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Sample records for rotavirus vp6 protein

  1. Antigenicity and Immunogenicity of Rotavirus VP6 Protein Expressed on the Surface of Lactococcus lactis

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    L. E. Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Group A rotaviruses are the major etiologic agents of acute gastroenteritis worldwide in children and young animals. Among its structural proteins, VP6 is the most immunogenic and is highly conserved within this group. Lactococcus lactis is a food-grade, Gram-positive, and nonpathogenic lactic acid bacteria that has already been explored as a mucosal delivery system of heterologous antigens. In this work, the nisin-controlled expression system was used to display the VP6 protein at the cell surface of L. lactis. Conditions for optimal gene expression were established by testing different nisin concentrations, cell density at induction, and incubation times after induction. Cytoplasmic and cell wall protein extracts were analyzed by Western blot and surface expression was confirmed by flow cytometry. Both analysis provided evidence that VP6 was efficiently expressed and displayed on the cell surface of L. lactis. Furthermore, the humoral response of mice immunized with recombinant L. lactis was evaluated and the displayed recombinant VP6 protein proved to be immunogenic. In conclusion, this is the first report of displaying VP6 protein on the surface of L. lactis to induce a specific immune response against rotavirus. These results provide the basis for further evaluation of this VP6-displaying L. lactis as a mucosal delivery vector in a mouse model of rotavirus infection.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of different immunogenic viral nanoconstructs from rotavirus VP6 inner capsid protein

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    Bugli F

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Francesca Bugli,1 Valeria Caprettini,2 Margherita Cacaci,1 Cecilia Martini,1 Francesco Paroni Sterbini,1 Riccardo Torelli,1 Stefano Della Longa,3 Massimiliano Papi,4 Valentina Palmieri,4 Bruno Giardina,5 Brunella Posteraro,1 Maurizio Sanguinetti,1 Alessandro Arcovito5 1Istituto di Microbiologia, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 2Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, 3Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica, Sanità Pubblica, Scienze della Vita e dell’Ambiente, Università dell’Aquila, L’Aquila, 4Istituto di Fisica, 5Istituto di Biochimica e Biochimica Clinica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy Abstract: In order to deliver low-cost viral capsomeres from a large amount of soluble viral VP6 protein from human rotavirus, we developed and optimized a biotechnological platform in Escherichia coli. Specifically, three different expression protocols were compared, differing in their genetic constructs, ie, a simple native histidine-tagged VP6 sequence, VP6 fused to thioredoxin, and VP6 obtained with the newly described small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO fusion system. Our results demonstrate that the histidine-tagged protein does not escape the accumulation in the inclusion bodies, and that SUMO is largely superior to the thioredoxin-fusion tag in enhancing the expression and solubility of VP6 protein. Moreover, the VP6 protein produced according to the SUMO fusion tag displays well-known assembly properties, as observed in both transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images, giving rise to either VP6 trimers, 60 nm spherical virus-like particles, or nanotubes a few micron long. This different quaternary organization of VP6 shows a higher level of immunogenicity for the elongated structures with respect to the spheres or the protein trimers. Therefore, the expression and purification strategy presented here – providing a large amount of the viral capsid protein in the native

  3. Transgenic Tobacco Expressing a Modified VP6 Gene Protects Mice Against Rotavirus Infection

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    Jiang-Li DONG; Bo ZHOU; Gang SHENG; Tao WANG

    2005-01-01

    Elevated expression of the rotavirus VP6 antigen in transgenic plants is a critical factor in the development of a safe and effective rotavirus vaccine. Using codon optimization, a gene that encodes the inner capsid protein VP6 of the human group A rotavirus was synthesized (sVP6). The VP6 and sVp6genes were transformed into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The expression level of the sVP6 gene in transgenic plants was 3.8-34-fold higher than that of controls containing the non-modified VP6 gene, accounting for up to 0.34% of the total soluble protein (TSP). Then, BALB/c female mice that had been gavaged weekly with 10 mg TSP containing 34 μg VP6 protein, in which VP6-specific serum IgG and mucosal IgA antibodies were investigated. The severity and duration of diarrhea caused by simian rotavirus SA-11 challenge were reduced significantly in passively immunized pups, which indicates that anti-VP6 antibodies generated in orally immunized female mice can be passed onto pups and provide heterotypic protection. An edible vaccine based on the VP6 of human rotavirus group A could provide a means to protect children and young animals from severe acute diarrhea.

  4. Rotavirus vaccination and infection induce VP6-specific IgA responses.

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    Lappalainen, Suvi; Blazevic, Vesna; Malm, Maria; Vesikari, Timo

    2017-02-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis (GE) in young children, but RVGE has drastically been reduced with the introduction of live oral RV vaccines into childhood immunization program in many countries. Serum IgA antibody is a marker of clinical protection against severe RVGE after RV infection and vaccination. This study investigated VP6-specificity of anti-RV IgA antibody levels in Finnish children aged 6-23 months before and after introduction of RotaTeq® into national immunization program. Although RV inner capsid protein VP6 is considered as antigenic target in clinical and seroepidemiological studies, at present VP6 protein is not commonly employed as a primary ELISA-antigen. Thus, sera from 20 unvaccinated and 19 vaccinated children were examined in ELISA with recombinant VP6 (rVP6) protein, and the VP6-specific responses were compared to responses observed with human RV Wa and bovine RV WC3 cell culture antigens. Moreover, fecal antibodies were tested with rVP6 and Wa cell culture antigen. Equal levels of serum anti-RV IgA antibodies were detected by the three antigens. Fecal IgA titers against rVP6 and Wa antigen showed a correlation with the corresponding serum levels. The results suggest that the IgA response measured by virus-capture ELISA is mainly directed to VP6 protein, supporting the usage of rVP6 in detection of anti-RV IgA antibodies. Natural RV infections and vaccinations induced similar levels of serum VP6-specific IgA antibodies. Serum IgA antibodies after RotaTeq® vaccination showed sustained levels up to two years of age in line with long term protection. J. Med. Virol. 89:239-245, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Targeting of rotavirus VP6 to DEC-205 induces protection against the infection in mice.

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    Badillo-Godinez, O; Gutierrez-Xicotencatl, L; Plett-Torres, T; Pedroza-Saavedra, A; Gonzalez-Jaimes, A; Chihu-Amparan, L; Maldonado-Gama, M; Espino-Solis, G; Bonifaz, L C; Esquivel-Guadarrama, F

    2015-08-20

    Rotavirus (RV) is the primary etiologic agent of severe gastroenteritis in human infants. Although two attenuated RV-based vaccines have been licensed to be applied worldwide, they are not so effective in low-income countries, and the induced protection mechanisms have not been clearly established. Thus, it is important to develop new generation vaccines that induce long lasting heterotypic immunity. VP6 constitutes the middle layer protein of the RV virion. It is the most conserved protein and it is the target of protective T-cells; therefore, it is a potential candidate antigen for a new generation vaccine against the RV infection. We determined whether targeting the DEC-205 present in dendritic cells (DCs) with RV VP6 could induce protection at the intestinal level. VP6 was cross-linked to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against murine DEC-205 (αDEC-205:VP6), and BALB/c mice were inoculated subcutaneously (s.c.) twice with the conjugated containing 1.5 μg of VP6 in the presence of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C) as adjuvant. As controls and following the same protocol, mice were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA) cross-linked to the mAb anti-DEC-205 (αDEC-205:OVA), VP6 cross-linked to a control isotype mAb (Isotype:VP6), 3 μg of VP6 alone, Poly I:C or PBS. Two weeks after the last inoculation, mice were orally challenged with a murine RV. Mice immunized with α-DEC-205:VP6 and VP6 alone presented similar levels of serum Abs to VP6 previous to the virus challenge. However, after the virus challenge, only α-DEC-205:VP6 induced up to a 45% IgA-independent protection. Memory T-helper (Th) cells from the spleen and the mesenteric lymph node (MLN) showed a Th1-type response upon antigen stimulation in vitro. These results show that when VP6 is administered parenterally targeting DEC-205, it can induce protection at the intestinal level at a very low dose, and this protection may be Th1-type cell dependent.

  6. Rotavirus VP6 preparations as a non-replicating vaccine candidates.

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    Jalilvand, Somayeh; Marashi, Sayed Mahdi; Shoja, Zabihollah

    2015-06-26

    Rotavirus (RV) structural proteins VP4 and VP7, located on the surface of viral particles, elicit neutralizing antibodies (Abs) and are therefore considered to be important components of RV vaccines. However, despite inducing neutralizing Abs, limits of cross-neutralizing activity and lack of full correlation with protection limit the usefulness of these proteins as protective agents against RV disease. VP6 protein, which forms the middle layer of RV particles, is discussed as an alternative vaccine candidate since it can induce cross-protective immune responses against different RV strains although the Ab raised is not neutralizing. This report reviews different functions of VP6 that can lead to considering it as an alternative vaccine against RV disease.

  7. Rotavirus Recombinant VP6 Nanotubes Act as an Immunomodulator and Delivery Vehicle for Norovirus Virus-Like Particles

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    Lappalainen, Suvi; Vesikari, Timo

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that tubular form of rotavirus (RV) recombinant VP6 protein has an in vivo adjuvant effect on the immunogenicity of norovirus (NoV) virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine candidate. In here, we investigated in vitro effect of VP6 on antigen presenting cell (APC) activation and maturation and whether VP6 facilitates NoV VLP uptake by these APCs. Mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 and dendritic cell line JAWSII were used as model APCs. Internalization of VP6, cell surface expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility class II molecules, and cytokine and chemokine production were analyzed. VP6 nanotubes were efficiently internalized by APCs. VP6 upregulated the expression of cell surface activation and maturation molecules and induced secretion of several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. The mechanism of VP6 action was shown to be partially dependent on lipid raft-mediated endocytic pathway as shown by methyl-β-cyclodextrin inhibition on tumor necrosis factor α secretion. These findings add to the understanding of mechanism by which VP6 exerts its immunostimulatory and immunomodulatory actions and further support its use as a part of nonlive RV-NoV combination vaccine. PMID:27689099

  8. Expresión y purificación de las proteínas recombinantes estructurales VP5, VP6 y VP8 del rotavirus / Expression and purification of recombinant structural rotavirus proteins VP5, VP6 and VP8

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    Moreno Rueda, Luz Yurany

    2010-01-01

    La identificación de posibles receptores del rotavirus y su participación durante la unión y penetración del virus en células suceptibles a la infección han requerido la expresión y purificación de las proteínas virales. Por tanto, el objetivo general de este trabajo consistió en la expresión de las proteínas estructurales VP5 y VP8 del rotavirus en un sistema bacteriano y VP6 en células MA104 mediante la infección con el virus vaccinia recombinante. Las proteínas recombinantes fueron purific...

  9. Determinants of VH1-46 Cross-Reactivity to Pemphigus Vulgaris Autoantigen Desmoglein 3 and Rotavirus Antigen VP6.

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    Cho, Michael Jeffrey; Ellebrecht, Christoph T; Hammers, Christoph M; Mukherjee, Eric M; Sapparapu, Gopal; Boudreaux, Crystal E; McDonald, Sarah M; Crowe, James E; Payne, Aimee S

    2016-08-15

    Shared VH1-46 gene usage has been described in B cells reacting to desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) in the autoimmune disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV), as well as B cells responding to rotavirus capsid protein VP6. In both diseases, VH1-46 B cells bearing few to no somatic mutations can recognize the disease Ag. This intriguing connection between an autoimmune response to self-antigen and an immune response to foreign Ag prompted us to investigate whether VH1-46 B cells may be predisposed to Dsg3-VP6 cross-reactivity. Focused testing of VH1-46 mAbs previously isolated from PV and rotavirus-exposed individuals indicates that cross-reactivity is rare, found in only one of seven VH1-46 IgG clonotypes. High-throughput screening of IgG B cell repertoires from two PV patients identified no additional cross-reactive clonotypes. Screening of IgM B cell repertoires from one non-PV and three PV patients identified specific cross-reactive Abs in one PV patient, but notably all six cross-reactive clonotypes used VH1-46. Site-directed mutagenesis studies indicate that amino acid residues predisposing VH1-46 Abs to Dsg3 reactivity reside in CDR2. However, somatic mutations only rarely promote Dsg3-VP6 cross-reactivity; most mutations abolish VP6 and/or Dsg3 reactivity. Nevertheless, functional testing identified two cross-reactive VH1-46 Abs that both disrupt keratinocyte adhesion and inhibit rotavirus replication, indicating the potential for VH1-46 Abs to have both pathologic autoimmune and protective immune functions. Taken together, these studies suggest that certain VH1-46 B cell populations may be predisposed to Dsg3-VP6 cross-reactivity, but multiple mechanisms prevent the onset of autoimmunity after rotavirus exposure.

  10. Structure based modification of Bluetongue virus helicase protein VP6 to produce a viable VP6-truncated BTV

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    Matsuo, Eiko [Microbiology and Immunology, Division of Animal Science, Department of Bioresource Science, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokkodai, Nada-ku, Kobe-City 657-8501 (Japan); Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT (United Kingdom); Leon, Esther; Matthews, Steve J. [Division of Molecular Biosciences, Centre for Structural Biology, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Roy, Polly, E-mail: polly.roy@lshtm.ac.uk [Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • NMR analysis on BTV VP6 reveals two large loop regions. • The loss of a loop (aa 34–130) does not affect the overall fold of the protein. • A region of VP6 (aa 34–92) is not required for BTV replication. • A region of VP6 (aa 93–130) plays an essential role in the virus replication. - Abstract: Bluetongue virus core protein VP6 is an ATP hydrolysis dependent RNA helicase. However, despite much study, the precise role of VP6 within the viral capsid and its structure remain unclear. To investigate the requirement of VP6 in BTV replication, we initiated a structural and biological study. Multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were assigned on his-tagged full-length VP6 (329 amino acid residues) as well as several truncated VP6 variants. The analysis revealed a large structured domain with two large loop regions that exhibit significant conformational exchange. One of the loops (amino acid position 34–130) could be removed without affecting the overall fold of the protein. Moreover, using a BTV reverse genetics system, it was possible to demonstrate that the VP6-truncated BTV was viable in BHK cells in the absence of any helper VP6 protein, suggesting that a large portion of this loop region is not absolutely required for BTV replication.

  11. Oral Administration of a Seed-based Bivalent Rotavirus Vaccine Containing VP6 and NSP4 Induces Specific Immune Responses in Mice

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    Hao Feng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrheal disease among newborns. Plant-based rotavirus vaccines have been developed in recent years and have been proven to be effective in animal models. In the present study, we report a bivalent vaccine candidate expressing rotavirus subunits VP6 and NSP4 fused with the adjuvant subunit B of E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LTB in maize seeds. The RT-PCR and Western blot results showed that VP6 and LTB-NSP4 antigens were expressed and accumulated in maize seeds. The expression levels were as high as 0.35 and 0.20% of the total soluble protein for VP6 and LTB-NSP4, respectively. Oral administration of transgenic maize seeds successfully stimulated systemic and mucosal responses, with high titers of serum IgG and mucosal IgA antibodies, even after long-term storage. This study is the first to use maize seeds as efficient generators for the development of a bivalent vaccine against rotavirus.

  12. Development of primers for sequencing the NSP1, NSP3, and VP6 genes of the group A porcine rotavirus

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    Fernanda Dornelas Florentino Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is the causative pathogen of diarrhea in humans and in several animal species. Eight pairs of primers were developed and used for Sanger sequencing of the coding region of the NSP1, NSP3, and VP6 genes based on the conserved regions of the genome of the group A porcine rotavirus. Three samples previously screened as positive for group A rotaviruses were subjected to gene amplification and sequencing to characterize the pathogen. The information generated from this study is crucial for the understanding of the epidemiology of the disease.

  13. Recombinant Monovalent Llama-Derived Antibody Fragments (VHH) to Rotavirus VP6 Protect Neonatal Gnotobiotic Piglets against Human Rotavirus-Induced Diarrhea

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    Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Chattha, Kuldeep S.; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Nuñez, Carmen; Alvarado, Carmen; Lasa, Rodrigo; Escribano, José M.; Garaicoechea, Lorena L.; Fernandez, Fernando; Bok, Karin; Wigdorovitz, Andrés; Saif, Linda J.; Parreño, Viviana

    2013-01-01

    Group A Rotavirus (RVA) is the leading cause of severe diarrhea in children. The aims of the present study were to determine the neutralizing activity of VP6-specific llama-derived single domain nanoantibodies (VHH nanoAbs) against different RVA strains in vitro and to evaluate the ability of G6P[1] VP6-specific llama-derived single domain nanoantibodies (VHH) to protect against human rotavirus in gnotobiotic (Gn) piglets experimentally inoculated with virulent Wa G1P[8] rotavirus. Supplementation of the daily milk diet with 3B2 VHH clone produced using a baculovirus vector expression system (final ELISA antibody -Ab- titer of 4096; virus neutralization -VN- titer of 256) for 9 days conferred full protection against rotavirus associated diarrhea and significantly reduced virus shedding. The administration of comparable levels of porcine IgG Abs only protected 4 out of 6 of the animals from human RVA diarrhea but significantly reduced virus shedding. In contrast, G6P[1]-VP6 rotavirus-specific IgY Abs purified from eggs of hyperimmunized hens failed to protect piglets against human RVA-induced diarrhea or virus shedding when administering similar quantities of Abs. The oral administration of VHH nanoAb neither interfered with the host's isotype profiles of the Ab secreting cell responses to rotavirus, nor induced detectable host Ab responses to the treatment in serum or intestinal contents. This study shows that the oral administration of rotavirus VP6-VHH nanoAb is a broadly reactive and effective treatment against rotavirus-induced diarrhea in neonatal pigs. Our findings highlight the potential value of a broad neutralizing VP6-specific VHH nanoAb as a treatment that can complement or be used as an alternative to the current strain-specific RVA vaccines. Nanobodies could also be scaled-up to develop pediatric medication or functional food like infant milk formulas that might help treat RVA diarrhea. PMID:23658521

  14. Recombinant monovalent llama-derived antibody fragments (VHH to rotavirus VP6 protect neonatal gnotobiotic piglets against human rotavirus-induced diarrhea.

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    Celina G Vega

    Full Text Available Group A Rotavirus (RVA is the leading cause of severe diarrhea in children. The aims of the present study were to determine the neutralizing activity of VP6-specific llama-derived single domain nanoantibodies (VHH nanoAbs against different RVA strains in vitro and to evaluate the ability of G6P[1] VP6-specific llama-derived single domain nanoantibodies (VHH to protect against human rotavirus in gnotobiotic (Gn piglets experimentally inoculated with virulent Wa G1P[8] rotavirus. Supplementation of the daily milk diet with 3B2 VHH clone produced using a baculovirus vector expression system (final ELISA antibody -Ab- titer of 4096; virus neutralization -VN- titer of 256 for 9 days conferred full protection against rotavirus associated diarrhea and significantly reduced virus shedding. The administration of comparable levels of porcine IgG Abs only protected 4 out of 6 of the animals from human RVA diarrhea but significantly reduced virus shedding. In contrast, G6P[1]-VP6 rotavirus-specific IgY Abs purified from eggs of hyperimmunized hens failed to protect piglets against human RVA-induced diarrhea or virus shedding when administering similar quantities of Abs. The oral administration of VHH nanoAb neither interfered with the host's isotype profiles of the Ab secreting cell responses to rotavirus, nor induced detectable host Ab responses to the treatment in serum or intestinal contents. This study shows that the oral administration of rotavirus VP6-VHH nanoAb is a broadly reactive and effective treatment against rotavirus-induced diarrhea in neonatal pigs. Our findings highlight the potential value of a broad neutralizing VP6-specific VHH nanoAb as a treatment that can complement or be used as an alternative to the current strain-specific RVA vaccines. Nanobodies could also be scaled-up to develop pediatric medication or functional food like infant milk formulas that might help treat RVA diarrhea.

  15. Recombinant monovalent llama-derived antibody fragments (VHH) to rotavirus VP6 protect neonatal gnotobiotic piglets against human rotavirus-induced diarrhea.

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    Vega, Celina G; Bok, Marina; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Nuñez, Carmen; Alvarado, Carmen; Lasa, Rodrigo; Escribano, José M; Garaicoechea, Lorena L; Fernandez, Fernando; Bok, Karin; Wigdorovitz, Andrés; Saif, Linda J; Parreño, Viviana

    2013-01-01

    Group A Rotavirus (RVA) is the leading cause of severe diarrhea in children. The aims of the present study were to determine the neutralizing activity of VP6-specific llama-derived single domain nanoantibodies (VHH nanoAbs) against different RVA strains in vitro and to evaluate the ability of G6P[1] VP6-specific llama-derived single domain nanoantibodies (VHH) to protect against human rotavirus in gnotobiotic (Gn) piglets experimentally inoculated with virulent Wa G1P[8] rotavirus. Supplementation of the daily milk diet with 3B2 VHH clone produced using a baculovirus vector expression system (final ELISA antibody -Ab- titer of 4096; virus neutralization -VN- titer of 256) for 9 days conferred full protection against rotavirus associated diarrhea and significantly reduced virus shedding. The administration of comparable levels of porcine IgG Abs only protected 4 out of 6 of the animals from human RVA diarrhea but significantly reduced virus shedding. In contrast, G6P[1]-VP6 rotavirus-specific IgY Abs purified from eggs of hyperimmunized hens failed to protect piglets against human RVA-induced diarrhea or virus shedding when administering similar quantities of Abs. The oral administration of VHH nanoAb neither interfered with the host's isotype profiles of the Ab secreting cell responses to rotavirus, nor induced detectable host Ab responses to the treatment in serum or intestinal contents. This study shows that the oral administration of rotavirus VP6-VHH nanoAb is a broadly reactive and effective treatment against rotavirus-induced diarrhea in neonatal pigs. Our findings highlight the potential value of a broad neutralizing VP6-specific VHH nanoAb as a treatment that can complement or be used as an alternative to the current strain-specific RVA vaccines. Nanobodies could also be scaled-up to develop pediatric medication or functional food like infant milk formulas that might help treat RVA diarrhea.

  16. A组轮状病毒VP6与霍乱毒素B亚基融合蛋白在大肠杆菌中的表达及生物活性分析%A Fusion Protein of Rotavirus VP6 and Cholera Toxin B Subunit:Expression in Escherichia coli and Analysis of Biological Activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭婷夏; 方荣祥; 李国华; 钱渊

    2001-01-01

    利用霍乱毒素B亚基(Cholera toxin B subunit,CTB)的免疫载体作用,将轮状病毒相关抗原引入口服免疫体系,可激起有效的粘膜免疫反应,这里报道了 CTB基因与A组轮状病毒地方株T114 VP6全基因的融合,并在大肠杆菌BI21(DE3)中进行了融合蛋白的表达.在IPTG诱导下得到分子量为56 kD的融合蛋白,表达量占菌体蛋白的15%.分别用抗CT的抗体和抗A组轮状病毒的高价免疫血清进行Western Blot检测,结果证明融合蛋白CTB-VP6保留了天然霍乱毒素R亚基及轮状病毒VP6的抗原性.GMi-ELISA检测表明,复性后的融合蛋白具有与神经节苷脂GMI结合的能力.

  17. [Use of the recombinant baculovirus BacVP6C for the construction of an internal positive control of rotavirus C].

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    Abid-Ayadi, I; Guix, S; Pintó, R M; Bosch, A

    2011-06-01

    Unlike group A, a few studies have interested other groups of the rotavirus, especially in Tunisia. The role of rotavirus C (RVC) infection is underestimated because of its sporadic nature. The aim of our study was to develop rapid diagnostic procedures of RVC by using an internal positive control of reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). The internal positive control (386pb) was designed from the recombinant baculovirus BacVP6C containing the full length cDNA of the Cowden strain gene 5 (1353pb). A fragment of 596pb was amplified by PCR using the BacVP6C DNA ds as template. Then, a central part of 210pb was deleted and the remaining fragment (386pb) was cloned into pGEM-3Zf(+) plasmid between SP6 and T7 RNA polymerase promoters. The obtained recombinant plasmid "pIAM1" was then used for the generation of the internal positive control by in vitro transcription. The sensibility of the RT-PCR was about 3.66×10(5) molecules of RNA/μl. The use of a shorter positive control, as compared to the wild type, allows increased specificity of the RT-PCR reaction, and could be used for efficient diagnostic and surveillance of RVC-caused diseases. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Rotavirus VP7 epitope chimeric proteins elicit cross-immunoreactivity in guinea pigs

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    Bingxin; Zhao; Xiaoxia; Pan; Yumei; Teng; Wenyue; Xia; Jing; Wang; Yuling; Wen; Yuanding; Chen

    2015-01-01

    VP7 of group A rotavirus(RVA) contains major neutralizing epitopes. Using the antigenic protein VP6 as the vector, chimeric proteins carrying foreign epitopes have been shown to possess good immunoreactivity and immunogenicity. In the present study, using modified VP6 as the vector,three chimeric proteins carrying epitopes derived from VP7 of RVA were constructed. The results showed that the chimeric proteins reacted with anti-VP6 and with SA11 and Wa virus strains.Antibodies from guinea pigs inoculated with the chimeric proteins recognized VP6 and VP7 of RVA and protected mammalian cells from SA11 and Wa infection in vitro. The neutralizing activities of the antibodies against the chimeric proteins were significantly higher than those against the vector protein VP6 F. Thus, development of chimeric vaccines carrying VP7 epitopes using VP6 as a vector could be a promising alternative to enhance immunization against RVAs.

  19. Rotavirus VP7 epitope chimeric proteins elicit cross-immunoreactivity in guinea pigs.

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    Zhao, Bingxin; Pan, Xiaoxia; Teng, Yumei; Xia, Wenyue; Wang, Jing; Wen, Yuling; Chen, Yuanding

    2015-10-01

    VP7 of group A rotavirus (RVA) contains major neutralizing epitopes. Using the antigenic protein VP6 as the vector, chimeric proteins carrying foreign epitopes have been shown to possess good immunoreactivity and immunogenicity. In the present study, using modified VP6 as the vector, three chimeric proteins carrying epitopes derived from VP7 of RVA were constructed. The results showed that the chimeric proteins reacted with anti-VP6 and with SA11 and Wa virus strains. Antibodies from guinea pigs inoculated with the chimeric proteins recognized VP6 and VP7 of RVA and protected mammalian cells from SA11 and Wa infection in vitro. The neutralizing activities of the antibodies against the chimeric proteins were significantly higher than those against the vector protein VP6F. Thus, development of chimeric vaccines carrying VP7 epitopes using VP6 as a vector could be a promising alternative to enhance immunization against RVAs.

  20. Molecular characterization of VP4, VP6, VP7 and NSP4 genes of group B rotavirus strains from outbreaks of gastroenteritis

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    Anismrita Lahon; Shobha D Chitambar

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To characterizeVP4, VP6, VP7andNSP4 genes of representativeGBR strains (NIV-005625, NIV-04622 andNIV-094456) detected as the major etiologic agent in the outbreaks of gastroenteritis in western India.Methods: Fecal specimens collected during the outbreaks of gastroenteritis were processed forRNA isolation,RT-PCR usingGBR VP4, VP6, VP7andNSP4 gene specific primers, nucleotide sequencing of the amplicons and phylogenetic analysis of the sequences.Results:Phylogenetic analysis of all of theVP4, VP6, VP7 andNSP4 gene sequences revealed clustering ofGBR strains in Indian-Bangladeshi lineage of genotypeG2 with95.8%-99.4%nucleotide and97.3%-100.0%amino acid identities. However, all three strains showed the presence of unique amino acid substitutions in theVP4 protein suggesting alteration in the antigenicity of outbreak strains ofGBR. TheVP8*andVP5* regions ofVP4 proteins showed respectively0.5%-6.3%and 0.2%-1.1% amino acid divergence from humanGBR strains of Indian-Bangladeshi lineage.Conclusions:These data confirm the reported variability ofVP8*region and suggest the possible role of this region in the perpetuation ofGBR infections in the environment. This is the first study to document the phylogenetic relationship ofVP4, VP6, VP7 andNSP4 genes of GBRstrains detected in the outbreaks of gastroenteritis from India with the GBR strains from other parts of world.

  1. Sequence analysis and structural implications of rotavirus capsid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parbhoo, N; Dewar, J B; Gildenhuys, S

    Rotavirus is the major cause of severe virus-associated gastroenteritis worldwide in children aged 5 and younger. Many children lose their lives annually due to this infection and the impact is particularly pronounced in developing countries. The mature rotavirus is a non-enveloped triple-layered nucleocapsid containing 11 double stranded RNA segments. Here a global view on the sequence and structure of the three main capsid proteins, VP2, VP6 and VP7 is shown by generating a consensus sequence for each of these rotavirus proteins, for each species obtained from published data of representative rotavirus genotypes from across the world and across species. Degree of conservation between species was represented on homology models for each of the proteins. VP7 shows the highest level of variation with 14-45 amino acids showing conservation of less than 60%. These changes are localised to the outer surface alluding to a possible mechanism in evading the immune system. The middle layer, VP6 shows lower variability with only 14-32 sites having lower than 70% conservation. The inner structural layer made up of VP2 showed the lowest variability with only 1-16 sites having less than 70% conservation across species. The results correlate with each protein's multiple structural roles in the infection cycle. Thus, although the nucleotide sequences vary due to the error-prone nature of replication and lack of proof reading, the corresponding amino acid sequence of VP2, 6 and 7 remain relatively conserved. Benefits of this knowledge about the conservation include the ability to target proteins at sites that cannot undergo mutational changes without influencing viral fitness; as well as possibility to study systems that are highly evolved for structure and function in order to determine how to generate and manipulate such systems for use in various biotechnological applications.

  2. VP6-SUMO Self-Assembly as Nanocarriers for Gastrointestinal Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Palmieri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High proteolytic degradation and poor absorption through epithelial barriers are major challenges to successful oral delivery of therapeutics. Nanoparticle platforms can enhance drug stability and extend the residence time in gastrointestinal (GI tract. However, drug delivery systems are often inactivated in acidic environment of stomach or suffer poor absorption from intestinal cells due to the mucus layer. To overcome these issues we developed a drug delivery system constituted by a protein construct made by a Rotavirus capsid protein (VP6 and the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO. This chimeric construct allows specificity towards intestinal cells, the Rotavirus natural target, combined by an enhanced stability given by the eukaryotic protein transporter SUMO. Furthermore SUMO can act as a molecular switch that facilitates import/export of its ligand to the nucleus, the hypersensitive subcellular site target of many cell killing therapies. In this paper we show that SUMO-VP6 constructs self-assembly into stable nanocarriers. SUMO-VP6 nanocarriers display ideal features for drug delivery: a small size and high monodispersity, a high stability in different pH conditions and a high uptake in the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartment of intestinal cells. These features make SUMO-VP6 nanocarriers a promising novel system for oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs.

  3. Construction and Co-expression of Grass Carp Reovirus VP6 Protein and Enhanced Green Fluorescence Protein in the Insect Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Grass carp reovirus (GCRV), a disaster agent to aquatic animals, belongs to Genus Aquareovirus of family Reoviridea. Sequence analysis revealed GCRV genome segment 8 (s8) was 1296 bp nucleotides in length encoding an inner capsid protein VP6 of about 43kDa. To obtain in vitro non-fusion expression of a GCRV VP6 protein containing a molecular of fluorescence reporter, the recombinant baculovirus, which contained the GCRVs8 and eGFP (enhanced green fluorescence protein)genes, was constructed by using the Bac-to-Bac insect expression system. In this study, the whole GCRVs8 and eGFP genes, amplified by PCR, were constructed into a pFastBacDual vector under polyhedron (PH) and p10 promoters, respectively. The constructed dual recombinant plasmid (pFbDGCRVs8/eGFP) was transformed into DH10Bac cells to obtain recombinant Bacmid (AcGCRVs8/eGFP) by transposition. Finally, the recombinant bacluovirus (vAcGCRVs8/eGFP) was obtained from transfected Sf9 insect cells. The green fluorescence that was expressed by transfected Sf9 cells was initially observed 3 days post transfection, and gradually enhanced and extended around 5days culture in P1(Passage1) stock. The stable high level expression of recombinant protein was observed in P2 and subsequent passage budding virus (BV) stock. Additionally, PCR amplification from P1 and amplified P2 BV stock further confirmed the validity of the dual-recombinant baculovirus. Our results provide a foundation for expression and assembly of the GCRV structural protein in vitro.

  4. 轮状病毒结构蛋白自组装修饰金纳米粒子%Modification of Gold Nanoparticles by Self-Assembly of Rotavirus Structural Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李咏梅; 赵庆欢

    2015-01-01

    In this research,gold nanoparticles were modified by self-assembly of rotavirus structural protein VP6,and VP6 coated gold nanoparticles were formed.The biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles enhanced and surfaces covered with abundant chemical groups,and then made it easier for applications in targeted drug deliv-ery,hyperthermia,and in vivo imaging.%通过轮状病毒结构蛋白 VP6自组装的方式对金纳米粒子进行了修饰,获得了 VP6包覆的金纳米复合材料,改善了金纳米粒子的生物相容性,使其表面带有丰富的化学基团,更易在靶向药物输运、热疗及造影等方面获得新应用。

  5. Mutation distribution in the NSP4 protein in rotaviruses isolated from Mexican children with moderate to severe gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ochoa, Guadalupe; Menchaca, Griselda E; Hernández, Carlos E; Rodríguez, Cristina; Tamez, Reyes S; Contreras, Juan F

    2013-03-11

    The NSP4 protein is a multifunctional protein that plays a role in the morphogenesis and pathogenesis of the rotavirus. Although NSP4 is considered an enterotoxin, the relationship between gastroenteritis severity and amino acid variations in NSP4 of the human rotavirus remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the sequence diversity of NSP4 and the severity of gastroenteritis of children with moderate to severe gastroenteritis. The rotavirus-infected children were hospitalized before the rotavirus vaccine program in Mexico. All children had diarrhea within 1-4 days, 44 (88%) were vomiting and 35 (70%) had fevers. The severity analysis showed that 13 (26%) cases had mild gastroenteritis, 23 (46%) moderate gastroenteritis and 14 (28%) severe. NSP4 phylogenetic analysis showed three clusters within the genotype E1. Sequence analysis revealed similar mutations inside each cluster, and an uncommon variation in residue 144 was found in five of the Mexican NSP4 sequences. Most of the amino acid variations were located in the VP4 and VP6 binding site domains, with no relationship to different grades of gastroenteritis. This finding indicates that severe gastroenteritis caused by the rotavirus appears to be related to diverse viral or cellular factors instead of NSP4 activity as a unique pathogenic factor.

  6. Mutation Distribution in the NSP4 Protein in Rotaviruses Isolated from Mexican Children with Moderate to Severe Gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F. Contreras

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The NSP4 protein is a multifunctional protein that plays a role in the morphogenesis and pathogenesis of the rotavirus. Although NSP4 is considered an enterotoxin, the relationship between gastroenteritis severity and amino acid variations in NSP4 of the human rotavirus remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the sequence diversity of NSP4 and the severity of gastroenteritis of children with moderate to severe gastroenteritis. The rotavirus-infected children were hospitalized before the rotavirus vaccine program in Mexico. All children had diarrhea within 1-4 days, 44 (88% were vomiting and 35 (70% had fevers. The severity analysis showed that 13 (26% cases had mild gastroenteritis, 23 (46% moderate gastroenteritis and 14 (28% severe. NSP4 phylogenetic analysis showed three clusters within the genotype E1. Sequence analysis revealed similar mutations inside each cluster, and an uncommon variation in residue 144 was found in five of the Mexican NSP4 sequences. Most of the amino acid variations were located in the VP4 and VP6 binding site domains, with no relationship to different grades of gastroenteritis. This finding indicates that severe gastroenteritis caused by the rotavirus appears to be related to diverse viral or cellular factors instead of NSP4 activity as a unique pathogenic factor.

  7. Rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 binds to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin-beta3 and fibronectin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Boshuizen; J.W. Rossen (John); C.K. Sitaram; F.F.P. Kimenai; Y. Simons-Oosterhuis (Ytje); C. Laffeber; H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractRotavirus is the most important cause of viral gastroenteritis and dehydrating diarrhea in young children. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) is an enterotoxin that was identified as an important agent in symptomatic rotavirus infection. To identify cellular

  8. MAVS protein is attenuated by rotavirus nonstructural protein 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satabdi Nandi

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is the single, most important agent of infantile gastroenteritis in many animal species, including humans. In developing countries, rotavirus infection attributes approximately 500,000 deaths annually. Like other viruses it establishes an intimate and complex interaction with the host cell to counteract the antiviral responses elicited by the cell. Among various pattern recognition receptors (PAMPs of the host, the cytosolic RNA helicases interact with viral RNA to activate the Mitochondrial Antiviral Signaling protein (MAVS, which regulates cellular interferon response. With an aim to identify the role of different PAMPs in rotavirus infected cell, MAVS was found to degrade in a time dependent and strain independent manner. Rotavirus non-structural protein 1 (NSP1 which is a known IFN antagonist, interacted with MAVS and degraded it in a strain independent manner, resulting in a complete loss of RNA sensing machinery in the infected cell. To best of our knowledge, this is the first report on NSP1 functionality where a signaling protein is targeted unanimously in all strains. In addition NSP1 inhibited the formation of detergent resistant MAVS aggregates, thereby averting the antiviral signaling cascade. The present study highlights the multifunctional role of rotavirus NSP1 and reinforces the fact that the virus orchestrates the cellular antiviral response to its own benefit by various back up strategies.

  9. Rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esona, Mathew D; Gautam, Rashi

    2015-06-01

    Group A rotavirus (RVA) is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young children worldwide. Introduction of two live, attenuated rotavirus vaccines, Rotarix® and RotaTeq®, has dramatically reduced RVA-associated AGE and mortality. High-throughput, sensitive and specific techniques are required to rapidly diagnose and characterize rotavirus strains in stool samples for proper patient treatment and to monitor circulating vaccine and wild-type rotavirus strains. New molecular assays are rapidly developed that are more sensitive and specific than the conventional assays for detection, genotyping and full genome characterization of circulating rotavirus wild-type and vaccine (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) strains causing AGE.

  10. Rotaviruses

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-01-06

    CDC's Dr. Jon Gentsch discusses rotaviruses, the most important cause of severe gastroenteritis in children less than five years of age. Essentially, all children around the world get the disease during the first few years of life.  Created: 1/6/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 1/6/2009.

  11. Rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 binds to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin-beta3 and fibronectin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuizen, J A; Rossen, J W A; Sitaram, C K; Kimenai, F F P; Simons-Oosterhuis, Y; Laffeber, C; Büller, H A; Einerhand, A W C

    2004-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most important cause of viral gastroenteritis and dehydrating diarrhea in young children. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) is an enterotoxin that was identified as an important agent in symptomatic rotavirus infection. To identify cellular proteins that interact with NSP4, a

  12. Rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 binds to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin-beta3 and fibronectin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuizen, J A; Rossen, J W A; Sitaram, C K; Kimenai, F F P; Simons-Oosterhuis, Y; Laffeber, C; Büller, H A; Einerhand, A W C

    Rotavirus is the most important cause of viral gastroenteritis and dehydrating diarrhea in young children. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) is an enterotoxin that was identified as an important agent in symptomatic rotavirus infection. To identify cellular proteins that interact with NSP4, a

  13. Rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 binds to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin-beta3 and fibronectin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Boshuizen; J.W. Rossen (John); C.K. Sitaram; F.F.P. Kimenai; Y. Simons-Oosterhuis (Ytje); C. Laffeber; H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractRotavirus is the most important cause of viral gastroenteritis and dehydrating diarrhea in young children. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) is an enterotoxin that was identified as an important agent in symptomatic rotavirus infection. To identify cellular prote

  14. 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid inhibits rotavirus replication in culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Michele E

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycyrrhizin (GA and primary metabolite 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GRA are pharmacologically active components of the medicinal licorice root, and both have been shown to have antiviral and immunomodulatory properties. Although these properties are well established, the mechanisms of action are not completely understood. In this study, GA and GRA were tested for the ability to inhibit rotavirus replication in cell culture, toward a long term goal of discovering natural compounds that may complement existing vaccines. Methods Epithelial cells were treated with GA or GRA various times pre- or post-infection and virus yields were measured by immunofluorescent focus assay. Levels of viral proteins VP2, VP6, and NSP2 in GRA treated cells were measured by immunoblot to determine if there was an effect of GRA treatment on the accumulation of viral protein. Results GRA treatment reduced rotavirus yields by 99% when added to infected cultures post-- virus adsorption, whereas virus yields in GA treated cultures were similar to mock treated controls. Time of addition experiments indicated that GRA-mediated replication inhibition likely occurs at a step or steps subsequent to virus entry. The amounts of VP2, VP6 and NSP2 were substantially reduced when GRA was added to cultures up to two hours post-entry. Conclusions GRA, but not GA, has significant antiviral activity against rotavirus replication in vitro, and studies to determine whether GRA attenuates rotavirus replication in vivo are underway.

  15. Detection of rare reassortant G5P[6] rotavirus, Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenova, Zornitsa; Papp, Hajnalka; Lengyel, György; Kisfali, Péter; Steyer, Andrej; Steyer, Adela F; Esona, Mathew D; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren; Bányai, Krisztián

    2012-12-01

    During the ongoing rotavirus strain surveillance program conducted in Bulgaria, an unusual human rotavirus A (RVA) strain, RVA/Human/BG/BG620/2008/G5P[6], was identified among 2200 genotyped Bulgarian RVAs. This strain showed the following genomic configuration: G5-P[6]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T1-E1-H1. Phylogenetic analysis of the genes encoding the neutralization proteins and backbone genes identified a probable mixture of RVA genes of human and porcine origin. The VP1, VP6 and NSP2 genes were more closely related to typical human rotavirus strains. The remaining eight genes were either closely related to typical porcine and unusual human-porcine reassortant rotavirus strains or were equally distant from reference human and porcine strains. This study is the first to report an unusual rotavirus isolate with G5P[6] genotype in Europe which has most likely emerged from zoonotic transmission. The absence of porcine rotavirus sequence data from this area did not permit to assess if the suspected ancestral zoonotic porcine strain already had human rotavirus genes in its genome when transmitted from pig to human, or, the transmission was coupled or followed by gene reassortment event(s). Because our strain shared no neutralization antigens with rotavirus vaccines used for routine immunization in children, attention is needed to monitor if this G-P combination will be able to emerge in human populations. A better understanding of the ecology of rotavirus zoonoses requires simultaneous monitoring of rotavirus strains in humans and animals.

  16. Modeling of the rotavirus group C capsid predicts a surface topology distinct from other rotavirus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Elif; Zamuda, Kimberly; Patton, John T

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus C (RVC) causes sporadic gastroenteritis in adults and is an established enteric pathogen of swine. Because RVC strains grow poorly in cell culture, which hinders generation of virion-derived RVC triple-layered-particle (TLP) structures, we used the known Rotavirus A (RVA) capsid structure to model the human RVC (Bristol) capsid. Comparative analysis of RVA and RVC capsid proteins showed major differences at the VP7 layer, an important target region for vaccine development due to its antigenic properties. Our model predicted the presence of a surface extended loop in RVC, which could form a major antigenic site on the capsid. We analyzed variations in the glycosylation patterns among RV capsids and identified group specific conserved sites. In addition, our results showed a smaller RVC VP4 foot, which protrudes toward the intermediate VP6 layer, in comparison to that of RVA. Finally, our results showed major structural differences at the VP8* glycan recognition sites.

  17. The tight junction protein JAM-A functions as coreceptor for rotavirus entry into MA104 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Flores, Jesús M; Silva-Ayala, Daniela; Espinoza, Marco A; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2015-01-15

    Several molecules have been identified as receptors or coreceptors for rotavirus infection, including glycans, integrins, and hsc70. In this work we report that the tight junction proteins JAM-A, occludin, and ZO-1 play an important role during rotavirus entry into MA104 cells. JAM-A was found to function as coreceptor for rotavirus strains RRV, Wa, and UK, but not for rotavirus YM. Reassortant viruses derived from rotaviruses RRV and YM showed that the virus spike protein VP4 determines the use of JAM-A as coreceptor.

  18. [Rotavirus and other viruses of diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajolet, O; Chippaux-Hyppolite, C

    1998-01-01

    Rotaviruses represent 80% of recognized viral etiologies and 140 million cases of diarrhea per year. They strike young children with similar frequency throughout the world, but the mortality rate is high in developing countries only, with some 870,000 deaths per year (WHO, 1997). Rotaviruses belong to the family of Reoviridae; they are segmented bicatenary RNA viruses, which explains their genetic variability, the presence of mixed infections, the establishment for some time already of a molecular epidemiology by electrophore types. The viruses are "naked" and thus resistant to the outside environment; their massive elimination, 10(8) to 10(10)viral particles per gram of faeces, begins with the first day of diarrhea. They are found in used water and can also be concentrated by shellfish; the environment thus constitutes a notable reservoir for the virus. Oral-faecal transmission is facilitated by deficient sanitary conditions. The 11 fragments of the genome each codify for 1 viral protein; 2 surface proteins, VP4 and VP7, bring about the formation of neutralizing antibodies, which are important for the protection and determination of different serotypes. A non structural protein--NSP4--would seem to intervene in the cytopathogenic effect and may act as a veritable viral enterotoxine. Numerous animal species are infected by rotaviruses which are district from the human ones. The pathology as it affects animals is of economic importance and of interest as an experimental and vaccinal model. Between human and animal rotaviruses there can be genetic rematchings and the VP6 protein is an antigen common to the group. The description of the other viruses responsible for diarrhea has benefited from widespread use of electronic microscopes from the very first years of study of rotaviruses. These other viruses belong to 6 different types: adenovirus, calcivirus, astrovirus, Norwalk agent and related viruses, coronavirus, enterovirus. They therefore have a structural and

  19. Distinguishing the genotype 1 genes and proteins of human Wa-like rotaviruses vs. porcine rotaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Fernanda D F; Gregori, F; McDonald, Sarah M

    2016-09-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are 11-segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses and important causes of gastroenteritis in the young of many animal species. Previous studies have suggested that human Wa-like RVAs share a close evolutionary relationship with porcine RVAs. Specifically, the VP1-VP3 and NSP2-5/6 genes of these viruses are usually classified as genotype 1 with >81% nucleotide sequence identity. Yet, it remains unknown whether the genotype 1 genes and proteins of human Wa-like strains are distinguishable from those of porcine strains. To investigate this, we performed comprehensive bioinformatic analyses using all known genotype 1 gene sequences. The RVAs analyzed represent wildtype strains isolated from humans or pigs at various geographical locations during the years of 2004-2013, including 11 newly-sequenced porcine RVAs from Brazil. We also analyzed archival strains that were isolated during the years of 1977-1992 as well as atypical strains involved in inter-species transmission between humans and pigs. We found that, in general, the genotype 1 genes of typical modern human Wa-like RVAs clustered together in phylogenetic trees and were separate from those of typical modern porcine RVAs. The only exception was for the NSP5/6 gene, which showed no host-specific phylogenetic clustering. Using amino acid sequence alignments, we identified 34 positions that differentiated the VP1-VP3, NSP2, and NSP3 genotype 1 proteins of typical modern human Wa-like RVAs versus typical modern porcine RVAs and documented how these positions vary in the archival/unusual isolates. No host-specific amino acid positions were identified for NSP4, NSP5, or NSP6. Altogether, the results of this study support the notion that human Wa-like RVAs and porcine RVAs are evolutionarily related, but indicate that some of their genotype 1 genes and proteins have diverged over time possibly as a reflection of sequestered replication and protein co-adaptation in their respective hosts.

  20. Antigenic relationships among human rotaviruses as determined by outer capsid protein VP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorziglia, M; Larralde, G; Kapikian, A Z; Chanock, R M

    1990-01-01

    cDNA clones representing the VP4 gene of symptomatic human rotavirus strain KU (VP7 serotype 1) or DS-1 (VP7 serotype 2) or asymptomatic human rotavirus strain 1076 (VP7 serotype 2) were constructed and inserted into a baculovirus expression vector under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. The resulting recombinants expressed the appropriate authentic VP4 rotavirus outer capsid protein. Guinea pigs immunized with these VP4 proteins developed antibodies that neutralized infectivity of the rotavirus from which the immunizing VP4 was derived. These antisera were then used in neutralization tests to define the extent and distribution of VP4 antigenic polymorphism among human rotaviruses. Three distinct serotypes and one subtype of the VP4 outer capsid protein were identified among 17 human rotavirus strains that had previously been assigned to five distinct VP7 serotypes. For the most part, VP4 serotype segregated independently of VP7 serotype. Ten strains of human rotavirus that were associated with symptomatic infection and that exhibited VP7 serotype 1, 3, 4, or 9 specificity, each possessed a VP4 of the same serotype and subtype, designated VP4 serotype 1A. Both symptomatic human rotavirus strains with VP7 serotype 2 specificity were related by neutralization to the VP4 serotype 1A strains and were classified as a subtype of VP4 serotype 1--i.e., serotype 1B--since viruses of serotype 1A appeared to be prime strains. Four human rotavirus strains that were recovered from healthy infants in newborn nurseries in which virus transmission persisted over a long interval, belonged to VP7 serotype 1, 2, 3, or 4, but each strain possessed the same VP4 antigenic specificity that was designated VP4 serotype 2. Finally, a single strain of symptomatic human rotavirus of VP7 serotype 1 specificity possessed a unique VP4 that was provisionally classified as VP4 serotype 3 but this remains to be confirmed because neutralization tests were performed in only one direction. Among

  1. Protein-loosing enteropathy associated with rotavirus infection in an infant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tadashi Iwasa; Nobuyuld Matsubayashi

    2008-01-01

    Rotavirus is an acute enteric pathogen in infants and children.We reported a rare case of a 6-mo-old infant with protein-loosing enteropathy (PLE) caused by rotavirus gastroenteritis,and evaluated the immunological profile in peripheral blood lymphocytes.Laboratory examinations showed lymphopenia,hypoproteinemia,hypoalbuminemia,hypogammaglobulinemia,and elevation of alpha-1-antitrypsin (a1-AT) clearance.Lymphocytes subpopulation study revealed the reversal of CD4+/CD8+ ratio with the selective decrease of CD4positive lymphocytes.Moreover,the excessive increase of T cells producing IFN-gamma(IFN-γ) was found,which plays an important role in the protection against viral infection.The primary or secondary activation of immune system by rotavirus may influence structural integrity and vascular permeability,which may play a triggering role in protein-loosing enteropathy.

  2. Silencing of the rotavirus NSP4 protein decreases the incidence of biliary atresia in murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiexiong Feng

    Full Text Available Biliary atresia is a common disease in neonates which causes obstructive jaundice and progressive hepatic fibrosis. Our previous studies indicate that rotavirus infection is an initiator in the pathogenesis of experimental biliary atresia (BA through the induction of increased nuclear factor-kappaB and abnormal activation of the osteopontin inflammation pathway. In the setting of rotavirus infection, rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4 serves as an important immunogen, viral protein 7 (VP7 is necessary in rotavirus maturity and viral protein 4 (VP4 is a virulence determiner. The purpose of the current study is to clarify the roles of NSP4, VP7 and VP4 in the pathogenesis of experimental BA. Primary cultured extrahepatic biliary epithelia were infected with Rotavirus (mmu18006. Small interfering RNA targeting NSP4, VP7 or VP4 was transfected before rotavirus infection both in vitro and in vivo. We analyzed the incidence of BA, morphological change, morphogenesis of viral particles and viral mRNA and protein expression. The in vitro experiments showed NSP4 silencing decreased the levels of VP7 and VP4, reduced viral particles and decreased cytopathic effect. NSP4-positive cells had strongly positive expression of integrin subunit α2. Silencing of VP7 or VP4 partially decreased epithelial injury. Animal experiments indicated after NSP4 silencing, mouse pups had lower incidence of BA than after VP7 or VP4 silencing. However, 33.3% of VP4-silenced pups (N = 6 suffered BA and 50% of pups (N = 6 suffered biliary injury after VP7 silencing. Hepatic injury was decreased after NSP4 or VP4 silencing. Neither VP4 nor VP7 were detected in the biliary ducts after NSP4. All together, NSP4 silencing down-regulates VP7 and VP4, resulting in decreased incidence of BA.

  3. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 1 antagonizes innate immune response by interacting with retinoic acid inducible gene I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Lan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nonstructural protein 1 (NSP1 of rotavirus has been reported to block interferon (IFN signaling by mediating proteasome-dependent degradation of IFN-regulatory factors (IRFs and (or the β-transducin repeat containing protein (β-TrCP. However, in addition to these targets, NSP1 may subvert innate immune responses via other mechanisms. Results The NSP1 of rotavirus OSU strain as well as the IRF3 binding domain truncated NSP1 of rotavirus SA11 strain are unable to degrade IRFs, but can still inhibit host IFN response, indicating that NSP1 may target alternative host factor(s other than IRFs. Overexpression of NSP1 can block IFN-β promoter activation induced by the retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I, but does not inhibit IFN-β activation induced by the mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS, indicating that NSP1 may target RIG-I. Immunoprecipitation experiments show that NSP1 interacts with RIG-I independent of IRF3 binding domain. In addition, NSP1 induces down-regulation of RIG-I in a proteasome-independent way. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that inhibition of RIG-I mediated type I IFN responses by NSP1 may contribute to the immune evasion of rotavirus.

  4. Electron microscopic analysis of rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreaux, Crystal E.; Kelly, Deborah F. [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); McDonald, Sarah M., E-mail: mcdonaldsa@vtc.vt.edu [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia—Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Rotaviruses (RVs) replicate their segmented, double-stranded RNA genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. In this study, we sought to gain insight into the ultrastructure of RV assembly-replication intermediates (RIs) using transmission electron microscopy (EM). Specifically, we examined a replicase-competent, subcellular fraction that contains all known RV RIs. Three never-before-seen complexes were visualized in this fraction. Using in vitro reconstitution, we showed that ~15-nm doughnut-shaped proteins in strings were nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) bound to viral RNA transcripts. Moreover, using immunoaffinity-capture EM, we revealed that ~20-nm pebble-shaped complexes contain the viral RNA polymerase (VP1) and RNA capping enzyme (VP3). Finally, using a gel purification method, we demonstrated that ~30–70-nm electron-dense, particle-shaped complexes represent replicase-competent core RIs, containing VP1, VP3, and NSP2 as well as capsid proteins VP2 and VP6. The results of this study raise new questions about the interactions among viral proteins and RNA during the concerted assembly–replicase process. - Highlights: • Rotaviruses replicate their genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. • Little is known about rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates. • Assembly-replication intermediates were imaged using electron microscopy.

  5. Suspected zoonotic transmission of rotavirus group A in Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, S. E.; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2012-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses infect humans and a variety of animals. In July 2006 a rare rotavirus strain with G8P[14] specificity was identified in the stool samples of two adult patients with diarrheoa, who lived in the same geographical area in Denmark. Nucleotide sequences of the VP7, VP4, VP6, and NSP4...... genes of the identified strains were identical. Phylogenetic analyses showed that both Danish G8P[14] strains clustered with rotaviruses of animal, mainly, bovine and caprine, origin. The high genetic relatedness to animal rotaviruses and the atypical epidemiological features suggest that these human G8...

  6. Serotype-specific epitope(s) present on the VP8 subunit of rotavirus VP4 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larralde, G; Li, B G; Kapikian, A Z; Gorziglia, M

    1991-01-01

    cDNA clones representing the VP8 and VP5 subunits of VP4 of symptomatic human rotavirus strain KU (VP7 serotype 1 and VP4 serotype 1A) or DS-1 (VP7 serotype 2 and VP4 serotype 1B) or asymptomatic human rotavirus strain 1076 (VP7 serotype 2 and VP4 serotype 2) were constructed and inserted into the pGEMEX-1 plasmid and expressed in Escherichia coli. Immunization of guinea pigs with the VP8 or VP5 protein of each strain induced antibodies that neutralized the rotavirus from which the VP4 subunits were derived. In a previous study (M. Gorziglia, G. Larralde, A.Z. Kapikian, and R. M. Chanock, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87:7155-7159, 1990), three distinct serotypes and one subtype of VP4 outer capsid protein were identified among 17 human rotavirus strains that had previously been assigned to five distinct VP7 serotypes. The results obtained by cross-immunoprecipitation and by neutralization assay with antisera to the VP8- and VP5-expressed proteins suggest that the VP8 subunit of VP4 contains the major antigenic site(s) responsible for serotype-specific neutralization of rotavirus via VP4, whereas the VP5 subunit of VP4 is responsible for much of the cross-reactivity observed among strains that belong to different VP4 serotypes. Images PMID:1709699

  7. The rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 directly interacts with the caveolar structural protein caveolin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Rebecca D; Storey, Stephen M; Mitchell, Deanne M; McIntosh, Avery L; Zhou, Minglong; Mir, Kiran D; Ball, Judith M

    2006-03-01

    Rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) is known to function as an intracellular receptor at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) critical to viral morphogenesis and is the first characterized viral enterotoxin. Exogenously added NSP4 induces diarrhea in rodent pups and stimulates secretory chloride currents across intestinal segments as measured in Ussing chambers. Circular dichroism studies further reveal that intact NSP4 and the enterotoxic peptide (NSP4(114-135)) that is located within the extended, C-terminal amphipathic helix preferentially interact with caveola-like model membranes. We now show colocalization of NSP4 and caveolin-1 in NSP4-transfected and rotavirus-infected mammalian cells in reticular structures surrounding the nucleus (likely ER), in the cytosol, and at the cell periphery by laser scanning confocal microscopy. A direct interaction between NSP4 residues 112 to 140 and caveolin-1 was determined by the Pro-Quest yeast two-hybrid system with full-length NSP4 and seven overlapping deletion mutants as bait, caveolin-1 as prey, and vice versa. Coimmunoprecipitation of NSP4-caveolin-1 complexes from rotavirus-infected mammalian cells demonstrated that the interaction occurs during viral infection. Finally, binding of caveolin-1 from mammalian cell lysates to Sepharose-bound, NSP4-specific synthetic peptides confirmed the yeast two-hybrid data and further delineated the binding domain to amino acids 114 to 135. We propose that the association of NSP4 and caveolin-1 contributes to NSP4 intracellular trafficking from the ER to the cell surface and speculate that exogenously added NSP4 stimulates signaling molecules located in caveola microdomains.

  8. Rotavirus structural proteins and dsRNA are required for the human primary plasmacytoid dendritic cell IFNalpha response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily M Deal

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses are the leading cause of severe dehydrating diarrhea in children worldwide. Rotavirus-induced immune responses, especially the T and B cell responses, have been extensively characterized; however, little is known about innate immune mechanisms involved in the control of rotavirus infection. Although increased levels of systemic type I interferon (IFNalpha and beta correlate with accelerated resolution of rotavirus disease, multiple rotavirus strains, including rhesus rotavirus (RRV, have been demonstrated to antagonize type I IFN production in a variety of epithelial and fibroblast cell types through several mechanisms, including degradation of multiple interferon regulatory factors by a viral nonstructural protein. This report demonstrates that stimulation of highly purified primary human peripheral plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs with either live or inactivated RRV induces substantial IFNalpha production by a subset of pDCs in which RRV does not replicate. Characterization of pDC responses to viral stimulus by flow cytometry and Luminex revealed that RRV replicates in a small subset of human primary pDCs and, in this RRV-permissive small subset, IFNalpha production is diminished. pDC activation and maturation were observed independently of viral replication and were enhanced in cells in which virus replicates. Production of IFNalpha by pDCs following RRV exposure required viral dsRNA and surface proteins, but neither viral replication nor activation by trypsin cleavage of VP4. These results demonstrate that a minor subset of purified primary human peripheral pDCs are permissive to RRV infection, and that pDCs retain functionality following RRV stimulus. Additionally, this study demonstrates trypsin-independent infection of primary peripheral cells by rotavirus, which may allow for the establishment of extraintestinal viremia and antigenemia. Importantly, these data provide the first evidence of IFNalpha induction in primary

  9. Structure of Rotavirus Outer-Layer Protein VP7 Bound with a Neutralizing Fab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Scott T.; Settembre, Ethan C.; Trask, Shane D.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Harrison, Stephen C.; Dormitzer, Philip R.; (Stanford-MED); (CH-Boston)

    2009-06-17

    Rotavirus outer-layer protein VP7 is a principal target of protective antibodies. Removal of free calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}) dissociates VP7 trimers into monomers, releasing VP7 from the virion, and initiates penetration-inducing conformational changes in the other outer-layer protein, VP4. We report the crystal structure at 3.4 angstrom resolution of VP7 bound with the Fab fragment of a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. The Fab binds across the outer surface of the intersubunit contact, which contains two Ca{sup 2+} sites. Mutations that escape neutralization by other antibodies suggest that the same region bears the epitopes of most neutralizing antibodies. The monovalent Fab is sufficient to neutralize infectivity. We propose that neutralizing antibodies against VP7 act by stabilizing the trimer, thereby inhibiting the uncoating trigger for VP4 rearrangement. A disulfide-linked trimer is a potential subunit immunogen.

  10. Rotavirus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotavirus is a virus that causes gastroenteritis. Symptoms include severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and dehydration. Almost all ... the U.S. are likely to be infected with rotavirus before their 5th birthday. Infections happen most often ...

  11. The shift from low to high non-structural protein 1 expression in rotavirus-infected MA-104 cells

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    Laura Martinez-Alvarez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of group/species A rotavirus (RVA replication in MA-104 cells is the logarithmic increase in viral mRNAs that occurs four-12 h post-infection. Viral protein synthesis typically lags closely behind mRNA synthesis but continues after mRNA levels plateau. However, RVA non-structural protein 1 (NSP1 is present at very low levels throughout viral replication despite showing robust protein synthesis. NSP1 has the contrasting properties of being susceptible to proteasomal degradation, but being stabilised against proteasomal degradation by viral proteins and/or viral mRNAs. We aimed to determine the kinetics of the accumulation and intracellular distribution of NSP1 in MA-104 cells infected with rhesus rotavirus (RRV. NSP1 preferentially localises to the perinuclear region of the cytoplasm of infected cells, forming abundant granules that are heterogeneous in size. Late in infection, large NSP1 granules predominate, coincident with a shift from low to high NSP1 expression levels. Our results indicate that rotavirus NSP1 is a late viral protein in MA-104 cells infected with RRV, presumably as a result of altered protein turnover.

  12. EXPRESSION AND GLYCOSYLATION OF ROTAVIRUS STRAIN SAIl VP4 PROTEIN IN A RECOMBINANT ADENOVIRUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙茂盛; 昝云红; 马雁冰; 张光明; 杜秋江; 戴长柏

    2001-01-01

    Objective. Using a recombinant human adenovirus to express modified VP4 gene of rotavirus SA11 strain. Methods. A whole VP4 gene was obtained with PCR and induced the signal peptide at the gene N terminal.The chimera gene Was cloned into pCMV plasmid that consists of human cytomegalovirus promoter, and then the gene was cloned to the transfer vector of human adenovirus type 5. Homologous recombination was performed by co-transfection to 293 cell lines with recombinant plasmid and viral genome using CaPO4 precipitation. Results. No mutation was found in the whole VP4 gene sequence of 2362 base pair. The expressed productin recombinant adenovirus was confirmed to be specific and more antigenicity by indirect immunofluorescence as-say. Both the Western blot and immunoprecipitation assay showed that the molecular mass of the expressed protein was higher than the wild type VP4 protein, and that the modified product was corresponding to a glycosyla-tion of VP4 protein. Conclusion. To modify the target gene might be an effective method to enhance the stability, antigenicityand immunogenicity of expressed protein.

  13. EXPRESSION AND GLYCOSYLATION OF ROTAVIRUS STRAIN SA11 VP4 PROTEIN IN A RECOMBINANT ADENOVIRUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙茂盛; 昝云红; 马雁冰; 张光明; 杜秋江; 戴长柏

    2001-01-01

    Objective. Using a recombinant human adenovirus to express modified VP4 gene of rotavirus SA11 strain.``Methods. A whole VP4 gene was obtained with PCR and induced the signal peptide at the gene N terninal.``The chimera gene was cloned into pCMV plasmid that consists of human cytomegalovirus promoter, and then the gene was cloned to the transfer vector of human adenovirus type 5. Homologous recombination was performed by co-transfection to 293 cell lines with recombinant plasmid and viral genome using CaPO4 precipitation.``Results. No mutation was found in the whole VP4 gene sequence of 2362 base pair. The expressed product in recombinant adenovirus was confirmed to be specific and more antigenicity by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Both the Western blot and immunoprecipitation assay showed that the molecular mass of the expressed protein was higher than the wild type VP4 protein, and that the modified product was corresponding to a glycosylation of VP4 protein.``Conclusion. To modify the target gene might be an effective method to enhance the stability, antigenicity and immunogenicity of expressed protein.``

  14. Adsorption characteristics of an enteric virus-binding protein to norovirus, rotavirus and poliovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imai Takahiro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Water contamination with human enteric viruses has posed human health risks all over the world. Reasonable and facile methodologies for recovering and quantifying infectious enteric viruses in environmental samples are needed to address the issues of waterborne viral infectious diseases. In this study, a bacterial protein that has a binding capability with several enteric viruses is discovered, and its binding characteristics were investigated for utilizing it as a viral adsorbent in virus recovery and detection technologies. Results A gene of an enteric virus-binding protein (EVBP, derived from a monomer of a bacterial chaperon protein GroEL, was successfully acquired from a genomic DNA library of activated sludge microorganisms with nested PCR. Equilibrium dissociation constants between EVBP and norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs of genotypes GI.7 and GII.4, estimated with quartz crystal microbalance method, were 240 and 210 nM, respectively. These values of equilibrium dissociation constant imply that the binding affinity between EVBP and NoVLPs is 1 to 3-log weaker than that in general antigen-antibody interactions, but about 2-log stronger than that in weak specific interactions of proteins with cations and organic polymers. The adsorptions of EVBP to norovirus, group A rotavirus and poliovirus type 1 were found to be significant in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Meanwhile, the binding of native GroEL tetradecamer to viral particles was weaker than that of EVBP, presumably because of a steric hindrance. The small molecule of EVBP could have an advantage in the access to the surface of viral particles with rugged structure. Conclusions EVBP that has a broad binding spectrum to enteric viruses was newly discovered. The broad binding characteristic of EVBP would allow us to utilize it as a novel adsorbent for detecting diverse enteric viruses in clinical and environmental samples.

  15. Neutralization epitopes on rotavirus SA11 4fM outer capsid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorziglia, M; Larralde, G; Ward, R L

    1990-01-01

    The VP7 and VP4 genes of seven antigenic mutants of simian rotavirus SA11 4fM (serotype 3) selected after 39 passages in the presence of SA11 4fM hyperimmune antiserum, were sequenced. Nucleotide sequence analysis indicated the following. (i) Twice as many amino acid substitutions occurred in the VP7 protein than in VP4, which has a molecular weight twice that of VP7. (ii) Most amino acid changes that occurred clustered in six variable regions of VP7 and in two variable regions of VP4; these variable regions may represent immunodominant epitopes. (iii) Most amino acid substitutions that occurred in VP7 and VP4 of these mutants were also observed in antigenic mutants selected with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NMAbs); however, some amino acid substitutions occurred that were not selected for NMAbs. (iv) On VP7, some of the neutralization epitopes appeared to be interrelated because amino acid substitution in one site affected binding of specific NMAbs to other sites, while other neutralization epitopes on VP7 appeared to be independent, in that amino acid substitution in one site did not affect the binding of NMAbs to another distant site. Images PMID:1696640

  16. Research progress on the structural and nonstructural proteins of group A rotavirus%A组轮状病毒结构和非结构蛋白的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郏继航; 杨学磊

    2015-01-01

    The group A rotavirus is the most important etiological agent of grave diarrhea in children under 5 years old,mainly causing fever,vomiting,diarrhea and other clinical symptoms,even severe dehydration or death.Study on the viral proteins of rotavirus may contribute to further understanding of its pathogenesis and developing new vaccines.In this article,the progresses on research of the structure,biological functions and immunological properties of group A rotavirus are reviewed.

  17. LAS PROTEÍNAS β3 Y PDI AISLADAS DE PLAQUETAS HUMANAS SE UNEN CON EL ROTAVIRUS ECwt IN VITRO β3 and PDI proteins isolated from human platelets bind with ECwt rotavirus in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Mayorga

    2010-01-01

    policlonal contra β3 y establecer que β3 y PDI se unen in vitro, luego de incubar las proteínas aisladas con el rotavirus ECwt, e in vivo, después de incubar el rotavirus con las vellosidades aisladas del intestino delgado de ratón lactante de la cepa ICR.Background. Commercial integrin β3 is currently not available and commercial PDI is too expensive, which is making access difficult to these proteins needed for conducting experiments aimed at the establishment of possible interactions between integrin β3 and PDI and wild type rotavirus strains. Objective. To explore a methodology allowing isolation of proteins β3 and PDI from human platelets to be used as antigens in the generation of rabbit polyclonal antibodies useful in the assessment of interactions between these proteins and rotavirus ECwt. Materials and methods. Proteins β3 and PDI from human platelet lysates were separated using preparative electrophoresis under reducing conditions and then eluted. Interactions of these proteins with rotavirus ECwt were analyzed using co-immunoprecipitation, Western blotting and capture ELISA. Results. Proteins from human platelet lysates were separated by preparative electrophoresis under reducing conditions. The identification of proteins β3 and PDI present in a gel slice was performed through their reaction with commercial antibodies in a Western blotting analysis. Protein purity was established after electroelution from a gel slice. Polyclonal antibodies against protein β3 were generated in rabbit. Incubation of eluted proteins β3 and PDI with rotavirus ECwt showed in co-immunoprecipitation and ELISA assays that these proteins bound virus in vitro. The same binding was showed to occur when rotavirus was incubated with isolated small intestinal villi from suckling mice. Conclusions. Relatively high amounts of proteins β3 and PDI were partially purified from human platelets by preparative electrophoresis. The isolation of these proteins allowed the generation of

  18. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* carbohydrate-binding protein of the human rotavirus strain Wa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraschnefski, Mark J.; Scott, Stacy A. [Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University (Gold Coast Campus), PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 9726 (Australia); Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S.; Itzstein, Mark von [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Blanchard, Helen, E-mail: h.blanchard@griffith.edu.au [Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University (Gold Coast Campus), PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 9726 (Australia)

    2005-11-01

    The carbohydrate-binding component (VP8*{sub 64–223}) of the human Wa rotavirus spike protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized in two different crystal forms. X-ray diffraction data have been collected that have enabled determination of the Wa VP8*{sub 64–223} structure by molecular replacement. Rotaviruses exhibit host-specificity and the first crystallographic information on a rotavirus strain that infects humans is reported here. Recognition and attachment to host cells, leading to invasion and infection, is critically linked to the function of the outer capsid spike protein of the rotavirus particle. In some strains the VP8* component of the spike protein is implicated in recognition and binding of sialic-acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates, thereby enabling infection by the virus. The cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* core from human Wa rotavirus is reported. Two crystal forms (trigonal P3{sub 2}21 and monoclinic P2{sub 1}) have been obtained and X-ray diffraction data have been collected, enabling determination of the VP8*{sub 64–223} structure by molecular replacement.

  19. Co-expression of anti-rotavirus proteins (llama VHH antibody fragments in Lactobacillus: development and functionality of vectors containing two expression cassettes in tandem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökçe Günaydın

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is an important pediatric pathogen, causing severe diarrhea and being associated with a high mortality rate causing approximately 500 000 deaths annually worldwide. Even though some vaccines are currently available, their efficacy is lower in the developing world, as compared to developed countries. Therefore, alternative or complementary treatment options are needed in the developing countries where the disease burden is the largest. The effect of Lactobacillus in promoting health and its use as a vehicle for delivery of protein and antibody fragments was previously shown. In this study, we have developed co-expression vectors enabling Lactobacillus paracasei BL23 to produce two VHH fragments against rotavirus (referred to as anti-rotavirus proteins 1 and 3, ARP1 and ARP3 as secreted and/or surface displayed products. ARP1 and ARP3 fragments were successfully co-expressed as shown by Western blot and flow cytometry. In addition, engineered Lactobacillus produced VHH antibody fragments were shown to bind to a broad range of rotavirus serotypes (including the human rotavirus strains 69M, Va70, F45, DS1, Wa and ST3 and simian rotavirus strains including RRV and SA11, by flow cytometry and ELISA. Hereby, we have demonstrated for the first time that when RRV was captured by one VHH displayed on the surface of co-expressor Lactobacillus, targeting other epitope was possible with another VHH secreted from the same bacterium. Therefore, Lactobacillus producing two VHH antibody fragments may potentially serve as treatment against rotavirus with a reduced risk of development of escape mutants. This co-expression and delivery platform can also be used for delivery of VHH fragments against a variety of mucosal pathogens or production of other therapeutic molecules.

  20. Protein Malnutrition Modifies Innate Immunity and Gene Expression by Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Human Rotavirus Infection in Neonatal Gnotobiotic Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paim, Francine C.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Alhamo, Moyasar A.; Fischer, David D.; Langel, Stephanie N.; Deblais, Loic; Kumar, Anand; Chepngeno, Juliet; Shao, Lulu; Huang, Huang-Chi; Candelero-Rueda, Rosario A.; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Malnutrition affects millions of children in developing countries, compromising immunity and contributing to increased rates of death from infectious diseases. Rotavirus is a major etiological agent of childhood diarrhea in developing countries, where malnutrition is prevalent. However, the interactions between the two and their combined effects on immune and intestinal functions are poorly understood. In this study, we used neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) pigs transplanted with the fecal microbiota of a healthy 2-month-old infant (HIFM) and fed protein-deficient or -sufficient bovine milk diets. Protein deficiency induced hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypoglycemia, stunting, and generalized edema in Gn pigs, as observed in protein-malnourished children. Irrespective of the diet, human rotavirus (HRV) infection early, at HIFM posttransplantation day 3 (PTD3), resulted in adverse health effects and higher mortality rates (45 to 75%) than later HRV infection (PTD10). Protein malnutrition exacerbated HRV infection and affected the morphology and function of the small intestinal epithelial barrier. In pigs infected with HRV at PTD10, there was a uniform decrease in the function and/or frequencies of natural killer cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and CD103+ and apoptotic mononuclear cells and altered gene expression profiles of intestinal epithelial cells (chromogranin A, mucin 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, SRY-Box 9, and villin). Thus, we have established the first HIFM-transplanted neonatal pig model that recapitulates major aspects of protein malnutrition in children and can be used to evaluate physiologically relevant interventions. Our findings provide an explanation of why nutrient-rich diets alone may lack efficacy in malnourished children. IMPORTANCE Malnutrition and rotavirus infection, prevalent in developing countries, individually and in combination, affect the health of millions of children, compromising their immunity and increasing

  1. Similarity of Bovine Rotavirus Receptor and Human Rotavirus Receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏琦华; 訾自强; 潘菊芬; 徐燕

    2004-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody against bovine rotavirus (BRV) receptor (BRV-R-mAb) was used to explore the similarity between the receptors of BRV and human rotavirus (HRV). ELISA, dot immunobinding assay, cell protection assay, solid-phase assay and immunohistochemistry method were applied. BRV-R-mAb bound both anti-BRV IgG and anti-HRV IgG respectively and could protect MA 104 cells against BRV and HRV challenges. Immunohistochemistry test showed that there were rotavirus receptors on the surfaces of foetal intestinal, tracheal mucosa and MA 104 cells membrane. We purified the rotavirus receptors on MA 104 ceils, which could bind both BRV and HRV in vitro. It is concluded that BRV receptor and HRV receptor are homogenous proteins and can be recognized by both BRV and HRV.

  2. Molecular characterization of group A rotaviruses detected in children with gastroenteritis in Ireland in 2006-2009.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, O

    2012-02-01

    SUMMARYCommunity and hospital-acquired cases of human rotavirus are responsible for millions of gastroenteritis cases in children worldwide, chiefly in developing countries, and vaccines are now available. During surveillance activity for human rotavirus infections in Ireland, between 2006 and 2009, a total of 420 rotavirus strains were collected and analysed. Upon either PCR genotyping and sequence analysis, a variety of VP7 (G1-G4 and G9) and VP4 (P[4], P[6], P[8] and P[9]) genotypes were detected. Strains G1P[8] were found to be predominant throughout the period 2006-2008, with slight fluctuations seen in the very limited samples available in 2008-2009. Upon either PCR genotyping and sequence analysis of selected strains, the G1, G3 and G9 viruses were found to contain E1 (Wa-like) NSP4 and I1 VP6 genotypes, while the analysed G2 strains possessed E2 NSP4 and I2 VP6 genotypes, a genetic make-up which is highly conserved in the major human rotavirus genogroups Wa- and Kun-like, respectively. Upon sequence analysis of the most common VP4 genotype, P[8], at least two distinct lineages were identified, both unrelated to P[8] Irish rotaviruses circulating in previous years, and more closely related to recent European humans rotaviruses. Moreover, sequence analysis of the VP7 of G1 rotaviruses revealed the onset of a G1 variant, previously unseen in the Irish population.

  3. Rotavirus Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including a severe allergy to latex. Babies with "severe combined immunodeficiency" (SCID) should not get rotavirus vaccine. Babies who have had a type of bowel blockage called "intussusception" should not get ... with moderate or severe diarrhea or vomiting. Check with your doctor if ...

  4. Cytoplasmic calcium measurement in rotavirus enterotoxin-enhanced green fluorescent protein (NSP4-EGFP) expressing cells loaded with Fura-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkova, Z; Morris, A P; Estes, M K

    2003-07-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its analogs are standard markers of protein expression and intracellular localization of proteins. The fluorescent properties of GFP complicate accurate measurement of intracellular calcium using calcium sensitive fluorophores, which show a great degree of spectral overlap with GFP, or their K(d) values are too high for accurate measurement of subtle changes in cytoplasmic calcium concentrations. Here we describe a simple modification of the standard microscope-based Fura-2 calcium-imaging technique which permits the quantitative measurement of intracellular calcium levels in cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion proteins. Longpass emission filtering of the Fura-2 signal in cells expressing an EGFP fusion protein is sufficient to eliminate the EGFP-Fura-2 emission spectra overlap and allows quantitative calibration of intracellular calcium. To validate this technique, we investigated the ability of rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4-EGFP to elevate intracellular calcium levels in mammalian HEK 293 cells. We show here that inducible intracellular expression of NSP4-EGFP fusion protein elevates basal intracellular calcium more than two-fold by a phospholipase C (PLC) independent mechanism.

  5. Characterization of a genetically heterogeneous porcine rotavirus C, and other viruses present in the fecal virome of a non-diarrheic Belgian piglet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theuns, Sebastiaan; Conceição-Neto, Nádia; Zeller, Mark; Heylen, Elisabeth; Roukaerts, Inge D M; Desmarets, Lowiese M B; Van Ranst, Marc; Nauwynck, Hans J; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are becoming increasingly accessible, leading to an expanded interest in the composition of the porcine enteric virome. In the present study, the fecal virome of a non-diarrheic Belgian piglet was determined. Although the virome of only a single piglet was analyzed, some interesting data were obtained, including the second complete genome of a pig group C rotavirus (RVC). This Belgian strain was only distantly related to the only other completely characterized pig RVC strain, Cowden. Its relatedness to RVC strains from other host species was also analyzed and the porcine strain found in our study was only distantly related to RVCs detected in humans and cows. The gene encoding the outer capsid protein VP7 belonged to the rare porcine G3 genotype, which might be serologically distinct from most other pig RVC strains. A putative novel RVC VP6 genotype was identified as well. A group A rotavirus strain also present in this fecal sample contained the rare pig genotype combination G11P[27], but was only partially characterized. Typical pig RVA genotypes I5, A8, and T7 were found for the viral proteins VP6, NSP1, and NSP3, respectively. Interestingly, the fecal virome of the piglet also contained an astrovirus and an enterovirus, of which the complete genomes were characterized. Results of the current study indicate that many viruses may be present simultaneously in fecal samples of non-diarrheic piglets. In this study, these viruses could not be directly associated with any disease, but still they might have had a potential subclinical impact on pig growth performance. The fast evolution of NGS will be a powerful tool for future diagnostics in veterinary practice. Its application will certainly lead to better insights into the relevance of many (sub)clinical enteric viral infections, that may have remained unnoticed using traditional diagnostic techniques. This will stimulate the development of new and durable prophylactic

  6. The N-Terminal of Aquareovirus NS80 Is Required for Interacting with Viral Proteins and Viral Replication.

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    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available Reovirus replication and assembly occurs within viral inclusion bodies that formed in specific intracellular compartments of cytoplasm in infected cells. Previous study indicated that aquareovirus NS80 is able to form inclusion bodies, and also can retain viral proteins within its inclusions. To better understand how NS80 performed in viral replication and assembly, the functional regions of NS80 associated with other viral proteins in aquareovirus replication were investigated in this study. Deletion mutational analysis and rotavirus NSP5-based protein association platform were used to detect association regions. Immunofluorescence images indicated that different N-terminal regions of NS80 could associate with viral proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 and NS38. Further co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the interaction between VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 with different regions covering the N-terminal amino acid (aa, 1-471 of NS80, respectively. Moreover, removal of NS80 N-terminal sequences required for interaction with proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 not only prevented the capacity of NS80 to support viral replication in NS80 shRNA-based replication complementation assays, but also inhibited the expression of aquareovirus proteins, suggesting that N-terminal regions of NS80 are necessary for viral replication. These results provided a foundational basis for further understanding the role of NS80 in viral replication and assembly during aquareovirus infection.

  7. Trivalent combination vaccine induces broad heterologous immune responses to norovirus and rotavirus in mice.

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    Kirsi Tamminen

    Full Text Available Rotavirus (RV and norovirus (NoV are the two major causes of viral gastroenteritis (GE in children worldwide. We have developed an injectable vaccine design to prevent infection or GE induced with these enteric viruses. The trivalent combination vaccine consists of NoV capsid (VP1 derived virus-like particles (VLPs of GI-3 and GII-4 representing the two major NoV genogroups and tubular RV recombinant VP6 (rVP6, the most conserved and abundant RV protein. Each component was produced in insect cells by a recombinant baculovirus expression system and combined in vitro. The vaccine components were administered intramuscularly to BALB/c mice either separately or in the trivalent combination. High levels of NoV and RV type specific serum IgGs with high avidity (>50% as well as intestinal IgGs were detected in the immunized mice. Cross-reactive IgG antibodies were also elicited against heterologous NoV VLPs not used for immunization (GII-4 NO, GII-12 and GI-1 VLPs and to different RVs from cell cultures. NoV-specific serum antibodies blocked binding of homologous and heterologous VLPs to the putative receptors, histo-blood group antigens, suggesting broad NoV neutralizing activity of the sera. Mucosal antibodies of mice immunized with the trivalent combination vaccine inhibited RV infection in vitro. In addition, cross-reactive T cell immune responses to NoV and RV-specific antigens were detected. All the responses were sustained for up to six months. No mutual inhibition of the components in the trivalent vaccine combination was observed. In conclusion, the NoV GI and GII VLPs combination induced broader cross-reactive and potentially neutralizing immune responses than either of the VLPs alone. Therefore, trivalent vaccine might induce protective immune responses to the vast majority of circulating NoV and RV genotypes.

  8. Whole genotype constellation of prototype feline rotavirus strains FRV-1 and FRV64 and their phylogenetic relationships with feline-like human rotavirus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauchan, Punita; Sasaki, Eriko; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Do, Loan Phuong; Doan, Yen Hai; Mochizuki, Masami; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2015-02-01

    Feline rotaviruses, members of the species Rotavirus A, are an infrequent source of zoonotic infections, and were previously shown by RNA-RNA hybridization assays to possess two distinct genomic RNA constellations, represented by strains FRV-1 and FRV64. Due to the lack of whole genome sequence information for FRV-1, human rotavirus strain AU-1 has been used as a surrogate for the genotype constellation of feline rotaviruses. The aim of this study was to determine the whole genome sequence of FRV-1 and FRV64 to help understand the genetic relationships among existing feline rotaviruses from the evolutionary perspective. The genotype constellations of FRV-1 and FRV64 were G3-P[9]-I3-R3-C3-M3-A3-N3-T3-E3-H3 and G3-P[3]-I3-R3-C2-M3-A9-N2-T3-E3-H6, respectively. FRV-1 has a genotype constellation identical to that of the AU-1 strain. Although for individual genes they shared lineages, with the exception of genes encoding VP2, VP6 and VP7, the sequence identity between FRV-1 and AU-1 was considered to be sufficiently high for the AU-1 to be regarded as an example of the direct transmission of a feline rotavirus to a child. On the other hand, the FRV64 strain was not only similar in all the 11 genome segments to another feline rotavirus strain, Cat97, but also to canine rotavirus strains (K9 and CU-1) and feline/canine-like human rotavirus strains (Ro1845 and HCR3A). In conclusion, this study revealed intermingled sharing of genotypes and lineages among feline rotaviruses, suggesting the occurrence of frequent reassortment events over the course of evolution to emerge in four genotype constellations represented by FRV-1, FRV64/Cat97, Cat2 and BA222 strains.

  9. Human group C rotavirus in children with diarrhea in the Federal District, Brazil

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    Teixeira J.M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Group C rotaviruses are fastidious in their in vitro cell culture requirements. Recent serosurveys indicate that antibody to group C rotavirus is present in 3-45% of the human population in certain geographic locations, suggesting that rotavirus group C infection is more prevalent than previously believed and that the low rate of detection of these agents is probably due to the lack of sensitive diagnostic assays. From March to December 1994, 406 fecal specimens were collected from children under five years of age who were outpatients at the emergency services of nine public hospitals in Brasília, Federal District, Brazil. In addition to the samples from children, one public outpatient unit requested virological investigation of a stool sample from an HIV-seropositive adult male with diarrhea of sudden onset. All samples were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay for group A rotavirus and adenovirus (EIARA and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE. One hundred and seven (26% were positive for group A rotavirus. Four samples from children and the sample from the HIV-seropositive patient, although negative by EIARA, showed a group C rotavirus profile by PAGE and were positive for rotavirus by electron microscopy. Using specific VP6 and VP7 primers for group C rotavirus, a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was performed and products were detected by agarose gel electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining. These products were confirmed to be specific for group C rotavirus by using digoxigenin-oligonucleotide probes, Southern hybridization and chemiluminescent detection. The five positive group C rotavirus samples were detected in August (3 samples and September (2 samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of group C rotavirus detected in the Federal District, Brazil and in an HIV-seropositive patient with acute gastroenteritis.

  10. Identification of the two rotavirus genes determining neutralization specificities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offit, P.A.; Blavat, G.

    1986-01-01

    Bovine rotavirus NCDV and simian rotavirus SA-11 represent two distinct rotavirus serotypes. A genetic approach was used to determine which viral gene segments segregated with serotype-specific viral neutralization. There were 16 reassortant rotarviruses derived by coinfection of MA-104 cells in vitro with the SA-11 and NCDV strains. The parental origin of reassortant rotavirus double-stranded RNA segments was determined by gene segment mobility in polyacrylamide gels and by hybridization with radioactively labeled parental viral transcripts. The authors found that two rotavirus gene segments found previously to code for outer capsid proteins vp3 and vp7 cosegreated with virus neutralization specificities.

  11. Rotavirus disrupts cytoplasmic P bodies during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Rahul; Mukherjee, Arpita; Patra, Upayan; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta

    2015-12-02

    Cytoplasmic Processing bodies (P bodies), the RNA-protein aggregation foci of translationally stalled and potentially decaying mRNA, have been reported to be differentially modulated by viruses. Rotavirus, the causative agent of acute infantile gastroenteritis is a double stranded RNA virus which completes its entire life-cycle exclusively in host cell cytoplasm. In this study, the fate of P bodies was investigated upon rotavirus infection. It was found that P bodies get disrupted during rotavirus infection. The disruption occurred by more than one different mechanism where deadenylating P body component Pan3 was degraded by rotavirus NSP1 and exonuclease XRN1 along with the decapping enzyme hDCP1a were relocalized from cytoplasm to nucleus. Overall the study highlights decay and subcellular relocalization of P body components as novel mechanisms by which rotavirus subverts cellular antiviral responses.

  12. Rotavirus is frequent among adults hospitalised for acute gastroenteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausch, Karen Rokkedal; Westh, Lena; Kristensen, Lena Hagelskjær;

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Rotavirus infection is the most common aetiology of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) among young children. In adults, diagnostics focus mainly on bacterial causes, though recent studies suggest that rotavirus is a frequent agent. The aim of this study was to examine the proportion...... culture for bacterial pathogens. RESULTS: A total of 265 adult patients were included. 9.4% tested positive for rotavirus. Enteropathogenic bacteria were found in 24.5% of the cases. In the majority of cases (62.3%), no pathogen was found. Overall, rotavirus was the second-most frequent pathogen, exceeded...... only by Campylobacter spp. Immunosuppression and a C-reactive protein (CRP) below 50 mg/l (0-8 mg/l) were associated with rotavirus. The seasonality of rotavirus differed markedly from that of bacterial gastroenteritis. CONCLUSION: Rotavirus is the second-most frequently identified pathogen in adults...

  13. Isolation and G-typing of Rotaviruses from diarrheal Calves in Tehran and Alborz provinces, Iran

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    Fallahi, R.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses group A are the major cause of diarrhea in calves under one month and every year causes enormous economic losses. Serological and molecular techniques can be used for rapid detection of rotaviruses but virus isolation requires specific methods of cell culture and suitable cell lines. In this study, 41 samples were collected from diarrheal calves up to the age of one month, from industrial and semi-industrial farms in Tehran and Alborz provinces. The samples were positive by RT-PCR on VP6 gene. After preparation and inoculation onto MA104 cells in roller tube culture and constant cell culture system, the cytopathic effect (CPE was observed. Eligible cultured with CPE, were confirmed by two-step RT-PCR using VP6 gene primers. Semi-nested PCR using VP7 gene primers was also performed for G-genotyping in which 11 and 2 samples were detected as G6 and G10, respectively. This is the first report on isolation and identification of rotaviruses, one of the causative agents of viral diarrhea in Iran. The results of this research suggest that, these two types, can be used as the dominant strains for manufacturing a suitable vaccine against the rotaviruses in Iran.

  14. Mimicking Retention and Transport of Rotavirus and Adenovirus in Sand Media Using DNA-labeled, Protein-coated Silica Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Liping; Farkas, Kata; Bennett, Grant; Varsani, Arvind; Easingwood, Richard; Tilley, Richard; Nowostawska, Urszula; Lin, Susan

    2014-05-01

    Rotavirus (RoV) and adenovirus (AdV) are important viral pathogens for the risk analysis of drinking water. Despite this, little is known about their retention and transport behaviors in porous media (e.g. sand filtered used for water treatment and groundwater aquifers due to a lack of representative surrogates. In this study, we developed RoV and AdV surrogates by covalently coating 70-nm sized silica nanoparticles with specific proteins and a DNA marker for sensitive detection. Filtration experiments using beach sand columns demonstrated the similarity of the surrogates' concentrations, attachment, and filtration efficiencies to the target viruses. The surrogates showed the same magnitude of concentration reduction as the viruses. Conversely, MS2 phage (a traditional virus model) over predicted concentrations of AdV and RoV by 1- and 2-orders of magnitude, respectively. The surrogates remained stable in size, surface charge and DNA concentration for at least one year. They can be easily and rapidly detected at concentrations down to one particle per PCR reaction and are readily detectable in natural waters and even in effluent. With up-scaling validation in pilot trials, the surrogates can be a useful cost-effective new tool for studying virus retention and transport in porous media, e.g. for assessing filter efficiency in water and wastewater treatment, tracking virus migration in groundwater after effluent land disposal, and establishing safe setback distances for groundwater protection.

  15. UN MODELO DEL MECANISMO DE ENTRADA DE LOS ROTAVIRUS A LA CÉLULA HOSPEDERA A model for the mechanism of entry of rotaviruses into the host cell

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    Orlando Acosta L

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes. La infección rotaviral es causa principal de gastroenteritis aguda severa en niños menores de cinco años. La capa protéica externa de la partícula viral está implicada en las interacciones iniciales virus-superficie celular. El mecanismo rotaviral de unión y entrada a la célula parece ser un proceso de múltiples pasos donde las proteínas rotavirales VP4 y VP7 interaccionan con diferentes moléculas de la superficie celular. Objetivo. Proponer un mecanismo de entrada de rotavirus a la célula que incorpore la actividad de la proteína disulfuro isomerasa (PDI. Material y métodos. Utilizando bases de datos electrónicas, se realizó una búsqueda de literatura original y de revisión publicada entre 1990 y 2009 sobre moléculas de la superficie rotaviral o celular participantes en el proceso de entrada del virus. El análisis de los resultados enfatizó las bases moleculares y celulares de las interacciones temporo-espaciales de las proteínas virales y las moléculas de unión/receptoras de la célula. Resultados. Se encontró fundamentos moleculares y celulares para incorporar la actividad de PDI a un mecanismo coherente de vías secuenciales o alternativas previas a la penetración viral. Se propone un mecanismo en que interaccionan las proteínas virales VP4, VP6 y VP7 con las moléculas de la superficie celular ácido siálico, integrinas, Hsc70 y PDI en un proceso endocítico caveola/“raft”-dependiente, caveolina/clatrina-independiente, dinamina-dependiente y sensible a depleción de colesterol. Conclusión. Se amplía el concepto de múltiples pasos en el proceso de entrada de rotavirus, donde la participación de PDI podría ser un blanco potencial de la acción de inhibidores de grupos tiol/disulfuro.Background. Rotavirus infection is the leading single cause of severe acute gastroenteritis in children under five years of age. The outermost layer of the triple-layered protein capsid of the non-enveloped virus

  16. Evolution of human G4P[8] group A rotavirus strains circulating in Italy in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianiro, Giovanni; Delogu, Roberto; Fiore, Lucia; Ruggeri, Franco M

    2015-06-02

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis in young (humans worldwide are associated with the five major G/P combinations G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G4P[8] and G9P[8]. During RVA gastroenteritis surveillance in Italy, a total of 1112 samples collected from children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in 2013 were RVA positive and were genotyped following standardized protocols from the EuroRotaNet. Most strains analyzed belonged to the five major human genotypes. Among these common strains, 22 G4P[8] RVA strains from different Italian regions were subjected to nucleotide sequencing of their VP4, VP6, VP7 and NSP4 genes to investigate their evolution. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the Italian strains belonged to lineage G4-I for VP7 and to lineage P[8]-III for VP4, in line with the modern G4P[8] RVA strains detected in children worldwide. The phylogenetic trees revealed high degrees of nucleotide identity between the RVA strains involved in this study and G4P[8] strains detected previously in Europe, Asia and Africa, but also demonstrated at least three separate evolution clusters within the same lineage. Based on the amino acid sequences deduced for their hypervariable regions, both the VP7 and VP8* proteins of the Italian G4P[8] RVA strains presented amino acid substitutions near known neutralizing epitopes.

  17. Surveillance of rotavirus diarrhea

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    Titis Widowati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Rotavirus is a major cause of severe diarrhea and dehydration in children worldwide. Data on the burden of disease in Indonesia is limited. Objective To provide an epidemiological profile of rotavirus infection among children hospitalized for diarrhea in Mohammad Hoesin Hospital, Palembang. Methods In January - December 2006, a prospective, hospital-based surveillance was carried out in children aged less than five years, presenting with diarrhea. Stool samples were examined for rotavirus using enzyme immunoassay (EIA. G- and P-typing were performed on specimens confirmed to be positive by EIA. Results A total of 513 fecal specimens from 534 children were tested for rotavirus. Rotavirus was detected in 64% of the specimens, mostly of the G9 type (62.5%. Incidence of rotavirus diarrhea was highest in the 6 month to 2 years age group (60.4%. Children with rotavirus diarrhea were more likely to present with dehydration, compared to those with non-rotavirus diarrhea (94% vs 70%, respectively, P=0.03. Conclusion Rotavirus was the most common pathogen found in children with diarrhea. Rotavirus was detected in 64% of pediatric diarrheal specimens tested in our study. This finding warrants the use of a large-scale program to prevent disease, such as vaccination against rotavirus. [Paediatr Indones. 2012;52:22-7].

  18. Supplementing suckling rats with whey protein concentrate modulates the immune response and ameliorates rat rotavirus-induced diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Marín-Gallén, Silvia; Castell, Margarida; Rodríguez-Palmero, María; Rivero, Montserrat; Castellote, Cristina; Franch, Angels

    2008-12-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RV) are the most common causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in children diarrhea incidence from approximately 90% in RV group to approximately 60% in WPC-RV and WPC+LF-RV groups (P immune response against the pathogen.

  19. Molecular Epidemiological Traits of Group A Rotaviruses in Japanese Children During Transitional Period of Rotavirus Vaccine Implementation, 2011 - 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanashi, Sayaka; Thongprachum, Aksara; Okitsu, Shoko; Nishimura, Shuichi; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Kikuta, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Atsuko; Sugita, Kumiko; Baba, Tsuneyoshi; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2017-05-01

    Group A rotavirus (RVA) vaccines have been introduced in Japan since 2011. To investigate the molecular epidemiological traits of RVA during the transitional period of rotavirus vaccine implementation in Japan, this study was undertaken by following up three-decade long surveillance conducted in the same regions. RVA were screened and genotyped by RT-PCR from diarrheal samples collected from non-hospitalized patients in six localities (Hokkaido, Tokyo, Shizuoka, Osaka, Kyoto, and Saga) during 2011 - 2014. Selected samples were sequenced to elucidate the evolutionary trend. Among 1858 specimens, the detection rate of RVA declined to 4.0% in 2013 - 2014 from 17.9% in 2011 - 2012 and 22.1% in 2012 - 2013. G1P[8] was the most predominant genotype in the first two years accounting for more than half, and G9P[8] showed the highest detection rate as 35.0% in the last year. Interestingly, the proportional rate of G2 strains in the studied period increased from 0% to 25%. VP6 genotyping revealed that DS-1 like reassortant G1P[8] strains were detected all over Japan and their prevalence fluctuated greatly from 35.0% to 89.5%. Sequence analysis of VP6 showed that strains in the current strains were closely related but distinct from the original reference strains, namely Wa and DS-1. The detection rates of RVA, their GP combinations, prevalence of reassortant strains varied greatly after the introduction of rotavirus vaccines in Japan. Continuous monitoring is warranted to refine future vaccine strategy.

  20. Molecular characterization of rotavirus isolated from alpaca (Vicugna pacos) crias with diarrhea in the Andean Region of Cusco, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, Antonio E; Lopez, Wellington; Ortega, Nastassja; Chamorro, Marycris J

    2015-10-22

    Alpacas (Vicugna pacos), a species of South American camelids (SAC), suffer high morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases. Diarrhea is one of the leading causes of alpaca cria mortality in Peru and elsewhere. In order to develop appropriate control and/or treatment, it is necessary to identify infectious pathogens that cause diarrhea in crias. Rotavirus was isolated in cell culture from feces collected from crias with acute diarrhea that tested positive to rotaviral antigen by rapid immunochromatographic methods in an earlier study. The isolates were identified as rotaviruses by RT-PCR run with specific primers for human rotavirus VP7 coding sequences using total RNA extracted from cells displaying cytopathic effects as template. These alpaca isolates were further identified as group A rotaviruses by means of a VP6-specific PCR and were designated as ALRVA-K'ayra/Perú/3368-10 and ALRVA-K'ayra/Perú/3386-10. Molecular G and P typing, placed the former as G3/P11 and the latter as G3/P?. Sequence analysis of two genome segments (coding for VP4 and VP7) from the alpaca isolates revealed partial homologies to swine and human rotaviruses, respectively. These results demonstrate that rotaviruses are associated with a proportion of cases of diarrhea in crias, although prevalence and impact remain to be determined. The isolation of rotaviruses from alpaca crias with diarrhea will contribute positively to further understand the pathogen and its role in the diarrhea complex.

  1. ACUMULACIÓN DE LA PROTEÍNA DE CHOQUE TÉRMICO, HSC70, EN CÉLULAS MA104 DESPUÉS DE LA INFECCIÓN CON ROTAVIRUS Increase of heat shock cognate protein, HSC70, in MA104 cells following rotavirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Rocio Pulido Morera

    2007-12-01

    rotavirus particles during the infection of MA104 cells, but changes in the accumulation levels of this protein through the rotavirus infection cycle are unknown. Objetive. To determine if the accumulation levels of HSC70 in MA104 cells change during the infection by rotavirus. Materials and methods. Immunofluorescene microscopy, Western blotting an ELISA were used in order to determine HSC70 accumulation levels in MA104 cells after infection (0 up to 16 h p.i. by rotavirus strains Wa (human, Rf (bovine and RRV (simian. Additionally, a rabbit polyclonal serum against purified rotavirus particles was used for detecting rotavirus antigen in an immunoperoxidase assay. Results. The immunofluorescence staining of cells infected with each of three rotavirus strains showed a direct correlation between the increase of fluorescence in the cytoplasm and the increase of the viral antigen. The intensity of the cytoplasm fluorescence was 1.1 to 2.0 times higher in infected cells than that observed in control cells. On the other hand, the intensity of the fluorescence in the cell membrane was similar to that of the non-infected control cells. The Western blotting assay did not allow to establish measurable differences between infected and non-infected MA104 cells, because the increase of the protein are below the detection limit. According to the results of ELISA, HSC70 level increases 1 to 3 times in MA104 cells after (8 h p.i. the infection with strain RRV, whereas infection with strain RF produced an increase which ranged from 1.3 to 2.5 times after 10 h p.i. Infection by strain Wa was correlated with un increase of HSC70 level between 1.7 and 3.0 times after 2 h p.i. Conclusions. The results suggest that the increase of HSC70 accumulation level possibly corresponds to an increased expression of its gene during the rotavirus infection and probably it is involved in rotavirus multiplication steps additional to those of entry and exit processes.

  2. Video coding standards AVS China, H.264/MPEG-4 PART 10, HEVC, VP6, DIRAC and VC-1

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, K R; Hwang, Jae Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Review by Ashraf A. Kassim, Professor, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, and Associate Dean, School of Engineering, National University of Singapore.     The book consists of eight chapters of which the first two provide an overview of various video & image coding standards, and video formats. The next four chapters present in detail the Audio & video standard (AVS) of China, the H.264/MPEG-4 Advanced video coding (AVC) standard, High efficiency video coding (HEVC) standard and the VP6 video coding standard (now VP10) respectively. The performance of the wavelet based Dirac video codec is compared with H.264/MPEG-4 AVC in chapter 7. Finally in chapter 8, the VC-1 video coding standard is presented together with VC-2 which is based on the intra frame coding of Dirac and an outline of a H.264/AVC to VC-1 transcoder.   The authors also present and discuss relevant research literature such as those which document improved methods & techniques, and also point to other related reso...

  3. Engineered Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG expressing IgG-binding domains of protein G: Capture of hyperimmune bovine colostrum antibodies and protection against diarrhea in a mouse pup rotavirus infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günaydın, Gökçe; Zhang, Ran; Hammarström, Lennart; Marcotte, Harold

    2014-01-16

    Rotavirus-induced diarrhea causes more than 500,000 deaths annually in the world, and although vaccines are being made available, new effective treatment strategies should still be considered. Purified antibodies derived from hyperimmune bovine colostrum (HBC), from cows immunized with rotavirus, were previously used for treatment of rotavirus diarrhea in children. A combination of HBC antibodies and a probiotic strain of Lactobacillus (L. rhamnosus GG) was also found to be more effective than HBC alone in reducing diarrhea in a mouse model of rotavirus infection. In order to further improve this form of treatment, L. rhamnosus GG was engineered to display surface expressed IgG-binding domains of protein G (GB1, GB2, and GB3) which capture HBC-derived IgG antibodies (HBC-IgG) and thus target rotavirus. The expression of IgG-binding domains on the surface of the bacteria as well as their binding to HBC-IgG and to rotavirus (simian strain RRV) was demonstrated by Western blot, flow cytometry, and electron microscopy. The prophylactic effect of engineered L. rhamnosus GG and anti-rotaviral activity of HBC antibodies was evaluated in a mouse pup model of RRV infection. The combination therapy with engineered L. rhamnosus GG (PG3) and HBC was significantly more effective in reducing the prevalence, severity, and duration of diarrhea in comparison to HBC alone or a combination of wild-type L. rhamnosus GG and HBC. The new therapy reduces the effective dose of HBC between 10 to 100-fold and may thus decrease treatment costs. This antibody capturing platform, tested here for the first time in vivo, could potentially be used to target additional gastrointestinal pathogens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pathogenesis of Rotavirus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Boshuizen

    2005-01-01

    textabstractRotaviruses comprise a genus within the family of the Reoviridae and are recognized as the single most significant cause of severe gastroenteritis, malnutrition and diarrhea in young children. Each year rotavirus causes the death of about 440.000 children <5 years of age (313). The resea

  5. Pathogenesis of Rotavirus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Boshuizen

    2005-01-01

    textabstractRotaviruses comprise a genus within the family of the Reoviridae and are recognized as the single most significant cause of severe gastroenteritis, malnutrition and diarrhea in young children. Each year rotavirus causes the death of about 440.000 children <5 years of age (313). The

  6. Identification of human rotavirus serotype by hybridization to polymerase chain reaction-generated probes derived from a hyperdivergent region of the gene encoding outer capsid protein VP7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, J.; Sears, J.; Schael, I.P.; White, L.; Garcia, D.; Lanata, C.; Kapikian, A.Z. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-08-01

    We have synthesized {sup 32}P-labeled hybridization probes from a hyperdivergent region (nucleotides 51 to 392) of the rotavirus gene encoding the VP7 glycoprotein by using the polymerase chain reaction method. Both RNA (after an initial reverse transcription step) and cloned cDNA from human rotavirus serotypes 1 through 4 could be used as templates to amplify this region. High-stringency hybridization of each of the four probes to rotavirus RNAs dotted on nylon membranes allowed the specific detection of corresponding sequences and thus permitted identification of the serotype of the strains dotted. The procedure was useful when applied to rotaviruses isolated from field studies.

  7. Rotavirus Antagonism of the Innate Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M. Arnold

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is a primary cause of severe dehydrating gastroenteritis in infants and young children. The virus is sensitive to the antiviral effects triggered by the interferon (IFN-signaling pathway, an important component of the host cell innate immune response. To counteract these effects, rotavirus encodes a nonstructural protein (NSP1 that induces the degradation of proteins involved in regulating IFN expression, such as members of the IFN regulatory factor (IRF family. In some instances, NSP1 also subverts IFN expression by causing the degradation of a component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex responsible for activating NF-κB. By antagonizing multiple components of the IFN-induction pathway, NSP1 aids viral spread and contributes to rotavirus pathogenesis.

  8. Evidence of multiple reassortment events of feline-to-human rotaviruses based on a rare human G3P[9] rotavirus isolated from a patient with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tinh Huu; Than, Van Thai; Thanh, Hien Dang; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-06-01

    A rare human/feline-like rotavirus G3P[9] strain, CAU14-1-262, from a 2-year-old girl with severe gastroenteritis was isolated and sequenced. The 11 gene segments of the CAU14-1-262 strain possessed a novel genotype constellation, G3-P[9]-I3-R3-C3-M3-A3-N3-T1-E3-H6, which was identified for the first time. Phylogenetic analysis of this strain identified the following genome origins: VP7, VP4, VP6, VP1-VP3, NSP1, NSP2, and NSP4 genes possessed an AU-1-like genotype 3 constellation with high sequence identity to those of the feline and human/feline-like rotaviruses; NSP5 possessed a H6 lineage, with highest sequence identity to the human/feline-like E2541 strain; and the NSP3 gene possessed a Wa-like genotype 1 constellation with high sequence identity to those of the of human rotaviruses. These results provided evidence of multiple reassortment events in G3P[9] rotavirus CAU14-1-262 and possibility of feline-to-human interspecies transmission.

  9. Current status of rotavirus vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Min Wang; Shou-Chien Chen; Kow-Tong Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rotaviruses remain the major cause of childhood diarrheal disease worldwide and of diarrheal deaths of infants and children in developing countries. The huge burden of childhood rotavirus-related diarrhea in the world continues to drive the remarkable pace of vaccine development. Data sources: Research articles were searched using terms "rotavirus" and "rotavirus vaccine" in MEDLINE and PubMed. Articles not published in the English language, articles without abstracts, and opinion articles were excluded from the review. After preliminary screening, all articles were reviewed and synthesized to provide an overview of current vaccines and vaccination programs. Results: In this review of the global rotavirus vaccines and vaccination programs, the principles of rotavirus vaccine development and the efficacy of the currently licensed vaccines from both developed and developing countries were summarized. Conclusions: Rotavirus is a common cause of diarrhea in children in both developed and developing countries. Rotavirus vaccination is a cost-effective measure to prevent rotavirus diarrhea.

  10. P[8] and P[4] Rotavirus Infection Associated with Secretor Phenotypes Among Children in South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu-Fu; Long, Yan; Tan, Ming; Zhang, Ting; Huang, Qiong; Jiang, Xi; Tan, Wen-Fang; Li, Jian-Dong; Hu, Gui-Fang; Tang, Shixing; Dai, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Rotaviruses are known to recognize human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as a host ligand that is believed to play an important role in rotavirus host susceptibility and host range. In this study, paired fecal and saliva samples collected from children with viral gastroenteritis, as well as paired serum and saliva samples collected from the general population in south China were studied to evaluate potential association between rotavirus infections and human HBGA phenotypes. Rotavirus was detected in 75 (28%) of 266 fecal samples and P[8] rotaviruses were found to be the predominant genotype. The HBGA phenotypes of the rotavirus-infected children were determined through their saliva samples. Secretor statuses were found to correlate with the risk of rotavirus infection and all P[8]/P[4] rotavirus infected children were secretors. Accordingly, recombinant VP8* proteins of the P[8]/P[4] rotaviruses bound saliva samples from secretor individuals. Furthermore, correlation between serum P[8]/P[4]-specific IgG and host Lewis and secretor phenotypes has been found among 206 studied serum samples. Our study supported the association between rotavirus infection and the host HBGA phenotypes, which would help further understanding of rotavirus host range and epidemiology. PMID:27708367

  11. One Family's Struggles with Rotavirus

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... GETVAXED print ads go to GETVAXED.ORG cme Immunizations Rotavirus One family's struggles with rotavirus We provide ... not possible without a visit to your doctor. Immunizations stop disease from spreading. Check with your family ...

  12. Analysis of complete genome sequences of G9P[19] rotavirus strains from human and piglet with diarrhea provides evidence for whole-genome interspecies transmission of nonreassorted porcine rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yodmeeklin, Arpaporn; Khamrin, Pattara; Chuchaona, Watchaporn; Kumthip, Kattareeya; Kongkaew, Aphisek; Vachirachewin, Ratchaya; Okitsu, Shoko; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2017-01-01

    Whole genomes of G9P[19] human (RVA/Human-wt/THA/CMH-S070-13/2013/G9P[19]) and porcine (RVA/Pig-wt/THA/CMP-015-12/2012/G9P[19]) rotaviruses concurrently detected in the same geographical area in northern Thailand were sequenced and analyzed for their genetic relationships using bioinformatic tools. The complete genome sequence of human rotavirus RVA/Human-wt/THA/CMH-S070-13/2013/G9P[19] was most closely related to those of porcine rotavirus RVA/Pig-wt/THA/CMP-015-12/2012/G9P[19] and to those of porcine-like human and porcine rotaviruses reference strains than to those of human rotavirus reference strains. The genotype constellation of G9P[19] detected in human and piglet were identical and displayed as the G9-P[19]-I5-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T1-E1-H1 genotypes with the nucleotide sequence identities of VP7, VP4, VP6, VP1, VP2, VP3, NSP1, NSP2, NSP3, NSP4, and NSP5 at 99.0%, 99.5%, 93.2%, 97.7%, 97.7%, 85.6%, 89.5%, 93.2%, 92.9%, 94.0%, and 98.1%, respectively. The findings indicate that human rotavirus strain RVA/Human-wt/THA/CMH-S070-13/2013/G9P[19] containing the genome segments of porcine genetic backbone is most likely a human rotavirus of porcine origin. Our data provide an evidence of interspecies transmission and whole-genome transmission of nonreassorted G9P[19] porcine RVA to human occurring in nature in northern Thailand. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Introduktion. Om rotavirus. Teknologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    vil skyldes rotavirus. Typisk vil børnene få feber, opkastninger og/eller diarré. Sygdommen går sædvanligvis over af sig selv i løbet af 3 til 7 dage. Nogle børn får dog væske- og saltmangel i en sådan grad, at de må indlægges på hospital til behandling med drop og væske direkte ind i årerne. 85 – 90...... % af danske børn følger det danske børnevaccinationsprogram og bliver vaccineret mod en række infektioner. Der findes i Danmark to velafprøvede og godkendte vacciner mod rotavirus. Begge vacciner gives gennem munden og ikke gennem indsprøjtning i huden, som de øvrige vacciner i det danske...... børnevaccinationsprogram. Verdenssundhedsorganisation (WHO=World Health Organisation) samt nationale og europæiske faglige selskaber har anbefalet at vaccinere mod rotavirus. I en række europæiske lande er vaccination mod rotavirus indført i det nationale børnevaccinationsprogram. Andre europæiske lande har fravalgt...

  14. Introduktion. Om rotavirus. Teknologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    vil skyldes rotavirus. Typisk vil børnene få feber, opkastninger og/eller diarré. Sygdommen går sædvanligvis over af sig selv i løbet af 3 til 7 dage. Nogle børn får dog væske- og saltmangel i en sådan grad, at de må indlægges på hospital til behandling med drop og væske direkte ind i årerne. 85 – 90...... % af danske børn følger det danske børnevaccinationsprogram og bliver vaccineret mod en række infektioner. Der findes i Danmark to velafprøvede og godkendte vacciner mod rotavirus. Begge vacciner gives gennem munden og ikke gennem indsprøjtning i huden, som de øvrige vacciner i det danske...... børnevaccinationsprogram. Verdenssundhedsorganisation (WHO=World Health Organisation) samt nationale og europæiske faglige selskaber har anbefalet at vaccinere mod rotavirus. I en række europæiske lande er vaccination mod rotavirus indført i det nationale børnevaccinationsprogram. Andre europæiske lande har fravalgt...

  15. Genotypic linkages of gene segments of rotaviruses circulating in pediatric patients with acute gastroenteritis in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaimongkol, Natthawan; Khamrin, Pattara; Malasao, Rungnapa; Thongprachum, Aksara; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2012-10-01

    Rotavirus is a major cause of morbidity and mortality of infants and young children with diarrhea throughout the world. In Thailand, extensive studies of rotavirus infections have been reported continually and rotavirus diarrhea remains a common illness. To monitor the epidemiological situation of rotavirus in Chiang Mai, Thailand, surveillance of rotavirus circulating in pediatric patients was conducted. A total of 160 fecal specimens collected from children hospitalized with diarrhea were tested for rotaviruses groups A, B, and C by RT-PCR and their genotypes were identified by multiplex PCR and nucleotide sequencing. Group A rotavirus was detected at 29.4% but none of group B and C was found in this study. Molecular characterizations of G- and P-genotypes revealed three different G-P combinations, G1P[8] was the most predominant genotype with the prevalence of 72.3% followed by G2P[4] at 19.2%, and G3P[8] at 8.5%. Phylogenetic analyses of VP7 and VP4 genes of the representative strains detected in the present study, G1, G2, G3, and P[4] and P[8], respectively, revealed that G1 belonged to G1-Ic and G1-II, G2 belonged to G2-II, and G3 belonged to G3-III-S4 lineages while P[4] and P[8] were identified as P[4]-V and P[8]-III lineages. Analyses of VP6, NSP4, and NSP5 genes demonstrated that these representative strains belonged to genotypes I1 and I2, E1 and E2, and H1 and H2, respectively. Analyzing the association of G- and P-genotypes with I, E, H genotypes revealed unique patterns of genotypic linkage. The G1P[8] and G3P[8] were intimately linked with I1, E1, H1 genotypes and displayed the genetic features of G1-P[8]-I1-E1-H1 and G3-P[8]-I1-E1-H1, respectively, while G2P[4] was closely linked to I2, E2, H2 genotypes and showed the genetic pattern of G2-P[4]-I2-E2-H2. This study provides epidemiological information and insight into the genetic background of rotaviruses circulating in pediatric patients in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

  16. Development of a Rotavirus-Shedding Model in Rhesus Macaques, Using a Homologous Wild-Type Rotavirus of a New P Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Monica M.; Sestak, Karol; Choi, Anthony H.-C.; Basu, Mitali; Cole, Michael J.; Aye, Pyone P.; Bohm, Rudolf P.; Ward, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Although there are several reports on rotavirus inoculation of nonhuman primates, no reliable model exists. Therefore, this study was designed to develop a rhesus macaque model for rotavirus studies. The goals were to obtain a wild-type macaque rotavirus and evaluate it as a challenge virus for model studies. Once rotavirus was shown to be endemic within the macaque colony at the Tulane National Primate Research Center, stool specimens were collected from juvenile animals (2.6 to 5.9 months of age) without evidence of previous rotavirus infection and examined for rotavirus antigen. Six of 10 animals shed rotavirus during the 10-week collection period, and the electropherotypes of all isolates were identical to each other but distinct from those of prototype simian rotaviruses. These viruses were characterized as serotype G3 and subgroup 1, properties typical of many animal rotaviruses, including simian strains. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the VP4 gene was performed with a culture-grown isolate from the stool of one animal, designated the TUCH strain. Based on both genotypic and phylogenetic comparisons between TUCH VP4 and cognate proteins of representatives of the reported 22 P genotypes, the TUCH virus belongs to a new genotype, P[23]. A pool of wild-type TUCH was prepared and intragastrically administered to eight cesarean section-derived, specific-pathogen-free macaques 14 to 42 days of age. All animals were kept in a biocontainment level 2 facility. Although no diarrhea was observed and the animals remained clinically normal, all animals shed large quantities of rotavirus antigen in their feces after inoculation, which resolved by the end of the 14-day observation period. Therefore, TUCH infection of macaques provides a useful nonhuman primate model for studies on rotavirus protection. PMID:15613323

  17. Burden of Norovirus and Rotavirus in Children After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction, Cochabamba, Bolivia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McAtee, Casey L; Webman, Rachel; Gilman, Robert H; Mejia, Carolina; Bern, Caryn; Apaza, Sonia; Espetia, Susan; Pajuelo, Mónica; Saito, Mayuko; Challappa, Roxanna; Soria, Richard; Ribera, Jose P; Lozano, Daniel; Torrico, Faustino

    2016-01-01

    .... Norovirus and rotavirus are the two major viral enteropathogens of childhood. This study describes the prevalence of norovirus and rotavirus 2 years after widespread rotavirus vaccination in Cochabamba, Bolivia...

  18. Expression and Immunoreactivity of a Human Group A Rotavirus Vp4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Rotavirus capsid protein Vp4 plays an important role in the virus adhering and entering the cells. In this study, a Vp4 gene cloned from a rotavirus strain TB-Chen was highly expressed in E.coli BL21 (DE3). The results of the Western blot showed that the protein possesses specific immuno-reactivities and can be specifically recognized by guinea pig antibodies against rotavirus strain SA11 or Wa. Some Vp4 dimers were formed during renaturation. These data obtained from this study provide a strong basis for further study on the structure and function of the Vp4.

  19. Progresses of the pathogenesis of rotavirus infection%轮状病毒感染机制新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑灵玲

    2015-01-01

    轮状病毒(rotavirus,RV)是世界范围内引起婴幼儿重症腹泻的最主要病原,而对于RV腹泻至今尚无特效治疗药物.目前对于RV感染的致病机制有多种说法,但尚无确切结论.在RV感染过程中,RV病原体必须克服宿主抗病毒先天免疫反应才能在宿主细胞中成功复制,而在此过程中RV编码的蛋白起到了重要作用.该文对RV编码蛋白在RV感染机制中的作用的研究进展加以综述.%Rotavirus is the most important pathogen causing severe diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide,and for rotavirus diarrhea there is no specific treatment so far.At present,there are a variety of claims on the pathogenesis of rotavirus infection,but none is conclusive.In the process of infection,rotavirus pathogens must overcome antiviral innate immune response that can replicate in host cell.Rotavirus encoded proteins play an important role in the process of rotavirus infection.This paperreviews the role of rotavirus encoding proteins in the pathogenesis of rotavirus infection.

  20. Diversity of group A rotavirus genes detected in the Triângulo Mineiro region, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulgheroff, Ana Carolina Bernardes; Silva, George Allan Villarouco da; Naveca, Felipe Gomes; Oliveira, Adriana Gonçalves de; Domingues, André Luiz da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses are the main causative agent of infantile gastroenteritis. The segmented nature of the viral genome allows reassortment of genome segments, which can generate genetic variants. In this study, we characterized the diversity of the VP7, VP4 (VP8*), VP6, NSP4, and NSP5 genes of the rotaviruses that circulated from 2005 to 2011 in the Triângulo Mineiro (TM) region of Brazil. Samples with genotypes G2 (sublineages IVa-1 and IVa-3), G1 (sublineage I-A), G9 (lineage III), G12 (lineages II and III), G8 (lineage II), G3 (lineage III), P[4] (sublineages IVa and IVb), P[8] (sublineages P[8]-3.6, P[8]-3.3, and P[8]-3.1), I2 (lineage VII), E2 (lineages VI, XII, and X), and H2 (lineage III) were identified. The associations found in the samples were G1, G9, or G12 with P[8]-I1-E1-H1; G2 or G8 with P[4]-I2-E2-H2; G12 with I3-E3-H6; and G3 with P[4]-I2-E3-H3 (previously unreported combination). Reassortment events in G2P[4] strains and an apparent pattern of temporal segregation within the lineages were observed. Five TM samples contained genes that exhibited high nucleotide and amino acid identities with strains of animal origin. The present study includes a period of pre- and post-introduction of rotavirus vaccination in all Brazilian territories, thereby serving as a basis for monitoring changes in the genetic constitution of rotaviruses. The results also contribute to the understanding of the diversity and evolution of rotaviruses in a global context.

  1. Diversity of group A rotavirus genes detected in the Triângulo Mineiro region, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Bernardes Dulgheroff

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Group A rotaviruses are the main causative agent of infantile gastroenteritis. The segmented nature of the viral genome allows reassortment of genome segments, which can generate genetic variants. In this study, we characterized the diversity of the VP7, VP4 (VP8*, VP6, NSP4, and NSP5 genes of the rotaviruses that circulated from 2005 to 2011 in the Triângulo Mineiro (TM region of Brazil. Samples with genotypes G2 (sublineages IVa-1 and IVa-3, G1 (sublineage I-A, G9 (lineage III, G12 (lineages II and III, G8 (lineage II, G3 (lineage III, P[4] (sublineages IVa and IVb, P[8] (sublineages P[8]-3.6, P[8]-3.3, and P[8]-3.1, I2 (lineage VII, E2 (lineages VI, XII, and X, and H2 (lineage III were identified. The associations found in the samples were G1, G9, or G12 with P[8]-I1-E1-H1; G2 or G8 with P[4]-I2-E2-H2; G12 with I3-E3-H6; and G3 with P[4]-I2-E3-H3 (previously unreported combination. Reassortment events in G2P[4] strains and an apparent pattern of temporal segregation within the lineages were observed. Five TM samples contained genes that exhibited high nucleotide and amino acid identities with strains of animal origin. The present study includes a period of pre- and post-introduction of rotavirus vaccination in all Brazilian territories, thereby serving as a basis for monitoring changes in the genetic constitution of rotaviruses. The results also contribute to the understanding of the diversity and evolution of rotaviruses in a global context.

  2. One Family's Struggles with Rotavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the herd dr. offit's testimony not vaccinating the abcs of mmr & dtp thimerosal vaccine safety q & a videos chickenpox (varicella) hepatitis b hib hpv pertussis (whooping cough) pneumococcal rotavirus ...

  3. One Family's Struggles with Rotavirus

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the herd dr. offit's testimony not vaccinating the abcs of mmr & dtp thimerosal vaccine safety q & a videos chickenpox (varicella) hepatitis b hib hpv pertussis (whooping cough) pneumococcal rotavirus ...

  4. One Family's Struggles with Rotavirus

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... not vaccinating the abcs of mmr & dtp thimerosal vaccine safety q & a videos chickenpox (varicella) hepatitis b hib hpv pertussis (whooping cough) pneumococcal rotavirus shingles media room ...

  5. Rotavirus-Like Particles: A Novel Nanocarrier for the Gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naima G. Cortes-Perez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The delivery of bioactive molecules directly to damaged tissues represents a technological challenge. We propose here a new system based on virus-like particles (VLP from rotavirus, with a marked tropism for the gut to deliver bio-active molecules to intestinal cells. For this, nonreplicative VLP nanoparticles were constructed using a baculovirus expression system and used to deliver an exogenous biomolecule, the green fluorescent protein (GFP, into either MA104 cells or intestinal cells from healthy and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS-treated mice. Our results show that expression of rotavirus capsid proteins in baculovirus led to the auto assembly of VLP that display similar properties to rotavirus. In vitro experiments showed that VLP were able to enter into MA104 cells and deliver the reporter protein. Intragastric administration of fluorescent VLP in healthy and TNBS-treated mice resulted in the detection of GFP and viral proteins in intestinal samples. Our results demonstrate an efficient entry of non-replicative rotavirus VLP into the epithelial cell line MA104 and provide the first in vivo evidence of the potential of these nanoparticles as a promising safe candidate for drug delivery to intestinal cells.

  6. Rotavirus Infections - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Rotavirus Infections URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Rotavirus Infections - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features ...

  7. Rapid detection of infectious rotavirus group A using a molecular beacon assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertol, Jéssica Wildgrube; Gatti, Maria Silvia Viccari

    2016-08-01

    Rapid, sensitive and specific methods are necessary to detect and quantify infectious viruses. Cultivating and detecting enteric viruses in cell culture are difficult, thus impairing the advancement of knowledge regarding virus-induced diarrhea. Rotavirus (RV) detection has been conducted by serological or molecular biology methods, which do not provide information regarding viral infectivity. Molecular beacons (MBs) have demonstrated efficacy for viral detection in cell culture. We propose a MB assay to detect human rotavirus group A (HuRVA) in cell culture. MA104 cells were mock-infected or infected with HuRVA strains (RotaTeq(®) vaccine and K8 strains), and a specific MB for the HuRVA VP6 gene was used for virus detection. Mock-infected cells showed basal fluorescence, while infected cells exhibited increased fluorescence emission. MB hybridization to the viral mRNA target of HuRVA was confirmed. Fluorescence increased according to the increase in the number of infectious viral particles per cell (MOI 0.5-MOI 1). This technique provides quick and efficient HuRVA detection in cell culture without a need for viral culture for several days or many times until cytopathic effects are visualized. This methodology could be applied in the selection of samples for developing RV vaccines.

  8. Monitoring impact and effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D

    2011-08-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in children IVANHOE study was initiated to determine the real-world impact and effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine following introduction in a limited geographic area. This study found a twofold reduction in rotavirus hospitalizations among children <2 years of age who were age-eligible to receive rotavirus vaccine and a 98% vaccine effectiveness, highlighting the health benefits of a vaccination program.

  9. The cultural properties in MA-104 cell and establishment of FQ-PCR diagnostic method for porcine rotavirus%猪轮状病毒的细胞培养特性与FQ-PCR检测方法的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏锁成; 巩转娣; 宋昌军

    2011-01-01

    To explore isolation conditions and culture properties of rotavirus and establish Real time fluorescence quantitative PCR(FQ-PCR) diagnostic method for porcine rotatirus(PRV).MA-104 cells were cultured in the three mediums to decide the optimum one.The positive fecal samples detected by ELISA in diarrhea piglets were cultured in group C medium 5% CO2 at 37℃.MA-104 cells were inoculated with rotavirus,the rotavirus was isolated and purified, VP6 gene nucleotides of the separated rotavirus strains were sequenced, the homology of VP6 gene was blasted with the standard porcine rotavirus (PRV) strain(AV-55).Real time FQ-PCR diagnostic method for porcine rotatirus has been established.The MA-104 cells pasted wall and grew quickly with low costs when cultured in group C culture medium.the optium culture conditions of rotavirus was 5 % CO2 at 37℃.Cells appeared some clear cytopathic effects (CPE) after 18 h of inoculation,such as cell shrinking and integrating,cell layer splitting, vacuolization and nuclear karyopyknosis ect.The rotaviruss were received when CPE reached 90 %.One rotavirus strains(GSPRV01 strain) was isolated and identified as PRV through VP6 nucleotide sequencing.Its homology was up to 88.50% with PRV reference strains (AV-55).PRV grows well in MA104 at 37℃ and 5%CO2.The homology of GSPRV01 strain is 88.50% with reference strain.FQ-PCR detection methods has been established.%为了探讨动物轮状病毒的细胞培养特性和分离方法,建立FQ-PCR检测方法,旨在为研发诊断试剂盒和疫苗莫定基础.37℃5%CO2下用细胞培养液C培养ELISA检测的阳性猪粪便样本,观察细胞形态的变化;用RV感染MA-104细胞,分离纯化病毒,测定VP6基因序列并分析其同源性,在普通PCR和实时定量PCR的基础上,建立FQ-PCR检测方法.结果,MA-104细胞培养的最佳条件为37℃5%CO2 ;接毒后18 h出现细胞膜缩融合、细胞层裂开、细胞核固缩及空泡化等

  10. Rotavirus vaccination: a concise review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesikari, T

    2012-10-01

    Live attenuated oral rotavirus vaccines were tested for proof-of-concept in the early 1980s, the first vaccine (RotaShield, Wyeth) was introduced in 1998 but was subsequently withdrawn because of association with intussusception, and the two currently licensed vaccine (Rotarix, GlaxoSmithKline, and RotaTeq, Merck) were introduced in 2006. Before licensure both vaccines were extensively tested for safety (for intussusception) and efficacy in trials comprising in over 60,000 infants each. Rotarix is a single-strain human rotavirus vaccine (RV1) and RotaTeq is a combination of five bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses (RV5). Although the composition of the two vaccines is different, their field effectiveness and, largely, mechanism of action are similar. Both prevent effectively severe rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) but are less efficacious against mild RVGE or rotavirus infection. Field effectiveness of these vaccines in Europe and the USA against severe RVGE has been above 90% and in Latin America around 80%. Trials in Africa have yielded efficacy rates between 50 and 80%. Rotavirus vaccination has been introduced into the national immunization programmes of about 20 countries in Latin America, with Brazil and Mexico as leading countries, as well as in the USA, Australia and South Africa. Introduction into other African countries will start in 2012. In Europe, Belgium, Luxembourg, Austria and Finland and five federal states of Germany have introduced universal rotavirus vaccination. The reasons for the slow progress in Europe include low mortality from RVGE, unfavourable cost-benefit calculations in some countries, and concerns that still exist over intussusception.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of human group C rotavirus in hospitalized children with gastroenteritis in Belém, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Patrícia dos Santos; Guerra, Sylvia de Fátima dos Santos; Siqueira, Jones Anderson Monteiro; Soares, Luana da Silva; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol; Linhares, Alexandre C; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira

    2016-04-01

    Group C rotavirus (RVC) is potentially an important pathogen associated with acute gastroenteritis (AG), especially in outbreaks. This study aims to detect and molecularly characterize RVC in hospitalized children with AG in Belém, Brazil. From May 2008 to April 2011, 279 stools were subjected to reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction targeting VP7, VP6, VP4, and NSP4 genes. RVC positivity rate was 2.1% (6/279) and phylogenetic analysis of positive samples yields genotype G4-P[2]-I2-E2. No evidence of zoonotic transmission and VP7 gene demonstrated close relationship with Asian strains. RVC surveillance is worth to expand information on evolutionary and epidemiological features of this virus.

  12. Candidate new rotavirus species in sheltered dogs, Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov-Kovács, Eszter; Gellért, Ákos; Marton, Szilvia; Farkas, Szilvia L; Fehér, Enikő; Oldal, Miklós; Jakab, Ferenc; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián

    2015-04-01

    We identified unusual rotavirus strains in fecal specimens from sheltered dogs in Hungary by viral metagenomics. The novel rotavirus species displayed limited genome sequence homology to representatives of the 8 rotavirus species, A-H, and qualifies as a candidate new rotavirus species that we tentatively named Rotavirus I.

  13. Structural correlates of rotavirus cell entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliaa H Abdelhakim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell entry by non-enveloped viruses requires translocation into the cytosol of a macromolecular complex--for double-strand RNA viruses, a complete subviral particle. We have used live-cell fluorescence imaging to follow rotavirus entry and penetration into the cytosol of its ∼ 700 Å inner capsid particle ("double-layered particle", DLP. We label with distinct fluorescent tags the DLP and each of the two outer-layer proteins and track the fates of each species as the particles bind and enter BSC-1 cells. Virions attach to their glycolipid receptors in the host cell membrane and rapidly become inaccessible to externally added agents; most particles that release their DLP into the cytosol have done so by ∼ 10 minutes, as detected by rapid diffusional motion of the DLP away from residual outer-layer proteins. Electron microscopy shows images of particles at various stages of engulfment into tightly fitting membrane invaginations, consistent with the interpretation that rotavirus particles drive their own uptake. Electron cryotomography of membrane-bound virions also shows closely wrapped membrane. Combined with high resolution structural information about the viral components, these observations suggest a molecular model for membrane disruption and DLP penetration.

  14. One Family's Struggles with Rotavirus

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... thimerosal vaccine safety q & a videos chickenpox (varicella) hepatitis b hib hpv pertussis (whooping cough) pneumococcal rotavirus shingles media room Flu's Gonna Lose M.O.V.E. newsfeeds PSAs publications infectious disease workshop pediatric hepatitis report someone you know has hbv/hcv standard ...

  15. One Family's Struggles with Rotavirus

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... thimerosal vaccine safety q & a videos chickenpox (varicella) hepatitis b hib hpv pertussis (whooping cough) pneumococcal rotavirus shingles media room Flu's Gonna Lose M.O.V.E. newsfeeds PSAs publications infectious disease workshop pediatric hepatitis report someone you know has hbv/hcv standard ...

  16. Severe Rotavirus gastroenteritis in a patient with infant leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Uygun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children. Reports about the clinical relevance of rotavirus in immunocompromised children are rare. We herein presented a case of life-threatening Rotavirus gastroenteritis in an infant with acute myeloblastic leukemia which could be prevented by recently recommended Rotavirus vaccination.

  17. Comparative study on the mechanisms of rotavirus inactivation by sodium dodecyl sulfate and ethylenediaminetetraacetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, R.L. (Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, C.S.

    1980-06-01

    This report describes a comparative study on the effects of the anionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate and the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate on purified rotavirus SA-11 particles. Both chemicals readily inactivated rotavirus at quite low concentrations and under very mild conditions. In addition, both agents modified the viral capsid and prevented the adsorption of inactivated virions to cells. Capsid damage by ethylenediaminetetraacetate caused a shift in the densities of rotavirions from about l.35 to about 1.37 g/ml and a reduction in their sedimentation coefficients. Sodium dodcyl sulfate, on the other hand, did not detectably alter either of these physical properties of rotavirions. Both agents caused some alteration of the isoelectric points of the virions. Finally, analysis of rotavirus proteins showed that ethylenediaminetetraacetate caused the loss of two protein peaks from the electrophoretic pattern of virions but sodium dodecyl sulfate caused the loss of only one of these same protein peaks.

  18. Zoonotic Transmission of Rotavirus in Denmark; a Case Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, Sofie; Gram, N.; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane;

    Rotavirus type A infection is a common cause of hospitalisation of children. However, in our laboratory almost 30% of rotavirus positive samples are from adults. Due to this an epidemiological study into the riskfactors for rotavirus infection in adults was set up. All identified rotavirus positive...... adults are sent a questionnaire to identify potential risk factors. Rotavirus type A infection can also occur in a range of animals, including domestic dogs, cats, cattle, horses, and birds. There is some data suggesting direct transmission between animals and humans. Rotavirus typing is carried out...... in Denmark as part of the EuroRotaNet vaccine study. Samples positive for rotavirus are type...

  19. Establishment of indirect immunofluorescence assay for rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, J; Zhang, J; Liu, X; Jin, H; Jiang, C; Yin, Y

    2016-03-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most frequent cause of infantile gastroenteritis worldwide and a significant cause of death in infants and young children, following severe diarrhea and dehydration. Rotavirus vaccines are considered the most effective way to prevent rotavirus infections. In the process of developing rotavirus vaccines, it is crucial to establish a reliable and standardized method to determine vaccine titer. In this study, we developed an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) to determine the infectious titer of Lanzhou lamb rotavirus (LLR) vaccine grown in MA104 cells. The activating concentration of trypsin was 1 µg/ml for healthy monolayers of MA104 cells at 100% confluence. After incubation for 18 hr, a rabbit anti-SA11 polyclonal antibody, diluted at 1:800 in PBS, was added to all wells, followed by an Alexa-488-conjugated secondary antibody diluted at 1:500 in PBS. Cells were examined with a fluorescence microscope. Our results show that IFA was more reproducible, more sensitive, simpler, and more rapid than the log 50% cell culture infectious dose-ELISA (lgCCID50-ELISA) in measuring the rotavirus vaccines. IFA provided a reliable basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of rotavirus, and the certification of rotavirus vaccine production.

  20. Amino Acid sequence analysis of the two major outer Capsid Proteins (VP7 and VP4 from human-derived canine G3P[3] Rotavirus Strain Detected in Brazil

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    Adriana Luchs

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A close look at the rotavirus group A (RVA genotypes in Brazil revealed the detection of a rare G3P[3] strain close related to canine strains. The aim of this study was to add to the already known genetic analysis by the description of the G3P[3] (IAL-R2638 strain amino acid characteristics. Methods: Amino acid sequence analysis and protein based trees were conducted using BioEdit and MEGA 4.0. Results: The VP7 and VP4 protein of the IAL-R2638 strain displayed the highest amino acid identity to the canine-derived human strain HCR3A (99.2%, and to the canine strain RV52/96 (96.4%, respectively. IAL-R2638 strain did not possess an extra VP7 N-linked glycosylation site at amino acid 238 recently described for some G3 strains, as well as RotaTeqTM G3 vaccine strain. The topology exhibited by phylogenetic trees in previous analysis were maintained in the present amino acid-based trees, reinforcing a stable relationship between G3P[3] strains. Conclusions: Amino acid analysis data were consistent with the previous sequence of data obtained for the IAL-R2638 strain, supporting its possible canine origin. Theoretically, RotaTeqTM vaccine could efficiently protect against G3P[3] infections based on the lack of the extra VP7 N-linked glycosylation site at amino acid 238. Phylogenetic analysis hypothesizes that all features undergo evolution independently of each other; however, unfavorable effects of nucleotide substitutions may be compensated by substitutions in other positions. The present study raises the question as to whether the amino acid-based trees could be applied as an approach to the study of RVA evolution, avoiding incorrect phylogenetic reconstructions.

  1. Burden of Norovirus and Rotavirus in Children after Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction, Cochabamba, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAtee, Casey L.; Webman, Rachel; Gilman, Robert H.; Mejia, Carolina; Bern, Caryn; Apaza, Sonia; Espetia, Susan; Pajuelo, Mónica; Saito, Mayuko; Challappa, Roxanna; Soria, Richard; Ribera, Jose P.; Lozano, Daniel; Torrico, Faustino

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in the field may set the stage for a changing landscape of diarrheal illness affecting children worldwide. Norovirus and rotavirus are the two major viral enteropathogens of childhood. This study describes the prevalence of norovirus and rotavirus 2 years after widespread rotavirus vaccination in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Stool samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and outpatients aged 5–24 months without AGE were recruited from an urban hospital serving Bolivia's third largest city. Both viruses were genotyped, and norovirus GII.4 was further sequenced. Norovirus was found much more frequently than rotavirus. Norovirus was detected in 69/201 (34.3%) of specimens from children with AGE and 13/71 (18.3%) of those without diarrhea. Rotavirus was detected in 38/201 (18.9%) of diarrheal specimens and 3/71 (4.2%) of non-diarrheal specimens. Norovirus GII was identified in 97.8% of norovirus-positive samples; GII.4 was the most common genotype (71.4% of typed specimens). Rotavirus G3P[8] was the most prevalent rotavirus genotype (44.0% of typed specimens) and G2P[4] was second most prevalent (16.0% of typed specimens). This community is likely part of a trend toward norovirus predominance over rotavirus in children after widespread vaccination against rotavirus. PMID:26598569

  2. Burden of Norovirus and Rotavirus in Children After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction, Cochabamba, Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAtee, Casey L; Webman, Rachel; Gilman, Robert H; Mejia, Carolina; Bern, Caryn; Apaza, Sonia; Espetia, Susan; Pajuelo, Mónica; Saito, Mayuko; Challappa, Roxanna; Soria, Richard; Ribera, Jose P; Lozano, Daniel; Torrico, Faustino

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in the field may set the stage for a changing landscape of diarrheal illness affecting children worldwide. Norovirus and rotavirus are the two major viral enteropathogens of childhood. This study describes the prevalence of norovirus and rotavirus 2 years after widespread rotavirus vaccination in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Stool samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and outpatients aged 5-24 months without AGE were recruited from an urban hospital serving Bolivia's third largest city. Both viruses were genotyped, and norovirus GII.4 was further sequenced. Norovirus was found much more frequently than rotavirus. Norovirus was detected in 69/201 (34.3%) of specimens from children with AGE and 13/71 (18.3%) of those without diarrhea. Rotavirus was detected in 38/201 (18.9%) of diarrheal specimens and 3/71 (4.2%) of non-diarrheal specimens. Norovirus GII was identified in 97.8% of norovirus-positive samples; GII.4 was the most common genotype (71.4% of typed specimens). Rotavirus G3P[8] was the most prevalent rotavirus genotype (44.0% of typed specimens) and G2P[4] was second most prevalent (16.0% of typed specimens). This community is likely part of a trend toward norovirus predominance over rotavirus in children after widespread vaccination against rotavirus.

  3. Innate immune responses to rotavirus infection in macrophages depend on MAVS but involve neither the NLRP3 inflammasome nor JNK and p38 signaling pathways.

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    Di Fiore, Izabel J M; Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S

    2015-10-02

    Rotavirus infection is a major cause of life-threatening infantile gastroenteritis. The innate immune system provides an immediate mechanism of suppressing viral replication and is necessary for an effective adaptive immune response. Innate immunity involves host recognition of viral infection and establishment of a powerful antiviral state through the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as type-1 interferon (IFN). Macrophages, the front-line cells of innate immunity, produce IFN and other cytokines in response to viral infection. However, the role of macrophages during rotavirus infection is not well defined. We demonstrate here that RRV rotavirus triggers the production of proinflammatory cytokines from mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. IFN and antiviral cytokine production was abolished in rotavirus-infected MAVS (-/-) macrophages. This indicates that rotavirus triggers innate immunity in macrophages through RIG-I and/or MDA5 viral recognition, and MAVS signaling is essential for cytokine responses in macrophages. Rotavirus induced IFN expression in both wild type and MDA5 (-/-) macrophages, showing that MDA5 is not essential for IFN secretion following infection, and RIG-I and MDA5 may act redundantly in promoting rotavirus recognition. Interestingly, rotavirus neither stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and JNK nor activated the NLRP3 inflammasome, demonstrating that these components might not be involved in innate responses to rotavirus infection in macrophages. Our results indicate that rotavirus elicits intracellular signaling in macrophages, resulting in the induction of IFN and antiviral cytokines, and advance our understanding of the involvement of these cells in innate responses against rotavirus.

  4. Therapeutics Insight with Inclusive Immunopharmacology Explication of Human Rotavirus A for the Treatment of Diarrhea

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    Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Hashem, Abu; Keya, Chaman Ara; Salimullah, Md.

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe infant and childhood diarrhea worldwide, and the morbidity and mortality rate is going to be outnumbered in developing countries like Bangladesh. To mitigate this substantial burden of disease, new therapeutics such as vaccine and drug are swiftly required against rotavirus. The present therapeutics insight study was performed with comprehensive immunoinformatics and pharmacoinformatics approach. T and B-cell epitopes were assessed in the conserved region of outer capsid protein VP4 among the highly reviewed strains from different countries including Bangladesh. The results suggest that epitope SU1 (TLKNLNDNY) could be an ideal candidate among the predicted five epitopes for both T and B-cell epitopes for the development of universal vaccine against rotavirus. This research also suggests five novel drug compounds from medicinal plant Rhizophora mucronata Lamk. for better therapeutics strategies against rotavirus diarrhea based on 3D structure building, pharmacophore, ADMET, and QSAR properties. The exact mode of action between drug compounds and target protein VP4 were revealed by molecular docking analysis. Drug likeness and oral bioavailability further confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed drugs against rotavirus diarrhea. This study might be implemented for experimental validation to facilitate the novel vaccine and drug design. PMID:27445802

  5. MASA DEPAN VAKSIN ROTAVIRUS DI INDONESIA

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    Krisna Nur Andriana Pangesti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakRotavirus adalah penyebab utama gastroenteritis pada anak-anak. Insiden diare yang disebabkan rotavirus di Indonesia terjadi sepanjang tahun dengan jumlah kematian mencapai sekitar 10.088 anak per tahun. Virus ini ditularkan melalui rute tinja-oral dengan tingkat transmisi tinggi. Lebih dari 50 kombinasi galur G - P yang dikenal sebagai galur yang menginfeksi manusia dengan serotipe dominan akan bervariasi antar wilayah dan tahun. Di Indonesia, berbagai penelitian rotavirus menunjukkan bahwa variasi tipe VP7 (G9 dan VP4 (P[8] merupakan kombinasi genotipe paling sering muncul. Metode pencegahan yang paling mungkin dan sangat diperlukan untuk mengontrol transmisi dan mencegah penyakit yang disebabkan oleh virus ini adalah dengan vaksinasi. Berbagai macam jenis vaksin Rotavirus dikembangkan untuk memberikan kekebalan sebaik infeksi alamiah dan meminimalisasi efek samping yang terjadi. Untuk itu pengawasan yang baik pra dan pasca perizinan diperlukan untuk memantau efek samping dari vaksin yang ada. Infeksi Rotavirus menyebabkan beban penyakit dan ekonomi yang tinggi sehingga vaksin dapat dipertimbangkan sebagai salah satu cara pencegahan yang baik.Kata kunci : Rotavirus, vaksin, diareAbstractRotaviruses are the leading cause of gastroenteritis in young children. The incidence of diarrhea due to rotavirus in Indonesia is evenly throughout the year with the mortality approximately of 10,088 children in a year. These viruses are transmitted by fecal-oral route with high rate of transmission. More than 50 combinations G-P known as strain that infect human with the predominant serotypes will vary between region and year. In Indonesia, rotavirus studies showed that a variety of VP7 type (G9 and VP4 type (P[8] were the genotype combinations most frequently encountered. The most likely methods of prevention and control of transmission for the disease caused by this virus are vaccination. Various types of rotavirus vaccine were developed to provide

  6. [Universal vaccination for Rotavirus infection control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Valentin; Capanna, Alessandra; Gervasi, Giuseppe; Zaratti, Laura; Franco, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the most common etiological cause for pediatric acute gastroenteritis, particularly in children under 5 years of age or immunocompromised. Since 2008, vaccination program has determined a decrease in Rotavirus-related hospitalization, outpatient's visits, emergency department visits and mortality. These indicators of illness for Rotaviruses diseases remain high in those countries where there is no access to rehydrating therapies. In Italy vaccine coverage is very low, even if the burden of RV disease is well known, and at present vaccination is offered free of charge in a single region.

  7. Rotavirus genotypes and the indigenous children of Brazilian midwest in the vaccine era, 2008-2012: Footprints of animal genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchs, Adriana; Cilli, Audrey; Morillo, Simone Guadagnucci; Ribeiro, Cibele Daniel; Carmona, Rita de Cassia Compagnoli; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2015-11-01

    World group A rotavirus (RVA) surveillance data provides useful estimates of the disease burden, however, indigenous population might require special consideration. The aim of this study was to describe the results of G- and P-types from Brazilian native children ≤ 3 years. Furthermore, selected strains have been analyzed for the VP7, VP6, VP4, and NSP4 encoding genes in order to gain insight into genetic variability of Brazilian strains. A total of 149 samples, collected during 2008-2012, were tested for RVA using ELISA and PAGE, following by RT-PCR and sequencing. RVA infection was detected in 8.7% of samples (13/149). Genotype G2P[4] was detected in 2008 and 2010, G8P[6] in 2009, and G3P[8] in 2011. The phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 and VP4 genes grouped the Brazilian G2P[4] and G3P[8] strains within the lineages currently circulating in humans worldwide. However, the phylogenetic analysis of the VP6 and NSP4 from the Brazilian G2P[4] strains, and the VP7 and NSP4 from the Brazilian G3P[8] strains suggest a distant common ancestor with different animal strains (bovine, caprine, and porcine). The epidemiological and genetic information obtained in the present study is expected to provide an updated understanding of RVA genotypes circulating in the native infant population, and to formulate policies for the use of RVA vaccines in indigenous Brazilian people. Moreover, these results highlight the great diversity of human RVA strains circulating in Brazil, and an in-depth surveillance of human and animal RVA will lead to a better understanding of the complex dynamics of RVA evolution.

  8. VP4 monotype specificities among porcine rotavirus strains of the same VP4 serotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liprandi, F; Rodriguez, I; Piña, C; Larralde, G; Gorziglia, M

    1991-01-01

    The porcine rotavirus OSU strain was used to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against the outer capsid protein VP4. From two separate fusions, eight MAbs that inhibited hemagglutination activity of the OSU strain were selected. All MAbs immunoprecipitated both the OSU VP4 protein derived from a lysate of infected MA104 cells and the OSU VP4 protein expressed in Sf9 cells by a recombinant baculovirus. By immunoprecipitation of in vitro-translated OSU gene 4 transcripts of different length, the eight MAbs were found to be specific for the VP8 subunit of VP4. All MAbs neutralized the OSU strain but failed to neutralize human, bovine, and simian rotavirus strains. Antiserum to the expressed OSU VP4 protein was used to study the distribution of VP4 antigenicity among porcine rotaviruses. At least two distinct specificities were identified among 14 rotavirus strains that had been previously assigned to four distinct VP7 serotypes. Five groups of monotype specificities of the VP4 protein were identified by the eight anti-VP4 MAbs among 11 porcine strains that share the same VP4 serotype. Images PMID:1847483

  9. New insights into rotavirus entry machinery: stabilization of rotavirus spike conformation is independent of trypsin cleavage.

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    Javier M Rodríguez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The infectivity of rotavirus, the main causative agent of childhood diarrhea, is dependent on activation of the extracellular viral particles by trypsin-like proteases in the host intestinal lumen. This step entails proteolytic cleavage of the VP4 spike protein into its mature products, VP8* and VP5*. Previous cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM analysis of trypsin-activated particles showed well-resolved spikes, although no density was identified for the spikes in uncleaved particles; these data suggested that trypsin activation triggers important conformational changes that give rise to the rigid, entry-competent spike. The nature of these structural changes is not well understood, due to lack of data relative to the uncleaved spike structure. Here we used cryo-EM and cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET to characterize the structure of the uncleaved virion in two model rotavirus strains. Cryo-EM three-dimensional reconstruction of uncleaved virions showed spikes with a structure compatible with the atomic model of the cleaved spike, and indistinguishable from that of digested particles. Cryo-ET and subvolume average, combined with classification methods, resolved the presence of non-icosahedral structures, providing a model for the complete structure of the uncleaved spike. Despite the similar rigid structure observed for uncleaved and cleaved particles, trypsin activation is necessary for successful infection. These observations suggest that the spike precursor protein must be proteolytically processed, not to achieve a rigid conformation, but to allow the conformational changes that drive virus entry.

  10. Effect of monovalent rotavirus vaccine on rotavirus disease burden and circulating rotavirus strains among children in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhafid, Mohammed; Elomari, Nezha; Azzouzi Idrissi, Meryem; Rguig, Ahmed; Gentsch, Jon R; Parashar, Umesh; Elaouad, Rajae

    2015-06-01

    Rotarix(TM) vaccine was introduced into the National Program of Immunization of Morocco in October 2010, reaching quickly 87% of the target population of children nationally. The incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis and the prevalence of circulating rotavirus strains has been monitored in three sentinel hospitals since June 2006. The average percentage of rotavirus positive cases among all children under 5 years old hospitalized for gastroenteritis during the pre-vaccine period (2006-2010) was 44%. This percentage dropped to 29%, 15% and 24% in the 3 years post vaccine introduction (2011, 2012 and 2013), which is a decline of 34%, 66%, and 45%, respectively. Declines in prevalence were greatest among children 0-1 years of age (53%) and were most prominent during the winter and autumn rotavirus season. The prevalence of the G2P[4] and G9P[8] genotype sharply increased in the post vaccine period (2011-2013) compared to the previous seasons (2006-2010). Rotavirus vaccines have reduced greatly the number of children hospitalized due to rotavirus infection at the three sentinel hospitals; it is however unclear if the predominance of G2P[4] and G9P[8] genotypes is related to the vaccine introduction, or if this is attributable to normal genotype fluctuations. Continued surveillance will be pivotal to answer this question in the future.

  11. Molecular epidemiology and genetic evolution of the whole genome of G3P[8] human rotavirus in Wuhan, China, from 2000 through 2013.

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    Yuan-Hong Wang

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses are a major etiologic agent of gastroenteritis in infants and young children worldwide. Since the latter of the 1990s, G3 human rotaviruses referred to as "new variant G3" have emerged and spread in China, being a dominant genotype until 2010, although their genomic evolution has not yet been well investigated.The complete genomes of 33 G3P[8] human rotavirus strains detected in Wuhan, China, from 2000 through 2013 were analyzed. Phylogenetic trees of concatenated sequences of all the RNA segments and individual genes were constructed together with published rotavirus sequences.Genotypes of 11 gene segments of all the 33 strains were assigned to G3-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1, belonging to Wa genogroup. Phylogenetic analysis of the concatenated full genome sequences indicated that all the modern G3P[8] strains were assigned to Cluster 2 containing only one clade of G3P[8] strains in the US detected in the 1970s, which was distinct from Cluster 1 comprising most of old G3P[8] strains. While main lineages of all the 11 gene segments persisted during the study period, different lineages appeared occasionally in RNA segments encoding VP1, VP4, VP6, and NSP1-NSP5, exhibiting various allele constellations. In contrast, only a single lineage was detected for VP7, VP2, and VP3 genes. Remarkable lineage shift was observed for NSP1 gene; lineage A1-2 emerged in 2007 and became dominant in 2008-2009 epidemic season, while lineage A1-1 persisted throughout the study period.Chinese G3P[8] rotavirus strains have evolved since 2000 by intra-genogroup reassortment with co-circulating strains, accumulating more reassorted genes over the years. This is the first large-scale whole genome-based study to assess the long-term evolution of common human rotaviruses (G3P[8] in an Asian country.

  12. Protect Your Child from Rotavirus Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KB] - a true story about 10-month-old twin boys who had severe illness caused by rotavirus ... by: Office of the Associate Director for Communication, Digital Media Branch, Division of Public Affairs Email Recommend ...

  13. Feline Origin of Rotavirus Strain, Tunisia, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredj, Mouna Ben Hadj; Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Fodha, Imene; Benhamida-Rebai, Meriam; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2013-01-01

    In Tunisia in 2008, an unusual G6P[9] rotavirus, RVA/human-wt/TUN/17237/2008/G6P[9], rarely found in humans, was detected in a child. To determine the origin of this strain, we conducted phylogenetic analyses and found a unique genotype constellation resembling rotaviruses belonging to the feline BA222-like genotype constellation. The strain probably resulted from direct cat-to-human transmission. PMID:23631866

  14. Impact of rotavirus vaccine on premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roué, Jean-Michel; Nowak, Emmanuel; Le Gal, Grégoire; Lemaitre, Thomas; Oger, Emmanuel; Poulhazan, Elise; Giroux, Jean-Dominique; Garenne, Armelle; Gagneur, Arnaud

    2014-10-01

    Infants born preterm are at a higher risk of complications and hospitalization in cases of rotavirus diarrhea than children born at term. We evaluated the impact of a rotavirus vaccination campaign (May 2007 to May 2010) on hospitalizations for rotavirus gastroenteritis in a population of children under 3 years old born prematurely (before 37 weeks of gestation) in the Brest University Hospital birth zone. Active surveillance from 2002 to 2006 and a prospective collection of hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea were initiated in the pediatric units of Brest University Hospital until May 2010. Numbers of hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea among the population of children born prematurely, before and after the start of the vaccination program, were compared using a Poisson regression model controlling for epidemic-to-epidemic variation. A total of 217 premature infants were vaccinated from 2007 to 2010. Vaccine coverage for a complete course of three doses was 41.9%. The vaccine safety in premature infants was similar to that in term infants. The vaccination program led to a division by a factor of 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 5.2) in the number of hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea during the first two epidemic seasons following vaccine introduction and by a factor of 11 (95% CI, 3.5 to 34.8) during the third season. We observed significant effectiveness of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine on the number of hospitalizations in a population of prematurely born infants younger than 3 years of age. A multicenter national study would provide better assessment of this impact. (This study [Impact of Systematic Infants Vaccination Against Rotavirus on Gastroenteritis Hospitalization: a Prospective Study in Brest District, France (IVANHOE)] has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00740935.).

  15. Discovery of rotavirus: Implications for child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Ruth

    2009-10-01

    For centuries, acute diarrhea has been a major worldwide cause of death in young children, and until 1973, no infectious agents could be identified in about 80% of patients admitted to hospital with severe dehydrating diarrhea. In 1973 Ruth Bishop, Geoffrey Davidson, Ian Holmes, and Brian Ruck identified abundant particles of a 'new' virus (rotavirus) in the cytoplasm of mature epithelial cells lining duodenal villi and in feces, from such children admitted to the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne. Rotaviruses have now been shown to cause 40-50% of severe acute diarrhea in young children worldwide in both developing and developed countries, and > 600 000 young children die annually from rotavirus disease, predominantly in South-East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Longitudinal surveillance studies following primary infection in young children have shown that rotavirus reinfections are common. However the immune response that develops after primary infection is protective against severe symptoms on reinfection. This observation became the basis for development of live oral rotavirus vaccines. Two safe and effective vaccines are now licensed in 100 countries and in use in 17 countries (including Australia). Rotarix (GSK) is a single attenuated human rotavirus, representative of the most common serotype identified worldwide (G1P[8]). RotaTeq (Merck) is a pentavalent mixture of naturally attenuated bovine/human rotavirus reassortants representing G1, G2, G3, G4, and P(8) serotypes. Preliminary surveillance of the numbers of children requiring hospitalization for severe diarrhea, in USA, Brazil, and Australia, after introduction of these vaccines, encourages the hope that rotavirus infection need no longer be a threat to young children worldwide.

  16. Immunogenicity of porcine P[6], P[7]-specific △VP8* rotavirus subunit vaccines with a tetanus toxoid universal T cell epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaobo; Wei, Xiaoman; Ran, Xuhua; Ni, Hongbo; Cao, Si; Zhang, Yao

    2015-08-26

    Currently, commercial porcine rotavirus vaccines remain varied limitations. The objective of this study is to develop an alternative porcine rotavirus subunit vaccine candidate by parenteral administration, which enables to elicit robust immune responses against most prevalence porcine rotavirus strains. The bacterially-expressed porcine rotavirus P[6]- or P[7]-specific truncated VP8* (aa 64-223) recombinant protein with or without a universal tetanus toxoid CD4(+) T cell epitope P2 was generated. All the recombinant subunit proteins △VP8*s or P2-△VP8*s were of high solubility and high yields. The immunogenicity of each purified △VP8* and P2-△VP8* was evaluated in mice (10 μg/dose) or guinea pigs (20 μg/dose) immunized IM with 600 μg aluminum hydroxide three times at 2-week interval. The introduction of P2T cell epitope to P[7]-△VP8* elicited significantly higher IgG titer in mice than its absence. Comparatively, P2 epitope slightly enhanced the immunogenicity of P[6]-△VP8*. P2-P[7]△VP8* elicited high titer of neutralizing antibody against heterotypic P[7]-specific rotaviruses with varied G type combination. Our data indicated that two subunit vaccines could be plausible bivalent rotavirus vaccine candidate to provide antigenic coverage of porcine rotavirus strains of global or regional importance.

  17. Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Drops) to Prevent It

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Immunizations Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Drops) to Prevent It Language: English Español (Spanish) Format: Select one PDF [ ... eating and drinking while they are sick. Is it serious? Rotavirus can be very harmful. Diarrhea, vomiting, ...

  18. Burden of rotavirus in India - Is rotavirus vaccine an answer to it?

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    Davendra K Taneja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is currently by far the most common cause of severe diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide and of diarrheal deaths in developing countries. Worldwide Rotavirus is responsible for 611,000 childhood deaths out of which more than 80% occur in low-income countries. The resistance of rotavirus to commonly used disinfectants and ineffectiveness of oral rehydration therapy due to severe vomiting indicates that if an effective vaccine is the preferred option. WHO has recommended inclusion of rotavirus vaccine in the National Schedules where under 5 mortality due to diarrheal diseases is ≥ 10%. Currently two vaccines are available against rotavirus. Rotarix (GlaxoSmithKline is a monovalent vaccine recommended to be orally administered in two doses at 6-12 weeks. Rota Teq (Merck is a pentavalent vaccine recommended to be orally administered in three doses starting at 6-12 weeks of age. Serodiversity of rotavirus in India and its regional variation favor either a monovalent vaccine that can induce heterotypic immunity or a polyvalent vaccine incorporating majority of serotypes prevalent in the country. However, the efficacy of available rotavirus vaccines is less in low-income countries. Both the candidate vaccines when coadministered with OPV, immune response to first dose of these vaccines is reduced. However, immune responses to subsequent rotavirus vaccine doses are not affected. In view of this, WHO recommends three doses of either vaccine to be given to children in developing countries to produce the optimum response. Indigenous vaccine, 116E (Bharat Biotech based on human rotavirus of serotype G9P [11] is still under Phase 2 trials. Another multivalent vaccine is being developed by Shantha Biotechnics in India. The cost effectiveness of the three dose schedule of the available and the rsults of the field trials of the indigenous vaccines should be assessed before inclusion of rotavirus vaccine in the National Immunization

  19. Unusual assortment of segments in 2 rare human rotavirus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grazia, Simona; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Potgieter, Christiaan A; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Banyai, Krisztian; Platia, Maria A; Colomba, Claudia; Martella, Vito

    2010-05-01

    Using full-length genome sequence analysis, we investigated 2 rare G3P[9] human rotavirus strains isolated from children with diarrhea. The genomes were recognized as assortments of genes closely related to rotaviruses originating from cats, ruminants, and humans. Results suggest multiple transmissions of genes from animal to human strains of rotaviruses.

  20. Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program annual report, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Carl D; Roczo-Farkas, Suzie

    2015-09-30

    The Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program, together with collaborating laboratories Australia-wide, reports the rotavirus genotypes responsible for the hospitalisation of children with acute gastroenteritis. During the survey period of 1 January to 31 December 2014, 1,022 faecal samples were referred for rotavirus G and P genotype analysis, and of these 733 were confirmed as rotavirus positive. A total of 480 specimens were collected from children under 5 years of age, while 253 were from older children and adults. Genotype analysis of the 733 rotavirus samples collected from both children and adults revealed that G12P[8] was the dominant genotype in this reporting period, identified in 29.6% of strains nationally. Genotype G1P[8] was the 2nd most common strain nationally, representing 22.9% of samples, followed by genotype G3P[8] (14.9%). This report highlights the continued significance of G12P[8] strains as the major cause of disease in this population. The genotype distribution was slightly altered when the analysis was restricted to samples collected from children under 5 years of age, with G1P[8] being the dominant genotype (29%) followed by G12P[8] as the 2nd most common genotype (26%). Fluctuations in genotype distribution were also observed based on the vaccine type in use. Genotype G12P[8] was more common in states and territories using RotaTeq, while G1P[8] was more common in the locations using Rotarix. This survey highlights the yearly fluctuations in rotavirus genotypes observed since vaccine introduction. The continuation of G12P[8] as the dominant genotype further illustrates the dynamic and diversity present in the wild-type rotavirus population evident in the Australian population since vaccine introduction.

  1. Genetic and serologic surveillance of rotavirus with P[8] and P[4] genotypes in feces from children in the city of Chihuahua, northern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Cordero, Juan F; Romo-Sáenz, César I; Menchaca-Rodríguez, Griselda E; Infante-Ramírez, Rocío; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Hernández-Luna, Carlos E; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Tamez-Guerra, Reyes S

    2015-12-01

    Rotavirus vaccine was developed using the most prominent G and P genotypes circulating in children population. Therefore, severe gastroenteritis has been reduced around the world. This study investigated the G and P rotavirus genotypes circulating in children from two hospitals in the city of Chihuahua, Mexico. Additionally, polyclonal antibodies against Rotavirus Wa strain were used to determine their homotypic and heterotypic reactivity to both P[8] and P[4] genotypes. G1, G2, and G3 VP7 genotypes and P[8] and P[4] VP4 genotypes were detected in common and uncommon combinations as well as mixed infectious. The predominant combination was G1P[8]. Phylogenetic analysis of VP4 gene revealed the presence of P[8]-1 and P[8]-3 lineages of P[8] genotype and P[4]-5 lineage of P[4] genotype. All but five G1P[8] rotavirus were detected by polyclonal anti-Rotavirus Wa strain. Mutation analysis revealed differences in three of the four neutralizing epitopes previously reported to VP8* subunit of VP4 protein. Results of this study offer insights over genetic variants of field rotavirus that could be detected in a homotypic and heterotypic way by antibodies elicited to rotavirus with P[8] genotype. [Int Microbiol 2016; 19(1):27-32].

  2. Rotavirus-associated hospitalization and emergency department costs and rotavirus vaccine program impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, April; Donauer, Stephanie; Edwards, Kathryn M; Weinberg, Geoffrey A; Payne, Daniel C; Szilagyi, Peter G; Rice, Marilyn; Cassedy, Amy; Ortega-Sanchez, Ismael R; Parashar, Umesh D; Staat, Mary Allen

    2013-08-28

    To determine the medical costs of laboratory-confirmed rotavirus hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits and estimate the economic impact of the rotavirus vaccine program. During 4 rotavirus seasons (2006-2009), children costs were obtained from hospital and physician billing data, and factors associated with increased costs were examined. Annual national costs were estimated using rotavirus hospitalization and ED visit rates and medical costs for rotavirus hospitalizations and ED visits from our surveillance program for pre- (2006-2007) and post-vaccine (2008-2009) time periods. Pre-vaccine, for hospitalizations, the median medical cost per child was $3581, the rotavirus hospitalization rate was 22.1/10,000, with an estimated annual national cost of $91 million. Post-vaccine, the median medical cost was $4304, the hospitalization rate was 6.3/10,000 and the estimated annual national cost was $31 million. Increased costs were associated with study site, age cost per child was $574, the ED visit rate was 291/10,000 resulting in an estimated annual national cost of $192 million. Post-vaccine, the median medical cost was $794, the ED visit rate was 71/10,000 with an estimated annual national cost of $65 million. After implementation of rotavirus immunization, the total annual medical costs decreased from $283 million to $96 million, an annual reduction of $187 million. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Full-length genomic analysis of porcine rotavirus strains isolated from pigs with diarrhea in Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monini, Marina; Zaccaria, Guendalina; Ianiro, Giovanni; Lavazza, Antonio; Vaccari, Gabriele; Ruggeri, Franco M

    2014-07-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) cause acute dehydrating diarrhea in young of man and many animal species, including pigs. Swine RVA has an important economic impact on the farming industry, and pigs represent a potential reservoir for zoonotic transmission of RVA to humans. To investigate the genetic diversity of porcine RVA strains in Italy and identify their possible zoonotic characteristics, 25 RVA-positive feces were collected from diarrheic pigs in Northern Italy, in 2009-2010; all viral strains were characterized by G and P genotyping RT-PCR. Three samples were selected for full genome sequencing. Sequencing of the NSP3 genes of all samples was also performed. Rotavirus diagnosis was carried out by ELISA and electron microscopy. RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing were performed in a one-tube format, using primer sets specific for each of the 11 genome segments. Analysis of the G (VP7) and P (VP4) genotypes showed that all strains identified were typical porcine RVAs (G4, G5, G9; P[6], P[13], P[23]). Full-length genome sequencing was performed on selected G9 isolates. Most segments belonged to the genotype constellation 1 (Wa-like), which is shared by most human RVA strains, but gene types such as I5 (VP6) and A8 (NSP1), which are typical of porcine and rare among human RVAs, were also detected. We identified RVA strains showing the T7 genotype, an NSP3 gene type that was previously reported in unusual strains of possible porcine or bovine origin from children with diarrhea. Recent reports suggested that G9 RVA may have been introduced from swine to human populations involving gene reassortment events. The observation that some of the RVA genotypes from swine in Italy were similar to viruses characterized in children underlines the importance of animal RVA surveillance, to clarify and monitor the role of animals as genetic reservoirs of emerging RVA strains pathogenic for humans.

  4. Vaccine-Acquired Rotavirus in Infants with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Niraj C.; Hertel, Paula M.; Estes, Mary K.; de la Morena, Maite; Petru, Ann M.; Noroski, Lenora M.; Revell, Paula A.; Celine Hanson, I.; Paul, Mary E.; Rosenblatt, Howard M.; Abramson, Stuart L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Live pentavalent human–bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine is recommended in the United States for routine immunization of infants. We describe three infants, two with failure to thrive, who had dehydration and diarrhea within 1 month after their first or second rotavirus immunization and subsequently received a diagnosis of severe combined immunodeficiency. Rotavirus was detected, by means of reverse-transcriptase–polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR) assay, in stool specimens obtained from all three infants, and gene-sequence analysis revealed the presence of vaccine rotavirus. These infections raise concerns regarding the safety of rotavirus vaccine in severely immunocompromised patients. PMID:20107217

  5. Rotavirus vaccination within the South African Expanded Programme on Immunisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seheri, L Mapaseka; Page, Nicola A; Mawela, Mothahadini P B; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey; Steele, A Duncan

    2012-09-07

    Diarrhoeal diseases are ranked the third major cause of childhood mortality in South African children less than 5 years, where the majority of deaths are among black children. Acute severe dehydrating rotavirus diarrhoea remains an important contributor towards childhood mortality and morbidity and has been well documented in South Africa. As the preventive strategy to control rotavirus diarrhoea, South Africa became the first country in the WHO African Region to adopt the rotavirus vaccine in the national childhood immunisation programme in August 2009. The rotavirus vaccine in use, Rotarix, GSK Biologicals, is given at 6 and 14 weeks of age, along with other vaccines as part of Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI). Studies which facilitated the introduction of rotavirus vaccine in South Africa included the burden of rotavirus disease and strain surveillance, economic burden of rotavirus infection and clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of vaccine candidates. This paper reviews the epidemiology of rotavirus in South Africa, outlines some of the steps followed to introduce rotavirus vaccine in the EPI, and highlights the early positive impact of vaccination in reducing the rotavirus burden of disease based on the post-marketing surveillance studies at Dr George Mukhari hospital, a sentinel site at University of Limpopo teaching hospital in Pretoria, South Africa, which has conducted rotavirus surveillance for >20 years.

  6. Isolation and characterization of a new simian rotavirus, YK-1

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    Shin Gary

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To effectively analyze the requirements for protection to rotavirus infection, a reliable animal model that reasonably mimics infection and disease in humans is needed. A requirement for an effective animal model is the availability of appropriate rotavirus stocks for challenge. Results A new simian rotavirus, designated YK-1, was isolated from a 2-year-old immunodeficient pigtailed macaque with chronic diarrhea. YK-1 was distinguishable by electropherotype from the other simian rotavirus strains, SA11 and RRV. One variant of YK-1, clone 311, which was isolated after adaptation and plaque purification in cell cultures, displayed an unusual RNA electropherotype with an abnormally migrating gene 11 segment. Sequence analysis demonstrated a genetic rearrangement that involved a partial duplication of the gene 11 ORF encoding NSP5. YK-1 was identified as a Group A rotavirus belonging to subgroup 1. To further characterize the YK-1 strain, the genes encoding VP4, VP7, and NSP4 were sequenced. Analysis of VP4 and VP7 gene fragments suggests that this strain is a G3P3 rotavirus and is closely related to the simian rotavirus strain RRV. Serotype analysis also identified YK-1 as a G3 rotavirus. The NSP4 genotype of YK-1 is C, the same genotype as RRV. Conclusion This newly isolated rotavirus, YK-1, is being used to establish a nonhuman primate model for studying the infectivity, immunity, and pathogenesis of rotavirus and for evaluating candidate rotavirus vaccines.

  7. Decline in rotavirus hospitalizations and health care visits for childhood diarrhea following rotavirus vaccination in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Catherine; Armero Guardado, Julio A; Alberto, Patricia; Rodriguez Araujo, David S; Mena, Carlos; Cuellar, Elizabeth; Nolasco, Jenny Brenda; De Oliveira, Lucia Helena; Pastor, Desiree; Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D; Patel, Manish M

    2011-01-01

    A recent postlicensure study from El Salvador showed that the monovalent rotavirus vaccine conferred 76% protection against rotavirus hospitalizations. We further examined the impact of rotavirus vaccination on the national burden of childhood diarrhea to help assess the total public health benefits of vaccination. We compared all-cause diarrhea and rotavirus-specific hospitalization rates during prevaccine year 2006, with postvaccine years 2008 and 2009 in children El Salvador. Important age-related changes in diarrheal incidence emphasize the need for ongoing rotavirus surveillance after vaccine introduction.

  8. Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program annual report, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roczo-Farkas, Susie; Kirkwood, Carl D; Bines, Julie E

    2016-12-24

    The Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program, together with collaborating laboratories Australia-wide, reports the rotavirus genotypes responsible for the hospitalisation of children with acute gastroenteritis during the period 1 January to 31 December 2015. During the survey period, 1,383 faecal samples were referred for rotavirus G and P genotype analysis, and of these, 1,031 were confirmed as rotavirus positive. A total of 634 specimens had been collected from children under 5 years of age, while 397 were from older children and adults. Genotype analysis of samples from both children and adults revealed that G12P[8] was the dominant genotype in this reporting period, identified in 48.2% of strains nationally. Genotype G3P[8] was the second most common strain nationally, representing 22.8% of samples, followed by G2P[4] and G1P[8] (9% and 8% respectively). G3P[8] was further divided as equine-like G3P[8] (13.2% of all strains) and other wild-type G3P[8] (9.6%). This report highlights the continued predominance of G12P[8] strains as the major cause of disease in this population. Genotype distribution was distinct between jurisdictions using RotaTeq and Rotarix vaccines. Genotype G12P[8] was more common in states using RotaTeq, while equine-like G3P[8] and G2P[4] were more common in the states and territories using Rotarix. This survey highlights the dynamic change in rotavirus genotypes observed since vaccine introduction, including the emergence of a novel equine-like G3P[8] as a major strain. The prolonged dominance of G12P[8] for a 4th consecutive year further illustrates the unexpected trends in the wild type rotaviruses circulating in the Australian population since vaccine introduction.

  9. Reduction in Rotavirus Disease and Sustained Predominance of G2P[4] Rotavirus Strain following Introduction of Rotavirus Vaccine in Recife, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Fernanda Maria Ulisses; Falbo, Ana Rodrigues; Germano, Eliane Mendes; Correia, Nancy Barros; Souza, Edvaldo da Silva; Nakagomi, Osamu; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Cuevas, Luis E; Cunliffe, Nigel A; Correia, Jailson B

    2015-06-01

    Rotavirus vaccination was introduced in Brazil in March 2006. We describe the distribution of rotavirus genotypes in children with acute gastroenteritis in a hospital in Recife, Brazil, during pre- and post-vaccination periods. There was a 43.8% reduction in the proportion of diarrhea episodes due to rotavirus. Nevertheless, we observed a sustained predominance of G2P[4] as the main genotype identified in the post-vaccination period.

  10. Rotavirus vaccines: targeting the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Roger I; Bresee, Joseph S; Turcios, Reina; Fischer, Thea K; Parashar, Umesh D; Steele, A Duncan

    2005-09-01

    For the past 2 decades, rotavirus infection, the most common cause of severe diarrhea in children, has been a priority target for vaccine development. This decision to develop rotavirus vaccines is predicated on the great burden associated with fatal rotavirus disease (i.e., 440,000 deaths/year), the firm scientific basis for developing live oral vaccines, the belief that increased investment in development at this time could speed the introduction of vaccines in developing countries, and the appreciation that implementation of a vaccine program should result in a measurable decrease in the number of hospitalizations and deaths associated with rotavirus disease within 2-3 years. RotaShield (Wyeth-Ayerst), the first rotavirus vaccine licensed in the United States, was withdrawn after 9 months because of a rare association of the vaccine with the development of intussusception. In the developing world, this vaccine could still have had a measurable effect, because the benefits of preventing deaths due to rotavirus disease would have been substantially greater than the rare risk of intussusception. Two live oral vaccines being prepared by GlaxoSmithKline and Merck have completed large-scale clinical trials. The GlaxoSmithKline vaccine has been licensed in Mexico and the Dominican Republic, and the Merck vaccine could be licensed in the United States within 1 year; several other candidate vaccines are in earlier stages of testing. However, many challenges remain before any of these vaccines can be incorporated into childhood immunization programs in the developing world. First, vaccine efficacy, which has already been demonstrated in children in industrialized and middle-income countries, needs to be proven in poor developing countries in Africa and Asia. The safety of vaccines with regard to the associated risk of intussusception must be demonstrated as well. Novel financing strategies will be needed to ensure that new vaccines are affordable and available in the

  11. Infectious rotavirus enters cells by direct cell membrane penetration, not by endocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaljot, K.T.; Shaw, R.D.; Greenberg, H.B. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA) Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Center, CA (USA)); Rubin, D.H. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (USA))

    1988-04-01

    Rotaviruses are icosahedral viruses with a segmented, double-stranded RNA genome. They are the major cause of severe infantile infectious diarrhea. Rotavirus growth in tissue culture is markedly enhanced by pretreatment of virus with trypsin. Trypsin activation is associated with cleavage of the viral hemagglutinin (viral protein 3 (VP3); 88 kilodaltons) into two fragments (60 and 28 kilodaltons). The mechanism by which proteolytic cleavage leads to enhanced growth is unknown. To determine whether trypsin treatment affected rotavirus internalization, the authors studied the kinetics of entry of infectious rhesus rotavirus (RRV) into MA104 cells. Trypsin-activated RRV was internalized with a half-time of 3 to 5 min, while nonactivated virus disappeared from the cell surface with a half-time of 30 to 50 min. In contrast to trypsin-activated RRV, loss of nonactivated RRV from the cell surface did not result in the appearance of infection, as measured by plaque formation. Purified trypsin-activated RRV added to cell monolayers at pH 7.4 mediated {sup 51}Cr, ({sup 14}C)choline, and ({sup 3}H)inositol released from prelabeled MA104 cells. This release could be specifically blocked by neutralizing antibodies to VP3. These results suggest that MA104 cell infection follows the rapid entry of trypsin-activated RRV by direct cell membrane penetration. Cell membrane penetration of infectious RRV is initiated by trypsin cleavage of VP3. Neutralizing antibodies can inhibit this direct membrane penetration.

  12. An evaluation of the inhibitory effects against rotavirus infection of edible plant extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knipping, Karen; Garssen, Johan; van't Land, Belinda

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rotaviruses are the single most important cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. The developments of specific, potent and accessible antiviral treatments that restrain rotavirus infection remain important to control rotavirus disease. Methods: 150 plant extracts with nutri

  13. Multispecies reassortant bovine rotavirus strain carries a novel simian G3-like VP7 genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Yashpal Singh; Kumar, Naveen; Sharma, Kuldeep; Saurabh, Sharad; Dhama, Kuldeep; Prasad, Minakshi; Ghosh, Souvik; Bányai, Krisztián; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Rotavirus-A (RVAs), are the major cause of severe gastroenteritis in the young of mammals and birds. RVA strains possessing G6, G8, and G10 genotypes in combination with P[1] or P[11] have been commonly detected in cattle. During a routine surveillance for enteric viruses in a bovine population on North-Western temperate Himalayan region of India, an uncommon bovine RVA strain, designated as RVA/Cow-wt/IND/M1/09/2009 was detected in a diarrhoeic crossbred calf. The examination of nearly complete genome sequence of this RVA strain revealed an unusual G-P combination (G3P[11]) on a typical bovine RVA genotype backbone (I2-R2-C2-M2-A11-N2-T6-E2-H3). The VP7 gene of M1/09 isolate displayed a maximum nucleotide sequence identity of 73.8% with simian strain (RVA/Simian-tc/USA/RRV/1975/G3P[3]). The VP4 and NSP5 genes clustered with an Indian pig strain, RVA/Pig-wt/IND/AM-P66/2012/G10P[11] (99.6%), and a caprine strain, RVA/Goat-tc/BGD/GO34/1999/G6P[1] (98.9%) from Bangladesh, respectively, whilst the, VP6, NSP1, NSP3 and NSP4 genes were identical or nearly identical to Indian bovine strains (RVA/Cow-wt/IND/B-72/2008/G10P[X], RVA/Cow-wt/IND/B85/2010/GXP[X], and RVA/Cow-wt/IND/C91/2011/G6P[X]). The remaining four genes (VP1, VP2, VP3 and NSP2) were more closely related to RVA/Human-wt/ITA/PAI11/1996/G2P[4] (93.5%), RVA/Sheep-wt/CHN/LLR/1985/G10P[15] (88.8%), RVA/Human-tc/SWE/1076/1983/G2P2A[6] (93.2%) and RVA/Human-wt/AUS/CK20003/2000/G2P[4] (91.2%), respectively. Altogether, these findings are suggestive of multiple independent interspecies transmission and reassortment events between co-circulating bovine, porcine, ovine and human rotaviruses. The complete genome sequence information is necessary to establish the evolutionary relationship, interspecies transmission and ecological features of animal RVAs from different geographical regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Adsorption of Rotavirus, MS2 Bacteriophage and Surface-Modified Silica Nanoparticles to Hydrophobic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Kata; Varsani, Arvind; Pang, Liping

    2015-09-01

    Adsorption to aquifer media is an important process in the removal of viruses from groundwater. Even though hydrophobic interactions have been shown to contribute to adsorption, little is known about the hydrophobicity of viruses found in groundwater. In this study, the hydrophobicity of rotavirus, MS2 bacteriophage and DNA-labelled silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) coated with glycoprotein, protein A and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor (AMBP) was investigated. The hydrophobicity was experimentally determined by using a modified microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) assay. The results were compared with the theoretical hydrophobicity of the viral capsid proteins and the proteins used to coat the nanoparticles, and with the results of adsorption tests with unmodified and organosilane-coated (hydrophobic) silica sand. While most theoretical protein hydrophobicity values were similar, the results of the MATH assay suggested fundamental differences in the hydrophobicity of the viruses and the SiNPs. MS2 was found to be highly hydrophobic as based on the MATH hydrophobicity and a significantly enhanced adsorption to hydrophobic sand, whereas rotavirus was relatively hydrophilic. The MATH assay revealed that protein-coating of SiNP introduced some degree of hydrophobicity to hydrophilic SiNPs, enabling them to more closely mimic viral hydrophobicity. Our study also demonstrated that the protein-coated SiNPs better mimicked rotavirus adsorption to sand media (coated or not coated with hydrophobic organic matter) than the MS2. This further supports previous findings that these surface-modified SiNPs are useful surrogates in mimicking rotavirus retention and transport in porous media.

  15. Rotavirus Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including a severe allergy to latex. Babies with “severe combined immunodeficiency” (SCID) should not get rotavirus vaccine. Babies who have had a type of bowel blockage called “intussusception” should not get ... moderate or severe diarrhea or vomiting. Check with your doctor if ...

  16. Respuesta inmune adaptativa al rotavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A. Franco

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available

    El rotavirus (RV es un importante patógeno humano y el estudio de la respuesta inmune específica de éste en humanos, es un buen modelo para caracterizar la respuesta inmune de la mucosa intestinal (1. Nuestros estudios han tenido como objetivo la caracterización fenotípica y funcional de las células T y B específicas de RV con énfasis importante en la expresión de marcadores de migración intestinal. Estas células son estudiadas en muestras de sangre periférica de niños y adultos recientemente infectados con RV. Los análisis se hicieron por citometría de flujo y ELISPOT. Estudio de células T: los adultos sanos presentan bajas frecuencias circulantes tanto de LT CD4+, como de LT CD8+ específicos de RV que secretan INF_ .

    Significativamente mayores porcentajes de éstas células se detectaron en adultos sintomáticos infectados por RV. Sin embargo, las frecuencias de LT específicos de RV en todos los grupos de estudio fueron muy bajas comparadas con las observadas para otros patógenos.

    Sorprendentemente, en niños sintomáticos infectados por RV se detectaron bajas frecuencias de LT CD8+ circulantes específicos de RV secretando INF-g y muy pocos o ningún LT CD4+ secretando INF-g o LT CD4+ y CD8+ al secretar IL-13 o IL4 (2,3. Esto sugiere que el RV es un inductor relativamente pobre de células T de memoria secretando estas citoquinas. Los LT circulantes CD4+ , INF-g.+ específicos de RV presentes en adultos

  17. Pronóstico de la diarrea por rotavirus Prognosis of rotavirus diarrhea

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    Felipe Mota-Hernández

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Comparar la gravedad de la diarrea por rotavirus (RV y por no rotavirus. Material y métodos. Estudio transversal en 520 lactantes con diarrea aguda, efectuado entre octubre de 1994 y marzo de 1995 en siete centros del primer nivel de atención en cinco estados de México. El diagnóstico de RV se realizó con ensayo inmunoenzimático o por electroforesis. El análisis se hizo a través de medidas de tendencia central. Los resultados se presentan como promedio y desviación estándar o mediana o variación. Resultados. Se aisló RV en 264 lactantes (50.7% con predominio en varones de 6 meses a un año. Las manifestaciones clínicas fueron significativamente diferentes entre el grupo rotavirus positivo y el grupo rotavirus negativo en mediana de evacuaciones por 24 horas, frecuencia de vómitos, temperatura > 38° C, deshidratación y calificación de gravedad, respectivamente. Conclusiones. Estos resultados mostraron peor pronóstico por mayor gravedad de la diarrea por RV en lactantes, con relación a otra etiología. El texto completo en inglés de este artículo está disponible en: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.htmlObjective. To compare the severity of rotavirus diarrhea (RV and non-rotavirus diarrhea. Material and Methods. Between October 1994 and March 1995, a cross-sectional study was performed in 520 infants with acute diarrhea, at seven primary care level centers in five states of Mexico. Diagnosis of RV was done through immunoenzymatic assay or electrophoresis. Central tendency measures were used for data analysis. Results were presented as means and standard deviations, or median and variation. Results. RV was isolated from 264 children; most of them were males aged 6 months to 1 year. Differences in clinical manifestations were statistically significant between the rotavirus-positive group and the rotavirus-negative group, in the following variables: median number of stools/24 hours; frequency of vomiting; temperature > 38

  18. Whole Genomic Analysis of an Unusual Human G6P[14] Rotavirus Strain Isolated from a Child with Diarrhea in Thailand: Evidence for Bovine-To-Human Interspecies Transmission and Reassortment Events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratana Tacharoenmuang

    Full Text Available An unusual rotavirus strain, SKT-27, with the G6P[14] genotypes (RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-27/2012/G6P[14], was identified in a stool specimen from a hospitalized child aged eight months with severe diarrhea. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genome of strain SKT-27. On whole genomic analysis, strain SKT-27 was found to have a unique genotype constellation: G6-P[14]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3. The non-G/P genotype constellation of this strain (I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3 is commonly shared with rotavirus strains from artiodactyls such as cattle. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that nine of the 11 genes of strain SKT-27 (VP7, VP4, VP6, VP2-3, NSP1, NSP3-5 appeared to be of artiodactyl (likely bovine origin, while the remaining VP1 and NSP2 genes were assumed to be of human origin. Thus, strain SKT-27 was found to have a bovine rotavirus genetic backbone, and thus is likely to be of bovine origin. Furthermore, strain SKT-27 appeared to be derived through interspecies transmission and reassortment events involving bovine and human rotavirus strains. Of note is that the VP7 gene of strain SKT-27 was located in G6 lineage-5 together with those of bovine rotavirus strains, away from the clusters comprising other G6P[14] strains in G6 lineages-2/6, suggesting the occurrence of independent bovine-to-human interspecies transmission events. To our knowledge, this is the first report on full genome-based characterization of human G6P[14] strains that have emerged in Southeast Asia. Our observations will provide important insights into the origin of G6P[14] strains, and into dynamic interactions between human and bovine rotavirus strains.

  19. Whole Genomic Analysis of an Unusual Human G6P[14] Rotavirus Strain Isolated from a Child with Diarrhea in Thailand: Evidence for Bovine-To-Human Interspecies Transmission and Reassortment Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Komoto, Satoshi; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Haga, Kei; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kato, Takema; Ouchi, Yuya; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Tsuji, Takao; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Taniguchi, Koki

    2015-01-01

    An unusual rotavirus strain, SKT-27, with the G6P[14] genotypes (RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-27/2012/G6P[14]), was identified in a stool specimen from a hospitalized child aged eight months with severe diarrhea. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genome of strain SKT-27. On whole genomic analysis, strain SKT-27 was found to have a unique genotype constellation: G6-P[14]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3. The non-G/P genotype constellation of this strain (I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3) is commonly shared with rotavirus strains from artiodactyls such as cattle. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that nine of the 11 genes of strain SKT-27 (VP7, VP4, VP6, VP2-3, NSP1, NSP3-5) appeared to be of artiodactyl (likely bovine) origin, while the remaining VP1 and NSP2 genes were assumed to be of human origin. Thus, strain SKT-27 was found to have a bovine rotavirus genetic backbone, and thus is likely to be of bovine origin. Furthermore, strain SKT-27 appeared to be derived through interspecies transmission and reassortment events involving bovine and human rotavirus strains. Of note is that the VP7 gene of strain SKT-27 was located in G6 lineage-5 together with those of bovine rotavirus strains, away from the clusters comprising other G6P[14] strains in G6 lineages-2/6, suggesting the occurrence of independent bovine-to-human interspecies transmission events. To our knowledge, this is the first report on full genome-based characterization of human G6P[14] strains that have emerged in Southeast Asia. Our observations will provide important insights into the origin of G6P[14] strains, and into dynamic interactions between human and bovine rotavirus strains.

  20. Genotypification of bovine group A rotavirus in México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Limas, William A; Flores-Samaniego, Beatriz; de la Mora, Germán; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2009-10-30

    Bovine scours, frequently provoked by rotavirus infection, causes significant economic losses. Nevertheless, no information exists about the bovine rotavirus genotypes present in Mexico. This information is necessary for designing efficient vaccines. In this work, 128 samples from diarrheic calves were collected between 2005 and 2006 in 26 dairy and/or beef cattle herds located in 10 regions of Mexico, and analyzed for the presence of group A rotavirus. G and P genotypes were determined by PCR in rotavirus-positive samples (12/128). Three different genotype combinations were found, G10, P[11]; G6, P[5]; and G10, P[5]; in 67, 25 and 8% of the positive samples, respectively. Some rotavirus-positive animals had been vaccinated with an inactivated rotavirus strain of a different genotype.

  1. Options for improving effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissera, Marion S; Cowley, Daniel; Bogdanovic-Sakran, Nada; Hutton, Melanie L; Lyras, Dena; Kirkwood, Carl D; Buttery, Jim P

    2016-11-11

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis is a leading global cause of mortality and morbidity in young children due to diarrhea and dehydration. Over 85% of deaths occur in developing countries. In industrialised countries, 2 live oral rotavirus vaccines licensed in 2006 quickly demonstrated high effectiveness, dramatically reducing severe rotavirus gastroenteritis admissions in many settings by more than 90%. In contrast, the same vaccines reduced severe rotavirus gastroenteritis by only 30-60% in developing countries, but have been proven life-saving. Bridging this "efficacy gap" offers the possibility to save many more lives of children under the age of 5. The reduced efficacy of rotavirus vaccines in developing settings may be related to differences in transmission dynamics, as well as host luminal, mucosal and immune factors. This review will examine strategies currently under study to target the issue of reduced efficacy and effectiveness of oral rotavirus vaccines in developing settings.

  2. Incidence and cost of rotavirus hospitalizations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Thea Kølsen; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In anticipation of licensure and introduction of rotavirus vaccine into the western market, we used modeling of national hospital registry data to determine the incidence and direct medical costs of annual rotavirus-associated admissions over >11 years in Denmark. Diarrhea-associated hospitalizat......In anticipation of licensure and introduction of rotavirus vaccine into the western market, we used modeling of national hospital registry data to determine the incidence and direct medical costs of annual rotavirus-associated admissions over >11 years in Denmark. Diarrhea......-associated hospitalizations coded as nonspecified viral or presumed infectious have demonstrated a marked winter peak similar to that of rotavirus-associated hospitalizations, which suggests that the registered rotavirus-coded admissions are grossly underestimated. We therefore obtained more realistic estimates by 2...

  3. Gene expression analysis in children with complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 or rotavirus gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuge, Mitsuru; Oka, Takashi; Yamashita, Nobuko; Saito, Yukie; Fujii, Yosuke; Nagaoka, Yoshiharu; Yashiro, Masato; Tsukahara, Hirokazu; Morishima, Tsuneo

    2014-02-01

    Viral infections have been implicated as a cause of complex seizures in children. The pathogenic differences in complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 or rotavirus gastroenteritis remain unclear. This study analyzed the gene expression profiles in the peripheral whole blood from pediatric patients with complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 or rotavirus gastroenteritis. The gene expression profiles of ten patients (five with seizures and five without) with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and six patients (three with seizures and three without) with rotavirus gastroenteritis were examined. Gene expression profiles in the whole blood were different in complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 or rotavirus gastroenteritis. Transcripts related to the immune response were significantly differentially expressed in complex seizures with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, and transcripts related to the stress response were significantly differentially expressed in complex seizures with rotavirus gastroenteritis. Pathway analysis showed that the mitogen-activated protein kinases in the T cell receptor signaling pathway were activated in complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. Dysregulation of the genes related to immune response or stress response could contribute to the pathogenic differences of the complex seizures due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 or rotavirus gastroenteritis.

  4. Implication of Hsc70, PDI and integrin αvβ3 involvement during entry of the murine rotavirus ECwt into small-intestinal villi of suckling mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Ana Y; Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2013-06-01

    In the present study, a homologous rotavirus, ECwt, infecting small intestinal villi isolated from ICR and BALB/c mice were used as a model for identifying cell-surface molecules involved in rotavirus entry. Small-intestinal villi were treated with anti-Hsc70, anti-PDI, anti-integrin β3 or anti-ERp57 antibodies or their corresponding F(ab')2 fragments before inoculation with rotavirus ECwt, RRV or Wa. Pretreatment of villi decreased virus infectivity by about 50-100 % depending of the rotavirus strain, antibody structure and detection assay used. Similar results were obtained by treating viral inocula with purified proteins Hsc70, PDI or integrin β3 before inoculation of untreated villi. Rotavirus infection of villi proved to be sensitive to membrane-impermeant thiol/disulfide inhibitors such as DTNB and bacitracin, suggesting the involvement of a redox reaction in infection. The present results suggest that PDI, Hsc70 and integrin β3 are used by both homologous and heterologous rotaviruses during infection of isolated mouse villi.

  5. Three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Yoshiki; Miura, Hiroki; Mori, Yuji; Sugata, Ken; Nakajima, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Yasuto; Morooka, Masashi; Tsuge, Ikuya; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Taniguchi, Koki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide in children. We report three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by various severity of gastrointestinal bleeding. Two patients (cases 1 and 2) recovered completely without any specific treatments. One patient (case 3) died despite extensive treatments including a red blood cell transfusion and endoscopic hemostatic therapy. Rotavirus genotypes G1P[8] and G9P[8] were detected in cases 2 and 3, respectively. Rotavirus antigenemia levels were not high at the onset of melena, suggesting that systemic rotaviral infection does not play an important role in causing melena.

  6. Incidence and cost of rotavirus hospitalizations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Thea Kølsen; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In anticipation of licensure and introduction of rotavirus vaccine into the western market, we used modeling of national hospital registry data to determine the incidence and direct medical costs of annual rotavirus-associated admissions over >11 years in Denmark. Diarrhea-associated hospitalizat......In anticipation of licensure and introduction of rotavirus vaccine into the western market, we used modeling of national hospital registry data to determine the incidence and direct medical costs of annual rotavirus-associated admissions over >11 years in Denmark. Diarrhea...

  7. [A rare cause of afebrile convulsion: rotavirus gastroenteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabel, Müsemma; Karabel, Duran; Kara, Semra; Halıcı Taş, Tuğba; Türkay, Sadi

    2013-04-01

    Rotavirus is the most common infectious diarrhea that causes important mortality and morbidities in small children, severe dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Extraintestinal signs are rare in rotavirus infections. Recently, afebrile seizures associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis but without encephalopathy, dehydration, electrolyte imbalance or hypoglycemia have being reported. In this article, the fact that rotavirus, which is seen commonly in our country, can be confronted with various clinical manifestations was emphasized by reminding that it can be seen not only in infants with neurologic and systemic disease but also in healthy infants.

  8. One-step multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for detecting and genotyping wild-type group A rotavirus strains and vaccine strains (Rotarix® and RotaTeq® in stool samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashi Gautam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Group A rotavirus (RVA infection is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE in young children worldwide. Introduction of two live-attenuated rotavirus vaccines, RotaTeq® and Rotarix®, has dramatically reduced RVA associated AGE and mortality in developed as well as in many developing countries. High-throughput methods are needed to genotype rotavirus wild-type strains and to identify vaccine strains in stool samples. Quantitative RT-PCR assays (qRT-PCR offer several advantages including increased sensitivity, higher throughput, and faster turnaround time. Methods. In this study, a one-step multiplex qRT-PCR assay was developed to detect and genotype wild-type strains and vaccine (Rotarix® and RotaTeq® rotavirus strains along with an internal processing control (Xeno or MS2 RNA. Real-time RT-PCR assays were designed for VP7 (G1, G2, G3, G4, G9, G12 and VP4 (P[4], P[6] and P[8] genotypes. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay also included previously published NSP3 qRT-PCR for rotavirus detection and Rotarix® NSP2 and RotaTeq® VP6 qRT-PCRs for detection of Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccine strains respectively. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay was validated using 853 sequence confirmed stool samples and 24 lab cultured strains of different rotavirus genotypes. By using thermostable rTth polymerase enzyme, dsRNA denaturation, reverse transcription (RT and amplification (PCR steps were performed in single tube by uninterrupted thermocycling profile to reduce chances of sample cross contamination and for rapid generation of results. For quantification, standard curves were generated using dsRNA transcripts derived from RVA gene segments. Results. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98.8–100% sensitivity, 99.7–100% specificity, 85–95% efficiency and a limit of detection of 4–60 copies per singleplex reaction. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 81–92% efficiency and limit of detection of 150–600 copies in multiplex reactions. The VP4 q

  9. One-step multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for detecting and genotyping wild-type group A rotavirus strains and vaccine strains (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) in stool samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Rashi; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Esona, Mathew D; Tam, Ka Ian; Quaye, Osbourne; Bowen, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Background. Group A rotavirus (RVA) infection is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young children worldwide. Introduction of two live-attenuated rotavirus vaccines, RotaTeq® and Rotarix®, has dramatically reduced RVA associated AGE and mortality in developed as well as in many developing countries. High-throughput methods are needed to genotype rotavirus wild-type strains and to identify vaccine strains in stool samples. Quantitative RT-PCR assays (qRT-PCR) offer several advantages including increased sensitivity, higher throughput, and faster turnaround time. Methods. In this study, a one-step multiplex qRT-PCR assay was developed to detect and genotype wild-type strains and vaccine (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) rotavirus strains along with an internal processing control (Xeno or MS2 RNA). Real-time RT-PCR assays were designed for VP7 (G1, G2, G3, G4, G9, G12) and VP4 (P[4], P[6] and P[8]) genotypes. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay also included previously published NSP3 qRT-PCR for rotavirus detection and Rotarix® NSP2 and RotaTeq® VP6 qRT-PCRs for detection of Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccine strains respectively. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay was validated using 853 sequence confirmed stool samples and 24 lab cultured strains of different rotavirus genotypes. By using thermostable rTth polymerase enzyme, dsRNA denaturation, reverse transcription (RT) and amplification (PCR) steps were performed in single tube by uninterrupted thermocycling profile to reduce chances of sample cross contamination and for rapid generation of results. For quantification, standard curves were generated using dsRNA transcripts derived from RVA gene segments. Results. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98.8-100% sensitivity, 99.7-100% specificity, 85-95% efficiency and a limit of detection of 4-60 copies per singleplex reaction. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 81-92% efficiency and limit of detection of 150-600 copies in multiplex reactions. The VP4 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98

  10. Prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in infants and children: rotavirus vaccine safety, efficacy, and potential impact of vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Chandran

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aruna Chandran1, Sean Fitzwater1, Anjie Zhen2, Mathuram Santosham11Department of International Health, Division of Health Systems, 2Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis globally, with greater than 86% of deaths occurring in low-income and middle-income countries. There are two rotavirus vaccines currently licensed in the United States and prequalified by the World Health Organization. RV1 is a monovalent attenuated human rotavirus strain, given orally in two doses. RV5 is a pentavalent human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine, given orally in three doses. A third rotavirus vaccine, LLV, is a lamb rotavirus strain given orally as a single dose, which is currently available only in China. RV1 and RV5 have been shown to be highly efficacious in developed countries, and initial results from trials in Africa and Asia are promising as well. At least three other vaccines are in development, which are being developed by manufacturers of developing countries. Further studies are needed to clarify issues including administration of oral rotavirus vaccines with breastfeeding and other oral vaccines, and alterations in dosing schedule. Using new data on global diarrheal burden, rotavirus is estimated to cause 390,000 deaths in children younger than 5 years. Should rotavirus vaccines be introduced in the routine immunization programs of all countries, a potential of 170,000 deaths could be prevented annually. The largest impact on mortality would be seen in low-income and middle-income countries, despite poor immunization coverage and lower efficacy. Therefore, international efforts are needed to ensure that rotavirus vaccines reach the populations with highest burden of rotavirus disease.Keywords: vaccination, mortality, rotavirus, gastroenteritis

  11. Large-scale whole genome sequencing identifies country-wide spread of an emerging G9P[8] rotavirus strain in Hungary, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóró, Renáta; Mihalov-Kovács, Eszter; Marton, Szilvia; László, Brigitta; Deák, Judit; Jakab, Ferenc; Juhász, Ágnes; Kisfali, Péter; Martella, Vito; Melegh, Béla; Molnár, Péter; Sántha, Ildikó; Schneider, Ferenc; Bányai, Krisztián

    2014-12-01

    With the availability of rotavirus vaccines routine strain surveillance has been launched or continued in many countries worldwide. In this study relevant information is provided from Hungary in order to extend knowledge about circulating rotavirus strains. Direct sequencing of the RT-PCR products obtained by VP7 and VP4 genes specific primer sets was utilized as routine laboratory method. In addition we explored the advantage of random primed RT-PCR and semiconductor sequencing of the whole genome of selected strains. During the study year, 2012, we identified an increase in the prevalence of G9P[8] strains across the country. This genotype combination predominated in seven out of nine study sites (detection rates, 45-83%). In addition to G9P[8]s, epidemiologically major strains included genotypes G1P[8] (34.2%), G2P[4] (13.5%), and G4P[8] (7.4%), whereas unusual and rare strains were G3P[8] (1%), G2P[8] (0.5%), G1P[4] (0.2%), G3P[4] (0.2%), and G3P[9] (0.2%). Whole genome analysis of 125 Hungarian human rotaviruses identified nine major genotype constellations and uncovered both intra- and intergenogroup reassortment events in circulating strains. Intergenogroup reassortment resulted in several unusual genotype constellations, including mono-reassortant G1P[8] and G9P[8] strains whose genotype 1 (Wa-like) backbone gene constellations contained DS1-like NSP2 and VP3 genes, respectively, as well as, a putative bovine-feline G3P[9] reassortant strain. The conserved genomic constellations of epidemiologically major genotypes suggested the clonal spread of the re-emerging G9P[8] genotype and several co-circulating strains (e.g., G1P[8] and G2P[4]) in many study sites during 2012. Of interest, medically important G2P[4] strains carried bovine-like VP1 and VP6 genes in their genotype constellation. No evidence for vaccine associated selection, or, interaction between wild-type and vaccine strains was obtained. In conclusion, this study reports the reemergence of G9P[8

  12. Stress Response and Translation Control in Rotavirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana López

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The general stress and innate immune responses are closely linked and overlap at many levels. The outcomes of these responses serve to reprogram host expression patterns to prevent viral invasions. In turn, viruses counter attack these cell responses to ensure their replication. The mechanisms by which viruses attempt to control host cell responses are as varied as the number of different virus families. One of the most recurrent strategies used by viruses to control the antiviral response of the cell is to hijack the translation machinery of the host, such that viral proteins are preferentially synthesized, while the expression of the stress and antiviral responses of the cell are blocked at the translation level. Here, we will review how rotaviruses, an important agent of acute severe gastroenteritis in children, overcome the stress responses of the cell to establish a productive infectious cycle.

  13. Stress Response and Translation Control in Rotavirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Susana; Oceguera, Alfonso; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The general stress and innate immune responses are closely linked and overlap at many levels. The outcomes of these responses serve to reprogram host expression patterns to prevent viral invasions. In turn, viruses counter attack these cell responses to ensure their replication. The mechanisms by which viruses attempt to control host cell responses are as varied as the number of different virus families. One of the most recurrent strategies used by viruses to control the antiviral response of the cell is to hijack the translation machinery of the host, such that viral proteins are preferentially synthesized, while the expression of the stress and antiviral responses of the cell are blocked at the translation level. Here, we will review how rotaviruses, an important agent of acute severe gastroenteritis in children, overcome the stress responses of the cell to establish a productive infectious cycle. PMID:27338442

  14. Assortment and packaging of the segmented rotavirus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Sarah M; Patton, John T

    2011-03-01

    The rotavirus (RV) genome comprises 11 segments of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and is contained within a non-enveloped, icosahedral particle. During assembly, a highly coordinated selective packaging mechanism ensures that progeny RV virions contain one of each genome segment. Cis-acting signals thought to mediate assortment and packaging are associated with putative panhandle structures formed by base-pairing of the ends of RV plus-strand RNAs (+RNAs). Viral polymerases within assembling core particles convert the 11 distinct +RNAs to dsRNA genome segments. It remains unclear whether RV +RNAs are assorted before or during encapsidation, and the functions of viral proteins during these processes are not resolved. However, as reviewed here, recent insights gained from the study of RV and two other segmented RNA viruses, influenza A virus and bacteriophage Φ6, reveal potential mechanisms of RV assortment and packaging.

  15. In silico study of rotavirus VP7 surface accessible conserved regions for antiviral drug/vaccine design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambarnil Ghosh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rotaviral diarrhoea kills about half a million children annually in developing countries and accounts for one third of diarrhea related hospitalizations. Drugs and vaccines against the rotavirus are handicapped, as in all viral diseases, by the rapid mutational changes that take place in the DNA and protein sequences rendering most of these ineffective. As of now only two vaccines are licensed and approved by the WHO (World Health Organization, but display reduced efficiencies in the underdeveloped countries where the disease is more prevalent. We approached this issue by trying to identify regions of surface exposed conserved segments on the surface glycoproteins of the virion, which may then be targeted by specific peptide vaccines. We had developed a bioinformatics protocol for these kinds of problems with reference to the influenza neuraminidase protein, which we have refined and expanded to analyze the rotavirus issue. RESULTS: Our analysis of 433 VP7 (Viral Protein 7 from rotavirus surface protein sequences across 17 subtypes encompassing mammalian hosts using a 20D Graphical Representation and Numerical Characterization method, identified four possible highly conserved peptide segments. Solvent accessibility prediction servers were used to identify that these are predominantly surface situated. These regions analyzed through selected epitope prediction servers for their epitopic properties towards possible T-cell and B-cell activation showed good results as epitopic candidates (only dry lab confirmation. CONCLUSIONS: The main reasons for the development of alternative vaccine strategies for the rotavirus are the failure of current vaccines and high production costs that inhibit their application in developing countries. We expect that it would be possible to use the protein surface exposed regions identified in our study as targets for peptide vaccines and drug designs for stable immunity against divergent strains of the

  16. Rotavirus and Serotonin Cross-Talk in Diarrhoea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Bialowas

    Full Text Available Rotavirus (RV has been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin from human enterochromaffin (EC cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice. It remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein(s is responsible for this novel property and to further establish the clinical role of serotonin in RV infection. First, we found that siRNA specifically silencing NSP4 (siRNANSP4 significantly attenuated secretion of serotonin from Rhesus rotavirus (RRV infected EC tumor cells compared to siRNAVP4, siRNAVP6 and siRNAVP7. Second, intracellular calcium mobilization and diarrhoeal capacity from virulent and avirulent porcine viruses correlated with the capacity to release serotonin from EC tumor cells. Third, following administration of serotonin, all (10/10 infants, but no (0/8 adult mice, responded with diarrhoea. Finally, blocking of serotonin receptors using Ondansetron significantly attenuated murine RV (strain EDIM diarrhoea in infant mice (2.9 vs 4.5 days. Ondansetron-treated mice (n = 11 had significantly (p < 0.05 less diarrhoea, lower diarrhoea severity score and lower total diarrhoea output as compared to mock-treated mice (n = 9. Similarly, Ondansetron-treated mice had better weight gain than mock-treated animals (p < 0.05. A most surprising finding was that the serotonin receptor antagonist significantly (p < 0.05 also attenuated total viral shedding. In summary, we show that intracellularly expressed NSP4 stimulates release of serotonin from human EC tumor cells and that serotonin participates in RV diarrhoea, which can be attenuated by Ondansetron.

  17. Rotavirus: disease and vaccine update, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Samuel

    2007-02-01

    Rotavirus infection is a ubiquitous illness, infecting the vast majority of children worldwide in the first 5 years of life. Rotavirus is one of the major causes of severe diarrhea in infants and young children throughout the developing and developed world. An estimated 500,000 deaths per year occur, with the burden of morbidity and mortality highest in the poorest nations. Two new oral, live, attenuated vaccines have recently shown efficacy and safety in clinical trials, and one of these, RotaTeq, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration on February 3, 2006. RotaTeq is recommended for general use by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Academy of Family Practice, and American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. New approaches in oral rotavirus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuate Defo, Zenas; Lee, Byong

    2016-05-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe dehydrating diarrhea worldwide, and affects primarily developing nations, in large part because of the inaccessibility of vaccines and high rates of mortality present therein. At present, there exist two oral rotaviral vaccines, Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™. These vaccines are generally effective in their actions: however, associated costs often stymie their effectiveness, and they continue to be associated with a slight risk of intussusception. While different programs are being implemented worldwide to enhance vaccine distribution and monitor vaccine administration for possible intussusception in light of recent WHO recommendation, another major problem persists: that of the reduced efficacy of the existing rotaviral vaccines in developing countries over time. The development of new oral rotavirus vaccine classes - live-attenuated vaccines, virus-like particles, lactic acid bacteria-containing vaccines, combination therapy with immunoglobulins, and biodegradable polymer-encapsulated vaccines - could potentially circumvent these problems.

  19. Impact of rotavirus vaccination on hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea: the IVANHOE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagneur, Arnaud; Nowak, Emmanuel; Lemaitre, Thomas; Segura, Jean-Francois; Delaperrière, Nadège; Abalea, Lydie; Poulhazan, Elise; Jossens, Anne; Auzanneau, Lucie; Tran, Adissa; Payan, Christopher; Jay, Nadine; de Parscau, Loic; Oger, Emmanuel

    2011-05-12

    The aim of the IVANHOE study was to determine the real-world impact of the rotavirus vaccine, controlling for epidemic-to-epidemic variation in disease burden. A population-based prospective cohort study was conducted in Brest City and 7 suburban districts (CUB area), North-western Brittany, France (210,000 inhabitants; 5500 births per year). The vaccination program started in May 2007 for a 2-year period for all infants born in the Brest birth zone through pediatricians, public outpatient clinics and general practitioners. To determine vaccine impact we monitored trends in hospitalizations for rotavirus-specific diarrhea using an active hospital-based surveillance system initiated 5 years before vaccine introduction. The number of hospitalizations for rotavirus-specific diarrhea during the 2008/2009 epidemic in infants less than 2 years of age whose parents lived within the CUB area was modelled as a function of (1) the number of hospitalizations in infants 2-5 years of age to control for epidemic-to-epidemic variation and (2) vaccine introduction. A total of 4684 infants received at least one dose. Of these, 2635 lived within the CUB area. Vaccine coverage for a complete schedule in the CUB area was 47.1%. Poisson modelling revealed a reduction by a factor of 2.04 (1.56-2.66) in the number of hospitalizations during the last epidemic season (2008/2009), the number of observed cases being equal to 30, against an expected number of 61. Relative risk reduction for hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea was 98% (95% CI: 83-100%). We observed a noticeable impact of vaccination on rotavirus diarrhea hospitalizations within 2 years of vaccine introduction integrating for the first time rotavirus epidemics variation. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number, NCT00740935.

  20. Rotavirus P[8] Infections in Persons with Secretor and Nonsecretor Phenotypes, Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayouni, Siwar; Sdiri-Loulizi, Khira; de Rougemont, Alexis; Estienney, Marie; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Aho, Serge; Hamami, Sabeur; Aouni, Mahjoub; Neji-Guediche, Mohamed; Pothier, Pierre; Belliot, Gaël

    2015-11-01

    To determine whether rotavirus infections are linked to secretor status, we studied samples from children in Tunisia with gastroenteritis. We phenotyped saliva for human blood group antigens and tested feces for rotavirus. Rotavirus was detected in 32/114 patients. Secretor genotyping showed that P[8] rotavirus infected secretors and nonsecretors, and infection correlated with presence of Lewis antigen.

  1. Rotavirus epidemiology in San Luis Potosí, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyola, Daniel E; Herrera, Ismael F

    2005-07-01

    The epidemiology of rotavirus infections was investigated in San Luis Potosí, Mexico during a 6-year period. In each of the study years, the epidemic period started in October or November; peak activity was detected between December and February, and the end of the epidemic occurred in March or April. Rotavirus infections show a consistent temporal pattern in our community.

  2. [Rotavirus infection in Brazil: epidemiology and challenges for its control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhares, A C

    2000-01-01

    Worldwide, rotaviruses account for 600,000 to 870,000 deaths per year among infants and young children. In Brazil, rotaviruses were first seen in 1976 by scanning electron microscopy of stool samples from diarrheic infants in Belém, Pará. Hospital-based studies have shown that rotaviruses are associated with 12-42% of cases of acute diarrhea. In addition, community-based studies yielded an average of 0.25 rotavirus-related diarrheal episodes per child per year. G types 1 to 4 account for about two-thirds of circulating strains, but the (unusual) P[8],G5 genotype has been claimed to cause over 10% of rotavirus diarrheal episodes. It has been shown that over 70% of children develop rotavirus antibodies by the age of 4-5 years. The tetravalent rhesus-human rotavirus vaccine (RRV-TV) conferred 35% protection according to a two-year follow-up study in Belém, Pará, Brazil, but reached an efficacy of 60% during the first year of life. RRV-TV was also shown to be 75% protective against very severe gastroenteritis in northern Brazil. Vaccination with RRV-TV has been suspended recently in the United States because of the detection of intussusception as a side effect. Therefore, further vaccine trials in Brazil will probably involve rotavirus candidate vaccines other than RRV-TV.

  3. Development of improved vaccine cell lines against rotavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weilin; Orr-Burks, Nichole; Karpilow, Jon; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2017-01-01

    Rotavirus is a major cause of severe gastroenteritis among very young children. In developing countries, rotavirus is the major cause of mortality in children under five years old, causing up to 20% of all childhood deaths in countries with high diarrheal disease burden, with more than 90% of these deaths occurring in Africa and Asia. Rotavirus vaccination mimics the first infection without causing illness, thus inducing strong and broad heterotypic immunity against prospective rotavirus infections. Two live vaccines are available, Rotarix and RotaTeq, but vaccination efforts are hampered by high production costs. Here, we present a dataset containing a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen that identified silencing events that enhanced rotavirus replication. Evaluated against several rotavirus vaccine strains, hits were validated in a Vero vaccine cell line as well as CRISPR/Cas9 generated cells permanently and stably lacking the genes that affect RV replication. Knockout cells were dramatically more permissive to RV replication and permitted an increase in rotavirus replication. These data show a means to improve manufacturing of rotavirus vaccine. PMID:28248921

  4. Rotavirus Type A in Danish Cattle and Swine Herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, Sofie; Gram, Nina; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane

    Rotavirus group A infection causes gastroenteritis in both humans and a variety of animal species. Both domestic pet species such as cats and dogs, and commercial species such as pigs and cows can be affected. Zoonotic transmission is a possibility and could lead to the introduction into human...... populations of novel rotavirus strains....

  5. Rotavirus Group A in Danish Cattle and Swine Herds 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, Sofie; Gram, Nina; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane

    Rotavirus group A infection causes gastroenteritis in both humans and a variety of animal species. Both domestic pet species such as cats and dogs, and commercial species such as pigs and cows can be affected. Zoonotic transmission is a possibility and could lead to the introduction into human...... populations of novel rotavirus strains....

  6. Rotavirus in the Netherlands : Background information for the Health Council

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk JDM; Bruijning-Verhagen P; de Melker H; RVP; I&V

    2017-01-01

    Rotavirus can cause a gastrointestinal infection and is common in young children. There are two vaccines available; both have to be administered via the mouth. The Dutch Health Council will advise the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport on how childhood vaccination against rotavirus will be made

  7. Rotavirus detection and isolation from chickens with or without symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LYB Villarreal

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses have been identified as one of the main etiological agents of diarrhea and enteritis in mammals, including humans, and in avian species. Few studies have been published about enteric viruses in Brazilian poultry, including those related to rotavirus infection. Such studies demonstrate significant occurrence and the importance of enteric viruses in poultry presenting intestinal problems. Enteric viruses are the primary cause of injuries to the gut, allowing other agents, especially bacteria, to attach, to penetrate, and to replicate in the enteric tissue, leading to further damage. The aim of the present study was to detect rotavirus in the intestinal contents of layers and broilers by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE and virus isolation in MA-104 cell culture. A total of 45.3% of all samples were positive to rotavirus; rotavirus frequencies were 48.7% in samples from flocks with diarrhea, 46.4% in flocks with delayed growth, and 30% in asymptomatic flocks. It was possible to isolate rotavirus in MA-104 cells from the nine rotavirus-positive randomly chosen samples. These results indicate that rotavirus may have an important role in pathogenesis of enteric disease.

  8. Rotavirus vaccines: viral shedding and risk of transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Evan J

    2008-10-01

    Rotavirus causes gastroenteritis in almost all children by 5 years of age. Immunity to rotavirus is incomplete, with potential for recurrent infections occurring throughout life. Live rotavirus vaccines have been developed for the protection of children from severe wildtype rotavirus infections. Transmission of vaccine virus strains from vaccinated children to unvaccinated contacts harbours the potential for herd immunity, but also the risk of vaccine-derived disease in immunocompromised contacts. A review of rotavirus vaccine prelicensure studies shows that viral shedding and transmission were higher with the old tetravalent rhesus rotavirus vaccine than with the current human attenuated monovalent rotavirus vaccine and the pentavalent bovine-human reassortant vaccine. Immunocompromised contacts should be advised to avoid contact with stool from the immunised child if possible, particularly after the first vaccine dose for at least 14 days. Since the risk of vaccine transmission and subsequent vaccine-derived disease with the current vaccines is much less than the risk of wildtype rotavirus disease in immunocompromised contacts, vaccination should be encouraged.

  9. Cost Effectiveness of Infant Vaccination for Rotavirus in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug Coyle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rotavirus is the main cause of gastroenteritis in Canadian children younger than five years of age, resulting in significant morbidity and cost. The present study provides evidence on the cost effectiveness of two alternative rotavirus vaccinations (RotaTeq [Merck Frosst Canada Ltd, Canada] and Rotarix [GlaxoSmithKline, Canada] available in Canada.

  10. Rotavirus-associated immune thrombocytopenic purpura in children: A retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Ai, Qi; Yin, Jing; Chen, Sen; Qiao, Lijin; Luo, Na

    2016-01-01

    Certain studies have previously indicated that an association may exist between rotavirus infection and primary immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The present retrospective study aimed to investigate whether rotavirus may cause ITP in children. Firstly, the incidence of ITP in children with or without rotavirus diarrhea was compared. A 14.58% incident rate was observed in children with rotavirus diarrhea compared with a 7.22% incident rate in children without rotavirus diarrhea. Subsequen...

  11. An update of "Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in the Netherlands : the results of a Consensus Rotavirus Vaccine model"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, Hong Anh T.; Rozenbaum, Mark H.; de Boer, Pieter T.; Noort, Albert C.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: To update a cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination in the Netherlands previously published in 2011.Methods: The rotavirus burden of disease and the indirect protection of older children and young adults (herd protection) were updated.Results: When updated data was used,

  12. Reaching every child with rotavirus vaccine: Report from the 10th African rotavirus symposium held in Bamako, Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sow, Samba O; Steele, A Duncan; Mwenda, Jason M; Armah, George E; Neuzil, Kathleen M

    2017-09-08

    The Center for Vaccine Development - Mali (CVD - Mali), the World Health Organization's regional office in Africa (WHO/AFRO), and the CVD at the University of Maryland School of Medicine hosted the 10th African Rotavirus Symposium in Bamako, Mali on 1-2 June 2016. The symposium is coordinated by WHO/AFRO, the Regional Rotavirus Reference Laboratories, and the African Rotavirus Network (ARN), with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The event brings together leading rotavirus researchers, scientists, and policy-makers from across Africa and the world. Over 150 participants, from 31 countries, including 27 in Africa, joined forces to address the theme "Reaching Every Child in Africa with Rotavirus Vaccines." This symposium, the first in francophone Africa, occurred at an unprecedented time when 33 African countries had introduced rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs. The symposium concluded with a Call to Action to introduce rotavirus vaccines in the 21 remaining African countries, to increase access in countries with existing vaccination programs, and to continue surveillance and research on rotavirus and other diarrheal diseases. Copyright © 2017.

  13. Diarrheal Diseases Hospitalization in Yemen before and after Rotavirus Vaccination

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    Mohammed Amood AL-Kamarany

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on diarrheal diseases hospitalization and to identify the rotavirus genotypes most prevalent before and after vaccine introduction among children ≤ 5 years of age. Rotarix™ ® rotavirus vaccine is currently licensed for infants in Yemen and was introduced in 2012. The vaccination course consists of two doses. The first dose is administrated at 6 weeks of age and the second dose is completed by 10 weeks. Based on a longitudinal observational study, we assessed the impact of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalization before and after vaccination among children ≤ 5 years of age at the Yemeni-Swedish Hospital (YSH in Taiz, Yemen. Prevaccination covered January 2009–July 2012 during which 2335 fecal samples were collected from children ≤ 5 years old. Postvaccination covered January 2013–December 2014 during which 1114 fecal samples were collected. Rotavirus was detected by Enzyme Linkage Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA. The incidence of rotavirus hospitalization decreased from 43.79% in 2009 to 10.54% in 2014. Hospitalization due to rotavirus diarrhea was reduced by 75.93%. Vaccine coverage increased from 23% in 2012 to 72% in 2014. Also, the results showed that the most predominant genotypes in prevaccination period were G2P[4] (55.0%, followed by G1P[8] (15.0%, while in postvaccination period G1P[8] (31% was the predominant genotype, followed by G9P[8] (27.5%. In conclusion, rotavirus vaccination in Yemen resulted in sharp reduction in diarrheal hospitalization. A successful rotavirus vaccination program in Yemen will rely upon efficient vaccine delivery systems and sustained vaccine efficacy against diverse and evolving rotavirus strains.

  14. A gastrointestinal rotavirus infection mouse model for immune modulation studies

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    van Amerongen Geert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotaviruses are the single most important cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. The current study was conducted to assess whether colostrum containing rotavirus-specific antibodies (Gastrogard-R® could protect against rotavirus infection. In addition, this illness model was used to study modulatory effects of intervention on several immune parameters after re-infection. Methods BALB/c mice were treated by gavage once daily with Gastrogard-R® from the age of 4 to 10 days, and were inoculated with rhesus rotavirus (RRV at 7 days of age. A secondary inoculation with epizootic-diarrhea infant-mouse (EDIM virus was administered at 17 days of age. Disease symptoms were scored daily and viral shedding was measured in fecal samples during the post-inoculation periods. Rotavirus-specific IgM, IgG and IgG subclasses in serum, T cell proliferation and rotavirus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH responses were also measured. Results Primary inoculation with RRV induced a mild but consistent level of diarrhea during 3-4 days post-inoculation. All mice receiving Gastrogard-R® were 100% protected against rotavirus-induced diarrhea. Mice receiving both RRV and EDIM inoculation had a lower faecal-viral load following EDIM inoculation then mice receiving EDIM alone or Gastrogard-R®. Mice receiving Gastrogard-R® however displayed an enhanced rotavirus-specific T-cell proliferation whereas rotavirus-specific antibody subtypes were not affected. Conclusions Preventing RRV-induced diarrhea by Gastrogard-R® early in life showed a diminished protection against EDIM re-infection, but a rotavirus-specific immune response was developed including both B cell and T cell responses. In general, this intervention model can be used for studying clinical symptoms as well as the immune responses required for protection against viral re-infection.

  15. Household transmission of rotavirus in a community with rotavirus vaccination in Quininde, Ecuador.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Lopman

    Full Text Available We studied the transmission of rotavirus infection in households in peri-urban Ecuador in the vaccination era.Stool samples were collected from household contacts of child rotavirus cases, diarrhea controls and healthy controls following presentation of the index child to health facilities. Rotavirus infection status of contacts was determined by RT-qPCR. We examined factors associated with transmissibility (index-case characteristics and susceptibility (household-contact characteristics.Amongst cases, diarrhea controls and healthy control household contacts, infection attack rates (iAR were 55%, 8% and 2%, (n = 137, 130, 137 respectively. iARs were higher from index cases with vomiting, and amongst siblings. Disease ARs were higher when the index child was <18 months and had vomiting, with household contact <10 years and those sharing a room with the index case being more susceptible. We found no evidence of asymptomatic infections leading to disease transmission.Transmission rates of rotavirus are high in households with an infected child, while background infections are rare. We have identified factors associated with transmission (vomiting/young age of index case and susceptibility (young age/sharing a room/being a sibling of the index case. Vaccination may lead to indirect benefits by averting episodes or reducing symptoms in vaccinees.

  16. [Seasonality of rotavirus infection in Venezuela: relationship between monthly rotavirus incidence and rainfall rates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Chávez, Rosabel

    2015-09-01

    In general, it has been reported that rotavirus infection was detected year round in tropical countries. However, studies in Venezuela and Brazil suggest a seasonal behavior of the infection. On the other hand, some studies link infection with climatic variables such as rainfall. This study analyzes the pattern of behavior of the rotavirus infection in Carabobo-Venezuela (2001-2005), associates the seasonality of the infection with rainfall, and according to the seasonal pattern, estimates the age of greatest risk for infection. The analysis of the rotavirus temporal series and accumulated precipitation was performed with the software SPSS. The infection showed two periods: high incidence (November-April) and low incidence (May-October). Accumulated precipitation presents an opposite behavior. The highest frequency of events (73.8% 573/779) for those born in the period with a low incidence of the virus was recorded at an earlier age (mean age 6.5 +/- 2.0 months) when compared with those born in the station of high incidence (63.5% 568/870, mean age 11.7 +/- 2.2 months). Seasonality of the infection and the inverse relationship between virus incidence and rainfall was demonstrated. In addition, it was found that the period of birth determines the age and risk of infection. This information generated during the preaccine period will be helpful to measure the impact of the vaccine against the rotavirus.

  17. Analysis of gene selection in reassortant formation between canine rotavirus K9 and human rotaviruses with different antigenic specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, N; Taniguchi, K; Urasawa, T; Urasawa, S

    1993-01-01

    A number of antigenic mosaic reassortants which have neutralization proteins VP4 and VP7 derived from different parental strains were analysed in order to study gene selection in reassortant formation between animal and human rotaviruses (HRV). These reassortants were isolated from mixed infection of MA-104 cells with canine rotavirus strain K9 (subgroup I and G serotype 3) and HRV strains (with subgroup I or II antigen and G serotype 1-4, 9 or 12 antigen), through repeated selections with anti-VP4 and anti-VP7 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies directed specifically at HRV and K9, respectively. By serological and genomic analyses, all the isolated clones were found to be antigenic mosaic reassortants possessing VP4 of K9 and VP7 of HRV. In the reassortants between strain K9 and one of the six strains of subgroup II HRV, a single or a few genotypes with particular constellations of RNA segments were predominant, with only a few RNA segments including gene 4 (encoding VP4) being derived from K9. In contrast, in the reassortants between strain K9 and any one of the subgroup I HRV, more than nine different genotypes were identified and various RNA segments, except for segments 8 and 10, were derived from K9. These findings indicated that the RNA segments of K9 might be reassorted more readily with those of subgroup I HRV than with those of subgroup II HRV, suggesting the possible existence of functional mechanisms which determine the extent of diversity of genome selection depending on the pairs of parent strains in the reassortant formation.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the sialic acid-binding domain (VP8*) of porcine rotavirus strain CRW-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Stacy A. [Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University (Gold Coast Campus) PMB 50, Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 9726 (Australia); Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Szyczew, Alex J.; Kiefel, Milton J.; Itzstein, Mark von; Blanchard, Helen, E-mail: h.blanchard@griffith.edu.au [Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University (Gold Coast Campus) PMB 50, Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 9726 (Australia)

    2005-06-01

    The sialic acid-binding domain (VP8*) component of the porcine CRW-8 rotavirus spike protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and co-crystallized with an N-acetylneuraminic acid derivative. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.3 Å, which has enabled determination of the structure by molecular replacement. Rotavirus recognition and attachment to host cells involves interaction with the spike protein VP4 that projects outwards from the surface of the virus particle. An integral component of these spikes is the VP8* domain, which is implicated in the direct recognition and binding of sialic acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates and facilitates subsequent invasion by the virus. The expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of VP8* from porcine CRW-8 rotavirus is reported. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.3 Å resolution, enabling the determination of the VP8* structure by molecular replacement.

  19. Distribution of conserved and specific epitopes on the VP8 subunit of rotavirus VP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larralde, G; Gorziglia, M

    1992-01-01

    Three cDNA clones comprising the VP8 subunit of the VP4 of human rotavirus strain KU (VP7 serotype G1; VP4 serotype P1A) G1 were constructed. The corresponding encoded peptides were designated according to their locations in the VP8 subunit as A (amino acids 1 to 102), B (amino acids 84 to 180), and C (amino acids 150 to 246 plus amino acids 247 to 251 from VP5). In addition, cDNA clones encoding peptide B of the VP8 subunit of the VP4 gene from human rotavirus strains DS-1 (G2; P1B) and 1076 (G2; P2) were also constructed. These DNA fragments were inserted into plasmid pGEMEX-1 and expressed in Escherichia coli. Western immunoblot analysis using antisera to rotavirus strains KU (P1A), Wa (P1A), DS-1 (P1B), 1076 (P2), and M37 (P2) demonstrated that peptides A and C cross-reacted with heterotypic human rotavirus VP4 antisera, suggesting that these two peptides represent conserved epitopes in the VP8 subunit. In contrast, peptide B appears to be involved in the VP4 serotype and subtype specificities, because it reacted only with the corresponding serotype- and subtype-specific antiserum. Antiserum raised against peptide A, B, or C of strain KU contained a lower level of neutralizing activity than did that induced by the entire VP8 subunit. In addition, the serotype-specific neutralizing activity of anti-KU VP8 serum was ablated after adsorption with the KU VP8 protein but not with a mixture of peptides A, B, and C of strain KU, suggesting that most of the serotype-specific epitopes in the VP8 subunit are conformational and are dependent on the entire amino acid sequence of VP8. Images PMID:1279204

  20. High Titers of Circulating Maternal Antibodies Suppress Effector and Memory B-Cell Responses Induced by an Attenuated Rotavirus Priming and Rotavirus-Like Particle-Immunostimulating Complex Boosting Vaccine Regimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trang V.; Yuan, Lijuan; Azevedo, Marli S. P.; Jeong, Kwang-il; Gonzalez, Ana M.; Iosef, Cristiana; Lovgren-Bengtsson, Karin; Morein, Bror; Lewis, Peggy; Saif, Linda J.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated maternal antibody (MatAb) effects on protection and immune responses to rotavirus vaccines. Gnotobiotic pigs were injected intraperitoneally at birth with pooled serum from sows hyperimmunized with human rotavirus (HRV); control pigs received no sow serum. Pigs with or without MatAbs received either sequential attenuated HRV (AttHRV) oral priming and intranasal boosting with VP2/VP6 virus-like particle (VLP)-immunostimulating complex (ISCOM) (AttHRV/VLP) or intranasal VLP-ISCOM prime/boost (VLP) vaccines at 3 to 5 days of age. Subsets of pigs were challenged at 28 or 42 days postinoculation with virulent Wa HRV to assess protection. Isotype-specific antibody-secreting cell (ASC) responses to HRV were quantitated by enzyme-linked immunospot assay to measure effector and memory B-cell responses in intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues pre- and/or postchallenge. Protection rates against HRV challenge (contributed by active immunity and passive circulating MatAbs) were consistently (but not significantly) lower in the MatAb-AttHRV/VLP groups than in the corresponding groups without MatAbs. Intestinal B-cell responses in the MatAb-AttHRV/VLP group were most suppressed with significantly reduced or no intestinal immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG effector and memory B-cell responses or antibody titers pre- and postchallenge. This suppression was not alleviated but was enhanced after extending vaccination/challenge from 28 to 42 days. In pigs vaccinated with nonreplicating VLP alone that failed to induce protection, MatAb effects differed, with intestinal and systemic IgG ASCs and prechallenge memory B cells suppressed but the low intestinal IgA and IgM ASC responses unaffected. Thus, we demonstrate that MatAbs differentially affect both replicating and nonreplicating HRV vaccines and suggest mechanisms of MatAb interference. This information should facilitate vaccine design to overcome MatAb suppression. PMID:16603615

  1. Anticipating rotavirus vaccines--a pre-vaccine assessment of incidence and economic burden of rotavirus hospitalizations among children Libya, 2012-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkoshi, Salem; Leshem, Eyal; Parashar, Umesh D; Dahlui, Maznah

    2015-01-24

    Libya introduced rotavirus vaccine in October 2013. We examined pre-vaccine incidence of rotavirus hospitalizations and associated economic burden among children Libya to provide baseline data for future vaccine impact evaluations. Prospective, hospital-based active surveillance for rotavirus was conducted at three public hospitals in two cities during August 2012 - April 2013. Clinical, demographic and estimated cost data were collected from children Libya, highlighting the potential value of vaccination of Libyan children against rotavirus.

  2. Incidence and cost of rotavirus hospitalizations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Thea Kølsen; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In anticipation of licensure and introduction of rotavirus vaccine into the western market, we used modeling of national hospital registry data to determine the incidence and direct medical costs of annual rotavirus-associated admissions over >11 years in Denmark. Diarrhea-associated hospitalizat......In anticipation of licensure and introduction of rotavirus vaccine into the western market, we used modeling of national hospital registry data to determine the incidence and direct medical costs of annual rotavirus-associated admissions over >11 years in Denmark. Diarrhea......-associated hospitalizations coded as nonspecified viral or presumed infectious have demonstrated a marked winter peak similar to that of rotavirus-associated hospitalizations, which suggests that the registered rotavirus-coded admissions are grossly underestimated. We therefore obtained more realistic estimates by 2...... different models, which indicated 2.4 and 2.5 (for children rotavirus-associated admissions per 1,000 children per year, respectively. These admissions amount to associated direct medical costs of US $1.7-1.8 million per year. Using 2 simple...

  3. Avian rotavirus enteritis - an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhama, Kuldeep; Saminathan, Mani; Karthik, Kumaragurubaran; Tiwari, Ruchi; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Kumar, Naveen; Malik, Yashpal Singh; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are among the leading causes of enteritis and diarrhea in a number of mammalian and avian species, and impose colossal loss to livestock and poultry industry globally. Subsequent to detection of rotavirus in mammalian hosts in 1973, avian rotavirus (AvRV) was first reported in turkey poults in USA during 1977 and since then RVs of group A (RVA), D (RVD), F (RVF) and G (RVG) have been identified around the globe. Besides RVA, other AvRV groups (RVD, RVF and RVG) may also contribute to disease. However, their significance has yet to be unraveled. Under field conditions, co-infection of AvRVs occurs with other infectious agents such as astroviruses, enteroviruses, reoviruses, paramyxovirus, adenovirus, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, cryptosporidium and Eimeria species prospering severity of disease outcome. Birds surviving to RV disease predominantly succumb to secondary bacterial infections, mostly E. coli and Salmonella spp. Recent developments in molecular tools including state-of-the-art diagnostics and vaccine development have led to advances in our understanding towards AvRVs. Development of new generation vaccines using immunogenic antigens of AvRV has to be explored and given due importance. Till now, no effective vaccines are available. Although specific as well as sensitive approaches are available to identify and characterize AvRVs, there is still need to have point-of-care detection assays to review disease burden, contemplate new directions for adopting vaccination and follow improvements in public health measures. This review discusses AvRVs, their epidemiology, pathology and pathogenesis, immunity, recent trends in diagnostics, vaccines, therapeutics as well as appropriate prevention and control strategies.

  4. Rotavirus-associated immune thrombocytopenic purpura in children: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Qi; Yin, Jing; Chen, Sen; Qiao, Lijin; Luo, Na

    2016-10-01

    Certain studies have previously indicated that an association may exist between rotavirus infection and primary immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The present retrospective study aimed to investigate whether rotavirus may cause ITP in children. Firstly, the incidence of ITP in children with or without rotavirus diarrhea was compared. A 14.58% incident rate was observed in children with rotavirus diarrhea compared with a 7.22% incident rate in children without rotavirus diarrhea. Subsequently, the clinical features of ITP children with or without rotavirus infection were compared. The results indicated that ITP children with rotavirus infection were significantly younger, showed significantly decreased mean platelet volume (MPV) levels and presented a significantly higher frequency of bleeding score of 3 against ITP children without rotavirus infection. In conclusion, these findings suggest that rotavirus serves a causative role in ITP.

  5. The molecular biology of rotaviruses X: intercellular dissemination of rotavirus NSP4 requires glycosylation and is mediated by direct cell-cell contact through cytoplasmic extrusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiming; McCrae, Malcolm A

    2012-02-01

    The effect of expressing the NSP4 protein of group A rotaviruses in cells has been studied. It led to the rapid appearance of long cytoplasmic extrusions, which, through site-directed mutagenesis of the N-linked glycosylation sites near the amino terminus of the protein, were shown to be dependent on its ability to become fully glycosylated. Real-time confocal microscopy was used to follow the appearance of similar cytoplasmic extrusions in virus-infected cells and revealed them to grow at a rate of ~2 microns/min to more than three cell diameters and to have a lifespan of 30-60 minutes. CellTracker dyes were used to label cell populations and facilitate the monitoring of the transfer of cytoplasm from virus-infected to surrounding uninfected cells through cytoplasmic extrusions that broke down to vesicles, seen both on the surface of and within uninfected cells in mixed cell populations. Staining of these tagged cell mixtures with monospecific antibody to NSP4 revealed the presence of the protein on uninfected cells, suggesting that the cytoplasmic extrusions formed by virus-infected cells facilitates the direct cell-cell spread of NSP4. This direct cell-cell transfer of infected cell material triggered by expression of glycosylated NSP4 in virus-infected cells may contribute to viral pathogenesis and facilitate host invasion by rotaviruses.

  6. Dynamic modeling of cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination, Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiesleben de Blasio, Birgitte; Flem, Elmira; Latipov, Renat; Kuatbaeva, Ajnagul; Kristiansen, Ivar Sønbø

    2014-01-01

    The government of Kazakhstan, a middle-income country in Central Asia, is considering the introduction of rotavirus vaccination into its national immunization program. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination spanning 20 years by using a synthesis of dynamic transmission models accounting for herd protection. We found that a vaccination program with 90% coverage would prevent ≈880 rotavirus deaths and save an average of 54,784 life-years for children vaccine cost at vaccination program costs would be entirely offset. To further evaluate efficacy of a vaccine program, benefits of indirect protection conferred by vaccination warrant further study.

  7. Detection of rotavirus using padlock probes and rolling circle amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Mezger

    Full Text Available Rotavirus infections are one of the most common reasons for hospitalizations due to gastrointestinal diseases. Rotavirus is often diagnosed by latex agglutination assay, chromatography immunoassay, or by electron microscopy, which are all quite insensitive. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, on the other hand, is very sensitive to variations at the genomic level. We developed a novel assay based on a set of 58 different padlock probes with a detection limit of 1,000 copies. Twenty-two patient samples were analyzed and the assay showed high concordance with a PCR-based assay. In summary, we present a new assay for sensitive and variation tolerant detection of rotavirus.

  8. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, J.M.; Chen, Y.S.; Lindburg, K.; Morales, D.

    1987-09-01

    The inactivation of simian rotavirus Sa-11 and human rotavirus type 2 (Wa) by ozone was compared at 4/sup 0/C by using single-particle virus stocks. Although the human strain was clearly more sensitive, both virus types were rapidly inactivated by ozone concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater at all pH levels tested. Comparison of the virucidal activity of ozone with that of chlorine in identical experiments indicated little significant difference in rotavirus-inactivating efficiencies when the disinfectants were used at concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater.

  9. Prevalence of rotavirus genotypes in children younger than 5 years of age before the introduction of a universal rotavirus vaccination program: report of rotavirus surveillance in Turkey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riza Durmaz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Group A rotaviruses are the most common causative agent of acute gastroenteritis among children less than 5 years of age throughout the world. This sentinel surveillance study was aimed to obtain baseline data on the rotavirus G and P genotypes across Turkey before the introduction of a universal rotavirus vaccination program. METHODS: Rotavirus antigen-positive samples were collected from 2102 children less than 5 years of age who attended hospitals participating in the Turkish Rotavirus Surveillance Network. Rotavirus antigen was detected in the laboratories of participating hospitals by commercial serological tests such as latex agglutination, immunochromatographic test or enzyme immunoassay. Rotavirus G and P genotypes were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR using consensus primers detecting the VP7 and VP4 genes, followed by semi-nested type-specific multiplex PCR. RESULTS: RT-PCR found rotavirus RNA in 1644 (78.2% of the samples tested. The highest rate of rotavirus positivity (38.7% was observed among children in the 13 to 24 month age group, followed by children in the age group of 25 to 36 months (28.3%. A total of eight different G types, six different P types, and 42 different G-P combinations were obtained. Four common G types (G1, G2, G3, and G9 and two common P types (P[8] and P[4] accounted for 95.1% and 98.8% of the strains, respectively. G9P[8] was the most common G/P combination found in 40.5% of the strains followed by G1P[8] (21.6%, G2P[8] (9.3%, G2P[4] (6.5%, G3P[8] (3.5%, and finally, G4P[8] (3.4%. These six common genotypes included 83.7% of the strains tested in this study. The rate of uncommon genotypes was 14%. CONCLUSION: The majority of the strains analyzed belonged to the G1-G4 and G9 genotypes, suggesting high coverage of current rotavirus vaccines. This study also demonstrates a dramatic increase in G9 genotype across the country.

  10. Rotavirus Infection in the Auckland Region Following the Implementation of Universal Infant Rotavirus Vaccination: Impact on Hospitalisations and Laboratory Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Gary N; Taylor, Susan L; Drinković, Dragana; Roberts, Sally A; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Best, Emma J

    2017-07-19

    In July 2014, New Zealand introduced universal infant vaccination with Rotateq (Merk & Co.) administered as three doses at 6 weeks, 3 and 5 months of age. We sought to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccination on gastroenteritis hospitalizations in the greater Auckland region and analyze changes in rotavirus testing in the period around vaccine introduction. Hospitalizations, laboratory testing rates and methods were compared between the pre-vaccine period (2009-2013), post vaccine period (January-December 2015), and year of vaccine introduction (2014). There was a 68% decline in rotavirus hospitalizations of children aged <5 years following vaccine introduction (from 258 per 100,000 to 83 per 100,000) and a 17% decline in all-cause gastroenteritis admissions (from 1815 per 100,000 to 1293 per 100,000). Reductions were also seen in pediatric groups too old to have received vaccine.Despite these changes, rotavirus testing rates in our region remained static in the year after vaccine introduction compared with the two prior years, and following vaccine introduction we observed a high rate of false positives 19/58 (33%) in patients with reactive rotavirus tests. Rotavirus vaccine has had a significant early impact on gastroenteritis hospitalizations for children in the Auckland region. However, continued rotavirus testing at pre-vaccine rates risks generating false positive results. Laboratories and clinicians should consider reviewing their testing algorithms prior to vaccine introduction.

  11. Outstanding challenges for rotavirus vaccine introduction in low-income countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ustrup, Marte; Madsen, Lizell B; Bygbjerg, Ib C

    2011-01-01

    Rotavirus infections are the most common cause of severe diarrhoea in children worldwide. Two internationally licensed rotavirus vaccines have proven to be efficacious in middle and high-income countries and they could potentially be valuable tools for the prevention of rotavirus....... There is also a need for political commitment to prevent rotavirus infections as well as a need for an overall strengthening of the health systems in low-income countries. If these challenges were met, rotavirus vaccination could substantially improve child health and survival from rotavirus...

  12. Production of rotavirus core-like particles in Sf9 cells using recombinase-mediated cassette exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Fabiana; Dias, Mafalda M; Vidigal, João; Sousa, Marcos F Q; Patrone, Marco; Teixeira, Ana P; Alves, Paula M

    2014-02-10

    A flexible Sf9 insect cell line was recently developed leveraging the recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) technology, which competes with the popular baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) in terms of speed to produce new proteins. Herein, the ability of this cell platform to produce complex proteins, such as rotavirus core-like particles, was evaluated. A gene construct coding for a VP2-GFP fusion protein was targeted to a pre-characterized high recombination efficiency locus flanked by flipase (Flp) recognition target sites and, after three weeks in selection, an isogenic cell population was obtained. Despite the lower cell specific productivities with respect to those obtained by baculovirus infection, the titers of VP2-GFP reached in shake flask batch cultures were comparable as a result of higher cell densities. To further improve the VP2-GFP levels from stable expression, analysis of exhausted medium was undertaken to design feeding strategies enabling higher cell densities as well as increased culture duration. The implementation of the best strategy allowed reaching 20 million cells per ml in bioreactor cultures; the integrity of the rotavirus core-like particles could be confirmed by electron microscopy. Overall, we show that this Sf9-Flp cell platform represents a valuable alternative to the BEVS for producing complex recombinant proteins, such as rotavirus core-like particles.

  13. The rotavirus experience in Mexico: discovery to control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish M; Parashar, Umesh D; Santosham, Mathuram; Richardson, Vesta

    2013-02-01

    The recent introduction of a rotavirus vaccine program in Mexico to control rotavirus disease, a common killer of children worldwide, has dramatically reduced the number of Mexican children dying and being hospitalized because of diarrhea. The successful introduction of a rotavirus vaccine program was preceded by several decades of focused research efforts to document the burden of disease and to generate the knowledge base to develop and deploy a vaccine. The postlicensure experience from Mexico demonstrates that evaluating the impact and safety of the vaccination program is vitally necessary for sustaining it. All in all, the immensely successful Mexico experience with control of rotavirus disease, if copied, could yield tremendously favorable results for children and parents worldwide.

  14. Zoonotic transmission of rotavirus in Denmark; a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, Sofie; Gram, N.; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane

    Rotavirus type A infection is a common cause of hospitalisation of children. In addition, almost 30% of diagnosed persons in Denmark are adults. Rotavirus type A infection can also occur in a range of animals, including domestic dogs, cats, cattle, horses, and birds. There is some data suggesting...... direct transmission between animals and humans. Rotavirus genotyping is carried out in Denmark as part of the EUROTAnet vaccine study. In 2006 a total of 180 samples were successfully typed, and to date 85 samples from 2007 have been typed. 19 samples from pigs and 31 samples from cattle (from 2006...... and 2007) have also been typed. For the human samples all common human G types (1-4 and 9), as well the emerging G12 were identified, and were found in combination with the common P types ([4], [6], and [8]). Two samples contained a G8 P[goat] rotavirus (G8 98% identical to bovine G8, 96% identical to goat...

  15. Clinical Characteristics of Nosocomial Rotavirus Infection in Children in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Te Lee

    2008-10-01

    Conclusion: NRI may cause significant morbidity in hospitalized children, especially young infants and those with underlying diseases. Infection control with hospital surveillance, strict isolation and cohort care should be adopted to prevent the spread of rotavirus among special care units.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of rotavirus in cats in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, A C; Iturriza-Gómara, M; Dove, W; Sandrasegaram, M; Nakagomi, T; Nakagomi, O; Cunliffe, N; Radford, A D; Morgan, K L

    2015-02-01

    Rotaviruses are leading causes of gastroenteritis in the young of many species. Molecular epidemiological studies in children suggest that interspecies transmission contributes to rotavirus strain diversity in people. However, population-based studies of rotaviruses in animals are few. We investigated the prevalence, risk factors for infection, and genetic diversity of rotavirus A in a cross-sectional survey of cats housed within 25 rescue catteries across the United Kingdom. Morning litter tray fecal samples were collected during the winter and summer in 2012 from all pens containing kittens and a random sample of those housing adult cats. Group A rotavirus RNA was detected by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, and positive samples were G and P genotyped using nested VP4 and VP7 PCR assays. A total of 1,727 fecal samples were collected from 1,105 pens. Overall, the prevalence of rotavirus was 3.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2 to 4.9%). Thirteen out of 25 (52%; 95% CI, 31.3 to 72.2%) centers housed at least one rotavirus-positive cat. The prevalence of rotavirus was associated with season (odds ratio, 14.8 [95% CI, 1.1 to 200.4]; P = 0.04) but not age or diarrhea. It was higher during the summer (4.7%; 95% CI, 1.2 to 8.3%) than in winter (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 1.5%). Asymptomatic epidemics of infection were detected in two centers. G genotypes were characterized for 19 (33.3%) of the 57 rotavirus-positive samples and P genotypes for 36 (59.7%). Two rotavirus genotypes were identified, G3P[9] and G6P[9]. This is the first population-based study of rotavirus in cats and the first report of feline G6P[9], which questions the previous belief that G6P[9] in people is of bovine origin. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Human group A rotavirus infections in children in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, S; Böttiger, B; Jensen, T G

    2014-01-01

    One of the leading causes of severe childhood gastroenteritis are group A rotaviruses, and they have been found to be associated with similar to 40% of the annual gastroenteritis-associated hospitalizations in young Danish children......One of the leading causes of severe childhood gastroenteritis are group A rotaviruses, and they have been found to be associated with similar to 40% of the annual gastroenteritis-associated hospitalizations in young Danish children...

  18. Unexpectedly high burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in very young infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reilly Megan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highest incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis has generally been reported in children 6-24 months of age. Young infants are thought to be partially protected by maternal antibodies acquired transplacentally or via breast milk. The purpose of our study was to assess the age distribution of children with confirmed community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis presenting to an urban referral hospital. Methods Children presenting to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia with acute gastroenteritis have been monitored for the presence of rotavirus antigen in the stool by ELISA (followed by genotyping if ELISA-positive since the 1994-95 epidemic season. Results Over the last 12 rotavirus seasons prior to the introduction of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in 2006, stool specimens from 1646 patients tested positive for community-acquired rotavirus infection. Gender or age was not recorded in 6 and 5 cases, respectively. Overall, 58% of the cases occurred in boys. G1 was the predominant VP7 serotype, accounting for 72% of cases. The median (IQR age was 11 (5-21 months. A total of 790 (48% cases occurred in children outside the commonly quoted peak age range, with 27% in infants 24 months of age. A total of 220 (13% cases occurred during the first 3 months of life, and the highest number of episodes per month of age [97 (6%] was observed during the second month of life. Conclusions The incidence of community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis monitored over 12 seasons in the prevaccine era at a major university hospital was nearly constant for each month of age during the first year of life, revealing an unexpectedly high incidence of symptomatic rotavirus disease in infants

  19. THE IMPROVEMENT OF RT-PCR TECHNIQUE ON DETECTING ROTAVIRUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To establish a speed and effective method to detect rotavirus. Methods Using ELISA and one step RT-PCR to detect 196 clinic samples from Xi'an area. Results Compared with ELISA method, one step RT PCR was more sensitive and specific (P <0.05). Conclusion One step RT-PCR is a simple, speed, sensitive and spe cific method for clinic and epidemic studies of rotavirus.

  20. Haze is an important medium for the spread of rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qing; Fu, Jun-Feng; Mao, Jian-Hua; Shen, Hong-Qiang; Chen, Xue-Jun; Shao, Wen-Xia; Shang, Shi-Qiang; Wu, Yi-Feng

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated whether the rotavirus infection rate in children is associated with temperature and air pollutants in Hangzhou, China. This study applied a distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) to assess the effects of daily meteorological data and air pollutants on the rotavirus positive rate among outpatient children. There was a negative correlation between temperature and the rotavirus infection rate. The impact of temperature on the detection rate of rotavirus presented an evident lag effect, the temperature change shows the greatest impact on the detection rate of rotavirus approximate at lag one day, and the maximum relative risk (RR) was approximately 1.3. In 2015, the maximum cumulative RR due to the cumulative effect caused by the temperature drop was 2.5. Particulate matter (PM) 2.5 and PM10 were the primary air pollutants in Hangzhou. The highest RR of rotavirus infection occurred at lag 1-1.5 days after the increase in the concentration of these pollutants, and the RR increased gradually with the increase in concentration. Based on the average concentrations of PM2.5 of 53.9 μg/m(3) and PM10 of 80.6 μg/m(3) in Hangzhou in 2015, the cumulative RR caused by the cumulative effect was 2.5 and 2.2, respectively. The current study suggests that temperature is an important factor impacting the rotavirus infection rate of children in Hangzhou. Air pollutants significantly increased the risk of rotavirus infection, and dosage, lag and cumulative effects were observed.

  1. Evaluation of pentavalent rotavirus vaccination in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrall, Samuel; Doll, Margaret K; Nhan, Charles; Gonzales, Milagros; Perreault, Thérèse; Lamer, Philippe; Quach, Caroline

    2015-09-22

    Preterm infants are at highest risk for severe rotavirus gastroenteritis. While rotavirus vaccination is recommended for age-eligible, clinically stable preterm infants, controversy exists regarding vaccination of these infants during hospitalization. The objectives of this study were to examine tolerance of pentavalent rotavirus vaccination (RV5) among hospitalized infants and nosocomial rotavirus transmission in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU) at two urban hospitals. A retrospective, medical chart review of patients receiving RV5 vaccine was conducted to examine clinical histories of vaccine recipients. Average risk differences of gastrointestinal complications were estimated between the three days prior and up to four weeks following RV5 vaccination. A generalized linear regression model was used to examine the association between days since RV5 administration and daily feeding totals, using fixed effects to account for individual-level clustering. Rates of nosocomial rotavirus from active surveillance were compared between pre- and post-NICU-based vaccination periods. From July 1, 2011 to March 30, 2013, RV5 vaccination was initiated for 102 NICU patients. No changes in the average risk of gastrointestinal complications or daily feeding among participants overall were detected following RV5 administration. Rates of nosocomial rotavirus were similar during the periods before and after NICU-based vaccination. On average, RV5 appeared to be well tolerated among vaccine recipients, with no increase in nosocomial rotavirus transmission observed following NICU-based rotavirus vaccination. While the benefits of a RV5 NICU-based vaccination program for otherwise eligible preterm infants seem to outweigh the possible risk of vaccine virus transmission, further studies are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Change in incidence of clinic visits for all-cause and rotavirus gastroenteritis in young children following the introduction of universal rotavirus vaccination in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhsen, Khitam; Chodick, Gabriel; Goren, Sophy; Anis, Emilia; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Shalev, Varda; Cohen, Dani

    2015-01-01

    Both rotavirus vaccines RotaTeq and Rotarix were efficacious against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in clinical trials; yet real-world data on the effect of rotavirus vaccines on mild to moderate disease are limited. We used a large computerised database of Maccabi Health Services Health Maintenance Organisation (HMO), the second largest HMO in Israel covering 25% of the Israeli population, to compare the incidence of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) clinic visits in community settings (n=302,445) before (2005-10) and after (2011-13) the introduction of universal rotavirus immunisation in Israel. We retrieved laboratory results of rotavirus antigen tests (n=18,133) and using a weighted analysis, we estimated the impact of rotavirus immunisation on the disease burden of rotavirus AGE clinic visits. Following the introduction of universal rotavirus immunisation, the typical winter peaks of rotavirus AGE were substantially lower and significant reductions of 14.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): 13.5-16.1) in all-cause AGE clinic visits and of 59.7% (95% CI: 59.8-62.6) in rotavirus AGE clinic visits were observed. The decrease was observed in all age groups, but it was greater in children aged 0 to 23 months than those aged 24 to 59 months. Continued rotavirus laboratory surveillance is warranted to monitor the sustainability of these changes.

  3. Characteristics of Rotavirus Diarrhea in Hospitalized Children in Kosovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Shala, Muje; Azemi, Mehmedali; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta; Avdiu, Muharrem; Spahiu, Shqipe; Jaha, Luan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diarrhea is a leading cause of child mortality worldwide. Rotavirus is one of the most common causes of severe diarrhea and dehydration in children. Authors reviewed epidemiological and clinical data of the rotavirus diarrhea in Kosovo. Methods: This is a prospective study carried between January 1st and December 31st 2011. All data, comprising demographics, nutrition, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, management and outcome of the rotavirus diarrhea are collected on the specially designed form. Results: 116 children with rotavirus diarrhea are included in the study. The majority boys (74.4%) and children aged 0 – 12 months (82.75%). Mean age of children in the study was 16.38 months. Almost every third child in the study was hypotrophic (29.2%). More than half of the infants (55.2%) were on mixed food, somewhat more than every third was breast feeding (36.45%), and every twelfth (8.33%) was on artificial milk (animal or formula). Apart from diarrhea, present in all patients, vomiting (97.41%) and fever (43.96%) were characteristics of the clinical presentation of the diarrhea. Two thirds of the children had mild grade dehydration (70.7%). All patients recovered with no sequels. Conclusion: Rotavirus continues to be responsible for a significant portion of acute diarrhea in Kosovo. Clinical features, epidemiological data and the agglutination test are safe enough to establish the diagnosis. Treated correctly rotavirus diarrhea has a favorable outcome. PMID:25568634

  4. Genotyping of Rotavirus by Using RT-PCR Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hera Nirwati

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a great diversity of rotavirus genotypes circulating worldwide, with dominant genotypes changing from year to year. Rotavirus genotyping was performed by using reverse transcription PCR with type-specifi c-primers. Since rotavirus is a RNA virus that has high mutation rate, there was a possibility of technical diffi culty in genotyping due to mutation in the primer binding sites. During Indonesian rotavirus surveillance study 2006-2009, it was reported that 17% of samples subjected for G type and 21% of samplessubjected for P type were untypeable. The objective of this study was to identify genotypes of the samples that were untypeable previously using RT-PCR based on the method described by Das et al. (1994 and Gentsch et al. (1992. There were 30 samples subjected to G type and 61 samples subjected to P type to be re-typed using method described by Gouvea et al. (1990 and Simmond et al. (2008 for G and P typing, respectively. By using another set of primer, the genotype of all samples was identifi ed. This study highlights the importance of a constant reconsideration of primer sequences employed for the molecular typing of rotaviruses.Key words: rotavirus, G typing, P typing

  5. Scope for rotavirus vaccination in India: revisiting the scientific evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Sutapa Bandyopadhyay; Hasan, Habib; Sheikh, Kabir; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2011-10-01

    Rotavirus vaccines have been developed to prevent deaths resulting from severe diarrhea of rotavirus origin. The use of vaccines as an intervention at scale to prevent and control the burden of rotavirus diarrhea is supported by the argument that prevailing public health measures such as hygiene and sanitation, breast feeding and use of ORS have failed to prevent severe dehydration resulting from diarrhea. The article reviews the existing evidence on the rationale of using rotavirus vaccine as against the feasibility of scaling it up in developing countries like India. The vaccines currently available may not cover the strains circulating in Indian population. The diversity of Rotavirus infection in the country is tremendous and since the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy data has not been collected for India, there is first a need to conduct studies to measure the extent of protection and cross-protection provided by the available vaccines for local strains, before venturing into Rotavirus vaccination program. The potential benefits of immunization have to be first vetted against the risks involved by the policymakers and other stakeholders.

  6. An improved method for concentrating rotavirus from water samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittigul Leera

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified adsorption-elution method for the concentration of seeded rotavirus from water samples was used to determine various factors which affected the virus recovery. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the rotavirus antigen after concentration. Of the various eluents compared, 0.05M glycine, pH 11.5 gave the highest rotavirus antigen recovery using negatively charged membrane filtration whereas 2.9% tryptose phosphate broth containing 6% glycine; pH 9.0 was found to give the greatest elution efficiency when a positively charged membrane was used. Reconcentration of water samples by a speedVac concentrator showed significantly higher rotavirus recovery than polyethylene glycol precipitation through both negatively and positively charged filters (p-value 1,800 MPN/100 ml were observed but rotavirus was not detected in any sample. This study suggests that the speedVac reconcentration method gives the most efficient rotavirus recovery from water samples.

  7. Monovalent rotavirus vaccine provides protection against an emerging fully heterotypic G9P[4] rotavirus strain in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Catherine; Figueroa, Jesùs Reyna; Uribe, Edgar Sánchez; Carmen-Hernández, Luz Del; Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D; Patel, Manish M; Richardson López-Collado, Vesta

    2011-09-01

    After the introduction of monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1) in Mexico in 2006-2007, diarrhea mortality and morbidity declined substantially among Mexican children under 5 years of age. In January 2010, surveillance identified the emergence of a novel G9P[4] rotavirus strain nationwide. We conducted a case-control study to assess the field effectiveness of RV1 against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis caused by this unusual strain and to determine whether the G9P[4] emergence was related to vaccine failure or failure to vaccinate. RV1 was 94% effective (95% confidence interval, 16%-100%) against G9P[4] rotavirus-related hospitalization, indicating that its emergence was likely unrelated to vaccine pressure.

  8. Rotavirus landscape in Africa-Towards prevention and control: A report of the 8th African rotavirus symposium, Livingstone, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Cheryl; Mwenda, Jason; Chilengi, Roma

    2015-06-26

    The 8th African Rotavirus Symposium was held in Livingstone, Zambia from the 12-13 June 2014. Over 130 delegates from 35 countries - 28 from African nations - participated in this symposium, which included scientists, clinicians, immunisation managers, public health officials, policymakers and vaccine manufacturers. The theme for the symposium was Rotavirus Landscape in Africa-Towards Prevention and Control. At the time of the symposium, a total of 21 African countries had introduced the rotavirus vaccine into their national immunisation schedules. This meeting was particularly timely and relevant to review early data on vaccine adoption and impact from these countries. The concluding panel discussion proposed several recommendations for areas of focus moving forward in rotavirus advocacy and research.

  9. Dual selection mechanisms drive efficient single-gene reverse genetics for rotavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Trask, Shane D.; Taraporewala, Zenobia F.; Boehme, Karl W.; Dermody, Terence S.; Patton, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Current methods for engineering the segmented double-stranded RNA genome of rotavirus (RV) are limited by inefficient recovery of the recombinant virus. In an effort to expand the utility of RV reverse genetics, we developed a method to recover recombinant viruses in which independent selection strategies are used to engineer single-gene replacements. We coupled a mutant SA11 RV encoding a temperature-sensitive (ts) defect in the NSP2 protein with RNAi-mediated degradation of NSP2 mRNAs to is...

  10. How can a multilevel promotion of breastfeeding reduce the required budget for rotavirus vaccination in Indonesia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakiyah, N.; Suwantika, A.A.; Postma, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Breast milk is considered to give protection against rotavirus infection since it contains anti-rotavirus maternal antibodies and other nonspecific inhibitors. Multilevel promotion of breastfeeding is a complex intervention that modifies behavioral determinants through multiple levels of

  11. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in the Netherlands; the results of a consensus model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozenbaum, M.H.; Mangen, M.J.J.; Giaquinto, C.; Wilschut, J.C.; Hak, E.; Postma, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Each year rotavirus gastroenteritis results in thousands of paediatric hospitalisations and primary care visits in the Netherlands. While two vaccines against rotavirus are registered, routine immunisation of infants has not yet been implemented. Existing cost-effectiveness studies showe

  12. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in the Netherlands; the results of a consensus model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozenbaum, M.H.; Mangen, M.J.; Giaquinto, C.; Wilschut, J.C.; Hak, E.; Postma, M.J.; Groot, R. de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Each year rotavirus gastroenteritis results in thousands of paediatric hospitalisations and primary care visits in the Netherlands. While two vaccines against rotavirus are registered, routine immunisation of infants has not yet been implemented. Existing cost-effectiveness studies showe

  13. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in the Netherlands; the results of a consensus model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozenbaum, M.H.; Mangen, M.J.J.; Giaquinto, C.; Wilschut, J.C.; Hak, E.; Postma, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Each year rotavirus gastroenteritis results in thousands of paediatric hospitalisations and primary care visits in the Netherlands. While two vaccines against rotavirus are registered, routine immunisation of infants has not yet been implemented. Existing cost-effectiveness studies

  14. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in the Netherlands; the results of a consensus model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozenbaum, M.H.; Mangen, M.J.; Giaquinto, C.; Wilschut, J.C.; Hak, E.; Postma, M.J.; Groot, R. de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Each year rotavirus gastroenteritis results in thousands of paediatric hospitalisations and primary care visits in the Netherlands. While two vaccines against rotavirus are registered, routine immunisation of infants has not yet been implemented. Existing cost-effectiveness studies

  15. How can a multilevel promotion of breastfeeding reduce the required budget for rotavirus vaccination in Indonesia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakiyah, N.; Suwantika, A.A.; Postma, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Breast milk is considered to give protection against rotavirus infection since it contains anti-rotavirus maternal antibodies and other nonspecific inhibitors. Multilevel promotion of breastfeeding is a complex intervention that modifies behavioral determinants through multiple levels of

  16. Report of the 7th African Rotavirus Symposium, Cape Town, South Africa, 8th November 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seheri, L M; Mwenda, J M; Page, N

    2014-11-12

    The 7th African Rotavirus Symposium was held in Cape Town, South Africa, on the 8th November 2012 as a Satellite Symposium at the First International African Vaccinology Conference. Over 150 delegates participated in this symposium including scientists, clinicians, health officials, policymakers and vaccine manufacturers from across Africa. Key topics discussed included rotavirus surveillance, rotavirus vaccine introduction, post rotavirus vaccine impact analysis and intussusception data and surveillance in Africa. The symposium provided early rotavirus vaccine adopter countries in Africa (South Africa, Ghana and Botswana) an opportunity to share up-to-date information on vaccine introduction, and allowed colleagues to share experiences in establishing routine rotavirus surveillance (Tanzania, Niger and Rwanda). Overall, the symposium highlighted the high burden of rotavirus in Africa, and the need to continue to strengthen efforts in preventing rotavirus diarrhoea in Africa.

  17. Rotavirus genotypes in Belarus, 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeiko, Galina V; Yermalovich, Marina A; Poliakova, Nadezhda; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Kerin, Tara K; Wasley, Annemarie; Videbaek, Dovile; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D; Samoilovich, Elena O

    2014-12-01

    This study describes group A rotavirus (RVA) genotype prevalence in Belarus from 2008 to 2012. In 2008, data from 3 sites in Belarus (Brest, Mogilev, Minsk) indicated that G4P[8] was the predominant genotype. Data from Minsk (2008-2012) showed that G4P[8] was the predominant RVA genotype in all years except in 2011 when G3P[8] was most frequently detected. Other RVA genotypes common in Europe (G1P[8], G2P[4]) were detected each year of the study. This study reveals the dominance of genotype G4P[8] in Belarus and helps to establish the baseline genotype prevalence prior to RVA vaccine introduction in the country.

  18. Health economics of rotavirus immunization in Vietnam : Potentials for favorable cost-effectiveness in developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, Hong-Anh T.; Rozenbaum, Mark H.; Coyte, Peter C.; Li, Shu Chuen; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhoea worldwide. Vietnam is situated in the region of high rotavirus infection incidence and eligible for financial support to introduce rotavirus vaccines into the Expanded Program of Immunization (EPI) from the GAVI. This study was des

  19. Health economics of rotavirus immunization in Vietnam : Potentials for favorable cost-effectiveness in developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, Hong-Anh T.; Rozenbaum, Mark H.; Coyte, Peter C.; Li, Shu Chuen; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhoea worldwide. Vietnam is situated in the region of high rotavirus infection incidence and eligible for financial support to introduce rotavirus vaccines into the Expanded Program of Immunization (EPI) from the GAVI. This study was

  20. Determinants of Parents' Decision to Vaccinate Their Children against Rotavirus: Results of a Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, E.; Bettinger, J. A.; Halperin, B.; Bradet, R.; Lavoie, F.; Sauvageau, C.; Gilca, V.; Boulianne, N.

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus disease is a common cause of health care utilization and almost all children are affected by the age of 5 years. In Canada, at the time of this survey (2008-09), immunization rates for rotavirus were less than 20%. We assessed the determinants of a parent's acceptance to have their child immunized against rotavirus. The survey…

  1. Rotavirus vaccination and herd immunity: an evidence-based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seybolt LM

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Lorna M Seybolt, Rodolfo E BéguéDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USAAbstract: Until recently, rotavirus was the most common cause of diarrhea in infants and young children with over 100 million cases and 400,000 deaths every year worldwide. Yet, its epidemiology is changing rapidly with the introduction of two rotavirus vaccines in the mid 2000s. Both vaccines were shown to be highly efficacious in prelicensure studies to reduce severe rotavirus disease; the efficacy being more pronounced in high- and middle-income countries than in low-income countries. Herd immunity – the indirect protection of unimmunized individuals as a result of others being immunized – was not expected to be a benefit of rotavirus vaccination programs since the vaccines were thought to reduce severe disease but not to decrease virus transmission significantly. Postlicensure studies, however, have suggested that this assumption may need reassessment. Studies in a variety of settings have shown evidence of greater than expected declines in rotavirus disease. While these studies were not designed specifically to detect herd immunity – and few failed to detect this phenomenon – the consistency of the evidence is compelling. These studies are reviewed and described here. While further work is needed, clarifying the presence of herd immunity is not just an academic exercise but an important issue for rotavirus control, especially in lower income countries where the incidence of the disease is highest and the direct protection of the vaccines is lower.Keywords: rotavirus, vaccine, herd immunity, efficacy

  2. Molecular epidemiology of bovine rotaviruses. Characterization of rotaviruses isolated from diarrhoeic calves by genome profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrottaglie, R; Rizzi, V; Agrimi, P

    1995-04-01

    Fifteen bovine rotavirus group A strains were isolated in several Italian regions over the period 1981-1989 from calves in ten neonatal diarrhoea outbreaks. The electrophoretical analysis of the genoma showed genomic variations and five different profiles were observed, including one with thirteen dsRNA segments. The finding of extra RNA fragments, with respect to the regular eleven genome segments, suggests the possibility of simultaneous or sequential infection by more than one electropherotype or a modification in the length of RNA segments during infection.

  3. Escherichia coli Meningitis after Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in an Infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermezoglu, Oznur; Ocal Topcu, Didem; Karbuz, Adem; Hacihamdioglu, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Although rotavirus gastroenteritis is quite common in the pediatric population, secondary bacterial sepsis following rotavirus infection is a rare clinical entity. Gram-negative bacilli are the fifth most common cause of meningitis in infants but this infection rarely occurs after gastroenteritis. Here, we report a 2.5-month-old infant who developed Escherichia coli (E. coli) meningitis after acute rotavirus gastroenteritis. The 2.5-month-old male infant with fever, vomiting, and watery diarrhea that started 1 day earlier was admitted to the hospital. Rotavirus antigen in stool sample was positive. He was hospitalized, and fever was measured at 39.5°C on the second day. Lumbar puncture was done for suspicion of meningitis, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings suggested meningitis. Intravenous vancomycin and cefotaxime were started empirically. Since E. coli reproduction was seen in blood culture and CSF culture, treatment was continued with cefotaxime. The patient was discharged with minimal midlevel hydrocephalus findings in cranial ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging following 21 days of antibiotics treatment. Septicemia development following rotavirus gastroenteritis is an extremely rare clinical condition. It is vital to start prompt antibiotic treatment as soon as the diagnosis of secondary bacterial infection is made because of high mortality and morbidity rates.

  4. Escherichia coli Meningitis after Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in an Infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Ozgurhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although rotavirus gastroenteritis is quite common in the pediatric population, secondary bacterial sepsis following rotavirus infection is a rare clinical entity. Gram-negative bacilli are the fifth most common cause of meningitis in infants but this infection rarely occurs after gastroenteritis. Here, we report a 2.5-month-old infant who developed Escherichia coli (E. coli meningitis after acute rotavirus gastroenteritis. The 2.5-month-old male infant with fever, vomiting, and watery diarrhea that started 1 day earlier was admitted to the hospital. Rotavirus antigen in stool sample was positive. He was hospitalized, and fever was measured at 39.5°C on the second day. Lumbar puncture was done for suspicion of meningitis, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF findings suggested meningitis. Intravenous vancomycin and cefotaxime were started empirically. Since E. coli reproduction was seen in blood culture and CSF culture, treatment was continued with cefotaxime. The patient was discharged with minimal midlevel hydrocephalus findings in cranial ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging following 21 days of antibiotics treatment. Septicemia development following rotavirus gastroenteritis is an extremely rare clinical condition. It is vital to start prompt antibiotic treatment as soon as the diagnosis of secondary bacterial infection is made because of high mortality and morbidity rates.

  5. Effects of wastewater sludge and its detergents on the stability of rotavirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, R.L. (Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, C.S.

    1980-06-01

    Wastewater sludge reduced the heat required to inactivate rotavirus SA-11, and ionic detergents were identified as the sludge components responsible for this effect. A similar result was found previously with reovirus. The quantitative effects of individual ionic detergents on rotavirus and reovirus were very different, and rotavirus was found to be extremely sensitive to several of these detergents. However, neither virus was destabilized by nonionic detergents. On the contrary, rotavirus was stabilized by a nonionic detergent against the potent destabilizing effects of the ionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate. The destabilizing effects of both cationic and anionic detergents on rotavirus were greatly altered by changes in the pH of the medium.

  6. Hospital-based Surveillance for Rotavirus Gastroenteritis Among Young Children in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastanaduy, Paul A.; Islam, Khaleda; Rahman, Mahmudur; Rahman, Mustafizur; Luby, Stephen P.; Heffelfinger, James D.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Gurley, Emily S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In anticipation of introduction of a rotavirus vaccine into the national immunization program of Bangladesh, active hospital-based surveillance was initiated to provide prevaccine baseline data on rotavirus disease. Methods: Children 5 years of age and younger admitted with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) (≥3 watery or looser-than-normal stools or ≥1 episode of forceful vomiting) at 7 hospitals throughout Bangladesh were identified. Clinical information and stool specimens were collected from every 4th patient. Specimens were tested for rotavirus antigen by enzyme immunoassays; 25% of detected rotaviruses were genotyped. Results: From July 2012 to June 2015, rotavirus was detected in 2432 (64%) of 3783 children hospitalized for AGE. Eight enrolled children died, including 4 (50%) who were rotavirus positive. Rotavirus was detected year-round in Bangladesh with peak detection rates of >80% during November–February. Most (86%) rotavirus AGE cases were 6–23 months of age. Sixty-nine percent of children with rotavirus had severe disease (Vesikari score, ≥11). Among 543 strains genotyped, G1P[8] (31%) and G12P[8] (29%) were the most common. Conclusions: Rotavirus is a major cause of morbidity in Bangladeshi children, accounting for nearly two-thirds of AGE hospitalizations. These data highlight the potential value of rotavirus vaccination in Bangladesh, and will be the key for future measurement of vaccine impact. PMID:27798545

  7. Fulfilling the promise of rotavirus vaccines: how far have we come since licensure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish M; Glass, Roger; Desai, Rishi; Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D

    2012-07-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of fatal and severe childhood diarrhoea worldwide. Two new rotavirus vaccines have shown efficacy against severe rotavirus disease in large clinical trials. Between 2006 and 2010, 27 countries introduced rotavirus vaccination into national immunisation programmes and, subsequently, the burden of severe rotavirus disease in these countries has decreased substantially in both vaccinated and unvaccinated children. Rotavirus vaccination has led to large, sustained declines in childhood deaths from diarrhoea in Brazil and Mexico, which supports estimates that rotavirus was the leading cause of diarrhoeal deaths in these countries. Studies after licensing have provided new insights into these vaccines, such as the duration of protection, relative effectiveness in poor populations, and strain evolution after vaccine introduction. The challenge for policy makers worldwide is to analyse the effect of vaccination in early adopter countries and to assess whether the benefits outweigh the costs and encourage wider dissemination of these vaccines.

  8. Multi-reassortant G3P[3] group A rotavirus in a horseshoe bat in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Michihito; Orba, Yasuko; Sasaki, Satoko; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Ishii, Akihiro; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Ito, Kimihito; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2016-10-01

    Group A rotavirus is a major cause of diarrhoea in humans, especially in young children. Bats also harbour group A rotaviruses, but the genetic backgrounds of bat rotavirus strains are usually distinct from those of human rotavirus strains. We identified a new strain of group A rotavirus in the intestinal contents of a horseshoe bat in Zambia. Whole genome sequencing revealed that the identified virus, named RVA/Bat-wt/ZMB/LUS12-14/2012/G3P[3], possessed the genotype constellation G3-P[3]-I3-R2-C2-M3-A9-N2-T3-E2-H3. Several genome segments of LUS12-14 were highly similar to those of group A rotaviruses identified from humans, cows and antelopes, indicating interspecies transmission of rotaviruses between bats and other mammals with possible multiple genomic reassortment events.

  9. Detection of two atypical rotaviruses in the province of Misiones, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnec, S N; Giordano, M O; Bennun, F R; Nates, S V; Vergara, M; Depetris, A R

    1991-09-01

    Out of 317 human gastroenteritis cases studied between August 1988-August 1989, two atypical antigenically distinct rotaviruses (pararotaviruses) were detected in faecal samples among 19 rotaviruses shedding children from Misiones province, North-Eastern Argentina. A 1 3/4 year old girl a 3 years old boy, both with vomiting and normal temperature, shed these atypical rotaviruses. Their morphology by electron microscopy was identical to other rotaviruses; they contained 11 double-stranded RNA segments detected by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and failed to react with the antibody directed against the rotavirus group specific antigen (Rotazyme II ELISA). The electrophoretic migration of these RNAs (electropherotype) in polyacrylamide gels did not coincide with the typical pattern of distinct size classes observed in most human rotaviruses reported, instead, they appeared to be related to patterns of rotaviruses group C.

  10. Transfection of exogenous rotavirus rearranged RNA segments in cells infected with a WT rotavirus results in subsequent gene rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duponchel, Sarah; Troupin, Cécile; Vu, Lan Trang; Schnuriger, Aurélie; Trugnan, Germain; Garbarg-Chenon, Antoine

    2014-09-01

    Group A rotaviruses, members of the family Reoviridae, are a major cause of infantile acute gastroenteritis. The rotavirus genome consists of 11 dsRNA segments. In some cases, an RNA segment is replaced by a rearranged RNA segment, which is derived from its standard counterpart by partial sequence duplication. It has been shown that some rearranged segments are preferentially encapsidated into viral progenies after serial passages in cell culture. Based on this characteristic, a reverse genetics system was used previously to introduce exogenous segment 7 rearrangements into an infectious rotavirus. This study extends this reverse genetics system to RNA segments 5 and 11. Transfection of exogenous rotavirus rearranged RNA segment 5 or 11 into cells infected with a WT helper rotavirus (bovine strain RF) resulted in subsequent gene rearrangements in the viral progeny. Whilst recombinant viruses were rescued with an exogenous rearranged segment 11, the exogenous segment was modified by a secondary rearrangement. The occurrence of spontaneous rearrangements of WT or exogenous segments is a major hindrance to the use of this reverse genetics approach. © 2014 The Authors.

  11. Risk factors of rotavirus diarrhea in hospitalized children in Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Hendra; Karyana, I Putu Gede; Sanjaya-Putra, I Gusti Ngurah; Budiarsa, Soetjiningsih; Soenarto, Yati

    2014-03-26

    Diarrhea is a major public health concern throughout the world because the prevalence of morbidity of diarrhea has not changed significantly in the past decade. It remains the third leading cause of death among children less than 5 years of age. Recent surveillance studies have shown that rotavirus is a significant cause of pediatric hospitalization and death due to diarrhea. Indonesia has limited data on risk factors, disease burden, and deaths in children due to rotavirus diarrhea. The objective of this study was to examine the above mentioned factors related to rotavirus diarrhea in hospitalized children in Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar. A prospective cohort study was conducted at Sanglah Hospital Denpasar from April 2009 to December 2011. The present study was part of a nationwide study on Extension for Hospital-based Surveillance and Strain Characterization of Rotavirus Diarrhea Indonesia involving four hospitals throughout Indonesia as a part of the Asian Rotavirus Surveillance Network. We studied children aged diarrhea, and analyzed their stool samples using an immunoassay that detects the rotavirus antigen. A total of 656 patients met the inclusion criteria for this study. Of 5805 patients under the age of 5 who were hospitalized between April 2009 and December 2011, the prevalence of diarrhea among hospitalized pediatric patients was 11.3% and the prevalence of rotavirus diarrhea was 49.8%. The male to female ratio of those affected by rotavirus was 1.6:1. The occurrence of vomiting was significantly higher in rotavirus diarrhea than in non-rotavirus diarrhea (RR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.70; p = 0.004). Diarrhea remains an important cause of hospitalization in children, and rotavirus was the most important etiology. We found that boys had a greatest risk of rotavirus infection than girls. Good nutritional status and breastfeeding provided the same protection against rotavirus and non-rotavirus diarrhea.

  12. Efficacy of synbiotic treatment in children with acute rotavirus diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Made Ratna Dewi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Diarrhea is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in children throughout the world, mostly due to rotavirus infection. In daily practice, we routinely use the World Health Organization Five steps for managing acute diarrhea.This practice has shown great success in diarrhea management, but concerns remain on reducing the duration of diarrhea to prevent complications. Synbiotics can reduce the severity of diarrhea. However, there has been limited data on synbiotic therapy for treating acute rotavirus diarrhea in children. Objective To compare the durations of acute rotavirus diarrhea treated with synbiotics vs. placebo. Methods This study was a randomized, double-blind, clinical trial, performed at the Pediatric Gastrohepatology Division, Sanglah and Wangaya Hospitals in Denpasar. Subjects were children aged 6 to 59 months with acute rotavirus diarrhea. Rotavirus was diagnosed by immune chromatography assay. The synbiotic group received probiotic comprised of Lactobacillus sp., Streptococcus sp., Bifidobacterium sp. (total viable count 1.00x109 CFU per dose, and prebiotic consisted of 990.00 mg fructooligosacharide (FOS. The placebo consisted of lactose monohydrate packaged similarly as the synbiotics. Subjects orally ingested 1 pack per day for 5 days. Results Seventy children with acute rotavirus diarrhea was involved in this study. The median duration of diarrhea in the synbiotic group was 50.0 (SE 1.1; 95%CI 47.9 to 52.1 hours, while that of the placebo group was 63.0 (SE 5.9; 95%CI 51.4 to 74.6 hours. Based on Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the duration of diarrhea in the synbiotic group was significantly shorter than that of the placebo group (log-rank test P <0.0001. Conclusion In children with acute rotaviral diarrhea, synbiotic reduces the duration of diarrhea compared to placebo. [Paediatr Indones. 2015;55:74-8.].

  13. Rhesus rotavirus VP4 sequence-specific activation of mononuclear cells is associated with cholangiopathy in murine biliary atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Ashley; Mohanty, Sujit K; Donnelly, Bryan; Coots, Abigail; Lages, Celine S; Lobeck, Inna; Dupree, Phylicia; Meller, Jaroslaw; McNeal, Monica; Sestak, Karol; Tiao, Greg

    2015-09-15

    Biliary atresia (BA), a neonatal obstructive cholangiopathy, remains the most common indication for pediatric liver transplantation in the United States. In the murine model of BA, Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) VP4 surface protein determines biliary duct tropism. In this study, we investigated how VP4 governs induction of murine BA. Newborn mice were injected with 16 strains of rotavirus and observed for clinical symptoms of BA and mortality. Cholangiograms were performed to confirm bile duct obstruction. Livers and bile ducts were harvested 7 days postinfection for virus titers and histology. Flow cytometry assessed mononuclear cell activation in harvested cell populations from the liver. Cytotoxic NK cell activity was determined by the ability of NK cells to kill noninfected cholangiocytes. Of the 16 strains investigated, the 6 with the highest homology to the RRV VP4 (>87%) were capable of infecting bile ducts in vivo. Although the strain Ro1845 replicated to a titer similar to RRV in vivo, it caused no symptoms or mortality. A Ro1845 reassortant containing the RRV VP4 induced all BA symptoms, with a mortality rate of 89%. Flow cytometry revealed that NK cell activation was significantly increased in the disease-inducing strains and these NK cells demonstrated a significantly higher percentage of cytotoxicity against noninfected cholangiocytes. Rotavirus strains with >87% homology to RRV's VP4 were capable of infecting murine bile ducts in vivo. Development of murine BA was mediated by RRV VP4-specific activation of mononuclear cells, independent of viral titers.

  14. PATHOGENETIC ROLE OF CYTOKINES IN CHILDHOOD ROTAVIRUS INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Benyova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Results of cytokine network studies system in children with rotavirus infection are presented. Concentrations of cytokines were determined at both local and systemic levels. Analysis of cytokine levels was performed at initial terms (day 1 to 3, and in the course of disease (day 7 to 10. It was revealed that mild and mid-severe cases of rotavirus infection in the children are characterized by early increase in proinflammatory cytokines with restricted overshoot of proinflammatory cytokines at early recovery period. Meanwhile, the patients with severe forms of viral gastroenteritis exhibited high levels of proinflammatory cytokines. However, this balance was shifted towards anti-inflammatory cytokines during early reconvalescence.

  15. Concomitant Rotavirus and Salmonella Infections in Children with Acute Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tzong Lan

    2009-02-01

    Conclusion: Concomitant rotavirus and Salmonella infections accounted for 3.7% of cases in this study. Patients in group C (30.0% had a significantly higher incidence of hypokalemia than group R (7.3% or S (8.8%. Group C consisted of 33 cases of the 895 reviewed cases (3.7%. In a child with rotavirus gastroenteritis, concomitant infection with Salmonella should be considered if the child has sustained a high fever (≥ 39°C for over 4 days and a green stool with mucus and blood.

  16. Detection of porcine rotavirus from tissue and faecal specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabha Suji

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Porcine small intestinal sub-mucosa is a cell-free collagen matrix that has demonstrated its ability as a scaffold material. Transplantation poses special hazards because grafted tissues and organs transmit pathogens efficiently, especially viruses. Rotavirus is thought to be confined to the intestine, causing acute diarrhoea. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the porcine intestinal tissue scaffold for Rotavirus and to study the incidence of this virus among pig herds. Only one isolate was successfully adapted to grow in cell line MA 104 from faecal samples. This isolate was further confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis.

  17. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* sialic acid-binding domain of porcine rotavirus strain OSU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang-De, E-mail: zhangyd1960@yahoo.com.cn; Li, Hao [National Hepatobiliary and Enteric Surgery Research Center of The Ministry of Health, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Hunan Province (China); Liu, Hui; Pan, Yi-Feng [Biochemistry Laboratory, Institution of Biomedical Engineering, Central South University, Hunan Province (China); National Hepatobiliary and Enteric Surgery Research Center of The Ministry of Health, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Hunan Province (China)

    2007-02-01

    Porcine rotavirus strain OSU VP8* domain has been expressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data from different crystal forms of the VP8* domain have been collected to 2.65 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively. The rotavirus outer capsid spike protein VP4 is utilized in the process of rotavirus attachment to and membrane penetration of host cells. VP4 is cleaved by trypsin into two domains: VP8* and VP5*. The VP8* domain is implicated in initial interaction with sialic acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates and triggers subsequent virus invasion. The VP8* domain from porcine OSU rotavirus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Different crystal forms (orthorhombic P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and tetragonal P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2) were harvested from two distinct crystallization conditions. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.65 and 2.2 Å resolution and the VP8*{sub 65–224} structure was determined by molecular replacement.

  18. Mechanism for Coordinated RNA Packaging and Genome Replication by Rotavirus Polymerase VP1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaohui; McDonald, Sarah M.; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Tao, Yizhi Jane; Vasquez-Del Carpio, Rodrigo; Nibert, Max L.; Patton, John T.; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med); (NIH); (CH-Boston)

    2009-04-08

    Rotavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase VP1 catalyzes RNA synthesis within a subviral particle. This activity depends on core shell protein VP2. A conserved sequence at the 3' end of plus-strand RNA templates is important for polymerase association and genome replication. We have determined the structure of VP1 at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, as apoenzyme and in complex with RNA. The cage-like enzyme is similar to reovirus {lambda}3, with four tunnels leading to or from a central, catalytic cavity. A distinguishing characteristic of VP1 is specific recognition, by conserved features of the template-entry channel, of four bases, UGUG, in the conserved 3' sequence. Well-defined interactions with these bases position the RNA so that its 3' end overshoots the initiating register, producing a stable but catalytically inactive complex. We propose that specific 3' end recognition selects rotavirus RNA for packaging and that VP2 activates the autoinhibited VP1/RNA complex to coordinate packaging and genome replication.

  19. Human rotavirus K8 strain represents a new VP4 serotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B; Larralde, G; Gorziglia, M

    1993-01-01

    The complete VP4 gene of the human rotavirus (HRV) K8 strain (G1 serotype) was cloned and inserted into the baculovirus transfer vector pVL941 under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. A K8VP4 recombinant baculovirus was obtained by cotransfection of Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells with transfer vector DNA containing the K8VP4 gene and wild-type baculovirus DNA. Infection of Sf9 cells with this VP4 recombinant baculovirus resulted in the production of a protein that is similar in size and antigenic activity to the authentic VP4 of the K8 strain. Guinea pigs immunized with the expressed VP4 developed antibodies that neutralized the infectivity of the K8 strain. This antiserum neutralized HRV strains belonging to VP4 serotypes 1A, 1B, and 2 with efficiency eightfold or lower than that of the homologous virus, indicating that the human rotavirus K8 strain represents a distinct VP4 serotype (P3). In addition, low levels of cross-immunoprecipitation of the K8VP4 and its VP5 and VP8 subunits with hyperimmune antisera to HRV strains representing different VP4 serotype specificities also suggested that the K8 strain possesses a unique VP4 with few epitopes in common with other P-serotype strains. Images PMID:8380098

  20. Progress in the introduction of rotavirus vaccine--Latin America and the Caribbean, 2006-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Rotavirus disease is the leading cause of childhood morbidity and mortality related to diarrhea in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), where an estimated 8,000 deaths related to rotavirus diarrhea occur annually among children aged rotavirus vaccines became available, the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2007 recommended inclusion of rotavirus vaccine in the immunization programs of Europe and the Americas, and in 2009 expanded the recommendation to all infants aged rotavirus vaccine in LAC, where it was first introduced in 2006 in Brazil, El Salvador, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, and Venezuela; by January 2011, it was included in the national immunization schedules of 14 countries in LAC. Estimated national rotavirus vaccine coverage (2 doses of the monovalent vaccine or 3 doses of the pentavalent vaccine) among children aged rotavirus vaccine into their national immunization programs, 13 participate in a hospital-based rotavirus surveillance network. Data from some countries in this network and from other monitoring efforts in LAC countries have shown declines in hospitalizations and deaths related to severe diarrhea after rotavirus vaccine introduction. The rapid introduction of rotavirus vaccine in LAC demonstrates the benefits of the early commitment of national decision makers to introduce these vaccines in low-income and middle-income countries at the same time as in high-income countries.

  1. Detection of emerging rotavirus G12P[8] in Sonora, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ochoa, G; J, G de; Calleja-García, P M; Rosas-Rodríguez, J A; Virgen-Ortíz, A; Tamez-Guerra, P

    2016-06-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in children up to five years of age worldwide. The aim of the present study was to analyze the genotypes of rotavirus strains isolated from children with gastroenteritis, after the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine in México. Rotavirus was detected in 14/100 (14%) fecal samples from children with gastroenteritis, using a commercial test kit. The viral genome was purified from these samples and used as a template in RT-PCR amplification of the VP4 and VP7 genes, followed by gene cloning and sequencing. Among the rotavirus strains, 4/14 (28.5%) were characterized as G12P[8], 2/14 (14.3%), as G12P (not typed), and 3/14 (21.42%) as G (not typed) P[8]. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 gene showed that G12 genotypes clustered in lineage III. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that VP4 genotype P[8] sequences clustered in lineage V, whereas other P[8] sequences previously reported in Mexico (2005-2008) clustered in different lineages. Rotavirus genotype G12 is currently recognized as a globally emerging rotavirus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this emerging rotavirus strain G12P[8] in México. Ongoing surveillance is recommended to monitor the distribution of rotavirus genotypes and to continually reassess the suitability of currently available rotavirus vaccines.

  2. Full Genome Sequence of Giant Panda Rotavirus Strain CH-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ling; Yang, Shaolin; Wang, Chengdong; Chen, Shijie; Yang, Xiaonong; Hou, Rong; Quan, Zifang; Hao, Zhongxiang

    2013-01-01

    We report here the complete genomic sequence of the giant panda rotavirus strain CH-1. This work is the first to document the complete genomic sequence (segments 1 to 11) of the CH-1 strain, which offers an effective platform for providing authentic research experiences to novice scientists. PMID:23469354

  3. The burden of rotavirus disease in Denmark 2009-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Thea Kølsen; Rungø, Christine; Jensen, Claus Sixtus

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study sought to determine the incidence and the burden of severe diarrheal disease in Denmark with emphasis on rotavirus (RV) disease. METHODS: This study was designed as a national prospective disease surveillance of children <5 years of age hospitalized for acute gastroenteriti...

  4. Serial observations of chronic rotavirus infection in an immunodeficient child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, I; Kimura, T; Murakami, T; Haruki, K; Yamazaki, K; Seto, Y; Minekawa, Y; Funamoto, H

    1991-01-01

    Chronic rotavirus infection of an infant with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) was studied by virological examinations in association with long-term observation of his symptoms and immune status. During eleven months of hospitalization, the patient was suffering from incurable severe diarrhea with persisting excretion of rotaviruses detected by electron microscopy and the reversed-passive hemagglutination (R-PHA) test and had transient hepatitis symptom despite multiple administrations of human gammaglobulin and high calorie fluids. The detected viruses were morphologically recognized as rotavirus with double capsid structure. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic (PAGE) analysis of their genomic RNAs showed the long electropherotype of group A virus with abnormal migration profiles changing considerably from the early to the late phase of illness: (1) The 11th segment became undetectable; (2) the molecular weight of the 6th segment slightly increased; (3) seven to fourteen extra segments appeared; and (4) PAGE patterns of viral genomic RNAs changed every three or four months. These findings suggest that chronic infection with rotavirus accompanied the generation of extra viral genomic segments and their unusual assortments in an immunodeficient host.

  5. Accelerating the introduction of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwantika, Auliya A.; Zakiyah, Neily; Lestari, Keri; Postma, Maarten J.

    The introduction of the rotavirus vaccine in Indonesia is currently in its infancy. Delay in its development might be caused by factors related to the perceived value of the vaccine, health system characteristics and policy considerations. Other factors, which may also interfere with optimizing the

  6. Characterization of a porcine enterocyte receptor for group A rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlenschmidt, M S; Rolsma, M D; Kuhlenschmidt, T B; Gelberg, H B

    1997-01-01

    We have identified, purified to apparent homogeneity and chemically characterized a biologically-relevant porcine enterocyte receptor for group A porcine rotavirus. Ceramide glycanase digestion followed by acid hydrolysis and monosaccharide compositional analyses indicated the receptor is a family of two GM, gangliosides, one containing N-glycolyl-neuraminic acid and the other N-acetylneuraminic acid. Both gangliosides displayed dose-dependent inhibition of rotavirus binding to, and infectivity of, host cells. Inhibition of infectivity in a focus-forming-unit-reduction assay was achieved with as little as 2 nmols of NeuGcGM3 (50% inhibition with 3.97 nmol) or NeuAcGM3 (50% inhibition with 9.84 nmol) per 10(4) FFU of virus. Preliminary data suggest specific porcine GM3 carbohydrate fine structure or spatial orientation of the sialyloligosaccharide epitopes of the holoGM3 gangliosides may be crucial to enterocyte receptor recognition by rotavirus. We have quantified both NeuGcGM3 and NeuAcGM3 in enterocytes of various-aged pigs from newborn through 16 weeks and have found with increasing age the amount of both GM3 derivatives, especially NeuGcGM3 per gram (dry weight) intestinal brush border decreases rapidly from newborn through 4 weeks of age. These results may help explain the age-sensitivity of piglets to severe rotavirus diarrhea.

  7. Rotavirus and adenovirus in Rondônia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleiciene Félix Magalhães

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute gastroenteritis is one of the most common diseases in humans worldwide. Viral gastroenteritis is a global problem in infants and young children. In this study the incidence of diarrhea was assessed in 877 hospitalized children under five years old, over a period of 24 months and distributed in 470 cases of diarrhea and 407 age-matched group with other pathologies, as control group. Two antigen detection techniques based on enzyme immunoassay (EIA and latex particles were used for detection of rotavirus and adenovirus. Rotavirus A was a major cause of gastroenteritis with 23.6% of cases, being 90% of these cases in young children. Adenovirus infections was detected by EIA with frequency of 6.4%. Rotavirus and adenovirus were detected in 10.1 and 1.7% of stools from control group, respectively. Interestingly, the frequency of the youngest children in the control group excreting Rotavirus A was comparable to that detected in stools from diarrheic children. We cannot rule out the existence of other enteric viruses because the etiology of 171 cases of diarrhea was not determined and active search for astrovirus and calicivirus was not done. This is the first study that shows the presence of enteric viruses in the infantile population from Western Brazilian Amazonia and it was important to help physicians in the treatment of viral gastroenteritis.

  8. Accelerating the introduction of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwantika, Auliya A.; Zakiyah, Neily; Lestari, Keri; Postma, Maarten J.

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of the rotavirus vaccine in Indonesia is currently in its infancy. Delay in its development might be caused by factors related to the perceived value of the vaccine, health system characteristics and policy considerations. Other factors, which may also interfere with optimizing the

  9. epidemiology of rotavirus and astrovirus infections in children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emmanuel Ameh

    of astrovirus falls in the range seen in hospital-based studies around the continent. Key words: ... Epidemiology of Rotavirus and Astrovirus infection in Nigerian children. Aminu M. et .... the forward direction and Con3 (5′-TGG CTT CGC CAT.

  10. Hydrophobic polycationic coatings disinfect poliovirus and rotavirus solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Alyssa M; Hsu, Bryan B; Rautaray, Debabrata; Haldar, Jayanta; Chen, Jianzhu; Klibanov, Alexander M

    2011-03-01

    Coating surfaces with N-alkylated polyethylenimines (PEIs), namely branched N,N-hexyl,methyl-PEI via covalent attachment to glass or linear N,N-dodecyl,methyl-PEI by physical deposition ("painting") onto polyethylene, enables the resultant materials to quickly and efficiently disinfect aqueous solutions of (non-enveloped) poliovirus and rotavirus.

  11. Pronóstico de la diarrea por rotavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mota-Hernández Felipe

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Comparar la gravedad de la diarrea por rotavirus (RV y por no rotavirus. Material y métodos. Estudio transversal en 520 lactantes con diarrea aguda, efectuado entre octubre de 1994 y marzo de 1995 en siete centros del primer nivel de atención en cinco estados de México. El diagnóstico de RV se realizó con ensayo inmunoenzimático o por electroforesis. El análisis se hizo a través de medidas de tendencia central. Los resultados se presentan como promedio y desviación estándar o mediana o variación. Resultados. Se aisló RV en 264 lactantes (50.7% con predominio en varones de 6 meses a un año. Las manifestaciones clínicas fueron significativamente diferentes entre el grupo rotavirus positivo y el grupo rotavirus negativo en mediana de evacuaciones por 24 horas, frecuencia de vómitos, temperatura > 38° C, deshidratación y calificación de gravedad, respectivamente. Conclusiones. Estos resultados mostraron peor pronóstico por mayor gravedad de la diarrea por RV en lactantes, con relación a otra etiología. El texto completo en inglés de este artículo está disponible en: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html

  12. Aquareovirus NS80 Initiates Efficient Viral Replication by Retaining Core Proteins within Replication-Associated Viral Inclusion Bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Liming Yan; Jie Zhang; Hong Guo; Shicui Yan; Qingxiu Chen; Fuxian Zhang; Qin Fang

    2015-01-01

    Viral inclusion bodies (VIBs) are specific intracellular compartments for reoviruses replication and assembly. Aquareovirus nonstructural protein NS80 has been identified to be the major constituent for forming globular VIBs in our previous study. In this study, we investigated the role of NS80 in viral structural proteins expression and viral replication. Immunofluorescence assays showed that NS80 could retain five core proteins or inner-capsid proteins (VP1-VP4 and VP6), but not outer-capsi...

  13. Respuesta inmune innata humana al rotavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanita Angel

    2004-03-01

    una respuesta inmunosupresora (3.

    En este contexto hemos comenzado a estudiar la interacción entre el rotavirus (RV y los monocitos y CD. Para tal efecto generamos CDI y CDM a partir de monolitos de sangre periférica de adultos sanos, como fue descrito anteriormente. Analizamos el impacto del RV en el fenotipo, la viabilidad y la capacidad de replicación viral en estos 3 tipos celulares. De esta manera podremos después probar la eficacia de estas células, tratadas con el RV, para estimular LT específicos del virus. Esperamos que estos estudios nos ayuden a entender el por qué de la baja respuesta de LT específicos contra el RV circulando en sujetos infectados (4,5 y nos abran vías que faciliten el estudio de los LT específicos de RV.

     

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    2. LARSSON, M., A. S. BEIGNON AND N. BHARDWAJ. Dcvirus interplay: A double edged sword. Semin Immunol 2004; 16: 147-161.

    3. GRANELLI-PIPERNO, A. A, GOLEBIOWSKA, C. TRUMPFHELLER, F. P. SIEGAL AND R. M. STEINMAN. Hiv-1-infected monocyte-derived dendritic cells do not undergo maturation but can elicit il-10 production and t cell regulation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2004; 101: 7669-7674. Epub 2004 May 7665.

    4. JAIMES, M. C., O. L. ROJAS, A. M. GONZÁLEZ, I. CAJIAO, A. CHARPILIENNE, P. POTHIER, E. KHOLI, H. B. GREENBERG, M. A. FRANCO AND J. ANGEL. Frequencies of virus specific cd4+ and cd8+ t

  14. A significant and consistent reduction in rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalization of children under 5 years of age, following the introduction of universal rotavirus immunization in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhsen, Khitam; Rubenstein, Uri; Kassem, Eias; Goren, Sophy; Schachter, Yaakov; Kremer, Adi; Shulman, Lester M; Ephros, Moshe; Cohen, Dani

    2015-01-01

    Universal rotavirus vaccination with RotaTeq was introduced in Israel in December 2010. We examined hospitalization rates of children under 5 years of age due to all-cause and rotavirus gastroenteritis, both before and 3 years after universal introduction of the vaccination. An ongoing hospital-based surveillance network that was established in November 2007, accessed information regarding hospitalization of children due to gastroenteritis (n = 6205) in 3 hospitals in northern Israel, with an annual average of about 60,000 children under 5 years of age living in the catchment area of these hospitals. Stool samples were tested for rotavirus by immunochromatography. Compared to the period preceding implementation of the universal rotavirus vaccination (2008-2010), hospitalizations due to rotavirus gastroenteritis in children gastroenteritis was also observed. During the period preceding universal vaccination, rotavirus diarrhea showed typical winter seasonality, with highest incidence in December. However, the winter peak was substantially blunted during the period of universal immunization. Surveillance of rotavirus gastroenteritis should continue to assess the long-term impact of such a program. Our findings are of relevance to high and middle-income countries considering the introduction of a universal rotavirus immunization program.

  15. Efficacy of synbiotic treatment in children with acute rotavirus diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Made Ratna Dewi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Diarrhea is one of the major causes of morbidityand mortality in children throughout the world, mostly due torotavirus infection. In daily practice, we routinely use the WorldHealth Organization Five steps for managing acute diarrhea.Thispractice has shown great success in diarrhea management, butconcerns remain on reducing the duration of diarrhea to preventcomplications. Synbiotics can reduce the severity of diarrhea.However, there has been limited data on synbiotic therapy fortreating acute rotavirus diarrhea in children.Objective To compare the durations of acute rotavirus diarrheatreated with synbiotics vs. placebo.Methods This study was a randomized, double-blind, clinical trial,performed at the Pediatric Gastrohepatology Division, Sanglahand Wangaya Hospitals in Denpasar. Subjects were children aged6 to 59 months with acute rotavirus diarrhea. Rotavirus wasdiagnosed by immune chromatography assay. The synbiotic groupreceived probiotic comprised of Lactobacillus sp., Streptococcus sp.,Bifidobacterium sp. (total viable count 1.00x109 CFU per dose, andprebiotic consisted of 990.00 mg fructooligosacharide (FOS. Theplacebo consisted of lactose monohydrate packaged similarly as thesynbiotics. Subjects orally ingested 1 pack per day for 5 days.Results Seventy children with acute rotavirus diarrhea wasinvolved in this study. The median duration of diarrhea in thesynbiotic group was 50.0 (SE 1.1; 95%CI 47.9 to 52.1 hours, whilethat of the placebo group was 63.0 (SE 5.9; 95%CI 51.4 to 74.6hours. Based on Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the duration ofdiarrhea in the synbiotic group was significantly shorter than thatof the placebo group (log-rank test P <0.0001.Conclusion In children with acute rotaviral diarrhea, synbioticreduces the duration of diarrhea compared to placebo.

  16. Identification and characterization of porcine rotavirus VP7 protein mimotope by phage screening technique%猪轮状病毒VP7蛋白模拟表位的噬菌体展示技术筛选与鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任晓峰; 秦昭恒; 曹丽艳; 葛旭颖

    2015-01-01

    猪轮状病毒(PoRV)是引起仔猪腹泻的重要病原之一,其主要结构蛋白衣壳蛋白VP7可诱导机体产生中和抗体。文章以制备的抗PoRV VP7单克隆抗体(MAb)3B6作为靶分子,利用噬菌体十二肽库展示技术对其模拟表位进行筛选。四轮筛选后随机挑取阳性克隆扩增后进行ELISA鉴定,同时提取其基因组DNA测序,10个阳性噬菌体亲和肽拥有共同的外源肽序列“VPLGTDNGDIWV”,而且与靶分子有很高亲和力。阳性噬菌体亲和肽与VP7蛋白进行序列比对,结果表明,十二肽中有4个氨基酸(第167位P、第178位T、第179位D和第184位W)与VP7蛋白167~184位氨基酸有一定的相似性。竞争抑制ELISA证明亲和多肽降低PoRV与抗VP7单克隆抗体之间的作用,病毒竞争抑制试验表明亲和多肽可以竞争性地抑制PoRV感染细胞。因此由这4个氨基酸构成的基序很有可能作为猪轮状病毒VP7蛋白的一个模拟表位。%Porcine rotavirus (PoRV) causes diarrhea, vomit, dehydration, acid-base imbalance and death in piglets. PoRV VP7 is the outer capsid glycoprotein that is highly immunogenic and induce the production of neutralizing antibody. A prepared monoclonal antibody (MAb) 3B6 against PoRV VP7 protein was used as immobilized target in a subtract biopanning process using a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. After four rounds of pannings, 10 phages bearing the consensus peptide VPLGTDNGDIWV and having a specific binding activity to the target were identified. Sequence alignment between positive phage-displayed 12-mer peptide and VP7 protein suggested that a potential motif that is identical with 167(P), 178(T), 179(D) or 184(W) aa in the VP7 protein. Competition ELISA showed that the high affinity peptide reduced the combination of PoRV with anti-VP7 MAb. Moreover, this peptide could significantly inhibit PoRV propagation in cell culture. In conclusion, the 4 amino acid motif (P

  17. Reduction in Rotavirus-associated Acute Gastroenteritis Following Introduction of Rotavirus Vaccine Into Australia's National Childhood Vaccine Schedule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttery, Jim P.; Lambert, Stephen B.; Grimwood, Keith; Nissen, Michael D.; Field, Emma J.; Macartney, Kristine K.; Akikusa, Jonathan D.; Kelly, Julian J.; Kirkwood, Carl D.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Rotavirus vaccines were introduced into the funded Australian National Immunization Program (NIP) in July 2007. Due to purchasing arrangements, individual states and territories chose either a 2-dose RV1 (Rotarix, GSK) regimen or 3-dose RV5 (Rotateq, Merck/CSL) regimen. This allowed co

  18. Reduction in Rotavirus-associated Acute Gastroenteritis Following Introduction of Rotavirus Vaccine Into Australia's National Childhood Vaccine Schedule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttery, Jim P.; Lambert, Stephen B.; Grimwood, Keith; Nissen, Michael D.; Field, Emma J.; Macartney, Kristine K.; Akikusa, Jonathan D.; Kelly, Julian J.; Kirkwood, Carl D.

    Introduction: Rotavirus vaccines were introduced into the funded Australian National Immunization Program (NIP) in July 2007. Due to purchasing arrangements, individual states and territories chose either a 2-dose RV1 (Rotarix, GSK) regimen or 3-dose RV5 (Rotateq, Merck/CSL) regimen. This allowed

  19. Outstanding challenges for rotavirus vaccine introduction in low-income countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ustrup, Marte; Madsen, Lizell B; Bygbjerg, Ib C

    2011-01-01

    . There is also a need for political commitment to prevent rotavirus infections as well as a need for an overall strengthening of the health systems in low-income countries. If these challenges were met, rotavirus vaccination could substantially improve child health and survival from rotavirus......Rotavirus infections are the most common cause of severe diarrhoea in children worldwide. Two internationally licensed rotavirus vaccines have proven to be efficacious in middle and high-income countries and they could potentially be valuable tools for the prevention of rotavirus......-associated diarrhoea in low-income countries where the disease burden is greatest. However, before the vaccines can be introduced into the national immunisation programmes in these countries, many challenges related to the financing of vaccine purchase, the cold chain capacity and vaccine efficacy must be overcome...

  20. Incidence of rotavirus infection in children with gastroenteritis attending Jos university teaching hospital, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olabode Atanda O

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was conducted to determine the incidence of rotavirus infection in children with gastroenteritis attending Jos university teaching hospital, Plateau State. A total of 160 children with acute diarrhea were selected by random sampling. Stool samples were obtained and assayed for rotavirus antigens by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay technique using standard diagnostic BIOLINE Rotavirus kit. Demographic data of parents were also recorded. Rotavirus were detected in faeces of 22(13.8% children with acute diarrhea, 90.9% of positive cases of rotavirus gastroenteritis were under 2 years of age with highest prevalence in children 7-12 months of age. Males excreted rotavirus at a significant higher rate than females (P

  1. Diversity and zoonotic potential of rotaviruses in swine and cattle across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, Sofie E.; Bányai, Krisztián; Buesa, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses can infect both humans and animals. Individual rotavirus strains can occasionally cross species barriers and might hereby contribute to the emergence of new genotypes in heterologous hosts. The incidence and impact of zoonotic rotavirus are not well defined, and one reason...... for this is a lack of data about strains circulating in suspected reservoir animal hosts. In this study we report the incidence, genetic diversity, and molecular epidemiology of rotaviruses detected in domestic cattle and swine in 6 European countries. From 2003 to 2007, 1101 and more than 2000 faecal specimens were...... collected from swine and cattle, both healthy and diarrhoeic, and tested for rotaviruses. Viruses from positive stools were genotyped and a subset of strains was characterized by nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 (G) and VP4 (P) genes. Rotaviruses were detected in 43% of bovine...

  2. Discrepancies between Antigen and Polymerase Chain Reaction Tests for the Detection of Rotavirus and Norovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jae-Seok

    2016-05-01

    We compared the results of an antigen test (ELISA) with those of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of rotavirus and norovirus in stool specimens. Rotavirus and norovirus antigen-positive stool specimens were collected, and rotavirus and norovirus PCRs were performed on these specimens. Of the 325 rotavirus antigen-positive specimens, 200 were positive for both assays and 125 were PCR negative. Of 286 norovirus antigen-positive specimens, 51 were PCR negative. Comparison of the lower limit of detection showed that rotavirus PCR was 16 times more sensitive and norovirus PCR was over 4,000 times more sensitive than the ELISA. Discrepant results between ELISA and PCR were common, and the possibility of false-positive and false-negative results should be considered with rotavirus and norovirus assays.

  3. Impact of the rotavirus vaccine in Valladolid, Spain: An interrupted time series analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Pérez-Rubio; Francisco Javier Luquero; Maria Rosario Bachiller Luque; Paz de la Torre Pardo; José María Eiros Bouza

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus vaccines (RV) have decreased the infant morbidity and mortality in countries that included RV in their national schedule. Rotavirus vaccination is recommended by the Spanish Society of Pediatrics; however, Spain, as most countries in Europe, has authorized commercialization but not included RV in its national vaccination program. We assessed the impact of RV on the rotavirus hospitalization rate through an interrupted time series analysis. There was a 46.8% (95% CI: 29.3–60.2) decre...

  4. Effective prophylaxis against rotavirus diarrhea using a combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Pant, Neha; Marcotte, Harold; Brüssow, Harald; Svensson, Lennart; Hammarström, Lennart

    2007-01-01

    Background Rotavirus is a worldwide cause of infectious infantile diarrhea that claims over 600,000 lives annually. Recently, two new vaccine candidates have been developed but their efficacy in developing countries, still remains to be proven. Oral delivery of specific immunoglobulins provides passive immunity and is a fast acting treatment for rotavirus diarrhea. Probiotic bacteria have also gained considerable attention lately as treatment for rotavirus diarrhea. Here we report an evaluati...

  5. Catching-up with pentavalent vaccine: Exploring reasons behind lower rotavirus vaccine coverage in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Castaneda, Eduardo; Burnett, Eleanor; Elas, Miguel; Baltrons, Rafael; Pezzoli, Lorenzo; Flannery, Brendan; Kleinbaum, David; de Oliveira, Lucia Helena; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina

    2015-11-27

    Rotavirus vaccine was introduced in El Salvador in 2006 and is recommended to be given concomitantly with DTP-HepB-Haemophilus influenzae type b (pentavalent) vaccine at ages 2 months (upper age limit 15 weeks) and 4 months (upper age limit 8 months) of age. However, rotavirus vaccination coverage continues to lag behind that of pentavalent vaccine, even in years when national rotavirus vaccine stock-outs have not occurred. We analyzed factors associated with receipt of oral rotavirus vaccine among children who received at least 2 doses of pentavalent vaccine in a stratified cluster survey of children aged 24-59 months conducted in El Salvador in 2011. Vaccine doses included were documented on vaccination cards (94.4%) or in health facility records (5.6%). Logistic regression and survival analysis were used to assess factors associated with vaccination status and age at vaccination. Receipt of pentavalent vaccine by age 15 weeks was associated with rotavirus vaccination (OR: 5.1; 95% CI 2.7, 9.4), and receipt of the second pentavalent dose by age 32 weeks was associated with receipt of two rotavirus vaccine doses (OR: 5.0; 95% CI 2.1-12.3). Timely coverage with the first pentavalent vaccine dose was 88.2% in the 2007 cohort and 91.1% in the 2008 cohort (p=0.04). Children born in 2009, when a four-month national rotavirus vaccine stock-out occurred, had an older median age of receipt of rotavirus vaccine and were less likely to receive rotavirus on the same date as the same dose of pentavalent vaccine than children born in 2007 and 2008. Upper age limit recommendations for rotavirus vaccine administration contributed to suboptimal vaccination coverage. Survey data suggest that late rotavirus vaccination and co-administration with later doses of pentavalent vaccine among children born in 2009 helped increase rotavirus vaccine coverage following shortages.

  6. Socio-demographic, Clinical and Laboratory Features of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children Treated in Pediatric Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Berisha, Majlinda; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Kolgeci, Selim; Avdiu, Muharrem; Jakupi, Xhevat; Hoxha, Rina; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of work was presentation of several socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics of gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. The examinees and methods: The examinees were children under the age of five years treated at the Pediatric Clinic due to acute gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. Rotavirus is isolated by method chromatographic immunoassay by Cer Test Biotec. Results: From the total number of patients (850) suffering from acute gastroenteritis, feces test on bac...

  7. Geo(spatial) Health Investigation of Rotavirus in an Endemic Region: Hydroclimatic Influences and Epidemiology of Rotavirus in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M. A.; Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A.; Colwell, R. R.

    2016-12-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe dehydrating diarrhea among children under 5. Over 80% of the approximate half a million child deaths every year occur in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa alone. Although less explored than cholera as a climate driven and influenced global health problem, recent studies have showed that the disease shown strong seasonality and spatio-temporal variability depending on regional hydroclimatic and local environmental conditions. Understanding the epidemiology of this disease, especially the spatio-temporal incidence patterns with respect to environmental factors is vitally important to allow for identification of "hotspots", preventative preparations, and vaccination strategies to improve wellbeing of the vulnerable populations. With climate change, spatio-temporal signatures and footprints of the disease are changing along with increasing burden. However, a robust understanding of the relationships between rotavirus epidemiology and hydroclimatic drivers is yet to be developed. In this study, we evaluate the seasonality and epidemiologic characteristics of rotavirous infection and its spatio-temporal incidence patterns with respect to regional hydroclimatic variables and their extremes in an endemic region in South Asia. Hospital-based surveillance data from different geographic locations allowed us to explore the detailed spatial and temporal characteristics of rotavirus propagation under the influence of climate variables in both coastal and inland areas. The rotavirus transmission patterns show two peaks in a year in the capital city of Dhaka, where winter season (highest in January) shows a high peak and the July-August monsoon season shows a smaller peak. Correlation with climate variables revealed that minimum temperature has strong influence on the winter season outbreak, while rainfall extremes show a strong positive association with the secondary monsoon peak. Spatial analysis also revealed that humidity and soil

  8. Epidemiology of rotavirus in the Iranian children: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hamid Reza Monavari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is associated with increased risk for severe diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to determine the prevalence rate of rotavirus from different parts of Iran and provide an overall relative frequency (RF for Iran. We performed a systematic literature review from several databases including PubMed, ISI Web of Science, Scopus, OVID, MAG IRAN, IranMedex, and Iranian Scientific Information Database. We searched the following keywords: “rotavirus,” “rotavirus infection,” “acute gastroenteritis,” “diarrhea,” “children,” “infant,” and “Iran.” The purpose of this study was to report the prevalence of rotavirus with the application of meta-analysis. We selected 43 researches out of 1147 for our study. From all the samples, the pooled estimate of prevalence (95% confidence interval =39.9% (0.396%–0.409% were rotavirus positive. It should be noted that rotavirus infection's RF varied from 6.4% to 79.3% in Birjand and Tehran Provinces, respectively. Thereupon, it is divergent in different studies. According to our study result, rotavirus RF has a wide range in Iran and is associated with diarrhea in children. Thus, further researches should be taken to minimize the emergence and transmission of rotavirus.

  9. Household catastrophic healthcare expenditure and impoverishment due to rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Loganathan, Tharani; Lee, Way-Seah; Lee, Kok-Foo; Jit, Mark; Ng, Chiu-Wan

    2015-01-01

    While healthcare costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization may be burdensome on households in Malaysia, exploration on the distribution and catastrophic impact of these expenses...

  10. Socio-economic modelling of rotavirus vaccination in Castilla y Leon, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rubio, Alberto; Luquero, Francisco Javier; Eiros Bouza, Jose María; Castrodeza Sanz, Jose Javier; Bachiller Luque, Maria Rosario; de Lejarazu, Raúl Ortiz; Sánchez Porto, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    Rotavirus is one of the main causes of acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children. Furthermore, rotavirus is the leading cause of hospitalization and death from acute gastroenteritis among infants and young children worldwide. Although death due to rotavirus is rare in industrialized regions such as Spain, the rotavirus disease burden and its economic impact is severe. This study aims to assess systematic vaccination against rotavirus economically and socially in a Spanish region. Economic cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit assessment through a choice tree was designed. We estimated health provider costs, economic costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) lost due to rotavirus infections. The study includes a fictitious cohort of 100,000 children from Castilla y Leon who were also administered the rotavirus vaccine together with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis (DTP) . The study adopted a society and health care system perspective. A sensitivity analysis was developed to assess the uncertainty of some variables. According to the estimated incidence rate for children in Castilla y Leon, rotavirus immunization is projected to prevent 45% of cases with RotaTeq and 57% with Rotarix. The respective cost per QALY is about Euro 75,000 and 50,000 from the perspective of the health care system. Routine infant vaccination in Castilla y Leon using either rotavirus vaccine is not profitable from the payer's perspective and is not cost-effective under basic case assumptions unless the vaccine is available at a lower cost.

  11. Prospective study of the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in Danish children and their families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Iturriza, Miren; Faaborg-Andersen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    This was the first study to characterize the total burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) at both hospital and general physician (GP) clinics in Denmark, and also the first to confirm rotavirus (RV) as the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (GE) among children......This was the first study to characterize the total burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) at both hospital and general physician (GP) clinics in Denmark, and also the first to confirm rotavirus (RV) as the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (GE) among children...

  12. Rotavirus disease in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa: a review of longitudinal community and hospital studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Thea Kølsen; Aaby, Peter; Mølbak, Kåre

    2010-01-01

    Rotavirus is one of the most common causes of childhood diarrheal disease and deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. This article reviews community- and hospital-based surveillance of rotavirus disease in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau, West Africa. Here, rotavirus infections exhibit a seasonal pattern, with annual...... epidemics occurring during the relatively dry and cooler months, from January to April, and few cases registered from May to December. Most children (74%) experience their first infection before the age of 2 years, and rotavirus has been identified as the most pathogenic of all diarrheal agents during 2...

  13. Sequence Diversity of VP4 and VP7 Genes of Human Rotavirus Strains in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Moneim, Ahmed S; Al-Malky, Mater I R; Alsulaimani, Adnan A A; Abuelsaad, Abdelaziz S A; Mohamed, Imad; Ismail, Ayman K

    2015-12-01

    Group A rotavirus is responsible for inducing severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. Rotavirus vaccines are used to control the disease in many countries. In the current study, the sequences of human rotavirus G and P types in Saudi Arabia are reported and compared to different relevant published sequences. In addition, the VP4 and VP7 genes of the G1P[8] strains are compared to different antigenic epitopes of the rotavirus vaccines. Stool samples were collected from children under 2 years suffering from severe diarrhea. Screening of the rotavirus-positive samples was performed with rapid antigen detection kit. RNA was amplified from rotavirus-positive samples by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay for both VP4 and VP7 genes. Direct sequencing of the VP4 and VP7 genes was conducted and the obtained sequences were compared to each other and to the rotavirus vaccines. Both G1P[8] G1P[4] genotypes were detected. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the detected strains belong to G1 lineage 1 and 2, P[8] lineage 3, and to P[4] lineage 5. Multiple amino acid substitutions were detected between the Saudi RVA strains and the commonly used vaccines. The current findings emphasize the importance of the continuous surveillance of the circulating rotavirus strains, which is crucial for monitoring virus evolution and helping in predicting the protection level afforded by rotavirus vaccines.

  14. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of rotavirus VP8* fused to cholera toxin B subunit in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Miaoge; Yu, Linqi; Jia, Lianzhi; Li, Yijian; Zeng, Yuanjun; Li, Tingdong; Ge, Shengxiang; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-11-01

    In attempts to develop recombinant subunit vaccines against rotavirus disease, it was previously shown that the N-terminal truncated VP8* protein, VP8-1 (aa26-231), is a good vaccine candidate when used for immunization in combination with Freund's adjuvant. However, this protein stimulated only weak immune response when aluminum hydroxide was used as an adjuvant. In this study, the nontoxic B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB) was employed as intra-molecular adjuvant to improve the immunogenicity of VP8-1. Both, the N-terminal and C-terminal fusion proteins, were purified to homogeneity, at which stage they formed pentamers, and showed significantly higher immunogenicity and protective efficacy than a VP8-1/aluminum hydroxide mixture in a mouse model. Compared to VP8-1-CTB, CTB-VP8-1 showed higher binding activity to both, GM1 and the conformation sensitive neutralizing monoclonal antibodies specific to VP8. More importantly, CTB-VP8-1 elicited higher titers of neutralizing antibodies and conferred higher protective efficacy than VP8-1-CTB. Therefore, the protein CTB-VP8-1, with enhanced immunogenicity and immunoprotectivity, could be considered as a viable candidate for further development of an alternative, replication-incompetent, parenterally administered vaccine against rotavirus disease.

  15. SEASONALITY OF ROTAVIRUS IN SOUTH ASIA: A META-ANALYSIS APPROACH ASSESSING ASSOCIATIONS WITH TEMPERATURE, PRECIPTATION, AND VEGETATION INDEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Rotavirus infection causes a significant proportion of diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide leading to dehydration, hospitalization, and in some cases death. Rotavirus infection represents a significant burden of disease in developing countries, such as th...

  16. Cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urueña, Analía; Pippo, Tomás; Betelu, María Sol; Virgilio, Federico; Hernández, Laura; Giglio, Norberto; Gentile, Ángela; Diosque, Máximo; Vizzotti, Carla

    2015-05-07

    Rotavirus is a leading cause of severe diarrhea in children under 5. In Argentina, the most affected regions are the Northeast and Northwest, where hospitalizations and deaths are more frequent. This study estimated the cost-effectiveness of adding either of the two licensed rotavirus vaccines to the routine immunization schedule. The integrated TRIVAC vaccine cost-effectiveness model from the Pan American Health Organization's ProVac Initiative (Version 2.0) was used to assess health benefits, costs savings, life-years gained (LYGs), DALYs averted, and cost/DALY averted of vaccinating 10 successive cohorts, from the health care system and societal perspectives. Two doses of monovalent (RV1) rotavirus vaccine and three doses of pentavalent (RV5) rotavirus vaccine were each compared to a scenario assuming no vaccination. The price/dose was US$ 7.50 and US$ 5.15 for RV1 and RV5, respectively. We ran both a national and sub-national analysis, discounting all costs and benefits 3% annually. Our base case results were compared to a range of alternative univariate and multivariate scenarios. The number of LYGs was 5962 and 6440 for RV1 and RV5, respectively. The cost/DALY averted when compared to no vaccination from the health care system and societal perspective was: US$ 3870 and US$ 1802 for RV1, and US$ 2414 and US$ 358 for RV5, respectively. Equivalent figures for the Northeast were US$ 1470 and US$ 636 for RV1, and US$ 913 and US$ 80 for RV5. Therefore, rotavirus vaccination was more cost-effective in the Northeast compared to the whole country; and, in the Northwest, health service's costs saved outweighed the cost of introducing the vaccine. Vaccination with either vaccine compared to no vaccination was highly cost-effective based on WHO guidelines and Argentina's 2011 per capita GDP of US$ 9090. Key variables influencing results were vaccine efficacy, annual loss of efficacy, relative coverage of deaths, vaccine price, and discount rate. Compared to no

  17. Rotavirus strain diversity in Blantyre, Malawi, from 1997 to 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunliffe, N A; Gondwe, J S; Graham, S M; Thindwa, B D; Dove, W; Broadhead, R L; Molyneux, M E; Hart, C A

    2001-03-01

    In a 2-year study of viral gastroenteritis in children in Blantyre, Malawi, the diversity of rotavirus strains was investigated by using electropherotyping, reverse transcription-PCR amplification of the VP7 and VP4 genes (G and P genotyping), and nucleotide sequencing. Of 414 rotavirus strains characterized, the following strain types were identified: P[8], G1 (n = 111; 26.8%); P[6], G8 (n = 110; 26.6%); P[8], G3 (n = 93; 22.5%); P[4], G8 (n = 31; 7.5%); P[8], G4 (n = 21; 5.1%); P[6], G3 (n = 12; 2.9%); P[6], G1 (n = 7; 1.7%); P[6], G9 (n = 3; 0.7%); P[6], G4 (n = 3; 0.7%); P[4], G3 (n = 1; 0.2%); and mixed (n = 15; 3.6%). While all strains could be assigned a G type, seven strains (1.7%) remained P nontypeable. The majority of serotype G8 strains and all serotype G9 strains had short electropherotype profiles. All remaining typeable strains had long electropherotypes. Divergent serotype G1 rotaviruses, which contained multiple base substitutions in the 9T-1 primer binding site, were commonly identified in the second year of surveillance. Serotype G2 was not identified. Overall, G8 was the most frequently identified VP7 serotype (n = 144; 34.8%) and P[8] was the most frequently detected VP4 genotype (n = 227; 54.8%). Partial sequence analysis of the VP4 gene of genotype P[8] rotaviruses identified three distinct clusters, which predominantly (but not exclusively) comprised strains belonging to a distinct VP7 serotype (G1, G3, or G4). As a result of mutations in the 1T-1 primer binding site, strains belonging to each cluster required a separate primer for efficient typing. One cluster, represented by P[8], G4 strain OP354, was highly divergent from the established Wa and F45 VP4 P[8] lineages. As is the case for some other countries, the diversity of rotaviruses in Malawi implies that rotavirus vaccines in development will need to protect against a wider panel of serotypes than originally envisioned.

  18. Development of a Real-time PCR test for porcine group A rotavirus diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C.M. Marconi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Group A Rotavirus (RVA is one of the most common causes of diarrhea in humans and several animal species. A SYBR-Green Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (PCR was developed to diagnose RVA from porcine fecal samples, targeting amplification of a 137-bp fragment of nonstructural protein 5 (NSP5 gene using mRNA of bovine NADH-desidrogenase-5 as exogenous internal control. Sixty-five samples were tested (25 tested positive for conventional PCR and genetic sequencing. The overall agreement (kappa was 0.843, indicating 'very good' concordance between tests, presenting 100% of relative sensitivity (25+ Real Time PCR/25+ Conventional PCR and 87.5% of relative sensitivity (35- Real Time PCR/40- Conventional PCR. The results also demonstrated high intra- and inter-assay reproducibility (coefficient of variation ≤1.42%; thus, this method proved to be a fast and sensitive approach for the diagnosis of RVA in pigs.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in vietnam: Exploring impacts of herd immunity and patterns of breastfeedingof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, H.A.T.; Coyte, P.; Li, S.C.; Postma, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: : Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhoea worldwide. This study was designed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Vietnam taking into account herd immunity and patterns of breastfeeding. The affordability of implementing universal rotavirus immun

  20. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in vietnam: Exploring impacts of herd immunity and patterns of breastfeedingof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, H.A.T.; Coyte, P.; Li, S.C.; Postma, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: : Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhoea worldwide. This study was designed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Vietnam taking into account herd immunity and patterns of breastfeeding. The affordability of implementing universal rotavirus

  1. The cost-effectiveness of pentavalent rotavirus vaccination in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Katherine E; Shim, Eunha; Carroll, Stuart; Quilici, Sibilia; Galvani, Alison P

    2012-11-01

    Rotavirus vaccines have shown great potential for reducing the disease burden of the major cause of severe childhood gastroenteritis. The decision regarding whether rotavirus vaccination will be introduced into the national immunization program is currently being reviewed. The conclusions of previous evaluations of rotavirus vaccination cost-effectiveness contradict each other. This is the first analysis to incorporate a dynamic transmission model to assess the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in England and Wales. Most previously reported models do not include herd protection, and thus may underestimate the cost-effectiveness of vaccination against rotavirus. We incorporate a dynamic model of rotavirus transmission in England and Wales into a cost-effectiveness analysis to determine the probability that the pentavalent rotavirus vaccination will be cost-effective over a range of full-course vaccine prices. This novel approach allows the cost-effectiveness analysis to include a feasible level of herd protection provided by a vaccination program. Our base case model predicts that pentavalent rotavirus vaccination is likely to be cost-effective in England and Wales at £ 60 per course. In some scenarios the vaccination is predicted to be not only cost-effective but also cost-saving. These savings could be generated within ten years after vaccine introduction. Our budget impact analysis demonstrates that for the realistic base case scenarios, 58-96% of the cost outlay for vaccination will be recouped within the first four years of a program. Our results indicate that rotavirus vaccination would be beneficial to public health and could be economically sound. Since rotavirus vaccination is not presently on the immunization schedule for England and Wales but is currently under review, this study can inform policymakers of the cost-effectiveness and budget impact of implementing a mass rotavirus vaccine strategy.

  2. Perspectivas de la diarrea por rotavirus en El Salvador.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Arturo Zablah

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Materiales y métodos: En diciembre del año 2000, un brote epidémico de gastroenteritis ocurrió en El Salvador que se asoció con numerosas hospitalizaciones y muertes de niños en todo el país. El Ministerio de Salud Pública se mostró preocupado, pues se ignoraba su etiología y las medidas de control usuales fueron ineficaces. El brote lo produjo un rotavirus, y las medidas de control fueron rediseñadas para mejorar el tratamiento con rehidratación oral e iniciar un sistema de vigilancia para conocer los agentes etiológicos de la gastroenteritis. Se colectaron datos clínicos, demográficos y también muestras de heces en niños menores de 5 años que presentaron gastroenteritis aguda. A las muestras de heces se les realizó exámenes para determinar la presencia de rotavirus, parásitos y bacterias. El sistema revigilancia se extrapoló con los datos nacionales para estimar el impacto nacional de la enfermedad por rotavirus. Resultados: La vigilancia epidemiológica entre mayo 2001 y abril 2002 demostró que el rotavirus tuvo predominio en la estación de invierno, y se asoció con la presencia de vómitos que se informaron en 27% de 12,083 consultas por diarrea. Los niños con gastroenteritis por rotavirus eran lactantes con un promedio de edad de 9 meses en comparación con las diarreas causadas por otros agentes (13 meses para bacterias y 16 meses para parásitos. Al extrapolar los datos nacionales, se estimó que el riesgo de un niño que consultaba por diarrea por rotavirus, que se hospitalizaba, y riesgo de muerte antes de los 5 años fue 1:7, 1:56, y 1:531, respectivamente. Conclusiones: El brote de gastroenteritis en niños menores de 5 años entre diciembre 2000 y febrero 2001 representó un exagerado predominio estacional de la infección por rotavirus. La actividad de vigilancia epidemiológica después del brote sugiere que el rotavirus es la causa mas frecuente de diarrea en El Salvador. Un seguimiento en la vigilancia

  3. Dielectrophoresis and dielectrophoretic impedance detection of adenovirus and rotavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Michihiko; Ding, Zhenhao; Suehiro, Junya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is the electrical detection of pathogenic viruses, namely, adenovirus and rotavirus, using dielectrophoretic impedance measurement (DEPIM). DEPIM consists of two simultaneous processes: dielectrophoretic trapping of the target and measurement of the impedance change and increase in conductance with the number of trapped targets. This is the first study of applying DEPIM, which was originally developed to detect bacteria suspended in aqueous solutions, to virus detection. The dielectric properties of the viruses were also investigated in terms of their dielectrophoretic behavior. Although their estimated dielectric properties were different from those of bacteria, the trapped viruses increased the conductance of the microelectrode in a manner similar to that in bacteria detection. We demonstrated the electrical detection of viruses within 60 s at concentrations as low as 70 ng/ml for adenovirus and 50 ng/ml for rotavirus.

  4. Nosocomial transmission of rotavirus from patients admitted with diarrhea.

    OpenAIRE

    Gaggero, A.; Avendaño, L F; Fernández, J.; Spencer, E.

    1992-01-01

    We studied the transmission of rotavirus (RV) in 950 patients under 2 years of age hospitalized for diarrhea in Santiago, Chile. Stool samples were collected every other day from all patients during their entire hospital stay. To trace nosocomial transmission, we mapped the ward at the time of detection of RV. Comparative study by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of 315 RV isolates (180 detected upon admission of patients and 135 attributed to nosocomial transmission) allowed the identifica...

  5. Efficacy of synbiotic treatment in children with acute rotavirus diarrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Made Ratna Dewi; Yati Soenarto; I Putu Gede Karyana

    2015-01-01

    Background Diarrhea is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in children throughout the world, mostly due to rotavirus infection. In daily practice, we routinely use the World Health Organization Five steps for managing acute diarrhea.This practice has shown great success in diarrhea management, but concerns remain on reducing the duration of diarrhea to prevent complications. Synbiotics can reduce the severity of diarrhea. However, there has been limited data on synbiotic therap...

  6. [Epidemic of nosocomial infection by rotavirus in a neonatology service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentama, I; Soussi, I; Ghanimi, Z; Riane, S; Tligui, H; Mdaghri Alaoui, A; Thimou Izgua, A

    2012-01-01

    The goal of work is to establish a clinical descriptive analysis of the epidemic of nosocomial rotavirus occurred in the Neonatal Unit of the Hospital's Child Rabat for a winter period. We systematically collected all the patients of the service right from the first case of rotavirus nosocomial infection. Patients with a stay of less than 48 hours of hospitalization were excluded. We have established operating sheets for all positive cases, with the term, birth weight, postnatal age and weight during the sampling, clinical symptoms, treatment, and the evolution. Out of the 36 cases analyzed (where 26 preterm and 10 term neonates), 12 samples were positive for rotavirus, so one third of patients. The patients with positive samples were in 75% symptomatic cases. The clinical signs were represented in term newborns with stool weight with stagnant fluid in 2 cases and weight loss in one case and in premature infants with mucous stools with abdominal distension in 2/3 of cases, and fluid and stool dehydration in 1/3 of cases. A very low rate of breastfeeding (17%) was noted among all newborns service in this epidemic. We performed the isolation of positive patients, with a strengthening of hygiene measures. In addition, infants were started on symptomatic treatment with careful clinical monitoring. Evolution was complicated by necrotizing enterocolitis in 3 cases of preterm infants.

  7. Application of Xiyanping in treatment of infantile rotavirus diarrhea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Xiong Tang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To observe the application effect of Xiyanping in the treatment of infantile rotavirus diarrhea.Methods:A total of 80 children with rotavirus diarrhea who were admitted in our hospital from January, 2014 to April, 2015 were included in the study and randomized into the treatment group and the control group with 40 cases in each group. The patients in the two groups were given ribavirin 10 mg/kg.d, iv drip, qd. On this basis, the patients in the treatment group were given additional Xiyanping injection 7.5 mg/kg, iv drip, qd. The symptom and sign relieving time and temperature reduced degree after treatment in the two groups were compared. The serum BDNF, NGF, and NTF levels in the two groups were detected.Results:The treatment total effective rate in the treatment group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.05). The symptom and sign relieving time in the treatment group was significantly shorter than that in the control group (P<0.05), and the temperature recovering degree was significantly superior to that in the control group (P<0.05). The serum BDNF, NGF, and NTF levels after treatment in the treatment group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05).Conclusions: Xiyanping in combined with ribavirin in the treatment of infantile rotavirus diarrhea can effectively relieve the symptoms and signs, and protect the neurological function, with efficacy superior to that by pure ribavirin treatment.

  8. Progress in the pathogenesis of rotavirus-associated disease%轮状病毒感染发病机制的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周玲

    2010-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most common pathogens of diarrheal diseases in children. Rotavirus infection lead to not only gastrointestinal symptoms but also a variety of extraintesu'nal manifestations. The pathogenesis of RV diarrhea and especially RV viremia is related to multiple factors. Rotavirus infectious diarrhea is related to the damaged cell intercellular connections,the non-structural protein 4, heat shock protein hsc70 and other factors. Pathogenesis of RV viremia may be related to the secretion of inflammatory mediators in vivo and expression of cytokines after RV infection.%轮状病毒(RV)是小儿腹泻病最常见病原体,RV感染不仅可导致胃肠道症状,亦可引起各种肠道外表现.RV腹泻特别是RV血症发病机制和多个因素有关,至今尚未完全明确.RV感染性腹泻可能和细胞胞间连接损害、非结构蛋白NSP4、热休克蛋白hsc70等因素有关.RV病毒血症发病机制可能和RV感染引起体内炎性介质分泌、细胞因子表达水平改变等免疫因素有关.

  9. Effect of breastfeeding promotion interventions on cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwantika, Auliya A.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rotavirus infection has been reported to be responsible for the majority of severe diarrhea in children under-5-years-old in Indonesia. Breast milk is considered to give protection against rotavirus infection. Increasing breastfeeding promotion programs could be an alternative target to

  10. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Vietnam: Results and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, H.A.T.; Rozenbaum, M.; Coyte, P.C.; Li, S.C.; Postma, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of universal rotavirus immunization, explicitly the use of Rotateq® and affordability of implementing rotavirus immunization based on the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI)-subsidized vaccine price in the context of Vietnamese health car

  11. Mouse intestinal villi as a model system for studies of rotavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Santana, Ana Y; Acosta, Orlando

    2010-09-01

    Rotavirus replicates in the mature enterocytes lining the villi of the small intestine and the availability of an in vitro system for culturing these natural target cells would contribute to substantial advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of rotavirus. A novel in vitro system was established for culturing isolated small intestinal villi from suckling mice, and the susceptibility of the villus cells to the wild-type murine rotavirus EDIM-Cambridge (ECwt) infection was assessed by immunocytochemistry staining and ELISA. Cell viability of cultured villi infected by rotavirus was estimated to be higher than 70% 16 h post-infection, whereas the accumulated rotavirus structural and non-structural antigen was found to reach a maximum value at 24 h post-infection. Terminal apoptosis was found in about 65% of villus cells 22 h post-infection as detected with either propidium iodide or Hoechst 33342 staining. Mock-infected villus cells exhibited a slight tendency toward more extensive chromatin fragmentation compared to their rotavirus-infected counterpart, mainly when caspase-3 activity was measured. Examination of villus cells by ELISA indicated that the amount of rotavirus structural antigen accumulated at 12 h post-infection was nearly the same regardless of the intestinal section (duodenum, jejunum and ileum) used. The isolation, culture and infection of small intestinal villi from suckling mice has led to the introduction of a useful model for rotavirus studies. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Rotavirus in the feces of children with acute diarrhea in Cochabamba, Bolivia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, E; Barrera, F; Saavedra, J; Cona, E; Aguilera, G

    1989-01-01

    Eighty patients with acute diarrheal disease from Cochabamba, Bolivia, were investigated for rotavirus infection by rotapheresis. Rotavirus ARN was detected in 18 (22.5%) of the cases, thus suggesting that this agent is also a frequent cause of acute diarrhea in the studied population as reported from other places of the world.

  13. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity reduces rotavirus infection at a postbinding step.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Rossen (John); J. Bouma (Janneke); R.H. Raatgeep (Rolien); H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractElevated levels of prostaglandins (PGs), products of cyclooxygenases (COXs), are found in the plasma and stool of rotavirus-infected children. We sought to determine the role of COXs, PGs, and the signal transduction pathways involved in rotavirus infection to elucidate

  14. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Vietnam: Results and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, H.A.T.; Rozenbaum, M.; Coyte, P.C.; Li, S.C.; Postma, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of universal rotavirus immunization, explicitly the use of Rotateq® and affordability of implementing rotavirus immunization based on the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI)-subsidized vaccine price in the context of Vietnamese health car

  15. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity reduces rotavirus infection at a postbinding step

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, John W A; Bouma, Janneke; Raatgeep, Rolien H C; Büller, Hans A; Einerhand, Alexandra W C

    2004-01-01

    Elevated levels of prostaglandins (PGs), products of cyclooxygenases (COXs), are found in the plasma and stool of rotavirus-infected children. We sought to determine the role of COXs, PGs, and the signal transduction pathways involved in rotavirus infection to elucidate possible new targets for anti

  16. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Vietnam: Results and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, H.A.T.; Rozenbaum, M.; Coyte, P.C.; Li, S.C.; Postma, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of universal rotavirus immunization, explicitly the use of Rotateq® and affordability of implementing rotavirus immunization based on the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI)-subsidized vaccine price in the context of Vietnamese health

  17. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity reduces rotavirus infection at a postbinding step

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, John W A; Bouma, Janneke; Raatgeep, Rolien H C; Büller, Hans A; Einerhand, Alexandra W C

    Elevated levels of prostaglandins (PGs), products of cyclooxygenases (COXs), are found in the plasma and stool of rotavirus-infected children. We sought to determine the role of COXs, PGs, and the signal transduction pathways involved in rotavirus infection to elucidate possible new targets for

  18. Detection and distribution of rotavirus in raw sewage and creeks in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehnert, D.U.; Stewien, K.E. (Univ. of Sao Paulo (Brazil))

    1993-01-01

    Rotavirus invection is an important cause of hospitalization and mortality of infants and children in developing countries, especially where the water supply and sewage disposal systems are in precarious conditions. This report describes the detection, quantitation, and distribution of rotaviruses in domestic sewage and sewage polluted creeks in the city of San Paulo. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Economic evaluations of rotavirus immunization for developing countries : a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, H.A.T.; Woerdenbag, H.J.; Kane, S.; Rozenbaum, M.H.; Li, S.C.; Postma, M.J.

    Diarrhea is a leading cause of mortality for children under 5 years of age, and rotavirus is identified as the main cause of severe diarrhea worldwide. Since 2006, two rotavirus vaccines, Rotarix and Rotateq, have been available in the market. These vaccines have proved to have high efficacy in

  20. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity reduces rotavirus infection at a postbinding step.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Rossen (John); J. Bouma (Janneke); R.H. Raatgeep (Rolien); H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractElevated levels of prostaglandins (PGs), products of cyclooxygenases (COXs), are found in the plasma and stool of rotavirus-infected children. We sought to determine the role of COXs, PGs, and the signal transduction pathways involved in rotavirus infection to elucidate

  1. Effect of breastfeeding promotion interventions on cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwantika, Auliya A.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rotavirus infection has been reported to be responsible for the majority of severe diarrhea in children under-5-years-old in Indonesia. Breast milk is considered to give protection against rotavirus infection. Increasing breastfeeding promotion programs could be an alternative target to

  2. Changes in small intestinal homeostasis, morphology, and gene expression during rotavirus infection of infant mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Boshuizen; J.H. Reimerink; A.M. Korteland-van Male (Anita); V.J. van Ham; H.A. Büller (Hans); J. Dekker (Jan); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractRotavirus is the most important cause of infantile gastroenteritis. Since in vivo mucosal responses to a rotavirus infection thus far have not been extensively studied, we related viral replication in the murine small intestine to alterations in mucosal structure, epith

  3. Economic evaluations of rotavirus immunization for developing countries : a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, H.A.T.; Woerdenbag, H.J.; Kane, S.; Rozenbaum, M.H.; Li, S.C.; Postma, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Diarrhea is a leading cause of mortality for children under 5 years of age, and rotavirus is identified as the main cause of severe diarrhea worldwide. Since 2006, two rotavirus vaccines, Rotarix and Rotateq, have been available in the market. These vaccines have proved to have high efficacy in deve

  4. Increased Rotavirus Prevalence in Diarrheal Outbreak Precipitated by Localized Flooding, Solomon Islands, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Forrest K; Ko, Albert I; Becha, Chris; Joshua, Cynthia; Musto, Jennie; Thomas, Sarah; Ronsse, Axelle; Kirkwood, Carl D; Sio, Alison; Aumua, Audrey; Nilles, Eric J

    2016-05-01

    Flooding on 1 of the Solomon Islands precipitated a nationwide epidemic of diarrhea that spread to regions unaffected by flooding and caused >6,000 cases and 27 deaths. Rotavirus was identified in 38% of case-patients tested in the city with the most flooding. Outbreak potential related to weather reinforces the need for global rotavirus vaccination.

  5. Rotavirus in Ireland: national estimates of disease burden, 1997 to 1998.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: We estimated the disease burden caused by rotavirus hospitalizations in the Republic of Ireland by using national data on the number of hospitalizations for diarrhea in children and laboratory surveillance of confirmed rotavirus detections. METHODS: We examined trends in diarrheal hospitalizations among children <5 years old as coded by ICD-9-CM for the period January, 1997, to December, 1998. We collated data on laboratory-confirmed rotavirus detections nationally for the same period among children <2 years old. We calculated the overall contribution of rotavirus to laboratory-confirmed intestinal disease in children <5 years old from INFOSCAN, a disease bulletin for one-third of the population. We compared data from all sources and estimated the proportion of diarrheal hospitalizations that are likely the result of rotavirus in children <5 years old. RESULTS: In children <5 years old, 9% of all hospitalizations are for diarrheal illness. In this age group 1 in 8 are hospitalized for a diarrheal illness, and 1 in 17 are hospitalized for rotavirus by 5 years of age. In hospitalized children <2 years old, 1 in 38 have a laboratory confirmed rotavirus infection. CONCLUSIONS: The disease burden of rotavirus hospitalizations is higher than in other industrialized countries. Access to comprehensive national databases may have contributed to the high hospitalization rates, as well as a greater tendency to hospitalize children with diarrhea in Ireland.

  6. Strain diversity plays no major role in the varying efficacy of rotavirus vaccines: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Daniel E; Parashar, Umesh D; Jiang, Baoming

    2014-12-01

    While a monovalent Rotarix® [RV1] and a pentavalent RotaTeq® [RV5] have been extensively tested and found generally safe and equally efficacious in clinical trials, the question still lingers about the evolving diversity of circulating rotavirus strains over time and their relationship with protective immunity induced by rotavirus vaccines. We reviewed data from clinical trials and observational studies that assessed the efficacy or field effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines against different rotavirus strains worldwide. RV1 provided broad clinical efficacy and field effectiveness against severe diarrhea due to all major circulating strains, including the homotypic G1P[8] and the fully heterotypic G2P[4] strains. Similarly, RV5 provided broad efficacy and effectiveness against RV5 and non-RV5 strains throughout different locations. Rotavirus vaccination provides broad heterotypic protection; however continuing surveillance is needed to track the change of circulating strains and monitor the effectiveness and safety of vaccines.

  7. Clinical Symptoms of Human Rotavirus Infection Observed in Children in Sokoto, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Alkali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus has been identified among the most important causes of infantile diarrhoea, especially in developing countries. The present study was undertaken to determine the occurrence and clinical symptoms of human rotavirus disease among children presenting with varying degree of diarrhoea in selected urban hospitals in Sokoto metropolis, Nigeria. Diarrhoea samples were collected from 200 diarrheic children younger than 5 years of age and tested using a commercially available DAKO Rotavirus ELISA kit which detects the presence of human group A rotaviruses. A questionnaire, based on WHO generic protocol, was completed for each child to generate the primary data. Of the total number of samples collected, 51 were found to be positive for human group A rotavirus indicating 25.5% prevalence of the disease in Sokoto state. The symptoms associated with the disease were analyzed and discussed.

  8. Human milk oligosaccharides shorten rotavirus-induced diarrhea and modulate piglet mucosal immunity and colonic microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Monaco, Marcia H; Wang, Mei; Comstock, Sarah S; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Fahey, George C; Miller, Michael J; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Donovan, Sharon M

    2014-08-01

    The impact of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) on mucosal immunity, gut microbiota and response to rotavirus (RV) infection was investigated in the piglet model. Newborn piglets were fed with formula alone (FF) or formula supplemented with 4 g l(-1) HMO (HMO) or a prebiotic mixture of 9:1 short-chain galactooligosaccharides (3.6 g l(-1)) and long-chain fructooligosaccharides (0.4 g l(-1)) (PRE) (n=19-21 per group) for 15 days. Piglets (n=7-8) in each dietary group were orally infected with porcine rotavirus (RV) OSU strain on d10, and stool consistency was assessed daily. Blood, small intestine and colonic contents were collected at day 15. Serum RV-specific antibody concentrations, intestinal histomorphology, RV non-structural protein-4 (NSP4) and cytokine mRNA expression were assessed. Colonic content pH, dry matter (DM) and short-chain fatty acid concentrations were measured. Ascending colonic microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene v1-3 region pyrosequencing. HMO- and PRE-fed groups had shorter duration of diarrhea than FF piglets. Infection changed intestinal histomorphology, increased serum RV-specific antibody response and intestinal RV NSP4 expression, and modulated ileal cytokine expression. HMO enhanced T helper type 1 (interferon-gamma) and anti-inflammatory (interleukin-10) cytokines in the ileum, while prebiotics promoted RV-specific immunoglobulin M response to the infection. RV infection and HMO supplementation altered intraluminal environment and gut microbiota. HMO increased pH and lowered DM of colonic contents and enhanced the abundance of unclassified Lachnospiraceae, which contains numerous butyrate-producing bacteria. In conclusion, HMO and prebiotics did not prevent the onset of RV infection but reduced the duration of RV-induced diarrhea in piglets, in part, by modulating colonic microbiota and immune response to RV infection.

  9. White matter injury following rotavirus infection in neonates: new aspects to a forgotten entity, 'fifth day fits'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Jung Sook; Park, Chan-Hoo

    2016-07-01

    That rotavirus infection can cause neurological symptoms in young children has been well established. However, it is surprising why rotavirus infection has been overlooked as a cause of neonatal seizures for many years, despite significant research interest in neonatal rotavirus infection. Neonates are the age group most vulnerable to seizures, which are typically attributed to a wide range of causes. By contrast, because rotavirus infection is usually asymptomatic, it has been difficult to identify an association between this virus and neonatal seizures. The conventional wisdom has been that, although neonates are commonly infected with rotavirus, neurological complications are rare in this age. However, recent studies using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) have suggested a connection between rotavirus infection and neonatal seizures and that rotavirus infection can induce diffuse white matter injury without direct invasion of the central nervous system. The clinical features of white matter injury in rotavirus-infected neonates include the onset of seizures at days 4-6 of life in apparently healthy term infants. The recent findings seem to contradict the conventional wisdom. However, white matter injury might not be a completely new aspect of rotavirus infection in neonates, considering the forgotten clinical entity of neonatal seizures, 'fifth day fits'. With increased use of DWI in neonatal seizures, we are just starting to understand connection between viral infection and white matter injury in neonates. In this review, we discuss the historical aspects of rotavirus infection and neonatal seizures. We also present the clinical features of white matter injury in neonatal rotavirus infection.

  10. Changes in epidemiology of rotavirus in the Triângulo Mineiro region of Brazil: lack of two consecutive rotavirus seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulgheroff, A C B; Figueiredo, E F; Gouvêa, V S; Domingues, A L S

    2014-12-01

    Rotaviruses are the main cause of infantile acute diarrhea, and a monovalent (G1P[8]) vaccine against the virus was introduced into the Brazilian National Immunization Program for all infants in March 2006. The objectives of this study were to determine the rate and genotype distribution of rotavirus causing infantile diarrhea in the Triângulo Mineiro region of Brazil during 2011-2012 and to assess the impact of local vaccination. Fecal specimens were analyzed for detection and characterization of rotavirus using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR-genotyping assays. Overall, rotavirus was diagnosed in 1.7% (6/348) of cases. Rotavirus positivity rates decreased 88% [95% confidence intervals (CI)=15.2, 98.3%; P=0.026] in 2011 and 78% (95%CI=30.6, 93.0%; P=0.007) in 2012 when compared with available data for baseline years (2005/2006) in Uberaba. In Uberlândia, reductions of 95.3% (95%CI=66.0, 99.4%; P=0.002) in 2011, and 94.2% (95%CI=56.4, 99.2%; P=0.004) in 2012 were also observed compared with data for 2008. The circulation of rotavirus G2P[4] strains decreased during the period under study, and strains related to the P[8] genotype reemerged in the region. This study showed a marked and sustained reduction of rotavirus-related cases, with a lack of rotavirus in the 2011 and 2012 seasons, suggesting a positive impact of the vaccination program.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of universal rotavirus vaccination in reducing rotavirus gastroenteritis in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tilson, L

    2011-10-06

    We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of universal infant rotavirus (RV) vaccination compared to current standard of care of "no vaccination". Two RV vaccines are currently licensed in Ireland: Rotarix and RotaTeq. A cohort model used in several European countries was adapted using Irish epidemiological, resource utilisation and cost data. The base case model considers the impact of Rotarix vaccination on health-related quality of life of children under five years old from a healthcare payer perspective. Other scenarios explored the use of RotaTeq, impact on one caregiver, on societal costs and on cases that do not seek medical attention. Cost was varied between the vaccine list price (€100\\/course) in the base case and an assumed tender price (€70\\/course). One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. Implementing universal RV vaccination may prevent around 1970 GP visits, 3280 A&E attendances and 2490 hospitalisations. A vaccination programme was estimated to cost approximately €6.54 million per year but €4.65 million of this would be offset by reducing healthcare resource use. The baseline ICER was €112,048\\/QALY and €72,736\\/QALY from the healthcare payer and societal perspective, respectively, falling to €68,896 and €43,916\\/QALY, respectively, if the impact on one caregiver was considered. If the price fell to €70 per course, universal RV vaccination would be cost saving under all scenarios. Results were sensitive to vaccination costs, incidence of RV infection and direct medical costs. Universal RV vaccination would not be cost-effective under base case assumptions. However, it could be cost-effective at a lower vaccine price or from a wider societal perspective.

  12. Detection of Rotavirus Genotypes in Korea 5 Years after the Introduction of Rotavirus Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ju-Young; Kim, Min-Sung; Jung, Tae Woong; Kim, Seong Joon; Kang, Jin-Han; Han, Seung Beom; Kim, Sang Yong; Rhim, Jung Woo; Kim, Hwang-Min; Park, Jae Hong; Jo, Dae Sun; Ma, Sang Hyuk; Jeong, Hye-Sook; Cheon, Doo-Sung; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is one of the most important viral etiologic agents of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in children. Although effective RV vaccines (RVVs) are now used worldwide, novel genotypes and outbreaks resulting from rare genotype combinations have emerged. This study documented RV genotypes in a Korean population of children with AGE 5 yr after the introduction of RVV and assessed potential genotype differences based on vaccination status or vaccine type. Children less than 5-yr-old diagnosed with AGE between October 2012 and September 2013 admitted to 9 medical institutions from 8 provinces in Korea were prospectively enrolled. Stool samples were tested for RV by enzyme immunoassay and genotyped by multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. In 346 patients, 114 (32.9%) were RV-positive. Among them, 87 (76.3%) patients were infected with RV alone. Eighty-six of 114 RV-positive stool samples were successfully genotyped, and their combinations of genotypes were G1P[8] (36, 41.9%), G2P[4] (12, 14.0%), and G3P[8] (6, 7.0%). RV was detected in 27.8% of patients in the vaccinated group and 39.8% in the unvaccinated group (P=0.035). Vaccination history was available for 67 of 86 cases with successfully genotyped RV-positive stool samples; RotaTeq (20, 29.9%), Rotarix (7, 10.4%), unvaccinated (40, 59.7%). The incidence of RV AGE is lower in the RV-vaccinated group compared to the unvaccinated group with no evidence of substitution with unusual genotype combinations.

  13. Sunlight-induced inactivation of human Wa and porcine OSU rotaviruses in the presence of exogenous photosensitizers

    KAUST Repository

    Romero-Maraccini, Ofelia C.

    2013-10-01

    Human rotavirus Wa and porcine rotavirus OSU solutions were irradiated with simulated solar UV and visible light in the presence of different photosensitizers dissolved in buffered solutions. For human rotavirus, the exogenous effects were greater than the endogenous effects under irradiation with full spectrum and UVA and visible light at 25 C. For porcine rotavirus, the exogenous effects with UVA and visible light irradiation were only observed at high temperatures, >40 C. The results from dark experiments conducted at different temperatures suggest that porcine rotavirus has higher thermostability than human rotavirus. Concentrations of 3′-MAP excited triplet states of 1.8 fM and above resulted in significant human rotavirus inactivation. The measured excited triplet state concentrations of ≤0.45 fM produced by UVA and visible light irradiation of natural dissolved organic matter solutions were likely not directly responsible for rotavirus inactivation. Instead, the linear correlation for human rotavirus inactivation rate constant (kobs) with the phenol degradation rate constant (kexp) found in both 1 mM NaHCO3 and 1 mM phosphate-buffered solutions suggested that OH radical was a major reactive species for the exogenous inactivation of rotaviruses. Linear correlations between rotavirus kobs and specific UV254 nm absorbance of two river-dissolved organic matter and two effluent organic matter isolates indicated that organic matter aromaticity may help predict formation of radicals responsible for rotavirus inactivation. The results from this study also suggested that the differences in rotavirus strains should be considered when predicting solar inactivation of rotavirus in sunlit surface waters. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  14. Phylogenetic and computational structural analysis of VP7 gene of group a human rotavirus G1P[8] strains obtained in Sapporo, Japan from 1987 to 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Yoshinobu; Tatsumi, Masatoshi; Tsugawa, Takeshi; Yoto, Yuko; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2012-05-01

    Many studies indicate that G1P[8] genotypes are the most prevalent rotavirus strains worldwide. Although two vaccines have been licensed and their value proven in many countries, continuous surveillance for genetic evolution of circulating rotavirus strains before and after the introduction of the vaccines is desirable. G and P typing were carried out on all field strains isolated during 1987-2000 in Sapporo, Japan. Phylogenetic analysis for the VP7 gene of rotavirus G1P[8] strains was performed. Amino acid substitutions were mapped on the predicted three-dimensional VP7 protein image. G1P[8] genotype predominated. One hundred thirteen strains with G1P[8] genotype were analyzed. Phylogenetic studies of the VP7 gene classified these strains into three lineages. The mean estimated substitution rate was 7.25 × 10(-4) nucleotide substitutions per site per year. One predominant lineage contained the mutant strains which had VP7 amino acid substitutions at residue 91 and 212 that is in the neutralization domains. They were estimated to locate in or near intersubunit boundary of VP7 trimer. It is suggested that the most prevalent G1P[8] lineage strains in Sapporo obtained some survival advantages by changing the neutralization domains of VP7.

  15. An Exopolysaccharide-Deficient Mutant of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Efficiently Displays a Protective Llama Antibody Fragment against Rotavirus on Its Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Beatriz; Krogh-Andersen, Kasper; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Martínez, Noelia; Günaydın, Gökçe; Lin, Yin; Martín, M Cruz; Álvarez, Miguel A; Hammarström, Lennart; Marcotte, Harold

    2015-09-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of infantile diarrhea in developing countries, where it causes a high number of deaths among infants. Two vaccines are available, being highly effective in developed countries although markedly less efficient in developing countries. As a complementary treatment to the vaccines, a Lactobacillus strain producing an anti-rotavirus antibody fragment in the gastrointestinal tract could potentially be used. In order to develop such an alternative therapy, the effectiveness of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG to produce and display a VHH antibody fragment (referred to as anti-rotavirus protein 1 [ARP1]) on the surface was investigated. L. rhamnosus GG is one of the best-characterized probiotic bacteria and has intrinsic antirotavirus activity. Among four L. rhamnosus GG strains [GG (CMC), GG (ATCC 53103), GG (NCC 3003), and GG (UT)] originating from different sources, only GG (UT) was able to display ARP1 on the bacterial surface. The genomic analysis of strain GG (UT) showed that the genes welE and welF of the EPS cluster are inactivated, which causes a defect in exopolysaccharide (EPS) production, allowing efficient display of ARP1 on its surface. Finally, GG (UT) seemed to confer a level of protection against rotavirus-induced diarrhea similar to that of wild-type GG (NCC 3003) in a mouse pup model, indicating that the EPS may not be involved in the intrinsic antirotavirus activity. Most important, GG (EM233), a derivative of GG (UT) producing ARP1, was significantly more protective than the control strain L. casei BL23. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Influence of birth rates and transmission rates on the global seasonality of rotavirus incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzer, Virginia E; Viboud, Cécile; Lopman, Ben A; Patel, Manish M; Parashar, Umesh D; Grenfell, Bryan T

    2011-11-07

    Rotavirus is a major cause of mortality in developing countries, and yet the dynamics of rotavirus in such settings are poorly understood. Rotavirus is typically less seasonal in the tropics, although recent observational studies have challenged the universality of this pattern. While numerous studies have examined the association between environmental factors and rotavirus incidence, here we explore the role of intrinsic factors. By fitting a mathematical model of rotavirus transmission dynamics to published age distributions of cases from 15 countries, we obtain estimates of local transmission rates. Model-predicted patterns of seasonal incidence based solely on differences in birth rates and transmission rates are significantly correlated with those observed (Spearman's ρ = 0.65, p rates and transmission rates and explore how vaccination may impact these patterns. Our results suggest that the relative lack of rotavirus seasonality observed in many tropical countries may be due to the high birth rates and transmission rates typical of developing countries rather than being driven primarily by environmental conditions. While vaccination is expected to decrease the overall burden of disease, it may increase the degree of seasonal variation in the incidence of rotavirus in some settings.

  17. Detection of Rotavirus in children with acute gastroenteritis in Zagazig University Hospitals in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Salwa Badrelsabbah; El-Bialy, Abdallah Abdelkader; Mohammed, Mervat Soliman; El-Sheikh, Azza Omar; Elhewala, Ahmed; Bahgat, Shereen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rotavirus is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in infants and young children all over the world. The objective of the study was to compare different methods for detecting rotavirus and to assess the burden of rotavirus as a causative agent for AGE in children younger than five. Methods: This case control study included 65 children with AGE and 35 healthy control children. They were chosen from the Pediatric Department of Zagazig University Hospitals from October 2014 to March 2015. Stool samples were obtained and assayed for rotavirus by the immunochromatography test (ICT), enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qr RT-PCR). Results: Fifty out of the 65 patients (76.9%) were positive for qr RT-PCR. Forty-five (69.2%) and 44 (67.7%) were positive for ICT and ELISA, respectively. There was a significant association between the severity of the disease as determined by the Vesikari score and rotavirus infection. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that ICT is a useful method for the rapid screening of group A rotavirus in fecal specimens, because it is rapid, inexpensive, easy to perform, and requires very little equipment. In addition, this study highlights the substantial health burden of rotavirus AGE among children less than five. PMID:26435821

  18. Analysis of factors in response to rotavirus vaccination counselling in a private paediatric clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan Kutty, P; Pathmanathan, G; Salleh, N M

    2010-06-01

    Rotavirus vaccine is available as an optional vaccine in Malaysia. The counselling of optional vaccines is considered an integral part of the health services offered in a private paediatric clinic. While ensuring that all babies are up-todate with their compulsory immunization, counselling of optional vaccines like the rotavirus vaccine could give parents the choice to make an informed decision on the acceptance of this vaccine. Over a period of two years, we counselled the parents regarding diarrhoea caused by rotavirus disease and the rotavirus vaccine. In this study, the factors that were significantly associated with the acceptance of the rotavirus vaccine were the gender of the baby, the mother's age, the mother's occupation, the mode of payment for the vaccine, the number of previous visits to the clinic by the parents, the number of counselling sessions given to the parents and the pre-counselling awareness or knowledge of rotavirus disease and rotavirus vaccine. It is hoped that these findings may assist busy clinicians in their continuous efforts to provide health education and vaccination counselling to the parents of their patients.

  19. Health Impact of Rotavirus Vaccination in Developing Countries: Progress and Way Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Umesh D; Johnson, Hope; Steele, A Duncan; Tate, Jacqueline E

    2016-05-01

    Two rotavirus vaccines have been licensed in >100 countries worldwide since 2006. As of October 2105, these vaccines have been implemented in the national immunization programs of 79 countries, including 36 low-income countries that are eligible for support for vaccine purchase from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. Rotavirus vaccines were initially introduced in Australia and countries of the Americas and Europe after completion of successful clinical trials in these regions, and the impact of routine vaccination in reducing the health burden of severe childhood gastroenteritis in these regions has been well documented. Because of concerns around the performance of orally administered rotavirus vaccines in developing countries, vaccine implementation in these settings only began after additional clinical trials were completed and the World Health Organization issued a global recommendation for use of rotavirus vaccines in 2009. This supplementary issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases includes a collection of articles describing the impact and effectiveness of routine rotavirus vaccination in developing countries that were among the early adopters of rotavirus vaccine. The data highlight the benefits of vaccination and should provide valuable evidence to sustain vaccine use in these countries and encourage other countries to adopt routine rotavirus vaccination to reduce the health burden of severe childhood gastroenteritis.

  20. Burden of rotavirus infections in Liguria, Northern Italy: hospitalisations and potential savings by vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, D; Amicizia, D; Giacchino, R; Tacchella, A; Natalizia, A R; Melioli, G; Bandettini, R; Di Pietro, P; Diana, M C; Gasparini, R

    2011-08-01

    We evaluated the rates of gastroenteritis admissions to the emergency department and of rotavirus-related hospitalisations in children ≤5 years of age in 2006 at an Italian paediatric hospital. We calculated the number of rotavirus cases avoidable through the universal vaccination of children. Epidemiological data were extracted from the Data Elaboration Centre. To calculate the hospitalisation rate due to rotavirus, the virus was sought in the faeces of children hospitalised for acute gastroenteritis by means of rapid immunochromatographic assay. Emergency department admissions due to gastroenteritis numbered 2,396 (11.58% of the total admissions). Of these, 276 children (11.52%) were examined and then sent home, 1,286 (53.67%) were kept in short observation and 776 (32.38%) were hospitalised. In 27.83% of hospitalised cases, the rotavirus test proved positive. The rotavirus hospitalisation rate was 55 per 10,000 children ≤5 years of age in Genoa in 2006. In 85.6% of hospitalised patients with community-acquired rotavirus infection, the disease was severe. The number of avoidable cases confirmed that the vaccination of children ≤1 year of age could reduce the burden of rotavirus infection, especially with regard to hospitalisation (45 per 10,000 children ≤5 years of age) and admissions to short observation (85 per 10,000), generating benefits for the Italian healthcare system.

  1. The cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in Armenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Yuzbashyan, Ruzanna; Sahakyan, Gayane; Avagyan, Tigran; Mosina, Liudmila

    2011-11-01

    The cost-effectiveness of introducing infant rotavirus vaccination in Armenia in 2012 using Rotarix(R) was evaluated using a multiple birth cohort model. The model considered the cost and health implications of hospitalisations, primary health care consultations and episodes not leading to medical care in children under five years old. Rotavirus vaccination is expected to cost the Ministry of Health $220,000 in 2012, rising to $830,000 in 2016 following termination of GAVI co-financing, then declining to $260,000 in 2025 due to vaccine price maturity. It may reduce health care costs by $34,000 in the first year, rising to $180,000 by 2019. By 2025, vaccination may be close to cost saving to the Ministry of Health if the vaccine purchase price declines as expected. Once coverage has reached high levels, vaccination may prevent 25,000 cases, 3000 primary care consultations, 1000 hospitalisations and 8 deaths per birth cohort vaccinated. The cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) saved is estimated to be about $650 from the perspective of the Ministry of Health, $850 including costs accrued to both the Ministry and to GAVI, $820 from a societal perspective excluding indirect costs and $44 from a societal perspective including indirect costs. Since the gross domestic product per capita of Armenia in 2008 was $3800, rotavirus vaccination is likely to be regarded as "very cost-effective" from a WHO standpoint. Vaccination may still be "very cost-effective" if less favourable assumptions are used regarding vaccine price and disease incidence, as long as DALYs are not age-weighted.

  2. Non-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to a trypsin-sensitive site on the major glycoprotein of rotavirus which discriminate between virus serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, B S; Fowler, K J; White, J R; Cotton, R G

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were derived to a human rotavirus purified from stools. Three of the antibodies immunoprecipitated the rotavirus outer capsid glycoprotein gp 34 and were non-neutralizing. These antibodies reacted by enzyme immunoassay with cultivable rotaviruses showing the "long" RNA electropherotype but were inefficient as detectors of "long" RNA pattern rotaviruses in stools. Treatment of SA 11 rotavirus with 7.5 micrograms/ml porcine trypsin for 30 minutes at 37 degrees C irreversibly reduced binding of the antibodies to SA 11 rotavirus in enzyme immunoassays by 50 per cent. Binding was abolished in the presence of rotavirus-negative faecal extracts. These results indicate that non-neutralizing sites on gp 34 of rotaviruses can vary with RNA electropherotype and serotype, and that levels of trypsin currently in use to assist growth of rotaviruses in cell culture may alter the serological profile of the viruses.

  3. An atypical rotavirus detected in a child with gastroenteritis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. G. Pereira

    1983-09-01

    Full Text Available Particles morphologically identical to rotaviruses were found in the faeces of a nine week-old child with gastroenteritis. Analysis of the viral RNA genome by polyacrylamine gel electrophoresis revealed 10 bands (probably 11 segments some of wich differed in migration rate from those of the great majority of rotaviruses infecting man and other animal hosts. The virus was not detected by a highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay (ELISA and therefore probably lacked the crossreactive antigen(s shared by the majority rotaviruses. This was the only strain with such behaviour among 230 rotaviruses of human origin examined in this laboratory since 1979. The implications of the existence of non-crossreactive rotaviruses are discussed.Partículas morfologicamente idênticas a rotavirus foram encontradas nas fezes de uma criança de dois meses com gastroenterite. Análise do genoma viral por eletroforese em gel de poliacrilamida revelou 10 faixas (provavelmente 11 segmentos de RNA, algumas das quais diferem em velocidade de migração das observadas na grande maioria de rotavirus de hospedeiros humanos e de diversas espécies de animais. O vírus não foi revelado por um ensaio imuno-enzimático de alta sensibilidade, o que sugere a ausência do antígeno de grupo que da reações cruzadas entre a maioria dos rotavirus. O vírus descrito no presente trabalho foi o único com tal comportamento entre 230 amostras analisadas por nós desde 1979. A relevância de existência de rotavirus não relacionados antigenicamente a outros membros do grupo é discutida.

  4. Evaluation of the Intussusception Risk after Pentavalent Rotavirus Vaccination in Finnish Infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuija Leino

    Full Text Available An association between rotavirus immunisation and intussusception (IS has been suggested with present rotavirus vaccines in post-licensure studies. In Finland, rotavirus vaccination programme was implemented in September 2009 using a 2, 3, and 5 months schedule with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine. By the end of 2013, it is estimated that 719 000 rotavirus vaccine doses have been given in the national programme of which 240 000 were first doses. Nationwide register allows us to evaluate the association between rotavirus vaccination and IS.Cases of IS diagnosed during 1999-2013 were identified from National Hospital Discharge Register. All cases under 250 days of age diagnosed during 2009-2013 were confirmed by reviewing medical charts. Self-controlled case-series method was used to assess the risk of IS during 1-21 days compared to 22-42 days post vaccination.In register data the relative incidence of IS at 2 months of age between the post and pre vaccination era was 9.1 (95%CI 2.0-84.3. We identified 22 verified cases with date of admission less than 43 days after any of the three rotavirus vaccine doses. The incidence of IS in the risk period after the 1st dose relative to the control period was 2.0 (95% CI 0.5-8.4; p = 0.34. Number of excess IS cases per 100 000 first vaccine doses was therefore estimated to be 1.04 (95% CI 0.0-2.5, i.e. one additional IS case per 96 000 first doses of rotavirus vaccine (95% CI 54 600 to ∞. There was no risk detected after 2nd and 3rd doses.The finding is in line with the recent published estimates. The benefits of rotavirus immunisation programme outweigh possible small risks of intussusception.

  5. Perspectivas de la diarrea por rotavirus en El Salvador

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Arturo Zablah

    2005-01-01

    Materiales y métodos: En diciembre del año 2000, un brote epidémico de gastroenteritis ocurrió en El Salvador que se asoció con numerosas hospitalizaciones y muertes de niños en todo el país. El Ministerio de Salud Pública se mostró preocupado, pues se ignoraba su etiología y las medidas de control usuales fueron ineficaces. El brote lo produjo un rotavirus, y las medidas de control fueron rediseñadas para mejorar el tratamiento con rehidratación oral e iniciar un sistema de vigilancia para c...

  6. Whole genome characterization of a G6P[5] rotavirus A strain isolated from a stray cat in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Miho; Mochizuki, Masami; Nakagomi, Osamu; Nakagomi, Toyoko

    2016-05-30

    The whole genome of an unusual G6P[5] rotavirus A strain named FRV537, which was isolated from a stray cat in Japan, was characterized to determine its species of origin. The genotype constellation of FRV537 was G6-P[5]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A13-N2- T6-E2-H3. No known feline rotavirus has this genotype constellation; the Japanese equine strain OH-4 is the only known strain that does. While FRV537 shares the same genotype with some feline rotaviruses in all genes except those encoding VP4 and NSP1, none of these genes are closely related to those of known feline rotaviruses. By contrast, G6P[5] is almost exclusively present in bovine rotaviruses. The VP7 and VP4 genes of FRV537 formed a lineage with typical bovine rotaviruses with high bootstrap values. As to the internal capsid and nonstructural gene constellation, three bovine rotavirus strains had a constellation identical to that of FRV537. Moreover, each of the genotypes of FRV537 was found to be a common bovine genotype. In addition to the high nucleotide sequence identities between FRV537 and bovine rotaviruses in each genome segment (≥95%), phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship to bovine/artiodactyl rotaviruses. Thus, the molecular and phylogenetic evidence suggests that FRV537 isolated from a stray cat was of bovine rotavirus origin.

  7. Design and Antigenic Epitopes Prediction of a New Trial Recombinant Multiepitopic Rotaviral Vaccine: In Silico Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarpour, Sima; Ayat, Hoda; Ahadi, Ali Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus is the major etiologic factor of severe diarrheal disease. Natural infection provides protection against subsequent rotavirus infection and diarrhea. This research presents a new vaccine designed based on computational models. In this study, three types of epitopes are considered-linear, conformational, and combinational-in a proposed model protein. Several studies on rotavirus vaccines have shown that VP6 and VP4 proteins are good candidates for vaccine production. In the present study, a fusion protein was designed as a new generation of rotavirus vaccines by bioinformatics analyses. This model-based study using ABCpred, BCPREDS, Bcepred, and Ellipro web servers showed that the peptide presented in this article has the necessary properties to act as a vaccine. Prediction of linear B-cell epitopes of peptides is helpful to investigate whether these peptides are able to activate humoral immunity.

  8. [Research progress of real-time quantitative PCR method for group A rotavirus detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan-Qing; Li, Dan-Di; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2013-11-01

    Group A rotavirus is one of the most significant etiological agents which causes acute gastroenteritis among infants and young children worldwide. So far, several method which includes electron microscopy (EM), enzyme immunoassay (EIA), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)and Real-time Quantitative PCR has been established for the detection of rotavirus. Compared with other methods, Real-time quantitative PCR have advantages in specificity, sensitivity, genotyping and quantitative accuracy. This article shows a overview of the application of real-time quantitative PCR technique to detecte group A rotavirus.

  9. SPREAD AND PRIMARY MANIFESTATIONS OF ROTAVIRUS INFECTION MORBIDITY IN DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE WORLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kudryavtsev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data on the peculiarities of the rotavirus infection spreading in the Russian Federation and other certain countries. It is shown that morbidity levels depend on both objective (population size and territory density, transmission paths activity and subjective (detectability levels factors. It has been established that children 0-3 years of age are the most susceptible to rotavirus infection. The epidemic process development intensity is higher in bigger cities. Considerable regional and seasonal changeability of circulating rotavirus strains is noted.

  10. Vigilancia de diarreas por rotavirus en hospitales centinelas, Chile 2006-2008

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz Tito, Janepsy

    2010-01-01

    La infección por rotavirus es una de las más importantes causas de diarrea moderada a grave en niños menores de cinco años en todo el mundo. En Chile, la enteritis por rotavirus ha ido en aumento con el transcurso de los años. En el periodo de enero a diciembre de 2006-2008, se condujo una investigación operacional, con el propósito de desarrollar una estrategia de vigilancia que permitiera la caracterización integral de las diarreas causadas por rotavirus en niños chilenos menores de cinco a...

  11. THE PREVENTION OF ROTAVIRUS INFECTION: THE MODERN VIEW OF THE POSSIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Grechukha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is a major public health problem in all countries. The incidence of rotavirus infection is growing steadily in the Russian Federation and over the past 10 years increased by 7 times, amounting to 72 cases per 100,000 in 2010. The rotavirus vaccine was registered in the Russian Federation in 2012 and successfully applied from 2013. The vaccine used for more than 8 years and have enough experience on the efficacy and safety. Different foreign investigations have shown the herd immunity of the vaccine. The authors present data about the effectiveness and safety of vaccines, established during clinical studies of the foreign scientists.

  12. Role of the Enteric Nervous System in the Fluid and Electrolyte Secretion of Rotavirus Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Ove; Peregrin, Attila Timar; Persson, Kjell; Kordasti, Shirin; Uhnoo, Ingrid; Svensson, Lennart

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the intestinal fluid loss in rotavirus diarrhea, which often afflicts children in developing countries, is not known. One hypothesis is that the rotavirus evokes intestinal fluid and electrolyte secretion by activation of the nervous system in the intestinal wall, the enteric nervous system (ENS). Four different drugs that inhibit ENS functions were used to obtain experimental evidence for this hypothesis in mice in vitro and in vivo. The involvement of the ENS in rotavirus diarrhea indicates potential sites of action for drugs in the treatment of the disease.

  13. Incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis by age in African, Asian and European children: Relevance for timing of rotavirus vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, A. Duncan; Madhi, Shabir A.; Cunliffe, Nigel A.; Vesikari, Timo; Phua, Kong Boo; Lim, Fong Seng; Nelson, E. Anthony S.; Lau, Yu-Lung; Huang, Li-Min; Karkada, Naveen; Debrus, Serge; Han, Htay Htay; Benninghoff, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Variability in rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) epidemiology can influence the optimal vaccination schedule. We evaluated regional trends in the age of RVGE episodes in low- to middle- versus high-income countries in three continents. We undertook a post-hoc analysis based on efficacy trials of a human rotavirus vaccine (HRV; Rotarix™, GSK Vaccines), in which 1348, 1641, and 5250 healthy infants received a placebo in Europe (NCT00140686), Africa (NCT00241644), and Asia (NCT00197210, NCT00329745). Incidence of any/severe RVGE by age at onset was evaluated by active surveillance over the first two years of life. Severity of RVGE episodes was assessed using the Vesikari-scale. The incidence of any RVGE in Africa was higher than in Europe during the first year of life (≤2.78% vs. ≤2.03% per month), but much lower during the second one (≤0.86% versus ≤2.00% per month). The incidence of severe RVGE in Africa was slightly lower than in Europe during the first year of life. Nevertheless, temporal profiles for the incidence of severe RVGE in Africa and Europe during the first (≤1.00% and ≤1.23% per month) and second (≤0.53% and ≤1.13% per month) years of life were similar to those of any RVGE. Any/severe RVGE incidences peaked at younger ages in Africa vs. Europe. In high-income Asian regions, severe RVGE incidence (≤0.31% per month) remained low during the study. The burden of any RVGE was higher earlier in life in children from low- to middle- compared with high-income countries. Differing rotavirus vaccine schedules are likely warranted to maximize protection in different settings. PMID:27260009

  14. Experimental pathways towards developing a rotavirus reverse genetics system: synthetic full length rotavirus ssRNAs are neither infectious nor translated in permissive cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E Richards

    Full Text Available At present the ability to create rationally engineered mutant rotaviruses is limited because of the lack of a tractable helper virus-free reverse genetics system. Using the cell culture adapted bovine RV RF strain (G6P6 [1], we have attempted to recover infectious RV by co-transfecting in vitro transcribed ssRNAs which are identical in sequence to the positive sense strand of each of the 11 dsRNA genomic segments of the RF strain. The RNAs were produced either from cDNAs cloned by a target sequence-independent procedure, or from purified double layered RV particles (DLPs. We have validated their translational function by in vitro synthesis of (35S-labelled proteins in rabbit reticulocyte lysates; all 11 proteins encoded by the RV genome were expressed. Transfection experiments with DLP- or cDNA-derived ssRNAs suggested that the RNAs do not act independently as mRNAs for protein synthesis, once delivered into various mammalian cell lines, and exhibit cytotoxicity. Transfected RNAs were not infectious since a viral cytopathic effect was not observed after infection of MA104 cells with lysates from transfected cells. By contrast, an engineered mRNA encoding eGFP was expressed when transfected under identical conditions into the same cell lines. Co-expression of plasmids encoding NSP2 and NSP5 using a fowlpox T7 polymerase recombinant virus revealed viroplasm-like structure formation, but this did not enable the translation of transfected RV ssRNAs. Attempts to recover RV from ssRNAs transcribed intracellularly from transfected cDNAs were also unsuccessful and suggested that these RNAs were also not translated, in contrast to successful translation from a transfected cDNA encoding an eGFP mRNA.

  15. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Shiaw (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Vaughn, J.M. (Univ. of New England College of Medicine, Biddeford, ME (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4{degree}C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10{sup 5}-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate a neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants.

  16. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y S; Vaughn, J M

    1990-01-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4 degrees C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10(5)-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate at neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants. PMID:2160222

  17. [Clinical study of acute diarrhea caused by rotavirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalache, Doina; Fîntînaru, Rodica; Iacob, Monica; Simonca, Cornelia

    2005-01-01

    To establish the implication of Rotavirus in acute diarrhea of babies and children. Prospective study on 164 patients aged between 1 month and 3 years with acute diarrhea, admitted in the Clinical Hospital of Infectious Diseases Iaşi between 01.01.2005 - 31.03.2005. Rotavirus cause the illness in 30 patients (18.29%). The disease was more prevalent among children with dystrophy or with other comorbidities like: iron-deficiency anemia, intestinal parasitosis, rhinopharyngitis, pneumococcal meningitidis. In seven cases the infectious was considered to be nosocomial. During the illness patients also accused other symptoms, while in order of frequency were: common respiratory infection (13.3%), nausea and vomiting (40%), maculopapular eruption and intestinal pneumonia (16.6%), acute pharyngitis (10%). In this study latex agglutination confirmed the diagnosis. Vomiting and diarrhea led in all cases to moderate or severe dehydration. Appropriate rehydration was necessary but only in 12 cases was made through intravenous access with: Ringer lactate, isotonic sodium chloride solutions. Most children recovered with in 5 days.

  18. Antigenic and genomic diversity of human rotavirus VP4 in two consecutive epidemic seasons in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Noriega, L; Méndez-Toss, M; Menchaca, G; Contreras, J F; Romero-Guido, P; Puerto, F I; Guiscafré, H; Mota, F; Herrera, I; Cedillo, R; Muñoz, O; Calva, J; Guerrero, M L; Coulson, B S; Greenberg, H B; López, S; Arias, C F

    1998-06-01

    In the present investigation we characterized the antigenic diversity of the VP4 and VP7 proteins in 309 and 261 human rotavirus strains isolated during two consecutive epidemic seasons, respectively, in three different regions of Mexico. G3 was found to be the prevalent VP7 serotype during the first year, being superseded by serotype G1 strains during the second season. To antigenically characterize the VP4 protein of the strains isolated, we used five neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which showed specificity for VP4 serotypes P1A, P1B, and P2 in earlier studies. Eight different patterns of reactivity with these MAbs were found, and the prevalence of three of these patterns varied from one season to the next. The P genotype of a subset of 52 samples was determined by PCR. Among the strains characterized as genotype P[4] and P[8] there were three and five different VP4 MAb reactivity patterns, respectively, indicating that the diversity of neutralization epitopes in VP4 is greater than that previously appreciated by the genomic typing methods.

  19. Evaluation of seasonal patterns of Kawasaki Syndrome- and rotavirus-associated hospitalizations in California and New York, 2000-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parashar Umesh D

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kawasaki Syndrome (KS is an uncommon childhood disease with unknown etiology. It has been suggested that rotavirus infection may play a causative role in the development of KS. Methods To examine potential temporal associations between KS and rotavirus infection, seasonal patterns of KS- and rotavirus-associated hospitalizations among children in California and New York during 2000-2005 were compared. Results Rotavirus hospital admissions were markedly winter seasonal, with very few summer hospitalizations. KS hospitalizations occurred year-round but also peaked slightly during winter and spring. Conclusion The strong winter seasonal pattern of rotavirus clearly differed from the year-round pattern of KS hospitalizations. While the present study cannot completely rule out rotavirus as having a role in the development of KS, other agents must be involved in the etiology of KS.

  20. [Identification of rotavirus associated to serotype G2 in Yucatan, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales-Loza, M del R; Polanco-Marín, G G; Puerto-Solis, M

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, rotavirus G2 serotype was identified from fecal samples of children with gastroenteritis from the city of Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. Virological diagnosis of disease was performed using polycrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoenzymatic assay. Out of 149 analyzed samples 25 (16.7%) gave positive reaction to rotavirus groups A, of these 23 (92%) were identified as serotype g2, subgroup i and electrophoretic short pattern, whereas 2 (8%) were identified as subgroups II and electrophoretic long pattern, however, the G serotype was not possible to determine. Rotavirus G serotype has not been detected in more than 90% of samples since 1985. This indicates that the number of people susceptible to G2 serotype within the population has increased over recent years, which perhaps indicates that an important outbreak of acute infectious diarrhea caused by the rotavirus G2 serotype may be forthcoming.

  1. Rotavirus vaccine: early introduction in Latin America-risks and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Isa, Pavel; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2006-01-01

    Rotavirus infection is the cause of severe gastroenteritis of young children worldwide, leading to an estimate of 600,000 deaths a year. Efforts to develop an effective and safe vaccine resulted in licensing in 1998 of a live oral vaccine (RotaShield) that was withdrawn less than 1 year later when reports of cases of intussusception were linked to its application. This led to development of new rotavirus vaccine candidates that are currently in late phase III clinical trials. One of these vaccines, GlaxoSmithKline's Rotarix, was licensed in July 2004 to be used in Mexico. This review describes the general background for rotavirus vaccine development, the different vaccine candidates that have been tested or are currently being evaluated, the association of rotavirus vaccination with the bowel blockage known as intussuception, and discusses the benefits and risks of the fast-track introduction of Rotarix in Latin America, and particularly in Mexico.

  2. [Molecular epidemiology of rotaviruses circulating among residents of St. Petersburg from 1986 through 1991].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, B Ia; Moskvin, A A; Semenov, N V; Grits'ko, R Iu; Marchenko, L G; Bannikov, A I

    1995-01-01

    The results of screening of 510 patients with acute gastrointestinal diseases over the period of 1986 to 1991 are presented. Rotaviruses were shown to be the infection agents in 112 (60%) children and 76 (40%) adults. The phoretyping of the isolated strains revealed cocirculation of 17 different phoretypes of rotaviruses: 8 "long" and 9 "short" ones. At the same time, two predominant phoretypes were found to alternately circulate in various epidemic seasons. The "long" phoretypes were found to be equally prevalent among adults and children, whereas the "short" phoretype rotaviruses were isolated mainly from children. The cyclic pattern of circulation of rotavirus phoretypes and genetic changeability of these viruses as a factor determining the prevalence of rotaviral infection are discussed.

  3. Protection against gastroenteritis in US households with children who received rotavirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Margaret M; Dahl, Rebecca Moritz; Curns, Aaron T; Parashar, Umesh D

    2015-02-15

    We used Truven Health Marketscan claims database (2008-2011) to compare gastroenteritis rates during January-June among households whose child had received rotavirus vaccine with those whose child did not receive vaccine. Statistically significantly lower rates of hospitalization with a rotavirus gastroenteritis or unspecified-gastroenteritis discharge code occurred in vaccinated households among persons 20-29 years and females 20-29 years (2008/2009), and males 30-39 years (2009/2010). Lower emergency department gastroenteritis rates occurred in vaccinated households among females 20-29 years (2009/2010) and individuals 5-19 years (2010/2011). These data suggest rotavirus vaccination of infants provides indirect protection against moderate-to-severe rotavirus disease in young parents and older siblings.

  4. Rotavirus Gastroenteritis is Associated with Increased Morbidity and Mortality in Children with Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, A

    2017-04-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of infantile diarrhoea worldwide in children <5 years1. Although mortality rates are low in Ireland, certain populations are more susceptible to the associated morbidity and mortality of infection. A retrospective chart review of 14 patients with confirmed IMDs who were admitted to Temple Street Children’s Hospital between 2010 to 2015 with rotavirus infection were compared with 14 randomly selected age matched controls. The median length of stay was 7 days (SD25.3) in IMD patients versus 1.5 days (SD 2.1) in the controls. IV fluids were required on average for 4.5 days (range 0-17) in IMD patients versus 0.63 days (range 0-3) in controls. This report highlights the increased morbidity of rotavirus infection in patients with IMD compared to healthy children. This vulnerable population are likely to benefit from the recent introduction of the rotavirus oral vaccination in October 2016.

  5. Estimating the costs of implementing the rotavirus vaccine in the national immunisation programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lizell B; Ustrup, Marte; Hansen, Kristian S

    2014-01-01

    in the national immunisation programme of a low-income country. Furthermore, the aim was to examine the relative contribution of different components to the total cost. METHODS: Following the World Health Organization guidelines, we estimated the resource use and costs associated with rotavirus vaccine......OBJECTIVES: Worldwide, rotavirus infections cause approximately 453,000 child deaths annually. Two licensed vaccines could be life- and cost-saving in low-income countries where the disease burden is highest. The aim of our study was to estimate the total cost of implementing the rotavirus vaccine...... implementation, using Malawi as a case. The cost analysis was undertaken from a governmental perspective. All costs were calculated for a 5-years period (2012-2016) and discounted at 5%. The value of key input parameters was varied in a sensitivity analysis. RESULTS: The total cost of rotavirus vaccine...

  6. Rotavirus y campylobacter fetus jejuni asociados a un brote de diarrea en terneros

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    artículo -- Universidad de Costa Rica. Instituto de Investigaciones en Salud, 1984 Rotaviruses and Campylobacter fetus jejuni are ubiquitous agents of diarrheal disease in animals and humans. Under natural conditions they do not seem to cross inter-species barriers; a zoonosis has not been documented for man. However, animal rotaviruses might contribute to the emergence of new reassortment strains in view of their segmented genome, and thus, produce new antigenic variants. On the contrary,...

  7. Acute Rotavirus-Induced Diarrhea in Children: Clinical Picture, Diagnosis, Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Niankovskyi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the current aspects of epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical picture and treatment of acute rotavirus-induced diarrhea in children. There are presented the basic thesis of ESPGHAN consensus (2014 about acute diarrheas. There was analyzed the effectiveness of probiotic Subalin producing interferon for the treatment of acute rotavirus-induced diarrhea. It was demonstrated its effectiveness according to the literature review and own data.

  8. Frequency of Adenoviruses, Rotaviruses and Noroviruses Among Diarrhea Samples Collected From Infants of Zabol, Southeastern Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Hoseini Alfatemi, Seyedeh Mahsan; Sharifi-Rad, Mehdi; Miri, Abdolhossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Viruses are one of the major reasons of gastrointestinal disease worldwide, and commonly infect children less than five years of age in developing countries. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the frequency of adenoviruses, rotaviruses and noroviruses among diarrhea samples collected from infants of Zabol, south-east of Iran. This study is the first investigation of adenoviruses, rotaviruses and noroviruses among diarrhea samples in Zabol. Patients and Methods: In th...

  9. Ninety-Four Cases of Enteritis Caused by Rotavirus with Different RNA Types Treated with Qiuxieling (

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    It has been known that Qiuxieling (秋泻灵,QXL) is a safe and effective drug for treating rotaviral enteritis. Some studies showed that rotavirus with different RNA types were different in toxicity and would induce enteritis with different clinical manifestations(1). So the effect of QXL in treating enteritis caused by rotavirus with different RNA types was studied and reported as follows.……

  10. Evaluation of the infectivity, gene and antigenicity persistence of rotaviruses by free chlorine disinfection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Li; April Z.Gu; Siyu Zeng; Wan Yang; Miao He; Hanchang Shi

    2011-01-01

    The effects of free chlorine disinfection of tap water and wastewater effluents on the infectivity,gene integrity and surface antigens of rotaviruses were evaluated by a bench-scale chlorine disinfection experiments.Plaque assays,integrated cell culture-quantitative RTPCR (ICC-RT-qPCR),RT-qPCR,and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA),respectively,were used to assess the influence of the disinfectant on virus infectivity as well as genetic and antigenic integrity of simian rotavirus SA11 as a surrogate for human rotaviruses.The ICC-RT-qPCR was able to detect rotaviruses survival from chlorine disinfection at chlorine dose up to 20 mg/L (60 min contact),which suggested a required chlorine dose of 5 folds (from 1 to 5 mg/L) higher than that indicated by the plaque assay to achieve 1.8 log10 reductions in tap water with 60 min exposing.The VP7 gene was more resistant than the infectivity and existed at chlorine dose up to 20 mg/L (60 min contact),while the antigencity was undetectable with chlorine dose more than 5 mg/L (60 ain contact).The water quality also impacted the inactivation efficiencies,and rotaviruses have a relatively higher resistant in secondary effluents than in the tap water under the same chlorine disinfection treatments.This study indicated that rotaviruses have a higher infectivity,gene and antigencity resistance to chlorine than that previously indicated by plaque assay only,which seemed to underestimate the resistance of rotaviruses to chlorine and the risk of rotaviruses in environments.Present results also suggested that re-evaluation of resistance of other waterborne viruses after disinfections by more sensitive infectivity detection method (such as ICC-RT-qPCR) may be necessary,to determine the adequate disinfectant doses required for the inactivation of waterborne viruses.

  11. Novel group A rotavirus G8 P[1] as primary cause of an ovine diarrheic syndrome outbreak in weaned lambs

    OpenAIRE

    Galindo-Cardiel, I.; Fernández-Jiménez, M.; Luján, L.; Buesa, J.; Espada, J.; Fantova, E.; Blanco, J; Segalés, J.; Badiola, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Rotavirus is a worldwide major cause of diarrhea outbreaks in neonatal ruminants. An outbreak of ovine diarrheic syndrome (ODS) in 50-75 days-old lambs (weaned lambs) is described. Fecal immunochromatography and intestinal immunohistochemistry for rotavirus group A were performed. In addition, semi-nested multiplex RT-PCR for G and P rotavirus genotyping in combination with sequencing were performed, to support the diagnosis and identify the viral strain. A novel ovine rot...

  12. Effective prophylaxis against rotavirus diarrhea using a combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Hammarström Lennart; Svensson Lennart; Brüssow Harald; Marcotte Harold; Pant Neha

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Rotavirus is a worldwide cause of infectious infantile diarrhea that claims over 600,000 lives annually. Recently, two new vaccine candidates have been developed but their efficacy in developing countries, still remains to be proven. Oral delivery of specific immunoglobulins provides passive immunity and is a fast acting treatment for rotavirus diarrhea. Probiotic bacteria have also gained considerable attention lately as treatment for rotavirus diarrhea. Here we report an...

  13. [Rotavirus Vaccine. Statement of the Consultive Committee of Immunizations on behalf of The Chilean Infectious Diseases Society. March 2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz M, Alma; Abarca V, Katia; Luchsinger F, Vivian; Valenzuela B, M Teresa; Jiménez de la J, Jorge

    2006-06-01

    The article briefly reviews the epidemiology of rotavirus infection and the scientific information of the rotavirus vaccines: Rotashield, withdrawn from the market due to its association with intussusception, Rotateq currently in an advanced phase of development, and Rotarix, recently licensed in Chile. Considering the available information, the Consultive Committee of Immunizations of the Chilean Society of Infectious Diseases, summarizes its conclusions and makes recommendations for infants vaccination against rotavirus in our country.

  14. Cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination among Libyan children using a simple economic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkoshi, Salem; Maimaiti, Namaitijiang; Dahlui, Maznah

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotavirus infection is a major cause of childhood diarrhea in Libya. The objective of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in that country. Methods We used a published decision tree model that has been adapted to the Libyan situation to analyze a birth cohort of 160,000 children. The evaluation of diarrhea events in three public hospitals helped to estimate the rotavirus burden. The economic analysis was done from two perspectives: health care provider and societal. Univariate sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess uncertainty in some values of the variables selected. Results The three hospitals received 545 diarrhea patients aged≤5 with 311 (57%) rotavirus positive test results during a 9-month period. The societal cost for treatment of a case of rotavirus diarrhea was estimated at US$ 661/event. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio with a vaccine price of US$ 27 per course was US$ 8,972 per quality-adjusted life year gained from the health care perspective. From a societal perspective, the analysis shows cost savings of around US$ 16 per child. Conclusion The model shows that rotavirus vaccination could be economically a very attractive intervention in Libya. PMID:25499622

  15. Prospective evaluation of indirect costs due to acute rotavirus gastroenteritis in Spain: the ROTACOST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzón-Alejandro, Marta; Redondo-Collazo, Lorenzo; Sánchez-Lastres, Juan Manuel; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2011-09-14

    The effect of rotavirus in developed countries is mainly economic. This study aimed to assess the indirect costs induced by rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (RVAGE) in Spain. A prospective observational study was conducted from October 2008 to June 2009. It included 682 children up to 5 years of age with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) who attended primary care (n = 18) and emergency room/hospital settings (n = 10), covering the regions of Galicia and Asturias (North-west Spain). All non-medical expenses incurred throughout the episode were recorded in detail using personal interviews and telephone contact. Among the 682 enrolled children, 207 (30.4%) were rotavirus positive and 170 (25%) had received at least one dose of rotavirus vaccine. The mean (standard deviation) indirect cost caused by an episode of AGE was estimated at 135.17 (182.70) Euros. Costs were 1.74-fold higher when AGE was caused by rotavirus compared with other etiologies: 192.7 (219.8) Euros vs. 111.6 (163.5) Euros (p purchase of material. Patients with RVAGE were admitted to hospital more frequently than those with other etiologies (47.8% vs 14%, p decision-making process of the eventual inclusion of rotavirus vaccine in the national immunization schedule of well developed countries.

  16. Prevalence of rotavirus in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Imam Sajjad Hospital of Yasuj, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Khodadadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Aim: Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of dehydrating and gastroenteritis among children worldwide. . The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of rotavirus in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Imam Sajjad Hospital of Yasuj. Methods: This cross sectional – descriptive study was done on 184 stool samples of children younger than 7 years of age hospitalized at Imam Sajjad hospital of Yasuj in 2011 due to acute gastroenteritis. All samples were routinely analyzed for detection of rotavirus by Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA test. Data was analyzed by SPSS version 16, Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Results: Of the 184 samples analyzed, 52(28.26% were positive.The Results showed significant relationship between the seasonal distribution and virus detection (p=0/001. The highest incidence of rotavirus was seen in autumn with frequency of (48.08% and the lowest in spring (5.77%. Conclusions: According to high prevalence of rotavirus infection, continual surveillance is necessary to provide useful data for formulating effective vaccines and perform diarrhea prevention programs. Key words: Rotavirus, Gastroenteritis, Prevalence, Elisa

  17. Economic and psychosocial impact of rotavirus infection in Spain: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Aldeán, Javier; Aristegui, Javier; López-Belmonte, Juan Luis; Pedrós, Montse; Sicilia, José García

    2014-06-24

    Severe rotavirus gastroenteritis is common in children under 5 years of age. A literature review was performed to investigate the economic and psychosocial impact of rotavirus infection in children in this age group. We retrieved 56 articles on the economic burden of the disease in Europe, 18 of them reported data from Spain; 8 articles were retrieved analysing its psychosocial impact. In Spain, rotavirus is responsible for 14% to 30% of all cases of gastroenteritis, and a quarter of these require hospitalisation. It is also associated with high use of health care resources (emergency and primary care visits). Rotavirus gastroenteritis costs the Spanish national health system EUR 28 million a year and causes productivity loss in two-thirds of parents (mean of 4 days). Taking into account these costs, it was estimated that implementing universal vaccination could prevent 76% to 95% of hospital admissions due to rotavirus gastroenteritis, as well as reduce emergency and paediatric visits, nosocomial infections, and days missed from work (77% reduction). Rotavirus gastroenteritis also has a considerable psychosocial impact on the family, although it is difficult to compare results due to the diversity of study designs and the low specificity of the measurement tools used. It also causes high stress among parents, adding to their workload and adversely affecting their quality of life.

  18. Interactions between Rotavirus and Suwannee River Organic Matter: Aggregation, Deposition, and Adhesion Force Measurement

    KAUST Repository

    Gutierrez, Leonardo

    2012-08-21

    Interactions between rotavirus and Suwannee River natural organic matter (NOM) were studied by time-resolved dynamic light scattering, quartz crystal microbalance, and atomic force microscopy. In NOM-containing NaCl solutions of up to 600 mM, rotavirus suspension remained stable for over 4 h. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement for interaction force decay length at different ionic strengths showed that nonelectrostatic repulsive forces were mainly responsible for eliminating aggregation in NaCl solutions. Aggregation rates of rotavirus in solutions containing 20 mg C/L increased with divalent cation concentration until reaching a critical coagulation concentration of 30 mM CaCl2 or 70 mM MgCl2. Deposition kinetics of rotavirus on NOM-coated silica surface was studied using quartz crystal microbalance. Experimental attachment efficiencies for rotavirus adsorption to NOM-coated surface in MgCl2 solution were lower than in CaCl2 solution at a given divalent cation concentration. Stronger adhesion force was measured for virus-virus and virus-NOM interactions in CaCl2 solution compared to those in MgCl2 or NaCl solutions at the same ionic strength. This study suggested that divalent cation complexation with carboxylate groups in NOM and on virus surface was an important mechanism in the deposition and aggregation kinetics of rotavirus. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination among Libyan children using a simple economic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Alkoshi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rotavirus infection is a major cause of childhood diarrhea in Libya. The objective of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in that country. Methods: We used a published decision tree model that has been adapted to the Libyan situation to analyze a birth cohort of 160,000 children. The evaluation of diarrhea events in three public hospitals helped to estimate the rotavirus burden. The economic analysis was done from two perspectives: health care provider and societal. Univariate sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess uncertainty in some values of the variables selected. Results: The three hospitals received 545 diarrhea patients aged≤5 with 311 (57% rotavirus positive test results during a 9-month period. The societal cost for treatment of a case of rotavirus diarrhea was estimated at US$ 661/event. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio with a vaccine price of US$ 27 per course was US$ 8,972 per quality-adjusted life year gained from the health care perspective. From a societal perspective, the analysis shows cost savings of around US$ 16 per child. Conclusion: The model shows that rotavirus vaccination could be economically a very attractive intervention in Libya.

  20. Rotavirus vaccines and health care utilization for diarrhea in the United States (2007-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshem, Eyal; Moritz, Rebecca E; Curns, Aaron T; Zhou, Fangjun; Tate, Jacqueline E; Lopman, Benjamin A; Parashar, Umesh D

    2014-07-01

    To examine reductions in diarrhea-associated health care utilization after rotavirus vaccine implementation and to assess direct and indirect effectiveness of vaccination. Retrospective cohort analysis of claims data of commercially insured US children aged vaccine coverage. We compared rates of diarrhea-associated health care utilization in prevaccine (2001-2006) versus postvaccine introduction (2007-2011) years, compared rates of diarrhea-associated health care utilization in vaccinated versus unvaccinated children and compared rates in unvaccinated children in postvaccine versus prevaccine years. Among children aged vaccine coverage rates reached 58% and 5%, respectively, by December 31, 2010. Compared with the average rate of rotavirus-coded hospitalizations in 2001-2006, rates were reduced by 75% in 2007-2008, 60% in 2008-2009, 94% in 2009-2010, and 80% in 2010-2011. Compared with unvaccinated children, in 2010-2011, the rate of rotavirus-coded hospitalizations was reduced by 92% among RV5 recipients and 96% among RV1 recipients. Rotavirus-coded hospitalization rate reductions among RV5 recipients versus unvaccinated children ranged from 87% among vaccines has substantially reduced diarrhea health care utilization in US children. Both rotavirus vaccines conferred high protection against rotavirus hospitalizations; RV5 conferred durable protection through the fourth year of life. Vaccination also conferred indirect benefits to unvaccinated children. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. 轮状病毒疫苗研究进展%Advances in research of rotavirus vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王奔

    2012-01-01

    轮状病毒是引起婴幼儿严重腹泻的主要原因,疫苗接种是预防轮状病毒感染的有效方法.此文讨论了轮状病毒的生物学和流行病学特征及轮状病毒疫苗的研究进展.%Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea among young children,and vaccination is an effective method to prevent rotavirus infection.This review describes biological and epidemiological characteristics of rotavirus and research progress of rotavirus vaccines.

  2. Acute myositis associated with concurrent infection of rotavirus and norovirus in a 2-year-old girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Yamamoto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus and norovirus are common pathogens associated with gastroenteritis in children. Although rotavirus occasionally induces central nervous system disease, only 3 cases with rotavirus-induced acute myositis have been reported in the English literature. We recently treated a female patient with acute myositis associated with gastroenteritis induced by concurrent infection with rotavirus and norovirus. Having suffered from gastroenteritis for 3 days, she suddenly developed myositis affecting her lower extremities with concomitant creatine kinase elevation. Herein, we present our patient and review the previous cases including those reported in the Japanese literature.

  3. High prevalence of G12P[8] rotavirus strains in Rio Branco, Acre, Western Amazon, in the post-rotavirus vaccine introduction period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Mayara A O; Pinheiro, Helder H C; Silva, Rita S U; Linhares, Alexandre C; Silva, Luciana D; Gabbay, Yvone B; Silva, Mônica C M; Loureiro, Edvaldo C B; Soares, Luana S; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc P

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to provide a molecular characterization of circulating rotavirus (RVA) strains in Rio Branco, Acre, in the post-rotavirus vaccination period, particularly with regard to the emerging, increasingly prevalent G12P[8] genotype. A total of 488 fecal specimens from diarrheic and non-diarrheic children were obtained between January and December 2012. RVA detection was initially performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method, followed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using specific primers. RVA was detected in 18.3% (44/241) of the children with acute diarrhea and in 1.2% (3/247) of the non-diarrheic children (P rotavirus vaccine introduction in Brazil and elsewhere, since the occurrence of either unusual our emerging genotypes may pose a challenge to vaccination strategies.

  4. Whole genome detection of rotavirus mixed infections in human, porcine and bovine samples co-infected with various rotavirus strains collected from sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyaga, Martin M; Jere, Khuzwayo C; Esona, Mathew D; Seheri, Mapaseka L; Stucker, Karla M; Halpin, Rebecca A; Akopov, Asmik; Stockwell, Timothy B; Peenze, Ina; Diop, Amadou; Ndiaye, Kader; Boula, Angeline; Maphalala, Gugu; Berejena, Chipo; Mwenda, Jason M; Steele, A Duncan; Wentworth, David E; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are among the main global causes of severe diarrhea in children under the age of 5years. Strain diversity, mixed infections and untypeable RVA strains are frequently reported in Africa. We analysed rotavirus-positive human stool samples (n=13) obtained from hospitalised children under the age of 5years who presented with acute gastroenteritis at sentinel hospital sites in six African countries, as well as bovine and porcine stool samples (n=1 each), to gain insights into rotavirus diversity and evolution. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis and genotyping with G-(VP7) and P-specific (VP4) typing primers suggested that 13 of the 15 samples contained more than 11 segments and/or mixed G/P genotypes. Full-length amplicons for each segment were generated using RVA-specific primers and sequenced using the Ion Torrent and/or Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencing platforms. Sequencing detected at least one segment in each sample for which duplicate sequences, often having distinct genotypes, existed. This supported and extended the PAGE and RT-PCR genotyping findings that suggested these samples were collected from individuals that had mixed rotavirus infections. The study reports the first porcine (MRC-DPRU1567) and bovine (MRC-DPRU3010) mixed infections. We also report a unique genome segment 9 (VP7), whose G9 genotype belongs to lineage VI and clusters with porcine reference strains. Previously, African G9 strains have all been in lineage III. Furthermore, additional RVA segments isolated from humans have a clear evolutionary relationship with porcine, bovine and ovine rotavirus sequences, indicating relatively recent interspecies transmission and reassortment. Thus, multiple RVA strains from sub-Saharan Africa are infecting mammalian hosts with unpredictable variations in their gene segment combinations. Whole-genome sequence analyses of mixed RVA strains underscore the considerable diversity of rotavirus sequences and

  5. Rotavirus gastroenteritis-associated urinary ammonium acid urate crystals.

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    Yokoyama, Tadafumi; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Kato, Eiji; Ohta, Kazuhide; Ishikawa, Sayaka; Ueno, Kazuyuki; Shimizu, Masaki; Yachie, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although ammonium acid urate (AAU) calculi are extremely rare renal stone components, it was recently found that many urinary tract calculi that cause post-renal renal failure in rotavirus (RV) gastroenteritis are AAU calculi. The mechanism of AAU calculi development in RV gastroenteritis has not been fully elucidated. We analyzed data from eight RV gastroenteritis patients who transiently had AAU crystals in their urinary sediment. In these patients, formation of AAU crystals occurred earlier than the formation of AAU calculi. No difference was observed in serum and urine uric acid levels between RV gastroenteritis patients with or without AAU crystals. Interestingly, fractional excretion of sodium was extremely low among patients with AAU crystals. These results suggest that the formation of AAU crystals might not be due to excretion of uric acid, but excretion of sodium.

  6. Genetic diversity of circulating rotavirus strains in Tanzania prior to the introduction of vaccination.

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    Sabrina J Moyo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tanzania currently rolls out vaccination against rotavirus-diarrhea, a major cause of child illness and death. As the vaccine covers a limited number of rotavirus variants, this study describes the molecular epidemiology of rotavirus among children under two years in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, prior to implementation of vaccination. METHODS: Stool specimens, demographic and clinical information, were collected from 690 children admitted to hospital due to diarrhea (cases and 545 children without diarrhea (controls during one year. Controls were inpatient or children attending child health clinics. Rotavirus antigen was detected using ELISA and positive samples were typed by multiplex semi-nested PCR and sequencing. RESULTS: The prevalence of rotavirus was higher in cases (32.5% than in controls (7.7%, P<0.001. The most common G genotypes were G1 followed by G8, G12, and G4 in cases and G1, G12 and G8 in controls. The Tanzanian G1 variants displayed 94% similarity with the Rotarix vaccine G1 variant. The commonest P genotypes were P[8], P[4] and P[6], and the commonest G/P combination G1 P[8] (n = 123, G8 P[4] and G12 P[6]. Overall, rotavirus prevalence was higher in cool (23.9% than hot months (17.1% of the year (P = 0.012. We also observed significant seasonal variation of G genotypes. Rotavirus was most frequently found in the age group of four to six months. The prevalence of rotavirus in cases was lower in stunted children (28.9% than in non-stunted children (40.1%, P = 0.003 and lower in HIV-infected (15.4%, 4/26 than in HIV-uninfected children (55.3%, 42/76, P<0.001. CONCLUSION: This pre-vaccination study shows predominance of genotype G1 in Tanzania, which is phylogenetically distantly related to the vaccine strains. We confirm the emergence of genotype G8 and G12. Rotavirus infection and circulating genotypes showed seasonal variation. This study also suggests that rotavirus may not be an opportunistic pathogen in

  7. Detection of rotavirus and other enteropathogens in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Havana, Cuba.

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    Ribas, María de Los Angeles; Tejero, Yahisel; Cordero, Yanislet; de Los Angeles León, María; Rodriguez, Misladys; Perez-Lastre, Jorge; Triana, Thelma; Guerra, Mabel; Ayllón, Lucía; Escalante, Gladys; Hadad, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to diagnose infections with rotavirus and other enteric pathogens in children under five years old with acute gastroenteritis and to identify the most common epidemiological and clinical characteristics of these pathogens. The study was conducted using 110 stool samples from the same number of children under five years old who were inpatients at three paediatric hospitals in Havana, Cuba, between October and December 2011. The samples were tested for rotavirus and other enteric pathogens using traditional and molecular microbiological methods. Pathogens were detected in 85 (77.3 %) of the children. Rotavirus was the most commonly found, appearing in 54.5 % of the children, followed by bacteria (29 %) and parasites (10.9 %). Other viral pathogens detected included adenovirus (6.4 %) and astrovirus (3.6 %). In rotavirus-positives cases, at least one other pathogen was detected, usually a bacterium (26.6 %). More than three episodes of watery diarrhea in 24 hours were observed in 78.3 % of the cases. Dehydration was found in 30 (50 %) rotavirus-positive children, of whom seven (11.6 %) were transferred to an intensive care unit due to complications of metabolic acidosis. Rotavirus was most commonly observed among children under 12 months old (65 %). The highest incidence of infection occurred in children who were under the care of a relative at home (78.3 %), had not been breastfed (65 %), or had been breastfed for less than six months (28.3 %). The genotype combinations most frequently found were G9P8 (28.3 %) and G1P8 (10 %). This study demonstrates the presence of rotavirus and other enteric pathogens as causes of gastroenteritis in hospitalized infants and young children in Cuba.

  8. Public finance of rotavirus vaccination in India and Ethiopia: an extended cost-effectiveness analysis.

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    Verguet, Stéphane; Murphy, Shane; Anderson, Benjamin; Johansson, Kjell Arne; Glass, Roger; Rheingans, Richard

    2013-10-01

    An estimated 4% of global child deaths (approximately 300,000 deaths) were attributed to rotavirus in 2010. About a third of these deaths occurred in India and Ethiopia. Public finance of rotavirus vaccination in these two countries could substantially decrease child mortality and also reduce rotavirus-related hospitalizations, prevent health-related impoverishment and bring significant cost savings to households. We use a methodology of 'extended cost-effectiveness analysis' (ECEA) to evaluate a hypothetical publicly financed program for rotavirus vaccination in India and Ethiopia. We measure program impact along four dimensions: 1) rotavirus deaths averted; 2) household expenditures averted; 3) financial risk protection afforded; 4) distributional consequences across the wealth strata of the country populations. In India and Ethiopia, the program would lead to a substantial decrease in rotavirus deaths, mainly among the poorer; it would reduce household expenditures across all income groups and it would effectively provide financial risk protection, mostly concentrated among the poorest. Potential indirect benefits of vaccination (herd immunity) would increase program benefits among all income groups, whereas potentially decreased vaccine efficacy among poorer households would reduce the equity benefits of the program. Our approach incorporates financial risk protection and distributional consequences into the systematic economic evaluation of vaccine policy, illustrated here with the case study of public finance for rotavirus vaccination. This enables selection of vaccine packages based on the quantitative inclusion of information on equity and on how much financial risk protection is being bought per dollar expenditure on vaccine policy, in addition to how much health is being bought. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An update of cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in indonesia: Takinga birth-dose vaccination strategy into account

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwantika, A.A.; Setiawan, D.; Atthobari, J.; Postma, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Rotavirus infection was reported as the major cause of severe diarrhea in children under 5-years-old in Indonesia. A low cost rotavirus vaccine to protect infants from birth has been developed for developing countries, such as Indonesia. This study aims to update our initial analysis on

  10. An update to "The cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination: comparative analyses for five European countries and transferability in Europe".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Mangen, Marie-Josée J; Melliez, Hugues; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Bilcke, Joke; Salo, Heini; Edmunds, W John; Beutels, Philippe

    2010-11-01

    A cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination in Belgium, England and Wales, Finland, France and the Netherlands published in 2009 was updated based on recent studies on rotavirus burden of disease and vaccine efficacy. All the qualitative conclusions in the previous study were found to remain valid. Vaccination remains cost-effective in Finland only when using plausible tender prices.

  11. In vitro neutralisation of rotavirus infection by two broadly specific recombinant monovalent llama-derived antibody fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Aladin (Farah); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra); J. Bouma (Janneke); S. Bezemer (Sandra); P. Hermans (Pim); D. Wolvers (Danielle); K. Bellamy (Kate); L.G.J. Frenken (Leon); J. Gray (Jim); M. Iturriza-Gómara (Miren)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractRotavirus is the main cause of viral gastroenteritis in young children. Therefore, the development of inexpensive antiviral products for the prevention and/or treatment of rotavirus disease remains a priority. Previously we have shown that a recombinant monovalent antibody fragment (refe

  12. An update to "The cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination : Comparative analyses for five European countries and transferability in Europe"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jit, Mark; Mangen, Marie-Josee J.; Melliez, Hugues; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Bilcke, Joke; Salo, Heini; Edmunds, W. John; Beutels, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    A cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination in Belgium, England and Wales, Finland, France and the Netherlands published in 2009 was updated based on recent studies on rotavirus burden of disease and vaccine efficacy. All the qualitative conclusions in the previous study were found to rem

  13. Rotaviruses as a cause of nosocomial, infantile diarrhoea in Northern Brazil: pilot study

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    Rosa Helena P. Gusmão

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Faecal samples were obtained from 190 children, aged 0 to 5 years, admitted to a public hospital in Belém, Pará, Brazil. These patients were placed in a pediatric ward with 40 beds distributed in six rooms. Case were classified into three groups: (a nosocomial: children who developed gastroenteritis 72 hr or later after admission; (b community-acquired: patients admitted either with diarrhoea or who had diarrhoea within 72 hr following admission; (c non-diarrhoeic: those children who had no diarrhoea three days before and three days after collection of formed faecal sample. Specimens were routinely processed for the presence of rotaviruses, bacteria and parasites. Rotaviruses were detected through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and subsequently serotyped/electrophoretyped. Rotaviruses were the most prevalent enteropathogens among nosocomial cases, accounting for 39 % (9/23 of diarrhoeal episodes; on the other hand, rotaviruses ocurred in 8.3 % (11/133 and 9 % (3/34 of community-acquired and non-diarrhoeic categories, respectively. Mixed infections involving rotavirus and Giardia intestinalis and rotavirus plus G. intestinalis and Entamoeba histolytica were detected in frequencies of 8.6 and 4.3 %, respectively, in the nosocomial group. The absence of bacterial pathogens in this category, and the unusual low prevalence of these agents in the other two groups may reflect the early and routine administration of antibiotics following admission to this hospital. Rotavirus serotype 2 prevailed over the other types, accounting for 77.8 % of isolates from nosocomial diarrhoeal episodes. In addition, at least five different genomic profiles could be observed, of which one displayed an unusual five-segment first RNA cluster. Dehydration was recorded in all cases of hospital-acquired, rotavirus-associated diarrhoea, whereas in only 57 % of nosocomial cases of other aetiology. It was also noted that nosocomial, rotavirus-associated diarrhoeal

  14. Socio-demographic, Clinical and Laboratory Features of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children Treated in Pediatric Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Berisha, Majlinda; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Kolgeci, Selim; Avdiu, Muharrem; Jakupi, Xhevat; Hoxha, Rina; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of work was presentation of several socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics of gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. The examinees and methods: The examinees were children under the age of five years treated at the Pediatric Clinic due to acute gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. Rotavirus is isolated by method chromatographic immunoassay by Cer Test Biotec. Results: From the total number of patients (850) suffering from acute gastroenteritis, feces test on bacteria, viruses. protozoa and fungi was positive in 425 (49.76%) cases. From this number the test on bacteria was positive in 248 (58.62%) cases, on viruses it was positive in 165 (39.0%), on protozoa in 9 (2.12%) cases and on fungi only one case. Rotavirus was the most frequent one in viral test, it was isolated in 142 (86.06%) cases, adenoviruses were found in 9 (5.45%) cases and noroviruses in only one case. The same feces sample that contained rotavirus and adenoviruses were isolated in five cases, whereas rotavirus with bacteria was isolated in the same feces sample in five cases. The biggest number of cases 62 (43.66%) were of the age 6-12 months, whereas the smallest number 10 (7.04%) cases were of the age 37-60 months. There were 76 (53.52%) of cases of male gender, from rural areas there were 81 (57.04%) cases and there were 58 (40.80%) cases during the summer period. Among the clinical symptoms the most prominent were diarrhea, vomiting, high temperature, whereas the different degree of dehydration were present in all cases (the most common one was moderate dehydration). The most frequent one was isonatremic dehydration in 91 (64.08%) cases, less frequent one was hypernatremic dehydration in 14 (9.85%) cases. The majority of cases (97.89%) had lower blood pH values, whereas 67 (47.17%) cases had pH values that varied from 7.16 -7.20 (curve peak), normal values were registered in only 3 (2.11%) cases. Urea values were increased in 45 (31.07%) cases (the maximum value

  15. Rotavirus G2P[4] detection in fresh vegetables and oysters in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz-Santiago, Carolina; Vázquez-Salinas, Carlos; Natividad-Bonifacio, Ivan; Barrón-Romero, Blanca Lilia; Quiñones-Ramírez, Elsa Irma

    2014-11-01

    Rotaviruses are the principal cause of dehydration caused by diarrhea in children younger than 2 years of age. Although these viral infections have mainly been associated with ingestion of fecally contaminated food and water, few studies have addressed the presence of the virus in food that is consumed raw or slightly cooked. In this work, 30 oyster samples and 33 vegetable samples were examined for the presence of rotavirus genotypes to evaluate their potential to produce gastrointestinal infections. The rotaviruses were identified by reverse transcriptase PCR amplification of the VP7 gene. G and P genotyping was also performed by reverse transcriptase PCR, with a detection sensitivity of up to 15 PFU/ml. Rotaviruses were found in 17 (26.9%) of 63 samples (10 oysters and 7 vegetables). The G2 genotype was found in 11 (64.7%) of 17 of the rotavirus strains, and 16 (94.1%) of 17 had the P[4] genotype. The combined genotypes found most frequently were G2P[4] (10 [58.82%] of 17), GNTP[4] (6 [35.29%] of 17), and G2P[NT] (1 [5.8%] of 17).

  16. Prevalence of Rotavirus, Adenovirus, Norovirus, and Astrovirus Infections and Coinfections among Hospitalized Children in Northern France▿

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    Tran, Adissa; Talmud, Déborah; Lejeune, Benoît; Jovenin, Nicolas; Renois, Fanny; Payan, Christopher; Leveque, Nicolas; Andreoletti, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    From January to December 2007, 973 stool specimens were prospectively collected from children hospitalized for gastroenteritis signs or from neonates and premature cases who were born in two French hospital settings in the north of France. They were tested by rapid enzyme immunoassay (EIA) analyses for rotavirus and adenovirus and by two commercially available ELISA tests for the detection of norovirus and astrovirus. The overall rates of prevalence for rotavirus, norovirus, adenovirus, and astrovirus were 21, 13, 5, and 1.8%, respectively, and they did not significantly differ between the two hospital settings (P = 0.12). Mixed virus infections were detected in 32 (3.3%) of the 973 study children and were associated with norovirus in 21 (66%) infants, including 5 premature cases. From fall to spring, norovirus infections accounted for 52% of documented gastroenteritidis viral infections at a time when rotavirus was epidemic, resulting in mixed norovirus and rotavirus gastrointestinal tract infections. Of the 367 documented viral gastroenteritis cases, 15 (4.1%) were identified as nosocomial infections, 5 of which occurred in premature cases. These findings highlight the need to implement norovirus and astrovirus ELISA detection assays in association with rapid EIA rotavirus and adenovirus detection assays for the clinical diagnosis and the nosocomial prevention of gastroenteritis viral infections in pediatric departments. PMID:20305010

  17. Development and characterization of candidate rotavirus vaccine strains derived from children with diarrhoea in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Le T; Trang, Nguyen V; Phuong, Nguyen M; Nguyen, Huong T; Ngo, Huong T; Nguyen, Huong T M; Tran, Hanh B; Dang, Ha N; Dang, Anh D; Gentsch, Jon R; Wang, Yuhuan; Esona, Mathew D; Glass, Roger I; Steele, A Duncan; Kilgore, Paul E; Nguyen, Man V; Jiang, Baoming; Nguyen, Hien D

    2009-11-20

    In Vietnam, rotavirus infection accounts for more than one-half of all hospitalizations for diarrhoea among children less than 5 years of age. While new vaccines to prevent rotavirus diarrhoea have been developed and introduced into some countries by multinational manufacturers, the ability for developing countries such as Vietnam to introduce several new and important vaccines into the routine infant immunization schedule may be challenging. In order to be partially self-sufficient in vaccine production, Vietnam has pursued the development of several rotavirus strains as candidate vaccines using isolates obtained from Vietnamese children with diarrhoea. This paper describes the origin, isolation and characterization of 3 human rotavirus strains being considered for further vaccine development in Vietnam. The goal is to prepare a monovalent G1P [8] rotavirus vaccine using one of these strains obtained in Vietnam and naturally attenuated by multiple passages in cell culture. While this is an ambitious project that will require several years' work, we are using the lessons learned to improve the overall quality of vaccine production including the use of Vero cell techniques for the manufacture of other vaccines in Vietnam.

  18. Molecular characterisation of a bovine-like rotavirus detected from a giraffe

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    O'Shea Helen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus (RV, is a member of the Reoviridae family and an important etiological agent of acute viral gastroenteritis in the young. Rotaviruses have a wide host range infecting a broad range of animal species, however little is known about rotavirus infection in exotic animals. In this paper we report the first characterisation of a RV strain from a giraffe calf. Results This report describes the identification and detailed molecular characterisation of a rotavirus strain detected from a 14-day-old Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis, presenting with acute diarrhea. The RV strain detected from the giraffe was characterized molecularly as G10P[11]. Detailed sequence analysis of VP4 and VP7 revealed significant identity at the amino acid sequence level to Bovine RV (BoRV. Conclusion This study demonstrates the need for continuous surveillance of RV strains in various animal populations, which will facilitate the identification of rotavirus hosts not previously reported. Furthermore, extending typical epidemiology studies to a broader host range will contribute to the timely identification of new emerging strain types.

  19. Economic costs of rotavirus gastroenteritis and cost-effectiveness of vaccination in developing countries.

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    Rheingans, Richard D; Antil, Lynn; Dreibelbis, Robert; Podewils, Laura Jean; Bresee, Joseph S; Parashar, Umesh D

    2009-11-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in children worldwide. We evaluated the economic burden of rotavirus and the cost-effectiveness of vaccination from the health care perspective. Estimates were based on existing epidemiological data, cost estimates, vaccine coverage, and efficacy data, as well as hypothetical vaccine prices. Outcome measures included health care and societal costs of rotavirus and benefits and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of vaccination. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the impact of estimate uncertainty. Treatment costs increased with income level, and health burden decreased; however, burden varied across regions. On the basis of current vaccination coverage and timing, rotavirus vaccination would annually prevent 228,000 deaths, 13.7 million hospital visits, and 8.7 million disability-adjusted life-years, saving $188 million in treatment costs and $243 million in societal costs. At $5 per dose, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio in low-, lower-middle-, and upper-middle-income countries was $88, $291, and $329 per disability-adjusted life-year averted, respectively, and $3,015, $9,951 and $11,296 per life saved, respectively. Vaccination would prevent approximately 45% of deaths and approximately 58% of associated medical visits and costs. Vaccination is a cost-effective strategy to reduce the health and economic burden of rotavirus. The cost-effectiveness of vaccination depends mostly on vaccine price and reaching children at highest risk of mortality.

  20. [Impact assessment of the rotavirus vaccine in Colombia using rapid evaluation methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotes, Karol; Alvis-Guzmán, Nelson; Rico, Alejandro; Porras, Alexandra; Cediel, Natalia; Chocontá Piraquive, Luz A; De la Hoz, Fernando

    2013-10-01

    Estimate the effectiveness of the monovalent rotavirus vaccine in preventing the need to hospitalize children under 2 years old for acute diarrheal disease in five Colombian cities. A population survey was conducted based on a probability sample of children over 2 months and under 24 months of age in five Colombian cities (Barranquilla, Bogotá, Cali, Cartagena, and Riohacha) over the period from August through October 2010. The vaccine had been introduced in the Expanded Program on Immunization in January 2009. Rotavirus vaccination coverage was estimated by age group; the cumulative incidence of hospitalization for severe diarrhea was determined; and the magnitude of correlation between vaccination with one or two doses of rotavirus vaccine and hospitalization for diarrhea was calculated using the age-adjusted probability ratio (PR) and other epidemiologically significant factors. Effectiveness of the vaccine was estimated using the expression 1-PR. Coverage with a single dose of the rotavirus vaccine was 87.3%. During the 12 months prior to the survey, 1 453 of the children under 24 months old in the study areas (43.2%) had presented with diarrhea, and of these, 174 (5.2%) had been hospitalized for this cause. The effectiveness of two doses of the vaccine in preventing hospitalization for severe diarrhea was 68% (CI 95% = 55%-77%). In Colombia, rotavirus vaccination protects against hospitalization for diarrhea due to any cause. The use of cross-sectional surveys appeared to be adequate for rapid evaluation of an immunization program's effectiveness with a new vaccine.

  1. Effective prophylaxis against rotavirus diarrhea using a combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and antibodies

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    Hammarström Lennart

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus is a worldwide cause of infectious infantile diarrhea that claims over 600,000 lives annually. Recently, two new vaccine candidates have been developed but their efficacy in developing countries, still remains to be proven. Oral delivery of specific immunoglobulins provides passive immunity and is a fast acting treatment for rotavirus diarrhea. Probiotic bacteria have also gained considerable attention lately as treatment for rotavirus diarrhea. Here we report an evaluation of the therapeutic potential of different probiotics and their combination with anti – rotavirus antibodies in a mouse model of rotavirus diarrhea. Results Of the six probiotic bacteria tested, Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG had the strongest influence in reducing prevalence, duration and severity of diarrhea and was therefore chosen for combination treatment with immunoglobulins. The combination treatment reduced the diarrhea outcome measures significantly, prevented histopathological changes and reduced the virus load in the intestines. Conclusion The advantages associated with immunoglobulins and probiotics based therapy is that the treatment provides a rapid therapeutic effect and is cost efficient. These components do not require special storage conditions and could potentially complement the rehydration therapy that is currently used.

  2. Rotavirus genotype distribution during the pre-vaccine period in Bolivia: 2007-2008.

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    Rivera, Rosario; Forney, Kristen; Castro, Maria René; Rebolledo, Paulina A; Mamani, Nataniel; Patzi, Maritza; Halkyer, Percy; Leon, Juan S; Iñiguez, Volga

    2013-09-01

    Rotavirus is the most important etiology of severe diarrhea in Bolivia. The monovalent attenuated human oral rotavirus vaccine Rotarix(®) was introduced in Bolivia in 2008. We describe the molecular epidemiology of circulating rotavirus strains before vaccine introduction. Two thousand one hundred thirty-five diarrheal samples were collected from hospitals in four Bolivian cities during 2007-2008. Forty-three percent (445 of 1030 rotavirus-positive samples) were analyzed for G and P genotypes. Among those, 331 were electropherotyped by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Disease severity was quantified using a modified Vesikari scale. Among the 445 samples, five genotypes were found to be prevalent: G9P[8] (33%), G1P[6] (17%), G2P[4] (13%), G9P[6] (12%), and G1P[8] (4%). Co-infections with two or more strains accounted for 14% of samples. The most prevalent strain, G9, showed greater electropherotype diversity compared to other serogroups. Strain G1P[6] generally infected younger children and peaked later in the year than other strains. No particular genotype was associated with a higher severity score, though there was a significant difference in the duration of diarrhea between genotypes. During the 2-year pre-vaccine period, substantial diversity of rotavirus co-circulating strains was observed. These data constitute a baseline against which changes in circulating strains post-vaccine introduction can be monitored. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nitazoxanide in Acute Rotavirus Diarrhea: A Randomized Control Trial from a Developing Country

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    Mahapatro, Samarendra; Mahilary, Nijwm; Satapathy, Amit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background. Acute diarrhea is one of the leading causes of childhood mortality, with rotavirus being an important pathogen. Nitazoxanide, an antiparasitic agent, has been shown to inhibit rotavirus. Objective. This double-blind, randomized trial was designed to study the role of nitazoxanide in acute rotavirus diarrhea. Methods. Of 174 children (12 months to 5 years) with acute diarrhea, 50 rotavirus positive cases were randomized. The intervention group received syrup nitazoxanide twice daily (100 mg in 12–47 months, 200 mg in ≥4 yr) for 3 days along with standard treatment of diarrhea. Duration of diarrhea was the primary outcome measure. Results. The median duration (hrs) of diarrhea (54 versus 80; 95% CI: –26 [–13.2 to –38.8]) and hospitalization (68 versus 90; 95% CI: –22 [–12.98 to –31.02]) was significantly shorter in the nitazoxanide group. No significant difference was seen in the median duration (hrs) of fever or vomiting or the proportion of children requiring parenteral rehydration. There was no report of any adverse events. Conclusions. Oral nitazoxanide is effective and safe in the management of acute rotavirus diarrhea in Indian children (CTRI REF/2016/10/012507). PMID:28331496

  4. Nitazoxanide in Acute Rotavirus Diarrhea: A Randomized Control Trial from a Developing Country

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    Samarendra Mahapatro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute diarrhea is one of the leading causes of childhood mortality, with rotavirus being an important pathogen. Nitazoxanide, an antiparasitic agent, has been shown to inhibit rotavirus. Objective. This double-blind, randomized trial was designed to study the role of nitazoxanide in acute rotavirus diarrhea. Methods. Of 174 children (12 months to 5 years with acute diarrhea, 50 rotavirus positive cases were randomized. The intervention group received syrup nitazoxanide twice daily (100 mg in 12–47 months, 200 mg in ≥4 yr for 3 days along with standard treatment of diarrhea. Duration of diarrhea was the primary outcome measure. Results. The median duration (hrs of diarrhea (54 versus 80; 95% CI: –26 [–13.2 to –38.8] and hospitalization (68 versus 90; 95% CI: –22 [–12.98 to –31.02] was significantly shorter in the nitazoxanide group. No significant difference was seen in the median duration (hrs of fever or vomiting or the proportion of children requiring parenteral rehydration. There was no report of any adverse events. Conclusions. Oral nitazoxanide is effective and safe in the management of acute rotavirus diarrhea in Indian children (CTRI REF/2016/10/012507.

  5. Rotavirus epidemiology and surveillance before vaccine introduction in Argentina, 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degiuseppe, Juan Ignacio; Reale, Ezequiel Agustín; Stupka, Juan Andrés

    2017-03-01

    Group A Rotavirus has been widely described as one of the most important infantile diarrheal pathogens worldwide. In Argentina, it is responsible for over 200,000 acute diarrhea cases and from 30 to 50 deaths annually in children under 5 years. The aim of this study is to analyze frequency, seasonality, age group distribution, and circulating genotypes based on data notified in the 2012-2014 period and in turn to assess the pre-vaccine scenario, considering that rotavirus vaccine was introduced in 2015. Data were taken from the Viral Diarrhea Notification module of the Argentine SNVS-SIVILA surveillance tool. Analyses of circulating genotypes were performed on rotavirus-positive stool specimens by conventional binary characterization of the outermost capsid genes. Overall data showed rotavirus detection in about 25% of samples tested, and higher rates in children under 2 years old were observed. Rotavirus positive cases were distributed according to a typical winter seasonal pattern. A heterogeneous regional pattern of prevalence was also observed, with higher rates detected in the North region. Genotype co-circulation and annual fluctuation were observed. In general, G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], and G12P[8] were the most frequently detected genotypes. This study represents the last survey taken of a population considered to be naïve. J. Med. Virol. 89:423-428, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Rotavirus genotype distribution during the pre-vaccine period in Bolivia: 2007–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Rosario; Forney, Kristen; Castro, Maria René; Rebolledo, Paulina A.; Mamani, Nataniel; Patzi, Maritza; Halkyer, Percy; Leon, Juan S.; Iñiguez, Volga

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objectives Rotavirus is the most important etiology of severe diarrhea in Bolivia. The monovalent attenuated human oral rotavirus vaccine Rotarix® was introduced in Bolivia in 2008. We describe the molecular epidemiology of circulating rotavirus strains before vaccine introduction. Methods Two thousand one hundred thirty-five diarrheal samples were collected from hospitals in four Bolivian cities during 2007–2008. Forty-three percent (445 of 1030 rotavirus-positive samples) were analyzed for G and P genotypes. Among those, 331 were electropherotyped by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Disease severity was quantified using a modified Vesikari scale. Results Among the 445 samples, five genotypes were found to be prevalent: G9P[8] (33%), G1P[6] (17%), G2P[4] (13%), G9P[6] (12%), and G1P[8] (4%). Co-infections with two or more strains accounted for 14% of samples. The most prevalent strain, G9, showed greater electropherotype diversity compared to other serogroups. Strain G1P[6] generally infected younger children and peaked later in the year than other strains. No particular genotype was associated with a higher severity score, though there was a significant difference in the duration of diarrhea between genotypes. Conclusions During the 2-year pre-vaccine period, substantial diversity of rotavirus co-circulating strains was observed. These data constitute a baseline against which changes in circulating strains post-vaccine introduction can be monitored. PMID:23688547

  7. Understanding reduced rotavirus vaccine efficacy in low socio-economic settings.

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    Benjamin A Lopman

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rotavirus vaccine efficacy ranges from >90% in high socio-economic settings (SES to 50% in low SES. With the imminent introduction of rotavirus vaccine in low SES countries, understanding reasons for reduced efficacy in these settings could identify strategies to improve vaccine performance. METHODS: We developed a mathematical model to predict rotavirus vaccine efficacy in high, middle and low SES based on data specific for each setting on incidence, protection conferred by natural infection and immune response to vaccination. We then examined factors affecting efficacy. RESULTS: Vaccination was predicted to prevent 93%, 86% and 51% of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in high, middle and low SES, respectively. Also predicted was that vaccines are most effective against severe disease and efficacy declines with age in low but not high SES. Reduced immunogenicity of vaccination and reduced protection conferred by natural infection are the main factors that compromise efficacy in low SES. DISCUSSION: The continued risk of severe disease in non-primary natural infections in low SES is a key factor underpinning reduced efficacy of rotavirus vaccines. Predicted efficacy was remarkably consistent with observed clinical trial results from different SES, validating the model. The phenomenon of reduced vaccine efficacy can be predicted by intrinsic immunological and epidemiological factors of low SES populations. Modifying aspects of the vaccine (e.g. improving immunogenicity in low SES and vaccination program (e.g. additional doses may bring improvements.

  8. The Comparition of the Efficacy of Two Different Probiotics in Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children

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    Özlem Erdoğan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the study is to compare the clinical effectiveness of the probiotics—Saccharomyces boulardii and Bifidobacterium lactis—in children who had been diagnosed with rotavirus gastroenteritis. Materials and methods. Seventy five patients aged between 5 months–5 years diagnosed as rotavirus gastroenteritis were included in the study. The patients diagnosed as rotavirus gastroenteritis by latex agglutination test in stool were divided into 3 groups of twenty-five patients each: First group was given oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet with Saccharomyces boulardii (spp. I-745, second group was given oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet with Bifidobacterium lactis (spp. B94, culture number:∘118529 and third group received only oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet. Results. The duration of diarrhea was shorter in the group given oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet with Bifidobacterium lactis and Saccharomyces boulardii than the group given only oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet. Conclusion. Bifidobacterium lactis has a complemental role in the treatment of rotavirus gatroenteritis and other probiotics may also have a beneficial effect in rotavirus gastroenteritis compared with the therapy included only oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet.

  9. Changes in Childhood Diarrhea Incidence in Nicaragua Following 3 Years of Universal Infant Rotavirus Immunization

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    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Paniagua, Margarita; Dominik, Rosalie; Cao, Hongyuan; Shah, Naman K.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Moreno, Gilberto; Espinoza, Félix

    2011-01-01

    Background While the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine was highly efficacious against rotavirus diarrhea in clinical trials, the vaccine’s effectiveness under field conditions in the developing world is unclear. In October, 2006, Nicaragua became the first developing nation to implement universal infant immunization with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine. To assess the impact of the immunization program, we examined the incidence of diarrhea episodes between 2003 and 2009 among children in the state of León, Nicaragua. Methods We extracted data on diarrhea episodes from health ministry records. We used scaled Poisson regression models to estimate diarrhea incidence rate ratios (IRR) for the period following the program’s implementation to the period before implementation. Results Following implementation of the immunization program, diarrhea episodes among infants were reduced (IRR 0.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.71–1.02) during the rotavirus season, but appear to have increased during other months. Conclusions While the immunization program appears effective in reducing diarrhea episodes during the rotavirus season, a large burden of diarrhea persists during the remainder of the year. PMID:20881511

  10. Whole genome analysis of Vietnamese G2P[4] rotavirus strains possessing the NSP2 gene sharing an ancestral sequence with Chinese sheep and goat rotavirus strains.

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    Do, Loan Phuong; Doan, Yen Hai; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Gauchan, Punita; Kaneko, Miho; Agbemabiese, Chantal; Dang, Anh Duc; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2015-10-01

    Because imminent introduction into Vietnam of a vaccine against Rotavirus A is anticipated, baseline information on the whole genome of representative strains is needed to understand changes in circulating strains that may occur after vaccine introduction. In this study, the whole genomes of two G2P[4] strains detected in Nha Trang, Vietnam in 2008 were sequenced, this being the last period during which virtually no rotavirus vaccine was used in this country. The two strains were found to be >99.9% identical in sequence and had a typical DS-1 like G2-P[4]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 genotype constellation. Analysis of the Vietnamese strains with >184 G2P[4] strains retrieved from GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ DNA databases placed the Vietnamese strains in one of the lineages commonly found among contemporary strains, with the exception of the NSP2 and NSP4 genes. The NSP2 genes were found to belong to a previously undescribed lineage that diverged from Chinese sheep and goat rotavirus strains, including a Chinese rotavirus vaccine strain LLR with 95% nucleotide identity; the time of their most recent common ancestor was 1975. The NSP4 genes were found to belong, together with Thai and USA strains, to an emergent lineage (VIII), adding further diversity to ever diversifying NSP4 lineages. Thus, there is a need to enhance surveillance of locally-circulating strains from both children and animals at the whole genome level to address the effect of rotavirus vaccines on changing strain distribution.

  11. Breastfeeding and the risk of rotavirus diarrhea in hospitalized infants in Uganda: a matched case control study

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    Kalyango Joan N

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus is responsible for over 25 million outpatient visits, over 2 million hospitalizations and 527,000 deaths annually, worldwide. It is estimated that breastfeeding in accordance with the World Health Organization recommendations would save 1.45 million children's lives each year in the developing countries. The few studies that examined the effect of breastfeeding on rotavirus diarrhea produced conflicting results. This study aimed to determine the effect of breastfeeding on rotavirus diarrhea among admitted infants in Uganda. Methods The study was conducted in the Pediatrics medical emergency unit of a National Referral hospital during a peak incidence time for rotavirus from February to April 2008. It was an age matched case-control study with a ratio of 1:1. We consecutively enrolled infants presenting at the study site during this period whose caretakers consented to participate in the study. A minimum sample size of 90 pairs was adequate with power of 80% to detect a 30% decrease in breastfeeding rate among the cases assuming a breastfeeding rate of 80% in the controls. The infants with rotavirus positive results were the "cases". We used the commercial enzyme immunoassay kit (DAKO IDEIA™ rotavirus EIA detection kit to diagnose the cases. The "controls" were admitted children with no diarrhea. We compared the cases and controls for antecedent breastfeeding patterns. Results Ninety-one matched case-control age-matched pairs with an age caliper of one month were included in the analysis. Breastfeeding was not protective against rotavirus diarrhea (OR 1.08: 95% CI 0.52 - 2.25; p = 0.8 in the conditional logistic model. Conclusions Our study findings did not reveal breastfeeding as protective against rotavirus diarrhea in infants. This suggests searching for other complementary preventive methods such as rotavirus vaccination and zinc supplementation to reduce the problem of rotavirus diarrhea in infants

  12. Human Milk Contains Novel Glycans That Are Potential Decoy Receptors for Neonatal Rotaviruses*

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    Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Mickum, Megan L.; Ashline, David J.; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Estes, Mary K.; Reinhold, Vernon N.; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Human milk contains a rich set of soluble, reducing glycans whose functions and bioactivities are not well understood. Because human milk glycans (HMGs) have been implicated as receptors for various pathogens, we explored the functional glycome of human milk using shotgun glycomics. The free glycans from pooled milk samples of donors with mixed Lewis and Secretor phenotypes were labeled with a fluorescent tag and separated via multidimensional HPLC to generate a tagged glycan library containing 247 HMG targets that were printed to generate the HMG shotgun glycan microarray (SGM). To investigate the potential role of HMGs as decoy receptors for rotavirus (RV), a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in children, we interrogated the HMG SGM with recombinant forms of VP8* domains of the RV outer capsid spike protein VP4 from human neonatal strains N155(G10P[11]) and RV3(G3P[6]) and a bovine strain, B223(G10P[11]). Glycans that were bound by RV attachment proteins were selected for detailed structural analyses using metadata-assisted glycan sequencing, which compiles data on each glycan based on its binding by antibodies and lectins before and after exo- and endo-glycosidase digestion of the SGM, coupled with independent MSn analyses. These complementary structural approaches resulted in the identification of 32 glycans based on RV VP8* binding, many of which are novel HMGs, whose detailed structural assignments by MSn are described in a companion report. Although sialic acid has been thought to be important as a surface receptor for RVs, our studies indicated that sialic acid is not required for binding of glycans to individual VP8* domains. Remarkably, each VP8* recognized specific glycan determinants within a unique subset of related glycan structures where specificity differences arise from subtle differences in glycan structures. PMID:25048705

  13. Rotavirus: Enfermedad emergente de transmisión digestiva

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    María de los Angeles González Fernández

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Las enfermedades diarreicas agudas (EDA, constituyen una de las principales causas de morbilidad y mortalidad infantil al nivel mundial. En los últimos años han sido descubiertos algunos virus asociados con la producción de manifestaciones diarreicas, y esto se corrobora con la presencia de partículas virales observadas al microscopio electrónico en heces fecales de pacientes con episodios de diarreas. Entre los agentes virales asociados con enfermedad diarreicas, son los rotavirus los de mayor importancia médica, por lo que la detección, la identificación, los estudios de inmunización, así como la obtención de una vacuna para la prevención de este agente infeccioso, resultan de gran valor epidemiológico, puesto que la gastroenteritis viral es causa de deshidratación en casi aproximadamente 500 000 niños anualmente, tanto en países desarrollados como en subdesarrollados, y resulta en costos médicos directos de $ 264 millones y $ 1 billón de costos totales para la sociedad.Acute diarrheal diseases (ADD are one of the main causes of infant morbidity and mortality at the world level. Some viruses associated with the production of diarrheal manifestations have been discovered in the last years. It is corroborated with the presence of viral particles observed on the electronic microscope in stools from patients with episodes of diarrhea. Among the viral agents associated with diarrheal diseases, the rotaviruses are the most important from the medical point of view. Therefore, the detection, identification, immunization studies, as well as the obtention of a vaccine for the prevention of these infectious agents are of great epidemiological value, since viral gastroenteritis causes dehydration in approximately 500 000 children annually, both in developed and underdeveloped countries, which result in direct medical costs of $264 million and $ 1 billion of total costs for society.

  14. Unexpected detection of animal VP7 genes among common rotavirus strains isolated from children in Mexico.

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    Laird, A R; Ibarra, V; Ruiz-Palacios, G; Guerrero, M L; Glass, R I; Gentsch, J R

    2003-09-01

    In the course of characterizing 103 rotaviruses from children in Mexico, we found that the majority of strains were globally common types (55.4% of total), while uncommon types represented 5.7%, mixed infections with common types represented 14.8%, and partially or fully nontypeable isolates represented about 24%. Serotype G9 was detected for the first time in Mexico. We sequenced a subset of strains that were G nontypeable by reverse transcriptase PCR and found surprisingly that two strains having common human rotavirus P genotypes (8 and 6) had serotype G3 and G4 VP7 gene sequences that shared closer homology with canine and porcine strains, respectively, than with human strains, suggesting that these isolates represented reassortants between human and animal rotaviruses.

  15. Out-of-pocket costs associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia.

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    Chai, P F; Lee, W S

    2009-11-20

    From August 2006 to July 2007 a prospective study of out-of-pocket costs incurred by care-givers of children hospitalized for rotavirus gastroenteritis was conducted in a hospital in Malaysia. Data on caretaker out-of-pocket costs were collected from 260 children hospitalized with diarrhoea. A stool sample was collected from 198 of these children of which 46 (23%) were positive for rotavirus by latex agglutination assay. The mean (median; interquartile range) out-of-pocket cost incurred by the care-givers was US$194 (US$169; US$47-738), constituting 26% of average monthly income of the households surveyed. Major components of the cost were hospital expenses (45%) and productivity loss (37%). These findings will allow further assessment of the cost-effectiveness of any future rotavirus immunization program in Malaysia.

  16. A Systems Survey of Progressive Host-Cell Reorganization during Rotavirus Infection.

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    Green, Victoria A; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2016-07-13

    Pathogen invasion is often accompanied by widespread alterations in cellular physiology, which reflects the hijacking of host factors and processes for pathogen entry and replication. Although genetic perturbation screens have revealed the complexity of host factors involved for numerous pathogens, it has remained challenging to temporally define the progression of events in host cell reorganization during infection. We combine high-confidence genome-scale RNAi screening of host factors required for rotavirus infection in human intestinal cells with an innovative approach to infer the trajectory of virus infection from fixed cell populations. This approach reveals a comprehensive network of host cellular processes involved in rotavirus infection and implicates AMPK in initiating the development of a rotavirus-permissive environment. Our work provides a powerful approach that can be generalized to order complex host cellular requirements along a trajectory of cellular reorganization during pathogen invasion.

  17. Simultaneous Detection of Group A Rotavirus in Swine and Rat on a Pig Farm in Brazil

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    Paloma de Oliveira Tonietti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the occurrence of rotavirus in porcine and Rattus norvegicus, at the same time, on a pig farm in the city of Jaguariúna, São Paulo, Brazil. Swine ( and rat ( fecal samples were analyzed by nested RT-PCR assay. Rotavirus occurred in seven porcine and two rat samples. A total of three pig and one rat samples were further submitted to genetic sequencing. The partial NSP5 gene phylogeny showed that all strains were segregated in the genotype H1. These results point toward a cross-species transmission between rats and pigs on the surveyed farm and represent the first detection of rotavirus in Rattus norvegicus in Brazil.

  18. Inclusion of a universal tetanus toxoid CD4(+) T cell epitope P2 significantly enhanced the immunogenicity of recombinant rotavirus ΔVP8* subunit parenteral vaccines.

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    Wen, Xiaobo; Wen, Ke; Cao, Dianjun; Li, Guohua; Jones, Ronald W; Li, Jianping; Szu, Shousun; Hoshino, Yasutaka; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-07-31

    Currently available live oral rotavirus vaccines, Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®), are highly efficacious in developed countries. However, the immunogenicity and efficacy of such vaccines in some developing countries are low. We reported previously that bacterially-expressed rotavirus ΔVP8* subunit vaccine candidates with P[8], P[4] or P[6] specificity elicited high-titer virus neutralizing antibodies in animals immunized intramuscularly. Of note was the finding that antibodies induced with the P[8]ΔVP8* vaccine neutralized both homotypic P[8] and heterotypic P[4] rotavirus strains to high titer. To further improve its vaccine potential, a tetanus toxoid universal CD4(+) T cell epitope P2 was introduced into P[8] or P[6]ΔVP8* construct. The resulting recombinant fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli were of high solubility and were produced with high yield. Two doses (10 or 20 μg/dose) of the P2-P[8]ΔVP8* vaccine or P2-P[6]ΔVP8* vaccine with aluminum phosphate adjuvant elicited significantly higher geometric mean homologous neutralizing antibody titers than the vaccines without P2 in intramuscularly immunized guinea pigs. Interestingly, high levels of neutralizing antibody responses induced in guinea pigs with 3 doses of the P2-P[8]ΔVP8* vaccine persisted for at least 6 months. Furthermore, in the gnotobiotic piglet challenge study, three intramuscular doses (50 μg/dose) of the P2-P[8]ΔVP8* vaccine with aluminum phosphate adjuvant significantly delayed the onset of diarrhea and significantly reduced the duration of diarrhea and the cumulative diarrhea score after oral challenge with virulent human rotavirus Wa (G1P[8]) strain. The P2-P[8]ΔVP8* vaccine induced serum virus neutralizing antibody and VP4-specific IgG antibody production prechallenge, and primed the pigs for higher antibody and intestinal and systemic virus-specific IFN-γ producing CD4(+) T cell responses postchallenge. These two subunit vaccines could be used at a minimum singly or

  19. An evaluation of the inhibitory effects against rotavirus infection of edible plant extracts

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    Knipping Karen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotaviruses are the single most important cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. The developments of specific, potent and accessible antiviral treatments that restrain rotavirus infection remain important to control rotavirus disease. Methods 150 plant extracts with nutritional applications were screened in vitro on MA-104 cells for their antiviral activity against rhesus rotavirus (RRV. One extract (Aspalathus linearis (Burm.f. R.Dahlgren was also tested for its effect on the loss of transepithelial resistance (TER of Caco-2 cells caused by simian rotavirus (SA-11 infection. Results Aqueous extracts of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. fruit, Urtica dioica L. root, Aspalathus linearis (Burm.f. R.Dahlgren leaves, Glycyrrhiza glabra L. root and Olea europaea L. leaves were found to have strong significant antiviral activity with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 Glycyrrhiza glabra was found to have the strongest antiviral activity (IC50 46 μM, followed by luteolin and vitexin from Aspalathus linearis (IC50 respectively 116 μM and 129 μM and apigenin-7-O-glucoside from Melissa officinalis (IC50 150 μM. A combination of Glycyrrhiza glabra L. + Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. and Urtica dioica L. + Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. showed synergy in their anti-viral activities. Aspalathus linearis (Burm.f. R.Dahlgren showed no positive effect on the maintenance of the TER. Conclusions These results indicate that nutritional intervention with extracts of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn., Aspalathus linearis (Burm.f. R.Dahlgren, Urtica dioica L., Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and Olea europaea L. might be useful in the treatment of diarrhea caused by rotavirus infection.

  20. Molecular epidemiology and surveillance of circulating rotavirus and adenovirus in Congolese children with gastroenteritis.

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    Mayindou, Gontran; Ngokana, Berge; Sidibé, Anissa; Moundélé, Victoire; Koukouikila-Koussounda, Felix; Christevy Vouvoungui, Jeannhey; Kwedi Nolna, Sylvie; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; Ntoumi, Francine

    2016-04-01

    Infectious Diarrhea caused by rotavirus and adenovirus, is a leading cause of death in children in sub-Sahara Africa but there is limited published data on the diverse rotavirus genotypes and adenovirus serotypes circulating in the Republic of Congo. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of severe diarrhea caused by rotavirus A (RVA) and Adenovirus serotype 40 and 41 in Congolese children hospitalized with severe gastroenteritis. Stool samples were collected from 655 Congolese children less than 60 months of age hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis between June 2012 and June 2013. Rotavirus and adenovirus antigens were tested using commercially available ELISA kits and the RVA G- and P- genotypes were identified by seminested multiplex RT-PCR. Three hundred and four (46.4%) children were tested positive for RVA. Adenovirus infection was found in 5.5% of the 564 tested children. Rotavirus infection was frequently observed in children between 6-12 months (55.9%). The dry season months recorded increased RVA infection while no seasonality of adenovirus infection was demonstrated. The most common RVA genotypes were G1 (57.5%), G2 (6.4%), G1G2 mixture (15.5%), P[8] (58%), P[6] (13.2%), and P[8]P[6] mixture (26%). Additionally, the genotype G12P[6] was significantly associated with increased vomiting. This first study on Congolese children demonstrates a high prevalence and clinical significance of existing rotavirus genotypes. Adenovirus prevalence is similar to that of other Central African countries. This baseline epidemiology and molecular characterization study will contribute significantly to the RVA surveillance after vaccine implementation in the country.

  1. Evaluating the potential risks and benefits of infant rotavirus vaccination in England.

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    Clark, Andy; Jit, Mark; Andrews, Nick; Atchison, Christina; Edmunds, W John; Sanderson, Colin

    2014-06-17

    Rotarix(®), a vaccine for the prevention of gastroenteritis in young children, was introduced in England in July 2013. At around this time, an elevated risk of intussusception (a cause of bowel obstruction) was reported among infants vaccinated in Australia and the USA. A risk-benefit analysis compared potential vaccine-related risks (additional intussusception admissions and deaths) with estimated vaccine benefits (prevented rotavirus general practitioner visits, emergency visits, admissions and deaths) in the 2012 birth cohort. Detailed data from England included the incidence of intussusception events aged <2 years by week of age, the coverage of vaccination aged <2 years by week of age, and the incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) events aged <5 years by week of age. Recent estimates of vaccine-related risk from Australia were applied during the 1-21 day period after the first and second dose of vaccination. Rotarix(®) is estimated to cause one additional intussusception admission in every 18,551 vaccinated English infants (5th and 95th percentiles, 6728-93,952), equivalent to 35 (7-98) additional intussusception admissions each year. The vaccine is estimated to prevent three rotavirus deaths, 13,000 rotavirus admissions, 27,000 rotavirus emergency visits and 74,000 rotavirus GP consultations in children aged <5 years, and lead to annual savings of over £11 million, each year. We estimate 375 (136-1900) fewer RVGE admissions for every additional intussusception admission, and 88 (18-852) fewer RVGE deaths for every additional intussusception death. The estimated benefits of Rotarix(®) vaccination would greatly exceed the potential risk in England.

  2. Physicochemical stability and inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses.

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    Meng, Z D; Birch, C; Heath, R; Gust, I

    1987-04-01

    The effects of various physical and chemical treatments on the stability of a human serotype 1 rotavirus and simian agent 11 (SA11) were compared by using a fluorescence focus assay. The infectivity of both strains was retained after storage at room temperature for 14 days, 4 degree C for 22 days, and -20 degree C for 32 days; lyophilization; and treatment at pH 3 to 11. Both viruses were inactivated at pH 12, as was the human virus at pH 2, although this pH resulted in only partial inactivation of SA11. The human virus also appeared to be more sensitive than SA11 to the action of ether and chloroform. The infectivity of both viruses was lost after UV irradiation for 15 min and after treatment with 8% formaldehyde for 5 min, 70% (vol/vol) ethanol for 30 min, and 2% lysol, 2% phenol, and 1% H2O2 for 1 h each.

  3. Physicochemical stability and inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses

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    Meng, Z.D.; Birch, C.; Heath, R.; Gust, I.

    1987-04-01

    The effects of various physical and chemical treatments on the stability of a human serotype 1 rotavirus and simian agent 11 (SA11) were compared by using a fluorescence focus assay. The infectivity of both strains was retained after storage at room temperature for 14 days, 4 degree C for 22 days, and -20 degree C for 32 days; lyophilization; and treatment at pH 3 to 11. Both viruses were inactivated at pH 12, as was the human virus at pH 2, although this pH resulted in only partial inactivation of SA11. The human virus also appeared to be more sensitive than SA11 to the action of ether and chloroform. The infectivity of both viruses was lost after UV irradiation for 15 min and after treatment with 8% formaldehyde for 5 min, 70% (vol/vol) ethanol for 30 min, and 2% lysol, 2% phenol, and 1% H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ for 1 h each.

  4. Global Occurrence and Emission of Rotaviruses to Surface Waters

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    Nicholas M. Kiulia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Group A rotaviruses (RV are the major cause of acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children globally. Waterborne transmission of RV and the presence of RV in water sources are of major public health importance. In this paper, we present the Global Waterborne Pathogen model for RV (GloWPa-Rota model to estimate the global distribution of RV emissions to surface water. To our knowledge, this is the first model to do so. We review the literature to estimate three RV specific variables for the model: incidence, excretion rate and removal during wastewater treatment. We estimate total global RV emissions to be 2 × 1018 viral particles/grid/year, of which 87% is produced by the urban population. Hotspot regions with high RV emissions are urban areas in densely populated parts of the world, such as Bangladesh and Nigeria, while low emissions are found in rural areas in North Russia and the Australian desert. Even for industrialized regions with high population density and without tertiary treatment, such as the UK, substantial emissions are estimated. Modeling exercises like the one presented in this paper provide unique opportunities to further study these emissions to surface water, their sources and scenarios for improved management.

  5. Porcine Rotaviruses: Epidemiology, Immune Responses and Control Strategies

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    Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Amimo, Joshua O.; Saif, Linda J.

    2017-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are a major cause of acute viral gastroenteritis in young animals and children worldwide. Immunocompetent adults of different species become resistant to clinical disease due to post-infection immunity, immune system maturation and gut physiological changes. Of the 9 RV genogroups (A–I), RV A, B, and C (RVA, RVB, and RVC, respectively) are associated with diarrhea in piglets. Although discovered decades ago, porcine genogroup E RVs (RVE) are uncommon and their pathogenesis is not studied well. The presence of porcine RV H (RVH), a newly defined distinct genogroup, was recently confirmed in diarrheic pigs in Japan, Brazil, and the US. The complex epidemiology, pathogenicity and high genetic diversity of porcine RVAs are widely recognized and well-studied. More recent data show a significant genetic diversity based on the VP7 gene analysis of RVB and C strains in pigs. In this review, we will summarize previous and recent research to provide insights on historic and current prevalence and genetic diversity of porcine RVs in different geographic regions and production systems. We will also provide a brief overview of immune responses to porcine RVs, available control strategies and zoonotic potential of different RV genotypes. An improved understanding of the above parameters may lead to the development of more optimal strategies to manage RV diarrheal disease in swine and humans. PMID:28335454

  6. Seroprevalence of Rotavirus infection in pig population of Arunachal Pradesh

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    Garam, G. B.; Bora, D. P.; Borah, B.; Bora, M.; Das, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to find out the seroprevalence of Rotavirus(RV) infection among the pig population of Arunachal Pradesh. Materials and Methods: Serums samples were collected from piglets of age ranging from 1 week to 6 months and the sows associated with the piglets that were reared under organized and unorganized system of management in six different districts of Arunachal Pradesh. The prevalence of RV specific antibodies was detected using a polyclonal antibody-based indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (i-ELISA). Results: The study revealed that out of 394 serum samples, 255 (64.72%) samples were found to be positive for RV-specific antibody in i-ELISA. Considering the samples from different districts, Papumpare district of Arunachal Pradesh showed highest numbers of seropositive animals (68.75%) followed by upper Subansiri (64.91%) while West Siang district showed lowest positivity rate (61.22%). Conclusion: As considerable seropositivity was recorded among pig population of Arunachal Pradesh in this study, there is urgent need to establish high-impact and cost-effective public health intervention tools, key among them being the introduction of strict hygiene practice and RV vaccination program, to greatly reduce the number of deaths due to diarrheal diseases. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report on the prevalence of RV infection from pigs of Arunachal Pradesh. PMID:27956785

  7. Removing the age restrictions for rotavirus vaccination: a benefit-risk modeling analysis.

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    Patel, Manish M; Clark, Andrew D; Sanderson, Colin F B; Tate, Jacqueline; Parashar, Umesh D

    2012-01-01

    To minimize potential risk of intussusception, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended in 2009 that rotavirus immunization should be initiated by age 15 weeks and completed before 32 weeks. These restrictions could adversely impact vaccination coverage and thereby its health impact, particularly in developing countries where delays in vaccination often occur. We conducted a modeling study to estimate the number of rotavirus deaths prevented and the number of intussusception deaths caused by vaccination when administered on the restricted schedule versus an unrestricted schedule whereby rotavirus vaccine would be administered with DTP vaccine up to age 3 years. Countries were grouped on the basis of child mortality rates, using WHO data. Inputs were estimates of WHO rotavirus mortality by week of age from a recent study, intussusception mortality based on a literature review, predicted vaccination rates by week of age from USAID Demographic and Health Surveys, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS), and WHO-UNICEF 2010 country-specific coverage estimates, and published estimates of vaccine efficacy and vaccine-associated intussusception risk. On the basis of the error estimates and distributions for model inputs, we conducted 2,000 simulations to obtain median estimates of deaths averted and caused as well as the uncertainty ranges, defined as the 5th-95th percentile, to provide an indication of the uncertainty in the estimates. We estimated that in low and low-middle income countries a restricted schedule would prevent 155,800 rotavirus deaths (5th-95th centiles, 83,300-217,700) while causing potentially 253 intussusception deaths (76-689). In contrast, vaccination without age restrictions would prevent 203,000 rotavirus deaths (102,000-281,500) while potentially causing 547 intussusception deaths (237-1,160). Thus, removing the age restrictions would avert an additional 47,200 rotavirus deaths (18

  8. [Application of immunospecific drug in the treatment of rotavirus gastroenteritis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeets, A V; Piskunova, S L; Beniova, S N; Chernikova, A A; Zhidkov, E M

    2013-01-01

    The case records of 120 children older than 4 years with rotavirus infection have been studied. In this group, 22 patients received basic therapy and 98 received complex therapy with cycloferon. Appropriate therapy resulted in rapid positive dynamics of clinical symptoms, the disease outcomes have been improved. Cytokine reaction has been studied as dependent on the treatment method. Positive dynamics of clinical symptoms and cytokine level has been revealed in a group of children having received cycloferon. It is recommended to include cycloferon in the basic therapy of rotavirus diarrhea in children.

  9. Incidence of nosocomial rotavirus infections, symptomatic and asymptomatic, in breast-fed and non-breast-fed infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianino, P; Mastretta, E; Longo, P; Laccisaglia, A; Sartore, M; Russo, R; Mazzaccara, A

    2002-01-01

    Rotavirus is one of the most important aetiological agents of nosocomial infections in childhood. We studied the incidence of nosocomial rotavirus infections in 420 patients (age range 1-18 months) consecutively admitted from 1 December 1999 to 31 May 2000 to the infant ward of the Department of Paediatrics, University of Turin. We also evaluated the protective effect of breast feeding. Faecal specimens were collected from every child (whether developing diarrhoeic symptoms or not) and tested for rotavirus during hospitalization and 72 h after discharge. The incidence of rotavirus nosocomial infections was 27.7%. The incidence of symptomatic nosocomial infections was 16.8%, and the incidence of asymptomatic infections was 10.9%. The attack rate of the infections that occurred during hospitalization was 11.8%, while for those occurring after discharge, it was 15.9%. Rotavirus infection, on average, prolonged hospital stay from 5.2 to 6.4 days. 10.6% of breast-fed infants and 32.4% of non-breast-fed infants contracted rotavirus infection (P<0.005). None of the breast-fed infants who contracted rotavirus infection developed diarrhoeic symptoms.

  10. Rotavirus infection in children and adult patients attending in a tertiary Hospital of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Carraro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available During the period of January 2003 to December 2005, 3,768 stool samples were received in the Microbiology Laboratory for rotavirus antigen detection from outpatients and inpatients of Albert Einstein Hospital, SP. Fresh stool samples from children and adults were analyzed by two methodologies: during 2003 and 2004 by latex agglutination (Slidex Rotavirus, Biomerieux and 2005 by an immunochromatographic assay for the combined detection of rotavirus and adenovirus (Vikia Rota-Adeno, Biomerieux. Rotavirus group A was detected in 755 (20% samples. The annual prevalence was 19.8% in 2003, 21.7% in 2004, and 18.7% in 2005. Rotavirus was detected every month during the period of the study, with peak of positivity between June and August (>35%. The prevalence in hospitalized patients was 26.1% (352/1,350 and in outpatients was 16.7% (403/2,418. For hospitalized patients most of the rotavirus infections were diagnosed in Pediatric setting, age range of 0 to 10 years (prevalence of 55.3%, 295/534. Overall positivity was up to 30% in patients between six months and five years of age (67% of all positive patients, all other age groups had at least 10% positive tests. Rotavirus infection is common in Sao Paulo, and besides the expected higher frequency in children it is also frequent in adults.

  11. Risk factors for hospital admission of Brazilian children with non-rotavirus diarrhoea: a case control-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Maria Yury T; Rodrigues, Laura C; Santos, Carlos A S T; Teixeira, Maria da Glória L C; Barreto, Mauricio L

    2015-07-01

    Rotavirus has been the leading cause of severe cases of acute diarrhoea (AD) among children worldwide; however, in the same areas, a large reduction in AD related to rotavirus has been observed after the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine. In Brazil, where there is a high rotavirus vaccine coverage, AD caused by pathogens other than rotavirus is still a frequent cause of outpatient visits and hospitalisations among children under 5 years. A hospital-based case-control study enrolled children aged 4 to 24 months admitted to 10 hospitals from all five Brazilian Regions. Cases (n=1178) were children admitted with diarrhoea who tested negative for rotavirus in a stool sample. Controls (n=2515) were children admitted without diarrhoea, frequency matched to cases by sex and age group. We estimated odds ratios using logistic regression, in a hierarchical approach according to a previously defined conceptual framework. Population-attributable fractions (PAF) were estimated for each variable, each block and for all significant variables in the latter model adjusted. The factors studied accounted for 41% of the non-rotavirus AD hospital admissions and the main risk factors included lack of adequate excreta disposal (PAF=12%), untreated drinking water (PAF=11%) and a history of previous hospitalization due to AD (PAF=21%). Low socio-economic conditions, no public water supply, crowding and low weight-for-age made smaller contributions. These findings further our knowledge of risk factors associated with severe AD in the post-rotavirus vaccination era. We recommend further increase in coverage of basic sanitation, improvements in water quality and further expansion of primary healthcare coverage to reduce the occurrence of non-rotavirus severe diarrhoea and subsequent hospitalization of Brazilian children. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e

  12. Identificação por contraimunoeletroforese de rotavirus em casos de diarréia infantil Detection of rotavirus by counterimmunoelectrophoresis in cases of infantile diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. N. Candeias

    1978-03-01

    Full Text Available Os resultados obtidos na identificação de rotavirus, usando a técnica da contraimunoeletroforese, com 162 amostras de feses de crianças com quadros diarréicos agudos, mostram uma distribuição percentual de positividade de 72,7%, 77,7% e 66,6% em diferentes grupos etários de 6 a 8 meses até um ano de idade.The faecal samples of 162 children with acute diarrhea were tested by counterimmunoelectrophoresis in order to detect rotaviruses. In 72.7%, 77.7% and 66.6% of samples from children of different age groups, varying from 6 to 8 months to 1 year or older, a positive result was found.

  13. Characterization of full-length and polymerase chain reaction-derived partial-length Gottfried and OSU gene 4 probes for serotypic differentiation of porcine rotaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, B I; Parwani, A V; Gorziglia, M; Larralde, G; Saif, L J

    1992-01-01

    To determine the VP4 (P type) specificity of porcine rotaviruses, full- and partial-length gene 4 probes were produced from cloned Gottfried and OSU porcine rotavirus genomic segment 4 cDNAs. The gene 4 segments from the prototype Gottfried (VP7 serotype 4) and OSU (VP7 serotype 5) porcine rotavirus strains were selected for study because of their distinct P types and the occurrence of rotaviruses with similar serotypes among swine. Partial-length gene 4 cDNAs were produced and amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and encompassed portions of the variable region (nucleotides 211 to 612) of VP8 encoded by genomic segment 4. The hybridization stringency conditions necessary for optimal probe specificity and sensitivity were determined by dot or Northern (RNA) blot hybridizations against a diverse group of human and animal rotaviruses of heterologous group A serotypes and against representative group B and C porcine rotaviruses. The PCR-derived gene 4 probes were more specific than the full-length gene 4 probes but demonstrated equivalent sensitivity. The Gottfried PCR-derived probe hybridized with Gottfried, SB2, SB3, and SB5 G serotype 4 porcine rotaviruses. The OSU PCR-derived probe hybridized with OSU, EE, A580, and SB-1A porcine rotaviruses and equine H1 rotavirus. Results of the hybridization reactions of the PCR-derived gene 4 probes with selected porcine rotavirus strains agreed with previous serological or genetic analyses, indicating their suitability as diagnostic reagents. Images PMID:1328281

  14. Incidence and clinical manifestations of rotavirus infection among children with acute diarrhea admitted at Buri Ram Hospital, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungkapalee, Thrissawan; Puntukosit, Puntawee; Eunsuwan, Orapun; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Chongsrisawat, Voranush; Poovorawan, Yong

    2006-11-01

    To study the incidence and clinical manifestations of rotavirus among children at Buri Ram Hospital, admitted with the diagnosis of acute diarrhea between November 2005 and February 2006. In the course of a cross sectional descriptive study, 103 stool samples obtained from inpatients below the age of 5 years were examined for rotavirus by RT- PCR. Data on clinical manifestations, complications, administration of antibiotics, length of admission and hospital cost were obtained by means of questionnaires distributed among physicians. The statistics used were presented as percentage, mean and 95% confidence interval, while chi-square and unpaired t-test were used to establish significant differences at p < 0.05. Rotavirus was detected in 45 of 103 stool samples (43.68%, 95%CI = 33.93, 53.81). No significant differences were found between clinical manifestations of children with rotavirus infection and non-rotavirus infection as both groups displayed acute watery diarrhea (p = 0.33), fever (p = 0.80), nausea or vomiting (p = 0.08), predominant lymphocytes (p = 0.54), absence of red blood cells (p = 0.63) or white blood cells (p = 0.57) in the stool examination, moderate or severe dehydration (p = 0.06), lactose intolerance (p = 0.41), hypokalemia (p = 0.55), metabolic acidosis (0.18) Administration of antibiotics was significantly reduced for treatment of rotavirus acute diarrhea (31.1% vs 63.8%, p = 0.001). Hospital cost and length of admission were significantly reduced in rotavirus acute diarrhea (1,845.04 baht vs 2,297.00 baht, p < 0.01) (2.09 days vs 2.81 days, p < 0.001). Compared to previous studies, no differences were found in the percentage of rotavirus acute diarrhea. Rotavirus infection is a major cause for hospitalization of children below the age of 5 years with acute diarrhea. Clinical characteristics of rotavirus acute diarrhea were not significantly different from those due to other etiologies. Diagnosis of rotavirus infection should be based on

  15. A qualitative assessment of factors influencing acceptance of a new rotavirus vaccine among health care providers and consumers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manish M Patel, Alan P Janssen, Richard Tardif, Mark Herring, Umesh Parashar

    2007-10-18

    In 2006, a new rotavirus vaccine (RotaTeq) was licensed in the US and recommended for routine immunization of all US infants. Because a previously licensed vaccine (Rotashield) was withdrawn from the US for safety concerns, identifying barriers to uptake of RotaTeq will help develop strategies to broaden vaccine coverage. Our qualitative assessment provides complementary data to recent quantitative surveys and suggests that physicians and parents are likely to adopt the newly licensed rotavirus vaccine. Increasing parental awareness of the rotavirus disease burden and providing physicians with timely post-marketing surveillance data will be integral to a successful vaccination program.

  16. Dietary rice bran protects against rotavirus diarrhea and promotes Th1-type immune responses to human rotavirus vaccine in gnotobiotic pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingdong; Wen, Ke; Tin, Christine; Li, Guohua; Wang, Haifeng; Kocher, Jacob; Pelzer, Kevin; Ryan, Elizabeth; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-10-01

    Rice bran (RB) contains a distinct stoichiometry of phytochemicals that can promote gut mucosal immune responses against enteric pathogens. The effects of RB on rotavirus diarrhea and immunogenicity of an attenuated human rotavirus (HRV) vaccine were evaluated in gnotobiotic pigs. The four treatment groups studied were RB plus vaccine, vaccine only, RB only, and mock control. Pigs in the RB groups were fed the amount of RB that replaced 10% of the pigs' total daily calorie intake from milk starting from 5 days of age until they were euthanized. Pigs in the vaccine groups were orally inoculated with two doses of the attenuated HRV vaccine. A subset of pigs from each group was orally challenged with the homologous virulent HRV on postinoculation day 28. Diarrhea and virus shedding were monitored daily from postchallenge day 0 to day 7. RB feeding significantly protected against diarrhea upon virulent HRV challenge and enhanced the protective rate of the vaccine against rotavirus diarrhea. Consistent with protection, RB significantly increased gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses in intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues. Furthermore, RB also increased the number of total IgM- and IgA-secreting cells, total serum IgM, IgG, and IgA titers, and HRV-specific IgA titers in intestinal contents. RB reduced the numbers of intestinal and systemic HRV-specific IgA and IgG antibody-secreting cells and reduced serum HRV-specific IgA and IgG antibody titers before the challenge. These results demonstrate clear beneficial effects of RB in protection against rotavirus diarrhea and stimulation of nonspecific and HRV-specific immune responses, as well as its biased Th1-type adjuvant effect for the vaccine.

  17. Infecções e reinfecções por Rotavirus A: genotipagem e implicações vacinais Rotavirus A infections and reinfections: genotyping and vaccine implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo S. S. Costa

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Identificar Rotavirus A em crianças com diarréia aguda, determinando os genótipos G e P prevalentes e avaliar a ocorrência de infecções e reinfecções por rotavírus do grupo A em crianças. MÉTODOS: Foram estudadas, prospectivamente, crianças com doença diarréica aguda e identificação de Rotavirus A em Goiânia (GO, durante o período de julho de 2000 a outubro de 2002. Igual número de crianças, pareadas por idade e sexo, que não apresentavam diarréia aguda e sem identificação de rotavírus nas amostras fecais à admissão ao estudo, representou o grupo controle. Foram analisadas a ocorrência de infecções ou reinfecções sintomáticas ou assintomáticas por rotavírus durante o período de estudo, durante um ano de seguimento em ambos os grupos. Todas as amostras positivas foram submetidas a genotipagem G e P através das reações de RT-PCR e Nested PCR. RESULTADOS: A infecção por rotavírus ocorreu em 37,2% (77 de 207 amostras fecais das crianças com diarréia aguda durante o período do estudo. Os genótipos G e P identificados foram, simultaneamente: G1 (62,3%, G9 (34,4% e G4 (3,3% e P[8] (59%, P[6] (7,7%, P[6]+P[8] (23,1%, P[4]+P[8] (7,7% e P[4]+P[6] (2,6%. As associações de genótipos G e P identificados durante o estudo foram: G1P[8] (77,8%, G9P[8] (11,1%, G4P[8] (5,6% e G1P[6] (5,6%. Não houve reinfecção por rotavírus nos pacientes do grupo Rotavirus A (+ durante o período de seguimento, enquanto duas crianças do grupo controle apresentaram infecções sintomáticas por rotavírus durante o mesmo período. CONCLUSÕES: Os genótipos G e P predominantes correspondem aos das candidatas atuais à vacina contra rotavírus. Não houve reinfecção por rotavírus pelo período de um ano em relação a todos os genótipos identificados.OBJECTIVE: To identify rotavirus A and the most prevalent G and P genotypes in children with acute diarrhea, and to the describe the occurrence of rotavirus infection

  18. Significant Correlation Between the Infant Gut Microbiome and Rotavirus Vaccine Response in Rural Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, Vanessa C.; Armah, George; Fuentes Enriquez de Salamanca, Susana; Korpela, Katri E.; Parashar, Umesh; Victor, John C.; Tate, Jacqueline; Weerth, de Carolina; Giaquinto, Carlo; Wiersinga, Willem Joost; Lewis, Kristen D.C.; Vos, de Willem M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Rotavirus (RV) is the leading cause of diarrhea-related death in children worldwide and 95% of RV-associated deaths occur in Africa and Asia where RV vaccines (RVVs) have lower efficacy. We hypothesize that differences in intestinal microbiome composition correlate with the decreased

  19. Peculiarities of rotavirus infection in children with different genotypes of the lactase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abaturov A.E.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to study the peculiarities of rotavirus infection in children with various genotypes of the lactase gene LCT. Molecular genetic studies of LCT13910 gene polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction with electrophoretic detection were determined in the Institute of Genetic and Immunological basis of pathology and pharmacogenetics of "Ukrainian Medical Stomatological Academy", Poltava. According to the results of molecular genetic studies, all children were divided into three groups: the first group included 45 children with genotype C/C-13910, the second - 22 children with genotype C/T-13910, the third - 3 chil¬d¬ren with genotype T/T-13910. It is proved that in infants with rotavirus, the most common (63% is genotype C/C-13910 of LCT gene. It is shown that a less severe form of the disease, which in most cases occurs without fever, a less duration of vomiting syndrome, a high incidence of respiratory syndrome, a less duration of illness are the peculiarities of rotavirus infection in children with genotype C/C-13910 LCT gene. Tendency to severe course with febrile fever, severe diarrhea, a high frequency of occurrence of expressed ketone blood syndrome, longer duration of disease may be considered to be features of rotavirus infection course in children with genotype C/T-13910 LCT gene.

  20. Prevention of surface-to-human transmission of rotaviruses by treatment with disinfectant spray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, R L; Bernstein, D I; Knowlton, D R; Sherwood, J R; Young, E C; Cusack, T M; Rubino, J R; Schiff, G M

    1991-09-01

    A model was developed to examine the effects of disinfectants on the transmission of infectious rotavirus from a dried surface to humans. The initial experiments were designed to find a method of preserving rotavirus infectivity during drying. Culture-adapted human rotavirus (CJN strain) was dried at room temperature in different organic suspensions, including fecal matter, several laboratory media, and nonfat dry milk (NDM). Recoveries of infectious virus were then compared. Fecal matter provided little protection in this study relative to distilled water, but the other suspensions were quite protective, especially NDM, which consistently allowed recoveries of greater than 50%. When 10(3) focus-forming units of unpassaged CJN virus were dried in NDM and administered to subjects who licked the dried material, 100% (8 of 8) became infected. The effect of Lysol brand disinfectant spray (LDS) was next examined. Although NDM provided some protection against inactivation by LDS, spraying under conditions recommended by the manufacturer consistently caused the CJN virus titer to decrease greater than 5 log10. Consumption of CJN virus (10(3) focus-forming units) sprayed with LDS caused no infection in 14 subjects, whereas 13 of 14 subjects who consumed the unsprayed virus became infected (P less than 0.00001). The methods developed in this study could be used to test the effects of other disinfectants on the spread of infectious rotavirus from inanimate surfaces to humans.

  1. Isolation and propagation of the animal rotaviruses in MA-104 cells--30 years of practical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Peter H; Reetz, Jochen; Eichhorn, Werner; Herbst, Werner; Elschner, Mandy C

    2015-10-01

    A total of 136 rotavirus positive samples from diarrhoeic animals of different species were submitted for isolation and cultural propagation of rotavirus on MA-104 cells. The samples were collected from animals with diarrhoea, between 1980 and 2010, originating from herds or farms located in several parts of Germany. Rotaviruses of species A were isolated from 102 faecal samples in cultures of MA-104 cells under the following conditions: pre-treatment of virus with trypsin, incorporation of trypsin into culture medium, use of roller cultures, and centrifugation of the samples on the cells. The cell culture adapted viruses produced a cytopathic effect, accompanied by the release of cells from the glass surface of the cultivation vessels. After 10 passages the virus isolates yielded titres between 10(5.5) and 10(7.5)ml(-1) TCID50. Isolation and serial propagation of the virus in MA-104 cells was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay, transmission electron microscopy, and polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of viral dsRNA. Eight (5.9%) of the electrophoretic profiles were characteristic of species B or D rotaviruses, which were not replicated in MA-104 cells.

  2. [Post-licensure passive safety surveillance of rotavirus vaccines: reporting sensitivity for intussusception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Vilar, S; Díez-Domingo, J; Gomar-Fayos, J; Pastor-Villalba, E; Sastre-Cantón, M; Puig-Barberà, J

    2014-08-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the reports of suspected adverse events due to rotavirus vaccines, and assess the reporting sensitivity for intussusception. Descriptive study performed using the reports of suspected adverse events following rotavirus vaccination in infants aged less than 10 months, as registered in the Pharmacovigilance Centre of the Valencian Community during 2007-2011. The reporting rate for intussusception was compared to the intussusception rate in vaccinated infants obtained using the hospital discharge database (CMBD), and the regional vaccine registry. The adverse event reporting rate was 20 per 100,000 administered doses, with the majority (74%) of the reports being classified as non-serious. Fever, vomiting, and diarrhea were the adverse events reported more frequently. Two intussusception cases, which occurred within the first seven days post-vaccination, were reported as temporarily associated to vaccination. The reporting sensitivity for intussusception at the Pharmacovigilance Centre in the 1-7 day interval following rotavirus vaccination was 50%. Our results suggest that rotavirus vaccines have, in general, a good safety profile. Intussusception reporting to the Pharmacovigilance Centre shows sensitivity similar to other passive surveillance systems. The intussusception risk should be further investigated using well-designed epidemiological studies, and evaluated in comparison with the well-known benefits provided by these vaccines. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Rotavirus vaccines contribute towards universal health coverage in a mixed public-private healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Tharani; Jit, Mark; Hutubessy, Raymond; Ng, Chiu-Wan; Lee, Way-Seah; Verguet, Stéphane

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate rotavirus vaccination in Malaysia from the household's perspective. The extended cost-effectiveness analysis (ECEA) framework quantifies the broader value of universal vaccination starting with non-health benefits such as financial risk protection and equity. These dimensions better enable decision-makers to evaluate policy on the public finance of health programmes. The incidence, health service utilisation and household expenditure related to rotavirus gastroenteritis according to national income quintiles were obtained from local data sources. Multiple birth cohorts were distributed into income quintiles and followed from birth over the first five years of life in a multicohort, static model. We found that the rich pay more out of pocket (OOP) than the poor, as the rich use more expensive private care. OOP payments among the poorest although small are high as a proportion of household income. Rotavirus vaccination results in substantial reduction in rotavirus episodes and expenditure and provides financial risk protection to all income groups. Poverty reduction benefits are concentrated amongst the poorest two income quintiles. We propose that universal vaccination complements health financing reforms in strengthening Universal Health Coverage (UHC). ECEA provides an important tool to understand the implications of vaccination for UHC, beyond traditional considerations of economic efficiency. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Reassortment Group A Rotavirus from Straw-colored Fruit Bat (Eidolon helvum)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-12-02

    In this podcast, Dr. Mathew Esona of the Division of Viral Diseases at CDC describes the discovery of a unique Group A rotavirus isolated from fruit bats in Kenya.  Created: 12/2/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.   Date Released: 12/2/2010.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia : Taking breastfeeding patterns into account

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwantika, Auliya A.; Tu, Hong Anh T.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to assess the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia, taking breastfeeding patterns explicitly into account. Method: An age-structured cohort model was developed for the 2011 Indonesia birth cohort. Next, we compared two strategies, the current situation

  6. Fiscal consequences of changes in morbidity and mortality attributed to rotavirus immunisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotsopoulos, Nikolaos; Connolly, Mark P.; Postma, Maarten J.; Hutubessy, Raymond C.W.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in population health status are known to influence government fiscal transfers both in terms of lost tax revenue and increased expenditure for health and social services. To estimate the fiscal impact of changes in morbidity and mortality attributed to rotavirus immunisation, we developed a

  7. Measuring the Impact of Rotavirus Acute Gastroenteritis Episodes (MIRAGE: A prospective Community-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sénécal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current assessments of the burden of rotavirus (RV-related gastroenteritis are needed to evaluate the potential benefits of RV immunization interventions. The objective of the present study was to characterize the burden of RV gastroenteritis among children presenting in outpatient settings with gastroenteritis.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia : Taking breastfeeding patterns into account

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwantika, Auliya A.; Tu, Hong Anh T.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to assess the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia, taking breastfeeding patterns explicitly into account. Method: An age-structured cohort model was developed for the 2011 Indonesia birth cohort. Next, we compared two strategies, the current situation

  9. Health care-associated rotavirus illness in pediatric inpatients in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppa, Ivo M; Karmaus, Wilfried; Ehlken, Birgit; Fruhwirth, Martin; Heininger, Ulrich; Plenge-Bonig, Anita; Forster, Johannes

    2006-06-01

    A longitudinal study of health care-associated transmission of rotaviruses (RVs) in pediatric inpatients 0-48 months old in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland showed that almost one third of all cases occurred in patients 2 months old or younger. The effectiveness of vaccination against RV from 2 months of age onward remains to be evaluated.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia taking breastfeeding patterns into account

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwantika, A.A.; Tu, H.A.T.; Postma, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aims to assess the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia, taking breastfeeding patterns explicitly into account. METHODS: An age-structured cohort model was developed for the 2011 Indonesia birth cohort. Next, we compared two strategies, the current

  11. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia taking breastfeeding patterns into account

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwantika, A.A.; Tu, H.A.T.; Postma, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aims to assess the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia, taking breastfeeding patterns explicitly into account. METHODS: An age-structured cohort model was developed for the 2011 Indonesia birth cohort. Next, we compared two strategies, the current situati

  12. Prevalence of rotavirus among children under five years of age with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-08-16

    Aug 16, 2016 ... Diarrheal disease kills 1.8 million children under five years of age yearly.1 It is the ... A prevalence rate of 36.5% reported in a previous study by Wada-Kura15 was ..... Rotavirus diarrhea in Bangladesh children: correlation of ...

  13. Updating the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozenbaum, M.H.; Hak, E.; Wilschut, J.C.; Postma, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigated the most important factors responsible for the large differences in previously estimated cost-effectiveness ratios and to update the costeffectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in the The Netherlands applying assumptions resulting from 2 consensus meetings with national an

  14. Astrovirus, reovirus and rotavirus concomitant infection causes decreased weight gain in broad-breasted white poults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkey astrovirus type-2 (TAstV-2), turkey rotavirus (TRotV) and turkey reovirus (TReoV) were evaluated for pathogenesis in 3 day-old turkey poults in all possible combinations of one, two or three viruses. Body-weights were recorded at 2, 4, 7, 10 and 14 days post inoculation (PI) and were decreas...

  15. How do the rotavirus NSP4 and bacterial enterotoxins lead differently to diarrhea?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasseur Monique

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rotavirus is the major cause of infantile gastroenteritis and each year causes 611 000 deaths worldwide. The virus infects the mature enterocytes of the villus tip of the small intestine and induces a watery diarrhea. Diarrhea can occur with no visible tissue damage and, conversely, the histological lesions can be asymptomatic. Rotavirus impairs activities of intestinal disaccharidases and Na+-solute symports coupled with water transport. Maldigestion of carbohydrates and their accumulation in the intestinal lumen as well as malabsorption of nutrients and a concomitant inhibition of water reabsorption can lead to a malabsorption component of diarrhea. Since the discovery of the NSP4 enterotoxin, diverse hypotheses have been proposed in favor of an additional secretion component in the pathogenesis of diarrhea. Rotavirus induces a moderate net chloride secretion at the onset of diarrhea, but the mechanisms appear to be quite different from those used by bacterial enterotoxins that cause pure secretory diarrhea. Rotavirus failed to stimulate Cl- secretion in crypt, whereas it stimulated Cl- reabsorption in villi, questioning, therefore, the origin of net Cl- secretion. A solution to this riddle was that intestinal villi do in fact secrete chloride as a result of rotavirus infection. Also, the overall chloride secretory response is regulated by a phospholipase C-dependent calcium signaling pathway induced by NSP4. However, the overall response is weak, suggesting that NSP4 may exert both secretory and subsequent anti-secretory actions, as did carbachol, hence limiting Cl- secretion. All these characteristics provide the means to make the necessary functional distinction between viral NSP4 and bacterial enterotoxins.

  16. Household catastrophic healthcare expenditure and impoverishment due to rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharani Loganathan

    Full Text Available While healthcare costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization may be burdensome on households in Malaysia, exploration on the distribution and catastrophic impact of these expenses on households are lacking.We assessed the economic burden, levels and distribution of catastrophic healthcare expenditure, the poverty impact on households and inequities related to healthcare payments for acute gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia.A two-year prospective, hospital-based study was conducted from 2008 to 2010 in an urban (Kuala Lumpur and rural (Kuala Terengganu setting in Malaysia. All children under the age of 5 years admitted for acute gastroenteritis were included. Patients were screened for rotavirus and information on healthcare expenditure was obtained.Of the 658 stool samples collected at both centers, 248 (38% were positive for rotavirus. Direct and indirect costs incurred were significantly higher in Kuala Lumpur compared with Kuala Terengganu (US$222 Vs. US$45; p<0.001. The mean direct and indirect costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis consisted 20% of monthly household income in Kuala Lumpur, as compared with only 5% in Kuala Terengganu. Direct medical costs paid out-of-pocket caused 141 (33% households in Kuala Lumpur to experience catastrophic expenditure and 11 (3% households to incur poverty. However in Kuala Terengganu, only one household (0.5% experienced catastrophic healthcare expenditure and none were impoverished. The lowest income quintile in Kuala Lumpur was more likely to experience catastrophic payments compared to the highest quintile (87% vs 8%. The concentration index for out-of-pocket healthcare payments was closer to zero at Kuala Lumpur (0.03 than at Kuala Terengganu (0.24.While urban households were wealthier, healthcare expenditure due to gastroenteritis had more catastrophic and poverty impact on the urban poor. Universal rotavirus vaccination would reduce both disease burden and health

  17. Prevalence and genotype distribution of rotaviruses in children with gastroenteritis in Rize province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Dereci

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the distribution of rotavirus genotypes is essential for understanding the epidemiology of this virus responsible for nearly half a million of deaths in patients with gastroenteritis worldwide. In the present study, we aimed to genotype the rotavirus strains isolated from diarrheal stool samples in children under 5 years old. A total of 1297 fecal samples were collected, and rotavirus antigen was detected in 73 of these samples. Antigen-positive samples were transferred to the Public Health Agency of Turkey, Molecular Microbiology Research Laboratory, and were tested for determination of genotypes G and P using semi-nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction method performed with consensus- and genotype-specific primers. Twelve specimens were found to be negative for rotavirus in genotyping method. All the positive-strains were in G1-4, G8-9, P(4, P(8, and P(9 genotypes. The most frequent GP genotype combinations were found to be G9P(8 in 21 strains (34.4%, G2P(4 in 14 strains (23.0%, and G1P(8 in 12 strains (19.7%. We found 10 distinct genotypes amongst a total of 61 strains. Among the strains isolated and genotyped in our study, 90.2% (55/61 and 67.2% (41/61 have already been included in the two existing commercial vaccines. In conclusion, these findings implicate the necessity of development of region-specific vaccines after evaluation of the local genotype distribution. Further studies on the large number of rotavirus strains would contribute to this process. 

  18. Prevalence and genotype distribution of rotaviruses in children with gastroenteritis in Rize province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereci, Selim; Çopur Çiçek, Ayşegül; Savaş Acar, Sümeyra; Bakkaloğlu, Zekiye; Özkasap, Serdar; Kanber, Kadri; Hacisalihoğlu, Şadan; Albayrak, Yücehan; Durmaz, Rıza

    2015-07-09

    Determination of the distribution of rotavirus genotypes is essential for understanding the epidemiology of this virus responsible for nearly half a million of deaths in patients with gastroenteritis worldwide. In the present study, we aimed to genotype the rotavirus strains isolated from diarrheal stool samples in children under 5 years old. A total of 1297 fecal samples were collected, and rotavirus antigen was detected in 73 of these samples. Antigen-positive samples were transferred to the Public Health Agency of Turkey, Molecular Microbiology Research Laboratory, and were tested for determination of genotypes G and P using semi-nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction method performed with consensus- and genotype-specific primers. Twelve specimens were found to be negative for rotavirus in genotyping method. All the positive-strains were in G1-4, G8-9, P(4), P(8), and P(9) genotypes. The most frequent GP genotype combinations were found to be G9P(8) in 21 strains (34.4%), G2P(4) in 14 strains (23.0%), and G1P(8) in 12 strains (19.7%). We found 10 distinct genotypes amongst a total of 61 strains. Among the strains isolated and genotyped in our study, 90.2% (55/61) and 67.2% (41/61) have already been included in the two existing commercial vaccines. In conclusion, these findings implicate the necessity of development of region-specific vaccines after evaluation of the local genotype distribution. Further studies on the large number of rotavirus strains would contribute to this process.

  19. Household catastrophic healthcare expenditure and impoverishment due to rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Tharani; Lee, Way-Seah; Lee, Kok-Foo; Jit, Mark; Ng, Chiu-Wan

    2015-01-01

    While healthcare costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization may be burdensome on households in Malaysia, exploration on the distribution and catastrophic impact of these expenses on households are lacking. We assessed the economic burden, levels and distribution of catastrophic healthcare expenditure, the poverty impact on households and inequities related to healthcare payments for acute gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia. A two-year prospective, hospital-based study was conducted from 2008 to 2010 in an urban (Kuala Lumpur) and rural (Kuala Terengganu) setting in Malaysia. All children under the age of 5 years admitted for acute gastroenteritis were included. Patients were screened for rotavirus and information on healthcare expenditure was obtained. Of the 658 stool samples collected at both centers, 248 (38%) were positive for rotavirus. Direct and indirect costs incurred were significantly higher in Kuala Lumpur compared with Kuala Terengganu (US$222 Vs. US$45; p<0.001). The mean direct and indirect costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis consisted 20% of monthly household income in Kuala Lumpur, as compared with only 5% in Kuala Terengganu. Direct medical costs paid out-of-pocket caused 141 (33%) households in Kuala Lumpur to experience catastrophic expenditure and 11 (3%) households to incur poverty. However in Kuala Terengganu, only one household (0.5%) experienced catastrophic healthcare expenditure and none were impoverished. The lowest income quintile in Kuala Lumpur was more likely to experience catastrophic payments compared to the highest quintile (87% vs 8%). The concentration index for out-of-pocket healthcare payments was closer to zero at Kuala Lumpur (0.03) than at Kuala Terengganu (0.24). While urban households were wealthier, healthcare expenditure due to gastroenteritis had more catastrophic and poverty impact on the urban poor. Universal rotavirus vaccination would reduce both disease burden and health

  20. Functional investigation of grass carp reovirus nonstructural protein NS80

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Ling

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grass Carp Reovirus (GCRV, a highly virulent agent of aquatic animals, has an eleven segmented dsRNA genome encased in a multilayered capsid shell, which encodes twelve proteins including seven structural proteins (VP1-VP7, and five nonstructural proteins (NS80, NS38, NS31, NS26, and NS16. It has been suggested that the protein NS80 plays an important role in the viral replication cycle that is similar to that of its homologous protein μNS in the genus of Orthoreovirus. Results As a step to understanding the basis of the part played by NS80 in GCRV replication and particle assembly, we used the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H system to identify NS80 interactions with proteins NS38, VP4, and VP6 as well as NS80 and NS38 self-interactions, while no interactions appeared in the four protein pairs NS38-VP4, NS38-VP6, VP4-VP4, and VP4-VP6. Bioinformatic analyses of NS80 with its corresponding proteins were performed with all currently available homologous protein sequences in ARVs (avian reoviruses and MRVs (mammalian reoviruses to predict further potential functional domains of NS80 that are related to VFLS (viral factory-like structures formation and other roles in viral replication. Two conserved regions spanning from aa (amino acid residues of 388 to 433, and 562 to 580 were discovered in this study. The second conserved region with corresponding conserved residues Tyr565, His569, Cys571, Asn573, and Glu576 located between the two coiled-coils regions (aa ~513-550 and aa ~615-690 in carboxyl-proximal terminus were supposed to be essential to form VFLS, so that aa residues ranging from 513 to 742 of NS80 was inferred to be the smallest region that is necessary for forming VFLS. The function of the first conserved region including Ala395, Gly419, Asp421, Pro422, Leu438, and Leu443 residues is unclear, but one-third of the amino-terminal region might be species specific, dominating interactions with other viral components. Conclusions Our

  1. Rotavirus strain surveillance for three years following the introduction of rotavirus vaccine into Belém, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Sylvia F S; Linhares, Alexandre C; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc P; Oliveira, Alessilva; Justino, Maria Cleonice A; Soares, Luana S; Müller, Elza Caroline; Brasil, Patrícia; Tuboi, Suely; Ortega-Barria, Eduardo; Colindres, Rómulo

    2015-08-01

    The monovalent human rotavirus (RV) vaccine, RIX4414 (Rotarix™, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals) was introduced into Brazil's Expanded Program on Immunization in March 2006. One year after vaccine introduction, the G2P[4] strain was found to be predominant, with an apparent extinction of many non-G2 strains. This study investigated the diversity of circulating strains in the three years following RIX4414 introduction. Between May 2008 and May 2011, stool samples were collected from children aged ≥12 weeks who were hospitalized for severe lab confirmed RV-gastroenteritis (≥3 liquid or semi-liquid motions over a 24-h period for <14 days, requiring ≥1 overnight hospital stay and intravenous rehydration therapy) in Belém, Brazil. RV-gastroenteritis was detected by ELISA and the G- and P-types were determined by RT-PCR assays. During the first year of surveillance nucleotide sequencing was used for typing those samples not previously typed by RT-PCR. A total of 1,726 of 10,030 severe gastroentertis hospitalizations (17.2%) were due to severe RVGE. G2P[4] was detected in 57.2% of circulating strains over the whole study period, however it predominated during the first 20 months from May 2008 to January 2009. G1P[8] increased in the last part of the study period from May 2010 to May 2011 and represented 36.6% (112/306) of the circulating strains. G2P[4] was the predominant RV strain circulating during the first 20 months of the study, followed by G1P[8]. These findings probably reflect a natural fluctuation in RV strains over time, rather than a vaccine-induced selective pressure.

  2. The application value of oral rotavirus vaccine in the prevention and treatment of diarrhea in children%口服轮状病毒疫苗在小儿腹泻防治中的应用价值研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑞芳

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the application value of oral rotavirus vaccine in the prevention and treatment of diarrhea in children. Methods: The medical examination of children in our hospital included in the study, according to the case of oral rotavirus vaccine into the observation group and the control group, the observation group oral rotavirus vaccine for children, children in the control group did not oral rotavirus vaccine, to compare two group of children within a year of diarrhea, inflammatory indicators. Results: The number of cases occurred in children with diarrhea in the observation group, the number of diarrhea per day, duration of diarrhea were lower than the control group, the inflammatory markers interleukin IL-1, IL-6, C-reactive protein levels than the control group. Conclusion: The oral rotavirus vaccine to help prevent diarrhea in children, the duration of diarrhea, reduce the number of diarrhea, inflammatory control level, with a positive value.%目的:研究口服轮状病毒疫苗在小儿腹泻防治中的应用价值。方法选择在我院体检的儿童纳入研究,根据口服轮状病毒疫苗的情况分为观察组和对照组,观察组儿童口服轮状病毒疫苗、对照组患儿未口服轮状病毒疫苗,比较两组儿童在一年内的腹泻情况、机体炎症指标。结果观察组患儿发生腹泻的例数、每日腹泻次数、腹泻持续时间均低于对照组,炎症指标白细胞介素IL-1、IL-6、C反应蛋白水平低于对照组。结论口服轮状病毒疫苗有助于预防小儿腹泻、缩短腹泻时间、减少腹泻次数、控制机体炎症水平,具有积极的应用价值。

  3. Malnutrition Is Associated with Protection from Rotavirus Diarrhea: Evidence from a Longitudinal Birth Cohort Study in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkerke, Hans; Sobuz, Shihab; Ma, Jennie Z.; Petri, Sarah E.; Reichman, Dan; Qadri, Firdausi; Haque, Rashidul

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is a leading cause of dehydrating diarrhea and death among infants and children globally, particularly in communities of the developing world. While numerous studies have described the complex relationships among infectious diarrhea, growth faltering, and poverty, the impact of nutritional status on susceptibility to rotavirus diarrhea is not well understood. In a longitudinal study conducted over the first 3 years of life among 626 slum-dwelling infants enrolled at birth in Dhaka, Bangladesh, we observed that common measures of healthy growth and development were positively associated with a risk of symptomatic rotavirus infection. This finding runs counter to the idea that improving childhood nutrition will implicitly decrease the incidence of symptomatic infection by enteric pathogens. As childhood nutrition improves worldwide, rotavirus infection may remain a public health challenge, making universal vaccination of even greater importance. PMID:27510830

  4. Prevalence of diarrheogenic Escherichia coli and rotavirus among children from Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In a one-year prospective study carried out to define the role of rotavirus and Escherichia coli in local childhood diarrhea, we determined the prevalence of both agents in 54 diarrheic children attending a health center in Botucatu. Diarrheogenic E. coli (DEC strains were characterized by O:H serotyping, a search for virulence genetic markers, and assays of adherence to HEp-2 cells. Except for enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC, no other DEC category was detected in the children's stools. Both EAEC and rotavirus were isolated from 22 of the 54 (41.0% diarrheic children as single agents or in combination with other enteropathogens. However, when considering the presence of a single agent, EAEC was dominant and isolated from 20.4% of the patients, whereas rotavirus was detected in 14.8%. These results indicate that rotavirus and EAEC play a significant role as agents of childhood diarrhea in the local population.

  5. Presencia de rotavirus durante un proceso de compostaje. Abonos como vectores de contaminación viral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Mercedes Martínez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus presence in a waste composting process. Organic fertilizers as vehicles for viral contamination. Objective. To show thepresence of rotavirus in different stages of a composting process: matrices used as raw material, mixture to be composted and the finalproduct. Materials and methods. Immunochromatography, ELISA and RT-PCR were used for viral detection. Results. Rotavirus wasfound in the first composting step, no virus was found in the second step, and some inhibitory substances were found in the third step thatposed difficulties in interpreting the PCR results and therefore providing a concluding result on rotavirus presence in the final product.Conclusions. Organic fertilizers can be vectors of human pathogenic viruses; therefore quality control tests must be implemented to avoidfurther viral dissemination. There are inhibitory substances present in organic fertilizers capable of interfering with the detection tests.

  6. PPAR[gamma] Agonists as an Anti-Inflammatory Treatment Inhibiting Rotavirus Infection of Small Intestinal Villi

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dory Gomez; Natalia Muñoz; Rafael Guerrero; Orlando Acosta; Carlos A. Guerrero

    2016-01-01

      Rotavirus infection has been reported to induce an inflammatory response in the host cell accompanied by the increased expression or activation of some cellular molecules including ROS, NF-κB, and COX-2. PPARγ...

  7. Rotavirus genotypes in sewage treatment plants and in children hospitalized with acute diarrhea in Italy in 2010 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Franco M; Bonomo, Paolo; Ianiro, Giovanni; Battistone, Andrea; Delogu, Roberto; Germinario, Cinzia; Chironna, Maria; Triassi, Maria; Campagnuolo, Rosalba; Cicala, Antonella; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Castiglia, Paolo; Serra, Caterina; Gaggioli, Andrea; Fiore, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Although the molecular surveillance network RotaNet-Italy provides useful nationwide data on rotaviruses causing severe acute gastroenteritis in children in Italy, scarce information is available on rotavirus circulation in the general Italian population, including adults with mild or asymptomatic infection. We investigated the genotypes of rotaviruses present in urban wastewaters and compared them with those of viral strains from clinical pediatric cases. During 2010 and 2011, 285 sewage samples from 4 Italian cities were tested by reverse transcription-PCRs (RT-PCRs) specific for rotavirus VP7 and VP4 genes. Rotavirus was detected in 172 (60.4%) samples, 26 of which contained multiple rotavirus G (VP7 gene) genotypes, for a total of 198 G types. Thirty-two samples also contained multiple P (VP4 gene) genotypes, yielding 204 P types in 172 samples. Genotype G1 accounted for 65.6% of rotaviruses typed, followed by genotypes G2 (20.2%), G9 (7.6%), G4 (4.6%), G6 (1.0%), G3 (0.5%), and G26 (0.5%). VP4 genotype P[8] accounted for 75.0% of strains, genotype P[4] accounted for 23.0% of strains, and the uncommon genotypes P[6], P[9], P[14], and P[19] accounted for 2.0% of strains altogether. These rotavirus genotypes were also found in pediatric patients hospitalized in the same areas and years but in different proportions. Specifically, genotypes G2, G9, and P[4] were more prevalent in sewage samples than among samples from patients, which suggests either a larger circulation of the latter strains through the general population not requiring medical care or their greater survival in wastewaters. A high level of nucleotide identity in the G1, G2, and G6 VP7 sequences was observed between strains from the environment and those from patients. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Equine-like G3 rotavirus in Hungary, 2015 - Is it a novel intergenogroup reassortant pandemic strain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóró, Renáta; Marton, Szilvia; Bartókné, Anett Horváth; Lengyel, György; Agócs, Zsófia; Jakab, Ferenc; Bányai, Krisztián

    2016-06-01

    Novel, intergenogroup reassortant G3 rotavirus strains are spreading in at least three continents: Asia, Australia, and Europe. The present study provides evidence that a closely related G3P[8] strain circulated in Hungary during 2015. Whole genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis showed that the identified strain continues to evolve by reassortment. This observation demonstrates the genomic plasticity of the novel strain, which is thought to be a prerequisite of the success of emerging rotavirus genotypes.

  9. A multi-center, qualitative assessment of pediatrician and maternal perspectives on rotavirus vaccines and the detection of Porcine circovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Daniel C; Humiston, Sharon; Opel, Douglas; Kennedy, Allison; Wikswo, Mary; Downing, Kimberly; Klein, Eileen J; Kobayashi, Ana; Locke, David; Albertin, Christina; Chesley, Claudia; Staat, Mary A

    2011-09-26

    In 2010, researchers using novel laboratory techniques found that US-licensed rotavirus vaccines contain DNA or DNA fragments from Porcine circovirus (PCV), a virus common among pigs but not believed to cause illness in humans. We sought to understand pediatricians' and mothers' perspectives on this finding. We conducted three iterations of focus groups for pediatricians and non-vaccine hesitant mothers in Seattle, WA, Cincinnati, OH, and Rochester, NY. Focus groups explored perceptions of rotavirus disease, rotavirus vaccination, and attitudes about the detection of PCV material in rotavirus vaccines. Pediatricians understood firsthand the success of rotavirus vaccines in preventing severe acute gastroenteritis among infants and young children. They measured this benefit against the theoretical risk of DNA material from PCV in rotavirus vaccines, determining overall that the PCV finding was of no clinical significance. Particularly influential was the realization that the large, randomized clinical trials that found both vaccines to be highly effective and safe were conducted with DNA material from PCV already in the vaccines.Most mothers supported the ideal of full disclosure regarding vaccination risks and benefits. However, with a scientific topic of this complexity, simplified information regarding PCV material in rotavirus vaccines seemed frightening and suspicious, and detailed information was frequently overwhelming. Mothers often remarked that if they did not understand a medical or technical topic regarding their child's health, they relied on their pediatrician's guidance.Many mothers and pediatricians were also concerned that persons who abstain from pork consumption for religious or personal reasons may have unsubstantiated fears of the PCV finding. Pediatricians considered the detection of DNA material from PCV in rotavirus vaccines a "non-issue" and reported little hesitation in continuing to recommend the vaccines. Mothers desired transparency, but

  10. Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Service Resources Additional Resources About FAQ Contact Protein Protein is found throughout the body—in muscle, ... the heart and respiratory system, and death. All Protein Isn’t Alike Protein is built from building ...

  11. Generation of an Avian-Mammalian Rotavirus Reassortant by Using a Helper Virus-Dependent Reverse Genetics System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johne, Reimar; Reetz, Jochen; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Trojnar, Eva

    2015-11-18

    The genetic diversity of rotavirus A (RVA) strains is facilitated in part by genetic reassortment. Although this process of genome segment exchange has been reported frequently among mammalian RVAs, it remained unknown if mammalian RVAs also could package genome segments from avian RVA strains. We generated a simian RVA strain SA11 reassortant containing the VP4 gene of chicken RVA strain 02V0002G3. To achieve this, we transfected BSR5/T7 cells with a T7 polymerase-driven VP4-encoding plasmid, infected the cells with a temperature-sensitive SA11 VP4 mutant, and selected the recombinant virus by increasing the temperature. The reassortant virus could be stably passaged and exhibited cytopathic effects in MA-104 cells, but it replicated less efficiently than both parental viruses. Our results show that avian and mammalian rotaviruses can exchange genome segments, resulting in replication-competent reassortants with new genomic and antigenic features. This study shows that rotaviruses of mammals can package genome segments from rotaviruses of birds. The genetic diversity of rotaviruses could be broadened by this process, which might be important for their antigenic variability. The reverse genetics system applied in the study could be useful for targeted generation and subsequent characterization of distinct rotavirus reassortant strains. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Epidemiological features of rotavirus infection in Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil, from 1986 to 2000

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    Divina das Dôres de Paula Cardoso

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 2,605 faecal specimens from children up to 10 years old with or without diarrhoea were collected. Samples were obtained from 1986 to 2000 in hospitals, outpatient clinics and day-care centers in Goiânia, Goiás. Two methodologies for viral detection were utilized: a combined enzyme immunoassay for rotavirus and adenovirus and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results showed 374 (14.4% faecal specimens positive for Rotavirus A, most of them collected from hospitalized children. A significant detection rate of rotavirus during the period from April to August, dry season in Goiânia, and different frequencies of viral detection throughout the years of study were also observed. Rotavirus was significantly related to hospitalization and to diarrhoeal illness in children up to 24 months old. This study reinforces the importance of rotavirus as a cause of diarrhoea in children and may be important in regards to the implementation of rotavirus vaccination strategies in our country.

  13. Burden of rotavirus disease and cost-effectiveness of universal vaccination in the Province of Genoa (Northern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, D; Amicizia, D; Ansaldi, F; Marocco, A; Marchetti, F; Bamfi, F; Giacchino, R; Tacchella, A; Del Buono, S; Gasparini, R

    2009-05-26

    Rotavirus is acknowledged to be a major cause of acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children. As gastroenteritis due to rotavirus is a public health problem and two new vaccines are currently available, we investigated the rotavirus burden and developed a cost-effectiveness analysis, using data collected in the Province of Genoa (Italy), to evaluate the benefits of new borns vaccination. The cost-effectiveness of a rotavirus vaccination programme in the Province of Genoa was performed, in comparison with no vaccination, for both the regional healthcare system (RHS) and society (S). In 2006, admissions to the paediatric emergency department for gastroenteritis numbered 2338 (about 11% of total admissions); of these 33% were hospitalised. In 28% of cases, the children tested positive for rotavirus. During epidemics, paediatricians receive from 3 to 5 calls per day for gastroenteritis, carry out 1 or 2 ambulatory examinations and for children with a severe case history, make house visits. A rotavirus immunisation programme would have a great impact on disease burden, in that 90% coverage would reduce the number of severe cases by more than 85%. From the perspective of both the RHS and S, vaccination proved to be highly cost-effective.

  14. An outbreak of diarrhoea associated with rotavirus serotype 1 in a day care nursery in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    Liane de Castro

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available Faeces from 17 children less than 1.6 years old 15 adultsmore than 22 years old were collected during an outbreak of gastroenteritis in aday care nursery and screened for the presence of adenovirus and rotavirus by enzyme immunoassay (EIARA and other viruses by electron microscopy (EM and polycrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE. Ten samples (58.8 per cent from childrenand one (6.7 per cent from adults were positive for rotavirus and all samples were negative for bacteria and parasites. No other viruses were observed in EM. An enzyme immunoassay test using monoclonal antibodies (MAb-EIA to determine the subgroup(s and the serotype(s of rotavirus was performed and the results showedthat all positive samples belong to serotype 1, subgroup II of group A rotaviruses. In PAGE test all samples had the same profile and the 10 and 11 dsRNA segments corresponed to the "long" profile of group A of rotaviruses. These results corroborated the MAbEIA results and indicate a sole source of infection. The majorsymptoms observed were: vomiting (60 per cent, fever (70 per cent and diarrhoea (100 per cent. In previous years (1989 to 1991 we observed only rotavirus serotype 2 in this same day care nursery, but no outbreak was reported.

  15. Estudios sobre la inmunogenicidad y los mecanismos fisiopatológicos de la proteína NSP4 de rotavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Díaz, Jesús

    2005-01-01

    RESUMEN Rotavirus es el principal agente causante de gastroenteritis viral en niños y animales jóvenes en todo el mundo. Una de las principales proteínas de rotavirus es la glicoproteína no estructural 4 (NSP4) que juega un papel crucial tanto en el ciclo replicativo de rotavirus, actuando como receptor de partículas inmaduras en el retículo endoplasmático, como en la fisiopatología de rotavirus, siendo la primera enterotoxina de origen vírico descrita hasta el momento. El objetivo de la p...

  16. [Long-term follow-up of nosocomial rotavirus infections at the Infectious Diseases Clinic of the Medical School Hospital in Plzen (1987-1994)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazdiora, P; Táborská, J; Svecová, M

    1996-09-01

    The authors evaluated in 1987-1994 the incidence of nosocomial rotavirus infections during hospitalization in 1718 junior children, 450 senior children and adults admitted with diarrhoeal diseases. Rotavirus infection was revealed in 6.2 and 1.3% of the patients resp. During hospitalization the rotaviruses were the most frequent causal agent of nosocomial infections. Hospital infection was contracted regardless of the initial diagnosis most frequently by patients aged 0-12 months. The majority of nosocomial rotavirus infections was associated with symptoms of diarrhoeal disease, on average symptomatic infections prolonged the hospitalization period by 4.2 days. The authors discuss the possibility to influence the incidence of these infections.

  17. HMGB1-promoted and TLR2/4-dependent NK cell maturation and activation take part in rotavirus-induced murine biliary atresia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinrong Qiu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies show that NK cells play important roles in murine biliary atresia (BA, and a temporary immunological gap exists in this disease. In this study, we found high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 and TLRs were overexpressed in human and rotavirus-induced murine BA. The overexpressed HMGB1 released from the nuclei of rotavirus-infected cholangiocytes, as well as macrophages, activated hepatic NK cells via HMGB1-TLRs-MAPK signaling pathways. Immature NK cells had low cytotoxicity on rotavirus-injured cholangiocytes due to low expression of TLRs, which caused persistent rotavirus infection in bile ducts. HMGB1 up-regulated the levels of TLRs of NK cells and promoted NK cell activation in an age-dependent fashion. As NK cells gained increasing activation as mice aged, they gained increasing cytotoxicity on rotavirus-infected cholangiocytes, which finally caused BA. Adult NK cells eliminated rotavirus-infected cholangiocytes shortly after infection, which prevented persistent rotavirus infection in bile ducts. Moreover, adoptive transfer of mature NK cells prior to rotavirus infection decreased the incidence of BA in newborn mice. Thus, the dysfunction of newborn NK cells may, in part, participate in the immunological gap in the development of rotavirus induced murine BA.

  18. Expresión y purificación de las proteínas estructurales del rotavirus VP5* y VP8* en bacterias E. coli BL21(DE3

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    Luz Yurany Moreno

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Título en ingles: Expression and purification of rotavirus structural proteins VP5* and VP8* in bacteria E. coli BL21(DE3 Resumen La caracterización de las proteínas estructurales del rotavirus y de las proteínas de la superficie de la célula hospedera implicadas en la unión y penetración del virion requiere de la disponibilidad de cantidades suficientes y de alto grado de pureza de estas proteínas.  Por lo tanto, el objetivo de este trabajo fue expresar y purificar las proteínas estructurales del rotavirus de la cepa RRV, VP5* y VP8*, y producir anticuerpos policlonales dirigidos contra ellas. Se expresaron las proteínas recombinantes VP5* (rVP5* y VP8* (rVP8* en bacterias E. coli BL21(DE3 transfectadas con el plásmido pGEX-4T que contenía sus secuencias codificantes. Se consideraron como variables el medio de crecimiento, número de bacterias antes de inducir la expresión, concentración del inductor y tiempo de inducción. La mayor proporción de rVP8* se obtuvo cuando las bacterias transformadas se cultivaron en medio LB y la inducción se llevó a cabo con 1 mM de IPTG cuando el cultivo alcanzó una OD 600 nm de 0.5 y la inducción se mantuvo durante 6 h. rVP5* alcanzó la mayor proporción cuando células a una OD 600 nm de 0.2 fueron inducidas con 0.5 mM de IPTG durante 4 h en medio 2XYT en presencia de glucosa al 2 %. Las proteínas recombinantes obtenidas, acumuladas en la fracción insoluble, fueron solubilizadas con detergentes iónicos y no iónicos, seguido de purificación mediante cromatografía de afinidad antes de ser empleadas como antígenos para la producción de anticuerpos policlonales en conejos. Estos anticuerpos se caracterizaron mediante su capacidad de reconocimiento de los antígenos correspondientes en ELISA, “Western blotting”, y en ensayos de inmunocitoquímica en células infectadas con rotavirus RRV. La cantidad y el grado de pureza de las proteínas recombinantes obtenidas, y los anticuerpos

  19. Characterization of rotavirus RNAs that activate innate immune signaling through the RIG-I-like receptors.

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    Dina Uzri

    Full Text Available In mammalian cells, the first line of defense against viral pathogens is the innate immune response, which is characterized by induction of type I interferons (IFN and other pro-inflammatory cytokines that establish an antiviral milieu both in infected cells and in neighboring uninfected cells. Rotavirus, a double-stranded RNA virus of the Reoviridae family, is the primary etiological agent of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. Previous studies demonstrated that rotavirus replication induces a MAVS-dependent type I IFN response that involves both RIG-I and MDA5, two cytoplasmic viral RNA sensors. This study reports the isolation and characterization of rotavirus RNAs that activate IFN signaling. Using an in vitro approach with purified rotavirus double-layer particles, nascent single-stranded RNA (ssRNA transcripts (termed in vitro ssRNA were found to be potent IFN inducers. In addition, large RNAs isolated from rotavirus-infected cells six hours post-infection (termed in vivo 6 hr large RNAs, also activated IFN signaling, whereas a comparable large RNA fraction isolated from cells infected for only one hour lacked this stimulatory activity. Experiments using knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts showed that RIG-I is required for and MDA5 partly contributes to innate immune signaling by both in vitro ssRNA and in vivo 6 hr large RNAs. Enzymatic studies demonstrated that in vitro ssRNA and in vivo 6 hr large RNA samples contain uncapped RNAs with exposed 5' phosphate groups. RNAs lacking 2'-O-methylated 5' cap structures were also detected in the in vivo 6 hr large RNA sample. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that the rotavirus VP3 enzyme, which encodes both guanylyltransferase and methyltransferase activities, is not completely efficient at either 5' capping or 2'-O-methylation of the 5' cap structures of viral transcripts, and in this way produces RNA patterns that activate innate immune signaling through the RIG

  20. Effect of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 on rotavirus replication and gene expressions of RIG-I signalling molecule in porcine rotavirus-infected IPEC-J2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ye; Yu, Bing; Mao, Xiangbing; He, Jun; Huang, Zhiqing; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Jie; Han, Guoquan; Liang, Xiaofang; Chen, Daiwen

    2015-01-01

    The study evaluated whether a 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25D3) supplementation decreases the replication of rotavirus by the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signalling pathway in a porcine small intestinal epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2). The results show that IPEC-J2 cells express high baseline levels of 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), which converts inactive 25D3 to the active 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3). Porcine rotavirus (PRV) infection alone resulted in a significant increase in CYP27B1 mRNA, which augmented the production of active vitamin D. Physiological concentrations of 25D3 were found to decrease PRV replication in IPEC-J2 cells. RIG-I plays an important role in the recognition of double-stranded RNA virus by host cells. Upon recognition, RIG-I triggers a series of signalling molecules such as interferon-β (IFN-β) promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1) leading to the expression of type I interferons (IFN-β). Active 25D3 that was generated by PRV-infected IPEC-J2 cells led to an increased expression of toll-like receptors 3 (TLR3), RIG-I, IPS-1, IFN-β and IFN-stimulated genes 15 (ISG15) with important innate immune functions. Inhibiting CYP27B1 also failed to increase RIG-I, IPS-1, IFN-β and ISG15 mRNA expression. These observations suggest that 25D3 can directly inhibit PRV in IPEC-J2 cells, which requires this active form of vitamin D. The anti-rotavirus effect of 25D3 is mediated at least in part by RIG-I signalling pathways in IPEC-J2 cells.

  1. Vitamin A deficiency impairs adaptive B and T cell responses to a prototype monovalent attenuated human rotavirus vaccine and virulent human rotavirus challenge in a gnotobiotic piglet model.

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    Kuldeep S Chattha

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses (RV are a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Widespread vitamin A deficiency is associated with reduced efficacy of vaccines and higher incidence of diarrheal infections in children in developing countries. We established a vitamin A deficient (VAD gnotobiotic piglet model that mimics subclinical vitamin A deficiency in children to study its effects on an oral human rotavirus (HRV vaccine and virulent HRV challenge. Piglets derived from VAD and vitamin A sufficient (VAS sows were orally vaccinated with attenuated HRV or mock, with/without supplemental vitamin A and challenged with virulent HRV. Unvaccinated VAD control piglets had significantly lower hepatic vitamin A, higher severity and duration of diarrhea and HRV fecal shedding post-challenge as compared to VAS control pigs. Reduced protection coincided with significantly higher innate (IFNα cytokine and CD8 T cell frequencies in the blood and intestinal tissues, higher pro-inflammatory (IL12 and 2-3 fold lower anti-inflammatory (IL10 cytokines, in VAD compared to VAS control pigs. Vaccinated VAD pigs had higher diarrhea severity scores compared to vaccinated VAS pigs, which coincided with lower serum IgA HRV antibody titers and significantly lower intestinal IgA antibody secreting cells post-challenge in the former groups suggesting lower anamnestic responses. A trend for higher serum HRV IgG antibodies was observed in VAD vs VAS vaccinated groups post-challenge. The vaccinated VAD (non-vitamin A supplemented pigs had significantly higher serum IL12 (PID2 and IFNγ (PID6 compared to vaccinated VAS groups suggesting higher Th1 responses in VAD conditions. Furthermore, regulatory T-cell responses were compromised in VAD pigs. Supplemental vitamin A in VAD pigs did not fully restore the dysregulated immune responses to AttHRV vaccine or moderate virulent HRV diarrhea. Our findings suggest that that VAD in children in developing countries may partially contribute to more

  2. First Molecular Detection of Group A Rotavirus in Urban and Hospital Sewage systems by Nested-RT PCR in Shiraz, Iran

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    Yahya Tahamtan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Group A rotaviruses are the most significant cause of acute gastroenteritis in children worldwide. Rotaviruses are shed in high numbers and dispersed widely throughout bodies of water in the environment. This represents a significant health hazard for humans, mainly due to the stability of the viruses during wastewater treatment processes. This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of rotaviruses, to determine G genotypes of circulating rotaviruses and to assess the efficiency of rotavirus removal in urban and hospital sewage treatment plants in Shiraz, Iran.Materials and methods: During the period from October 2010 to June 2011, a total of sixty sewage samples from urban and hospital sewage disposal systems were collected by Grab Sampling in Shiraz, Iran. All the samples were concentrated in pellet form and two-phase methods and then group A rotaviruses were investigated with enzyme immunoassays (EIA. Rotavirus-positive specimens were genotyped by the nested RT-PCR and by using different types of specific primers.Results:In total, rotaviruses were identified in 25% (15 cases of sewage samples, representing 73.33% (11 cases of influent and 26.67% (4 cases of effluent systems. The frequency of rotavirus detection in autumn, winter and spring was 46.67%, 33.33% and 20%, respectively (P= 0.004. The most common circulating genotype was G1 (73.33%, followed by G1G4 (20% and non-typeable (6.67%, respectively.Conclusions:The high prevalence of rotaviruses in urban and hospital sewage systems highlights the importance of environmental surveillance as a tool to detect new genotypes and to investigate the epidemiology of rotaviruses circulating in the community.

  3. Removing the age restrictions for rotavirus vaccination: a benefit-risk modeling analysis.

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    Manish M Patel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To minimize potential risk of intussusception, the World Health Organization (WHO recommended in 2009 that rotavirus immunization should be initiated by age 15 weeks and completed before 32 weeks. These restrictions could adversely impact vaccination coverage and thereby its health impact, particularly in developing countries where delays in vaccination often occur. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a modeling study to estimate the number of rotavirus deaths prevented and the number of intussusception deaths caused by vaccination when administered on the restricted schedule versus an unrestricted schedule whereby rotavirus vaccine would be administered with DTP vaccine up to age 3 years. Countries were grouped on the basis of child mortality rates, using WHO data. Inputs were estimates of WHO rotavirus mortality by week of age from a recent study, intussusception mortality based on a literature review, predicted vaccination rates by week of age from USAID Demographic and Health Surveys, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS, and WHO-UNICEF 2010 country-specific coverage estimates, and published estimates of vaccine efficacy and vaccine-associated intussusception risk. On the basis of the error estimates and distributions for model inputs, we conducted 2,000 simulations to obtain median estimates of deaths averted and caused as well as the uncertainty ranges, defined as the 5th-95th percentile, to provide an indication of the uncertainty in the estimates. We estimated that in low and low-middle income countries a restricted schedule would prevent 155,800 rotavirus deaths (5th-95th centiles, 83,300-217,700 while causing potentially 253 intussusception deaths (76-689. In contrast, vaccination without age restrictions would prevent 203,000 rotavirus deaths (102,000-281,500 while potentially causing 547 intussusception deaths (237-1,160. Thus, removing the age restrictions would avert an

  4. Progress on Porcine Rotavirus%猪轮状病毒概述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任文华; 崔志洪

    2005-01-01

    轮状病毒(Porcine Rotavirus,PRV)属呼肠孤病毒科(Reoviridae)轮状病毒属(Rotavirus)成员,是引起幼龄仔猪病毒性腹泻的主要病源之一.目前尚无治疗RV感染的有效药物,对于发病动物,可以对症治疗以及采取措施防止脱水和酸中毒等等.预防该病的有效方法是加强饲养管理和在准确诊断基础上的有效疫苗接种.

  5. Rotavirus infection in children: mono-and combines forms, especially clinics and course

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    N. B. Denisyuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyzed 74 case histories of children under one year with rotavirus infection. The most commonly detected rotavirus gastroenteritis in the form of mono-and combined forms. Mono-infection in 78.3% of cases occurred in the moderate form with a leading syndrome in the form of gastroenteritis, severe dehydration proceeded with symptoms of varying severity. Mixed variants in 98.7% of cases are in the unfavorable premorbid background, in 42.8% of children were registered in the severe forms, and children younger than 6 months were erased within. The diagnosis of intestinal infection was confirmed by PCR, bacteriological and immunological methods.

  6. Surveillance and molecular characterization of group A rotaviruses in Goroka, Papua New Guinea.

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    Horwood, Paul Francis; Luang-Suarkia, Dagwin; Bebes, Sauli; Boniface, Karen; Datta, Siddhartha Sankar; Siba, Peter Max; Kirkwood, Carl Dunn

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular epidemiology of group A rotaviruses in cases of acute gastroenteritis in Goroka, Papua New Guinea. From April 2008 through November 2010, 813 diarrheal stool samples were collected from children < 5 years of age hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis. Rotavirus antigen was detected in 31.2% of samples using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Genotyping revealed the presence of the globally circulating strains G1P[8] (50.0%), G3P[8] (23.0%), and G2P[4] (8.2%). The globally emerging strains G9 and G12 were detected in 1.2% and 6.1% of samples, respectively. Mixed infections were detected in a high proportion of samples (11.9%), with 9.0% and 3.7% of samples displaying multiple G and P genotypes, respectively.

  7. Human rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix): focus on effectiveness and impact 6 years after first introduction in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Giaquinto, Carlo; Benninghoff, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    A decade after licensure of the human rotavirus vaccine (HRV), a wealth of evidence supports a reduction of rotavirus (RV) gastroenteritis-associated mortality and hospitalizations following HRV inclusion in national immunization programs. Nevertheless, the majority of real-world data has been generated in high- or middle-income settings. Clinical efficacy trials previously indicated RV vaccine performance may be lower in less-developed countries compared with wealthier counterparts. Using recently published data from Africa, we examine the effectiveness and impact of HRV in resource-deprived areas, exploring whether vaccine performance differs by socioeconomic setting and the potential underlying factors. HRV vaccine effectiveness in early adopting African countries has proven to be similar or even superior to the efficacy results observed in pre-licensure studies.

  8. An unusual outbreak of rotavirus genotype G2P[6] during the 2005-2006 epidemic season in Philadelphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, H Fred; Lawley, Diane; DiStefano, Daniel; Maliga, Marianne; Kilby, Bronwyn; Kulnis, Greg; Mallette, Laura; DiNubile, Mark J

    2011-06-01

    Most rotavirus gastroenteritis is caused by G1P[8] strains. When G2 infections are encountered, the P type has most often been reported to be P[4]. The purpose of our study was to describe an unusual outbreak of G2P[6] cases. Children presenting to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia with acute gastroenteritis have been monitored for rotavirus antigen in stool by ELISA (with G-typing if ELISA positive) since 1994-1995. Compared to the last 12 rotavirus seasons before the 2006 introduction of a new rotavirus vaccine, the 2005-2006 season had by far the highest number of evaluable rotavirus infections [n = 275 from September 2005 through June 2006, of which 261 (95%) were G typed] and the greatest number of G2 cases (n = 101, 39% of typed strains). Only 16% of G2 strains were associated with P[4], whereas genotype G2P[6] was responsible for 83% of the G2 infections. Eighty-eight percent of the 84 G2P[6] cases occurred in the 60% of patients who were African-Americans, most of whom were urban residents. Among 157 African-American patients, G2 cases (n = 80; 52%) predominated, including 74 due to G2P[6]. Children <6 months old accounted for 27% of cases overall, but 36% of the G2P[6] cases. G2 rotaviruses caused over a third of the community-acquired rotavirus cases in children presenting to CHOP in 2005-2006, attesting to the potential impact of G2 strains during some epidemics. The large majority of G2 strains had the rare P[6] genotype. Urban African-American children under 6 months of age were disproportionately affected.

  9. The Hidden Health and Economic Burden of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Malaysia: An Estimation Using Multiple Data Sources.

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    Loganathan, Tharani; Ng, Chiu-Wan; Lee, Way-Seah; Jit, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) results in substantial mortality and morbidity worldwide. However, an accurate estimation of the health and economic burden of RVGE in Malaysia covering public, private and home treatment is lacking. Data from multiple sources were used to estimate diarrheal mortality and morbidity according to health service utilization. The proportion of this burden attributable to rotavirus was estimated from a community-based study and a meta-analysis we conducted of primary hospital-based studies. Rotavirus incidence was determined by multiplying acute gastroenteritis incidence with estimates of the proportion of gastroenteritis attributable to rotavirus. The economic burden of rotavirus disease was estimated from the health systems and societal perspective. Annually, rotavirus results in 27 deaths, 31,000 hospitalizations, 41,000 outpatient visits and 145,000 episodes of home-treated gastroenteritis in Malaysia. We estimate an annual rotavirus incidence of 1 death per 100,000 children and 12 hospitalizations, 16 outpatient clinic visits and 57 home-treated episodes per 1000 children under-5 years. Annually, RVGE is estimated to cost US$ 34 million to the healthcare provider and US$ 50 million to society. Productivity loss contributes almost a third of costs to society. Publicly, privately and home-treated episodes consist of 52%, 27% and 21%, respectively, of the total societal costs. RVGE represents a considerable health and economic burden in Malaysia. Much of the burden lies in privately or home-treated episodes and is poorly captured in previous studies. This study provides vital information for future evaluation of cost-effectiveness, which are necessary for policy-making regarding universal vaccination.

  10. The Genetic Diversity and Phylogenetic Characteritics of Rotavirus VP4(P Genotypes in Children With Acute Diarrhea

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    Haghshenas Z

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute gastroenteritis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children in developing countries. Rotaviruses are recognized as the most common etiologic factors of gastroenteritis. In this study, we determined the epidemiologic features, clinical symptoms and molecular structure of rotavirus VP4(P genotypes in children with acute diarrhea in Bahrami Hospital in Tehran Iran, during 2009 for justifying the routine use of rotavirus vaccines in children. Methods: One hundred fifty fecal samples from 150 children with acute diarrhea in Bahrami Pediatric Hospital in Tehran, Iran were collected from January to December 2009. The patients’ mean age was 20.90+18.19 years (ranging from 1 month to 14 years. Fecal samples were transported on ice to the laboratory of virology department of Pasture Institute of Iran. The demographic and clinical data for each case were entered in an author-devised questionnaire. Group A rotavirus was detected by dsRNA-PAGE. Subsequently, rotavirus genotyping (VP4 was performed by semi-nested multiple RT-PCR and the phylogenetic tree of the Rotavirus nucleotides was constructed. The data were analyzed by statistical tests including Wilcoxon signed and Mann-Whitney U. Results: Rotavirus was isolated in 19.3% of the samples, more than 90% of which had long RNA patterns. The predominant genotype (VP4 was P[8] (86% and other genotypes respectively were P[6] (6.9% and P[4] (6.9%. Conclusion: A high prevalence of the P[8] genotype was found to be the cause of acute diarrhea. The analysis of P[8] genotype sequence showed a high level of similarity of the virus in this study with those of other Asian countries.

  11. Ecological analysis of social risk factors for Rotavirus infections in Berlin, Germany, 2007–2009

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    Wilking Hendrik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Socioeconomic factors are increasingly recognised as related to health inequalities in Germany and are also identified as important contributing factors for an increased risk of acquiring infections. The aim of the present study was to describe in an ecological analysis the impact of different social factors on the risk of acquiring infectious diseases in an urban setting. The specific outcome of interest was the distribution of Rotavirus infections, which are a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis among infants and also a burden in the elderly in Germany. The results may help to generate more specific hypothesis for infectious disease transmission. Methods We analysed the spatial distribution of hospitalized patients with Rotavirus infections in Berlin, Germany. The association between the small area incidence and different socio-demographic and economic variables was investigated in order to identify spatial relations and risk factors. Our spatial analysis included 447 neighbourhood areas of similar population size in the city of Berlin. We included all laboratory-confirmed cases of patients hospitalized due to Rotavirus infections and notified between 01/01/2007 and 31/12/2009. We excluded travel-associated and nosocomial infections. A spatial Bayesian Poisson regression model was used for the statistical analysis of incidences at neighbourhood level in relation to socio-demographic variables. Results Altogether, 2,370 patients fulfilled the case definition. The disease mapping indicates a number of urban quarters to be highly affected by the disease. In the multivariable spatial regression model, two risk factors were identified for infants ( Conclusions Neighbourhoods with a high unemployment rate and high day care attendance rate appear to be particularly affected by Rotavirus in the population of Berlin. Public health promotion programs should be developed for the affected areas. Due to the ecological study

  12. Socioeconomic profile of children who did not join the rotavirus vaccine schedule

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriella Miranda Martins; Eliane Janine Hedwiges Gradvohl Aboim

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Rotavirus has a universal distribution, causing episodes of acute gastroenteritis, endemic in tropical regions. Immunization is the most effective way to avoid it. Children from an environment with better conditions and higher socioeconomic factors have better prognosis, while those coming from poor families have more risk of disease severity. Objective: To evaluate the socioeconomic profile of children’s families that di...

  13. Impact of community-acquired paediatric rotavirus gastroenteritis on family life: data from the REVEAL study

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    Talayero José MP

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus is the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE and the most frequent cause of severe diarrhoea in children aged less than 5 years. Although the epidemiology of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE is well documented, there are few data on the impact of RVGE on the families of affected children. Methods Data associated with the burden of RVGE, including number of working days lost, levels of parental stress, the need for alternative childcare arrangements and additional nappies used, were extracted from questionnaires completed by parents of children participating in a prospective, multicentre, observational study (Rotavirus gastroenteritis Epidemiology and Viral types in Europe Accounting for Losses in public health and society, REVEAL, conducted during 2004-2005 in selected areas of Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom to estimate the incidence of RVGE in children aged less than 5 years seeking medical care as a result of AGE. Results 1102 children with RVGE were included in the present analysis. The proportion of RVGE cases that required at least one parent or other person to be absent from work was 39%-91% in the hospital setting, 44%-64% in the emergency department, and 20%-64% in primary care. Self-reported levels of parental stress were generally high (mean stress levels, ≥ 5 on a 10-point visual analogue scale. Additional childcare arrangements were required in up to 21% of RVGE episodes. The mean number of nappies used per day during RVGE episodes was approximately double that used when the child was not ill. Conclusions Paediatric RVGE cases cause disruption to families and parental stress. The burden of RVGE on children and their families could be substantially reduced by routine rotavirus vaccination of infants.

  14. Hospitalizations for Diarrhea in Quebec Children from 1985 to 1998: Estimates of Rotavirus-Associated Diarrhea

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    René-Pierre Buigues; Bernard Duval; Louis Rochette; Nicole Boulianne; Monique Douville-Fradet; Pierre Déry; Gaston De Serres

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the incidence and duration of hospitalization due to diarrhea and to assess the proportion of hospitalizations that are attributed to rotavirus-associated diarrhea.DESIGN: Retrospective study of hospitalization data.SETTING: Hospitals located in Quebec.POPULATION STUDIED: Children from one to 59 months of age who were discharged from hospital from April 1, 1985 to March 31, 1998.MAIN RESULTS: There were 63,827 hospitalizations for diarrhea over the study period, for...

  15. WHO global rotavirus surveillance network: a strategic review of the first 5 years, 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agócs, Mary M; Serhan, Fatima; Yen, Catherine; Mwenda, Jason M; de Oliveira, Lúcia H; Teleb, Nadia; Wasley, Annemarie; Wijesinghe, Pushpa R; Fox, Kimberley; Tate, Jacqueline E; Gentsch, Jon R; Parashar, Umesh D; Kang, Gagandeep

    2014-07-25

    Since 2008, the World Health Organization (WHO) has coordinated the Global Rotavirus Surveillance Network, a network of sentinel surveillance hospitals and laboratories that report to ministries of health (MoHs) and WHO clinical features and rotavirus testing data for children aged strategic review to assess surveillance network performance, provide recommendations for strengthening the network, and assess the network's utility as a platform for other vaccine-preventable disease surveillance. The strategic review team determined that during 2011 and 2012, a total of 79 sites in 37 countries met reporting and testing inclusion criteria for data analysis. Of the 37 countries with sites meeting inclusion criteria, 13 (35%) had introduced rotavirus vaccine nationwide. All 79 sites included in the analysis were meeting 2008 network objectives of documenting presence of disease and describing disease epidemiology, and all countries were using the rotavirus surveillance data for vaccine introduction decisions, disease burden estimates, and advocacy; countries were in the process of assessing the use of this surveillance platform for other vaccine-preventable diseases. However, the review also indicated that the network would benefit from enhanced management, standardized data formats, linkage of clinical data with laboratory data, and additional resources to support network functions. In November 2013, WHO's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization (SAGE) endorsed the findings and recommendations made by the review team and noted potential opportunities for using the network as a platform for other vaccine-preventable disease surveillance. WHO will work to implement the recommendations to improve the network's functions and to provide higher quality surveillance data for use in decisions related to vaccine introduction and vaccination program sustainability.

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of Rotavirus Vaccination in Bolivia from the State Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Emily R.; Rowlinson, Emily E.; Iniguez, Volga; Etienne, Kizee A.; Rivera, Rosario; Mamani, Nataniel; Rheingans, Rick; Patzi, Maritza; Halkyer, Percy; Leon, Juan S.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND In Bolivia, in 2008, the under-five mortality rate is 54 per 1000 live births. Diarrhea causes 15% of these deaths, and 40% of pediatric diarrhea-related hospitalizations are caused by rotavirus illness (RI). Rotavirus vaccination (RV), subsidized by international donors, is expected to reduce morbidity, mortality, and economic burden to the Bolivian state. Estimates of illness and economic burden of RI and their reduction by RV are essential to the Bolivian state’s policies on RV program financing. The goal of this report is to estimate the economic burden of RI and the cost-effectiveness of the RV program. METHODS To assess treatment costs incurred by the healthcare system, we abstracted medical records from 287 inpatients and 6,751 outpatients with acute diarrhea between 2005 and 2006 at 5 sentinel hospitals in 4 geographic regions. RI prevalence rates were estimated from 4 years of national hospital surveillance. We used a decision-analytic model to assess the potential cost-effectiveness of universal RV in Bolivia. RESULTS Our model estimates that, in a 5-year birth cohort, Bolivia will incur over US$3 million in direct medical costs due to RI. RV reduces, by at least 60%, outpatient visits, hospitalizations, deaths, and total direct medical costs associated with rotavirus diarrhea. Further, RV was cost-savings below a price of US$3.81 per dose and cost-effective below a price of US$194.10 per dose. Diarrheal mortality and hospitalization inputs were the most important drivers of rotavirus vaccine cost-effectiveness. DISCUSSION Our data will guide Bolivia’s funding allocation for RV as international subsidies change. PMID:21624421

  17. Tylosema esculentum (Marama) Tuber and Bean Extracts Are Strong Antiviral Agents against Rotavirus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Walter Chingwaru; Runner T. Majinda; Sam O. Yeboah; Jackson, Jose C.; Petrina T. Kapewangolo; Martha Kandawa-Schulz; Avrelija Cencic

    2011-01-01

    Tylosema esculentum (marama) beans and tubers are used as food, and traditional medicine against diarrhoea in Southern Africa. Rotaviruses (RVs) are a major cause of diarrhoea among infants, young children, immunocompromised people, and domesticated animals. Our work is first to determine anti-RV activity of marama bean and tuber ethanol and water extracts; in this case on intestinal enterocyte cells of human infant (H4), adult pig (CLAB) and adult bovine (CIEB) origin. Marama cotyledon ethan...

  18. Immune Response of Children Who Develop Persistent Diarrhea following Rotavirus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Azim, Tasnim; Ahmad, S. Meshbahuddin; Khuda, Sefat-e-; Sarker, M. Safiullah; Unicomb, Leanne E.; De, Soma; Hamadani, Jena D.; Salam, Mohammed A; Wahed, M A; Albert, M John

    1999-01-01

    A prospective study was conducted with Bangladeshi children with rotavirus (RV) diarrhea to assess whether nutritional and clinical parameters, RV serotypes, levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and RV-specific antibody titers in plasma and stool were associated with the development of persistent diarrhea. Children with watery diarrhea for 6 to 8 days, selected from the Dhaka Hospital of the International ...

  19. Rotavirus seasonality and age effects in a birth cohort study of southern India.

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    Rajiv Sarkar

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Understanding the temporal patterns in disease occurrence is valuable for formulating effective disease preventive programs. Cohort studies present a unique opportunity to explore complex interactions associated with emergence of seasonal patterns of infectious diseases. METHODS: We used data from 452 children participating in a birth cohort study to assess the seasonal patterns of rotavirus diarrhea by creating a weekly time series of rotavirus incidence and fitting a Poisson harmonic regression with biannual peaks. Age and cohort effects were adjusted for by including the weekly counts of number of children in the study and the median age of cohort in a given week. Weekly average temperature, humidity and an interaction term to reflect the joint effect of temperature and humidity were included to consider the effects of meteorological variables. RESULTS: In the overall rotavirus time series, two significant peaks within a single year were observed--one in winter and the other in summer. The effect of age was found to be the most significant contributor for rotavirus incidence, showing a strong negative association. Seasonality remained a significant factor, even after adjusting for meteorological parameters, and the age and cohort effects. CONCLUSIONS: The methodology for assessing seasonality in cohort studies is not yet developed. This is the first attempt to explore seasonal patterns in a cohort study with a dynamic denominator and rapidly changing immune response on individual and group levels, and provides a highly promising approach for a better understanding of the seasonal patterns of infectious diseases, tracking emergence of pathogenic strains and evaluating the efficacy of intervention programs.

  20. Rotavirus NSP4 is secreted from infected cells as an oligomeric lipoprotein and binds to glycosaminoglycans on the surface of non-infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didsbury Alicia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonstructural glycoprotein 4 (NSP4 encoded by rotavirus is the only viral protein currently believed to function as an enterotoxin. NSP4 is synthesized as an intracellular transmembrane glycoprotein and as such is essential for virus assembly. Infection of polarized Caco-2 cells with rotavirus also results in the secretion of glycosylated NSP4 apparently in a soluble form despite retention of its transmembrane domain. We have examined the structure, solubility and cell-binding properties of this secreted form of NSP4 to further understand the biochemical basis for its enterotoxic function. We show here that NSP4 is secreted as discrete detergent-sensitive oligomers in a complex with phospholipids and demonstrate that this secreted form of NSP4 can bind to glycosaminoglycans present on the surface of a range of different cell types. Methods NSP4 was purified from the medium of infected cells after ultracentrifugation and ultrafiltration by successive lectin-affinity and ion exchange chromatography. Oligomerisation of NSP4 was examined by density gradient centrifugation and chemical crosslinking and the lipid content was assessed by analytical thin layer chromatography and flame ionization detection. Binding of NSP4 to various cell lines was measured using a flow cytometric-based assay. Results Secreted NSP4 formed oligomers that contained phospholipid but dissociated to a dimeric species in the presence of non-ionic detergent. The purified glycoprotein binds to the surface of various non-infected cells of distinct lineage. Binding of NSP4 to HT-29, a cell line of intestinal origin, is saturable and independent of divalent cations. Complementary biochemical approaches reveal that NSP4 binds to sulfated glycosaminoglycans on the plasma membrane. Conclusion Our study is the first to analyze an authentic (i.e. non-recombinant form of NSP4 that is secreted from virus-infected cells. Despite retention of the transmembrane domain