinal image quality under natural conditions differs from that corresponding to laboratory ones. In the present article, pupil and wave aberration data supplied by the Shin Nippon CT 1000 (SN CT 1000) topography system are analysed. Two groups of eyes under natural viewing conditions are considered ((260+/-20) lux at the eye under study). The first group consists of 10 normal eyes (-1.25 to 3 D sphere; 0 to -1.75 D cylinder) of five young subjects (age between 18 and 33 years). For this group, five determinations per eye are performed and the repeatability of results is analysed. Pupil centre is displaced from corneal vertex towards the temporal region, the largest displacement being (0.5+/-0.1) mm. The variation of pupil diameter in each eye is less than 21% while the inter-subject variability is large since diameters are between (3+/-0.3) and (5.3+/-0.6) mm. Aberrations are evaluated for two different pupil sizes, the natural one and a fictitious one of 6 mm. The corneal higher-order root-mean square wavefront error (RMSHO) for a 6 mm pupil centred in the corneal vertex, averaged across all eyes, is (0.37+/-0.06) [mu]m while, considering the natural pupil diameter, the average in each eye is significantly lower, up to eight times smaller. The fourth-order spherical aberration is an important aberration in the considered eyes, its maximum value for a 6 mm pupil being (0.38+/-0.02) [mu]m. The second group consists of 24 eyes of 12 subjects (age between 25 and 68 years) such that four eyes are of normal adults (1.25 to +6 D sphere; 0 to -0.5 D cylinder), eight have astigmatisms (-5.5 to +3.25 D sphere; -1.5 to -4.5 D cylinder), six have post-refractive surgery (+0.5 to +3.5 D sphere; -0.5 to -4 D cylinder) and six have keratoconus (-9.5 to +1 D sphere; -1 to -4.5 D cylinder). For this group only one determination per eye is performed. Pupil centre is displaced from corneal vertex towards the temporal

  11. Estimating hydrodynamic roughness in a wave-dominated environment with a high-resolution acoustic Doppler profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, J.R.; Sherwood, C.R.; Wilson, D.J.; Chisholm, T.A.; Gelfenbaum, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrodynamic roughness is a critical parameter for characterizing bottom drag in boundary layers, and it varies both spatially and temporally due to variation in grain size, bedforms, and saltating sediment. In this paper we investigate temporal variability in hydrodynamic roughness using velocity profiles in the bottom boundary layer measured with a high-resolution acoustic Doppler profiler (PCADP). The data were collected on the ebb-tidal delta off Grays Harbor, Washington, in a mean water depth of 9 m. Significant wave height ranged from 0.5 to 3 m. Bottom roughness has rarely been determined from hydrodynamic measurements under conditions such as these, where energetic waves and medium-to-fine sand produce small bedforms. Friction velocity due to current u*c and apparent bottom roughness z0a were determined from the PCADP burst mean velocity profiles using the law of the wall. Bottom roughness kB was estimated by applying the Grant-Madsen model for wave-current interaction iteratively until the model u*c converged with values determined from the data. The resulting kB values ranged over 3 orders of magnitude (10-1 to 10-4 m) and varied inversely with wave orbital diameter. This range of kB influences predicted bottom shear stress considerably, suggesting that the use of time-varying bottom roughness could significantly improve the accuracy of sediment transport models. Bedform height was estimated from kB and is consistent with both ripple heights predicted by empirical models and bedforms in sonar images collected during the experiment. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Coherent light scattering of heterogeneous randomly rough films and effective medium in the theory of electromagnetic wave multiple scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berginc, G.

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a general formalism based on Green's functions to calculate the coherent electromagnetic field scattered by a random medium with rough boundaries. The approximate expression derived makes it possible to determine the effective permittivity, which is generalised for a layer of an inhomogeneous random medium with different types of particles and bounded with randomly rough interfaces. This effective permittivity describes the coherent propagation of an electromagnetic wave in a random medium with randomly rough boundaries. We have obtained an expression, which contains the Maxwell - Garnett formula at the low-frequency limit, and the Keller formula; the latter has been proved to be in good agreement with experiments for particles whose dimensions are larger than a wavelength.

  13. Coupling of WRF meteorological model to WAM spectral wave model through sea surface roughness at the Balearic Sea: impact on wind and wave forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosana-Delgado, R.; Soret, A.; Jorba, O.; Baldasano, J. M.; Sánchez-Arcilla, A.

    2012-04-01

    Meteorological models, like WRF, usually describe the earth surface characteristics by tables that are function of land-use. The roughness length (z0) is an example of such approach. However, over sea z0 is modeled by the Charnock (1955) relation, linking the surface friction velocity u*2 with the roughness length z0 of turbulent air flow, z0 = α-u2* g The Charnock coefficient α may be considered a measure of roughness. For the sea surface, WRF considers a constant roughness α = 0.0185. However, there is evidence that sea surface roughness should depend on wave energy (Donelan, 1982). Spectral wave models like WAM, model the evolution and propagation of wave energy as a function of wind, and include a richer sea surface roughness description. Coupling WRF and WAM is thus a common way to improve the sea surface roughness description of WRF. WAM is a third generation wave model, solving the equation of advection of wave energy subject to input/output terms of: wind growth, energy dissipation and resonant non-linear wave-wave interactions. Third generation models work on the spectral domain. WAM considers the Charnock coefficient α a complex yet known function of the total wind input term, which depends on the wind velocity and on the Charnock coefficient again. This is solved iteratively (Janssen et al., 1990). Coupling of meteorological and wave models through a common Charnock coefficient is operationally done in medium-range met forecasting systems (e.g., at ECMWF) though the impact of coupling for smaller domains is not yet clearly assessed (Warner et al, 2010). It is unclear to which extent the additional effort of coupling improves the local wind and wave fields, in comparison to the effects of other factors, like e.g. a better bathymetry and relief resolution, or a better circulation information which might have its influence on local-scale meteorological processes (local wind jets, local convection, daily marine wind regimes, etc.). This work, within the

  14. Effects of Topography and Current on Horizontal Irrotational Waves in Shallow Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙明光; 高虎山

    2000-01-01

    Based on the Boussinesq assumption, derived are couple equations of free surface elevation and horizontal velocities for horizontal irrotational flow, and analytical expressions of the corresponding pressure and vertical velocity. After the free surface elevation and horizontal velocity at a certain depth are obtained by numerical method, the pressure and vertical velocity distributions can be obtained by simple calculation. The dispersion at different depths is the same at the O (ε) approximation. The wave amplitude will decrease with increasing time due to viscosity, but it will increase due to the matching of viscosity and the bed slope, thus. flow is unstable. Numerical or analytical results show that the wave amplitude, velocity and length will increase as the current increases along the wave direction, but the amplitude will increase, and the wave velocity and length will decrease as the water depth decreases.

  15. 基于三维形貌重建的镗加工表面粗糙度检测%Boring Surface Roughness Detection Based on 3D Topography Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭便

    2011-01-01

    以计算机显微视觉为检测手段,采用明暗恢复形状方法重建加工表面微观形貌,进而检测加工表面粗糙度.根据微观金属表面反射特性,采用基于Torrance-Sparrow光照模型的明暗恢复形状算法,完成了镗加工表面图像三维形貌重构与表面粗糙度参数检测.%Computer micro- vision is taken as the detection means.The 3D topography and roughness parameters of the workpiece surface was obtained by 3D reconstruction of the gray images of the workpiece surface using shape from shading.The SFS algorithm based on Torrance -Sparrow illuminant model was applied according to reflective characteristics of the metal micro - surface, 3D topography reconstruction and roughness detection of the workpiece surface was completed.

  16. Physical optics solution for the scattering of a partially-coherent wave from a statistically rough material surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Milo W; Basu, Santasri; Spencer, Mark F; Cusumano, Salvatore J; Fiorino, Steven T

    2013-03-25

    The scattering of a partially-coherent wave from a statistically rough material surface is investigated via derivation of the scattered field cross-spectral density function. Two forms of the cross-spectral density are derived using the physical optics approximation. The first is applicable to smooth-to-moderately rough surfaces and is a complicated expression of source and surface parameters. Physical insight is gleaned from its analytical form and presented in this work. The second form of the cross-spectral density function is applicable to very rough surfaces and is remarkably physical. Its form is discussed at length and closed-form expressions are derived for the angular spectral degree of coherence and spectral density radii. Furthermore, it is found that, under certain circumstances, the cross-spectral density function maintains a Gaussian Schell-model form. This is consistent with published results applicable only in the paraxial regime. Lastly, the closed-form cross-spectral density functions derived here are rigorously validated with scatterometer measurements and full-wave electromagnetic and physical optics simulations. Good agreement is noted between the analytical predictions and the measured and simulated results.

  17. Evolution in the knowledge of the origin of the Atlas Mountains topography: from structural geology to seismic wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayarza, Puy; Teixell, Antonio; Carbonell, Ramón; Arboleya, Maria Luisa; Palomeras, Immaculada; Kchickach, Azzouz; Charroud, Mohammed; Levander, Alan

    2014-05-01

    The Atlas Mountain Range is an active intracontinental orogenic belt located to the S of the diffuse plate boundary between Africa and Europe. This orogen has been the target of scientists that over the past two decades have tried to unravel the origin of its high topography in a context of low to moderate shortening, moderately low Bouguer gravity anomaly, high heat flow and low P and S-wave velocities. In this regard, some of the first assessments were presented by Teixell et al. (2003) and Arboleya et al., (2004), who found out, on the basis of balanced sections, that shortening in the High Atlas was below 25%, whereas in the Middle Atlas was even less than 15%. Those results pointed out to a subcrustal contribution to surface uplift and were compatible with Bouguer anomaly values that suggested that the crust, even reaching elevations of 3000-4000 m, had its Moho located at maximun depths of 40-41 km (Ayarza et al., 2005). The crustal models derived from gravity data were used as the input of lithospheric scale potential field based multidisciplinary modeling, which concluded that an astenospheric upwelling places the LAB as shallow as 70 km (e.g. Teixell et al., 2005; Zeyen et al., 2005; Fullea et al, 2010). This feature helps to support the mountain load and is responsable for the mantle-driven uplift that has occurred in the past 5 ma, as proposed by Babault et al. (2008) on the basis of risen marine deposits and geomorphic indicators. Uncertainties in the exact LAB depth existed and were related to the crustal thickness: a thicker crust would imply a thicker lithosphere. In order to image the Moho topography and depth, and to constrain the seismic velocity structure of the crust in this mountain system, a 700 km long, seismic wide-angle reflection transect, crossing the High and the Middle Atlas, was acquired in 2010 by an international team. Even with a low signal/noise ratio, the data allowed the identification of mantle reflected/refracted phases (Pm

  18. Millimeter-Wave Airborne Interferometry for High-accuracy Topography Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Wu, X.; Rodriguez, E.

    2011-12-01

    In April 2009, an airborne Ka-band single pass interferometric SAR (GLISTIN-A) was demonstrated as a modification to the UAVSAR system. GLISTIN-A was developed under the NASA International Polar Year program to demonstrate swath-mapping for ice-surface topography. Instrument performance confirmed swath widths over the ice between 5-7km, with height precisions ranging from 30cm-3m at a 3m x 3m posting. However processing challenges were encountered on several fronts to achieve the required accuracies including, aircraft motion sensitivity, multipath and systematic drifts. A combination of processor optimization, a modified phase-screen and motion-compensation implementations were able to minimize the impact of these systematic error sources. Funded by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office, upgrades are currently underway to improve the performance (swath >10km) and portability of GLISTIN-A. The upgraded GLISTIN-A will be compatible with the GlobalHawk making Antarctica regional mapping feasible. Beyond this, the surface water and ocean topography (SWOT) mission slated for launch in 2019, needs an airborne sensor to support pre-mission phenomenology measurements and mission calibration and valibration (cal/val). SWOT is unique and distinct from precursor ocean altimetry missions in some notable regards: 1) 100km+ of swath will provide complete ocean elevation coverage, 2) in addition the land surface water will be mapped for storage measurement and discharge estimation and 3) Ka-band single-pass interferometry will produce the 2-D water surface elevation (WSE) maps. In support of SWOT, en-route to Greenland, GLISTIN-A collected a limited amount of data over surface-water targets in North Dakota. While instructive as a preliminary validation of Ka-band interferometry over inland water bodies, further application is limited because GLISTIN-A itself was not designed to address SWOT needs. While ideal for a the ice topography mapping application, the combination of

  19. Acoustic imaging in application to reconstruction of rough rigid surface with airborne ultrasound waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krynkin, A.; Dolcetti, G.; Hunting, S.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate reconstruction of the surface roughness is of high importance to various areas of science and engineering. One important application of this technology is for remote monitoring of open channel flows through observing its dynamic surface roughness. In this paper a novel airborne acoustic method of roughness reconstruction is proposed and tested with a static rigid rough surface. This method is based on the acoustic holography principle and Kirchhoff approximation which make use of acoustic pressure data collected at multiple receiver points spread along an arch. The Tikhonov regularisation and generalised cross validation technique are used to solve the underdetermined system of equations for the acoustic pressures. The experimental data are collected above a roughness created with a 3D printer. For the given surface, it is shown that the proposed method works well with the various number of receiver positions. In this paper, the tested ratios between the number of surface points at which the surface elevation can be reconstructed and number of receiver positions are 2.5, 5, and 7.5. It is shown that, in a region comparable with the projected size of the main directivity lobe, the method is able to reconstruct the spatial spectrum density of the actual surface elevation with the accuracy of 20%.

  20. Surface Micro Topography Replication in Injection Moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlø, Uffe Rolf; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Kjær, Erik Michael

    2005-01-01

    carried out with rough EDM (electrical discharge machining) mould surfaces, a PS grade, and by applying established three-dimensional topography parameters. Significant quantitative relationships between process parameters and topography parameters were established. It further appeared that replication...

  1. A web-based platform for simulating seismic wave propagation in 3D shallow Earth models with DEM surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cong; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Realistic shallow seismic wave propagation simulation is an important tool for studying induced seismicity (e.g., during geothermal energy development). However over a long time, there is a significant problem which constrains computational seismologists from performing a successful simulation conveniently: pre-processing. Conventional pre-processing has often turned out to be inefficient and unrobust because of the miscellaneous operations, considerable complexity and insufficiency of available tools. An integrated web-based platform for shallow seismic wave propagation simulation has been built. It is aiming at providing a user-friendly pre-processing solution, and cloud-based simulation abilities. The main features of the platform for the user include: revised digital elevation model (DEM) retrieving and processing mechanism; generation of multi-layered 3D shallow Earth model geometry (the computational domain) with user specified surface topography based on the DEM; visualization of the geometry before the simulation; a pipeline from geometry to fully customizable hexahedral element mesh generation; customization and running the simulation on our HPC; post-processing and retrieval of the results over cloud. Regarding the computational aspect, currently the widely accepted specfem3D is chosen as the computational package; packages using different types of elements can be integrated as well in the future. According to our trial simulation experiments, this web-based platform has produced accurate waveforms while significantly simplifying and enhancing the pre-processing and improving the simulation success rate.

  2. Scattering of oblique surface water waves by thin vertical barrier over undulating bed topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, A.; Martha, S. C.

    2017-06-01

    The present study deals with the scattering of oblique surface water waves by small undulation on the bottom in the presence of a thin vertical barrier. Here, three different configurations of vertical barriers are investigated. Perturbation analysis is employed to determine the physical quantities, namely, the reflection and transmission coefficients. In this analysis, many different Boundary Value Problems (BVPs) are obtained out of which the first two bvps are considered. The zeroth order bvp is solved with the aid of eigenfunction expansion method. The first order reflection and transmission coefficients are derived in terms of the integrals by the method of the Green's integral theorem. The variation of these coefficients is plotted and analyzed for different physical parameters. Furthermore, the energy balance relation, an important relation in the study of water wave scattering, is derived and checked for assuring the correctness of the numerical results for the present problem.

  3. Recovery of correlation function of internal random rough surfaces from diffusely scattered elastic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, F.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Craster, R. V.

    2017-02-01

    We propose an ultrasonic methodology to reconstruct the height correlation function of remotely inaccessible random rough surfaces in solids. The inverse method is based on the Kirchhoff approximation(KA), and it requires measuring the angular distribution of diffuse scattering intensities by sending in a narrow band incident pulse. Near field scattering effects are also included by considering the Fresnel assumption. The proposed approach is successfully verified by simulating the scattering from multiple realizations of rough surfaces whose correlation function is known, calculating the mean scattering intensities from these received signals, and then deploying the inverse method on these to reconstruct the original correlation function. Very good agreement between the reconstructed correlation function and the original is found, for a wide range of roughness parameters. In addition, the effect of reducing the number of realizations to approximate the mean intensity are investigated, providing confidence bounds for the experiment. An experiment on a corrugated rough surface is performed with a limited number of scans using a phased array, which further validates the proposed inversion algorithm.

  4. Effects of Small-Scale Bathymetric Roughness on the Global Internal Wave Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-30

    gravity field (Sandwell and Smith, 1997), emphasizing roughness, over a portion of the Southeast Indian Ridge (yellow) corresponding to a change in...constrained by digital maps of paleo -spreading rate and direction (Meuller et al. 2008), and sediment thickness (Divens, NGDC webs site). Next, modifying...better than for wind-forced motions, important questions about the tidal energy cycle remain. 4 Figure 3. Paleo -ridge azimuths (D

  5. An Optimized Combined Wave and Current Bottom Boundary Layer Model for Arbitrary Bed Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    studies of shelf circulation patterns that incorporate wave-current effects in the bottom boundary layer have been conducted in the past (e.g...presence of surface waves reemphasizes the fact that wave-current effects are important on storm- dominated continental shelves. In addition to these...can be defined for / rz z1 (i.e., */ rrzz ακR1 ), where * * / )(r cw rR u z ω . The two expressions are related by * */ /r r zR zR  0 , where

  6. Unification of the Kirchhoff approximation and the method of moment for optical wave scattering from the lossy dielectric Gaussian random rough surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Ma; Lixin Guo; Xiangzhe Cheng

    2009-01-01

    The optical wave scattering from one-dimensional (1D) lossy dielectric Gaussian random rough surface is studied. The tapered incident wave is introduced into the classical Kirchhoff approximation (KA), and the shadowing effect is also taken into account to make the KA results have a high accuracy. The definition of the bistatic scattering coefficient of the modified KA and the method of moment (MOM) are unified. The characteristics of the optical wave scattering from the lossy dielectric Gaussian random rough surface of different parameters are analyzed by implementing MOM.

  7. Moored and Towed Measurements of Lee Waves at West Mariana Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Moored Profiler and towed LADCP/CTD measurements of flow encountering rough topography in the Samoan Passage. The flow of dense water across a sill in...interested in the general problems of internal waves and ocean mixing. Breaking of internal waves is the main cause for ocean mixing away from surface ...climate models . A special type of internal waves are lee waves, generated as low frequency currents interact with the bottom topography. The research

  8. Surface Roughness Measurements Utilizing Long-Range Surface-Plasma Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    constants in media 2. 1. and 0 and represents termined for given dielectric parameters by the propa- a generalization of the formula given by Marcuse in...Brekhovshikh, Waues in Layered Media (Academic, New in either of the forms York, 1960): D. Marcuse , Theory of Dielectric ’ptical Wave- guides (Academic

  9. The effect of foam on waves and the aerodynamic roughness of the water surface at high winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Vdovin, Maxim; Sergeev, Daniil; Kandaurov, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Air-sea coupling at extreme winds is of special interest now in connection with the problem of explanation of the sea surface drag saturation at the wind speed exceeding 30 m/s. The idea on saturation (and even reduction) of the coefficient of aerodynamic resistance of the sea surface at hurricane wind speed first suggested in [1] on the basis of theoretical analysis of sensitivity of maximum wind speed in a hurricane to the ratio of the enthalpy and momentum exchange coefficients was then confirmed by a number of field (e.g.[2]) and laboratory [3] experiments, which showed that the sea surface drag coefficient was significantly reduced in comparison with the parameterization obtained at moderate to strong wind conditions. The theoretical explanations of the effect of the sea surface drag reduction exploit either peculiarities of the air flow over breaking waves (e.g.[4,5]) or the effect of sea drops and spray on the wind-wave momentum exchange (e.g. [6,7]). Recently an alternative hypothesis was suggested in [8], where the surface drag reduction in hurricanes was explained by the influence of foam covering sea surface on its aerodynamic roughness. This paper describes a series of laboratory experiments in Thermostratified Wind-Wave Tank (TSWiWaT) of IAP directed to investigation of the foam impact on the short-wave part of the surface waves and the momentum exchange in the atmospheric boundary layer at high winds in the range of equivalent 10-m wind speed from 12 to 38 m/s. A special foam generator was designed for these experiments. The air flow parameters were retrieved from measurements of the velocity profiles. The frequency-wavenumber spectra of surface waves were retrieved from the measurements of water surface elevation by the array 3-channel wave gauge. Foam coverage of water surface was controlled by video filming of the water surface. The results of measurements were compared with predictions of the quasi-linear model of atmospheric boundary layer over

  10. High-precision drop shape analysis (HPDSA) of quasistatic contact angles on silanized silicon wafers with different surface topographies during inclining-plate measurements: Influence of the surface roughness on the contact line dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heib, F.; Hempelmann, R.; Munief, W. M.; Ingebrandt, S.; Fug, F.; Possart, W.; Groß, K.; Schmitt, M.

    2015-07-01

    Contact angles and wetting of solid surfaces are strongly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of the surfaces. These influence quantities are difficult to distinguish from each other if contact angle measurements are performed by measuring only the advancing θa and the receding θr contact angle. In this regard, time-dependent water contact angles are measured on two hydrophobic modified silicon wafers with different physical surface topographies. The first surface is nearly atomically flat while the second surface is patterned (alternating flat and nanoscale rough patterns) which is synthesized by a photolithography and etching procedure. The different surface topographies are characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FTIRRAS) and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR). The resulting set of contact angle data obtained by the high-precision drop shape analysis approach is further analyzed by a Gompertzian fitting procedure and a statistical counting procedure in dependence on the triple line velocity. The Gompertzian fit is used to analyze overall properties of the surface and dependencies between the motion on the front and the back edge of the droplets. The statistical counting procedure results in the calculation of expectation values E(p) and standard deviations σ(p) for the inclination angle φ, contact angle θ, triple line velocity vel and the covered distance of the triple line dis relative to the first boundary points XB,10. Therefore, sessile drops during the inclination of the sample surface are video recorded and different specific contact angle events in dependence on the acceleration/deceleration of the triple line motion are analyzed. This procedure results in characteristically density distributions in dependence on the surface properties. The used procedures lead to the possibility to investigate influences on contact

  11. High-precision drop shape analysis (HPDSA) of quasistatic contact angles on silanized silicon wafers with different surface topographies during inclining-plate measurements: Influence of the surface roughness on the contact line dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heib, F., E-mail: f.heib@mx.uni-saarland.de [Department of Physical Chemistry, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Hempelmann, R. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Munief, W.M.; Ingebrandt, S. [Department of Informatics and Microsystem Technology, University of Applied Sciences, Kaiserslautern, 66482 Zweibrücken (Germany); Fug, F.; Possart, W. [Department of Adhesion and Interphases in Polymers, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Groß, K.; Schmitt, M. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Highlights: • Analysis of the triple line motion on surfaces with nanoscale surface topographies. • Analysis of the triple line motion is performed in sub-pixel resolution. • A special fitting and statistical approach for contact angle analysis is applied. • The analyses result set of contact angle data which is independent of “user-skills”. • Characteristically density distributions in dependence on the surface properties. - Abstract: Contact angles and wetting of solid surfaces are strongly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of the surfaces. These influence quantities are difficult to distinguish from each other if contact angle measurements are performed by measuring only the advancing θ{sub a} and the receding θ{sub r} contact angle. In this regard, time-dependent water contact angles are measured on two hydrophobic modified silicon wafers with different physical surface topographies. The first surface is nearly atomically flat while the second surface is patterned (alternating flat and nanoscale rough patterns) which is synthesized by a photolithography and etching procedure. The different surface topographies are characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FTIRRAS) and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR). The resulting set of contact angle data obtained by the high-precision drop shape analysis approach is further analyzed by a Gompertzian fitting procedure and a statistical counting procedure in dependence on the triple line velocity. The Gompertzian fit is used to analyze overall properties of the surface and dependencies between the motion on the front and the back edge of the droplets. The statistical counting procedure results in the calculation of expectation values E(p) and standard deviations σ(p) for the inclination angle φ, contact angle θ, triple line velocity vel and the covered distance of the triple

  12. Dune dynamics and roughness under gradually varying flood waves, comparing flume and field observations, doi: 10.5194/adgeo-39-115-2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warmink, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate forecasts of bed forms and their roughness during a flood wave are essential for flood management. Bed forms remain dynamic even under steady discharge and are subject to a continuous process of creations and destructions of individual bed forms. Dune evolution during the rising limb of a f

  13. Topography Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC builds and distributes high-resolution, coastal digital elevation models (DEMs) that integrate ocean bathymetry and land topography to support NOAA's mission to...

  14. The effect of stratification and topography on high-frequency internal waves in a continental shelf sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domina, Anastasiia; Palmer, Matthew; Vlasenko, Vasil; Sharples, Jonathan; Green, Mattias; Stashchuk, Nataliya

    2017-04-01

    Internal gravity waves (IWs) have been recognised as one of the main drivers of climate controlling circulation, sustaining fisheries in shelf seas and CO2-pump system. High frequency IWs are particularly important to internal mixing in the shelf seas, where they contain an enhanced fraction of the available baroclinic energy. The origin, generation mechanism, propagation and spatial distribution of these waves are unfortunately still poorly understood since they are difficult to measure and simulate, and are therefore not represented in the vast majority of ocean and climate models. In this study we aim to increase our understanding of high frequency IWs dynamics in shelf seas through a combination of observational (from moorings and ocean gliders) and modelling methods (MITgcm), and test the hypothesis that "Solitary waves are responsible for driving a large fraction of the vertical diffusivity at the shelf edge and adjacent shelf region". A new high-resolution (50m horizontal) MITgcm configuration is employed to identify the generation and propagation of IWs in a regional shelf sea and subsequently identify internal wave generation hotspots by using calculated Froude number and body force maps. We assess the likely impact of changing seasonal and climate forcing on IWs with a range of different density structures. Our model suggests that under increasing stratification, the IW field becomes more energetic at all frequencies, however the increase in energy is not evenly distributed. While energy in the dominant low frequency IWs increase by 20-40%, energy associated with high frequency waves increases by as much as 90%. These model results are compared to varying stratification scenarios from observations made during 2012 and 2013 to interpret the impact on continental shelf sea IW generation and propagation. We use the results from a turbulence enabled ocean glider to assess the impact that this varying wavefield has on internal mixing, and discuss the

  15. Why is topography fractal?

    CERN Document Server

    Pelletier, J D

    1997-01-01

    The power spectrum S of linear transects of the earth's topography is often observed to be a power-law function of wave number k with exponent close to -2: S(k) is proportional to k^-2. In addition, river networks are fractal trees that satisfy many power-law or fractal relationships between their morphologic components. A model equation for the evolution of the earth's topography by erosional processes which produces fractal topography and fractal river networks is presented and its solutions compared in detail to real topography. The model is the diffusion equation for sediment transport on hillslopes and channels with the local diffusivity proportional to the square of the discharge. The dependence of diffusivity on discharge follows from fundamental equations of sediment transport. We study the model in two ways. In the first analysis the diffusivity is parameterized as a function of relief and a Taylor expansion procedure is carried out to obtain a differential equation for the landform elevation which i...

  16. An accurate and fast forward model of three-dimensional electromagnetic wave scattering in a layered structure with multilayer rough interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chao; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Fang, Guangyou; Shi, Jiancheng; Liu, Shiyin

    2015-03-01

    We develop an accurate and fast forward model for calculating the compact closed-form high-order perturbative solutions of the problem of three-dimensional (3-D) radiation and propagation electromagnetic fields in a layered structure with multilayer rough interfaces. The proposed method for the fast forward model is first demonstrated by strictly theoretical formulas derivation in the framework of classical small perturbation method (SPM) without other else approximation and equivalent process. The kernel functions of high order are proposed for calculating the radar cross sections with more efficiency and clear physical meanings for better use in practice. What is more, we give the clear physical interpretation of the first-order fully polarimetric electromagnetic wave scattering mechanism in the layered structure with multilayer rough interfaces. The proposed forward model is necessary to insure a successful inversion process. Furthermore, the high-order SPM solutions derived by employing the proposed method are validated with existing methods and numerical results. Finally, we study the performance of the high-order fully polarimetric electromagnetic wave scattering according to the numerical results and analyze the scattering enhancement phenomena.

  17. 3D surface topography formation in ultra-precision turning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽伟; 董申; 程凯

    2004-01-01

    The generation process of 3 D surface topography in ultra-precision turning is analyzed, as the result of superimposing between actual roughness surface, waviness surface and geometrical form texture surface. From the viewpoints of machine technical system and manufacturing process, factors influencing on roughness surface,waviness surface and geometrical form texture surface in ultra-precision turning are discussed further. The 3D topography of ideal roughness surface and actual surface affected by cutting vibration are simulated respectively.

  18. Effects of Roughly Focused Extracorporeal Shock Waves Therapy on the Expressions of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 and Osteoprotegerin in Osteoporotic Fracture in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai-Ming; Li, Xiao-Lin; Tu, Shu-Qiang; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Lu, Chang-Chun; Jiang, Liang-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background: Roughly focused extracorporeal shock waves therapy (ESWT) is characterized by a wide focal area, a large therapy zone, easy positioning, and less pain during treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of roughly focused ESWT on the expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in osteoporotic fractures in rats. Methods: Seventy-two female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, 3 months old, were divided into sham-operated group (n = 6) and an ovariectomized (OVX) group (n = 66). Sixty OVX SD rats were used as a model of double proximal tibial osteotomy and inner fixation. The osteotomy site in the left tibia was treated with roughly focused ESWT once at an energy density of 0.26 mJ/mm2, 60 doses/min, and 2000 pact quantities. The contralateral right tibia was left untreated and served as a control. Expression of OPG and BMP-2 in the callus of the osteoporotic fracture area was assessed using immunohistochemistry, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and Western blotting analysis. Results: Bone mineral density (BMD) at the proximal tibia, femur, and L5 spine was significantly reduced after ovariectomy. BMD of proximal tibia was 12.9% less in the OVX group than that in the sham-operated group. Meanwhile, bilateral oophorectomy resulted in a lower trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) in the proximal tibia of the sham-OVX animals. Three months after bilateral oophorectomy, BV/TV was 14.29% of baseline BV/TV in OVX legs versus 45.91% in the sham-OVX legs (P shock wave treatment, paired with a much earlier (at 4 weeks) increase of BMP-2, and declined close to normal at 8 weeks. Conclusions: Roughly focused ESWT may promote the expression of OPG and BMP-2 in the osteoporotic fracture area in rats. BMP-2 and OPG may act synergistically and may lead to a significant enhancement of bone formation and remodeling. PMID:27779163

  19. Bed slope effects on turbulent wave boundary layers: 1. Model validation and quantification of rough-turbulent results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model solving incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, combined with a two-equation k-omega turbulence closure, is used to study converging-diverging effects from a sloping bed on turbulent (oscillatory) wave boundary layers. Bed shear stresses from the numerical model...

  20. Controlling Surface Roughness to Enhance Mass Flow Rates in Nanochannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimon, Malgorzata; Emerson, David; Reese, Jason

    2012-11-01

    A very active field of research in fluid mechanics and material science is predicting the behavior of Newtonian fluids flowing over porous media with different wettabilities. Opposite effects have been observed: some state that wall roughness always suppresses fluid-slip, whereas others show that for some cases roughness may reduce the surface friction. In this work, MD simulations were carried out to further investigate physical mechanisms for liquid slip, and factors affecting it. A rough wall was formed by either periodically spaced rectangular protrusions or was represented by a cosine wave. The MD simulations were conducted to study Poiseuille and Couette flow of liquid argon in a nanochannel with hydrophilic kryptonian walls. The effect of wall roughness and interface wettability on the streaming velocity, and the slip-length at the walls, is observed to be significant. Our results show a dependency of mass flow rate on the type of flow and topography of the channel walls. For a fixed magnitude of the driving force, an increase in the mass flow rate, compared to the smooth surface, was observed for the wavy roughness, whereas the opposite effect was observed for Couette flow where a higher slip was obtained for rectangular gaps. The study is funded in the UK by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  1. Parameterizing turbulence over abrupt topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymak, Jody

    2016-11-01

    Stratified flow over abrupt topography generates a spectrum of propagating internal waves at large scales, and non-linear overturning breaking waves at small scales. For oscillating flows, the large scale waves propagate away as internal tides, for steady flows the large-scale waves propagate away as standing "columnar modes". At small-scales, the breaking waves appear to be similar for either oscillating or steady flows, so long as in the oscillating case the topography is significantly steeper than the internal tide angle of propagation. The size and energy lost to the breaking waves can be predicted relatively well from assuming that internal modes that propagate horizontally more slowly than the barotropic internal tide speed are arrested and their energy goes to turbulence. This leads to a recipe for dissipation of internal tides at abrupt topography that is quite robust for both the local internal tide generation problem (barotropic forcing) and for the scattering problem (internal tides incident on abrupt topography). Limitations arise when linear generation models break down, an example of which is interference between two ridges. A single "super-critical" ridge is well-modeled by a single knife-edge topography, regardless of its actual shape, but two supercritical ridges in close proximity demonstrate interference of the high modes that makes knife-edfe approximations invalid. Future direction of this research will be to use more complicated linear models to estimate the local dissipation. Of course, despite the large local dissipation, many ridges radiate most of their energy into the deep ocean, so tracking this low-mode radiated energy is very important, particularly as it means dissipation parameterizations in the open ocean due to these sinks from the surface tide cannot be parameterized locally to where they are lost from the surface tide, but instead lead to non-local parameterizations. US Office of Naval Research; Canadian National Science and

  2. Effects of Roughly Focused Extracorporeal Shock Waves Therapy on the Expressions of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 and Osteoprotegerin in Osteoporotic Fracture in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Ming Huang; Xiao-Lin Li; Shu-Qiang Tu; Xiao-Feng Chen; Chang-Chun Lu; Liang-Hua Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Background:Roughly focused extracorporeal shock waves therapy (ESWT) is characterized by a wide focal area,a large therapy zone,easy positioning,and less pain during treatment.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of roughly focused ESWT on the expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in osteoporotic fractures in rats.Methods:Seventy-two female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats,3 months old,were divided into sham-operated group (n =6) and an ovariectomized (OVX) group (n =66).Sixty OVX SD rats were used as a model of double proximal tibial osteotomy and inner fixation.The osteotomy site in the left tibia was treated with roughly focused ESWT once at an energy density of 0.26 mJ/mm2,60 doses/min,and 2000 pact quantities.The contralateral right tibia was left untreated and served as a control.Expression of OPG and BMP-2 in the callus of the osteoporotic fracture area was assessed using immunohistochemistry,real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR),and Western blotting analysis.Results:Bone mineral density (BMD) at the proximal tibia,femur,and L5 spine was significantly reduced after ovariectomy.BMD of proximal tibia was 12.9% less in the OVX group than that in the sham-operated group.Meanwhile,bilateral oophorectomy resulted in a lower trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) in the proximal tibia of the sham-OVX animals.Three months after bilateral oophorectomy,BV/TV was 14.29% of baseline BV/TV in OVX legs versus 45.91% in the sham-OVX legs (P < 0.001).These data showed that the SD rats became a suitable model of osteoporosis,3 months after they were OVX.Immunohistochemical analysis showed higher levels of BMP-2 and OPG expression in the treatment group than those in the control group.Compared with the contralateral controls,decreased expression of OPG and BMP-2 at 3 days after roughly focused ESWT,followed by a later increase at 7 days,was indicated by real-time PCR and Western blotting analysis.The OPG

  3. Reflected GPS Power for the Detection of Surface Roughness Patterns in Coastal Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertel, George, F.; Allen, Thomas R.

    2000-01-01

    Coastal bays formed by the barrier islands of Delaware, Maryland and Virginia are parts of a coastal region known as a "Coastal Compartment". The coastal compartment between the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays is actually the mosaic of landscapes on the headland of the interfluve that separates these large drainage basins. The coastal compartments form a variety of different-shaped waterways landward of the coastline. Shape differences along the boundaries produce differences in exposure to wind and waves. Different shoreface topographies seaward of the coastline also influence surface roughness by changing wave-refraction patterns. Surface-water roughness (caused by waves) is controlled by a number of parameters, including fetch, shielding, exposure corridors, water-mass boundary conditions, wetland vegetation and water depth in coastal bays. In the coastal ocean, surface roughness patterns are controlled by shoreface shoaling and inlet refraction patterns in the coastal ocean. Knowledge of wave phenomena in the nearshore and backbarrier areas is needed to understand how wave climate influences important ecosystems in estuaries and bays.

  4. Mapping of sea bottom topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkoen, C. J.; Wensink, G. J.; Hesselmans, G. H. F. M.

    1992-01-01

    Under suitable conditions the bottom topography of shallow seas is visible in remote sensing radar imagery. Two experiments were performed to establish which remote sensing technique or combination yields optimal imaging of bottom topography and which hydro-meteorological conditions are favorable. A further goal is to gain experience with these techniques. Two experiments were performed over an area in the North Sea near the measuring platform Meetpost Noordwijk (MPN). The bottom topography in the test area is dominated by sand waves. The crests of the sand waves are perpendicular to the coast line and the dominating (tidal-)current direction. A 4x4 sq km wide section of the test area was studied in more detail. The first experiment was undertaken on 16 Aug. 1989. During the experiment the following remote sensing instruments were used: Landsat-Thematic Mapper, and NASA/JPL Airborne Imaging Radar (AIR). The hydro-meteorological conditions; current, wind, wave, and air and water temperature were monitored by MPN, a ship of Rijkswaterstaat (the OCTANS), and a pitch-and-roll WAVEC-buoy. The second experiment took place on 12 July 1992. During this experiment data were collected with the NASA/JPL polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR), and a five-band helicopter-borne scatterometer. Again the hydro-meteorological conditions were monitored at MPN and the OCTANS. Furthermore, interferometric radar data were collected.

  5. Numerical simulation of bistatic scattering from a target at low altitude above rough sea surface under an EM wave incidence at low grazing angle by using the finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Peng; JIN Yaqiu

    2004-01-01

    To study bistatic scattering from a target at low altitude above two- dimensional (2D) randomly rough sea surface under an electromagnetic (EM) wave incidence at low grazing angle (LGA), a numerical approach of the finite element method (FEM) is developed. The conformal perfectly matched layer (PML), as the truncation boundary of the FEM, is employed to reduce the reflection error of planar PML in conventional FEM. Numerical code of our FEM is examined by available solution of the forward backward iterative (FBM) method. Bistatic and back-scattering from composite model of a target above random rough sea surface generated by Monte Carlo realization, and functional dependence upon the sea surface wind speed, target altitude, incident and scattering angles, etc. are numerically simulated and discussed. This paper presents a numerical description of the observation principle and physical insight associated with the coupling interactions of a complex volumetric target and random rough sea surface.

  6. Interference of lee waves over mountain ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Makarenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal waves in the atmosphere and ocean are generated frequently from the interaction of mean flow with bottom obstacles such as mountains and submarine ridges. Analysis of these environmental phenomena involves theoretical models of non-homogeneous fluid affected by the gravity. In this paper, a semi-analytical model of stratified flow over the mountain range is considered under the assumption of small amplitude of the topography. Attention is focused on stationary wave patterns forced above the rough terrain. Adapted to account for such terrain, model equations involves exact topographic condition settled on the uneven ground surface. Wave solutions corresponding to sinusoidal topography with a finite number of peaks are calculated and examined.

  7. Effects of Roughly Focused Extracorporeal Shock Waves Therapy on the Expressions of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 and Osteoprotegerin in Osteoporotic Fracture in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Ming Huang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Roughly focused ESWT may promote the expression of OPG and BMP-2 in the osteoporotic fracture area in rats. BMP-2 and OPG may act synergistically and may lead to a significant enhancement of bone formation and remodeling.

  8. Rough function model and rough membership function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yun; Guan Yanyong; Huang Zhiqin

    2008-01-01

    Two pairs of approximation operators, which are the scale lower and upper approximations as well as the real line lower and upper approximations, are defined. Their properties and antithesis characteristics are analyzed. The rough function model is generalized based on rough set theory, and the scheme of rough function theory is made more distinct and complete. Therefore, the transformation of the real function analysis from real line to scale is achieved. A series of basic concepts in rough function model including rough numbers, rough intervals, and rough membership functions are defined in the new scheme of the rough function model. Operating properties of rough intervals similar to rough sets are obtained. The relationship of rough inclusion and rough equality of rough intervals is defined by two kinds of tools, known as the lower (upper) approximation operator in real numbers domain and rough membership functions. Their relative properties are analyzed and proved strictly, which provides necessary theoretical foundation and technical support for the further discussion of properties and practical application of the rough function model.

  9. Effect of Surface Topography on Stress Concentration Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zhengkun; LIAO Ridong

    2015-01-01

    Neuber rule and Arola-Ramulu model are widely used to predict the stress concentration factor of rough specimens. However, the height parameters and effective valley radius used in these two models depend strongly on the resolution of the roughness-measuring instruments and are easily introduce measuring errors. Besides, it is difficult to find a suitable parameter to characterize surface topography to quantitatively describe its effect on stress concentration factor. In order to overcome these disadvantages, profile moments are carried out to characterize surface topography, surface topography is simulated by superposing series of cosine components, the stress concentration factors of different micro cosine-shaped surface topographies are investigated by finite element analysis. In terms of micro cosine-shaped surface topography, an equation using the second profile moment to estimate the stress concentration factor is proposed, predictions for the stress concentration factor using the proposed expression are within 10% error compared with the results of finite element analysis, which are more accurate than other models. Moreover, the proposed equation is applied to the real surface topography machined by turning. Predictions for the stress concentration factor using the proposed expression are within 10% of the maximum stress concentration factors and about 5% of the effective stress concentration factors estimated from the finite element analysis for three levels of turning surface topographies under different simulated scales. The proposed model is feasible in predicting the stress concentration factors of real machined surface topographies.

  10. Experimental study on influence of particle roughness on shear wave velocity of sand%砂土颗粒粗糙度对剪切波速影响的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘瑜; 夏唐代

    2011-01-01

    6 sand samples are made by use of Fujian standard sand, Hangzhou sand and man-made quartz sand, respectively, with each sample composed of the single sand particle in diameter.The average particle roughness of every sample and the shear wave velocities (Vs) of each sample in different porosities are obtained by electron microscope and bender element testing equipment.The analytic results indicate that Vs is greatly influenced by the particle roughness, and the magnitude of Vs decreases with the increase of the particle roughness.The roughness coefficient is introduced to deduce the formula of Vs by means of the researches on micro fabrics and constitutive relations of granular materials, elastic contact of rough particles, etc.Moreover, the results drawn from the present method are compared with the measured data, and the calculating method of the roughness coefficient for low sands is obtained.In addition, the relationship between the roughness coefficient and the stress is discussed.%将福建标准砂、杭州黄砂和人工石英砂制备成6个砂样,每个砂样只由一种粒径的砂颗粒组成,从每个砂样中选取一定数量的颗粒进行电镜扫描并分析砂样的颗粒平均粗糙度,用弯曲元测试仪测试各砂样在不同孔隙比下的剪切波速(Vs).对比分析说明颗粒粗糙度对Vs的影响显著,Vs随着颗粒粗糙度的增大而减小.引入粗糙度修正系数,在散粒体介质细观组构与本构关系、弹性粗糙颗粒接触等研究的基础上推导了砂土Vs计算公式.将计算结果与试验实测值进行对比,得到了浅层砂土的粗糙度修正系数的计算方法,讨论了粗糙度修正系数随应力大小的变化趋势.

  11. Effect of hydrofluoric acid etching time on the topography and surface roughness of lithium disilicate glass ceramic%氢氟酸处理对二硅酸锂玻璃陶瓷表面形貌及粗糙度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任冬锋; 骆小平

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨氢氟酸处理时间对二硅酸锂玻璃陶瓷表面形貌及粗糙度的影响,拟为与之相关的玻璃陶瓷机械强度和树脂粘接强度做出初步解释.方法 采用失蜡铸造法制作直径10 mm、厚1 mm的玻璃陶瓷片状试件15个,打磨抛光之后随机分为5组,每组3个.陶瓷表面分别接受9.5%的氢氟酸凝胶酸蚀处理0、20、40、60和120 s.使用原子力显微镜(AFM)测量表面粗糙度参数和酸蚀深度,观测其表面三维形貌,并结合使用场发射扫描电子显微镜(FE-SEM)对陶瓷表面微观结构进行观察分析.结果 FE-SEM观察显示,陶瓷表面的玻璃基质首先被氢氟酸侵蚀溶解,随着酸蚀时间的延长,玻璃基质进一步被侵蚀,部分晶体结构也从陶瓷表面脱落、消失.AFM测量酸蚀表面得出,对照组、20、40、60和120 s氢氟酸处理组陶瓷片表面粗糙度Ra[分别为(17.2±1.6)、(241.8±23.6)、(290.6±38.2)、(322.6±19.6)和(371.3 ± 43.0) nm]随氢氟酸酸蚀时间的延长而显著增加(P<0.05),且与酸蚀时间成正相关.结论 氢氟酸处理可显著增加二硅酸锂陶瓷表面粗糙度.结合使用FE-SEM和AFM能够更好地对玻璃陶瓷的酸蚀表面微观形貌结构进行分析评价.%Objective To analyze the effect of hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching time on the surface roughness and the topography of lithium disilicate glass ceramic.Methods Fifteen glass ceramic disks (10 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness) were made from IPS e.max(R) Press ingots by lost-wax,hot-pressed ceramic fabrication technology,and then divided randomly into five groups (three per group) after polishing.The ceramic surfaces of different groups were etched by 9.5% hydrofluoric acid gel for 0,20,40,60,and 120 s,respectively.Atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to evaluate the surface roughness and the 3D topography.Microstructure was also analyzed by the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM).Results The result showed

  12. Rock discontinuity surface roughness variation with scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitenc, Maja; Kieffer, D. Scott; Khoshelham, Kourosh

    2017-04-01

    ABSTRACT: Rock discontinuity surface roughness refers to local departures of the discontinuity surface from planarity and is an important factor influencing the shear resistance. In practice, the Joint Roughness Coefficient (JRC) roughness parameter is commonly relied upon and input to a shear strength criterion such as developed by Barton and Choubey [1977]. The estimation of roughness by JRC is hindered firstly by the subjective nature of visually comparing the joint profile to the ten standard profiles. Secondly, when correlating the standard JRC values and other objective measures of roughness, the roughness idealization is limited to a 2D profile of 10 cm length. With the advance of measuring technologies that provide accurate and high resolution 3D data of surface topography on different scales, new 3D roughness parameters have been developed. A desirable parameter is one that describes rock surface geometry as well as the direction and scale dependency of roughness. In this research a 3D roughness parameter developed by Grasselli [2001] and adapted by Tatone and Grasselli [2009] is adopted. It characterizes surface topography as the cumulative distribution of local apparent inclination of asperities with respect to the shear strength (analysis) direction. Thus, the 3D roughness parameter describes the roughness amplitude and anisotropy (direction dependency), but does not capture the scale properties. In different studies the roughness scale-dependency has been attributed to data resolution or size of the surface joint (see a summary of researches in [Tatone and Grasselli, 2012]). Clearly, the lower resolution results in lower roughness. On the other hand, have the investigations of surface size effect produced conflicting results. While some studies have shown a decrease in roughness with increasing discontinuity size (negative scale effect), others have shown the existence of positive scale effects, or both positive and negative scale effects. We

  13. Dynamic Topography Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresi, Louis

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic Topography Revisited Dynamic topography is usually considered to be one of the trinity of contributing causes to the Earth's non-hydrostatic topography along with the long-term elastic strength of the lithosphere and isostatic responses to density anomalies within the lithosphere. Dynamic topography, thought of this way, is what is left over when other sources of support have been eliminated. An alternate and explicit definition of dynamic topography is that deflection of the surface which is attributable to creeping viscous flow. The problem with the first definition of dynamic topography is 1) that the lithosphere is almost certainly a visco-elastic / brittle layer with no absolute boundary between flowing and static regions, and 2) the lithosphere is, a thermal / compositional boundary layer in which some buoyancy is attributable to immutable, intrinsic density variations and some is due to thermal anomalies which are coupled to the flow. In each case, it is difficult to draw a sharp line between each contribution to the overall topography. The second definition of dynamic topography does seem cleaner / more precise but it suffers from the problem that it is not measurable in practice. On the other hand, this approach has resulted in a rich literature concerning the analysis of large scale geoid and topography and the relation to buoyancy and mechanical properties of the Earth [e.g. refs 1,2,3] In convection models with viscous, elastic, brittle rheology and compositional buoyancy, however, it is possible to examine how the surface topography (and geoid) are supported and how different ways of interpreting the "observable" fields introduce different biases. This is what we will do. References (a.k.a. homework) [1] Hager, B. H., R. W. Clayton, M. A. Richards, R. P. Comer, and A. M. Dziewonski (1985), Lower mantle heterogeneity, dynamic topography and the geoid, Nature, 313(6003), 541-545, doi:10.1038/313541a0. [2] Parsons, B., and S. Daly (1983), The

  14. Geo-rough Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Rough set is a new approach to uncertainties in spatial analysis.In this paper,rough set symbols are simplified and standardized in terms of rough interpretation and specialized indication.Rough spatial entities and their topological relationships are also proposed in rough space,thus a universal intersected equation is developed,and rough membership function is further extended with the gray scale in our case study.We complete three works.First,a set of simplified rough symbols is advanced on the basis of existing rough symbols.Second,rough spatial entity is put forward to study the real world as it is,without forcing uncertainties into crisp set.Third,rough spatial topological relationships are studied by using rough matrix and their figures.The relationships are divided into three types,crisp entity and crisp entity (CC),rough entity and crisp entity (RC),and rough entity and rough entity (RR).A universal intersected equation is further proposed.Finally,the maximum and minimum maps of river thematic classification are generated via rough membership function and rough relationships in our case study.

  15. Moire topography in odontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Yeras, A.

    2001-08-01

    For several decades measurement optical techniques have been used in different branches of Science and Technology and in medicine. One of these techniques is the so-called Moire topography that allows the accurate measurement of different parts of the human body topography. This investigation presents the measurement of topographies of teeth and gums using an automated system of shadow moire, with which precision can be reached up to the order of the microns by the phase shift instrumentation in an original way. Advantages and disadvantages of using the Moire topography and its comparison with other techniques used in the optical metrology are presented. Also, some positive and negative aspects of the implementation of this technique are shown in dentistry.

  16. Observed longitude variations of zonal wind, UV albedo and H2O at Venus cloud top level: the role of stationary gravity waves generated by Venus topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Hauchecorne, Alain; khatuntsev, Igor; Markiewicz, Wojciech; Marcq, emmanuel; Lebonnois, Sebastien; Patsaeva, Marina; Turin, Alexander; Fedorova, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Based on the analysis of UV images (at 365 nm) of Venus cloud top (altitude 67±2 km) collected with VMC (Venus Monitoring Camera) on board Venus Express (VEX), it is found that the zonal wind speed south of the equator (from 5°S to 15°S) shows a conspicuous variation (from -101 to -83 m/s) with geographic longitude of Venus, correlated with the underlying relief of Aphrodite Terra. We interpret this pattern as the result of stationary gravity waves produced at ground level by the up lift of air when the horizontal wind encounters a mountain slope. These waves can propagate up to the cloud top level, break there and transfer their momentum to the zonal flow. Such upward propagation of gravity waves and influence on the wind speed vertical profile was shown to play an important role in the middle atmosphere of the Earth but is not reproduced in the current GCM of Venus atmosphere from LMD.In the equatorial regions, the UV albedo of clouds at 365 nm and the H2O mixing ratio at cloud top varies also with longitude, with an anti-correlation: the more H2O, the darker are the clouds. We argue that these variations may be simply explained by the divergence of the horizontal wind field. In the longitude region (from 60° to -10°) where the horizontal wind speed is increasing in magnitude (stretch), it triggers air upwelling which brings both the UV absorber and H2O at cloud top level and decreases the albedo, and vice-versa when the wind is decreasing in magnitude (compression). This picture is fully consistent with the classical view of Venus meridional circulation, with upwelling at equator revealed by horizontal air motions away from equator: the longitude effect is only an additional but important modulation of this effect. We argue that H2O enhancement is the sign of upwelling because the H2O mixing ratio decreases with altitude, comforting the view that the UV absorber is also brought to cloud top by upwelling.

  17. Influence of Venus topography on the zonal wind and UV albedo at cloud top level: The role of stationary gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Khatuntsev, I. V.; Hauchecorne, A.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Marcq, E.; Lebonnois, S.; Patsaeva, M.; Turin, A.; Fedorova, A.

    2016-06-01

    Based on the analysis of UV images (at 365 nm) of Venus cloud top (altitude 67 ± 2 km) collected with Venus Monitoring Camera on board Venus Express (VEX), it is found that the zonal wind speed south of the equator (from 5°S to 15°S) shows a conspicuous variation (from -101 to -83 m/s) with geographic longitude of Venus, correlated with the underlying relief of Aphrodite Terra. We interpret this pattern as the result of stationary gravity waves produced at ground level by the uplift of air when the horizontal wind encounters a mountain slope. These waves can propagate up to the cloud top level, break there, and transfer their momentum to the zonal flow. Such upward propagation of gravity waves and influence on the wind speed vertical profile was shown to play an important role in the middle atmosphere of the Earth by Lindzen (1981) but is not reproduced in the current GCM of Venus atmosphere from LMD. (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) In the equatorial regions, the UV albedo at 365 nm varies also with longitude. We argue that this variation may be simply explained by the divergence of the horizontal wind field. In the longitude region (from 60° to -10°) where the horizontal wind speed is increasing in magnitude (stretch), it triggers air upwelling which brings the UV absorber at cloud top level and decreases the albedo and vice versa when the wind is decreasing in magnitude (compression). This picture is fully consistent with the classical view of Venus meridional circulation, with upwelling at equator revealed by horizontal air motions away from equator: the longitude effect is only an additional but important modulation of this effect. This interpretation is comforted by a recent map of cloud top H2O, showing that near the equator the lower UV albedo longitude region is correlated with increased H2O. We argue that H2O enhancement is the sign of upwelling, suggesting that the UV absorber is also brought to cloud top by upwelling.

  18. Spatially resolved surface topography retrieved from far-field intensity scattering measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerrad, Myriam; Lequime, Michel; Amra, Claude

    2014-02-01

    A far-field setup based on the fast and simultaneous recording of 1 million intensity angle-resolved-light-scattering patterns allows both to reconstruct surface topography and to cancel local defects in this topography. A spectral analysis is performed on measured data and allows to extract roughness and slopes mapping of a surface taking into account the spectral bandpass.

  19. Surface topography evolvement of galvanized steels in sheet metal forming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Ying-ke; YU Zhong-qi; ZHANG Wei-gang; JIANG Hao-min; LIN Zhong-qin

    2009-01-01

    U-channel forming tests were performed to investigate the surface topography evolvement of hot-dip galvanized(GI) and galvannealed(GA) steels and the effects of die hardness on sheet metal forming(SMF). Experimental results indicate that the surface roughness values of the two galvanized steels increase with the number of forming, i.e., the surface topographies of galvanized steels are roughened in SMF. Moreover, GI steel has a better ability of damage-resistance than GA steel. The mechanisms of topography evolvement are different in the forming of GI and GA steels. Scratch is the main form of surface damage in the forming of GI steels. The severity of scratch can be decreased by increasing die hardness. GA steel results in exfoliating of the coating firstly and then severe scratching. The surface topography of galvannealed steels can be improved by increasing die hardness. However, the hardness should not be too high.

  20. Exploring scaling laws in surface topography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abedini, M.J. [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada)], E-mail: abedini@shirazu.ac.ir; Shaghaghian, M.R. [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-11-30

    Surface topography affects many soil properties and processes, particularly surface water storage and runoff. Application of fractal analysis helps understand the scaling laws inherent in surface topography at a wide range of spatial scales and climatic regimes. In this research, a high resolution digital elevation model with a 3 mm resolution on one side of the spectrum and large scale DEMs, with a 500 m spatial resolution on the other side were used to explore scaling laws in surface topography. With appropriate exploratory spatial data analysis of both types of data sets, two conventional computational procedures - variogram and Box Counting Methods (BCM) - address scaling laws in surface topography. The results respect scaling laws in surface topography to some extent as neither the plot treatment nor the direction treatment has a significant impact on fractal dimension variability. While in the variogram method, the change in slope in Richardson's plots appears to be the norm rather than the exception; Richardson's plots resulting from box counting implementation lack such mathematical behavior. These breaks in slope might have useful implications for delineating homogeneous hydrologic units and detecting change in trend in hydrologic time series. Furthermore, it is shown that fractal dimension cannot be used to capture anisotropic variabilities both within and among micro-plots. In addition, its numerical value remains insignificant at the 5% level in moving from one direction to another and also from one spatial scale to another while the ordinate intercept could discriminate the surface roughness variability from one spatial scale to another.

  1. SIMULATION STUDY OF IMAGING OF UNDERWATER BOTTOM TOPOGRAPHY BY SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Interaction between current and underwater bottom topography modulates roughness of the sea surface, which in turn yields variation of the radar scattering echo. By using the mechanism, this paper presents a simulation model for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging of underwater bottom topography. The numerical simulations experiments were made using the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) and analytical expression theory of SAR Image in Mischief sea area. It is concluded that the SAR image is better visual when water depth of underwater bottom topography is shallow or gradient of underwater bottom topography is high.

  2. Generalization Rough Set Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Di; ZHANG Jun-feng; HU Shou-song

    2008-01-01

    In order to avoid the discretization in the classical rough set theory, a generlization rough set theory is proposed.At first, the degree of general importance of an attribute and attribute subsets are presented.Then, depending on the degree of general importance of attribute, the space distance can be measured with weighted method.At last, a generalization rough set theory based on the general near neighborhood relation is proposed.The proposed theory partitions the universe into the tolerant modules, and forms lower approximation and upper approximation of the set under general near neighborhood relationship, which avoids the discretization in Pawlak's rough set theory.

  3. Measurement of surface roughness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo

    This document is used in connection with two 3 hours laboratory exercises that are part of the course GEOMETRICAL METROLOGY AND MACHINE TESTING. The laboratories include a demonstration of the function of roughness measuring instruments plus a series of exercises illustrating roughness measurement...

  4. Rough Neutrosophic Sets

    OpenAIRE

    Said Broumi; Florentin Smarandache; Mamoni Dhar

    2013-01-01

     Both neutrosophic sets theory and rough sets theory are emerging as powerful tool for managing uncertainty, indeterminate, incomplete and imprecise information. In this paper we develop an hybrid structure called rough neutrosophic sets and studied their properties. 

  5. On universality of scaling law describing roughness of triple line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Musin, Albina; Whyman, Gene; Barkay, Zahava; Zinigrad, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The fine structure of the three-phase (triple) line was studied for different liquids, various topographies of micro-rough substrates and various wetting regimes. Wetting of porous and pillar-based micro-scaled polymer surfaces was investigated. The triple line was visualized with the environmental scanning electron microscope and scanning electron microscope for the "frozen" triple lines. The value of the roughness exponent ζ for water (ice)/rough polymer systems was located within 0.55-0.63. For epoxy glue/rough polymer systems somewhat lower values of the exponent, 0.42 switch of the exponent, when the roughness size approaches to the correlation length of the defects, is also universal.

  6. Rough interfaces and ultrasonic imaging logging behind casing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Bei; Chen, De-Hua; He, Xiao; Wang, Xiu-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Ultrasonic leaky Lamb waves are sensitive to defects and debonding in multilayer media. In this study, we use the finite-difference method to simulate the response of flexural waves in the presence of defects owing to casing corrosion and rough fluctuations at the cement-formation interface. The ultrasonic obliquely incidence could effectively stimulate the flexural waves. The defects owing to casing corrosion change the amplitude of the earlyarrival flexural wave, which gradually decrease with increasing defect thickness on the exterior walls and is the lowest when the defect length and wavelength were comparable. The scattering at the defects decreases the energy of flexural waves in the casing that leaks directly to fluids. For rough cement-formation interface, the early-arrival flexural waves do not change, whereas the late-arrival flexural waves have reduced amplitude owing to the scattering at rough interface.

  7. Toward optical coherence topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayegh, Samir; Jiang, Yanshui

    2012-03-01

    Commercial OCT systems provide pachymetry measurements. Full corneal topographic information of anterior and posterior corneal surfaces for use in cataract surgery and refractive procedures is a desirable goal and would add to the usefulness of anterior and posterior segment evaluation. While substantial progress has been made towards obtaining "average" central corneal power (D Huang), power in different meridians and topography are still missing. This is usually reported to be due to eye movement. We analyze the role of centration, eye movements and develop a model that allows for the formulation of criteria for obtaining reliable topographic data within ¼ diopter.

  8. F-rough law and the discovery of rough law

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu Jinming; Shi Kaiquan

    2009-01-01

    By using function one direction S-rough sets (function one direction singular rough sets), this article presents the concepts of F-law, F-rough law, and the relation metric of rough law; by using these concepts, this article puts forward the theorem of F-law relation metric, two orders theorem of F-rough law relation metric, the attribute theorem of F-rough law band, the extremum theorem of F-rough law relation metric, the discovery principle of F-rough law and the application of F-rough law.

  9. Automatic Determination of Roughness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    During the second development and the design of AutoCAD, it's necessary for us to choose roughness according to the part's precision grade, it's connecting relationship, and look up the list. In order to make the designer and programmer get the precision grade quickly and accurately, and decide the roughness in the drawing, this article analyze the relationship between the precision and roughness on the basis of analyzing method, and consider the experience in practice, then carry out a set of method formul...

  10. AFM study of the SIMS beam induced roughness in monocrystalline silicon in presence of initial surface or bulk defects of nanometric size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fares, B. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere (UMR CNRS 5511), INSA de Lyon, 7 Avenue Capelle, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: boubker.fares@insa-lyon.fr; Dubois, C. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere (UMR CNRS 5511), INSA de Lyon, 7 Avenue Capelle, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Gautier, B. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere (UMR CNRS 5511), INSA de Lyon, 7 Avenue Capelle, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Dupuy, J.C. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere (UMR CNRS 5511), INSA de Lyon, 7 Avenue Capelle, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Cayrel, F. [Universite de Tours, Laboratoire de Micro-Electronique de Puissance, 16 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France); Gaudin, G. [Universite de Tours, Laboratoire de Micro-Electronique de Puissance, 16 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France)

    2006-07-30

    In this paper, the SIMS beam induced roughness (BIR) in monocrystalline Si in presence of initial surface or bulk defects of nanometric size is studied. We follow the development of the BIR by monitoring the increase of Si{sup 2+} and SiO{sub 2} {sup +} signals during SIMS sputtering. The topography of the crater bottoms is measured at different steps of the evolution of the roughness using an atomic force microscope (AFM). We show that in presence of nanometric sized defects on the surface or in the bulk, the BIR develops far more rapidly than usual. It appears as soon as the crater reaches the defects and, as reported on Si free from any treatment, the same morphology evidencing waves perpendicular to the sputtering beam develops rapidly. This study of the behaviour of the BIR in presence of voluntarily introduced defects allows us to better understand the basic physical phenomena involved in its apparition.

  11. Umatilla - Rough Fish Eradication

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In order to enhance environmental conditions in the McCormack Slough on Umatilla NWR, the population of rough fish, including common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and...

  12. Topography of Io (color)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The images used to create this color composite of Io were acquired by Galileo during its ninth orbit (C9) of Jupiter and are part of a sequence of images designed to map the topography or relief on Io and to monitor changes in the surface color due to volcanic activity. Obtaining images at low illumination angles is like taking a picture from a high altitude around sunrise or sunset. Such lighting conditions emphasize the topography of the volcanic satellite. Several mountains up to a few miles high can be seen in this view, especially near the upper right. Some of these mountains appear to be tilted crustal blocks. Most of the dark spots correspond to active volcanic centers.North is to the top of the picture which merges images obtained with the clear, red, green, and violet filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. . The resolution is 8.3 kilometers per picture element. The image was taken on June 27, 1997 at a range of 817,000 kilometers by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  13. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many t...

  14. Study of the tear topography dynamics using a lateral shearing interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubra, Alfredo; Paterson, Carl; Dainty, Christopher

    2004-12-01

    The dynamics of the pre-corneal tear film topography are studied on 21 subjects with a purpose-built lateral shearing interferometer. Interesting tear topography features such as post-blink undulation, break-up, eyelid-produced bumps/ridges, bubbles and rough pre-contact lens tear surfaces were recorded. Using the calculated tear topography maps, the effects of the tear dynamics in visual performance, refractive surgery and ophthalmic adaptive optics are discussed in terms of wavefront RMS. The potential of lateral shearing interferometry for clinical applications such as dry eye diagnosis and contact lens performance studies is illustrated by the recorded topography features such as post-blink undulation, break-up, eyelid-produced bumps/ridges, bubbles and rough tear surfaces in front of contact lenses.

  15. Isostasy, flexure, and dynamic topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvirtzman, Zohar; Faccenna, Claudio; Becker, Thorsten W.

    2016-06-01

    A fundamental scientific question is, what controls the Earth's topography? Although the theoretical principles of isostasy, flexure, and dynamic topography are widely discussed, the parameters needed to apply these principles are frequently not available. Isostatic factors controlling lithospheric buoyancy are frequently uncertain and non-isostatic factors, such as lithospheric bending towards subduction zones and dynamic topography, are hard to distinguish. The question discussed here is whether a set of simple rules that relate topography to lithospheric structure in various tectonic environments can be deduced in a way that missing parameters can be approximated; or does each area behave differently, making generalizations problematic. We contribute to this issue analyzing the Asia-Africa-Arabia-Europe domain following a top-down strategy. We compile a new crustal thickness map and remove the contribution of the crust from the observed elevation. Then, the challenge is to interpret the residual topography in terms of mantle lithosphere buoyancy and dynamics. Based on systematic relationships between tectonic environments and factors controlling topography, we argue that crustal buoyancy and mantle lithospheric density can be approximated from available geological data and that regions near mantle upwelling or downwelling are easily identified by their extreme residual topography. Yet, even for other areas, calculating lithospheric thickness from residual topography is problematic, because distinguishing variations in mantle lithosphere thickness from sub-lithospheric dynamics is difficult. Fortunately, the area studied here provides an opportunity to examine this issue. Based on the conjunction between the Afar Plume and the mid-ocean ridge in the nearby Gulf of Aden and southern Red Sea, we constrain the maximal amplitude of dynamic topography to ~ 1 km. This estimate is based on a narrow definition of dynamic topography that only includes sub

  16. Underlayer Roughness Influence on the Properties of ag Thin Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pei; Wang, Reng; Liu, Dingquan; Zhang, Fengshan; Su, Weitao; Xu, Xiaofeng

    The effects of the roughness of ZnS underlayer on the microstructure, optical, and electrical properties of nanometer Ag thin film have been investigated in this paper. Nanometer Ag thin films in glass/ZnS/7.5 nm Ag/30 nm ZnS stacks have been deposited and analyzed. In the stacks, the underlayers of ZnS have been sputtered with various thicknesses to generate various surface roughnesses. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been used to study the crystal structure of Ag films. The surface topography and the roughness of ZnS underlayer have been analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The sheet resistant will become larger as the increasing of the roughness. The optical constants can be derived by fitting the transmission and reflectance spectrum. From optical constants comparison of Ag films, with the surface of the stack becoming rougher, it was found that the refractive index will increase but the extinction coefficient will decrease.

  17. SV波入射下峡谷地形对多支撑大跨桥梁地震反应影响分析%Canyon topography effects on seismic responses of multi-support bridge under incident SV seismic waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周国良; 李小军; 李铁萍; 侯春林

    2012-01-01

    以二维河谷地形在SV波垂直入射和斜入射下的结果作为地震动输入,分析了地形因素导致的地震动差异对一座桥墩高差悬殊的连续刚构桥地震反应的影响,并与一致激励下的结果进行了对比.结果表明:与一致激励相比,考虑地形效应的多点激励作用下,刚构桥地震反应存在显著差异,难以找到规律性,不同的结构部位其最大内力的表现各不一样;多点激励使主梁遭受不利反应;斜入射对低墩和主梁有显著影响,使其内力显著增加或使结构各部位内力分布明显不均衡;与低墩相比,高柔的桥墩对多点激励相对不敏感;大跨度桥梁抗震分析与设计应考虑局部场地和入射波的入射方向和角度的影响.%The seismic response of a reinforced concrete continuous rigid frame bridge is analyzed considering the scattering of SV seismic waves by canyon topography. The differences of structural responses between uniform and nonuniform seismic excitation cases are revealed. The results indicate that the canyon topography has significant and complex effects on the seismic response of the bridge. Different structural members suffer critical responses in different analysis cases. The low piers and rigid frames are more sensitive to the nonuniform ground motions obtained from the seismic response analysis of canyon topography in the case of oblique incidence of SV waves; otherwise the flexible high piers are insensitive. Canyon topography effects as well as the incidence angle of the waves should be regarded as important factors taken into account in aseismic design.

  18. Experimental Gravity Currents Propagating Downslope Over A Synthetic Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos Cuevas, Andrea; Ruiz-Angulo, Angel; Palacios-Morales, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    Lock-release gravity currents are studied experimentally in order to investigate their dynamics and the mixing process between them and the ambient fluid. We produced these currents in a laboratory tank and allow them to propagate downslope first in a flat slope and then in a rough one with a synthetic topography. This topography is similar to the one of a side of a mountain near mexico's valley. Our aim is to investigate the dynamics of gravity currents as similar as possible to the mountain breezes that can develop around this valley. To the best of our knowledge, there are few experimental investigations that take into account the roughness of the slope. For each experiment, we obtain the instantaneous velocity fields using the standard piv technique. From the velocity fields, we estimate the entrainment coefficient time series. We found that this coefficient depends on the roughness of the surface where the current propagates. Besides, pressure time series were obtained in synthetic stations along the rough profile. These series showed a very clear signal of the gravity current propagating along the slope.

  19. Metabolic topography of Parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Seung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most frequent neurodegenerative diseases, which mainly affects the elderly. Parkinson's disease is often difficult to differentiate from atypical parkinson disorder such as progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, dementia with Lewy body, and corticobasal ganglionic degeneration, based on the clinical findings because of the similarity of phenotypes and lack of diagnostic markers. The accurate diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinson disorders is not only important for deciding on treatment regimens and providing prognosis, but also it is critical for studies designed to investigate etiology and pathogenesis of parkinsonism and to develop new therapeutic strategies. Although degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system results in marked loss of striatal dopamine content in most of the diseases causing parkinsonism, pathologic studies revealed different topographies of the neuronal cell loss in Parkinsonism. Since the regional cerebral glucose metabolism is a marker of integrated local synaptic activity and as such is sensitive to both direct neuronal/synaptic damage and secondary functional disruption at synapses distant from the primary site of pathology, and assessment of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism with F-18 FDG PET is useful in the differential diagnosis of parkinsonism and evaluating the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism.

  20. Prediction of the Functional Performance of Machined Components Based on Surface Topography: State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzesik, Wit

    2016-10-01

    This survey overviews the functional performance of manufactured components produced by typical finishing machining operations in terms of their topographical characteristics. Surface topographies were characterized using both profile (2D) and 3D (areal) surface roughness parameters. The prediction of typical functional properties such as fatigue, friction, wear, bonding and corrosion is discussed based on appropriate surface roughness parameters. Some examples of real 3D surface topographies produced with desired functional characteristics are provided. This survey highlights technological possibilities of producing surfaces with enhanced functional properties by machining processes.

  1. Scattering from rough thin films: discrete-dipole-approximation simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, Hannu; Lumme, Kari

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the wave-optical light scattering properties of deformed thin circular films of constant thickness using the discrete-dipole approximation. Effects on the intensity distribution of the scattered light due to different statistical roughness models, model dependent roughness parameters, and uncorrelated, random, small-scale porosity of the inhomogeneous medium are studied. The suitability of the discrete-dipole approximation for rough-surface scattering problems is evaluated by considering thin films as computationally feasible rough-surface analogs. The effects due to small-scale inhomogeneity of the scattering medium are compared with the analytic approximation by Maxwell Garnett, and the results are found to agree with the approximation.

  2. Dynamic wetting and spreading and the role of topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I; Shirtcliffe, Neil J

    2009-11-18

    The spreading of a droplet of a liquid on a smooth solid surface is often described by the Hoffman-de Gennes law, which relates the edge speed, v(e), to the dynamic and equilibrium contact angles θ and θ(e) through [Formula: see text]. When the liquid wets the surface completely and the equilibrium contact angle vanishes, the edge speed is proportional to the cube of the dynamic contact angle. When the droplets are non-volatile this law gives rise to simple power laws with time for the contact angle and other parameters in both the capillary and gravity dominated regimes. On a textured surface, the equilibrium state of a droplet is strongly modified due to the amplification of the surface chemistry induced tendencies by the topography. The most common example is the conversion of hydrophobicity into superhydrophobicity. However, when the surface chemistry favors partial wetting, topography can result in a droplet spreading completely. A further, frequently overlooked consequence of topography is that the rate at which an out-of-equilibrium droplet spreads should also be modified. In this report, we review ideas related to the idea of topography induced wetting and consider how this may relate to dynamic wetting and the rate of droplet spreading. We consider the effect of the Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter equations on the driving forces and discuss how these may modify power laws for spreading. We relate the ideas to both the hydrodynamic viscous dissipation model and the molecular-kinetic theory of spreading. This suggests roughness and solid surface fraction modified Hoffman-de Gennes laws relating the edge speed to the dynamic and equilibrium contact angle. We also consider the spreading of small droplets and stripes of non-volatile liquids in the capillary regime and large droplets in the gravity regime. In the case of small non-volatile droplets spreading completely, a roughness modified Tanner's law giving the dependence of dynamic contact angle on time is

  3. Subcellular fractionation of rough microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, David D

    2014-09-02

    When eukaryotic cells are homogenized, the rough endoplasmic reticula are converted into small vesicles, called rough microsomes. Strategies for the isolation of rough microsomes are introduced here, as are methods for evaluating the purity and intactness of an isolated rough microsomal fraction.

  4. Dualities in Covering Rough Operations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William Zhu

    2006-01-01

    Rough set theory is a technique of granular computing. In this paper, we study a type of generalized rough sets based on covering. There are several literatures[ 1,40-43 ] exploring covering-based rough sets. Our focus of this paper is on the dualities in rough operations.

  5. Roughing up Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Li, Sophia Zhengzi; Todorov, Viktor

    Motivated by the implications from a stylized equilibrium pricing framework, we investigate empirically how individual equity prices respond to continuous, or \\smooth," and jumpy, or \\rough," market price moves, and how these different market price risks, or betas, are priced in the cross-section...

  6. Island-trapped Waves, Internal Waves, and Island Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Island-trapped waves , internal waves , and island circulation T. M. Shaun Johnston Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California...topography. As strong flows encounter small islands, points, and submarine ridges, it is expected that wakes, eddies, and arrested internal lee waves ...form drag, lee waves , eddy generation) over small-scale topographic features and (ii) fundamentally nonlinear processes (turbulent island wakes

  7. Effect of electrochemical polishing time on surface topography of mild steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baocheng Wang; Jinhua Zhu

    2007-01-01

    The variation in altitude density function (ADF) of the surface topography of mild steel during electrochemical polishing (ECP) was investigated, and the mechanism of the variation of surface roughness with polishing time was analyzed. The results show that the variation trend of ADF with polishing time is flat-steep-flat; the variation of surface roughness results in the different distributions of surface current density, and there is a fine surface smoothness in the special period of ECP from 4 to 8 s.

  8. Skin friction measurements of mathematically generated roughness in the transitionally- to fully-rough regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Julio; Schultz, Michael; Flack, Karen

    2016-11-01

    Engineering systems are affected by surface roughness which cause an increase in drag leading to significant performance penalties. One important question is how to predict frictional drag purely based upon surface topography. Although significant progress has been made in recent years, this has proven to be challenging. The present work takes a systematic approach by generating surface roughness in which surfaces parameters, such as rms , skewness, can be controlled. Surfaces were produced using the random Fourier modes method with enforced power-law spectral slopes. The surfaces were manufactured using high resolution 3D-printing. In this study three surfaces with constant amplitude and varying slope, P, were investigated (P = - 0 . 5 , - 1 . 0 , - 1 . 5). Skin-friction measurements were conducted in a high Reynolds number turbulent channel flow facility, covering a wide range of Reynolds numbers, from hydraulic-smooth to fully-rough regimes. Results show that some long wavelength roughness scales do not contribute significantly to the frictional drag, thus highlighting the need for filtering in the calculation of surface statistics. Upon high-pass filtering, it was found that krms is highly correlated with the measured ks.

  9. Rough similarity degree and rough close degree in rough fuzzy sets and the applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jian; Xu Xiaojing; Shi Kaiquan

    2008-01-01

    Based on rough similarity degree of rough sets and close degree of fuzzy sets,the definitions of rough similarity degree and rough close degree of rough fuzzy sets are given,which can be used to measure the similar degree between two rough fuzzy sets.The properties and theorems are listed.Using the two new measures,the method of clustering in the rough fuzzy system can be obtained.After clustering,the new fuzzy sample can be recognized by the principle of maximal similarity degree.

  10. Fractal reconstruction of rough membrane surface related with membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meijia; Chen, Jianrong; Ma, Yuanjun; Shen, Liguo; He, Yiming; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, fractal reconstruction of rough membrane surface with a modified Weierstrass-Mandelbrot (WM) function was conducted. The topography of rough membrane surface was measured by an atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the results showed that the membrane surface was isotropous. Accordingly, the fractal dimension and roughness of membrane surface were calculated by the power spectrum method. The rough membrane surface was reconstructed on the MATLAB platform with the parameter values acquired from raw AFM data. The reconstructed membrane was much similar to the real membrane morphology measured by AFM. The parameters (including average roughness and root mean square (RMS) roughness) associated with membrane morphology for the model and real membrane were calculated, and a good match of roughness parameters between the reconstructed surface and real membrane was found, indicating the feasibility of the new developed method. The reconstructed membrane surface can be potentially used for interaction energy evaluation.

  11. Velopharyngeal mucosal surface topography in healthy subjects and subjects with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambeth, Christopher; Amatoury, Jason; Wang, Ziyu; Foster, Sheryl; Amis, Terence; Kairaitis, Kristina

    2017-03-01

    Macroscopic pharyngeal anatomical abnormalities are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of upper airway (UA) obstruction in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Microscopic changes in the UA mucosal lining of OSA subjects are reported; however, the impact of these changes on UA mucosal surface topography is unknown. This study aimed to 1) develop methodology to measure UA mucosal surface topography, and 2) compare findings from healthy and OSA subjects. Ten healthy and eleven OSA subjects were studied. Awake, gated (end expiration), head and neck position controlled magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of the velopharynx (VP) were obtained. VP mucosal surfaces were segmented from axial images, and three-dimensional VP mucosal surface models were constructed. Curvature analysis of the models was used to study the VP mucosal surface topography. Principal, mean, and Gaussian curvatures were used to define surface shape composition and surface roughness of the VP mucosal surface models. Significant differences were found in the surface shape composition, with more saddle/spherical and less flat/cylindrical shapes in OSA than healthy VP mucosal surface models (P surface models were also found to have more mucosal surface roughness (P surface models. Our novel methodology was utilized to model the VP mucosal surface of OSA and healthy subjects. OSA subjects were found to have different VP mucosal surface topography, composed of increased irregular shapes and increased roughness. We speculate increased irregularity in VP mucosal surface may increase pharyngeal collapsibility as a consequence of friction-related pressure loss.NEW & NOTEWORTHY A new methodology was used to model the upper airway mucosal surface topography from magnetic resonance images of patients with obstructive sleep apnea and healthy adults. Curvature analysis was used to analyze the topography of the models, and a new metric was derived to describe the mucosal surface roughness. Increased roughness was

  12. IMPROVED ACCURACY AND ROUGHNESS MEASURES FOR ROUGH SETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Yuming; Xu Baowen

    2002-01-01

    Accuracy and roughness, proposed by Pawlak(1982), might draw a conclusion inconsistent with our intuition in some cases. This letter analyzes the limitations in these measures and proposes improved accuracy and roughness measures based on information theory.

  13. Elastic Reverse Time Migration (RTM) From Surface Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Naveed; Chen, Xiaofei

    2017-04-01

    Seismic Migration is a promising data processing technique to construct subsurface images by projecting the recorded seismic data at surface back to their origins. There are numerous Migration methods. Among them, Reverse Time Migration (RTM) is considered a robust and standard imaging technology in present day exploration industry as well as in academic research field because of its superior performance compared to traditional migration methods. Although RTM is extensive computing and time consuming but it can efficiently handle the complex geology, highly dipping reflectors and strong lateral velocity variation all together. RTM takes data recorded at the surface as a boundary condition and propagates the data backwards in time until the imaging condition is met. It can use the same modeling algorithm that we use for forward modeling. The classical seismic exploration theory assumes flat surface which is almost impossible in practice for land data. So irregular surface topography has to be considered in simulation of seismic wave propagation, which is not always a straightforward undertaking. In this study, Curved grid finite difference method (CG-FDM) is adapted to model elastic seismic wave propagation to investigate the effect of surface topography on RTM results and explore its advantages and limitations with synthetic data experiments by using Foothill model with topography as the true model. We focus on elastic wave propagation rather than acoustic wave because earth actually behaves as an elastic body. Our results strongly emphasize on the fact that irregular surface topography must be considered for modeling of seismic wave propagation to get better subsurface images specially in mountainous scenario and suggest practitioners to properly handled the geometry of data acquired on irregular topographic surface in their imaging algorithms.

  14. Three-dimensional measurement and characterization of grinding tool topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Changcai; Blunt, Liam; Jiang, Xiangqian; Xu, Xipeng; Huang, Hui; Ye, Ruifang

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive 3-dimensional measurement and characterization method for grinding tool topography was developed. A stylus instrument (SOMICRONIC, France) was used to measure the surface of a metal-bonded diamond grinding tool. The sampled data was input the software SurfStand developed by Centre for Precision Technology (CPT) for reconstruction and further characterization of the surface. Roughness parameters pertaining to the general surface and specific feature parameters relating to the grinding grits, such as height and angle peak curvature have been calculated. The methodology of measurement has been compared with that using an optical microscope. The comparison shows that the three-dimensional characterization has distinct advantages for grinding tool topography assessment. It is precise, convenient and comprehensive so it is suitable for precision measurement and analysis where an understanding of the grinding tool and its cutting ability are required.

  15. Thermal slip for liquids at rough solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengbin; Chen, Yongping; Peterson, G. P.

    2014-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to examine the thermal slip of liquids at rough solid surfaces as characterized by fractal Cantor structures. The temperature profiles, potential energy distributions, thermal slip, and interfacial thermal resistance are investigated and evaluated for a variety of surface topographies. In addition, the effects of liquid-solid interaction, surface stiffness, and boundary condition on thermal slip length are presented. Our results indicate that the presence of roughness expands the low potential energy regions in adjacent liquids, enhances the energy transfer at liquid-solid interface, and decreases the thermal slip. Interestingly, the thermal slip length and thermal resistance for liquids in contact with solid surfaces depends not only on the statistical roughness height, but also on the fractal dimension (i.e., topographical spectrum).

  16. Pavement roughness and skid properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Road roughness and roadway safety as it relates to both surface and air transportation are discussed. The role of road roughness in vehicle ride, the measurement of roughness, the evaluation of riding confort, and the effect of grooving pavements are discussed. The effects of differential pavement friction on the response of cars in skidding maneuvers is discussed.

  17. Modelling dynamic roughness during floods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paarlberg, Andries; Dohmen-Janssen, Catarine M.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Termes, A.P.P.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a dynamic roughness model to predict water levels during floods. Hysteresis effects of dune development are explicitly included. It is shown that differences between the new dynamic roughness model, and models where the roughness coefficient is calibrated, are most

  18. Rough-Granular Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrzej Skowron

    2006-01-01

    Solving complex problems by multi-agent systems in distributed environments requires new approximate reasoning methods based on new computing paradigms. One such recently emerging computing paradigm is Granular Computing(GC). We discuss the Rough-Granular Computing(RGC) approach to modeling of computations in complex adaptive systems and multiagent systems as well as for approximate reasoning about the behavior of such systems. The RGC methods have been successfully applied for solving complex problems in areas such as identification of objects or behavioral patterns by autonomous systems, web mining, and sensor fusion.

  19. On Random Rough Sets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weizhi Wu

    2006-01-01

    In this paper,the concept of a random rough set which includes the mechanisms of numeric and non-numeric aspects of uncertain knowledge is introduced. It is proved that for any belief structure and its inducing belief and plausibility measures there exists a random approximation space such that the associated lower and upper probabilities are respectively the given belief and plausibility measures, and vice versa. And for a random approximation space generated from a totally random set, its inducing lower and upper probabilities are respectively a pair of necessity and possibility measures.

  20. Lake topography and wind waves determining seasonal-spatial dynamics of total suspended matter in turbid Lake Taihu, China: assessment using long-term high-resolution MERIS data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlin; Shi, Kun; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhou, Yongqiang; Qin, Boqiang

    2014-01-01

    Multiple comprehensive in situ bio-optical investigations were conducted from 2005 to 2010 and covered a large variability of total suspended matter (TSM) in Lake Taihu to calibrate and validate a TSM concentration estimation model based on Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) data. The estimation model of the TSM concentration in Lake Taihu was developed using top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance of MERIS image data at band 9 in combination with a regional empirical atmospheric correction model, which was strongly correlated with the in situ TSM concentration (r(2) = 0.720, pmean square error (RRMSE) and mean relative error (MRE) were 36.9% and 31.6%, respectively, based on an independent validation dataset that produced reliable estimations of the TSM concentration. The developed algorithm was applied to 50 MERIS images from 2003 to 2011 to obtain a high spatial and temporal heterogeneity of TSM concentrations in Lake Taihu. Seasonally, the highest and lowest TSM concentrations were found in spring and autumn, respectively. Spatially, TSM concentrations were high in the southern part and center of the lake and low in Xukou Bay, East Lake Taihu. The lake topography, including the water depth and distance from the shore, had a significant effect on the TSM spatial distribution. A significant correlation was found between the daily average wind speed and TSM concentration (r(2)= 0.685, p<0.001, and n = 50), suggesting a critical role of wind speed in the TSM variations in Lake Taihu. In addition, a low TSM concentration was linked to the appearance of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV). Therefore, TSM dynamics were controlled by the lake topography, wind-driven sediment resuspension and SAV distribution.

  1. Rough weather rescue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This report, which was commissioned by the Offshore Division of the Health and Safety Executive, reviews the type of equipment and techniques used to rescue people from the water around offshore platforms in rough weather. It also examines the limitations of the equipment in extreme conditions and reports the views of the various industry sectors (as determined by a questionnaire survey). The type of incidents covered by the report include: man overboard; helicopter ditching; and evacuation from totally enclosed motor propelled survival craft (TEMPSC) and life rafts. The report considers: the approach taken by other oil-producing countries; current escape, evacuation and rescue (EER) practices for the UK Continental Shelf (UKCS); environmental limits; methods for rescue and recovery from the water and TEMPSC; launch and recovery systems; fast rescue craft (FSC) and daughter craft; emergency response and rescue vessels; helicopters; casualty personal protection equipment; claimed versus actual equipment performance; training and practice procedures; attitudes to environmental limits; lessons learnt from incidents; mechanical recovery devices; equipment design and use in rough weather; and recommendations for improvements.

  2. Protein adsorption on materials surfaces with nano-topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Protein adsorption behavior on the surfaces of biomedical materials is highly related to the biocompatibility of the materials. In the past, numerous research reports were mainly focused on the effect of chemical components of a material's surface on protein adsorption. The effect of surface topography on protein adsorption, the topic of this review, has recently receuvedkeen interest. The influence of surface nano-topographic factors, including roughness, curvature and geometry, on protein adsorption as well as the protein adsorption behavior, such as the amount of protein adsorbed, the activity and morphology of adsorbed protein, is introduced.

  3. Rough solutions of Einstein vacuum equations in CMCSH gauge

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we consider very rough solutions to Cauchy problem for the Einstein vacuum equations in CMC spacial harmonic gauge, and obtain the local well-posedness result in $H^s, s>2$. The novelty of our approach lies in that, without resorting to the standard paradifferential regularization over the rough, Einstein metric $\\bg$, we manage to implement the commuting vector field approach to prove Strichartz estimate for geometric wave equation $\\Box_\\bg \\phi=0$ directly.

  4. Loading-unloading hysteresis loop of randomly rough adhesive contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Giuseppe; Pierro, Elena; Recchia, Giuseppina

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the loading and unloading behavior of soft solids in adhesive contact with randomly rough profiles. The roughness is assumed to be described by a self-affine fractal on a limited range of wave vectors. A spectral method is exploited to generate such randomly rough surfaces. The results are statistically averaged, and the calculated contact area and applied load are shown as a function of the penetration, for loading and unloading conditions. We found that the combination of adhesion forces and roughness leads to a hysteresis loading-unloading loop. This shows that energy can be lost simply as a consequence of roughness and van der Waals forces, as in this case a large number of local energy minima exist and the system may be trapped in metastable states. We numerically quantify the hysteretic loss and assess the influence of the surface statistical properties and the energy of adhesion on the hysteresis process.

  5. Spectral Radiative Properties of Two-Dimensional Rough Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yimin; Han, Yuge; Zhou, Yue

    2012-12-01

    Spectral radiative properties of two-dimensional rough surfaces are important for both academic research and practical applications. Besides material properties, surface structures have impact on the spectral radiative properties of rough surfaces. Based on the finite difference time domain algorithm, this paper studies the spectral energy propagation process on a two-dimensional rough surface and analyzes the effect of different factors such as the surface structure, angle, and polarization state of the incident wave on the spectral radiative properties of the two-dimensional rough surface. To quantitatively investigate the spatial distribution of energy reflected from the rough surface, the concept of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function is introduced. Correlation analysis between the reflectance and different impact factors is conducted to evaluate the influence degree. Comparison between the theoretical and experimental data is given to elucidate the accuracy of the computational code. This study is beneficial to optimizing the surface structures of optoelectronic devices such as solar cells.

  6. SRF Cavity Surface Topography Characterization Using Replica Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Xu, M.J. Kelley, C.E. Reece

    2012-07-01

    To better understand the roll of topography on SRF cavity performance, we seek to obtain detailed topographic information from the curved practical cavity surfaces. Replicas taken from a cavity interior surface provide internal surface molds for fine Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and stylus profilometry. In this study, we confirm the replica resolution both on surface local defects such as grain boundary and etching pits and compare the surface uniform roughness with the aid of Power Spectral Density (PSD) where we can statistically obtain roughness parameters at different scales. A series of sampling locations are at the same magnetic field chosen at the same latitude on a single cell cavity to confirm the uniformity. Another series of sampling locations at different magnetic field amplitudes are chosen for this replica on the same cavity for later power loss calculation. We also show that application of the replica followed by rinsing does not adversely affect the cavity performance.

  7. The propagation of internal undular bores over variable topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimshaw, R.; Yuan, C.

    2016-10-01

    In the coastal ocean, large amplitude, horizontally propagating internal wave trains are commonly observed. These are long nonlinear waves and can be modelled by equations of the Korteweg-de Vries type. Typically they occur in regions of variable bottom topography when the variable-coefficient Korteweg-de Vries equation is an appropriate model. Of special interest is the situation when the coefficient of the quadratic nonlinear term changes sign at a certain critical point. This case has been widely studied for a solitary wave, which is extinguished at the critical point and replaced by a train of solitary waves of the opposite polarity to the incident wave, riding on a pedestal of the original polarity. Here we examine the same situation for an undular bore, represented by a modulated periodic wave train. Numerical simulations and some asymptotic analysis based on Whitham modulation equations show that the leading solitary waves in the undular bore are destroyed and replaced by a developing rarefaction wave supporting emerging solitary waves of the opposite polarity. In contrast the rear of the undular bore emerges with the same shape, but with reduced wave amplitudes, a shorter overall length scale and moves more slowly.

  8. Shape and topography corrections for planetary nuclear spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Hendricks, John S.

    2015-11-01

    The elemental composition of planetary surfaces can be determined using gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy. Most planetary bodies for which nuclear spectroscopy data have been acquired are round, and simple, analytic corrections for measurement geometry can be applied; however, recent measurements of the irregular asteroid 4 Vesta by Dawn required more detailed corrections using a shape model (Prettyman et al., Science 2012). In addition, subtle artifacts of topography have been observed in low altitude measurements of lunar craters, with potential implications for polar hydrogen content (Eke et al., JGR 2015). To explore shape and topography effects, we have updated the general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX to include a polygonal shape model (Prettyman and Hendricks, LPSC 2015). The shape model is fully integrated with the code’s 3D combinatorial geometry modules. A voxel-based acceleration algorithm enables fast ray-intersection calculations needed for Monte Carlo. As modified, MCNPX can model neutron and gamma ray transport within natural surfaces using global and/or regional shape/topography data (e.g. from photogrammetry and laser altimetry). We are using MCNPX to explore the effect of small-scale roughness, regional-, and global-topography for asteroids, comets and close-up measurements of high-relief features on larger bodies, such as the lunar surface. MCNPX can characterize basic effects on measurements by an orbiting spectrometer such as 1) the angular distribution of emitted particles, 2) shielding of galactic cosmic rays by surrounding terrain and 3) re-entrant scattering. In some cases, re-entrant scattering can be ignored, leading to a fast ray-tracing model that treats effects 1 and 2. The algorithm is applied to forward modeling and spatial deconvolution of epithermal neutron data acquired at Vesta. Analyses of shape/topography effects and correction strategies are presented for Vesta, selected small bodies and cratered

  9. Spectral emissivity of type E235B low carbon structural steel with different roughnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kun; Zhang, Feilin; Liu, Dong; Liu, Yufang

    2017-08-01

    A self-built experimental apparatus was employed to study the spectral emissivity of type E235B low carbon structural steel in the wavelength range 2-15 μm at different temperatures by energy comparison method. The surface roughness and topography of the steel E235B were determined by a roughness tester and a scanning electron microscopy, respectively. And then, the spectral emissivity of steel E235B with six different roughnesses was measured before and after oxidation. The measurement results showed that the spectral emissivity increased with the increasing temperature and surface roughness before oxidation. The effect of roughness on the spectral emissivity is different at different wavelength and temperature ranges. However, the oscillatory behavior of the spectral emissivity was observed after oxidation. To explore the possible reasons for emissivity variation, the changes of surface roughness and optical roughness were investigated after oxidation. It is found that both the surface roughness and optical roughness increased after oxidation. Although the optical roughness can be used as one of the parameters to evaluate the effect of surface roughness on the spectral emissivity, it is insufficient to describe the effect of surface morphology on the spectral emissivity.

  10. A laboratory study of low-mode internal tide scattering by finite-amplitude topography

    CERN Document Server

    Peacock, Thomas; Didelle, Henri; Viboud, Samuel; Dauxois, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    We present the first laboratory experimental results concerning the scattering of a low-mode internal tide by a gaussian topography. Experiments performed at the Coriolis Platform in Grenoble used a recently-conceived internal wave generator as a means of producing a high-quality mode-1 wave field. The evolution of the wave field in the absence and presence of a supercritical Gaussian was studied by performing spatiotemporal modal decompositions of velocity field data obtained using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The results support predictions that large-amplitude supercritical topography produces significant reflection of the internal tide and transfer of energy from low to high modes.

  11. Rough Surface Contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Nguyen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the contact of general rough curved surfaces having nearly identical geometries, assuming the contact at each differential area obeys the model proposed by Greenwood and Williamson. In order to account for the most general gross geometry, principles of differential geometry of surface are applied. This method while requires more rigorous mathematical manipulations, the fact that it preserves the original surface geometries thus makes the modeling procedure much more intuitive. For subsequent use, differential geometry of axis-symmetric surface is considered instead of general surface (although this “general case” can be done as well in Chapter 3.1. The final formulas for contact area, load, and frictional torque are derived in Chapter 3.2.

  12. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers to Distributed Roughness and Acoustic Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, P.

    2013-01-01

    Boundary-layer receptivity and stability of Mach 6 flows over smooth and rough seven-degree half-angle sharp-tipped cones are numerically investigated. The receptivity of the boundary layer to slow acoustic disturbances, fast acoustic disturbances, and vortical disturbances is considered. The effects of three-dimensional isolated roughness on the receptivity and stability are also simulated. The results for the smooth cone show that the instability waves are generated in the leading edge region and that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves than to the fast acoustic waves. Vortical disturbances also generate unstable second modes, however the receptivity coefficients are smaller than that of the slow acoustic wave. Distributed roughness elements located near the nose region decreased the receptivity of the second mode generated by the slow acoustic wave by a small amount. Roughness elements distributed across the continuous spectrum increased the receptivity of the second mode generated by the slow and fast acoustic waves and the vorticity wave. The largest increase occurred for the vorticity wave. Roughness elements distributed across the synchronization point did not change the receptivity of the second modes generated by the acoustic waves. The receptivity of the second mode generated by the vorticity wave increased in this case, but the increase is lower than that occurred with the roughness elements located across the continuous spectrum. The simulations with an isolated roughness element showed that the second mode waves generated by the acoustic disturbances are not influenced by the small roughness element. Due to the interaction, a three-dimensional wave is generated. However, the amplitude is orders of magnitude smaller than the two-dimensional wave.

  13. The influence of surface treatment on the implant roughness pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Borges Rosa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An important parameter for the clinical success of dental implants is the formation of direct contact between the implant and surrounding bone, whose quality is directly influenced by the implant surface roughness. A screw-shaped design and a surface with an average roughness of Sa of 1-2 µm showed a better result. The combination of blasting and etching has been a commonly used surface treatment technique. The versatility of this type of treatment allows for a wide variation in the procedures in order to obtain the desired roughness. OBJECTIVES: To compare the roughness values and morphological characteristics of 04 brands of implants, using the same type of surface treatment. In addition, to compare the results among brands, in order to assess whether the type of treatment determines the values and the characteristics of implant surface roughness. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three implants were purchased directly from each selected company in the market, i.e., 03 Brazilian companies (Biomet 3i of Brazil, Neodent and Titaniumfix and 01 Korean company (Oneplant. The quantitative or numerical characterization of the roughness was performed using an interferometer. The qualitative analysis of the surface topography obtained with the treatment was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy images. RESULTS: The evaluated implants showed a significant variation in roughness values: Sa for Oneplant was 1.01 µm; Titaniumfix reached 0.90 µm; implants from Neodent 0.67 µm, and Biomet 3i of Brazil 0.53 µm. Moreover, the SEM images showed very different patterns for the surfaces examined. CONCCLUSIONS: The surface treatment alone is not able to determine the roughness values and characteristics.

  14. Characterizing the statistical structure of bathymetry and topography as a Matérn process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Frederik J.; Olhede, Sofia C.; Eggers, Gabe L.; Lewis, Kevin W.

    2014-05-01

    Describing and classifying the statistical structure of topography and bathymetry is of much interest across the geophysical sciences. Oceanographers are interested in the roughness of seafloor bathymetry as a parameter that can be linked to internal-wave generation and mixing of ocean currents. Tectonicists are searching for ways to link the shape and fracturing of the ocean floor to build detailed models of the evolution of the ocean basins in a plate-tectonic context. Geomorphologists are building time-dependent models of the surface that benefit from sparsely parameterized representations whose evolution can be described by differential equations. Geophysicists seek access to parameterized forms for the spectral shape of topographic or bathymetric loading at various (sub)surface interfaces in order to use the joint structure of topography and gravity for inversions for the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere. Planetary scientists are in need of robust terrain-classification models to help unravel the cratering history and tectonic evolution of planetary surfaces, for the selection of suitable landing sites, and for purposes as mundane as the prediction of wear and tear on rover wheels. Finally, statisticians, mathematicians and computer scientists are interested in the analysis of texture for purposes of out-of-sample prediction, extension, and in-painting for application in fields as diverse as computer graphics and medical imaging. A unified geostatistical framework for the description, characterization and study of surfaces of these various kinds and for such a multitude of applications is via the Matérn process, a theoretically well justified and mathematically attractive parameterized form for the spectral-domain covariance of Gaussian processes, both in isotropic form and considering various geometrical kinds anisotropy. We discuss a constructive new estimation technique to find the parameters of the Matérn forms of topography and bathymetry

  15. Mapping Bedrock Topography using Electromagnetic Profiling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mapping Bedrock Topography using Electromagnetic Profiling. ... Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management ... within the Abakaliki Urban, to map the bedrock topography which also aids us to determine the position of the ...

  16. Quantum Loop Topography for Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Kim, Eun-Ah

    2017-05-01

    Despite rapidly growing interest in harnessing machine learning in the study of quantum many-body systems, training neural networks to identify quantum phases is a nontrivial challenge. The key challenge is in efficiently extracting essential information from the many-body Hamiltonian or wave function and turning the information into an image that can be fed into a neural network. When targeting topological phases, this task becomes particularly challenging as topological phases are defined in terms of nonlocal properties. Here, we introduce quantum loop topography (QLT): a procedure of constructing a multidimensional image from the "sample" Hamiltonian or wave function by evaluating two-point operators that form loops at independent Monte Carlo steps. The loop configuration is guided by the characteristic response for defining the phase, which is Hall conductivity for the cases at hand. Feeding QLT to a fully connected neural network with a single hidden layer, we demonstrate that the architecture can be effectively trained to distinguish the Chern insulator and the fractional Chern insulator from trivial insulators with high fidelity. In addition to establishing the first case of obtaining a phase diagram with a topological quantum phase transition with machine learning, the perspective of bridging traditional condensed matter theory with machine learning will be broadly valuable.

  17. Rough Sets and Nuclear Safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that rough set theory can be applied successfully to rough classification and knowledge discovery. Our work is concerned with finding methods for using rough sets to identify classes in datasets, finding dependencies in relations and discovering rules which are hidden in databases by means of decision tables and algorithm D. We use these methods to analyze and control aspects of nuclear energy generation.

  18. Roughness Measurement of Dental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulev Assen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a roughness measurement of zirconia ceramics, widely used for dental applications. Surface roughness variations caused by the most commonly used dental instruments for intraoral grinding and polishing are estimated. The applied technique is simple and utilizes the speckle properties of the scattered laser light. It could be easily implemented even in dental clinic environment. The main criteria for roughness estimation is the average speckle size, which varies with the roughness of zirconia. The algorithm used for the speckle size estimation is based on the normalized autocorrelation approach.

  19. Roughness Measurement of Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulev, Assen; Roussev, Ilia; Karpuzov, Simeon; Stoilov, Georgi; Ignatova, Detelina; See, Constantin von; Mitov, Gergo

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a roughness measurement of zirconia ceramics, widely used for dental applications. Surface roughness variations caused by the most commonly used dental instruments for intraoral grinding and polishing are estimated. The applied technique is simple and utilizes the speckle properties of the scattered laser light. It could be easily implemented even in dental clinic environment. The main criteria for roughness estimation is the average speckle size, which varies with the roughness of zirconia. The algorithm used for the speckle size estimation is based on the normalized autocorrelation approach.

  20. Surface micro topography replication in injection moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlø, Uffe Rolf

    of the mechanisms controlling topography replication. Surface micro topography replication in injection moulding depends on the main elements of  Process conditions  Plastic material  Mould topography In this work, the process conditions is the main factor considered, but the impact of plastic material...

  1. Ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) and Superstorm Sandy (2012): Coupled model predictions and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Forecasting hurricane impacts of extreme winds and flooding requires accurate prediction of hurricane structure and storm-induced ocean surface waves days in advance. The waves are complex, especially near landfall when the hurricane winds and water depth varies significantly and the surface waves refract, shoal and dissipate. In this study, we examine the spatial structure, magnitude, and directional spectrum of hurricane-induced ocean waves using a high resolution, fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model and observations. The coupled model predictions of ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) over the Gulf of Mexico and Superstorm Sandy (2012) in the northeastern Atlantic and coastal region are evaluated with the NDBC buoy and satellite altimeter observations. Although there are characteristics that are general to ocean waves in both hurricanes as documented in previous studies, wave fields in Ike and Sandy possess unique properties due mostly to the distinct wind fields and coastal bathymetry in the two storms. Several processes are found to significantly modulate hurricane surface waves near landfall. First, the phase speed and group velocities decrease as the waves become shorter and steeper in shallow water, effectively increasing surface roughness and wind stress. Second, the bottom-induced refraction acts to turn the waves toward the coast, increasing the misalignment between the wind and waves. Third, as the hurricane translates over land, the left side of the storm center is characterized by offshore winds over very short fetch, which opposes incoming swell. Landfalling hurricanes produce broader wave spectra overall than that of the open ocean. The front-left quadrant is most complex, where the combination of windsea, swell propagating against the wind, increasing wind-wave stress, and interaction with the coastal topography requires a fully coupled model to meet these challenges in hurricane wave and surge prediction.

  2. The influence of Carisolv on enamel and dentine surface topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennerberg, A; Sawase, T; Kultje, C

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the surface topography of healthy enamel and dentine before and after application of a new chemomechanical system for caries removal, Carisolv. The same surfaces were investigated with respect to the influence of phosphoric acid, plus carious dentine after removal with either Carisolv or burrs. One-hundred freshly extracted teeth were used. Surface topography was measured in two different ways in order to characterize the surfaces at different levels of resolution, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a contact stylus profilometer. Somewhat conflicting data were obtained with the two measuring techniques. When surfaces were investigated over a small area (AFM), healthy enamel seemed unaffected by Carisolv, while healthy dentine became smoother. Etching enamel with phosphoric acid resulted in a rougher surface, while no effect was detected on etched healthy dentine. Caries removal using Carisolv resulted in a smoother surface compared with conventional caries removal. When the surfaces were monitored with the contact profilometer, no effect of Carisolv could be detected on healthy enamel or dentine. Phosphoric acid etching, in contrast, increased the surface roughness of both enamel and dentine. When compared with conventional caries removal technique, caries removal with Carisolv did increase the surface roughness.

  3. Measurement of fine dynamic changes of corneal topography by use of interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzak, Henryk T.; Jaronski, Jaroslaw W.

    2002-06-01

    Paper presents results of in vivo measurements of dynamic variations of the corneal topography by use of the Twyman Green interferometer. Sequence of interferograms were recorded by the CCD camera and stored in the computer memory. Then the fringe tracking method was used separately to each interferogram giving the phase surface of the wave reflected from the cornea in the numerical form. Results from neighboring interferograms were subtracted giving new sequence of changes of the corneal topography within 40 ms. Obtained results show the complex space distribution of the corneal topography variations.

  4. Sources of mesoscale variability of gravity waves. I - Topographic excitation. II - Frontal, convective, and jet stream excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastrom, Gregory D.; Fritts, David C.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of topography as a source of mesoscale variability was investigated using aircraft measurements of winds and temperature collected during the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program, with results showing marked increases in the variance of zonal and meridional wind speeds and of potential temperature over rough terrain. In addition, four cases of mesoscale variance enhancements of horizontal velocity and temperature due to frontal activity, nonfrontal convection, and wind shear were studied. The implications of these episodic enhancements of variances for the vertical transports of energy and momentum are considered in the framework of the gravity wave theory.

  5. ROUGHNESS ON WOOD SURFACES AND ROUGHNESS MEASUREMENT METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Aydın

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Some visual characteristics of wood such as color, pattern and texture determine the quality of manufactured products. Surface properties of wood material are important both in production and marketing after production. Initial studies related to the roughness of wood surface were begun in early 1950’s. However, no general agreed standardization can not have been developed for wood surfaces. Surface roughness of wood is function of the production process, product type and the natural anatomical properties of wood. Contact and non-contact tracing methods are used to measure of wood surface roughness. Surface roughness also affects the gluability and wettability of wood surfaces. The success in finishing also depends on the surface roughness of wood.

  6. Earth rotation and core topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Bradford H.; Clayton, Robert W.; Spieth, Mary Ann

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Geodynamics program has as one of its missions highly accurate monitoring of polar motion, including changes in length of day (LOD). These observations place fundamental constraints on processes occurring in the atmosphere, in the mantle, and in the core of the planet. Short-timescale (t less than or approx 1 yr) variations in LOD are mainly the result of interaction between the atmosphere and the solid earth, while variations in LOD on decade timescales result from the exchange of angular momentum between the mantle and the fluid core. One mechanism for this exchange of angular momentum is through topographic coupling between pressure variations associated with flow in the core interacting with topography at the core-mantel boundary (CMB). Work done under another NASA grant addressing the origin of long-wavelength geoid anomalies as well as evidence from seismology, resulted in several models of CMB topography. The purpose of work supported by NAG5-819 was to study further the problem of CMB topography, using geodesy, fluid mechanics, geomagnetics, and seismology. This is a final report.

  7. Quantitative characterization of surface topography using spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Tevis D. B.; Junge, Till; Pastewka, Lars

    2017-03-01

    Roughness determines many functional properties of surfaces, such as adhesion, friction, and (thermal and electrical) contact conductance. Recent analytical models and simulations enable quantitative prediction of these properties from knowledge of the power spectral density (PSD) of the surface topography. The utility of the PSD is that it contains statistical information that is unbiased by the particular scan size and pixel resolution chosen by the researcher. In this article, we first review the mathematical definition of the PSD, including the one- and two-dimensional cases, and common variations of each. We then discuss strategies for reconstructing an accurate PSD of a surface using topography measurements at different size scales. Finally, we discuss detecting and mitigating artifacts at the smallest scales, and computing upper/lower bounds on functional properties obtained from models. We accompany our discussion with virtual measurements on computer-generated surfaces. This discussion summarizes how to analyze topography measurements to reconstruct a reliable PSD. Analytical models demonstrate the potential for tuning functional properties by rationally tailoring surface topography—however, this potential can only be achieved through the accurate, quantitative reconstruction of the PSDs of real-world surfaces.

  8. Nano-topography Enhances Communication in Neural Cells Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Onesto, V.

    2017-08-23

    Neural cells are the smallest building blocks of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Information in neural networks and cell-substrate interactions have been heretofore studied separately. Understanding whether surface nano-topography can direct nerve cells assembly into computational efficient networks may provide new tools and criteria for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this work, we used information theory approaches and functional multi calcium imaging (fMCI) techniques to examine how information flows in neural networks cultured on surfaces with controlled topography. We found that substrate roughness Sa affects networks topology. In the low nano-meter range, S-a = 0-30 nm, information increases with Sa. Moreover, we found that energy density of a network of cells correlates to the topology of that network. This reinforces the view that information, energy and surface nano-topography are tightly inter-connected and should not be neglected when studying cell-cell interaction in neural tissue repair and regeneration.

  9. Influence of nanoscale particle roughness on the stability of Pickering emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Miguel, Adriana; Behrens, Sven H

    2012-08-21

    The wetting behavior of solid surfaces can be altered dramatically by introducing surface roughness on the nanometer scale. Some of nature's most fascinating wetting phenomena are associated with surface roughness; they have inspired both fundamental research and the adoption of surface roughness as a design parameter for man-made functional coatings. So far the attention has focused primarily on macroscopic surfaces, but one should expect the wetting properties of colloidal particles to be strongly affected by roughness, too. Particle wettability, in turn, is a key parameter for the adsorption of particles at liquid interfaces and for the industrially important use of particles as emulsion stabilizers; yet, the consequence of particle roughness for emulsion stability remains poorly understood. In order to investigate the matter systematically, we have developed a surface treatment, applicable to micrometer-sized particles and macroscopic surfaces alike, that produces surface coatings with finely tunable nanoscale roughness and identical surface chemistry. Coatings with different degrees of roughness were characterized with regard to their morphology, charging, and wetting properties, and the results were correlated with the stability of emulsions prepared with coated particles of different roughness. We find that the maximum capillary pressure, a metric of the emulsions' resistance to droplet coalescence, varies significantly and in a nonmonotonic fashion with particle roughness. Surface topography and contact angle hysteresis suggest that particle roughness benefits the stability of our emulsions as long as wetting occurs homogeneously (Wenzel regime), whereas the transition toward heterogeneous wetting (Cassie-Baxter regime) is associated with a loss of stability.

  10. Determination of the Wenzel roughness parameter by the Power Spectral Density of functional Alumina surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardim, P.L.G., E-mail: pedro.lovato@ufrgs.br [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Microeletrônica, Instituto de Física da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, CEP. 91501-970 Porto Alegre (Brazil); Horowitz, F. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Microeletrônica, Instituto de Física da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, CEP. 91501-970 Porto Alegre (Brazil); Felde, N.; Schröder, S.; Coriand, L.; Duparré, A. [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering, D 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2016-05-01

    The Wenzel roughness parameter of isotropic Gaussian surfaces is analytically described in terms of the Power Spectral Density function without the smooth surface approximation. This Wenzel roughness parameter — Power Spectral Density link was examined for distinct roughnesses of Aluminum-oxide thin films. The Power Spectral Density functions of the surfaces were determined in a wide spatial frequency range by combining different scan areas of Atomic Force Microscopy measurements. The calculated results presented a good agreement with the Wenzel roughness parameter values obtained directly from the topography measured by Atomic Force Microscopy. Finally, wetting behavior was ascertained through determination of water contact angles, including superhydrophobic behavior. This approach, together with an empirical procedure based on a structural parameter, can predict the wetting properties of a surface by taking all its relevant roughness components into account. - Highlights: • Wenzel roughness parameter and Power Spectral Density are theoretically linked. • The formula is tested for Alumina surfaces with distinct roughnesses. • The formula agrees with the experimental data from Atomic Force Microscopy. • The proper contribution of topography in surface wetting can be ascertained.

  11. Bankruptcy Prediction with Rough Sets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Bioch (Cor); V. Popova (Viara)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe bankruptcy prediction problem can be considered an or dinal classification problem. The classical theory of Rough Sets describes objects by discrete attributes, and does not take into account the order- ing of the attributes values. This paper proposes a modification of the Rough Set

  12. Surface roughness analysis after machining of direct laser deposited tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, S.; Twardowski, P.; Chwalczuk, T.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, an experimental surface roughness analysis in machining of tungsten carbide is presented. The tungsten carbide was received using direct laser deposition technology (DLD). Experiments carried out included milling of tungsten carbide samples using monolithic torus cubic boron nitride (CBN) tool and grinding with the diamond cup wheel. The effect of machining method on the generated surface topography was analysed. The 3D surface topographies were measured using optical surface profiler. The research revealed, that surface roughness generated after the machining of tungsten carbide is affected by feed per tooth (fz) value related to kinematic-geometric projection only in a minor extent. The main factor affecting machined surface roughness is the occurrence of micro grooves and protuberances on the machined surface, as well as other phenomena connected, inter alia, with the mechanism for material removal.

  13. The effect of mold surface topography on plastic parat in-process shrinkage in injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlø, Uffe Rolf; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Kjær, Erik Michael

    2003-01-01

    An experimental study of the effect of mold surface roughness on in-process in-flow linear part shrinkage in injection molding has been carried out. The investigation is based on an experimental two-cavity tool, where the cavities have different surface topographies, but are otherwise identical....... The study has been carried out for typical commercial polystyrene and polypropylene grades. The relationship between mold surface topography and linear shrinkage has been investigated with an experimental two-cavity mold producing simple rectangular parts with the nominal dimensions 1 x 25 x 50 mm (see...

  14. Realization of quantifying interfacial interactions between a randomly rough membrane surface and a foulant particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianrong; Lin, Hongjun; Shen, Liguo; He, Yiming; Zhang, Meijia; Liao, Bao-Qiang

    2017-02-01

    Quantification of interfacial interaction with randomly rough surface is the prerequisite to quantitatively understand and control the interface behaviors such as adhesion, flocculation and membrane fouling. In this study, it was found that membrane surface was randomly rough with obvious fractal characteristics. The randomly rough surface of membrane could be well reconstructed by the fractal geometry represented by a modified Weierstrass-Mandelbrot function. A novel method, which combined composite Simpson's approach, surface element integration method and approximation by computer programming, was developed. By using this method, this study provided the first realization of quantifying interfacial energy between randomly rough surface of membrane and a foulant particle. The calculated interactions with randomly rough surface of membrane were significantly different from those with smooth surface of membrane, indicating the significant effect of surface topography on interactions. This proposed method could be also potentially used to investigate various natural interface environmental phenomena.

  15. Scanning White light interferometry: calibration and application to roughness assesment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo

    of polymer replicated EDM rough topographies. The present method resulted to be not suitable for the purpose. • Based on the matured experience, some conclusions regarding the applicability of the method to some typical surface metrology problems to be investigated at nanometer-scale were drawn This work......This report refers to an experimental investigation recently completed. The aim was to gain some knowledge of the application of white light interferometry to surface metrology. The following issues were addressed by the present work: • How a white light interferometry microscope works, what...

  16. Simultaneous measurement of refractive index distribution and topography by integrated transmission and reflection digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chaojie; Di, Jianglei; Zhang, Jiwei; Li, Ying; Xi, Teli; Li, Enpu; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-11-20

    We propose a method for simultaneously measuring dynamic changes of the refractive index distribution and surface topography, which integrates the transmission and reflection digital holographic microscopy based on polarization and angular multiplexing techniques. The complex amplitudes of the transmitted and reflected object waves can be simultaneously retrieved. The phase information of the reflected object wave is directly used to determine the topography of the specimen which corresponds to its physical thickness. Assuming that the refractive index distribution is uniform in the direction of the specimen thickness, the refractive index distribution can be deduced from the phase distributions of the transmitted and reflected object waves without any approximation. The refractive index distribution and dynamic changes of the topography of a tiny deionized water droplet have been measured for the availability of the proposed method.

  17. River dykes investigation using seismic surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitri, Adnand; Jousset, Philippe; Samyn, Kévin; Naylor, Adam

    2010-05-01

    Natural underground caves such as karsts are quite common in the region "Centre", France. These subsurface perturbations can be found underneath the protection dykes around "the Loire" River and the damage caused can create routes for floods. Geophysical methods such as Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) can be used for locating voids or karsts systems, but its efficiency on surface with strong topography such as dykes is not certain. Three dimensional Rayleigh wave modelling was used to understand the role of topography in the propagation of surface waves and with the aim of determining the best way for MASW investigations of surfaces with strong topography such as river dykes. Numerical modelling shows that surface waves propagation is not strongly affected by topography for an array parallel to the dyke. For homogeneous models with topography, a diminution of surface waves amplitude is observed while higher propagation modes are amplified in the dispersion curves in the case of heterogeneous models with topography. For an array perpendicular to the dyke, numerical modeling shows that Rayleigh waves' velocity is lower. MASW investigations can then be applied if lateral variations of the topography are not too strong along the seismic line. Diffraction hyperbolas created by a full of water cavity were identified in numerical modelling with topography. According to these elements, a MASW survey has been performed on the dykes of "the Loire" river close to a collapsed cavity and potential karstic systems were discovered.

  18. S-Rough communication and its characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Haiqing; Wang Yan; Shi Kaiquan

    2007-01-01

    In view of certain defects of common rough communication, using the S-rough sets, this article presents a S-rough communication model. The S-rough communication model is the extension of the common rough communication model.S-rough communication has two kinds of forms: one-direction S-rough communication and two-direction S-rough communication. The mathematical structure and characteristics of the one-direction S-rough communication and the two-direction S-rough communication, the relationship theorem between the one-direction S-rough communication and the two-direction S-rough communication are also presented. The S-rough communication is a dynamic communication method,and it is a novel research direction in rough sets field.

  19. Upper-Mantle Flow Driven Dynamic Topography in Eastern Anatolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul Uluocak, Ebru; Pysklywec, Russell; Eken, Tuna; Hakan Gogus, Oguz

    2016-04-01

    Eastern Anatolia is characterized by 2 km plateau uplift -in the last 10 Myrs-, high surface heat flow distribution, shallow Curie-point depth, anomalous gravity field. Seismological observations indicate relatively high Pn and Sn attenuation and significant low seismic velocity anomalies in the region. Moreover, the surface geology is associated predominantly with volcanic rocks in which melt production through mantle upwelling (following lithospheric delamination) has been suggested. It has been long known that the topographic loading in the region cannot be supported by crustal thickness (~45 km) based on the principle of Airy isostasy. Recent global geodynamic studies carried out for evaluating the post-collisional processes imply that there is an explicit dynamic uplift in Eastern Anatolia and its adjacent regions. In this study we investigate the instantaneous dynamic topography driven by 3-D upper-mantle flow in Eastern Anatolia. For this purpose we conducted numerous thermo-mechanical models using a 2-D Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) finite element method. The available P-wave tomography data extracted along 10 profiles were used to obtain depth-dependent density anomalies in the region. We present resulting dynamic topography maps and estimated 3D mantle flow velocity vectors along these 2-D cross sections for each profile. The residual topography based on crustal thickness and observed topography was calculated and compared with other independent datasets concerning geological deformation and dynamic topography predictions. The results indicate an upper mantle driven dynamic uplift correlated with the under-compensated characteristic in Eastern Anatolia. We discuss our results combined with 3D mantle flow by considering seismic anisotropy studies in the region. Initial results indicate that high dynamic uplift and the localized low Pn velocities in concurrence with Pn anisotropy structures show nearly spatial coherence in Eastern Anatolia.

  20. ROUGHNESS ON WOOD SURFACES AND ROUGHNESS MEASUREMENT METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    İsmail Aydın; Gürsel Çolakoğlu

    2003-01-01

    Some visual characteristics of wood such as color, pattern and texture determine the quality of manufactured products. Surface properties of wood material are important both in production and marketing after production. Initial studies related to the roughness of wood surface were begun in early 1950’s. However, no general agreed standardization can not have been developed for wood surfaces. Surface roughness of wood is function of the production process, product type and the natural anatomic...

  1. Scattering and Depolarization of Electromagnetic Waves--Full Wave Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Analysis," Proceedings of the International Union of Radio Science URSI Conference at Ciudad Universitaria , Madrid, August 1983, in press. . . 13...rough land and seat3 J. The full wave approach was also used to determine the scattering and depolarization of radio waves in irregular spheroidal struc...Full Wave Solutions," Radio Science, Vol. 17, No. 5, September-October 1982, pp. 1055-1066. 4. "Scattering and Depolarization by Rough Surfaces: Full

  2. Scales of form roughness on riverbanks with different riparian vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsoer, K. M.; Rhoads, B. L.; Best, J.; Langendoen, E. J.; Ursic, M.; Abad, J. D.; Garcia, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Riverbanks often include topographic irregularities that occur over a range of scales and that are produced by interactions among erosional processes, vegetation, and the geotechnical properties of the banks and floodplains. Irregularity of the bank surface can increase form drag, affecting the overall flow resistance, near-bank shear stresses, and patterns of sediment transport. Understanding how dominant scales of form roughness influence the near-bank flow structure, and thus the shear stress partitioning, is vital for the development of accurate predictive morphodynamic models. In this paper, the scales of bank roughness are examined for two meander bends of a large alluvial river with differing riparian vegetation on the Wabash River near Grayville, Illinois. Detailed measurements of bank topography were obtained using terrestrial LiDAR during low flow events and a multibeam echo sounder (MBES) during bankfull events. These measurements yielded high spatial resolution maps (~5-10 cm) that were used to analyze scales of roughness at different elevations along the banks during both subaerial and subaqueous conditions. The results of these analyses provide insight into the influence of riparian vegetation on form roughness and patterns of near-bank flow structure as documented using acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP).

  3. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TOPOGRAPHY CHANGE IN RECLAIMED LAND ALONG COAST OF SOUTH CHINA SEA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A formula for total sediment transport rate was worked out based on field surveys and experiments, which could be used to predict the topography change under wave climate. The sediment transport and wave induced hydrodynamics were solved separately, which is more convenient to predict long-term beach evolution than solving a coupled equation. In applying the sediment transport equation to wave model, the topography change was considered to give a new bathymetry as input for the wave equations, which in return will give a time-dependent hydrodynamic environment. The wave transformation including wave breaking was simulated by solving Boussinesq-type wave equations, together with some verification and comparisons. The longshore currents due to eddy viscosity was simulated by the model under uni-directional waves, which have been applied in erosion control of reclaimed land by headland breakwaters. The topography is found in equilibrium by headland breakwaters and the equilibrium process is simulated with comparison to the engineering practice in the South China Sea.

  4. Energy Absorption in a Load-Unload Cycle of Knee Implant Using Fractal Model of Rough Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodaei, Mohammad; Farhang, Kambiz

    2016-05-01

    Roughness measurement of knee implant surfaces is investigated. The study of roughness measurement show that the topography of knee implant surface is multi-scale and surface spectra follows a power law behavior. A magnification of rough surface topography implies that there is no difference between original and magnified profile of implant surface. For implant surface, statistical parameters such as variance of height, curvature, and slope are found to be scale-dependent. Fractal representation of implant surface shows that the size-distribution of the multi-scale contacts spots follows a power law and is characterized by the fractal dimension of implant surface. Fractal surface description of the rough surfaces of knee implant is used to obtain force-displacement relationship of the contact force. Using an approximate function through the fusion of two piecewise functions, energy absorption of a knee implant in a single cycle of load-unload is obtained.

  5. Bayesian approach to rough set

    CERN Document Server

    Marwala, Tshilidzi

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach to training rough set models using Bayesian framework trained using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. The prior probabilities are constructed from the prior knowledge that good rough set models have fewer rules. Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling is conducted through sampling in the rough set granule space and Metropolis algorithm is used as an acceptance criteria. The proposed method is tested to estimate the risk of HIV given demographic data. The results obtained shows that the proposed approach is able to achieve an average accuracy of 58% with the accuracy varying up to 66%. In addition the Bayesian rough set give the probabilities of the estimated HIV status as well as the linguistic rules describing how the demographic parameters drive the risk of HIV.

  6. Open questions in surface topography measurement: a roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Richard; Evans, Christopher; He, Liangyu; Davies, Angela; Duparré, Angela; Henning, Andrew; Jones, Christopher W.; O'Connor, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    principles for statistically stationary, random surfaces. For rougher surfaces, correlations can be found experimentally for specific manufacturing processes. Improvements in computational methods encourage us to revisit light scattering as a powerful and versatile tool to investigate surface and thin film topographies, potentially providing information on both topography and defects over large areas at high speed. Future scattering techniques will be applied for complex film systems and for sub-surface damage measurement, but more research is required to quantify and standardise such measurements. A fundamental limitation of all topography measurement systems is their finite spatial bandwidth, which limits the slopes that they can detect. The third section ‘Optical measurements of surfaces containing high slope angles’ discusses this limitation and potential methods to overcome it. In some cases, a rough surface can allow measurement of slopes outside the classical optics limit, but more research is needed to fully understand this process. The last section ‘What are the challenges for high dynamic range surface measurement?’ presents the challenge facing metrologists by the use of surfaces that need measurement systems with very high spatial and temporal bandwidths, for example, those found in roll-to-roll manufacturing. High resolution, large areas and fast measurement times are needed, and these needs are unlikely to be fulfilled by developing a single all-purpose instrument. A toolbox of techniques needs to be developed which can be applied for any specific manufacturing scenario. The functional significance of surface topography has been known for centuries. Mirrors are smooth. Sliding behaviour depends on roughness. We have been measuring surfaces for centuries, but we still face many challenges. New manufacturing paradigms suggest that we need to make rapid measurements online that relate to the functional performance of the surface. This first

  7. The influence of surface topography of UV coated and printed cardboard on the print gloss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Karlović

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The incident light on the printed surface undergoes through several processes of scattering, absorbtion and reflectiondepending on the surface topography and structure of the material. The specular part of the surface reflection is commonlyattributed as the geometric component of the reflection, and when measured is associated with specular gloss.The diffuse part of the surface reflection contains the chromatic part of the reflection and is commonly calculatedthrough colorimetric values. Using UV coatings as surface enhacement materials which affect the optical propertiesof coated surfaces and final appearance of the printed product forms new surface topography over the existingone. We have investigated the influence of three different amounts of UV glossy and matte oveprint coating on themeasured specular gloss of printed cardboard samples. The different amount of coatings on the printed samples wereachived using three different screen stencils of 180 threads/cm, 150 threads/cm and 120 threads/cm thread count.The cardboard samples were analysed with AFM and SEM microscopes to obtain surface topography and roughnessvalues which were evaluated with the measured geometric values speficied as instrumental gloss. The surfaceswith a specific amount of UV coatings showed a new formed topography which influences the reflection of light.The changes in topography were evaluated through surface roughness parameters which showed a decline of surfaceroughness with tht additional ammount of glossy and matte coatings. The obtained and calculated correlations showthere is a high correlation between coating ammount and surface roughness change and gloss for the glossy UVcoating. The results for the matte UV coatings showed lower correlation for the gloss and surface roughness.

  8. Why re-entrant surface topography is needed for robust oleophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosonovsky, Michael; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-08-06

    Surface patterns affect wetting properties of solid materials allowing manipulation of the phase state of an adjacent fluid. The best known example of this effect is the superhydrophobic composite (Cassie-Baxter) interface with vapour/air pockets between the solid and liquid. Mathematically, the effect of surface micropatterns can be studied by an averaging technique similarly to the method of separation of motions in dynamics. However, averaged parameters are insufficient for robust superhydrophobic and superoleophobic surfaces because additional topography features are important: hierarchical organization and re-entrant roughness. The latter is crucial for the oleophobicity because it enhances the stability of a composite interface. The re-entrant topography can be achieved by various methods. Understanding the role of re-entrant surface topography gives us new insights on the multitude of wetting scenarios beyond the standard Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter models.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'.

  9. Carbon Dioxide Exchange in Complex Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Matthias; Rotach, Mathias; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Gohm, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    On a global scale the budget of carbon dioxide (CO_2) bears a quite substantial uncertainty, which is commonly understood to be mainly due to land-surface exchange processes. In this project we investigate to what extent complex topography can amplify these land-surface exchange processes. The hypothesis is that, on the meso-scale, topography adds additional atmospheric mechanisms that drive the exchange of CO2 at the surface. This sensitivity model study investigates an idealized sine shaped valley with the atmospheric numerical model Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) coupled to the community land model (CLM) to study the effect of complex topography on the CO2 budget compared to flat terrain. The experiment is designed to estimate the effect of the topography during maximum ecosystem exchange in summer using meteorological and ecosystem conditions at solstice, the 21. of June. Systematic variation of meteorological initial conditions, plant functional types and the topography creates an ensemble that unveils the fundamental factors that dominate the differences of CO2 between simulations with topography compared to plain surfaces in the model. The sign and magnitude of the difference between the CO2 exchange over topography and over a plain simulation are strongly dependent on the CLM plant functional type, the initial temperature, the initial relative humidity, the latitude and the area height distribution of the topography. However, in this model experiment the topography is, in the mean, a sink to the CO2 budget in the order of 5% per day.

  10. Evaluating roughness scaling properties of natural active fault surfaces by means of multi-view photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradetti, Amerigo; McCaffrey, Ken; De Paola, Nicola; Tavani, Stefano

    2017-10-01

    Fault roughness is a measure of the dimensions and distribution of fault asperities, which can act as stress concentrators affecting fault frictional behaviour and the dynamics of rupture propagation. Studies aimed at describing fault roughness require the acquisition of extremely detailed and accurate datasets of fault surface topography. Fault surface data have been acquired by methods such as LiDAR, laser profilometers and white light interferometers, each covering different length scales and with only LiDAR available in the field. Here we explore the potential use of multi-view photogrammetric methods in fault roughness studies, which are presently underexplored and offer the advantage of detailed data acquisition directly in the field. We applied the photogrammetric method to reproduce fault topography, by using seven dm-sized fault rock samples photographed in the lab, three fault surfaces photographed in the field, and one control object used to estimate the model error. We studied these topographies estimating their roughness scaling coefficients through a Fourier power spectrum method. Our results show scaling coefficients of 0.84 ± 0.17 along the slip direction and 0.91 ± 0.17 perpendicularly to it, and are thus comparable to those results obtained by previous authors. This provides encouragement for the use of photogrammetric methods for future studies, particularly those involving field-based acquisition, where other techniques have limitations.

  11. Modelling Earth's surface topography: decomposition of the static and dynamic components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerri, Mattia; Cammarano, Fabio; Tackley, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    . We account for pressure, temperature and compositional effects as inferred by mineral physics to relate seismic velocity with density. Mantle density models are coupled to crustal density distributions obtained with a similar methodology. We compute isostatic topography and associated residual...... topography maps and perform instantaneous mantle flow modelling to calculate the dynamic topography. We explore the effects of proposed mantle 1-D viscosities and also test a 3D pressure- and temperature-dependent viscosity model. We find that the patterns of residual and dynamic topography are robust...... mantle density and viscosity models. These extremely high values would be associated with a magnitude of geoid undulations that is not in agreement with observations. Considering chemical heterogeneities in correspondence with the lower mantle Large Low Shear wave Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) helps...

  12. Integrated Surface Topography Characterization of Variously Polished Niobium for Superconducting Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Tian, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley, G. Ribeill

    2009-05-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro-and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents flow. Interior surface chemical polishing (BCP/EP) to remove mechanical damage leaves surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely-used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is being used to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of EP is reported, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography.

  13. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Hui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Applied Sci. Dept., College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States); Ribeill, Guilhem [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Dept. of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Xu Chen [Applied Sci. Dept., College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Kelley, Michael J., E-mail: mkelley@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Applied Sci. Dept., College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  14. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Tian, Guilhem Ribeill, Chen Xu, Charles E. Reece, Michael J. Kelley

    2011-03-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  15. High-resolution land topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massonnet, Didier; Elachi, Charles

    2006-11-01

    After a description of the background, methods of production and some scientific uses of high-resolution land topography, we present the current status and the prospect of radar interferometry, regarded as one of the best techniques for obtaining the most global and the most accurate topographic maps. After introducing briefly the theoretical aspects of radar interferometry - principles, limits of operation and various capabilities -, we will focus on the topographic applications that resulted in an almost global topographic map of the earth: the SRTM map. After introducing the Interferometric Cartwheel system, we will build on its expected performances to discuss the scientific prospects of refining a global topographic map to sub-metric accuracy. We also show how other fields of sciences such as hydrology may benefit from the products generated by interferometric radar systems. To cite this article: D. Massonnet, C. Elachi, C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  16. Ground-motion signature of dynamic ruptures on rough faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, P. Martin; Galis, Martin; Thingbaijam, Kiran K. S.; Vyas, Jagdish C.

    2016-04-01

    Natural earthquakes occur on faults characterized by large-scale segmentation and small-scale roughness. This multi-scale geometrical complexity controls the dynamic rupture process, and hence strongly affects the radiated seismic waves and near-field shaking. For a fault system with given segmentation, the question arises what are the conditions for producing large-magnitude multi-segment ruptures, as opposed to smaller single-segment events. Similarly, for variable degrees of roughness, ruptures may be arrested prematurely or may break the entire fault. In addition, fault roughness induces rupture incoherence that determines the level of high-frequency radiation. Using HPC-enabled dynamic-rupture simulations, we generate physically self-consistent rough-fault earthquake scenarios (M~6.8) and their associated near-source seismic radiation. Because these computations are too expensive to be conducted routinely for simulation-based seismic hazard assessment, we thrive to develop an effective pseudo-dynamic source characterization that produces (almost) the same ground-motion characteristics. Therefore, we examine how variable degrees of fault roughness affect rupture properties and the seismic wavefield, and develop a planar-fault kinematic source representation that emulates the observed dynamic behaviour. We propose an effective workflow for improved pseudo-dynamic source modelling that incorporates rough-fault effects and its associated high-frequency radiation in broadband ground-motion computation for simulation-based seismic hazard assessment.

  17. Waves in the Red Sea: Response to monsoonal and mountain gap winds

    KAUST Repository

    Ralston, David K.

    2013-08-01

    An unstructured grid, phase-averaged wave model forced with winds from a high resolution atmospheric model is used to evaluate wind wave conditions in the Red Sea over an approximately 2-year period. The Red Sea lies in a narrow rift valley, and the steep topography surrounding the basin steers the dominant wind patterns and consequently the wave climate. At large scales, the model results indicated that the primary seasonal variability in waves was due to the monsoonal wind reversal. During the winter, monsoon winds from the southeast generated waves with mean significant wave heights in excess of 2. m and mean periods of 8. s in the southern Red Sea, while in the northern part of the basin waves were smaller, shorter period, and from northwest. The zone of convergence of winds and waves typically occurred around 19-20°N, but the location varied between 15 and 21.5°N. During the summer, waves were generally smaller and from the northwest over most of the basin. While the seasonal winds oriented along the axis of the Red Sea drove much of the variability in the waves, the maximum wave heights in the simulations were not due to the monsoonal winds but instead were generated by localized mountain wind jets oriented across the basin (roughly east-west). During the summer, a mountain wind jet from the Tokar Gap enhanced the waves in the region of 18 and 20°N, with monthly mean wave heights exceeding 2. m and maximum wave heights of 14. m during a period when the rest of the Red Sea was relatively calm. Smaller mountain gap wind jets along the northeast coast created large waves during the fall and winter, with a series of jets providing a dominant source of wave energy during these periods. Evaluation of the wave model results against observations from a buoy and satellites found that the spatial resolution of the wind model significantly affected the quality of the wave model results. Wind forcing from a 10-km grid produced higher skills for waves than winds from a

  18. Surface analysis of titanium dental implants with different topographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva M.H. Prado da

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical dental implants made of commercially pure titanium were analysed in four different surface finishes: as-machined, Al2O3 blasted with Al2O3 particles, plasma-sprayed with titanium beads and electrolytically coated with hydroxyapatite. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM with Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDX revealed the topography of the surfaces and provided qualitative results of the chemical composition of the different implants. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS was used to perform chemical analysis on the surface of the implants while Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSM produced topographic maps of the analysed surfaces. Optical Profilometry was used to quantitatively characterise the level of roughness of the surfaces. The implant that was plasma-sprayed and the hydroxyapatite coated implant showed the roughest surface, followed by the implant blasted with alumina and the as-machined implant. Some remnant contamination from the processes of blasting, coating and cleaning was detected by XPS.

  19. Relevance of roughness parameters of surface finish in precision hard turning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouini, Nabil; Revel, Philippe; Bigerelle, Maxence

    2014-01-01

    Precision hard turning is a process to improve the surface integrity of functional surfaces. Machining experiments are carried out on hardened AISI 52100 bearing steel under dry condition using c-BN cutting tools. A full factorial experimental design is used to characterize the effect of cutting parameters. As surface topography is characterized by numerous roughness parameters, their relative relevance is investigated by statistical indices of performance computed by combining the analysis of variance, discriminant analysis and the bootstrap method. The analysis shows that the profile Length ratio (Lr) and the Roughness average (Ra) are the relevant pair of roughness parameters which best discriminates the effect of cutting parameters and enable the classification of surfaces which cannot be distinguished by one parameter: low profile length ratio Lr (Lr = 100.23%) is clearly distinguished from an irregular surface corresponding to a profile length ratio Lr (Lr = 100.42%), whereas the roughness average Ra values are nearly identical.

  20. Massively Parallel Computation of Soil Surface Roughness Parameters on A Fermi GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojie; Song, Changhe

    2016-06-01

    Surface roughness is description of the surface micro topography of randomness or irregular. The standard deviation of surface height and the surface correlation length describe the statistical variation for the random component of a surface height relative to a reference surface. When the number of data points is large, calculation of surface roughness parameters is time-consuming. With the advent of Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) architectures, inherently parallel problem can be effectively solved using GPUs. In this paper we propose a GPU-based massively parallel computing method for 2D bare soil surface roughness estimation. This method was applied to the data collected by the surface roughness tester based on the laser triangulation principle during the field experiment in April 2012. The total number of data points was 52,040. It took 47 seconds on a Fermi GTX 590 GPU whereas its serial CPU version took 5422 seconds, leading to a significant 115x speedup.

  1. Information Measures of Roughness of Knowledge and Rough Sets for Incomplete Information Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Ji-ye; QU Kai-she

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we address information measures of roughness of knowledge and rough sets for incomplete information systems. The definition of rough entropy of knowledge and its important properties are given. In particular, the relationship between rough entropy of knowledge and the Hartley measure of uncertainty is established. We show that rough entropy of knowledge decreases monotonously as granularity of information become smaller. This gives an information interpretation for roughness of knowledge. Based on rough entropy of knowledge and roughness of rough set. a definition of rough entropy of rough set is proposed, and we show that rough entropy of rough set decreases monotonously as granularity of information become smaller. This gives more accurate measure for roughness of rough set.

  2. Surface Micro Topography Replication in Injection Moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlø, Uffe Rolf; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Kjær, Erik Michael

    2005-01-01

    The surface micro topography of injection moulded plastic parts can be important for aesthetical and technical reasons. The quality of replication of mould surface topography onto the plastic surface depends among other factors on the process conditions. A study of this relationship has been...

  3. SECTION 6.2 SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY ANALYSIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seah, M. P.; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    Surface physical analysis, i.e. topography characterisation, encompasses measurement, visualisation, and quantification. This is critical for both component form and for surface finish at macro-, micro- and nano-scales. The principal methods of surface topography measurement are stylus profilomet...

  4. Comparison among sea surface roughness schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the measurements from the US National Data Buoy Center 3-m discus buoy site No.44004 (38.5°N, 70.47°W) from January 1 to March 31 of 2003, with the COARE algorithm (Version 3.0), the results from four parameterization schemes developed recently for sea surface aerodynamic roughness length were compared with each other. Calculations of frictional speed u*, drag coefficient Cd and wind stress τ indicate that the calculated frictional velocities from the four schemes (8.50%-16.20%, the normalized standard error estimate, or NSEE), the computed drag coefficients and wind stress (respectively 15.08%-28.67% and 17.26%-50.59% NSEE) are reasonable. Schemes YT96 and GW03 are consistent. The O02 scheme gives overestimated values for u* and Cd. Schemes TY01 and GW03 display discontinuous characteristics in handling young wave data.

  5. Sensing roughness and polish direction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Olesen, Anders Sig; Larsen, Henning Engelbrecht;

    2016-01-01

    needs information about the RMS-value of the surface roughness and the current direction of the scratches introduced by the polishing process. The RMS-value indicates to the operator how far he is from the final finish, and the scratch orientation is often specified by the customer in order to avoid...... complications during the casting process. In this work we present a method for measuring the RMS-values of the surface roughness while simultaneously determining the polishing direction. We are mainly interested in the RMS-values in the range from 0 – 100 nm, which corresponds to the finish categories of A1, A2...... and A3 (Finishing guide, Bales). Based on simple intensity measurements, we estimate the RMS-value of the surface roughness, and by using a sectioned annually shaped photo-detector to collect the scattered light, we can determine the direction of polishing and distinguish light scattered from random...

  6. Stochastic control with rough paths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, Joscha [University of California San Diego (United States); Friz, Peter K., E-mail: friz@math.tu-berlin.de [TU & WIAS Berlin (Germany); Gassiat, Paul [CEREMADE, Université Paris-Dauphine, PSL Research University (France)

    2017-04-15

    We study a class of controlled differential equations driven by rough paths (or rough path realizations of Brownian motion) in the sense of Lyons. It is shown that the value function satisfies a HJB type equation; we also establish a form of the Pontryagin maximum principle. Deterministic problems of this type arise in the duality theory for controlled diffusion processes and typically involve anticipating stochastic analysis. We make the link to old work of Davis and Burstein (Stoch Stoch Rep 40:203–256, 1992) and then prove a continuous-time generalization of Roger’s duality formula [SIAM J Control Optim 46:1116–1132, 2007]. The generic case of controlled volatility is seen to give trivial duality bounds, and explains the focus in Burstein–Davis’ (and this) work on controlled drift. Our study of controlled rough differential equations also relates to work of Mazliak and Nourdin (Stoch Dyn 08:23, 2008).

  7. Improved phase-shifting diffraction interferometer for microsphere topography measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guodong Liu; Binghui Lu; Heyi Sun; Bingguo Liu; Fengdong Chen; Zhitao Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    In this study,an improved phase-shifting diffraction interferometer for measuring the surface topography of a microsphere is developed.A common diode-pumped solid state laser is used as the light source to facilitate apparatus realization,and a new polarized optical arrangement is designed to filter the bias light for phase-shifting control.A pinhole diffraction self-calibration method is proposed to eliminate systematic errors introduced by optical elements.The system has an adjustable signal contrast and is suitable for testing the surface with low reflectivity.Finally,a spherical ruby probe of a coordinate measuring machine is used as an example tested by the new phase-shifting diffraction interferometer system and the WYKO scanning white light interferometer for experimental comparison.The measured region presents consistent overall topography features,and the resulting peak-to-valley value of 84.43 nm and RMS value of 18.41 nm are achieved.The average roughness coincides with the manufacturer's specification value.

  8. Age-related changes in skin topography and microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Mac-Mary, Sophie; Marsaut, David; Sainthillier, Jean Marie; Nouveau, Stéphanie; Gharbi, Tijani; de Lacharriere, Olivier; Humbert, Philippe

    2006-03-01

    Skin topography and microvasculature undergo characteristic changes with age. Although several non-invasive bioengineering methods are currently available to measure them quantitatively, few publications have referred to their relationship with age in different anatomical sites. This study was carried out to observe the age-related changes of the skin topography and skin microcirculation. The microrelief was assessed with special processing software from scanning by interference fringe profilometry of silicone replicas performed on two sites (volar forearm and back of hand) on 50 female volunteers (aged 20-74 years who consisted of ten probands in each decade). The superficial vascular network of both sites was assessed by videocapillaroscopy, and the subpapillary vascular plexus was studied with laser Doppler flowmetry. Skin color, which is affected by blood flow, was observed by colorimeter. The skin roughness and the mean height between peak and valley increased with age. There were statistically significant differences between the evaluated sites. This study also shows that the capillary loops in the dermal papillae decrease but the subpapillary plexus increase with age. The interference fringe profilometry associated with videocapillaroscopy may be useful and accurate to measure the efficacy of medical or cosmetic products to delay skin aging.

  9. Topology theory on rough sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, QingE; Wang, Tuo; Huang, YongXuan; Li, JiSheng

    2008-02-01

    For further studying the theories and applications of rough sets (RS), this paper proposes a new theory on RS, which mainly includes topological space, topological properties, homeomorphism, and its properties on RS by some new definitions and theorems given. The relationship between partition and countable open covering is discussed, and some applications based on the topological rough space and its topological properties are introduced. Moreover, some perspectives for future research are given. Throughout this paper, the advancements of the new theory on RS and topological algebra not only represent an important theoretical value but also exhibit significant applications of RS and topology.

  10. Cassini/VIMS observes rough surfaces on Titan's Punga Mare in specular reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jason W; Sotin, Christophe; Soderblom, Jason M; Brown, Robert H; Hayes, Alexander G; Donelan, Mark; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Mouélic, Stéphane Le; Baines, Kevin H; McCord, Thomas B

    Cassini/VIMS high-phase specular observations of Titan's north pole during the T85 flyby show evidence for isolated patches of rough liquid surface within the boundaries of the sea Punga Mare. The roughness shows typical slopes of 6°±1°. These rough areas could be either wet mudflats or a wavy sea. Because of their large areal extent, patchy geographic distribution, and uniform appearance at low phase, we prefer a waves interpretation. Applying theoretical wave calculations based on Titan conditions our slope determination allows us to infer winds of 0.76±0.09 m/s and significant wave heights of [Formula: see text] cm at the time and locations of the observation. If correct, these would represent the first waves seen on Titan's seas, and also the first extraterrestrial sea-surface waves in general.

  11. Cassini/VIMS Observes Rough Surfaces on Titan's Punga Mare in Specular Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jason W.; Sotin, Christophe; Soderblom, Jason M.; Brown, Robert H.; Hayes, Alexander G.; Donelan, Mark; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Le Mouelic, Stephane; Baines, Kevin H.; McCord, Thomas B.

    2014-08-01

    Cassini/VIMS high-phase specular observations of Titan's north pole during the T85 flyby show evidence for isolated patches of rough liquid surface within the boundaries of the sea Punga Mare. The roughness shows typical slopes of 6°±1°. These rough areas could be either wet mudflats or a wavy sea. Because of their large areal extent, patchy geographic distribution, and uniform appearance at low phase, we prefer a waves interpretation. Applying theoretical wave calculations based on Titan conditions our slope determination allows us to infer winds of 0.76±0.09 m/s and significant wave heights of 2+2-1 cm at the time and locations of the observation. If correct, these would represent the first waves seen on Titan's seas, and also the first extraterrestrial sea-surface waves in general.

  12. Topography and Landforms of Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirico, Peter G.; Warner, Michael B.

    2005-01-01

    EXPLANATION The digital elevation model of Ecuador represented in this data set was produced from over 40 individual tiles of elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Each tile was downloaded, converted from its native Height file format (.hgt), and imported into a geographic information system (GIS) for additional processing. Processing of the data included data gap filling, mosaicking, and re-projection of the tiles to form one single seamless digital elevation model. For 11 days in February of 2000, NASA, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), the German Aerospace Center (DLR), and the Italian Space Agency (ASI) flew X-band and C-band radar interferometry onboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor. The mission covered the Earth between 60?N and 57?S and will provide interferometric digital elevation models (DEMs) of approximately 80% of the Earth's land mass when processing is complete. The radar-pointing angle was approximately 55? at scene center. Ascending and descending orbital passes generated multiple interferometric data scenes for nearly all areas. Up to eight passes of data were merged to form the final processed SRTM DEMs. The effect of merging scenes averages elevation values recorded in coincident scenes and reduces, but does not completely eliminate, the amount of area with layover and terrain shadow effects. The most significant form of data processing for the Ecuador DEM was gap-filling areas where the SRTM data contained a data void. These void areas are a result of radar shadow, layover, standing water, and other effects of terrain, as well as technical radar interferometry phase unwrapping issues. To fill these gaps, topographic contours were digitized from 1:50,000 - scale topographic maps which date from the mid-late 1980's (Souris, 2001). Digital contours were gridded to form elevation models for void areas and subsequently were merged with the SRTM data through GIS and remote sensing image-processing techniques

  13. Quantitative characterization of the surface topography of rolled sheets by laser scanning microscopy and fourier transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjønnes, Liv

    1996-08-01

    The surface of twin-roll cast aluminum sheets undergoes dramatic changes during cold rolling. This is mainly due to variables in the roll gap, topography of the rolls, lubrication, material properties, and in particular the initial structure and topography of the cast sheet. Therefore, it is important to have means to quantitatively describe the changes in the surface structure of each pass and from pass to pass in order to optimize the desired final surface structure. To achieve this, the laser scanning microscope (LSM) with its confocal technique has been employed to image the three-dimensional (3-D) topography and to digitize the image for further computer analysis. The digitization of the image is primarily motivated by the need to introduce a Fourier transformation of the surface topography. The method is effective in describing qualitative periodic trends in the surface features. Information is gained on the shape and periodicities as well as roughness directionality. For instance, grooves and cross hatches and their remnants can be followed from one pass to the other. Important characteristics of the surface topography such as rolling ridges and shingles can also easily be characterized.

  14. Control Method for Steel Strip Roughness in Two-stand Temper Mill Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Rui; ZHANG Qingdong; ZHANG Xiaofeng; YU Meng; WANG Bo

    2015-01-01

    How to control surface roughness of steel strip in a narrow range for a long time has become an important question because surface roughness would significantly influence the appearance of the products. However, there are few effective solutions to solve the problem currently. In this paper, considering both asperities of work roll pressing in and squeezing the steel strip, two asperity contact models including squeezing model and pressing in model in a two-stand temper mill rolling are established by using finite element method (FEM). The simulation investigates the influences of multiple process parameters, such as work roll surface roughness, roll radius and roll force on the surface roughness of steel strip. The simulation results indicate that work rolls surface roughness and roll force play important roles in the products;furthermore, the effect of roll force in the first stand is opposite to the second. According to the analysis, a control method for steel strip surface roughness in a narrow range for a long time is proposed, which applies higher work roll roughness in the first stand and lower roll roughness in the second to make the steel strip roughness in a required narrow range. In the later stage of the production, decreasing the roll force in the first stand and increasing the roll force in the second stand guarantee the steel strip roughness relatively stable in a long time. The following experimental measurements on the surface topography and roughness of the steel strips during the whole process are also conducted. The results validate the simulation conclusions and prove the effect of the control method. The application of the proposed method in the steel strip production shows excellent performance including long service life of work roll and high finished product rate.

  15. Control method for steel strip roughness in Two-stand temper mill rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Zhang, Qingdong; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Yu, Meng; Wang, Bo

    2015-05-01

    How to control surface roughness of steel strip in a narrow range for a long time has become an important question because surface roughness would significantly influence the appearance of the products. However, there are few effective solutions to solve the problem currently. In this paper, considering both asperities of work roll pressing in and squeezing the steel strip, two asperity contact models including squeezing model and pressing in model in a two-stand temper mill rolling are established by using finite element method (FEM). The simulation investigates the influences of multiple process parameters, such as work roll surface roughness, roll radius and roll force on the surface roughness of steel strip. The simulation results indicate that work rolls surface roughness and roll force play important roles in the products; furthermore, the effect of roll force in the first stand is opposite to the second. According to the analysis, a control method for steel strip surface roughness in a narrow range for a long time is proposed, which applies higher work roll roughness in the first stand and lower roll roughness in the second to make the steel strip roughness in a required narrow range. In the later stage of the production, decreasing the roll force in the first stand and increasing the roll force in the second stand guarantee the steel strip roughness relatively stable in a long time. The following experimental measurements on the surface topography and roughness of the steel strips during the whole process are also conducted. The results validate the simulation conclusions and prove the effect of the control method. The application of the proposed method in the steel strip production shows excellent performance including long service life of work roll and high finished product rate.

  16. Estimation of scattering from a moist rough surface with spheroidal dust particles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukesh Kumar

    2009-08-01

    The scattering from moisture rough surface with spheroidal dust particles having surface with spheroidal dust particles has recently received much attention. In part due to the recent prediction and observation of the spheroidal dust particles in rough surfaces under elastic wave by the Kirchhoff scattering model and scalar approximation with slope. Our analysis shows that the scattering depends on the moisture (2–4.5%) with spheroidal dust particles. At slightly moisture rough surface the dielectric properties increase with change in field amplitude in a rough surface with spheroidal dust particles.

  17. ANALYZING SURFACE ROUGHNESS DEPENDENCE OF LINEAR RF LOSSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Kelley, Michael J. [JLAB, W& amp; M College; Xu, Chen [JLAB, W& amp; M College

    2012-09-01

    Topographic structure on Superconductivity Radio Frequency (SRF) surfaces can contribute additional cavity RF losses describable in terms of surface RF reflectivity and absorption indices of wave scattering theory. At isotropic homogeneous extent, Power Spectrum Density (PSD) of roughness is introduced and quantifies the random surface topographic structure. PSD obtained from different surface treatments of niobium, such Buffered Chemical Polishing (BCP), Electropolishing (EP), Nano-Mechanical Polishing (NMP) and Barrel Centrifugal Polishing (CBP) are compared. A perturbation model is utilized to calculate the additional rough surface RF losses based on PSD statistical analysis. This model will not consider that superconductor becomes normal conducting at fields higher than transition field. One can calculate the RF power dissipation ratio between rough surface and ideal smooth surface within this field range from linear loss mechanisms.

  18. A consistent data set of Antarctic ice sheet topography, cavity geometry, and global bathymetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Timmermann

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sub-ice shelf circulation and freezing/melting rates in ocean general circulation models depend critically on an accurate and consistent representation of cavity geometry. Existing global or pan-Antarctic topography data sets have turned out to contain various inconsistencies and inaccuracies. The goal of this work is to compile independent regional surveys and maps into a global data set. We use the S-2004 global 1-min bathymetry as the backbone and add an improved version of the BEDMAP topography (ALBMAP bedrock topography for an area that roughly coincides with the Antarctic continental shelf. The position of the merging line is individually chosen in different sectors in order to capture the best of both data sets. High-resolution gridded data for ice shelf topography and cavity geometry of the Amery, Fimbul, Filchner-Ronne, Larsen C and George VI Ice Shelves, and for Pine Island Glacier are carefully merged into the ambient ice and ocean topographies. Multibeam survey data for bathymetry in the former Larsen B cavity and the southeastern Bellingshausen Sea have been obtained from the data centers of Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI, British Antarctic Survey (BAS and Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO, gridded, and blended into the existing bathymetry map. The resulting global 1-min Refined Topography data set (RTopo-1 contains self-consistent maps for upper and lower ice surface heights, bedrock topography, and surface type (open ocean, grounded ice, floating ice, bare land surface. The data set is available in NetCDF format from the PANGAEA database at doi:10.1594/pangaea.741917.

  19. Homomorphic Properties of Fuzzy Rough Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Ke-yun; ZHANG Xiao-hua

    2012-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the discussion of homomorphic properties of fuzzy rough groups.The fuzzy approximation space was generated by fuzzy normal subgroups and the fuzzy rough approximation operators were discussed in the frame of fuzzy rough set model.The basic properties of fuzzy rough approximation operators were obtained.

  20. Fuzzy Rough Ring and Its Prop erties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Bi-jun; FU Yan-ling

    2013-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the theories of fuzzy rough ring and its properties. The fuzzy approximation space generated by fuzzy ideals and the fuzzy rough approximation operators were proposed in the frame of fuzzy rough set model. The basic properties of fuzzy rough approximation operators were analyzed and the consistency between approximation operators and the binary operation of ring was discussed.

  1. Global dynamic topography: geoscience communities requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewez, T.; Costeraste, J.

    2012-04-01

    The advent of free-of-charge global topographic data sets SRTM and Aster GDEM have enabled testing a host of geoscience hypotheses. This is because they first revealed the relief of previously unavailable earth landscapes, enabled quantitative geomorphometric analyses across entire landscapes and improved the resolution of measurements. Availability of such data is now considered standard, and though resolved at 30-m to 90-m pixel, which is amazing seeing where we come from, they are now regarded as mostly obsolete given the sub-meter imagery coming through web services like Google Earth. Geoscientists now appear to desire two additional features: field-scale-compatible elevation datasets (i.e. meter-scale digital models and sub-meter elevation precision) and dispose of regularly updated topography to retrieve earth surface changes, while retaining the key for success: data availability at no charge. A new satellite instrument is currently under phase 0 study at CNES, the French space agency, to fulfil these aims. The scientific community backing this demand is that of natural hazards, glaciology and to a lesser extent the biomass community. The system under study combines a native stereo imager and a lidar profiler. This combination provides spatially resolved elevation swaths together with absolute along-track elevation control point profiles. Data generated through this system, designed for revisit time better than a year, is intended to produce not only single acquisition digital surface models, colour orthoimages and small footprint full-wave-form lidar profiles to update existing topographic coverages, but also time series of them. This enables 3D change detection with centimetre-scale planimetric precision and metric vertical precision, in complement of classical spectral change appoaches. The purpose of this contribution, on behalf of the science team, is to present the mission concepts and philosophy and the scientific needs for such instrument including

  2. A New Minimal Rough Set Axiom Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Jian-hua

    2004-01-01

    Rough set axiomatization is one aspect of rough set study, and the purpose is to characterize rough set theory using independable and minimal axiom groups. Thus, rough set theory can be studied by logic and axiom system methods. To characterize rough set theory, an axiom group named H consisting of 4 axioms, is proposed. That validity of the axiom group in characterizing rough set theory is reasonable, is proved. Simultaneously, the minimization of the axiom group, which requires that each axiom is an inequality and each is independent, is proved. The axiom group is helpful for researching rough set theory by logic and axiom system methods.

  3. Plant Communities of Rough Rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Linda

    A unit of study on plants grown in the Navajo community of Rough Rock, Arizona, is presented in sketches providing the common Navajo name for the plant, a literal English translation, the English name of the plant, and the Latin name. A brief description of each plant includes where the plant grows, how the Navajos use the plant, and the color and…

  4. Calibration of surface roughness standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thalmann, R.; Nicolet, A.; Meli, F.

    2016-01-01

    The key comparison EURAMET.L-K8.2013 on roughness was carried out in the framework of a EURAMET project starting in 2013 and ending in 2015. It involved the participation of 17 National Metrology Institutes from Europe, Asia, South America and Africa representing four regional metrology organisat...

  5. Rough Set Theory over Fuzzy Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guilong Liu

    2006-01-01

    Rough set theory, proposed by Pawlak in 1982, is a tool for dealing with uncertainty and vagueness aspects of knowledge model. The main idea of roug h sets corresponds to the lower and upper approximations based on equivalence relations. This paper studies the rough set and its extension. In our talk, we present a linear algebra approach to rough set and its extension, give an equivalent definition of the lower and upper approximations of rough set based on the characteristic function of sets, and then we explain the lower and upper approximations as the colinear map and linear map of sets, respectively. Finally, we define the rough sets over fuzzy lattices, which cover the rough set and fuzzy rough set, and the independent axiomatic systems are constructed to characterize the lower and upper approximations of rough set over fuzzy lattices, respectively, based on inner and outer products. The axiomatic systems unify the axiomization of Pawlak's rough sets and fuzzy rough sets.

  6. Defect-free Perpendicular Diblock Copolymer Films: The Synergistic Effect of Surface Topography and Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Man, Xingkun; Tang, Jiuzhou; Yan, Dadong; Andelman, David

    2016-01-01

    We propose a direct self-assembly mechanism towards obtaining defect-free perpendicular lamellar phases of diblock copolymer (BCP) thin films. In our numerical study, a thin BCP film having a flat top surface is casted on a uni-directional corrugated solid substrate. The substrate is treated chemically and has a weak preference toward one of the two BCP components. Employing self-consistent field theory (SCFT), we find that there is an enhanced synergy between two substrate characteristics: its topography (geometrical roughness) combined with a weak surface preference. This synergy produces the desired perpendicular lamellar phase with perfect inplane ordering. Defect-free BCP lamellar phases are reproducible for several random initial states, and are obtained for a range of substrate roughness and chemical characteristics, even for a uni-directional multi-mode substrate roughness. Our theoretical study suggests possible experiments that will explore the interplay between uni-directional substrate corrugation...

  7. Modulation of energetic coherent motions by large-scale topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wing; Hamed, Ali M.; Troolin, Dan; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2016-11-01

    The distinctive characteristics and dynamics of the large-scale coherent motions induced over 2D and 3D large-scale wavy walls were explored experimentally with time-resolved volumetric PIV, and selected wall-normal high-resolution stereo PIV in a refractive-index-matching channel. The 2D wall consists of a sinusoidal wave in the streamwise direction with amplitude to wavelength ratio a/ λx = 0.05, while the 3D wall has an additional wave in the spanwise direction with a/ λy = 0.1. The ?ow was characterized at Re 8000, based on the bulk velocity and the channel half height. The walls are such that the amplitude to boundary layer thickness ratio is a/ δ99 0.1, which resemble geophysical-like topography. Insight on the dynamics of the coherent motions, Reynolds stress and spatial interaction of sweep and ejection events will be discussed in terms of the wall topography modulation.

  8. Human roughness perception and possible factors effecting roughness sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktar, Tugba; Chen, Jianshe; Ettelaie, Rammile; Holmes, Melvin; Henson, Brian

    2017-06-01

    Surface texture sensation is significant for business success, in particular for solid surfaces for most of the materials; including foods. Mechanisms of roughness perception are still unknown, especially under different conditions such as lubricants with varying viscosities, different temperatures, or under different force loads during the observation of the surface. This work aims to determine the effect of those unknown factors, with applied sensory tests on 62 healthy participants. Roughness sensation of fingertip was tested under different lubricants including water and diluted syrup solutions at room temperature (25C) and body temperature (37C) by using simple pair-wise comparison to observe the just noticeable difference threshold and perception levels. Additionally, in this research applied force load during roughness observation was tested with pair-wise ranking method to illustrate its possible effect on human sensation. Obtained results showed that human's capability of roughness discrimination reduces with increased viscosity of the lubricant, where the influence of the temperature was not found to be significant. Moreover, the increase in the applied force load showed an increase in the sensitivity of roughness discrimination. Observed effects of the applied factors were also used for estimating the oral sensation of texture during eating. These findings are significant for our fundamental understanding to texture perception, and for the development of new food products with controlled textural features. Texture discrimination ability, more specifically roughness discrimination capability, is a significant factor for preference and appreciation for a wide range of materials, including food, furniture, or fabric. To explore the mechanism of sensation capability through tactile senses, it is necessary to identify the relevant factors and define characteristics that dominate the process involved. The results that will be obtained under these principles

  9. Deposition of latex colloids at rough mineral surfaces: an analogue study using nanopatterned surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Darbha, Gopala; Fischer, Cornelius; Michler, Alex; Luetzenkirchen, Johannes; Schäfer, Thorsten; Heberling, Frank; Schild, Dieter

    2012-04-24

    Deposition of latex colloids on a structured silicon surface was investigated. The surface with well-defined roughness and topography pattern served as an analogue for rough mineral surfaces with half-pores in the submicrometer size. The silicon topography consists of a regular pit pattern (pit diameter = 400 nm, pit spacing = 400 nm, pit depth = 100 nm). Effects of hydrodynamics and colloidal interactions in transport and deposition dynamics of a colloidal suspension were investigated in a parallel plate flow chamber. The experiments were conducted at pH ∼ 5.5 under both favorable and unfavorable adsorption conditions using carboxylate functionalized colloids to study the impact of surface topography on particle retention. Vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) was applied for both surface topography characterization and the quantification of colloidal retention over large fields of view. The influence of particle diameter variation (d = 0.3-2 μm) on retention of monodisperse as well as polydisperse suspensions was studied as a function of flow velocity. Despite electrostatically unfavorable conditions, at all flow velocities, an increased retention of colloids was observed at the rough surface compared to a smooth surface without surface pattern. The impact of surface roughness on retention was found to be more significant for smaller colloids (d = 0.3, 0.43 vs. 1, 2 μm). From smooth to rough surfaces, the deposition rate of 0.3 and 0.43 μm colloids increased by a factor of ∼2.7 compared to a factor of 1.2 or 1.8 for 1 and 2 μm colloids, respectively. For a substrate herein, with constant surface topography, the ratio between substrate roughness and radius of colloid, Rq/rc, determined the deposition efficiency. As Rq/rc increased, particle-substrate overall DLVO interaction energy decreased. Larger colloids (1 and 2 μm) beyond a critical velocity (7 × 10(-5) and 3 × 10(-6) m/s) (when drag force exceeds adhesion force) tend to detach from the surface

  10. Transformation and entropy for fuzzy rough sets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new method for translating a fuzzy rough set to a fuzzy set is introduced and the fuzzy approximation of a fuzzy rough set is given.The properties of the fuzzy approximation of a fuzzy rough set are studied and a fuzzy entropy measure for fuzzy rough sets is proposed.This measure is consistent with similar considerations for ordinary fuzzy sets and is the result of the fuzzy approximation of fuzzy rough sets.

  11. Rough Class on a Completely Distributive Lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈德刚; 张文修; 宋士吉

    2003-01-01

    This paper generalizes the Pawlak rough set method to a completely distributive lattice. Theconcept of a rough set has many applications in data mining. The approximation operators on a completelydistributive lattice are studied, the rough class on a completely distributive lattice is defined and theexpressional theorems of the rough class are proven. These expressional theorems are used to prove that thecollection of all rough classes is an atomic completely distributive lattice.

  12. Dental enamel roughness with different acid etching times: Atomic force microscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Objective: An important characteristic of human dental enamel not yet studied in detail is its surface roughness in mesoscopic scale. This study evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively the surface topography of acid etched enamel with different etching times. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six human maxillary bicuspids were randomly distributed into three groups (n=32): T0 (control), pumiced; T15, 35% phosphoric acid etched enamel for 15 s; T30, 35% phosphoric acid etched enamel for 30 s. R...

  13. Statistical assessment of soil surface roughness for environmental applications using photogrammetric imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzahn, Philip; Rieke-Zapp, Dirk; Ludwig, Ralf

    2010-05-01

    Micro scale soil surface roughness is a crucial parameter in many environmental applications. Recent soil erosion studies have shown the impact of micro topography on soil erosion rates as well as overland flow generation due to soil crusting effects. Besides the above mentioned, it is widely recognized that the backscattered signal in SAR remote sensing is strongly influenced by soil surface roughness and by regular higher order tillage patterns. However, there is an ambiguity in the appropriate measurement technique and scale for roughness studies and SAR backscatter model parametrization. While different roughness indices depend on their measurement length, no satisfying roughness parametrization and measurement technique has been found yet, introducing large uncertainty in the interpretation of the radar backscatter. In the presented study, we computed high resolution digital elevation models (DEM) using a consumer grade digital camera in the frame of photogrammetric imaging techniques to represent soil micro topography from different soil surfaces (ploughed, harrowed, seedbed and crusted) . The retrieved DEMs showed sufficient accuracy, with an RMSE of a 1.64 mm compared to high accurate reference points,. For roughness characterization, we calculated different roughness indices (RMS height (s), autocorrelation length (l), tortuosity index (TB)). In an extensive statistical investigation we show the behaviour of the roughness indices for different acquisition sizes. Compared to results from profile measurements taken from literature and profiles generated out of the dataset, results indicate,that by using a three dimensional measuring device, the calculated roughness indices are more robust against outliers and even saturate faster with increasing acquisition size. Dependent on the roughness condition, the calculated values for the RMS-height saturate for ploughed fields at 2.3 m, for harrowed fields at 2.0 m and for crusted fields at 1.2 m. Results also

  14. INVERSION OF ROUGHNESS PROFILE OF HETEROGENEOUS FRACTAL SURFACE USING GAUSSIAN BEAM INCIDENCE AT LOW GRAZING ANGLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Yaqin; Li Zhongxin

    2001-01-01

    As a Gaussian beam is incident upon a rough surface at low grazing angle, the Helmholts scalar wave equation may be replaced by the parabolic approximate equation. As the incident field is known, the scattered field and surface current give the Volterra integral equation.Surface roughness profile can be formulated by the integral equation of the surface currents. These two coupled equations are applied to invert the roughness profile of heterogeneous fractal surface.Using Monte Carlo method, the fractal rough surfaces with a band-limited Weistrass-Manderbrot function are numerically simulated and the scattered fields along a line parallel to the mean surface are solved. The Gaussian beam incidence and scattered fields are used to progressively invert the surface roughness profile. Reconstructed profile and its inverted fractal dimension,roughness variance and correlation length are well matched with the simulated surfaces.

  15. Emissivity as a Function of Surface Roughness: A Computer Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-29

    dependance on surface roughness sheds some light on ship wake measurements (8] , and corrects some of the analysis of spatial sea surface temperature...variation recently reported in (6) . The wind wave spectral dependance of surface emissivity also indicates that shorter wavelengths, such as...definition, a power spectrum contains no phase dependance . Therefore, in order to create a reasonable model of the surface elevation, we assume that the

  16. Scaling laws governing the roughness of the swash edge line

    CERN Document Server

    Bormashenko, Ed; Grynuov, R

    2014-01-01

    The physics of swash i.e. a layer of water that washes up on the beach after an incoming wave has broken is complicated and intriguing. It includes perplexed hydrodynamic and sediment transport events. In our paper we address to the roughness of the moving swash boundary at which a beach, water and air meet. We treat the behavior of this boundary as an interfacial phenomenon, without going into details of formation of edge waves and beach cusps, covered broadly in literature. This "crude" approach turns out to be productive and revealing the resemblance of the swash line with a broad diversity of effects arising from the random pinning of moving boundaries.

  17. Sensory properties of menthol and smoking topography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffman Allison C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although there is a great deal known about menthol as a flavoring agent in foods and confections, less is known about the particular sensory properties of menthol cigarette smoke. Similarly, although smoking topography (the unique way an individual smokes a cigarette has been well studied using non-menthol cigarettes, there is relatively less known about how menthol affects smoking behavior. The objective of this review is to assess the sensory properties of menthol tobacco smoke, and smoking topography associated with menthol cigarettes. The cooling, analgesic, taste, and respiratory effects of menthol are well established, and studies have indicated that menthol’s sensory attributes can have an influence on the positive, or rewarding, properties associated smoking, including ratings of satisfaction, taste, perceived smoothness, and perceived irritation. Despite these sensory properties, the data regarding menthol’s effect on smoking topography are inconsistent. Many of the topography studies have limitations due to various methodological issues.

  18. Enhanced Characterization of Niobium Surface Topography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xu, Hui Tian, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley

    2011-12-01

    Surface topography characterization is a continuing issue for the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) particle accelerator community. Efforts are underway to both to improve surface topography, and its characterization and analysis using various techniques. In measurement of topography, Power Spectral Density (PSD) is a promising method to quantify typical surface parameters and develop scale-specific interpretations. PSD can also be used to indicate how chemical processes modifiesy the roughnesstopography at different scales. However, generating an accurate and meaningful topographic PSD of an SRF surface requires careful analysis and optimization. In this report, polycrystalline surfaces with different process histories are sampled with AFM and stylus/white light interferometer profilometryers and analyzed to indicate trace topography evolution at different scales. evolving during etching or polishing. Moreover, Aan optimized PSD analysis protocol will be offered to serve the SRF surface characterization needs is presented.

  19. SECTION 6.2 SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY ANALYSIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seah, M. P.; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    Surface physical analysis, i.e. topography characterisation, encompasses measurement, visualisation, and quantification. This is critical for both component form and for surface finish at macro-, micro- and nano-scales. The principal methods of surface topography measurement are stylus profilometry...... representing some average property of the surface under examination. Measurement methods, as well as their application and limitations, are briefly reviewed, including standardisation and traceability issues....

  20. Dynamic Topography of the Bering Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Bering Sea. Comparisons also indicate that MDT estimates derived from the latest Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment geoid model have more in common...with the presented sea surface topography than with the MDTs based on earlier versions of the geoid . The presented MDT will increase the accuracy of...estimating the geoid in the Bering Sea. 15. SUBJECT TERMS dynamic topography, sea surface height, Bering Sea, 4DVar 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a

  1. Modelling Earth's surface topography: Decomposition of the static and dynamic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerri, M.; Cammarano, F.; Tackley, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    . Considering chemical heterogeneities in correspondence with the lower mantle Large Low Shear wave Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) helps to decrease the peak-to-peak amplitudes of dynamic topography and geoid, but significantly reduces the correlation between synthetic and observed geoid. The correlation coefficients between all our residual and dynamic topography maps (a total of 220 and 198, respectively) is <0.55 (average = ∼0.19). The correlation slightly improves when considering only the very long-wavelength components of the maps (average = ∼0.23). We therefore conclude that a robust determination of dynamic topography is not feasible since current uncertainties affecting crustal density, mantle density and mantle viscosity are still too large. A truly interdisciplinary approach, combining constraints from the geological record with a multi-methodological interpretation of geophysical observations, is required to tackle the challenging task of linking the surface topography to deep processes.

  2. Enhanced Backscattering from Rough Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    under Referee ..................... 12 3.4 Papers Presented at Professional Conferences ................... 12 4.0 LIST OF ALL PARTICIPATING SCIENTIFIC...60 -30 0 30 60 90 Scattering Angle (deg) Figure 2 (b). The DRC for the Perfectly Conducting Surface whose Profile is shown in Figure 2 (a) when the...Randomly Rough Surfaces", accepted for publication in Applied Optics (1993). I 3.3 Papers Submitted to Journal under Referee 19. E.R. Mendez, H.M

  3. Rough Sets in Quotient Semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LanShu; JialiYu

    2004-01-01

    This article is based on the notions of a congruence of a semigroup and the p-lower and p-upper approximations of a nonempty subset of a semigroup, discussing some properties of the product of these two subsets according to the properties of some especial single subsets such as subsemigroups and ideals, then the rigorous proof was given. Thus the rough theory in semigroups are completed and perfected.

  4. Noise of sliding rough contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bot, Alain

    2017-01-01

    This article is a discussion about the origin of friction noise produced when rubbing solids having rough surfaces. We show that noise emerges from numerous impacts into the contact between antagonist asperities of surfaces. Prediction of sound sources reduces to a statistical problem of contact mechanics. On the other hand, contact is also responsible of dissipation of vibration. This leads to the paradoxical result that the noise may not be proportional to the number of sources.

  5. Corneal topography measurements for biometric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nathan D.

    The term biometrics is used to describe the process of analyzing biological and behavioral traits that are unique to an individual in order to confirm or determine his or her identity. Many biometric modalities are currently being researched and implemented including, fingerprints, hand and facial geometry, iris recognition, vein structure recognition, gait, voice recognition, etc... This project explores the possibility of using corneal topography measurements as a trait for biometric identification. Two new corneal topographers were developed for this study. The first was designed to function as an operator-free device that will allow a user to approach the device and have his or her corneal topography measured. Human subject topography data were collected with this device and compared to measurements made with the commercially available Keratron Piccolo topographer (Optikon, Rome, Italy). A third topographer that departs from the standard Placido disk technology allows for arbitrary pattern illumination through the use of LCD monitors. This topographer was built and tested to be used in future research studies. Topography data was collected from 59 subjects and modeled using Zernike polynomials, which provide for a simple method of compressing topography data and comparing one topographical measurement with a database for biometric identification. The data were analyzed to determine the biometric error rates associated with corneal topography measurements. Reasonably accurate results, between three to eight percent simultaneous false match and false non-match rates, were achieved.

  6. Sensing roughness and polish direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, M. L.; Olesen, A. S.; Larsen, H. E.; Stubager, J.; Hanson, S. G.; Pedersen, T. F.; Pedersen, H. C.

    2016-04-01

    As a part of the work carried out on a project supported by the Danish council for technology and innovation, we have investigated the option of smoothing standard CNC machined surfaces. In the process of constructing optical prototypes, involving custom-designed optics, the development cost and time consumption can become relatively large numbers in a research budget. Machining the optical surfaces directly is expensive and time consuming. Alternatively, a more standardized and cheaper machining method can be used, but then the object needs to be manually polished. During the polishing process the operator needs information about the RMS-value of the surface roughness and the current direction of the scratches introduces by the polishing process. The RMS-value indicates to the operator how far he is from the final finish, and the scratch orientation is often specified by the customer in order to avoid complications during the casting process. In this work we present a method for measuring the RMS-values of the surface roughness while simultaneously determining the polishing direction. We are mainly interested in the RMS-values in the range from 0 - 100 nm, which corresponds to the finish categories of A1, A2 and A3. Based on simple intensity measurements we estimates the RMS-value of the surface roughness, and by using a sectioned annual photo-detector to collect the scattered light we can determine the direction of polishing and distinguish light scattered from random structures and light scattered from scratches.

  7. The effect of heterogeneity and surface roughness on soil hydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, I.; Bryant, R.; Doerr, S. H.; Douglas, P.

    2010-05-01

    Soil water repellency, or hydrophobicity, can develop under both natural and anthropogenic conditions. Forest fires, vegetation decomposition, microbial activity and oil spills can all promote hydrophobic behaviour in surrounding soils. Hydrophobicity can stabilize soil organic matter pools and decrease evapotranspiration, but there are many negative impacts of hydrophobicity as well: increased erosion of topsoil, an increasingly scarce resource; increased runoff, which can lead to flooding; and decreased infiltration, which directly affects plant health. The degree of hydrophobicity expressed by soil can vary greatly within a small area, depending partly on the type and severity of the disturbance as well as on temporal factors such as water content and microbial activity. To date, many laboratory investigations into soil hydrophobicity have focused on smooth particle surfaces. As a result, our understanding of how hydrophobicity develops on rough surfaces of macro, micro and nano-particulates is limited; we are unable to predict with certainty how these soil particles will behave on contact with water. Surface chemistry is the main consideration when predicting hydrophobic behaviour of smooth solids, but for particles with rough surfaces, hydrophobicity is believed to develop as a combination of surface chemistry and topography. Topography may reflect both the arrangement (aggregation) of soil particles and the distribution of materials adsorbed on particulate surfaces. Patch-wise or complete coverage of rough soil particles by hydrophobic material may result in solid/water contact angles ≥150° , at which point the soil may be classified as super-hydrophobic. Here we present a critical review of the research to date on the effects of heterogeneity and surface roughness on soil hydrophobicity in which we discuss recent advances, current trends, and future research areas. References: Callies, M., Y. Chen, F. Marty, A. Pépin and D. Quéré. 2005. Microfabricated

  8. Scanning White light interferometry: calibration and application to roughness assesment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo

    This report refers to an experimental investigation recently completed. The aim was to gain some knowledge of the application of white light interferometry to surface metrology. The following issues were addressed by the present work: • How a white light interferometry microscope works, what...... similarities and differences compared to laser interferometry can be identified. • What the main error sources are, and how such an instrument should be calibrated. The possibility of using calibration standards developed for other techniques was evaluated. • The technique was then applied to assessment...... of polymer replicated EDM rough topographies. The present method resulted to be not suitable for the purpose. • Based on the matured experience, some conclusions regarding the applicability of the method to some typical surface metrology problems to be investigated at nanometer-scale were drawn This work...

  9. Anisotropic spreading of liquid metal on a rough intermetallic surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An anisotropic wicking of molten Sn-Pb solder over an intermetallic rough surface has been studied. The phenomenon features preferential spreading and forming of an elliptical spread domain. A theoretically formulated model was established to predict the ratio of the wicking distance along the long axis (rx to that along the short axis (ry of the final wicking pattern. The phenomenon was simultaneously experimentally observed and recorded with a hotstage microscopy technique. The anisotropic wicking is established to be caused by a non-uniform topography of surface micro structures as opposed to an isotropic wicking on an intermetallic surface with uniformly distributed surface micro features. The relative deviation between the theoretically predicted rx/ry ratio and the corresponding average experimental value is 5%. Hence, the small margin of error confirms the validity of the proposed theoretical model of anisotropic wicking.

  10. Focus-variation microscopy for measurement of surface roughness and autocorrelation length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Erich

    2017-06-01

    Spatial bandwidth limitations frequently introduce large biases into the estimated values of RMS roughness and autocorrelation length that are extracted from topography data on random rough surfaces. The biases can be particularly severe for focus-variation microscopy data because of the technique's spatial bandwidth limitations (limited lateral resolution and field-of-view). We recently developed a measurement protocol that greatly reduces the bias due to limited resolution[1]. In the present paper, we describe an extension of the protocol to correct for limited field-of-view, and present measurements on a series of commercial surface roughness comparator samples to validate the protocol. The protocol strictly applies to the case of surfaces that are isotropic, and whose topography displays an autocovariance function that is exponential, with a single autocorrelation length. However, we find that applying the protocol yields extracted values of roughness and autocorrelation length for each surface that are accurate and consistent among datasets obtained at different magnifications (i.e. among datasets obtained with different spatial bandpass limits), even for samples that are not in any way selected to conform to the model's assumptions.

  11. Rough Implication%粗糙蕴涵

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛占熬; 何华灿

    2003-01-01

    Rough implication operator is the emphasis and difficulty in the study of rough logic. Due to the shortage of rough implication in [3]~[5], we redefine rough set and rough implication operator by Stone algebra, and introduce new rough operators such as rough intersection, rough union, and rough complement. Moreover the characteristics of the proposed rough implication are investigated ,and we also point out that the proposed implication operation is superior to that of three-valued Lukasiewicz logic.

  12. Quantitative roughness measurements with iTIRM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, R.J.M. van der; Fähnle, O.W.; Brug, H. van; Braat, J.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    A new method, iTIRM, is used for quantitative surface roughness measurements of ground and polished surfaces and it is shown to be a useful tool for measuring total surface quality instead of individual roughness parameters.

  13. Robust evaluation of statistical surface topography parameters using focus-variation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, E. N.; Gould, M.; Mujica-Schwann, N. P.

    2016-09-01

    Spatial bandwidth limitations frequently introduce large biases into the estimated values of rms roughness and autocorrelation length that are extracted from topography data on random rough surfaces. The biases can be particularly severe for focus-variation microscopy data because of the reduced lateral resolution (and therefore dynamic range) inherent in the technique. In this paper, we describe a measurement protocol—something similar to a deconvolution algorithm—that greatly reduces these biases. The measurement protocol is developed for the case of surfaces that are isotropic, and whose topography displays an autocovariance function that is exponential, with a single autocorrelation length. The protocol is first validated against Monte Carlo-generated mock surfaces of this form that have been filtered so as to simulate the lateral resolution and field-of-view limits of a particular commercial focus-variation microscope. It is found that accurate values of roughness and autocorrelation length can be extracted over a four octave range in autocorrelation length by applying the protocol, whereas errors without applying the protocol are a minimum of 30% even at the absolute optimum autocorrelation length. Then, microscopy data on eleven examples of rough, outdoor building materials are analyzed using the protocol. Even though the samples were not in any way selected to conform to the model’s assumptions, we find that applying the protocol yields extracted values of roughness and autocorrelation length for each surface that are highly consistent among datasets obtained at different magnifications (i.e. datasets obtained with different spatial bandpass limits). Publication of the US Government, not subject to copyright.

  14. Enhanced adhesion of osteoblastic cells on polystyrene films by independent control of surface topography and wettability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seung Yun [National Creative Research Center for Block Copolymer Self-Assembly, Departments of Environmental Science and Engineering and Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung-Sam [School of Interdisciplinary Bioscience and Bioengineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Gumhye [National Creative Research Center for Block Copolymer Self-Assembly, Departments of Environmental Science and Engineering and Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kwan Yong, E-mail: kchoi@postech.ac.kr [School of Interdisciplinary Bioscience and Bioengineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Life Science, Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Kon, E-mail: jkkim@postech.ac.kr [National Creative Research Center for Block Copolymer Self-Assembly, Departments of Environmental Science and Engineering and Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-01

    We independently controlled surface topography and wettability of polystyrene (PS) films by CF{sub 4} and oxygen plasma treatments, respectively, to evaluate the adhesion and proliferation of human fetal osteoblastic (hFOB) cells on the films. Among the CF{sub 4} plasma-treated PS films with the average surface roughness ranging from 0.9 to 70 nm, the highest adhesion of hFOB cells was observed on a PS film with roughness of ∼ 11 nm. When this film was additionally treated by oxygen plasma to provide a hydrophilic surface with a contact angle less than 10°, the proliferation of bone-forming cell was further enhanced. Thus, the plasma-based independent modification of PS film into an optimum nanotexture for human osteoblast cells could be appplied to materials used in bone tissue engineering. Highlights: ► New approach based on plasma treatment to independently control the surface topography and wettability ► The adhesion of human fetal osteoblast (hFOB) was enhanced on a surface with an average roughness of ∼ 11 nm. ► The adhesion and proliferation of hFOB was maximized when nanotextured surface became highly hydrophilic.

  15. Function S-Rough sets and its applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Yuquan; Shi Kaiquan

    2006-01-01

    Based on S-rough sets(singular rough sets), this paper presents function S-rough sets (function singular rough sets)and its mathematical structures and features. Function S-rough sets has two forms: function one direction S-rough sets (function one direction singular rough sets) and function two direction S-rough sets (function two direction singular rough sets). This paper advances the relationship theorem of function S-rough sets and S-rough sets. Function S-rough sets is the general form of S-rough sets, and S-rough sets is the special case of function Srough sets. In this paper, applications of function S-rough sets in rough law mining-discovery of system are given. Function S-rough sets is a new research direction of rough sets and rough system.

  16. Electromagnetic Scattering from Randomly Rough Surfaces with Hybrid FEM/BIE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jie; GUO Li-Xin; HE Qiong; WEI Bing

    2011-01-01

    The hybrid finite element method (FEM) together with the boundary integral equation (BIE) is firstly applied to scattering from a conducting rough surface.The BIE is used as the truncation boundary condition for the special unbounled half space,whereas the FEM is used to solve the governing equation in the region surrounded by a rough surface and artificial boundary.Tapered wave incidence is employed to cancel the so-called “edge effect”.A hybrid FEM/BIE form ulation for generalized one-dimensional conducting rough surface scattering is presented,as well as examples that evaluate its validity compared to the method of moments.The bistatic scattering coefficients of a Gaussian rough surface are calculated for transverse-magnetic wave incidence.Conclusions are reached after analyzing the scattering patterns of rough surfaces with different rms heights and correlation lengths Analysis of electromagnetic scattering from a rough surface[1-3] is a very important issue in various areas of electromagnetic wave theory.Methods used to study rough surface scattering can be categorized into two groups:(1) analytical and approximate methods[4,5] and (2) numerical methods.[6,7] including method of moment (MoM)[8-10] and the finite difference in time domain method (FDTD).%The hybrid finite element, method (FEM) together with the boundary integral equation (BIE) in firstly applied to scattering from a conducting rough surface. The BIE is used an the truncation boundary condition for the special unbounded half space, whereas the FEM is used to solve the governing equation in the region surrounded by a rough surface and artificial boundary. Tapered wave incidence is employed to cancel the so-called "edge effect". A hybrid FEM/BIE formulation for generalized one-dimensional conducting rough surface scattering is presented, as well as examples that evaluate its validity compared to the method of moments, The bistatic scattering coefficients of a Gaussian rough surface are

  17. On Wind and Roughness over Land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    The relation between wind, momentum flux, roughness and land-use in disturbed, non-homogeneous boundary layers is studied. Key questions are: ``how is the roughness related to land-use?'', ``how are wind and friction related to the upstream land-use and roughness?'', and ``is Monin-Obukhov theory

  18. Diffusion-induced line-edge roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Michael D.; Schmid, Gerard M.; Goldfarb, Dario L.; Angelopoulos, Marie; Willson, C. Grant

    2003-06-01

    As feature dimensions shrink, line edge roughness has become an increasing concern in semiconductor fabrication. There are numerous potential contributors to line edge roughness throughout the lithographic process and any measured roughness value on a printed device feature is, like the feature itself, a convolved function of every processing step. When the full lithographic process is used to study line edge roughness, it can be difficult to isolate the contribution to final roughness from any individual processing step or factor. To gain a more fundamental understanding of roughness generation that is specifically related to photoresist chemistry and formulation it is necessary to design experiments that separate out exposure related issues like mask dimension variation or local dose variation ("shot noise"). This can be accomplished using previously reported experimental protocols for bilayer film stack creation. The bilayer experimental approach has been used to study the effect of variations in such factors as post exposure bake time, photoacid generator loading, and developer concentration on roughness generation. Surface roughness of the developed film stacks is measured via atomic force microscopy. Surface roughness of developed bilayer film stacks may be considered analogous to sidewall roughness of printed features. An acrylate-based 193nm photoresist resin and an APEX-type resin are used in these experiments. In addition to experimental results, results from mesoscale lithographic simulations are used to gain further insight into diffusion induced roughness and how roughness in the latent image is modified during the development step.

  19. Electronic Cigarette Topography in the Natural Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R J Robinson

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a clinical, observational, descriptive study to quantify the use patterns of electronic cigarette users in their natural environment. Previously published work regarding puff topography has been widely indirect in nature, and qualitative rather than quantitative, with the exception of three studies conducted in a laboratory environment for limited amounts of time. The current study quantifies the variation in puffing behaviors among users as well as the variation for a given user throughout the course of a day. Puff topography characteristics computed for each puffing session by each subject include the number of subject puffs per puffing session, the mean puff duration per session, the mean puff flow rate per session, the mean puff volume per session, and the cumulative puff volume per session. The same puff topography characteristics are computed across all puffing sessions by each single subject and across all subjects in the study cohort. Results indicate significant inter-subject variability with regard to puffing topography, suggesting that a range of representative puffing topography patterns should be used to drive machine-puffed electronic cigarette aerosol evaluation systems.

  20. Irregular topography at the Earth’s inner core boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhiyang; Wang, Wei; Wen, Lianxing

    2012-01-01

    Compressional seismic wave reflected off the Earth’s inner core boundary (ICB) from earthquakes occurring in the Banda Sea and recorded at the Hi-net stations in Japan exhibits significant variations in travel time (from -2 to 2.5 s) and amplitude (with a factor of more than 4) across the seismic array. Such variations indicate that Earth’s ICB is irregular, with a combination of at least two scales of topography: a height variation of 14 km changing within a lateral distance of no more than 6 km, and a height variation of 4–8 km with a lateral length scale of 2–4 km. The characteristics of the ICB topography indicate that small-scale variations of temperature and/or core composition exist near the ICB, and/or the ICB topographic surface is being deformed by small-scale forces out of its thermocompositional equilibrium position and is metastable. PMID:22547788

  1. Irregular topography at the Earth's inner core boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhiyang; Wang, Wei; Wen, Lianxing

    2012-05-15

    Compressional seismic wave reflected off the Earth's inner core boundary (ICB) from earthquakes occurring in the Banda Sea and recorded at the Hi-net stations in Japan exhibits significant variations in travel time (from -2 to 2.5 s) and amplitude (with a factor of more than 4) across the seismic array. Such variations indicate that Earth's ICB is irregular, with a combination of at least two scales of topography: a height variation of 14 km changing within a lateral distance of no more than 6 km, and a height variation of 4-8 km with a lateral length scale of 2-4 km. The characteristics of the ICB topography indicate that small-scale variations of temperature and/or core composition exist near the ICB, and/or the ICB topographic surface is being deformed by small-scale forces out of its thermocompositional equilibrium position and is metastable.

  2. Inducing Changes in Surface Topography of Copper Thin Films: Implications for Chemical Mechanical Polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. L.; Mitchell, E. J. R.; Koeck, D. C.; Galloway, H. C.

    2000-10-01

    We have investigated the effects of pH and corrosion inhibitors on the surface of Cu films when exposed and polished in H_2O2 based slurries. Acetic Acid was used to buffer H_2O2 into the acidic range necessary to keep the corrosion inhibitor, benzotriazole (BTA) in solution. Surface characteristics were examined using atomic force microscopy and profilometry. Some conditions cause dramatic changes in the surface topography of the Cu films. The original small "grains" that give the film a uniform roughness, disappear and leave large crystalline appearing structures with terrace widths of up to 600 Åand heights of 200-1000 ÅWe believe these changes have strong implications for Chemical Mechanical Polishing processes used to manufacture integrated circuits and will discuss how these changes in surface topography may be occurring.

  3. Coupling Atmosphere and Waves for Coastal Wind Turbine Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolanos, Rodolfo; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Petersen, Ole S.

    2014-01-01

    , but new roughness formulations have been proposed to better estimate wave-wind interactions according to observations. In the present work, an assessment of several roughness descriptions is performed, and implications for coastal wind and wave modelling are studied. An atmospheric (WRF) and spectral wave...... model (MIKE 21 SW) are implemented for the North Sea in order to consider wave effects on roughness. The objective is to see the reaction of an atmospheric model to the water surface description through offline coupling. A comparison with three simplified roughness formulations embedded in WRF showed...

  4. Moiré topography in odontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Yeras, A.

    2003-07-01

    For several decades, measurement of optical techniques has been used in different branches of science and technology. One of these techniques is the so-called moiré topography (MT) that enables the accurate measurement of different parts of the human body topography. This investigation presents the measurement of topographies of teeth and gums using an automated system of shadow moiré and the phase shift method in an original way. The fringe patterns used to compute the shape and the shape matrix itself are presented in the article. The phase shift method ensures precisions up to the order of microns. Advantages and disadvantages of using the MT are included. Besides, some positive and negative aspects concerned with the implementation of this technique in odontology are shown in the article.

  5. Forecasting hurricane impact on coastal topography: Hurricane Ike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Stockdon, Hilary F.; Sallenger,, Asbury H.; Turco, Michael J.; East, Jeffery W.; Taylor, Arthur A.; Shaffer, Wilson A.

    2010-01-01

    Extreme storms can have a profound impact on coastal topography and thus on ecosystems and human-built structures within coastal regions. For instance, landfalls of several recent major hurricanes have caused significant changes to the U.S. coastline, particularly along the Gulf of Mexico. Some of these hurricanes (e.g., Ivan in 2004, Katrina and Rita in 2005, and Gustav and Ike in 2008) led to shoreline position changes of about 100 meters. Sand dunes, which protect the coast from waves and surge, eroded, losing several meters of elevation in the course of a single storm. Observations during these events raise the question of how storm-related changes affect the future vulnerability of a coast.

  6. Mercury's Thermal Evolution, Dynamical Topography and Geoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziethe, Ruth; Benkhoff, Johannes

    stagnant lid comprises roughly half the mantle after only 0.5Ga. Since the rigid lithosphere does not take part in the convection anymore, the heat coming from the interior (due to the cooling of the large core) can only be transported through the lithosphere by thermal conduction. This is a significantly less effective mechanism of heat transport than convection and hence the lithosphere forms an insulating layer. As a result, the interior is kept relatively warm.Because the mantle is relatively shallow compared to the planet's radius, and additionally the thick stagnant lid is formed relatively rapid, the convection is confined to a layer of only about 200km to 300km. Convection structures are therefore relatively small structured. The flow patterns in the early evolution show that mantle convection is characterized by numerous upwelling plumes, which are fed by the heat flow from the cooling core. These upwellings are relatively stable regarding their spatial position. As the core cools down the temperature anomalies become colder and less pronounced but not less numerous. In our calculations, a region of partial melt in the mantle forms immediately after the start of the model at a depths of roughly 220km. While in the entire lower mantle the temperature exceeds the solidus, the highest melt degrees can be found in the upwelling plumes. The partial molten region persists a significant time (up to 2.5Ga). How long the partial molten zone actually survives depends strongly on the initial conditions of the model. For instance, an outer layer with a reduced thermal conductivity would keep the lower mantle significantly warmer and a molten layer survives longer. The hot upwellings cause a surface deformation (dynamical topography) which itself causes a gravity anomaly. Due to the weak constraints of important parameters (e.g. sulfur content of the core, mantle rheology, amount and distribution of radiogenic heat sources, planetary contraction, thermal conductivity, etc

  7. Comparison of the Inspections of Smooth and Rough Crack-Like Defects Using Ultrasonic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2011-06-01

    The use of ultrasonic arrays to detect crack-like defects is an important area in nondestructive evaluation. The array data, which contains scattered ultrasonic waves from a scatterer, can be used to reconstruct a high resolution image, e.g., using the total focusing method (TFM). In this paper, the TFM images from smooth and rough crack-like defects are compared. It is shown that roughness can be either beneficial or detrimental to the detectability of crack-like defects.

  8. A NEW HIGH RESOLUTION OPTICAL METHOD FOR OBTAINING THE TOPOGRAPHY OF FRACTURE SURFACES IN ROCKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Ogilvie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Surface roughness plays a major role in the movement of fluids through fracture systems. Fracture surface profiling is necessary to tune the properties of numerical fractures required in fluid flow modelling to those of real rock fractures. This is achieved using a variety of (i mechanical and (ii optical techniques. Stylus profilometry is a popularly used mechanical method and can measure surface heights with high precision, but only gives a good horizontal resolution in one direction on the fracture plane. This method is also expensive and simultaneous coverage of the surface is not possible. Here, we describe the development of an optical method which images cast copies of rough rock fractures using in-house developed hardware and image analysis software (OptiProf™ that incorporates image improvement and noise suppression features. This technique images at high resolutions, 15-200 μm for imaged areas of 10 × 7.5 mm and 100 × 133 mm, respectively and a similar vertical resolution (15 μm for a maximum topography of 4 mm. It uses in-house developed hardware and image analysis (OptiProf™ software and is cheap and non-destructive, providing continuous coverage of the fracture surface. The fracture models are covered with dye and fluid thicknesses above the rough surfaces converted into topographies using the Lambert-Beer Law. The dye is calibrated using 2 devices with accurately known thickness; (i a polycarbonate tile with wells of different depths and (ii a wedge-shaped vial made from silica glass. The data from each of the two surfaces can be combined to provide an aperture map of the fracture for the scenario where the surfaces touch at a single point or any greater mean aperture. The topography and aperture maps are used to provide data for the generation of synthetic fractures, tuned to the original fracture and used in numerical flow modelling.

  9. Constraining the roughness degree of slip heterogeneity

    KAUST Repository

    Causse, Mathieu

    2010-05-07

    This article investigates different approaches for assessing the degree of roughness of the slip distribution of future earthquakes. First, we analyze a database of slip images extracted from a suite of 152 finite-source rupture models from 80 events (Mw = 4.1–8.9). This results in an empirical model defining the distribution of the slip spectrum corner wave numbers (kc) as a function of moment magnitude. To reduce the “epistemic” uncertainty, we select a single slip model per event and screen out poorly resolved models. The number of remaining models (30) is thus rather small. In addition, the robustness of the empirical model rests on a reliable estimation of kc by kinematic inversion methods. We address this issue by performing tests on synthetic data with a frequency domain inversion method. These tests reveal that due to smoothing constraints used to stabilize the inversion process, kc tends to be underestimated. We then develop an alternative approach: (1) we establish a proportionality relationship between kc and the peak ground acceleration (PGA), using a k−2 kinematic source model, and (2) we analyze the PGA distribution, which is believed to be better constrained than slip images. These two methods reveal that kc follows a lognormal distribution, with similar standard deviations for both methods.

  10. Axis Problem of Rough 3-Valued Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhua Dai; Weidong Chen; Yunhe Pan

    2006-01-01

    The collection of all the rough sets of an approximation space has been given several algebraic interpretations, including Stone algebras, regular double Stone algebras, semi-simple Nelson algebras, pre-rough algebras and 3-valued Lukasiewicz algebras. A 3-valued Lukasiewicz algebra is a Stone algebra, a regular double Stone algebra, a semi-simple Nelson algebra, a pre-rough algebra. Thus, we call the algebra constructed by the collection of rough sets of an approximation space a rough 3-valued Lukasiewicz algebra. In this paper,the rough 3-valued Lukasiewicz algebras, which are a special kind of 3-valued Lukasiewicz algebras, are studied. Whether the rough 3-valued Lukasiewicz algebra is a axled 3-valued Lukasiewicz algebra is examined.

  11. Rough Sets in Approximate Solution Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Sun; Wei Tian; Qing Liu

    2006-01-01

    As a new mathematical theory, Rough sets have been applied to processing imprecise, uncertain and in complete data. It has been fruitful in finite and non-empty set. Rough sets, however, are only served as the theoretic tool to discretize the real function. As far as the real function research is concerned, the research to define rough sets in the real function is infrequent. In this paper, we exploit a new method to extend the rough set in normed linear space, in which we establish a rough set,put forward an upper and lower approximation definition, and make a preliminary research on the property of the rough set. A new tool is provided to study the approximation solutions of differential equation and functional variation in normed linear space. This research is significant in that it extends the application of rough sets to a new field.

  12. Function S-rough sets and mining-discovery of rough law in systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Kaiquan; Xia Jiarong

    2006-01-01

    Function S-rough sets (function singular rough sets) is defined on -function equivalence class [u]. Function S-rough sets is the extension form of S-rough sets. By using the function S-rough sets, this paper gives rough law generation model of -function equivalence class, discussion on law mining and law discovery in systems, and application of law mining and law discovery in communication system. Function S-rough sets is a new theory and method in law mining research.

  13. Effects of patterned topography on biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Ravikumar

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a population of bacteria attached to each other and irreversibly to a surface, enclosed in a matrix of self-secreted polymers, among others polysaccharides, proteins, DNA. Biofilms cause persisting infections associated with implanted medical devices and hospital acquired (nosocomial) infections. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are the most common type of nosocomial infections accounting for up to 40% of all hospital acquired infections. Several different strategies, including use of antibacterial agents and genetic cues, quorum sensing, have been adopted for inhibiting biofilm formation relevant to CAUTI surfaces. Each of these methods pertains to certain types of bacteria, processes and has shortcomings. Based on eukaryotic cell topography interaction studies and Ulva linza spore studies, topographical surfaces were suggested as a benign control method for biofilm formation. However, topographies tested so far have not included a systematic variation of size across basic topography shapes. In this study patterned topography was systematically varied in size and shape according to two approaches 1) confinement and 2) wetting. For the confinement approach, using scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy, orienting effects of tested topography based on staphylococcus aureus (s. aureus) (SH1000) and enterobacter cloacae (e. cloacae) (ATCC 700258) bacterial models were identified on features of up to 10 times the size of the bacterium. Psuedomonas aeruginosa (p. aeruginosa) (PAO1) did not show any orientational effects, under the test conditions. Another important factor in medical biofilms is the identification and quantification of phenotypic state which has not been discussed in the literature concerning bacteria topography characterizations. This was done based on antibiotic susceptibility evaluation and also based on gene expression analysis. Although orientational effects occur, phenotypically no difference

  14. Ocean Surface Wave Optical Roughness: Analysis of Innovative Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    Banner et al., 2013]. RESULTS To provide the context of our new results for FY13, during the SBC experiment, diurnal processes were the...fluxes during the Santa Barbara Channel (hereafter SBC ) and central Pacific Ocean studies of Hawaii (hereafter HI). Full details are provided in Zappa et...heat flux is within 1.1 W m -2 of the TOGA-COARE 3.0 model prediction for SBC and within 2.1 Wm -2 for the Pacific Ocean south of Hawaii. The TOGA

  15. Heat transfer between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volokitin, A I; Lorenz, B; Persson, B N J

    2010-01-01

    We study the heat transfer between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces.We include both the heat transfer from the area of real contact, and the heat transfer between the surfaces in the non-contact regions.We apply a recently developed contact mechanics theory, which accounts for the hierarchical nature of the contact between solids with roughness on many different length scales. For elastic contact, at the highest (atomic) resolution the area of real contact typically consists of atomic (nanometer) sized regions, and we discuss the implications of this for the heat transfer. For solids with very smooth surfaces, as is typical in many modern engineering applications, the interfacial separation in the non-contact regions will be very small, and for this case we show the importance of the radiative heat transfer associated with the evanescent electromagnetic waves which exist outside of all bodies.

  16. [Influence of surface roughness on oral streptococcal adhesion forces to dental filling materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainan, Zheng; Li, Jiang; Lei, Zhang; Liying, Hao; Lu, Ye; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    This study is to determine the common oral streptococcal adhesion forces by using composite resin and glass ionomer cement (GIC) with different degrees of surface roughness via atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis. The influence of surface roughness on bacterial adhesion force is also discussed. Polishing and grinding were applied to obtain 300, 200, 100, and 10 nm surfaces of light-cured composite resin and GIC samples. Surface topography was assessed by AFM analysis. Initial colonizers (Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mitis) and cariogenic bacterial strains (Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus) were used to obtain bacteria-modified AFM probes. The force-distance curves were also measured by AFM analysis to determine the adhesion forces of bacteria on the surfaces of the composite resin and GIC. Material surface roughness was analyzed using ANOVA, and adhesion forces were subjected to nonparametric analysis (Kruskal-Wallis test). Comparison among groups was performed by Dunn's test. Material surface roughness and bacterial adhesion forces were subjected to correlation analysis. Bacterial adhesion forces increased with increasing material roughness. The adhesion forces of the four bacterial species reached the maximum on the material surface of 300 nm. The adhesion force of Streptococcus mutans increased from 0.578 nN to 2.876 nN on GIC surfaces with 10 and 300 nm roughness. The adhesion forces of the four species on the surface of the composite resin were stronger than that of GIC. The initial colonizers exhibited stronger adhesion forces to different materials than the cariogenic strains. Intergroup differences were evident on the 200 and 300 nm material surfaces. The surface roughness of the material significantly affected the bacterial adhesion forces, and a significant linear correlation existed between both factors. The bacterial adhesion forces of the GIC were lower than that of the composite resin. Furthermore, surface roughness

  17. Multiscale analysis of replication technique efficiency for 3D roughness characterization of manufactured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolivet, S.; Mezghani, S.; El Mansori, M.

    2016-09-01

    The replication of topography has been generally restricted to optimizing material processing technologies in terms of statistical and single-scale features such as roughness. By contrast, manufactured surface topography is highly complex, irregular, and multiscale. In this work, we have demonstrated the use of multiscale analysis on replicates of surface finish to assess the precise control of the finished replica. Five commercial resins used for surface replication were compared. The topography of five standard surfaces representative of common finishing processes were acquired both directly and by a replication technique. Then, they were characterized using the ISO 25178 standard and multiscale decomposition based on a continuous wavelet transform, to compare the roughness transfer quality at different scales. Additionally, atomic force microscope force modulation mode was used in order to compare the resins’ stiffness properties. The results showed that less stiff resins are able to replicate the surface finish along a larger wavelength band. The method was then tested for non-destructive quality control of automotive gear tooth surfaces.

  18. Metrological Aspects of Surface Topographies Produced by Different Machining Operations Regarding Their Potential Functionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żak Krzysztof

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive methodology for measuring and characterizing the surface topographies on machined steel parts produced by precision machining operations. The performed case studies concern a wide spectrum of topographic features of surfaces with different geometrical structures but the same values of the arithmetic mean height Sa. The tested machining operations included hard turning operations performed with CBN tools, grinding operations with Al2O3 ceramic and CBN wheels and superfinish using ceramic stones. As a result, several characteristic surface textures with the Sa roughness parameter value of about 0.2 μm were thoroughly characterized and compared regarding their potential functional capabilities. Apart from the standard 2D and 3D roughness parameters, the fractal, motif and frequency parameters were taken in the consideration.

  19. Effects of Asymmetrical Micro Electrode Surface Topography to AC Electroosmosis flow Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Hong-Yuan, Jiang; Zhen-Xiu, Hou; Yu-Kun, Ren; Yong-Jun, Sun

    2010-01-01

    AC Electroosmosis (ACEO) has many advantages such as low power consumption, non-moving parts, and easy to integrate etc., so it is widely used for low concentration microfluid manipulation in low frequency range. Classical ACEO theory assumes that electric double layer (EDL) is the main cause of electric field induced flow, and gives electric-flow field coupling equations for ACEO flow rate. But the calculation data usually are tens times faster than the experimental velocities. In this paper, electrode surface topography is included to solve ACEO flow rate. With electrode surface roughness as the characteristic parameter, equivalent EDL model is set up to modify the classical EDL model. The relationship between flow rate and electrode surface roughness is studied. Experiment results agree with the simulation very well, proving the feasibility of equivalent EDL model.

  20. Mountains: Geology, Topography and Environmental Concerns

    OpenAIRE

    Martin F. Price

    2016-01-01

    Reviewed: Mountains: Geology, Topography and Environmental Concerns. Edited by António José, Bento Gonçalves, and António Avelino Batista Vieria. New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, 2014. ix + 371 pp. US$ 175.00. ISBN 978-1-63117-288-5.

  1. Mountains: Geology, Topography and Environmental Concerns

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Martin F.

    2016-01-01

    Reviewed: Mountains: Geology, Topography and Environmental Concerns. Edited by António José, Bento Gonçalves, and António Avelino Batista Vieria. New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, 2014. ix + 371 pp. US$ 175.00. ISBN 978-1-63117-288-5.

  2. Mountains: Geology, Topography and Environmental Concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin F. Price

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed: Mountains: Geology, Topography and Environmental Concerns. Edited by António José, Bento Gonçalves, and António Avelino Batista Vieria. New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers, 2014. ix + 371 pp. US$ 175.00. ISBN 978-1-63117-288-5.

  3. Geostatistical modeling of topography using auxiliary maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengl, T.; Bajat, B.; Blagojević, D.; Reuter, H.I.

    2008-01-01

    This paper recommends computational procedures for employing auxiliary maps, such as maps of drainage patterns, land cover and remote-sensing-based indices, directly in the geostatistical modeling of topography. The methodology is based on the regression-kriging technique, as implemented in the R pa

  4. Influence of mesoscale topography on vortex intensity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The effect of mesoscale topography on multi-vortex self-organization is investigated numerically in this paper using a barotropic primitive equation model with topographic term. In the initial field there are one DeMaria major vortex with the maximum wind radius rm of 80 km at the center of the computational domain, and four meso-β vortices in the vicinity of rm to the east of the major vortex center.When there is no topography present, the initial vortices self-organize into a quasi-final state flow pattern, I.e. A quasi-axisymmetric vortex whose intensity is close to that of the initial major vortex. However, when a mesoscale topography is incorporated, the spatial scale of the quasi-final state vortex reduces, and the relative vorticity at the center of the vortex and the local maximum wind speed remarkably increase. The possible mechanism for the enhancement of the quasi-final state vortex might be that the negative relative vorticity lump,generated above the mesoscale topography because of the constraint of absolute vorticity conservation, squeezes the center of positive vorticity towards the mountain slope area, and thus reduces the spatial range of the major vortex. Meanwhile, because the total kinetic energy is basically conservative, the squeezing directly leads to the concentration of the energy in a smaller area, I.e. The strengthening of the vortex.

  5. The role of topography and lateral velocity heterogeneities on near-source scattering and ground-motion variability

    KAUST Repository

    Imperatori, W.

    2015-07-28

    The scattering of seismic waves travelling in the Earth is not only caused by random velocity heterogeneity but also by surface topography. Both factors are known to strongly affect ground-motion complexity even at relatively short distance from the source. In this study, we simulate ground motion with a 3-D finite-difference wave propagation solver in the 0–5 Hz frequency band using three topography models representative of the Swiss alpine region and realistic heterogeneous media characterized by the Von Karman correlation functions. Subsequently, we analyse and quantify the characteristics of the scattered wavefield in the near-source region. Our study shows that both topography and velocity heterogeneity scattering may excite large coda waves of comparable relative amplitude, especially at around 1 Hz, although large variability in space may occur. Using the single scattering model, we estimate average QC values in the range 20–30 at 1 Hz, 36–54 at 1.5 Hz and 62–109 at 3 Hz for constant background velocity models with no intrinsic attenuation. In principle, envelopes of topography-scattered seismic waves can be qualitatively predicted by theoretical back-scattering models, while forward- or hybrid-scattering models better reproduce the effects of random velocity heterogeneity on the wavefield. This is because continuous multiple scattering caused by small-scale velocity perturbations leads to more gentle coda decay and envelope broadening, while topography abruptly scatters the wavefield once it impinges the free surface. The large impedance contrast also results in more efficient mode mixing. However, the introduction of realistic low-velocity layers near the free surface increases the complexity of ground motion dramatically and indicates that the role of topography in elastic waves scattering can be relevant especially in proximity of the source. Long-period surface waves can form most of the late coda, especially when intrinsic attenuation is taken

  6. Topographical scattering of waves: a spectral approach

    CERN Document Server

    Magne, R; Rey, V; Herbers, T H C; Magne, Rudy; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Rey, Vincent; Herbers, Thomas H. C.

    2005-01-01

    The topographical scattering of gravity waves is investigated using a spectral energy balance equation that accounts for first order wave-bottom Bragg scattering. This model represents the bottom topography and surface waves with spectra, and evaluates a Bragg scattering source term that is theoretically valid for small bottom and surface slopes and slowly varying spectral properties. The robustness of the model is tested for a variety of topographies uniform along one horizontal dimension including nearly sinusoidal, linear ramp and step profiles. Results are compared with reflections computed using an accurate method that applies integral matching along vertical boundaries of a series of steps. For small bottom amplitudes, the source term representation yields accurate reflection estimates even for a localized scatterer. This result is proved for small bottom amplitudes $h$ relative to the mean water depth $H$. Wave reflection by small amplitude bottom topography thus depends primarily on the bottom elevati...

  7. Enhanced turbulence driven by mesoscale motions and flow-topography interaction in the Denmark Strait Overflow plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Janin; Kanzow, Torsten; Jochumsen, Kerstin; Lackschewitz, Klas; Tippenhauer, Sandra; Zhurbas, Victor M.; Quadfasel, Detlef

    2016-10-01

    The Denmark Strait Overflow (DSO) contributes roughly half to the total volume transport of the Nordic overflows. The overflow increases its volume by entraining ambient water as it descends into the subpolar North Atlantic, feeding into the deep branch of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. In June 2012, a multiplatform experiment was carried out in the DSO plume on the continental slope off Greenland (180 km downstream of the sill in Denmark Strait), to observe the variability associated with the entrainment of ambient waters into the DSO plume. In this study, we report on two high-dissipation events captured by an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) by horizontal profiling in the interfacial layer between the DSO plume and the ambient water. Strong dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy of O(10-6) W kg-1 was associated with enhanced small-scale temperature variance at wavelengths between 0.05 and 500 m as deduced from a fast-response thermistor. Isotherm displacement slope spectra reveal a wave number-dependence characteristic of turbulence in the inertial-convective subrange (k1/3) at wavelengths between 0.14 and 100 m. The first event captured by the AUV was transient, and occurred near the edge of a bottom-intensified energetic eddy. Our observations imply that both horizontal advection of warm water and vertical mixing of it into the plume are eddy-driven and go hand in hand in entraining ambient water into the DSO plume. The second event was found to be a stationary feature on the upstream side of a topographic elevation located in the plume pathway. Flow-topography interaction is suggested to drive the intense mixing at this site.

  8. Air flow through smooth and rough cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kula, H.-G.; Sharples, S. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Building Science

    1994-12-31

    A series of laboratory experiments are described which investigated the effect of surface roughness on the air flow characteristics of simple, straight-through, no-bend cracks with smooth and rough internal surfaces. The crack thicknesses used in the study were 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0mm. The crack lengths, in the direction of flow, were 50.8mm and 76.2mm. For the rough cracks the roughness was simulated with two different grades of commercially available energy-cloth (grade 60 and 100). The experimental results were satisfactorily fitted to a quadratic relationship between {Delta}p and Q of the form {Delta}p = AQ + BQ{sup 2} for both the smooth and rough crack data. The effect of roughness on the reduction of air flowing through a crack is also discussed. (author)

  9. Roughness Influence On Macro- And Micro-Tribology Of Multi-Layered Hard Coatings On Carbon Fibre Polymer Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lackner J.M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Goal of this work is the investigation of roughness influences on the abrasive wear behaviour of magnetron sputtered multi-layered, low-friction coatings on carbon-fibre reinforced polymers (CFRP. Higher coating roughness at similar CFRP quality was realized by higher deposition rates, leading to increased heat flux to the substrates during deposition. Thermal expansion of the epoxy matrix on the micro scale results in a wavy, wrinkled surface topography. Both in scratch and reciprocal sliding testing against alumina, the friction coefficients are lower for the smooth coatings, but their wear rate is higher due to low-cycle fatigue caused abrasion.

  10. Electromagnetic Scattering from Rough Sea Surface with PM Spectrum Covered by an Organic Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rui; GUO Li-Xin; WANG An-Qi; WU Zhen-Sen

    2011-01-01

    The rough sea surface covered by an organic film will cause attenuation of capillarity waves, which implies that the organic films play an important role in rough sea surface processes. We focus on a one-dimensional(1D)rough sea surface with the Pierson-Moskowitz(PM)spectrum distributed to the homogeneous insoluble organic slicks. First, the impact of the organic film on the PM surface spectrum is presented, as well as that of the correlation length, the rms height and slope of the rough sea surface. The damping effect of the organic film changes the physical parameters of the rough sea surface. For example, the organic film will reduce the rms height and slopee of the rough sea surface, which results in the attenuation of the high-frequency components of the PM spectrum leading to modification of the surface PM spectrum. Then, the influence of the organic film on the electromagnetic(EM) scattering coefficients from PM rough sea surface covered by the organic film is investigated and discussed in detail, compared with the clean PM rough sea surface through the method of moments.

  11. Dental enamel roughness with different acid etching times: Atomic force microscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Bochnia Cerci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: An important characteristic of human dental enamel not yet studied in detail is its surface roughness in mesoscopic scale. This study evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively the surface topography of acid etched enamel with different etching times. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six human maxillary bicuspids were randomly distributed into three groups (n=32: T0 (control, pumiced; T15, 35% phosphoric acid etched enamel for 15 s; T30, 35% phosphoric acid etched enamel for 30 s. Roughness measurements Ra, Rz and root mean square (RMS and 3D images of enamel′s topography were obtained with atomic force microscopy (AFM, which is a powerful technique to obtain direct measurements on microscale features. Results and Conclusions: Roughness variables Ra, Rz and RMS presented statistically significant differences to all groups (P<0.000, with values increasing with etching time. This increase was greater from T0 to T15 than from T15 to T30. Enamel surface alterations T15 to T30 occur mainly due to increase in height and deepening of prisms central region.

  12. Simplified Approach to Predicting Rough Surface Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Stripf, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Turbine vane heat transfer predictions are given for smooth and rough vanes where the experimental data show transition moving forward on the vane as the surface roughness physical height increases. Consiste nt with smooth vane heat transfer, the transition moves forward for a fixed roughness height as the Reynolds number increases. Comparison s are presented with published experimental data. Some of the data ar e for a regular roughness geometry with a range of roughness heights, Reynolds numbers, and inlet turbulence intensities. The approach ta ken in this analysis is to treat the roughness in a statistical sense , consistent with what would be obtained from blades measured after e xposure to actual engine environments. An approach is given to determ ine the equivalent sand grain roughness from the statistics of the re gular geometry. This approach is guided by the experimental data. A roughness transition criterion is developed, and comparisons are made with experimental data over the entire range of experimental test co nditions. Additional comparisons are made with experimental heat tran sfer data, where the roughness geometries are both regular as well a s statistical. Using the developed analysis, heat transfer calculatio ns are presented for the second stage vane of a high pressure turbine at hypothetical engine conditions.

  13. Rough set models of Physarum machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancerz, Krzysztof; Schumann, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we consider transition system models of behaviour of Physarum machines in terms of rough set theory. A Physarum machine, a biological computing device implemented in the plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum (true slime mould), is a natural transition system. In the behaviour of Physarum machines, one can notice some ambiguity in Physarum motions that influences exact anticipation of states of machines in time. To model this ambiguity, we propose to use rough set models created over transition systems. Rough sets are an appropriate tool to deal with rough (ambiguous, imprecise) concepts in the universe of discourse.

  14. Modulation of human gingival fibroblast adhesion, morphology, tyrosine phosphorylation, and ERK 1/2 localization on polished, grooved and SLA substratum topographies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubu, Eitoyo; Hamilton, Douglas W; Inoue, Takashi; Brunette, Donald M

    2009-12-01

    Attachment of connective tissue to dental implants, which is influenced by surface topography, is an important determinant of implant success. Approaches employed to alter topography include acid etching or blasting to produce roughened surfaces, and production of precisely defined topographies using microfabrication techniques. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of polished, microgrooved, and sand-blasted, large grit, acid-etched (SLA) topographies on fibroblast adhesion, morphology, activation, and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation and localization. Human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) spread on all tested surfaces within 2 h, and topography influenced the pattern of phosphotyrosine localization. Fibrillar adhesion formation was prominent in HGFs cultured on microgrooves and SLA at 24 h compared with smooth. No significant difference in ERK 1/2 phosphorylation was observed at 2 or 24 h, but nuclear localization depended on culture time and substratum topography. Nuclear localization of ERK 1/2 occurred at 2 h on polished surfaces, but was not evident at 1 week. In contrast, cells on SLA and grooved surfaces did not exhibit nuclear localization of ERK 1/2 at early times, but did at 1 week. The results of this study suggest that rough and microfabricated topographies influence fibroblast adhesion and intracellular signaling through focal adhesion/integrin-dependent mechanisms in a time-dependent manner. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Topography data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, September 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release presents topography data from the Elwha River delta collected in September 2014. Topography data were collected on foot with global...

  16. Topography, the geoid, and compensation mechanisms for the southern Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coblentz, D.; Chase, C. G.; Karlstrom, K. E.; van Wijk, J.

    2011-04-01

    The southern Rockies of Colorado are anomalously high (elevations greater than 2800 m), topographically rough (implying active uplift), and underlain by significant low-velocity anomalies in the upper mantle that suggest an intimate relationship between mantle geodynamic processes and the surface topography. The region is in isostatic equilibrium (i.e., near-zero free-air gravity anomaly); however, the poor correlation between the high topography and crustal thickness makes the application of simple compensation models (e.g., pure Heiskanen or Pratt-Hayford) problematic. Knowledge of how the current topography of the Rockies is isostatically compensated could provide constraints on the relative role of sublithospheric buoyancy versus lithospheric support. Here we evaluate the geoid and its relationship to the topography (using the geoid-to-elevation ratio (GTR) in the spatial domain and the admittance in the frequency domain) to constrain the mechanism of compensation. We separate the upper mantle geoid anomalies from those with deeper sources through the use of spherical harmonic filtering of the EGM2008 geoid. We exploit the fact that at wavelengths greater than the flexural wavelength where features are isostatically compensated, the geoid/topography ratio can be used to estimate the depth of compensation and the elastic thickness of the lithosphere. The results presented below indicate that the main tectonic provinces of the western United States have moderate geoid/topography ratios between 3.5 and 5.5 m/km (˜3.9 for the southern Rockies, ˜4.25 for the Colorado Plateau, and ˜5.2 for the Northern Basin and Range) suggesting shallow levels of isostatic compensation. In terms of the elastic thickness of the lithosphere, our results indicate an elastic thickness of less than 20 km. These value support the notion that a major portion of the buoyancy that has driven uplift resides at depths less than 100 km and that upper mantle processes such as small

  17. Impact of tidal mixing with different scales of bottom roughness on the general circulation in the ocean model MPIOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarchou, E.; Von Storch, J.-S.; Jungclaus, J.

    2012-04-01

    We implement a tidal mixing scheme that parameterizes diapycnal diffusivity depending on the location of energy dissipation over rough topography in the ocean general circulation model MPIOM. The tidal mixing scheme requires a bottom roughness map that can be calculated depending on the scales of topographic features one wants to focus on. Here, we examine the sensitivity of the modeled circulations to different spatial scales of the modeled bottom roughness. We compare three simulations that include the tidal mixing scheme using bottom roughness calculated at three different spatial scales, ranging from 15 to 200 km. We find that with decreasing spatial scales at which roughness is calculated, the roughness values increase in the deep ocean and decrease in coastal or shallow regions. The diffusivities produced by the three experiments, therefore, have not only different spatial structures but different vertical structures as well, with stronger bottom diffusivities for smaller scales of roughness. The lower limb of the Atlantic overturning and the bottom water transport in the Pacific Ocean are stronger for stronger bottom diffusivities, suggesting a 1/2 power law scaling between overturning strength and diffusivity. Such a relation does not hold for the upper limb of the Atlantic. All tidal simulations significantly increase the Indo-Pacific bottom water transport, improving the model solution in the Indo-Pacific Ocean.

  18. Effect of roughness on imaging and characterizing rough crack-like defect using ultrasonic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2012-05-01

    All naturally occurring crack-like defects in solid structures are rough to some degree, which can affect defect inspection and characterization. Based on the simulated array data for various rough cracks and the total focusing method imaging algorithm, the effect of roughness on defect imaging and characterization was discussed. The array data was simulated by using the forward model combining with scattering matrices for various rough cracks. The scattering matrix describes the scattering field of a scatterer from all possible incident and scattering directions. It is shown that roughness can be either beneficial or detrimental to the detectability of a crack-like defect, depending on the defect characteristics such as length, roughness, correlation length, orientation angle, and array inspection configuration. It is also shown that roughness can cause the underestimation of length of rough crack-like defects by using the image-based approach.

  19. Surface micro topography replication in injection moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlø, Uffe Rolf

    , the topography itself, and other factors were also investigated. The experimental work is based on a multi-purpose experimental injection mould with a collection of test surface inserts manufactured by EDM (electrical discharge machining). Experimental production took place with an injection moulding machine......Thermoplastic injection moulding is a widely used industrial process that involves surface generation by replication. The surface topography of injection moulded plastic parts can be important for aesthetical or technical reasons. With the emergence of microengineering and nanotechnology additional...... in a clean room environment. The mould and the injection moulding machine were fitted with transducers for subsequent process analysis. A total of 13 different plastic material grades were applied. Topographical characterisation was performed with an optical laser focus detection instrument. Replication...

  20. Impact of watershed topography on hyporheic exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Alice; Ridolfi, Luca; Boano, Fulvio

    2016-08-01

    Among the interactions between surface water bodies and aquifers, hyporheic exchange has been recognized as a key process for nutrient cycling and contaminant transport. Even though hyporheic exchange is strongly controlled by groundwater discharge, our understanding of the impact of the regional groundwater flow on hyporheic fluxes is still limited because of the complexity arising from the multi-scale nature of these interactions. In this work, we investigate the role of watershed topography on river-aquifer interactions by way of a semi-analytical model, in which the landscape topography is used to approximate the groundwater head distribution. The analysis of a case study shows how the complex topographic structure is the direct cause of a substantial spatial variability of the aquifer-river exchange. Groundwater upwelling along the river corridor is estimated and its influence on the hyporheic zone is discussed. In particular, the fragmentation of the hyporeic corridor induced by groundwater discharge at the basin scale is highlighted.

  1. New null screen design for corneal topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-García, Manuel; Estrada-Molina, Amilcar; Díaz-Uribe, Rufino

    2011-09-01

    In this work we report the design of a null screen for corneal topography. Here we assume that the corneal surface is an ellipsoid with a diameter of 12 mm and a curvature radius of 7.8 mm. To avoid the difficulties in the alignment of the test system due to the face contour (eyebrows, nose, or eyelids), we design a conical null-screen with spots (similar to ellipses) drawn on it in such a way that its image, which is formed by reflection on the test surface, becomes an exact radial array of circular spots if the surface is perfect. Additionally, we performed a numerical simulation introducing Gaussian random errors in the coordinates of the centroids of the spots on the image plane, and in the coordinates of the sources (spots on the null-screen) in order to obtain the conical null-screen that reduces the error in the evaluation of the topography.

  2. Impact of plasma chemistry versus titanium surface topography on osteoblast orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebl, Henrike; Finke, Birgit; Lange, Regina; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Nebe, J Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Topographical and chemical modifications of biomaterial surfaces both influence tissue physiology, but unfortunately little knowledge exists as to their combined effect. There are many indications that rough surfaces positively influence osteoblast behavior. Having determined previously that a positively charged, smooth titanium surface boosts osteoblast adhesion, we wanted to investigate the combined effects of topography and chemistry and elucidate which of these properties is dominant. Polished, machined and corundum-blasted titanium of increasing microroughness was additionally coated with plasma-polymerized allylamine (PPAAm). Collagen I was then immobilized using polyethylene glycol diacid and glutar dialdehyde. On all PPAAm-modified surfaces (i) adhesion of human MG-63 osteoblastic cells increased significantly in combination with roughness, (ii) cells resemble the underlying structure and melt with the surface, and (iii) cells overcome the restrictions of a grooved surface and spread out over a large area as indicated by actin staining. Interestingly, the cellular effects of the plasma-chemical surface modification are predominant over surface topography, especially in the initial phase. Collagen I, although it is the gold standard, does not improve surface adhesion features comparably.

  3. Effects of food surface topography on phage-based magnetoelastic biosensor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Shin; Chai, Yating; Zhao, Ruiting; Wikle, Howard C.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2014-05-01

    Phage-based magnetoelastic (ME) biosensors have proven useful in rapidly and inexpensively detecting food surface con- tamination. These biosensors are wireless, mass-sensitive biosensors and can be placed directly on food surfaces to detect the presence of target pathogens. Previously, millimeter-scale strip-shaped ME biosensors have been used to demonstrate direct detection of Salmonella Typhimurium on various fresh produce surfaces, including tomatoes, shell eggs, watermel- ons, and spinach leaves. Since the topography of these produce surfaces are different, and the biosensor must come into direct contact with Salmonella bacteria, food surfaces with large roughness and curvatures (e.g., spinach leaf surfaces) may allow the bacteria to avoid direct contact, thereby avoiding detection. The primary objective of this paper is, hence, to investigate the effects of food surface topography on the detection capabilities of the biosensors. Spinach leaf surfaces were selected as model surfaces, and detection experiments were conducted with differently sized biosensors (2 mm, 0.5 mm, and 150 μm in length). Spinach leaf roughness and curvatures of both adaxial (top) and abaxial (underside) surfaces were measured using a confocal laser scanning microscope. The experimental results showed that in spinach as the sen- sor was made smaller, the physical contact between the biosensors and bacteria were improved. Smaller sensors thereby enhance detection capabilities. When proper numbers of biosensors are used, micron-scale biosensors are anticipated to yield improved limits of detection over previously investigated millimeter-scale biosensors.

  4. The role of titanium surface topography on J774A.1 macrophage inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kai Soo; Qian, Li; Rosado, Roy; Flood, Patrick M; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2006-10-01

    A role for monocyte/macrophage modulation of wound healing at endosseous implants is proposed. The modification of the endosseous implant surface topography can alter cell adhesion and resultant cell behavior. The aim of this study was to define the effect of increased cpTitanium surface topography on adherent J744A.1 macrophage phenotype in culture. The J744A.1 cells were cultured on 20mm diameter cpTitanium disks prepared with smooth and grit-blasted/acid rough surface topographies for 24-72 h. Following culture in growth media with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS), total RNA was isolated and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to measure the steady-state levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 1-beta (IL-1beta) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). Additional evidence of pro-inflammatory signaling was sought by measurement of cellular nitric oxide (NO) production. In the absence of LPS, IL-1beta levels were increased on grit-blasted/acid rough surfaces during the first 48 h. In contrast, IL-6 levels were reduced on the grit-blasted/acid rough surfaces. When cultures were treated with LPS, high levels of IL-1beta and IL-6 expression were measured, irrespective of surface topography. The responses of J744A.1 cells to surface and superimposed LPS stimulation suggest only modest effects of the modeled endosseous implant surface on adherent cell pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and NO signaling.

  5. Topography over South America from ERS altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Anita; Frey, Herb; DiMarzio, John; Tsaoussi, Lucia

    1997-01-01

    The results of the surface topography mapping of South America during the ERS-1 geodetic mission are presented. The altimeter waveforms, the range measurement, and the internal and Doppler range corrections were obtained. The atmospheric corrections and solid tides were calculated. Comparisons between Shuttle laser altimetry and ERS-1 altimetry grid showed good agreement. Satellite radar altimetry data can be used to improve the topographic knowledge of regions for which only poor elevation data currently exist.

  6. ATM Coastal Topography-Alabama 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Alabama coastline, acquired October 3-4, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface, and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for pre-survey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create maps that

  7. ATM Coastal Topography-Mississippi, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Mississippi coastline, from Lakeshore to Petit Bois Island, acquired September 9-10, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative scanning lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS

  8. Lessons learnt from the Indian Ocean Tsunami 2004: the role of surface and subsurface topography in deep water tsunami propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattiaratchi, C. B.

    2014-12-01

    The Indian Ocean experienced its most devastating natural disaster through the action of a Tsunami, resulting from of an earthquake off the coast of Sumatra on 26th of December 2004. This resulted in widespread damage both to property and human lives with over 250,000 deaths in the region and many millions homeless. Our understanding of tsunami generation and propagation has increased significantly over the past decade. In this presentation, results obtained from detailed analysis of sea level data from Western Australia and Sri Lanka together with numerical modelling are presented to highlight the effects of topography both at the surface and subsurface. The major effects are due to wave reflection and refraction. Examples of wave reflection include: impacts on Malaysia/Thailand, Sri Lanka and Western Australia due to wave reflection from Sri Lanka, Maldives and Mascarene Ridge, respectively. In the case of Sri Lanka, the maximum wave height recorded along the west coast during the 2004 tsunami was due to the reflected wave from Maldives impacting 3 hours after the arrival of the initial waves. Similarly, along the West coast of Australia highest waves occurred 15 hours after the arrival of the first wave. Here, based on travel times, we postulate that the waves were reflected from the Mascarene Ridge and/or the island of Madagascar (Figure 1b). The conclusions based on observations were verified using numerical model simulations using the MOST and ComMIT models. Numerical modelling using the MOST model indicated the role of offshore susurface topography on tsunami propagation through wave wave refraction. Examples of wave refraction included the effects of deep water seamounts (Venin Meinesz) and plateaus (Wallaby, Cuvier and Exmouth) on tsunami propagation along the West Australian coast. The tsunami waves are first scattered by the Venin Meinesz seamounts and were then refracted by the Wallaby and Cuvier plateaus resulting in waves being deflected onto the

  9. Investigation on electromagnetic scattering from rough soil surface of layered medium using the small perturbation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Xin-Cheng; Guo Li-Xin

    2008-01-01

    Electromagnetic scattering from a rough surface of layered medium is investigated, and the formulae of the scattering coefficients for different polarizations are derived using the small perturbation method. A rough surface with exponential correlation function is presented for describing a rough soil surface of layered medium, the formula of its scattering coefficient is derived by considering the spectrum of the rough surface with exponential correlation function; the curves of the bistatic scattering coefficient of HH polarization with variation of the scattering angle are obtained by numerical calculation. The influence of the permittivity of layered medium, the mean layer thickness of intermediate medium, the roughness surface parameters and the frequency of the incident wave on the bistatic scattering coefficient is discussed. Numerical results show that the influence of the permittivity of layered medium, the mean layer thickness of intermediate medium, the rms and the correlation length of the rough surface, and the frequency of the incident wave on the bistatic scattering coefficient is very complex.

  10. Wetting properties of molecularly rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, Martin; Malijevský, Alexandr; Lísal, Martin

    2015-09-01

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wettability of nanoscale rough surfaces in systems governed by Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. We consider both smooth and molecularly rough planar surfaces. Solid substrates are modeled as a static collection of LJ particles arranged in a face-centered cubic lattice with the (100) surface exposed to the LJ fluid. Molecularly rough solid surfaces are prepared by removing several strips of LJ atoms from the external layers of the substrate, i.e., forming parallel nanogrooves on the surface. We vary the solid-fluid interactions to investigate strongly and weakly wettable surfaces. We determine the wetting properties by measuring the equilibrium droplet profiles that are in turn used to evaluate the contact angles. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to Wenzel's law, suggest that surface roughness always amplifies the wetting properties of a lyophilic surface. However, our results indicate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., surface roughness deteriorates the substrate wettability. Adding the roughness to a strongly wettable surface shrinks the surface area wet with the liquid, and it either increases or only marginally affects the contact angle, depending on the degree of liquid adsorption into the nanogrooves. For a weakly wettable surface, the roughness changes the surface character from lyophilic to lyophobic due to a weakening of the solid-fluid interactions by the presence of the nanogrooves and the weaker adsorption of the liquid into the nanogrooves.

  11. Preparation of rough microsomes from rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, David D

    2014-08-01

    This protocol describes how to prepare rat liver rough microsomes that contain undegraded membrane-bound polysomes and can function very well in an in vitro translation system. It uses endogenous ribonuclease inhibitor in all steps, avoiding pelleting rough microsomes in all steps and sacrificing good recovery.

  12. SOME ROUGH OPERATORS ON PRODUCT SPACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jiecheng; Wang Silei

    2001-01-01

    In this survery report, we shall mainly summarize some recent progress, interesting problems and typi cal methods used in the theory related to rough Marcinkiewicz integrals and rough singular integrals on product spaces. In addition, we give new proofs for some known results.

  13. Prediction of Ductile Fracture Surface Roughness Scaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Needleman, Alan; Tvergaard, Viggo; Bouchaud, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Experimental observations have shown that the roughness of fracture surfaces exhibit certain characteristic scaling properties. Here, calculations are carried out to explore the extent to which a ductile damage/fracture constitutive relation can be used to model fracture surface roughness scaling....... The scaling properties of the predicted thickness average fracture surfaces are calculated and the results are discussed in light of experimental observations....

  14. Axiomatic Characterizations of IVF Rough Approximation Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangji Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the study of axiomatic characterizations of IVF rough approximation operators. IVF approximation spaces are investigated. The fact that different IVF operators satisfy some axioms to guarantee the existence of different types of IVF relations which produce the same operators is proved and then IVF rough approximation operators are characterized by axioms.

  15. Influence of surface roughness on dispersion forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    Surface roughness occurs in a wide variety of processes where it is both difficult to avoid and control. When two bodies are separated by a small distance the roughness starts to play an important role in the interaction between the bodies, their adhesion, and friction. Control of this

  16. Hydrodynamics and Roughness of Irregular Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    principle component analysis (PCA) similar to that used by Preston (2009) for ship- mounted multibeam data. Several variables derived from the...complex boundaries as well as characterization of acoustic and optical processes. Turbulent processes at the seabed are at the foundation of littoral...nearshore hydrodynamics, turbulence over rough beds influences optical and acoustic properties. Bed roughness also directly affects acoustic propagation in

  17. Bed roughness experiments in supply limited conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spekkers, Matthieu; Tuijnder, Arjan; Ribberink, Jan S.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Parsons, D.R.; Garlan, T.; Best, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Reliable roughness models are of great importance, for example, when predicting water levels in rivers. The currently available roughness models are based on fully mobile bed conditions. However, in rivers where widely graded sediments are present more or less permanent armour layers can develop

  18. Turning rough sleepers into responsible citizens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Tonkens; dr Lia van Doorn

    2001-01-01

    On the eve of the twenty-first century, it is a scandal that there are still people sleeping rough on our streets. This is not a situation we can continue to tolerate in a modern and civil society. These were the words of Tony Blair in his foreword to the policy document Rough Sleeping, The Governme

  19. Roughness on Dutch railway wheels and rails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dings, P.C.; Dittrich, M.G.

    1996-01-01

    Surface roughness on 150 railway wheels and on the rails of 30 sites in the Netherlands have been measured. Block braked wheels were found to show higher roughnesses than the rail at any site. The smoothest rail is 8 dB smoother than the smoothest wheel. It was concluded that in reducing railway

  20. Computation of surface roughness using optical correlation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A M hamed; M Saudy

    2007-05-01

    The laser speckle photography is used to calculate the average surface roughness from the autocorrelation function of the aluminum diffuse objects. The computed results of surface roughness obtained from the profile shapes of the autocorrelation function of the diffuser show good agreement with the results obtained by the stylus profile meter.

  1. Modeling and simulation of surface roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrikar, Rajendra M

    2004-04-30

    With the technology advancement, electronic devices are miniaturized at every development node. Physical parameters such as microscopic roughness are affecting these devices because surface to volume ratio is increasing rapidly. On all the real surfaces microscopic roughness appears, which affects many electronic properties of the material, which in turn decides the yield and reliability of the devices. Different type of parameters and simulation methods are used to describe the surface roughness. Classically surface roughness was modeled by methods such as power series and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). Limitations of this methods lead to use the concept of self-similar fractals to model the rough surface through Mandelbrot-Weierstrass function. It is difficult to express surface roughness as a function of process parameters in the form of analytical functions. Method based on neural networks has been used to model these surfaces to map the process parameters to roughness parameters. Finally, change in electrical parameters such as capacitance, resistance and noise due to surface roughness has been computed by numerical methods.

  2. Curvature sensor for the measurement of the static corneal topography and the dynamic tear film topography in the human eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruppetta, Steve; Koechlin, Laurent; Lacombe, François; Puget, Pascal

    2005-10-01

    A system to measure the topography of the first optical surface of the human eye noninvasively by using a curvature sensor is described. The static corneal topography and the dynamic topography of the tear film can both be measured, and the topographies obtained are presented. The system makes possible the study of the dynamic aberrations introduced by the tear film to determine their contribution to the overall ocular aberrations in healthy eyes, eyes with corneal pathologies, and eyes wearing contact lenses.

  3. Datum Level and NMO Corrections to Shallow Seismic Reflection Data on Rugged Topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jiangping; Xia Jianghai; Chen Chao; Zhang Suxin

    2003-01-01

    The application of the seismic reflection method is often limited in complex terrain areas.The problem is the incorrect correction of time-shift caused by topography. To apply normal moveout (NMO) correction to reflection data correctly, static corrections are necessary to be applied in advance for the compensation of the time distortions of topography and the time-delays from near-surface weathered layers. For environment and engineering investigation, weathered layers are our targets so that the static correction mainly serves the adjustment of time-shift due to an undulating surface. In practice,seismic reflected raypaths are assumed to be almost vertical through the near-surface layers because they have much lower velocities than layers below. This assumption is typically acceptable in most cases since it results in little residual error for small elevation changes and small offsets in reflection events. Although static algorithms based on choosing a floating datum related to common midpoint gathers or residual surface-consistent functions are available and effective, errors caused by the assumption of vertical raypaths often generate pseudo indications of structures. This paper presents the comparison of applying corrections based on the vertical raypaths and bias (non-vertical) raypaths. It also provides an approach of combining elevation and NMO corrections. The advantages of the approach are demonstrated by a synthetic example of multi-coverage seismic reflection surveys on rough topography.

  4. Inhibition of Rac and ROCK Signalling Influence Osteoblast Adhesion, Differentiation and Mineralization on Titanium Topographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prowse, Paul D. H.; Elliott, Christopher G.; Hutter, Jeff; Hamilton, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    Reducing the time required for initial integration of bone-contacting implants with host tissues would be of great clinical significance. Changes in osteoblast adhesion formation and reorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton in response to altered topography are known to be upstream of osteoblast differentiation, and these processes are regulated by the Rho GTPases. Rac and RhoA (through Rho Kinase (ROCK)). Using pharmacological inhibitors, we tested how inhibition of Rac and ROCK influenced osteoblast adhesion, differentiation and mineralization on PT (Pre-treated) and SLA (sandblasted large grit, acid etched) topographies. Inhibition of ROCK, but not Rac, significantly reduced adhesion number and size on PT, with adhesion size consistent with focal complexes. After 1 day, ROCK, but not Rac inhibition increased osteocalcin mRNA levels on SLA and PT, with levels further increasing at 7 days post seeding. ROCK inhibition also significantly increased bone sialoprotein expression at 7 days, but not BMP-2 levels. Rac inhibition significantly reduced BMP-2 mRNA levels. ROCK inhibition increased nuclear translocation of Runx2 independent of surface roughness. Mineralization of osteoblast cultures was greater on SLA than on PT, but was increased by ROCK inhibition and attenuated by Rac inhibition on both topographies. In conclusion, inhibition of ROCK signalling significantly increases osteoblast differentiation and biomineralization in a topographic dependent manner, and its pharmacological inhibition could represent a new therapeutic to speed bone formation around implanted metals and in regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23505566

  5. Inhibition of Rac and ROCK signalling influence osteoblast adhesion, differentiation and mineralization on titanium topographies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D H Prowse

    Full Text Available Reducing the time required for initial integration of bone-contacting implants with host tissues would be of great clinical significance. Changes in osteoblast adhesion formation and reorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton in response to altered topography are known to be upstream of osteoblast differentiation, and these processes are regulated by the Rho GTPases. Rac and RhoA (through Rho Kinase (ROCK. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we tested how inhibition of Rac and ROCK influenced osteoblast adhesion, differentiation and mineralization on PT (Pre-treated and SLA (sandblasted large grit, acid etched topographies. Inhibition of ROCK, but not Rac, significantly reduced adhesion number and size on PT, with adhesion size consistent with focal complexes. After 1 day, ROCK, but not Rac inhibition increased osteocalcin mRNA levels on SLA and PT, with levels further increasing at 7 days post seeding. ROCK inhibition also significantly increased bone sialoprotein expression at 7 days, but not BMP-2 levels. Rac inhibition significantly reduced BMP-2 mRNA levels. ROCK inhibition increased nuclear translocation of Runx2 independent of surface roughness. Mineralization of osteoblast cultures was greater on SLA than on PT, but was increased by ROCK inhibition and attenuated by Rac inhibition on both topographies. In conclusion, inhibition of ROCK signalling significantly increases osteoblast differentiation and biomineralization in a topographic dependent manner, and its pharmacological inhibition could represent a new therapeutic to speed bone formation around implanted metals and in regenerative medicine applications.

  6. Surface topography characterization of automotive cylinder liner surfaces using fractal methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence K, Deepak; Ramamoorthy, B.

    2013-09-01

    This paper explores the use of fractal approaches for the possible characterization of automotive cylinder bore surface topography by employing methods such as differential box counting method, power spectral method and structure function method. Three stage plateau honing experiments were conducted to manufacture sixteen cylinder liner surfaces with different surface topographies, for the study. The three fractal methods are applied on the image data obtained using a computer vision system and 3-D profile data obtained using vertical scanning white light interferometer from the cylinder liner surfaces. The computed fractal parameters (fractal dimension and topothesy) are compared and correlated with the measured 3-D Abbott-Firestone curve parameters (Sk, Spk, Svk, Sr1 and Sr2) that are currently used for the surface topography characterization cylinder liner surfaces. The analyses of the results indicated that the fractal dimension (D) computed using the vision data as well as 3-D profile data by employing three different fractal methods consistantly showed a negative correlation with the functional surface topographical parameters that represents roughness at peak (Spk),core (Sk) and valley (Svk) regions and positive correlation with the upper bearing area (Sr1) and lower bearing area (Sr2) of the automotive of cylinder bore surface.

  7. Comparison of aerodynamically and model-derived roughness lengths (zo) over diverse surfaces, central Mojave Desert, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, D.J.; Clow, G.D.; Tigges, R.K.; Reynolds, R.L.; Chavez, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    The vulnerability of dryland surfaces to wind erosion depends importantly on the absence or the presence and character of surface roughness elements, such as plants, clasts, and topographic irregularities that diminish wind speed near the surface. A model for the friction velocity ratio has been developed to account for wind sheltering by many different types of co-existing roughness elements. Such conditions typify a monitored area in the central Mojave Desert, California, that experiences frequent sand movement and dust emission. Two additional models are used to convert the friction velocity ratio to the surface roughness length (zo) for momentum. To calculate roughness lengths from these models, measurements were made at 11 sites within the monitored area to characterize the surface roughness element. Measurements included (1) the number of roughness species (e.g., plants, small-scale topography, clasts), and their associated heights and widths, (2) spacing among species, and (3) vegetation porosity (a measurement of the spatial distribution of woody elements of a plant). Documented or estimated values of drag coefficients for different species were included in the modeling. At these sites, wind-speed profiles were measured during periods of neutral atmospheric stability using three 9-m towers with three or four calibrated anemometers on each. Modeled roughness lengths show a close correspondence (correlation coefficient, 0.84-0.86) to the aerodynamically determined values at the field sites. The geometric properties of the roughness elements in the model are amenable to measurement at much higher temporal and spatial resolutions using remote-sensing techniques than can be accomplished through laborious ground-based methods. A remote-sensing approach to acquire values of the modeled roughness length is particularly important for the development of linked surface/atmosphere wind-erosion models sensitive to climate variability and land-use changes in areas such

  8. An Integrated Assessment of Basal Scattering and Topographic Roughness Information Derived from Greenland Radar-Sounding Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet-chaulet, F.; Jordan, T.; Cooper, M.; Bamber, J. L.; Schroeder, D. M.; Williams, C.; Paden, J. D.; Siegert, M. J.; Huybrechts, P.; Gagliardini, O.; Price, S. F.

    2016-12-01

    Quantifying the basal roughness of ice sheets is important for understanding and constraining the role of basal traction on ice dynamics. Numerical model simulations demonstrate high sensitivity to the parametrisation of the lower boundary condition, which is governed by both basal roughness and the thermal state of the bed. In terms of ice dynamics history, basal roughness can reveal aspects of past behaviour as well as provide insight towards more recent flow distribution of marine sediments. Basal roughness information, defined here in general terms as the irregularity of the basal interface relative to a reference surface, can be obtained from radar-sounding data in two physically different ways. Firstly, via the statistical properties of along-track topography (e.g. from spectral analysis); and secondly via the electromagnetic scattering properties of the radar pulse (e.g. by quantifying the spread of the distribution of scattered energy). In general, the basal roughness of the Greenland Ice Sheet has been little studied, and the vast increase in recent Operation Ice Bridge radar-sounding data presents an opportunity for comprehensive, quantitative ice-sheet-wide analysis. Here we present a synthesis of basal scattering and topographic based roughness information for the Greenland Ice Sheet, along with a comparison to present day numerical model output including ice velocity, basal traction, and basal temperature. One central topic which we address is the scale dependence of basal roughness information that is inferred from both analysis methods, and the relationship with basal sliding physics. Consideration of scale is important since basal sliding is primarily controlled by higher frequency roughness. The other topic that we consider is identifying whether there are any defined and unambiguous roughness characteristics in regions where there is suspected to be a thawed basal interface. An overall goal of this work is to integrate basal roughness information

  9. Rough sets: the classical and extended views

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZIARKO Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    The article is a comprehensive review of two major approaches to rough set theory: the classic rough setmodel introduced by Pawlak and the probabilistic approaches. The classic model is presented as a staging ground to the discussion of two varieties of the probabilistic approach, i.e. of the variable precision and Bayesian rough set models. Both of these models extend the classic model to deal with stochastic interactions while preserving the basicideas of the original rough set theory, such as set approximations, data dependencies, reducts etc. The probabilistic models are able to handle weaker data interactions than the classic model, thus extending the applicability of the rough set paradigm. The extended models are presented in considerable detail with some illustrative examples.

  10. MODULAR APPROACH WITH ROUGH DECISION MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed T. Shawky

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Decision models which adopt rough set theory have been used effectively in many real world applications.However, rough decision models suffer the high computational complexity when dealing with datasets ofhuge size. In this research we propose a new rough decision model that allows making decisions based onmodularity mechanism. According to the proposed approach, large-size datasets can be divided intoarbitrary moderate-size datasets, then a group of rough decision models can be built as separate decisionmodules. The overall model decision is computed as the consensus decision of all decision modulesthrough some aggregation technique. This approach provides a flexible and a quick way for extractingdecision rules of large size information tables using rough decision models.

  11. Modular Approach with Rough Decision Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed T. Shawky

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Decision models which adopt rough set theory have been used effectively in many real world applications.However, rough decision models suffer the high computational complexity when dealing with datasets ofhuge size. In this research we propose a new rough decision model that allows making decisions based onmodularity mechanism. According to the proposed approach, large-size datasets can be divided intoarbitrary moderate-size datasets, then a group of rough decision models can be built as separate decisionmodules. The overall model decision is computed as the consensus decision of all decision modulesthrough some aggregation technique. This approach provides a flexible and a quick way for extractingdecision rules of large size information tables using rough decision models.

  12. Modeling surface roughness scattering in metallic nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moors, Kristof, E-mail: kristof@itf.fys.kuleuven.be [KU Leuven, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Sorée, Bart [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Physics Department, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); KU Leuven, Electrical Engineering (ESAT) Department, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Magnus, Wim [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Physics Department, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2015-09-28

    Ando's model provides a rigorous quantum-mechanical framework for electron-surface roughness scattering, based on the detailed roughness structure. We apply this method to metallic nanowires and improve the model introducing surface roughness distribution functions on a finite domain with analytical expressions for the average surface roughness matrix elements. This approach is valid for any roughness size and extends beyond the commonly used Prange-Nee approximation. The resistivity scaling is obtained from the self-consistent relaxation time solution of the Boltzmann transport equation and is compared to Prange-Nee's approach and other known methods. The results show that a substantial drop in resistivity can be obtained for certain diameters by achieving a large momentum gap between Fermi level states with positive and negative momentum in the transport direction.

  13. Electrochemically grown rough-textured nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, Pawan; Postetter, David; Saragnese, Daniel [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (United States); Papadakis, Stergios J. [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (United States); Gracias, David H., E-mail: dgracias@jhu.ed [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Nanowires with a rough surface texture show unusual electronic, optical, and chemical properties; however, there are only a few existing methods for producing these nanowires. Here, we describe two methods for growing both free standing and lithographically patterned gold (Au) nanowires with a rough surface texture. The first strategy is based on the deposition of nanowires from a silver (Ag)-Au plating solution mixture that precipitates an Ag-Au cyanide complex during electrodeposition at low current densities. This complex disperses in the plating solution, thereby altering the nanowire growth to yield a rough surface texture. These nanowires are mass produced in alumina membranes. The second strategy produces long and rough Au nanowires on lithographically patternable nickel edge templates with corrugations formed by partial etching. These rough nanowires can be easily arrayed and integrated with microscale devices.

  14. Suppression of intrinsic roughness in encapsulated graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Joachim Dahl; Gunst, Tue; Gregersen, Søren Schou

    2017-01-01

    Roughness in graphene is known to contribute to scattering effects which lower carrier mobility. Encapsulating graphene in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) leads to a significant reduction in roughness and has become the de facto standard method for producing high-quality graphene devices. We have...... fabricated graphene samples encapsulated by hBN that are suspended over apertures in a substrate and used noncontact electron diffraction measurements in a transmission electron microscope to measure the roughness of encapsulated graphene inside such structures. We furthermore compare the roughness...... of these samples to suspended bare graphene and suspended graphene on hBN. The suspended heterostructures display a root mean square (rms) roughness down to 12 pm, considerably less than that previously reported for both suspended graphene and graphene on any substrate and identical within experimental error...

  15. Dynamical framework with blocking topography coordinates for atmospheric GCM and its validation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhaohui; ZHANG Ming; LIANG Danqing; WANG Aihui; ZHANG Dongling; ZENG Qingcun

    2003-01-01

    The dynamical framework with Blocking Topography Coordinates (hereafter, BTC), which is suited to handle the steep topography for the atmospheric general circulation models, is presented in this paper, together with its validation results. The integral properties of both the differential and finite-difference equations for the BTC dynamical core are: gross mass conservation, quadratic conservation for advection terms, Coriolis force does not change the kinetic energy, conservation of total available energy. The improved nonlinear iteration scheme is utilized for the time-integration. The energy conservation for BTC dynamical core is validated by using the integration results from 9-layer and 21-layer version respectively. Comparison results show that, the changes of the kinetic energy and total available potential energy during the integration are quite close for both the BTC dynamical framework and the dynamical framework of IAP 9-level and IAP 21-level AGCM, and this may suggest that the BTC dynamical core can be used for long-term integration with good computational stability. Furthermore, the BTC dynamical core has the advantage over the terrain following (sigma) coordinates in its better representation of the influence of the large-scale topography on the atmospheric general circulation. Finally, the correctness and reasonableness of the BTC dynamical core has been further proved by the numerical simulation of the topography influence on the quasi-stationary planetary wave with 21-layer version of BTC dynamical framework.

  16. Swept Mechanism of Micro-Milling Tool Geometry Effect on Machined Oxygen Free High Conductivity Copper (OFHC) Surface Roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhenyu; Liu, Zhanqiang; Li, Yuchao; Qiao, Yang

    2017-01-28

    Cutting tool geometry should be very much considered in micro-cutting because it has a significant effect on the topography and accuracy of the machined surface, particularly considering the uncut chip thickness is comparable to the cutting edge radius. The objective of this paper was to clarify the influence of the mechanism of the cutting tool geometry on the surface topography in the micro-milling process. Four different cutting tools including two two-fluted end milling tools with different helix angles of 15° and 30° cutting tools, as well as two three-fluted end milling tools with different helix angles of 15° and 30° were investigated by combining theoretical modeling analysis with experimental research. The tool geometry was mathematically modeled through coordinate translation and transformation to make all three cutting edges at the cutting tool tip into the same coordinate system. Swept mechanisms, minimum uncut chip thickness, and cutting tool run-out were considered on modeling surface roughness parameters (the height of surface roughness Rz and average surface roughness Ra) based on the established mathematical model. A set of cutting experiments was carried out using four different shaped cutting tools. It was found that the sweeping volume of the cutting tool increases with the decrease of both the cutting tool helix angle and the flute number. Great coarse machined surface roughness and more non-uniform surface topography are generated when the sweeping volume increases. The outcome of this research should bring about new methodologies for micro-end milling tool design and manufacturing. The machined surface roughness can be improved by appropriately selecting the tool geometrical parameters.

  17. Geophysical, petrological and mineral physics constraints on Earth's surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerri, Mattia; Cammarano, Fabio; Tackley, Paul J.

    2015-04-01

    Earth's surface topography is controlled by isostatically compensated density variations within the lithosphere, but dynamic topography - i.e. the topography due to adjustment of surface to mantle convection - is an important component, specially at a global scale. In order to separate these two components it is fundamental to estimate crustal and mantle density structure and rheological properties. Usually, crustal density is constrained from interpretation of available seismic data (mostly VP profiles) based on empirical relationships such those in Brocher [2005]. Mantle density structure is inferred from seismic tomography models. Constant coefficients are used to interpret seismic velocity anomalies in density anomalies. These simplified methods are unable to model the effects that pressure and temperature variations have on mineralogical assemblage and physical properties. Our approach is based on a multidisciplinary method that involves geophysical observables, mineral physics constraints, and petrological data. Mantle density is based on the thermal interpretation of global seismic tomography models assuming various compositional structures, as in Cammarano et al. [2011]. We further constrain the top 150 km by including heat-flow data and considering the thermal evolution of the oceanic lithosphere. Crustal density is calculated as in Guerri and Cammarano [2015] performing thermodynamic modeling of various average chemical compositions proposed for the crust. The modeling, performed with the code PerpleX [Connolly, 2005], relies on the thermodynamic dataset from Holland and Powell [1998]. Compressional waves velocity and crustal layers thickness from the model CRUST 1.0 [Laske et al., 2013] offer additional constrains. The resulting lithospheric density models are tested against gravity (GOCE) data. Various crustal and mantle density models have been tested in order to ascertain the effects that uncertainties in the estimate of those features have on the

  18. OpenTopography: Enabling Online Access to High-Resolution Lidar Topography Data and Processing Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Christopher; Nandigam, Viswanath; Baru, Chaitan; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution topography data acquired with lidar (light detection and ranging) technology are revolutionizing the way we study the Earth's surface and overlying vegetation. These data, collected from airborne, tripod, or mobile-mounted scanners have emerged as a fundamental tool for research on topics ranging from earthquake hazards to hillslope processes. Lidar data provide a digital representation of the earth's surface at a resolution sufficient to appropriately capture the processes that contribute to landscape evolution. The U.S. National Science Foundation-funded OpenTopography Facility (http://www.opentopography.org) is a web-based system designed to democratize access to earth science-oriented lidar topography data. OpenTopography provides free, online access to lidar data in a number of forms, including the raw point cloud and associated geospatial-processing tools for customized analysis. The point cloud data are co-located with on-demand processing tools to generate digital elevation models, and derived products and visualizations which allow users to quickly access data in a format appropriate for their scientific application. The OpenTopography system is built using a service-oriented architecture (SOA) that leverages cyberinfrastructure resources at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at the University of California San Diego to allow users, regardless of expertise level, to access these massive lidar datasets and derived products for use in research and teaching. OpenTopography hosts over 500 billion lidar returns covering 85,000 km2. These data are all in the public domain and are provided by a variety of partners under joint agreements and memoranda of understanding with OpenTopography. Partners include national facilities such as the NSF-funded National Center for Airborne Lidar Mapping (NCALM), as well as non-governmental organizations and local, state, and federal agencies. OpenTopography has become a hub for high-resolution topography

  19. Interferometer for measuring dynamic corneal topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micali, Jason Daniel

    The cornea is the anterior most surface of the eye and plays a critical role in vision. A thin fluid layer, the tear film, coats the outer surface of the cornea and serves to protect, nourish, and lubricate the cornea. At the same time, the tear film is responsible for creating a smooth continuous surface where the majority of refraction takes place in the eye. A significant component of vision quality is determined by the shape of the cornea and stability of the tear film. It is desirable to possess an instrument that can measure the corneal shape and tear film surface with the same accuracy and resolution that is currently performed on common optical elements. A dual interferometer system for measuring the dynamic corneal topography is designed, built, and verified. The completed system is validated by testing on human subjects. The system consists of two co-aligned polarization splitting Twyman-Green interferometers designed to measure phase instantaneously. The primary interferometer measures the surface of the tear film while the secondary interferometer simultaneously tracks the absolute position of the cornea. Eye motion, ocular variation, and a dynamic tear film surface will result in a non-null configuration of the surface with respect to the interferometer system. A non-null test results in significant interferometer induced errors that add to the measured phase. New algorithms are developed to recover the absolute surface topography of the tear film and corneal surface from the simultaneous interferometer measurements. The results are high-resolution and high-accuracy surface topography measurements of the in vivo cornea that are captured at standard camera frame rates. This dissertation will cover the development and construction of an interferometer system for measuring the dynamic corneal topography of the human eye. The discussion starts with the completion of an interferometer for measuring the tear film. The tear film interferometer is part of an

  20. The Interior of Enceladus from Gravity and Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iess, L.

    2015-12-01

    The combination of gravity and topography has been the method of choice to obtain quantitative information on the interior of Enceladus, but its application was challenging because of the small mass of the moon and the short gravitational interaction time with the Cassini spacecraft. The main observable quantity used in the estimation of the gravity field was the spacecraft range rate, measured by the antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network to an accuracy of about 0.03 mm/s (at 60 s integration time). In spite of these challenges and thanks to the careful design of three gravity flybys, Cassini was able to catch the essential features of Enceladus's gravity field, in particular to estimate its quadrupole and detect the sought-for hemispherical asymmetry [1]. Crucial for the correct fit of the Doppler data was the inclusion in the dynamical model of the drag acceleration from the plume's neutral particles. Although the largest quadrupole coefficients indicate only a mild deviation from hydrostatic equilibrium (J2/C22=3.55±0.05), a reliable determination of the MOIF uses J3 to separate the hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic components of the quadrupole field. The application of this method results in a MOIF (0.336) compatible with a differentiated structure. (An admittance analysis leads to a similar value.) The magnitude and the sign of J3 indicate that the gravity anomaly associated to the striking topographic depression (-1 km) in the southern polar regions is largely compensated by denser material at depth. The obvious (but not the only) interpretation points to a liquid water mass, denser than the surrounding ice and sandwiched between the ice shell and the rocky core. The gravity field and the topography provide also rough estimate of the size of the water mass and the depth at which it is located. Starting from the consideration that the hydrostatic J2/C22 ratio for a fast rotator like Enceladus is about 3.25 and not 10/3, a recent work [2] offers some adjustments

  1. Function S-rough sets and law identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI KaiQuan; YAO BingXue

    2008-01-01

    By introducing element equivalence class that proposes dynamic characteristic into Pawlak Z rough sets theory, the first author of this paper improved Pawlak Z rough sets and put forward S-rough sets (singular rough sets). S-rough sets are defined by element equivalence class that proposes dynamic characteristic. S-rough sets have dynamic characteristic. By introducing the function equivalence class (law equivalence class) that proposes dynamic characteristic into S-rough sets, the first author improved S-rough sets and put forward function S-rough sets (function singular rough sets). Function S-rough sets have dynamic characteristic and law characteristic, and a function is a law. By using function S-rough sets, this paper presents law identification, law identification theorem, and law identification criterion and applications. Function S-rough sets are a new research direction of rough sets theory, and it is also a new tool to the research of system law identifica-tion.

  2. Reduction of Surface Roughness by Means of Laser Processing over Additive Manufacturing Metal Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Alfieri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of processing parameters and exposure strategies is usually performed in additive manufacturing to set up the process; nevertheless, standards for roughness may not be evenly matched on a single complex part, since surface features depend on the building direction of the part. This paper aims to evaluate post processing treating via laser surface modification by means of scanning optics and beam wobbling to process metal parts resulting from selective laser melting of stainless steel in order to improve surface topography. The results are discussed in terms of roughness, geometry of the fusion zone in the cross-section, microstructural modification, and microhardness so as to assess the effects of laser post processing. The benefits of beam wobbling over linear scanning processing are shown, as heat effects in the base metal are proven to be lower.

  3. Satellite multispectral data for improved floodplain roughness modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forzieri, Giovanni; Degetto, Massimo; Righetti, Maurizio; Castelli, Fabio; Preti, Federico

    2011-09-01

    SummaryRiparian vegetation plays a crucial role on affecting the floodplain hydraulic roughness, which in turn significantly influences the dynamics of flood waves. This paper explores the potential accuracies of retrieving vegetation hydrodynamic parameters through satellite multispectral data. The method is focused on estimation of vegetation height ( h g) and flexural rigidity ( MEI) for herbaceous patterns and of plant density ( M), tree height ( h), stem diameter ( Ds), crown base height ( cbh) and crown diameter ( Dc) of high-forest ( hf) and coppice ( cop) consociations for arboreal and shrub patterns. The method is organized in four sequential steps: (1) classification procedure of riparian corridor; (2) land cover-based Principal Component Analysis of spectral channels; (3) explorative analysis of correlation structure between principal components and biomechanical properties and (4) model identification/estimation/validation for floodplain roughness parameterization. To capture the hydrodynamic impacts of stiff/flexible vegetation, a GIS hydrodynamic model has been coupled with a flow resistance external routine that estimates the hydraulic roughness by using simulated water stages and the remote sensing-derived hydrodynamic parameters. The procedure is tested along a 3-km reach of the Avisio river (Trentino Alto Adige, Italy) by comparing extended field surveys and a synchronous SPOT-5 multispectral image acquired on 28/08/2004. Results showed significant correlation values between spectral-derived information and hydrodynamic parameters. Predictive models provided high coefficients of determination, especially for mixed arboreal and shrub land covers. The generated structural parameter maps represent spatially explicit data layers that can be used as inputs to hydrodynamic models to analyze flow resistance effects in different submergence conditions of vegetation. The hydraulic modelling results showed that the new method is able to provide accurate

  4. Estimating the aerodynamic roughness of debris covered glacier ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quincey, Duncan; Smith, Mark; Rounce, David; Ross, Andrew; King, Owen; Watson, Scott

    2017-04-01

    Aerodynamic roughness length (z0), the height above the ground surface at which the extrapolated horizontal wind velocity profile drops to zero, is one of the most poorly parameterised elements of the glacier surface energy balance equation. Microtopographic methods for estimating z0 are becoming increasingly well used, but are rarely validated against independent measures and are yet to be comprehensively analysed for scale or data resolution dependency. Here, we present the results of a field investigation conducted on the debris covered Khumbu Glacier during the post-monsoon season of 2015. We focus on two sites. The first is characterised by gravels and cobbles supported by a fine sandy matrix. The second comprises cobbles and boulders separated by voids. Vertical profiles of wind speed measured over both sites enable us to derive measurements of aerodynamic roughness that reflect their observed surface characteristics (0.0184 m vs 0.0243 m). z0 at the second site also varied through time following snowfall (0.0055 m) and during its subsequent melt (0.0129 m), showing the importance of fine resolution topography for near-surface airflow. We conducted Structure from Motion Multi-View Stereo (SfM-MVS) surveys across each patch and calculated z0 using three microtopographic methods. The fully three-dimensional cloud-based approach is shown to be most stable across different scales and these z0 values are most correct in relative order when compared to the wind tower data. Popular profile-based methods perform less well providing highly variable values across different scales and when using data of differing resolution.

  5. Superhydrophobic nanocomposite surface topography and ice adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alexander; Yeong, Yong Han; Steele, Adam; Bayer, Ilker S; Loth, Eric

    2014-06-25

    A method to reduce the surface roughness of a spray-casted polyurethane/silica/fluoroacrylic superhydrophobic nanocomposite coating was demonstrated. By changing the main slurry carrier fluid, fluoropolymer medium, surface pretreatment, and spray parameters, we achieved arithmetic surface roughness values of 8.7, 2.7, and 1.6 μm on three test surfaces. The three surfaces displayed superhydrophobic performance with modest variations in skewness and kurtosis. The arithmetic roughness level of 1.6 μm is the smoothest superhydrophobic surface yet produced with these spray-based techniques. These three nanocomposite surfaces, along with a polished aluminum surface, were impacted with a supercooled water spray in icing conditions, and after ice accretion occurred, each was subjected to a pressurized tensile test to measure ice-adhesion. All three superhydrophobic surfaces showed lower ice adhesion than that of the polished aluminum surface. Interestingly, the intermediate roughness surface yielded the best performance, which suggests that high kurtosis and shorter autocorrelation lengths improve performance. The most ice-phobic nanocomposite showed a 60% reduction in ice-adhesion strength when compared to polished aluminum.

  6. On Characterization of Rough Type-2 Fuzzy Sets

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Zhao; Zhenbo Wei

    2016-01-01

    Rough sets theory and fuzzy sets theory are important mathematical tools to deal with uncertainties. Rough fuzzy sets and fuzzy rough sets as generalizations of rough sets have been introduced. Type-2 fuzzy set provides additional degree of freedom, which makes it possible to directly handle high uncertainties. In this paper, the rough type-2 fuzzy set model is proposed by combining the rough set theory with the type-2 fuzzy set theory. The rough type-2 fuzzy approximation operators induced f...

  7. 界面粗糙度对氧化层残余应力分布的影响%Effects of Interface Roughness on Distribution of Residual Stress in Thermally-growth Oxide Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑伟; 李平; 王银坤

    2013-01-01

    According to the interface topography and roughness of the thermally-growth oxide layer between the top coating and the bond coating,the plane strain model of thermal barrier coating with thermally-growth oxide layer was established,the distribution of the residual stress in thermally-growth oxide layer was calculated,the effects of roughness on the distribution of the residual stress were analyzed.The calculating results show that with the increase of the roughness of the oxide layer,X and Y direction stress values increase and along the waveform downward trend,the stress increases gradually,the stress is the largest and X stress is larger than Y stress at the valley of the wave.%根据热障涂层中陶瓷层和粘结层界面间的氧化层界面形貌和界面粗糙情况,建立了具有氧化层的热障涂层平面应变模型,模拟计算了氧化层界面残余应力分布,分析了粗糙度对氧化层残余应力分布的影响.计算结果表明,随粗糙度的增加,氧化层中的X和Y方向应力值均不断增加,沿着波形下降的趋势应力逐渐增大,波谷处应力最大,且X方向的应力值远大于y的方向应力值.

  8. Support of long-wavelength topography on Mercury inferred from MESSENGER measurements of gravity and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Peter B.; Zuber, Maria T.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-02-01

    To explore the mechanisms of support of surface topography on Mercury, we have determined the admittances and correlations of topography and gravity in Mercury's northern hemisphere from measurements obtained by NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. These admittances and correlations can be interpreted in the context of a number of theoretical scenarios, including flexural loading and dynamic flow. We find that long-wavelength (spherical harmonic degree l shallow crustal compensation and are weakly correlated with positive mass anomalies in the mantle. The center of the Caloris basin features some of the thinnest crust on the planet, and the basin is underlain by a large negative mass anomaly. We also explore models of dynamic flow in the presence of compositional stratification above the liquid core. If there is substantial compositional stratification in Mercury's solid outer shell, relaxation of perturbed compositional interfaces may be capable of creating and sustaining long-wavelength topography.

  9. Understanding EUV mask blank surface roughness induced LWR and associated roughness requirement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Pei-Yang [Intel Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Zhang, Guojing [Intel Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Gullickson, Eric M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Goldberg, Kenneth A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Benk, Markus P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask multi-layer (ML) blank surface roughness specification historically comes from blank defect inspection tool requirement. Later, new concerns on ML surface roughness induced wafer pattern line width roughness (LWR) arise. In this paper, we have studied wafer level pattern LWR as a function of EUVL mask surface roughness via High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Tool. We found that the blank surface roughness induced LWR at current blank roughness level is in the order of 0.5nm 3σ for NA=0.42 at the best focus. At defocus of ±40nm, the corresponding LWR will be 0.2nm higher. Further reducing EUVL mask blank surface roughness will increase the blank cost with limited benefit in improving the pattern LWR, provided that the intrinsic resist LWR is in the order of 1nm and above.

  10. Additive manufactured polymeric 3D scaffolds with tailored surface topography influence mesenchymal stromal cells activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Sara C; Mota, Carlos; Longoni, Alessia; Barrias, Cristina C; Granja, Pedro L; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-05-24

    Additive manufactured three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds with tailored surface topography constitute a clear advantage in tissue regeneration strategies to steer cell behavior. 3D fibrous scaffolds of poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) block copolymer presenting different fiber surface features were successfully fabricated by additive manufacturing combined with wet-spinning, in a single step, without any post-processing. The optimization of the processing parameters, mainly driven by different solvent/non-solvent combinations, led to four distinct scaffold types, with average surface roughness values ranging from 0.071 ± 0.012 μm to 1.950 ± 0.553 μm, average pore sizes in the x- and y-axis between 351.1 ± 33.6 μm and 396.1 ± 32.3 μm, in the z-axis between 36.5 ± 5.3 μm and 70.7 ± 8.8 μm, average fiber diameters between 69.4 ± 6.1 μm and 99.0 ± 9.4 μm, and porosity values ranging from 60.2 ± 0.8% to 71.7 ± 2.6%. Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) cultured on these scaffolds adhered, proliferated, and produced endogenous extracellular matrix. The effect of surface roughness and topography on hMSCs differentiation was more evident for cells seeded at lower density, where the percentage of cells in direct contact with the surface was higher compared to more densely seeded scaffolds. Under osteogenic conditions, lower surface roughness values (0.227 ± 0.035 μm) had a synergistic effect on hMSCs behavior, while chondrogenesis was favored on rougher surfaces (1.950 ± 0.553 μm).

  11. Existence of a typical threshold in the response of human mesenchymal stem cells to a peak and valley topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigerelle, M; Giljean, S; Anselme, K

    2011-09-01

    Our objective in this study was to determine whether a threshold in sensitivity of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) to isotropic roughness exists. Using electrical discharge machining a very wide range of roughnesses (1.2μmtopography can be produced on titanium, with a range of roughness overlapping the hMSC length dimensions. The curve of the number of adherent hMSC after 2days culture as a function of roughness showed a U-shape with a minimum number of attached cells for a roughness amplitude R(a)=4.5μm and a distance between surface features (width of peaks and valleys) S(m)=110μm. The maximum cell number was observed at the lowest and highest roughnesses. Due to this very wide range of roughness it was possible to demonstrate that the response of hMSC to roughness varies with the dimensions of the surface features relative to the cell size. Above or below their own size hMSC essentially adhere to the nano and submicron features. When the surface displays features about the same size as hMSC the curvature of these surface features will decrease the number of attached cells by a factor of two. A modelling approach is proposed to help the interpretation of these results. It is hypothesized that this minimal adhesion is a consequence of an unfavourable stress imposed on the cell cytoskeleton.

  12. Rough Fuzzy Relation on Two Universal Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Thao Nguyen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fuzzy set theory was introduced by L.A. Zadeh in 1965. Immediately, it has many applications in practice and in building databases, one of which is the construction of a fuzzy relational database based on similar relationship. The study of cases of fuzzy relations in different environments will help us understand its applications. In this paper, the rough fuzzy relation on Cartesian product of two universe sets is defined, and then the algebraic properties of them, such as the max, min, and composition of two rough fuzzy relations are examined. Finally, reflexive, α-reflexive, symmetric and transitive rough fuzzy relations on two universe sets are also defined.

  13. Rough Sets, Their Extensions and Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Shen; Richard Jensen

    2007-01-01

    Rough set theory provides a useful mathematical foundation for developing automated computational systems that can help understand and make use of imperfect knowledge. Despite its recency, the theory and its extensions have been widely applied to many problems, including decision analysis, data mining, intelligent control and pattern recognition. This paper presents an outline of the basic concepts of rough sets and their major extensions, covering variable precision, tolerance and fuzzy rough sets. It also shows the diversity of successful applications these theories have entailed, ranging from financial and business, through biological and medicine, to physical, art, and meteorological.

  14. Self-affine subglacial roughness: consequences for radar scattering and basal water discrimination in northern Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Thomas M.; Cooper, Michael A.; Schroeder, Dustin M.; Williams, Christopher N.; Paden, John D.; Siegert, Martin J.; Bamber, Jonathan L.

    2017-05-01

    Subglacial roughness can be determined at a variety of length scales from radio-echo sounding (RES) data either via statistical analysis of topography or inferred from basal radar scattering. Past studies have demonstrated that subglacial terrain exhibits self-affine (power law) roughness scaling behaviour, but existing radar scattering models do not take this into account. Here, using RES data from northern Greenland, we introduce a self-affine statistical framework that enables a consistent integration of topographic-scale roughness with the electromagnetic theory of radar scattering. We demonstrate that the degree of radar scattering, quantified using the waveform abruptness (pulse peakiness), is topographically controlled by the Hurst (roughness power law) exponent. Notably, specular bed reflections are associated with a lower Hurst exponent, with diffuse scattering associated with a higher Hurst exponent. Abrupt waveforms (specular reflections) have previously been used as a RES diagnostic for basal water, and to test this assumption we compare our radar scattering map with a recent prediction for the basal thermal state. We demonstrate that the majority of thawed regions (above pressure melting point) exhibit a diffuse scattering signature, which is in contradiction to the prior approach. Self-affine statistics provide a generalised model for subglacial terrain and can improve our understanding of the relationship between basal properties and ice-sheet dynamics.

  15. Global and local mapping of motor blocks liners roughness for the analysis of honing performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanettes, F.; Fahlgren, L.; Hoering, T.; Rosén, B.-G.

    2014-03-01

    The manufacturing and finishing (honing) of cylinder liners for the automotive industry is a constant challenge in order to reduce friction losses and oil consumption. A better knowledge of surfaces generated during plateau honing is then required for optimization of the process. Despite a well-known and controlled honing process, variations in surface roughness appear at both global (due to honing tool wear) and local (TDC, middle stroke, BDC) scales and need to be mapped and analysed. The following paper proposes to map the global and local variations in roughness by using a confocal 3D measuring equipment able to measure and scan any area of a cylinder liner. Six motor blocks (five liners each) are evaluated with twenty topography measurements per liner. In total, six hundred 3D measurements of size 1×1 mm are performed and roughness parameters are computed. The results show that some parameters do correlate with the honing tool wear specific to each cylinder. Experimental models could be built. Furthermore surface roughness varies significantly over the axial length of the liners due to waviness deviations combined with a lack of flexibility of the honing tool in axial direction.

  16. The effect of milling and postmilling procedures on the surface roughness of CAD/CAM materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Smidt, Laura Nunes; Fracasso, Lisiane Martins; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2017-09-11

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness and analyze the surface topography of five different CAD/CAM ceramics and one CAD/CAM composite resin for CEREC after milling and postmilling procedures. Blocks of the ceramics Mark II, IPS Empress CAD, IPS e.max CAD, Suprinity and Enamic, and blocks of the composite resin Lava Ultimate were milled at CEREC MCXL. Ten flat samples of each material were obtained. The surface roughness (Ra) test was performed before and after milling, crystallization, polishing, and glaze when indicated, followed by SEM and AFM analysis. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA with repeated measures and the Tukey HSD test (α = 0.05). The milling step significantly increased the roughness of all the tested materials (P CAD and Suprinity) were more suitable to roughness than the other tested materials (P CAD/CAM materials, that is, fully sintered, should be only hand polished. The glaze step can be suppressed resulting in time saving. However, the glaze step in soft-milling lithium disilicate is imperative. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Evaluation of the topographical surface changes and roughness of zirconia after different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subaşı, Meryem Gülce; İnan, Özgür

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the surface morphology and roughness of zirconia after different surface treatments. Eighty sintered zirconia specimens were divided into four groups (n = 20) according to the surface treatments received: no treatment, erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser irradiation (400 mJ, 10 Hz, 4 W, 100 MPS, distance: 1 mm), tribochemical silica coating with 30 μm aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3)) modified by silica, and air abrasion with 110 μm Al(2)O(3) particles. After the surface treatments, the surface roughness (Ra in μm) of the specimens was evaluated using a surface texture measuring instrument. Surface morphology of a specimen from each group was evaluated with atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses. The surface roughness values were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (p = 0.05). All of the surface treatments produced rougher surfaces than the control group (p roughness of laser and silica groups (p > 0.05). SEM and AFM analyses revealed changes in surface topography after surface treatments, especially in the laser group with the formation of rare pits and in the silica and air abrasion groups with the formation of microretentive grooves. According to the results of the statistical and microscopic analyses, all of the surface treatments can be used for roughening zirconia prior to cementation; however, air abrasion is the most effective surface treatment to obtain micromechanical retention.

  18. How to select the most relevant 3D roughness parameters of a surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deltombe, R; Kubiak, K J; Bigerelle, M

    2014-01-01

    In order to conduct a comprehensive roughness analysis, around sixty 3D roughness parameters are created to describe most of the surface morphology with regard to specific functions, properties or applications. In this paper, a multiscale surface topography decomposition method is proposed with application to stainless steel (AISI 304), which is processed by rolling at different fabrication stages and by electrical discharge tool machining. Fifty-six 3D-roughness parameters defined in ISO, EUR, and ASME standards are calculated for the measured surfaces. Then, expert software "MesRug" is employed to perform statistical analysis on acquired data in order to find the most relevant parameters characterizing the effect of both processes (rolling and machining), and to determine the most appropriate scale of analysis. For the rolling process: The parameter Vmc (the Core Material Volume--defined as volume of material comprising the texture between heights corresponding to the material ratio values of p = 10% and q = 80%) computed at the scale of 3 µm is the most relevant parameter to characterize the cold rolling process. For the EDM Process, the best roughness parameter is SPD that represents the number of peaks per unit area after segmentation of a surface into motifs computed at the scale of 8 µm.

  19. Global-Scale Evaluation of Roughness Effects on C-Band AMSR-E Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying roughness effects on ground surface emissivity is an important step in obtaining high-quality soil moisture products from large-scale passive microwave sensors. In this study, we used a semi-empirical method to evaluate roughness effects (parameterized here by the  parameter on a global scale from AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS observations. AMSR-E brightness temperatures at 6.9 GHz obtained from January 2009 to September 2011, together with estimations of soil moisture from the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity L3 products and of soil temperature from ECMWF’s (European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasting were used as inputs in a retrieval process. In the first step, we retrieved a parameter (referred to as the  parameter accounting for the combined effects of roughness and vegetation. Then, global MODIS NDVI data were used to decouple the effects of vegetation from those of surface roughness. Finally, global maps of the Hr parameters were produced and discussed. Initial results showed that some spatial patterns in the  values could be associated with the main vegetation types (higher values of  were retrieved generally in forested regions, intermediate values were obtained over crops and grasslands, and lower values were obtained over shrubs and desert and topography. For instance, over the USA, lower values of  were retrieved in relatively flat regions while relatively higher values were retrieved in hilly regions.

  20. Paper coatings with multi-scale roughness evaluated at different sampling sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samyn, Pieter, E-mail: Pieter.Samyn@UGent.be [Ghent University - Department of Textiles, Technologiepark 907, B-9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium); Van Erps, Juergen; Thienpont, Hugo [Vrije Universiteit Brussels - Department of Applied Physics and Photonics, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Schoukens, Gustaaf [Ghent University - Department of Textiles, Technologiepark 907, B-9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium)

    2011-04-15

    Papers have a complex hierarchical structure and the end-user functionalities such as hydrophobicity are controlled by a finishing layer. The application of an organic nanoparticle coating and drying of the aqueous dispersion results in an unique surface morphology with microscale domains that are internally patterned with nanoparticles. Better understanding of the multi-scale surface roughness patterns is obtained by monitoring the topography with non-contact profilometry (NCP) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) at different sampling areas ranging from 2000 {mu}m x 2000 {mu}m to 0.5 {mu}m x 0.5 {mu}m. The statistical roughness parameters are uniquely related to each other over the different measuring techniques and sampling sizes, as they are purely statistically determined. However, they cannot be directly extrapolated over the different sampling areas as they represent transitions at the nano-, micro-to-nano and microscale level. Therefore, the spatial roughness parameters including the correlation length and the specific frequency bandwidth should be taken into account for each measurement, which both allow for direct correlation of roughness data at different sampling sizes.

  1. Corneal topography and soft contact lens fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Graeme; Schnider, Cristina; Hunt, Chris; Efron, Suzanne

    2010-05-01

    To determine which ocular topography variables affect soft contact lens fit. Fifty subjects each wore three pairs of soft lenses in random succession (Vistakon Acuvue 2, Vistakon Acuvue Advance, Ciba Vision Night & Day), and various aspects of lens fit were evaluated. The steeper base curves of each type were worn in one eye and the flatter base curves in the other eye. Corneal topography data were collected using a Medmont E300 corneal topographer (Camberwell, Australia). Corneal curvature, shape factor (SF), and corneal height were measured over a 10 mm chord and also over the maximum measurable diameter. These were measured in the horizontal, vertical, steepest, and flattest meridians. With each lens type, the steeper base curve provided the best fit on the greatest proportion of eyes and the significant differences in various aspects of fit were noted between base curves. For each lens type, there was no significant difference in mean K-reading between those eyes best fit with the steeper base curve and those eyes best fit with the flatter base curve. Two of the lenses showed a positive correlation between centration and horizontal corneal height (maximum), whereas one lens showed a negative correlation between centration and horizontal SF (SF = e). Several lenses showed a positive correlation between post-blink movement and horizontal or vertical corneal SF. The measurement of corneal topography using current Placido disc instrumentation allows a better prediction of soft lens fit than by keratometry, but it is not reliable enough to enable accurate selection of the best fitting base curve. Some correlations are evident between corneal measurements; however, trial fitting remains the method of choice for selection of soft lens base curve.

  2. Macromolecular Topography Leaps into the Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, J.; Bellamy, H.; Snell, E. H.; Borgstahl, G.

    2003-01-01

    A low-cost, real-time digital topography system is under development which will replace x-ray film and nuclear emulsion plates. The imaging system is based on an inexpensive surveillance camera that offers a 1000x1000 array of 8 im square pixels, anti-blooming circuitry, and very quick read out. Currently, the system directly converts x-rays to an image with no phosphor. The system is small and light and can be easily adapted to work with other crystallographic equipment. Preliminary images have been acquired of cubic insulin at the NSLS x26c beam line. NSLS x26c was configured for unfocused monochromatic radiation. Six reflections were collected with stills spaced from 0.002 to 0.001 degrees apart across the entire oscillation range that the reflections were in diffracting condition. All of the reflections were rotated to the vertical to reduce Lorentz and beam related effects. This particular CCD is designed for short exposure applications (much less than 1 sec) and so has a relatively high dark current leading to noisy raw images. The images are processed to remove background and other system noise with a multi-step approach including the use of wavelets, histogram, and mean window filtering. After processing, animations were constructed with the corresponding reflection profile to show the diffraction of the crystal volume vs. the oscillation angle as well as composite images showing the parts of the crystal with the strongest diffraction for each reflection. The final goal is to correlate features seen in reflection profiles captured with fine phi slicing to those seen in the topography images. With this development macromolecular topography finally comes into the digital age.

  3. Ocean wave imaging mechanism by imaging radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何宜军

    2000-01-01

    Analytical representations of the high frequency spectra of ocean wave and its variation due to the variation of ocean surface current are derived from the wave-number spectrum balance equation. The ocean surface imaging formulation of real aperture radar (RAR) is given using electromagnetic wave backscattering theory of ocean surface and the modulations of ocean surface winds, currents and their variations to RAR are described. A general representation of the phase modulation induced by the ocean surface motion is derived according to standard synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging theory. The detectability of ocean current and sea bottom topography by imaging radar is discussed. The results constitute the theoretical basis for detecting ocean wave fields, ocean surface winds, ocean surface current fields, sea bottom topography, internal wave and so on.

  4. Dynamic topography change of the eastern United States since 3 million years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, David B; Forte, Alessandro M; Moucha, Robert; Mitrovica, Jerry X; Simmons, Nathan A; Grand, Stephen P

    2013-06-28

    Sedimentary rocks from Virginia through Florida record marine flooding during the mid-Pliocene. Several wave-cut scarps that at the time of deposition would have been horizontal are now draped over a warped surface with a maximum variation of 60 meters. We modeled dynamic topography by using mantle convection simulations that predict the amplitude and broad spatial distribution of this distortion. The results imply that dynamic topography and, to a lesser extent, glacial isostatic adjustment account for the current architecture of the coastal plain and proximal shelf. This confounds attempts to use regional stratigraphic relations as references for longer-term sea-level determinations. Inferences of Pliocene global sea-level heights or stability of Antarctic ice sheets therefore cannot be deciphered in the absence of an appropriate mantle dynamic reference frame.

  5. Welcome to Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Richard

    2013-11-01

    I am delighted to welcome readers to this inaugural issue of Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties (STMP). In these days of citation indexes and academic reviews, it is a tough, and maybe a brave, job to start a new journal. But the subject area has never been more active and we are seeing genuine breakthroughs in the use of surfaces to control functional performance. Most manufactured parts rely on some form of control of their surface characteristics. The surface is usually defined as that feature on a component or device, which interacts with either the environment in which it is housed (or in which the device operates), or with another surface. The surface topography and material characteristics of a part can affect how fluids interact with it, how the part looks and feels and how two bearing parts will slide together. The need to control, and hence measure, surface features is becoming increasingly important as we move into a miniaturized world. Surface features can become the dominant functional features of a part and may become large in comparison to the overall size of an object. Research into surface texture measurement and characterization has been carried out for over a century and is now more active than ever, especially as new areal surface texture specification standards begin to be introduced. The range of disciplines for which the function of a surface relates to its topography is very diverse; from metal sheet manufacturing to art restoration, from plastic electronics to forensics. Until now, there has been no obvious publishing venue to bring together all these applications with the underlying research and theory, or to unite those working in academia with engineering and industry. Hence the creation of Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties . STMP will publish the best work being done across this broad discipline in one journal, helping researchers to share common themes and highlighting and promoting the extraordinary benefits this

  6. EAARL Coastal Topography - Sandy Hook 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Stevens, Sara; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of Gateway National Recreation Area's Sandy Hook Unit in New Jersey, acquired on May 16, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then

  7. Bessel Function Model for Corneal Topography

    CERN Document Server

    Okrasiński, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a new nonlinear mathematical model for corneal topography formulated as two-point boudary value problem. We derive it from first physical principles and provide some mathematical analysis. The existence and uniqeness theorems are proved as well as various estimates on exact solution. At the end we fit the simplified model based on Modified Bessel Function of the First Kind with the real corneal data consisting of matrix of 123x123 points and obtain an error of order of 1%.

  8. Use of roughness maps in visualisation of surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seitavuopio, Paulus; Rantanen, Jukka; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2005-01-01

    In this study we will present a new method to describe surface roughness. This method builds a roughness map of the studied area. The roughness map can give information of localised roughness. The test surfaces used in the evaluation of the method were tablets, which were made of lactose monohydr...... of the heterogeneity of surface roughness of various materials....

  9. Umatilla - Umatilla Slough Rough Fish Eradication

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the proposed action is to enhance environmental conditions in the Whitcomb Island Slough by reducing the population of rough fish, including common...

  10. McNary - Rough Fish Control

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the action is to enhance environmental conditions in the McNary Slough by reducing the population of rough fish, including common carp (Cyprinus...

  11. Accurate Topological Measures for Rough Sets

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Data granulation is considered a good tool of decision making in various types of real life applications. The basic ideas of data granulation have appeared in many fields, such as interval analysis, quantization, rough set theory, Dempster-Shafer theory of belief functions, divide and conquer, cluster analysis, machine learning, databases, information retrieval, and many others. Some new topological tools for data granulation using rough set approximations are initiated. Moreover, some topolo...

  12. Laser surface treatment and the resultant hierarchical topography of Ti grade 2 for biomedical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczyńska, Donata; Kwaśniak, Piotr; Marczak, Jan; Bonarski, Jan; Smolik, Jerzy; Garbacz, Halina

    2016-12-01

    Modern prosthesis often have a complex structure, where parts of an implant have different functional properties. This gradient of functional properties means that local surface modifications are required. Method presented in this study was develop to functionalize prefabricated elements with original roughness obtained by conventional treatments used to homogenize and clean surface of titanium implants. Demonstrated methodology results in multimodal, periodic grooved topography with roughness in a range from nano- to micrometers. The modified surfaces were characterized in terms of shape, roughness, wettability, surface energy and chemical composition. For this purpose, the following methods were used: scanning electron microscopy, optical profilometry, atomic force microscopy, contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Protein adsorption studies were conducted to determine the potential biomedical application of proposed method. In order to estimate the intensity and way of the protein adsorption process on different titanium surfaces, XPS studies and AFM measurements were performed. The systematic comparison of surface states and their osseointegration tendency will be useful to evaluate suitability of presented method as an single step treatment for local surface functionalization of currently produced implantable devices.

  13. Modification of three dimensional topography of the machined KDP crystal surface using wavelet analysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. X.; Zong, W. J.; Sun, T.; Liu, Q.

    2010-06-01

    The wavelet analysis method has been extensively employed to analyze the surface structures and evaluate the surface roughness. In this work, however, the wavelet analysis method was introduced to decompose and reconstruct the sampled surface profile signals in the cutting direction that achieved by SPDT (single point diamond turning) operation, and the surface profile signals in tool feeding direction were reconstructed with the approximate harmonic functions directly. And moreover, the orthogonal design method, i.e. the combination design of general rotary method, was resorted to model the variations of the independent frequency and amplitude of different simulated harmonic signals in the cutting and tool feeding directions. As expected resultantly, a novel 3D surface topography modeling solution was established, which aims to predict and modify the finished KDP (potassium dihydrogen phosphate or KH 2PO 4) crystal surfaces. The validation tests were carried out finally under different cutting conditions, and the collected average surface roughness in any case was compared with the corresponding value as predicted. The results indicated the experimental data were well consistent with the predictions, and only an average relative error of 11.4% occurred in predicting the average surface roughness.

  14. Resistance to protein adsorption and adhesion of fibroblasts on nanocrystalline diamond films: the role of topography and boron doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaide, María; Papaioannou, Stavros; Taylor, Andrew; Fekete, Ladislav; Gurevich, Leonid; Zachar, Vladimir; Pennisi, Cristian Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BNCD) films exhibit outstanding electrochemical properties that make them very attractive for the fabrication of electrodes for novel neural interfaces and prosthetics. In these devices, the physicochemical properties of the electrode materials are critical to ensure an efficient long-term performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the relative contribution of topography and doping to the biological performance of BNCD films. For this purpose, undoped and boron-doped NCD films were deposited on low roughness (LR) and high roughness (HR) substrates, which were studied in vitro by means of protein adsorption and fibroblast growth assays. Our results show that BNCD films significantly reduce the adsorption of serum proteins, mostly on the LR substrates. As compared to fibroblasts cultured on LR BNCD films, cells grown on the HR BNCD films showed significantly reduced adhesion and lower growth rates. The mean length of fibronectin fibrils deposited by the cells was significantly increased in the BNCD coated substrates, mainly in the LR surfaces. Overall, the largest influence on protein adsorption, cell adhesion, proliferation, and fibronectin deposition was due to the underlying sub-micron topography, with little or no influence of boron doping. In perspective, BNCD films displaying surface roughness in the submicron range may be used as a strategy to reduce the fibroblast growth on the surface of neural electrodes.

  15. Effects of sterilisation method on surface topography and in-vitro cell behaviour of electrostatically spun scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Kirstie D; Hunt, John A; Black, Richard A

    2007-02-01

    Electrostatic spinning is a potentially significant technique for scaffold production within the field of tissue engineering; however, the effect of sterilisation upon these structures is not known. This research investigated the extent of any topographical alteration to electrostatically spun scaffolds post-production through sterilisation, and examined any subsequent effect on contacting cells. Scaffolds made from Tecoflex SG-80A polyurethane were sterilised using ethylene oxide and UV-ozone. Scaffold topography was characterized in terms of inter-fibre separation (ifs), fibre diameter (f.dia) and surface roughness. Cell culture was performed over 7 days with both mouse L929 and human embryonic lung fibroblasts, the results of which were assessed using SEM, image analysis and confocal microscopy. Sterilisation by UV-ozone and ethylene oxide decreased ifs and increased f.dia; surface roughness was decreased by UV-ozone but increased by ethylene oxide. Possible mechanisms to explain these observations are discussed, namely photo-oxidative degradation in the case of UV-ozone and process-induced changes in surface roughness. UV-ozone sterilised scaffolds showed greater cell coverage than those treated with ethylene oxide, but lower coverage than all the controls. Changes in cell attachment and morphology were thought to be due to the changes in topography brought about by the sterilisation process. We conclude that surface modification by sterilisation could prove to be a useful tool at the final stage of scaffold production to enhance cell contact, phenotype or function.

  16. General Regularities of Wood Surface Roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAGOSS, Endre

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface roughness of wood products is depending on many factors related both towood properties and wood working operational parameters. Probably this is the reason why there areno generally valid correlation determining surface roughness parameters as a function of influencingfactors. In particular, the account of wood structure in the surface roughness interpretation proved tobe difficult.In the last years an important progress was made in recognizing the role of the anatomicalstructure of wood species in the attainable surface roughness. The introduction of a structure numbermade it possible to express and characterize the different wood species numerically.The aim of these studies was the separation of roughness components due to the anatomicalstructure and the woodworking operation. Using a special finishing technique, the roughnesscomponent due to woodworking operations was not significant and could be separated. The samespecimens were also subjected to different woodworking operations using cutting velocities between10 and 50 m/s. The processing of experimental data resulted in a chart showing the minimumroughness component due to different woodworking operations. Special experimental investigationwas conducted to clear the influence of edge dullness on the surface roughness, especially on itsAbbott-parameters. The measurements showed that the Rk-parameter is a good indicator to predictedge dullness.

  17. Measurement of the topography of human cadaver lenses using the PAR corneal topography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Viviana; Manns, Fabrice; Zipper, Stanley; Sandadi, Samith; Hamaoui, Marie; Tahi, Hassan; Ho, Arthur; Parel, Jean-Marie A.

    2001-06-01

    To measure the radius of curvature and asphericity of the anterior and posterior surfaces of crystalline lenses of human Eye-Bank eyes using the PAR Corneal Topography System. The measured values will be used in an optical model of the eye for lens refilling procedures.

  18. Analysis Of Scoliosis By Back Shape Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Smith, Alan R.; Harris, John D.

    1983-07-01

    The use of surface topography for the assessment of scoliotic deformity in the clinic depends firstly on the quality of measures which reliably characterise deformity of the back, and secondly on the ease and speed with which these measures can be applied. A method of analysis of back shape measurements is presented which can be applied to any topographic measurement system. Measures presented are substantially independent of minor changes in the patient's posture in rotation and flexion from one clinic to the next, and yet sensitive enough to indicate significant improvement or degeneration of the disease. The presentation shows (1) horizontal cross-sections at ten levels up the back from sacrum to vertebra prominens, (2) angles of rotation of the surface over a small region about the spine, (3) three vertical profiles following the line of the spine, and (4) measures of maximum kyphosis and lordosis. Dependence on the operator has been reduced to a minimum. Extreme care in positioning the patient is unnecessary and those spinous processes which are easily palpable, the vertebra prominens and the two dimples over the posterior superior iliac spines are marked. Analysis proceeds entirely automatically once the basic shape data have been supplied. Applications of the technique to indirect moire topography and a television topographic measurement system are described.

  19. Topography Influences Adherent Cell Regulation of Osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, M; Cooper, L F; Ogino, Y; Mendonca, D; Liang, R; Yang, S; Mendonca, G; Uoshima, K

    2016-03-01

    The importance of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in the process of osseointegration has not been widely considered. In this study, cell culture was used to investigate the hypothesis that the function of implant-adherent bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in osteoclastogenesis is influenced by surface topography. BMSCs isolated from femur and tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto 3 types of titanium surfaces (smooth, micro, and nano) and a control surface (tissue culture plastic) with or without osteogenic supplements. After 3 to 14 d, conditioned medium (CM) was collected. Subsequently, rat bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were cultured in media supplemented with soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) as well as BMSC CM from each of the 4 surfaces. Gene expression levels of soluble RANKL, osteoprotegerin, tumor necrosis factor α, and M-CSF in cultured BMSCs at different time points were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The number of differentiated osteoclastic cells was determined after tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Analysis of variance and t test were used for statistical analysis. The expression of prominent osteoclast-promoting factors tumor necrosis factor α and M-CSF was increased by BMSCs cultured on both micro- and nanoscale titanium topographies (P cells at the implant-bone interface may indirectly control osteoclastogenesis and bone accrual around endosseous implants. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  20. Jet Formation Mechanisms in the presence of Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Emma; Haynes, Peter; Shuckburgh, Emily

    2013-04-01

    Despite over 35 years of discussion, there still remain a range of theories describing the formation of jets on a beta plane. One such theory, first proposed by Rhines (1975), is that jets form as a result of an inverse cascade of energy that is halted by the excitation of Rossby waves. We present the results of an investigation in which we attempt to apply this theory to the case of tilted jets forming over a uniform slope in bottom topography in a quasi-geostrophic, two-layer, doubly periodic model. The forms of the Rossby wave frequencies of this system depend on the Rossby deformation radius, and have two limits: a shortwave limit in which the two frequencies are the equivalent layer-wise frequencies, and orientated with the layer-wise PV gradients; and a longwave limit in which the two frequencies are barotropic- and baroclinic-like, and orientated with the barotropic PV gradient. Freely decaying simulations of the system show that the anisotropy of the frequencies successfully predicts the orientation of the jets that form, which are found to be decoupled and follow layer-wise PV gradients in the shortwave limit, and to be coupled and follow the barotropic PV gradient in the longwave limit. Introducing shear and bottom friction does not change the qualitative form of the Rossby wave frequencies, but due to the forcing by baroclinic instability occurring close to the deformation radius, all such quasi-equilibrated simulations are in the longwave limit and jets follow the barotropic PV gradient. However, only some simulations demonstrate the predicted inverse cascade and associated cascade barrier. Other simulations do not have a well developed inverse cascade, and yet still show jet formation. Previous studies have also shown that significant non-local transfers of energy occur in quasi-geostrophic systems with jets, which suggests a richer picture of jet formation. We thus propose that Rossby waves provide a barrier to further energy transfer, and their

  1. The relationship between cellular adhesion and surface roughness in polystyrene modified by microwave plasma radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biazar E

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Esmaeil Biazar1, Majid Heidari2, Azadeh Asefnezhad2, Naser Montazeri11Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Tonekabon Branch, Mazandaran; 2Department of Biomaterial Engineering, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, IranBackground: Surface modification of medical polymers can improve biocompatibility. Pure polystyrene is hydrophobic and cannot provide a suitable environment for cell cultures. The conventional method for surface modification of polystyrene is treatment with plasma. In this study, conventional polystyrene was exposed to microwave plasma treatment with oxygen and argon gases for 30, 60, and 180 seconds.Methods and results: Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectra investigations of irradiated samples indicated clearly the presence of functional groups. Atomic force microscopic images of samples irradiated with inert and active gases indicated nanometric surface topography. Samples irradiated with oxygen plasma showed more roughness (31 nm compared with those irradiated with inert plasma (16 nm at 180 seconds. Surface roughness increased with increasing duration of exposure, which could be due to reduction of the contact angle of samples irradiated with oxygen plasma. Contact angle analysis showed reduction in samples irradiated with inert plasma. Samples irradiated with oxygen plasma showed a lower contact angle compared with those irradiated by argon plasma.Conclusion: Cellular investigations with unrestricted somatic stem cells showed better adhesion, cell growth, and proliferation for samples radiated by oxygen plasma with increasing duration of exposure than those of normal samples.Keywords: surface topography, polystyrene, plasma treatment, argon, oxygen

  2. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, Abby; Wright, C. Wayne; Travers, Laurinda J.; Lebonitte, James

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived coastal topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey areas for the purposes of geomorphic change studies following major storm events. The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program's National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project is a multi-year undertaking to identify and quantify the vulnerability of U.S. shorelines to coastal change hazards such as effects of severe storms, sea-level rise, and shoreline erosion and retreat. Airborne Lidar surveys conducted during periods of calm weather are compared to surveys collected following extreme storms in order to quantify the resulting coastal change. Other applications of high-resolution topography include habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, volumetric change detection, and event assessment. The purpose of this project is to provide highly detailed and accurate datasets of the northern Gulf of Mexico coastal areas, acquired on September 19, 2004, immediately following Hurricane Ivan. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532 nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking RGB (red-green-blue) digital camera, a high-resolution multi

  3. Morphology, topography, and optics of the orthokeratology cornea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria-Ribeiro, Miguel; Belsue, Rafael Navarro; López-Gil, Norberto; González-Méijome, José Manuel

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this work was to objectively characterize the external morphology, topography, and optics of the cornea after orthokeratology (ortho-k). A number of 24 patients between the ages of 17 and 30 years (median=24 years) were fitted with Corneal Refractive Therapy® contact lenses to correct myopia between -2.00 and -5.00 diopters (D) (median=-3.41 D). A classification algorithm was applied to conduct an automatic segmentation based on the mean local curvature. As a result, three zones (optical zone, transition zone, and peripheral zone) were delimited. Topographical analysis was provided through global and zonal fit to a general ellipsoid. Ray trace on partially customized eye models provided wave aberrations and retinal image quality. Monozone topographic description of the ortho-k cornea loses accuracy when compared with zonal description. Primary (C40) and secondary (C60) spherical aberration (SA) coefficients for a 5-mm pupil increased 3.68 and 19 times, respectively, after the treatments. The OZ area showed a strong correlation with C40 (r=-0.49, p<0.05) and a very strong correlation with C60 (r=0.78, p<0.01). The OZ, as well as the TZ, areas did not correlate with baseline refraction. The increase in the eye's positive SA after ortho-k is the major factor responsible for the decreased retinal optical quality of the unaccommodated eye.

  4. Simulation of surface topography of big aspheric fabrication by ultra-precision diamond turning based on tool swing feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Honghui; Li, Zengqiang; Sun, Tao

    2014-08-01

    In the respect of ultra-precision manufacturing of axisymmetric surface, the machine tool with tool swing feeding which has less interpolation error sources compared to the conventional ultra-precision diamond turning machine tool with T-structureis worth studying.Therefore,based on the dynamic simulation modeling and multi-body dynamics theory,in this paper, we establish the control model,and tool path for Ultra-precision machine.Then we got the model for surface topography with differentinput parameters like spindle speed, feedrate, tool parameters and so on. Taking the spherical optics part with diameter of 300 mm, for example, we input the process parameters and get its surface topography, then evaluate its surface quality by surface roughness value (Ra) and surface shape accuracy(PV) .

  5. Corneal Topography Analysis of Stromal Corneal Dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Kocluk, Yusuf; Yalniz-Akkaya, Zuleyha; Burcu, Ayse; Ornek, Firdevs

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to compare the corneal topography and tomography parameters of macular corneal dystrophy (MCD), granular corneal dystrophy (GCD) and lattice corneal dystrophy (LCD) patients obtained by Scheimpflug imaging system. Methods: The charts, photographs and topography images of patients were reviewed retrospectively. This study included 73 eyes of 73 patients (28 MCD, 20 GCG and 25 LCD patients). Topography images were obtained by Pentacam (Oculus Optikgerate, Wetzlar, Germany...

  6. Dynamic Topography at Earth's Surface: Fact or Fiction? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Silver, P. G.

    2009-12-01

    Contributions to Earth’s surface topography range from short-wavelength uncompensated features due to tectonic activity, to variations in crustal structure and long-wavelength deflections of the lithosphere caused by mantle dynamics. The latter we call dynamic topography. Dynamic topography elevates or depresses the surface even if the density anomaly giving rise to flow is deep in the mantle. Dynamic topography is also a major contributor to Earth’s gravitational potential and to surface deformation. However, direct observations of dynamic topography are elusive, because signals are obscured by the isostatic contribution due to crustal and lithospheric structure. The only seemingly unequivocal signals of dynamically supported topography have been found over mantle upwellings on both continents (Africa [Lithgow-Bertelloni and Silver, 1998] and Arabia [Daradich et al., 2004]) and oceanic basins (North-Atlantic [Conrad et al., 2004]). Recent work on Africa’s geomorphic history [Moore et al., 2009] and North Atlantic gravity and topography have called even these results into questions. In downwelling regions (near slabs) no clear signals have been found. I will explore why this dichotomy may exist and relate it to the need for dynamic topography in mantle flow models, with an eye towards the effects of phase transitions, lateral variations in viscosity and layered convection. I will also present recent results on dynamic topography over flat slab segments that overturn the conventional wisdom and explain basin topography in the Andean foreland. Along with the new models I will discuss a recent global lithospheric structure model with which to compute the residual topography, i.e. the “observed” dynamic topography.

  7. Gravity Terrain Effect of the Seafloor Topography in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun-Tao Tong Tai-Rong Guo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravity terrain correction is used to compensate for the gravitational effects of the topography residual to the Bouguer plate. The seafloor topography off the eastern offshore of Taiwan is extremely rugged, and the depth of the sea bottom could be greater than 5000 m. In order to evaluate the terrain effect caused by the seafloor topography, a modern computer algorithm is used to calculate the terrain correction based on the digital elevation model (DEM.

  8. dc Josephson Effect in s-Wave Superconductor/Ferromagnet Insulator/p-Wave Superconductor Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Wei

    2007-01-01

    The Josephson currents in s-wave superconductor/ferromagnet insulator/p-wave superconductor(s/FI/p)junctions are calculated as a function of temperature and the phase taking into account the roughness scattering effect at interface.The phase dependence of the Josephson current I ( φ) between s-wave and px-wave superconductor is predicted to be sin(2φ).The ferromagnet scattering effect,the barrier strength,and the roughness strength at interface suppress the dc currents in s/FI/p junction.

  9. Origin of bending in uncoated microcantilever - Surface topography?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshmoji, K.; Prabakar, K.; Tripura Sundari, S., E-mail: sundari@igcar.gov.in; Jayapandian, J.; Tyagi, A. K.; Sundar, C. S. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2014-01-27

    We provide direct experimental evidence to show that difference in surface topography on opposite sides of an uncoated microcantilever induces bending, upon exposure to water molecules. Examination on opposite sides of the microcantilever by atomic force microscopy reveals the presence of localized surface features on one side, which renders the induced stress non-uniform. Further, the root mean square inclination angle characterizing the surface topography shows a difference of 73° between the opposite sides. The absence of deflection in another uncoated microcantilever having similar surface topography confirms that in former microcantilever bending is indeed induced by differences in surface topography.

  10. Model for continuously scanning ultrasound vibrometer sensing displacements of randomly rough vibrating surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratilal, Purnima; Andrews, Mark; Donabed, Ninos; Galinde, Ameya; Rappaport, Carey; Fenneman, Douglas

    2007-02-01

    An analytic model is developed for the time-dependent ultrasound field reflected off a randomly rough vibrating surface for a continuously scanning ultrasound vibrometer system in bistatic configuration. Kirchhoff's approximation to Green's theorem is applied to model the three-dimensional scattering interaction of the ultrasound wave field with the vibrating rough surface. The model incorporates the beam patterns of both the transmitting and receiving ultrasound transducers and the statistical properties of the rough surface. Two methods are applied to the ultrasound system for estimating displacement and velocity amplitudes of an oscillating surface: incoherent Doppler shift spectra and coherent interferometry. Motion of the vibrometer over the randomly rough surface leads to time-dependent scattering noise that causes a randomization of the received signal spectrum. Simulations with the model indicate that surface displacement and velocity estimation are highly dependent upon the scan velocity and projected wavelength of the ultrasound vibrometer relative to the roughness height standard deviation and correlation length scales of the rough surface. The model is applied to determine limiting scan speeds for ultrasound vibrometer measuring ground displacements arising from acoustic or seismic excitation to be used in acoustic landmine confirmation sensing.

  11. Analytic height correlation function of rough surfaces derived from light scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Zamani, M; Fazeli, S M; Downer, M C; Jafari, G R

    2015-01-01

    We obtain an analytic expression for the height correlation function of a rough surface based on the inverse wave scattering method of Kirchhoff theory. The expression directly relates the height correlation function to diffuse scattered intensity. We test the solution by measuring the angular distribution of light scattered from rough silicon surfaces, solving for the height correlation functions, and comparing them to functions derived from AFM measurements. The results show good agreement. The advantages of this method are its accurate analytical equation for the height correlation function and the simplicity of the experimental setup required to measure it.

  12. Extraction of Surface Roughness from the Central δ-peak of Light Scattering Using a Multi-wavelength Ar+ Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Deli; QI Dongping; CHENG Chuanfu

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a new light scattering method for measuring the roughness of random surfaces is proposed. The method is based on the relation between the specularly reflected intensity Is, i.e., the central δ-peak intensity and wave vector component kz. The linear fit of the logarithm graph of the normalized central δ-peak intensity Isr versus k2z, whose variation is induced by changing illuminating wavelength, gives the square of the surface roughness w. The roughnesses of 6 silicon backside samples were measured.

  13. Parametric Deduction Optimization for Surface Roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Syung Lan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Surface roughness is a major consideration in modern Computer Numerical Control (CNC turning industry. Most existing optimization researches for CNC finish turning were either accomplished within certain manufacturing circumstances, or achieved through numerous equipment operations. Therefore, a general deduction optimization scheme is deemed to be necessary for the industry. Approach: In this study, four parameters (cutting depth, feed rate, speed, tool nose runoff with three levels (low, medium, high were considered to optimize the surface roughness for Computer Numerical Control (CNC finish turning. Additionally, twenty-seven fuzzy control rules using trapezoid membership function with respective to seventeen linguistic grades for the surface roughness were constructed. Considering thirty input and eighty output intervals, the defuzzification using center of gravity was moreover completed. Through the Taguchi experiment, the optimum general deduction parameters can then be received. Results: The confirmation experiment for optimum deduction parameters was furthermore performed on an ECOCA-3807 CNC lathe. It was shown that the surface roughness from the fuzzy deduction optimization parameters are significantly advanced comparing to those from benchmark. Conclusion: This study not only proposed a parametric deduction optimization scheme using orthogonal array, but also contributed the satisfactory fuzzy approach to the surface roughness for CNC turning with profound insight.

  14. Surface roughness measurement with laser triangulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Fuzhong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Tian, Chaoping

    2016-09-01

    A surface roughness measurement method is introduced in the paper, which is based on laser triangulation and digital image processing technique. In the measuring system, we use the line-structured light as light source, microscope lens and high-accuracy CCD sensor as displacement sensor as well. In addition, the working angle corresponding to the optimal sensitivity is considered in the optical structure design to improve the measuring accuracy. Through necessary image processing operation for the light strip image, such as center-line extraction with the barycenter algorithm, Gaussian filtering, the value of roughness is calculated. A standard planing surface is measured experimentally with the proposed method and the stylus method (Mitutoyo SJ-410) respectively. The profilograms of surface appearance are greatly similar in the shape and the amplitude to two methods. Also, the roughness statistics values are close. The results indicate that the laser triangulation with the line-structured light can be applied to measure the surface roughness with the advantages of rapid measurement and visualized display of surface roughness profile.

  15. Australian topography from Seasat overland altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Herbert; Brenner, Anita C.

    1990-01-01

    Retracking of overland returns from the Seasat altimeter using algorithms originally developed for recovering elevations over ice has led to the successful recovery of high quality continental topography over Australia and other continents. Cross-over analysis both before and after orbit adjustment shows the altimetric data over land to have a 2-3 m quality. Direct comparison of gridded Seasat data with surface data re-averaged in the same way shows excellent agreement except where Seasat data are sparse, due either to poor track spacing or to dropouts caused by loss of tracker lock over steeply sloping ground. These results suggest that useful topographic data can be derived from Seasat and the more recent Geosat altimeters for parts of the world where surface data are few or of poor quality.

  16. EAARL topography: Dry Tortugas National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Judd

    2008-01-01

    This lidar-derived submarine topography map was produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, National Park Service (NPS) South Florida/Caribbean Network Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs for the purposes of habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, ad event assessment (for example: bleaching, hurricanes, disease outbreaks). As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring water depth and conducting cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to managers of coastal tropical habitats.

  17. Mean Dynamic Topography of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Sinead Louise; Mcadoo, David C.; Laxon, Seymour W.; Zwally, H. Jay; Yi, Donghui; Ridout, Andy; Giles, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    ICESat and Envisat altimetry data provide measurements of the instantaneous sea surface height (SSH) across the Arctic Ocean, using lead and open water elevation within the sea ice pack. First, these data were used to derive two independent mean sea surface (MSS) models by stacking and averaging along-track SSH profiles gathered between 2003 and 2009. The ICESat and Envisat MSS data were combined to construct the high-resolution ICEn MSS. Second, we estimate the 5.5-year mean dynamic topography (MDT) of the Arctic Ocean by differencing the ICEn MSS with the new GOCO02S geoid model, derived from GRACE and GOCE gravity. Using these satellite-only data we map the major features of Arctic Ocean dynamical height that are consistent with in situ observations, including the topographical highs and lows of the Beaufort and Greenland Gyres, respectively. Smaller-scale MDT structures remain largely unresolved due to uncertainties in the geoid at short wavelengths.

  18. Gravity and topography. [of planet Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, P. B.; Banerdt, W. B.; Lindal, G. F.; Sjogren, W. L.; Slade, M. A.; Bills, B. G.; Smith, D. E.; Balmino, G.

    1992-01-01

    The paper summarizes the fundamental gravity field constants for Mars and a brief historical review of early determinations and current-day accurate estimates. These include the planetary gravitational constant, global figure, dynamical oblateness, mean density, and rotational period. Topographic results from data acquired from the 1967 opposition to the most recent, 1988, opposition are presented. Both global and selected local topographic variations and features are discussed. The inertia tensor and the nonhydrostatic component of Mars are examined in detail. The dimensionless moment of inertia about the rotational axis is 0.4 for a body of uniform density and 0.37621 if Mars were in hydrostatic equilibrium. By comparing models of both gravity and topography, inferences are made about the degree and depth of compensation in the interior and stresses in the lithosphere.

  19. Synthesizing Waves from Animated Height Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Bang; Söderström, Andreas; Bridson, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Computer animated ocean waves for feature films are typically carefully choreographed to match the vision of the director and to support the telling of the story. The rough shape of these waves is established in the previsualization (previs) stage, where artists use a variety of modeling tools...

  20. Corneal topography matching by iterative registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjie; Elsheikh, Ahmed; Davey, Pinakin G; Wang, Weizhuo; Bao, Fangjun; Mottershead, John E

    2014-11-01

    Videokeratography is used for the measurement of corneal topography in overlapping portions (or maps) which must later be joined together to form the overall topography of the cornea. The separate portions are measured from different viewpoints and therefore must be brought together by registration of measurement points in the regions of overlap. The central map is generally the most accurate, but all maps are measured with uncertainty that increases towards the periphery. It becomes the reference (or static) map, and the peripheral (or dynamic) maps must then be transformed by rotation and translation so that the overlapping portions are matched. The process known as registration, of determining the necessary transformation, is a well-understood procedure in image analysis and has been applied in several areas of science and engineering. In this article, direct search optimisation using the Nelder-Mead algorithm and several variants of the iterative closest/corresponding point routine are explained and applied to simulated and real clinical data. The measurement points on the static and dynamic maps are generally different so that it becomes necessary to interpolate, which is done using a truncated series of Zernike polynomials. The point-to-plane iterative closest/corresponding point variant has the advantage of releasing certain optimisation constraints that lead to persistent registration and alignment errors when other approaches are used. The point-to-plane iterative closest/corresponding point routine is found to be robust to measurement noise, insensitive to starting values of the transformation parameters and produces high-quality results when using real clinical data.

  1. Surface Topography of Fine-grained ZrO2 Ceramic by Two-dimensional Ultrasonic Vibration Grinding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Ailing; WU Yan; LIU Yongjiang

    2011-01-01

    The surface quality of fine-grained ZrO2 engineering ceramic were researched using 270# diamond wheel both with and without work-piece two-dimension ultrasonic vibration grinding(WTDUVG).By AFM images,the surface topography and the micro structure of the two-dimensional ultrasonic vibration grinding ceramics were especially analyzed.The experimental results indicate that the surface roughness is related to grinding vibration mode and the material removal mechanism.Surface quality of WTDUVG is superior to that of conventional grinding,and it is easy for two-dimensional ultrasonic vibration grinding that material removal mechanism is ductile mode grinding.

  2. Evaluating the effectiveness of low cost UAV generated topography for geomorphic change detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    With the recent explosion in the use and availability of unmanned aerial vehicle platforms and development of easy to use structure from motion software, UAV based photogrammetry is increasingly being adopted to produce high resolution topography for the study of surface processes. UAV systems can vary substantially in price and complexity, but the tradeoffs between these and the quality of the resulting data are not well constrained. We look at one end of this spectrum and evaluate the effectiveness of a simple low cost UAV setup for obtaining high resolution topography in a challenging field setting. Our study site is the Daan River gorge in western Taiwan, a rapidly eroding bedrock gorge that we have monitored with terrestrial Lidar since 2009. The site presents challenges for the generation and analysis of high resolution topography, including vertical gorge walls, vegetation, wide variation in surface roughness, and a complicated 3D morphology. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the UAV-derived topography, we compare it with terrestrial Lidar data collected during the same survey period. Our UAV setup combines a DJI Phantom 2 quadcopter with a 16 megapixel Canon Powershot camera for a total platform cost of less than $850. The quadcopter is flown manually, and the camera is programmed to take a photograph every 5 seconds, yielding 200-250 pictures per flight. We measured ground control points and targets for both the Lidar scans and the aerial surveys using a Leica RTK GPS with 1-2 cm accuracy. UAV derived point clouds were obtained using Agisoft Photoscan software. We conducted both Lidar and UAV surveys before and after a summer typhoon season, allowing us to evaluate the reliability of the UAV survey to detect geomorphic changes in the range of one to several meters. We find that this simple UAV setup can yield point clouds with an average accuracy on the order of 10 cm compared to the Lidar point clouds. Well-distributed and accurately located ground

  3. Radiative transfer model for contaminated rough slabs

    CERN Document Server

    Andrieu, François; Schmidt, Frédéric; Schmitt, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    We present a semi-analytical model to simulate bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) spectra of a rough slab layer containing impurities. This model has been optimized for fast computation in order to analyze hyperspectral data. We designed it for planetary surfaces ices studies but it could be used for other purposes. It estimates the bidirectional reflectance of a rough slab of material containing inclusions, overlaying an optically thick media (semi-infinite media or stratified media, for instance granular material). The inclusions are supposed to be close to spherical, and of any type of other material than the ice matrix. It can be any type of other ice, mineral or even bubbles, defined by their optical constants. We suppose a low roughness and we consider the geometrical optics conditions. This model is thus applicable for inclusions larger than the considered wavelength. The scattering on the inclusions is assumed to be isotropic. This model has a fast computation implementation and th...

  4. Probabilistic Approach to Rough Set Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wojciech Ziarko

    2006-01-01

    The presentation introduces the basic ideas and investigates the probabilistic approach to rough set theory. The major aspects of the probabilistic approach to rough set theory to be explored during the presentation are: the probabilistic view of the approximation space, the probabilistic approximations of sets, as expressed via variable precision and Bayesian rough set models, and probabilistic dependencies between sets and multi-valued attributes, as expressed by the absolute certainty gain and expected certainty gain measures, respectively. The probabilis-tic dependency measures allow for representation of subtle stochastic associations between attributes. They also allow for more comprehensive evaluation of rules computed from data and for computation of attribute reduct, core and significance factors in probabilistic decision tables. It will be shown that the probabilistic dependency measure-based attribute reduction techniques are also extendible to hierarchies of decision tables. The presentation will include computational examples to illustrate pre-sented concepts and to indicate possible practical applications.

  5. Spin Hall effect by surface roughness

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lingjun

    2015-01-08

    The spin Hall and its inverse effects, driven by the spin orbit interaction, provide an interconversion mechanism between spin and charge currents. Since the spin Hall effect generates and manipulates spin current electrically, to achieve a large effect is becoming an important topic in both academia and industries. So far, materials with heavy elements carrying a strong spin orbit interaction, provide the only option. We propose here a new mechanism, using the surface roughness in ultrathin films, to enhance the spin Hall effect without heavy elements. Our analysis based on Cu and Al thin films suggests that surface roughness is capable of driving a spin Hall angle that is comparable to that in bulk Au. We also demonstrate that the spin Hall effect induced by surface roughness subscribes only to the side-jump contribution but not the skew scattering. The paradigm proposed in this paper provides the second, not if only, alternative to generate a sizable spin Hall effect.

  6. Bacterial Adhesion and Surface Roughness for Different Clinical Techniques for Acrylic Polymethyl Methacrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Costa de Medeiros Dantas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to assess the effect of different surface finishing and polishing protocols on the surface roughness and bacterial adhesion (S. sanguinis to polymethyl methacrylates (PMMA. Fifty specimens were divided into 5 groups (n=10 according to their fabrication method and surface finishing protocol: LP (3 : 1 ratio and laboratory polishing, NF (Nealon technique and finishing, NP (Nealon technique and manual polishing, MF (3 : 1 ratio and manual finishing, and MP (3 : 1 ratio and manual polishing. For each group, five specimens were submitted to bacterial adhesion tests and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Two additional specimens were subjected to surface topography analysis by SEM and the remaining three specimens were subjected to surface roughness measurements. Data were compared by one-way ANOVA. The mean bacterial counts were as follows: NF, 19.6±3.05; MP, 5.36±2.08; NP, 4.96±1.93; MF, 7.36±2.45; and LP, 1.56±0.62 (CFU. The mean surface roughness values were as follows: NF, 3.23±0.15; MP, 0.52±0.05; NP, 0.60±0.08; MF, 2.69±0.12; and LP, 0.07±0.02 (μm. A reduction in the surface roughness was observed to be directly related to a decrease in bacterial adhesion. It was verified that the laboratory processing of PMMA might decrease the surface roughness and consequently the adhesion of S. sanguinis to this material.

  7. Bacterial Adhesion and Surface Roughness for Different Clinical Techniques for Acrylic Polymethyl Methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Lucas Costa de Medeiros; da Silva-Neto, João Paulo; Dantas, Talita Souza; Naves, Lucas Zago; das Neves, Flávio Domingues; da Mota, Adérito Soares

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to assess the effect of different surface finishing and polishing protocols on the surface roughness and bacterial adhesion (S. sanguinis) to polymethyl methacrylates (PMMA). Fifty specimens were divided into 5 groups (n = 10) according to their fabrication method and surface finishing protocol: LP (3 : 1 ratio and laboratory polishing), NF (Nealon technique and finishing), NP (Nealon technique and manual polishing), MF (3 : 1 ratio and manual finishing), and MP (3 : 1 ratio and manual polishing). For each group, five specimens were submitted to bacterial adhesion tests and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Two additional specimens were subjected to surface topography analysis by SEM and the remaining three specimens were subjected to surface roughness measurements. Data were compared by one-way ANOVA. The mean bacterial counts were as follows: NF, 19.6 ± 3.05; MP, 5.36 ± 2.08; NP, 4.96 ± 1.93; MF, 7.36 ± 2.45; and LP, 1.56 ± 0.62 (CFU). The mean surface roughness values were as follows: NF, 3.23 ± 0.15; MP, 0.52 ± 0.05; NP, 0.60 ± 0.08; MF, 2.69 ± 0.12; and LP, 0.07 ± 0.02 (μm). A reduction in the surface roughness was observed to be directly related to a decrease in bacterial adhesion. It was verified that the laboratory processing of PMMA might decrease the surface roughness and consequently the adhesion of S. sanguinis to this material.

  8. Quantifying the coevolution of bedload transport rates and bed topography in mountain rivers: a field experiment in Reynolds Creek, ID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinde, L.; Johnson, J.; Pierson, F. B.

    2010-12-01

    Bedload transport rates in upland rivers remain difficult to predict, even to within an order of magnitude. We are conducting a field experiment by modifying the morphology of a mountain river channel and monitoring its response to better understand the evolution of bed topography and, ultimately, to improve bedload transport rate predictions. The field site is upper Reynolds Creek, a perennial gravel-cobble stream in the northern Owyhee Mountains, Idaho, within the USDA-ARS Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed. Discharge is dominated by predictable snowmelt runoff and rain-on-snow events , and is well constrained by a 40-year record of discharge and suspended sediment transport rates collected at a gauging station immediately downstream of our study reach. The Reynolds Creek experiment consists of perturbing a 100m reach by straightening, steepening, and smoothing the channel using construction equipment. Quantifying bedload transport rates and changes in bed topography and reach morphology over several years following the perturbation will provide temporal constraints on system dynamics and feedbacks between transport and bed topography. To date, we have collected field data to document reach conditions prior to the channel manipulation, including ground based LiDAR, detailed 10cm bed topography surveys, and grain size distribution analyzes. We have also installed a series of time-lapse cameras throughout this reach to relate stage-discharge conditions to channel width and channel response to precipitation. We will quantify bed roughness changes throughout the experiment over varied length scales with ground-based high resolution LiDAR and detailed survey data. Deployed Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tagged particles and receiving antennas established along several cross sections will record changes in bedload transport rates. We hypothesize that subsequent runoff events will rework the smoothed bed topography into a rougher topography due to the

  9. A Novel Research on Rough Clustering Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Qu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is focusing the issue of traditional clustering algorithm subjects to data space distribution influence, a novel clustering algortihm combined with rough set theory is employed to the normal clustering. The proposed rough clustering algorithm takes the condition attributes and decision attributes displayed in the information table as the consistency principle, meanwhile it takes the data supercubic and information entropy to realize data attribute shortcutting and discretizing. Based on above discussion, by applying assemble feature vector addition principle computiation only one scanning information table can realize clustering for the data subject. Experiments reveal that the proposed algorithm is efficient and feasible.

  10. Fuzzy sets, rough sets, multisets and clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlbom, Anders; Narukawa, Yasuo

    2017-01-01

    This book is dedicated to Prof. Sadaaki Miyamoto and presents cutting-edge papers in some of the areas in which he contributed. Bringing together contributions by leading researchers in the field, it concretely addresses clustering, multisets, rough sets and fuzzy sets, as well as their applications in areas such as decision-making. The book is divided in four parts, the first of which focuses on clustering and classification. The second part puts the spotlight on multisets, bags, fuzzy bags and other fuzzy extensions, while the third deals with rough sets. Rounding out the coverage, the last part explores fuzzy sets and decision-making.

  11. ROUGHNESS LENGTHS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, C.

    2012-03-28

    Surface roughness values for the areas surrounding the H, D and N-Area meteorological towers were computed from archived 2010 meteorological data. These 15-minute-averaged data were measured with cup anemometers and bidirectional wind vanes (bivanes) 61 m above the surface. The results of the roughness calculation using the standard deviation of elevation angle {sigma}{sub E}, and applying the simple formula based on tree canopy height, gave consistent estimates for roughness around the H-Area tower in the range of 1.76 to 1.86 m (95% confidence interval) with a mean value of 1.81 m. Application of the {sigma}{sub E} method for the 61-m level at D and N-Areas gave mean values of 1.71 and 1.81 with confidence ranges of 1.62-1.81 and 1.73-1.88 meters, respectively. Roughness results are azimuth dependent, and thus are presented as averages over compass sectors spanning 22.5 degrees. Calculated values were compared to other methods of determining roughness, including the standard deviation of the azimuth direction, {sigma}{sub A}, and standard deviation of the wind speed, {sigma}{sub U}. Additional data was obtained from a sonic anemometer at 61-m on the H-Area tower during a period of a few weeks in 2010. Results from the sonic anemometer support our use of {sigma}{sub E} to calculate roughness. Based on the H-Area tower results, a surface roughness of 1.8 m using is recommended for use in dispersion modeling applications that consider the impacts of a contaminant release to individuals along the Site boundary. The canopy surrounding the H-Area tower is relatively uniform (i.e., little variance in roughness by upwind direction), and data supplied by the U.S. Forest Service at Savannah River show that the canopy height and composition surrounding the H-Area tower is reasonably representative of forested areas throughout the SRS reservation. For dispersion modeling analyses requiring assessments of a co-located worker within the respective operations area, recommended

  12. Effect of collision cascade density on swelling and surface topography of GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titov, A.I. [State Polytechnic University, Polytechnicheskaya 29, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Karaseov, P.A., E-mail: platon.karaseov@rphf.spbstu.ru [State Polytechnic University, Polytechnicheskaya 29, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Karabeshkin, K.V.; Belyakov, V.S.; Arkhipov, A.V. [State Polytechnic University, Polytechnicheskaya 29, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kucheyev, S.O. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    We study the surface topography and swelling of GaN irradiated at room temperature with 1.3 keV/amu F, P, PF{sub 2}, and PF{sub 4} ions. These irradiation conditions reveal the effect of the collision cascade density on ion-induced swelling and roughening of the GaN surface. Results show that, for F and P ions that create dilute collision cascades, swelling dominates erosion. In the case of molecular ion irradiation, characterized by larger cascade densities, surface erosion dominates swelling. For the conditions studied, surface roughness scales with the thickness of surface amorphous layers when these layers are thinner than about 20 nm.

  13. A novel wide-range precision instrument for measuring three-dimensional surface topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xu-dong; CHEN Yu-rong; XIE Tie-bang

    2008-01-01

    We developed a measuring instrument that had wide range, high precision, small measuring touch force. The instrument for three-dimensional (3D) surface topography measurement was composed of a high precision displacement sensor based on the Michelson interference principle, a 3D platform based on vertical scanning, a measuring and control circuit, and an industrial control computer. It was a closed loop control system, which changed the traditional moving stylus scanning style into a moving platform scanning style. When the workpiece was measured, the lever of the displacement sensor returned to the balanced position in every sample interval according to the zero offset of the displacement sensor. The non-linear error caused by the rotation of the lever was, therefore, very small even if the measuring range was wide. The instrument can measure the roughness and the profile size of a curved surface.

  14. Multifunctional commercially pure titanium for the improvement of bone integration: Multiscale topography, wettability, corrosion resistance and biological functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Sara; Vitale, Alessandra; Bertone, Elisa; Guastella, Salvatore; Cassinelli, Clara; Pan, Jinshan; Spriano, Silvia

    2016-03-01

    The objects of this research are commercially pure titanium surfaces, with multifunctional behavior, obtained through a chemical treatment and biological functionalization. The explored surfaces are of interest for dental implants, in contact with bone, where several simultaneous and synergistic actions are needed, in order to get a fast and effective osseointegration. The here described modified surfaces present a layer of titanium oxide, thicker than the native one, with a multi-scale surface topography (a surface roughness on the nano scale, which can be overlapped to a micro or macro roughness of the substrate) and a high density of OH groups, that increase surface wettability, induce a bioactive behavior (hydroxyapatite precipitation in simulated body fluid) and make possible the grafting of biomolecules (alkaline phosphatase, ALP, in the present research). The surface oxide is an efficient barrier against corrosion, with passive behavior both with and without application of an external voltage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Wettability influences cell behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces with different topographies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourenco, B.N.; Marchioli, G.; Song, W; Reis, R L; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; Mano, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Surface wettability and topography are recognized as critical factors influencing cell behavior on biomaterials. So far only few works have reported cell responses on surfaces exhibiting extreme wettability in combination with surface topography. The goal of this work is to study whether cell behavi

  16. Wettability influences cell behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces with different topographies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourenco, B.N.; Marchioli, G.; Song, W; Reis, R.L.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Karperien, H.B.J.; Apeldoorn, van A.A.; Mano, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Surface wettability and topography are recognized as critical factors influencing cell behavior on biomaterials. So far only few works have reported cell responses on surfaces exhibiting extreme wettability in combination with surface topography. The goal of this work is to study whether cell behavi

  17. Turbulent boundary layers under irregular waves and currents: Experiments and the equivalent-wave concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing

    2016-04-01

    A full-scale experimental study of turbulent boundary layer flows under irregular waves and currents is conducted with the primary objective to investigate the equivalent-wave concept by Madsen (1994). Irregular oscillatory flows following the bottom-velocity spectrum under realistic surface irregular waves are produced over two fixed rough bottoms in an oscillatory water tunnel, and flow velocities are measured using a Particle Image Velocimetry. The root-mean-square (RMS) value and representative phase lead of wave velocities have vertical variations very similar to those of the first-harmonic velocity of periodic wave boundary layers, e.g., the RMS wave velocity follows a logarithmic distribution controlled by the physical bottom roughness in the very near-bottom region. The RMS wave bottom shear stress and the associated representative phase lead can be accurately predicted using the equivalent-wave approach. The spectra of wave bottom shear stress and boundary layer velocity are found to be proportional to the spectrum of free-stream velocity. Currents in the presence of irregular waves exhibit the classic two-log-profile structure with the lower log-profile controlled by the physical bottom roughness and the upper log-profile controlled by a much larger apparent roughness. Replacing the irregular waves by their equivalent sinusoidal waves virtually makes no difference for the coexisting currents. These observations, together with the excellent agreement between measurements and model predictions, suggest that the equivalent-wave representation adequately characterizes the basic wave-current interaction under irregular waves.

  18. Reconstruction of Topography and Lithosphere Dynamics Within the Basin and Range of Western North America Since 36 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, W. E.; Bahadori, A.; Liu, L.; Flesch, L. M.; Piccione, G.; Rasbury, T.; Badgley, C.; Smiley, T.; Smith, R.

    2016-12-01

    The complex deformation history of the western U.S. since 36 Ma involved a dramatic transition from a subduction-dominated to a transform-dominated margin, with widespread extension within the interior Basin and Range region. This deformation history altered the topography and drainage patterns and basins throughout the southwest. We perform a comprehensive analysis of the dynamics of the plate boundary zone in the western U.S. since 36 Ma, focusing on the U.S. Basin and Range region, with the goal of understanding the link between mantle dynamics, crustal deformation history, and topography evolution. Using position estimates from McQuarrie and Wernicke [2005], we determine lithospheric strain rates through time and integrate these to determine estimates of crustal thickness evolution. We generate dynamic models to test a number of paleotopographic models (which produce effective body forces) that, together with the mantle contribution, produce compatible directions and magnitudes of extension and shear strain rate through time in the lithosphere. The mantle coupling input is determined using adjoint solutions to move tomography-constrained convection simulations backward. We simultaneously calculate the dynamics of subducting oceanic lithosphere and tomography-driven mantle buoyancy anomalies. These convection simulations provide the lower boundary conditions in the dynamic models. Topography estimates not only incorporate crustal thickness estimates over time, they also include time-dependent dynamic topography estimates from the convection simulations. Our effort on the dynamics will be combined with other independent geochemical constraints provided by the dating of fluorite deposits within fault-associated veins. These fluorite deposits are proposed to be used as a timing constraint for mantle fluid input. Furthermore, our topography, stress, and strain rate models are being used to test the hypothesis that topographic roughness has provided a major control

  19. Self-affine subglacial roughness: consequences for radar scattering and basal thaw discrimination from radio-echo sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Thomas; Cooper, Michael; Schroeder, Dustin; Williams, Christopher; Paden, John; Siegert, Martin; Bamber, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Subglacial roughness can be determined at variety of length scales from radio-echo sounding (RES) data; either via statistical analysis of along-track topography, or inferred from basal radar scattering. Past studies have demonstrated that subglacial terrain exhibits self-affine (power-law) roughness scaling behaviour, but existing radar scattering models don't take this into account. Here we introduce a self-affine statistical framework that, for the first time, enables a consistent integration of roughness determined from subglacial topography with basal radar scattering. Using RES data from northern Greenland, we demonstrate that radar scattering is strongly topographically controlled by the Hurst (roughness power-law) exponent. Notably specular reflections are confined to regions with lower Hurst exponent, with diffuse scattering more typical in regions with higher Hurst exponent. Considering this relationship, we then assess the consequences of our self-affine roughness framework for the discrimination of basal thaw from RES. Unambiguous discrimination of the basal thermal state of ice sheets from RES is a complex, and currently unsolved, problem, with conventional basal reflection analysis greatly limited by uncertainty in radar attenuation. To mitigate the ambiguity of reflection analysis, the presence of a specular bed echo - as occurs for reflection from electrically deep subglacial lakes - has been proposed to serve as a necessary criteria for positive discrimination of basal thaw. Via a comparison between our RES-derived data and a recent prediction for the basal thermal state, we demonstrate that predicted thawed regions in northern Greenland exhibit an overall more diffuse scattering signature than frozen regions. This is in contradiction with the prior use of high reflection specularity as necessary criteria for the presence of basal thaw, and indicates that radar scattering is best viewed as being under direct topographic, rather than thermal

  20. A simple scaling model for smooth vs. rough bathymetry along hotspot tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana Rovirosa, F.; Richards, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Oceanic hotspot tracks exhibit a remarkable variety of morphologies, both in terms of volcanic seamounts/ocean islands, as well as broader bathymetric swells. A conspicuous feature is that although most hotspot tracks are characterized by "rough" topography, due mainly to volcanic construction, a number are much "smoother," and likely dominated more by the thermal/dynamic swell and crustal intrusion. Examples of relatively smooth tracks include the Nazca Ridge , Carnegie/Cocos/Galápagos, Walvis Ridge, Rio Grande Rise, Iceland, and Kerguelen and much of the Ninety-east Ridge; contrasting with rough and discontinuous seamount chains such Easter/Sala y Gomez, Tristan-Gough, Louisville, Emperor, and much of the Hawaiian ridge. Previous studies have pointed out the role of age, lithospheric thickness, and the plume strength; on the style of the associated bathymetry. Here, we take a systematic approach that emphasizes remarkable along-track changes from smooth to rough topography, e.g., the rough Sala y Gomez and smooth Nazca Ridge portions of the Easter Island hotspot track. Considering the primary controls to be hotspot swell volume flux Qs, the plate-hotspot relative speed v, and the lithospheric elastic thickness D, we suggest that such transitions are controlled by the dimensionless parameter R = sqrt(Qs / v) / D, which is roughly a measure of the heat available from the plume to the heat necessary to thermally attenuate the overlying lithosphere. For very thin (young) lithosphere, such as at the Galápagos platform, igneous intrusion into the hot, weak lithosphere and lower crust may dominate the topographic expression of the hotspot, whereas older lithosphere will support large volcanoes built from magmas passing through more intact lithosphere. Using data from observational studies on mantle-plume buoyancy fluxes, gravity, bathymetry, and tectonic reconstructions, we show that R is a good predictor of bathymetric style: for R3 they are smooth. This analysis

  1. Silk film topography directs collective epithelial cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D Lawrence

    Full Text Available The following study provides new insight into how surface topography dictates directed collective epithelial cell sheet growth through the guidance of individual cell movement. Collective cell behavior of migrating human corneal limbal-epithelial cell sheets were studied on highly biocompatible flat and micro-patterned silk film surfaces. The silk film edge topography guided the migratory direction of individual cells making up the collective epithelial sheet, which resulted in a 75% increase in total culture elongation. This was due to a 3-fold decrease in cell sheet migration rate efficiency for movement perpendicular to the topography edge. Individual cell migration direction is preferred in the parallel approach to the edge topography where localization of cytoskeletal proteins to the topography's edge region is reduced, which results in the directed growth of the collective epithelial sheet. Findings indicate customized biomaterial surfaces may be created to direct both the migration rate and direction of tissue epithelialization.

  2. Effect of diameter and surface roughness on ultrasonic properties of GaAs nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Punit Kumar; Wan, Meher; Verma, S. K.; Pandey, D. K.; Yadav, R. R.

    2015-02-01

    Second and third order elastic constants of GaAs Nanowires (NWs) are calculated using the many-body interaction potential model. The velocities of ultrasonic waves at different orientations of propagation with unique axis are evaluated using the second order elastic constants. The ultrasonic attenuation and thermal relaxation times of the single crystalline GaAs-NW are determined as a function of diameter and surface roughness by means of Mason theoretical approach using the thermal conductivity and higher order elastic constants. The diameter variation of ultrasonic attenuation and thermal relaxation exhibit second order polynomial function of diameter. It is also found that ultrasonic attenuation and thermal relaxation follow the exponential decay with the surface roughness for GaAs-NW due to reduction in thermal conductivity caused by dominance of surface asperities. Finally, the correlations among ultrasonic parameters, thermal conductivity, surface roughness, and diameter for GaAs-NWs are established leading towards potential applications.

  3. Self-affine roughness influence on the Casimir effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G

    2005-01-01

    In this work we investigate the influence of self-affine roughness on the Casimir energy for plate-plate geometry. The plate roughness is characterized by the rms roughness amplitude w, the lateral correlation length xi, and the roughness exponent H. It is shown that the latter has a prominent effec

  4. Self-affine roughness influence on redox reaction charge admittance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G

    2005-01-01

    In this work we investigate the influence of self-affine electrode roughness on the admittance of redox reactions during facile charge transfer kinetics. The self-affine roughness is characterized by the rms roughness amplitude w, the correlation length xi and the roughness exponent H (0

  5. Effect of surface orientation on dissolution rates and topography of CaF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, J. R. A.; Piazolo, S.; Evins, L. Z.

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports how during dissolution differences in surface chemistry affect the evolution of topography of CaF2 pellets with a microstructure similar to UO2 spent nuclear fuel. 3D confocal profilometry and atomic force microscopy were used to quantify retreat rates and analyze topography changes on surfaces with different orientations as dissolution proceeds up to 468 h. A NaClO4 (0.05 M) solution with pH 3.6 which was far from equilibrium relative to CaF2 was used. Measured dissolution rates depend directly on the orientation of the exposed planes. The {1 1 1} is the most stable plane with a dissolution rate of (1.2 ± 0.8) × 10-9 mol m-2 s-1, and {1 1 2} the least stable plane with a dissolution rate 33 times faster that {1 1 1}. Surfaces that expose both Ca and F atoms in the same plane dissolve faster. Dissolution rates were found to be correlated to surface orientation which is characterized by a specific surface chemistry and therefore related to surface energy. It is proposed that every surface is characterized by the relative proportions of the three reference planes {1 1 1}, {1 0 0} and {1 1 0}, and by the high energy sites at their interceptions. Based on the different dissolution rates observed we propose a dissolution model to explain changes of topography during dissolution. Surfaces with slower dissolution rate, and inferred lower surface energy, tend to form while dissolution proceeds leading to an increase of roughness and surface area. This adjustment of the surface suggests that dissolution rates during early stages of dissolution are different from the later stages. The time-dependency of this dynamic system needs to be taken into consideration when predicting long-term dissolution rates.

  6. Mars topography investigated through the wavelet leaders method: A multidimensional study of its fractal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliège, Adrien; Kleyntssens, Thomas; Nicolay, Samuel

    2017-02-01

    This work examines the scaling properties of Mars topography through a wavelet-based formalism. We conduct exhaustive one-dimensional (both longitudinal and latitudinal) and two-dimensional studies based on Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data using the multifractal formalism called Wavelet Leaders Method (WLM). This approach shows that a scale break occurs at approximately 15 km, giving two scaling regimes in both 1D and 2D cases. At small scales, these topographic profiles mostly display a monofractal behavior while a switch to multifractality is observed in several areas at larger scales. The scaling exponents extracted from this framework tend to be greater at small scales. In the 1D context, these observations are in agreement with previous works and thus suggest that the WLM is well-suited for examining scaling properties of topographic fields. Moreover, the 2D analysis is the first such complete study to our knowledge. It gives both a local and global insight on the scaling regimes of the surface of Mars and allows to exhibit the link between the scaling exponents and several famous features of the Martian topography. These results may be used as a solid basis for further investigations of the scaling laws of the Red planet and show that the WLM could be used to perform systematic analyses of the surface roughness of other celestial bodies.

  7. Effect of Bleaching on Color Change and Surface Topography of Composite Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Pruthi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effect of 15% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent on color change and surface topography of different composite veneering materials (Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE, Esthet X (Dentsply India, and Admira (Voco, Germany. Methods. 30 samples were fabricated for evaluation of color change using CIELAB color system and Gonioreflectometer (GK 311/M, ZEISS. 45 disc-shaped specimens were made for evaluation of surface topography after bleaching (Nupro White Gold; Dentsply using SEM. Statistical analysis. One way ANOVA and Multiple comparison tests were used to analyze the data. Statistical significance was declared if the P value was .05 or less. Results and conclusion. All the specimens showed significant discoloration (ΔE>3.3 after their immersion in solutions representing food and beverages. The total color change after bleaching as compared to baseline color was significant in Filtek Z350 (P=.000 and Esthet X (P=.002, while it was insignificant for Admira (P=.18. Esthet X showed maximum surface roughness followed by Admira and Filtek Z350. Bleaching was effective in reducing the discoloration to a clinically acceptable value in all the three groups (ΔE<3.3.

  8. Mars Topography Investigated Through the Wavelet Leaders Method: a Multidimensional Study of its Fractal Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliège, Adrien; Kleyntssens, Thomas; Nicolay, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    This work examines the scaling properties of Mars topography through a wavelet-based formalism. We conduct exhaustive one-dimensional (both longitudinal and latitudinal) and two-dimensional studies based on Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data using the multifractal formalism called Wavelet Leaders Method (WLM). This approach shows that a scale break occurs at approximately 15 km, giving two scaling regimes in both 1D and 2D cases. At small scales, these topographic profiles mostly display a monofractal behavior while a switch to multifractality is observed in several areas at larger scales. The scaling exponents extracted from this framework tend to be greater at small scales. In the 1D context, these observations are in agreement with previous works and thus suggest that the WLM is well-suited for examining scaling properties of topographic fields. Moreover, the 2D analysis is the first such complete study to our knowledge. It gives both a local and global insight on the scaling regimes of the surface of Mars and allows to exhibit the link between the scaling exponents and several famous features of the Martian topography. These results may be used as a solid basis for further investigations of the scaling laws of the Red planet and show that the WLM could be used to perform systematic analyses of the surface roughness of other celestial bodies.

  9. Influence of Implant Surface Topography on Primary Stability in a Standardized Osteoporosis Rabbit Model Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Oue

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating primary stability is important to predict the prognosis of dental implant treatment. Primary stability is decreased in a low bone density site such as osteoporosis. However, it is difficult to apply in small animal and the effect of the different implant surface topography for the primary stability at low bone density site has not yet fully been investigated. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the influence of implant surface topography on primary stability in a standardized osteoporosis animal model. Six rabbits underwent ovariectomy and administrated glucocorticoid to induce an osteoporosis model. Sham-operations were performed in additional six rabbits. Implants with machined or oxidized-surfaces were inserted into the femur epiphyses and insertion torque (IT and implant stability quotient (ISQ were measured. In sham model, the IT and ISQ did not differ significantly between the both implant. However, the IT value of oxidized-surface implant was significantly higher than that of the machined implant in the osteoporosis model. Meanwhile, ISQ did not significantly differ between the machined and oxidized-surfaced implants. In conclusion, the IT of implants is higher with rough than with smooth surfaces but that there are no differences in ISQ value between different surfaces in a standardized osteoporosis bone reduced rabbit model.

  10. Atomic force microscopy observation of the enamel roughness and depth profile after phosphoric acid etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyola-Rodriguez, Juan Pablo; Zavala-Alonso, Veronica; Reyes-Vela, Enrique; Patiño-Marin, Nuria; Ruiz, Facundo; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to compare the enamel surface roughness (ESR) and absolute depth profile (ADP) (mean peak-to-valley height) by atomic force microscopy (AFM) before and after using four different phosphoric acids. A total of 160 enamel samples from 40 upper premolars were prepared. The inclusion criterion was that the teeth have healthy enamel. Exclusion criteria included any of the following conditions: facial restorations, caries lesions, enamel hypoplasia and dental fluorosis. Evaluations of the ESR and ADP were carried out by AFM. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare continuous variables and the Wilcoxon test was used to analyze the differences between before and after etching. There were statistically significant differences (P roughness and absolute depth before and after using four different phosphoric acids in healthy enamel; Etch-37 and Scotchbond Etching Gel showed higher profiles after etching (P roughness and ADP before and after using four different phosphoric acids in healthy enamel. However, consistently Etch-37 and Scotchbond Etching Gel showed the highest increase regarding the ESR and ADP after etching healthy enamel. AFM was a useful tool to study site-specific structural topography changes in enamel after phosphoric acid etching.

  11. Cement paste surface roughness analysis using coherence scanning interferometry and confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apedo, K.L., E-mail: apedo@unistra.fr [ICube, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, 2 rue Boussingault, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Munzer, C.; He, H. [ICube, INSA de Strasbourg, CNRS, 24 Bld de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Montgomery, P. [ICube, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, 23 rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Serres, N. [ICube, INSA de Strasbourg, CNRS, 24 Bld de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Fond, C. [ICube, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, 2 rue Boussingault, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Feugeas, F. [ICube, INSA de Strasbourg, CNRS, 24 Bld de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg (France)

    2015-02-15

    Scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy have been used for several decades to better understand the microstructure of cementitious materials. Very limited work has been performed to date to study the roughness of cementitious materials by optical microscopy such as coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) and chromatic confocal sensing (CCS). The objective of this paper is to better understand how CSI can be used as a tool to analyze surface roughness and topography of cement pastes. Observations from a series of images acquired using this technique on both polished and unpolished samples are described. The results from CSI are compared with those from a STIL confocal microscopy technique (SCM). Comparison between both optical techniques demonstrates the ability of CSI to measure both polished and unpolished cement pastes. - Highlights: • Coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) was used to analyze cement paste surfaces. • The results from the CSI were compared with those from a confocal microscopy. • 3D roughness parameters were obtained using the window resizing method. • Polished and unpolished cement pastes were studied.

  12. Bathymetric mapping of submarine sand waves using multiangle sun glitter imagery: a case of the Taiwan Banks with ASTER stereo imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua-guo; Yang, Kang; Lou, Xiu-lin; Li, Dong-ling; Shi, Ai-qin; Fu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Submarine sand waves are visible in optical sun glitter remote sensing images and multiangle observations can provide valuable information. We present a method for bathymetric mapping of submarine sand waves using multiangle sun glitter information from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer stereo imagery. Based on a multiangle image geometry model and a sun glitter radiance transfer model, sea surface roughness is derived using multiangle sun glitter images. These results are then used for water depth inversions based on the Alpers-Hennings model, supported by a few true depth data points (sounding data). Case study results show that the inversion and true depths match well, with high-correlation coefficients and root-mean-square errors from 1.45 to 2.46 m, and relative errors from 5.48% to 8.12%. The proposed method has some advantages over previous methods in that it requires fewer true depth data points, it does not require environmental parameters or knowledge of sand-wave morphology, and it is relatively simple to operate. On this basis, we conclude that this method is effective in mapping submarine sand waves and we anticipate that it will also be applicable to other similar topography types.

  13. Rough sets selected methods and applications in management and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Georg; lzak, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    Rough Set Theory, introduced by Pawlak in the early 1980s, has become an important part of soft computing within the last 25 years. However, much of the focus has been on the theoretical understanding of Rough Sets, with a survey of Rough Sets and their applications within business and industry much desired. Rough Sets: Selected Methods and Applications in Management and Engineering provides context to Rough Set theory, with each chapter exploring a real-world application of Rough Sets. Rough Sets is relevant to managers striving to improve their businesses, industry researchers looking to imp

  14. More on neutrosophic soft rough sets and its modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Marei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to introduce and discuss anew mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainties, which is a combination of neutrosophic sets, soft sets and rough sets, namely neutrosophic soft rough set model. Also, its modification is introduced. Some of their properties are studied and supported with proved propositions and many counter examples. Some of rough relations are redefined as a neutrosophic soft rough relations. Comparisons among traditional rough model, suggested neutrosophic soft rough model and its modification, by using their properties and accuracy measures are introduced. Finally, we illustrate that, classical rough set model can be viewed as a special case of suggested models in this paper.

  15. Surface roughness scattering in multisubband accumulation layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Han; Reich, K. V.; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation layers with very large concentrations of electrons where many subbands are filled became recently available due to ionic liquid and other new methods of gating. The low-temperature mobility in such layers is limited by the surface roughness scattering. However, theories of roughness scattering so far dealt only with the small-density single subband two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Here we develop a theory of roughness-scattering limited mobility for the multisubband large concentration case. We show that with growing 2D electron concentration n the surface dimensionless conductivity σ /(2 e2/h ) first decreases as ∝n-6 /5 and then saturates as ˜(d aB/Δ2)≫1 , where d and Δ are the characteristic length and height of the surface roughness and aB is the effective Bohr radius. This means that in spite of the shrinkage of the 2DEG thickness and the related increase of the scattering rate the 2DEG remains a good metal.

  16. Plasticity under rough surface contact and friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, F.

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this work is to gain a better understanding of the plastic behavior of rough metal surfaces under contact loading. Attention in this thesis focuses on the study of single and multiple asperities with micrometer scale dimensions, a scale at which plasticity is known to be si

  17. Potential roughness near lithographically fabricated atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Andersson, L. M.; Wildermuth, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Potential roughness has been reported to severely impair experiments in magnetic microtraps. We show that these obstacles can be overcome as we measure disorder potentials that are reduced by two orders of magnitude near lithographically patterned high-quality gold layers on semiconductor atom chip...

  18. Traceability of optical roughness measurements on polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Gasparin, Stefania; Carli, Lorenzo;

    2008-01-01

    An experimental investigation on surface roughness measurements on plastics was carried out with the objective of developing a methodology to achieve traceability of optical instruments. A ground steel surface and its replicas were measured using a stylus instrument, an optical auto-focus......% for the auto-focus instrument and 10% for confocal microscope....

  19. WEIGHTED BOUNDEDNESS OF A ROUGH MAXIMAL OPERATOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this note the authors give the weighted Lp-boundedness fora class of maximal singular integral operators with rough kernel.The result in this note is an improvement and extension ofthe result obtained by Chen and Lin in 1990.

  20. Using Modularity with Rough Decision Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed T. Shawky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many real world applications need to deal with imprecise data. Therefore, there is a need for new techniques which can manage such imprecision. Computational Intelligence (CI techniques are the most appropriate for dealing with imprecise data to help decision makers. It is well known that soft computing techniques like genetic algorithms, neural networks, and fuzzy logic are effective in dealing with problems without explicit model and characterized by uncertainties Using fuzzy set theory considered as major techniques, which allows decision makers to take a good decision using imprecise inexact data and knowledge. Now using rough set is getting quite necessary to be used for its ability to mining such type of data. In this research, we are looking forward to propose a novel technique, which depends on the integration between fuzzy set concepts and rough set theory in mining relational databases. The proposed model allows introducing modularity mechanism, by building a virtual modular decision tables according to variety of decision makers points of view. And introduce decision grouping mechanism for getting the optimizing decision. This approach provides flexibility in decision making verifies all decision standards and determines decision requirements, through modularizing rough decision table, extraction of rough association rules and developing mechanisms for decision grouping.

  1. Distance upon contact: Determination from roughness profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwol, P.J.; Svetovoy, Vitaly; Palasantzas, G.

    2009-01-01

    The point at which two random rough surfaces make contact takes place at the contact of the highest asperities. The distance upon contact d0 in the limit of zero load has crucial importance for determination of dispersive forces. Using gold films as an example we demonstrate that for two parallel

  2. Automated Grading of Rough Hardwood Lumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard W. Conners; Tai-Hoon Cho; Philip A. Araman

    1989-01-01

    Any automatic hardwood grading system must have two components. The first of these is a computer vision system for locating and identifying defects on rough lumber. The second is a system for automatically grading boards based on the output of the computer vision system. This paper presents research results aimed at developing the first of these components. The...

  3. Optical measurement of surface roughness in manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodmann, R.

    1984-11-01

    The measuring system described here is based on the light-scattering method, and was developed by Optische Werke G. Rodenstock, Munich. It is especially useful for rapid non-contact monitoring of surface roughness in production-related areas. This paper outlines the differences between this system and the common stylus instrument, including descriptions of some applications in industry.

  4. Radiative Transfer Model for Contaminated Rough Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    plot of Figure 8 shows three sharp spectral features (in the LWIR region) that were used for calibration . 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 0 0.1 0.2...transfer, reflectance, rough surface, BRDF, Kramers-Kronig, penetration depth, fill factor, infrared, LWIR , MWIR, absorption coefficient, scattering...and the calibrated α are plotted in red, and green, respectively

  5. Thermal smoothing of rough surfaces in vacuo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, G.

    1986-01-01

    The derivation of equations governing the smoothing of rough surfaces, based on Mullins' (1957, 1960, and 1963) theories of thermal grooving and of capillarity-governed solid surface morphology is presented. As an example, the smoothing of a one-dimensional sine-shaped surface is discussed.

  6. Surface roughness evolution of nanocomposite thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkin, A; Pei, Y.T.; Shaha, K.P.; Chen, C.Q.; Vainchtein, David; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of dynamic roughening and smoothening mechanisms of thin films grown with pulsed-dc magnetron sputtering is presented. The roughness evolution has been described by a linear stochastic equation, which contains the second- and fourth-order gradient terms. Dynamic smoothening of the growin

  7. New Global Bathymetry and Topography Model Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. H.; Sandwell, D. T.; Marks, K. M.

    2008-12-01

    A new version of the "Smith and Sandwell" global marine topography model is available in two formats. A one-arc-minute Mercator projected grid covering latitudes to +/- 80.738 degrees is available in the "img" file format. Also available is a 30-arc-second version in latitude and longitude coordinates from pole to pole, supplied as tiles covering the same areas as the SRTM30 land topography data set. The new effort follows the Smith and Sandwell recipe, using publicly available and quality controlled single- and multi-beam echo soundings where possible and filling the gaps in the oceans with estimates derived from marine gravity anomalies observed by satellite altimetry. The altimeter data have been reprocessed to reduce the noise level and improve the spatial resolution [see Sandwell and Smith, this meeting]. The echo soundings database has grown enormously with new infusions of data from the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVO), the National Geospatial-intelligence Agency (NGA), hydrographic offices around the world volunteering through the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO), and many other agencies and academic sources worldwide. These new data contributions have filled many holes: 50% of ocean grid points are within 8 km of a sounding point, 75% are within 24 km, and 90% are within 57 km. However, in the remote ocean basins some gaps still remain: 5% of the ocean grid points are more than 85 km from the nearest sounding control, and 1% are more than 173 km away. Both versions of the grid include a companion grid of source file numbers, so that control points may be mapped and traced to sources. We have compared the new model to multi-beam data not used in the compilation and find that 50% of differences are less than 25 m, 95% of differences are less than 130 m, but a few large differences remain in areas of poor sounding control and large-amplitude gravity anomalies. Land values in the solution are taken from SRTM30v2, GTOPO30 and ICESAT data

  8. Internal Tide Generation by Steep Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    acting on the barotropic tide ( Foda and Hill 1998) was incomplete. Kunze will put this work in the context of recent internal tide research and...Topographically generated internal waves in the open ocean. J. Geophys. Res., 80, 320-327. Foda , M.A., and D.F. Hill, 1998: Nonlinear energy

  9. Comparing Vesta's Surface Roughness to the Moon Using Bistatic Radar Observations by the Dawn Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, E. M.; Heggy, E.; Kofman, W. W.; Moghaddam, M.

    2015-12-01

    The first orbital bistatic radar (BSR) observations of a small body have been conducted opportunistically by NASA's Dawn spacecraft at Asteroid Vesta using the telecommunications antenna aboard Dawn to transmit and the Deep Space Network 70-meter antennas on Earth to receive. Dawn's high-gain communications antenna continuously transmitted right-hand circularly polarized radio waves (4-cm wavelength), and due to the opportunistic nature of the experiment, remained in a fixed orientation pointed toward Earth throughout each BSR observation. As a consequence, Dawn's transmitted radio waves scattered from Vesta's surface just before and after each occultation of the Dawn spacecraft behind Vesta, resulting in surface echoes at highly oblique incidence angles of greater than 85 degrees, and a small Doppler shift of ~2 Hz between the carrier signal and surface echoes from Vesta. We analyze the power and Doppler spreading of Vesta's surface echoes to assess surface roughness, and find that Vesta's area-normalized radar cross section ranges from -8 to -17 dB, which is notably much stronger than backscatter radar cross section values reported for the Moon's limbs (-20 to -35 dB). However, our measurements correspond to the forward scattering regime--such that at high incidence, radar waves are expected to scatter more weakly from a rough surface in the backscatter direction than that which is scattered forward. Using scattering models of rough surfaces observed at high incidence, we report on the relative roughness of Vesta's surface as compared to the Moon and icy Galilean satellites. Through this, we assess the dominant processes that have influenced Vesta's surface roughness at centimeter and decimeter scales, which are in turn applicable to assisting future landing, sampling and orbital missions of other small bodies.

  10. Turbulent boundary layer over roughness transition with variation in spanwise roughness length scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerweel, Jerry; Tomas, Jasper; Eisma, Jerke; Pourquie, Mathieu; Elsinga, Gerrit; Jonker, Harm

    2016-11-01

    Both large-eddy simulations (LES) and water-tunnel experiments, using simultaneous stereoscopic PIV and LIF were done to investigate pollutant dispersion in a region where the surface changes from rural to urban roughness. This consists of rectangular obstacles where we vary the spanwise aspect ratio of the obstacles. A line source of passive tracer was placed upstream of the roughness transition. The objectives of the study are: (i) to determine the influence of the aspect ratio on the roughness-transition flow, and (ii) to determine the dominant mechanisms of pollutant removal from street canyons in the transition region. It is found that for a spanwise aspect ratio of 2 the drag induced by the roughness is largest of all considered cases, which is caused by a large-scale secondary flow. In the roughness transition the vertical advective pollutant flux is the main ventilation mechanism in the first three streets. Furthermore, by means of linear stochastic estimation the mean flow structure is identied that is responsible for exchange of the fluid between the roughness obstacles and the outer part of the boundary layer. Furthermore, it is found that the vertical length scale of this structure increases with increasing aspect ratio of the obstacles in the roughness region.

  11. Contact angle hysteresis on randomly rough surfaces: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Robert; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2013-04-09

    Wetting is important in many applications, and the solid surfaces being wet invariably feature some amount of surface roughness. A free energy-based computational simulation is used to study the effect of roughness on wetting and especially contact angle hysteresis. On randomly rough, self-affine surfaces, it is found that hysteresis depends primarily on the value of the Wenzel roughness parameter r, increasing in proportion with r - 1. Micrometer-level roughness causes hysteresis of a few degrees.

  12. Coherent reflection of He atom beams from rough surfaces at near-grazing incidence

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Bum Suk; Meijer, Gerard; Schöllkopf, Wieland

    2010-01-01

    We here report coherent reflection of thermal He atom beams from various microscopically rough surfaces at grazing incidence. For a sufficiently small normal component $k_z$ of the incident wave-vector of the atom the reflection probability is found to be a function of $k_z$ only. This behavior is explained by quantum-reflection at the attractive branch of the Casimir-van der Waals interaction potential. For larger values of $k_z$ the overall reflection probability decreases rapidly and is found to also depend on the parallel component $k_x$ of the wave-vector. The material specific $k_x$ dependence for this classical reflection at the repulsive branch of the potential is explained qualitatively in terms of the averaging-out of the surface roughness under grazing incidence conditions.

  13. Coherent Reflection of He Atom Beams from Rough Surfaces at Grazing Incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bum Suk; Schewe, H. Christian; Meijer, Gerard; Schöllkopf, Wieland

    2010-09-01

    We report coherent reflection of thermal He atom beams from various microscopically rough surfaces at grazing incidence. For a sufficiently small normal component kz of the incident wave vector of the atom the reflection probability is found to be a function of kz only. This behavior is explained by quantum reflection at the attractive branch of the Casimir-van der Waals interaction potential. For larger values of kz the overall reflection probability decreases rapidly and is found to also depend on the parallel component kx of the wave vector. The material specific kx dependence for this classic reflection at the repulsive branch of the potential is discussed in terms of an averaging out of the surface roughness under grazing incidence conditions.

  14. Physically-based Ice Thickness and Surface Roughness Retrievals over Rough Deformed Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Gaiser, Peter; Allard, Richard; Posey, Pamela; Hebert, David; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline; Polashenski, Christopher; Claffey, Keran

    2016-04-01

    The observations of sea ice thickness and ice surface roughness are critical for our understanding of the state of the changing Arctic. Currently, the Radar and/or LiDAR data of sea ice freeboard are used to infer sea ice thickness via isostasy. The underlying assumption is that the LiDAR signal returns at the air/snow interface and radar signal at the snow/ice interface. The elevations of these interfaces are determined based on LiDAR/Radar return waveforms. However, the commonly used threshold-based surface detection techniques are empirical in nature and work well only over level/smooth sea ice. Rough sea ice surfaces can modify the return waveforms, resulting in significant Electromagnetic (EM) bias in the estimated surface elevations, and thus large errors in the ice thickness retrievals. To understand and quantify such sea ice surface roughness effects, a combined EM rough surface and volume scattering model was developed to simulate radar returns from the rough sea ice 'layer cake' structure. A waveform matching technique was also developed to fit observed waveforms to a physically-based waveform model and subsequently correct the roughness induced EM bias in the estimated freeboard. This new EM Bias Corrected (EMBC) algorithm was able to better retrieve surface elevations and estimate the surface roughness parameter simultaneously. Both the ice thickness and surface roughness retrievals are validated using in-situ data. For the surface roughness retrievals, we applied this EMBC algorithm to co-incident LiDAR/Radar measurements collected during a Cryosat-2 under-flight by the NASA IceBridge missions. Results show that not only does the waveform model fit very well to the measured radar waveform, but also the roughness parameters derived independently from the LiDAR and radar data agree very well for both level and deformed sea ice. For sea ice thickness retrievals, validation based on in-situ data from the coordinated CRREL/NRL field campaign demonstrates

  15. Reynolds number and roughness effects on turbulent stresses in sandpaper roughness boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill-Winter, C.; Squire, D. T.; Klewicki, J. C.; Hutchins, N.; Schultz, M. P.; Marusic, I.

    2017-05-01

    Multicomponent turbulence measurements in rough-wall boundary layers are presented and compared to smooth-wall data over a large friction Reynolds number range (δ+). The rough-wall experiments used the same continuous sandpaper sheet as in the study of Squire et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 795, 210 (2016), 10.1017/jfm.2016.196]. To the authors' knowledge, the present measurements are unique in that they cover nearly an order of magnitude in Reynolds number (δ+≃2800 -17 400 ), while spanning the transitionally to fully rough regimes (equivalent sand-grain-roughness range, ks+≃37 -98 ), and in doing so also maintain very good spatial resolution. Distinct from previous studies, the inner-normalized wall-normal velocity variances, w2¯, exhibit clear dependencies on both ks+ and δ+ well into the wake region of the boundary layer, and only for fully rough flows does the outer portion of the profile agree with that in a comparable δ+ smooth-wall flow. Consistent with the mean dynamical constraints, the inner-normalized Reynolds shear stress profiles in the rough-wall flows are qualitatively similar to their smooth-wall counterparts. Quantitatively, however, at matched Reynolds numbers the peaks in the rough-wall Reynolds shear stress profiles are uniformly located at greater inner-normalized wall-normal positions. The Reynolds stress correlation coefficient, Ru w, is also greater in rough-wall flows at a matched Reynolds number. As in smooth-wall flows, Ru w decreases with Reynolds number, but at different rates depending on the roughness condition. Despite the clear variations in the Ru w profiles with roughness, inertial layer u , w cospectra evidence invariance with ks+ when normalized with the distance from the wall. Comparison of the normalized contributions to the Reynolds stress from the second quadrant (Q2) and fourth quadrant (Q4) exhibit noticeable differences between the smooth- and rough-wall flows. The overall time fraction spent in each quadrant is, however

  16. Impact of surface waves in a Regional Climate Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutgersson, Anna; Sætra, Oyvind; Semedo, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    A coupled regional atmosphere-wave model system is developed with the purpose of investigating the impact of climate changes on the wave field, as well as feed-back effects of the wave field on the atmospheric parameters. This study focuses on the effects of introducing a two-way atmosphere-wave...... coupling on the atmosphere as well as on wave parameters. The model components are the regional climate model RCA, and the third generation wave model WAM. Two different methods are used for the coupling, using the roughness length and only including the effect of growing sea, and using the wave age...... and introducing the reduction of roughness due to decaying sea (swell). Introducing a two-way coupling results in an altered frequency distribution of wind speed and wave heights. When only including growing sea the impact of waves on the long term mean atmospheric parameters is limited, inducing a reduction...

  17. Topography Simulation for Nanometer Semiconductor Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun‑Gu; Yoon, Sukin; Won, Taeyoung

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel scheme for simulating the topography of nanometer semiconductor processes. Since the proposed scheme considers only the surface cells moving forward and backward during etching or deposition, the simulator does not suffer from an increased memory requirement due to the complexity of the high aspect-ratio structure built on the wafer. This method consists of steps for calculating the front surface moving forward and backward and converting the cell structure into a tetrahedral mesh structure for subsequent numerical simulation. This method mitigates the excessive memory requirement through a dynamic allocating scheme wherein only topographical data at the surface cell are taken into account. A spillover algorithm is also implemented in the simulator so that any excessive etching or deposition which is more than the rate acceptable at the exposed cell during a single time step is reconsidered in the adjacent cells. Our proposed scheme was verified for structures with complex geometry, such as a thin film transistor-liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) structure, a read only memory (ROM) or a dynamic random access memory (DRAM) cell.

  18. Topography of cerebellar deficits in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Manto, Mario

    2012-06-01

    The cerebellum is a key-piece for information processing and is involved in numerous motor and nonmotor activities, thanks to the anatomical characteristics of the circuitry, the enormous computational capabilities and the high connectivity to other brain areas. Despite its uniform cytoarchitecture, cerebellar circuitry is segregated into functional zones. This functional parcellation is driven by the connectivity and the anatomo-functional heterogeneity of the numerous extra-cerebellar structures linked to the cerebellum, principally brain cortices, precerebellar nuclei and spinal cord. Major insights into cerebellar functions have been gained with a detailed analysis of the cerebellar outputs, with the evidence that fundamental aspects of cerebrocerebellar operations are the closed-loop circuit and the predictions of future states. Cerebellar diseases result in disturbances of accuracy of movements and lack of coordination. The cerebellar syndrome includes combinations of oculomotor disturbances, dysarthria and other speech deficits, ataxia of limbs, ataxia of stance and gait, as well as often more subtle cognitive/behavioral impairments. Our understanding of the corresponding anatomo-functional maps for the human cerebellum is continuously improving. We summarize the topography of the clinical deficits observed in cerebellar patients and the growing evidence of a regional subdivision into motor, sensory, sensorimotor, cognitive and affective domains. The recently described topographic dichotomy motor versus nonmotor cerebellum based upon anatomical, functional and neuropsychological studies is also discussed.

  19. Modelling roughness evolution and debris production in faults using discrete particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Karen; Abe, Steffen

    2017-04-01

    The frictional strength and stability (hence seismic potential) of faults in the brittle part of the crust is closely linked to fault roughness evolution and debris production during accumulated slip. The relevant processes may also control the dynamics of rock-slides, avalanches and sub glacial slip thus are of general interest in several fields. The quantitative characterisation of fault surfaces in the field (e.g. Candela et al. JGR, 2012) has helped build a picture of fault roughness across many orders of magnitude, however, since fault zones are generally not exposed during slip and gouge zones rarely preserved, the mechanical implications of evolving roughness and the important role of debris or gouge in fault zone evolution remain elusive. Here we investigate the interplay between fault roughness evolution and gouge production using 3D Discrete Element Method (DEM) Boundary Erosion Models. Our fault walls are composed of many particles or clusters stuck together with breakable bonds. When bond strength is exceeded, the walls fracture to produce erodible boundaries and a debris filled fault zone that evolves with accumulated slip. We slide two initially bare surfaces past each other under a range of normal stresses, tracking the evolving topography of eroded fault walls, the granular debris generated and the associated mechanical behaviour. The development of slip parallel striations, reminiscent of those found in natural faults, are commonly observed, however often as transient rather than persistent features. At the higher normal stresses studied, we observe a two stage wear-like gouge production where an initial 'running-in' high production rate saturates as debris accumulates and separates the walls. As shear, and hence granular debris, accumulates, we see evidence of grain size based sorting in the granular layers. Wall roughness and friction mimic this stabilisation, highlighting a direct link between gouge processes, wall roughness evolution and

  20. Strength anisotropy in Southern Africa from gravity-topography coherence studies: Implications for continental deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J.; Simons, F. J.

    2006-12-01

    The relationship between gravity anomalies and topography, diagnostic of the elastic strength of the lithosphere and expressed in the wavelength domain by means of the coherence function, has been found to be directionally dependent in various portions of the North American, Australian, and Indian (sub)continents. While various mechanisms have been proposed as to the origin of azimuthal variations in the degree and mechanism of isostatic compensation per se, a fruitful way of interpreting this information has been to construe the orientations of mechanical weakness as indicators of fossil strain and compare them to the fast axes of seismic anisotropy, which are themselves an independent measure of strain, and to which they should be orthogonal under certain simplifying assumptions. Seen in this light, the study of mechanical anisotropy via gravity-topography coherence functions is a useful way to define the very essence of the mechanical lithosphere, as that portion which relates consistently to its seismic anisotropy, delineating a stable regime that has been coherently deformed by the action of orogenic processes over time (in the sense of Silver) and separating it from the actively deforming asthenosphere (in the sense of Vinnik) below it. In this study we present evidence for the mechanically anisotropic nature of the Southern African continent from a multitaper spectral analysis of two-dimensional coherence functions relating high-resolution Bouguer gravity anomalies and topography. Of the thirteen 750×750 km2 areas surveyed within the continental confines, five fall within an area for which seismic anisotropy has been measured by means of shear-wave splitting analysis, and 80%, or four of those, corroborate Silver's hypothesis of vertically coherent deformation in that the directions of mechanical weakness are perpendicular to the fast axis of seismic wave propagation. We discuss the limitations of our evidence and present it with a view to further work.

  1. Seismic imaging of the upper mantle beneath the northern Central Andean Plateau: Implications for surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, K. M.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Wagner, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    Extending over 1,800 km along the active South American Cordilleran margin, the Central Andean Plateau (CAP) as defined by the 3 km elevation contour is second only to the Tibetan Plateau in geographic extent. The uplift history of the 4 km high Plateau remains uncertain with paleoelevation studies along the CAP suggesting a complex, non-uniform uplift history. As part of the Central Andean Uplift and the Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project, we use surface waves measured from ambient noise and two-plane wave tomography to image the S-wave velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle to investigate the upper mantle component of plateau uplift. We observe three main features in our S-wave velocity model including (1), a high velocity slab (2), a low velocity anomaly above the slab where the slab changes dip from near horizontal to a normal dip, and (3), a high-velocity feature in the mantle above the slab that extends along the length of the Altiplano from the base of the Moho to a depth of ~120 km with the highest velocities observed under Lake Titicaca. A strong spatial correlation exists between the lateral extent of this high-velocity feature beneath the Altiplano and the lower elevations of the Altiplano basin suggesting a potential relationship. Non-uniqueness in our seismic models preclude uniquely constraining this feature as an uppermost mantle feature bellow the Moho or as a connected eastward dipping feature extending up to 300 km in the mantle as seen in deeper mantle tomography studies. Determining if the high velocity feature represents a small lithospheric root or a delaminating lithospheric root extending ~300 km into the mantle requires more integration of observations, but either interpretation shows a strong geodynamic connection with the uppermost mantle and the current topography of the northern CAP.

  2. Taking into account topography rapid variations in forward modelling and inverse problems in seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdeville, Y.; Jean-Jacques, M.

    2011-12-01

    The modeling of seismic elastic wave full waveform in a limited frequency band is now well established with a set of efficient numerical methods like the spectral element, the discontinuous Galerking or the finite difference methods. The constant increase of computing power with time has now allowed the use of seismic elastic wave full waveforms in a limited frequency band to image the elastic properties of the earth. Nevertheless, inhomogeneities of scale much smaller the minimum wavelength of the wavefield associated to the maximum frequency of the limited frequency band, are still a challenge for both forward and inverse problems. In this work, we tackle the problem of a topography varying much faster than the minimum wavelength. Using a non periodic homogenization theory and a matching asymptotic technique, we show how to remove the fast variation of the topography and replace it by a smooth Dirichlet to Neumann operator at the surface. After showing some 2D forward modeling numerical examples, we will discuss the implications of such a development for both forward and inverse problems.

  3. Wave-induced nearshore circulation along the Calangute-Candolim beach, Goa, West coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnakumar, V.; Murty, C.S.; Heblekar, A.K.

    The wave-induced nearshore circulation model suggested by Noda has been modified and applied for three small segments along the coast of Goa. The present model incorporates the prevailing bottom topography and considers its variation along...

  4. Coherent reflection of He atom beams from rough surfaces at near-grazing incidence

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, B.; Schewe, C.; Meijer, G.; Schöllkopf, W.

    2010-01-01

    We report coherent reflection of thermal He atom beams from various microscopically rough surfaces at grazing incidence. For a sufficiently small normal component kz of the incident wave- vector of the atom the reflection probability is found to be a function of kz only. This behavior is explained by quantum-reflection at the attractive branch of the Casimir-van der Waals interaction potential. For larger values of kz the overall reflection probability decreases rapidly and is found to also d...

  5. Double-Humped Transverse Density Profile in Two-Dimensional Chute Flow with Rough Sidewalls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Guo-Qi; ZHANG Xun-Sheng; BAO De-Song; TANG Xiao-Wei

    2006-01-01

    @@ We study a two-dimensional granular rapid flow with rough sidewalls stuck with the same size discs by molecular dynamics simulation. A transient state of the double-humped density profile in the flowing process has been found, which appears and moves as travelling wave and is the same as the phenomena in the recent experiments [Acta Phys. Sin. 53 (2004) 3389 (in Chinese)].

  6. Accounting for Fault Roughness in Pseudo-Dynamic Ground-Motion Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Mai, Paul Martin

    2017-04-03

    Geological faults comprise large-scale segmentation and small-scale roughness. These multi-scale geometrical complexities determine the dynamics of the earthquake rupture process, and therefore affect the radiated seismic wavefield. In this study, we examine how different parameterizations of fault roughness lead to variability in the rupture evolution and the resulting near-fault ground motions. Rupture incoherence naturally induced by fault roughness generates high-frequency radiation that follows an ω−2 decay in displacement amplitude spectra. Because dynamic rupture simulations are computationally expensive, we test several kinematic source approximations designed to emulate the observed dynamic behavior. When simplifying the rough-fault geometry, we find that perturbations in local moment tensor orientation are important, while perturbations in local source location are not. Thus, a planar fault can be assumed if the local strike, dip, and rake are maintained. We observe that dynamic rake angle variations are anti-correlated with the local dip angles. Testing two parameterizations of dynamically consistent Yoffe-type source-time function, we show that the seismic wavefield of the approximated kinematic ruptures well reproduces the radiated seismic waves of the complete dynamic source process. This finding opens a new avenue for an improved pseudo-dynamic source characterization that captures the effects of fault roughness on earthquake rupture evolution. By including also the correlations between kinematic source parameters, we outline a new pseudo-dynamic rupture modeling approach for broadband ground-motion simulation.

  7. Turbulent transfer coefficient and roughness length in a high-altitude lake, Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoguo; Lyu, Shihua; Zhao, Lin; Wen, Lijuan; Ao, Yinhuan; Wang, Shaoying

    2016-05-01

    A persistent unstable atmospheric boundary layer was observed over Lake Ngoring, caused by higher temperature on the water surface compared with the overlying air. Against this background, the eddy covariance flux data collected from Lake Ngoring were used to analyse the variation of transfer coefficients and roughness lengths for momentum, heat and moisture. Results are discussed and compared with parameterization schemes in a lake model. The drag coefficient and momentum roughness length rapidly decreased with increasing wind velocity, reached a minimum value in the moderate wind velocity and then increased slowly as wind velocity increased further. Under weak wind conditions, the surface tension or small scale capillary wave becomes more important and increases the surface roughness. The scalar roughness length ratio was much larger than unity under weak wind conditions, and it decreased to values near unity as wind velocity exceeded 4.0 m s-1. The lake model could not reproduce well the variation of drag coefficient, or momentum roughness length, versus wind velocity in Lake Ngoring, but it did simulate well the sensible heat and latent heat fluxes, as a result of complementary opposite errors.

  8. 函数粗集生成的粗积分%Rough Integrals Generated by Function Rough Sets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于秀清; 徐凤生

    2011-01-01

    The concepts of the lower approximation integral, the upper approximation integral and rough integrals are given on the basis of function rough sets. Based on these concepts, the relation of the lower approximation integrals, the relation of the upper approximation integrals, the relation of rough integrals, and the double median theorem of rough integrals are discussed. Rough integrals have finite contraction characteristic and finite extension characteristic.

  9. An experimental study of regime transitions in a differentially heated baroclinic annulus with flat and sloping bottom topographies

    CERN Document Server

    Vincze, Miklos; von Larcher, Thomas; Egbers, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    A series of laboratory experiments has been carried out in a thermally driven rotating annulus to study the onset of baroclinic instability, using horizontal and uniformly sloping bottom topographies. Different wave flow regimes have been identified and their phase boundaries -- expressed in terms of appropriate non-dimensional parameters -- have been compared to the recent numerical results of \\citet{thomas_slope}. In the flat bottom case, the numerically predicted alignment of the boundary between the axisymmetric and the regular wave flow regime was found to be consistent with the experimental results. However, once the sloping bottom end wall was introduced, the detected behaviour was qualitatively different from that of the simulations. This disagreement is thought to be the consequence of nonlinear wave-wave interactions that could not be resolved in the framework of the numerical study. This argument is supported by the observed development of interference vacillation in the runs with sloping bottom, a...

  10. Adhesion forces in liquid media: effect of surface topography and wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serro, A P; Colaço, R; Saramago, B

    2008-09-15

    This work was motivated by the unexpected values of adhesion forces measured between an atomic force microscopy tip and the hydrophobic surface of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene. Two types of samples with different roughness but similar wettability were tested. Adhesion forces of similar magnitude were obtained in air and in polar liquids (water and Hank's Balanced Salt Solution, a saline solution) with the rougher sample. In contrast, the adhesion forces measured on the smoother sample in air were much higher than those measured in water or in the aqueous solution. Those experimental results suggested the presence of nanobubbles at the interface between the rough sample and the polar liquids. The existence of the nanobubbles was further confirmed by the images of the interface obtained in noncontact tapping mode. The adhesion forces measured in a nonpolar liquid (hexadecane) were small and of the same order of magnitude for both samples and their values were in good agreement with the predictions of the London-Hamaker approach for the van der Waals interactions. Finally, we correlate the appearance of nanobubbles with surface topography. The conclusion of this work is that adhesion forces measured in aqueous media may be strongly affected by the presence of nanobubbles if the surface presents topographical accidents.

  11. Tactile perception of the roughness of the end of a tool: what role does tool handle roughness play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampini, Massimiliano; Mawhinney, Sara; Spence, Charles

    2006-06-12

    We investigated whether the perceived roughness of the end of a tool is influenced by the texture of the handle used to hold it. Participants rated the roughness of the ends (caps) of a series of tools by rubbing them along their forearm, and indicated the perceived roughness of the tool's cap by means of an anchored visual scale. The caps of the tools had one of eight different levels of roughness varying from very smooth (sample 1) to very rough (sample 8). The participants held the tool handle in one hand while rubbing the cap of the tool against their contralateral forearm. The tool handle was either smooth (similar in smoothness to sample 1) or else very rough (matched in roughness to sample 8). Overall, participants were remarkably good at ignoring the roughness of the tool's handle when discriminating the roughness of the tool's cap. Nevertheless, the roughness of the tool handle was shown to modulate roughness judgments concerning the tool cap under certain conditions: in particular, tool caps at the rougher end of the scale (6 and 7) were rated as being significantly less rough when the participants held tools with a rough handle than when they held tools with a smooth handle. Our results therefore demonstrate a small but significant effect of the roughness of the handle of a tool on the perceived roughness of its cap.

  12. Characterization and analysis of sub-micron surface roughness of injection moulded microfluidic systems using White Light Interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Marinello, Francesco; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2009-01-01

    Surface topography is of great importance in polymer micro fluidics, therefore the replication capability of the process and the surface quality of the tool has to be suitably optimized. In this paper, optical profilometry (white light interferometry, WLI) is implemented for topographical...... have been controlled: temperature of the melt, temperature of the mould and injection speed. Hybrid tooling was employed for the tool making process and two different types of surfaces were obtained within the micro cavity: a finely finished flat surface (average roughness Ra...

  13. Minimal axiom group of similarity-based rough set model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Jian-hua; PAN Yun-he

    2006-01-01

    Rough set axiomatization is one aspect of rough set study to characterize rough set theory using dependable and minimal axiom groups.Thus,rough set theory can be studied by logic and axiom system methods.The classical rough set theory is based on equivalence relation,but the rough set theory based on similarity relation has wide applications in the real world.To characterize similarity-based rough set theory,an axiom group named S,consisting of 3 axioms,is proposed.The reliability of the axiom group,which shows that characterizing of rough set theory based on similarity relation is rational,is proved.Simultaneously,the minimization of the axiom group,which requests that each axiom is an equation and independent,is proved.The axiom group is helpful to research rough set theory by logic and axiom system methods.

  14. Surface Wave Amplitude Anomalies in the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, C.; Ekstrom, G.

    2011-12-01

    We determine maps of local surface wave amplitude factors across the Western United States for Rayleigh and Love waves at discrete periods between 25 and 125s. Measurements of raw amplitude anomalies are made from data recorded at 1161 USArray stations for minor arc arrivals of earthquakes with Mw>5.5 occurring between 2006 and 2010. We take the difference between high-quality amplitude anomaly measurements for events recorded on station pairs less than 2 degrees apart. The mean of these differences for each station pair is taken as the datum. Surface wave amplitudes are controlled by four separate mechanisms: focusing due to elastic structure, attenuation due to anelastic structure, source effects, and receiver effects. By taking the mean of the differences of amplitude anomalies for neighboring stations, we reduce the effects of focusing, attenuation, and the seismic source, thus isolating amplitude anomalies due to near-receiver amplitude effects. We determine local amplitude factors for each USArray station by standard linear inversion of the differential data set. The individual station amplitude factors explain the majority of the variance of the data. For example, derived station amplitude factors for 50s Rayleigh waves explain 92% of the variance of the data. We explore correlations between derived station amplitude factors and local amplitude factors predicted by crust and upper mantle models. Maps of local amplitude factors show spatial correlation with topography and geologic structures in the Western United States, particularly for maps derived from Rayleigh wave amplitude anomalies. A NW-SE trending high in amplitude factors in Eastern California is evident in the 50s map, corresponding to the location of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. High amplitude factors are observed in Colorado and New Mexico in the 50s-125s maps in the location of the highest peaks of the Rocky Mountains. High amplitude factors are also seen in Southern Idaho and Eastern Wyoming in

  15. A General Linear Wave Theory for Water Waves Propagating over Uneven Porous Bottoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    锁要红; 黄虎

    2004-01-01

    Starting from the widespread phenomena of porous bottoms in the near shore region, considering fully the diversity of bottom topography and wave number variation, and including the effect of evanescent modes, a general linear wave theory for water waves propagating over uneven porous bottoms in the near shore region is established by use of Green's second identity. This theory can be reduced to a number of the most typical mild-slope equations currently in use and provide a reliable research basis for follow-up development of nonlinear water wave theory involving porous bottoms.

  16. Replicated mask surface roughness effects on EUV lithographic pattering and line edge roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Simi A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Mochi, Iacopo; Salmassi, Farhad; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Anderson, Erik H.

    2011-03-11

    To quantify the roughness contributions to speckle, a programmed roughness substrate was fabricated with a number of areas having different roughness magnitudes. The substrate was then multilayer coated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface maps were collected before and after multilayer deposition. At-wavelength reflectance and total integrated scattering measurements were also completed. Angle resolved scattering based power spectral densities are directly compared to the AFM based power spectra. We show that AFM overpredicts the roughness in the picometer measurements range. The mask was then imaged at-wavelength for the direct characterization of the aerial image speckle using the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT). Modeling was used to test the effectiveness of the different metrologies in predicting the measured aerial-image speckle. AIT measured contrast values are 25% or more than the calculated image contrast values obtained using the measured rms roughness input. The extent to which the various metrologies can be utilized for specifying tolerable roughness limits on EUV masks is still to be determined. Further modeling and measurements are being planned.

  17. Rough primes and rough conversations: evidence for a modality-specific basis to mental metaphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Michael; Denke, Claudia; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Rotte, Michael

    2014-11-01

    How does our brain organize knowledge? Traditional theories assume that our knowledge is represented abstractly in an amodal conceptual network of formal logic symbols. The theory of embodied cognition challenges this view and argues that conceptual representations that constitute our knowledge are grounded in sensory and motor experiences. We tested this hypothesis by examining how the concept of social coordination is grounded metaphorically in the tactile sensation of roughness. Participants experienced rough or smooth touch before being asked to judge an ambiguous social interaction. Results revealed that rough touch made social interactions appear more difficult and adversarial, consistent with the rough metaphor. This impact of tactile cues on social impressions was accompanied by a network including primary and secondary somatosensory cortices, amygdala, hippocampus and inferior prefrontal cortex. Thus, the roughness of tactile stimulation affected metaphor-relevant (but not metaphor-irrelevant) behavioral and neural responses. Receiving touch from a rough object seems to trigger the application of associated ontological concepts (or scaffolds) even for unrelated people and situations (but not to unrelated or more general feelings). Since this priming was based on somatosensory brain areas, our results provide support for the theory that sensorimotor grounding is intrinsic to cognitive processes.

  18. Five-axis rough machining for impellers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruolong QI; Weijun LIU; Hongyou BIAN; Lun LI

    2009-01-01

    The most important components used in aero-space, ships, and automobiles are designed with free form surfaces. An impeller is one of the most important components that is difficult to machine because of its twisted blades. Rough machining is recognized as the most crucial procedure influencing machining efficiency and is critical for the finishing process. An integrated rough machining course with detailed algorithms is presented in this paper. An algorithm for determining the minimum distance between two surfaces is applied to estimate the tool size. The space between two blades that will be cleared from the roughcast is divided to generate CC points. The tool axis vector is confirmed based on flank milling using a simple method that could eliminate global interference between the tool and the blades. The result proves that the machining methodology presented in this paper is useful and successful.

  19. Generalized rough sets hybrid structure and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Anjan

    2015-01-01

    The book introduces the concept of “generalized interval valued intuitionistic fuzzy soft sets”. It presents the basic properties of these sets and also, investigates an application of generalized interval valued intuitionistic fuzzy soft sets in decision making with respect to interval of degree of preference. The concept of “interval valued intuitionistic fuzzy soft rough sets” is discussed and interval valued intuitionistic fuzzy soft rough set based multi criteria group decision making scheme is presented, which refines the primary evaluation of the whole expert group and enables us to select the optimal object in a most reliable manner. The book also details concept of interval valued intuitionistic fuzzy sets of type 2. It presents the basic properties of these sets. The book also introduces the concept of “interval valued intuitionistic fuzzy soft topological space (IVIFS topological space)” together with intuitionistic fuzzy soft open sets (IVIFS open sets) and intuitionistic fuzzy soft cl...

  20. Fractai Estimation of Joint Roughness Coefficients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢和平; Willian G.Pariseau

    1994-01-01

    Based on the triadic Koch curve,a generalized fractal model of joint profiles is establishedto simulate joint roughness.The fractal dimension of a joint profile can be directly obtained from the two pa-rameters,L~* and h~*, the average base length and average height of asperities of the joint,respectively,i,e D=log4/log[2(1+cos tan~1(2h’/L’))]This fractal dimension is strongly correlated with the value of the joint roughness coefficient (JRC). An empirical relationship is found in the form,JRC=85.2671·(D-1)~0.5679 Thus, the fractal analysis proposed provides a new method of estimating JRC values