WorldWideScience

Sample records for rotorcraft noise model

  1. A Tool for Low Noise Procedures Design and Community Noise Impact Assessment: The Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, David A.; Page, Juliet A.

    2002-01-01

    To improve aircraft noise impact modeling capabilities and to provide a tool to aid in the development of low noise terminal area operations for rotorcraft and tiltrotors, the Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM) was developed by the NASA Langley Research Center and Wyle Laboratories. RNM is a simulation program that predicts how sound will propagate through the atmosphere and accumulate at receiver locations located on flat ground or varying terrain, for single and multiple vehicle flight operations. At the core of RNM are the vehicle noise sources, input as sound hemispheres. As the vehicle "flies" along its prescribed flight trajectory, the source sound propagation is simulated and accumulated at the receiver locations (single points of interest or multiple grid points) in a systematic time-based manner. These sound signals at the receiver locations may then be analyzed to obtain single event footprints, integrated noise contours, time histories, or numerous other features. RNM may also be used to generate spectral time history data over a ground mesh for the creation of single event sound animation videos. Acoustic properties of the noise source(s) are defined in terms of sound hemispheres that may be obtained from theoretical predictions, wind tunnel experimental results, flight test measurements, or a combination of the three. The sound hemispheres may contain broadband data (source levels as a function of one-third octave band) and pure-tone data (in the form of specific frequency sound pressure levels and phase). A PC executable version of RNM is publicly available and has been adopted by a number of organizations for Environmental Impact Assessment studies of rotorcraft noise. This paper provides a review of the required input data, the theoretical framework of RNM's propagation model and the output results. Code validation results are provided from a NATO helicopter noise flight test as well as a tiltrotor flight test program that used the RNM as a tool to aid in

  2. Modeling Tool Advances Rotorcraft Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Continuum Dynamics Inc. (CDI), founded in 1979, specializes in advanced engineering services, including fluid dynamic modeling and analysis for aeronautics research. The company has completed a number of SBIR research projects with NASA, including early rotorcraft work done through Langley Research Center, but more recently, out of Ames Research Center. NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants on helicopter wake modeling resulted in the Comprehensive Hierarchical Aeromechanics Rotorcraft Model (CHARM), a tool for studying helicopter and tiltrotor unsteady free wake modeling, including distributed and integrated loads, and performance prediction. Application of the software code in a blade redesign program for Carson Helicopters, of Perkasie, Pennsylvania, increased the payload and cruise speeds of its S-61 helicopter. Follow-on development resulted in a $24 million revenue increase for Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation, of Stratford, Connecticut, as part of the company's rotor design efforts. Now under continuous development for more than 25 years, CHARM models the complete aerodynamics and dynamics of rotorcraft in general flight conditions. CHARM has been used to model a broad spectrum of rotorcraft attributes, including performance, blade loading, blade-vortex interaction noise, air flow fields, and hub loads. The highly accurate software is currently in use by all major rotorcraft manufacturers, NASA, the U.S. Army, and the U.S. Navy.

  3. Automated Design of Noise-Minimal, Safe Rotorcraft Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robert A.; Venable, K. Brent; Lindsay, James

    2012-01-01

    NASA and the international community are investing in the development of a commercial transportation infrastructure that includes the increased use of rotorcraft, specifically helicopters and aircraft such as a 40-passenger civil tilt rotors. Rotorcraft have a number of advantages over fixed wing aircraft, primarily in not requiring direct access to the primary fixed wing runways. As such they can operate at an airport without directly interfering with major air carrier and commuter aircraft operations. However, there is significant concern over the impact of noise on the communities surrounding the transportation facilities. In this paper we propose to address the rotorcraft noise problem by exploiting powerful search techniques coming from artificial intelligence, coupled with simulation and field tests, to design trajectories that are expected to improve on the amount of ground noise generated. This paper investigates the use of simulation based on predictive physical models to facilitate the search for low-noise trajectories using a class of automated search algorithms called local search. A novel feature of this approach is the ability to incorporate constraints into the problem formulation that addresses passenger safety and comfort.

  4. Propulsion System Models for Rotorcraft Conceptual Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    The conceptual design code NDARC (NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft) was initially implemented to model conventional rotorcraft propulsion systems, consisting of turboshaft engines burning jet fuel, connected to one or more rotors through a mechanical transmission. The NDARC propulsion system representation has been extended to cover additional propulsion concepts, including electric motors and generators, rotor reaction drive, turbojet and turbofan engines, fuel cells and solar cells, batteries, and fuel (energy) used without weight change. The paper describes these propulsion system components, the architecture of their implementation in NDARC, and the form of the models for performance and weight. Requirements are defined for improved performance and weight models of the new propulsion system components. With these new propulsion models, NDARC can be used to develop environmentally-friendly rotorcraft designs.

  5. Examination of a Rotorcraft Noise Prediction Method and Comparison to Flight Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Greenwood, Eric; Watts, Michael E.; Lopes, Leonard V.

    2017-01-01

    With a view that rotorcraft noise should be included in the preliminary design process, a relatively fast noise prediction method is examined in this paper. A comprehensive rotorcraft analysis is combined with a noise prediction method to compute several noise metrics of interest. These predictions are compared to flight test data. Results show that inclusion of only the main rotor noise will produce results that severely underpredict integrated metrics of interest. Inclusion of the tail rotor frequency content is essential for accurately predicting these integrated noise metrics.

  6. Real-Time, Maneuvering Flight Noise Prediction for Rotorcraft Flight Simulations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal outlines a plan for developing new technology to provide accurate real-time noise prediction for rotorcraft in steady and maneuvering flight. Main...

  7. Hybrid Finite Element Analysis for Rotorcraft Interior Noise Simulations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — One of the main attributes contributing to the competitiveness of rotorcraft, is the continuously increasing expectations for passenger comfort which is directly...

  8. NASA/AHS rotorcraft noise reduction program - NASA Langley Acoustics Division contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ruth M.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of the contributions made by NASA-Langley's rotorcraft noise research programs over the last five years. Attention has been given to the broadband and blade-vortex interaction noise sources; both analytical and empirical noise-prediction codes have been developed and validated for several rotor noise sources, and the 'Rotonet' comprehensive system-noise prediction capability has been instituted. Among the technologies explored for helicopter noise reduction have been higher harmonic control and active vibration-suppression.

  9. Anatomy, modelling and prediction of aeroservoelastic rotorcraft-pilot-coupling.

    OpenAIRE

    Gennaretti, M.; Collela, M.M.; Serafini, J.; Dang Vu, B.; Masarati, P.; Quaranta, G; Muscarello, V.; Jump, M.; M. Jones; Lu, L.(Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Wuppertal, Germany); Ionita, A.; Fuiorea, I.; Mihaila-Andres, M.; Stefan, R

    2013-01-01

    Research activity and results obtained within the European project ARISTOTEL (2010-2013) are presented. It deals with anatomy, modelling and prediction of Rotorcraft Pilot Coupling (RPC) phenomena, which are a really broad and wide category of events, ranging from discomfort to catastrophic crash. The main topics concerning piloted helicopter simulation that are of interest for designers are examined. These include comprehensive rotorcraft modelling suited for Pilot Assisted Oscillations (PAO...

  10. Passive control of rotorcraft high-speed impulsive noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulc, O.; Doerffer, P.; Tejero, F.

    2016-10-01

    A strong, normal shock wave, terminating a local supersonic area located at the tip of a helicopter blade, not only limits the aerodynamic performance, but also constitutes an origin of the High-Speed Impulsive (HSI) noise. The application of a passive control device (a shallow cavity covered by a perforated plate) just beneath the interaction region weakens the compression level, thus reducing the main source of the HSI noise. The numerical investigation based on the URANS approach and Bohning/Doerffer (BD) transpiration law (SPARC code) confirms a large potential of the new method. Two exemplary implementations, adapted to model helicopter rotors tested at NASA Ames facility in transonic conditions: Caradonna-Tung (lifting, transonic hover) and Caradonna-Laub-Tung (non-lifting, high-speed forward flight), demonstrate the possible gains in terms of the reduction of acoustic pressure fluctuations in the near-field of the blade tip. The CFD results are validated against the experimental data obtained for the reference configurations (no control), while the analysis of the passive control arrangement is based on a purely numerical research. The normal shock wave is effectively eliminated by the wall ventilation exerting a positive impact on the generated level of the HSI noise.

  11. Hybrid Finite Element Developments for Rotorcraft Interior Noise Computations within a Multidisciplinary Design Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — One of the main attributes contributing to the civil competitiveness of rotorcraft, is the continuously increasing expectations for passenger comfort which is...

  12. Rotorcraft Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haste, Deepak; Azam, Mohammad; Ghoshal, Sudipto; Monte, James

    2012-01-01

    Health management (HM) in any engineering systems requires adequate understanding about the system s functioning; a sufficient amount of monitored data; the capability to extract, analyze, and collate information; and the capability to combine understanding and information for HM-related estimation and decision-making. Rotorcraft systems are, in general, highly complex. Obtaining adequate understanding about functioning of such systems is quite difficult, because of the proprietary (restricted access) nature of their designs and dynamic models. Development of an EIM (exact inverse map) solution for rotorcraft requires a process that can overcome the abovementioned difficulties and maximally utilize monitored information for HM facilitation via employing advanced analytic techniques. The goal was to develop a versatile HM solution for rotorcraft for facilitation of the Condition Based Maintenance Plus (CBM+) capabilities. The effort was geared towards developing analytic and reasoning techniques, and proving the ability to embed the required capabilities on a rotorcraft platform, paving the way for implementing the solution on an aircraft-level system for consolidation and reporting. The solution for rotorcraft can he used offboard or embedded directly onto a rotorcraft system. The envisioned solution utilizes available monitored and archived data for real-time fault detection and identification, failure precursor identification, and offline fault detection and diagnostics, health condition forecasting, optimal guided troubleshooting, and maintenance decision support. A variant of the onboard version is a self-contained hardware and software (HW+SW) package that can be embedded on rotorcraft systems. The HM solution comprises components that gather/ingest data and information, perform information/feature extraction, analyze information in conjunction with the dependency/diagnostic model of the target system, facilitate optimal guided troubleshooting, and offer

  13. Next Generation Modeling Technology for High Speed Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recent R&D associated with designing high speed rotorcraft has been greatly hampered by a lack of test data and confidence in predictions for rotors operating...

  14. Next Generation Modeling Technology for High Speed Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a new generation of high speed rotorcraft has been hampered by both an absence of strong predictive methods for rotors operating at very high advance...

  15. Analysis of computational modeling techniques for complete rotorcraft configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, David M., Jr.

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) provides the helicopter designer with a powerful tool for identifying problematic aerodynamics. Through the use of CFD, design concepts can be analyzed in a virtual wind tunnel long before a physical model is ever created. Traditional CFD analysis tends to be a time consuming process, where much of the effort is spent generating a high quality computational grid. Recent increases in computing power and memory have created renewed interest in alternative grid schemes such as unstructured grids, which facilitate rapid grid generation by relaxing restrictions on grid structure. Three rotor models have been incorporated into a popular fixed-wing unstructured CFD solver to increase its capability and facilitate availability to the rotorcraft community. The benefit of unstructured grid methods is demonstrated through rapid generation of high fidelity configuration models. The simplest rotor model is the steady state actuator disk approximation. By transforming the unsteady rotor problem into a steady state one, the actuator disk can provide rapid predictions of performance parameters such as lift and drag. The actuator blade and overset blade models provide a depiction of the unsteady rotor wake, but incur a larger computational cost than the actuator disk. The actuator blade model is convenient when the unsteady aerodynamic behavior needs to be investigated, but the computational cost of the overset approach is too large. The overset or chimera method allows the blades loads to be computed from first-principles and therefore provides the most accurate prediction of the rotor wake for the models investigated. The physics of the flow fields generated by these models for rotor/fuselage interactions are explored, along with efficiencies and limitations of each method.

  16. Physics Based Tool for Rotorcraft Computational Aeroacoustics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reduction of noise is critical to the public acceptance and mission suitability of rotorcraft. Accurate prediction of rotorcraft noise is directly related to the...

  17. Dynamic modeling and nonlinear control strategy for an underactuated quad rotor rotorcraft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ashfaq Ahmad MIAN; Dao-bo WANG

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear dynamic MIMO model of a 6-DOF underactuated quad rotor rotorcraft is derived based on Newton-Euler formalism. The derivation comprises determining equations of motion of the quad rotor in three dimensions and seeking to approximate the actuation forces through modeling of the aerodynamic coefficients and electric motor dynamics. The derived model is dynamically unstable, so a sequential nonlinear control strategy is implemented for the quad rotor. The control strategy includes exact feedback linearization technique, using the geometric methods of nonlinear control. The performance of the nonlinear control algorithm is evaluated using simulation and the results show the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy for the quad rotor rotorcraft near quasi-stationary flight.

  18. Building vibrations induced by noise from rotorcraft and propeller aircraft flyovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Hubbard, Harvey H.

    1992-01-01

    Noise and building vibrations were measured for a series of helicopter and propeller-driven aircraft flyovers at WFF during May 1978. The building response data are compared with similar data acquired earlier at sites near Dulles and Kennedy Airports for operation of commercial jet transports, including the Concorde supersonic transport. Results show that noise-induced vibration levels in windows and walls are directly proportional to sound pressure level and that for a given noise level, the acceleration levels induced by a helicopter or a propeller-driven aircraft flyover cannot be distinguished from the acceleration levels induced by a commercial jet transport flyover. Noise-induced building acceleration levels were found to be lower than those levels which might be expected to cause structural damage and were also lower than some acceleration levels induced by such common domestic events as closing windows and doors.

  19. SCI Identification (SCIDNT) program user's guide. [maximum likelihood method for linear rotorcraft models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The computer program Linear SCIDNT which evaluates rotorcraft stability and control coefficients from flight or wind tunnel test data is described. It implements the maximum likelihood method to maximize the likelihood function of the parameters based on measured input/output time histories. Linear SCIDNT may be applied to systems modeled by linear constant-coefficient differential equations. This restriction in scope allows the application of several analytical results which simplify the computation and improve its efficiency over the general nonlinear case.

  20. Sound Diffraction Modeling of Rotorcraft Noise Around Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, James H.; Sim, Ben W.; Chitta, Subhashini; Steinhoff, John

    2017-01-01

    A new computational technique, Wave Confinement (WC), is extended here to account for sound diffraction around arbitrary terrain. While diffraction around elementary scattering objects, such as a knife edge, single slit, disc, sphere, etc. has been studied for several decades, realistic environments still pose significant problems. This new technique is first validated against Sommerfeld's classical problem of diffraction due to a knife edge. This is followed by comparisons with diffraction over three-dimensional smooth obstacles, such as a disc and Gaussian hill. Finally, comparisons with flight test acoustics data measured behind a hill are also shown. Comparison between experiment and Wave Confinement prediction demonstrates that a Poisson spot occurred behind the isolated hill, resulting in significantly increased sound intensity near the center of the shadowed region.

  1. Rotorcraft simulation at Ames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, T. S.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to rotorcraft simulation experience at NASA's Ames research facility, which has involved complex mathematical modeling, high computational capability requirements, and strong influences from pilot motion and visual cues. A development history and performance assessment is presented for the rotorcraft simulation hardware, together with projections of near term development improvements of capabilities. Greater demand is anticipated for the simulation of all-digital helicopter flight control systems.

  2. The Model Identification for Small Unmanned Aerial Rotorcraft Based on Adaptive Ant Colony Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xusheng Lei; Kexin Guo

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a model identification method to get high performance dynamic model of a small unmanned aerial rotorcraft.With the analysis of flight characteristics,a linear dynamic model is constructed by the small perturbation theory.Using the micro guidance navigation and control module,the system can record the control signals of servos,the state information of attitude and velocity information in sequence.After the data preprocessing,an adaptive ant colony algorithm is proposed to get optimal parameters of the dynamic model.With the adaptive adjustment of the pheromone in the selection process,the proposed model identification method can escape from local minima traps and get the optimal solution quickly.Performance analysis and experiments are conducted to validate the effectiveness of the identified dynamic model.Compared with real flight data,the identified model generated by the proposed method has a better performance than the model generated by the adaptive genetic algorithm.Based on the identified dynamic model,the small unmanned aerial rotorcraft can generate suitable control parameters to realize stable hovering,turning,and straight flight.

  3. Modeling methods for high-fidelity rotorcraft flight mechanics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, M. Hossein; Tischler, Mark B.; Chaimovich, Menahem; Rosen, Aviv; Rand, Omri

    1992-01-01

    The cooperative effort being carried out under the agreements of the United States-Israel Memorandum of Understanding is discussed. Two different models of the AH-64 Apache Helicopter, which may differ in their approach to modeling the main rotor, are presented. The first model, the Blade Element Model for the Apache (BEMAP), was developed at Ames Research Center, and is the only model of the Apache to employ a direct blade element approach to calculating the coupled flap-lag motion of the blades and the rotor force and moment. The second model was developed at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology and uses an harmonic approach to analyze the rotor. The approach allows two different levels of approximation, ranging from the 'first harmonic' (similar to a tip-path-plane model) to 'complete high harmonics' (comparable to a blade element approach). The development of the two models is outlined and the two are compared using available flight test data.

  4. An upper limb musculoskeletal model using bond graphs for rotorcraft-pilot couplings analysis

    OpenAIRE

    TOD, Georges; Malburet, François; Gomand, Julien; Barre, Pierre-Jean

    2014-01-01

    Under certain flight conditions, a rotorcraft fuselage motions and vibrations might interact with its pilot voluntary and involuntary actions leading to potentially dangerous dynamic instabilities known as rotorcraft-pilot couplings (RPCs). A better understanding of this phenomenon could be achieved by being able to reproduce the phenomenon during simulations. Design guidelines could be then obtained at an early stage of development of rotorcrafts improving flight safety for pilots and passen...

  5. A Status of NASA Rotorcraft Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    non-interfering ( SNI ) operation of large rotorcraft are planned in the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS). The Future Flight Central facility at NASA Ames...is also being considered for simulating SNI operations. Handling qualities and external noise of large rotorcraft are addressed in Chapters 6 and 3

  6. Linear Parameter Varying Model Identification for Control of Rotorcraft-based UAV

    CERN Document Server

    Budiyono, Agus

    2008-01-01

    A rotorcraft-based unmanned aerial vehicle exhibits more complex properties compared to its full-size counterparts due to its increased sensitivity to control inputs and disturbances and higher bandwidth of its dynamics. As an aerial vehicle with vertical take-off and landing capability, the helicopter specifically poses a difficult problem of transition between forward flight and unstable hover and vice versa. The LPV control technique explicitly takes into account the change in performance due to the real-time parameter variations. The technique therefore theoretically guarantees the performance and robustness over the entire operating envelope. In this study, we investigate a new approach implementing model identification for use in the LPV control framework. The identification scheme employs recursive least square technique implemented on the LPV system represented by dynamics of helicopter during a transition. The airspeed as the scheduling of parameter trajectory is not assumed to vary slowly. The exclu...

  7. NLSCIDNT user's guide maximum likehood parameter identification computer program with nonlinear rotorcraft model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    A nonlinear, maximum likelihood, parameter identification computer program (NLSCIDNT) is described which evaluates rotorcraft stability and control coefficients from flight test data. The optimal estimates of the parameters (stability and control coefficients) are determined (identified) by minimizing the negative log likelihood cost function. The minimization technique is the Levenberg-Marquardt method, which behaves like the steepest descent method when it is far from the minimum and behaves like the modified Newton-Raphson method when it is nearer the minimum. Twenty-one states and 40 measurement variables are modeled, and any subset may be selected. States which are not integrated may be fixed at an input value, or time history data may be substituted for the state in the equations of motion. Any aerodynamic coefficient may be expressed as a nonlinear polynomial function of selected 'expansion variables'.

  8. Rotorcrafts for Mars Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaram, J.; Tokumaru, P. T.

    2014-06-01

    Rotorcraft mobility provides a number of useful capabilities to potential Mars missions. We present some recent results relating to the design and test of Mars rotorcraft mobility elements, and aspects of rotorcraft system and mission design.

  9. High-Order Aeromechanics Model Support for Rotorcraft Conceptual Design Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Conceptual design tools for rotorcraft are used to size vehicles for intended flight operations, as well as reveal trends on the relative benefits certain...

  10. A Maneuvering Flight Noise Model for Helicopter Mission Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Eric; Rau, Robert; May, Benjamin; Hobbs, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A new model for estimating the noise radiation during maneuvering flight is developed in this paper. The model applies the Quasi-Static Acoustic Mapping (Q-SAM) method to a database of acoustic spheres generated using the Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustics Modeling from Experiments (FRAME) technique. A method is developed to generate a realistic flight trajectory from a limited set of waypoints and is used to calculate the quasi-static operating condition and corresponding acoustic sphere for the vehicle throughout the maneuver. By using a previously computed database of acoustic spheres, the acoustic impact of proposed helicopter operations can be rapidly predicted for use in mission-planning. The resulting FRAME-QS model is applied to near-horizon noise measurements collected for the Bell 430 helicopter undergoing transient pitch up and roll maneuvers, with good agreement between the measured data and the FRAME-QS model.

  11. Research Plans for Improving Understanding of Effects of Very Low-Frequency Noise of Heavy Lift Rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidell, Sanford; Horonieff, Richard D.; Schmitz, Fredric H.

    2010-01-01

    This report reviews the English-language technical literature on infrasonic and low-frequency noise effects; identifies the most salient effects of noise produced by a future large civil tiltrotor aircraft on crew, passengers, and communities near landing areas; and recommends research needed to improve understanding of the effects of such noise on passengers, crew, and residents of areas near landing pads.

  12. Design of Quiet Rotorcraft Approach Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Burley, Casey L.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Marcolini, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    A optimization procedure for identifying quiet rotorcraft approach trajectories is proposed and demonstrated. The procedure employs a multi-objective genetic algorithm in order to reduce noise and create approach paths that will be acceptable to pilots and passengers. The concept is demonstrated by application to two different helicopters. The optimized paths are compared with one another and to a standard 6-deg approach path. The two demonstration cases validate the optimization procedure but highlight the need for improved noise prediction techniques and for additional rotorcraft acoustic data sets.

  13. Acoustically Tailored Composite Rotorcraft Fuselage Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambric, Stephen; Shepherd, Micah; Koudela, Kevin; Wess, Denis; Snider, Royce; May, Carl; Kendrick, Phil; Lee, Edward; Cai, Liang-Wu

    2015-01-01

    A rotorcraft roof sandwich panel has been redesigned to optimize sound power transmission loss (TL) and minimize structure-borne sound for frequencies between 1 and 4 kHz where gear meshing noise from the transmission has the most impact on speech intelligibility. The roof section, framed by a grid of ribs, was originally constructed of a single honeycomb core/composite face sheet panel. The original panel has coincidence frequencies near 700 Hz, leading to poor TL across the frequency range of 1 to 4 kHz. To quiet the panel, the cross section was split into two thinner sandwich subpanels separated by an air gap. The air gap was sized to target the fundamental mass-spring-mass resonance of the double panel system to less than 500 Hz. The panels were designed to withstand structural loading from normal rotorcraft operation, as well as 'man-on-the-roof' static loads experienced during maintenance operations. Thin layers of VHB 9469 viscoelastomer from 3M were also included in the face sheet ply layups, increasing panel damping loss factors from about 0.01 to 0.05. Measurements in the NASA SALT facility show the optimized panel provides 6-11 dB of acoustic transmission loss improvement, and 6-15 dB of structure-borne sound reduction at critical rotorcraft transmission tonal frequencies. Analytic panel TL theory simulates the measured performance quite well. Detailed finite element/boundary element modeling of the baseline panel simulates TL slightly more accurately, and also simulates structure-borne sound well.

  14. Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossler, Robert; Heath, Gregory

    1991-01-01

    Reported herein is work done on the Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission by McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Company under Army/NASA contract. The novel concept pursued includes the use of face gears for power transmission and a torque splitting arrangement. The design reduces the size and weight of the corner-turning hardware and the next reduction stage. New methods of analyzing face gears have increased confidence in their usefulness. Test gears have been designed and manufactured for power transmission testing on the NASA-Lewis spiral bevel test rig. Transmission design effort has included finite element modeling of the split torque paths to assure equal deflection under load. A finite element model of the Apache main transmission has been completed to substantiate noise prediction methods. A positive engagement overrunning clutch design is described. Test spur gears have been made by near-net-shape forging from five different materials. Three housing materials have been procured for evaluation testing.

  15. Model of flicker noise effects on phase noise in oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centurelli, Francesco; Ercolani, Alessandro; Tommasino, Pasquale; Trifiletti, Alessandro

    2003-05-01

    Phase noise models that describe the near-carrier spectrum in an accurate but insightful way are needed, to better optimize the oscillator design. In this paper we present a model to describe the effect of flicker noise sources on the phase noise of an oscillator, that can be applied both to linear oscillators and to nonlinear structures like relaxation and ring oscillators, so extending previous works that considered only the effect of the flicker noise superimposed to the control voltage of a VCO. In the phase noise of an oscillator we can separate the effect of high frequency noise sources, that can be described by a short-time-constant system, and the effect of low frequency noises (mostly flicker sources), described by a system with time constants much slower than the oscillation period. Flicker noise has been considered to cause a change in the circuit bias point; this bias point change can be mapped in a shift of the oscillation frequency by exploiting Barkhausen conditions (for linear oscillators) or obtaining this link by simulations. The power spectral density of the oscillator can then be obtained as the probability distribution of the oscillation frequency, starting from the flicker noise probability distribution. If the effect of high frequency noise sources is also taken into account, the overall oscillator spectrum can be obtained as a convolution of the spectrum due to flicker sources with the Lorentzian-shaped spectrum due to white noise sources, in analogy with the description of inhomogeneous broadening of laser linewidth.

  16. A Toolbox for Rotorcraft Preliminary Design

    OpenAIRE

    Lier, Max; Krenik, Alex; Kunze, Philipp; Kohlgrüber, Dieter; Schwinn, Dominik; Lützenberger, Marius

    2015-01-01

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) developed a toolbox, which is able to reflect the conceptual and preliminary design process of rotorcraft configuration. Such a toolbox is a valuable aid for the design engineer and can be used for the assessment of new technologies with regard to the overall configuration. This toolbox is currently extended to model novel rotorcraft configurations. Automated optimization procedures will be added in the future as well. This paper describes the too...

  17. Propeller aircraft interior noise model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, L. D.; Wilby, E. G.; Wilby, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical model was developed to predict the interior noise of propeller-driven aircraft. The fuselage model is that of a cylinder with a structurally-integral floor. The cabin sidewall is stiffened by stringers and ring frames, and the floor by longitudinal beams. The cabin interior is covered with a sidewall treatments consisting of layers of porous material and an impervious trim septum. Representation of the propeller pressure field is utilized as input data in the form of the propeller noise signature at a series of locations on a grid over the fuselage structure. Results obtained from the analytical model are compared with test data measured by NASA in a scale model cylindrical fuselage excited by a model propeller.

  18. Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) Program summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, T. L.; Kish, J. G.

    1992-07-01

    The Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) Program was initiated to advance the state of the art for rotorcraft transmissions. The goal of the ART Program was to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to reduce transmission weight by 25 pct and reduce noise by 10 dB while obtaining a 5000 hr 'mean time between failure'. The research done under the ART Program is summarized. A split path design was selected as best able to meet the program goals. Key part technologies needed for this design were identified, studied, and developed. Two of these technologies are discussed in detail: the load sharing of split path designs including the use of a compliant elastomeric torque splitter and the application of a high ratio, low pitch line velocity gear mesh. Development of an angular contact spherical roller bearing, transmission error analysis, and fretting fatigue testing are discussed. The technologies for a light weight, quiet, and reliable rotorcraft transmission were demonstrated.

  19. 75 FR 50688 - Special Conditions: Erickson Air-Crane Incorporated S-64E and S-64F Rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ... (Erickson Air-Crane) model S-64E and S-64F rotorcraft. These rotorcraft have novel or unusual design features associated with being transport category rotorcraft designed only for use in heavy external-load.... The rotorcraft does not have a passenger compartment and is not designed to transport passengers....

  20. Comprehensive Modeling and Analysis of Rotorcraft Variable Speed Propulsion System With Coupled Engine/Transmission/Rotor Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSmidt, Hans A.; Smith, Edward C.; Bill, Robert C.; Wang, Kon-Well

    2013-01-01

    This project develops comprehensive modeling and simulation tools for analysis of variable rotor speed helicopter propulsion system dynamics. The Comprehensive Variable-Speed Rotorcraft Propulsion Modeling (CVSRPM) tool developed in this research is used to investigate coupled rotor/engine/fuel control/gearbox/shaft/clutch/flight control system dynamic interactions for several variable rotor speed mission scenarios. In this investigation, a prototypical two-speed Dual-Clutch Transmission (DCT) is proposed and designed to achieve 50 percent rotor speed variation. The comprehensive modeling tool developed in this study is utilized to analyze the two-speed shift response of both a conventional single rotor helicopter and a tiltrotor drive system. In the tiltrotor system, both a Parallel Shift Control (PSC) strategy and a Sequential Shift Control (SSC) strategy for constant and variable forward speed mission profiles are analyzed. Under the PSC strategy, selecting clutch shift-rate results in a design tradeoff between transient engine surge margins and clutch frictional power dissipation. In the case of SSC, clutch power dissipation is drastically reduced in exchange for the necessity to disengage one engine at a time which requires a multi-DCT drive system topology. In addition to comprehensive simulations, several sections are dedicated to detailed analysis of driveline subsystem components under variable speed operation. In particular an aeroelastic simulation of a stiff in-plane rotor using nonlinear quasi-steady blade element theory was conducted to investigate variable speed rotor dynamics. It was found that 2/rev and 4/rev flap and lag vibrations were significant during resonance crossings with 4/rev lagwise loads being directly transferred into drive-system torque disturbances. To capture the clutch engagement dynamics, a nonlinear stick-slip clutch torque model is developed. Also, a transient gas-turbine engine model based on first principles mean

  1. Rotorcraft Conceptual Design Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne; Sinsay, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Requirements for a rotorcraft conceptual design environment are discussed, from the perspective of a government laboratory. Rotorcraft design work in a government laboratory must support research, by producing technology impact assessments and defining the context for research and development; and must support the acquisition process, including capability assessments and quantitative evaluation of designs, concepts, and alternatives. An information manager that will enable increased fidelity of analysis early in the design effort is described. This manager will be a framework to organize information that describes the aircraft, and enable movement of that information to and from analyses. Finally, a recently developed rotorcraft system analysis tool is described.

  2. Rotorcraft Diagnostics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under this SBIR program, Ridgetop will introduce the first low-cost, low-power, and lightweight data monitoring solution for rotorcraft diagnostics. The solution is...

  3. 基于Lagrange方法的单旋翼飞行器动力学建模%Dynamics modeling for monowing rotorcraft using Lagrange method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李家乐; 王正平

    2016-01-01

    For the dynamics modeling for the microminiature monowing rotorcraft,several coordinate systems for different parts of the vehicle were set up to reflect the relative movements.Firstly,vectors such as position,velocity and acceleration were obtained by transformation of coordinates,and substituted into Lagrange equation to get dynamic model.Then,attitude responses were obtained by numerical calculation of the model.Simulation results show that the force is zero and the energy remains constant when the rotorcraft is hovering;non-conservative force works and the energy increase when the rotorcraft is climbing or flying forward.%为了进行微小型单旋翼飞行器的动力学建模,通过建立多个坐标系来反映各部分间的相对运动.首先,利用坐标变换得到位置、速度及加速度等向量,并代入拉格朗日方程得到运动学模型;然后,对模型进行数值求解,得到飞行器的姿态响应.仿真结果表明,飞行器定点盘旋时合外力为零,能量保持不变;爬升或前飞时有非保守力做正功,能量增大.

  4. Modeling phase noise in multifunction subassemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Obtaining requisite phase noise performance in hardware containing multifunction circuitry requires accurate modeling of the phase noise characteristics of each signal path component, including both absolute (oscillator) and residual (non-oscillator) circuit contributors. This includes prediction of both static and vibration-induced phase noise. The model (usually in spreadsheet form) is refined as critical components are received and evaluated. Additive (KTBF) phase noise data can be reasonably estimated, based on device drive level and noise figure. However, accurate determination of component near-carrier (multiplicative) and vibration-induced noise usually must be determined via measurement. The model should also include the effects of noise introduced by IC voltage regulators and properly discriminate between common versus independent signal path residual noise contributors. The modeling can be easily implemented using a spreadsheet.

  5. Nonlinear modeling, strength-based design, and testing of flexible piezoelectric energy harvesters under large dynamic loads for rotorcraft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadenham, Stephen; Erturk, Alper

    2014-04-01

    There has been growing interest in enabling wireless health and usage monitoring for rotorcraft applications, such as helicopter rotor systems. Large dynamic loads and acceleration fluctuations available in these environments make the implementation of vibration-based piezoelectric energy harvesters a very promising choice. However, such extreme loads transmitted to the harvester can also be detrimental to piezoelectric laminates and overall system reliability. Particularly flexible resonant cantilever configurations tuned to match the dominant excitation frequency can be subject to very large deformations and failure of brittle piezoelectric laminates due to excessive bending stresses at the root of the harvester. Design of resonant piezoelectric energy harvesters for use in these environments require nonlinear electroelastic dynamic modeling and strength-based analysis to maximize the power output while ensuring that the harvester is still functional. This paper presents a mathematical framework to design and analyze the dynamics of nonlinear flexible piezoelectric energy harvesters under large base acceleration levels. A strength-based limit is imposed to design the piezoelectric energy harvester with a proof mass while accounting for material, geometric, and dissipative nonlinearities, with a focus on two demonstrative case studies having the same linear fundamental resonance frequency but different overhang length and proof mass values. Experiments are conducted at different excitation levels for validation of the nonlinear design approach proposed in this work. The case studies in this work reveal that harvesters exhibiting similar behavior and power generation performance at low excitation levels (e.g. less than 0.1g) can have totally different strength-imposed performance limitations under high excitations (e.g. above 1g). Nonlinear modeling and strength-based design is necessary for such excitation levels especially when using resonant cantilevers with no

  6. On-line methods for rotorcraft aeroelastic mode identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molusis, J. A.; Kleinman, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The requirements for the on-line identification of rotorcraft aeroelastic blade modes from random response test data are presented. A recursive maximum likelihood (RML) technique is used in conjunction with a bandpass filter to identify isolated blade mode damping and frequency. The RML technique is demonstrated to have excellent convergence characteristics in random measurement noise and random process noise excitation. The RML identification technique uses an ARMA representation for the aeroelastic stochastic system and requires virtually no user interaction while providing accurate confidence bands on the parameter estimates. Comparisons are made with an off-line Newton type maximum likelihood algorithm which uses a state variable model representation. Results are presented from simulation random response data which quantify the identifed parameter convergence behavior for various levels of random excitation which is typical of wind tunnel turbulence levels. The RML technique is applied to hingless rotor test data from the NASA Langley Research Center Helicopter Hover Facility.

  7. NDARC NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne R.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft (NDARC) software is an aircraft system analysis tool intended to support both conceptual design efforts and technology impact assessments. The principal tasks are to design (or size) a rotorcraft to meet specified requirements, including vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) operation, and then analyze the performance of the aircraft for a set of conditions. For broad and lasting utility, it is important that the code have the capability to model general rotorcraft configurations, and estimate the performance and weights of advanced rotor concepts. The architecture of the NDARC code accommodates configuration flexibility; a hierarchy of models; and ultimately multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization. Initially the software is implemented with lowfidelity models, typically appropriate for the conceptual design environment. An NDARC job consists of one or more cases, each case optionally performing design and analysis tasks. The design task involves sizing the rotorcraft to satisfy specified design conditions and missions. The analysis tasks can include off-design mission performance calculation, flight performance calculation for point operating conditions, and generation of subsystem or component performance maps. For analysis tasks, the aircraft description can come from the sizing task, from a previous case or a previous NDARC job, or be independently generated (typically the description of an existing aircraft). The aircraft consists of a set of components, including fuselage, rotors, wings, tails, and propulsion. For each component, attributes such as performance, drag, and weight can be calculated; and the aircraft attributes are obtained from the sum of the component attributes. Description and analysis of conventional rotorcraft configurations is facilitated, while retaining the capability to model novel and advanced concepts. Specific rotorcraft configurations considered are single main-rotor and

  8. NDARC - NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft (NDARC) software is an aircraft system analysis tool that supports both conceptual design efforts and technology impact assessments. The principal tasks are to design (or size) a rotorcraft to meet specified requirements, including vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) operation, and then analyze the performance of the aircraft for a set of conditions. For broad and lasting utility, it is important that the code have the capability to model general rotorcraft configurations, and estimate the performance and weights of advanced rotor concepts. The architecture of the NDARC code accommodates configuration flexibility, a hierarchy of models, and ultimately multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization. Initially the software is implemented with low-fidelity models, typically appropriate for the conceptual design environment. An NDARC job consists of one or more cases, each case optionally performing design and analysis tasks. The design task involves sizing the rotorcraft to satisfy specified design conditions and missions. The analysis tasks can include off-design mission performance calculation, flight performance calculation for point operating conditions, and generation of subsystem or component performance maps. For analysis tasks, the aircraft description can come from the sizing task, from a previous case or a previous NDARC job, or be independently generated (typically the description of an existing aircraft). The aircraft consists of a set of components, including fuselage, rotors, wings, tails, and propulsion. For each component, attributes such as performance, drag, and weight can be calculated; and the aircraft attributes are obtained from the sum of the component attributes. Description and analysis of conventional rotorcraft configurations is facilitated, while retaining the capability to model novel and advanced concepts. Specific rotorcraft configurations considered are single-main-rotor and tail

  9. Aero-acoustic noise of wind turbines. Noise prediction models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maribo Pedersen, B. [ed.

    1997-12-31

    Semi-empirical and CAA (Computational AeroAcoustics) noise prediction techniques are the subject of this expert meeting. The meeting presents and discusses models and methods. The meeting may provide answers to the following questions: What Noise sources are the most important? How are the sources best modeled? What needs to be done to do better predictions? Does it boil down to correct prediction of the unsteady aerodynamics around the rotor? Or is the difficult part to convert the aerodynamics into acoustics? (LN)

  10. Designs and Technology Requirements for Civil Heavy Lift Rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Watts, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Systems Investigation examined in depth several rotorcraft configurations for large civil transport, designed to meet the technology goals of the NASA Vehicle Systems Program. The investigation identified the Large Civil Tiltrotor as the configuration with the best potential to meet the technology goals. The design presented was economically competitive, with the potential for substantial impact on the air transportation system. The keys to achieving a competitive aircraft were low drag airframe and low disk loading rotors; structural weight reduction, for both airframe and rotors; drive system weight reduction; improved engine efficiency; low maintenance design; and manufacturing cost comparable to fixed-wing aircraft. Risk reduction plans were developed to provide the strategic direction to support a heavy-lift rotorcraft development. The following high risk areas were identified for heavy lift rotorcraft: high torque, light weight drive system; high performance, structurally efficient rotor/wing system; low noise aircraft; and super-integrated vehicle management system.

  11. The Effects of Ambient Conditions on Helicopter Rotor Source Noise Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Frederic H.; Greenwood, Eric

    2011-01-01

    A new physics-based method called Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustic Modeling from Experiments (FRAME) is used to demonstrate the change in rotor harmonic noise of a helicopter operating at different ambient conditions. FRAME is based upon a non-dimensional representation of the governing acoustic and performance equations of a single rotor helicopter. Measured external noise is used together with parameter identification techniques to develop a model of helicopter external noise that is a hybrid between theory and experiment. The FRAME method is used to evaluate the main rotor harmonic noise of a Bell 206B3 helicopter operating at different altitudes. The variation with altitude of Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise, known to be a strong function of the helicopter s advance ratio, is dependent upon which definition of airspeed is flown by the pilot. If normal flight procedures are followed and indicated airspeed (IAS) is held constant, the true airspeed (TAS) of the helicopter increases with altitude. This causes an increase in advance ratio and a decrease in the speed of sound which results in large changes to BVI noise levels. Results also show that thickness noise on this helicopter becomes more intense at high altitudes where advancing tip Mach number increases because the speed of sound is decreasing and advance ratio increasing for the same indicated airspeed. These results suggest that existing measurement-based empirically derived helicopter rotor noise source models may give incorrect noise estimates when they are used at conditions where data were not measured and may need to be corrected for mission land-use planning purposes.

  12. Calibration of Airframe and Occupant Models for Two Full-Scale Rotorcraft Crash Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin S.; Horta, Lucas G.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Two full-scale crash tests of an MD-500 helicopter were conducted in 2009 and 2010 at NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Research Facility in support of NASA s Subsonic Rotary Wing Crashworthiness Project. The first crash test was conducted to evaluate the performance of an externally mounted composite deployable energy absorber under combined impact conditions. In the second crash test, the energy absorber was removed to establish baseline loads that are regarded as severe but survivable. Accelerations and kinematic data collected from the crash tests were compared to a system integrated finite element model of the test article. Results from 19 accelerometers placed throughout the airframe were compared to finite element model responses. The model developed for the purposes of predicting acceleration responses from the first crash test was inadequate when evaluating more severe conditions seen in the second crash test. A newly developed model calibration approach that includes uncertainty estimation, parameter sensitivity, impact shape orthogonality, and numerical optimization was used to calibrate model results for the second full-scale crash test. This combination of heuristic and quantitative methods was used to identify modeling deficiencies, evaluate parameter importance, and propose required model changes. It is shown that the multi-dimensional calibration techniques presented here are particularly effective in identifying model adequacy. Acceleration results for the calibrated model were compared to test results and the original model results. There was a noticeable improvement in the pilot and co-pilot region, a slight improvement in the occupant model response, and an over-stiffening effect in the passenger region. This approach should be adopted early on, in combination with the building-block approaches that are customarily used, for model development and test planning guidance. Complete crash simulations with validated finite element models can be used

  13. Modeling and Prediction of Krueger Device Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yueping; Burley, Casey L.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a noise prediction model for aircraft Krueger flap devices that are considered as alternatives to leading edge slotted slats. The prediction model decomposes the total Krueger noise into four components, generated by the unsteady flows, respectively, in the cove under the pressure side surface of the Krueger, in the gap between the Krueger trailing edge and the main wing, around the brackets supporting the Krueger device, and around the cavity on the lower side of the main wing. For each noise component, the modeling follows a physics-based approach that aims at capturing the dominant noise-generating features in the flow and developing correlations between the noise and the flow parameters that control the noise generation processes. The far field noise is modeled using each of the four noise component's respective spectral functions, far field directivities, Mach number dependencies, component amplitudes, and other parametric trends. Preliminary validations are carried out by using small scale experimental data, and two applications are discussed; one for conventional aircraft and the other for advanced configurations. The former focuses on the parametric trends of Krueger noise on design parameters, while the latter reveals its importance in relation to other airframe noise components.

  14. Development and Calibration of a System-Integrated Rotorcraft Finite Element Model for Impact Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin S.; Horta, Lucas G.; Jackson, Karen E.; Polanco, Michael A.; Littell, Justin D.

    2012-01-01

    Two full-scale crash tests of an MD-500 helicopter were conducted in 2009 and 2010 at NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Research Facility in support of NASA s Subsonic Rotary Wing Crashworthiness Project. The first crash test was conducted to evaluate the performance of an externally mounted composite deployable energy absorber (DEA) under combined impact conditions. In the second crash test, the energy absorber was removed to establish baseline loads that are regarded as severe but survivable. The presence of this energy absorbing device reduced the peak impact acceleration levels by a factor of three. Accelerations and kinematic data collected from the crash tests were compared to a system-integrated finite element model of the test article developed in parallel with the test program. In preparation for the full-scale crash test, a series of sub-scale and MD-500 mass simulator tests were conducted to evaluate the impact performances of various components and subsystems, including new crush tubes and the DEA blocks. Parameters defined for the system-integrated finite element model were determined from these tests. Results from 19 accelerometers placed throughout the airframe were compared to finite element model responses. The model developed for the purposes of predicting acceleration responses from the first crash test was inadequate when evaluating more severe conditions seen in the second crash test. A newly developed model calibration approach that includes uncertainty estimation, parameter sensitivity, impact shape orthogonality, and numerical optimization was used to calibrate model results for the full-scale crash test without the DEA. This combination of heuristic and quantitative methods identified modeling deficiencies, evaluated parameter importance, and proposed required model changes. The multidimensional calibration techniques presented here are particularly effective in identifying model adequacy. Acceleration results for the calibrated model were

  15. Finite element model reduction application to parametric studies and optimization of rotorcraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi-Kia, M.; Toossi, M.

    1990-01-01

    As a result of this work, a reduction procedure has been developed which can be applied to large finite element model of airframe type structures. This procedure, which is tailored to be used with MSC/NASTRAN finite element code, is applied to the full airframe dynamic finite element model of AH-64A Attack Helicopter. The applicability of the resulting reduced model to parametric and optimization studies is examined. Through application of the design sensitivity analysis, the viability and efficiency of this reduction technique has been demonstrated in a vibration reduction study.

  16. Enhanced Core Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James R.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Clark, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes work performed by MTC Technologies (MTCT) for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 15. MTCT previously developed a first-generation empirical model that correlates the core/combustion noise of four GE engines, the CF6, CF34, CFM56, and GE90 for General Electric (GE) under Contract No. 200-1X-14W53048, in support of GRC Contract NAS3-01135. MTCT has demonstrated in earlier noise modeling efforts that the improvement of predictive modeling is greatly enhanced by an iterative approach, so in support of NASA's Quiet Aircraft Technology Project, GRC sponsored this effort to improve the model. Since the noise data available for correlation are total engine noise spectra, it is total engine noise that must be predicted. Since the scope of this effort was not sufficient to explore fan and turbine noise, the most meaningful comparisons must be restricted to frequencies below the blade passage frequency. Below the blade passage frequency and at relatively high power settings jet noise is expected to be the dominant source, and comparisons are shown that demonstrate the accuracy of the jet noise model recently developed by MTCT for NASA under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 10. At lower power settings the core noise became most apparent, and these data corrected for the contribution of jet noise were then used to establish the characteristics of core noise. There is clearly more than one spectral range where core noise is evident, so the spectral approach developed by von Glahn and Krejsa in 1982 wherein four spectral regions overlap, was used in the GE effort. Further analysis indicates that the two higher frequency components, which are often somewhat masked by turbomachinery noise, can be treated as one component, and it is on that basis that the current model is formulated. The frequency scaling relationships are improved and are now based on combustor and core nozzle geometries. In conjunction with the Task

  17. Computation of Rotorcraft Wake Geometry using NURBS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hoydonck, W.R.M.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis contains the results of research in the area of rotorcraft aerodynamics with a focus on method development related to the vortical wake generated by rotor blades. It is applied to a vortex tube representation of the wake (using a single NURBS surface) and a simplified filament wake model

  18. Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Gregory F.; Bossler, Robert B., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed by the McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Company and Lucas Western, Inc. within the U.S. Army/NASA Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) Program is summarized. The design of a 5000 horsepower transmission for a next generation advanced attack helicopter is described. Government goals for the program were to define technology and detail design the ART to meet, as a minimum, a weight reduction of 25 percent, an internal noise reduction of 10 dB plus a mean-time-between-removal (MTBR) of 5000 hours compared to a state-of-the-art baseline transmission. The split-torque transmission developed using face gears achieved a 40 percent weight reduction, a 9.6 dB noise reduction and a 5270 hour MTBR in meeting or exceeding the above goals. Aircraft mission performance and cost improvements resulting from installation of the ART would include a 17 to 22 percent improvement in loss-exchange ratio during combat, a 22 percent improvement in mean-time-between-failure, a transmission acquisition cost savings of 23 percent of $165K, per unit, and an average transmission direct operating cost savings of 33 percent, or $24K per flight hour. Face gear tests performed successfully at NASA Lewis are summarized. Also, program results of advanced material tooth scoring tests, single tooth bending tests, Charpy impact energy tests, compact tension fracture toughness tests and tensile strength tests are summarized.

  19. Electronic noise modeling in statistical iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingyan; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2009-06-01

    We consider electronic noise modeling in tomographic image reconstruction when the measured signal is the sum of a Gaussian distributed electronic noise component and another random variable whose log-likelihood function satisfies a certain linearity condition. Examples of such likelihood functions include the Poisson distribution and an exponential dispersion (ED) model that can approximate the signal statistics in integration mode X-ray detectors. We formulate the image reconstruction problem as a maximum-likelihood estimation problem. Using an expectation-maximization approach, we demonstrate that a reconstruction algorithm can be obtained following a simple substitution rule from the one previously derived without electronic noise considerations. To illustrate the applicability of the substitution rule, we present examples of a fully iterative reconstruction algorithm and a sinogram smoothing algorithm both in transmission CT reconstruction when the measured signal contains additive electronic noise. Our simulation studies show the potential usefulness of accurate electronic noise modeling in low-dose CT applications.

  20. Mathematical modeling of complex noise barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayek, S.I.

    1982-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of the noise reduction efficiency of highway noise barriers depends on the shape and absorptivity of the barrier, the influence of the impedance of the ground under the receiver, the atmospheric conditions as well as traffic details. The mathematical model for a barrier's noise reduction requires the knowledge of point-to-point acoustic diffraction models. In many instances, the shape of the barrier is simple; such as thin wall (edge), sharp wedge, and cylindrically topped berms. However, new designs of more efficient barriers have been investigated recently.

  1. Urban Noise Modelling in Boka Kotorska Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Nikolić

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Traffic is the most significant noise source in urban areas. The village of Kamenari in Boka Kotorska Bay is a site where, in a relatively small area, road traffic and sea (ferry traffic take place at the same time. Due to the specificity of the location, i.e. very rare synergy of sound effects of road and sea traffic in the urban area, as well as the expressed need for assessment of noise level in a simple and quick way, a research was conducted, using empirical methods and statistical analysis methods, which led to the creation of acoustic model for the assessment of equivalent noise level (Leq. The developed model for noise assessment in the Village of Kamenari in Boka Kotorska Bay quite realistically provides data on possible noise levels at the observed site, with very little deviations in relation to empirically obtained values.

  2. Noise Residual Learning for Noise Modeling in Distributed Video Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luong, Huynh Van; Forchhammer, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Distributed video coding (DVC) is a coding paradigm which exploits the source statistics at the decoder side to reduce the complexity at the encoder. The noise model is one of the inherently difficult challenges in DVC. This paper considers Transform Domain Wyner-Ziv (TDWZ) coding and proposes...... decoding. A residual refinement step is also introduced to take advantage of correlation of DCT coefficients. Experimental results show that the proposed techniques robustly improve the coding efficiency of TDWZ DVC and for GOP=2 bit-rate savings up to 35% on WZ frames are achieved compared with DISCOVER....

  3. Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission program - A status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Raymond J.; Lenski, Joseph W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The work being conducted under the first phase of the joint Army/NASA Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission program is reviewed. The work includes the selection of the Tactical Tilt Rotor (TTR) system and the development plans for assessing advanced component technologies. The TTR drive-system arrangement is outlined, and the comparisons and trade studies of self-aligning bearingless planetary, split torque, and conventional single-stage planetary configurations are presented. The effects of transmission improvements are evaluated, and component development testing is discussed, including noise reduction by active force cancellation, hybrid bidirectional tapered roller bearings, and precision net forged spur gears.

  4. Three-Dimensional Ocean Noise Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    particular attention paid to the case of Gaussian canyon . The solution to the three-dimensional wave equation in Cartesian co-ordinates can be written...in terms of a modal decomposition, carried out in the vertical and across- canyon horizontal directions. Work Completed 1. Nx2D and 3D Noise PE...azimuth in the Hudson Canyon [Figure 2). Additionally, the PE-reciprocity noise model was used to estimate the size, speed and distance from the

  5. Modeling aircraft noise induced sleep disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Sarah M.

    One of the primary impacts of aircraft noise on a community is its disruption of sleep. Aircraft noise increases the time to fall asleep, the number of awakenings, and decreases the amount of rapid eye movement and slow wave sleep. Understanding these changes in sleep may be important as they could increase the risk for developing next-day effects such as sleepiness and reduced performance and long-term health effects such as cardiovascular disease. There are models that have been developed to predict the effect of aircraft noise on sleep. However, most of these models only predict the percentage of the population that is awakened. Markov and nonlinear dynamic models have been developed to predict an individual's sleep structure during the night. However, both of these models have limitations. The Markov model only accounts for whether an aircraft event occurred not the noise level or other sound characteristics of the event that may affect the degree of disturbance. The nonlinear dynamic models were developed to describe normal sleep regulation and do not have a noise effects component. In addition, the nonlinear dynamic models have slow dynamics which make it difficult to predict short duration awakenings which occur both spontaneously and as a result of nighttime noise exposure. The purpose of this research was to examine these sleep structure models to determine how they could be altered to predict the effect of aircraft noise on sleep. Different approaches for adding a noise level dependence to the Markov Model was explored and the modified model was validated by comparing predictions to behavioral awakening data. In order to determine how to add faster dynamics to the nonlinear dynamic sleep models it was necessary to have a more detailed sleep stage classification than was available from visual scoring of sleep data. An automatic sleep stage classification algorithm was developed which extracts different features of polysomnography data including the

  6. Underwater Noise Modelling of Wave Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    Future large-scale implementation of wave energy converts (WECs) will introduce an anthropogenic activity in the ocean which may contribute to underwater noise. The Ocean houses several marine species with acoustic sensibility; consequently the potential impact of the underwater noise needs to be addressed. At present, there are no acoustic impact studies based on acquired data. The WEAM project (Wave Energy Acoustic Monitoring) aims at developing an underwater noise monitoring plan for WECs. The development of an acoustic monitoring plan must consider the sound propagation in the ocean, identify noise sources, understand the operational characteristics and select adequate instrumentation. Any monitoring strategy must involve in-situ measurements. However, the vast distances which sound travels within the ocean, can make in-situ measurements covering the entire area of interest, impracticable. This difficulty can be partially overcome through acoustic numerical modelling. This paper presents a synthetic study, on the application of acoustic forward modelling and the evaluation of the impact of noise produced by wave energy devices on marine mammals using criteria based on audiograms of dolphins, or other species. The idea is to illustrate the application of that methodology, and to show to what extent it allows for estimating distances of impacts due to acoustic noise.

  7. Improved Trailing Edge Noise Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    2012-01-01

    The modeling of the surface pressure spectrum under a turbulent boundary layer is investigated in the presence of an adverse pressure gradient along the flow direction. It is shown that discrepancies between measurements and results from a well-known model increase as the pressure gradient...... increases. This model is modified by introducing anisotropy in the definition of the vertical velocity component spectrum across the boundary layer. The degree of anisotropy is directly related to the strength of the pressure gradient. It is shown that by appropriately normalizing the pressure gradient...... and by tuning the anisotropy factor, experimental results can be closely reproduced by the modified model. In this section, the original TNO-Blake model is modified in order to account for the effects of a pressure gradient through turbulence anisotropy. The model results are compared with measurements...

  8. Advanced Phase noise modeling techniques of nonlinear microwave devices

    OpenAIRE

    Prigent, M.; J. C. Nallatamby; R. Quere

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present a coherent set of tools allowing an accurate and predictive design of low phase noise oscillators. Advanced phase noise modelling techniques in non linear microwave devices must be supported by a proven combination of the following : - Electrical modeling of low-frequency noise of semiconductor devices, oriented to circuit CAD . The local noise sources will be either cyclostationary noise sources or quasistationary noise sources. - Theoretic...

  9. Noise, sleep and poor health: Modeling the relationship between road traffic noise and cardiovascular problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyhri, Aslak; Aasvang, Gunn Marit

    2010-10-01

    Several adverse effects have been associated with exposure to traffic noise. Studies supporting a noise-stress-health model have suggested links between noise level and increased noradrenalin concentrations in urine, hypertension and myocardial infarction. Among the more commonly documented effects, sleep disturbances have been regarded as being the most serious. Both noise annoyance and sleep disturbance have been proposed as important mediators of the impact of noise on health. The present paper investigates the relationships among long-term noise exposure, annoyance, sleeping problems and subjective health complaints by the use of a structural equation model. Further, it aims at giving insight into how noise sensitivity is related to sleep disturbances from road traffic noise. Finally, it examines whether any effect of noise exposure or response to noise can be detected on prevalence of cardiovascular problems, when information on sleep disturbances is included in a model. Data from a questionnaire survey conducted among a population sample in Oslo (N=2786) are combined with nighttime noise levels calculated from outside each respondents dwelling, at the bedroom façade. The results of the analysis showed significant relationships between noise annoyance at night and sleeping problems. The model also showed strong links among pseudoneurological complaints, annoyance and sleeping problems, thus pointing to the importance of including information on psychosomatic disorders and mild psychological problems in future studies looking at potential health effects of noise. The analysis showed no relationship between neither noise exposure nor response to noise and cardiovascular problems.

  10. Dichotomous noise models of gene switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potoyan, Davit A., E-mail: potoyan@rice.edu; Wolynes, Peter G., E-mail: pwolynes@rice.edu [Department of Chemistry and Center for Theoretical Biological Physics, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2015-11-21

    Molecular noise in gene regulatory networks has two intrinsic components, one part being due to fluctuations caused by the birth and death of protein or mRNA molecules which are often present in small numbers and the other part arising from gene state switching, a single molecule event. Stochastic dynamics of gene regulatory circuits appears to be largely responsible for bifurcations into a set of multi-attractor states that encode different cell phenotypes. The interplay of dichotomous single molecule gene noise with the nonlinear architecture of genetic networks generates rich and complex phenomena. In this paper, we elaborate on an approximate framework that leads to simple hybrid multi-scale schemes well suited for the quantitative exploration of the steady state properties of large-scale cellular genetic circuits. Through a path sum based analysis of trajectory statistics, we elucidate the connection of these hybrid schemes to the underlying master equation and provide a rigorous justification for using dichotomous noise based models to study genetic networks. Numerical simulations of circuit models reveal that the contribution of the genetic noise of single molecule origin to the total noise is significant for a wide range of kinetic regimes.

  11. Dichotomous noise models of gene switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potoyan, Davit. A.; Wolynes, Peter. G.

    2015-11-01

    Molecular noise in gene regulatory networks has two intrinsic components, one part being due to fluctuations caused by the birth and death of protein or mRNA molecules which are often present in small numbers and the other part arising from gene state switching, a single molecule event. Stochastic dynamics of gene regulatory circuits appears to be largely responsible for bifurcations into a set of multi-attractor states that encode different cell phenotypes. The interplay of dichotomous single molecule gene noise with the nonlinear architecture of genetic networks generates rich and complex phenomena. In this paper, we elaborate on an approximate framework that leads to simple hybrid multi-scale schemes well suited for the quantitative exploration of the steady state properties of large-scale cellular genetic circuits. Through a path sum based analysis of trajectory statistics, we elucidate the connection of these hybrid schemes to the underlying master equation and provide a rigorous justification for using dichotomous noise based models to study genetic networks. Numerical simulations of circuit models reveal that the contribution of the genetic noise of single molecule origin to the total noise is significant for a wide range of kinetic regimes.

  12. Aerodynamic Noise Prediction Using stochastic Turbulence Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Ahmadzadegan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Amongst many approaches to determine the sound propagated from turbulent flows, hybrid methods, in which the turbulent noise source field is computed or modeled separately from the far field calculation, are frequently used. For basic estimation of sound propagation, less computationally intensive methods can be developed using stochastic models of the turbulent fluctuations (turbulent noise source field. A simple and easy to use stochastic model for generating turbulent velocity fluctuations called continuous filter white noise (CFWN model was used. This method based on the use of classical Langevian-equation to model the details of fluctuating field superimposed on averaged computed quantities. The resulting sound field due to the generated unsteady flow field was evaluated using Lighthill's acoustic analogy. Volume integral method used for evaluating the acoustic analogy. This formulation presents an advantage, as it confers the possibility to determine separately the contribution of the different integral terms and also integration regions to the radiated acoustic pressure. Our results validated by comparing the directivity and the overall sound pressure level (OSPL magnitudes with the available experimental results. Numerical results showed reasonable agreement with the experiments, both in maximum directivity and magnitude of the OSPL. This method presents a very suitable tool for the noise calculation of different engineering problems in early stages of the design process where rough estimates using cheaper methods are needed for different geometries.

  13. A Review Paper : Noise Models in Digital Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Boyat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Noise is always presents in digital images during image acquisition, coding, transmission, and processing steps. Noise is very difficult to remove it from the digital images without the prior knowledge of noise model. That is why, review of noise models are essential in the study of image denoising techniques. In this paper, we express a brief overview of various noise models. These noise models can be selected by analysis of their origin. In this way, we present a complete and quantitative analysis of noise models available in digital images.

  14. Current Research Activities in Drive System Technology in Support of the NASA Rotorcraft Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    2006-01-01

    Drive system technology is a key area for improving rotorcraft performance, noise/vibration reduction, and reducing operational and manufacturing costs. An overview of current research areas that support the NASA Rotorcraft Program will be provided. Work in drive system technology is mainly focused within three research areas: advanced components, thermal behavior/emergency lubrication system operation, and diagnostics/prognostics (also known as Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS)). Current research activities in each of these activities will be presented. Also, an overview of the conceptual drive system requirements and possible arrangements for the Heavy Lift Rotorcraft program will be reviewed.

  15. Nonlinear GARCH model and 1 / f noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononovicius, A.; Ruseckas, J.

    2015-06-01

    Auto-regressive conditionally heteroskedastic (ARCH) family models are still used, by practitioners in business and economic policy making, as a conditional volatility forecasting models. Furthermore ARCH models still are attracting an interest of the researchers. In this contribution we consider the well known GARCH(1,1) process and its nonlinear modifications, reminiscent of NGARCH model. We investigate the possibility to reproduce power law statistics, probability density function and power spectral density, using ARCH family models. For this purpose we derive stochastic differential equations from the GARCH processes in consideration. We find the obtained equations to be similar to a general class of stochastic differential equations known to reproduce power law statistics. We show that linear GARCH(1,1) process has power law distribution, but its power spectral density is Brownian noise-like. However, the nonlinear modifications exhibit both power law distribution and power spectral density of the 1 /fβ form, including 1 / f noise.

  16. Modelling of Train Noise in Underground Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J.

    1996-08-01

    TNS, a computer model for predicting the temporal and spatial distribution of train noise in underground stations, is developed. The train is regarded as a series of sections, and the train noise distribution in a station is calculated by inputting the sound attenuation from a train section source in the underground system (i.e., the station and tunnel). This input can be obtained by physical scale modelling. The prediction by TNS in an underground station in London shows good agreement with site measurements. A series of computations in the station demonstrates that: (1) the overall level of the train noise in the area near the end walls is slightly less than the other areas; (2) some conventional architectural acoustic treatments in the station are effective when a train is still in the tunnel but not as helpful when the train is already in the station; and (3) train noise has a significant effect on the speech intelligibility of public address systems as measured by the Speech Transmission Index (STI).

  17. Noise modeling for MOAs and ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Michael J.; Lee, Robert A.

    Whenever there is a reallocation of DOD fixed- or rotary-wing aircraft or a change in the use of the airspace requirements, either an Environmental Assessment or an Environmental Impact Statement must be prepared. These environmental studies require an analysis of the noise impacts resulting from aircraft operations surrounding the airports and under Military Training Routes (MTR's), Military Operating Areas (MOA's), and Ranges. NOISEMAP and ROUTEMAP were developed for the purpose of estimating the noise levels around military airports and under MTR's. Neither of these programs is suitable for estimating noise levels under MOA's or Ranges. MR NMAP is a PC-based computer model that has been developed to calculate the noise levels under MOA's and ranges. The program calculates L(sub dn), CNEL, L(sub eq), SEL, L(sub max), and where appropriate L(sub dnmr). The program output is a tabular form or in graphics suitable for inclusion in reports. The computer program is designed for use by environmental planning personnel who are familiar with MOA and range operations and with noise, but are not necessarily expert. The program will be widely distributed to DOD planners and contractors that have a requirement to make noise estimates. A companion graphical user interface (GUI) computer program called MR OPS has been developed that allows the user to draw the airspace, specify areas of high/medium/low activity, and draw the specific flight tracks for bombing runs and military training routes. MR OPS writes an ASCII file that is read by MR NMAP. Contained in this ASCII file is the operation data and keywords that control the computational features in MR NMAP. MR NMAP is written in FORTRAN; executable versions are available under DOS, Windows, and Windows NT. MR OPS is written in the C programming language and will run under Windows and Windows NT.

  18. A Goldilocks principle for modeling radial velocity noise

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Fabo; Jones, H R A; Butler, R P; Vogt, S

    2016-01-01

    The doppler measurements of stars are diluted and distorted by stellar activity noise. Different choices of noise models and statistical methods have led to much controversy in the confirmation of exoplanet candidates obtained through analysing radial velocity data. To quantify the limitation of various models and methods, we compare different noise models and signal detection criteria for various simulated and real data sets in the Bayesian framework. According to our analyses, the white noise model tend to interpret noise as signal, leading to false positives. On the other hand, the red noise models are likely to interprete signal as noise, resulting in false negatives. We find that the Bayesian information criterion combined with a Bayes factor threshold of 150 can efficiently rule out false positives and confirm true detections. We further propose a Goldilocks principle aimed at modeling radial velocity noise to avoid too many false positives and too many false negatives. We propose that the noise model w...

  19. Tunable Interior Rotorcraft Noise Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CRG has recently developed a new class of shape memory polymers (SMP) that are electrically activated, as opposed to the more mature thermally activated SMPs....

  20. Tunable Interior Rotorcraft Noise Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CRG has recently developed a new class of shape memory polymers (SMP) that are electrically activated, as opposed to the more mature thermally activated SMPs....

  1. A measurement model for general noise reaction in response to aircraft noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroesen, M.; Schreckenberg, D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a measurement model for general noise reaction (GNR) in response to aircraft noise is developed to assess the performance of aircraft noise annoyance and a direct measure of general reaction as indicators of this concept. For this purpose GNR is conceptualized as a superordinate latent

  2. NDARC NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft Theory Appendix 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft (NDARC) software is an aircraft system analysis tool that supports both conceptual design efforts and technology impact assessments. The principal tasks are to design (or size) a rotorcraft to meet specified requirements, including vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) operation, and then analyze the performance of the aircraft for a set of conditions. For broad and lasting utility, it is important that the code have the capability to model general rotorcraft configurations, and estimate the performance and weights of advanced rotor concepts. The architecture of the NDARC code accommodates configuration flexibility, a hierarchy of models, and ultimately multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization. Initially the software is implemented with low-fidelity models, typically appropriate for the conceptual design environment. An NDARC job consists of one or more cases, each case optionally performing design and analysis tasks. The design task involves sizing the rotorcraft to satisfy specified design conditions and missions. The analysis tasks can include off-design mission performance calculation, flight performance calculation for point operating conditions, and generation of subsystem or component performance maps. For analysis tasks, the aircraft description can come from the sizing task, from a previous case or a previous NDARC job, or be independently generated (typically the description of an existing aircraft). The aircraft consists of a set of components, including fuselage, rotors, wings, tails, and propulsion. For each component, attributes such as performance, drag, and weight can be calculated; and the aircraft attributes are obtained from the sum of the component attributes. Description and analysis of conventional rotorcraft configurations is facilitated, while retaining the capability to model novel and advanced concepts. Specific rotorcraft configurations considered are single-main-rotor and tail

  3. NDARC NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft - Input, Appendix 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft (NDARC) software is an aircraft system analysis tool that supports both conceptual design efforts and technology impact assessments. The principal tasks are to design (or size) a rotorcraft to meet specified requirements, including vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) operation, and then analyze the performance of the aircraft for a set of conditions. For broad and lasting utility, it is important that the code have the capability to model general rotorcraft configurations, and estimate the performance and weights of advanced rotor concepts. The architecture of the NDARC code accommodates configuration exibility, a hierarchy of models, and ultimately multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization. Initially the software is implemented with low-fidelity models, typically appropriate for the conceptual design environment. An NDARC job consists of one or more cases, each case optionally performing design and analysis tasks. The design task involves sizing the rotorcraft to satisfy specified design conditions and missions. The analysis tasks can include off-design mission performance calculation, flight performance calculation for point operating conditions, and generation of subsystem or component performance maps. For analysis tasks, the aircraft description can come from the sizing task, from a previous case or a previous NDARC job, or be independently generated (typically the description of an existing aircraft). The aircraft consists of a set of components, including fuselage, rotors, wings, tails, and propulsion. For each component, attributes such as performance, drag, and weight can be calculated; and the aircraft attributes are obtained from the sum of the component attributes. Description and analysis of conventional rotorcraft configurations is facilitated, while retaining the capability to model novel and advanced concepts. Specific rotorcraft configurations considered are single-main-rotor and tail

  4. Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Jules

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the work accomplished to date on the NASA/Army Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program. A 23-percent weight reduction has been demonstrated for a high output reduction ratio split path transmission compared to an aggressive program goal of 25-percent. Greater than 10 dB noise reduction in the cabin is achieved by the use of high contact ratio spur and double helical gears. In addition, mean times between transmission removals have been increased by almost four fold. These performance gains have been achieved by application of advanced transmission technology concepts. Technology areas are being explored which offer high gain but at relatively high risk in such areas as composites, split power gear concepts, double helical gears, new gear materials, high speed spring clutches, and ceramic rolling element bearings.

  5. Modelling coloured residual noise in gravitational-wave signal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roever, Christian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut) and Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Meyer, Renate [Department of Statistics, University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Christensen, Nelson, E-mail: christian.roever@aei.mpg.de [Physics and Astronomy, Carleton College, Northfield, MN (United States)

    2011-01-07

    We introduce a signal processing model for signals in non-white noise, where the exact noise spectrum is a priori unknown. The model is based on a Student's t distribution and constitutes a natural generalization of the widely used normal (Gaussian) model. This way, it allows for uncertainty in the noise spectrum, or more generally is also able to accommodate outliers (heavy-tailed noise) in the data. Examples are given pertaining to data from gravitational-wave detectors.

  6. Transitions in a Logistic Growth Model Induced by Noise Coupling and Noise Color

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jin; ZHU Shi-Qun

    2006-01-01

    With unified colored noise approximation, the logistic growth model is used to analyze cancer cell population when colored noise is included. It is found that both the coupling between noise terms and the noise color can induce continuous first-order-like and re-entrance-like phase transitions in the system. The coupling and the noise color can also increase tumor cell growth for small number of cell mass and repress tumor cell growth for large number of cell mass. It is shown that the approximate analytic expressions are consistent with the numerical simulations.

  7. Rotorcraft and Enabling Robotic Rescue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines some of the issues underlying potential robotic rescue devices (RRD) in the context where autonomous or manned rotorcraft deployment of such robotic systems is a crucial attribute for their success in supporting future disaster relief and emergency response (DRER) missions. As a part of this discussion, work related to proof-of-concept prototyping of two notional RRD systems is summarized.

  8. Trailing edge noise model applied to wind turbine airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    The aim of this work is firstly to provide a quick introduction to the theory of noise generation that are relevant to wind turbine technology with focus on trailing edge noise. Secondly, the socalled TNO trailing edge noise model developed by Parchen [1] is described in more details. The model...

  9. Handling Qualities Optimization for Rotorcraft Conceptual Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Ben; Theodore, Colin R.; Berger, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, NASA, under a succession of rotary-wing programs has been moving towards coupling multiple discipline analyses in a rigorous consistent manner to evaluate rotorcraft conceptual designs. Handling qualities is one of the component analyses to be included in a future NASA Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization framework for conceptual design of VTOL aircraft. Similarly, the future vision for the capability of the Concept Design and Assessment Technology Area (CD&A-TA) of the U.S Army Aviation Development Directorate also includes a handling qualities component. SIMPLI-FLYD is a tool jointly developed by NASA and the U.S. Army to perform modeling and analysis for the assessment of flight dynamics and control aspects of the handling qualities of rotorcraft conceptual designs. An exploration of handling qualities analysis has been carried out using SIMPLI-FLYD in illustrative scenarios of a tiltrotor in forward flight and single-main rotor helicopter at hover. Using SIMPLI-FLYD and the conceptual design tool NDARC integrated into a single process, the effects of variations of design parameters such as tail or rotor size were evaluated in the form of margins to fixed- and rotary-wing handling qualities metrics as well as the vehicle empty weight. The handling qualities design margins are shown to vary across the flight envelope due to both changing flight dynamic and control characteristics and changing handling qualities specification requirements. The current SIMPLI-FLYD capability and future developments are discussed in the context of an overall rotorcraft conceptual design process.

  10. Noise optimization of the source follower of a CMOS pixel using BSIM3 noise model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Swaraj; Meynants, Guy; Raskin, Gert; De Ridder, J.; Van Winckel, H.

    2016-07-01

    CMOS imagers are becoming increasingly popular in astronomy. A very low noise level is required to observe extremely faint targets and to get high-precision flux measurements. Although CMOS technology offers many advantages over CCDs, a major bottleneck is still the read noise. To move from an industrial CMOS sensor to one suitable for scientific applications, an improved design that optimizes the noise level is essential. Here, we study the 1/f and thermal noise performance of the source follower (SF) of a CMOS pixel in detail. We identify the relevant design parameters, and analytically study their impact on the noise level using the BSIM3v3 noise model with an enhanced model of gate capacitance. Our detailed analysis shows that the dependence of the 1/f noise on the geometrical size of the source follower is not limited to minimum channel length, compared to the classical approach to achieve the minimum 1/f noise. We derive the optimal gate dimensions (the width and the length) of the source follower that minimize the 1/f noise, and validate our results using numerical simulations. By considering the thermal noise or white noise along with 1/f noise, the total input noise of the source follower depends on the capacitor ratio CG/CFD and the drain current (Id). Here, CG is the total gate capacitance of the source follower and CFD is the total floating diffusion capacitor at the input of the source follower. We demonstrate that the optimum gate capacitance (CG) depends on the chosen bias current but ranges from CFD/3 to CFD to achieve the minimum total noise of the source follower. Numerical calculation and circuit simulation with 180nm CMOS technology are performed to validate our results.

  11. An Adaptive Altitude Information Fusion Method for Autonomous Landing Processes of Small Unmanned Aerial Rotorcraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xusheng Lei

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an adaptive information fusion method to improve the accuracy and reliability of the altitude measurement information for small unmanned aerial rotorcraft during the landing process. Focusing on the low measurement performance of sensors mounted on small unmanned aerial rotorcraft, a wavelet filter is applied as a pre-filter to attenuate the high frequency noises in the sensor output. Furthermore, to improve altitude information, an adaptive extended Kalman filter based on a maximum a posteriori criterion is proposed to estimate measurement noise covariance matrix in real time. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is proved by static tests, hovering flight and autonomous landing flight tests.

  12. Incorporating Handling Qualities Analysis into Rotorcraft Conceptual Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Ben

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the initial development of a framework to incorporate handling qualities analyses into a rotorcraft conceptual design process. In particular, the paper describes how rotorcraft conceptual design level data can be used to generate flight dynamics models for handling qualities analyses. Also, methods are described that couple a basic stability augmentation system to the rotorcraft flight dynamics model to extend analysis to beyond that of the bare airframe. A methodology for calculating the handling qualities characteristics of the flight dynamics models and for comparing the results to ADS-33E criteria is described. Preliminary results from the application of the handling qualities analysis for variations in key rotorcraft design parameters of main rotor radius, blade chord, hub stiffness and flap moment of inertia are shown. Varying relationships, with counteracting trends for different handling qualities criteria and different flight speeds are exhibited, with the action of the control system playing a complex part in the outcomes. Overall, the paper demonstrates how a broad array of technical issues across flight dynamics stability and control, simulation and modeling, control law design and handling qualities testing and evaluation had to be confronted to implement even a moderately comprehensive handling qualities analysis of relatively low fidelity models. A key outstanding issue is to how to 'close the loop' with an overall design process, and options for the exploration of how to feedback handling qualities results to a conceptual design process are proposed for future work.

  13. Frequency Domain Identification Model's Parameter Perturbation Analysis for an Unmanned Rotorcraft%无人直升机频域辨识模型参数摄动分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏慧; 陈庆伟; 王冠林; 朱纪洪

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a model perturbation analysis method based on frequency domain identification for aircraft. Hie model parameter perturbation estimation algorithm was analyzed and proved through the combination of Cramer-Rao Theorem and frequency domain identification. In the meanwhile, the model structure was refined by related indexes, which solved the model order-selecting problem. The model can describe system more precisely through perturbation analysis and model structure refine. The yaw channel frequency domain identification model's parameter perturbation was analyzed for a small-scale unmanned rotorcraft. The comparison of theoretical analysis and the statistical result showed that the effect of theoretical method is consistent with that of experimental method, and the time domain verification showed the model perturbation analysis method is feasible and effective.%提出了一种基于飞行器频城辩识模型的模型参数摄动分析方法.该方法通过将克莱姆-拉奥定理与频域辩识方法相结合对辨识模型参数的摄动范围估计算法进行了分析及证明.同时运用摄动范围计算过程中的相关指标对模型结构进行了优化,解决了飞行器模型辨识过程中模型阶次较难确定的问题.通过时辨识模型的摄动分析及模型结构优化使得模型能更准确地对系统进行描述.根据一种小型无人直升机悬停状态下的偏航通道飞行实验数据,利用该方法对其频域辨识模型参数撮动进行了分析并对其模型结构进行了优化,理论分析结果与统计结果的比较表明理论与实验方法效果一致,模型时域预测输出与实际输出的比较验证了摄动分析方法的可行性及有效性.

  14. System Identification Modeling of Rotorcraft Flight Mechanics%旋翼飞行器飞行动力学系统辨识建模算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋彦国; 孙涛

    2011-01-01

    描述了旋翼飞行器飞行力学模型的系统辨识建模算法,从旋翼飞行器飞行动力学建模的共性问题入手,首先采用机理建模的方法分析了旋翼飞行嚣主要气动部件所受气动力.考虑旋翼挥舞运动对旋翼飞行器飞行动力学特性的影响,建立了旋翼飞行器的飞行力学系统辨识参数化模型集.其次以子空间方法辨识初始飞行动力学模型,采用加权频域预报误差法获得最优模型的两步辨识方法解决旋翼飞行器这一非线性不稳定,多输入-多输出系统辨识问题,且所辨识模型与机理模型具有相同的结构.最后对样例直升机的悬停飞行状态模型辨识进行了数值与试飞试验验证,表明了方法的有效性.%Based on common characteristics of rotorcraft flight mechanics modeling, theories and algorithm of model identification are studied. Firstly, by using mechanism modeling method and considering blades flapping, the parameter identification model group is established. Secondly, in order to solve multi input and output system identification problems, a two step identification method is proposed. It identifies the initial model by subspace identification method and then the optimized model by frequency prediction error method. Finally, with this two-step identification method, the simulation and flight tests are conducted to identify the example helicopter flight mechanics model in the hover state. The result shows that the method is effective and accurate.

  15. Urban background noise mapping: the general model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, W.; Botteldooren, D.; Renterghem, T. van; Hornikx, M.; Forssen, J.; Salomons, E.; Ogren, M.

    2014-01-01

    Surveys show that inhabitants of dwellings exposed to high noise levels benefit from having access to a quiet side. However, current practice in noise prediction often underestimates the noise levels at a shielded façade. Multiple reflections between façades in street canyons and inner yards are com

  16. Correlated noise in a logistic growth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bao-Quan; Wang, Xian-Ju; Liu, Guo-Tao; Liu, Liang-Gang

    2003-02-01

    The logistic differential equation is used to analyze cancer cell population, in the presence of a correlated Gaussian white noise. We study the steady state properties of tumor cell growth and discuss the effects of the correlated noise. It is found that the degree of correlation of the noise can cause tumor cell extinction.

  17. Urban background noise mapping: the general model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, W.; Botteldooren, D.; Renterghem, T. van; Hornikx, M.; Forssen, J.; Salomons, E.; Ogren, M.

    2014-01-01

    Surveys show that inhabitants of dwellings exposed to high noise levels benefit from having access to a quiet side. However, current practice in noise prediction often underestimates the noise levels at a shielded façade. Multiple reflections between façades in street canyons and inner yards are com

  18. A noise generation and propagation model for large wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    2016-01-01

    A wind turbine noise calculation model is combined with a ray tracing method in order to estimate wind farm noise in its surrounding assuming an arbitrary topography. The wind turbine noise model is used to generate noise spectra for which each turbine is approximated as a point source. However......, the detailed three-dimensional directivity features are taken into account for the further calculation of noise propagation over the surrounding terrain. An arbitrary number of turbines constituting a wind farm can be spatially distributed. The noise from each individual turbine is propagated into the far......-field using the ray tracing method. These results are added up assuming the noise from each turbine is uncorrelated. The methodology permits to estimate a wind farm noise map over the surrounding terrain in a reasonable amount of computational time on a personal computer....

  19. Identifying confounders using additive noise models

    CERN Document Server

    Janzing, Dominik; Mooij, Joris; Schoelkopf, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    We propose a method for inferring the existence of a latent common cause ('confounder') of two observed random variables. The method assumes that the two effects of the confounder are (possibly nonlinear) functions of the confounder plus independent, additive noise. We discuss under which conditions the model is identifiable (up to an arbitrary reparameterization of the confounder) from the joint distribution of the effects. We state and prove a theoretical result that provides evidence for the conjecture that the model is generically identifiable under suitable technical conditions. In addition, we propose a practical method to estimate the confounder from a finite i.i.d. sample of the effects and illustrate that the method works well on both simulated and real-world data.

  20. A Goldilocks principle for modelling radial velocity noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, F.; Tuomi, M.; Jones, H. R. A.; Butler, R. P.; Vogt, S.

    2016-09-01

    The Doppler measurements of stars are diluted and distorted by stellar activity noise. Different choices of noise models and statistical methods have led to much controversy in the confirmation of exoplanet candidates obtained through analysing radial velocity data. To quantify the limitation of various models and methods, we compare different noise models and signal detection criteria for various simulated and real data sets in the Bayesian framework. According to our analyses, the white noise model tend to interpret noise as signal, leading to false positives. On the other hand, the red noise models are likely to interpret signal as noise, resulting in false negatives. We find that the Bayesian information criterion combined with a Bayes factor threshold of 150 can efficiently rule out false positives and confirm true detections. We further propose a Goldilocks principle aimed at modelling radial velocity noise to avoid too many false positives and too many false negatives. We propose that the noise model with RHK-dependent jitter is used in combination with the moving average model to detect planetary signals for M dwarfs. Our work may also shed light on the noise modelling for hotter stars, and provide a valid approach for finding similar principles in other disciplines.

  1. Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission program summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossler, Robert B., Jr.; Heath, Gregory F.

    1992-07-01

    The current status of the Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program is reviewed. The discussion includes a general configuration and face gear description, weight analysis, stress analysis, reliability analysis, acoustic analysis, face gear testing, and planned torque split testing. Design descriptions include the face gear webs sized for equal stiffness, a positive engagement clutch, the lubrication system, and a high contact ratio planetary. Test results for five gear materials and three housing materials are presented.

  2. Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  3. Sikorsky Aircraft Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Jules G.

    1993-03-01

    The objectives of the Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission program were to achieve a 25 percent weight reduction, a 10 dB noise reduction, and a 5,000 hour mean time between removals (MTBR). A three engine Army Cargo Aircraft (ACA) of 85,000 pounds gross weight was used as the baseline. Preliminary designs were conducted of split path and split torque transmissions to evaluate weight, reliability, and noise. A split path gearbox was determined to be 23 percent lighter, greater than 10 dB quieter, and almost four times more reliable than the baseline two stage planetary design. Detail design studies were conducted of the chosen split path configuration, and drawings were produced of a 1/2 size gearbox consisting of a single engine path of the split path section. Fabrication and testing was then conducted on the 1/2 size gearbox. The 1/2 size gearbox testing proved that the concept of the split path gearbox with high reduction ratio double helical output gear was sound. The improvements were attributed to extensive use of composites, spring clutches, advanced high hot hardness gear steels, the split path configuration itself, high reduction ratio, double helical gearing on the output stage, elastomeric load sharing devices, and elimination of accessory drives.

  4. Aftershocks in Coherent-Noise Models

    CERN Document Server

    Wilke, C; Martinetz, T

    1998-01-01

    The aftershock-distribution of the so-called 'coherent-noise' models (K. Sneppen, M. E. J. Newman, Physica D, in press) is studied in detail. Analytical and numerical results show that the distribution is a power-law with an exponent ranging from 0 to values well above 1. This is in contrast to Sneppen und Newman, who stated that the exponent is about 1, independent of the microscopic details of the simulation. Numerical simulations of an extended model (C. Wilke, T. Martinetz, Phys. Rev. E, in press) show that the power-law is only a generic feature of the original dynamics and does not necessarily appear in a more general context. Moreover, a rederivation of the master-equation for the model reveals a correting term that was not present in the previous works. This term does not affect the validity of the previous results, but has a measurable effect in the limit of a large mutation rate $f$. Finally, the implications of the results to the modeling of earthquakes are discussed.

  5. Improvement of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær;

    2016-01-01

    , Pope, and Marcolini airfoil noise prediction model developed by Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini (NASA Reference Publication 1218, 1989). It was found in previous study that the Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini model tends to over-predict noise at high frequencies. Furthermore, it was observed...... that this was caused by a lack in the model to predict accurately noise from blunt trailing edges. For more physical understanding of bluntness noise generation, in this study, we also use an advanced in-house developed high-order computational aero-acoustic technique to investigate the details associated...... with trailing edge bluntness noise. The results from the numerical model form the basis for an improved Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini trailing edge bluntness noise model....

  6. The IMAGINE source model for railway noise prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittrich, M.G.

    2007-01-01

    The IMAGINE railway traffic noise source model is described, which is a further elaboration and completion of the Harmonoise model. Within the EU project Harmonoise, a model was proposed including most of the main railway noise sources. In the IMAGINE project, complete formulation was put forward

  7. The IMAGINE source model for railway noise prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittrich, M.G.

    2007-01-01

    The IMAGINE railway traffic noise source model is described, which is a further elaboration and completion of the Harmonoise model. Within the EU project Harmonoise, a model was proposed including most of the main railway noise sources. In the IMAGINE project, complete formulation was put forward ta

  8. Noise optimization of the source follower of a CMOS pixel using BSIM3 noise model

    CERN Document Server

    Mahato, Swaraj; Raskin, Gert; De Ridder, J; Van Winckel, H

    2016-01-01

    CMOS imagers are becoming increasingly popular in astronomy. A very low noise level is required to observe extremely faint targets and to get high-precision flux measurements. Although CMOS technology offers many advantages over CCDs, a major bottleneck is still the read noise. To move from an industrial CMOS sensor to one suitable for scientific applications, an improved design that optimizes the noise level is essential. Here, we study the 1/f and thermal noise performance of the source follower (SF) of a CMOS pixel in detail. We identify the relevant design parameters, and analytically study their impact on the noise level using the BSIM3v3 noise model with an enhanced model of gate capacitance. Our detailed analysis shows that the dependence of the 1/f noise on the geometrical size of the source follower is not limited to minimum channel length, compared to the classical approach to achieve the minimum 1/f noise. We derive the optimal gate dimensions (the width and the length) of the source follower that ...

  9. Study on noise prediction model and control schemes for substation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuanmin; Gao, Yang; Liu, Songtao

    2014-01-01

    With the government's emphasis on environmental issues of power transmission and transformation project, noise pollution has become a prominent problem now. The noise from the working transformer, reactor, and other electrical equipment in the substation will bring negative effect to the ambient environment. This paper focuses on using acoustic software for the simulation and calculation method to control substation noise. According to the characteristics of the substation noise and the techniques of noise reduction, a substation's acoustic field model was established with the SoundPLAN software to predict the scope of substation noise. On this basis, 4 reasonable noise control schemes were advanced to provide some helpful references for noise control during the new substation's design and construction process. And the feasibility and application effect of these control schemes can be verified by using the method of simulation modeling. The simulation results show that the substation always has the problem of excessive noise at boundary under the conventional measures. The excess noise can be efficiently reduced by taking the corresponding noise reduction methods.

  10. Mechanisms and actuators for rotorcraft blade morphing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocke, Robert D., III

    The idea of improved fight performance through changes in the control surfaces dates back to the advent of aviation with the Wright brothers' pioneering work on "wing warping," but it was not until the recent progress in material and actuator development that such control surfaces seemed practical for modern aircraft. This has opened the door to a new class of aircraft that have the ability to change shape or morph, which are being investigated due to the potential to have a single platform serve multiple mission objectives, as well as improve performance characteristics. While the majority of existing research for morphing aircraft has focused on fixedwing aircraft, rotary-wing aircraft have begun to receive more attention. The purpose of this body of work is to investigate the current state of morphing actuation technology for rotorcraft and improve upon it. Specifically, this work looks at two types of morphing: Pneumatic Artificial Muscle (PAM) actuated trailing edge flaps and conformal variable diameter morphing. First, active camber changes through the use of PAM powered trailing edge flaps were investigated due to the potential for reductions in power requirements and vibration/noise levels. A PAM based antagonistic actuation system was developed utilizing a novel combination of mechanism geometry and PAM bias contraction optimization to overcome the natural extension stiffening characteristics of PAMs. In open-loop bench-top testing against a "worst-case" constant torsional loading, the system demonstrated actuation authority suitable for both primary control and vibration/noise reduction. Additionally, closed-loop test data indicated that the system was capable of tracking complex waveforms consistent with those needed for rotorcraft control. This system demonstrated performance on-par with the state of the art pneumatic trailing edge flap actuators, yet with a much smaller footprint and impact on the rotor-blade. The second morphing system developed in

  11. Optical linear algebra processors: noise and error-source modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, D; Ghosh, A

    1985-06-01

    The modeling of system and component noise and error sources in optical linear algebra processors (OLAP's) are considered, with attention to the frequency-multiplexed OLAP. General expressions are obtained for the output produced as a function of various component errors and noise. A digital simulator for this model is discussed.

  12. Optical linear algebra processors - Noise and error-source modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, D.; Ghosh, A.

    1985-01-01

    The modeling of system and component noise and error sources in optical linear algebra processors (OLAPs) are considered, with attention to the frequency-multiplexed OLAP. General expressions are obtained for the output produced as a function of various component errors and noise. A digital simulator for this model is discussed.

  13. Phase noise and jitter modeling for fractional-N PLLs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Osmany

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an analytical phase noise model for fractional-N phase-locked loops (PLL with emphasis on integrated RF synthesizers in the GHz range. The noise of the crystal reference, the voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO, the loop filter, the charge pump, and the sigma-delta modulator (SDM is filtered by the PLL operation. We express the rms phase error (jitter in terms of phase noise of the reference, the VCO phase noise and the third-order loop filter parameters. In addition, we consider OFDM systems, where the PLL phase noise is reduced by digital signal processing after down-conversion of the RF signal to baseband. The rms phase error is discussed as a function of the loop parameters. Our model drastically simplifies the noise optimization of the PLL loop dynamics.

  14. Phase noise and jitter modeling for fractional-N PLLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmany, S. A.; Herzel, F.; Schmalz, K.; Winkler, W.

    2007-06-01

    We present an analytical phase noise model for fractional-N phase-locked loops (PLL) with emphasis on integrated RF synthesizers in the GHz range. The noise of the crystal reference, the voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO), the loop filter, the charge pump, and the sigma-delta modulator (SDM) is filtered by the PLL operation. We express the rms phase error (jitter) in terms of phase noise of the reference, the VCO phase noise and the third-order loop filter parameters. In addition, we consider OFDM systems, where the PLL phase noise is reduced by digital signal processing after down-conversion of the RF signal to baseband. The rms phase error is discussed as a function of the loop parameters. Our model drastically simplifies the noise optimization of the PLL loop dynamics.

  15. Overview of Lightweight Structures for Rotorcraft Engines and Drivetrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gary D.

    2011-01-01

    This is an overview presentation of research being performed in the Advanced Materials Task within the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Project. This research is focused on technology areas that address both national goals and project goals for advanced rotorcraft. Specific technology areas discussed are: (1) high temperature materials for advanced turbines in turboshaft engines; (2) polymer matrix composites for lightweight drive system components; (3) lightweight structure approaches for noise and vibration control; and (4) an advanced metal alloy for lighter weight bearings and more reliable mechanical components. An overview of the technology in each area is discussed, and recent accomplishments are presented.

  16. Modeling of the roundabout noise impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarewicz, Rufin; Golebiewski, Roman

    2007-08-01

    A roundabout is a very popular tool used by town planners for carrying smooth and stationary road traffic flow. In this study it is shown that the replacement of a classical road intersection by a roundabout, under certain conditions, may produce a traffic noise decrease. These conditions are expressed in terms of the roundabout speed and the receiver location. The A-weighted sound exposure level is used to describe noise reduction.

  17. X-ray fluoroscopy noise modeling for filter design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarelli, M; Bifulco, P; Cerciello, T; Romano, M; Paura, L

    2013-03-01

    Fluoroscopy is an invaluable tool in various medical practices such as catheterization or image-guided surgery. Patient's screen for prolonged time requires substantial reduction in X-ray exposure: The limited number of photons generates relevant quantum noise. Denoising is essential to enhance fluoroscopic image quality and can be considerably improved by considering the peculiar noise characteristics. This study presents analytical models of fluoroscopic noise to express the variance of noise as a function of gray level, a practical method to estimate the parameters of the models and a possible application to improve the performance of noise filtering. Quantum noise is modeled as a Poisson distribution and results strongly signal-dependent. However, fluoroscopic devices generally apply gray-level transformations (i.e., logarithmic-mapping, gamma-correction) for image enhancement. The resulting statistical transformations of the noise were analytically derived. In addition, a characterization of the statistics of noise for fluoroscopic image differences was offered by resorting to Skellam distribution. Real fluoroscopic sequences of a simple step-phantom were acquired by a conventional fluoroscopic device and were utilized as actual noise measurements to compare with. An adaptive spatio-temporal filter based on the local conditional average of similar pixels has been proposed. The gray-level differences between the local pixel and the neighboring pixels have been assumed as measure of similarity. Filter performance was evaluated by using real fluoroscopic images of a step phantom and acquired during a pacemaker implantation. The comparison between experimental data and the analytical derivation of the relationship between noise variance and mean pixel intensity (noise-parameter models) were presented relatively to raw-images, after applying logarithmic-mapping or gamma-correction and for difference images. Results have confirmed a great agreement (adjusted R

  18. Toward Right-Fidelity Rotorcraft Conceptual Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsay, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    utilized are driven by the timeline in which questions must be answered. This can range from quick "back-of-the-envelope" assessments of a configuration made in an afternoon, to more detailed tradespace explorations that can take upwards of a year to complete. A variety of spreadsheet based tools and conceptual design codes are currently in use. The in-house developed conceptual sizing code RC (Rotorcraft) has been the preferred tool of choice for CD activity for a number of years. Figure 2 illustrates the long standing coupling between RC and solid modeling tools for layout, as well as a number of ad-hoc interfaces with external analyses. RC contains a sizing routine that is built around the use of momentum theory for rotors, classic finite wing theory, a referred parameter engine model, and semi-emperical weight estimation techniques. These methods lend themselves to rapid solutions, measured in seconds and minutes. The successful use of RC, however requires careful consideration of model input parameters and judicious comparison with existing aircraft to avoid unjustified extrapolation of results. RC is in fact a legacy of a series of codes whose development started in the early 1970s, and is best suited to the study of conventional helicopters and XV-15 style tiltrotors. Other concepts have been analyzed with RC, but typically it became necessary to modify the source code and methods for each unique configuration. Recent activity has lead to the development of a new code, NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft (NDARC). NDARC uses a similar level of analytical fidelity as RC, but is built on a new framework intended to improve modularity and ability to rapidly model a wider array of concepts. Critical to achieving this capability is the decomposition of the aircraft system into a series of fundamental components which can then be assembled to form a wide-array of configurations. The paper will provide an overview of NDARC and its capabilities.

  19. 78 FR 12254 - Interest in Restructure of Rotorcraft Airworthiness Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... above at the following Web site link: http://www.faa.gov/aircraft/air_cert/design_approvals/rotorcraft... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 27 and 29 Interest in Restructure of Rotorcraft... restructuring the rotorcraft airworthiness standards of normal category rotorcraft and transport...

  20. 14 CFR 21.5 - Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. 21.5... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS General § 21.5 Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. (a) With each airplane or rotorcraft that was not type certificated with an Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight...

  1. An improved source model for aircraft interior noise studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, J. R.; Fuller, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    There is concern that advanced turboprop engines currently being developed may produce excessive aircraft cabin noise level. This concern has stimulated renewed interest in developing aircraft interior noise reduction methods that do not significnatly increase take off weight. An existing analytical model for noise transmission into aircraft cabins was utilized to investigate the behavior of an improved propeller source model for use in aircraft interior noise studies. The new source model, a virtually rotating dipole, is shown to adequately match measured fuselage sound pressure distributions, including the correct phase relationships, for published data. The virtually rotating dipole is used to study the sensitivity of synchrophasing effectiveness to the fuselage sound pressure trace velocity distribution. Results of calculations are presented which reveal the importance of correctly modeling the surface pressure phase relations in synchrophasing and other aircraft interior noise studies.

  2. Improvement of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jun Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise is investigated using both computational aero-acoustic and semi-empirical approach. For engineering purposes, one of the most commonly used prediction tools for trailing edge noise are based on semi-empirical approaches, for example, the Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini airfoil noise prediction model developed by Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini (NASA Reference Publication 1218, 1989. It was found in previous study that the Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini model tends to over-predict noise at high frequencies. Furthermore, it was observed that this was caused by a lack in the model to predict accurately noise from blunt trailing edges. For more physical understanding of bluntness noise generation, in this study, we also use an advanced in-house developed high-order computational aero-acoustic technique to investigate the details associated with trailing edge bluntness noise. The results from the numerical model form the basis for an improved Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini trailing edge bluntness noise model.

  3. Phase noise and jitter modeling for fractional-N PLLs

    OpenAIRE

    S. A. Osmany; Herzel, F.; Schmalz, K; Winkler, W.

    2007-01-01

    We present an analytical phase noise model for fractional-N phase-locked loops (PLL) with emphasis on integrated RF synthesizers in the GHz range. The noise of the crystal reference, the voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO), the loop filter, the charge pump, and the sigma-delta modulator (SDM) is filtered by the PLL operation. We express the rms phase error (jitter) in terms of phase noise of the reference, the VCO phase noise and the third-order loop filter parameters. In addition, we conside...

  4. Complex reaction noise in a molecular quasispecies model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, David; Zorzano, María-Paz; Morán, Federico

    2006-05-01

    We have derived exact Langevin equations for a model of quasispecies dynamics. The inherent multiplicative reaction noise is complex and its statistical properties are specified completely. The numerical simulation of the complex Langevin equations is carried out using the Cholesky decomposition for the noise covariance matrix. This internal noise, which is due to diffusion-limited reactions, produces unavoidable spatio-temporal density fluctuations about the mean field value. In two dimensions, this noise strictly vanishes only in the perfectly mixed limit, a situation difficult to attain in practice.

  5. A COMPACT MODEL FOR PREDICTING ROAD TRAFFIC NOISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Golmohammadi ، M. Abbaspour ، P. Nassiri ، H. Mahjub

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Noise is one of the most important sources of pollution in the metropolitan areas. The recognition of road traffic noise as one of the main sources of environmental pollution has led to develop models that enable us to predict noise level from fundamental variables. Traffic noise prediction models are required as aids in the design of roads and sometimes in the assessment of existing, or envisaged changes in, traffic noise conditions. The purpose of this study was to design a prediction road traffic noise model from traffic variables and conditions of transportation in Iran.This paper is the result of a research conducted in the city of Hamadan with the ultimate objective of setting up a traffic noise model based on the traffic conditions of Iranian cities. Noise levels and other variables have been measured in 282 samples to develop a statistical regression model based on A-weighted equivalent noise level for Iranian road condition. The results revealed that the average LAeq in all stations was 69.04± 4.25 dB(A, the average speed of vehicles was 44.57±11.46 km/h and average traffic load was 1231.9 ± 910.2 V/h.The developed model has seven explanatory entrance variables in order to achieve a high regression coefficient (R2=0.901. Comparing means of predicted and measuring equivalent sound pressure level (LAeq showed small difference less than -0.42 dB(A and -0.77 dB(A for Tehran and Hamadan cities, respectively. The suggested road traffic noise model can be effectively used as a decision support tool for predicting equivalent sound pressure level index in the cities of Iran.

  6. Impact of pilots' biodynamic feedthrough on rotorcraft by robust stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Giuseppe; Masarati, Pierangelo; Venrooij, Joost

    2013-09-01

    The coupling of rotorcraft dynamics with the dynamics of one of the main systems devoted to its control, the pilot, may lead to several peculiar phenomena, known as Rotorcraft-Pilot Couplings (RPCs), all characterized by an abnormal behavior that may jeopardize flight safety. Among these phenomena, there is a special class of couplings which is dominated by the biodynamic behavior of the pilot's limbs that close the loop between the vibrations and the control inceptors in the cockpit. Leveraging robust stability analysis, the inherently uncertain pilot biodynamics can be treated as the uncertain portion of a feedback system, making analytical, numerical or graphical determination of proneness to RPC possible by comparing robust stability margins of helicopter models with experimental Biodynamic Feedthrough (BDFT) data. The application of the proposed approach to collective bounce is exemplified using simple analytical helicopter and pilot models. The approach is also applied to detailed helicopter models and experimental BDFT measurement data.

  7. Catastrophe Insurance Modeled by Shot-Noise Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Schmidt

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Shot-noise processes generalize compound Poisson processes in the following way: a jump (the shot is followed by a decline (noise. This constitutes a useful model for insurance claims in many circumstances; claims due to natural disasters or self-exciting processes exhibit similar features. We give a general account of shot-noise processes with time-inhomogeneous drivers inspired by recent results in credit risk. Moreover, we derive a number of useful results for modeling and pricing with shot-noise processes. Besides this, we obtain some highly tractable examples and constitute a useful modeling tool for dynamic claims processes. The results can in particular be used for pricing Catastrophe Bonds (CAT bonds, a traded risk-linked security. Additionally, current results regarding the estimation of shot-noise processes are reviewed.

  8. Validation of noise models for single-cell transcriptomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grün, Dominic; Kester, Lennart; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell transcriptomics has recently emerged as a powerful technology to explore gene expression heterogeneity among single cells. Here we identify two major sources of technical variability: sampling noise and global cell-to-cell variation in sequencing efficiency. We propose noise models to co

  9. Background noise model development for seismic stations of KMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Youngsoo

    2010-05-01

    The background noise recorded at seismometer is exist at any seismic signal due to the natural phenomena of the medium which the signal passed through. Reducing the seismic noise is very important to improve the data quality in seismic studies. But, the most important aspect of reducing seismic noise is to find the appropriate place before installing the seismometer. For this reason, NIMR(National Institution of Meteorological Researches) starts to develop a model of standard background noise for the broadband seismic stations of the KMA(Korea Meteorological Administration) using a continuous data set obtained from 13 broadband stations during the period of 2007 and 2008. We also developed the model using short period seismic data from 10 stations at the year of 2009. The method of Mcmara and Buland(2004) is applied to analyse background noise of Korean Peninsula. The fact that borehole seismometer records show low noise level at frequency range greater than 1 Hz compared with that of records at the surface indicate that the cultural noise of inland Korean Peninsula should be considered to process the seismic data set. Reducing Double Frequency peak also should be regarded because the Korean Peninsula surrounded by the seas from eastern, western and southern part. The development of KMA background model shows that the Peterson model(1993) is not applicable to fit the background noise signal generated from Korean Peninsula.

  10. Structural Dynamics Verification of Rotorcraft Comprehensive Analysis System (RCAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bir, G. S.

    2005-02-01

    The Rotorcraft Comprehensive Analysis System (RCAS) was acquired and evaluated as part of an ongoing effort by the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to provide state-of-the-art wind turbine modeling and analysis technology for Government and industry. RCAS is an interdisciplinary tool offering aeroelastic modeling and analysis options not supported by current codes. RCAS was developed during a 4-year joint effort among the U.S. Army's Aeroflightdynamics Directorate, Advanced Rotorcraft Technology Inc., and the helicopter industry. The code draws heavily from its predecessor 2GCHAS (Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System), which required an additional 14 years to develop. Though developed for the rotorcraft industry, its general-purpose features allow it to model or analyze a general dynamic system. Its key feature is a specialized finite element that can model spinning flexible parts. The code, therefore, appears particularly suited for wind turbines whose dynamics is dominated by massive flexible spinning rotors. In addition to the simulation capability of the existing codes, RCAS [1-3] offers a range of unique capabilities, including aeroelastic stability analysis, trim, state-space modeling, operating modes, modal reduction, multi-blade coordinate transformation, periodic-system-specific analysis, choice of aerodynamic models, and a controls design/implementation graphical interface.

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Multidisciplinary Rotorcraft Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Diskin, Boris; Biedron, Robert T.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Bauchau, Olivier A.

    2017-01-01

    A multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis of rotorcraft simulations involving tightly coupled high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics and comprehensive analysis solvers is presented and evaluated. An unstructured sensitivity-enabled Navier-Stokes solver, FUN3D, and a nonlinear flexible multibody dynamics solver, DYMORE, are coupled to predict the aerodynamic loads and structural responses of helicopter rotor blades. A discretely-consistent adjoint-based sensitivity analysis available in FUN3D provides sensitivities arising from unsteady turbulent flows and unstructured dynamic overset meshes, while a complex-variable approach is used to compute DYMORE structural sensitivities with respect to aerodynamic loads. The multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis is conducted through integrating the sensitivity components from each discipline of the coupled system. Numerical results verify accuracy of the FUN3D/DYMORE system by conducting simulations for a benchmark rotorcraft test model and comparing solutions with established analyses and experimental data. Complex-variable implementation of sensitivity analysis of DYMORE and the coupled FUN3D/DYMORE system is verified by comparing with real-valued analysis and sensitivities. Correctness of adjoint formulations for FUN3D/DYMORE interfaces is verified by comparing adjoint-based and complex-variable sensitivities. Finally, sensitivities of the lift and drag functions obtained by complex-variable FUN3D/DYMORE simulations are compared with sensitivities computed by the multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis, which couples adjoint-based flow and grid sensitivities of FUN3D and FUN3D/DYMORE interfaces with complex-variable sensitivities of DYMORE structural responses.

  12. Noise Model Analysis and Estimation of Effect due to Wind Driven Ambient Noise in Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sakthivel Murugan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transmission in ocean using water as a channel is a challenging process due to attenuation, spreading, reverberation, absorption, and so forth, apart from the contribution of acoustic signals due to ambient noises. Ambient noises in sea are of two types: manmade (shipping, aircraft over the sea, motor on boat, etc. and natural (rain, wind, seismic, etc., apart from marine mammals and phytoplanktons. Since wind exists in all places and at all time: its effect plays a major role. Hence, in this paper, we concentrate on estimating the effects of wind. Seven sets of data with various wind speeds ranging from 2.11 m/s to 6.57 m/s were used. The analysis is performed for frequencies ranging from 100 Hz to 8 kHz. It is found that a linear relationship between noise spectrum and wind speed exists for the entire frequency range. Further, we developed a noise model for analyzing the noise level. The results of the empirical data are found to fit with results obtained with the aid of noise model.

  13. FLOW NOISE MEASUREMENT OF SURFACE SHIP WITH TOWED MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this article, a new acoustic test technique using towed model was introduced to study flow noise caused by a surface ship. The project of model test was be properly designed for acoustic signal collecting and with the help of appropriate data processing method different kinds of acoustic sources could be successfully identified. A lot of work about fuid noise could be carried on with the towed model, and the noise corresponding to low frequency which is especially interested for its long distance radiating with small attenuation could also be studied in this way.

  14. Modeling environmental noise exceedances using non-homogeneous Poisson processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnaccia, Claudio; Quartieri, Joseph; Barrios, Juan M; Rodrigues, Eliane R

    2014-10-01

    In this work a non-homogeneous Poisson model is considered to study noise exposure. The Poisson process, counting the number of times that a sound level surpasses a threshold, is used to estimate the probability that a population is exposed to high levels of noise a certain number of times in a given time interval. The rate function of the Poisson process is assumed to be of a Weibull type. The presented model is applied to community noise data from Messina, Sicily (Italy). Four sets of data are used to estimate the parameters involved in the model. After the estimation and tuning are made, a way of estimating the probability that an environmental noise threshold is exceeded a certain number of times in a given time interval is presented. This estimation can be very useful in the study of noise exposure of a population and also to predict, given the current behavior of the data, the probability of occurrence of high levels of noise in the near future. One of the most important features of the model is that it implicitly takes into account different noise sources, which need to be treated separately when using usual models.

  15. Modeling Of Construction Noise For Environmental Impact Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. Hamoda

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This study measured the noise levels generated at different construction sites in reference to the stage of construction and the equipment used, and examined the methods to predict such noise in order to assess the environmental impact of noise. It included 33 construction sites in Kuwait and used artificial neural networks (ANNs for the prediction of noise. A back-propagation neural network (BPNN model was compared with a general regression neural network (GRNN model. The results obtained indicated that the mean equivalent noise level was 78.7 dBA which exceeds the threshold limit. The GRNN model was superior to the BPNN model in its accuracy of predicting construction noise due to its ability to train quickly on sparse data sets. Over 93% of the predictions were within 5% of the observed values. The mean absolute error between the predicted and observed data was only 2 dBA. The ANN modeling proved to be a useful technique for noise predictions required in the assessment of environmental impact of construction activities.

  16. Adaptive cyclic physiologic noise modeling and correction in functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Erik B

    2010-03-30

    Physiologic noise in BOLD-weighted MRI data is known to be a significant source of the variance, reducing the statistical power and specificity in fMRI and functional connectivity analyses. We show a dramatic improvement on current noise correction methods in both fMRI and fcMRI data that avoids overfitting. The traditional noise model is a Fourier series expansion superimposed on the periodicity of parallel measured breathing and cardiac cycles. Correction using this model results in removal of variance matching the periodicity of the physiologic cycles. Using this framework allows easy modeling of noise. However, using a large number of regressors comes at the cost of removing variance unrelated to physiologic noise, such as variance due to the signal of functional interest (overfitting the data). It is our hypothesis that there are a small variety of fits that describe all of the significantly coupled physiologic noise. If this is true, we can replace a large number of regressors used in the model with a smaller number of the fitted regressors and thereby account for the noise sources with a smaller reduction in variance of interest. We describe these extensions and demonstrate that we can preserve variance in the data unrelated to physiologic noise while removing physiologic noise equivalently, resulting in data with a higher effective SNR than with current corrections techniques. Our results demonstrate a significant improvement in the sensitivity of fMRI (up to a 17% increase in activation volume for fMRI compared with higher order traditional noise correction) and functional connectivity analyses.

  17. Rotorcraft System Identification (Identification des Systemes de Voilures Tournantes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    139, 1985. DuVal, R.W., Wang , .C. and Demiroz, M.Y.: A Practtcal Approach to Rotorcraft Systems Padfield, G.D., Thorne, R., Murray-Smith, D...an experimentel verification of the Kalman filter iRA)YOUG, PETER, (AB)PATTOn, ROALD J implementation, sod an experimental evaluation of filter...The estimation of the measurements wlth the RSRA compound helicopter parameter values in this model (the stability and control derivatives) (AA) WANG

  18. Envelope protection systems for piloted and unmanned rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahani, Nilesh A.

    Performance and agility of rotorcraft can be improved using envelope protection systems (or carefree maneuvering systems), which allow the aircraft to use the full flight envelope without risk of exceeding structural or controllability limits. Implementation of such a system can be divided into two necessary parts: "Limit Prediction" which detects the impending violation of the limit parameter, and "Limit Avoidance" where a preventive action is taken in the form of pilot cueing or autonomous limiting. Depending upon the underlying flight control system, implementation of the envelope limiting system was categorized into two different structures: "Inceptor Constraint Architecture" and "Command Limiting Architecture". The Inceptor Constraint Architecture is applicable to existing rotorcraft with conventional flight control system where control input proportionally affects control surfaces. The relationship between control input and limit parameter is complex which requires advanced algorithms for predicting impending limit violations. This research focuses on limits that exceed in transient response. A new algorithm was developed for predicting transient response using non-linear functions of measured aircraft states. The functions were generated off-line using simulation data from a non-real-time simulation, model to demonstrate the procedure for extracting them from flight test data. Modern rotorcraft flight control systems are designed to accurately track certain aircraft states like roll and pitch attitudes which are either specified as command inputs in unmanned rotorcraft or mapped to control stick in piloted aircrafts. In the Command Limiting Architecture applicable to these systems, performance constraints were generated on the command input corresponding to the envelope limit. To simulate this flight control system, an adaptive model inversion controller was applied to a non-linear, blade element simulation model of a helicopter. The controller generated

  19. Development of a highway noise prediction model using an Leq20 s measure of basic vehicular noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamanikabud, P.; Tansatcha, M.; Brown, A. L.

    2008-09-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to build a highway traffic noise simulation model for free-flow traffic conditions in Thailand employing a technique utilizing individual vehicular noise modelling based on the equivalent sound level over 20 s ( Leq20 s). This Leq20 s technique provides a more accurate measurement of noise energy from each type of vehicle under real running conditions. The coefficient of propagation and ground effect for this model was then estimated using a trial-and-error method, and applied to the highway traffic noise simulation model. This newly developed highway traffic noise model was tested for its goodness-of-fit to field observations. The test shows that this new model provides good predictions for highway noise conditions in Thailand. The concepts and techniques that are modeled and tested in this study can also be applied for prediction of traffic noise for local conditions in other countries.

  20. NDARC - NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft Validation and Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Validation and demonstration results from the development of the conceptual design tool NDARC (NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft) are presented. The principal tasks of NDARC are to design a rotorcraft to satisfy specified design conditions and missions, and then analyze the performance of the aircraft for a set of off-design missions and point operating conditions. The aircraft chosen as NDARC development test cases are the UH-60A single main-rotor and tail-rotor helicopter, the CH-47D tandem helicopter, the XH-59A coaxial lift-offset helicopter, and the XV-15 tiltrotor. These aircraft were selected because flight performance data, a weight statement, detailed geometry information, and a correlated comprehensive analysis model are available for each. Validation consists of developing the NDARC models for these aircraft by using geometry and weight information, airframe wind tunnel test data, engine decks, rotor performance tests, and comprehensive analysis results; and then comparing the NDARC results for aircraft and component performance with flight test data. Based on the calibrated models, the capability of the code to size rotorcraft is explored.

  1. Sound Modeling Simplifies Vehicle Noise Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Under two SBIR contracts with Langley Research Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan-based Comet Technology Corporation developed Comet EnFlow, a software program capable of predicting both high- and low-frequency noise and vibration behavior in plane fuselages and other structures. The company now markets the software to airplane, automobile, and ship manufacturers, and Langley has found an unexpected use for it in leak detection on the International Space Station.

  2. Braided Composite Technologies for Rotorcraft Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed program will focus on the development of a new generation of advanced technology for rotorcraft transmission systems. This program will evaluate the...

  3. A fuzzy rule based framework for noise annoyance modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botteldooren, Dick; Verkeyn, Andy; Lercher, Peter

    2003-09-01

    Predicting the effect of noise on individual people and small groups is an extremely difficult task due to the influence of a multitude of factors that vary from person to person and from context to context. Moreover, noise annoyance is inherently a vague concept. That is why, in this paper, it is argued that noise annoyance models should identify a fuzzy set of possible effects rather than seek a very accurate crisp prediction. Fuzzy rule based models seem ideal candidates for this task. This paper provides the theoretical background for building these models. Existing empirical knowledge is used to extract a few typical rules that allow making the model more specific for small groups of individuals. The resulting model is tested on two large-scale social surveys augmented with exposure simulations. The testing demonstrates how this new way of thinking about noise effect modeling can be used in practice both in management support as a "noise annoyance adviser" and in social science for testing hypotheses such as the effect of noise sensitivity or the degree of urbanization.

  4. Effects of random noise in a dynamical model of love

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yong, E-mail: hsux3@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Gu Rencai; Zhang Huiqing [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > We model the complexity and unpredictability of psychology as Gaussian white noise. > The stochastic system of love is considered including bifurcation and chaos. > We show that noise can both suppress and induce chaos in dynamical models of love. - Abstract: This paper aims to investigate the stochastic model of love and the effects of random noise. We first revisit the deterministic model of love and some basic properties are presented such as: symmetry, dissipation, fixed points (equilibrium), chaotic behaviors and chaotic attractors. Then we construct a stochastic love-triangle model with parametric random excitation due to the complexity and unpredictability of the psychological system, where the randomness is modeled as the standard Gaussian noise. Stochastic dynamics under different three cases of 'Romeo's romantic style', are examined and two kinds of bifurcations versus the noise intensity parameter are observed by the criteria of changes of top Lyapunov exponent and shape of stationary probability density function (PDF) respectively. The phase portraits and time history are carried out to verify the proposed results, and the good agreement can be found. And also the dual roles of the random noise, namely suppressing and inducing chaos are revealed.

  5. Noise Modeling From Conductive Shields Using Kirchhoff Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandin, Henrik J; Volegov, Petr L; Espy, Michelle A; Matlashov, Andrei N; Savukov, Igor M; Schultz, Larry J

    2010-10-01

    Progress in the development of high-sensitivity magnetic-field measurements has stimulated interest in understanding the magnetic noise of conductive materials, especially of magnetic shields based on high-permeability materials and/or high-conductivity materials. For example, SQUIDs and atomic magnetometers have been used in many experiments with mu-metal shields, and additionally SQUID systems frequently have radio frequency shielding based on thin conductive materials. Typical existing approaches to modeling noise only work with simple shield and sensor geometries while common experimental setups today consist of multiple sensor systems with complex shield geometries. With complex sensor arrays used in, for example, MEG and Ultra Low Field MRI studies, knowledge of the noise correlation between sensors is as important as knowledge of the noise itself. This is crucial for incorporating efficient noise cancelation schemes for the system. We developed an approach that allows us to calculate the Johnson noise for arbitrary shaped shields and multiple sensor systems. The approach is efficient enough to be able to run on a single PC system and return results on a minute scale. With a multiple sensor system our approach calculates not only the noise for each sensor but also the noise correlation matrix between sensors. Here we will show how the algorithm can be implemented.

  6. Design of Quiet Rotorcraft Approach Trajectories: Verification Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Sharon L.

    2010-01-01

    Flight testing that is planned for October 2010 will provide an opportunity to evaluate rotorcraft trajectory optimization techniques. The flight test will involve a fully instrumented MD-902 helicopter, which will be flown over an array of microphones. In this work, the helicopter approach trajectory is optimized via a multiobjective genetic algorithm to improve community noise, passenger comfort, and pilot acceptance. Previously developed optimization strategies are modified to accommodate new helicopter data and to increase pilot acceptance. This paper describes the MD-902 trajectory optimization plus general optimization strategies and modifications that are needed to reduce the uncertainty in noise predictions. The constraints that are imposed by the flight test conditions and characteristics of the MD-902 helicopter limit the testing possibilities. However, the insights that will be gained through this research will prove highly valuable.

  7. Joint models for noise annoyance and willingness to pay for road noise reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Mogens; Bue Bjørner, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Recent contingent valuation (CV) studies of the willingness to pay (WTP) for road noise reduction have used stated annoyance as an independent variable. We argue that this may be inappropriate due to potential endogeneity bias. Instead, an alternative model is proposed that treats both WTP...

  8. A Semiconductor Device Noise Model: A Deterministic Approach to Semiconductor Device Current Noise for Semiclassical Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noaman, B. A.; Korman, C. E.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we present a deterministic approach to calculate terminal current noise characteristics in semiconductor devices in the framework of semiclassical transport based on the spherical harmonics of the Boltzmann Transport Equation. The model relies on the solution of the Boltzmann equation in the frequency domain with special initial and boundary conditions. The terminal current fluctuation is directly related to scattering without the additional Langevin noise term added to the calculation. Simulation results are presented for the terminal current spectral density for a 1-D n+nn+ structure due to elastic-acoustic and intervally scattering.

  9. Noise-induced hearing loss: new animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Kevin W; Eberl, Daniel F

    2014-10-01

    This article presents research findings from two invertebrate model systems with potential to advance both the understanding of noise-induced hearing loss mechanisms and the development of putative therapies to reduce human noise damage. Work on sea anemone hair bundles, which resemble auditory hair cells, has revealed secretions that exhibit astonishing healing properties not only for damaged hair bundles, but also for vertebrate lateral line neuromasts. We present progress on identifying functional components of the secretions, and their mechanisms of repair. The second model, the Johnston's organ in Drosophila, is also genetically homologous to hair cells and shows noise-induced hearing loss similar to vertebrates. Drosophila offers genetic and molecular insight into noise sensitivity and pathways that can be manipulated to reduce stress and damage from noise. Using the comparative approach is a productive avenue to understanding basic mechanisms, in this case cellular responses to noise trauma. Expanding study of these systems may accelerate identification of strategies to reduce or prevent noise damage in the human ear.

  10. Statistics of a neuron model driven by asymmetric colored noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Hansen, Finn; Droste, Felix; Lindner, Benjamin

    2015-02-01

    Irregular firing of neurons can be modeled as a stochastic process. Here we study the perfect integrate-and-fire neuron driven by dichotomous noise, a Markovian process that jumps between two states (i.e., possesses a non-Gaussian statistics) and exhibits nonvanishing temporal correlations (i.e., represents a colored noise). Specifically, we consider asymmetric dichotomous noise with two different transition rates. Using a first-passage-time formulation, we derive exact expressions for the probability density and the serial correlation coefficient of the interspike interval (time interval between two subsequent neural action potentials) and the power spectrum of the spike train. Furthermore, we extend the model by including additional Gaussian white noise, and we give approximations for the interspike interval (ISI) statistics in this case. Numerical simulations are used to validate the exact analytical results for pure dichotomous noise, and to test the approximations of the ISI statistics when Gaussian white noise is included. The results may help to understand how correlations and asymmetry of noise and signals in nerve cells shape neuronal firing statistics.

  11. Noise controlled synchronization in potassium coupled neural models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, Dmitry E; Ryazanova, Ludmila S; Zhirin, Roman A;

    2007-01-01

    The paper applies biologically plausible models to investigate how noise input to small ensembles of neurons, coupled via the extracellular potassium concentration, can influence their firing patterns. Using the noise intensity and the volume of the extracellular space as control parameters, we...... show that potassium induced depolarization underlies the formation of noise-induced patterns such as delayed firing and synchronization. These phenomena are associated with the appearance of new time scales in the distribution of interspike intervals that may be significant for the spatio...

  12. Modeling flux noise in SQUIDs due to hyperfine interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiansheng; Yu, Clare C

    2012-06-15

    Recent experiments implicate spins on the surface of metals as the source of flux noise in superconducting quantum interference devices and indicate that these spins are able to relax without conserving total magnetization. We present a model of 1/f flux noise in which electron spins on the surface of metals can relax via hyperfine interactions. Our results indicate that flux noise would be significantly reduced in superconducting materials where the most abundant isotopes do not have nuclear moments, such as zinc and lead.

  13. Modeling deep ocean shipping noise in varying acidity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udovydchenkov, Ilya A; Duda, Timothy F; Doney, Scott C; Lima, Ivan D

    2010-09-01

    Possible future changes of ambient shipping noise at 0.1-1 kHz in the North Pacific caused by changing seawater chemistry conditions are analyzed with a simplified propagation model. Probable decreases of pH would cause meaningful reduction of the sound absorption coefficient in near-surface ocean water for these frequencies. The results show that a few decibels of increase may occur in 100 years in some very quiet areas very far from noise sources, with small effects closer to noise sources. The use of ray physics allows sound energy attenuated via volume absorption and by the seafloor to be compared.

  14. Analysis of bilinear noise models in circuits and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willsky, A. S.; Marcus, S. I.

    1976-01-01

    There are a number of applications in which linear noise models are inappropriate. In the paper, the use of bilinear noise models in circuits and devices is considered. Several physical problems are studied in this framework. These include circuits involving varying parameters (such as variable resistance circuits constructed using field-effect transistors), the effect of switching jitter on sampled data system performance and communication systems involving voltage-controlled oscillators and phase-lock loops. In addition, several types of analytical techniques for stochastic bilinear systems are considered. Specifically, the moment equations of Brockett for bilinear systems driven by white noise are discussed, and closed-form expressions for certain bilinear systems (those that evolve an Abelian or solvable Lie groups) driven by white or colored noise are derived. In addition, an approximate statistical technique involving the use of harmonic expansions is described.

  15. Wind Turbine Noise and Natural Sounds: Masking, Propagation and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolin, Karl

    2009-05-15

    Wind turbines are an environmentally friendly and sustainable power source. Unfortunately, the noise impact can cause deteriorated living conditions for nearby residents. The audibility of wind turbine sound is influenced by ambient sound. This thesis deals with some aspects of noise from wind turbines. Ambient sounds influence the audibility of wind turbine noise. Models for assessing two commonly occurring natural ambient sounds namely vegetation sound and sound from breaking waves are presented in paper A and B. A sound propagation algorithm has been compared to long range measurements of sound propagation in paper C. Psycho-acoustic tests evaluating the threshold and partial loudness of wind turbine noise when mixed with natural ambient sounds have been performed. These are accounted for in paper D. The main scientific contributions are the following.Paper A: A semi-empiric prediction model for vegetation sound is proposed. This model uses up-to-date simulations of wind profiles and turbulent wind fields to estimate sound from vegetation. The fluctuations due to turbulence are satisfactory estimated by the model. Predictions of vegetation sound also show good agreement to measured spectra. Paper B: A set of measurements of air-borne sound from breaking waves are reported. From these measurements a prediction method of sound from breaking waves is proposed. Third octave spectra from breaking waves are shown to depend on breaker type. Satisfactory agreement between predictions and measurements has been achieved. Paper C: Long range sound propagation over a sea surface was investigated. Measurements of sound transmission were coordinated with local meteorological measurements. A sound propagation algorithm has been compared to the measured sound transmission. Satisfactory agreement between measurements and predictions were achieved when turbulence were taken into consideration in the computations. Paper D: The paper investigates the interaction between wind

  16. An aerodynamic noise propagation model for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2005-01-01

    A model based on 2-D sound ray theory for aerodynamic noise propagation from wind turbine rotating blades is introduced. The model includes attenuation factors from geometric spreading, sound directivity of source, air absorption, ground deflection and reflection, as well as effects from temperat......A model based on 2-D sound ray theory for aerodynamic noise propagation from wind turbine rotating blades is introduced. The model includes attenuation factors from geometric spreading, sound directivity of source, air absorption, ground deflection and reflection, as well as effects from...

  17. KF-based Adaptive UKF Algorithm and its Application for Rotorcraft UAV Actuator Failure Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntong Qi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A new adaptive Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF algorithm for actuator failure estimation is proposed. A novel filter method with the ability to adapt to the statistical characteristics of noise is presented to improve the estimation accuracy of traditional UKFs. A new algorithm (Kalman Filter (KF ‐based adaptive UKF, with the ability to adapt to the statistical characteristic of noise, is proposed to improve the UKF’s performance. Such an adaptive mechanism is intended to compensate for the lack of prior knowledge. The asymptotic property of the adaptive UKF is discussed. Actuator Healthy Coefficients (AHCs are introduced to denote the actuator failure model while the adaptive UKF is employed for the online estimation of both the flight states and the AHCs’ parameters of a rotorcraft UAV (RUAV. Simulations are conducted using the model of a ServoHeli‐90 RUAV from the Shenyang Institute of Automation, CAS. The results are compared with those obtained by normal UKF to demonstrate the effectiveness and improvements of the adaptive UKF algorithm. Besides this, we also compare this algorithm with the MIT‐based one which we proposed in previous research.

  18. Model independent control of lightly damped noise/vibration systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing

    2008-07-01

    Feedforward control is a popular strategy of active noise/vibration control. In well-damped noise/vibration systems, path transfer functions from actuators to sensors can be modeled by finite impulse response (FIR) filters with negligible errors. It is possible to implement noninvasive model independent feedforward control by a recently proposed method called orthogonal adaptation. In lightly damped noise/vibration systems, however, path transfer functions have infinite impulse responses (IIRs) that cause difficulties in design and implementation of broadband feedforward controllers. A major source of difficulties is model error if IIR path transfer functions are approximated by FIR filters. In general, active control performance deteriorates as model error increases. In this study, a new method is proposed to design and implement model independent feedforward controllers for broadband in lightly damped noise/vibration systems. It is shown analytically that the proposed method is able to drive the convergence of a noninvasive model independent feedforward controller to improve broadband control in lightly damped noise/vibration systems. The controller is optimized in the minimum H2 norm sense. Experiment results are presented to verify the analytical results.

  19. Developing an Empirical Model for Jet-Surface Interaction Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2014-01-01

    The process of developing an empirical model for jet-surface interaction noise is described and the resulting model evaluated. Jet-surface interaction noise is generated when the high-speed engine exhaust from modern tightly integrated or conventional high-bypass ratio engine aircraft strikes or flows over the airframe surfaces. An empirical model based on an existing experimental database is developed for use in preliminary design system level studies where computation speed and range of configurations is valued over absolute accuracy to select the most promising (or eliminate the worst) possible designs. The model developed assumes that the jet-surface interaction noise spectra can be separated from the jet mixing noise and described as a parabolic function with three coefficients: peak amplitude, spectral width, and peak frequency. These coefficients are fit to functions of surface length and distance from the jet lipline to form a characteristic spectra which is then adjusted for changes in jet velocity and/or observer angle using scaling laws from published theoretical and experimental work. The resulting model is then evaluated for its ability to reproduce the characteristic spectra and then for reproducing spectra measured at other jet velocities and observer angles; successes and limitations are discussed considering the complexity of the jet-surface interaction noise versus the desire for a model that is simple to implement and quick to execute.

  20. Correlated noise and prior models in electromagnetic flow tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtikangas, Ossi; Vauhkonen, Marko

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetic flow meters are a gold standard in measuring the mean flow velocity of conductive liquids and slurries in process industry. A drawback of this approach is that the velocity field cannot be determined. Information about velocity fields is important for characterizing multiphase flows in the process industry. Recently, electromagnetic flow tomography (EMFT) has been proposed for measuring velocity fields using several coils and a set of electrodes attached to the inner surface of the pipe. The velocity field reconstruction method utilizes a finite element based computational forward model and a Bayesian framework for inverse problem. In the approach, a priori probability and noise models are written describing the flow and measurement error characteristics, respectively. In this work, the effect of additive, possibly correlated, measurement noise and different prior models on the velocity field reconstructions in EMFT are tested using numerical simulations. The results show that the velocity field reconstruction method produces feasible estimates even with relatively high level of correlated measurement noise if the covariance structure of the noise is taken into account. In practice, the noise covariance can be estimated from measurements using sample based methods. Moreover, it is shown that a smoothness prior using a squared exponential covariance function is in general a good choice for the prior model and more advanced prior models for specific flow types such as stratified or turbulent flows can be used.

  1. Modeling the Noise for Indoor Power Line Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Samser Ali

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic interference, man-made noise, and multipath effects are main causes of bit errors in power-line communication. To design an efficient powerline transmission system, the channel characterization has to be known and this paper deals with a statistical noise model (SNM for the indoor powerline channel in a frequency band from 1 MHz to 30 MHz . The SNM parameters are obtained from large-scale measurements of the noise density spectrum on a real powerline channel. All measurements are between line and neutral at different locations in the same grid. The SNM is used for simulation of the noise density spectrum and offline analysis on the powerline channel

  2. Residual phase noise modeling of amplifiers using silicon bipolar transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoropoulos, Konstantinos; Everard, Jeremy

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the modeling of residual 1/f phase noise for Si bipolar amplifiers operating in the linear region. We propose that for Si bipolar amplifiers, the 1/f phase noise is largely caused by the base emitter recombination flicker noise. The up-conversion mechanism is described through linear approximation of the phase variation of the amplifier phase response by the variation of the device parameters (C(b)c, C(be), g(m), r(e)) caused by the recombination 1/f noise. The amplifier phase response describes the device over the whole frequency range of operation for which the influence of the poles and zeros is investigated. It is found that for a common emitter amplifier it is sufficient to only incorporate the effect of the device poles to describe the phase noise behavior over most of its operational frequency range. Simulations predict the measurements of others, including the flattening of the PM noise at frequencies beyond f(3dB), not predicted by previous models.

  3. Rumor spreading model with noise interference in complex social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang; Wang, Youguo

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a modified susceptible-infected-removed (SIR) model has been proposed to explore rumor diffusion on complex social networks. We take variation of connectivity into consideration and assume the variation as noise. On the basis of related literature on virus networks, the noise is described as standard Brownian motion while stochastic differential equations (SDE) have been derived to characterize dynamics of rumor diffusion both on homogeneous networks and heterogeneous networks. Then, theoretical analysis on homogeneous networks has been demonstrated to investigate the solution of SDE model and the steady state of rumor diffusion. Simulations both on Barabási-Albert (BA) network and Watts-Strogatz (WS) network display that the addition of noise accelerates rumor diffusion and expands diffusion size, meanwhile, the spreading speed on BA network is much faster than on WS network under the same noise intensity. In addition, there exists a rumor diffusion threshold in statistical average meaning on homogeneous network which is absent on heterogeneous network. Finally, we find a positive correlation between peak value of infected individuals and noise intensity while a negative correlation between rumor lifecycle and noise intensity overall.

  4. NDARC-NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft Theoretical Basis and Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical basis and architecture of the conceptual design tool NDARC (NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft) are described. The principal tasks of NDARC are to design (or size) a rotorcraft to satisfy specified design conditions and missions, and then analyze the performance of the aircraft for a set of off-design missions and point operating conditions. The aircraft consists of a set of components, including fuselage, rotors, wings, tails, and propulsion. For each component, attributes such as performance, drag, and weight can be calculated. The aircraft attributes are obtained from the sum of the component attributes. NDARC provides a capability to model general rotorcraft configurations, and estimate the performance and attributes of advanced rotor concepts. The software has been implemented with low-fidelity models, typical of the conceptual design environment. Incorporation of higher-fidelity models will be possible, as the architecture of the code accommodates configuration flexibility, a hierarchy of models, and ultimately multidisciplinary design, analysis and optimization.

  5. Engineering modeling of traffic noise in shielded areas in cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomons, Erik M; Polinder, Henk; Lohman, Walter J A; Zhou, Han; Borst, Hieronymous C; Miedema, Henk M E

    2009-11-01

    A computational study of road traffic noise in cities is presented. Based on numerical boundary-element calculations of canyon-to-canyon propagation, an efficient engineering algorithm is developed to calculate the effect of multiple reflections in street canyons. The algorithm is supported by a room-acoustical analysis of the reverberant sound fields in the source and receiver canyons. Using the algorithm, a simple model for traffic noise in cities is developed. Noise maps and exposure distributions of the city of Amsterdam are calculated with the model, and for comparison also with an engineering model that is currently used for traffic noise impact assessments in cities. Considerable differences between the two model predictions are found for shielded buildings with day-evening-night levels of 40-60 dB at the facades. Further, an analysis is presented of level differences between the most and the least exposed facades of buildings. Large level differences are found for buildings directly exposed to traffic noise from nearby roads. It is shown that by a redistribution of traffic flow around these buildings, one can achieve low sound levels at quiet sides and a corresponding reduction in the percentage of highly annoyed inhabitants from typically 23% to 18%.

  6. Urban traffic noise assessment by combining measurement and model results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, F.J.M. van der; Graafland, F.; Wessels, P.W.; Basten, T.G.H.

    2013-01-01

    A model based monitoring system is applied on a local scale in an urban area to obtain a better understanding of the traffic noise situation. The system consists of a scalable sensor network and an engineering model. A better understanding is needed to take appropriate and cost efficient measures,

  7. Noise barriers and the harmonoise sound propagation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.; Maercke, D. van; Randrianoelina, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Harmonoise sound propagation model ('the Harmonoise engineering model') was developed in the European project Harmonoise (2001-2004) for road and rail traffic noise. In 2008, CSTB Grenoble and TNO Delft have prepared a detailed description of the various steps involved in a calculation with the

  8. Measurement of noise associated with model transformer cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, David [Cogent Power Ltd., Development and Market Research, Orb Electrical Steels, Corporation Road, Newport, South Wales NP19 OXT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Dave.snell@cogent-power.com

    2008-10-15

    The performance of a transformer core may be considered in terms of power loss and by the noise generated by the core, both of which should be minimised. This paper discusses the setting up of a suitable system for evaluation of noise in a large model transformer core (500 kV A) and issues associated with noise measurement. The equivalent continuous sound pressure level (LAeq) was used as a measure of the A-weighted sound level and measurements were made in the range 16 Hz-25 kHz for various step lap core configurations. The selection of optimum sound insulation materials between core and ground support and for enclosing the transformer is essential for minimisation of background noise. Core clamping pressure must be optimised in order to minimise noise. The use of two laminations per layer instead of one leads to an increase in noise arising from the core. Provided care is taken in building the core, good reproducibility of results can be obtained for analysis.

  9. Transitions in a genotype selection model driven by coloured noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Can-Jun; Mei Dong-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates a genotype selection model subjected to both a multiplicative coloured noise and an additive coloured noise with different correlation time T1 and T2 by means of the numerical technique.By directly simulating the Langevin Equation,the following results are obtained.(1) The multiplicative coloured noise dominates,however,the effect of the additive coloured noise is not neglected in the practical gene selection process.The selection rate μ decides that the selection is propitious to gene A haploid or gene B haploid.(2) The additive coloured noise intensity α and the correlation time T2 play opposite roles.It is noted that α and T2 can not separate the single peak,while αcan make the peak disappear and T2 can make the peak be sharp.(3) The multiplicative coloured noise intensity D and the correlation time T1 can induce phase transition,at the same time they play opposite roles and the reentrance phenomenon appears.In this case,it is easy to select one type haploid from the group with increasing D and decreasing T1.

  10. Modeling of the Simultaneous Influence of the Thermal Noise and the Phase Noise in Space Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Baran

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Our work deals with studies of a noise behavior in space communication systems. Two most important noise types the additive thermal noise and the multiplicative phase noise, respectively, are included. A simple model of the narrowband communication system is created and simulated in the Ansoft Designer system simulator. The additive thermal noise is modeled as AWGN in a communication channel. The phase noise is produced in transmitter and receiver oscillators. The main intention is to investigate the receiver filter bandwidth decrease effect on powers of both noise types. Results proposed in this paper show that for defined system conditions and for a certain filter bandwidth value, the power of the multiplicative phase noise equals to the additive thermal noise power. Another decrease of the filter bandwidth causes the phase noise power exceeding. To demonstrate the noise behavior transparently, input system parameters are properly selected. All simulation results are documented by theoretical calculations. Simulation outcomes express a good coincidence with presumptions and calculations.

  11. Rotorcraft handling-qualities design criteria development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Edwin W.; Lebacqz, J. Victor; Chen, Robert T. N.; Key, David L.

    1988-01-01

    Joint NASA/Army efforts at the Ames Research Center to develop rotorcraft handling-qualities design criteria began in earnest in 1975. Notable results were the UH-1H VSTOLAND variable stability helicopter, the VFA-2 camera-and-terrain-board simulator visual system, and the generic helicopter real-time mathematical model, ARMCOP. An initial series of handling-qualities studies was conducted to assess the effects of rotor design parameters, interaxis coupling, and various levels of stability and control augmentation. The ability to conduct in-flight handling-qualities research was enhanced by the development of the NASA/Army CH-47 variable-stability helicopter. Research programs conducted using this vehicle include vertical-response investigations, hover augmentation systems, and the effects of control-force characteristics. The handling-qualities data base was judged to be sufficient to allow an update of the military helicopter handling-qualities specification, MIL-H-8501. These efforts, including not only the in-house experimental work but also contracted research and collaborative programs performed under the auspices of various international agreements. The report concludes by reviewing the topics that are currently most in need of work, and the plans for addressing these topics.

  12. Difference-Based Image Noise Modeling Using Skellam Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Youngbae; Kim, Jun-Sik; Kweon, In So

    2012-07-01

    By the laws of quantum physics, pixel intensity does not have a true value, but should be a random variable. Contrary to the conventional assumptions, the distribution of intensity may not be an additive Gaussian. We propose to directly model the intensity difference and show its validity by an experimental comparison to the conventional additive model. As a model of the intensity difference, we present a Skellam distribution derived from the Poisson photon noise model. This modeling induces a linear relationship between intensity and Skellam parameters, while conventional variance computation methods do not yield any significant relationship between these parameters under natural illumination. The intensity-Skellam line is invariant to scene, illumination, and even most of camera parameters. We also propose practical methods to obtain the line using a color pattern and an arbitrary image under natural illumination. Because the Skellam parameters that can be obtained from this linearity determine a noise distribution for each intensity value, we can statistically determine whether any intensity difference is caused by an underlying signal difference or by noise. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new noise model by applying it to practical applications of background subtraction and edge detection.

  13. A trade-off analysis design tool. Aircraft interior noise-motion/passenger satisfaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, I. D.

    1977-01-01

    A design tool was developed to enhance aircraft passenger satisfaction. The effect of aircraft interior motion and noise on passenger comfort and satisfaction was modelled. Effects of individual aircraft noise sources were accounted for, and the impact of noise on passenger activities and noise levels to safeguard passenger hearing were investigated. The motion noise effect models provide a means for tradeoff analyses between noise and motion variables, and also provide a framework for optimizing noise reduction among noise sources. Data for the models were collected onboard commercial aircraft flights and specially scheduled tests.

  14. Application of Machine Learning to Rotorcraft Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Tyler; Dempsey, Paula J.

    2017-01-01

    Machine learning is a powerful tool for data exploration and model building with large data sets. This project aimed to use machine learning techniques to explore the inherent structure of data from rotorcraft gear tests, relationships between features and damage states, and to build a system for predicting gear health for future rotorcraft transmission applications. Classical machine learning techniques are difficult, if not irresponsible to apply to time series data because many make the assumption of independence between samples. To overcome this, Hidden Markov Models were used to create a binary classifier for identifying scuffing transitions and Recurrent Neural Networks were used to leverage long distance relationships in predicting discrete damage states. When combined in a workflow, where the binary classifier acted as a filter for the fatigue monitor, the system was able to demonstrate accuracy in damage state prediction and scuffing identification. The time dependent nature of the data restricted data exploration to collecting and analyzing data from the model selection process. The limited amount of available data was unable to give useful information, and the division of training and testing sets tended to heavily influence the scores of the models across combinations of features and hyper-parameters. This work built a framework for tracking scuffing and fatigue on streaming data and demonstrates that machine learning has much to offer rotorcraft health monitoring by using Bayesian learning and deep learning methods to capture the time dependent nature of the data. Suggested future work is to implement the framework developed in this project using a larger variety of data sets to test the generalization capabilities of the models and allow for data exploration.

  15. Thermodynamic Model of Noise Information Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejna, Bohdan

    2008-10-01

    In this paper we apply a certain unifying physical description of the results of Information Theory. Assuming that heat entropy is a thermodynamic realization of information entropy [2], we construct a cyclical, thermodynamic, average-value model of an information transfer chain [3] as a general heat engine, in particular a Carnot engine, reversible or irreversible. A working medium of the cycle (a thermodynamic system transforming input heat energy) can be considered as a thermodynamic, average-value model or, as such, as a realization of an information transfer channel. We show that in a model realized in this way the extended II. Principle of Thermodynamics is valid [2] and we formulate its information form.

  16. Modelling of Substrate Noise and Mitigation Schemes for UWB Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Ming; Mikkelsen, Jan H.; Larsen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    The last chapter of this first part of the book, chapter seven, is devoted to Modeling of Substrate Noise and Mitigation Schemes for Ultrawideband (UWB) systems, and is written by Ming Shen, Jan H. Mikkelsen, and Torben Larsen from Aalborg University, Denmark. In highly integrated mixed-mode desi...

  17. THEORETICAL MODEL OF VIBRATING OBJECT TRANSMITTING NOISE TOWARDS EXTERNAL SOUND

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚志远

    2002-01-01

    On the basic theory of modal method, the coupling relation between the vibration of objects and external sound was analyzed, the theoretical model solving the vibration and noise was provided, the corresponding calculation formula was given. The calculating results show out that this calculation formula is correct.

  18. A mathematical model of traffic noise at a signalized intersection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorawit Narupiti

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This research aims at modeling interrupted flow traffic noise at a signalized intersection. The models are mathematically derived by applying the inverse square law of sound pressure incorporating with theories of traffic flow at an intersection. The traffic flow theories utilized for developing the model consist of characteristics of individual vehicle motion at intersection, shock wave model, and queuing analysis. The modelformulation is divided into two different approaches and takes into account of all regimes of vehicle movement while traversing an intersection (i.e. idling, decelerating, accelerating, and cruising conditions. The first approach assumes a constant acceleration/deceleration rate for each type of vehicle. Another appliesinconstant acceleration/deceleration which comes from speed-distance relationship. The final models are expressed in LAeq (1 hr.Eventually, the developed models are validated by collecting equivalent continuous noise level in 1 min as well as traffic parameters (i.e. red time, number of vehicle in the queue, queue length, time of queue dissipation, and final cruise speed from fifteen vehicle platoons. The noise levels predicted from the developed models are compared with the measured ones. The results show that the inconstant acceleration model gives the predicted levels closer to the measured ones than constant acceleration model. The error of inconstant acceleration model ranges from 0.1-3.9 dB(A with the average value of 2 dB(A overestimated and that of constant acceleration model ranges from 1.8-6.5 dB(A with the average value of 3 dB(A underestimated. It might be concluded that movement characteristic of vehicle is an important factor that apparently affects the accuracy of traffic noise prediction at an intersection.

  19. A Stochastic Energy Budget Model Using Physically Based Red Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Weniger, Michael; Hense, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    A method to describe unresolved processes in meteorological models by physically based stochastic processes (SP) is proposed by the example of an energy budget model (EBM). Contrary to the common approach using additive white noise, a suitable variable within the model is chosen to be represented by a SP. Spectral analysis of ice core time series shows a red noise character of the underlying fluctuations. Fitting Ornstein Uhlenbeck processes to the observed spectrum defines the parameters for the stochastic dynamic model (SDM). Numerical simulations for different sets of ice core data lead to three sets of strongly differing systems. Pathwise, statistical and spectral analysis of these models show the importance of carefully choosing suitable stochastic terms in order to get a physically meaningful SDM.

  20. Statistical fluctuations in a saturation laser model with correlated noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Shi-Bo; Mei Dong-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    We study the effects of correlations between quantum and pump noises on fluctuations of the laser intensity in a saturation laser model. An approximative Fokker-Planck equation and analytic expressions of the steady-state probability distribution function (SPD) of the laser system are derived. Based on the SPD, the normalized mean, the normalized variance, and the normalized skewness of the steady-state laser intensity are calculated numerically. The results indicate that (i) the correlation strength λ of correlated noises always enhances the fluctuation of laser intensity;(ii) the correlation time τ of correlated noises strengthens the fluctuation of laser intensity for the below-threshold case but τ weakens it for the above-threshold case.

  1. Suction-generated noise in an anatomic silicon ear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxenberger, Wolfgang; Lahousen, T; Walch, C

    2012-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate noise levels generated during micro-suction aural toilet using an anatomic silicon ear model. It is an experimental study. In an anatomic ear model made of silicone, the eardrum was replaced by a 1-cm diameter microphone of a calibrated sound-level measuring device. Ear wax was removed using the sucker of a standard ENT treatment unit (Atmos Servant 5(®)). Mean and peak sound levels during the suction procedure were recorded with suckers of various diameters (Fergusson-Frazier 2.7-4 mm as well as Rosen 1.4-2.5 mm). Average noise levels during normal suction in a distance of 1 cm in front of the eardrum ranged between 97 and 103.5 dB(A) (broadband noise). Peak noise levels reached 118 dB(A). During partial obstruction of the sucker by cerumen or dermal flakes, peak noise levels reached 146 dB(A). Peak noise levels observed during the so-called clarinet phenomena were independent of the diameter or type of suckers used. Although micro-suction aural toilet is regarded as an established, widespread and usually safe method to clean the external auditory canal, some caution seems advisable. The performance of long-lasting suction periods straight in front of the eardrum without sound-protecting earwax between sucker and eardrum should be avoided. In particular, when clarinet phenomena are occurring (as described above), the suction procedure should be aborted immediately. In the presence of dermal flakes blocking the auditory canal, cleaning with micro-forceps or other non-suctioning instruments might represent a reasonable alternative.

  2. Modeling the characteristics of wheel/rail rolling noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Wai Keung; Li, Kai Ming; Frommer, Glenn H.

    2005-04-01

    To study the sound radiation characteristics of a passing train, four sets of noise measurements for different train operational conditions have been conducted at three different sites, including ballast tracks at grade and railway on a concrete viaduct. The time histories computed by the horizontal radiation models were compared with the measured noise profiles. The measured sound exposure levels are used to deduce the vertical directivity pattern for different railway systems. It is found that the vertical directivity of different railway systems shows a rather similar pattern. The vertical directivity of train noise is shown to increase up to about 30× before reducing to a minimum at 90×. A multipole expansion model is proposed to account for the vertical radiation directivity of the train noise. An empirical formula, which has been derived, compares well with the experimental data. The empirical model is found to be applicable to different train/rail systems at train speeds ranging up to 120 km/h in this study. [Work supported by MTR Corporation Ltd., Innovation Technology Commission of the HKSAR Government and The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

  3. Squeal noise in simple numerical brake models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberst, S.; Lai, J. C. S.

    2015-09-01

    Since the early 1920s, automotive disc brake squeal has caused warranty issues and customer dissatisfaction. Despite a good deal of progress achieved, predicting brake squeal propensity is as difficult as ever as not all mechanisms and interactions are known owing to their highly fugitive complex nature. In recent years, research has been focused on the prediction of unstable vibration modes by the complex eigenvalue analysis (CEA) for the mode-coupling type of instability. There has been very limited consideration given to the calculation of the acoustic radiation properties due to friction contact between a pad and a rotor. Recent analyses using a forced response analysis with harmonic contact pressure excitation indicates negative dissipated energy at some pad eigenfrequencies predicted to be stable by the CEA. A transient nonlinear time domain analysis with no external excitation indicates that squeal could develop at these eigenfrequencies. Here, the acoustic radiation characteristics of those pad modes are determined by analysing the acoustic power levels and radiation efficiencies of simplified brake models in the form of a pad rubbing on a plate or on a disc using the acoustic boundary element method based on velocities extracted from the forced response analysis. Results show that unstable pad modes trigger unstable disc vibrations resulting in instantaneous mode squeal similar to those observed experimentally. Changes in the radiation efficiency with pressure variations are smaller than those with friction coefficient variations and are caused by the phase difference of the velocities out-of-plane vibration between the pad and the disc.

  4. Reduced Noise Effect in Nonlinear Model Estimation Using Multiscale Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed N. Nounou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear process models are widely used in various applications. In the absence of fundamental models, it is usually relied on empirical models, which are estimated from measurements of the process variables. Unfortunately, measured data are usually corrupted with measurement noise that degrades the accuracy of the estimated models. Multiscale wavelet-based representation of data has been shown to be a powerful data analysis and feature extraction tool. In this paper, these characteristics of multiscale representation are utilized to improve the estimation accuracy of the linear-in-the-parameters nonlinear model by developing a multiscale nonlinear (MSNL modeling algorithm. The main idea in this MSNL modeling algorithm is to decompose the data at multiple scales, construct multiple nonlinear models at multiple scales, and then select among all scales the model which best describes the process. The main advantage of the developed algorithm is that it integrates modeling and feature extraction to improve the robustness of the estimated model to the presence of measurement noise in the data. This advantage of MSNL modeling is demonstrated using a nonlinear reactor model.

  5. A Stochastic Approach to Noise Modeling for Barometric Altimeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Maria Sabatini

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The question whether barometric altimeters can be applied to accurately track human motions is still debated, since their measurement performance are rather poor due to either coarse resolution or drifting behavior problems. As a step toward accurate short-time tracking of changes in height (up to few minutes, we develop a stochastic model that attempts to capture some statistical properties of the barometric altimeter noise. The barometric altimeter noise is decomposed in three components with different physical origin and properties: a deterministic time-varying mean, mainly correlated with global environment changes, and a first-order Gauss-Markov (GM random process, mainly accounting for short-term, local environment changes, the effects of which are prominent, respectively, for long-time and short-time motion tracking; an uncorrelated random process, mainly due to wideband electronic noise, including quantization noise. Autoregressive-moving average (ARMA system identification techniques are used to capture the correlation structure of the piecewise stationary GM component, and to estimate its standard deviation, together with the standard deviation of the uncorrelated component. M-point moving average filters used alone or in combination with whitening filters learnt from ARMA model parameters are further tested in few dynamic motion experiments and discussed for their capability of short-time tracking small-amplitude, low-frequency motions.

  6. A stochastic approach to noise modeling for barometric altimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Genovese, Vincenzo

    2013-11-18

    The question whether barometric altimeters can be applied to accurately track human motions is still debated, since their measurement performance are rather poor due to either coarse resolution or drifting behavior problems. As a step toward accurate short-time tracking of changes in height (up to few minutes), we develop a stochastic model that attempts to capture some statistical properties of the barometric altimeter noise. The barometric altimeter noise is decomposed in three components with different physical origin and properties: a deterministic time-varying mean, mainly correlated with global environment changes, and a first-order Gauss-Markov (GM) random process, mainly accounting for short-term, local environment changes, the effects of which are prominent, respectively, for long-time and short-time motion tracking; an uncorrelated random process, mainly due to wideband electronic noise, including quantization noise. Autoregressive-moving average (ARMA) system identification techniques are used to capture the correlation structure of the piecewise stationary GM component, and to estimate its standard deviation, together with the standard deviation of the uncorrelated component. M-point moving average filters used alone or in combination with whitening filters learnt from ARMA model parameters are further tested in few dynamic motion experiments and discussed for their capability of short-time tracking small-amplitude, low-frequency motions.

  7. Propeller aircraft interior noise model: User's manual for computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilby, E. G.; Pope, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program entitled PAIN (Propeller Aircraft Interior Noise) has been developed to permit calculation of the sound levels in the cabin of a propeller-driven airplane. The fuselage is modeled as a cylinder with a structurally integral floor, the cabin sidewall and floor being stiffened by ring frames, stringers and floor beams of arbitrary configurations. The cabin interior is covered with acoustic treatment and trim. The propeller noise consists of a series of tones at harmonics of the blade passage frequency. Input data required by the program include the mechanical and acoustical properties of the fuselage structure and sidewall trim. Also, the precise propeller noise signature must be defined on a grid that lies in the fuselage skin. The propeller data are generated with a propeller noise prediction program such as the NASA Langley ANOPP program. The program PAIN permits the calculation of the space-average interior sound levels for the first ten harmonics of a propeller rotating alongside the fuselage. User instructions for PAIN are given in the report. Development of the analytical model is presented in NASA CR 3813.

  8. A high-resolution ambient seismic noise model for Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Toni

    2014-05-01

    measurement precision (i.e. earthquake location), while considering this extremely complex boundary condition. To solve this problem I have developed a high-resolution ambient seismic noise model for Europe. The model is based on land-use data derived from satellite imagery by the EU-project CORINE in a resolution of 100x100m. The the CORINE data consists of several land-use classes, which, besides others, contain: industrial areas, mines, urban fabric, agricultural areas, permanent corps, forests and open spaces. Additionally, open GIS data for highways, and major and minor roads and railway lines were included from the OpenStreetMap project (www.openstreetmap.org). This data was divided into three classes that represent good, intermediate and bad ambient conditions of the corresponding land-use class based on expert judgment. To account for noise propagation away from its source a smoothing operator was applied to individual land-use noise-fields. Finally, the noise-fields were stacked to obtain an European map of ambient noise conditions. A calibration of this map with data of existing seismic stations Europe allowed me to estimate the expected noise level in actual ground motion units for the three ambient noise condition classes of the map. The result is a high-resolution ambient seismic noise map, that allows the network designer to make educated predictions on the expected noise level for arbitrary location in Europe. The ambient noise model was successfully tested in several network optimization projects in Switzerland and surrounding countries and will hopefully be a valuable contribution to improving the data quality of microseismic monitoring networks in Europe.

  9. Multivariate Product-Shot-noise Cox Point Process Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalilian, Abdollah; Guan, Yongtao; Mateu, Jorge

    We introduce a new multivariate product-shot-noise Cox process which is useful for model- ing multi-species spatial point patterns with clustering intra-specific interactions and neutral, negative or positive inter-specific interactions. The auto and cross pair correlation functions of the proces...... can be obtained in closed analytical forms and approximate simulation of the process is straightforward. We use the proposed process to model interactions within and among five tree species in the Barro Colorado Island plot.......We introduce a new multivariate product-shot-noise Cox process which is useful for model- ing multi-species spatial point patterns with clustering intra-specific interactions and neutral, negative or positive inter-specific interactions. The auto and cross pair correlation functions of the process...

  10. A Model Stitching Architecture for Continuous Full Flight-Envelope Simulation of Fixed-Wing Aircraft and Rotorcraft from Discrete Point Linear Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    aircraft mass to obtain the dimensional gravity forces: F grav = XgravYgrav Zgrav  = X̄gravȲgrav Z̄grav msim (2.45) The current simulation value ...simulation model. off-nominal An off-nominal configuration is an aircraft loading configuration with values of aircraft mass, inertia, and/or center of gravity ...CG) location that differ from the identified/baseline values . relinearize To obtain a state-space representation (and the corresponding stability

  11. Trailing Edge Noise Model Validation and Application to Airfoil Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Bak, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is twofold. First, an existing trailing edge noise model is validated by comparing with airfoil surface pressure fluctuations and far field sound pressure levels measured in three different experiments. The agreement is satisfactory in one case but poor in two other cases...... across the boundary layer near the trailing edge and to a lesser extent by a smaller boundary layer displacement thickness. ©2010 American Society of Mechanical Engineers...

  12. Improvement of TNO type trailing edge noise models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Andreas; Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes an improvement of the so-called TNO model to predict the noise emission from aerofoil sections due to the interaction of the boundary layer turbulence with the trailing edge. The surface pressure field close to the trailing edge acts as source of sound in the TNO model....... It is computed by solving a Poisson equation which includes flow turbulence cross correlation terms. Previously published TNO type models used the assumption of Blake to simplify the Poisson equation. This paper shows that the simplification should not be used. We present a new model which fully models...... the turbulence cross correlation terms. The predictions of the new model are in better agreement with measurements of the surface pressure and far field sound spectra. The computational cost of the new model is only slightly higher than the one of the TNO model, because we derived an analytical solution...

  13. Noise Simulations of the High-Lift Common Research Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Vatsa, Veer N.; O'Connell, Matthew D.; Duda, Benjamin; Fares, Ehab

    2017-01-01

    The PowerFLOW(TradeMark) code has been used to perform numerical simulations of the high-lift version of the Common Research Model (HL-CRM) that will be used for experimental testing of airframe noise. Time-averaged surface pressure results from PowerFLOW(TradeMark) are found to be in reasonable agreement with those from steady-state computations using FUN3D. Surface pressure fluctuations are highest around the slat break and nacelle/pylon region, and synthetic array beamforming results also indicate that this region is the dominant noise source on the model. The gap between the slat and pylon on the HL-CRM is not realistic for modern aircraft, and most nacelles include a chine that is absent in the baseline model. To account for those effects, additional simulations were completed with a chine and with the slat extended into the pylon. The case with the chine was nearly identical to the baseline, and the slat extension resulted in higher surface pressure fluctuations but slightly reduced radiated noise. The full-span slat geometry without the nacelle/pylon was also simulated and found to be around 10 dB quieter than the baseline over almost the entire frequency range. The current simulations are still considered preliminary as changes in the radiated acoustics are still being observed with grid refinement, and additional simulations with finer grids are planned.

  14. Critical noise of majority-vote model on complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hanshuang; He, Gang; Zhang, Haifeng; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2016-01-01

    The majority-vote model with noise is one of the simplest nonequilibrium statistical model that has been extensively studied in the context of complex networks. However, the relationship between the critical noise where the order-disorder phase transition takes place and the topology of the underlying networks is still lacking. In the paper, we use the heterogeneous mean-field theory to derive the rate equation for governing the model's dynamics that can analytically determine the critical noise $f_c$ in the limit of infinite network size $N\\rightarrow \\infty$. The result shows that $f_c$ depends on the ratio of ${\\left\\langle k \\right\\rangle }$ to ${\\left\\langle k^{3/2} \\right\\rangle }$, where ${\\left\\langle k \\right\\rangle }$ and ${\\left\\langle k^{3/2} \\right\\rangle }$ are the average degree and the $3/2$ order moment of degree distribution, respectively. Furthermore, we consider the finite size effect where the stochastic fluctuation should be involved. To the end, we derive the Langevin equation and obtai...

  15. Experimental Investigation of Rotorcraft Outwash in Ground Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Philip E.; Overmeyer, Austin D.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    The wake characteristics of a rotorcraft are affected by the proximity of a rotor to the ground surface, especially during hover. Ground effect is encountered when the rotor disk is within a distance of a few rotor radii above the ground surface and results in an increase in thrust for a given power relative to that same power condition with the rotor out of ground effect. Although this phenomenon has been highly documented and observed since the beginning of the helicopter age, there is still a relatively little amount of flow-field data existing to help understand its features. Joint Army and NASA testing was conducted at NASA Langley Research Center using a powered rotorcraft model in hover at various rotor heights and thrust conditions in order to contribute to the complete outwash data set. The measured data included outwash velocities and directions, rotor loads, fuselage loads, and ground pressures. The researchers observed a linear relationship between rotor height and percent download on the fuselage, peak mean outwash velocities occurring at radial stations between 1.7 and 1.8 r/R regardless of rotor height, and the measurement azimuthal dependence of the outwash profile for a model incorporating a fuselage. Comparisons to phase-locked PIV data showed similar contours but a more contracted wake boundary for the PIV data. This paper describes the test setup and presents some of the averaged results.

  16. A comparison of fatigue life prediction methodologies for rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Because of the current U.S. Army requirement that all new rotorcraft be designed to a 'six nines' reliability on fatigue life, this study was undertaken to assess the accuracy of the current safe life philosophy using the nominal stress Palmgrem-Miner linear cumulative damage rule to predict the fatigue life of rotorcraft dynamic components. It has been shown that this methodology can predict fatigue lives that differ from test lives by more than two orders of magnitude. A further objective of this work was to compare the accuracy of this methodology to another safe life method called the local strain approach as well as to a method which predicts fatigue life based solely on crack growth data. Spectrum fatigue tests were run on notched (k(sub t) = 3.2) specimens made of 4340 steel using the Felix/28 tests fairly well, being slightly on the unconservative side of the test data. The crack growth method, which is based on 'small crack' crack growth data and a crack-closure model, also predicted the fatigue lives very well with the predicted lives being slightly longer that the mean test lives but within the experimental scatter band. The crack growth model was also able to predict the change in test lives produced by the rainflow reconstructed spectra.

  17. Blogger, stick to your story: Modeling topical noise in blogs with coherence measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. He; W. Weerkamp; M. Larson; M. de Rijke

    2008-01-01

    Topical noise in blogs arises when bloggers digress from the central topical thrust of their blogs. We introduce a method to explicitly incorporate a model of topical noise into a language modeling approach to the task of blog distillation. Topical noise is integrated into the model using a coherenc

  18. An analytical channel thermal noise model for deep-submicron MOSFETs with short channel effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jongwook; Lee, Jong Duk; Park, Byung-Gook; Shin, Hyungcheol

    2007-07-01

    In this work, an analytical channel thermal noise model for short channel MOSFETs is derived. The transfer function of the noise was derived by following the Tsividis' method. The proposed model takes into account the channel length modulation, velocity saturation, and carrier heating effects in the gradual channel region. Modeling results show good agreements with the measured noise data.

  19. Acoustic FMRI noise: linear time-invariant system model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo Sierra, Carlos V; Versluis, Maarten J; Hoogduin, Johannes M; Duifhuis, Hendrikus Diek

    2008-09-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For auditory system studies, however, the acoustic noise generated by the scanner tends to interfere with the assessments of this activation. Understanding and modeling fMRI acoustic noise is a useful step to its reduction. To study acoustic noise, the MR scanner is modeled as a linear electroacoustical system generating sound pressure signals proportional to the time derivative of the input gradient currents. The transfer function of one MR scanner is determined for two different input specifications: 1) by using the gradient waveform calculated by the scanner software and 2) by using a recording of the gradient current. Up to 4 kHz, the first method is shown as reliable as the second one, and its use is encouraged when direct measurements of gradient currents are not possible. Additionally, the linear order and average damping properties of the gradient coil system are determined by impulse response analysis. Since fMRI is often based on echo planar imaging (EPI) sequences, a useful validation of the transfer function prediction ability can be obtained by calculating the acoustic output for the EPI sequence. We found a predicted sound pressure level (SPL) for the EPI sequence of 104 dB SPL compared to a measured value of 102 dB SPL. As yet, the predicted EPI pressure waveform shows similarity as well as some differences with the directly measured EPI pressure waveform.

  20. Propeller aircraft interior noise model utilization study and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    Utilization and validation of a computer program designed for aircraft interior noise prediction is considered. The program, entitled PAIN (an acronym for Propeller Aircraft Interior Noise), permits (in theory) predictions of sound levels inside propeller driven aircraft arising from sidewall transmission. The objective of the work reported was to determine the practicality of making predictions for various airplanes and the extent of the program's capabilities. The ultimate purpose was to discern the quality of predictions for tonal levels inside an aircraft occurring at the propeller blade passage frequency and its harmonics. The effort involved three tasks: (1) program validation through comparisons of predictions with scale-model test results; (2) development of utilization schemes for large (full scale) fuselages; and (3) validation through comparisons of predictions with measurements taken in flight tests on a turboprop aircraft. Findings should enable future users of the program to efficiently undertake and correctly interpret predictions.

  1. A general theory of rotorcraft trim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Peters

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we offer a general theory of rotorcraft trim. The theory is set in the context of control theory. It allows for completely arbitrary trim controls and trim settings for multi-rotor aircraft with tests to ensure that a system is trimmable. In addition, the theory allows for “optimal trim” in which some variable is minimized or maximized rather than set to a specified value. The theory shows that sequential trim cannot work for free flight. The theory is not tied to any particular trim algorithm; but, in this paper, it is exercised with periodic shooting to show how free-flying rotorcraft can be trimmed in a variety of ways (zero yaw, zero pitch, zero roll, minimum power, etc. by use of the general theory. The paper also discusses applications to harmonic balance and auto-pilot trim techniques.

  2. Preliminary Work for Modeling the Propellers of an Aircraft as a Noise Source in an Acoustic Boundary Element Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahopoulos, Nickolas; Lyle, Karen H.; Burley, Casey L.

    1998-01-01

    An algorithm for generating appropriate velocity boundary conditions for an acoustic boundary element analysis from the kinematics of an operating propeller is presented. It constitutes the initial phase of Integrating sophisticated rotorcraft models into a conventional boundary element analysis. Currently, the pressure field is computed by a linear approximation. An initial validation of the developed process was performed by comparing numerical results to test data for the external acoustic pressure on the surface of a tilt-rotor aircraft for one flight condition.

  3. Optimization-based controller design for rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsing, N.-K.; Fan, M. K. H.; Barlow, J.; Tits, A. L.; Tischler, M. B.

    1993-01-01

    An optimization-based methodology for linear control system design is outlined by considering the design of a controller for a UH-60 rotorcraft in hover. A wide range of design specifications is taken into account: internal stability, decoupling between longitudinal and lateral motions, handling qualities, and rejection of windgusts. These specifications are investigated while taking into account physical limitations in the swashplate displacements and rates of displacement. The methodology crucially relies on user-machine interaction for tradeoff exploration.

  4. The New Evolution for SIA Rotorcraft UAV Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntong Qi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes recent research on the design, implement, and testing of a new small-scaled rotorcraft Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (RUAV system—ServoHeli-40. A turbine-powered UAV weighted less than 15 kg was designed, and its major components were tested at the Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shenyang, China. The aircraft was designed to reach a top speed of more than 20 mps, flying a distance of more than 10 kilometers, and it is going to be used as a test-bed for experimentally evaluating advanced control methodologies dedicated on improving the maneuverability, reliability, as well as autonomy of RUAV. Sensors and controller are all onboard. The full system has been tested successfully in the autonomous mode using the multichannel active modeling controller. The results show that in a real windy environment the rotorcraft UAV can follow the trajectory which was assigned by the ground control station exactly, and the new control method is obviously more effective than the one in the past year's research.

  5. Robust Crossfeed Design for Hovering Rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapang, David R.

    1993-01-01

    Control law design for rotorcraft fly-by-wire systems normally attempts to decouple angular responses using fixed-gain crossfeeds. This approach can lead to poor decoupling over the frequency range of pilot inputs and increase the load on the feedback loops. In order to improve the decoupling performance, dynamic crossfeeds may be adopted. Moreover, because of the large changes that occur in rotorcraft dynamics due to small changes about the nominal design condition, especially for near-hovering flight, the crossfeed design must be 'robust'. A new low-order matching method is presented here to design robust crossfeed compensators for multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) systems. The technique identifies degrees-of-freedom that can be decoupled using crossfeeds, given an anticipated set of parameter variations for the range of flight conditions of concern. Cross-coupling is then reduced for degrees-of-freedom that can use crossfeed compensation by minimizing off-axis response magnitude average and variance. Results are presented for the analysis of pitch, roll, yaw and heave coupling of the UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter in near-hovering flight. Robust crossfeeds are designed that show significant improvement in decoupling performance and robustness over nominal, single design point, compensators. The design method and results are presented in an easily used graphical format that lends significant physical insight to the design procedure. This plant pre-compensation technique is an appropriate preliminary step to the design of robust feedback control laws for rotorcraft.

  6. Computational Wind Tunnel: A Design Tool for Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During initial design studies, parametric variation of vehicle geometry is routine. In addition, rotorcraft engineers traditionally use the wind tunnel to evaluate...

  7. Computational Wind Tunnel: A Design Tool for Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rotorcraft engineers traditionally use the wind tunnel to evaluate and finalize designs. Insufficient correlation between wind tunnel results and flight tests, have...

  8. Embedded Data Acquisition Tools for Rotorcraft Diagnostic Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ridgetop's innovation addresses the need for improved capabilities for detecting wear in the drive gears inside helicopter gearboxes. Rotorcraft drive trains must...

  9. Adaptive Rotorcraft Condition and Usage Tracking System (ARCUTS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — International Electronic Machines (IEM), a leader in the development of innovative sensor solutions for transportation systems, will develop the Adaptive Rotorcraft...

  10. A closed loop experiment of collective bounce aeroelastic Rotorcraft-Pilot Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masarati, Pierangelo; Quaranta, Giuseppe; Lu, Linghai; Jump, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study that investigated the possibility of destabilising a rotorcraft by coupling the biomechanical behaviour of human subjects with the dynamics of the vehicle. The results of a study focused on the behaviour of pilots holding the collective control inceptor in a flight simulator are discussed. The motion of the flight simulation model was restricted to the heave axis, and augmented to include an elastic mode of vibration in addition to the rigid heave degree of freedom. Four different pilots flew several alternative model configurations with different elastic mode frequency and different collective pitch gearing ratios. This resulted in several observable unstable pilot-vehicle interactions at frequencies that cannot be traced back to the rotorcraft dynamics. Unstable oscillatory events evolving into limit cycle oscillations occurred most often at frequencies related to the biomechanics of the flight simulator occupant. They appeared to be task dependent and, in some cases, the trigger could be attributed to specific events. Additionally, it was found that the presence of collective friction alleviates but does not completely eliminate the unstable interactions between the pilot and the rotorcraft. Although not statistically meaningful because of the small set of human subjects available for the study, the results confirmed that the biomechanics transfer function of the pilot is the most influential aspect of the pilot-vehicle system that gives rise to the adverse vertical bounce phenomenon. Additionally, this study gave useful insight into the vehicle parameters that can adversely influence the involuntary interaction of pilots with rotorcraft.

  11. Model based monitoring of traffic noise in an urban district

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, F. van der; Graafland, F.; Wessels, P.; Segers, A.; Salomons, E.

    2014-01-01

    Noise control for an urban district starts by understanding the actual noise situation. A correct understanding is needed to take appropriate and cost efficient measures. For a noise burdened urban district, surrounded by road and rail traffic, the traffic noise as well as the annoyance has been mea

  12. ROBUST (Rotorcraft Blade Universal Shape Transformation) System for Controlled Aerodynamic Warping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In rotorcraft flight dynamics, optimized warping camber/twist change is a potentially enabling technology for improved overall rotorcraft performance. Recent...

  13. A Convex Variational Model for Restoring Blurred Images with Multiplicative Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yiqiu; Tieyong Zeng

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a new variational model for restoring blurred images with multiplicative noise is proposed. Based on the statistical property of the noise, a quadratic penalty function technique is utilized in order to obtain a strictly convex model under a mild condition, which guarantees...... to multiplicative noise. A comparison with other methods is provided as well....

  14. Adaptive Noise Model for Transform Domain Wyner-Ziv Video using Clustering of DCT Blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luong, Huynh Van; Huang, Xin; Forchhammer, Søren

    2011-01-01

    The noise model is one of the most important aspects influencing the coding performance of Distributed Video Coding. This paper proposes a novel noise model for Transform Domain Wyner-Ziv (TDWZ) video coding by using clustering of DCT blocks. The clustering algorithm takes advantage of the residual...... information of all frequency bands, iteratively classifies blocks into different categories and estimates the noise parameter in each category. The experimental results show that the coding performance of the proposed cluster level noise model is competitive with state-ofthe- art coefficient level noise...... modelling. Furthermore, the proposed cluster level noise model is adaptively combined with a coefficient level noise model in this paper to robustly improve coding performance of TDWZ video codec up to 1.24 dB (by Bjøntegaard metric) compared to the DISCOVER TDWZ video codec....

  15. 3自由度旋翼飞行机械臂系统动力学建模与预测控制方法%Strategy of Dynamic Modeling and Predictive Control on 3-DoF Rotorcraft Aerial Manipulator System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋大雷; 孟祥冬; 齐俊桐; 韩建达

    2015-01-01

    Rotorcraft aerial manipulator (RAM) system is an aerial robot with manipulators. When performing precise operation in hovering mode, there exists relative disturbance between the rotorcraft aerial vehicle and the manipulator, which cannot be eliminated through establishing dynamic models of the manipulator and the rotorcraft separately. In this research, the overall dynamics model is firstly developed based on dynamic disturbance of the both components, which is simplified as a linear control reference model in hovering mode. The dynamics disturbance caused by rotor system’s control delay is compensated, and a predictive controller is designed to eliminate the errors of position and attitude of the end-effector. At last, control strategies are compared in simulative peg-in-hole tasks in cases of external and internal disturbances. The effectiveness of the proposed model and control method is verified by the simulation results of end-effector pose error.%旋翼飞行机械臂(rotorcraft aerial manipulator,RAM)系统是安装在飞行机器人上的可操作型机械臂,悬停模式下执行准确的空中操作时旋翼无人机与所加机械臂之间存在相对扰动,通过分离机械臂与飞行机器人进行动力学建模并不能有效消除这种扰动。本文基于对相互扰动力学作用的分析建立整体动力学模型,并在悬停飞行模式下将其简化为线性控制参考模型。进而对旋翼系统控制延时所引起的动力学扰动进行补偿,同时设计预测控制器来消除末端执行器的位置和姿态误差。最后,在存在内部和外部扰动的情况下,设定销钉插入操作任务进行控制方法的对比仿真。末端执行器位姿偏差的仿真结果表明了模型结构与控制方法的有效性。

  16. Noise-induced decline and propagation of population in the delayed Malthus-Verhulst model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jianchun; Mei, Dongcheng

    2010-06-01

    The effects of multiplicative and additive colored noises on decline and propagation processes of population in the delayed stochastic Malthus-Verhulst model are investigated by numerically computing and stochastically simulating. From the biological point of view, our results indicate that: the increasing correlation time of multiplicative noise strengthens the stability of population, and the correlation time of additive noise does not affect it. The increasing correlation time of multiplicative noise slows down the replacement of old individuals with young ones, while the increasing correlation time of additive noise with short delay time and the optimal correlation time of additive noise with long delay time quicken it.

  17. Noise monitoring and modeling on four lanning of national highways corridor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, P Shiyamala; Rosaline, G Vimala

    2012-10-01

    Noise emitted from traffic contributes to about 55% of total noise pollution in India. This paper is an effort of a research conducted to quantify and analyze the traffic noise emissions along the Salem-Namakkal NH 7 corridor with an ultimate objective of setting up a traffic noise model based on the traffic noise conditions of Indian cities. Noise levels and other variables have been measured in 15 locations to develop a statistical regression model based on A-weighted equivalent noise level for Indian road conditions. The ambient noise levels recorded represent the higher noise levels prevailing along the NH 7 corridor. The Receptor Oriented Technique adopted proves to be helpful in characterizing the ambient noise levels along the study area. The newly developed road traffic noise model can be effectively used as a decision support tool for predicting equivalent noise levels in the cities of India. The present analysis also reveals that the magnitude of noise levels has an increasing trend due to the increased traffic flow and presents the attention needed for minimization. The mitigation measures and the future evaluations are discussed.

  18. Numerical modeling of wind turbine aerodynamic noise in the time domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghoon; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Soogab

    2013-02-01

    Aerodynamic noise from a wind turbine is numerically modeled in the time domain. An analytic trailing edge noise model is used to determine the unsteady pressure on the blade surface. The far-field noise due to the unsteady pressure is calculated using the acoustic analogy theory. By using a strip theory approach, the two-dimensional noise model is applied to rotating wind turbine blades. The numerical results indicate that, although the operating and atmospheric conditions are identical, the acoustical characteristics of wind turbine noise can be quite different with respect to the distance and direction from the wind turbine.

  19. Comparison of the polynomial model against explicit measurements of noise components for different mammography systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnin, P.; Bosmans, H.; Verdun, F. R.; Marshall, N. W.

    2014-10-01

    Given the adverse impact of image noise on the perception of important clinical details in digital mammography, routine quality control measurements should include an evaluation of noise. The European Guidelines, for example, employ a second-order polynomial fit of pixel variance as a function of detector air kerma (DAK) to decompose noise into quantum, electronic and fixed pattern (FP) components and assess the DAK range where quantum noise dominates. This work examines the robustness of the polynomial method against an explicit noise decomposition method. The two methods were applied to variance and noise power spectrum (NPS) data from six digital mammography units. Twenty homogeneously exposed images were acquired with PMMA blocks for target DAKs ranging from 6.25 to 1600 µGy. Both methods were explored for the effects of data weighting and squared fit coefficients during the curve fitting, the influence of the additional filter material (2 mm Al versus 40 mm PMMA) and noise de-trending. Finally, spatial stationarity of noise was assessed. Data weighting improved noise model fitting over large DAK ranges, especially at low detector exposures. The polynomial and explicit decompositions generally agreed for quantum and electronic noise but FP noise fraction was consistently underestimated by the polynomial method. Noise decomposition as a function of position in the image showed limited noise stationarity, especially for FP noise; thus the position of the region of interest (ROI) used for noise decomposition may influence fractional noise composition. The ROI area and position used in the Guidelines offer an acceptable estimation of noise components. While there are limitations to the polynomial model, when used with care and with appropriate data weighting, the method offers a simple and robust means of examining the detector noise components as a function of detector exposure.

  20. Hybrid model decomposition of speech and noise in a radial basis function neural model framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Hartmann, Uwe

    1994-01-01

    applied is based on a combination of the hidden Markov model (HMM) decomposition method, for speech recognition in noise, developed by Varga and Moore (1990) from DRA and the hybrid (HMM/RBF) recognizer containing hidden Markov models and radial basis function (RBF) neural networks, developed by Singer...... and Lippmann (1992) from MIT Lincoln Lab. The present authors modified the hybrid recognizer to fit into the decomposition method to achieve high performance speech recognition in noisy environments. The approach has been denoted the hybrid model decomposition method and it provides an optimal method...... for decomposition of speech and noise by using a set of speech pattern models and a noise model(s), each realized as an HMM/RBF pattern model...

  1. Analysis and modeling of noise in biomedical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Jalaleddini, Kian; Lopez, Diego Guarin; Kearney, Robert E; Galiana, Henrietta L

    2013-01-01

    Noise characteristics play an important role in evaluating tools developed to study biomedical systems. Despite usual assumptions, noise in biomedical systems is often nonwhite or non-Gaussian. In this paper, we present a method to analyze the noise component of a biomedical system. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method in the analysis of noise in voluntary ankle torque measured by a torque transducer and eye movements measured by electro-oculography (EOG).

  2. Fatigue Crack Growth Threshold Testing of Metallic Rotorcraft Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John A.; James, Mark A.; Johnson, William M.; Le, Dy D.

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented for a program to determine the near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior appropriate for metallic rotorcraft alloys. Four alloys, all commonly used in the manufacture of rotorcraft, were selected for study: Aluminum alloy 7050, 4340 steel, AZ91E Magnesium, and Titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V (beta-STOA). The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sponsored this research to advance efforts to incorporate damage tolerance design and analysis as requirements for rotorcraft certification. Rotorcraft components are subjected to high cycle fatigue and are typically subjected to higher stresses and more stress cycles per flight hour than fixed-wing aircraft components. Fatigue lives of rotorcraft components are generally spent initiating small fatigue cracks that propagate slowly under near-threshold cracktip loading conditions. For these components, the fatigue life is very sensitive to the near-threshold characteristics of the material.

  3. Model based monitoring for industrial and traffic noise control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, F.J.M. van der; Binnerts, B.; Graafland, F.

    2015-01-01

    Noise control starts by understanding the actual noise situation. Especially for situations where the distance between industrial and traffic noise sources and a local community is in the order of one kilometer or more, it may not be clear what sources are the main contributors to annoyance. Then a

  4. Flow induced noise modelling for industrial piping systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijrath, H.; Ǎbom, M.

    2003-01-01

    Noise from e.g. gas-transport piping systems becomes more and more a problem for plants located close to urban areas. Too high noise levels are unacceptable and will put limitations on the plant capacity. Flow-induced noise of valves, orifices and headers installed in the installation plays a domina

  5. Underwater Noise Modeling and Direction-Finding Based on Heteroscedastic Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamarei Mahmoud

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new method for practical non-Gaussian and nonstationary underwater noise modeling. This model is very useful for passive sonar in shallow waters. In this application, measurement of additive noise in natural environment and exhibits shows that noise can sometimes be significantly non-Gaussian and a time-varying feature especially in the variance. Therefore, signal processing algorithms such as direction-finding that is optimized for Gaussian noise may degrade significantly in this environment. Generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (GARCH models are suitable for heavy tailed PDFs and time-varying variances of stochastic process. We use a more realistic GARCH-based noise model in the maximum-likelihood approach for the estimation of direction-of-arrivals (DOAs of impinging sources onto a linear array, and demonstrate using measured noise that this approach is feasible for the additive noise and direction finding in an underwater environment.

  6. Gaussian noise and the two-network frustrated Kuramoto model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Andrew B.; Zuparic, Mathew L.; Kalloniatis, Alexander C.

    2017-02-01

    We examine analytically and numerically a variant of the stochastic Kuramoto model for phase oscillators coupled on a general network. Two populations of phased oscillators are considered, labelled 'Blue' and 'Red', each with their respective networks, internal and external couplings, natural frequencies, and frustration parameters in the dynamical interactions of the phases. We disentangle the different ways that additive Gaussian noise may influence the dynamics by applying it separately on zero modes or normal modes corresponding to a Laplacian decomposition for the sub-graphs for Blue and Red. Under the linearisation ansatz that the oscillators of each respective network remain relatively phase-synchronised centroids or clusters, we are able to obtain simple closed-form expressions using the Fokker-Planck approach for the dynamics of the average angle of the two centroids. In some cases, this leads to subtle effects of metastability that we may analytically describe using the theory of ratchet potentials. These considerations are extended to a regime where one of the populations has fragmented in two. The analytic expressions we derive largely predict the dynamics of the non-linear system seen in numerical simulation. In particular, we find that noise acting on a more tightly coupled population allows for improved synchronisation of the other population where deterministically it is fragmented.

  7. An RF tag communication system model for noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qihe; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2008-04-01

    RF (radio-frequency) tags have drawn increasing research interest because of their great potential uses in many radio frequency identification applications. They can also be configured to work with radar as a communication channel by receiving radar acquisition signals, suitably coding these, and retransmitting them back to the radar. This paper proposes a system model for the communication between a noise radar and multiple RF tags. The radar interrogates the RF tags in a region of interest by sending ultrawideband noise signals. Upon receiving the radar's signal, all the tags within the radar's range wake up, and respond to the radar with simple messages. The RF tag filters the radar signal to a unique spectral band, which represents its identification information, and different RF tags occupy different non-overlapping bands of the spectrum of the radar signal. Tag messages are modulated onto the waveform through taps of weighted delays. The radar decodes the RF tag identifications and corresponding messages by cross-correlating the RF tag returned signals with the replica of the radar transmitted signal. Calculations and simulation results both show that the proposed system is capable of communicating simple messages between RF tags and radar.

  8. A new approach to active control of rotorcraft vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, N. K.; Du Val, R. W.; Fuller, J.

    1980-01-01

    A state-variable feedback approach is utilized for active control of rotorcraft vibration. Fuselage accelerations are passed through undamped second-order filters with resonant frequencies at N/rev. The resulting outputs contain predominantly the N/rev vibration components, phase shifted by 180 deg, and are used to drive the blade pitch to cancel this component of fuselage vibration. The linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) method is used to design a feedback control system utilizing these filtered accelerations. The design is based on a nine-degree-of-freedom linear model of the Rotor System Research Aircraft (RSRA) in hover and is evaluated on a nonlinear blade-element simulation of the RSRA for this flight condition. The system is shown to essentially eliminate vibrations at N/rev in all axes. The required blade-pitch amplitude is within the capability of conventional actuators at the N/rev frequency.

  9. Disturbance Observer Based Control of Small Unmanned Aerial Rotorcraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xusheng Lei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a complex system, the control performance of small unmanned aerial rotorcraft is easily affected by the dynamic model errors, measurement errors, and environment disturbances. This paper proposes a disturbance observer based control method to improve performance. The disturbance observer based control is constructed by the feedback control and a series of integral filters. The system stability can be guaranteed by the feedback control method. Furthermore, the disturbances can be estimated and eliminated quickly by the integral filters. Therefore, the control performance can be improved effectively. The control performance of the disturbance observer based control has been validated by a series of flight tests. Compared with feedback control, the disturbance observer based control yields a better tracking performance in the presence of disturbances.

  10. High Order Wavelet-Based Multiresolution Technology for Airframe Noise Prediction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An integrated framework is proposed for efficient prediction of rotorcraft and airframe noise. A novel wavelet-based multiresolution technique and high-order...

  11. Experimentation Toward the Analysis of Gear Noise Sources Controlled by Sliding Friction and Surface Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnani, Vivake M.

    2004-01-01

    In helicopters and other rotorcraft, the gearbox is a major source of noise and vibration (N&V). The two N&V excitation mechanisms are the relative displacements between mating gears (transmission errors) and the friction associated with sliding between gear teeth. Historically, transmission errors have been minimized via improved manufacturing accuracies and tooth modifications. Yet, at high torque loads, noise levels are still relatively high though transmission errors might be somewhat minimal. This suggests that sliding friction is indeed a dominant noise source for high power density rotorcraft gearboxes. In reality, friction source mechanism is associated with surface roughness, lubrication regime properties, time-varying friction forces/torques and gear-mesh interface dynamics. Currently, the nature of these mechanisms is not well understood, while there is a definite need for analytical tools that incorporate sliding resistance and surface roughness, and predict their effects on the vibro- acoustic behavior of gears. Toward this end, an experiment was conducted to collect sound and vibration data on the NASA Glenn Gear-Noise Rig. Three iterations of the experiment were accomplished: Iteration 1 tested a baseline set of gears to establish a benchmark. Iteration 2 used a gear-set with low surface asperities to reduce the sliding friction excitation. Iteration 3 incorporated low viscosity oil with the baseline set of gears to examine the effect of lubrication. The results from this experiment will contribute to a two year project in collaboration with the Ohio State University to develop the necessary mathematical and computer models for analyzing geared systems and explain key physical phenomena seen in experiments. Given the importance of sliding friction in the gear dynamic and vibro-acoustic behavior of rotorcraft gearboxes, there is considerable potential for research & developmental activities. Better models and understanding will lead to quiet and

  12. Rotorcraft Crash Mishap Analysis (Revised)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Multiple injuries in the same region (e.g., multiple vertebral injuries) will increase the frequency for that body region. A second set of maps was...installation of an energy absorbing seat might prevent three lumbar fractures for the copilot, but that is one person who has avoided serious injury, not...speed, and ground speed, will look like: FSI = c1*(vertical speed) + c2 *(ground speed) + k The regression model provides values for the coefficients

  13. Workshop on Dynamics and Aeroelastic Stability Modeling of Rotorcraft Systems (3rd), Held in Durham, North Carolina on March 12-14, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-14

    computed. However an aerolastic analysis of a rotor blade, basedm on this model, is not available to date. Receny Minguet and Dugundji [55,56] have...AL, April 1989, *pp. 10-86 -15- I 56 Minguet, P. and Dugundji , J., "Expenments and Analysis for Structurally Coupled Composite Blades Under Large

  14. Gear noise, vibration, and diagnostic studies at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrajsek, J. J.; Oswald, F. B.; Townsend, D. P.; Coy, J. J.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command are involved in a joint research program to advance the technology of rotorcraft transmissions. This program consists of analytical as well as experimental efforts to achieve the overall goals of reducing weight, noise, and vibration, while increasing life and reliability. Recent analytical activities are highlighted in the areas of gear noise, vibration, and diagnostics performed in-house and through NASA and U.S. Army sponsored grants and contracts. These activities include studies of gear tooth profiles to reduce transmission error and vibration as well as gear housing and rotordynamic modeling to reduce structural vibration and transmission and noise radiation, and basic research into current gear failure diagnostic methodologies. Results of these activities are presented along with an overview of near-term research plans in the gear noise, vibration, and diagnostics area.

  15. Parameter Estimation for Traffic Noise Models Using a Harmony Search Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deok-Soon An

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A technique has been developed for predicting road traffic noise for environmental assessment, taking into account traffic volume as well as road surface conditions. The ASJ model (ASJ Prediction Model for Road Traffic Noise, 1999, which is based on the sound power level of the noise emitted by the interaction between the road surface and tires, employs regression models for two road surface types: dense-graded asphalt (DGA and permeable asphalt (PA. However, these models are not applicable to other types of road surfaces. Accordingly, this paper introduces a parameter estimation procedure for ASJ-based noise prediction models, utilizing a harmony search (HS algorithm. Traffic noise measurement data for four different vehicle types were used in the algorithm to determine the regression parameters for several road surface types. The parameters of the traffic noise prediction models were evaluated using another measurement set, and good agreement was observed between the predicted and measured sound power levels.

  16. Embedded Data Acquisition Tools for Rotorcraft Diagnostic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Rotorcraft drive trains must withstand enormous pressure while operating continuously in extreme temperature and vibration environments. Captive components, such as planetary and spiral bevel gears, see enormous strain but are not accessible to fixed instrumentation, such as a piezoelectric transducer. Thus, it is difficult to directly monitor components that are most susceptible to damage. This innovation is a self-contained data processing unit within a specialized fixture that installs directly inside the rotating pinion gear in the gearbox. From this location, it detects and transmits high-resolution prognostic data to a fixed transceiver. The sensor is based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology and uses innovative circuit designs to capture high-bandwidth data and transmit it wirelessly from inside an operational helicopter transmission. With Ridgetop's advanced MEMS-based sensor, researchers have, for the first time, been able to extract high-resolution acoustic signatures wirelessly from sensors within the transmission that would otherwise be muffled by background gear noises. Ridgetop's innovative instrument will help researchers perform dynamic analysis of gear interaction and develop improved designs for gear components. In addition, data from this instrument can be used to validate new algorithms that detect and predict faults based on external acoustic signatures, for prognostic purposes. The result of this work will be an improvement in safety, performance, and cost for future generations of rotating components.

  17. De-noising Diurnal Variation Data in Geomagnetic Field Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onovughe, E.

    2017-01-01

    Ground based geomagnetic observatory series have been used to investigate and describe the residuals between a continuous geomagnetic field model and observed diurnal variation for noise-removal of signal due to external field of magnetospheric ring current sources. In all the observatories studied, the residuals in the X-direction consistently show the noisiest signal. Results show that the residuals in the X-direction correlates closely with the RC-index, suggesting an origin from unmodelled external field variation. Notable cross-correlation is also seen between the residuals and the RC-index at zero-lag. Removal/reduction of this unmodelled signal enhances resolution of fine-scale detail in diurnal variation studies.

  18. Digital control of highly augmented combat rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Mark B.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed concepts for the next generation of combat helicopters are to be embodied in a complex, highly maneuverable, multiroled vehicle with avionics systems. Single pilot and nap-of-the-Earth operations require handling qualities which minimize the involvement of the pilot in basic stabilization tasks. To meet these requirements will demand a full authority, high-gain, multimode, multiply-redundant, digital flight-control system. The gap between these requirements and current low-authority, low-bandwidth operational rotorcraft flight-control technology is considerable. This research aims at smoothing the transition between current technology and advanced concept requirements. The state of the art of high-bandwidth digital flight-control systems are reviewed; areas of specific concern for flight-control systems of modern combat are exposed; and the important concepts are illustrated in design and analysis of high-gain, digital systems with a detailed case study involving a current rotorcraft system. Approximate and exact methods are explained and illustrated for treating the important concerns which are unique to digital systems.

  19. The Effects of Ambient Conditions on Helicopter Harmonic Noise Radiation: Theory and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Eric; Sim, Ben W.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of ambient atmospheric conditions, air temperature and density, on rotor harmonic noise radiation are characterized using theoretical models and experimental measurements of helicopter noise collected at three different test sites at elevations ranging from sea level to 7000 ft above sea level. Significant changes in the thickness, loading, and blade-vortex interaction noise levels and radiation directions are observed across the different test sites for an AS350 helicopter flying at the same indicated airspeed and gross weight. However, the radiated noise is shown to scale with ambient pressure when the flight condition of the helicopter is defined in nondimensional terms. Although the effective tip Mach number is identified as the primary governing parameter for thickness noise, the nondimensional weight coefficient also impacts lower harmonic loading noise levels, which contribute strongly to low frequency harmonic noise radiation both in and out of the plane of the horizon. Strategies for maintaining the same nondimensional rotor operating condition under different ambient conditions are developed using an analytical model of single main rotor helicopter trim and confirmed using a CAMRAD II model of the AS350 helicopter. The ability of the Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustics Modeling from Experiments (FRAME) technique to generalize noise measurements made under one set of ambient conditions to make accurate noise predictions under other ambient conditions is also validated.

  20. Modeling of road traffic noise and estimated human exposure in Fulton County, Georgia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Jeong C; Park, Tae H; Ko, Joon H; Chang, Seo I; Kim, Minho; Holt, James B; Mehdi, Mohammed R

    2011-11-01

    Environmental noise is a major source of public complaints. Noise in the community causes physical and socio-economic effects and has been shown to be related to adverse health impacts. Noise, however, has not been actively researched in the United States compared with the European Union countries in recent years. In this research, we aimed at modeling road traffic noise and analyzing human exposure in Fulton County, Georgia, United States. We modeled road traffic noise levels using the United States Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration Traffic Noise Model implemented in SoundPLAN®. After analyzing noise levels with raster, vector and façade maps, we estimated human exposure to high noise levels. Accurate digital elevation models and building heights were derived from Light Detection And Ranging survey datasets and building footprint boundaries. Traffic datasets were collected from the Georgia Department of Transportation and the Atlanta Regional Commission. Noise level simulation was performed with 62 computers in a distributed computing environment. Finally, the noise-exposed population was calculated using geographic information system techniques. Results show that 48% of the total county population [N=870,166 residents] is potentially exposed to 55 dB(A) or higher noise levels during daytime. About 9% of the population is potentially exposed to 67 dB(A) or higher noises. At nighttime, 32% of the population is expected to be exposed to noise levels higher than 50 dB(A). This research shows that large-scale traffic noise estimation is possible with the help of various organizations. We believe that this research is a significant stepping stone for analyzing community health associated with noise exposures in the United States.

  1. Modelling the effect of telegraph noise in the SIRS epidemic model using Markovian switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, D.; Liang, Y.; Mao, X.

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the effect of introducing telegraph noise, which is an example of an environmental noise, into the susceptible-infectious-recovered-susceptible (SIRS) model by examining the model using a finite-state Markov Chain (MC). First we start with a two-state MC and show that there exists a unique nonnegative solution and establish the conditions for extinction and persistence. We then explain how the results can be generalised to a finite-state MC. The results for the SIR (Susceptible-Infectious-Removed) model with Markovian Switching (MS) are a special case. Numerical simulations are produced to confirm our theoretical results.

  2. Modeling of quantization noise in linear analog-to-digital converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švihlík, Jan; Fliegel, Karel

    2013-09-01

    Quantization noise is present in all the current digital imaging systems, therefore its understanding and modeling is crucial for optimization of image reconstruction techniques. Hence, this paper deals with modeling of the quantization noise. We exploit the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) for signal representation. We assume that the quantization noise in the spatial domain can be seen as additive, white and uniformly distributed. Hence, the UWT causes the transform of noise distribution due to weighted sum of noise samples and filter coefficients. From the known quantization step we are able to estimate suitable moments of noise uniform probability density function (PDF). These moments then could be directly evaluated in the undecimated wavelet domain using the derived equations. The presented algorithm gives the a priori information about the quantization noise and can be used for the suppression of it.

  3. The method of narrow-band audio classification based on universal noise background model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Rui; Bao, Chang-chun

    2013-03-01

    Audio classification is the basis of content-based audio analysis and retrieval. The conventional classification methods mainly depend on feature extraction of audio clip, which certainly increase the time requirement for classification. An approach for classifying the narrow-band audio stream based on feature extraction of audio frame-level is presented in this paper. The audio signals are divided into speech, instrumental music, song with accompaniment and noise using the Gaussian mixture model (GMM). In order to satisfy the demand of actual environment changing, a universal noise background model (UNBM) for white noise, street noise, factory noise and car interior noise is built. In addition, three feature schemes are considered to optimize feature selection. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm achieves a high accuracy for audio classification, especially under each noise background we used and keep the classification time less than one second.

  4. Efficient Modeling of Distributed Power-Supply Noise of Deep Submicron Chip for EMI-Noise Suppression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGJun

    2004-01-01

    The effects of power-supply noise on radiated electromagnetic interference of deep submicron chip are studied by simulating the distributed properties of power-supply network. The model is characterized by a lumped configuration but completely, effectively includes the distributed, coupled feature of interconnection. Interconnections are modeled as resistances, inductances and capacitances to match the distributed transmission behavior. And the switching-activity profiles of the functional circuit modules in chip are represented by the time-varying current sources. Accordingly, this model can be used to predict the signal integrity for high-speed and high-density VLSI design. Further, the integrated decoupling capacitors are used for the increased circuit density, reduced parasitics and increased reliability. Since the noise correlations between the different functional modules are considered effectively in the process of estimating the power-supply noise, the adequate allocation of decoupling capacitance in some functional module can also suppress the powersupply noise of the functional modules correlated with it, which will lead to save the layout space occupied by the decoupling capacitors.

  5. Initial Integration of Noise Prediction Tools for Acoustic Scattering Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Burley, Casey L.; Tinetti, Ana; Rawls, John W.

    2008-01-01

    This effort provides an initial glimpse at NASA capabilities available in predicting the scattering of fan noise from a non-conventional aircraft configuration. The Aircraft NOise Prediction Program, Fast Scattering Code, and the Rotorcraft Noise Model were coupled to provide increased fidelity models of scattering effects on engine fan noise sources. The integration of these codes led to the identification of several keys issues entailed in applying such multi-fidelity approaches. In particular, for prediction at noise certification points, the inclusion of distributed sources leads to complications with the source semi-sphere approach. Computational resource requirements limit the use of the higher fidelity scattering code to predict radiated sound pressure levels for full scale configurations at relevant frequencies. And, the ability to more accurately represent complex shielding surfaces in current lower fidelity models is necessary for general application to scattering predictions. This initial step in determining the potential benefits/costs of these new methods over the existing capabilities illustrates a number of the issues that must be addressed in the development of next generation aircraft system noise prediction tools.

  6. Intensity Correlation Function and Associated Relaxation Time of a Saturation Laser Model with Correlated Noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ping; CHEN Shi-Bo; MEI Dong-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the intensity correlation function C(s) and its associated relaxation time Tc for a saturation model of single-mode laser with correlated noises.The expressions of C(s) and Tc are derived by means of the projection operator method,and effects of correlations between an additive noise and a multiplicative noise are discussed by numerical calculation.Based on the calculated results,it is found that the correlation strength λ between the additive noise and the multiplicative noise can enhance the fluctuation decay of the laser intensity.

  7. Columnar architecture improves noise robustness in a model cortical network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Bush

    Full Text Available Cortical columnar architecture was discovered decades ago yet there is no agreed upon explanation for its function. Indeed, some have suggested that it has no function, it is simply an epiphenomenon of developmental processes. To investigate this problem we have constructed a computer model of one square millimeter of layer 2/3 of the primary visual cortex (V1 of the cat. Model cells are connected according to data from recent paired cell studies, in particular the connection probability between pyramidal cells is inversely proportional both to the distance separating the cells and to the distance between the preferred parameters (features of the cells. We find that these constraints, together with a columnar architecture, produce more tightly clustered populations of cells when compared to the random architecture seen in, for example, rodents. This causes the columnar network to converge more quickly and accurately on the pattern representing a particular stimulus in the presence of noise, suggesting that columnar connectivity functions to improve pattern recognition in cortical circuits. The model also suggests that synaptic failure, a phenomenon exhibited by weak synapses, may conserve metabolic resources by reducing transmitter release at these connections that do not contribute to network function.

  8. Spontaneous fluctuations in a zero-noise model of flocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Bhattacharya, Kunal

    2016-11-01

    Investigations into the complex structure and dynamics of collectively moving groups of living organisms have provided valuable insights. Understanding the emergent features, especially, the origin of fluctuations, appears to be challenging in the current scheme of models. It has been argued that flocks are poised at criticality. We present a two-dimensional self-propelled particle model where neighbourhoods and forces are defined through topology-based rules. The attractive forces are modeled in order to maintain cohesion in the flock in open-boundary conditions. We find that fluctuations occur spontaneously in the absence of any external noise. For certain values of the parameters the flock shows a high degree of order as well as scale-free decay of spatial correlations in velocity and speed. We characterize the dynamical behaviour of the system using the Lyapunov spectrum. Largest exponents being positive but small in magnitude suggest that the apparent high susceptibility may result from the system operating near the borderline of order and chaos.

  9. Removal of correlated noise by modeling the signal of interest in the wavelet domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Bart; Pizurica, Aleksandra; Philips, Wilfried

    2009-06-01

    Images, captured with digital imaging devices, often contain noise. In literature, many algorithms exist for the removal of white uncorrelated noise, but they usually fail when applied to images with correlated noise. In this paper, we design a new denoising method for the removal of correlated noise, by modeling the significance of the noise-free wavelet coefficients in a local window using a new significance measure that defines the "signal of interest" and that is applicable to correlated noise. We combine the intrascale model with a hidden Markov tree model to capture the interscale dependencies between the wavelet coefficients. We propose a denoising method based on the combined model and a less redundant wavelet transform. We present results that show that the new method performs as well as the state-of-the-art wavelet-based methods, while having a lower computational complexity.

  10. Predictive modelling of noise level generated during sawing of rocks by circular diamond sawblades

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Izzet Karakurt; Gokhan Aydin; Kerim Aydiner

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental and statistical study on noise level generated during of rock sawing by circular diamond sawblades. Influence of the operating variables and rock properties on the noise level are investigated and analysed. Statistical analyses are then employed and models are built for the prediction of noise levels depending on the operating variables and the rock properties. The derived models are validated through some statistical tests. It is found that increasing of peripheral speed, traverse speed and cutting depth result in an increase in noise levels. On the other hand, a decreasing trend for noise levels is initially observed with the increasing of flow rate of cooling fluid. It is also determined that there are moderate correlations between uniaxial compressive strength, density and noise levels. Furthermore, the modelling results reveal that the predictive models have high potentials as guidance for practical applications.

  11. Modeling Thermal Noise From Crystalline Coatings For Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Nicholas; Lovelace, Geoffrey; LSC Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, Advanced LIGO made the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The sensitivity of current and future ground-based gravitational-wave detectors is limited by thermal noise in each detector's test mass substrate and coating. This noise can be modeled using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, which relates thermal noise to an auxiliary elastic problem. I will present results from a new code that numerically models thermal noise for different crystalline mirror coatings. The thermal noise in crystalline mirror coatings could be significantly lower but is challenging to model analytically. The code uses a finite element method with adaptive mesh refinement to model the auxiliary elastic problem which is then related to thermal noise. Specifically, I will show results for a crystal coating on an amorphous substrate of varying sizes and elastic properties. This and future work will help develop the next generation of ground-based gravitational-wave detectors.

  12. A combined aeroelastic-aeroacoustic model for wind turbine noise: Verification and analysis of field measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Fischer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, semi-empirical engineering models for the three main wind turbine aerodynamic noise sources, namely, turbulent inflow, trailing edge and stall noise, are introduced. They are implemented into the in-house aeroelastic code HAWC2 commonly used for wind turbine load calculations...... and design. The results of the combined aeroelastic and aeroacoustic model are compared with field noise measurements of a 500kW wind turbine. Model and experimental data are in fairly good agreement in terms of noise levels and directivity. The combined model allows separating the various noise sources...... and highlights a number of mechanisms that are difficult to differentiate when only the overall noise from a wind turbine is measured....

  13. Noise calculation model and analysis of high-gain readout circuits for CMOS image sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Shoji; Itoh, Shinya

    2008-02-01

    A thermal noise calculation model of high-gain switched-capacitor column noise cancellers for CMOS image sensors is presented. In the high-gain noise canceller with a single noise cancelling stage, the reset noise of the readout circuits dominates the noise at high gain. Using the double-stage architecture using a switched-capacitor gain stage and a sample-and-hold stage using two sampling capacitors, the reset noise of the gain stage can be cancelled. The resulting input referred thermal noise power of high-gain double-stage switched-capacitor noise canceller is revealed to be proportional to (g_a/g_s)/GC_L where g_a, G and C_L are the transconductance, gain and output capacitance of the amplifier, respectively, and g_s is the output conductance of an in-pixel source follower. An important contribution of the proposed noise calculation formula is the inclusion of the influence of the transconductance ratio of the amplifier to that of the source follower. For low-noise design, it is important that the transconductance of the amplifier used in the noise canceller is minimized under the condition of meeting the required response time of the switched capacitor amplifier which is inversely proportional to the cutoff angular frequency.

  14. Rotorcraft pilot coupling susceptibility accompanying handling qualities prospects in preliminary rotorcraft design.

    OpenAIRE

    Yilmaz, D; Dang Vu, B.; M. Jones

    2012-01-01

    Due to expensive and risky Rotorcraft-Pilot Couplings (RPC) that can develop during flight testing phases of any new prototype aircraft, it is beneficial to crosscheck the RPC susceptibility of the vehicle as early as possible during the design process. One of the objectives of the European project ARISTOTEL (2010-2013) is to provide guidelines to designers and simulator programs to reveal RPC aspects of the vehicle to be designed. First, a methodology to assess the sensitivity of Handling Qu...

  15. Development of a traffic noise prediction model for an urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Asheesh; Bodhe, G L; Schimak, G

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a traffic noise model under diverse traffic conditions in metropolitan cities. The model has been developed to calculate equivalent traffic noise based on four input variables i.e. equivalent traffic flow (Q e ), equivalent vehicle speed (S e ) and distance (d) and honking (h). The traffic data is collected and statistically analyzed in three different cases for 15-min during morning and evening rush hours. Case I represents congested traffic where equivalent vehicle speed is 30 km/h and case III represents calm traffic where no honking is recorded. The noise model showed better results than earlier developed noise model for Indian traffic conditions. A comparative assessment between present and earlier developed noise model has also been presented in the study. The model is validated with measured noise levels and the correlation coefficients between measured and predicted noise levels were found to be 0.75, 0.83 and 0.86 for case I, II and III respectively. The noise model performs reasonably well under different traffic conditions and could be implemented for traffic noise prediction at other region as well.

  16. Percolation model of excess electrical noise in transition-edge sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindeman, M.A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)]. E-mail: lindeman@wisp.physics.wisc.edu; Anderson, M.B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bandler, S.R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bilgri, N. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Chervenak, J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gwynne Crowder, S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Fallows, S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Figueroa-Feliciano, E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Finkbeiner, F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Iyomoto, N. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kelley, R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kilbourne, C.A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lai, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Man, J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); McCammon, D. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Nelms, K.L. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Porter, F.S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Rocks, L.E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Saab, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sadleir, J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Vidugiris, G. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    We present a geometrical model to describe excess electrical noise in transition-edge sensors (TESs). In this model, a network of fluctuating resistors represents the complex dynamics inside a TES. The fluctuations can cause several resistors in series to become superconducting. Such events short out part of the TES and generate noise because much of the current percolates through low resistance paths. The model predicts that excess white noise increases with decreasing TES bias resistance (R/R{sub N}) and that perpendicular zebra stripes reduce noise and alpha of the TES by reducing percolation.

  17. Effects of noise variance model on optimal feedback design and actuator placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Mifang; Choudhury, Ajit K.

    1994-01-01

    In optimal placement of actuators for stochastic systems, it is commonly assumed that the actuator noise variances are not related to the feedback matrix and the actuator locations. In this paper, we will discuss the limitation of that assumption and develop a more practical noise variance model. Various properties associated with optimal actuator placement under the assumption of this noise variance model are discovered through the analytical study of a second order system.

  18. Modeling noise-induced resonance in an excitable system: an alternative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurujjaman, Md

    2010-03-01

    Recently, it has been observed [Md. Nurujjaman, Phy. Rev. E 80, 015201(R) (2009)] that in an excitable system, one can maintain noise-induced coherency in the coherence resonance by blocking the destructive effect of the noise on the system at higher noise level. This phenomenon of constant coherence resonance (CCR) cannot be explained by the existing way of simulation of the model equations of an excitable system with added noise. In this paper, we have proposed a general model which explains the noise-induced resonance phenomenon CCR as well as coherence resonance (CR) and stochastic resonance (SR). The simulation has been carried out considering the basic mechanism of noise-induced resonance phenomena: noise only perturbs the system control parameter to excite coherent oscillations, taking proper precautions so that the destructive effect of noise does not affect the system. In this approach, the CR has been obtained from the interference between the system output and noise and the SR has been obtained by adding noise and a subthreshold signal. This also explains the observation of the frequency shift of coherent oscillations in the CCR with noise level.

  19. Modeling the Non-Linear Behavior of Library Cells for an Accurate Static Noise Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Forzan, Cristiano

    2011-01-01

    In signal integrity analysis, the joint effect of propagated noise through library cells, and of the noise injected on a quiet net by neighboring switching nets through coupling capacitances, must be considered in order to accurately estimate the overall noise impact on design functionality and performances. In this work the impact of the cell non-linearity on the noise glitch waveform is analyzed in detail, and a new macromodel that allows to accurately and efficiently modeling the non-linear effects of the victim driver in noise analysis is presented. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of our method, and confirm that existing noise analysis approaches based on linear superposition of the propagated and crosstalk-injected noise can be highly inaccurate, thus impairing the sign-off functional verification phase.

  20. 可重构旋翼无人飞行器的动力学建模与分析%Dynamics Modeling and Analysis of a Reconfigurable Rotorcraft Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮晓钢; 侯旭阳; 龚道雄

    2013-01-01

    提出了一种具有可重构能力的旋翼无人飞行器(RUAV),其执行机构主要由内置在涵道中的主旋翼、环绕主旋翼的4个辅旋翼以及涵道末端的2个副翼组成,其中辅旋翼与主旋翼、副翼的部分功能重合以使系统具备重构控制能力.运用牛顿-欧拉方法建立了旋翼无人飞行器的6自由度(6DOF)动力学模型.基于此模型,首先分析了在悬停状态附近系统发生不同故障时的可控性,然后基于控制可重构度的概念分析了在发生不同程度故障时系统的容错能力,在此基础上构建了飞行器的多模型重构控制器,最后通过仿真实验分别对系统的动态响应特性和重构控制效果进行了分析.结果显示,旋翼无人飞行器具有较好的动态响应特性,且对一定范围内的故障具有较好的鲁棒性.本文提出的模型及相关分析为旋翼无人飞行器的容错设计和控制提供了一定的理论依据.%A kind of reconfigurable rotorcraft unmanned aerial vehicle (RUAV) is presented. Its actuators consist of the major rotor inside the duct, four auxiliary rotors surrounding the major rotor and two ailerons at the end of the duct, and the auxiliary rotors have some similar functions as that of the major rotor and ailerons in order to achieve reconfigurable control of the system. The Newton-Euler method is adopted to build 6-DOF (degree of freedom) dynamic model of the RUAV. Based on the model, the controllability of the system in different fault cases is analyzed near the hover state. Then, the fault-tolerance performance of the system with different fault degrees is analyzed based on the notation of control reconfigurability, and the analysis helps to build the multi-model reconfigurable controller. At last, the dynamic response characteristics and reconfigurable control performance of the system are analyzed by simulation, respectively. The result shows that the RUAV has good dynamic response characteristics and

  1. System analysis in rotorcraft design: The past decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Thomas L.

    1988-01-01

    Rapid advances in the technology of electronic digital computers and the need for an integrated synthesis approach in developing future rotorcraft programs has led to increased emphasis on system analysis techniques in rotorcraft design. The task in systems analysis is to deal with complex, interdependent, and conflicting requirements in a structured manner so rational and objective decisions can be made. Whether the results are wisdom or rubbish depends upon the validity and sometimes more importantly, the consistency of the inputs, the correctness of the analysis, and a sensible choice of measures of effectiveness to draw conclusions. In rotorcraft design this means combining design requirements, technology assessment, sensitivity analysis and reviews techniques currently in use by NASA and Army organizations in developing research programs and vehicle specifications for rotorcraft. These procedures span simple graphical approaches to comprehensive analysis on large mainframe computers. Examples of recent applications to military and civil missions are highlighted.

  2. Rotorcraft Research at the NASA Vertical Motion Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponso, Bimal Lalith; Tran, Duc T.; Schroeder, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    In the 1970 s the role of the military helicopter evolved to encompass more demanding missions including low-level nap-of-the-earth flight and operation in severely degraded visual environments. The Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) at the NASA Ames Research Center was built to provide a high-fidelity simulation capability to research new rotorcraft concepts and technologies that could satisfy these mission requirements. The VMS combines a high-fidelity large amplitude motion system with an adaptable simulation environment including interchangeable and configurable cockpits. In almost 30 years of operation, rotorcraft research on the VMS has contributed significantly to the knowledge-base on rotorcraft performance, handling qualities, flight control, and guidance and displays. These contributions have directly benefited current rotorcraft programs and flight safety. The high fidelity motion system in the VMS was also used to research simulation fidelity. This research provided a fundamental understanding of pilot cueing modalities and their effect on simulation fidelity.

  3. Measurement of Rotorcraft Blade Deformation Using Projection Moiré Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary A. Fleming

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Projection Moiré Interferometry (PMI has been used to obtain near instantaneous, quantitative blade deformation measurements of a generic rotorcraft model at several test conditions. These laser-based measurements provide quantitative, whole field, dynamic blade deformation profiles conditionally sampled as a function of rotor azimuth. The instantaneous nature of the measurements permits computation of the mean and unsteady blade deformation, blade bending, and twist. The PMI method is presented, and the image processing steps required to obtain quantitative deformation profiles from PMI interferograms are described. Experimental results are provided which show blade bending, twist, and unsteady motion. This initial proof-of-concept test has demonstrated the capability of PMI to acquire accurate, full field rotorcraft blade deformation data.

  4. Model-based temperature noise monitoring methods for LMFBR core anomaly detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaoki, Tetsuo; Sonoda, Yukio; Sato, Masuo (Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)); Takahashi, Ryoichi

    1994-03-01

    Temperature noise, measured by thermocouples mounted at each core fuel subassembly, is considered to be the most useful signal for detecting and locating local cooling anomalies in an LMFBR core. However, the core outlet temperature noise contains background noise due to fluctuations in the operating parameters including reactor power. It is therefore necessary to reduce this background noise for highly sensitive anomaly detection by subtracting predictable components from the measured signal. In the present study, both a physical model and an autoregressive model were applied to noise data measured in the experimental fast reactor JOYO. The results indicate that the autoregressive model has a higher precision than the physical model in background noise prediction. Based on these results, an 'autoregressive model modification method' is proposed, in which a temporary autoregressive model is generated by interpolation or extrapolation of reference models identified under a small number of different operating conditions. The generated autoregressive model has shown sufficient precision over a wide range of reactor power in applications to artificial noise data produced by an LMFBR noise simulator even when the coolant flow rate was changed to keep a constant power-to-flow ratio. (author).

  5. RETRACTED: Flap side edge noise modeling and prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yueping

    2013-08-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy).This article has been retracted at the request of the first author because of the overlap with previously published papers. The first author takes full responsibility and sincerely apologizes for the error made.This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief.The article duplicates significant parts of an earlier paper by the same author, published in AIAA (Y.P. Guo, Aircraft flap side edge noise modeling and prediction. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, (2011), 10.2514/6.2011-2731). Prior to republication, conference papers should be comprehensively extended, and re-use of any data should be appropriately cited. As such this article represents a severe abuse of the scientific publishing system. The scientific community takes a very strong view on this matter and apologies are offered to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process.

  6. Total Variation Regularization Algorithms for Images Corrupted with Different Noise Models: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Total Variation (TV regularization has evolved from an image denoising method for images corrupted with Gaussian noise into a more general technique for inverse problems such as deblurring, blind deconvolution, and inpainting, which also encompasses the Impulse, Poisson, Speckle, and mixed noise models. This paper focuses on giving a summary of the most relevant TV numerical algorithms for solving the restoration problem for grayscale/color images corrupted with several noise models, that is, Gaussian, Salt & Pepper, Poisson, and Speckle (Gamma noise models as well as for the mixed noise scenarios, such the mixed Gaussian and impulse model. We also include the description of the maximum a posteriori (MAP estimator for each model as well as a summary of general optimization procedures that are typically used to solve the TV problem.

  7. Frequency Effect of Harmonic Noise on the FitzHugh-Nagumo Neuron Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋艳丽

    2011-01-01

    Using harmonic noise,the frequency effect of noise on the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model is investigated.The results show that the neuron has a resonance characteristic and responds strongly to the noise with a certain frequency at fixed power.Driven by the noise with this frequency,the train is most regular and the coefficient of variation R has a minimum.The imperfect synchronization takes place,which,however,is optimal only for noise with an appropriate frequency.It is shown that there exists coherence resonance related to frequency.%Using harmonic noise, the frequency effect of noise on the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model is investigated. The results show that the neuron has a resonance characteristic and responds strongly to the noise with a certain frequency at fixed power. Driven by the noise with this frequency, the train is most regular and the coefficient of variation R has a minimum. The imperfect synchronization takes place, which, however, is optimal only for noise with an appropriate frequency. It is shown that there exists coherence resonance related to frequency.

  8. Practices to identify and preclude adverse Aircraft-and-Rotorcraft-Pilot Couplings - A design perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, Marilena D.; Masarati, Pierangelo; Gennaretti, Massimo; Jump, Michael; Zaichik, Larisa; Dang-Vu, Binh; Lu, Linghai; Yilmaz, Deniz; Quaranta, Giuseppe; Ionita, Achim; Serafini, Jacopo

    2015-07-01

    Understanding, predicting and supressing the inadvertent aircraft oscillations caused by Aircraft/Rotorcraft Pilot Couplings (A/RPC) is a challenging problem for designers. These are potential instabilities that arise from the effort of controlling aircraft with high response actuation systems. The present paper reviews, updates and discusses desirable practices to be used during the design process for unmasking A/RPC phenomena. These practices are stemming from the European Commission project ARISTOTEL Aircraft and Rotorcraft Pilot Couplings - Tools and Techniques for Alleviation and Detection (2010-2013) and are mainly related to aerodynamic and structural modelling of the aircraft/rotorcraft, pilot modelling and A/RPC prediction criteria. The paper proposes new methodologies for precluding adverse A/RPCs events taking into account the aeroelasticity of the structure and pilot biodynamic interaction. It is demonstrated that high-frequency accelerations due to structural elasticity cause negative effects on pilot control, since they lead to involuntary body and limb-manipulator system displacements and interfere with pilot's deliberate control activity (biodynamic interaction) and, finally, worsen handling quality ratings.

  9. Modeling of the cell-electrode interface noise for microelectrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Yuan, Jie; Chan, Mansun

    2012-12-01

    Microelectrodes are widely used in the physiological recording of cell field potentials. As microelectrode signals are generally in the μV range, characteristics of the cell-electrode interface are important to the recording accuracy. Although the impedance of the microelectrode-solution interface has been well studied and modeled in the past, no effective model has been experimentally verified to estimate the noise of the cell-electrode interface. Also in existing interface models, spectral information is largely disregarded. In this work, we developed a model for estimating the noise of the cell-electrode interface from interface impedances. This model improves over existing noise models by including the cell membrane capacitor and frequency dependent impedances. With low-noise experiment setups, this model is verified by microelectrode array (MEA) experiments with mouse muscle myoblast cells. Experiments show that the noise estimated from this model has models. With this model, noise of the cell-electrode interface can be estimated by simply measuring interface impedances. This model also provides insights for micro- electrode design to achieve good recording signal-to-noise ratio.

  10. Identification procedures for the charge-controlled nonlinear noise model of microwave electron devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filicori, Fabio; Traverso, Pier Andrea; Florian, Corrado; Borgarino, Mattia

    2004-05-01

    The basic features of the recently proposed Charge-Controlled Non-linear Noise (CCNN) model for the prediction of low-to-high-frequency noise up-conversion in electron devices under large-signal RF operation are synthetically presented. It is shown that the different noise generation phenomena within the device can be described by four equivalent noise sources, which are connected at the ports of a "noiseless" device model and are non-linearly controlled by the time-varying instantaneous values of the intrinsic device voltages. For the empirical identification of the voltage-controlled equivalent noise sources, different possible characterization procedures, based not only on conventional low-frequency noise data, but also on different types of noise measurements carried out under large-signal RF operating conditions are discussed. As an example of application, the measurement-based identification of the CCNN model for a GaInP heterojunction bipolar microwave transistor is presented. Preliminary validation results show that the proposed model can describe with adequate accuracy not only the low-frequency noise of the HBT, but also its phase-noise performance in a prototype VCO implemented by using the same monolithic GaAs technology.

  11. Stability of a Beddington-DeAngelis type predator-prey model with trichotomous noises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yanfei; Niu, Siyong

    2016-06-01

    The stability analysis of a Beddington-DeAngelis (B-D) type predator-prey model driven by symmetric trichotomous noises is presented in this paper. Using the Shapiro-Loginov formula, the first-order and second-order solution moments of the system are obtained. The moment stability conditions of the B-D predator-prey model are given by using Routh-Hurwitz criterion. It is found that the stabilities of the first-order and second-order solution moments depend on the noise intensities and correlation time of noise. The first-order and second-order moments are stable when the correlation time of noise is increased. That is, the trichotomous noise plays a constructive role in stabilizing the solution moment with regard to Gaussian white noise. Finally, some numerical results are performed to support the theoretical analyses.

  12. Noise effect on the dynamics and synchronization of saline oscillator's model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokou Kenfack, W.; Siewe Siewe, M.; Kofane, T. C.

    2017-02-01

    The effects of noisy flows on the dynamics and synchronization of the saline oscillator's model are studied. To this aim, we first of all take the noisy perturbations into account in our recent mathematical model of coupled saline oscillators in the form of an additive noise. We next study, through numerical simulations, the effects of the noisy perturbations on the relaxation oscillations and the bifurcation of the oscillatory mode of a sole oscillator. Lastly, the effects of noise on the synchronization of the oscillatory behaviors observed in several coupled cups are investigated through numerical simulations. We find that noises of low intensity synchronize with the internal periodicity of the system and have as effect the shortening of the relaxation time of oscillations. Also, we show that noise has as major effect, to overcome the region of "dead" dynamical behavior. Accounting for noise is useful to reproduce some of the experimental findings in the sense that noises break the identity of coupled identical oscillators.

  13. Stochastic resonance in a gain-noise model of a single-mode laser driven by pump noise and quantum noise with cross-correlation between real and imaginary parts under direct signal modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Li-Mei; Cao Li; Wu Da-Jin

    2007-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is studied in a gain-noise model of a single-mode laser driven by a coloured pump noise and a quantum noise with cross-correlation between real and imaginary parts under a direct signal modulation. By using a linear approximation method, we find that the SR appears during the variation of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)separately with the pump noise self-correlation time τ, the noise correlation coefficient between the real part and the imaginary part of the quantum noise λq, the attenuation coefficient γ and the deterministic steady-state intensity I0.In addition, it is found that the SR can be characterized not only by the dependence of SNR on the noise variables of τand λq, but also by the dependence of SNR on the laser system variables of γ and I0. Thus our investigation extends the characteristic quantity of SR proposed before.

  14. Using Gaussian Processes to Model Noise in Eclipsing Binary Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prsa, Andrej; Hambleton, Kelly M.

    2017-01-01

    The most precise data we have at hand arguably comes from NASA's Kepler mission, for which there is no good flux calibration available since it was designed to measure relative flux changes down to ~20ppm level. Instrumental artifacts thus abound in the data, and they vary with the module, location on the CCD, target brightness, electronic cross-talk, etc. In addition, Kepler's near-uninterrupted mode of observation reveals astrophysical signals and transient phenomena (i.e. spots, flares, protuberances, pulsations, magnetic field features, etc) that are not accounted for in the models. These "nuisance" signals, along with instrumental artifacts, are considered noise when modeling light curves; this noise is highly correlated and it cannot be considered poissonian or gaussian. Detrending non-white noise from light curve data has been an ongoing challenge in modeling eclipsing binary star and exoplanet transit light curves. Here we present an approach using Gaussian Processes (GP) to model noise as part of the overall likelihood function. The likelihood function consists of the eclipsing binary light curve generator PHOEBE, correlated noise model using GP, and a poissonian (shot) noise attributed to the actual stochastic component of the entire noise model. We consider GP parameters and poissonian noise amplitude as free parameters that are being sampled within the likelihood function, so the end result is the posterior probability not only for eclipsing binary model parameters, but for the noise parameters as well. We show that the posteriors of principal parameters are significantly more robust when noise is modeled rigorously compared to modeling detrended data with an eclipsing binary model alone. This work has been funded by NSF grant #1517460.

  15. Scaling model for a speed-dependent vehicle noise spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Zambon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the well-known features of the noise emitted by moving sources, a number of vehicle characteristics such as speed, unladen mass, engine size, year of registration, power and fuel were recorded in a dedicated monitoring campaign performed in three different places, each characterized by different number of lanes and the presence of nearby reflective surfaces. A full database of 144 vehicles (cars was used to identify statistically relevant features. In order to compare the vehicle transit noise in different environmental condition, all 1/3-octave band spectra were normalized and analysed. Unsupervised clustering algorithms were employed to group together spectrum levels with similar profiles. Our results corroborate the well-known fact that speed is the most relevant characteristic to discriminate between different vehicle noise spectrum. In keeping with this fact, we present a new approach to predict analytically noise spectra for a given vehicle speed. A set of speed-dependent analytical functions are suggested in order to fit the normalized average spectrum profile at different speeds. This approach can be useful for predicting vehicle speed based purely on its noise spectrum pattern. The present work is complementary to the accurate analysis of noise sources based on the beamforming technique.

  16. Model of small-scale self-focusing and spatial noise in high power laser driver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU; Wei(胡巍); FU; Xiquan(傅喜泉); YU; Song; (喻松); GUO; Hong(郭弘)

    2002-01-01

    A linearization model was used to analyze the laser beam propagation in a high power laser driver and the influence of the small-scale self-focusing and spatial phase noise on beam quality in disk amplifiers. The quantitative relations between intensities of spatial phase noise, B-integral, and beam intensity contrast in near field are given explicitly. A spectrum specification of phase noise has been obtained by setting a limit to the contrast of an output beam.

  17. Modeling and Simulation of Road Traffic Noise Using Artificial Neural Network and Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarmand, M; Mousavi, S M

    2014-04-01

    Modeling and simulation of noise pollution has been done in a large city, where the population is over 2 millions. Two models of artificial neural network and regression were developed to predict in-city road traffic noise pollution with using the data of noise measurements and vehicle counts at three points of the city for a period of 12 hours. The MATLAB and DATAFIT softwares were used for simulation. The predicted results of noise level were compared with the measured noise levels in three stations. The values of normalized bias, sum of squared errors, mean of squared errors, root mean of squared errors, and squared correlation coefficient calculated for each model show the results of two models are suitable, and the predictions of artificial neural network are closer to the experimental data.

  18. Common mode noise modeling and its suppression in ultra-high efficiency full bridge boost converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makda, Ishtiyaq Ahmed; Nymand, Morten; Madawala, Udaya

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, common mode noise modeling of low-voltage high-current isolated full bridge boost dc-dc converters intended for fuel cell application is presented. Due to the tightly coupled primary and secondary windings of the transformer, such converter has inherently large capacitive coupling...... between input and output which is normally associated with high common mode noise generation. In this work, common mode noise sources in the converter are identified, and a common mode noise model is developed. Based on the established noise model, a practical CM filter is designed to comply...... with the CISPR-A requirements. Finally, a 3kW dc-dc converter including filters has been built and tested to verify the theoretical model. Experimental results confirm the theoretical analysis of the converter....

  19. Noise Localization Method for Model Tests in a Large Cavitation Tunnel Using a Hydrophone Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheolsoo Park

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Model tests are performed in order to predict the noise level of a full ship and to control its noise signature. Localizing noise sources in the model test is therefore an important research subject along with measuring noise levels. In this paper, a noise localization method using a hydrophone array in a large cavitation tunnel is presented. The 45-channel hydrophone array was designed using a global optimization technique for noise measurement. A set of noise experiments was performed in the KRISO (Korea Research Institute of Ships & Ocean Engineering large cavitation tunnel using scaled models, including a ship with a single propeller, a ship with twin propellers and an underwater vehicle. The incoherent broadband processors defined based on the Bartlett and the minimum variance (MV processors were applied to the measured data. The results of data analysis and localization are presented in the paper. Finally, it is shown that the mechanical noise, as well as the propeller noise can be successfully localized using the proposed localization method.

  20. High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor for Rotorcraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medic, Gorazd; Sharma, Om P.; Jongwook, Joo; Hardin, Larry W.; McCormick, Duane C.; Cousins, William T.; Lurie, Elizabeth A.; Shabbir, Aamir; Holley, Brian M.; Van Slooten, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    The report "High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor for Rotorcraft Applications" documents the work conducted at UTRC under the NRA Contract NNC08CB03C, with cost share 2/3 NASA, and 1/3 UTRC, that has been extended to 4.5 years. The purpose of this effort was to identify key technical barriers to advancing the state-of-the-art of small centrifugal compressor stages; to delineate the measurements required to provide insight into the flow physics of the technical barriers; to design, fabricate, install, and test a state-of-the-art research compressor that is representative of the rear stage of an axial-centrifugal aero-engine; and to acquire detailed aerodynamic performance and research quality data to clarify flow physics and to establish detailed data sets for future application. The design activity centered on meeting the goal set outlined in the NASA solicitation-the design target was to increase efficiency at higher work factor, while also reducing the maximum diameter of the stage. To fit within the existing Small Engine Components Test Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and to facilitate component re-use, certain key design parameters were fixed by UTRC, including impeller tip diameter, impeller rotational speed, and impeller inlet hub and shroud radii. This report describes the design effort of the High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor stage (HECC) and delineation of measurements, fabrication of the compressor, and the initial tests that were performed. A new High-Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor stage with a very challenging reduction in radius ratio was successfully designed, fabricated and installed at GRC. The testing was successful, with no mechanical problems and the running clearances were achieved without impeller rubs. Overall, measured pressure ratio of 4.68, work factor of 0.81, and at design exit corrected flow rate of 3 lbm/s met the target requirements. Polytropic efficiency of 85.5 percent and stall margin of 7.5 percent were

  1. Modeling Vehicle Interior Noise Exposure Dose on Freeways Considering Weaving Segment Designs and Engine Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Qiao, Fengxiang; Yu, Lei; Shi, Junqing

    2017-07-05

    Vehicle interior noise functions at the dominant frequencies of 500 Hz below and around 800 Hz, which fall into the bands that may impair hearing. Recent studies demonstrated that freeway commuters are chronically exposed to vehicle interior noise, bearing the risk of hearing impairment. The interior noise evaluation process is mostly conducted in a lab environment. The test results and the developed noise models may underestimate or ignore the noise effects from dynamic traffic, road conditions and configuration. However, the interior noise is highly associated with vehicle maneuvering. The vehicle maneuvering on a freeway weaving segment is more complex for its nature of conflicting areas. This research is intended to explore the risk of the interior noise exposure on freeway weaving segments for freeway commuters, and improve the interior noise estimation by constructing a decision tree learning based noise exposure dose (NED) model, considering weaving segment designs and engine operation. On-road driving tests were conducted to twelve subjects on State Highway 288 in Houston, Texas. An On-board Diagnosis (OBD) II, a smartphone based roughness app, and a digital sound meter were used to collect vehicle maneuvering and engine information, International Roughness Index, and interior noise levels, respectively. Eleven variables were obtainable from the driving tests, including the length and type of a weaving segment, serving as predictors. The importance of the predictors was estimated by their Out-Of-Bag permuted predictor delta errors. The hazardous exposure level of the interior noise on weaving segments is quantified to Hazard Quotient, NED and daily noise exposure level, respectively. Results showed that the risk of hearing impairment on freeway is acceptable, the interior noise level is the most sensitive to the pavement roughness, and subject to freeway configuration and traffic conditions. The constructed NED model performs highly predictive power (R

  2. Railway noise annoyance: exposure-response relationships and testing a theoretical model by structural equation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennig, Sibylle; Schady, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    In some regions the exposure to railway noise is extremely concentrated, which may lead to high residential annoyance. Nonacoustical factors contribute to these reactions, but there is limited evidence on the interrelations between the nonacoustical factors that influence railway noise annoyance. The aims of the present study were (1) to examine exposure-response relationships between long-term railway noise exposure and annoyance in a region severely affected by railway noise and (2) to determine a priori proposed interrelations between nonacoustical factors by structural equation analysis. Residents (n = 320) living close to railway tracks in the Middle Rhine Valley completed a socio-acoustic survey. Individual noise exposure levels were calculated by an acoustical simulation model for this area. The derived exposure-response relationships indicated considerably higher annoyance at the same noise exposure level than would have been predicted by the European Union standard curve, particularly for the night-time period. In the structural equation analysis, 72% of the variance in noise annoyance was explained by the noise exposure (L(den)) and nonacoustical variables. The model provides insights into several causal mechanisms underlying the formation of railway noise annoyance considering indirect and reciprocal effects. The concern about harmful effects of railway noise and railway traffic, the perceived control and coping capacity, and the individual noise sensitivity were the most important factors that influence noise annoyance. All effects of the nonacoustical factors on annoyance were mediated by the perceived control and coping capacity and additionally proposed indirect effects of the theoretical model were supported by the data.

  3. Railway noise annoyance: Exposure-response relationships and testing a theoretical model by structural equation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibylle Pennig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In some regions the exposure to railway noise is extremely concentrated, which may lead to high residential annoyance. Nonacoustical factors contribute to these reactions, but there is limited evidence on the interrelations between the nonacoustical factors that influence railway noise annoyance. The aims of the present study were (1 to examine exposure-response relationships between long-term railway noise exposure and annoyance in a region severely affected by railway noise and (2 to determine a priori proposed interrelations between nonacoustical factors by structural equation analysis. Residents (n = 320 living close to railway tracks in the Middle Rhine Valley completed a socio-acoustic survey. Individual noise exposure levels were calculated by an acoustical simulation model for this area. The derived exposure-response relationships indicated considerably higher annoyance at the same noise exposure level than would have been predicted by the European Union standard curve, particularly for the night-time period. In the structural equation analysis, 72% of the variance in noise annoyance was explained by the noise exposure (Lden and nonacoustical variables. The model provides insights into several causal mechanisms underlying the formation of railway noise annoyance considering indirect and reciprocal effects. The concern about harmful effects of railway noise and railway traffic, the perceived control and coping capacity, and the individual noise sensitivity were the most important factors that influence noise annoyance. All effects of the nonacoustical factors on annoyance were mediated by the perceived control and coping capacity and additionally proposed indirect effects of the theoretical model were supported by the data.

  4. Modeling nonlinear errors in surface electromyography due to baseline noise: a new methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Laura Frey; Krishnan, Chandramouli; Avin, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The surface electromyographic (EMG) signal is often contaminated by some degree of baseline noise. It is customary for scientists to subtract baseline noise from the measured EMG signal prior to further analyses based on the assumption that baseline noise adds linearly to the observed EMG signal. The stochastic nature of both the baseline and EMG signal, however, may invalidate this assumption. Alternately, "true" EMG signals may be either minimally or nonlinearly affected by baseline noise. This information is particularly relevant at low contraction intensities when signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) may be lowest. Thus, the purpose of this simulation study was to investigate the influence of varying levels of baseline noise (approximately 2-40% maximum EMG amplitude) on mean EMG burst amplitude and to assess the best means to account for signal noise. The simulations indicated baseline noise had minimal effects on mean EMG activity for maximum contractions, but increased nonlinearly with increasing noise levels and decreasing signal amplitudes. Thus, the simple baseline noise subtraction resulted in substantial error when estimating mean activity during low intensity EMG bursts. Conversely, correcting EMG signal as a nonlinear function of both baseline and measured signal amplitude provided highly accurate estimates of EMG amplitude. This novel nonlinear error modeling approach has potential implications for EMG signal processing, particularly when assessing co-activation of antagonist muscles or small amplitude contractions where the SNR can be low.

  5. Intrinsic and extrinsic noise effects on phase transitions of network models with applications to swarming systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Jaime A; Aldana, Maximino; Huepe, Cristián; Larralde, Hernán

    2008-06-01

    We analyze order-disorder phase transitions driven by noise that occur in two kinds of network models closely related to the self-propelled model proposed by Vicsek [Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 1226 (1995)] to describe the collective motion of groups of organisms. Two different types of noise, which we call intrinsic and extrinsic, are considered. The intrinsic noise, the one used by Vicsek in their original work, is related to the decision mechanism through which the particles update their positions. In contrast, the extrinsic noise, later introduced by Grégoire and Chaté [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 025702 (2004)], affects the signal that the particles receive from the environment. The network models presented here can be considered as mean-field representations of the self-propelled model. We show analytically and numerically that, for these two network models, the phase transitions driven by the intrinsic noise are continuous, whereas the extrinsic noise produces discontinuous phase transitions. This is true even for the small-world topology, which induces strong spatial correlations between the network elements. We also analyze the case where both types of noise are present simultaneously. In this situation, the phase transition can be continuous or discontinuous depending upon the amplitude of each type of noise.

  6. A structured population modeling framework for quantifying and predicting gene expression noise in flow cytometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Kevin B

    2013-07-01

    We formulated a structured population model with distributed parameters to identify mechanisms that contribute to gene expression noise in time-dependent flow cytometry data. The model was validated using cell population-level gene expression data from two experiments with synthetically engineered eukaryotic cells. Our model captures the qualitative noise features of both experiments and accurately fit the data from the first experiment. Our results suggest that cellular switching between high and low expression states and transcriptional re-initiation are important factors needed to accurately describe gene expression noise with a structured population model.

  7. Cooperative Effects of Noise and Coupling on Stochastic Dynamics of a Membrane-Bulk Coupling Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jun; JIA Ya; YI Ming

    2009-01-01

    Based on a membrane-bulk coupling cell model proposed by Gomez-Marin et al. [ Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 (2007) 168303], the cooperative effects of noise and coupling on the stochastic dynamical behavior are investigated, For parameters in a certain region, the oscillation can be induced by the cooperative effect of noise and coupling. Whether considering the coupling or not, corresponding coherence resonance phenomena are observed. Furthermore, the effects of two coupling parameters, cell size L and coupling intensity k, on the noise-induced oscillation of membranes are studied. Contrary effects of noise are found in and out of the deterministic oscillatory regions.

  8. Auto Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) Modeling Method for Gyro Random Noise Using a Robust Kalman Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei

    2015-09-30

    To solve the problem in which the conventional ARMA modeling methods for gyro random noise require a large number of samples and converge slowly, an ARMA modeling method using a robust Kalman filtering is developed. The ARMA model parameters are employed as state arguments. Unknown time-varying estimators of observation noise are used to achieve the estimated mean and variance of the observation noise. Using the robust Kalman filtering, the ARMA model parameters are estimated accurately. The developed ARMA modeling method has the advantages of a rapid convergence and high accuracy. Thus, the required sample size is reduced. It can be applied to modeling applications for gyro random noise in which a fast and accurate ARMA modeling method is required.

  9. General model selection estimation of a periodic regression with a Gaussian noise

    CERN Document Server

    Konev, Victor; 10.1007/s10463-008-0193-1

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of estimating a periodic function in a continuous time regression model with an additive stationary gaussian noise having unknown correlation function. A general model selection procedure on the basis of arbitrary projective estimates, which does not need the knowledge of the noise correlation function, is proposed. A non-asymptotic upper bound for quadratic risk (oracle inequality) has been derived under mild conditions on the noise. For the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise the risk upper bound is shown to be uniform in the nuisance parameter. In the case of gaussian white noise the constructed procedure has some advantages as compared with the procedure based on the least squares estimates (LSE). The asymptotic minimaxity of the estimates has been proved. The proposed model selection scheme is extended also to the estimation problem based on the discrete data applicably to the situation when high frequency sampling can not be provided.

  10. A simple model to describe intrinsic stellar noise for exoplanet detection around red giants

    CERN Document Server

    North, Thomas S H; Gilliland, Ronald L; Huber, Daniel; Campante, Tiago L; Handberg, Rasmus; Lund, Mikkel N; Veras, Dimitri; Kuszlewicz, James S; Farr, Will M

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the huge advances in exoplanet research provided by the NASA Kepler Mission, there remain only a small number of transit detections around evolved stars. Here we present a reformulation of the noise properties of red-giant stars, where the intrinsic stellar granulation, and the stellar oscillations described by asteroseismology play a key role. The new noise model is a significant improvement on the current Kepler results for evolved stars. Our noise model may be used to help understand planet detection thresholds for the ongoing K2 and upcoming TESS missions, and serve as a predictor of stellar noise for these missions. As an application of our noise model, we explore the minimum detectable planet radii for red giant stars, and find that Neptune sized planets should be detectable around low luminosity red giant branch stars.

  11. A simple model to describe intrinsic stellar noise for exoplanet detection around red giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Thomas S. H.; Chaplin, William J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Huber, Daniel; Campante, Tiago L.; Handberg, Rasmus; Lund, Mikkel N.; Veras, Dimitri; Kuszlewicz, James S.; Farr, Will M.

    2017-02-01

    In spite of the huge advances in exoplanet research provided by the NASA Kepler Mission, there remain only a small number of transit detections around evolved stars. Here, we present a reformulation of the noise properties of red-giant stars, where the intrinsic stellar granulation and the stellar oscillations described by asteroseismology play a key role. The new noise model is a significant improvement on the current Kepler results for evolved stars. Our noise model may be used to help understand planet detection thresholds for the ongoing K2 and upcoming TESSmissions, and serve as a predictor of stellar noise for these missions. As an application of our noise model, we explore the minimum detectable planet radii for red giant stars, and find that Neptune-sized planets should be detectable around low-luminosity red giant branch stars.

  12. Modeling speech intelligibility in quiet and noise in listeners with normal and impaired hearing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.S. Rhebergen; J. Lyzenga; W.A. Dreschler; J.M. Festen

    2010-01-01

    The speech intelligibility index (SII) is an often used calculation method for estimating the proportion of audible speech in noise. For speech reception thresholds (SRTs), measured in normally hearing listeners using various types of stationary noise, this model predicts a fairly constant speech pr

  13. Use of noise attenuation modeling in managing missile motor detonation activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Michael J; Watkins, Jeffrey W; Kordich, Micheal M; Pollet, Dean A; Palmer, Glenn R

    2004-03-01

    The Sound Intensity Prediction System (SIPS) and Blast Operation Overpressure Model (BOOM) are semiempirical sound models that are employed by the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR) to predict whether noise levels from the detonation of large missile motors will exceed regulatory thresholds. Field validation of SIPS confirmed that the model was effective in limiting the number of detonations of large missile motors that could potentially result in a regulatory noise exceedance. Although the SIPS accurately predicted the impact of weather on detonation noise propagation, regulators have required that the more conservative BOOM model be employed in conjunction with SIPS in evaluating peak noise levels in populated areas. By simultaneously considering the output of both models, in 2001, UTTR detonated 104 missile motors having net explosive weights (NEW) that ranged between 14,960 and 38,938 lb without a recorded public noise complaint. Based on the encouraging results, the U.S. Department of Defense is considering expanding the application of these noise models to support the detonation of missile motors having a NEW of 81,000 lb. Recent modeling results suggest that, under appropriate weather conditions, missile motors containing up to 96,000 lb NEW can be detonated at the UTTR without exceeding the regulatory noise limit of 134 decibels (dB).

  14. Source modelling of train noise - Literature review and some initial measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xuetao; Jonasson, Hans; Holmberg, Kjell

    2000-07-01

    A literature review of source modelling of railway noise is reported. Measurements on a special test rig at Surahammar and on the new railway line between Arlanda and Stockholm City are reported and analyzed. In the analysis the train is modelled as a number of point sources with or without directivity and each source is combined with analytical sound propagation theory to predict the sound propagation pattern best fitting the measured data. Wheel/rail rolling noise is considered to be the most important noise source. The rolling noise can be modelled as an array of moving point sources, which have a dipole-like horizontal directivity and some kind of vertical directivity. In general it is necessary to distribute the point sources on several heights. Based on our model analysis the source heights for the rolling noise should be below the wheel axles and the most important height is about a quarter of wheel diameter above the railheads. When train speeds are greater than 250 km/h aerodynamic noise will become important and even dominant. It may be important for low frequency components only if the train speed is less than 220 km/h. Little data are available for these cases. It is believed that aerodynamic noise has dipole-like directivity. Its spectrum depends on many factors: speed, railway system, type of train, bogies, wheels, pantograph, presence of barriers and even weather conditions. Other sources such as fans, engine, transmission and carriage bodies are at most second order noise sources, but for trains with a diesel locomotive engine the engine noise will be dominant if train speeds are less than about 100 km/h. The Nord 2000 comprehensive model for sound propagation outdoors, together with the source model that is based on the understandings above, can suitably handle the problems of railway noise propagation in one-third octave bands although there are still problems left to be solved.

  15. Modeling signal-to-noise ratio of otoacoustic emissions in workers exposed to different industrial noise levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Nassiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Noise is considered as the most common cause of harmful physical effects in the workplace. A sound that is generated from within the inner ear is known as an otoacoustic emission (OAE. Distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs assess evoked emission and hearing capacity. The aim of this study was to assess the signal-to-noise ratio in different frequencies and at different times of the shift work in workers exposed to various levels of noise. It was also aimed to provide a statistical model for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of OAEs in different frequencies based on the two variables of sound pressure level (SPL and exposure time. Materials and Methods: This case–control study was conducted on 45 workers during autumn 2014. The workers were divided into three groups based on the level of noise exposure. The SNR was measured in frequencies of 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, and 6000 Hz in both ears, and in three different time intervals during the shift work. According to the inclusion criterion, SNR of 6 dB or greater was included in the study. The analysis was performed using repeated measurements of analysis of variance, spearman correlation coefficient, and paired samples t-test. Results: The results showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the three exposed groups in terms of the mean values of SNR (P > 0.05. Only in signal pressure levels of 88 dBA with an interval time of 10:30–11:00 AM, there was a statistically significant difference between the right and left ears with the mean SNR values of 3000 frequency (P = 0.038. The SPL had a significant effect on the SNR in both the right and left ears (P = 0.023, P = 0.041. The effect of the duration of measurement on the SNR was statistically significant in both the right and left ears (P = 0.027, P < 0.001. Conclusion: The findings of this study demonstrated that after noise exposure during the shift, SNR of OAEs reduced from the

  16. Modeling speech intelligibility in quiet and noise in listeners with normal and impaired hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhebergen, Koenraad S; Lyzenga, Johannes; Dreschler, Wouter A; Festen, Joost M

    2010-03-01

    The speech intelligibility index (SII) is an often used calculation method for estimating the proportion of audible speech in noise. For speech reception thresholds (SRTs), measured in normally hearing listeners using various types of stationary noise, this model predicts a fairly constant speech proportion of about 0.33, necessary for Dutch sentence intelligibility. However, when the SII model is applied for SRTs in quiet, the estimated speech proportions are often higher, and show a larger inter-subject variability, than found for speech in noise near normal speech levels [65 dB sound pressure level (SPL)]. The present model attempts to alleviate this problem by including cochlear compression. It is based on a loudness model for normally hearing and hearing-impaired listeners of Moore and Glasberg [(2004). Hear. Res. 188, 70-88]. It estimates internal excitation levels for speech and noise and then calculates the proportion of speech above noise and threshold using similar spectral weighting as used in the SII. The present model and the standard SII were used to predict SII values in quiet and in stationary noise for normally hearing and hearing-impaired listeners. The present model predicted SIIs for three listener types (normal hearing, noise-induced, and age-induced hearing loss) with markedly less variability than the standard SII.

  17. Ground Based Simulation Evaluation of the Effects of Time Delays and Motion on Rotorcraft Handling Qualities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Simulation Facility B. MATH MODEL The mathematical model for the rotorcraft was a generic, uncoupled stability-derivative model that has been used for...5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 Affiftu VCR Alti~de VCR Afttiue VCR a) Ho~w b) Vedical TAns/alon#)Pkue 5 5 5 12 "-i " -2 _ 3 3 3 3LC- L7 3______ i -1 1 1 eI 1...13-1 - 13-62. A-2. McRuer, D. T., and E. S. Krendel, Mathematical Models of Human Pilot Behavior. AGARD AG-188, Jan. 1974. A-3. Peters, Richard A

  18. Spatiotemporal noise covariance model for MEG/EEG data source analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Plis, S M; Jun, S C; Pare-Blagoev, J; Ranken, D M; Schmidt, D M; Wood, C C

    2005-01-01

    A new method for approximating spatiotemporal noise covariance for use in MEG/EEG source analysis is proposed. Our proposed approach extends a parameterized one pair approximation consisting of a Kronecker product of a temporal covariance and a spatial covariance into 1) an unparameterized one pair approximation and then 2) into a multi-pair approximation. These models are motivated by the need to better describe correlated background and make estimation of these models more efficient. The effects of these different noise covariance models are compared using a multi-dipole inverse algorithm and simulated data consisting of empirical MEG background data as noise and simulated dipole sources.

  19. Diffusion of active particles with stochastic torques modeled as α-stable noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nötel, Jörg; Sokolov, Igor M.; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the stochastic dynamics of an active particle moving at a constant speed under the influence of a fluctuating torque. In our model the angular velocity is generated by a constant torque and random fluctuations described as a Lévy-stable noise. Two situations are investigated. First, we study white Lévy noise where the constant speed and the angular noise generate a persistent motion characterized by the persistence time {τ }D. At this time scale the crossover from ballistic to normal diffusive behavior is observed. The corresponding diffusion coefficient can be obtained analytically for the whole class of symmetric α-stable noises. As typical for models with noise-driven angular dynamics, the diffusion coefficient depends non-monotonously on the angular noise intensity. As second example, we study angular noise as described by an Ornstein–Uhlenbeck process with correlation time {τ }c driven by the Cauchy white noise. We discuss the asymptotic diffusive properties of this model and obtain the same analytical expression for the diffusion coefficient as in the first case which is thus independent on {τ }c. Remarkably, for {τ }c\\gt {τ }D the crossover from a non-Gaussian to a Gaussian distribution of displacements takes place at a time {τ }G which can be considerably larger than the persistence time {τ }D.

  20. Diffusion of Active Particles With Stochastic Torques Modeled as $\\alpha$-Stable Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Noetel, Joerg; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the stochastic dynamics of an active particle moving at a constant speed under the influence of a fluctuating torque. In our model the angular velocity is generated by a constant torque and random fluctuations described as a L\\'evy-stable noise. Two situations are investigated. First, we study white L\\'evy noise where the constant speed and the angular noise generate a persistent motion characterized by the persistence time $\\tau_D$. At this time scale the crossover from ballistic to normal diffusive behavior is observed. The corresponding diffusion coefficient can be obtained analytically for the whole class of symmetric $\\alpha$-stable noises. As typical for models with noise-driven angular dynamics, the diffusion coefficient depends non-monotonously on the angular noise intensity. As second example, we study angular noise as described by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process with correlation time $\\tau_c$ driven by the Cauchy white noise. We discuss the asymptotic diffusive properties of this model ...

  1. Improved jet noise modeling using a new acoustic time scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azarpeyvand, M.; Self, R.H.; Golliard, J.

    2006-01-01

    To calculate the noise emanating from a turbulent flow (such as a jet flow) using Lighthill's analogy, knowledge concerning the unsteady characteristics of the turbulence is required. Specifically, the form of the turbulent correlation tensor together with various time and length-scales and convecti

  2. Theoretical Modeling of Intensity Noise in InGaN Semiconductor Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces modeling and simulation of the noise properties of the blue-violet InGaN laser diodes. The noise is described in terms of the spectral properties of the relative intensity noise (RIN). We examine the validity of the present noise modeling by comparing the simulated results with the experimental measurements available in literature. We also compare the obtained noise results with those of AlGaAs lasers. Also, we examine the influence of gain suppression on the quantum RIN. In addition, we examine the changes in the RIN level when describing the gain suppression by the case of inhomogeneous spectral broadening. The results show that RIN of the InGaN laser is nearly 9 dB higher than that of the AlGaAs laser. PMID:25147848

  3. Theoretical modeling of intensity noise in InGaN semiconductor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Moustafa

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces modeling and simulation of the noise properties of the blue-violet InGaN laser diodes. The noise is described in terms of the spectral properties of the relative intensity noise (RIN). We examine the validity of the present noise modeling by comparing the simulated results with the experimental measurements available in literature. We also compare the obtained noise results with those of AlGaAs lasers. Also, we examine the influence of gain suppression on the quantum RIN. In addition, we examine the changes in the RIN level when describing the gain suppression by the case of inhomogeneous spectral broadening. The results show that RIN of the InGaN laser is nearly 9 dB higher than that of the AlGaAs laser.

  4. Theoretical Modeling of Intensity Noise in InGaN Semiconductor Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces modeling and simulation of the noise properties of the blue-violet InGaN laser diodes. The noise is described in terms of the spectral properties of the relative intensity noise (RIN. We examine the validity of the present noise modeling by comparing the simulated results with the experimental measurements available in literature. We also compare the obtained noise results with those of AlGaAs lasers. Also, we examine the influence of gain suppression on the quantum RIN. In addition, we examine the changes in the RIN level when describing the gain suppression by the case of inhomogeneous spectral broadening. The results show that RIN of the InGaN laser is nearly 9 dB higher than that of the AlGaAs laser.

  5. Inexpensive Reliable Oil-Debris Optical Sensor for Rotorcraft Health Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rotorcrafts form a unique subset of air vehicles in that a rotorcraft's propulsion system is used not only for propulsion, but it also serves as the primary source...

  6. Modeling reaction noise with a desired accuracy by using the X level approach reaction noise estimator (XARNES) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkoli, Zoran

    2012-07-21

    A novel computational method for modeling reaction noise characteristics has been suggested. The method can be classified as a moment closure method. The approach is based on the concept of correlation forms which are used for describing spatially extended many body problems where particle numbers change in space and time. In here, it was shown how the formalism of spatially extended correlation forms can be adapted to study well mixed reaction systems. Stochastic fluctuations in particle numbers are described by selectively capturing correlation effects up to the desired order, ξ. The method is referred to as the ξ-level Approximation Reaction Noise Estimator method (XARNES). For example, the ξ=1 description is equivalent to the mean field theory (first-order effects), the ξ=2 case corresponds to the previously developed PARNES method (pair effects), etc. The main idea is that inclusion of higher order correlation effects should lead to better (more accurate) results. Several models were used to test the method, two versions of a simple complex formation model, the Michaelis-Menten model of enzymatic kinetics, the smallest bistable reaction network, a gene expression network with negative feedback, and a random large network. It was explicitly demonstrated that increase in ξ indeed improves accuracy in all cases investigated. The approach has been implemented as automatic software using the Mathematica programming language. The user only needs to input reaction rates, stoichiometry coefficients, and the desired level of computation ξ.

  7. Component-based model to predict aerodynamic noise from high-speed train pantographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre Iglesias, E.; Thompson, D. J.; Smith, M. G.

    2017-04-01

    At typical speeds of modern high-speed trains the aerodynamic noise produced by the airflow over the pantograph is a significant source of noise. Although numerical models can be used to predict this they are still very computationally intensive. A semi-empirical component-based prediction model is proposed to predict the aerodynamic noise from train pantographs. The pantograph is approximated as an assembly of cylinders and bars with particular cross-sections. An empirical database is used to obtain the coefficients of the model to account for various factors: incident flow speed, diameter, cross-sectional shape, yaw angle, rounded edges, length-to-width ratio, incoming turbulence and directivity. The overall noise from the pantograph is obtained as the incoherent sum of the predicted noise from the different pantograph struts. The model is validated using available wind tunnel noise measurements of two full-size pantographs. The results show the potential of the semi-empirical model to be used as a rapid tool to predict aerodynamic noise from train pantographs.

  8. Development and implementation of rotorcraft preliminary design methodology using multidisciplinary design optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Adeel Syed

    Rotorcraft's evolution has lagged behind that of fixed-wing aircraft. One of the reasons for this gap is the absence of a formal methodology to accomplish a complete conceptual and preliminary design. Traditional rotorcraft methodologies are not only time consuming and expensive but also yield sub-optimal designs. Rotorcraft design is an excellent example of a multidisciplinary complex environment where several interdependent disciplines are involved. A formal framework is developed and implemented in this research for preliminary rotorcraft design using IPPD methodology. The design methodology consists of the product and process development cycles. In the product development loop, all the technical aspects of design are considered including the vehicle engineering, dynamic analysis, stability and control, aerodynamic performance, propulsion, transmission design, weight and balance, noise analysis and economic analysis. The design loop starts with a detailed analysis of requirements. A baseline is selected and upgrade targets are identified depending on the mission requirements. An Overall Evaluation Criterion (OEC) is developed that is used to measure the goodness of the design or to compare the design with competitors. The requirements analysis and baseline upgrade targets lead to the initial sizing and performance estimation of the new design. The digital information is then passed to disciplinary experts. This is where the detailed disciplinary analyses are performed. Information is transferred from one discipline to another as the design loop is iterated. To coordinate all the disciplines in the product development cycle, Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) techniques e.g. All At Once (AAO) and Collaborative Optimization (CO) are suggested. The methodology is implemented on a Light Turbine Training Helicopter (LTTH) design. Detailed disciplinary analyses are integrated through a common platform for efficient and centralized transfer of design

  9. Noise variation by compressive stress on the model core of power transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizokami, Masato, E-mail: mizokami.g76.masato@jp.nssmc.com; Kurosaki, Yousuke

    2015-05-01

    The reduction of audible noise generated by cores for power transformers has been required due to environmental concern. It is known that compressive stress in the rolling direction of electrical steel affects magnetostriction and it can result in an increase in noise level. In this research, the effect of compressive stress to noise was investigated on a 3-phase 3-limb model core. Compressive stress was applied in the rolling direction of the limbs from the outside of the core. It increased the sound pressure levels and the slope of the rise was about 2 dBA/MPa. Magnetostriction on single sheet samples was also measured under compressive stress and the harmonic components of the magnetostriction were compared with those of noise. It revealed that the variation in magnetostriction with compressive stress did not entirely correspond to that in noise. In one of the experiments, localized bending happened on one limb during compressing the core. While deformation of the core had not been intended, the noise was measured. The deformation increased the noise by more than 10 dBA and it occurred on most of the harmonic components. - Highlights: • Audible noise was measured on a model core to which compressive stress was applied. • The stress in the rolling direction of the steel causes a rise in noise level. • The slope of the rise in sound pressure level up to 2.5 MPa is about 2 dBA/MPa. • Variation in magnetostriction by stress does not entirely agree with that in noise. • Bend arisen in the core causes an extreme increase in noise.

  10. Towards More Efficient Comprehensive Rotor Noise Simulation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rotorcraft design and optimization currently still rely largely on simplified (low-fidelity) models, such as rotor disk or wake models to reduce the turn-around time...

  11. Validation of an Aero-Acoustic Wind Turbine Noise Model Using Advanced Noise Source Measurements of a 500kW Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of a 500 kW stall-regulated wind turbine is investigated. Microphones located relatively close to the wind turbine are used to measure its acoustic emission. The operational conditions of the turbine, such as wind speed, are simultaneously monitored. In parallel, a wind turbine....... A good qualitative agreement is found. When wind speed increases, the rotor noise model shows that at high frequencies the stall noise becomes dominant. It also shows that turbulent inflow noise is dominant at low frequencies for all wind speeds and that trailing edge noise is dominant at low wind speeds...... and at frequencies above 200 Hz....

  12. Development of in-vehicle noise prediction models for Mumbai Metropolitan Region, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Konbattulwar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Traffic noise is one of the major sources of noise pollution in metropolitan regions causing various health hazards (e.g., long-term sleep disturbance, increase in blood pressure, physical tension, etc.. In this research, noise prediction models, which can measure the noise level experienced by the commuters while driving or traveling by motorized vehicles in the Mumbai Metropolitan Region, India, were developed. These models were developed by conducting a comprehensive study of various factors (e.g., vehicle speed, traffic volume and road characteristics, etc. affecting the levels of concentration of noise. A widespread data collection was done by conducting road trips of total length of 403.80 km via different modes of transport, such as air-conditioned (A/C car, non A/C car, bus and intermediate public transport (i.e., traditional 3-wheeler autos. Multiple regression analyses were performed to develop a functional relation between equivalent noise levels experienced by passengers while traveling (which was considered as a dependent variable and explanatory variables such as traffic characteristics, vehicle class, vehicle speed, various other location characteristics, etc. Noise levels are generally higher in the vicinity of intersections and signalized junctions. Independent data sets (for each mode of transport were used to validate the developed models. It was noted that maximum differences between observed and estimated values from the model were within the range of ±7.8% of the observed value.

  13. Swept-sine noise-induced damage as a hearing loss model for preclinical assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena eSanz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mouse models are key tools for studying cochlear alterations in noise-induced hearing loss and for evaluating new therapies. Stimuli used to induce deafness in mice are usually white and octave band noises that include very low frequencies, considering the large mouse auditory range. We designed different sound stimuli, enriched in frequencies up to 20 kHz (violet noises to examine their impact on hearing thresholds and cochlear cytoarchitecture after short exposure. In addition, we developed a cytocochleogram to quantitatively assess the ensuing structural degeneration and its functional correlation. Finally, we used this mouse model and cochleogram procedure to evaluate the potential therapeutic effect of transforming growth factor β1 inhibitors P17 and P144 on noise-induced hearing loss. CBA mice were exposed to violet swept-sine noise with different frequency ranges (2-20 or 9-13 kHz and levels (105 or 120 dB SPL for 30 minutes. Mice were evaluated by auditory brainstem response and otoacoustic emission tests prior to and 2, 14 and 28 days after noise exposure. Cochlear pathology was assessed with gross histology; hair cell number was estimated by a stereological counting method. Our results indicate that functional and morphological changes induced by violet swept-sine noise depend on the sound level and frequency composition. Partial hearing recovery followed the exposure to 105 dB SPL, whereas permanent cochlear damage resulted from the exposure to 120 dB SPL. Exposure to 9-13 kHz noise caused an auditory threshold shift in those frequencies that correlated with hair cell loss in the corresponding areas of the cochlea that were spotted on the cytocochleogram. In summary, we present mouse models of noise-induced hearing loss, which depending on the sound properties of the noise, cause different degrees of cochlear damage, and could therefore be used to study molecules which are potential players in hearing loss protection and repair.

  14. Preliminary Mathematical Model for Jet Fuel Exacerbated Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    hearing loss . Noise alone induces hearing loss due to loss of hair cells in the cochlea, associated with oxidative stress. Jet fuel toxicity in association with noise may be at least partially explained by increased free radical production and oxidative stress at the cellular level, resulting in hair cell dysfunction and loss. This project combines a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to describe jet fuel component concentrations in the cochlea with pharmacodynamic (PD) models of free radical formation in the cochlea by both noise and

  15. Non-white noise in fMRI: Does modelling have an impact?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Torben Ellegaard; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Sidaros, Karam;

    2006-01-01

    are typically modelled as an autoregressive (AR) process. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach: Nuisance Variable Regression (NVR). By inclusion of confounding effects in a general linear model (GLM), we first confirm that the spatial distribution of the various fMRI noise sources is similar......The sources of non-white noise in Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are many. Familiar sources include low-frequency drift due to hardware imperfections, oscillatory noise due to respiration and cardiac pulsation and residual movement artefacts...

  16. STOCHASTIC DYNAMICS OF PRICES IN A MODEL OF FINANCIAL MARKET WITH DIFFERENT TYPES OF NOISE TRADERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebedeva T. S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the calculations of price dynamics are made in the model of a financial market consisting of fundamentalist and noise traders. Numerical calculations are carried out in accordance with the full Walrasian dynamic price adjustment rule. To describe fluctuations in the number of optimistic and pessimistic noise traders, a seminal stochastic Kirman’s ant model (reducible to a Markov chain is used, as well as its modification with different scaling properties of the parameter controlling the strength of herding behavior of noise agents

  17. Including Finite Surface Span Effects in Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of finite span on the jet-surface interaction noise source and the jet mixing noise shielding and reflection effects is considered using recently acquired experimental data. First, the experimental setup and resulting data are presented with particular attention to the role of surface span on far-field noise. These effects are then included in existing empirical models that have previously assumed that all surfaces are semi-infinite. This extended abstract briefly describes the experimental setup and data leaving the empirical modeling aspects for the final paper.

  18. Analytical model for investigation of interior noise characteristics in aircraft with multiple propellers including synchrophasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    A simplified analytical model of transmission of noise into the interior of propeller-driven aircraft has been developed. The analysis includes directivity and relative phase effects of the propeller noise sources, and leads to a closed form solution for the coupled motion between the interior and exterior fields via the shell (fuselage) vibrational response. Various situations commonly encountered in considering sound transmission into aircraft fuselages are investigated analytically and the results obtained are compared to measurements in real aircraft. In general the model has proved successful in identifying basic mechanisms behind noise transmission phenomena.

  19. 14 CFR 29.519 - Hull type rotorcraft: Water-based and amphibian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hull type rotorcraft: Water-based and amphibian. 29.519 Section 29.519 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 29.519 Hull type rotorcraft: Water-based and amphibian. (a) General. For hull type rotorcraft,...

  20. Effects on generalized growth models driven by a non-Poissonian dichotomic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bologna, M.; Calisto, H.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we consider a general growth model with stochastic growth rate modelled via a symmetric non-poissonian dichotomic noise. We find an exact analytical solution for its probability distribution. We consider the, as yet, unexplored case where the deterministic growth rate is perturbed by a dichotomic noise characterized by a waiting time distribution in the two state that is a power law with power 1 Malthus-Verhulst and Gompertz.

  1. In Vitro Studies and Preliminary Mathematical Model for Jet Fuel and Noise Induced Auditory Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    impairment in stimulus encoding was exacerbated by low level (non-damaging) noise (8 kHz octave band at 85 dB sound pressure level) exposure. The results...and necrosis were enhanced when cells were exposed to JP-8 or hydrocarbons with oligomycin (in vitro noise surrogate). The PD model is designed to...death. The PD model will be parameterized using results from in vitro studies, and is designed to be interfaced with a physiologically-based

  2. Stability analysis of a stochastic Gilpin-Ayala model driven by Lévy noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinhong; Wang, Ke

    2014-05-01

    A stochastic one-dimensional Gilpin-Ayala model driven by Lévy noise is presented in this paper. Firstly, we show that this model has a unique global positive solution under certain conditions. Then sufficient conditions for the almost sure exponential stability and moment exponential stability of the trivial solution are established. Results show that the jump noise can make the trivial solution stable under some conditions. Numerical example is introduced to illustrate the results.

  3. Modeling and estimation of signal-dependent noise in hyperspectral imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Joseph; Eismann, Michael T; Moses, Randolph L; Ash, Joshua N

    2011-07-20

    The majority of hyperspectral data exploitation algorithms are developed using statistical models for the data that include sensor noise. Hyperspectral data collected using charge-coupled devices or other photon detectors have sensor noise that is directly dependent on the amplitude of the signal collected. However, this signal dependence is often ignored. Additionally, the statistics of the noise can vary spatially and spectrally as a result of camera characteristics and the calibration process applied to the data. Here, we examine the expected noise characteristics of both raw and calibrated visible/near-infrared hyperspectral data and provide a method for estimating the noise statistics using calibration data or directly from the imagery if calibration data is unavailable.

  4. Ising-Glauber Spin Cluster Model for Temperature-Dependent Magnetization Noise in SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Amrit

    2014-11-01

    Clusters of interacting two-level-systems, likely due to Farbe+(F+) centers at the metal-insulator interface, are shown to self-consistently lead to 1 /fα magnetization noise [with α (T )≲1 ] in SQUIDs. Model calculations, based on a new method of obtaining correlation functions, explains various puzzling experimental features. It is shown why the inductance noise is inherently temperature dependent while the flux noise is not, despite the same underlying microscopics. Magnetic ordering in these systems, established by three-point correlation functions, explains the observed flux- inductance-noise cross correlations. Since long-range ferromagnetic interactions are shown to lead to a more weakly temperature dependent flux noise when compared to short-range interactions, the time reversal symmetry of the clusters is also not likely broken by the same mechanism which mediates surface ferromagnetism in nanoparticles and thin films of the same insulator materials.

  5. A WYNER-ZIV VIDEO CODING METHOD UTILIZING MIXTURE CORRELATION NOISE MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Xiaofei; Zhu Xiuchang

    2012-01-01

    In Wyner-Ziv (WZ) Distributed Video Coding (DVC),correlation noise model is often used to describe the error distribution between WZ frame and the side information.The accuracy of the model can influence the performance of the video coder directly.A mixture correlation noise model in Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) domain for WZ video coding is established in this paper.Different correlation noise estimation method is used for direct current and alternating current coefficients.Parameter estimation method based on expectation maximization algorithm is used to estimate the Laplace distribution center of direct current frequency band and Mixture Laplace-Uniform Distribution Model (MLUDM) is established for alternating current coefficients.Experimental results suggest that the proposed mixture correlation noise model can describe the heavy tail and sudden change of the noise accurately at high rate and make significant improvement on the coding efficiency compared with the noise model presented by DIStributed COding for Video sERvices (DISCOVER).

  6. Phase noise modeling in LC oscillators implemented in SiGe technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Bouhouche; S.Latreche; C.Gontrand

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses phase noise analysis of a radiofrequency LC oscillator built around a SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) realized in a 0.35 μm BiCMOS process,as an active device.First,we give a brief background to SiGe HBT device physics.The key point is to initiate quantitative analysis on the influence of defects induced during extrinsic base implantation on electric performances of this device.These defects are responsible for the current fluctuations at the origin of low frequency noise in BiCMOS technologies.Next,we investigate the effect of implantation defects as a source of noise in semiconductors on the phase noise of a radiofrequency LC oscillator.We observe their influence on the oscillator phase noise,and we quantify the influence of their energy distribution in the semiconductor gap.Second,we give a behavioral model of an LC oscillator containing a SiGe HBT as an active device.The key goal is to study the susceptibility of a radiofrequency oscillator built around a SiGe HBT to phase noise disturbance sources.Based on the time variance behavior of phase noise in oscillators,transient simulations (in the time domain) were used to analyze the time-dependent noise sensitivity of the oscillator.

  7. Computer vision techniques for rotorcraft low altitude flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Banavar

    1990-01-01

    Rotorcraft operating in high-threat environments fly close to the earth's surface to utilize surrounding terrain, vegetation, or manmade objects to minimize the risk of being detected by an enemy. Increasing levels of concealment are achieved by adopting different tactics during low-altitude flight. Rotorcraft employ three tactics during low-altitude flight: low-level, contour, and nap-of-the-earth (NOE). The key feature distinguishing the NOE mode from the other two modes is that the whole rotorcraft, including the main rotor, is below tree-top whenever possible. This leads to the use of lateral maneuvers for avoiding obstacles, which in fact constitutes the means for concealment. The piloting of the rotorcraft is at best a very demanding task and the pilot will need help from onboard automation tools in order to devote more time to mission-related activities. The development of an automation tool which has the potential to detect obstacles in the rotorcraft flight path, warn the crew, and interact with the guidance system to avoid detected obstacles, presents challenging problems. Research is described which applies techniques from computer vision to automation of rotorcraft navigtion. The effort emphasizes the development of a methodology for detecting the ranges to obstacles in the region of interest based on the maximum utilization of passive sensors. The range map derived from the obstacle-detection approach can be used as obstacle data for the obstacle avoidance in an automatic guidance system and as advisory display to the pilot. The lack of suitable flight imagery data presents a problem in the verification of concepts for obstacle detection. This problem is being addressed by the development of an adequate flight database and by preprocessing of currently available flight imagery. The presentation concludes with some comments on future work and how research in this area relates to the guidance of other autonomous vehicles.

  8. Experimental validation of the twins prediction program for rolling noise. Pt.1: description of the model and method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, D.J.; Hemsworth, B.; Vincent, N.

    1996-01-01

    The C163 Expert Committee of the European Rail Research Institute (ERRI) concerned with Railway Noise, has been developing theoretical models for the generation of wheel/rail rolling noise. These models have been brought together into a software package, called TWINS ("Track-Wheel Interaction Noise

  9. Experimental validation of the twins prediction program for rolling noise. Pt.1: description of the model and method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, D.J.; Hemsworth, B.; Vincent, N.

    1996-01-01

    The C163 Expert Committee of the European Rail Research Institute (ERRI) concerned with Railway Noise, has been developing theoretical models for the generation of wheel/rail rolling noise. These models have been brought together into a software package, called TWINS ("Track-Wheel Interaction Noise

  10. Secondary Path Modeling Method for Active Noise Control of Power Transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tong; Liang, Jiabi; Liang, Yuanbin; Wang, Lixin; Pei, Xiugao; Li, Peng

    The accuracy of the secondary path modeling is critical to the stability of active noise control system. On condition of knowing the input and output of the secondary path, system identification theory can be used to identify the path. Based on the experiment data, correlation analysis is adopted to eliminate the random noise and nonlinear harmonic in the output data in order to obtain the accurate frequency characteristic of the secondary path. After that, Levy's Method is applied to identify the transfer function of the path. Computer simulation results are given respectively, both showing the proposed off-line modeling method is feasible and applicable. At last, Levy's Method is used to attain an accurate secondary path model in the active control of transformer noise experiment and achieves to make the noise sound level decrease about 10dB.

  11. Mean First-Passage Time of a Bistable Kinetic Model Driven by Multiplicative Coloured Noise and Additive White Noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢崇伟; 梅冬成

    2003-01-01

    We study the transient properties of a bistable kinetic system driven by correlated noises for the cases of multiplicative coloured noise and additive white noise. The mean first-passage time (MFPT) of the system is calculated.From numerical computations we find that: (i) The MFPT of the bistable system are affected by the correlation time of multiplicative coloured noise τ and the cross-correlation strength between noises λ and, τ and λ play the same roles in the MFPT. (ii) The MFPT corresponding to weakly correlated noises and strongly correlated noises exhibits the very different behaviour and there is a one-peak structure in the MFPT for strongly correlated noises. The peak grows highly as τ increases, which means that the noisy colour causes the suppression effect of the escape rate to become more pronounced.

  12. Rotorcraft flight-propulsion control integration: An eclectic design concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaloew, James R.; Ballin, Mark G.; Ruttledge, D. C. G.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Ames and Lewis Research Centers, in conjunction with the Army Research and Technology Laboratories, have initiated and partially completed a joint research program focused on improving the performance, maneuverability, and operating characteristics of rotorcraft by integrating the flight and propulsion controls. The background of the program, its supporting programs, its goals and objectives, and an approach to accomplish them are discussed. Results of the modern control governor design of the General Electric T700 engine and the Rotorcraft Integrated Flight-Propulsion Control Study, which were key elements of the program, are also presented.

  13. A Perceptual Audio Representation for Low Rate Coding Based on Sines+Noise Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AL-MoussawyRaed; YINJunxun; HUANGJiancheng

    2003-01-01

    This work is concerned with the develop-ment and optimization of an efficient (which allows high compression ratios) and flexible (which allows scalability)signal model for perceptual audio coding at low bitrates.A novel, complementary two-part model for audio consist-ing of sines+ noise (SN) is presented. The SN model uses a sinusoidal model that explicitly takes into account the human hearing system by using psychoacoustically based matching pursuits. This technique iteratively extracts si-nusoidal components according to their perceptually im-portant signal-to-mask ratio (SMR). The second modeling stage is for noise-like components. The SN model uses the equivalent rectangular bandwidth (ERB) noise model;that is based on observations that for noise-like signals,energy in the ERBs describes the underlying signal with perceptual accuracy. The SN model has an intuitive inter-pretation in terms of discrete fourier transform (DFT) and can be efficiently implemented via the fast fourier trans-form (FFT). Informal listening tests demonstrate that the synthesized (sines + noise) signal is almost perceptually identical to the original. A compression ratio of typically 16 to 19.5 can be readily reached with SN model.

  14. Measuring the levels of noise at the İstanbul Atatürk Airport and comparisons with model simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Deniz; Ozkurt, Nesimi; Akdag, Ali; Kutukoglu, Murat; Gurarslan, Aliye

    2014-06-01

    Airport noise and its impact on the surrounding areas are major issues in the aviation industry. The İstanbul Atatürk Airport is a major global airport with passenger numbers increasing rapidly per annum. The noise levels for day, evening and night times were modeled around the İstanbul Atatürk Airport according to the European Noise Directive using the actual data records for the year 2011. The "ECAC Doc. 29-Interim" method was used for the computation of the aircraft traffic noise. In the setting the noise model for the local airport topography was taken into consideration together with the noise source data, the airport loadings, features of aircraft and actual air traffic data. Model results were compared with long-term noise measurement values for calibration. According to calibration results, classifications of the aircraft type and flight tracks were revised. For noise model validation, the daily noise measurements at four additional locations were used during the verification period. The input data was re-edited only for these periods and the model was validated. A successful model performance was obtained in several zones around the airport. The validated noise model of the İstanbul Atatürk Airport can be now utilized both for determining the noise levels in the future and for producing new strategies which are about the land use planning, operational considerations for the air traffic management and the noise abatement procedures.

  15. Analysis and models of pre-injection surface seismic array noise recorded at the Aquistore carbon storage site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnie, Claire; Chambers, Kit; Angus, Doug; Stork, Anna L.

    2016-08-01

    Noise is a persistent feature in seismic data and so poses challenges in extracting increased accuracy in seismic images and physical interpretation of the subsurface. In this paper, we analyse passive seismic data from the Aquistore carbon capture and storage pilot project permanent seismic array to characterise, classify and model seismic noise. We perform noise analysis for a three-month subset of passive seismic data from the array and provide conclusive evidence that the noise field is not white, stationary, or Gaussian; characteristics commonly yet erroneously assumed in most conventional noise models. We introduce a novel noise modelling method that provides a significantly more accurate characterisation of real seismic noise compared to conventional methods, which is quantified using the Mann-Whitney-White statistical test. This method is based on a statistical covariance modelling approach created through the modelling of individual noise signals. The identification of individual noise signals, broadly classified as stationary, pseudo-stationary and non-stationary, provides a basis on which to build an appropriate spatial and temporal noise field model. Furthermore, we have developed a workflow to incorporate realistic noise models within synthetic seismic data sets providing an opportunity to test and analyse detection and imaging algorithms under realistic noise conditions.

  16. Modeling and Compensating Temperature-Dependent Non-Uniformity Noise in IR Microbolometer Cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Alejandro; Pezoa, Jorge E; Figueroa, Miguel

    2016-07-19

    Images rendered by uncooled microbolometer-based infrared (IR) cameras are severely degraded by the spatial non-uniformity (NU) noise. The NU noise imposes a fixed-pattern over the true images, and the intensity of the pattern changes with time due to the temperature instability of such cameras. In this paper, we present a novel model and a compensation algorithm for the spatial NU noise and its temperature-dependent variations. The model separates the NU noise into two components: a constant term, which corresponds to a set of NU parameters determining the spatial structure of the noise, and a dynamic term, which scales linearly with the fluctuations of the temperature surrounding the array of microbolometers. We use a black-body radiator and samples of the temperature surrounding the IR array to offline characterize both the constant and the temperature-dependent NU noise parameters. Next, the temperature-dependent variations are estimated online using both a spatially uniform Hammerstein-Wiener estimator and a pixelwise least mean squares (LMS) estimator. We compensate for the NU noise in IR images from two long-wave IR cameras. Results show an excellent NU correction performance and a root mean square error of less than 0.25 ∘ C, when the array's temperature varies by approximately 15 ∘ C.

  17. A transformed analytical model for thermal noise of FinFET based on fringing field approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhulika Sharma, Savitesh; Dasgupta, S.; Kartikeyant, M. V.

    2016-09-01

    This paper delineates the effect of nonplanar structure of FinFETs on noise performance. We demonstrate the thermal noise analytical model that has been inferred by taking into account the presence of an additional inverted region in the extended (underlap) S/D region due to finite gate electrode thickness. Noise investigation includes the effects of source drain resistances which become significant as channel length becomes shorter. In this paper, we evaluate the additional noise caused by three dimensional (3-D) structure of the single fin device and then extended analysis of the multi-fin and multi-fingers structure. The addition of fringe field increases its minimum noise figure and noise resistance of approximately 1 dB and 100 Ω respectively and optimum admittance increases to 5.45 mƱ at 20 GHz for a device operating under saturation region. Hence, our transformed model plays a significant function in evaluation of accurate noise performance at circuit level. Project supported in part by the All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE).

  18. Noise modeling by the trend of each range gate for coherent Doppler LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Zhichao; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, Siying; Guo, Pan; Li, Lu; Chen, He

    2014-06-01

    A denoising method of all-fiber pulsed coherent Doppler LIDAR (CDL) is investigated. The goal is to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the weak signal regime. Based on differential detection theory, the total noise expression of CDL with a dual-balanced detector is introduced and analyzed. The conclusion is drawn that the total noise can be acquired under the local oscillator laser exposure conditions by reasonable simplification. Using the actual measured data, the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean value of the total noise in each range gate is obtained and is up to approximately 11%. In order to suppress the jitter of the noise, an effective noise modeling by the trend of each range gate is developed. The feasibility of this method is verified by a long set of measured data. The spatial and temporal distribution of wind speed is illustrated with 400 pulses accumulation. Compared to the noise modeling of the tail, the detection range of wind speed using the proposed method can be improved by 35.3%.

  19. Phase-noise-induced resonance in arrays of coupled excitable neural models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoming Liang; Liang Zhao

    2013-08-01

    Recently, it is observed that, in a single neural model, phase noise (time-varying signal phase) arising from an external stimulating signal can induce regular spiking activities even if the signal is subthreshold. In addition, it is also uncovered that there exists an optimal phase noise intensity at which the spiking rhythm coincides with the frequency of the subthreshold signal, resulting in a phase-noise-induced resonance phenomenon. However, neurons usually do not work alone, but are connected in the form of arrays or blocks. Therefore, we study the spiking activity induced by phase noise in arrays of globally and locally coupled excitable neural models. We find that there also exists an optimal phase noise intensity for generating large neural response and such an optimal value is significantly decreased compared to an isolated single neuron case, which means the detectability in response to the subthreshold signal of neurons is sharply improved because of the coupling. In addition, we reveal two new resonance behaviors in the neuron ensemble with the presence of phase noise: there exist optimal values of both coupling strength and system size, where the coupled neurons generate regular spikes under subthreshold stimulations, which are called as coupling strength and system size resonance, respectively. Finally, the dependence of phase-noise-induced resonance on signal frequency is also examined.

  20. Integration of Environment Sensing and Control Functions for Robust Rotorcraft UAV (RUAV) Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadkhah Tehrani, Navid

    Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) have started supplanting manned aircraft in a broad range of tasks. Vehicles such as miniature rotorcrafts with broad maneuvering range and small size can enter remote locations that are hard to reach using other air and ground vehicles. Developing a guidance system which enables a Rotorcraft UAV (RUAV) to perform such tasks involves combing key elements from robotics motion planning, control system design, trajectory optimization as well as dynamics modeling. The focus of this thesis is to integrate a guidance system for a small-scale rotorcraft to enable a high level of performance and situational awareness. We cover large aspects of the system integration including modeling, control system design, environment sensing as well as motion planning in the presence of uncertainty. The system integration in this thesis is performed around a Blade-CX2 miniature coaxial helicopter. The first part of the thesis focuses on the development of the parameterized model for the Blade-CX2 helicopter with an emphasis on the coaxial rotor configuration. The model explicitly accounts for the dynamics of lower rotor and uses an implicit lumped parameter model for the upper rotor and stabilizer-bar. The parameterized model was identified using frequency domain system identification. In the second part of the thesis, we use the identified model to design a control law for the Blade-CX2 helicopter. The control augmentation for the Blade-CX2 helicopter was based on a nested attitude-velocity loop control architecture and was designed following classical loop-shaping and dynamic inversion techniques. A path following layer wrapped around the velocity control system enables the rotorcraft to follow reference trajectories specified by a sequence of waypoints and velocity vectors. Such reference paths are common in autonomous guidance systems. Finally, the third part of the thesis addresses the problem of autonomous navigation through a partially known or

  1. Coupling and noise induced spiking-bursting transition in a parabolic bursting model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lin; Zhang, Jia; Lang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Xiuhui

    2013-03-01

    The transition from tonic spiking to bursting is an important dynamic process that carry physiologically relevant information. In this work, coupling and noise induced spiking-bursting transition is investigated in a parabolic bursting model with specific discussion on their cooperation effects. Fast/slow analysis shows that weak coupling may help to induce the bursting by changing the geometric property of the fast subsystem so that the original unstable periodical solution are stabilized. It turned out that noise can play the similar stabilization role and induce bursting at appropriate moderate intensity. However, their cooperation may either strengthen or weaken the overall effect depending on the choice of noise level.

  2. Modeling and Measurement of Phase Noise in GaAs HBT Ka-Band Oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Lenk, Friedrich; Schott, Matthias; Heinrich, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    Accurate oscillator phase-noise simulation is a key problem in MMIC design, which is not solved satisfactory so far and needs further investigation. In this paper, a Ka-band MMIC oscillator with GaInP/GaAs HBT and on-chip resonator is treated as an example. Measured phase noise reaches -90 dBc/Hz and below at 100 kHz offset. To evaluate phase-noise predic-tion, the circuit is simulated using different commercial simulation tools and HBT models. Con-siderable differences in simulation results ...

  3. Structural equation models of memory performance across noise conditions and age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enmarker, Ingela; Boman, Eva; Hygge, Staffan

    2006-12-01

    Competing models of declarative memory were tested with structural equation models to analyze whether a second-order latent variable structure for episodic and semantic memory was invariant across age groups and across noise exposure conditions. Data were taken from three previous experimental noise studies that were performed with the same design, procedure, and dependent measures, and with participants from four age groups (13-14, 18-20, 35-45, and 55-65 years). Two noise conditions, road traffic noise and meaningful irrelevant speech, were compared to a quiet control group. The structural models put to the test were taken from Nyberg et al. (2003), which employed several memory tests that were the same as ours and studied age-groups that partly overlapped with our groups. In addition we also varied noise exposure conditions. Our analyses replicated and supported the second-order semantic-episodic memory models in Nyberg et al. (2003). The latent variable structures were invariant across age groups, with the exception of our youngest group, which by itself showed a less clear latent structure. The obtained structures were also invariant across noise exposure conditions. We also noted that our text memory items, which did not have a counterpart in the study by Nyberg et al. (2003), tend to form a separate latent variable loading on episodic memory.

  4. Effects of noise on a computational model for disease states of mood disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias Huber, Martin; Krieg, Jürgen-Christian; Braun, Hans Albert; Moss, Frank

    2000-03-01

    Nonlinear dynamics are currently proposed to explain the progressive course of recurrent mood disorders starting with isolated episodes and ending with accelerated irregular (``chaotic") mood fluctuations. Such a low-dimensional disease model is attractive because of its principal accordance with biological disease models, i.e. the kindling and biological rhythms model. However, most natural systems are nonlinear and noisy and several studies in the neuro- and physical sciences have demonstrated interesting cooperative behaviors arising from interacting random and deterministic dynamics. Here, we consider the effects of noise on a recent neurodynamical model for the timecourse of affective disorders (Huber et al.: Biological Psychiatry 1999;46:256-262). We describe noise effects on temporal patterns and mean episode frequencies of various in computo disease states. Our simulations demonstrate that noise can cause unstructured randomness or can maximize periodic order. The frequency of episode occurence can increase with noise but it can also remain unaffected or even can decrease. We show further that noise can make visible bifurcations before they would normally occur under deterministic conditions and we quantify this behavior with a recently developed statistical method. All these effects depend critically on both, the dynamic state and the noise intensity. Implications for neurobiology and course of mood disorders are discussed.

  5. Modeling population exposure to community noise and air pollution in a large metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Wen Qi; McLean, Kathleen; Brauer, Michael; Chiarello, Sarah A; Davies, Hugh W

    2012-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that both air pollution and community noise are associated with cardiovascular disease mortality. Because road traffic is a major contributor to these environmental pollutants in metropolitan areas, it is plausible that the observed associations may be confounded by coexistent pollutants. As part of a large population-based cohort study to address this concern, we used a noise prediction model to assess annual average community noise levels from transportation sources in metropolitan Vancouver, Canada. The modeled annual average noise level was 64 (inter quartile range 60-68) dB(A) for the region. This model was evaluated by comparing modeled annual daytime A-weighted equivalent continuous noise levels (L(day)) with measured 5-min daytime A-weighted equivalent continuous noise levels (L(eq,day,5 min)) at 103 selected roadside sites in the study region. On average, L(day) was 6.2 (95% CI, 6.0-7.9) dB(A) higher than, but highly correlated (r=0.62; 95% CI, 0.48-0.72) with, L(eq,day,5 min). These results suggest that our model-based noise exposure assessment could approximately reflect actual noise exposure in the study region. Overall, modeled noise levels were not strongly correlated with land use regression estimates of traffic-related air pollutants including black carbon, particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm (PM(2.5)), NO(2) and NO; the highest correlation was with black carbon (r=0.48), whereas the lowest correlation was with PM(2.5) (r=0.18). There was no consistent effect of traffic proximity on the correlations between community noise levels and traffic-related air pollutant concentrations. These results, consistent with previous studies, suggest that it is possible to assess potential adverse cardiovascular effects from long-term exposures to community noise and traffic-related air pollution in prospective epidemiologic studies. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Single velocity-component modeling of leading edge turbulence interaction noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, J; Zhang, X; Joseph, P

    2015-06-01

    A computational aeroacoustics approach is used to predict leading edge turbulence interaction noise for real airfoils. One-component (transverse), two-component (transverse and streamwise), and three-component (transverse, streamwise, and spanwise) synthesized turbulence disturbances are modeled instead of harmonic transverse gusts, to which previous computational studies of leading edge noise have often been confined. The effects of the inclusion of streamwise and spanwise disturbances on the noise are assessed. It is shown that accurate noise predictions can be made by modeling only transverse disturbances which reduces the computational expense of simulations. The accuracy of using only transverse disturbances is assessed for symmetric and cambered airfoils, and also for airfoils at non-zero angle of attack.

  7. Computational Modeling of a Mechanized Benchtop Apparatus for Leading-Edge Slat Noise Treatment Device Prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis L.; Moore, James B.; Long, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Airframe noise is a growing concern in the vicinity of airports because of population growth and gains in engine noise reduction that have rendered the airframe an equal contributor during the approach and landing phases of flight for many transport aircraft. The leading-edge-slat device of a typical high-lift system for transport aircraft is a prominent source of airframe noise. Two technologies have significant potential for slat noise reduction; the slat-cove filler (SCF) and the slat-gap filler (SGF). Previous work was done on a 2D section of a transport-aircraft wing to demonstrate the implementation feasibility of these concepts. Benchtop hardware was developed in that work for qualitative parametric study. The benchtop models were mechanized for quantitative measurements of performance. Computational models of the mechanized benchtop apparatus for the SCF were developed and the performance of the system for five different SCF assemblies is demonstrated.

  8. Dynamic Behavior of Artificial Hodgkin-Huxley Neuron Model Subject to Additive Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Qi; Huang, BingYao; Zhou, MengChu

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by neuroscience discoveries during the last few years, many studies consider pulse-coupled neural networks with spike-timing as an essential component in information processing by the brain. There also exists some technical challenges while simulating the networks of artificial spiking neurons. The existing studies use a Hodgkin-Huxley (H-H) model to describe spiking dynamics and neuro-computational properties of each neuron. But they fail to address the effect of specific non-Gaussian noise on an artificial H-H neuron system. This paper aims to analyze how an artificial H-H neuron responds to add different types of noise using an electrical current and subunit noise model. The spiking and bursting behavior of this neuron is also investigated through numerical simulations. In addition, through statistic analysis, the intensity of different kinds of noise distributions is discussed to obtain their relationship with the mean firing rate, interspike intervals, and stochastic resonance.

  9. Noise Reduction of MEMS Gyroscope Based on Direct Modeling for an Angular Rate Signal

    OpenAIRE

    Liang Xue; Chengyu Jiang; Lixin Wang; Jieyu Liu; Weizheng Yuan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel approach for processing the outputs signal of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) gyroscopes was presented to reduce the bias drift and noise. The principle for the noise reduction was presented, and an optimal Kalman filter (KF) was designed by a steady-state filter gain obtained from the analysis of KF observability. In particular, the true angular rate signal was directly modeled to obtain an optimal estimate and make a self-compensation for the gyroscope witho...

  10. Stationary solution and parametric estimation for Bilinear model driven by ARCH noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘家柱; 李国栋; 谢衷洁

    2002-01-01

    Bilinear model driven by ARCH (1) noises is proposed. Existence, uniqueness and form of sta-tionary solution to this new model are presented. Maximum likelihood estimation of the model is discussedand some simulation results are given to evaluate our algorithm.

  11. Conceptual Design of Environmentally Friendly Rotorcraft - A Comparison of NASA and ONERA Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Carl; Basset, Pierre-Marie

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, a task was initiated under the US-French Project Agreement on rotorcraft studies to collaborate on design methodologies for environmentally friendly rotorcraft. This paper summarizes the efforts of that collaboration. The French and US aerospace agencies, ONERA and NASA, have their own software toolsets and approaches to rotorcraft design. The first step of this research effort was to understand how rotorcraft impact the environment, with the initial focus on air pollution. Second, similar baseline helicopters were developed for a passenger transport mission, using NASA and ONERA rotorcraft design software tools. Comparisons were made between the designs generated by the two tools. Finally, rotorcraft designs were generated targeting reduced environmental impact. The results show that a rotorcraft design that targets reduced environmental impact can be significantly different than one that targets traditional cost drivers, such as fuel burn and empty weight.

  12. Median Filter Noise Reduction of Image and Backpropagation Neural Network Model for Cervical Cancer Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wutsqa, D. U.; Marwah, M.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we consider spatial operation median filter to reduce the noise in the cervical images yielded by colposcopy tool. The backpropagation neural network (BPNN) model is applied to the colposcopy images to classify cervical cancer. The classification process requires an image extraction by using a gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) method to obtain image features that are used as inputs of BPNN model. The advantage of noise reduction is evaluated by comparing the performances of BPNN models with and without spatial operation median filter. The experimental result shows that the spatial operation median filter can improve the accuracy of the BPNN model for cervical cancer classification.

  13. Validation of input-noise model for simulations of supercontinuum generation and rogue waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frosz, Michael Henoch

    2010-01-01

    A new model of pump noise in supercontinuum and rogue wave generation is presented. Simulations are compared with experiments and show that the new model provides significantly better agreement than the currently ubiquitously used one-photon-per-mode model. The new model also allows for a study...... of the influence of the pump spectral line width on the spectral broadening mechanisms. Specifically, it is found that for four-wave mixing (FWM) a narrow spectral line width ( 0.1 nm) initially leads to a build-up of FWM from quantum noise, whereas a broad spectral line width ( 1 nm) initially leads to a gradual...

  14. Modeled traffic noise at the residence and colorectal cancer incidence: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roswall, Nina; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Ketzel, Matthias; Overvad, Kim; Halkjær, Jytte; Sørensen, Mette

    2017-07-01

    Traffic noise has become an increasing public health concern, associated with pervasive negative health effects, most likely through pathways of sleep disruption and stress. Both sleep disruption and stress have been associated with colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between residential traffic noise and colorectal cancer incidence. Traffic noise was calculated for all residential addresses from 1987 to 2012 for 51,283 Danes in the Diet, Cancer and Health Cohort. We used Cox proportional hazard models to investigate the association between residential traffic noise 5 and 10 years before diagnosis, and overall colorectal cancer incidence, as well as subtypes (rectal, proximal, and distal colon). Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated as crude and adjusted for potential confounders. During follow-up, 1,134 colorectal cancers developed (737 colon, 397 rectal). We found no association between residential road traffic noise and rectal cancer. We observed an association with distal colon cancer: HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.00-1.40, but not for proximal colon cancer: 0.99 (0.83-1.18), per 10 dB, 10 years preceding diagnosis. There was no association between railway noise and colorectal cancer, or any subtype. The present study suggested that long-term exposure to residential road traffic noise might increase the risk for colon cancer, especially distal colon cancer.

  15. Noise generated by model step lap core configurations of grain oriented electrical steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, David [Cogent Power Ltd., Development and Market Research, Orb Electrical Steels, Corporation Road, Newport, South Wales NP19 OXT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Dave.snell@cogent-power.com

    2008-10-15

    Although it is important to reduce the power loss associated with transformer cores by use of electrical steel of the optimum grade, it is equally important to minimise the noise generated by the core. This paper discusses the effect of variations in the number of steps (3, 5, and 7) and the step overlap (2, 4, and 6 mm) on noise associated with model step lap cores of conventional, high permeability and ball unit domain refined high permeability grain oriented electrical steel. A-weighted sound pressure level noise measurements (LAeq) were made at various locations of the core over the frequency range 25-16,000 Hz. For all step lap cores investigated, the noise generated was dependent on the induction level, and on the number of steps and step overlap employed. The use of 3 step lap cores and step overlaps of 2 mm should be avoided, if low noise is to be achieved. There was very little difference between the noise emitted by the 5 and 7 step lap cores. Similar noise levels were noted for 27M0H material in the non-domain refined (NDR) and ball unit domain refined condition for a 5 step lap core with 6 mm step overlap.

  16. Nonlinear modeling of low-to-high-frequency noise up-conversion in microwave electron devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filicori, Fabio; Traverso, Pier A.; Florian, Corrado

    2003-05-01

    Measurement-based, circuit-oriented non-linear noise modeling of microwave electron devices is still an open field of research, since existing approaches are not always suitable for the accurate prediction of low-frequency noise up-conversion to RF, which represents an essential information for the non-linear circuit analyses performed in the CAD of low phase-noise oscillators. In this paper a technology-independent, empirical approach to the modeling of noise contributions at the ports of electron devices, operating under strongly non-linear conditions, is proposed. Details concerning the analytical formulation of the model, which is derived by considering randomly time-varying perturbations in the basic equations of an otherwise conventional charge-controlled non-linear model, are presented, along with a discussion about the measurement techniques devoted to its experimental characterization. An example of application of the proposed Charge-Controlled Non-linear Noise (CCNN) model is considered in the case of a HBT transistor. Techniques devoted to the implementation of the obtained model in the framework of commercial CAD tools for circuit analysis and design are provided as well.

  17. Optimization and Modeling of Noise Reduction for Turbulent Jets with Induced Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamimonjezi, Sara

    This project relates to the development of next-generation high-speed aircraft that are efficient and environmentally compliant. The emphasis of the research is on reducing noise from high-performance engines that will power these aircraft. A strong component of engine noise is jet mixing noise that comes from the turbulent mixing process between the high-speed exhaust flow of the engine and the atmosphere. The fan flow deflection method (FFD) suppresses jet noise by deflecting the fan stream downward, by a few degrees, with respect to the core stream. This reduces the convective Mach number of the primary shear layer and turbulent kinetic energy in the downward direction and therefore reduces the noise emitted towards the ground. The redistribution of the fan stream is achieved with inserting airfoil-shaped vanes inside the fan duct. Aerodynamic optimization of FFD has been done by Dr. Juntao Xiong using a computational fluid dynamics code to maximize reduction of noise perceived by the community while minimizing aerodynamic losses. The optimal vane airfoils are used in a parametric experimental study of 50 4-vane deflector configurations. The vane chord length, angle of attack, and azimuthal location are the parameters studied in acoustic optimization. The best vane configuration yields a reduction in cumulative (downward + sideline) effective perceived noise level (EPNL) of 5.3 dB. The optimization study underscores the sensitivity of FFD to deflector parameters and the need for careful design in the practical implementation of this noise reduction approach. An analytical model based on Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) and acoustic analogy is developed to predict the spectral changes from a known baseline in the direction of peak emission. A generalized form for space-time correlation is introduced that allows shapes beyond the traditional exponential forms. Azimuthal directivity based on the wavepacket model of jet noise is integrated with the acoustic

  18. Symmetry: modeling the effects of masking noise, axial cueing and salience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Tyler, Christopher W

    2010-04-06

    Symmetry detection is an interesting probe of pattern processing because it requires the matching of novel patterns without the benefit of prior recognition. However, there is evidence that prior knowledge of the axis location plays an important role in symmetry detection. We investigated how the prior information about the symmetry axis affects symmetry detection under noise-masking conditions. The target stimuli were random-dot displays structured to be symmetric about vertical, horizontal, or diagonal axes and viewed through eight apertures (1.2 degrees diameter) evenly distributed around a 6 degrees diameter circle. The information about axis orientation was manipulated by (1) cueing of axis orientation before the trial and (2) varying axis salience by including or excluding the axis region within the noise apertures. The percentage of correct detection of the symmetry was measured at for a range of both target and masking noise densities. The threshold vs. noise density function was flat at low noise density and increased with a slope of 0.75-0.8 beyond a critical density. Axis cueing reduced the target threshold 2-4 fold at all noise densities while axis salience had an effect only at high noise density. Our results are inconsistent with an ideal observer or signal-to-noise account of symmetry detection but can be explained by a multiple-channel model is which the response in each channel is the ratio between the nonlinear transform of the responses of sets of early symmetry detectors and the sum of external and intrinsic sources of noise.

  19. Noise-Induced Transitions in a Population Growth Model Based on Size-Dependent Carrying Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeme Lumi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The stochastic dynamics of a population growth model with size-dependent carrying capacity is considered. The effect of a fluctuating environment on population growth is modeled as a multiplicative dichotomous noise. At intermediate values of population size the deterministic counterpart of the model behaves similarly to the Von Foerster model for human population, but at small and very large values of population size substantial differences occur. In the stochastic case, an exact analytical solution for the stationary probability distribution is found. It is established that variation of noise correlation time can cause noise-induced transitions between three different states of the system characterized by qualitatively different behaviors of the probability distributions of the population size. Also, it is shown that, in some regions of the system parameters, variation of the amplitude of environmental fluctuations can induce single unidirectional abrupt transitions of the mean population size.

  20. Accounting for anatomical noise in search-capable model observers for planar nuclear imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Anando; Gifford, Howard C

    2016-01-01

    Model observers intended to predict the diagnostic performance of human observers should account for the effects of both quantum and anatomical noise. We compared the abilities of several visual-search (VS) and scanning Hotelling-type models to account for anatomical noise in a localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) study involving simulated nuclear medicine images. Our VS observer invoked a two-stage process of search and analysis. The images featured lesions in the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. Lesion contrast and the geometric resolution and sensitivity of the imaging collimator were the study variables. A set of anthropomorphic mathematical phantoms was imaged with an analytic projector based on eight parallel-hole collimators with different sensitivity and resolution properties. The LROC study was conducted with human observers and the channelized nonprewhitening, channelized Hotelling (CH) and VS model observers. The CH observer was applied in a "background-known-statistically" protocol while the VS observer performed a quasi-background-known-exactly task. Both of these models were applied with and without internal noise in the decision variables. A perceptual search threshold was also tested with the VS observer. The model observers without inefficiencies failed to mimic the average performance trend for the humans. The CH and VS observers with internal noise matched the humans primarily at low collimator sensitivities. With both internal noise and the search threshold, the VS observer attained quantitative agreement with the human observers. Computational efficiency is an important advantage of the VS observer.

  1. Corona noise model of high-voltage AC transmission lines and engineering applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Jiuhui; Di Zelong

    2013-01-01

    In order to predict the levels of corona noise from high-voltage alternating current (AC) transmission lines,the mechanism of corona noise and the corresponding theoretical prediction model are investigated.On the basis of Drude model,the motion of positive and negative ions produced by high-voltage corona is analyzed,and the mechanism of corona noise is discovered.The theoretical prediction model is put forward by using Kirchhoff formula,which is verified by the well agreement between our result and others',considering the case of three-phase single lines.Moreover,the calculation results show that for both single and bundled lines,the sound pressure level of the typical frequency,i.e.twice the power frequency,attenuates slowly and leads to an obviously interferential phenomenon near the transmission lines,but the level of the bundled lines is smaller than that of the single ones under the same transmission voltage.Based on the mechanism of corona noise and the prediction model,it is obvious that bundled lines and/or increased line radius can be adopted to reduce corona noise in the practical engineering applications effectively.This model can also provide a theoretical guidance for the high-volt-age AC transmission line design.

  2. A Method of Eliminating Noises in Web Pages by Style Tree Model and Its Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Cheng-li; YI Dong-yun

    2004-01-01

    A Web page typically contains many information blocks.Apart from the main content blocks, it usually has such blocks as navigation panels, copyright and privacy notices, and advertisements.We call these blocks the noisy blocks.The noises in Web pages can seriously harm Web data mining.To the question of eliminating these noises, we introduce a new tree structure, called Style Tree, and study an algorithm how to construct a site style tree.The Style Tree Model is employed to detect and eliminate noises in any Web pages of the site.An information based measure to determine which element node is noisy is also constructed.In addition, the applications of this method are discussed in detail.Experimental results show that our noises elimination technique is able to improve the mining results significantly.

  3. Research on the effect of noise at different times of day: Models, methods and findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Social surveys of residents' responses to noise at different times of day are reviewed. Some of the discrepancies in published reports about the importance of noise at different times of day are reduced when the research findings are classified according to the type of time of day reaction model, the type of time of day weight calculated and the method which is used to estimate the weight. When the estimates of nighttime weights from 12 studies are normalized, it is found that they still disagree, but do not support stronger nighttime weights than those used in existing noise indices. Challenges to common assumptions in nighttime response models are evaluated. Two of these challenges receive enough support to warrant further investigation: the impact of changes in numbers of noise events may be less at night than in the day and nighttime annoyance may be affected by noise levels in other periods. All existing social survey results in which averages of nighttime responses were plotted by nighttime noise levels are reproduced.

  4. Effect of otologic drill noise on ABR thresholds in a guinea pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suits, G W; Brummett, R E; Nunley, J

    1993-10-01

    The noise generated by the otologic drill has been implicated as a cause of sensorineural hearing loss after ear surgery. However, clinical studies on this subject are contradictory and difficult to interpret. Therefore a guinea pig model was used to study whether the level of noise generated by the otologic drill can cause threshold shifts in the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The source noise was a recording obtained during a human cadaver mastoidectomy using a microphone and an accelerometer. Ten female Topeka-strain guinea pigs were exposed to the recorded drill noise for a period of 55 minutes. Exposure included both air-conducted energy from a speaker and bone-conducted energy from a bone vibrator applied directly to the skull. ABR threshold measurements were taken pre-exposure (baseline), immediately after exposure, and at weekly intervals thereafter for 3 weeks. Three control animals were subjected to the same procedure without the sound exposure. A significant threshold shift (p < 0.0001) was seen for each frequency tested (2, 4, 8, 16, 20, and 32 kHz) immediately after exposure to noise in all experimental animals. Thresholds returned to baseline within 3 weeks. We conclude that the level of noise generated by the otologic drill in mastoid surgery can cause a temporary threshold shift in this guinea pig model.

  5. A weighted dictionary learning model for denoising images corrupted by mixed noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Tai, Xue-Cheng; Huang, Haiyang; Huan, Zhongdan

    2013-03-01

    This paper proposes a general weighted l(2)-l(0) norms energy minimization model to remove mixed noise such as Gaussian-Gaussian mixture, impulse noise, and Gaussian-impulse noise from the images. The approach is built upon maximum likelihood estimation framework and sparse representations over a trained dictionary. Rather than optimizing the likelihood functional derived from a mixture distribution, we present a new weighting data fidelity function, which has the same minimizer as the original likelihood functional but is much easier to optimize. The weighting function in the model can be determined by the algorithm itself, and it plays a role of noise detection in terms of the different estimated noise parameters. By incorporating the sparse regularization of small image patches, the proposed method can efficiently remove a variety of mixed or single noise while preserving the image textures well. In addition, a modified K-SVD algorithm is designed to address the weighted rank-one approximation. The experimental results demonstrate its better performance compared with some existing methods.

  6. Initial Results from SQUID Sensor: Analysis and Modeling for the ELF/VLF Atmospheric Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Hao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the amplitude probability density (APD of the wideband extremely low frequency (ELF and very low frequency (VLF atmospheric noise is studied. The electromagnetic signals from the atmosphere, referred to herein as atmospheric noise, was recorded by a mobile low-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID receiver under magnetically unshielded conditions. In order to eliminate the adverse effect brought by the geomagnetic activities and powerline, the measured field data was preprocessed to suppress the baseline wandering and harmonics by symmetric wavelet transform and least square methods firstly. Then statistical analysis was performed for the atmospheric noise on different time and frequency scales. Finally, the wideband ELF/VLF atmospheric noise was analyzed and modeled separately. Experimental results show that, Gaussian model is appropriate to depict preprocessed ELF atmospheric noise by a hole puncher operator. While for VLF atmospheric noise, symmetric α-stable (SαS distribution is more accurate to fit the heavy-tail of the envelope probability density function (pdf.

  7. Propeller aircraft interior noise model. II - Scale-model and flight-test comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, C. M.; Mayes, W. H.

    1987-01-01

    A program for predicting the sound levels inside propeller driven aircraft arising from sidewall transmission of airborne exterior noise is validated through comparisons of predictions with both scale-model test results and measurements obtained in flight tests on a turboprop aircraft. The program produced unbiased predictions for the case of the scale-model tests, with a standard deviation of errors of about 4 dB. For the case of the flight tests, the predictions revealed a bias of 2.62-4.28 dB (depending upon whether or not the data for the fourth harmonic were included) and the standard deviation of the errors ranged between 2.43 and 4.12 dB. The analytical model is shown to be capable of taking changes in the flight environment into account.

  8. A Verilog-A Based Fractional Frequency Synthesizer Model for Fast and Accurate Noise Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Gonzalez-Diaz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new strategy to simulate fractional frequency synthesizer behavioral models with better performance and reduced simulation time. The models are described in Verilog-A with accurate phase noise predictions and they are based on a time jitter to power spectral density transformation of the principal noise sources in a synthesizer. The results of a fractional frequency synthesizer simulation is compared with state of the art Verilog-A descriptions showing a reduction of nearly 20 times. In addition, experimental results of a fractional frequency synthesizer are compared to the simulation results to validate the proposed model.

  9. Internal atmospheric noise characteristics in twentieth century coupled atmosphere-ocean model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colfescu, Ioana; Schneider, Edwin K.

    2017-09-01

    The statistical characteristics of the atmospheric internal variability (hereafter internal atmospheric noise) for surface pressure (PS) in twentieth century simulations of a coupled general circulation model are documented. The atmospheric noise is determined from daily post-industrial (1871-1998) Community Climate System Model 3 simulations by removing the SST and externally forced responses from the total fields. The forced responses are found from atmosphere-only simulations forced by the SST and external forcing of the coupled runs. However, we do not address the influence of the SST variability on the synoptic scale high frequency weather noise.The spatial patterns of the main seasonal modes of atmospheric noise variability are found for boreal winter and summer from empirical orthogonal function analyses performed globally and for various regions, including the North Atlantic, the North Pacific, and the equatorial Pacific. The temporal characteristics of the modes are illustrated by power spectra and probability density functions (PDF) of the principal components (PC). Our findings show that, for two different realizations of noise, the variability is dominated by large scale spatial structures of the atmospheric noise that resemble observed patterns, and that their relative amplitudes in the CGCM and AGCM simulations are very similar. The regional expression of the dominant global mode, a seasonally dependent AO-like or AAO-like pattern is also found in the regional analyses, with similar time dependence. The PCs in the CGCM and the corresponding SST forced AGCM simulations are uncorrelated, but the spectra and PDFs of the CGCM and AGCM PCs are similar.The temporal structures of the noise PCs are white at timescales larger than few months, so that these modes can be thought of as stochastic forcings (in time) for the climate system. The PDFs of the noise PCs are not statistically distinguishable from Gaussian distributions with the same standard deviation

  10. Fatigue Modeling via Mammalian Auditory System for Prediction of Noise Induced Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pengfei; Qin, Jun; Campbell, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) remains as a severe health problem worldwide. Existing noise metrics and modeling for evaluation of NIHL are limited on prediction of gradually developing NIHL (GDHL) caused by high-level occupational noise. In this study, we proposed two auditory fatigue based models, including equal velocity level (EVL) and complex velocity level (CVL), which combine the high-cycle fatigue theory with the mammalian auditory model, to predict GDHL. The mammalian auditory model is introduced by combining the transfer function of the external-middle ear and the triple-path nonlinear (TRNL) filter to obtain velocities of basilar membrane (BM) in cochlea. The high-cycle fatigue theory is based on the assumption that GDHL can be considered as a process of long-cycle mechanical fatigue failure of organ of Corti. Furthermore, a series of chinchilla experimental data are used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed fatigue models. The regression analysis results show that both proposed fatigue models have high corrections with four hearing loss indices. It indicates that the proposed models can accurately predict hearing loss in chinchilla. Results suggest that the CVL model is more accurate compared to the EVL model on prediction of the auditory risk of exposure to hazardous occupational noise.

  11. Fatigue Modeling via Mammalian Auditory System for Prediction of Noise Induced Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL remains as a severe health problem worldwide. Existing noise metrics and modeling for evaluation of NIHL are limited on prediction of gradually developing NIHL (GDHL caused by high-level occupational noise. In this study, we proposed two auditory fatigue based models, including equal velocity level (EVL and complex velocity level (CVL, which combine the high-cycle fatigue theory with the mammalian auditory model, to predict GDHL. The mammalian auditory model is introduced by combining the transfer function of the external-middle ear and the triple-path nonlinear (TRNL filter to obtain velocities of basilar membrane (BM in cochlea. The high-cycle fatigue theory is based on the assumption that GDHL can be considered as a process of long-cycle mechanical fatigue failure of organ of Corti. Furthermore, a series of chinchilla experimental data are used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed fatigue models. The regression analysis results show that both proposed fatigue models have high corrections with four hearing loss indices. It indicates that the proposed models can accurately predict hearing loss in chinchilla. Results suggest that the CVL model is more accurate compared to the EVL model on prediction of the auditory risk of exposure to hazardous occupational noise.

  12. Comment on ``Correlated noise in a logistic growth model''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Anita; O'Rourke, S. Francesca C.

    2008-01-01

    We argue that the results published by Ai [Phys. Rev. E 67, 022903 (2003)] on “correlated noise in logistic growth” are not correct. Their conclusion that, for larger values of the correlation parameter λ , the cell population is peaked at x=0 , which denotes a high extinction rate, is also incorrect. We find the reverse behavior to their results, that increasing λ promotes the stable growth of tumor cells. In particular, their results for the steady-state probability, as a function of cell number, at different correlation strengths, presented in Figs. 1 and 2 of their paper show different behavior than one would expect from the simple mathematical expression for the steady-state probability. Additionally, their interpretation that at small values of cell number the steady-state probability increases as the correlation parameter is increased is also questionable. Another striking feature in their Figs. 1 and 3 is that, for the same values of the parameters λ and α , their simulation produces two different curves, both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  13. Velocity measurements in jets with application to noise source modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Philip J.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the statistical properties of turbulent velocity fluctuations in an axisymmetric jet. The focus is on those properties that are relevant to the prediction of noise. Measurements are performed using two single hot-wire anemometers as well as a two-component anemometer. Two-point cross correlations of the axial velocity fluctuations and of the fluctuations in the square of the axial velocity fluctuations are presented. Several reference locations in the jet are used including points on the jet lip and centerline. The scales of the turbulence and the convection velocity are determined, both in an overall sense as well as a function of frequency. The relationship between the second and fourth order correlations is developed and compared with the experimental data. The implications of the use of dimensional as well as non-dimensional correlations are considered. Finally, a comparison is made between the length scales deduced from the flow measurements and a RANS CFD calculation.

  14. Towards a Comprehensive Model of Jet Noise Using an Acoustic Analogy and Steady RANS Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic analogy is developed to predict the noise from jet flows. It contains two source models that independently predict the noise from turbulence and shock wave shear layer interactions. The acoustic analogy is based on the Euler equations and separates the sources from propagation. Propagation effects are taken into account by calculating the vector Green's function of the linearized Euler equations. The sources are modeled following the work of Tam and Auriault, Morris and Boluriaan, and Morris and Miller. A statistical model of the two-point cross-correlation of the velocity fluctuations is used to describe the turbulence. The acoustic analogy attempts to take into account the correct scaling of the sources for a wide range of nozzle pressure and temperature ratios. It does not make assumptions regarding fine- or large-scale turbulent noise sources, self- or shear-noise, or convective amplification. The acoustic analogy is partially informed by three-dimensional steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solutions that include the nozzle geometry. The predictions are compared with experiments of jets operating subsonically through supersonically and at unheated and heated temperatures. Predictions generally capture the scaling of both mixing noise and BBSAN for the conditions examined, but some discrepancies remain that are due to the accuracy of the steady RANS turbulence model closure, the equivalent sources, and the use of a simplified vector Green's function solver of the linearized Euler equations.

  15. Conceptual Design and Feasibility of Foil Bearings for Rotorcraft Engines: Hot Core Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in gas foil bearing technology have led to numerous advanced high-speed rotating system concepts, many of which have become either commercial products or experimental test articles. Examples include oil-free microturbines, motors, generators and turbochargers. The driving forces for integrating gas foil bearings into these high-speed systems are the benefits promised by removing the oil lubrication system. Elimination of the oil system leads to reduced emissions, increased reliability, and decreased maintenance costs. Another benefit is reduced power plant weight. For rotorcraft applications, this would be a major advantage, as every pound removed from the propulsion system results in a payload benefit.. Implementing foil gas bearings throughout a rotorcraft gas turbine engine is an important long-term goal that requires overcoming numerous technological hurdles. Adequate thrust bearing load capacity and potentially large gearbox applied radial loads are among them. However, by replacing the turbine end, or hot section, rolling element bearing with a gas foil bearing many of the above benefits can be realized. To this end, engine manufacturers are beginning to explore the possibilities of hot section gas foil bearings in propulsion engines. This overview presents a logical follow-on activity by analyzing a conceptual rotorcraft engine to determine the feasibility of a foil bearing supported core. Using a combination of rotordynamic analyses and a load capacity model, it is shown to be reasonable to consider a gas foil bearing core section. In addition, system level foil bearing testing capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented along with analysis work being conducted under NRA Cooperative Agreements.

  16. Railway source models for integration in the new European noise prediction method proposed in Harmonoise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talotte, C.; Stap, P. van der; Ringheim, M.; Dittrich, M.G.; Zhang, X.; Stiebel, D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the Harmonoise European project is to provide an engineering model for the propagation of road and rail traffic noise which requires, for a better accuracy than existing models, the distinction between source output and propagation. In that context, the purpose of work package 1.2 of

  17. Calculation of noise distribution in mesoscopic dynamics models for phase separation of multicomponent complex fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanVlimmeren, BAC; Fraaije, JGEM

    1996-01-01

    We present a simple method for the numerical calculation of the noise distribution in multicomponent functional Langevin models. The topic is of considerable importance, in view of the increased interest in the application of mesoscopic dynamics simulation models to phase separation of complex

  18. Railway source models for integration in the new European noise prediction method proposed in Harmonoise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talotte, C.; Stap, P. van der; Ringheim, M.; Dittrich, M.G.; Zhang, X.; Stiebel, D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the Harmonoise European project is to provide an engineering model for the propagation of road and rail traffic noise which requires, for a better accuracy than existing models, the distinction between source output and propagation. In that context, the purpose of work package 1.2 of

  19. Modelling of Noise and Straw to Straw Variations in the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Kittelmann, T H

    2006-01-01

    In this note a procedure is presented for modelling noise and straw to straw variations in the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker which can ultimately be based on reliable off-beam occupancy maps. The model is tuned and validated against the results of a test beam study, and its implementation in offline digitisation software is discussed.

  20. An Analytical Model for Spectral Peak Frequency Prediction of Substrate Noise in CMOS Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Ming; Mikkelsen, Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an analytical model describing the generation of switching current noise in CMOS substrates. The model eliminates the need for SPICE simulations in existing methods by conducting a transient analysis on a generic CMOS inverter and approximating the switching current waveform us...

  1. Rich dynamics in a predator–prey model with both noise and periodic force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, G.Q.; Jin, Z.; Liu, Q.X.; Li, B.L.

    2010-01-01

    A spatial version of the predator–prey model with Holling III functional response, which includes some important factors such as external periodic forces, noise, and diffusion processes is investigated. For the model only with diffusion, it exhibits spiral waves in the two-dimensional space. However

  2. Determinism, noise, and spurious estimations in a generalised model of population growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vladar, H.P.; Pen, I.R.

    2007-01-01

    We study a generalised model of population growth in which the state variable is population growth rate instead of population size. Stochastic parametric perturbations, modelling phenotypic variability, lead to a Langevin system with two sources of multiplicative noise. The stationary probability di

  3. An Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Model with Temperature and Nozzle Aspect Ratio Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    An empirical model for jet-surface interaction (JSI) noise produced by a round jet near a flat plate is described and the resulting model evaluated. The model covers unheated and hot jet conditions (1 less than or equal to jet total temperature ratio less than or equal to 2.7) in the subsonic range (0.5 less than or equal to M(sub a) less than or equal to 0.9), surface lengths 0.6 less than or equal to (axial distance from jet exit to surface trailing edge (inches)/nozzle exit diameter) less than or equal to 10, and surface standoff distances (0 less than or equal to (radial distance from jet lipline to surface (inches)/axial distance from jet exit to surface trailing edge (inches)) less than or equal to 1) using only second-order polynomials to provide predictable behavior. The JSI noise model is combined with an existing jet mixing noise model to produce exhaust noise predictions. Fit quality metrics and comparisons to between the predicted and experimental data indicate that the model is suitable for many system level studies. A first-order correction to the JSI source model that accounts for the effect of nozzle aspect ratio is also explored. This correction is based on changes to the potential core length and frequency scaling associated with rectangular nozzles up to 8:1 aspect ratio. However, more work is needed to refine these findings into a formal model.

  4. Tuning of turbulent boundary layer anisotropy for improved surface pressure and trailing-edge noise modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Fischer, Andreas; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2014-01-01

    The modeling of the surface pressure spectrum beneath a turbulent boundary layer is investigated, focusing on the case of airfoil flows and associated trailing edge noise prediction using the so-called TNO model. This type of flow is characterized by the presence of an adverse pressure gradient a...

  5. Range and Endurance Tradeoffs on Personal Rotorcraft Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotorcraft design has always been a challenging tradeoff among overall size, capabilities, complexity, and other factors based on available technology and customer requirements. Advancements in propulsion, energy systems and other technologies have enabled new vehicles and missions; complementary advances in analysis methods and tools enable exploration of these enhanced vehicles and the evolving mission design space. A system study was performed to better understand the interdependency between vehicle design and propulsion system capabilities versus hover loiter requirements and range capability. Three representative vertical lift vehicles were developed to explore the tradeoff in capability between hover efficiency versus range and endurance capability. The vehicles were a single-main rotor helicopter, a tilt rotor, and a vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft. Vehicle capability was limited to two or three people (including pilot or crew) and maximum range within one hour of flight (100-200 miles, depending on vehicle). Two types of propulsion and energy storage systems were used in this study. First was traditional hydrocarbon-fueled cycles (such as Otto, diesel or gas turbine cycles). Second was an all-electric system using electric motors, power management and distribution, assuming batteries for energy storage, with the possibility of hydrocarbon-fueled range extenders. The high power requirements for hover significantly reduced mission radius capability. Loiter was less power intensive, resulting in about 12 the equivalent mission radius penalty. With so many design variables, the VTOL aircraft has the potential to perform well for a variety of missions. This vehicle is a good candidate for additional study; component model development is also required to adequately assess performance over the design space of interest.

  6. Blind source separation of ship-radiated noise based on generalized Gaussian model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kong Wei; Yang Bin

    2006-01-01

    When the distribution of the sources cannot be estimated accurately, the ICA algorithms failed to separate the mixtures blindly. The generalized Gaussian model (GGM) is presented in ICA algorithm since it can model nonGaussian statistical structure of different source signals easily. By inferring only one parameter, a wide class of statistical distributions can be characterized. By using maximum likelihood (ML) approach and natural gradient descent, the learning rules of blind source separation (BSS) based on GGM are presented. The experiment of the ship-radiated noise demonstrates that the GGM can model the distributions of the ship-radiated noise and sea noise efficiently, and the learning rules based on GGM gives more successful separation results after comparing it with several conventional methods such as high order cumulants and Gaussian mixture density function.

  7. NB-PLC channel modelling with cyclostationary noise addition & OFDM implementation for smart grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Togis; Gupta, K. K.

    2016-03-01

    Power line communication (PLC) technology can be a viable solution for the future ubiquitous networks because it provides a cheaper alternative to other wired technology currently being used for communication. In smart grid Power Line Communication (PLC) is used to support communication with low rate on low voltage (LV) distribution network. In this paper, we propose the channel modelling of narrowband (NB) PLC in the frequency range 5 KHz to 500 KHz by using ABCD parameter with cyclostationary noise addition. Behaviour of the channel was studied by the addition of 11KV/230V transformer, by varying load location and load. Bit error rate (BER) Vs signal to noise ratio SNR) was plotted for the proposed model by employing OFDM. Our simulation results based on the proposed channel model show an acceptable performance in terms of bit error rate versus signal to noise ratio, which enables communication required for smart grid applications.

  8. Implicit particle filtering for models with partial noise, and an application to geomagnetic data assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Morzfeld, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Implicit particle filtering is a sequential Monte Carlo method for data assim- ilation, designed to keep the number of particles manageable by focussing attention on regions of large probability. These regions are found by min- imizing, for each particle, a scalar function F of the state variables. Some previous implementations of the implicit filter rely on finding the Hessians of these functions. The calculation of the Hessians can be cumbersome if the state dimension is large or if the underlying physics are such that derivatives of F are difficult to calculate. This is the case in many geophysical applica- tions, in particular for models with partial noise, i.e. with a singular state covariance matrix. Examples of models with partial noise include stochastic partial differential equations driven by spatially smooth noise processes and models for which uncertain dynamic equations are supplemented by con- servation laws with zero uncertainty. We make the implicit particle filter applicable to such situation...

  9. Statistics of a leaky integrate-and-fire model of neurons driven by dichotomous noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankin, Romi; Lumi, Neeme

    2016-05-01

    The behavior of a stochastic leaky integrate-and-fire model of neurons is considered. The effect of temporally correlated random neuronal input is modeled as a colored two-level (dichotomous) Markovian noise. Relying on the Riemann method, exact expressions for the output interspike interval density and for the serial correlation coefficient are derived, and their dependence on noise parameters (such as correlation time and amplitude) is analyzed. Particularly, noise-induced sign reversal and a resonancelike amplification of the kurtosis of the interspike interval distribution are established. The features of spike statistics, analytically revealed in our study, are compared with recently obtained results for a perfect integrate-and-fire neuron model.

  10. Noise-induced ectopic activity in a simple cardiac cell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Harold

    2005-03-01

    Ectopic activity in the form of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) is relatively common in the normal heart. Although PVCs are normally harmless, sometimes but rarely PVCs can generate spiral waves of activation through interaction with other waves of activation, potentially progressing to ventricular tachycardia, followed by ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death. Clusters of PVCs have been found to be significantly more dangerous than isolated PVCs. We model PVC generation by applying triggers (noise) to the generic FitzHugh-Nagumo model as substrate, and study the effects the noise level and excitability. We find: exponential waiting time behavior at fixed parameter levels; no evidence of clustering at fixed parameter levels; and a sharp increase in PVCs as excitability approaches the auto-oscillatory threshold or noise increases beyond a similar threshold. This produces sharp increases in theoretical rates of PVC-induced fibrillation, consistent with results of A Gelzer et al. in animal models. Partially supported by the NSF and NIH.

  11. Noise analysis of genome-scale protein synthesis using a discrete computational model of translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racle, Julien; Stefaniuk, Adam Jan; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2015-07-28

    Noise in genetic networks has been the subject of extensive experimental and computational studies. However, very few of these studies have considered noise properties using mechanistic models that account for the discrete movement of ribosomes and RNA polymerases along their corresponding templates (messenger RNA (mRNA) and DNA). The large size of these systems, which scales with the number of genes, mRNA copies, codons per mRNA, and ribosomes, is responsible for some of the challenges. Additionally, one should be able to describe the dynamics of ribosome exchange between the free ribosome pool and those bound to mRNAs, as well as how mRNA species compete for ribosomes. We developed an efficient algorithm for stochastic simulations that addresses these issues and used it to study the contribution and trade-offs of noise to translation properties (rates, time delays, and rate-limiting steps). The algorithm scales linearly with the number of mRNA copies, which allowed us to study the importance of genome-scale competition between mRNAs for the same ribosomes. We determined that noise is minimized under conditions maximizing the specific synthesis rate. Moreover, sensitivity analysis of the stochastic system revealed the importance of the elongation rate in the resultant noise, whereas the translation initiation rate constant was more closely related to the average protein synthesis rate. We observed significant differences between our results and the noise properties of the most commonly used translation models. Overall, our studies demonstrate that the use of full mechanistic models is essential for the study of noise in translation and transcription.

  12. Hamiltonian dynamics with a weak noise and the echo effect for the rotator model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchetti, Giorgio [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, INFN Sezione di Bologna (Italy); Bassi, Gabriele [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bazzani, Armando [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, INFN Sezione di Bologna (Italy); Giorgini, Bruno [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, INFN Sezione di Bologna (Italy); Mais, Helmut [DESY Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    We analyse the effect of a weak noise on the Hamiltonian transport from the analytical and numerical viewpoint. A solvable model, the noisy rotator, is proposed to illustrate the basic phenomena. In the absence of noise, the phase space evolution is a shear flow, whose angular correlations decay following a power law, which depends on the smoothness of the initial action distribution. If the action has a fluctuating component, given by a Wiener process, then the angular correlations decay exponentially according to e{sup -{epsilon}{sup 2}}{sup t{sup 3/6}} or faster, where {epsilon} is the noise amplitude. The echo effect is well suited to investigate the competition between the decorrelation due to filamentation and noise. The noisy rotator model allows an exhaustive analytical investigation of the process for a wide class of initial conditions and a generic disturbance. The echo time is proportional to the delay {tau} of the disturbance and its amplitude is proportional to {lambda}{tau}, where {lambda} is the amplitude of the disturbance. The noise reduces the echo amplitude by e{sup -c{epsilon}{sup 2}}{sup t{sup 3}}, where c depends on the Fourier components of the initial angular distribution, and of the disturbance applied at time {tau}. The analytical results, derived in the limit {lambda} {yields} 0, {tau} {yields} {infinity}, with {lambda}{tau} finite and sufficiently small to justify a first-order expansion, are checked numerically. For more realistic models the analytical procedure would provide qualitative results and scaling laws. Quantitative results are obtained by solving the Fokker-Planck equation with a numerical scheme based on splitting: back propagation and biquadratic interpolation for the integrable part, implicit finite difference scheme for the noise component. The application to a noisy pendulum describing the longitudinal dynamics in a particle accelerator is considered, and we determine the value of the noise amplitude {epsilon}, below

  13. Noise analysis of genome-scale protein synthesis using a discrete computational model of translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racle, Julien; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily, E-mail: vassily.hatzimanikatis@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Computational Systems Biotechnology, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Stefaniuk, Adam Jan [Laboratory of Computational Systems Biotechnology, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-07-28

    Noise in genetic networks has been the subject of extensive experimental and computational studies. However, very few of these studies have considered noise properties using mechanistic models that account for the discrete movement of ribosomes and RNA polymerases along their corresponding templates (messenger RNA (mRNA) and DNA). The large size of these systems, which scales with the number of genes, mRNA copies, codons per mRNA, and ribosomes, is responsible for some of the challenges. Additionally, one should be able to describe the dynamics of ribosome exchange between the free ribosome pool and those bound to mRNAs, as well as how mRNA species compete for ribosomes. We developed an efficient algorithm for stochastic simulations that addresses these issues and used it to study the contribution and trade-offs of noise to translation properties (rates, time delays, and rate-limiting steps). The algorithm scales linearly with the number of mRNA copies, which allowed us to study the importance of genome-scale competition between mRNAs for the same ribosomes. We determined that noise is minimized under conditions maximizing the specific synthesis rate. Moreover, sensitivity analysis of the stochastic system revealed the importance of the elongation rate in the resultant noise, whereas the translation initiation rate constant was more closely related to the average protein synthesis rate. We observed significant differences between our results and the noise properties of the most commonly used translation models. Overall, our studies demonstrate that the use of full mechanistic models is essential for the study of noise in translation and transcription.

  14. The Effect of Nondeterministic Parameters on Shock-Associated Noise Prediction Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Engineering applications for aircraft noise prediction contain models for physical phenomenon that enable solutions to be computed quickly. These models contain parameters that have an uncertainty not accounted for in the solution. To include uncertainty in the solution, nondeterministic computational methods are applied. Using prediction models for supersonic jet broadband shock-associated noise, fixed model parameters are replaced by probability distributions to illustrate one of these methods. The results show the impact of using nondeterministic parameters both on estimating the model output uncertainty and on the model spectral level prediction. In addition, a global sensitivity analysis is used to determine the influence of the model parameters on the output, and to identify the parameters with the least influence on model output.

  15. Calculation Model for the Propagation of Audible Noise from High Voltage Transmission Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuebao; CUI Xiang; LU Tiebing; HE Jiamei

    2013-01-01

    Audible noise from high voltage transmission lines' corona discharge has become one of the decisive factors affecting design of high voltage transmission lines,thus it is very important to study the spatial propagation characteristics of audible noise for its accurate prediction.A calculation model for the propagation of audible noise is presented in this paper,which is based on the basic equation of the sound wave and can involve the influences of the atmosphere absorption and ground effects.The effects of different ground impedances and the atmospheric attenuation on the distribution of sound pressure level are discussed in this paper.The results show that the atmospheric absorption may increase the attenuation of the audible noise,and the ground surface affects both the amplitude and phase of the sound.The spatial distribution fluctuates considering the ground effects.The atmospheric attenuation and the ground effect are closely related to the frequency of the noise.In the frequency range of the audible noise,the influence of atmospheric attenuation on the spatial propagation characteristics is more obvious in high frequency while ground has significant influences in low frequency.

  16. A gate current 1/f noise model for GaN/AlGaN HEMTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu'an, Liu; Yiqi, Zhuang

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a theoretical and experimental study on the gate current 1/f noise in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. Based on the carrier number fluctuation in the two-dimensional electron gas channel of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs, a gate current 1/f noise model containing a trap-assisted tunneling current and a space charge limited current is built. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experiment. Experiments show that, if Vg Vx (critical gate voltage of dielectric relaxation), gate current 1/f noise comes from the superimposition of trap-assisted tunneling RTS (random telegraph noise), while Vg > Vx, gate current 1/f noise comes from not only the trap-assisted tunneling RTS, but also the space charge limited current RTS. This indicates that the gate current 1/f noise of the GaN-based HEMTs device is sensitive to the interaction of defects and the piezoelectric relaxation. It provides a useful characterization tool for deeper information about the defects and their evolution in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs.

  17. NDARC NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft - Input, Appendix 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The NDARC code performs design and analysis tasks. The design task involves sizing the rotorcraft to satisfy specified design conditions and missions. The analysis tasks can include off-design mission performance analysis, flight performance calculation for point operating conditions, and generation of subsystem or component performance maps. The principal tasks (sizing, mission analysis, flight performance analysis) are shown in the figure as boxes with heavy borders. Heavy arrows show control of subordinate tasks. The aircraft description consists of all the information, input and derived, that denes the aircraft. The aircraft consists of a set of components, including fuselage, rotors, wings, tails, and propulsion. This information can be the result of the sizing task; can come entirely from input, for a fixed model; or can come from the sizing task in a previous case or previous job. The aircraft description information is available to all tasks and all solutions. The sizing task determines the dimensions, power, and weight of a rotorcraft that can perform a specified set of design conditions and missions. The aircraft size is characterized by parameters such as design gross weight, weight empty, rotor radius, and engine power available. The relations between dimensions, power, and weight generally require an iterative solution. From the design flight conditions and missions, the task can determine the total engine power or the rotor radius (or both power and radius can be fixed), as well as the design gross weight, maximum takeoff weight, drive system torque limit, and fuel tank capacity. For each propulsion group, the engine power or the rotor radius can be sized. Missions are defined for the sizing task, and for the mission performance analysis. A mission consists of a number of mission segments, for which time, distance, and fuel burn are evaluated. For the sizing task, certain missions are designated to be used for design gross weight calculations; for

  18. Air blast circuit breaker noise and hearing loss: a multifactorial model for risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, D I; Williams, S

    2000-04-01

    The assessment of the risk to hearing from impulse noise exposure may be a problem for the occupational physician because existing legislative and international noise exposure standards deal primarily with continuous noise, and are not valid in excess of the peak exposure limit of 200 pa (140 dB). Noise exposure in excess of this level, for example that due to firearms, is frequently perceived as harmful, but this is not necessarily the case, as impulse noise standards do, in fact, allow exposure with a maximum in the order of 6.3 kPa (170 dB). To illustrate this, a cross-sectional group of electrical transmission workers have been studied who were exposed to significant levels of impulse noise from air blast circuit breakers and firearms. Important hearing loss factors have been identified by means of a specially designed questionnaire. Using the Health & Safety Executive definition, the risk of hearing loss was determined by calculating prevalence odds ratios (ORs) for exposure to these factors. The OR for those with fewer than eight unprotected air blast circuit breaker exposures was 2.27 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-5.08), whilst for those with more than eight exposures the OR was 2.10 (95% CI, 0.97-4.54). For firearm exposure, ORs of 1.61 (95% CI, 0.95-2.74) were noted in the medium exposure group and 2.05 (95% CI, 1.08-3.86) in the high exposure group. When all the factors were included in the model, the most significant factor was age. The study gives support to the impulse noise exposure criteria, confirming the borderline risk from air blast circuit breaker noise exposure and the relative safety of moderate gunfire exposure.

  19. Robustness of digitally modulated signal features against variation in HF noise model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoaib Mobien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High frequency (HF band has both military and civilian uses. It can be used either as a primary or backup communication link. Automatic modulation classification (AMC is of an utmost importance in this band for the purpose of communications monitoring; e.g., signal intelligence and spectrum management. A widely used method for AMC is based on pattern recognition (PR. Such a method has two main steps: feature extraction and classification. The first step is generally performed in the presence of channel noise. Recent studies show that HF noise could be modeled by Gaussian or bi-kappa distributions, depending on day-time. Therefore, it is anticipated that change in noise model will have impact on features extraction stage. In this article, we investigate the robustness of well known digitally modulated signal features against variation in HF noise. Specifically, we consider temporal time domain (TTD features, higher order cumulants (HOC, and wavelet based features. In addition, we propose new features extracted from the constellation diagram and evaluate their robustness against the change in noise model. This study is targeting 2PSK, 4PSK, 8PSK, 16QAM, 32QAM, and 64QAM modulations, as they are commonly used in HF communications.

  20. A survey of models for the prediction of ambient ocean noise: Circa 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doolittle, R.

    1996-01-01

    The state of the art of model development for application to computer studies of undersea search systems utilizing acoustics is surveyed in this document. Due to the demands for surveillance of submarines operating in ocean basins, the development of noise models for application in deep oceans is fairly advanced and somewhat generic. This is due to the deep sound channel, discovered during World War II, which when present allows for long-range sound propagation with little or no interaction with the bottom. Exceptions to this channel, also well understood, are found in both the high latitudes where the sound is upward refracting and in tropical ocean areas with downward refracting sound transmission. The controlling parameter is the sound speed as a function of depth within the ocean, the sound speed profile. When independent of range, this profile may be converted to a noise-versus-depth profile with well-validated consequences for deep-ocean ambient noise. When considering ocean areas of shallow water, the littoral regions, the idea of a genenic ocean channel advisedly is abandoned. The locally unique nature of both the noise production mechanisms and of the channel carrying the sound, obviates the generic treatment. Nevertheless, idealizations of this case exist and promote the understanding if not the exact predictability of the statistics of shallow water ambient noise. Some examples of these models are given in this document.

  1. A computer model of auditory efferent suppression: implications for the recognition of speech in noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Guy J; Ferry, Robert T; Meddis, Ray

    2010-02-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying the ability of human listeners to recognize speech in the presence of background noise are still imperfectly understood. However, there is mounting evidence that the medial olivocochlear system plays an important role, via efferents that exert a suppressive effect on the response of the basilar membrane. The current paper presents a computer modeling study that investigates the possible role of this activity on speech intelligibility in noise. A model of auditory efferent processing [Ferry, R. T., and Meddis, R. (2007). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3519-3526] is used to provide acoustic features for a statistical automatic speech recognition system, thus allowing the effects of efferent activity on speech intelligibility to be quantified. Performance of the "basic" model (without efferent activity) on a connected digit recognition task is good when the speech is uncorrupted by noise but falls when noise is present. However, recognition performance is much improved when efferent activity is applied. Furthermore, optimal performance is obtained when the amount of efferent activity is proportional to the noise level. The results obtained are consistent with the suggestion that efferent suppression causes a "release from adaptation" in the auditory-nerve response to noisy speech, which enhances its intelligibility.

  2. The Stochastic stability of a Logistic model with Poisson white noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Dong-Hai; Xu Wei; Su Jun; Zhou Bing-Chang

    2011-01-01

    The stochastic stability of a logistic model subjected to the effect of a random natural environment, modeled as Poisson white noise process, is investigated. The properties of the stochastic response are discussed for calculating the Lyapunov exponent, which had proven to be the most useful diagnostic tool for the stability of dynamical systems. The generalised It(o) differentiation formula is used to analyse the stochastic stability of the response. The results indicate that the stability of the response is related to the intensity and amplitude distribution of the environment noise and the growth rate of the species.

  3. Boundary Layer Measurements of the NACA0015 and Implications for Noise Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    A NACA0015 airfoil section instrumented with an array of high frequency microphones flush-mounted beneath its surface was measured in the wind tunnel at LM Wind Power in Lunderskov. Various inflow speeds and angles of attack were investigated. In addition, a hot-wire device system was used...... of surface pressure fluctuations spectra are used to analyze and improve trailing edge noise modeling by the so-called TNO model. Finally, a pair of hot-wires were placed on each side of the trailing edge in order to measure the radiated trailing edge noise. However, there is no strong evidence...

  4. Simulation Model of the ANC System for Noise Reduction in the Real Ambient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STOJANOVIC, V. O.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The simulation model of ANC system for noise reduction caused by rotating machines in a room was described in the first part of this paper. This simulation model was presented in an acoustic-electrical diagram. The detailed mathematical analysis of the adaptive algorithm was performed. The second part of the paper presents the simulation results of the application of the ANC system for the noise reduction of fans in a room intended for a classroom. Simulation was performed for sine and real aroused signal. The results are presented both numerically and graphically and the comparative analysis was also done.

  5. Noise-Induced Bursting and Coherence Resonance in Minimal Cytosolic Ca2+ Oscillation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Ya; YANG Li-Jian; WU Dan; LIU Quan; ZHAN Xuan

    2004-01-01

    @@ A stochastic calcium oscillation model based on the minimal calcium oscillation model is investigated by numerical computation. When the extracellular stimulation is sub-threshold and random, the oscillations of cytosolic calcium show complex behaviour: a bursting-like phenomenon induced by noise, that is, the phase of glomerate spikes are separated by phase of quiescence (but fluctuations in the baseline values of calcium with small amplitude during the silent phase), in a pattern that occurs at irregular inter,ls. By using the histogram of interspike intervals of calcium concentration spikes, it is found that the noise-induced coherence resonance phenomenon occurs at the cellular level.

  6. Aerodynamic Measurements of a Gulfstream Aircraft Model With and Without Noise Reduction Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; Hannon, Judith A.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2014-01-01

    Steady and unsteady aerodynamic measurements of a high-fidelity, semi-span 18% scale Gulfstream aircraft model are presented. The aerodynamic data were collected concurrently with acoustic measurements as part of a larger aeroacoustic study targeting airframe noise associated with main landing gear/flap components, gear-flap interaction noise, and the viability of related noise mitigation technologies. The aeroacoustic tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel with the facility in the acoustically treated open-wall (jet) mode. Most of the measurements were obtained with the model in landing configuration with the flap deflected at 39º and the main landing gear on and off. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0.16, 0.20, and 0.24. Global forces (lift and drag) and extensive steady and unsteady surface pressure measurements were obtained. Comparison of the present results with those acquired during a previous test shows a significant reduction in the lift experienced by the model. The underlying cause was traced to the likely presence of a much thicker boundary layer on the tunnel floor, which was acoustically treated for the present test. The steady and unsteady pressure fields on the flap, particularly in the regions of predominant noise sources such as the inboard and outboard tips, remained unaffected. It is shown that the changes in lift and drag coefficients for model configurations fitted with gear/flap noise abatement technologies fall within the repeatability of the baseline configuration. Therefore, the noise abatement technologies evaluated in this experiment have no detrimental impact on the aerodynamic performance of the aircraft model.

  7. Analysis of EMCCD and sCMOS readout noise models for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Basden, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, detectors with sub-electron readout noise have been used very effectively in astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare readout noise models for the two key faint flux level detector technologies that are commonly used: EMCCD and scientific CMOS (sCMOS) detectors. We find that in almost all situations, EMCCD technology is advantageous, and that the commonly used simplified model for EMCCD readout is appropriate. We also find that the commonly used simple models for sCMOS readout noise are optimistic, and recommend that a proper treatment of the sCMOS rms readout noise probability distribution should be considered during instrument performance modelling and development.

  8. Dispersion modelling approaches for near road applications involving noise barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The talk will present comparisons with two datasets of the barrier algorithms implemented in two different dispersion models: US EPA’s R-LINE (a research dispersion modelling tool under development by the US EPA’s Office of Research and Development) and CERC’s A...

  9. Performance of Cooperative Eigenvalue Spectrum Sensing with a Realistic Receiver Model under Impulsive Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayan A. Guimarães

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a unified comparison of the performance of four detection techniques for centralized data-fusion cooperative spectrum sensing in cognitive radio networks under impulsive noise, namely, the eigenvalue-based generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT, the maximum-minimum eigenvalue detection (MMED, the maximum eigenvalue detection (MED, and the energy detection (ED. We consider two system models: an implementation-oriented model that includes the most relevant signal processing tasks realized by a real cognitive radio receiver, and the theoretical model conventionally adopted in the literature. We show that under the implementation-oriented model, GLRT and MMED are quite robust under impulsive noise, whereas the performance of MED and ED is drastically degraded. We also show that performance under the conventional model can be too pessimistic if impulsive noise is present, whereas it can be too optimistic in the absence of this impairment. We also discuss the fact that impulsive noise is not such a severe problem when we take into account the more realistic implementation-oriented model.

  10. Deterministic decomposition and seasonal ARIMA time series models applied to airport noise forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnaccia, Claudio; Quartieri, Joseph; Tepedino, Carmine

    2017-06-01

    One of the most hazardous physical polluting agents, considering their effects on human health, is acoustical noise. Airports are a strong source of acoustical noise, due to the airplanes turbines, to the aero-dynamical noise of transits, to the acceleration or the breaking during the take-off and landing phases of aircrafts, to the road traffic around the airport, etc.. The monitoring and the prediction of the acoustical level emitted by airports can be very useful to assess the impact on human health and activities. In the airports noise scenario, thanks to flights scheduling, the predominant sources may have a periodic behaviour. Thus, a Time Series Analysis approach can be adopted, considering that a general trend and a seasonal behaviour can be highlighted and used to build a predictive model. In this paper, two different approaches are adopted, thus two predictive models are constructed and tested. The first model is based on deterministic decomposition and is built composing the trend, that is the long term behaviour, the seasonality, that is the periodic component, and the random variations. The second model is based on seasonal autoregressive moving average, and it belongs to the stochastic class of models. The two different models are fitted on an acoustical level dataset collected close to the Nice (France) international airport. Results will be encouraging and will show good prediction performances of both the adopted strategies. A residual analysis is performed, in order to quantify the forecasting error features.

  11. Demographic noise and resilience in a semi-arid ecosystem model

    CERN Document Server

    Realpe-Gomez, John; Galla, Tobias; McKane, Alan J; Rietkerk, Max

    2013-01-01

    The scarcity of water characterizing drylands forces vegetation to adopt appropriate survival strategies. Some of these generate water-vegetation feedback mechanisms that can lead to spatial self-organisation of vegetation. To date these phenomena have mostly been studied with models representing plants by a density of biomass, varying continuously in time and space. Such models disregard the discrete nature of plant individuals and their intrinsically stochastic behaviour. These features give rise to demographic noise, which can influence the qualitative dynamics of ecosystem models. In the present work we explore the effects of demographic noise on the resilience of a model semi-arid ecosystem. We introduce a spatial stochastic eco-hydrological hybrid model in which plants are modelled as discrete entities subject to stochastic dynamical rules, while the dynamics of surface and soil water are described by continuous variables. The model has a deterministic approximation very similar to previous continuous m...

  12. Structured Spatio-temporal shot-noise Cox point process models, with a view to modelling forest fires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Diaz-Avalos, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Spatio-temporal Cox point process models with a multiplicative structure for the driving random intensity, incorporating covariate information into temporal and spatial components, and with a residual term modelled by a shot-noise process, are considered. Such models are flexible and tractable...

  13. Structured spatio-temporal shot-noise Cox point process models, with a view to modelling forest fires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Diaz-Avalos, Carlos

    Spatio-temporal Cox point process models with a multiplicative structure for the driving random intensity, incorporating covariate information into temporal and spatial components, and with a residual term modelled by a shot-noise process, are considered. Such models are flexible and tractable...

  14. Channel noise enhances signal detectability in a model of acoustic neuron through the stochastic resonance paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberti, M; Paffi, A; Maggio, F; De Angelis, A; Apollonio, F; d'Inzeo, G

    2009-01-01

    A number of experimental investigations have evidenced the extraordinary sensitivity of neuronal cells to weak input stimulations, including electromagnetic (EM) fields. Moreover, it has been shown that biological noise, due to random channels gating, acts as a tuning factor in neuronal processing, according to the stochastic resonant (SR) paradigm. In this work the attention is focused on noise arising from the stochastic gating of ionic channels in a model of Ranvier node of acoustic fibers. The small number of channels gives rise to a high noise level, which is able to cause a spike train generation even in the absence of stimulations. A SR behavior has been observed in the model for the detection of sinusoidal signals at frequencies typical of the speech.

  15. Dynamic Ambient Noise Model (DANM) Evaluation Using Port Everglades Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-31

    PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 2. REPORT TYPE1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 6...Thompson ASTRAL model (Version 5.0) or the Parabolic Equation (PE Version 5.1) model for calculating the TL grid. PE 5.1 is configured to use the Range...the hour (less than 0.76 dB for all frequencies; see Table 7). The PE model is expected to be more accurate (but slower) than ASTRAL for highly

  16. High-fidelity Simulation of Jet Noise from Rectangular Nozzles . [Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Model for Noise Reduction in Advanced Jet Engines and Automobiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    This Phase II project validated a state-of-the-art LES model, coupled with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) far-field acoustic solver, to support the development of advanced engine concepts. These concepts include innovative flow control strategies to attenuate jet noise emissions. The end-to-end LES/ FW-H noise prediction model was demonstrated and validated by applying it to rectangular nozzle designs with a high aspect ratio. The model also was validated against acoustic and flow-field data from a realistic jet-pylon experiment, thereby significantly advancing the state of the art for LES.

  17. An efficient feedback active noise control algorithm based on reduced-order linear predictive modeling of FMRI acoustic noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Govind; Milani, Ali A; Panahi, Issa M S; Briggs, Richard W

    2011-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) acoustic noise exhibits an almost periodic nature (quasi-periodicity) due to the repetitive nature of currents in the gradient coils. Small changes occur in the waveform in consecutive periods due to the background noise and slow drifts in the electroacoustic transfer functions that map the gradient coil waveforms to the measured acoustic waveforms. The period depends on the number of slices per second, when echo planar imaging (EPI) sequencing is used. Linear predictability of fMRI acoustic noise has a direct effect on the performance of active noise control (ANC) systems targeted to cancel the acoustic noise. It is shown that by incorporating some samples from the previous period, very high linear prediction accuracy can be reached with a very low order predictor. This has direct implications on feedback ANC systems since their performance is governed by the predictability of the acoustic noise to be cancelled. The low complexity linear prediction of fMRI acoustic noise developed in this paper is used to derive an effective and low-cost feedback ANC system.

  18. A Cucker--Smale Model with Noise and Delay

    KAUST Repository

    Erban, Radek

    2016-08-09

    A generalization of the Cucker-Smale model for collective animal behavior is investigated. The model is formulated as a system of delayed stochastic differential equations. It incorporates two additional processes which are present in animal decision making, but are often neglected in modeling: (i) stochasticity (imperfections) of individual behavior and (ii) delayed responses of individuals to signals in their environment. Sufficient conditions for flocking for the generalized Cucker-Smale model are derived by using a suitable Lyapunov functional. As a by-product, a new result regarding the asymptotic behavior of delayed geometric Brownian motion is obtained. In the second part of the paper, results of systematic numerical simulations are presented. They not only illustrate the analytical results, but hint at a somehow surprising behavior

  19. Information Loss Caused by Noise in Models for Dichotomous Items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-29

    University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee. Those who worked for her as assistants include Paul S. Changas, Charles T. McCarter, Christina C. Grey... Lazarsfeld , 1959) and the constant information model (Samejima, RR-79-1), belong t " Type A Note that in the former two models the interval (6, 5...ability. In F. M. Lord and M. R. Novick; Statistical theories of mental test scores. Addison-Wesley, 1968, Chapters - 17-20. * [2] Lazarsfeld , P. F. Latent

  20. Influence of strong noise on the decline and propagation of population in the delayed Malthus-Verhulst model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jian-Chun; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2010-11-01

    The effects of strong noise on the decline and propagation processes of a population in the Malthus-Verhulst model with time delay are investigated by a stochastic simulation. Time delays in two different processes are concurrent in ecosystems. The simulation results indicate that: The stability of the population is enhanced by the decreasing multiplicative noise intensity and the increasing delay time. The replacement of old individuals with young ones is accelerated by an increasing multiplicative noise intensity, an increasing additive noise intensity and a decreasing delay time. An increasing multiplicative noise intensity will drive the population of species to fluctuate more largely.

  1. Spherical Deconvolution of Multichannel Diffusion MRI Data with Non-Gaussian Noise Models and Spatial Regularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick J Canales-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Spherical deconvolution (SD methods are widely used to estimate the intra-voxel white-matter fiber orientations from diffusion MRI data. However, while some of these methods assume a zero-mean Gaussian distribution for the underlying noise, its real distribution is known to be non-Gaussian and to depend on many factors such as the number of coils and the methodology used to combine multichannel MRI signals. Indeed, the two prevailing methods for multichannel signal combination lead to noise patterns better described by Rician and noncentral Chi distributions. Here we develop a Robust and Unbiased Model-BAsed Spherical Deconvolution (RUMBA-SD technique, intended to deal with realistic MRI noise, based on a Richardson-Lucy (RL algorithm adapted to Rician and noncentral Chi likelihood models. To quantify the benefits of using proper noise models, RUMBA-SD was compared with dRL-SD, a well-established method based on the RL algorithm for Gaussian noise. Another aim of the study was to quantify the impact of including a total variation (TV spatial regularization term in the estimation framework. To do this, we developed TV spatially-regularized versions of both RUMBA-SD and dRL-SD algorithms. The evaluation was performed by comparing various quality metrics on 132 three-dimensional synthetic phantoms involving different inter-fiber angles and volume fractions, which were contaminated with noise mimicking patterns generated by data processing in multichannel scanners. The results demonstrate that the inclusion of proper likelihood models leads to an increased ability to resolve fiber crossings with smaller inter-fiber angles and to better detect non-dominant fibers. The inclusion of TV regularization dramatically improved the resolution power of both techniques. The above findings were also verified in human brain data.

  2. Spherical Deconvolution of Multichannel Diffusion MRI Data with Non-Gaussian Noise Models and Spatial Regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales-Rodríguez, Erick J; Daducci, Alessandro; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Caruyer, Emmanuel; Aja-Fernández, Santiago; Radua, Joaquim; Yurramendi Mendizabal, Jesús M; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Melie-García, Lester; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Sarró, Salvador; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; Salvador, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Spherical deconvolution (SD) methods are widely used to estimate the intra-voxel white-matter fiber orientations from diffusion MRI data. However, while some of these methods assume a zero-mean Gaussian distribution for the underlying noise, its real distribution is known to be non-Gaussian and to depend on many factors such as the number of coils and the methodology used to combine multichannel MRI signals. Indeed, the two prevailing methods for multichannel signal combination lead to noise patterns better described by Rician and noncentral Chi distributions. Here we develop a Robust and Unbiased Model-BAsed Spherical Deconvolution (RUMBA-SD) technique, intended to deal with realistic MRI noise, based on a Richardson-Lucy (RL) algorithm adapted to Rician and noncentral Chi likelihood models. To quantify the benefits of using proper noise models, RUMBA-SD was compared with dRL-SD, a well-established method based on the RL algorithm for Gaussian noise. Another aim of the study was to quantify the impact of including a total variation (TV) spatial regularization term in the estimation framework. To do this, we developed TV spatially-regularized versions of both RUMBA-SD and dRL-SD algorithms. The evaluation was performed by comparing various quality metrics on 132 three-dimensional synthetic phantoms involving different inter-fiber angles and volume fractions, which were contaminated with noise mimicking patterns generated by data processing in multichannel scanners. The results demonstrate that the inclusion of proper likelihood models leads to an increased ability to resolve fiber crossings with smaller inter-fiber angles and to better detect non-dominant fibers. The inclusion of TV regularization dramatically improved the resolution power of both techniques. The above findings were also verified in human brain data.

  3. An adaptive grid to improve the efficiency and accuracy of modelling underwater noise from shipping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigg, Leah; Chen, Feng; Shapiro, Georgy; Ingram, Simon; Embling, Clare

    2017-04-01

    Underwater noise from shipping is becoming a significant concern and has been listed as a pollutant under Descriptor 11 of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive. Underwater noise models are an essential tool to assess and predict noise levels for regulatory procedures such as environmental impact assessments and ship noise monitoring. There are generally two approaches to noise modelling. The first is based on simplified energy flux models, assuming either spherical or cylindrical propagation of sound energy. These models are very quick but they ignore important water column and seabed properties, and produce significant errors in the areas subject to temperature stratification (Shapiro et al., 2014). The second type of model (e.g. ray-tracing and parabolic equation) is based on an advanced physical representation of sound propagation. However, these acoustic propagation models are computationally expensive to execute. Shipping noise modelling requires spatial discretization in order to group noise sources together using a grid. A uniform grid size is often selected to achieve either the greatest efficiency (i.e. speed of computations) or the greatest accuracy. In contrast, this work aims to produce efficient and accurate noise level predictions by presenting an adaptive grid where cell size varies with distance from the receiver. The spatial range over which a certain cell size is suitable was determined by calculating the distance from the receiver at which propagation loss becomes uniform across a grid cell. The computational efficiency and accuracy of the resulting adaptive grid was tested by comparing it to uniform 1 km and 5 km grids. These represent an accurate and computationally efficient grid respectively. For a case study of the Celtic Sea, an application of the adaptive grid over an area of 160×160 km reduced the number of model executions required from 25600 for a 1 km grid to 5356 in December and to between 5056 and 13132 in August, which

  4. Dynamics of a stochastic multi-strain SIS epidemic model driven by Lévy noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Can; Kang, Yanmei

    2017-01-01

    A stochastic multi-strain SIS epidemic model is formulated by introducing Lévy noise into the disease transmission rate of each strain. First, we prove that the stochastic model admits a unique global positive solution, and, by the comparison theorem, we show that the solution remains within a positively invariant set almost surely. Next we investigate stochastic stability of the disease-free equilibrium, including stability in probability and pth moment asymptotic stability. Then sufficient conditions for persistence in the mean of the disease are established. Finally, based on an Euler scheme for Lévy-driven stochastic differential equations, numerical simulations for a stochastic two-strain model are carried out to verify the theoretical results. Moreover, numerical comparison results of the stochastic two-strain model and the deterministic version are also given. Lévy noise can cause the two strains to become extinct almost surely, even though there is a dominant strain that persists in the deterministic model. It can be concluded that the introduction of Lévy noise reduces the disease extinction threshold, which indicates that Lévy noise may suppress the disease outbreak.

  5. What will Europa sound like? Modeling seismic background noise due to tidal cracking events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panning, M. P.; Stähler, S. C.; Huang, H. H.; Vance, S.; Kedar, S.; Lorenz, R. D.; Pike, W. T.

    2016-12-01

    Seismology is a powerful tool for illuminating internal structure and dynamics in planetary bodies. With the plan for a Europa lander next decade, we have the opportunity to place a seismometer on the surface and greatly increase our knowledge of internal structure of the ocean world. In order to maximize return from such an instrument, we need to understand both predicted signals and noise. Instrument noise can be quantified well on Earth, but estimating the ambient noise of a planetary body is significantly more challenging. For Europa, we make an initial range of estimates of ambient noise due to ongoing tidally induced events within the ice shell. We estimate a range of cumulative moment releases based on tidal dissipation energy, and then create an assumed Gutenberg-Richter relationship (e.g. Golombek et al., 1992). We then use this relationship to generate random realizations of event catalogs with a length of 1 day, including all events down to a moment magnitude of -1, and generate continuous 3 component seismic records from these catalogs using a spectral element method (Instaseis/AxiSEM, van Driel et al., 2015). The seismic data are calculated using a range of thermodynamically self-consistent layered models of Europa structure, varying ice shell thickness and attenuation (e.g. Cammarano et al., 2006). The noise records are then used to define overall spectral characteristics of the noise and to test methods to take advantage of the ambient noise, such as autocorrelation techniques. Ambient noise characteristics are also compared with candidate instrument noise models which may be included in future Europa missions. F. Cammarano, V. Lekic, M. Manga, M.P. Panning, and B.A. Romanowicz (2006), "Long-period seismology on Europa: 1. Physically consistent interior models," J. Geophys. Res., 111, E12009, doi: 10.1029/2006JE002710. M. van Driel, L. Krischer, S.C. Stähler, K. Hosseini, and T. Nissen-Meyer (2015), "Instaseis: instant global seismograms based on a

  6. Emergency Medical Service (EMS): Rotorcraft Technology Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauchspies, J. S.; Adams, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A lead organization on the national level should be designated to establish concepts, locations, and the number of shock trauma air medical services. Medical specialists desire a vehicle which incorporates advances in medical technology trends in health care. Key technology needs for the emergency medical services helicopter of the future include the riding quality of fixed wing aircraft (reduced noise and vibration), no tail rotor, small rotor, small rotor diameter, improved visibility, crashworthy vehicle, IFR capability, more affordability high reliability, fuel efficient, and specialized cabins to hold medical/diagnostic and communications equipment. Approaches to a national emergency medical service are discussed.

  7. New Concepts and Perspectives on Micro-Rotorcraft and Small Autonomous Rotary-Wing Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Larry A.; Aiken, E. W.; Johnson, J. L.; Demblewski, R.; Andrews, J.; Aiken, Irwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A key part of the strategic vision for rotorcraft research as identified by senior technologists within the Army/NASA Rotorcraft Division at NASA Ames Research Center is the development and use of small autonomous rotorcraft. Small autonomous rotorcraft are defined for the purposes of this paper to be a class of vehicles that range in size from rotary-wing micro air vehicles (MAVs) to larger, more conventionally sized, rotorcraft uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs) - i.e. vehicle gross weights ranging from hundreds of grams to thousands of kilograms. The development of small autonomous rotorcraft represents both a technology challenge and a potential new vehicle class that will have substantial societal impact for: national security, personal transport, planetary science, and public service.

  8. Efficient Control of Nonlinear Noise-Corrupted Systems Using a Novel Model Predictive Control Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Weissel, Florian; Huber, Marco F.; Hanebeck, Uwe D.

    2007-01-01

    Model identification and measurement acquisition is always to some degree uncertain. Therefore, a framework for Nonlinear Model Predictive Control (NMPC) is proposed that explicitly considers the noise influence on nonlinear dynamic systems with continuous state spaces and a finite set of control inputs in order to significantly increase the control quality. Integral parts of NMPC are the prediction of system states over a finite horizon as well as the problem specific modeling of reward func...

  9. Exact probability distribution for the Bernoulli-Malthus-Verhulst model driven by a multiplicative colored noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calisto, H.; Bologna, M.

    2007-05-01

    We report an exact result for the calculation of the probability distribution of the Bernoulli-Malthus-Verhulst model driven by a multiplicative colored noise. We study the conditions under which the probability distribution of the Malthus-Verhulst model can exhibit a transition from a unimodal to a bimodal distribution depending on the value of a critical parameter. Also we show that the mean value of x(t) in the latter model always approaches asymptotically the value 1.

  10. A calculation model for the noise from steel railway bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, M.H.A.; Thompson, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    The sound level of a train crossing a steel railway bridge is usually about 10 dB higher than on plain track. In the Netherlands there are many such bridges which, for practical reasons, cannot be replaced by more intrinsically quiet concrete bridges. A computational model is described for the

  11. A calculation model for the noise from steel railway bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, M.H.A.; Thompson, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    The sound level of a train crossing a steel railway bridge is usually about 10 dB higher than on plain track. In the Netherlands there are many such bridges which, for practical reasons, cannot be replaced by more intrinsically quiet concrete bridges. A computational model is described for the estim

  12. Identifying modeled ship noise hotspots for marine mammals of Canada's Pacific region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Erbe

    Full Text Available The inshore, continental shelf waters of British Columbia (BC, Canada are busy with ship traffic. South coast waters are heavily trafficked by ships using the ports of Vancouver and Seattle. North coast waters are less busy, but expected to get busier based on proposals for container port and liquefied natural gas development and expansion. Abundance estimates and density surface maps are available for 10 commonly seen marine mammals, including northern resident killer whales, fin whales, humpback whales, and other species with at-risk status under Canadian legislation. Ship noise is the dominant anthropogenic contributor to the marine soundscape of BC, and it is chronic. Underwater noise is now being considered in habitat quality assessments in some countries and in marine spatial planning. We modeled the propagation of underwater noise from ships and weighted the received levels by species-specific audiograms. We overlaid the audiogram-weighted maps of ship audibility with animal density maps. The result is a series of so-called "hotspot" maps of ship noise for all 10 marine mammal species, based on cumulative ship noise energy and average distribution in the boreal summer. South coast waters (Juan de Fuca and Haro Straits are hotspots for all species that use the area, irrespective of their hearing sensitivity, simply due to ubiquitous ship traffic. Secondary hotspots were found on the central and north coasts (Johnstone Strait and the region around Prince Rupert. These maps can identify where anthropogenic noise is predicted to have above-average impact on species-specific habitat, and where mitigation measures may be most effective. This approach can guide effective mitigation without requiring fleet-wide modification in sites where no animals are present or where the area is used by species that are relatively insensitive to ship noise.

  13. Application of Climate Impact Metrics to Rotorcraft Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Carl; Johnson, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Multiple metrics are applied to the design of large civil rotorcraft, integrating minimum cost and minimum environmental impact. The design mission is passenger transport with similar range and capacity to a regional jet. Separate aircraft designs are generated for minimum empty weight, fuel burn, and environmental impact. A metric specifically developed for the design of aircraft is employed to evaluate emissions. The designs are generated using the NDARC rotorcraft sizing code, and rotor analysis is performed with the CAMRAD II aeromechanics code. Design and mission parameters such as wing loading, disk loading, and cruise altitude are varied to minimize both cost and environmental impact metrics. This paper presents the results of these parametric sweeps as well as the final aircraft designs.

  14. Handling Qualities of Large Rotorcraft in Hover and Low Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpica, Carlos; Theodore, Colin R.; Lawrence , Ben; Blanken, Chris L.

    2015-01-01

    According to a number of system studies, large capacity advanced rotorcraft with a capability of high cruise speeds (approx.350 mph) as well as vertical and/or short take-off and landing (V/STOL) flight could alleviate anticipated air transportation capacity issues by making use of non-primary runways, taxiways, and aprons. These advanced aircraft pose a number of design challenges, as well as unknown issues in the flight control and handling qualities domains. A series of piloted simulation experiments have been conducted on the NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) in recent years to systematically investigate the fundamental flight control and handling qualities issues associated with the characteristics of large rotorcraft, including tiltrotors, in hover and low-speed maneuvering.

  15. A Survey of Current Rotorcraft Propulsion Health Monitoring Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Irebert R.; Dempsey, Paula J.; Simon, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    A brief review is presented on the state-of-the-art in rotorcraft engine health monitoring technologies including summaries on current practices in the area of sensors, data acquisition, monitoring and analysis. Also, presented are guidelines for verification and validation of Health Usage Monitoring System (HUMS) and specifically for maintenance credits to extend part life. Finally, a number of new efforts in HUMS are summarized as well as lessons learned and future challenges. In particular, gaps are identified to supporting maintenance credits to extend rotorcraft engine part life. A number of data sources were consulted and include results from a survey from the HUMS community, Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) documents, American Helicopter Society (AHS) papers, as well as references from Defence Science & Technology Organization (DSTO), Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

  16. Selection of noise power ratio spectrum models for electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant

    CERN Document Server

    Coakley, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    In the electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant based on Johnson noise thermometry, the ratio of the power spectral densities of thermal noise across a resistor and pseudo-random noise synthetically generated by a quantum-accurate voltage-noise source varies with frequency due to mismatch between transmission lines. We model this ratio spectrum as an even polynomial function of frequency. For any given frequency range, defined by the maximum frequency $f_{max}$, we select the optimal polynomial ratio spectrum model with a cross-validation method and estimate the conditional uncertainty of the constant term in the ratio spectrum model in a way that accounts for both random and systematic effects associated with imperfect knowledge of the model with a resampling method. We select $f_{max}$ by minimizing this conditional uncertainty. Since many values of $f_{max}$ yield conditional uncertainties close to the observed minimum value on a frequency grid, we quantify an additional component of uncertainty as...

  17. Improved virtual channel noise model for transform domain Wyner-Ziv video coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xin; Forchhammer, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Distributed video coding (DVC) has been proposed as a new video coding paradigm to deal with lossy source coding using side information to exploit the statistics at the decoder to reduce computational demands at the encoder. A virtual channel noise model is utilized at the decoder to estimate...

  18. Load influence on gear noise. [mathematical model for determining acoustic pressure level as function of load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merticaru, V.

    1974-01-01

    An original mathematical model is proposed to derive equations for calculation of gear noise. These equations permit the acoustic pressure level to be determined as a function of load. Application of this method to three parallel gears is reported. The logical calculation scheme is given, as well as the results obtained.

  19. Acoustic fMRI noise : Linear time-invariant system model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierra, Carlos V. Rizzo; Versluis, Maarten J.; Hoogduin, Johannes M.; Duifhuis, Hendrikus (Diek)

    2008-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For auditory system studies, however, the acoustic noise generated by the scanner tends to interfere with the assessments of this activation. Understanding and modeling fMRI acoustic noi

  20. Modeling random telegraph signal noise in CMOS image sensor under low light based on binomial distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhang; Xinmiao, Lu; Guangyi, Wang; Yongcai, Hu; Jiangtao, Xu

    2016-07-01

    The random telegraph signal noise in the pixel source follower MOSFET is the principle component of the noise in the CMOS image sensor under low light. In this paper, the physical and statistical model of the random telegraph signal noise in the pixel source follower based on the binomial distribution is set up. The number of electrons captured or released by the oxide traps in the unit time is described as the random variables which obey the binomial distribution. As a result, the output states and the corresponding probabilities of the first and the second samples of the correlated double sampling circuit are acquired. The standard deviation of the output states after the correlated double sampling circuit can be obtained accordingly. In the simulation section, one hundred thousand samples of the source follower MOSFET have been simulated, and the simulation results show that the proposed model has the similar statistical characteristics with the existing models under the effect of the channel length and the density of the oxide trap. Moreover, the noise histogram of the proposed model has been evaluated at different environmental temperatures. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61372156 and 61405053) and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province of China (Grant No. LZ13F04001).

  1. Modeling random telegraph signal noise in CMOS image sensor under low light based on binomial distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张钰; 逯鑫淼; 王光义; 胡永才; 徐江涛

    2016-01-01

    The random telegraph signal noise in the pixel source follower MOSFET is the principle component of the noise in the CMOS image sensor under low light. In this paper, the physical and statistical model of the random telegraph signal noise in the pixel source follower based on the binomial distribution is set up. The number of electrons captured or released by the oxide traps in the unit time is described as the random variables which obey the binomial distribution. As a result, the output states and the corresponding probabilities of the first and the second samples of the correlated double sampling circuit are acquired. The standard deviation of the output states after the correlated double sampling circuit can be obtained accordingly. In the simulation section, one hundred thousand samples of the source follower MOSFET have been simulated, and the simulation results show that the proposed model has the similar statistical characteristics with the existing models under the effect of the channel length and the density of the oxide trap. Moreover, the noise histogram of the proposed model has been evaluated at different environmental temperatures.

  2. A semi-empirical airfoil stall noise model based on surface pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Fischer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    This work is concerned with the experimental study of airfoil stall and the modelling of stall noise. Using pressure taps and high-frequency surface pressure microphones flush-mounted on airfoils measured in wind tunnels and on an operating wind turbine blade, the characteristics of stall are ana...

  3. Unravelling the noise: the discrimination of wave function collapse models under time-continuous measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genoni, Marco G.; Duarte, O. S.; Serafini, Alessio

    2016-10-01

    Inspired by the notion that environmental noise is in principle observable, while fundamental noise due to spontaneous localization would not be, we study the estimation of the diffusion parameter induced by wave function collapse models under continuous monitoring of the environment. We take into account finite measurement efficiencies and, in order to quantify the advantage granted by monitoring, we analyse the quantum Fisher information associated with such a diffusion parameter, identify optimal measurements in limiting cases, and assess the performance of such measurements in more realistic conditions.

  4. Modeling the effect of transcriptional noise on switching in gene networks in a genetic bistable switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Srabanti

    2015-06-01

    Gene regulatory networks in cells allow transitions between gene expression states under the influence of both intrinsic and extrinsic noise. Here we introduce a new theoretical method to study the dynamics of switching in a two-state gene expression model with positive feedback by explicitly accounting for the transcriptional noise. Within this theoretical framework, we employ a semi-classical path integral technique to calculate the mean switching time starting from either an active or inactive promoter state. Our analytical predictions are in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations and experimental observations.

  5. Modelling the Noise-Robustness of Infants' Word Representations: The Impact of Previous Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Bergmann

    Full Text Available During language acquisition, infants frequently encounter ambient noise. We present a computational model to address whether specific acoustic processing abilities are necessary to detect known words in moderate noise--an ability attested experimentally in infants. The model implements a general purpose speech encoding and word detection procedure. Importantly, the model contains no dedicated processes for removing or cancelling out ambient noise, and it can replicate the patterns of results obtained in several infant experiments. In addition to noise, we also addressed the role of previous experience with particular target words: does the frequency of a word matter, and does it play a role whether that word has been spoken by one or multiple speakers? The simulation results show that both factors affect noise robustness. We also investigated how robust word detection is to changes in speaker identity by comparing words spoken by known versus unknown speakers during the simulated test. This factor interacted with both noise level and past experience, showing that an increase in exposure is only helpful when a familiar speaker provides the test material. Added variability proved helpful only when encountering an unknown speaker. Finally, we addressed whether infants need to recognise specific words, or whether a more parsimonious explanation of infant behaviour, which we refer to as matching, is sufficient. Recognition involves a focus of attention on a specific target word, while matching only requires finding the best correspondence of acoustic input to a known pattern in the memory. Attending to a specific target word proves to be more noise robust, but a general word matching procedure can be sufficient to simulate experimental data stemming from young infants. A change from acoustic matching to targeted recognition provides an explanation of the improvements observed in infants around their first birthday. In summary, we present a

  6. Low-frequency noise in bare SOI wafers: Experiments and model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirro, L.; Ionica, I.; Cristoloveanu, S.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2016-11-01

    Low-frequency noise (LFN) measurements are largely used for interface quality characterization in MOSFETs. In this work, a detailed investigation of LFN technique applied to pseudo-MOSFETs in bare silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates is provided. A physical model capable to describe the experimental results is proposed and validated using different die areas and inter-probe distances. The effective silicon area contributing to the noise signal, the impact of defects induced by probes and the possibility to extract interface trap density are addressed.

  7. Wind Turbine Noise Propagation Modelling: An Unsteady Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlas, E.; Zhu, W. J.; Shen, W. Z.; Andersen, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbine sound generation and propagation phenomena are inherently time dependent, hence tools that incorporate the dynamic nature of these two issues are needed for accurate modelling. In this paper, we investigate the sound propagation from a wind turbine by considering the effects of unsteady flow around it and time dependent source characteristics. For the acoustics modelling we employ the Parabolic Equation (PE) method while Large Eddy Simulation (LES) as well as synthetically generated turbulence fields are used to generate the medium flow upon which sound propagates. Unsteady acoustic simulations are carried out for three incoming wind shear and various turbulence intensities, using a moving source approach to mimic the rotating turbine blades. The focus of the present paper is to study the near and far field amplitude modulation characteristics and time evolution of Sound Pressure Level (SPL).

  8. Coherence estimation in synthetic aperture radar data based on speckle noise modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Martínez, Carlos; Pottier, Eric

    2007-02-01

    In the past we proposed a multidimensional speckle noise model to which we now include systematic phase variation effects. This extension makes it possible to define what is believed to be a novel coherence model able to identify the different sources of bias when coherence is estimated on multidimensional synthetic radar aperture (SAR) data. On the one hand, low coherence biases are basically due to the complex additive speckle noise component of the Hermitian product of two SAR images. On the other hand, the availability of the coherence model permits us to quantify the bias due to topography when multilook filtering is considered, permitting us to establish the conditions upon which information may be estimated independently of topography. Based on the coherence model, two coherence estimation approaches, aiming to reduce the different biases, are proposed. Results with simulated and experimental polarimetric and interferometric SAR data illustrate and validate both, the coherence model and the coherence estimation algorithms.

  9. Analytical stability analysis of periodic systems by Poincaré mappings with application to rotorcraft dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryk Flashner

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A point mapping analysis is employed to investigate the stability of periodic systems. The method is applied to simplified rotorcraft models. The proposed approach is based on a procedure to obtain an analytical expression for the period-to-period mapping description of system's dynamics, and its dependence on system's parameters. Analytical stability and bifurcation conditions are then determined and expressed as functional relations between important system parameters. The method is applied to investigate the parametric stability of flapping motion of a rotor and the ground resonance problem encountered in rotorcraft dynamics. It is shown that the proposed approach provides very accurate results when compared with direct numerical results which are assumed to be an “exact solution” for the purpose of this study. It is also demonstrated that the point mapping method yields more accurate results than the widely used classical perturbation analysis. The ability to perform analytical stability studies of systems with multiple degrees-of-freedom is an important feature of the proposed approach since most existing analysis methods are applicable to single degree-of-freedom systems. Stability analysis of higher dimensional systems, such as the ground resonance problems, by perturbation methods is not straightforward, and is usually very cumbersome.

  10. Noise modeling in a signal conditioning circuit for low power audio application using resistive sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meillère Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Piezoresistive sensors convert a physical value into a resistance variation. Often four resistive elements are connected together in a Wheatstone bridge to provide electrical variations of sensors. When this structure is biased with a fixed voltage source or a current source the topology provides a differential output voltage. To exploit information a conditioning circuit is associated to the bridge. In most cases it consists of an instrumentation amplifier followed by a data converter to obtain very quickly a digital representation of information. Due to the high input impedance of the instrumentation amplifier, bridge sensitivity is preserved. A filter may be added to avoid aliasing or a continuous time sigma-delta modulator that includes filtering feature. This study is concerning the conditioning structure for piezoresistive sensors bridge especially fully integrated microphones for biomedical application. The bridge signal to noise ratio is set by biasing the amplifier stage by current. The noise performance becomes the limiting factor of the read-out circuit. Current mode topologies drive amplifiers design where inputs are the main noise contributor. Modeling noise contribution is a key point in the design of the conditioning circuit. The current consumption leads noise performances too. A proposed architecture was implemented in a 65nm CMOS standard technology for performance measurement and evaluation with nanowire based microphone dedicated to hearing aids application.

  11. Protective role of hydrogen sulfide against noise-induced cochlear damage: a chronic intracochlear infusion model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A reduction in cochlear blood flow plays an essential role in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL. The timely regulation of cochlear perfusion determines the progression and prognosis of NIHL. Hydrogen sulfide (H(2S has attracted increasing interest as a vasodilator in cardiovascular systems. This study identified the role of H(2S in cochlear blood flow regulation and noise protection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The gene and protein expression of the H(2S synthetase cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE in the rat cochlea was examined using immunofluorescence and real-time PCR. Cochlear CSE mRNA levels varied according to the duration of noise exposure. A chronic intracochlear infusion model was built and artificial perilymph (AP, NaHS or DL-propargylglycine (PPG were locally administered. Local sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS significantly increased cochlear perfusion post-noise exposure. Cochlear morphological damage and hearing loss were alleviated in the NaHS group as measured by conventional auditory brainstem response (ABR, cochlear scanning electron microscope (SEM and outer hair cell (OHC count. The highest percentage of OHC loss occurred in the PPG group. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that H(2S plays an important role in the regulation of cochlear blood flow and the protection against noise. Further studies may identify a new preventive and therapeutic perspective on NIHL and other blood supply-related inner ear diseases.

  12. Signal-to-noise performance analysis of streak tube imaging lidar systems. I. Cascaded model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongru; Wu, Lei; Wang, Xiaopeng; Chen, Chao; Yu, Bing; Yang, Bin; Yuan, Liang; Wu, Lipeng; Xue, Zhanli; Li, Gaoping; Wu, Baoning

    2012-12-20

    Streak tube imaging lidar (STIL) is an active imaging system using a pulsed laser transmitter and a streak tube receiver to produce 3D range and intensity imagery. The STIL has recently attracted a great deal of interest and attention due to its advantages of wide azimuth field-of-view, high range and angle resolution, and high frame rate. This work investigates the signal-to-noise performance of STIL systems. A theoretical model for characterizing the signal-to-noise performance of the STIL system with an internal or external intensified streak tube receiver is presented, based on the linear cascaded systems theory of signal and noise propagation. The STIL system is decomposed into a series of cascaded imaging chains whose signal and noise transfer properties are described by the general (or the spatial-frequency dependent) noise factors (NFs). Expressions for the general NFs of the cascaded chains (or the main components) in the STIL system are derived. The work presented here is useful for the design and evaluation of STIL systems.

  13. Common-mode noise analysis, modeling and filter design for a phase-shifted full-bridge forward converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makda, Ishtiyaq Ahmed; Nymand, Morten

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the common-mode noise analysis and modeling of a phase-shifted full-bridge forward converter. The common-mode noise source due to a transformer inter-winding capacitance is considered for the case of study. The generated common-mode noise voltage-source in a converter...... is analytically determined, which then leads to a common-mode noise modeling of a phase-shifted converter. Using a proposed model, common-mode noise-current harmonics are calculated and a fully analytical filter design procedure is presented to comply with the CISPR-11 standard. Finally, a prototype phase......-shifted forward converter is built to verify the theoretical analysis. This study shows that the primary-to-secondary transformer winding capacitance creates a very significant amount of common-mode noise current in a phase-shifted forward converter....

  14. Restoring the encoding properties of a stochastic neuron model by an exogenous noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra ePaffi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Here we evaluate the possibility of improving the encoding properties of an impaired neuronal system by superimposing an exogenous noise to an external electric stimulation signal. The approach is based on the use of mathematical neuron models consisting of stochastic HH-like circuit, where the impairment of the endogenous presynaptic inputs is described as a subthreshold injected current and the exogenous stimulation signal is a sinusoidal voltage perturbation across the membrane. Our results indicate that a correlated Gaussian noise, added to the sinusoidal signal can significantly increase the encoding properties of the impaired system, through the Stochastic Resonance (SR phenomenon. These results suggest that an exogenous noise, suitably tailored, could improve the efficacy of those stimulation techniques used in neuronal systems, where the presynaptic sensory neurons are impaired and have to be artificially bypassed.

  15. Restoring the encoding properties of a stochastic neuron model by an exogenous noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paffi, Alessandra; Camera, Francesca; Apollonio, Francesca; d'Inzeo, Guglielmo; Liberti, Micaela

    2015-01-01

    Here we evaluate the possibility of improving the encoding properties of an impaired neuronal system by superimposing an exogenous noise to an external electric stimulation signal. The approach is based on the use of mathematical neuron models consisting of stochastic HH-like circuit, where the impairment of the endogenous presynaptic inputs is described as a subthreshold injected current and the exogenous stimulation signal is a sinusoidal voltage perturbation across the membrane. Our results indicate that a correlated Gaussian noise, added to the sinusoidal signal can significantly increase the encoding properties of the impaired system, through the Stochastic Resonance (SR) phenomenon. These results suggest that an exogenous noise, suitably tailored, could improve the efficacy of those stimulation techniques used in neuronal systems, where the presynaptic sensory neurons are impaired and have to be artificially bypassed.

  16. Psychoacoustic Evaluation Model on the Luxury of Sound Quality in Vehicle Interior Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper studied the comprehensive evaluation index of sensory luxury of Sound Quality in Vehicle interior noise. The relationship between it and psychoacoustic parameters under different conditions was studied. Four types of vehicle real-time noises were recorded at several running speeds and later were subjectively evaluated in the testing room by semantic subdivided method. According to the subjective test and evaluation, the psychoacoustic objective quantificational model was built using correlation analysis and multi-dimensional linear regression analysis. The results indicated that: the luxury of vehicle interior noise showed good correlation with loudness and sharpness. The luxury increased as loudness or sharpness decreased, but it decreased as speed increased.

  17. Robust crossfeed design for hovering rotorcraft. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapang, David R.

    1993-01-01

    Control law design for rotorcraft fly-by-wire systems normally attempts to decouple angular responses using fixed-gain crossfeeds. This approach can lead to poor decoupling over the frequency range of pilot inputs and increase the load on the feedback loops. In order to improve the decoupling performance, dynamic crossfeeds may be adopted. Moreover, because of the large changes that occur in rotorcraft dynamics due to small changes about the nominal design condition, especially for near-hovering flight, the crossfeed design must be 'robust.' A new low-order matching method is presented here to design robost crossfeed compensators for multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) systems. The technique identifies degrees-of-freedom that can be decoupled using crossfeeds, given an anticipated set of parameter variations for the range of flight conditions of concern. Cross-coupling is then reduced for degrees-of-freedom that can use crossfeed compensation by minimizing off-axis response magnitude average and variance. Results are presented for the analysis of pitch, roll, yaw, and heave coupling of the UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter in near-hovering flight. Robust crossfeeds are designed that show significant improvement in decoupling performance and robustness over nominal, single design point, compensators. The design method and results are presented in an easily-used graphical format that lends significant physical insight to the design procedure. This plant pre-compensation technique is an appropriate preliminary step to the design of robust feedback control laws for rotorcraft.

  18. Predicting Modeling Method of Ship Radiated Noise Based on Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohui Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Because the forming mechanism of underwater acoustic signal is complex, it is difficult to establish the accurate predicting model. In this paper, we propose a nonlinear predicting modeling method of ship radiated noise based on genetic algorithm. Three types of ship radiated noise are taken as real underwater acoustic signal. First of all, a basic model framework is chosen. Secondly, each possible model is done with genetic coding. Thirdly, model evaluation standard is established. Fourthly, the operation of genetic algorithm such as crossover, reproduction, and mutation is designed. Finally, a prediction model of real underwater acoustic signal is established by genetic algorithm. By calculating the root mean square error and signal error ratio of underwater acoustic signal predicting model, the satisfactory results are obtained. The results show that the proposed method can establish the accurate predicting model with high prediction accuracy and may play an important role in the further processing of underwater acoustic signal such as noise reduction and feature extraction and classification.

  19. Rotorcraft On-Blade Pressure and Strain Measurements Using Wireless Optical Sensor System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Experimental measurements of rotor blades are important for understanding the aerodynamics and dynamics of a rotorcraft. This understanding can help in solving...

  20. Experimental Characterization of Stall Noise Toward its Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Fischer, Andreas;

    2015-01-01

    Wind tunnel measurements of three different airfoils are investigated using surface pressure microphones flush-mounted on the suction side of the airfoils. In stalled conditions, these microphones can be used to evaluate the convection velocity and the correlation length of the turbulent vortices...... that are generated in the separated region of the stalled flow. In addition, stall is characterized by the appearance of a spectral hump at relatively low frequencies that can be measured by the microphones located in the separated region. Using appropriate normalization and scaling, a nearly universal model...

  1. Image simulation and a model of noise power spectra across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, Alistair, E-mail: alistairmackenzie@nhs.net; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C. [National Coordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Diaz, Oliver [Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, United Kingdom and Computer Vision and Robotics Research Institute, University of Girona, Girona 17071 (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to create a model to predict the noise power spectra (NPS) for a range of mammographic radiographic factors. The noise model was necessary to degrade images acquired on one system to match the image quality of different systems for a range of beam qualities. Methods: Five detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASEh), Carestream computed radiography CR900 (CRc), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream NIP (NIPc), and Siemens Inspiration (ASEs)] were characterized for this study. The signal transfer property was measured as the pixel value against absorbed energy per unit area (E) at a reference beam quality of 28 kV, Mo/Mo or 29 kV, W/Rh with 45 mm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the tube head. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic at each spatial frequency of the NPS against E. A quantum noise correction factor which was dependent on beam quality was quantified using a set of images acquired over a range of radiographic factors with different thicknesses of PMMA. The noise model was tested for images acquired at 26 kV, Mo/Mo with 20 mm PMMA and 34 kV, Mo/Rh with 70 mm PMMA for three detectors (ASEh, CRc, and CSI) over a range of exposures. The NPS were modeled with and without the noise correction factor and compared with the measured NPS. A previous method for adapting an image to appear as if acquired on a different system was modified to allow the reference beam quality to be different from the beam quality of the image. The method was validated by adapting the ASEh flat field images with two thicknesses of PMMA (20 and 70 mm) to appear with the imaging characteristics of the CSI and CRc systems. Results: The quantum noise correction factor rises with higher beam qualities, except for CR systems at high spatial frequencies, where a flat response was found against mean photon energy. This is due to the dominance of secondary quantum noise

  2. Spectral model selection in the electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant by Johnson noise thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Kevin J.; Qu, Jifeng

    2017-04-01

    In the electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant based on Johnson noise thermometry, the ratio of the power spectral densities of thermal noise across a resistor at the triple point of water, and pseudo-random noise synthetically generated by a quantum-accurate voltage-noise source is constant to within 1 part in a billion for frequencies up to 1 GHz. Given knowledge of this ratio, and the values of other parameters that are known or measured, one can determine the Boltzmann constant. Due, in part, to mismatch between transmission lines, the experimental ratio spectrum varies with frequency. We model this spectrum as an even polynomial function of frequency where the constant term in the polynomial determines the Boltzmann constant. When determining this constant (offset) from experimental data, the assumed complexity of the ratio spectrum model and the maximum frequency analyzed (fitting bandwidth) dramatically affects results. Here, we select the complexity of the model by cross-validation—a data-driven statistical learning method. For each of many fitting bandwidths, we determine the component of uncertainty of the offset term that accounts for random and systematic effects associated with imperfect knowledge of model complexity. We select the fitting bandwidth that minimizes this uncertainty. In the most recent measurement of the Boltzmann constant, results were determined, in part, by application of an earlier version of the method described here. Here, we extend the earlier analysis by considering a broader range of fitting bandwidths and quantify an additional component of uncertainty that accounts for imperfect performance of our fitting bandwidth selection method. For idealized simulated data with additive noise similar to experimental data, our method correctly selects the true complexity of the ratio spectrum model for all cases considered. A new analysis of data from the recent experiment yields evidence for a temporal trend in the offset

  3. A Computational Study of BVI Noise Reduction Using Active Twist Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, David E.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2010-01-01

    The results of a computational study examining the effects of active-twist control on blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise using the Apache Active Twist Rotor are presented. The primary goal of this activity is to reduce BVI noise during a low-speed descent flight condition using active-twist control. Rotor aeroelastic behavior was modeled using the Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics code and the rotor noise was predicted using the acoustics code PSU-WOPWOP. The accuracy of the analysis was validated through comparisons with experimental acoustic data for the first generation Active Twist Rotor at an advance ratio of mu=0.14. The application of active-twist to the main rotor blade system consisted of harmonic actuation frequencies ranging from 2P to 5P, control phase angles from 0' to 360 , and tip-twist amplitudes ranging from 0.5 to 4.0 . The acoustic analysis was conducted for a single low-speed flight condition of advance ratio =0.14 and shaft angle-of-attack, c^=+6 , with BVI noise levels predicted on a flat plane of observers located 1.1 rotor diameters beneath the rotor. The results indicated reductions of up to 11dB in BVI noise using 1.25 tip-twist amplitude with negligible effects on 4P vertical hub shear.

  4. Helical Face Gear Development Under the Enhanced Rotorcraft Drive System Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Gregory F.; Slaughter, Stephen C.; Fisher, David J.; Lewicki, David G.; Fetty, Jason

    2011-01-01

    U.S. Army goals for the Enhanced Rotorcraft Drive System Program are to achieve a 40 percent increase in horsepower to weight ratio, a 15 dB reduction in drive system generated noise, 30 percent reduction in drive system operating, support, and acquisition cost, and 75 percent automatic detection of critical mechanical component failures. Boeing s technology transition goals are that the operational endurance level of the helical face gearing and related split-torque designs be validated to a TRL 6, and that analytical and manufacturing tools be validated. Helical face gear technology is being developed in this project to augment, and transition into, a Boeing AH-64 Block III split-torque face gear main transmission stage, to yield increased power density and reduced noise. To date, helical face gear grinding development on Northstar s new face gear grinding machine and pattern-development tests at the NASA Glenn/U.S. Army Research Laboratory have been completed and are described.

  5. The effects of noise on binocular rivalry waves: a stochastic neural field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Matthew A.; Bressloff, Paul C.

    2013-03-01

    We analyze the effects of extrinsic noise on traveling waves of visual perception in a competitive neural field model of binocular rivalry. The model consists of two one-dimensional excitatory neural fields, whose activity variables represent the responses to left-eye and right-eye stimuli, respectively. The two networks mutually inhibit each other, and slow adaptation is incorporated into the model by taking the network connections to exhibit synaptic depression. We first show how, in the absence of any noise, the system supports a propagating composite wave consisting of an invading activity front in one network co-moving with a retreating front in the other network. Using a separation of time scales and perturbation methods previously developed for stochastic reaction-diffusion equations, we then show how extrinsic noise in the activity variables leads to a diffusive-like displacement (wandering) of the composite wave from its uniformly translating position at long time scales, and fluctuations in the wave profile around its instantaneous position at short time scales. We use our analysis to calculate the first-passage-time distribution for a stochastic rivalry wave to travel a fixed distance, which we find to be given by an inverse Gaussian. Finally, we investigate the effects of noise in the depression variables, which under an adiabatic approximation lead to quenched disorder in the neural fields during propagation of a wave.

  6. Helicopter model rotor-blade vortex interaction impulsive noise: Scalability and parametric variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic data taken in the anechoic Deutsch-Niederlaendischer Windkanal (DNW) have documented the blade vortex interaction (BVI) impulsive noise radiated from a 1/7-scale model main rotor of the AH-1 series helicopter. Averaged model scale data were compared with averaged full scale, inflight acoustic data under similar nondimensional test conditions. At low advance ratios (mu = 0.164 to 0.194), the data scale remarkable well in level and waveform shape, and also duplicate the directivity pattern of BVI impulsive noise. At moderate advance ratios (mu = 0.224 to 0.270), the scaling deteriorates, suggesting that the model scale rotor is not adequately simulating the full scale BVI noise; presently, no proved explanation of this discrepancy exists. Carefully performed parametric variations over a complete matrix of testing conditions have shown that all of the four governing nondimensional parameters - tip Mach number at hover, advance ratio, local inflow ratio, and thrust coefficient - are highly sensitive to BVI noise radiation.

  7. The effects of noise on binocular rivalry waves: a stochastic neural field model

    KAUST Repository

    Webber, Matthew A

    2013-03-12

    We analyze the effects of extrinsic noise on traveling waves of visual perception in a competitive neural field model of binocular rivalry. The model consists of two one-dimensional excitatory neural fields, whose activity variables represent the responses to left-eye and right-eye stimuli, respectively. The two networks mutually inhibit each other, and slow adaptation is incorporated into the model by taking the network connections to exhibit synaptic depression. We first show how, in the absence of any noise, the system supports a propagating composite wave consisting of an invading activity front in one network co-moving with a retreating front in the other network. Using a separation of time scales and perturbation methods previously developed for stochastic reaction-diffusion equations, we then show how extrinsic noise in the activity variables leads to a diffusive-like displacement (wandering) of the composite wave from its uniformly translating position at long time scales, and fluctuations in the wave profile around its instantaneous position at short time scales. We use our analysis to calculate the first-passage-time distribution for a stochastic rivalry wave to travel a fixed distance, which we find to be given by an inverse Gaussian. Finally, we investigate the effects of noise in the depression variables, which under an adiabatic approximation lead to quenched disorder in the neural fields during propagation of a wave. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd and SISSA Medialab srl.

  8. Noise and Synchronization Analysis of the Cold-Receptor Neuronal Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Du

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the dynamics of the cold receptor neural network model. First, it examines noise effects on neuronal stimulus in the model. From ISI plots, it is shown that there are considerable differences between purely deterministic simulations and noisy ones. The ISI-distance is used to measure the noise effects on spike trains quantitatively. It is found that spike trains observed in neural models can be more strongly affected by noise for different temperatures in some aspects; meanwhile, spike train has greater variability with the noise intensity increasing. The synchronization of neuronal network with different connectivity patterns is also studied. It is shown that chaotic and high period patterns are more difficult to get complete synchronization than the situation in single spike and low period patterns. The neuronal network will exhibit various patterns of firing synchronization by varying some key parameters such as the coupling strength. Different types of firing synchronization are diagnosed by a correlation coefficient and the ISI-distance method. The simulations show that the synchronization status of neurons is related to the network connectivity patterns.

  9. Modeling the impact of common noise inputs on the network activity of retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidne, Michael; Ahmadian, Yashar; Shlens, Jonathon; Pillow, Jonathan W; Kulkarni, Jayant; Litke, Alan M; Chichilnisky, E J; Simoncelli, Eero; Paninski, Liam

    2012-08-01

    Synchronized spontaneous firing among retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), on timescales faster than visual responses, has been reported in many studies. Two candidate mechanisms of synchronized firing include direct coupling and shared noisy inputs. In neighboring parasol cells of primate retina, which exhibit rapid synchronized firing that has been studied extensively, recent experimental work indicates that direct electrical or synaptic coupling is weak, but shared synaptic input in the absence of modulated stimuli is strong. However, previous modeling efforts have not accounted for this aspect of firing in the parasol cell population. Here we develop a new model that incorporates the effects of common noise, and apply it to analyze the light responses and synchronized firing of a large, densely-sampled network of over 250 simultaneously recorded parasol cells. We use a generalized linear model in which the spike rate in each cell is determined by the linear combination of the spatio-temporally filtered visual input, the temporally filtered prior spikes of that cell, and unobserved sources representing common noise. The model accurately captures the statistical structure of the spike trains and the encoding of the visual stimulus, without the direct coupling assumption present in previous modeling work. Finally, we examined the problem of decoding the visual stimulus from the spike train given the estimated parameters. The common-noise model produces Bayesian decoding performance as accurate as that of a model with direct coupling, but with significantly more robustness to spike timing perturbations.

  10. Diversity and noise effects in a model of homeostatic regulation of the sleep-wake cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Patriarca, Marco; Braun, Hans A; Hernández-García, Emilio; Toral, Raúl; 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002650

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in sleep neurobiology have allowed development of physiologically based mathematical models of sleep regulation that account for the neuronal dynamics responsible for the regulation of sleep-wake cycles and allow detailed examination of the underlying mechanisms. Neuronal systems in general, and those involved in sleep regulation in particular, are noisy and heterogeneous by their nature. It has been shown in various systems that certain levels of noise and diversity can significantly improve signal encoding. However, these phenomena, especially the effects of diversity, are rarely considered in the models of sleep regulation. The present paper is focused on a neuron-based physiologically motivated model of sleep-wake cycles that proposes a novel mechanism of the homeostatic regulation of sleep based on the dynamics of a wake-promoting neuropeptide orexin. Here this model is generalized by the introduction of intrinsic diversity and noise in the orexin-producing neurons in order to study the e...

  11. Noise suppression by noise

    OpenAIRE

    Vilar, J. M. G.; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the interplay between an externally added noise and the intrinsic noise of systems that relax fast towards a stationary state, and found that increasing the intensity of the external noise can reduce the total noise of the system. We have established a general criterion for the appearance of this phenomenon and discussed two examples in detail.

  12. Roughness distribution of multiple hit and long surface diffusion length noise reduced discrete growth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disrattakit, P.; Chanphana, R.; Chatraphorn, P.

    2016-11-01

    Conventionally, the universality class of a discrete growth model is identified via the scaling of interface width. This method requires large-scale simulations to minimize finite-size effects on the results. The multiple hit noise reduction techniques (m > 1 NRT) and the long surface diffusion length noise reduction techniques (ℓ > 1 NRT) have been used to promote the asymptotic behaviors of the growth models. Lately, an alternative method involving comparison of roughness distribution in the steady state has been proposed. In this work, the roughness distribution of the (2 +1)-dimensional Das Sarma-Tamborenea (DT), Wolf-Villain (WV), and Larger Curvature (LC) models, with and without NRTs, are calculated in order to investigate effects of the NRTs on the roughness distribution. Additionally, effective growth exponents of the noise reduced (2 +1)-dimensional DT, WV and LC models are also calculated. Our results indicate that the NRTs affect the interface width both in the growth and the saturation regimes. In the steady state, the NRTs do not seem to have any impact on the roughness distribution of the DT model, but it significantly changes the roughness distribution of the WV and LC models to the normal distribution curves.

  13. Modeling high signal-to-noise ratio in a novel silicon MEMS microphone with comb readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, Johannes; Dehe, Alfons; Schrag, Gabriele

    2017-05-01

    Strong competition within the consumer market urges the companies to constantly improve the quality of their devices. For silicon microphones excellent sound quality is the key feature in this respect which means that improving the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), being strongly correlated with the sound quality is a major task to fulfill the growing demands of the market. MEMS microphones with conventional capacitive readout suffer from noise caused by viscous damping losses arising from perforations in the backplate [1]. Therefore, we conceived a novel microphone design based on capacitive read-out via comb structures, which is supposed to show a reduction in fluidic damping compared to conventional MEMS microphones. In order to evaluate the potential of the proposed design, we developed a fully energy-coupled, modular system-level model taking into account the mechanical motion, the slide film damping between the comb fingers, the acoustic impact of the package and the capacitive read-out. All submodels are physically based scaling with all relevant design parameters. We carried out noise analyses and due to the modular and physics-based character of the model, were able to discriminate the noise contributions of different parts of the microphone. This enables us to identify design variants of this concept which exhibit a SNR of up to 73 dB (A). This is superior to conventional and at least comparable to high-performance variants of the current state-of-the art MEMS microphones [2].

  14. Modeling of interior noise levels in large combustion turbine power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedeen, R.A. [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Loud, R.L. [GE Energy, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2007-07-01

    A study was conducted to predict noise emissions from power generating stations. In particular, the SoundPLAN4 ray-tracing program originally designed for exterior environmental noise propagation analysis, was used to predict the sound levels coming from inside combustion turbines and combined-cycle power plants. Although exterior sound levels are of interest due to their propagation into nearby communities, interior sound levels are important because of their influence on occupational noise exposure. Most regulations are concerned with an 85 dBA, 8 hour exposure. Therefore, plant designers, operators, and owners must be able to predict and control the areas in their plants where these regulations must be considered. In this study, the Raynoise 5 program was also used to analyze sound propagation. The ray-trace model considered the known sound power levels of the major pieces of equipment and was able to predict the sound distribution through the turbine hall with acceptable accuracy. The models used in this study were suitable for both compliance evaluation and noise target optimization of the individual power train components. It was concluded that the location and arrangement of the power train, off-base skids, and stand-alone equipment can be altered to control the sound level in desired areas of the plant. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Homoclinic Spike adding in a neuronal model in the presence of noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuwape, Ibiyinka; Neiman, Alexander; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2008-03-01

    We study the influence of noise on a spike adding transitions within the bursting activity in a Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of the leech heart interneuron. Spike adding in this model occur via homoclinic bifurcation of a saddle periodic orbit. Although narrow chaotic regions are observed near bifurcation transition, overall bursting dynamics is regular and is characterized by a constant number of spikes per burst. Experimental studies, however, show variability of bursting patterns whereby number of spikes per burst varies randomly. Thus, introduction of external synaptic noise is a necessary step to account for variability of burst durations observed experimentally. We show that near every such transition the neuron is highly sensitive to random perturbations that lead to and enhance broadly the regions of chaotic dynamics of the cell. For each spike adding transition there is a critical noise level beyond which the dynamics of the neuron becomes chaotic throughout the entire region of the given transition. Noise-induced chaotic dynamics is characterized in terms of the Lyapunov exponents and the Shannon entropy and reflects variability of firing patterns with various numbers of spikes per burst, traversing wide range of the neuron's parameters

  16. Non-Hermitian approach for modeling of noise-assisted quantum electron transfer in photosynthetic complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterov, Alexander I; Bishop, Alan R

    2012-01-01

    We model the quantum electron transfer (ET) in the photosynthetic reaction center (RC), using a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian approach. Our model includes (i) two protein cofactors, donor and acceptor, with discrete energy levels and (ii) a third protein pigment (sink) which has a continuous energy spectrum. Interactions are introduced between the donor and acceptor, and between the acceptor and the sink, with noise acting between the donor and acceptor. The noise is considered classically (as an external random force), and it is described by an ensemble of two-level systems (random fluctuators). Each fluctuator has two independent parameters, an amplitude and a switching rate. We represent the noise by a set of fluctuators with fitting parameters (boundaries of switching rates), which allows us to build a desired spectral density of noise in a wide range of frequencies. We analyze the quantum dynamics and the efficiency of the ET as a function of (i) the energy gap between the donor and acceptor, (ii) the streng...

  17. Boundary layer measurements of the NACA0015 and implications for noise modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F.

    2011-01-15

    A NACA0015 airfoil section instrumented with an array of high frequency microphones flush-mounted beneath its surface was measured in the wind tunnel at LM Wind Power in Lunderskov. Various inflow speeds and angles of attack were investigated. In addition, a hot-wire device system was used to measure the velocity profiles and turbulence characteristics in the boundary layer near the trailing edge of the airfoil. The measured boundary layer data are presented in this report and compared with CFD results. A relative good agreement is observed, though a few discrepancies also appear. Comparisons of surface pressure fluctuations spectra are used to analyze and improve trailing edge noise modeling by the so-called TNO model. Finally, a pair of hot-wires were placed on each side of the trailing edge in order to measure the radiated trailing edge noise. However, there is no strong evidence that such noise could be measured in the higher frequency range. Nevertheless, low-frequency noise could be measured and related to the presence of the airfoil but its origin is unclear. (Author)

  18. Applications of the predictability of the Coherent Noise Model to aftershock sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulos, Stavros-Richard; Sarlis, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    A study [1] of the coherent noise model [2-4] in natural time [5-7] has shown that it exhibits predictability. Interestingly, one of the predictors suggested [1] for the coherent noise model can be generalized and applied to the case of (real) aftershock sequences. The results obtained [8] so far are beyond chance. Here, we apply this approach to several aftershock sequences of strong earthquakes with magnitudes Mw ≥6.9 in Indonesia, California and Greece, including the Mw9.2 earthquake that occurred on 26 December 2004 in Sumatra. References. [1] N. V. Sarlis and S.-R. G. Christopoulos, Predictability of the coherent-noise model and its applications, Physical Review E, 85, 051136, 2012. [2] M.E.J. Newman, Self-organized criticality, evolution and the fossil extinction record, Proc. R. Soc. London B, 263, 1605-1610, 1996. [3] M. E. J. Newman and K. Sneppen, Avalanches, scaling, and coherent noise, Phys. Rev. E, 54, 6226-6231, 1996. [4] K. Sneppen and M. Newman, Coherent noise, scale invariance and intermittency in large systems, Physica D, 110, 209 - 222. [5] P. Varotsos, N. Sarlis, and E. Skordas, Spatiotemporal complexity aspects on the interrelation between Seismic Electric Signals and seismicity, Practica of Athens Academy, 76, 294-321, 2001. [6] P.A. Varotsos, N.V. Sarlis, and E.S. Skordas, Long-range correlations in the electric signals that precede rupture, Phys. Rev. E, 66, 011902, 2002. [7] Varotsos P. A., Sarlis N. V. and Skordas E. S., Natural Time Analysis: The new view of time. Precursory Seismic Electric Signals, Earthquakes and other Complex Time-Series (Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg) 2011. [8] N. V. Sarlis and S.-R. G. Christopoulos, "Visualization of the significance of Receiver Operating Characteristics based on confidence ellipses", Computer Physics Communications, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpc.2013.12.009

  19. A new model of noise characteristics of SiC Schottky barrier MESFET with deep impurity levels and traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aroutiounian, V.M. [Yerevan State University, Al. Manoukian Str. 1, 375025 Yerevan (Armenia)]. E-mail: kisahar@ysu.am; Avetisyan, G.A. [Yerevan State University, Al. Manoukian Str. 1, 375025 Yerevan (Armenia); Buniatyan, V.V. [State Engineering University of Armenia, 105 Teryan Str., 375009 Yerevan (Armenia); Soukiassian, P.G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Laboratoire Surfaces et Interfaces de Materiaux, Avances associe a l' Universite de Paris-Sud/Orsay, DSM-DRECAM-SPCSI, Batiment 462, Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Buniatyan, Vaz.V. [State Engineering University of Armenia, 105 Teryan Str., 375009 Yerevan (Armenia)

    2006-05-30

    Noise characteristics of silicon carbide Schottky barrier field effect transistors (MESFET) are examined for the case of the operation in small-signal regime and the presence of deep impurity levels and electron traps in the band gap of the channel. A new model of calculations of noise is suggested. It is shown that the noise measure of the short channel MESFET can be decreased within certain high frequency range.

  20. An application of generalized predictive control to rotorcraft terrain-following flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Ronald A.; Jung, Yoon C.

    1989-01-01

    Generalized predictive control (GPC) describes an algorithm for the control of dynamic systems in which a control input is generated which minimizes a quadratic cost function consisting of a weighted sum of errors between desired and predicted future system output and future predicted control increments. The output predictions are obtained from an internal model of the plant dynamics. The GPC algorithm is first applied to a simplified rotorcraft terrain-following problem, and GPC performance is compared to that of a conventional compensatory automatic system in terms of flight-path following, control activity, and control law implementation. Next, more realistic vehicle dynamics are utilized, and the GPC algorithm is applied to simultaneous terrain following and velocity control in the presence of atmospheric disturbances and errors in the internal model of the vehicle. The online computational and sensing requirements for implementing the GPC algorithm are minimal. Its use for manual control models appears promising.

  1. Rotorcraft control system design for uncertain vehicle dynamics using quantitative feedback theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative Feedback Theory describes a frequency-domain technique for the design of multi-input, multi-output control systems which must meet time or frequency domain performance criteria when specified uncertainty exists in the linear description of the vehicle dynamics. This theory is applied to the design of the longitudinal flight control system for a linear model of the BO-105C rotorcraft. Uncertainty in the vehicle model is due to the variation in the vehicle dynamics over a range of airspeeds from 0-100 kts. For purposes of exposition, the vehicle description contains no rotor or actuator dynamics. The design example indicates the manner in which significant uncertainty exists in the vehicle model. The advantage of using a sequential loop closure technique to reduce the cost of feedback is demonstrated by example.

  2. Modeling speech intelligibility based on the signal-to-noise envelope power ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Søren

    through three commercially available mobile phones. The model successfully accounts for the performance across the phones in conditions with a stationary speech-shaped background noise, whereas deviations were observed in conditions with “Traffic” and “Pub” noise. Overall, the results of this thesis......The intelligibility of speech depends on factors related to the auditory processes involved in sound perception as well as on the acoustic properties of the sound entering the ear. However, a clear understanding of speech perception in complex acoustic conditions and, in particular, a quantitative...... description of the involved auditory processes provides a major challenge in speech and hearing research. This thesis presents a computational model that attempts to predict the speech intelligibility obtained by normal-hearing listeners in various adverse conditions. The model combines the concept...

  3. A cocktail party model of spatial release from masking by both noise and speech interferers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gary L; Litovsky, Ruth Y

    2011-09-01

    A mathematical formula for estimating spatial release from masking (SRM) in a cocktail party environment would be useful as a simpler alternative to computationally intensive algorithms and may enhance understanding of underlying mechanisms. The experiment presented herein was designed to provide a strong test of a model that divides SRM into contributions of asymmetry and angular separation [Bronkhorst (2000). Acustica 86, 117-128] and to examine whether that model can be extended to include speech maskers. Across masker types the contribution to SRM of angular separation of maskers from the target was found to grow at a diminishing rate as angular separation increased within the frontal hemifield, contrary to predictions of the model. Speech maskers differed from noise maskers in the overall magnitude of SRM and in the contribution of angular separation (both greater for speech). These results were used to develop a modified model that achieved good fits to data for noise maskers (ρ=0.93) and for speech maskers (ρ=0.94) while using the same functions to describe separation and asymmetry components of SRM for both masker types. These findings suggest that this approach can be used to accurately model SRM for speech maskers in addition to primarily "energetic" noise maskers.

  4. A cocktail party model of spatial release from masking by both noise and speech interferers a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gary L.; Litovsky, Ruth Y.

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical formula for estimating spatial release from masking (SRM) in a cocktail party environment would be useful as a simpler alternative to computationally intensive algorithms and may enhance understanding of underlying mechanisms. The experiment presented herein was designed to provide a strong test of a model that divides SRM into contributions of asymmetry and angular separation [Bronkhorst (2000). Acustica 86, 117–128] and to examine whether that model can be extended to include speech maskers. Across masker types the contribution to SRM of angular separation of maskers from the target was found to grow at a diminishing rate as angular separation increased within the frontal hemifield, contrary to predictions of the model. Speech maskers differed from noise maskers in the overall magnitude of SRM and in the contribution of angular separation (both greater for speech). These results were used to develop a modified model that achieved good fits to data for noise maskers (ρ = 0.93) and for speech maskers (ρ = 0.94) while using the same functions to describe separation and asymmetry components of SRM for both masker types. These findings suggest that this approach can be used to accurately model SRM for speech maskers in addition to primarily “energetic” noise maskers. PMID:21895087

  5. A semi-empirical airfoil stall noise model based on surface pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Madsen, Helge Aa.; Fischer, Andreas; Bak, Christian

    2017-01-01

    This work is concerned with the experimental study of airfoil stall and the modelling of stall noise. Using pressure taps and high-frequency surface pressure microphones flush-mounted on airfoils measured in wind tunnels and on an operating wind turbine blade, the characteristics of stall are analyzed. This study shows that the main quantities of interest, namely convection velocity, spatial correlation and surface pressure spectra, can be scaled highlighting the universal nature of stall independently of airfoil shapes and flow conditions, although within a certain range of experimental conditions. Two main regimes for the scaling of the correlation lengths and the surface pressure spectra, depending on the Reynolds number of the flow, can be distinguished. These results are used to develop a model for the surface pressure spectra within the detached flow region valid for Reynolds numbers ranging from 1 ×106 to 6 ×106. Subsequently, this model is used to derive a model for stall noise. Modelled noise spectra are compared with experimental data measured in anechoic wind tunnels with reasonably satisfactory agreement.

  6. Diversity and noise effects in a model of homeostatic regulation of the sleep-wake cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Patriarca

    Full Text Available Recent advances in sleep neurobiology have allowed development of physiologically based mathematical models of sleep regulation that account for the neuronal dynamics responsible for the regulation of sleep-wake cycles and allow detailed examination of the underlying mechanisms. Neuronal systems in general, and those involved in sleep regulation in particular, are noisy and heterogeneous by their nature. It has been shown in various systems that certain levels of noise and diversity can significantly improve signal encoding. However, these phenomena, especially the effects of diversity, are rarely considered in the models of sleep regulation. The present paper is focused on a neuron-based physiologically motivated model of sleep-wake cycles that proposes a novel mechanism of the homeostatic regulation of sleep based on the dynamics of a wake-promoting neuropeptide orexin. Here this model is generalized by the introduction of intrinsic diversity and noise in the orexin-producing neurons, in order to study the effect of their presence on the sleep-wake cycle. A simple quantitative measure of the quality of a sleep-wake cycle is introduced and used to systematically study the generalized model for different levels of noise and diversity. The model is shown to exhibit a clear diversity-induced resonance: that is, the best wake-sleep cycle turns out to correspond to an intermediate level of diversity at the synapses of the orexin-producing neurons. On the other hand, only a mild evidence of stochastic resonance is found, when the level of noise is varied. These results show that disorder, especially in the form of quenched diversity, can be a key-element for an efficient or optimal functioning of the homeostatic regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Furthermore, this study provides an example of a constructive role of diversity in a neuronal system that can be extended beyond the system studied here.

  7. Modeling of signal propagation and sensor performance for infrasound and blast noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Danney R.; Wilson, D. Keith; Waldrop, Lauren E.; Hart, Carl R.; White, Michael J.; Nykaza, Edward T.; Swearingen, Michelle E.

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive modeling approach for infrasonic (sub-audible acoustic) signals, which starts with an accurate representation of the source spectrum and directivity, propagates the signals through the environment, and senses and processes the signals at the receiver. The calculations are implemented within EASEE (Environmental Awareness for Sensor and Emitter Employment), which is a general software framework for modeling the impacts of terrain and weather on target signatures and the performance of a diverse range of battlefield sensing systems, including acoustic, seismic, RF, visible, and infrared. At each stage in the modeling process, the signals are described by realistic statistical distributions. Sensor performance is quantified using statistical metrics such as probability of detection and target location error. To extend EASEE for infrasonic calculations, new feature sets were created including standard octaves and one-third octaves. A library of gunfire and blast noise spectra and directivity functions was added from ERDC's BNOISE (Blast Noise) and SARNAM (Small Arms Range Noise Assessment Model) software. Infrasonic propagation modeling is supported by extension of several existing propagation algorithms, including a basic ground impedance model, and the Green's function parabolic equation (GFPE), which provides accurate numerical solutions for wave propagation in a refractive atmosphere. The BNOISE propagation algorithm, which is based on tables generated by a fast-field program (FFP), was also added. Finally, an extensive library of transfer functions for microphones operating in the infrasonic range were added, which interface to EASEE's sensor performance algorithms. Example calculations illustrate terrain and atmospheric impacts on infrasonic signal propagation and the directivity characteristics of blast noise.

  8. Development of a high-fidelity noise prediction and propagation model for noise generated from wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debertshäuser, Harald; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2015-01-01

    technique for any kind of flow conditions. We investigated laminar/ turbulent inflow, as well as wind shear and yaw of the 2.3 MW NM80 wind turbine. The turbulent case shows higher noise levels than the laminar one. Yaw changes the directivity from a dipole characteristic to an oval shape, inclined...

  9. Stochastic differential equation models for ion channel noise in Hodgkin-Huxley neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwyn, Joshua H; Imennov, Nikita S; Famulare, Michael; Shea-Brown, Eric

    2011-04-01

    The random transitions of ion channels between conducting and nonconducting states generate a source of internal fluctuations in a neuron, known as channel noise. The standard method for modeling the states of ion channels nonlinearly couples continuous-time Markov chains to a differential equation for voltage. Beginning with the work of R. F. Fox and Y.-N. Lu [Phys. Rev. E 49, 3421 (1994)], there have been attempts to generate simpler models that use stochastic differential equation (SDEs) to approximate the stochastic spiking activity produced by Markov chain models. Recent numerical investigations, however, have raised doubts that SDE models can capture the stochastic dynamics of Markov chain models.We analyze three SDE models that have been proposed as approximations to the Markov chain model: one that describes the states of the ion channels and two that describe the states of the ion channel subunits. We show that the former channel-based approach can capture the distribution of channel noise and its effects on spiking in a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model to a degree not previously demonstrated, but the latter two subunit-based approaches cannot. Our analysis provides intuitive and mathematical explanations for why this is the case. The temporal correlation in the channel noise is determined by the combinatorics of bundling subunits into channels, but the subunit-based approaches do not correctly account for this structure. Our study confirms and elucidates the findings of previous numerical investigations of subunit-based SDE models. Moreover, it presents evidence that Markov chain models of the nonlinear, stochastic dynamics of neural membranes can be accurately approximated by SDEs. This finding opens a door to future modeling work using SDE techniques to further illuminate the effects of ion channel fluctuations on electrically active cells.

  10. Modeling hemodynamic responses in auditory cortex at 1.5 T using variable duration imaging acoustic noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuowen; Olulade, Olumide; Castillo, Javier Gonzalez; Santos, Joseph; Kim, Sungeun; Tamer, Gregory G; Luh, Wen-Ming; Talavage, Thomas M

    2010-02-15

    A confound for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), especially for auditory studies, is the presence of imaging acoustic noise generated mainly as a byproduct of rapid gradient switching during volume acquisition and, to a lesser extent, the radiofrequency transmit. This work utilized a novel pulse sequence to present actual imaging acoustic noise for characterization of the induced hemodynamic responses and assessment of linearity in the primary auditory cortex with respect to noise duration. Results show that responses to brief duration (46 ms) imaging acoustic noise is highly nonlinear while responses to longer duration (>1 s) imaging acoustic noise becomes approximately linear, with the right primary auditory cortex exhibiting a higher degree of nonlinearity than the left for the investigated noise durations. This study also assessed the spatial extent of activation induced by imaging acoustic noise, showing that the use of modeled responses (specific to imaging acoustic noise) as the reference waveform revealed additional activations in the auditory cortex not observed with a canonical gamma variate reference waveform, suggesting an improvement in detection sensitivity for imaging acoustic noise-induced activity. Longer duration (1.5 s) imaging acoustic noise was observed to induce activity that expanded outwards from Heschl's gyrus to cover the superior temporal gyrus as well as parts of the middle temporal gyrus and insula, potentially affecting higher level acoustic processing.

  11. Simulating Flying Insects Using Dynamics and Data-Driven Noise Modeling to Generate Diverse Collective Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiaping; Wang, Xinjie; Jin, Xiaogang; Manocha, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    We present a biologically plausible dynamics model to simulate swarms of flying insects. Our formulation, which is based on biological conclusions and experimental observations, is designed to simulate large insect swarms of varying densities. We use a force-based model that captures different interactions between the insects and the environment and computes collision-free trajectories for each individual insect. Furthermore, we model the noise as a constructive force at the collective level and present a technique to generate noise-induced insect movements in a large swarm that are similar to those observed in real-world trajectories. We use a data-driven formulation that is based on pre-recorded insect trajectories. We also present a novel evaluation metric and a statistical validation approach that takes into account various characteristics of insect motions. In practice, the combination of Curl noise function with our dynamics model is used to generate realistic swarm simulations and emergent behaviors. We highlight its performance for simulating large flying swarms of midges, fruit fly, locusts and moths and demonstrate many collective behaviors, including aggregation, migration, phase transition, and escape responses.

  12. Vibroacoustic Modeling and Path Control of Air-Borne Axle Whine Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Guo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The axle whine noise will eventually affect the vehicle noise performance. In this study, a systematic modeling approach is developed to analyze the axle whine problem by considering the hypoid gear mesh from the tooth contact process as well as the system dynamics effect with gear design parameters and shaft-bearing-housing system taken into account. Moreover, the tuning of the dominant air-borne path is modeled analytically by using the sound transmission loss idea. First, gear tooth load distribution results are obtained in a 3-dimensional loaded tooth contact analysis program. Then mesh parameters are synthesized and applied to a linear multibody gear dynamic model to obtain dynamic mesh and bearing responses. The bearing responses are used as the excitation force to a housing finite element model. Finally, the vibroacoustic analysis of the axle is performed using the boundary element method; sound pressure responses in the axle surface are then simulated. Transmission losses of different panel partitions are included in the final stage to guide the tuning of air-borne paths to reduce the radiated axle whine noise. The proposed approach gives a more in-depth understanding of the axle whine generation and therefore can further facilitate the system design and trouble-shooting.

  13. Modeling the impact of solid noise barriers on near road air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatram, Akula; Isakov, Vlad; Deshmukh, Parikshit; Baldauf, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Studies based on field measurements, wind tunnel experiments, and controlled tracer gas releases indicate that solid, roadside noise barriers can lead to reductions in downwind near-road air pollutant concentrations. A tracer gas study showed that a solid barrier reduced pollutant concentrations as much as 80% next to the barrier relative to an open area under unstable meteorological conditions, which corresponds to typical daytime conditions when residents living or children going to school near roadways are most likely to be exposed to traffic emissions. The data from this tracer gas study and a wind tunnel simulation were used to develop a model to describe dispersion of traffic emissions near a highway in the presence of a solid noise barrier. The model is used to interpret real-world data collected during a field study conducted in a complex urban environment next to a large highway in Phoenix, Arizona, USA. We show that the analysis of the data with the model yields useful information on the emission factors and the mitigation impact of the barrier on near-road air quality. The estimated emission factors for the four species, ultrafine particles, CO, NO2, and black carbon, are consistent with data cited in the literature. The results suggest that the model accounted for reductions in pollutant concentrations from a 4.5 m high noise barrier, ranging from 40% next to the barrier to 10% at 300 m from the barrier.

  14. Vortex Noise Reductions from a Flexible Fiber Model of Owl Down

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Justin; Peake, Nigel

    2013-11-01

    Many species of owl rely on specialized plumage to reduce their self-noise levels and enable hunting in acoustic stealth. In contrast to the leading-edge comb and compliant trailing-edge fringe attributes of owls, the aeroacoustic impact of the fluffy down material on the upper wing surface remains largely speculative as a means to eliminate aerodynamic noise across a broad range of frequencies. The down is presently idealized as a collection of independent and rigid fibers, which emerge perpendicularly from a rigid plane and are allowed to rotate under elastic restraint. Noise generation from an isolated fiber is effected by its interaction with a point vortex, whose motion is induced by the presence of the rigid half-plane and the elastically-restrained fiber. Numerical evaluations of the vortex path and acoustic signature furnish a comparison with known analytical results for stationary fibers, and results from this primitive model seek to address how aerodynamic noise could be mitigated by flexible fibers.

  15. Noise-shaping all-digital phase-locked loops modeling, simulation, analysis and design

    CERN Document Server

    Brandonisio, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a novel approach to the analysis and design of all-digital phase-locked loops (ADPLLs), technology widely used in wireless communication devices. The authors provide an overview of ADPLL architectures, time-to-digital converters (TDCs) and noise shaping. Realistic examples illustrate how to analyze and simulate phase noise in the presence of sigma-delta modulation and time-to-digital conversion. Readers will gain a deep understanding of ADPLLs and the central role played by noise-shaping. A range of ADPLL and TDC architectures are presented in unified manner. Analytical and simulation tools are discussed in detail. Matlab code is included that can be reused to design, simulate and analyze the ADPLL architectures that are presented in the book.   • Discusses in detail a wide range of all-digital phase-locked loops architectures; • Presents a unified framework in which to model time-to-digital converters for ADPLLs; • Explains a procedure to predict and simulate phase noise in oscil...

  16. Equivalent magnetic noise in multi- push-pull configuration magnetoelectric composites: model and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaojin; Hasanyan, Davresh; Li, Menghui; Gao, Junqi; Li, Jiefang; Viehland, Dwight

    2013-06-01

    A theoretical model for the multi-push-pull configuration of magnetoelectric (ME) laminated composites comprising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric layers with interdigitated electrodes encapsulated in polyimide film is presented. Analytical solutions for the ME voltage coefficient αE, ME charge coefficient αQ, noise charge density and equivalent magnetic noise were derived. Parametric studies are presented to evaluate the influence of material properties and polyimide film geometries. The results show that the value of αE was determined by the parameters of the magnetostrictive and piezoelectric phases, and that the values of αQ and noise charge density were determined not only by the component parameters, but also by the volume fraction of the piezoelectric phase and polyimide film geometry. The equivalent magnetic noise had no dependence on the polyimide film geometry, but rather was determined by the component parameters and the volume fraction of the piezoelectric phase. Theoretical and experimental results are compared and shown to have good agreement with each other.

  17. Broad band shock associated noise predictions in axisymmetric and asymmetric jets using an improved turbulence scale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyan, Anuroopa; Karabasov, Sergey A.

    2017-04-01

    Supersonic jets that are subject to off-design operating conditions are marked by three distinct regions in their far-field spectra: mixing noise, screech and Broadband Shock Associated Noise (BBSAN). BBSAN is conspicuous by the prominent multiple peaks. The Morris and Miller BBSAN model that is based on an acoustic analogy, offering a straightforward implementation for RANS, forms the foundation of the present work. The analogy model robustly captures the peak frequency noise, that occurs near Strouhal number of about 1, based on the nozzle exit diameter but leads to major sound under prediction for higher frequencies. In the jet mixing noise literature, it has been shown that an inclusion of frequency dependence into the characteristic length and temporal scales of the effective noise sources improves the far-field noise predictions. In the present paper, several modifications of the original Morris and Miller model are considered that incorporate the frequency dependent scales as recommended in the jet mixing noise literature. In addition to these, a new mixed scale model is proposed that incorporates a correlation scale that depends both on the mean-flow velocity gradient and the standard mixing noise-type scaling based on the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy. In comparison with the original Morris and Miller model, the mixed scale model shows considerable improvements in the noise predictions for the benchmark axisymmetric convergent-divergent and convergent jets. Further to this validation, the new model has been applied for improved predictions for elliptic jets of various eccentricity. It has been shown that, for the same thrust conditions, the elliptical nozzles lead to noise reduction at the source in comparison with the baseline axisymmetric jets.

  18. Integrating Flight Dynamics & Control Analysis and Simulation in Rotorcraft Conceptual Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Ben; Berger, Tom; Tischler, Mark B.; Theodore, Colin R; Elmore, Josh; Gallaher, Andrew; Tobias, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    The development of a toolset, SIMPLI-FLYD ('SIMPLIfied FLight dynamics for conceptual Design') is described. SIMPLI-FLYD is a collection of tools that perform flight dynamics and control modeling and analysis of rotorcraft conceptual designs including a capability to evaluate the designs in an X-Plane-based real-time simulation. The establishment of this framework is now facilitating the exploration of this new capability, in terms of modeling fidelity and data requirements, and the investigation of which stability and control and handling qualities requirements are appropriate for conceptual design. Illustrative design variation studies for single main rotor and tiltrotor vehicle configurations show sensitivity of the stability and control characteristics and an approach to highlight potential weight savings by identifying over-design.

  19. Pressure-Sensitive Paints Advance Rotorcraft Design Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The rotors of certain helicopters can spin at speeds as high as 500 revolutions per minute. As the blades slice through the air, they flex, moving into the wind and back out, experiencing pressure changes on the order of thousands of times a second and even higher. All of this makes acquiring a true understanding of rotorcraft aerodynamics a difficult task. A traditional means of acquiring aerodynamic data is to conduct wind tunnel tests using a vehicle model outfitted with pressure taps and other sensors. These sensors add significant costs to wind tunnel testing while only providing measurements at discrete locations on the model's surface. In addition, standard sensor solutions do not work for pulling data from a rotor in motion. "Typical static pressure instrumentation can't handle that," explains Neal Watkins, electronics engineer in Langley Research Center s Advanced Sensing and Optical Measurement Branch. "There are dynamic pressure taps, but your costs go up by a factor of five to ten if you use those. In addition, recovery of the pressure tap readings is accomplished through slip rings, which allow only a limited amount of sensors and can require significant maintenance throughout a typical rotor test." One alternative to sensor-based wind tunnel testing is pressure sensitive paint (PSP). A coating of a specialized paint containing luminescent material is applied to the model. When exposed to an LED or laser light source, the material glows. The glowing material tends to be reactive to oxygen, explains Watkins, which causes the glow to diminish. The more oxygen that is present (or the more air present, since oxygen exists in a fixed proportion in air), the less the painted surface glows. Imaged with a camera, the areas experiencing greater air pressure show up darker than areas of less pressure. "The paint allows for a global pressure map as opposed to specific points," says Watkins. With PSP, each pixel recorded by the camera becomes an optical pressure

  20. Waveform modeling and inversion of ambient noise cross-correlation functions in a coastal ocean environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xiaoqin; Brown, Michael G; Godin, Oleg A

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical studies have shown that cross-correlation functions (CFs) of time series of ambient noise measured at two locations yield approximations to the Green's functions (GFs) that describe propagation between those locations. Specifically, CFs are estimates of weighted GFs. In this paper, it is demonstrated that measured CFs in the 20-70 Hz band can be accurately modeled as weighted GFs using ambient noise data collected in the Florida Straits at ∼100 m depth with horizontal separations of 5 and 10 km. Two weighting functions are employed. These account for (1) the dipole radiation pattern produced by a near-surface source, and (2) coherence loss of surface-reflecting energy in time-averaged CFs resulting from tidal fluctuations. After describing the relationship between CFs and GFs, the inverse problem is considered and is shown to result in an environmental model for which agreement between computed and simulated CFs is good.