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Sample records for rotator cuff tendon

  1. Calcific Tendonitis of the Rotator Cuff: An Unusual Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Mitsui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Few case reports have described the surgical treatment of calcifying tendonitis of the subscapularis tendon. We present a case of symptomatic diffuse calcifying tendonitis involving the subscapularis and infraspinatus insertions that was difficult to detect arthroscopically. The patient was treated with arthroscopic incision of the tendinous insertions thorough removal of the calcific deposits and subsequent repair using a suture-anchor technique. Two years after the surgical procedure, the patient was completely pain-free and attained full range of motion. Radiographic evaluation performed 2 years after the procedure revealed no calcific deposits. We conclude that the combination of incision of the subscapularis and infraspinatus insertions, complete removal of the calcific deposits, and subsequent suture-anchor repair in an all-arthroscopic manner can lead to an excellent clinical outcome without compromising the functional integrity of the rotator cuff tendons.

  2. Latissimus dorsi tendon transfers for rotator cuff deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, James; Pandit, Adam; Noorani, Ali; Douglas, Tania; Falworth, Mark; Lambert, Simon

    2011-10-01

    Latissimus dorsi tendon transfers are increasingly being used around the shoulder. We aim to assess any improvement in pain and function following a latissimus dorsi tendon transfer for massive, irreparable postero-superior cuff deficiency. At our institution, between 1996 and 2009, 38 latissimus dorsi tendon transfer procedures were performed. Sixteen of these were for massive irreparable rotator cuff deficiency associated with pain and impaired function. All patients were evaluated by means of interview or postal questionnaire and case note review. Pain and function were assessed using the Stanmore percentage of normal shoulder assessment (SPONSA) score, visual analogue scale and Oxford Shoulder Score. Forward elevation was also assessed and a significant improvement was thought to correlate with the success of the procedure at stabilizing the humeral head upon elevation. Mean follow-up time was 70 months. There was a significant reduction in pain on the visual analogue scale from 6.4 to 3.4 (P < 0.05), an improved SPONSA score from 32.5 to 57.5 (P < 0.05), and an improved Oxford Shoulder Score from 40.75 to 29.6 (P < 0.05). Forward elevation improved from 40° preoperatively to 75° postoperatively (P < 0.05). Our results add to the body of evidence that latissimus dorsi tendon transfers for irreparable postero-superior cuff deficiency in selected patients reduce pain and improve shoulder function in the medium term. Level 4.

  3. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cuff are common. They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become ... cuff depends on age, health, how severe the injury is, and how long you've had the ...

  4. Functional and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation after single-tendon rotator cuff reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, H B; Gelineck, J; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate tendon integrity after surgical repair of single-tendon rotator cuff lesions. In 31 patients, 31 single-tendon repairs were evaluated. Thirty-one patients were available for clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at follow-up. A standard...

  5. Case reports: ossified mass of the rotator cuff tendon in the subacromial bursa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Isshin; Ito, Yoichi; Tomo, Hiroyasu; Nakao, Yoshihiro; Takaoka, Kunio

    2005-08-01

    Unlike calcification, ossification is infrequent in the rotator cuff. We describe the clinical, radiographic, and pathologic findings in 64-year-old man with an ossified mass arising from a calcified portion of the rotator cuff tendon within the subacromial bursa. Mechanical stress and ischemic events are possible causes of cartilage formation followed by endochondral ossification, producing a mass causing outlet impingement.

  6. Relationship of rotator cuff tendon pathology with obesity, chronic diseases and steroid use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Umul

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: In our study, statistically significant correlation was observed between the supraspinatus tendon pathology with increasing age and increasing BMI. Aging process can not be changed, however prevention of obesity may provide a positive contribution to the conservation of the rotator cuff tendon pathology. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(4.000: 648-652

  7. Assessment of the Postoperative Appearance of the Rotator Cuff Tendon Using Serial Sonography After Arthroscopic Repair of a Rotator Cuff Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hye Jin; Choi, Ja-Young; Hong, Sung Hwan; Kang, Yusuhn; Park, Jina; Kim, Sae Hoon; Kang, Heung Sik

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate serial changes in sonographic findings of a rotator cuff tendon after rotator cuff repair. Sixty-five arthroscopically repaired rotator cuff tears (43 full-thickness tears and 22 partial-thickness tears) were retrospectively included in this study. Serial sonographic examinations were performed at 5 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. The sonographic findings of the repaired tendon were assessed for a recurrent tear, tendon thickness, morphologic tendon characteristics, vascularity, and bursitis at each time point. Four recurrent tears occurred within 3 months of surgery. The postoperative tendon thickness decreased from 5 weeks to 6 months after surgery (P = .001). There were significant changes in the morphologic tendon characteristics, including the echo texture, fibrillar pattern, and surface irregularity of the repaired tendon, from 5 weeks to 6 months after surgery (P subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis and the vascularity of the repaired tendon decreased postoperatively over time. Serial sonography after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was useful for monitoring the postoperative changes in a repaired tendon. The morphologic appearance of the repaired tendon and peritendinous soft tissue changes improved over time and nearly normalized within 6 months of surgery. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  8. Do the rotator cuff tendons of young athletic subjects hypertrophy in response to increased loading demands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Charles; Moran, Daniel S; Safran, Ori; Finsestone, Aharon S

    2012-11-01

    The rotator cuff is composed of muscle and tendon units. Although muscle has been shown to adapt to mechanical loads, the response of human tendon is not well defined. We hypothesized that increased loading demands on the rotator cuff of young trainees would cause an adaptive muscle response but not an adaptive hypertrophic tendon response. The hypertrophic response of the rotator cuff tendon, shoulder strength, aerobic fitness, and the lean body weight of 70 young male recruits were studied before and after a 1-year course of elite infantry training. Shoulder strength was assessed by the maximum number of pull-ups done and the rotator cuff thickness by ultrasound measurement of the supraspinatus thickness. Aerobic physical fitness was assessed by maximum oxygen consumption (Vo(2) max). Lean body weight was measured by skin-fold thickness. The mean number of pull-ups done increased from 17.5 to 21.7 (P = .01), but the supraspinatus thickness at the beginning of training (6.1 mm) was unchanged at the end of the training. Vo(2) max increased from 57 to 64 mL/kg/min (P = .0001). Lean body weight increased from 58.3 to 64.7 kg (P = .0001). As a result of increased loading, the strength of the rotator cuff muscles of young trainees increased, but by the parameter of hypertrophy, no evidence was found of a parallel adaptive response of the rotator cuff tendon. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. the clinical anatomy of the insertion of the rotator cuff tendons

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... Current surgical repair methods (arthroscopic techniques), rarely mention or consider these connections during repair. Rotator cuff surgery .... repaired or even non-repaired tendons. Various techniques are used to repair these ..... attachments to bone in man. Journal of Anatomy, 149, pp.89-100. 4. Bicknell ...

  10. Deltoid muscle and tendon tears in patients with chronic rotator cuff tears

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    Ilaslan, Hakan; Recht, Michael P. [Cleveland Clinic, Musculoskeletal Radiology/A21, Division of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Iannotti, Joseph P. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2007-06-15

    To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of tears of the deltoid muscle and tendon in patients with rotator cuff tears and without a prior history of shoulder surgery. Deltoid tears diagnosed on MR examinations were prospectively recorded between February 2003 through June 2004. The images of these patients were then retrospectively reviewed to determine the location of the deltoid tear, the presence of rotator cuff tears, tendon retraction, muscle atrophy, degree of humeral head subluxation, bony erosive changes involving the undersurface of the acromion, and the presence of edema or fluid-like signal intensity in the deltoid muscle and overlying subcutaneous tissues. There were 24 (0.3%) patients with deltoid tears; nine men and 15 women. The age range was 54 to 87 (average 73) years. The right side was involved in 20 cases, and the left in four cases. Fifteen patients had full thickness and nine had partial thickness tears of the deltoid. Shoulder pain was the most common presenting symptom. The physical examination revealed a defect in the region of the deltoid in two patients. Nineteen patients had tears in the muscle belly near the musculotendinous junction, and five had avulsion of the tendon from the acromial origin. Full thickness rotator cuff tears were present in all of the patients, and 22 patients had associated muscle atrophy. Subcutaneous edema and fluid-like signal was present in 15 patients. Tears of the deltoid muscle or tendon is an unusual finding, but they can be seen in patients with chronic massive rotator cuff tears. Partial thickness tears tend to involve the undersurface of the deltoid muscle and tendon. Associated findings such as intramuscular cyst or ganglion in the deltoid muscle belly and subcutaneous edema or fluid-like signal overlying the deltoid in a patient with a rotator cuff tear should raise the suspicion of a deltoid tear. (orig.)

  11. Blood supply of the subacromial bursa and rotator cuff tendons on the bursal side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Põldoja, Elle; Rahu, Madis; Kask, Kristo; Weyers, Imke; Kolts, Ivo

    2017-07-01

    Vascularity of the subacromial bursa and rotator cuff tendons is key factors in the pathogenesis of subacromial bursitis and impingement syndrome, rotator cuff tendinitis, and rotator cuff tears. The purpose of this study was to investigate and describe blood supply to the cranial and caudal parts of the subacromial bursa and the vascularity of the rotator cuff tendons on the bursal side. Fourteen fresh cadaveric shoulders from six females and eight males with a mean age of 71.7 (±10.8) years were studied. Before dissection, an arterial injection of 10% aqueous dispersion of latex was administered. Post-injection, the shoulders were fixed in an alcohol-formalin-glycerol solution. The cranial and caudal bursa of all specimens was mainly supplied by the thoracoacromial, suprascapular, and anterior and posterior circumflex humeral arteries. The cranial part of the bursa was supplied anteriorly by the thoracoacromial artery, and posteriorly and medially by the posterior circumflex humeral artery as far as the medial third. The caudal part received arterial blood anteriorly from the anterior circumflex humeral artery, and posteriorly and medially by the posterior circumflex humeral artery as far as the medial third of the caudal bursa. In addition, the suprascapular artery branched at the upper surface of the coracohumeral ligament, and the subcoracoid artery branched at the under surface of the same ligament. The subacromial bursa appears well vascularized. The results of the present investigation showed that blood supply to the subacromial bursa at the caudal part and rotator cuff tendons on the bursal side was linked to the same arteries. The subcoracoid artery supplied interval rotator structures close to the caudal bursa. It is the wish of the authors that this meticulous anatomical work will help surgeons in their day-to-day clinical work, e.g. to minimize the risk of complications such as perioperative bleeding.

  12. The Biomechanical Role of Scaffolds in Augmented Rotator Cuff Tendon Repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    double-row suture anchor repair for rotator cuff tears: a random- ized controlled trial. Am J Sports Med 2007;35:1254-60. doi:10.1177/ 0363546507302218... sutures cutting through the tendon was reduced, occurring in 17 of 20 nonaugmented repairs but in only 7 of 20 augmented repairs. In another study...tuberosity using a double-row transosseous technique with 2 Mason Allen sutures per row.20 The prototypical augmen- tation graft used for the augmented

  13. [Tangent sign - a reliable predictor of risk for tendon re-rupture in rotator cuff repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smíd, P; Hart, R; Puskeiler, M

    2014-01-01

    Repair techniques for rotator cuff injury are currently well advanced. However, the risk of re-rupture, particularly when severe damage to the tendons has been repaired, is still high. The causes of failure can be due to the extent of injury, a repair done on a highly degenerated tendon with diminished viability or ischaemic damage to the tendon tissue resulting from suture material. The aim of the study was to ascertain the reliability of the tangent sign, a commonly used indicator of the degree of suprasupinatus muscle atrophy, in the prediction of risk for tendon re-rupture in the post-operative period. In 2011 the rotator cuff torn tendons were repaired by the method of double-row suture in 37 patients. The surgery was done by an open technique using the deltoid-splitting approach. A pre-operative magnetic resonance image (MRI) of the shoulder was obtained in all patients and each was assessed by a competent independent radiology specialist with a focus on the extent of a tendon lesion and the tangent sign. At 2-year follow-up, the results of repeated MRI were evaluated in view of the state of repaired tendons and, if a re-tear was found, its relation to the original suture and its extent in the sagittal plane were determined. The pre- and post-operative MRI findings were compared to find out how the presence or absence of a tangent sign before surgery relates to the incidence of supraspinatus tendon re-rupture at 2 years after surgery. The results were statistically analysed using Student's t-test and the Chi-square test. Of the 37 shoulders, in the pre-operative period, a tangent sign was identified in 21 (56.8%). The average size of a rotator cuff tear was 29.3 mm for the whole group. For the shoulders with no tangent sign, the average value was 21.8 mm, for those with a tangent sign present, it was 39.6 mm. At 2-year follow-up, no tear was found in the patients in whom preoperative MRI showed no tangent sign while re-tears were recorded in 18 of 21

  14. [Clinical follow-up study of combined tenodesis for long head of biceps tendon lesion with massive rotator cuff tear].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Zhu, Yi-ming; Jiang, Chun-yan

    2011-06-21

    To evaluate the combined tenodesis for long head of bicep tendon lesion with massive rotator cuff tear. From January 2004 to June 2009, 41 patients of long head of bicep tendon lesion with massive rotator cuff tear were treated by arthroscopy. The follow-up period was over 12 months. There were 19 males and 22 females with an average age of 57 ± 11 year old. All patients were treated by arthroscopy with double row technique for rotator cuff tear repair and tenodesis for lesions of long head of bicep tendon. It combined the long head of bicep tendon with anterior edge of rotator cuff. The mean visual analogue scale (VAS) was 5.1 ± 23, the range of forward flexion (100 ± 55)°, external rotation (27 ± 24)° and internal rotation up to T(12) (T(5)-S(1)) level pre-operation on average. The Constant-Merly score was 50 ± 23, the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score 14 ± 6 and the simple shoulder test (SST) score 4.0 ± 2.7 pre-operation on average. The strength of flexed elevation was (17 ± 20)% and strength of elbow flexion (101 ± 16)% versus the other side. All patients healed without any complication. Their outcomes improved significantly (P lesion of long head of bicep tendon with massive rotator cuff tear.

  15. Rotator cuff tendon repair morphology comparing 2 single-anchor repair techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Maxwell C; Bui, Christopher; Park, Chong J; Oh, Joo H; Lee, Thay Q

    2013-07-01

    To compare the effect of 2 common rotator cuff repair techniques, for smaller tears limited to the use of a single anchor, on tendon morphology in relation to the footprint. Six matched pairs of human shoulders were dissected, and a standardized 10-mm supraspinatus tendon tear was created. Two single-anchor repairs were performed: simple repair with the anchor on the footprint or inverted-mattress repair with the anchor 1 cm distal-lateral to the footprint. The repaired specimens were frozen in situ with liquid nitrogen. Coronal cross sections through the intact and repaired tendon were made. A digitizer was used to measure variables including tendon area and radius of tendon curvature. Comparing between repairs, we found significantly more gap formation for the simple repair at the repair cross section (3.67 ± 0.32 mm v 0.68 ± 0.10 mm, P = .00050). The simple repair had less tendon area (38.28 ± 2.50 mm(2)v 58.65 ± 4.06 mm(2), P = .0036) and a smaller radius of curvature (8.47 ± 1.39 mm v 32.51 ± 3.94 mm, P = .0046). For the simple repair, there was significantly more gap formation, less tendon area, and a smaller radius of tendon curvature for all repair cross sections compared with the intact cross sections (P anchor, using a distal-lateral anchor position with tape-type suture can provide better maintenance of native tendon morphology and footprint dimensions when compared with repair that uses standard sutures and places the anchor on the footprint. For smaller tears, the inverted-mattress repair described in this article may provide a relatively improved healing environment compared with a simple repair on the footprint, potentially optimizing the prevention of early tear progression. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anabolic Steroids Reduce Muscle Degeneration Associated With Rotator Cuff Tendon Release in Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Christian; Meyer, Dominik C; Flück, Martin; Benn, Mario C; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Wieser, Karl

    2015-10-01

    Chronic rotator cuff tendon tearing is associated with irreversible atrophy, fatty infiltration, and interstitial fibrosis of the corresponding muscle. Anabolic steroids can prevent musculotendinous degeneration during retraction and/or can reverse these changes after operative repair of the retracted musculotendinous unit in sheep. Controlled laboratory study. The infraspinatus tendon was released in 18 alpine sheep. All sheep underwent repair of the retracted musculotendinous unit after 16 weeks and were sacrificed after 22 weeks; 6 sheep served as controls, 6 sheep were treated with weekly intramuscular injection of 150 mg of nandrolone decanoate after infraspinatus (ISP) repair (group N6W), and 6 sheep were treated with 150 mg of nandrolone decanoate immediately after tendon release (group N22W). Muscle biopsy specimens were taken before tendon release and after 16 and 22 weeks. Muscle volume and fatty infiltration (on MRI), myotendinous retraction, and muscle density (on computed tomography) were measured immediately after ISP release, after 6 weeks, and before ISP repair and sacrifice. Muscle volume on MRI decreased to a mean (±SD) of 80% ± 8% of the original volume after 6 weeks, remained stable at 78% ± 11% after 16 weeks, and decreased further to 69% ± 9% after 22 weeks in the control group. These findings were no different from those in group N22W (72% ± 9% at 6 weeks, 73% ± 6% at 16 weeks, and 67% ± 5% at 22 weeks). Conversely, the N6W group did not show a decrease in ISP volume after repair; this finding differed significantly from the response in the control and N22W groups. Fatty infiltration (on MRI) continuously increased in the control group (12% ± 4% at tendon release, 17% ± 4% after 6 weeks, 50% ± 9% after 16 weeks, and 60% ± 8% after 22 weeks) and the N6W group. However, application of anabolic steroids at the time of tendon release (N22W group) significantly reduced fatty infiltration after 16 (16% ± 5%; P anabolic steroids starting

  17. Work above shoulder level and degenerative alterations of the rotator cuff tendons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Gelineck, John; Mathiassen, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine whether work performed with the arms in a highly elevated position is associated with alterations in the rotator cuff tendons as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in a historical cohort of male machinists, car...... work histories obtained by questionnaire and from registry data. Supraspinatus tendinopathy was evidenced by MRI signal intensity changes and morphologic alterations. Infraspinatus and subscapularis tendinopathy were also assessed. Additional outcomes were acromioclavicular joint degeneration.......02–1.60) for a 5-month increase in the total number of full-time working months spent with the arm elevated >90°. Conclusion Work with the arms in a highly elevated position is associated with MRI-diagnosed alterations in the supraspinatus tendon. By demonstrating the first part of a possible biologic pathway...

  18. Rotator Cuff Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Prevention and Wellness Exercise and Fitness Injury Rehabilitation Rotator Cuff Exercises Rotator Cuff Exercises Share Print Rotator Cuff ... Best Rotator Cuff ExercisesNational Institutes of Health: MedlinePlus, ... and WellnessTags: Exercise Prescription, prevention, Shoulder Problems, ...

  19. The effect of rotator cuff malreduction on tendon tension: an evaluation of a custom-made digital tensiometer clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Marc-Frederic; Kraemer, Manuel; Schwarze, Michael; Hurschler, Christof; Smith, Tomas; Wellmann, Mathias

    2017-10-27

    Rotator cuff tears are common and good-to-excellent clinical outcome is reported after subsequent repair. However, the retear rate of rotator cuff repairs has been shown to be as high as 20%. The reasons for retear seem to be multifactorial, mainly comprised by mechanical and biological aspects. Regarding mechanical causes, the role of the tendon tension and malreduction is so far unknown. First, we hypothesized that the tendon tension depends on the technique of tendon reposition and that malreduction of the tendon results in an increased tendon tension. Second, we aimed to demonstrate the inter- and intraobserver reliability of a novel custom-made digital tensiometer clamp. A tendon defect of posterosuperior rotator cuff (reverse L-shaped) was simulated in seven cadaveric human shoulder specimens. By use of a custom-made tensiometer clamp, the supraspinatus tendon was reduced by pulling it in (1) an anterolateral direction (anatomical reduction) and (2) in a straight lateral direction (malreduction) until the footprint was completely covered. The reduction procedure was consecutively repeated to evaluate the inter- and intraobserver reliability. The mean traction forces for anatomical reduction and malreduction were 16.02 N (SD 8.06) and 19.52 N (SD 9.95), respectively. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p = 0.028). The interobserver reliability showed a correlation of r = 0.757 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.092-0.955]. The intraobserver reliability of the three surgeons was observed to be between r = 0.905 and 0.986. The malreduction of the rotator cuff has a significant influence on the tendon tension and may therefore affect the healing rate of the tendon after the repair, so that a tension-balanced repair could improve the clinical results. Furthermore, the application of a novel custom-made tensiometer clamp showed good interobserver and excellent intraobserver reliabilities.

  20. Autologous tendon-derived cell-seeded nanofibrous scaffolds improve rotator cuff repair in an age-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huegel, Julianne; Kim, Dong Hwa; Cirone, James M; Pardes, Adam M; Morris, Tyler R; Nuss, Courtney A; Mauck, Robert L; Soslowsky, Louis J; Kuntz, Andrew F

    2017-06-01

    Rotator cuff tendon tears are one of the most common shoulder pathologies, especially in the aging population. Due to a poor healing response and degenerative changes associated with aging, rotator cuff repair failure remains common. Although cell-based therapies to augment rotator cuff repair appear promising, it is unknown whether the success of such a therapy is age-dependent. We hypothesized that autologous cell therapy would improve tendon-to-bone healing across age groups, with autologous juvenile cells realizing the greatest benefit. In this study, juvenile, adult, and aged rats underwent bilateral supraspinatus tendon repair with augmentation of one shoulder with autologous tendon-derived cell-seeded polycaprolactone scaffolds. At 8 weeks, shoulders treated with cells in both juvenile and aged animals exhibited increased cellularity, increased collagen organization, and improved mechanical properties. No changes between treated and control limbs were seen in adult rats. These findings suggest that cell delivery during supraspinatus repair initiates earlier matrix remodeling in juvenile and aged animals. This may be due to the relative "equilibrium" of adult tendon tissue with regards to catabolic and anabolic processes, contrasted with actively growing juvenile tendons and degenerative aged tendons. This study demonstrates the potential for autologous cell-seeded scaffolds to improve repairs in both the juvenile and aged population. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1250-1257, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Systematics of injuries of the rotator cuff and biceps tendon; Systematik der Verletzungen von Rotatorenmanschette und Bizepssehne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenseher, M.J. [Landesklinikum Horn, Institut fuer Radiologie und interventionelle Radiologie, Horn (Austria); Pones, M.; Breitenseher, J.B. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    2015-03-01

    Injuries of the rotator cuff and the biceps tendon demonstrate different patterns, which can be recognized clinically and radiologically. These patterns are impingement syndrome with additional trauma, isolated trauma of the rotator cuff and shoulder dislocation causing rotator cuff tears. Furthermore, it is clinically crucial to evaluate the extent of a rotator cuff injury. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice to differentiate these patterns. (orig.) [German] Bei der Verletzung von Rotatorenmanschette und Bizepssehne koennen verschiedene Muster klinisch und radiologisch erkannt werden. Diese Muster sind das Impingementsyndrom mit einem zusaetzlichen Trauma, das isolierte Trauma und die Verletzung der Rotatorenmanschette im Rahmen einer Schulterluxation. Darueber hinaus ist die Beurteilung des Ausmasses einer Verletzung von zentraler klinischer Relevanz. Die MRT kann die Differenzierung dieser Muster bestmoeglich durchfuehren. (orig.)

  2. Engineered stem cell niche matrices for rotator cuff tendon regenerative engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, M Sean; Ramos, Daisy M; James, Roshan; Morozowich, Nicole L; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Doty, Steven B; Allcock, Harry R; Kumbar, Sangamesh G; Laurencin, Cato T

    2017-01-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) tears represent a large proportion of musculoskeletal injuries attended to at the clinic and thereby make RC repair surgeries one of the most widely performed musculoskeletal procedures. Despite the high incidence rate of RC tears, operative treatments have provided minimal functional gains and suffer from high re-tear rates. The hypocellular nature of tendon tissue poses a limited capacity for regeneration. In recent years, great strides have been made in the area of tendonogenesis and differentiation towards tendon cells due to a greater understanding of the tendon stem cell niche, development of advanced materials, improved scaffold fabrication techniques, and delineation of the phenotype development process. Though in vitro models for tendonogenesis have shown promising results, in vivo models have been less successful. The present work investigates structured matrices mimicking the tendon microenvironment as cell delivery vehicles in a rat RC tear model. RC injuries augmented with a matrix delivering rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) showed enhanced regeneration over suture repair alone or repair with augmentation, at 6 and 12-weeks post-surgery. The local delivery of rMSCs led to increased mechanical properties and improved tissue morphology. We hypothesize that the mesenchymal stem cells function to modulate the local immune and bioactivity environment through autocrine/paracrine and/or cell homing mechanisms. This study provides evidence for improved tendon healing with biomimetic matrices and delivered MSCs with the potential for translation to larger, clinical animal models. The enhanced regenerative healing response with stem cell delivering biomimetic matrices may represent a new treatment paradigm for massive RC tendon tears.

  3. Texture Analysis of Torn Rotator Cuff on Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Arthrography as a Predictor of Postoperative Tendon Status

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Yeonah; Lee, Guen Young; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Eugene; Kim, Bohyoung; Kim, Su Jin; Ahn, Joong Mo; Kang, Heung Sik

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate texture data of the torn supraspinatus tendon (SST) on preoperative T2-weighted magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) using the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) for prediction of post-operative tendon state. Materials and Methods Fifty patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for full-thickness tears of the SST were included in this retrospective study. Based on 1-year follow-up, magnetic resonance imaging showed that 30 patients had intact SSTs, and...

  4. Comparison of the Tendon Damage Caused by Four Different Anchor Systems Used in Transtendon Rotator Cuff Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Song Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objective of this study was to compare the damage to the rotator cuff tendons caused by four different anchor systems. Methods. 20 cadaveric human shoulder joints were used for transtendon insertion of four anchor systems. The Healix Peek, Fastin RC, Bio-Corkscrew Suture, and Healix Transtend anchors were inserted through the tendons using standard transtendon procedures. The areas of tendon damage were measured. Results. The areas of tendon damage (mean ± standard deviation, n=7 were 29.1 ± 4.3 mm2 for the Healix Peek anchor, 20.4 ± 2.3 mm2 for the Fastin RC anchor, 23.4 ± 1.2 mm2 for the Bio-Corkscrew Suture anchor, 13.7 ± 3.2 mm2 for the Healix Transtend anchor inserted directly, and 9.1 ± 2.1 mm2 for the Healix Transtend anchor inserted through the Percannula system (P<0.001 or P<0.001, compared to other anchors. Conclusions. In a cadaver transtendon rotator cuff repair model, smaller anchors caused less damage to the tendon tissues. The Healix Transtend implant system caused the least damage to the tendon tissues. Our findings suggest that smaller anchors should be considered when performing transtendon procedures to repair partial rotator cuff tears.

  5. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  6. The role of tendon and subacromial bursa in rotator cuff tear pain: a clinical and histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillemi, Claudio; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Franceschini, Vincenzo; Garro, Luca; Pacchiarotti, Alberto; Porta, Natale; Cirenza, Mirko; Salate Santone, Francesco; Castagna, Alessandro

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate a possible association of shoulder pain with the clinical features and the histopathological changes occurring in the ruptured tendon and subacromial bursa of patients with rotator cuff tear. One hundred and eighty patients were clinically evaluated with the constant score and the visual analogue pain scale. Radiographs and MRI were performed. The chronology of the rupture, the muscle fatty degeneration according to Goutallier's scale and the tear size were evaluated. For each patient, a biopsy of the supraspinatus tendon and subacromial bursa was performed during arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair and the specimens were histopathologically analysed. Clinically, the shoulder was more painful in females, in the presence of a chronic cuff lesion and a low Goutallier's grade (P bursa were directly associated with pain (P bursa compared with those in the rotator cuff. Considering that the bursa plays also an essential role during the healing process, this "new" role of the subacromial bursa as pain generator has important repercussions in both pharmacological and surgical treatments of rotator cuff tears. IV.

  7. Morphology of the humeral insertion of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons: Application to rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumsdaine, William; Smith, Adam; Walker, Rowan G; Benz, Daniel; Mohammed, Khalid D; Stewart, Fiona

    2015-09-01

    In shoulder surgery, a precise understanding of anatomical relationships is required for accurate reconstruction. Reports in recent literature have challenged the traditional definitions of the humeral footprints of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons. This study aims to precisely delineate these footprints. The rotator cuffs of 54 shoulders from 27 Australian Caucasoid donor cadavers were examined. The tendinous portions were dissected down to their region/footprint of attachment upon the humerus. Measurements of those footprints, upon the greater and lesser tuberosities, were made. Those measurements were statistically analyzed for any association with age, sex, height, or side. Twenty-seven cadavers had an average age at death of 74.9 (± 12.8), 56% were male, average height was 168 (± 8.6) cm. Due to premorbid fracture, or degeneration, 11 shoulders were excluded. The footprint of the supraspinatus was triangular, with a medial, anteroposterior length of 20.4 ± 4.2 mm. Its lateral anteroposterior length was 6.3 ± 1.6 mm and its maximal mediolateral width was 6.6 ± 2.7 mm. Its calculated area was 122.0 ± 66.6 mm(2). The footprint of the infraspinatus was trapezoidal, with a medial anteroposterior length 22.6 ± 3.0 mm. Its lateral anteroposterior length was 25.4 ± 3.3mm and its maximal mediolateral width was 12.0 ± 2.7 mm. Its calculated area was 294.9 ± 74.1 mm(2). There was no statistical correlation between size of the footprint and age, sex, side, or height. The humeral footprints of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons upon the greater tuberosity were distinct. The lateral border of the infraspinatus' humeral attachment extended much farther anteriorly upon the highest facet of the greater tuberosity than in traditional descriptions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Longitudinal Long-term Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Clinical Follow-up After Single-Row Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Clinical Superiority of Structural Tendon Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberer, Philipp R; Smolen, Daniel; Pauzenberger, Leo; Plachel, Fabian; Salem, Sylvia; Laky, Brenda; Kriegleder, Bernhard; Anderl, Werner

    2017-05-01

    The number of arthroscopic rotator cuff surgeries is consistently increasing. Although generally considered successful, the reported number of retears after rotator cuff repair is substantial. Short-term clinical outcomes are reported to be rarely impaired by tendon retears, whereas to our knowledge, there is no study documenting long-term clinical outcomes and tendon integrity after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. To investigate longitudinal long-term repair integrity and clinical outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff reconstruction. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with suture anchors for a full-tendon full-thickness tear of the supraspinatus or a partial-tendon full-thickness tear of the infraspinatus were included. Two and 10 years after initial arthroscopic surgery, tendon integrity was analyzed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score and Constant score as well as subjective questions regarding satisfaction with the procedure and return to normal activity were used to evaluate short- and long-term outcomes. At the early MRI follow-up, 42% of patients showed a full-thickness rerupture, while 25% had a partial rerupture, and 33% of tendons remained intact. The 10-year MRI follow-up (129 ± 11 months) showed 50% with a total rerupture, while the other half of the tendons were partially reruptured (25%) or intact (25%). The UCLA and Constant scores significantly improved from preoperatively (UCLA total: 50.6% ± 20.2%; Constant total: 44.7 ± 10.5 points) to 2 years (UCLA total: 91.4% ± 16.0% [ P Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair showed good clinical long-term results despite a high rate of retears. Nonetheless, intact tendons provided significantly superior clinical long-term outcomes, making the improvement of tendon healing and repair integrity important goals of future research efforts.

  9. Treatment alternative for irreparable rotator cuff ruptures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The treatment of massive irreparable rotator cuff rupture has still no consensus among shoulder surgeons. It is assumed that symptomatic rotator cuff tendon rupture is accepted as irreparable if retraction amount of tendon is Patte stage 3 on MRI; degree of fatty atrophy is Goutallier stage 3 or 4; narrowing of ...

  10. Texture analysis of torn rotator cuff on preoperative magnetic resonance arthrography as a predictor of postoperative tendon status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yeon Ah; Lee, Guen Young; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Eugene; Kim, Boh Young; Kim, Su Jin; Ahn, Joong Mo; Kang, Heung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate texture data of the torn supraspinatus tendon (SST) on preoperative T2-weighted magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) using the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) for prediction of post-operative tendon state. Fifty patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for full-thickness tears of the SST were included in this retrospective study. Based on 1-year follow-up, magnetic resonance imaging showed that 30 patients had intact SSTs, and 20 had rotator cuff retears. Using GLCM, two radiologists measured independently the highest signal intensity area of the distal end of the torn SST on preoperative T2-weighted MRA, which were compared between two groups.The relationships with other well-known prognostic factors, including age, tear size (anteroposterior dimension), retraction size (mediolateral tear length), grade of fatty degeneration of the SST and infraspinatus tendon, and arthroscopic fixation technique (single or double row), also were evaluated. Of all the GLCM features, the retear group showed significantly higher entropy (p < 0.001 and p = 0.001), variance (p = 0.030 and 0.011), and contrast (p = 0.033 and 0.012), but lower angular second moment (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002) and inverse difference moment (p = 0.027 and 0.027), as well as larger tear size (p = 0.001) and retraction size (p = 0.002) than the intact group. Retraction size (odds ratio [OR] = 3.053) and entropy (OR = 17.095) were significant predictors. Texture analysis of torn SSTs on preoperative T2-weighted MRA using the GLCM may be helpful to predict postoperative tendon state after rotator cuff repair.

  11. [EFFECTIVENESS OF COMBINED TENODESIS FOR PROXIMAL LESIONS OF BICEPS TENDON WITH MASSIVE ROTATOR CUFF TEAR BY ARTHROSCOPY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianwu; Ye, Ruqing; Xu, Haiping; Lu, Jianmeng

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the combined tenodesis for proximal lesions of biceps tendon with massive rotator cuff tear by arthroscopy. Between January 2011 and June 2013, 48 patients with massive rotator cuff tear and proximal lesions of biceps tendon underwent combined tenodesis under arthroscopy, and the clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. Of 48 cases, 22 were male and 26 were female with an average age of 46 years (range, 35-59 years); 12 cases had clear history of trauma. The disease duration ranged from 1 to 57 months (mean, 4.6 months). All cases suffered from moderate to severe shoulder pain, the strength and the range of motion (ROM) declined when compared with those of the other side. According to Goutallier classification standard, 3 cases were rated as grade 0, 18 cases as grade 1, and 27 cases as grade 2. The operation time and complication were recorded. The visual analogue scale (VAS) score, ROM, the strength of flexed elevation and elbow flexion, Constant-Murley score, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Mayo elbow performance score (MEPS) were used to evaluate the effectiveness. The operations were performed successfully, and incisions healed primarily. The operation time was 120-160 minutes (mean, 135 minutes). One case had shoulder joint swelling with wound bleeding, which was cured after proper treatment. All 48 patients were followed up 12-18 months (mean, 13.9 months). The results of MRI showed good healing of tendon at 6 months after operation. When compared with preoperative values, VAS score was significantly decreased (P 0.05). The technique of combined tenodesis under arthroscopy can obtain satisfactory clinical outcomes in treating proximal lesions of biceps tendon with massive rotator cuff tear.

  12. Comparison of the effect of low-power laser with therapeutic ultrasound on the treatment of rotator cuff tendonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    asghar Akbari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Akbari A1 1. Assistant Professor, Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences Abstract Background: Shoulder pain is the third most prevalent cause of musculoskeletal disorder after low back and cervical pains. Most of the shoulder symptoms are attributed to the rotator cuff. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of low-power laser therapy with ultrasound therapy on the patients with rotator cuff tendonitis. Materials and methods: This clinical trial was performed in Zahedan university of medical sciences in 2006. Thirty patients with rotator cuff tendonitis were randomly assigned to either a low-power laser therapy group (15 patients or an ultrasound therapy group (15 patients. Strength (kg of shoulder abductor, and internal and external rotator muscles, as well as range (degree of shoulder abduction, and internal and external rotation were measured before and after intervention using hand-held dynamometer and goniometer respectively. The pain was evaluated using the visual analogue scale. In the laser group, a low-level Ga-As laser was applied with a 100 mw point probe (average power, wave length of 905 nm, pulse duration of 200 ns, 6 J/cm2 dosage, 5 KHz frequency, and lasting 3 minutes. The ultrasound treatment was applied with a power of 1 W/cm2, a frequency of 1 MHz, pulse mode of 1:4, and lasting 10 minutes on each occasion. The treatment was carried out 3 times weekly for 10 days. The data were analyzed using independent sample t-test and paired t-test. Results: The pain in the laser group was significantly decreased from 6.06±1.6 to 5±1.3 in abduction, from 5.3±1.5 to 4.7±1.3 in internal rotation, and from 5.06±1.4 to 4.3±1.44 in external rotation (p0.05. A significant improvement after treatment was observed in the laser group in measures of shoulder abductor, internal rotator and external rotator muscles strength compared to those of the ultrasound therapy group (p<0

  13. Arthroscopic Removal and Tendon Repair for Refractory Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendinitis of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Hiroshi; Iwashita, Satoshi; Okubo, Atsushi; Takai, Shinro

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes of arthroscopic treatment for refractory rotator cuff calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Subjects were 37 patients (35 women and 2 men; mean age, 47.8 years; age range 34-61 years) who had undergone arthroscopic treatment for calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Despite sufficient nonsurgical treatments, all patients had residual calcific deposit with persistent or recurrent pain. Before surgery, all patients underwent 3-directional radiographs of the shoulder and three-dimensional computed tomography to determine the location and size of calcific deposit. Arthroscopic surgery was performed with the patient under general anesthesia in the lateral decubitus position. A 2-cm single longitudinal incision was made with a radiofrequency hook blade on the tendon surface above calcific deposit. Calcific deposit was removed as much as possible with a curette and a motorized shaver. The incised tendon was repaired with a side-to-side suture with strong sutures. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association shoulder score was used to evaluate clinical outcomes. The extent of calcific deposit removal was evaluated with radiographs obtained before surgery, 1 week after the surgery and at the final follow-up examination. The mean follow-up duration was 30.4 (range, 13-72) months. The mean shoulder score significantly improved from 69.7 (range, 58-80) points before surgery to 97.8 (range, 89-100) points at the final follow-up examination. Postoperative radiographs in all patients, showed that the calcific deposit was resolved or reduced and those from 1 week after surgery to the final examination showed no evidence of recurrence or enlargement of calcific deposit. The calcific deposit had completely resolved in 34 patients but remained in 3 patients. When treating calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, it is important to accurately determine the size and location of calcific deposit by radiographs and 3

  14. Regeneration of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tendon Tear After Ultrasound-Guided Injection With Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rabbit Model

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Gi-Young; Kwon, Dong Rak; Lee, Sang Chul

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic effects of ultrasound-guided human umbilical cord blood (UBC)-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) injection to regenerate a full-thickness subscapularis tendon tear in a rabbit model were studied. Gross morphology and histology of the injected tendon were evaluated, and improvement in functional ability was assessed by motion analysis. Histology revealed that UCB-derived MSCs induced regeneration of the rotator cuff tendon; motion analysis showed improved walking capacity.

  15. Tendon of the long head of the biceps originating from the rotator cuff - An uncommon anatomical variation: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Vicente Andreoli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Anatomical variations at the origin of the biceps tendon have been described by several authors, but occurrences of an origin in the supraspinatus are rare. It is unclear whether this variation might contribute toward pathological conditions of the shoulder. Our objective here was to describe a case of an anatomical variation in the origin of the tendon of the long head of the biceps. The clinical information, preoperative images and arthroscopic images relating to a patient with an aberrant origin of the long head of the biceps, which was observed during shoulder arthroscopy, were reviewed. In this case study, the origin of the biceps was found in the rotator cuff, without any origin from the supraglenoid tubercle or upper labrum. This variant did not seem to contribute toward the pathological condition of the shoulder, and standard treatment for the concomitant condition was sufficient for treating it.

  16. Occult Interpositional Rotator Cuff - an Extremely Rare Case of Traumatic Rotator Cuff Tear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Wei Ren; Jou, I Ming [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan (China); Lin, Cheng Li [Show-Chwan Memorial Hospital, Changhua (China); Chih, Wei Hsing [Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi (China)

    2012-01-15

    Traumatic interposition of a rotator cuff tendon in the glenohumeral joint without recognizable glenohumeral dislocation is an unusual complication after shoulder trauma. Here we report the clinical and imaging presentations of a 17-year-old man with trapped rotator cuff tendons in the glenohumeral joint after a bicycle accident. The possible trauma mechanism is also discussed.

  17. The effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on tendon-bone healing in a transosseous-equivalent sheep rotator cuff model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovric, Vedran; Ledger, Michael; Goldberg, Jerome; Harper, Wade; Bertollo, Nicky; Pelletier, Matthew H; Oliver, Rema A; Yu, Yan; Walsh, William R

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound has on initial tendon-bone healing in a clinically relevant extra-articular transosseous-equivalent ovine rotator cuff model. Eight skeletally mature wethers, randomly allocated to either control group (n = 4) or treatment group (n = 4), underwent rotator cuff surgery following injury to the infraspinatus tendon. All animals were killed 28 days post surgery to allow examination of early effects of Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound treatment. General improvement in histological appearance of tendon-bone integration was noted in the treatment group. Newly formed woven bone with increased osteoblast activity along the bone surface was evident. A continuum was observed between the tendon and bone in an interdigitated fashion with Sharpey's fibres noted in the treatment group. Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound treatment also increased bone mineral density at the tendon-bone interface (p < 0.01), while immunohistochemistry results revealed an increase in the protein expression patterns of VEGF (p = 0.038), RUNX2 (p = 0.02) and Smad4 (p = 0.05). The results of this study indicate that Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound may aid in the initial phase of tendon-bone healing process in patients who have undergone rotator cuff repair. This treatment may also be beneficial following other types of reconstructive surgeries involving the tendon-bone interface.

  18. Rotator cuff muscles lose responsiveness to anabolic steroids after tendon tear and musculotendinous retraction: an experimental study in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Christian; Meyer, Dominik C; Von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Hoppeler, Hans; Frigg, Robert; Farshad, Mazda

    2012-11-01

    Long-standing rotator cuff tendon tearing is associated with retraction, loss of work capacity, irreversible fatty infiltration, and atrophy of the rotator cuff muscles. Although continuous musculotendinous relengthening can experimentally restore muscular architecture, restoration of atrophy and fatty infiltration is hitherto impossible. Continuous relengthening with pharmacological stimulation of muscle growth using an anabolic steroid or insulin-like growth factor (IGF) can reverse atrophy and fatty infiltration as well as improve the work capacity of chronically retracted rotator cuff muscles in sheep. Controlled laboratory study. Sixteen weeks after tenotomy of the infraspinatus (ISP) tendon, atrophy and fatty infiltration had developed in the retracted ISP muscle. The musculotendinous unit was continuously relengthened in 14 sheep during 6 weeks: Four sheep were treated without pharmacological stimulation, 4 with intramuscular administration of an anabolic steroid, and 6 with IGF before final repair and rehabilitation (12 weeks). Changes were documented by intraoperative measurements of muscle work capacity, histology, and computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging. Musculotendinous relengthening by continuous traction resulted in gains of length ranging from 0.7 cm in the IGF group to 1.3 cm in the control group. Fatty infiltration progressed in all groups, and the muscle's cross-sectional area ranged from 71% to 74% of the contralateral side at sacrifice and did not show any differences between groups in weight, volume, histological composition, or work capability of the muscle. The contralateral muscles in the anabolic steroid group, however, showed significantly higher (mean ± standard deviation) muscle work capacity of 10 ± 0.9 N·m than the contralateral muscles of the control group (6.8 ± 2.4 N·m) (P muscle fiber area as well as by an unusual gain in the animals' weight after injection of the anabolic steroid. Subcutaneous continuous

  19. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells obtained during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery show potential for tendon cell differentiation after treatment with insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocca, Augustus D; McCarthy, Mary Beth R; Chowaniec, David; Cote, Mark P; Judson, Christopher H; Apostolakos, John; Solovyova, Olga; Beitzel, Knut; Arciero, Robert A

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a one-time physiologic dose of insulin when compared with the growth factors insulin-like growth factor 1, β-fibroblastic growth factor, and growth differentiation factor 5 is capable of differentiating bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into tendon. Eleven patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair consented to undergo aspiration of bone marrow. A dose-response curve was calculated to determine the optimal dose of insulin needed to differentiate MSCs into tendon. After purification of bone marrow in the operating room, MSCs were exposed to either insulin or tendon-inducing growth factors or were left untreated to serve as a control. The potential for MSCs in each of these groups to differentiate into tendon was evaluated with a multistep process that included determination of the genetic upregulation for tendon-specific proteins, confirmation that the levels of these proteins were actually increased, staining of the MSCs with antibodies for these proteins to ensure that they were expressed on the cell surface, and finally, evaluation of cell morphology to verify the MSCs' tendon-like appearance. MSCs treated with insulin showed increased gene expression of tendon-specific markers (P differentiated into cells with characteristics consistent with tendon. The potential for MSCs to differentiate into tendon after a 1-time dose of insulin may assist in developing practical biologic options for augmentation of rotator cuff repairs. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Classification of the degenerative grade of lesions of supraspinatus rotator cuff tendons by FT-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma Fogazza, Bianca; da Silva Carvalho, Carolina; Godoy Penteado, Sergio; Meneses, Cláudio S.; Abrahão Martin, Airton; da Silva Martinho, Herculano

    2007-02-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy was employed to access the biochemical alterations occurring on the degenerative process of the rotator cuff supraspinatus tendons. The spectral characteristic variations in the 351 spectra of samples of 39 patients were identified with the help of Principal Components Analysis. The main variations occurred in the 840-911; 1022- 1218; 1257; 1270; 1300; 1452; 1663; and 1751 cm -1 regions corresponding to the vibrational bands of proline, hydroxiproline, lipids, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, collagen, and elastin. These alterations are compatible with the pathology alterations reported on the literature. Scattering plots of PC 4 vs PC 2 and PC 3 vs PC 2 contrasted with histopathological analysis has enabled the spectral classification of the data into normal and degenerated groups of tendons. By depicting empiric lines the estimated sensibility and specificity were 39,6 % and 97,8 %, respectively for PC 4 vs PC 2 and 36,0 % and 100 %, respectively for PC 3 vs PC 2. These results indicate that Raman spectroscopy can be used to probe the general tendon quality and could be applied as co adjuvant element in the usual arthroscopy surgery apparatus to guide the procedure and possibly infer about the probability of rerupture.

  1. Effect of Angiogenesis-Related Cytokines on Rotator Cuff Disease: The Search for Sensitive Biomarkers of Early Tendon Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia A. Savitskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Hallmarks of the pathogenesis of rotator cuff disease (RCD include an abnormal immune response, angiogenesis, and altered variables of vascularity. Degenerative changes enhance production of pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory, and vascular angiogenesis-related cytokines (ARC that play a pivotal role in the immune response to arthroscopic surgery and participate in the pathogenesis of RCD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ARC profile, ie, interleukin (IL: IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, and angiogenin (ANG, in human peripheral blood serum and correlate this with early degenerative changes in patients with RCD. Methods Blood specimens were obtained from 200 patients with RCD and 200 patients seen in the orthopedic clinic for nonrotator cuff disorders. Angiogenesis imaging assays was performed using power Doppler ultrasound to evaluate variables of vascularity in the rotator cuff tendons. Expression of ARC was measured by commercial Bio-Plex Precision Pro Human Cytokine Assays. Results Baseline concentrations of IL-1β, IL-8, and VEGF was significantly higher in RCD patients than in controls. Significantly higher serum VEGF levels were found in 85% of patients with RCD, and correlated with advanced stage of disease (r = 0.75; P < 0.0005, average microvascular density (r = 0.68, P < 0.005, and visual analog score (r = 0.75, P < 0.0002 in RCD patients. ANG and IL-10 levels were significantly lower in RCD patients versus controls. IL-1β and ANG levels were significantly correlated with degenerative tendon grade in RCD patients. No difference in IL-6 and bFGF levels was observed between RCD patients and controls. Patients with degenerative changes had markedly lower ANG levels compared with controls. Power Doppler ultrasound showed high blood vessel density in patients with tendon rupture. Conclusion The pathogenesis of RCD is associated with an

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of 3T conventional shoulder MRI in the detection of the long head of the biceps tendon tears associated with rotator cuff tendon tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ro Woon; Choi, Soo-Jung; Ahn, Jae Hong; Shin, Dong Rock; Kang, Chae Hoon [University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Foundation, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung-si, Gangwon-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Man Ho [Andong Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Andong-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki Won [University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Asan Foundation, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung-si, Gangwon-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance (DP) of 3T (3 Tesla field strength) conventional shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) tears in association with rotator cuff tendon tears. This study included 80 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery for rotator cuff tendon tears. Two radiologists independently evaluated the preoperative 3T shoulder MRI for the presence of LHBT tears. The DP of MRI was evaluated using the results of arthroscopy as the reference standard. We also evaluated the DP of several MR signs of LHBT in detection of partial LHBT tears. Arthroscopic examination revealed 35 partial and 5 complete tears. According to the results of evaluation by reviewers 1 and 2, shoulder MRI exhibited sensitivities of 77.14 and 80 % and specificities of 71.11 and 73.33 % in detection of partial LHBT tears and sensitivities of 80 and 100 % and a specificity of 100% (both) in detection of complete LHBT tears. In detecting partial LHBT tears, increased T2 signal intensity of the LHBT exhibited high sensitivities (reviewers 1 and 2; 82.85 and 80 %, respectively) and the presence of intratendinous defects or C-signs exhibited the highest specificities (reviewers 1 and 2; 95.55 and 93.33 %, respectively), followed by abnormalities in shape and outer margins of the LHBT (reviewers 1 and 2; 91.11 and 82 %; 91.11 and 86.66 %, respectively). Non-contrast-enhanced 3T shoulder MRI is potentially highly accurate in detection of complete LHBT tears, but moderately accurate in detection of partial LHBT tears. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of the clinical-functional results from repairing extensive rotator cuff injury with inclusion of the tendon of the long head of the biceps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Yukio Ikemoto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess the outcomes of the arthroscopic margin convergence of the posterior cuff to the biceps tendon. METHODS: From October 2003 to December 2007, 20 patients with massive rotator cuff tear which include the rotator interval were treated with arthroscopic margin convergence of the posterior cuff to biceps tendon. Sixteen patients were female and four were male. The mean age was 58.95 years old. The dominant side was affected in 16 cases (80%. The outcomes were analysed according to the UCLA Score with a minimum follow-up period of two years. RESULTS: The UCLA score improved, on average, 14 points (p < 0.001. Six patients had excellent results; nine good; three fair and two poor results. The mean improvement of forward flexion was 33º (p < 0.001, 3º of external rotation (p < 0.396 and two vertebral levels for internal rotation (p < 0.025. CONCLUSION: The arthroscopic margin convergence of the posterior cuff to the biceps tendon leads to satisfactory results.

  4. Lysylhydroxylation and non-reducible crosslinking of human supraspinatus tendon collagen: changes with age and in chronic rotator cuff tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, R A; TeKoppele, J M; Oostingh, G; Hazleman, B L; Riley, G P

    1999-01-01

    To investigate age related and site specific variations in turnover and chemistry of the collagen network in healthy tendons as well as the role of collagen remodelling in the degeneration of the supraspinatus tendon (ST-D) in rotator cuff tendinitis. Collagen content and the amount of hydroxylysine (Hyl), hydroxy-lysylpyridinoline (HP), lysylpyridinoline (LP), and the degree of non-enzymatic glycation (pentosidine) were investigated in ST-D and in normal human supraspinatus (ST-N) and biceps brachii tendons (BT-N) by high-performance liquid chromatography. In BT-N, tendons that served as control tissue as it shows rarely matrix abnormalities, pentosidine levels rise linearly with age (20-90 years), indicating little tissue remodelling (resulting in an undisturbed accumulation of pentosidine). A similar accumulation was observed in ST-N up to 50 years. At older ages, little pentosidine accumulation was observed and pentosidine levels showed large interindividual variability. This was interpreted as remodelling of collagen in normal ST after age 50 years because of microruptures (thus diluting old collagen with newly synthesised collagen). All degenerate ST samples showed decreased pentosidine levels compared with age matched controls, indicating extensive remodelling in an attempt to repair the tendon defect. Collagen content and the amount of Hyl, HP, and LP of ST-N and BT-N did not change with age. With the exception of collagen content, which did not differ, all parameters were significantly (p collagen content and had higher Hyl, HP, and LP levels than ST-N (p collagen. On the other hand, the clearly different profile of post-translational modifications in ST-D indicates that the newly deposited collagen network in degenerated tendons is qualitatively different. It is concluded that in ST-D the previously functional and carefully constructed matrix is replaced by aberrant collagen. This may result in a mechanically less stable tendon; as the supraspinatus is

  5. Current Biomechanical Concepts for Rotator Cuff Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    For the past few decades, the repair of rotator cuff tears has evolved significantly with advances in arthroscopy techniques, suture anchors and instrumentation. From the biomechanical perspective, the focus in arthroscopic repair has been on increasing fixation strength and restoration of the footprint contact characteristics to provide early rehabilitation and improve healing. To accomplish these objectives, various repair strategies and construct configurations have been developed for rotator cuff repair with the understanding that many factors contribute to the structural integrity of the repaired construct. These include repaired rotator cuff tendon-footprint motion, increased tendon-footprint contact area and pressure, and tissue quality of tendon and bone. In addition, the healing response may be compromised by intrinsic factors such as decreased vascularity, hypoxia, and fibrocartilaginous changes or aforementioned extrinsic compression factors. Furthermore, it is well documented that torn rotator cuff muscles have a tendency to atrophy and become subject to fatty infiltration which may affect the longevity of the repair. Despite all the aforementioned factors, initial fixation strength is an essential consideration in optimizing rotator cuff repair. Therefore, numerous biomechanical studies have focused on elucidating the strongest devices, knots, and repair configurations to improve contact characteristics for rotator cuff repair. In this review, the biomechanical concepts behind current rotator cuff repair techniques will be reviewed and discussed. PMID:23730471

  6. Rotator cuff repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... presentations/100229.htm Rotator cuff repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  7. Triple-Loaded Single-Row Versus Suture-Bridge Double-Row Rotator Cuff Tendon Repair With Platelet-Rich Plasma Fibrin Membrane: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan

    2016-05-01

    To compare the structural healing and clinical outcomes of triple-loaded single-row with suture-bridging double-row repairs of full-thickness rotator cuff tendons when both repair constructs are augmented with platelet-rich plasma fibrin membrane. A prospective, randomized, consecutive series of patients diagnosed with full-thickness rotator cuff tears no greater than 3 cm in anteroposterior length were treated with a triple-loaded single-row (20) or suture-bridging double-row (20) repair augmented with platelet-rich plasma fibrin membrane. The primary outcome measure was cuff integrity by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 12 months postoperatively. Secondary clinical outcome measures were American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, Rowe, Simple Shoulder Test, Constant, and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation scores. The mean MRI interval was 12.6 months (range, 12-17 months). A total of 3 of 20 single-row repairs and 3 of 20 double-row repairs (15%) had tears at follow-up MRI. The single-row group had re-tears in 1 single tendon repair and 2 double tendon repairs. All 3 tears failed at the original attachment site (Cho type 1). In the double-row group, re-tears were found in 3 double tendon repairs. All 3 tears failed medial to the medial row near the musculotendinous junction (Cho type 2). All clinical outcome measures were significantly improved from the preoperative level (P plasma fibrin membrane. No difference could be demonstrated between these repairs on clinical outcome scores. I, Prospective randomized study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. All rights reserved.

  8. Regenerative Medicine in Rotator Cuff Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Randelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff injuries are a common source of shoulder pathology and result in an important decrease in quality of patient life. Given the frequency of these injuries, as well as the relatively poor result of surgical intervention, it is not surprising that new and innovative strategies like tissue engineering have become more appealing. Tissue-engineering strategies involve the use of cells and/or bioactive factors to promote tendon regeneration via natural processes. The ability of numerous growth factors to affect tendon healing has been extensively analyzed in vitro and in animal models, showing promising results. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is a whole blood fraction which contains several growth factors. Controlled clinical studies using different autologous PRP formulations have provided controversial results. However, favourable structural healing rates have been observed for surgical repair of small and medium rotator cuff tears. Cell-based approaches have also been suggested to enhance tendon healing. Bone marrow is a well known source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Recently, ex vivo human studies have isolated and cultured distinct populations of MSCs from rotator cuff tendons, long head of the biceps tendon, subacromial bursa, and glenohumeral synovia. Stem cells therapies represent a novel frontier in the management of rotator cuff disease that required further basic and clinical research.

  9. Strain Distribution of Intact Rat Rotator Cuff Tendon-to-Bone Attachments and Attachments With Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Ryan C; Peloquin, John M; Lemmon, Elisabeth A; Szostek, Adrianna; Elliott, Dawn M; Killian, Megan L

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to experimentally track the tissue-scale strains of the tendon-bone attachment with and without a localized defect. We hypothesized that attachments with a localized defect would develop strain concentrations and would be weaker than intact attachments. Uniaxial tensile tests and digital image correlation were performed on rat infraspinatus tendon-to-bone attachments with defects (defect group) and without defects (intact group). Biomechanical properties were calculated, and tissue-scale strain distributions were quantified for superior and inferior fibrous and calcified regions. At the macroscale, the defect group exhibited reduced stiffness (31.3±3.7 N/mm), reduced ultimate load (24.7±3.8 N), and reduced area under the curve at ultimate stress (3.7±1.5 J/m2) compared to intact attachments (42.4±4.3 N/mm, 39.3±3.7 N, and 5.6±1.4 J/m2, respectively). Transverse strain increased with increasing axial load in the fibrous region of the defect group but did not change for the intact group. Shear strain of the superior fibrous region was significantly higher in the defect group compared to intact group near yield load. This work experimentally identified that attachments may resist failure by distributing strain across the interface and that strain concentrations develop near attachment defects. By establishing the tissue-scale deformation patterns of the attachment, we gained insight into the micromechanical behavior of this interfacial tissue and bolstered our understanding of the deformation mechanisms associated with its ability to resist failure.

  10. [Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with patch augmentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, M

    2012-11-01

    SURGICAL OBJECTIVE: Augmentation of the rotator cuff with an ECM patch during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is performed in order to unload the reconstruction and to activate biological healing. Reconstructable rotator cuff ruptures with reduced tendon quality. Non-reconstructable tendon defects. After tendon reconstruction the graft is shuttled and fixed on the cuff with two medially placed pulling sutures. With two lateral sutures the graft is pulled laterally over the reconstructed cuff and on the lateral tuberculum majus. Immobilization in an abduction pillow for 6 weeks with passive motion, active motion the next 6 weeks, and weight bearing after 12 weeks. Eight patients with a reconstructable re-rupture were augmented with an ECM patch. Short-term results after 6 months showed 5 (62.5%) healed tendons, 1 complete (12.5%) and 2 incomplete re-ruptures (25%). The CS (Constant Score) and SSV (Subjective Shoulder Value) were improved from 51 to 57% and 51 to 71%, which was not significant (p > 0.05). The Oxford shoulder score improved significantly from 21 to 38 (p < 0.05). There were no relevant intra- or postoperative complications.

  11. Management of Failed Rotator Cuff Repair in Young Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhassan, Bassem T; Cox, Ryan M; Shukla, Dave R; Lee, Julia; Murthi, Anand M; Tashjian, Robert Z; Abboud, Joseph A

    2017-11-01

    Management of failed rotator cuff repair may be difficult, especially in young patients. Various nonmodifiable and modifiable patient factors, including age, tendon quality, rotator cuff tear characteristics, acute or chronic rotator cuff tear, bone quality, tobacco use, and medications, affect rotator cuff repair healing. Surgical variables, such as the technique, timing, tension on the repair, the biomechanical construct, and fixation, as well as the postoperative rehabilitation strategy also affect rotator cuff repair healing. Variable outcomes have been reported in patients who undergo revision rotator cuff repair; however, a systematic surgical approach may increase the likelihood of a successful outcome. Numerous cellular and mechanical biologic augments, including platelet-rich plasma, platelet-rich fibrin matrix, mesenchymal stem cells, and acellular dermal matrix grafts, have been used in rotator cuff repair; however, conflicting or inconclusive outcomes have been reported in patients who undergo revision rotator cuff repair with the use of these augments. A variety of tendon transfer options, including latissimus dorsi, teres major, lower trapezius, pectoralis minor, pectoralis major, combined pectoralis major and latissimus dorsi, and combined latissimus dorsi and teres major, are available for the management of massive irreparable rotator cuff tears. Ultimately, the optimization of surgical techniques and the use of appropriate biologic/tendon transfer techniques, if indicated, is the best method for the management of failed rotator cuff repair.

  12. Role of metalloproteinases in rotator cuff tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Raffaele; Cesari, Eugenio; Vinci, Enzo; Castagna, Alessandro

    2011-09-01

    The role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPS) in the pathophysiology of rotator cuff tears has not been established yet. Recent advances empathize about the role of MMPs and TIMPS in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and degradation in rotator cuff tears pathogenesis and healing after surgical repair. An increase in MMPs synthesis and the resulting MMPs mediated alterations in the ECM of tendons have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of tendinopathy, and there is an increase in the expression of MMPs and a decrease in TIMP messenger ribonucleic acid expression in tenocytes from degenerative or ruptured tendons. Importantly, MMPs are amenable to inhibition by cheap, safe, and widely available drugs such as the tetracycline antibiotics and bisphosphonates. A better understanding of relationship and activity of these molecules could provide better strategies to optimize outcomes of rotator cuff therapy.

  13. Metalloproteases and rotator cuff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Buono, Angelo; Oliva, Francesco; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Rodeo, Scott A; Orchard, John; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-02-01

    The molecular changes occurring in rotator cuff tears are still unknown, but much attention has been paid to better understand the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in the development of tendinopathy. These are potent enzymes that, once activated, can completely degrade all components of the connective tissue, modify the extracellular matrix (ECM), and mediatethe development of painful tendinopathy and tendon rupture. To control the local activity of activated proteinases, the same cells produce tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP) that bind to the enzymes and prevent degradation. The balance between the activities of MMPs and TIMPs regulates tendon remodeling, whereas an imbalance produces a collagen dis-regulation and disturbances intendons. ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) are cell membrane-linked enzymes with proteolytic and cell signaling functions. ADAMTSs (ADAM with thrombospondin motifs) are secreted into the circulation, and constitute a heterogenous family of proteases with both anabolic and catabolic functions. Biologic modulation of endogenous MMP activity to basal levels may reduce pathologic tissue degradation and favorably influence healing after rotator cuff repair. Further studies are needed to better define the mechanism of action, and whether these new strategies are safe and effective in larger models. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment Alternative for Irreparable Rotator Cuff Ruptures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-09-03

    Sep 3, 2016 ... tendon to repair has decreased and patient has severe pain. Biodegradable balloon is one of the newest methods for the treatment of irreparable massive rotator cuff ruptures. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess shoulder function in the patients who underwent biodegradable balloon procedure ...

  15. Arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness and small full-thickness rotator cuff tears: tendon quality as a prognostic factor for repair integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seok Won; Kim, Jae Yoon; Yoon, Jong Pil; Lyu, Seong Hwa; Rhee, Sung Min; Oh, Se Bong

    2015-03-01

    The healing failure rate is high for partial-thickness or small full-thickness rotator cuff tears. To retrospectively evaluate and compare outcomes after arthroscopic repair of high-grade partial-thickness and small full-thickness rotator cuff tears and factors affecting rotator cuff healing. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Included in the study were 55 consecutive patients (mean age, 57.9 ± 7.2 years) who underwent arthroscopic repair for high-grade partial-thickness (n = 34) and small full-thickness (n = 21) rotator cuff tears. The study patients also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and computed tomography arthrography (CTA) at least 6 months postoperatively, and their functional outcomes were evaluated preoperatively and at the last follow-up (>24 months). All partial-thickness tears were repaired after being converted to full-thickness tears; thus, the repair process was almost the same as for small full-thickness tears. The tendinosis of the torn tendon was graded from the MRI images using a 4-point scale, and the reliabilities were assessed. The outcomes between high-grade partial-thickness tears that were converted to small full-thickness tears and initially small full-thickness tears were compared, and factors affecting outcomes were evaluated. The inter- and intraobserver reliabilities of the tendinosis grade were good (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.706 and 0.777, respectively). Failure to heal as determined by CTA was observed in 12 patients with a high-grade partial-thickness tear (35.3%; complete failure in 4 and partial failure in 8) and in 3 patients with a small full-thickness tear (14.3%; complete failure in 1 and partial failure in 2). The patients with high-grade partial-thickness rotator cuff tears showed a higher tendinosis grade than did those with small full-thickness tears (P = .014), and the severity of the tendinosis was related to the failure to heal (P = .037). Tears with a higher tendinosis grade

  16. Employment of synthetic patch with augmentation of the long head of the biceps tendon in irreparable lesions of the rotator cuff: our technique applied to 60 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Matteo; Cusumano, Andrea; Pedretti, Alberto; Naim Rodriguez, Nadim; Fraschini, Gianfranco

    2015-03-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of both clinical and functional benefits after the surgical repair of the rotator cuff in irreparable lesions using a synthetic patch with augmentation of the long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon. This is a retrospective study analysis of a randomized series of 60 patients (45 women and 15 men; average age 66 y) who underwent open repair of irreparable rotator cuff tear with synthetic patch using LHB tendon augmentation between 1999 and 2008.The inclusion criteria were: patients painful symptomatology, presenting a deficit in elevation, who are not responsive to physiotherapy, irreparable tear size, minimum follow-up of 36 months after surgery, and active and motivated patients. We used a control group of 60 patients treated without employment of the synthetic patch and LHB tendon augmentation.Patients were evaluated preoperatively and after 36 months with a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale and by measuring elevation of the scapular plane and strength with a dynamometer. All the patients were assessed preoperatively also with plain radiographs (anteroposterior and axillary views), ultrasound, and NMRI of the shoulder. The VAS and UCLA scores were also obtained 3 months postoperatively. Tendon integrity was assessed after 1 year by NMRI. Statistical analysis was conducted by 1-way analysis of variance between groups of treatment, with Dunnett post hoc correction for multiple comparisons. P-values ≤ 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. This surgical technique consisted in a short deltoid splitting, irreparable lesion evaluation, and, after tenodesis, the proximal segment of the LHB tendon was sutured to the remaining cuff tendons to fill the gap of the corresponding lesion. To shield the repaired rotator cuff we inserted a synthetic patch. Satisfactory results were achieved in 52 of the patients treated with this procedure; after

  17. MRI of the rotator cuff and internal derangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opsha, Oleg; Malik, Archana; Baltazar, Romulo; Primakov, Denis; Beltran, Salvador; Miller, Theodore T; Beltran, Javier

    2008-10-01

    Disease to the rotator cuff is the most common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction in adults. This group of muscles performs multiple functions and is often stressed during various activities. The anatomy and physiology of the rotator cuff is complex and interconnected to other muscle groups in the shoulder. One must take the anatomic status of the rotator cuff tendons into account when planning the treatment of the rotator cuff injury. Diagnostic imaging of the rotator cuff, performed by MRI, provides valuable information about the nature of the injury. In this article, we will review the various types and causes of rotator cuff injuries, normal MR anatomy, function, patho-anatomy, and the biomechanics of the rotator cuff. We will also review shoulder impingement syndromes.

  18. MRI of the rotator cuff and internal derangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opsha, Oleg [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219 (United States)], E-mail: oopsha@hotmail.com; Malik, Archana [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219 (United States)], E-mail: dr.armal@gmail.com; Baltazar, Romulo [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219 (United States)], E-mail: rbaltazar@gmail.com; Primakov, Denis [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, 300 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030 (United States)], E-mail: dgprim@yahoo.com; Beltran, Salvador [Dr. Ramon Marti, 2 Albons, Ginrona 17136 (Spain); Miller, Theodore T. [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021 (United States)], E-mail: MillerTT@hss.edu; Beltran, Javier [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219 (United States)], E-mail: jbeltran46@msn.com

    2008-10-15

    Disease to the rotator cuff is the most common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction in adults. This group of muscles performs multiple functions and is often stressed during various activities. The anatomy and physiology of the rotator cuff is complex and interconnected to other muscle groups in the shoulder. One must take the anatomic status of the rotator cuff tendons into account when planning the treatment of the rotator cuff injury. Diagnostic imaging of the rotator cuff, performed by MRI, provides valuable information about the nature of the injury. In this article, we will review the various types and causes of rotator cuff injuries, normal MR anatomy, function, patho-anatomy, and the biomechanics of the rotator cuff. We will also review shoulder impingement syndromes.

  19. Xanthomatous Infiltration of the Rotator Cuff and Long Head of Biceps with Rotator Cuff Tear in a Patient with Mixed Hyperlipidemia: A Case Report with MRI Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley S. Bath

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Xanthomatous infiltration may rarely affect the rotator cuff muscles and long head of the biceps tendon. It is the deposition of cholesterol within the rotator cuff muscles and long head of the biceps tendon resulting from hyperlipidemia, specifically high triglyceride and total cholesterol levels. As more commonly seen with xanthomatous infiltration and tear of the Achilles tendon, there may also be an association with rotator cuff tendon deposition and tear. MRI images of xanthomatous infiltration with rotator cuff tear in a 77 year old man with hyperlipidemia are detailed in the following case report.

  20. Instability of the long head of the biceps tendon in patients with rotator cuff tear: evaluation on magnetic resonance arthrography of the shoulder with arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yusuhn; Lee, Joon Woo; Ahn, Joong Mo; Lee, Eugene; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of MR arthrography (MRA) in diagnosing instability of the LHBT in patients with rotator cuff tendon tear. The MR arthrograms of 101 patients were retrospectively reviewed and correlated with arthroscopic findings as the standard reference. Images were evaluated for (1) the integrity of the LHBT, (2) the position of the LHBT (subluxation/dislocation on axial images, inferior displacement on oblique sagittal image) and (3) the integrity of the biceps pulley (SGHL, supraspinatus and subscapularis tendon adjacent to the rotator interval). The integrity of the LHBT was correctly classified in 74.3% (75/101) and 66.3% (67/101) by readers 1 and 2, respectively. The diagnosis of LHBT instability could be made on axial images with a sensitivity of 82.6% and 73.9% and specificity of 69.9% and 87.7%, whereas the displacement sign on sagittal images had a sensitivity of 73.9% and 78.3% and a specificity of 64.4% and 61.6%, respectively. Assessing the integrity of the SGHL had a sensitivity of 60.9 and 93.3% and a specificity of 70.4 and 75.0%, respectively. By combining the different image findings, the accuracy in assessing LHBT instability was 80.9 and 90.5% with a sensitivity of 60.9 and 86.7% and specificity of 83.1 and 91.8%, respectively. Individual image findings may have a limited role in diagnosing LHBT instability in patients with rotator cuff tendon tear. The accuracy of MRA may be improved by assessing the integrity of the biceps pulley structures along with the position of the LHBT on both axial and sagittal images. (orig.)

  1. Biomechanic and histologic analysis of fibroblastic effects of tendon-to-bone healing by transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) in rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chong; Liu, Yu-Jie

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) on tendon-to-bone reconstruction of rotator cuff tears. Seventy-two rat supraspinatus tendons were transected and reconstructed in situ. At 8 and 16 weeks, specimens of three groups; that is control, L-dose (low dose), and H-dose (high dose) were harvested and underwent a biomechanical test to evaluate the maximum load and stiffness values. Histology sections of the tendon-to-bone interface were identified by hematoxylin-eosin or Masson trichrome stain. Collagen type III was observed by picric acid sirius red staining under polarized light. The level of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Collagen type III of the H-dose group had a significant difference in histology structure compared with the L-dose group (P<0.05). The maximum load and stiffness decreased significantly in the control group compared with the values of the L-dose and H-dose groups. The stiffness among the three groups differed significantly at the same postoperative time (P<0.05). Interestingly, progressive reestablishment of collagen type III affected tendon-to-bone healing significantly in the later stages. The H-dose was associated with an increased collagen type III morphology stimulated by TGF-β1.

  2. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff with cortical bone erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Roxanne; Kim, David H.; Millett, Peter J. [Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Weissman, Barbara N. [Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, Boston (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Calcifying tendinitis occurs most commonly in the rotator cuff tendons, particularly involving the supraspinatus tendon insertion, and is often asymptomatic. Cortical erosion secondary to calcifying tendinitis has been reported in multiple locations, including in the rotator cuff tendons. We present a pathologically proven case of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis involving the infraspinatus tendon with cortical erosion with correlative radiographic, CT, and MR findings. The importance of considering this diagnosis when evaluating lytic lesions of the humerus and the imaging differential diagnosis of calcifying tendinitis and cortical erosion are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Rotator cuff tendon assessment using magic-angle insensitive 3D ultrashort echo time cones magnetization transfer (UTE-Cones-MT) imaging and modeling with histological correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanchun; Cheng, Xin; Ma, Yajun; Wong, Jonathan H; Xie, Yaoqin; Du, Jiang; Chang, Eric Y

    2017-12-08

    Rotator cuff tendons (RCTs) are challenging to image due to the "magic angle effect" and their short T2 . To assess the degree of magic angle sensitivity of human RCTs and to utilize a 3D ultrashort echo time Cones sequence with magnetization transfer preparation (UTE-Cones-MT) and two-pool quantitative MT modeling with histological correlation. We hypothesized that MT parameters would be less sensitive to the magic angle compared with conventional T2 measurements. Prospective imaging pathologic correlation. Twenty cadaveric rotator cuff tendons were imaged at five sample orientations ranging from 0-90° relative to the B0 field. 3T/3D UTE-Cones-MT and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG). Two-pool quantitative MT modeling parameters and T2 values were calculated in regions of interest drawn by a medical physicist. Histopathological analysis was performed and mild and severe tendinopathy groups were assigned by a histopathologist and histotechnician. Coefficients of variations (CVs) were calculated for measures between the different orientations and group means were compared for each measure. CVs of T2 and macromolecular fractions between orientations were 26.14 ± 16.82% and 6.18 ± 2.77% (mean ± SD), respectively. T2 measurements at 0°, 27°, 70°, and 90° showed significant differences between the two histological groups (P = 0.004, 0.008, 0.003, and 0.015, respectively), but not at 55° (P = 0.611). Mean T2 value ranges between orientations for the mild and severe tendinopathy groups were 15.27-30.32 msec and 20.81-35.85 msec, respectively, showing overlap despite statistically significant differences (P = 0.003). Macromolecular fractions at all angles showed significant differences between the two groups (P Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Anomalous biceps origin from the rotator cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samik Banerjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Variations in the origin of the long head of biceps tendon (LHBT have been described in literature; however, its clinical significance remains uncertain. We describe in this report, the history, physical examination and the arthroscopic findings in a patient who had an anomalous origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff, resulting in restriction of range of motion. This anomalous origin of the long head of biceps tendon causing capsular contracture and restriction of movements leading to secondary internal impingement, has not been extensively reported in the literature. Shoulder arthroscopists should be aware that, although, an uncommon clinical condition, the aberrant congenital origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff can rarely become pathologic in middle age and lead to shoulder dysfunction. In such cases, release of the anomalous band may be required, along with the treatment of other concomitant intraarticular pathologies in the glenohumeral joint.

  5. Influence of psychomotor skills and innervation patterns on results of latissimus dorsi tendon transfer for irreparable rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Clément M L; Ruckstuhl, Thomas; Müller, Roland; Zanetti, Marco; Gerber, Christian

    2008-01-01

    This investigation was performed to analyze the influence of innervation and psychomotor skills on the outcome of latissimus dorsi transfer. Patients with the 10 best and 10 worst results after latissimus dorsi transfer for irreparable rotator cuff tears were selected. All patients meeting the inclusion criteria (n = 12) were subject to a psychomotor test battery (Motorische Leistungsserie) and electromyographic innervation assessment. There was no statistical difference between the 2 groups preoperatively in terms of the commonly tested factors known to influence the results of this procedure adversely. There was a significant difference in both the pattern and selectivity of innervation in the group that had better clinical results. The psychomotor findings were negatively correlated with the range of motion and the strength of the operative shoulder. Function of the operative shoulder could also be predicted by psychomotor function of the uninjured contralateral side. Psychomotor skills testing appears to be a new, potential method by which to predict the outcome of latissimus dorsi transfer.

  6. Delaminated rotator cuff tear: extension of delamination and cuff integrity after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Heui-Chul; Kim, Chang-Wan; Kim, Jung-Han; Choo, Hye-Jeung; Sagong, Seung-Yeob; Shin, John

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extension of delamination and the cuff integrity after arthroscopic repair of delaminated rotator cuff tears. Sixty-five patients with delaminated rotator cuff tears were retrospectively reviewed. The delaminated tears were divided into full-thickness delaminated tears and partial-thickness delaminated tears. To evaluate the medial extension, we calculated the coronal size of the delaminated portion. To evaluate the posterior extension, we checked the tendon involved. Cuff integrity was evaluated by computed tomography arthrography. The mean medial extension in the full-thickness and partial-thickness delaminated tears was 18.1 ± 6.0 mm and 22.7 ± 6.3 mm, respectively (P = .0084). The posterior extension into the supraspinatus and the infraspinatus was 36.9% and 32.3%, respectively, in the full-thickness delaminated tears, and it was 27.7% and 3.1%, respectively, in the partial-thickness delaminated tears (P = .0043). With regard to cuff integrity, 35 cases of anatomic healing, 10 cases of partial healing defects, and 17 cases of retear were detected. Among the patients with retear and partial healing of the defect, all the partially healed defects showed delamination. Three retear patients showed delamination, and 14 retear patients did not show delamination; the difference was statistically significant (P = .0001). The full-thickness delaminated tears showed less medial extension and more posterior extension than the partial-thickness delaminated tears. Delamination did not develop in retear patients, but delamination was common in the patients with partially healed defects. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical results of arthroscopic polyglycolic acid sheet patch graft for irreparable rotator cuff tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Mochizuki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The high retear rates after surgery for irreparable rotator cuff tears can be explained by the healing capacity potential of tendons and the native rotator cuff enthesis characterised by complex morphological structures, called direct insertion. Many experimental researches have focused on biologically augmenting the rotator cuff reconstruction and improving tendon–bone healing of the rotator cuff. The results of the experimental study showed that the polyglycolic acid sheet scaffold material allows for the regeneration of not only tendon-to-tendon, but also tendon-to-bone interface in an animal model. We performed a clinical study of the arthroscopic polyglycolic acid sheet patch graft used for the repair of irreparable rotator cuff tears. One-year clinical results of the repair of irreparable rotator cuff tears by arthroscopic patch graft with a polyglycolic acid sheet demonstrated improved shoulder function and a significantly lower retear rate, compared with patients treated with a fascia lata patch.

  8. Diagnostic imaging of shoulder rotator cuff lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira-Barbosa Marcello Henrique

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder rotator cuff tendon tears were evaluated with ultrasonography (US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Surgical or arthroscopical correlation were available in 25 cases. Overall costs were also considered. Shoulder impingement syndrome diagnosis was done on a clinical basis. Surgery or arthroscopy was considered when conservative treatment failure for 6 months, or when rotator cuff repair was indicated. Ultrasound was performed in 22 patients and MRI in 17 of the 25 patients. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 80%, 100% and 90.9% for US and 90%, 100% and 94.12% for MRI, respectively. In 16 cases both US and MRI were obtained and in this subgroup statistical correlation was excellent (p< 0.001. We concluded that both methods are reliable for rotator cuff full thickness tear evaluation. Since US is less expensive, it could be considered as the screening method when rotator cuff integrity is the main question, and when well trained radiologists and high resolution equipment are available.

  9. WHAT RESULTS IN TENDON AND MUSCLE TISSUES OF THE ROTATOR CUFF FROM FULL-THICKNESS TEARS: DATA OF MRI, ARTHROSCOPY AND HISTOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Dokolin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Full-thickness rotator cuff tears - is abundant injury which leads to the expressed pain syndrome and functional violation of the top extremity. At making decision about necessary of surgery, MRI is the important source of information about the injury The purpose: to determine the qualitative and quantitative indicators of degenerative-dystrophic changes in muscular and tendinous parts of the rotator cuff. based on a combined MRI, arthroscopic and histological diagnostics of full-thickness rupture of shoulder cuff Methods: We have examined 28 patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears. MRI of damaged joint to all patients before an operation was performed. Thereafter an arthroscopy was performed and intraoperative biopsy of the muscular and tendinous parts of the rotator cuff, with following histological examination. Results: It was found that at small full-thickness rotator cuff tears the intensity of degenerative changes in muscular and tendinous tissue was lower, so these tears are the most promising for all kinds of treatment. At medium and big tears intensity of degenerative changes in the tissues begins to prevail over productive inflammation and it limits to the ability of conservative treatment and increases the risk of unsuccessful outcomes of arthroscopic reconstruction. Conclusions: In this regard, it is necessary to search biological decisions, which complement the stage of arthroscopic reconstruction of the rotator cuff.

  10. Correlation between Rotator Cuff Tears and Systemic Atherosclerotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Donovan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of aortic arch calcification, a surrogate marker of atherosclerosis, with rotator cuff tendinosis and tears given the hypothesis that decreased tendon vascularity is a contributing factor in the etiology of tendon degeneration. A retrospective review was performed to identify patients ages 50 to 90 years who had a shoulder MRI and a chest radiograph performed within 6 months of each other. Chest radiographs and shoulder MRIs from 120 patients were reviewed by two sets of observers blinded to the others' conclusions. Rotator cuff disease was classified as tendinosis, partial thickness tear, and full thickness tear. The presence or absence of aortic arch calcification was graded and compared with the MRI appearance of the rotator cuff. The tendon tear grading was positively correlated with patient age. However, the tendon tear grading on MRI was not significantly correlated with the aorta calcification scores on chest radiographs. Furthermore, there was no significant correlation between aorta calcification severity and tendon tear grading. In conclusion, rotator cuff tears did not significantly correlate with aortic calcification severity. This suggests that tendon ischemia may not be associated with the degree of macrovascular disease.

  11. Enhancement of rotator cuff tendon-bone healing with fibroblast growth factor 2 impregnated in gelatin hydrogel sheets in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Takuya; Karasugi, Tatsuki; Arimura, Hitoshi; Yonemitsu, Ryuji; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Ide, Junji; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2017-10-01

    Application of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) may improve the healing response after rotator cuff (RC) surgical repair. This study aimed to determine whether FGF-2-impregnated gelatin hydrogel sheet (GHS) incorporation into the bony trough on the greater tuberosity facilitates healing after RC surgical repair in rabbits. We assigned 120 adult male Japanese white rabbits treated with unilateral surgery for supraspinatus tendon repair into the following groups: suture-only group (suture); suture and GHS with phosphate-buffered saline (carrier); suture and GHS with 3 µg of FGF-2 (F3); and suture and GHS with 30 µg of FGF-2 (F30). The effect of FGF-2 was assessed using histologic, biomechanical, and microcomputed tomography evaluations at 2, 6, and 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, loose fibrovascular tissues emerged at the repair site in the suture and carrier groups and dense tendon-like tissues in the F3 and F30 groups, which demonstrated significantly higher ultimate load-to-failure and stress-to-failure at 12 weeks than that in the suture and carrier groups. Microcomputed tomography imaging showed ectopic calcification formation in some specimens from each group. Appearances or frequencies were similar among groups. The histologic and biomechanical effects of FGF-2 on RC healing were obvious at ≥6 weeks postoperatively. FGF-2-impregnated GHS incorporation into the bony trough on the greater tuberosity before RC surgical repair is feasible and results in histologic and biomechanical improvements during RC healing in rabbits. No detrimental effect on ectopic calcification was observed. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Combined Subscapularis Tears in Massive Posterosuperior Rotator Cuff Tears: Do They Affect Postoperative Shoulder Function and Rotator Cuff Integrity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Young; Chung, Seok Won; Lee, Seoung-Joon; Cho, Hyoung-Weon; Lee, Jae Hyung; Lee, Jun-Hee; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on massive rotator cuff tears have not addressed the outcomes of tears extending to the subscapularis tendon. The retear rate in patients with a massive posterosuperior rotator cuff tear combined with a subscapularis tear is higher than that in patients with a massive posterosuperior rotator cuff tear with an intact subscapularis tendon. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Data were collected and analyzed from 92 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of a massive posterosuperior rotator cuff tear. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the status of the subscapularis tendon: intact subscapularis tendon (I-massive tear; n = 42), tear involving half or less than half of the subscapularis tendon (S-massive tear; n = 22), and tear involving more than half of the subscapularis tendon (L-massive tear; n = 28). The integrity of the rotator cuff was determined by ultrasonography at 4.5 and 12 months or later after surgery. Clinical evaluations were performed using the visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, the Constant score, and active shoulder range of motion. Data were collected on the day before surgery and at final follow-up (at least 24 months postoperatively). A total of 25 retears (27%) were identified based on an ultrasonographic evaluation. Although statistical significance was not found, there was a trend toward a higher retear rate in patients with an L-massive tear (43%) compared with those with an S-massive tear (18%; P = .050) or I-massive tear (21%; P = .059) at final follow-up. The subclassification of retears according to the involved tendons revealed that subsequent retears of the subscapularis tendon were noted only in patients with an L-massive tear. In patients with an L-massive tear, postoperative data comparison between patients with intact subscapularis tendons and those with failed subscapularis tendons revealed that a significant difference was noted

  13. The Rotator Cuff Organ: Integrating Developmental Biology, Tissue Engineering, and Surgical Considerations to Treat Chronic Massive Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Pauyo, Thierry; Debski, Richard E; Rodosky, Mark W; Tuan, Rocky S; Musahl, Volker

    2017-08-01

    The torn rotator cuff remains a persistent orthopedic challenge, with poor outcomes disproportionately associated with chronic, massive tears. Degenerative changes in the tissues that comprise the rotator cuff organ, including muscle, tendon, and bone, contribute to the poor healing capacity of chronic tears, resulting in poor function and an increased risk for repair failure. Tissue engineering strategies to augment rotator cuff repair have been developed in an effort to improve rotator cuff healing and have focused on three principal aims: (1) immediate mechanical augmentation of the surgical repair, (2) restoration of muscle quality and contractility, and (3) regeneration of native enthesis structure. Work in these areas will be reviewed in sequence, highlighting the relevant pathophysiology, developmental biology, and biomechanics, which must be considered when designing therapeutic applications. While the independent use of these strategies has shown promise, synergistic benefits may emerge from their combined application given the interdependence of the tissues that constitute the rotator cuff organ. Furthermore, controlled mobilization of augmented rotator cuff repairs during postoperative rehabilitation may provide mechanotransductive cues capable of guiding tissue regeneration and restoration of rotator cuff function. Present challenges and future possibilities will be identified, which if realized, may provide solutions to the vexing condition of chronic massive rotator cuff tears.

  14. Rotator cuff problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TENDINITIS Your doctor will likely advise you to rest your shoulder and avoid activities that cause pain. Other measures ... the shoulder muscles Medicine (corticosteroid) injected into the ... tendons TEARS Rest and physical therapy may help with a partial ...

  15. Rotator cuff repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cuff repair may be done include: You have shoulder pain when you rest or at night, and it has not improved ... A partial tear may not require surgery. Instead, rest and exercise are used to heal the shoulder. This approach is often best for people who ...

  16. Ultrasonography of the Rotator Cuff

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    Yoon, Yong Cheol [Samsung Medica Center, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    The ultrasonography (US) is an important modality in evaluating shoulder disease. It is accurate in diagnosing the various shoulder diseases including tendinosis, calcific tendinitis, and subacromial bursitis as well as rotator cuff tears. This article presents a pictorial review of US anatomy of the shoulder, the technical aspects of shoulder US, major types of shoulder pathology, and interventional procedure under US guidance

  17. Intense focused ultrasound stimulation of the rotator cuff: evaluation of the source of pain in rotator cuff tears and tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellhorn, Alfred C; Gillenwater, Cody; Mourad, Pierre D

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to evaluate the ability of individual 0.1-s long pulses of intense focused ultrasound (iFU) emitted with a carrier frequency of 2 MHz to evoke diagnostic sensations when applied to patients whose shoulders have rotator cuff tears or tendinopathy. Patients were adults with painful shoulders and clinical and imaging findings consistent with rotator cuff disease. iFU stimulation of the shoulder was performed using B-mode ultrasound coupled with a focused ultrasound transducer that allowed image-guided delivery of precisely localized pulses of energy to different anatomic areas around the rotator cuff. The main outcome measure was iFU spatial average-temporal average intensity (I_SATA), and location required to elicit sensation. In control patients, iFU produced no sensation throughout the range of stimulation intensities (≤2000 W/cm(2) I_SATA). In patients with rotator cuff disease, iFU was able to induce sensation in the tendons of the rotator cuff, the subacromial bursa, and the subchondral bone in patients with chronic shoulder pain and rotator cuff disease, with an average ± standard deviation intensity equaling 680 ± 281 W/cm(2) I_SATA. This result suggests a primary role for these tissues in the pathogenesis of shoulder pain related to rotator cuff tendinopathy. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Local Application of Gelatin Hydrogel Sheets Impregnated With Platelet-Derived Growth Factor BB Promotes Tendon-to-Bone Healing After Rotator Cuff Repair in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Takuya; Ide, Junji; Arimura, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Takayuki; Uehara, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    To determine whether the local application of platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) in hydrogel sheets would promote healing and improve histologic characteristics and biomechanical strength after rotator cuff (RC) repair in rats. To assess the effect of PDGF-BB on tendon-to-bone healing we divided 36 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with bilateral surgery to repair the supraspinatus tendon at its insertion site into 3 groups: group 1 = suture-only group; group 2 = suture and gelatin hydrogel sheets impregnated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS); and group 3 = suture and gelatin hydrogel sheets impregnated with PDGF-BB (0.5 μg). Semiquantitative histologic evaluation was carried out 2, 6, and 12 weeks later; cell proliferation was assessed 2 and 6 weeks postoperatively by immunostaining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and biomechanical testing, including ultimate load to failure, stiffness, and ultimate stress to failure, was performed 12 weeks after the operation. At 2 weeks, the average percentage of PCNA-positive cells at the insertion site was significantly higher in group 3 (40.5% ± 2.4%) than in group 1 (32.1% ± 6.9%; P = .03) and group 2 (31.9% ± 3.7%; P = .02). At 2 and 6 weeks, the histologic scores were similar among the 3 groups. At 12 weeks, the histologic score was significantly higher in group 3 (10.3 ± 0.8) than in group 1 (8.5 ± 0.5; P = .002) or group 2 (8.8 ± 0.8; P = .009), whereas ultimate load to failure, stiffness, and ultimate load to stress (normal control population, 44.73 ± 9.75 N, 27.59 ± 4.32 N/mm, and 21.33 ± 4.65 N/mm(2), respectively) were significantly higher in group 3 (28.28 ± 6.28 N, 11.05 ± 2.37 N/mm, and 7.99 ± 2.13 N/mm(2), respectively) than in group 1 (10.44 ± 1.98 N, 4.74 ± 1.31 N/mm, and 3.28 ± 1.27 N/mm(2), respectively; all P < .001) or group 2 (11.85 ± 2.89 N, 5.86 ± 1.75 N/mm, and 3.31 ± 0.80 N/mm(2), respectively; all P < .001). The placement of a PDGF

  19. Progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotoh, Masafumi; Higuchi, Fujio; Suzuki, Ritsu; Yamanaka, Kensuke [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical Center of Kurume University, 155-1 Kokubu-machi, Kurume City, Fukuoka 839-0862 (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    This report documents the clinical, radiographic and histologic findings in a 46-year-old man with calcifying tendinitis in his left shoulder which progressed to rotator cuff tear. The patient had a 1-year history of repeated calcifying tendinitis before being referred to our hospital. On the initial visit, radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed calcium deposition localized in the supraspinatus tendon without apparent tear. Three months after the first visit, MRI revealed a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear at the site of calcium deposition. Surgical and histologic findings demonstrated that calcium deposition was the cause of cuff rupture. To our knowledge, based on a review of the English literature, this is the first case report in which the progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear has been serially observed. (orig.)

  20. A meta-analysis comparing tenotomy and tenodesis for treating rotator cuff tears combined with long head of the biceps tendon lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiliang Shang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this meta-analysis was to assess whether there were differences in the outcomes between tenotomy and tenodesis in treating LHBT lesions combined with rotator cuff repairs.Using Medline, Embase, and Cochrane, we searched for articles comparing tenotomy and tenodesis combined with rotator cuff repair which were published before April 2016 with the terms "biceps", "tenotomy", "tenodesis", and "rotator cuff". The controlled clinical studies that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were assessed for quality of methodology by utilizing the Coleman score.On the basis of the inclusion and exclusion criteria, ten articles (903 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The Coleman score ranged between 40 and 89 in the included studies. The results showed that the incidence of the popeye sign (OR, 2.777, P = 0.000 were higher in tenotomy group compared with tenodesis group when concomitant rotator cuff repair. Statistically significant difference in favor of tenodesis was observed for Constant score (SMD, -0.230, P = 0.025. As for the arm cramping pain, patient satisfaction, VAS score, ASES score and UCLA increased score, the strength and the range of motion, there were no significant differences between tenodesis and tenotomy of the LHBT, corresponding to the currently available results in the literature.Based on this meta-analysis, both tenotomy and tenodesis are effective in pain relief and function improvement in patients with repairable rotator cuff tears. No significant differences in post-operative functional outcome between tenotomy and tenodesis for the treatment of LHBT lesions were observed except for a lower Constant score and higher risk of Popeye deformity in tenotomy.

  1. SECEC Research Grant 2008 II: Use of platelet- and leucocyte-rich fibrin (L-PRF) does not affect late rotator cuff tendon healing: a prospective randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumstein, Matthias A; Rumian, Adam; Thélu, Charles Édouard; Lesbats, Virginie; O'Shea, Kieran; Schaer, Michael; Boileau, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Because the retear rate after rotator cuff repairs remains high, methods to improve healing are very much needed. Platelet-rich concentrates have been shown to enhance tenocyte proliferation and promote extracellular matrix synthesis in vitro; however, their clinical benefit remains unclear. We hypothesized that arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with leucocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) results in better clinical and radiographic outcome at 12 months of follow-up than without L-PRF. Thirty-five patients were randomized to receive arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with L-PRF locally applied to the repair site (L-PRF+ group, n = 17) or without L-PRF (L-PRF- group, n = 18). Preoperative and postoperative clinical evaluation included the Subjective Shoulder Value, visual analog score for pain, Simple Shoulder Test, and Constant-Murley score. The anatomic watertight healing, tendon thickness, and tendon quality was evaluated using magnetic resonance arthrography at 12 months of follow-up. No complications were reported in either group. The mean Subjective Shoulder Value, Simple Shoulder Test, and Constant-Murley scores increased from preoperatively to postoperatively, showing no significant differences between the groups. Complete anatomic watertight healing was found in 11 of 17 in the L-PRF+ group and in 11 of 18 in the L-PRP- group (P = .73). The mean postoperative defect size (214 ± 130 mm(2) in the L-PRF+ group vs 161 ± 149 mm(2) in the L-PRF- group; P = .391) and the mean postoperative tendon quality according to Sugaya (L-PRF+ group: 3.0 ± 1.4, L-PRF- group: 3.0 ± 0.9) were similar in both groups at 12 months of follow-up. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with application of L-PRF yields no beneficial effect in clinical outcome, anatomic healing rate, mean postoperative defect size, and tendon quality at 12 months of follow-up. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The global percutaneous shuttling technique tip for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan G. Vopat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Most arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs utilize suture passing devices placed through arthro- scopic cannulas. These devices are limited by the size of the passing device where the suture is passed through the tendon. An alternative technique has been used in the senior author’s practice for the past ten years, where sutures are placed through the rotator cuff tendon using percutaneous passing devices. This technique, dubbed the global percutaneous shuttling technique of rotator cuff repair, affords the placement of sutures from nearly any angle and location in the shoulder, and has the potential advantage of larger suture bites through the tendon edge. These advantages may increase the area of tendon available to compress to the rotator cuff footprint and improve tendon healing and outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the global percutaneous shuttling (GPS technique and report our results using this method. The GPS technique can be used for any full thickness rotator cuff tear and is particularly useful for massive cuff tears with poor tissue quality. We recently followed up 22 patients with an average follow up of 32 months to validate its usefulness. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores improved significantly from 37 preoperatively to 90 postoperatively (P<0.0001. This data supports the use of the GPS technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Further biomechanical studies are currently being performed to assess the improvements in tendon footprint area with this technique.

  3. Massive rotator cuff tears: definition and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J; Collin, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this review is to summarise tear pattern classification and management options for massive rotator cuff tears (MRCT), as well as to propose a treatment paradigm for patients with a MRCT. Data from 70 significant papers were reviewed in order to define the character of reparability and the possibility of alternative techniques in the management of MRCT. Massive rotator cuff tears (MRCT) include a wide panoply of lesions in terms of tear pattern, functional impairment, and reparability. Pre-operative evaluation is critical to successful treatment. With the advancement of medical technology, arthroscopy has become a frequently used method of treatment, even in cases of pseudoparalytic shoulders. Tendon transfer is limited to young patients with an irreparable MRCT and loss of active rotation. Arthroplasty can be considered for the treatment of a MRCT with associated arthritis. There is insufficient evidence to establish an evidence-based treatment algorithm for MRCTs. Treatment is based on patient factors and associated pathology, and includes personal experience and data from case series.

  4. Improved apparatus for predictive diagnosis of rotator cuff disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Anup; Hall, Brittany N.; Thigpen, Charles A.; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2014-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease impacts over 50% of the population over 60, with reports of incidence being as high as 90% within this population, causing pain and possible loss of function. The rotator cuff is composed of muscles and tendons that work in tandem to support the shoulder. Heavy use of these muscles can lead to rotator cuff tear, with the most common causes is age-related degeneration or sport injuries, both being a function of overuse. Tears ranges in severity from partial thickness tear to total rupture. Diagnostic techniques are based on physical assessment, detailed patient history, and medical imaging; primarily X-ray, MRI and ultrasonography are the chosen modalities for assessment. The final treatment technique and imaging modality; however, is chosen by the clinician is at their discretion. Ultrasound has been shown to have good accuracy for identification and measurement of full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. In this study, we report on the progress and improvement of our method of transduction and analysis of in situ measurement of rotator cuff biomechanics. We have improved the ability of the clinician to apply a uniform force to the underlying musculotendentious tissues while simultaneously obtaining the ultrasound image. This measurement protocol combined with region of interest (ROI) based image processing will help in developing a predictive diagnostic model for treatment of rotator cuff disease and help the clinicians choose the best treatment technique.

  5. Functional Recovery After Rotator Cuff Repair: The Role of Biceps Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gialanella, Bernardo; Grossetti, Francesco; Mazza, Marina; Danna, Laura; Comini, Laura

    2017-05-22

    Surgical cuff repair is indicated in full-thickness rotator cuff tear when non-operative treatment fails. Surgical cuff repair can comprehend surgery of long head of the biceps when concomitant biceps pathology is present. However, the studies executed up to now do not have yet clearly defined if additional biceps surgery affects the shoulder functionality in patients who underwent rotator cuff repair. The aim of this study is to verify if the concomitant biceps surgery prejudices the shoulder functionality during the short-term period in rotator cuff repair patients. Prospective and observational study. Outpatient Service for Rehabilitation. Ninety-three consecutive patients who have undergone surgery for full-thickness symptomatic rotator cuff tear were enrolled for rehabilitation: 25 underwent rotator cuff repair and tendon biceps surgery (ABS), 68 patients rotator cuff repair only (RCR). Motor rehabilitation after surgical treatment of rotator cuff repair. Final Constant score was used as primary outcome measure, and efficiency and effectiveness in Constant score were evaluated both at the end of the last cycle of rehabilitation and after six months post-surgery. Patients with rotator cuff repair and tendon biceps surgery had lower final scores (36.5 ± 12.0 vs 49.3 ± 13.0, p rotator cuff repair only at the end of rehabilitation. Moreover, they had lower final score (53.3 ± 14.0 vs 64.5 ± 10.0, p rehabilitation period, while tendon biceps surgery was a determinant of final score and effectiveness in Constant score at the end of the rehabilitation period and at six months from surgery. The study highlights that concomitant tendon biceps surgery negatively affects functional outcome of patients who underwent rotator cuff repair and is an important determinant of shoulder functionality in the first six months post-surgery.

  6. Rotator cuff tears in asymptomatic individuals: a clinical and ultrasonographic screening study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schibany, N. E-mail: nadja.schibany@univie.ac.at; Zehetgruber, H.; Kainberger, F.; Wurnig, C.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Herneth, A.M.; Lang, T.; Gruber, D.; Breitenseher, M.J

    2004-09-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence and clinical impact of rotator cuff tears in asymptomatic volunteers. Materials and Methods: Sonographic examinations of the shoulder of 212 asymptomatic individuals between 18 and 85 years old were performed by a single experienced operator. The prevalence and location of complete rotator cuff tears were evaluated. The clinical assessment was based on the Constant Score. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder was obtained in those patients where US showed rotator cuff pathology. Results: Ultrasound showed a complete rupture of the supraspinatus tendon in 6% of 212 patients from 56 to 83 years of age (mean: 67 years). MRI confirmed a complete rupture of the supraspinatus tendon in 90%. All patients reported no functional deficits, although strength was significantly lower in the patient group with complete supraspinatus tendon tear (P<0.01). Conclusion: There is a higher prevalence in older individuals of rotator cuff tendon tears that cause no pain or decrease in activities of daily living.

  7. Rotator cuff rehabilitation: current theories and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Jeffrey D; Gowda, Ashok L; Wiater, Brett; Wiater, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    A fully functioning, painless shoulder joint is essential to maintain a healthy, normal quality of life. Disease of the rotator cuff tendons (RCTs) is a common issue that affects the population, increasing with age, and can lead to significant disability and social and health costs. RCT injuries can affect younger, healthy patients and the elderly alike, and may be the result of trauma or occur as a result of chronic degeneration. They can be acutely painful, limited to certain activities or completely asymptomatic and incidental findings. A wide variety of treatment options exists ranging from conservative local and systemic pain modalities, to surgical fixation. Regardless of management ultimately chosen, physiotherapy of the RCT, rotator cuff muscles and surrounding shoulder girdle plays an essential role in proper treatment. Length of treatment, types of therapy and timing may vary if therapy is definitive care or part of a postoperative protocol. Allowing time for adequate RCT healing must always be considered when implementing ROM and strengthening after surgery. With current rehabilitation methods, patients with all spectrums of RCT pathology can improve their function, pain and quality of life. This manuscript reviews current theories and practice involving rehabilitation for RCT injuries.

  8. Immobilization After Rotator Cuff Repair: What Evidence Do We Have Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jason E; Horneff, John G; Gee, Albert O

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent tears after rotator cuff repair are common. Postoperative rehabilitation after rotator cuff repair is a modifiable factor controlled by the surgeon that can affect re-tear rates. Some surgeons prefer early mobilization after rotator cuff repair, whereas others prefer a period of immobilization to protect the repair site. The tendon-healing process incorporates biochemical and biomechanical responses to mechanical loading. Healing can be optimized with controlled loading. Complete load removal and chronic overload can be deleterious to the process. Several randomized clinical studies have also characterized the role of postoperative mobilization after rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Triple-Row Modification of the Suture-Bridge Technique for Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrander, Roger V; Smith, Jarrod; Saper, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Recent advances to improve outcomes in rotator cuff repair include using arthroscopic double-row suture-bridge techniques in an effort to reconstruct the rotator cuff footprint and improve fixation. However, when using this technique for larger tears, it can be difficult to get the lateral portion of the rotator cuff into an anatomic position. This report describes a triple-row modification of the suture-bridge technique that results in significantly more footprint contact area and contact pressure compared with the double-row and standard suture-bridge techniques. Maximizing the rotator cuff footprint contact area exposes more of the tendon to bone and may improve the healing potential.

  10. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff with focal umeral osteolysis. Imaging features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Mascarenhas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying tendinitis occurs most commonly in the rotator cuff tendons, particularly involving the supraspinatus tendon insertion, and is often asymptomatic. Cortical erosion secondary to calcifying tendinitis has been reported in multiple locations, including in the rotator cuff tendons. The authors report two cases of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis involving the infraspinatus tendon with cortical erosion with correlative radiographic, and MR findings. The importance of considering this diagnosis when evaluating lytic lesions of the humerus and the imaging differential diagnosis of calcifying tendinitis and cortical erosion are discussed.

  11. Biologic and pharmacologic augmentation of rotator cuff repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Sara L; Lynch, T Sean; Saltzman, Matthew D; Terry, Michael A; Nuber, Gordon W

    2011-10-01

    As rotator cuff repair techniques have improved, failure of the tendon to heal to the proximal humerus is less likely to occur from weak tendon-to-bone fixation. More likely causes of failure include biologic factors such as intrinsic tendon degeneration, fatty atrophy, fatty infiltration of muscle, and lack of vascularity of the tendons. High failure rates have led to the investigation of biologic augmentation to potentially enhance the healing response. Histologic studies have shown that restoration of the rotator cuff footprint during repair can help reestablish the enthesis. In animal models, growth factors and their delivery scaffolds as well as tissue engineering have shown promise in decreasing scar tissue while maintaining biomechanical strength. Platelet-rich plasma may be a safe adjuvant to rotator cuff repair, but it has not been shown to improve healing or function. Many of these strategies need to be further defined to permit understanding of, and to optimize, the biologic environment; in addition, techniques need to be refined for clinical use.

  12. Rotator cuff tear: A detailed update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff tear has been a known entity for orthopaedic surgeons for more than two hundred years. Although the exact pathogenesis is controversial, a combination of intrinsic factors proposed by Codman and extrinsic factors theorized by Neer is likely responsible for most rotator cuff tears. Magnetic resonance imaging remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears, but the emergence of ultrasound has revolutionized the diagnostic capability. Even though mini-open rotator cuff repair is still commonly performed, and results are comparable to arthroscopic repair, all-arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear is now fast becoming a standard care for rotator cuff repair. Appropriate knowledge of pathology and healing pattern of cuff, strong and biological repair techniques, better suture anchors, and gradual rehabilitation of postcuff repair have led to good to excellent outcome after repair. As the healing of degenerative cuff tear remains unpredictable, the role of biological agents such as platelet-rich plasma and stem cells for postcuff repair augmentation is still under evaluation. The role of scaffolds in massive cuff tear is also being probed.

  13. Is rehabilitation effective in massive rotator cuff tears?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, P G; Gain, S; Nguyen Huu, F; Lädermann, A

    2015-06-01

    Irreparable massive rotator cuff tears are challenging to treat. Our objective here was to evaluate the efficacy of a specifically designed rehabilitation programme. We hypothesised that outcomes of the rehabilitation programme would vary with the site of the tears. Patients with irreparable massive rotator cuff tears and shoulder pseudoparalysis were included prospectively. They followed a five-session specific rehabilitation programme. The outcomes were analysed according to the site of the tears. We included 45 patients with a mean age of 67 years. At last follow-up after rehabilitation, 24 patients had recovered more than 160° of anterior shoulder elevation. Treatment failure was common in patients with massive anterior rotator cuff tears or tears involving three or more tendons. Patients with massive posterior tears, in contrast, often experienced substantial improvements, even in the medium term. Outcomes of rehabilitation therapy in patients with irreparable massive rotator cuff tears and shoulder pseudoparalysis vary according to the site and number of the tears. Failure of rehabilitation therapy is common in patients with massive anterior tears or tears involving at least three tendons. In contrast, in patients with isolated massive posterior tears, substantial benefits from rehabilitation therapy can be expected. III. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Fewer rotator cuff tears fifteen years after arthroscopic subacromial decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsson, Hanna; Norlin, Rolf; Knutsson, Anders; Adolfsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    A successful clinical result is reported in 75% to 85% of impingement patients after arthroscopic subacromial decompression. The result is maintained over time, but few studies have investigated the integrity of the rotator cuff in these patients. Using ultrasonography, we examined the integrity of the rotator cuff in 70 patients 15 years after arthroscopic subacromial decompression. All patients had an intact rotator cuff at the index procedure. Tendons were still intact in 57 patients (82%), 10 (14%) had partial-thickness tears, and 3 (4%) had full-thickness tears. The total number of 18% tears (partial and full thickness) in this study, including patients clinically diagnosed with subacromial impingement at a mean age of 60 years, is unexpectedly low compared with 40% degenerative tears reported in asymptomatic adults of the same age. Arthroscopic subacromial decompression seems to reduce the prevalence of rotator cuff tears in impingement patients. This appears attributable to elimination of extrinsic factors such as mechanical wear and bursitis. The potential effect of surgery on intrinsic cuff degeneration is unknown, but intrinsic factors may explain tears still developing despite decompression. Level III, therapeutic study.

  15. HIGH-RESOLUTION ULTRASONOGRAPHY OF SHOULDER FOR ROTATOR CUFF TEAR: CORRELATION WITH ARTHROSCOPIC FINDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnumurthy H. Y

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Rotator cuff disease is the most common cause of shoulder pain. Ultrasonography being non-invasive, widely available, more cost-effective method and is the first choice in imaging of rotator cuff tears. Arthroscopy of shoulder is considered as the gold standard for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. Objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution ultrasonography of shoulder for rotator cuff tears with arthroscopy of shoulder. METHODS Thirty patients clinically suspected to have rotator cuff tear who underwent ultrasonography and arthroscopy of shoulder were included in the study. Duration of study was for two years. All ultrasonography examinations were conducted in ultrasound machine using GE Voluson 730 PRO high frequency (10-12 MHz linear array transducer done by two experienced radiologists. Arthroscopies were done by two experienced shoulder arthroscopic surgeons. RESULTS Age of the patients with rotator cuff tears ranged from 40 to 80 years. 57% were females and 43% were males among the patients who had rotator cuff tears. 71.43% of the rotator cuff tears were found in the dominant arm. 64.28% of patients with rotator cuff tear had given history of fall or trauma to the corresponding shoulder within 6 months prior to presentation. 39.28% of patients who had rotator cuff tears were known diabetics. Supraspinatus tendon was the most commonly affected tendon, followed by infraspinatus and subscapularis tendons. For overall detection of rotator cuff tears, ultrasonography in comparison with the arthroscopy has sensitivity and specificity of 92.85% and 100%. For detection of full thickness rotator cuff tear, its sensitivity and specificity was 94.73% and 100% and for partial thickness rotator cuff tears 76.92% and 100%. Ultrasonography has 100% sensitivity and specificity for detection of supraspinatus full thickness tear. For supraspinatus partial thickness tear, sensitivity and specificity was 88

  16. Rotator cuff tears: An evidence based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Khanna, Vishesh; Gul, Arif; Mounasamy, Varatharaj

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the rotator cuff (RC) are a common occurrence affecting millions of people across all parts of the globe. RC tears are also rampantly prevalent with an age-dependent increase in numbers. Other associated factors include a history of trauma, limb dominance, contralateral shoulder, smoking-status, hypercholesterolemia, posture and occupational dispositions. The challenge lies in early diagnosis since a high proportion of patients are asymptomatic. Pain and decreasing shoulder power and function should alert the heedful practitioner in recognizing promptly the onset or aggravation of existing RC tears. Partial-thickness tears (PTT) can be bursal-sided or articular-sided tears. Over the course of time, PTT enlarge and propagate into full-thickness tears (FTT) and develop distinct chronic pathological changes due to muscle retraction, fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy. These lead to a reduction in tendon elasticity and viability. Eventually, the glenohumeral joint experiences a series of degenerative alterations - cuff tear arthropathy. To avert this, a vigilant clinician must utilize and corroborate clinical skill and radiological findings to identify tear progression. Modern radio-diagnostic means of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging provide excellent visualization of structural details and are crucial in determining further course of action for these patients. Physical therapy along with activity modifications, anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications form the pillars of nonoperative treatment. Elderly patients with minimal functional demands can be managed conservatively and reassessed at frequent intervals. Regular monitoring helps in isolating patients who require surgical interventions. Early surgery should be considered in younger, active and symptomatic, healthy patients. In addition to being cost-effective, this helps in providing a functional shoulder with a stable cuff. An easily reproducible technique of maximal strength and

  17. The rotator cuff: from bench to bedside. Developments in tissue engineering, surgical techniques and pathogenetic factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Longo, U.G.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis originates from the difficulties in the management of patients with rotator cuff tears. Since tendon healing rate is relatively slow compared with other connective tissues, we reviewed the available literature on tissue engineered biological augmentation for tendon healing, including

  18. Avaliação da microcirculação das bordas do tendão do supra-espinal nas lesões do manguito rotador Microvascular evaluation of the supraspinatus tendon borders in rotator cuff lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Yukio Ikemoto

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a microcirculação das bordas do tendão supra-espinal nas lesões do manguito rotador com a finalidade de determinar a necessidade ou não do desbridamento de suas bordas no momento do seu reparo cirúrgico. MÉTODOS: No período de junho a dezembro de 2004, foram avaliadas amostras recolhidas de 31 pacientes portadores de lesão completa do tendão supra-espinal, submetidos ao tratamento da lesão do manguito rotador por via artroscópica. Apresentavam idade entre 42 e 82 anos (média de 56,6 anos, sendo nove do sexo masculino e 22 do feminino. Durante a realização do procedimento, foram retiradas amostras de tecido da lesão do manguito rotador e enviadas para estudo anatomopatológico com coloração com hematoxilina-eosina. Após esse processo, foi realizada a contagem das fendas vasculares/mm². Utilizaram-se como grupo controle 10 amostras de tendões normais do supra-espinal de cadáveres frescos, submetidos aos mesmos processos anteriores. Os resultados obtidos foram avaliados estatisticamente através da aplicação do teste de Mann-Whitney. RESULTADOS: Entre as amostras, 28 apresentaram tecidos vascularizados e três, ausência de vascularização. O número médio de fendas vasculares/mm² nas amostras de lesões do manguito rotador foi estatisticamente maior que o do grupo controle. CONCLUSÃO: A maioria das bordas das lesões dos tendões do supra-espinal é hipervascularizada.OBJECTIVES: To evaluate microvasculature in the borders of the supraspinatus tendon in rotator cuff lesions in order to determine the need to debrid the borders when surgical repair is performed. METHODS: From June to December 224, samples were evaluated from 31 patients with full lesion of the supraspinatus tendon that had been submitted to arthroscopic rotator cuff lesion treatment. They were between 42 and 82 years of age (mean 56.6 years, nine of them male, and twenty-two female. During the procedure, samples of the rotator cuff

  19. Delivered growth factor therapy to improve healing after rotator cuff repair

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    Emilie V Cheung

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Emilie V Cheung, Luz Silverio, Jeffrey YaoDepartment of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University, Redwood City, CA, USABackground: Degenerative rotator cuff tears are a significant cause of shoulder pain in the aging population. Rotator cuff repair surgery may be more successful when growth factors are delivered to the repair site. This study was designed to determine the cellular processes involved in normal bone-to-tendon healing and the current approaches used for biologic augmentation of rotator cuff repair.Methods: This review focuses on animal studies of rotator cuff repair and early human trials.Results: Regular bone-to-tendon healing forms a fibrous junction between tendon and bone that is markedly different from the original bone-to-tendon junction. Tendon augmentation with cellular components serves as scaffolding for endogenous fibroblastic cells and a possible source of growth factors and fibroblastic cells. Extracellular matrices provide a scaffold for incoming fibroblastic cells. However, research in extracellular matrices is not conclusive due to intermanufacturer variation and the lack of human subject research. Growth factors and platelet-rich plasma are established in other fields of research and show promise, but have not yet been rigorously tested in rotator cuff repair augmentation.Conclusions: Rotator cuff repair can benefit from biologic augmentation. However, research in this field is still young and has not yet demonstrated that the benefits in healing rates are significant enough to merit regular clinical use. Randomized controlled trials will elucidate the use of biologic augmentation in rotator cuff repairs.Keywords: rotator cuff, shoulder pain, growth factors, repair

  20. Management of failed rotator cuff repair: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    Importance Recurrent tear after rotator cuff repair (RCR) is common. Conservative, and open and arthroscopic revisions, have been advocated to treat these failures. Aim or objective The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the different options for managing recurrent rotator cuff tears. Evidence review A search was conducted of level I through 4 studies from January 2000 to October 2015, to identify studies reporting on failed RCR. 10 articles were identified. The overall quality of evidence was very low. Findings Mid-term to long-term follow-up of patients treated conservatively revealed acceptable results; a persistent defect is a well-tolerated condition that only occasionally requires subsequent surgery. Conservative treatment might be indicated in most patients, particularly in case of posterosuperior involvement and poor preoperative range of motion. Revision surgery might be indicated in a young patient with a repairable lesion, a 3 tendon tear, and in those with involvement of the subscapularis. Conclusions and relevance The current review indicates that arthroscopic revision RCR can lead to improvement in functional outcome despite a high retear rate. Further studies are needed to develop specific rehabilitation in the case of primary rotator cuff failure, to better understand the place of each treatment option, and, in case of repair, to optimise tendon healing. PMID:27134759

  1. Difference between early versus delayed postoperative physical rehabilitation protocol following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar M Fawzy

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Significant improvement in pain, ROM, and function after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was seen at 1 year postoperatively, regardless of early or delayed postoperative rehabilitation protocols. However, early motion increases pain scores and may increase the possibility of rotator cuff retear but with early regain of ROM. A delayed rehabilitation protocol with immobilization for 6 weeks would be better for tendon healing without risk for retear or joint stiffness and easily convalescence with less postoperative pain.

  2. Current Biomechanical Concepts of Suture Bridge Repair Technique for Rotator Cuff Tear

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    Ming-Long Yeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff tears are one of the most common disorders of the shoulder and can have significant effects on daily activities as a result of pain, loss of motion and strength. The goal of rotator cuff repair is aimed at anatomic restoration of the rotator cuff tendon to reduce pain and improve the joint function. Recently, arthroscopic repair has been widely accepted for treatment of rotator cuff tears due to its equal or better results than those from open repair. In 2006, a transosseousequivalent (TOE or “suture bridge” technique was introduced by Park et al. This technique maximizes the utility of the conventional double-row technique by using the suture limbs to form the media mattress sutures to bridge and compress the repaired tendon. This technique has been proven to provide biomechanical properties that are superior to other arthroscopic repair techniques regarding the initial fixation strength, contact area and contact pressure at the tendon-bone interface. Since suture bridge techniques have been evolving over time, further biomechanical investigations have been carried out. These studies include examination of the effects of dynamic humeral external rotation on the mechanic stability of the repaired tendon construct, the effects of various modifications of the suture bridge configurations on the biomechanical characteristics of the medial mattress suture, biomechanical implications of medial row failure, and biomechanical performance of the repaired constructs over time. In this review, the biomechanical concepts behind the suture bridge technique for rotator cuff repair were reviewed and discussed.

  3. Retrospective study of sonographic findings in bone involvement associated with rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy: preliminary results of a case series

    OpenAIRE

    Marcello H. Nogueira-Barbosa; Gregio-Junior, Everaldo; Lorenzato, Mario Muller

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The present study was aimed at investigating bone involvement secondary to rotator cuff calcific tendonitis at ultrasonography. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study of a case series. The authors reviewed shoulder ultrasonography reports of 141 patients diagnosed with rotator cuff calcific tendonitis, collected from the computer-based data records of their institution over a four-year period. Imaging findings were retrospectively and consensually analyzed by two exp...

  4. NMR of the rotator cuff. An update; MRT der Rotatorenmanschette. Ein Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Maehringer-Kunz, Aline [Universitaetsmedizin Mainz (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2016-03-15

    The rotator cuff consists of the tendons of the supscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus and teres minor muscles. This group of muscles performs multiple functions and is often stressed during various activities. This explains, why rotator cuff disease is common and the most often cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction in adults. MR imaging still is the most important imaging modality in assessment of rotator cuff disease. It enables the radiologist to make an accurate diagnosis, the basis for an appropriate management. In this article, current concepts with regard to anatomy and imaging diagnosis will be reviewed. The discussion of the complex anatomy is followed by normal and pathologic MR imaging appearances of the rotator cuff including tendinopathy and tearing, and concluding with a review of the postoperative cuff.

  5. Mobility recovery after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumina, Stefano; Izzo, Rosanna; Pintabona, Giovanni; Candela, Vittorio; Savastano, Riccardo; Santilli, Valter

    2017-02-01

    Mobility recovery after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in different tears size. To investigate, after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, the range of motion (ROM) progression in different sized tears (small, large and massive), and evaluating ROM changes in the pre- and postoperative periods of each group. Cohort study. Policlinico Umberto I, "Sapienza" University, Rome, Italy. Ninety-two patients with reparable rotator cuff tears. Patients were divided in three groups: group A (small lesions), group B (large lesions) and group C (reparable massive lesions) composed by 29, 31 and 32 patients, respectively. ROM were measured preoperatively (T0), and after 45 (T1), 70 (T2) and 100 (T3) days after the arthroscopic treatment. From T0 to T3, small lesions are associated to excellent results, with an improvement of all parameters; the same in patients with large lesions, except for flexion parameter; in reparable massive lesions only external and internal rotation improved. Not all parameters recover in the same way: postoperative rehabilitative protocol is an integral contributor to favorable outcomes in patients with rotator cuff tears. The knowledge about ROM recovering after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a strategic information for the patient, as well as for the surgeon and physiatrist.

  6. Rotator cuff tears in the throwing athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Benjamin; Huttman, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Tears of the rotator cuff, both partial, and less commonly, full thickness, are relatively common in the throwing athlete. The rotator cuff is subjected to enormous stresses during repetitive overhead activity. The supraphysiological strains, especially when combined with pathology elsewhere in the kinetic chain, can lead to compromise of the cuff fabric, most commonly on the undersurface where tensile overload occurs. Exacerbation by a tight posterior capsular, anterior instability, and internal impingement render the cuff progressively compromised, with intrinsic shear stresses and undersurface fiber failure. Advances in imaging technology, including contrast magnetic resonance imaging, dynamic ultrasound, and arthroscopic visualization have enhanced our understanding of cuff pathology in this athletic population. Unfortunately, this has not yet translated into how to best approach these athletes to return them to their previous level of activity. Nonoperative management remains the mainstay for most throwers, with arthroscopic debridement an effective surgical option for those with refractory symptoms. Despite technological advances in cuff repair in the general population, comparable outcomes have not been achieved in high-level throwers. Widespread appreciation that securing the cuff operatively will likely end an athletes' throwing career has led to adopting a surgical approach that emphasizes debridement over repair for nearly all partial and full-thickness tears. Whether advances in surgical technique will ultimately permit definitive and lasting repairs that allow overhead throwers to return to their previous level of sports remains unknown at this time.

  7. Latissimus Dorsi Transfer in Posterior Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasopoulos, Panagiotis P; Alexiadis, George; Spyridonos, Sarantis; Fandridis, Emmanouil

    2017-01-01

    Massive rotator cuff tears pose a difficult and complex challenge even for the experienced surgeon; inability to repair these tears by conventional means designates them as irreparable, while management becomes quite taxing. Several operative options have been suggested for the management of such lesions with varying degrees of success, while it is imperative to match patient demands and expectations to the predicted outcome. Research articles are examined and key concepts are discussed, in order to provide an evidence based review of the available literature. The anatomy and pathomechanics along with the indications, contraindications and surgical techniques are reported. Transfer of the Latissimus dorsi has been used with success to restore shoulder function in deficits of the posterior rotator cuff. Although it can be used in a variety of settings, the ideal patient for a Latissimus dorsi tendon transfer is a young and active individual, with no glenohumeral osteoarthritis that has a severe disability and weakness related to an irreparable posterior cuff tear. Tendon transfers have proved to be a successful treatment option in salvaging this difficult problem, providing pain relief and restoring shoulder function. Despite the excellent functional outcomes and pain suppression following operation, a variety of factors may affect the outcome; thus making indications and preoperative assessment a valuable component.

  8. Andreas Vesalius' five hundreth anniversary: initiation of the rotator cuff concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Romy J; Hage, J Joris

    2015-12-01

    The rotator cuff concept refers to the four scapulohumeral muscles that stabilize and rotate the humerus relative to the scapula. To date, the first description of the rotator cuff remained unidentified. In light of the 500th birthday of Andreas Vesalius (1515-1564) we searched his 1543 masterwork "Fabrica Corporis Humani Libri Septem" for references to the morphology and function of the rotator cuff muscles. Even though he distinguished three rather than four scapulohumeral muscles, Vesalius recognized the need for structures that prevent dislocation of the shoulder inherent to the morphology of the humeral caput and scapular socket. He recorded "three strong ligaments" and the "three muscles that rotate the arm" of which the tendons completely "embrace the ligaments of the joint" as such structures. Vesalius defined the rotator cuff concept avant la lettre.

  9. Augmentation techniques for rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; Zampogna, Biagio; D'Adamio, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    There is a high rate of recurrence of tear and failed healing after rotator cuff repair. Several strategies have proposed to augment rotator cuff repairs to improve postoperative outcome and shoulder performance. We systematically review the literature on clinical outcome following rotator cuff augmentation. We performed a comprehensive search of Medline, CINAHL, Embase and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials, from inception of the database to 20 June 2012, using various combinations of keywords. The reference lists of the previously selected articles were then examined by hand. Only studies focusing on clinical outcomes of human patients who had undergone augmented rotator cuff repair were selected. We then evaluated the methodological quality of each article using the Coleman methodology score (CMS), a 10 criteria scoring list assessing the methodological quality of the selected studies (CMS). Thirty-two articles were included in the present review. Two were retrospective studies, and 30 were prospective. Biologic, synthetic and cellular devices were used in 24, 7 and 1 studies, respectively. The mean modified Coleman methodology score was 64.0. Heterogeneity of the clinical outcome scores makes it difficult to compare different studies. None of the augmentation devices available is without problems, and each one presents intrinsic weaknesses. There is no dramatic increase in clinical and functional assessment after augmented procedures, especially if compared with control groups. More and better scientific evidence is necessary to use augmentation of rotator cuff repairs in routine clinical practice.

  10. Early anchor displacement after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaliczki, Gábor; Paladini, Paolo; Merolla, Giovanni; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a success and became the mainstream method of reconstruction in recent years. Due to the technical development in shoulder surgery, novel suture anchors and high-strength sutures are widely used providing convincing fixation, however anchor pullout still remains a problem. The aim of our study was to observe early anchor movement on a large patient cohort, and identify clinical, biological and technical variables that can lead to this complication. A total of 5,327 patients who had arthroscopic rotator cuff reconstruction for full thickness tear were included in the study. Radiographs taken immediately after surgery were observed and occurrent anchor displacement was recorded. Patient-specific, tendon-specific, bone-specific and implant-specific variables were studied. Any possible relationship between these factors and anchor displacement was investigated. Early anchor movement occurred in six cases (0.1%). The involvement of two or more tendons, retraction of the tendon by more than 2 cm and the use of four anchors was associated with higher incidence of anchor displacement, however the difference was not significant. Based on our study, anchor pullout occurring immediately after surgery is a relatively rare complication. Instead of timing the radiologic examination directly after the procedure, assessment of the anchors' position four to six weeks after surgery should be considered.

  11. Tissue Engineering for Rotator Cuff Repair: An Evidence-Based Systematic Review

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    Nicola Maffulli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this systematic review was to address the treatment of rotator cuff tears by applying tissue engineering approaches to improve tendon healing, specifically platelet rich plasma (PRP augmentation, stem cells, and scaffolds. Our systematic search was performed using the combination of the following terms: “rotator cuff”, “shoulder”, “PRP”, “platelet rich plasma”, “stemcells”, “scaffold”, “growth factors”, and “tissue engineering”. No level I or II studies were found on the use of scaffolds and stem cells for rotator cuff repair. Three studies compared rotator cuff repair with or without PRP augmentation. All authors performed arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with different techniques of suture anchor fixation and different PRP augmentation. The three studies found no difference in clinical rating scales and functional outcomes between PRP and control groups. Only one study showed clinical statistically significant difference between the two groups at the 3-month followup. Any statistically significant difference in the rates of tendon rerupture between the control group and the PRP group was found using the magnetic resonance imaging. The current literature on tissue engineering application for rotator cuff repair is scanty. Comparative studies included in this review suggest that PRP augmented repair of a rotator cuff does not yield improved functional and clinical outcome compared with non-augmented repair at a medium and long-term followup.

  12. Transtendon rotator-cuff repair of partial-thickness articular surface tears can lead to medial rotator-cuff failure

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    Woods TC

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tom C Woods,4 Michael J Carroll,1 Atiba A Nelson,2 Kristie D More,2 Randa Berdusco,1 Stephen Sohmer,3 Richard S Boorman,1,2 Ian KY Lo1,21Department of Surgery, 2Sport Medicine Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 3Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 4St Joseph's Hospital, Comox, BC, CanadaPurpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and anatomic outcomes of patients following transtendon rotator-cuff repair of partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion (PASTA lesions.Patients and methods: Patients in the senior author's practice who had isolated PASTA lesions treated by transtendon rotator-cuff repair were included (n=8 and retrospectively reviewed. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and at a mean of 21.2 months (±9.7 months postoperatively using standardized clinical evaluation (physical exam, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, and Simple Shoulder Test. All patients underwent postoperative imaging with a magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram.Results: There was a significant improvement in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (42.7±17.5 to 86.9±25.2 and Simple Shoulder Test (4.6±3.2 to 10.1±3.8 scores from pre- to postoperative, respectively. Postoperative imaging demonstrated full-thickness medial cuff tearing in seven patients, and one patient with a persistent partial articular surface defect.Conclusion: Transtendon repair of PASTA lesions may lead to improvements in clinical outcome. However, postoperative imaging demonstrated a high incidence of full-thickness rotator-cuff defects following repair.Keywords: rotator cuff, PASTA lesion, transtendon repair

  13. Delayed early passive motion is harmless to shoulder rotator cuff healing in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shurong; Li, Hong; Tao, Hongyue; Li, Hongyun; Cho, Samson; Hua, Yinghui; Chen, Jiwu; Chen, Shiyi; Li, Yunxia

    2013-08-01

    Postoperative passive motion is the most widely accepted rehabilitation protocol after rotator cuff repair; however, a rotator cuff retear remains a frequent surgical complication. Clinical outcomes indicate that early passive motion is harmless to rotator cuff healing, but no laboratory evidence supports this proposition. (1) Immediate postoperative immobilization improves rotator cuff healing in rabbits. (2) Early passive motion after short-term immobilization does not harm rotator cuff healing in rabbits. Controlled laboratory study. An injury to the supraspinatus tendon was created and repaired in 90 New Zealand White rabbits, after which they were randomly separated into 3 groups: (1) nonimmobilization (NI; n = 30), (2) continuous immobilization (IM; n = 30), and (3) immobilization with early passive motion (IP; n = 30). At 3, 6, and 12 weeks postoperatively, 5 rabbits from each group were sacrificed for histological evaluation, biomechanical testing, and magnetic resonance imaging. The histological study demonstrated better postoperative healing in the IM and IP groups, with clusters of chondrocytes accumulated at the tendon-bone junction. Magnetic resonance imaging illustrated that the tendon-bone junction was intact in the IM and IP groups. The magnetic resonance quantification analysis showed that the signal-to-noise quotient (SNQ) of the NI group was not significantly higher than that of the immobilization groups at 3 weeks (P = .232) or 6 weeks (P = .117), but it was significantly different at 12 weeks (NI vs IM, P = .006; NI vs IP, P = .009). At 12 weeks, the failure load was significantly higher in the IM and IP groups than in the NI group (NI vs IM, P = .002; NI vs IP, P = .002), but no difference was found between the IM and IP groups (P = .599). Immediate postoperative immobilization led to better tendon-bone healing than immediate postoperative mobilization, and under immobilization, early passive motion was harmless to tendon-bone healing in this

  14. Epigenetic regulation of metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in rotator cuff tears.

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    Mariana Ferreira Leal

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff tear is a common orthopedic condition. Metalloproteinases (MMP and their inhibitors (TIMP seem to play a role in the development of joint injuries and in the failure of tissue healing. However, the mechanisms of regulation of gene expression in tendons are still unknown. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and microRNAs regulation, are involved in the dynamic control of gene expression. Here, the mRNA expression and DNA methylation status of MMPs (MMP1, MMP2, MMP3, MMP9, MMP13, and MMP14 and TIMPs (TIMP1-3 and the expression of miR-29 family members in ruptured supraspinatus tendons were compared with non-injured tendons of individuals without this lesion. Additionally, the gene expression and methylation status at the edge of the ruptured tendon were compared with macroscopically non-injured rotator cuff tendon samples from the anterior and posterior regions of patients with tendon tears. Moreover, the possible associations between the molecular alterations and the clinical and histologic characteristics were investigated. Dysregulated expression and DNA methylation of MMP and TIMP genes were found across the rotator cuff tendon samples of patients with supraspinatus tears. These alterations were influenced at least in part by age at surgery, sex, smoking habit, tear size, and duration of symptoms. Alterations in the studied MMP and TIMP genes may contribute to the presence of microcysts, fissures, necrosis, and neovascularization in tendons and may thus be involved in the tendon healing process. In conclusion, MMPs and their inhibitors are regulated by epigenetic modifications and may play a role in rotator cuff tears.

  15. Shouldering the blame for impingement: the rotator cuff continuum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The aim of this article was to summarise recent research on shoulder impingement and rotator cuff pathology. A continuum model of rotator cuff pathology is described, and the challenges of accurate clinical diagnosis, imaging and best management discussed. ..... aging and morphologic changes in the rotator cuff.

  16. Shouldering the blame for impingement: the rotator cuff continuum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... research on shoulder impingement and rotator cuff pathology. A continuum model of rotator cuff pathology is described, and the challenges of accurate clinical diagnosis, imaging and best management discussed. Keywords: shoulder impingement syndrome, subacromial impingement syndrome, rotator cuff, tendinopathy, ...

  17. ARTHROSCOPIC CORRECTION OF THE INJURIES OF THE COMPLEX «TENDON OF THE BICEPS LONG HEAD - THE ARTICULAR LIP» IN TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH FULL-LAYER RUPTURES OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Dokolin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage of the long head of the biceps at the place of attachment to the articular tubercle supraglenoidal lip of shoulder, to the entrance and throughout intertubercle furrows are common causes of pain and dysfunction of the shoulder joint. At the same clinical manifestations of the morphology of such lesions may be different. The current literature discusses various options of surgical correction of the biceps injury. Variety of methods of surgical treatment and the lack of consensus in support of their application in different patients in different types of injuries were the basis for the present study. A prospective analysis of the functional results of surgical treatment of the 34 - year’s patients with associated rotator cuff (SSP+ISP+SSC+ and the tendon of the biceps muscle in age from 34 to 75 years. Options for surgical correction of the damaged part of the biceps were: biceps tenotomy, biceps tenotomy with intraarticular tenodez of the shoulder to the head before entering intertubercle furrow, biceps tenotomy and extraarticular subpectorialtenodez to the proximal humerus is intertubercle interferrent screw groove, as well as its attachment to the tendon suture large pectoral muscle. Choice of surgical approach depended on the patient's age, level of daily physical activity, morphology and localization of lesions. The best results were obtained when the extra-articular subpectorialtenodez of long head of the biceps to the proximal humerus interferrent screw and suture fixation to the pectoralis major muscle, the average follow-up was 16,6 ± 4,7 months.

  18. The science of rotator cuff tears: translating animal models to clinical recommendations using simulation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannava, Sandeep; Plate, Johannes F; Tuohy, Christopher J; Seyler, Thorsten M; Whitlock, Patrick W; Curl, Walton W; Smith, Thomas L; Saul, Katherine R

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to review basic science studies using various animal models for rotator cuff research and to describe structural, biomechanical, and functional changes to muscle following rotator cuff tears. The use of computational simulations to translate the findings from animal models to human scale is further detailed. A comprehensive review was performed of the basic science literature describing the use of animal models and simulation analysis to examine muscle function following rotator cuff injury and repair in the ageing population. The findings from various studies of rotator cuff pathology emphasize the importance of preventing permanent muscular changes with detrimental results. In vivo muscle function, electromyography, and passive muscle-tendon unit properties were studied before and after supraspinatus tenotomy in a rodent rotator cuff injury model (acute vs chronic). Then, a series of simulation experiments were conducted using a validated computational human musculoskeletal shoulder model to assess both passive and active tension of rotator cuff repairs based on surgical positioning. Outcomes of rotator cuff repair may be improved by earlier surgical intervention, with lower surgical repair tensions and fewer electromyographic neuromuscular changes. An integrated approach of animal experiments, computer simulation analyses, and clinical studies may allow us to gain a fundamental understanding of the underlying pathology and interpret the results for clinical translation.

  19. Preliminary Results of a Consecutive Series of Large & Massive Rotator Cuff Tears Treated with Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs Augmented with Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Consigliere

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrence rate of rotator cuff tears is still high despite the improvements of surgical techniques, materials used and a better knowledge of the healing process of the rotator cuff tendons. Large to massive rotator cuff tears are particularly associated with a high failure rate, especially in elderly. Augmentation of rotator cuff repairs with extracellular matrix or synthetic patches has gained popularity in recent years with the aim of reducing failure.The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of rotator cuff repairs augmented with denatured extracellular matrix in a series of patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for large to massive tears.Methods: Ten consecutive patients, undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with extracellular matrix augment for large and massive tears, were prospectively enrolled into this single surgeon study. All repairs were performed arthroscopically with a double row technique augmented with extracellular matrix. Oxford Shoulder Score, Constant Score and pain visual analogue scale (VAS were used to monitor the shoulder function and outcome pre-operatively and at three, six and 12-month follow-up. Minimum follow up was tree months. Mean follow up was 7 months.Results: Mean Constant score improved from 53 (SD=4 pre-operatively to 75 (SD=11 at final follow up. Mean Oxford score also increased from 30 (SD=8 pre-operatively to 47 (SD=10 at the final follow up. The visual analogue scale (VAS improved from seven out of 10 (SD=2 preoperatively to 0.6 (SD=0.8 at final follow up. Additionally, there was significant improvement at three months mark in Constant score. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair and augmentation of large and massive rotator cuff tears with extracellular matrix patch has good early outcome.

  20. Preliminary Results of a Consecutive Series of Large & Massive Rotator Cuff Tears Treated with Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs Augmented with Extracellular Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consigliere, Paolo; Polyzois, Ioannis; Sarkhel, Tanaya; Gupta, Rohit; Levy, Ofer; Narvani, A Ali

    2017-01-01

    Recurrence rate of rotator cuff tears is still high despite the improvements of surgical techniques, materials used and a better knowledge of the healing process of the rotator cuff tendons. Large to massive rotator cuff tears are particularly associated with a high failure rate, especially in elderly. Augmentation of rotator cuff repairs with extracellular matrix or synthetic patches has gained popularity in recent years with the aim of reducing failure. The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of rotator cuff repairs augmented with denatured extracellular matrix in a series of patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for large to massive tears. Ten consecutive patients, undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with extracellular matrix augment for large and massive tears, were prospectively enrolled into this single surgeon study. All repairs were performed arthroscopically with a double row technique augmented with extracellular matrix. Oxford Shoulder Score, Constant Score and pain visual analogue scale (VAS) were used to monitor the shoulder function and outcome pre-operatively and at three, six and 12-month follow-up. Minimum follow up was three months. Mean follow up was 7 months. Mean Constant score improved from 53 (SD=4) pre-operatively to 75 (SD=11) at final follow up. Mean Oxford score also increased from 30 (SD=8) pre-operatively to 47 (SD=10) at the final follow up. The visual analogue scale (VAS) improved from seven out of 10 (SD=2) preoperatively to 0.6 (SD=0.8) at final follow up. Additionally, there was significant improvement at three months mark in Constant score. Arthroscopic repair and augmentation of large and massive rotator cuff tears with extracellular matrix patch has good early outcome.

  1. Rotator cuff repair: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amini MH

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael H Amini,1 Eric T Ricchetti,1 Joseph P Iannotti,1 Kathleen A Derwin2 1Orthopaedic and Rheumatologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Each year, 250,000 rotator cuff repairs are performed in the United States at a cost of $3 billion. Despite advancements in repair techniques and rehabilitation, 20%–70% of repairs continue to undergo structural failure; however, there is a poor correlation between clinical and structural outcomes, both before and after surgery. "Failure in continuity", or retraction of the repair site without a structural defect, is likely a common phenomenon after rotator cuff repair, and this retraction of the myotendinous unit and interposing scar tissue may be one explanation for the discordance between clinical and structural outcomes. Scaffolds, both synthetic and biologic, have shown promise in both augmentation of repairs and interposition of irreparable tears, but most studies are small retrospective case series without control groups. Future efforts will need to determine the ideal indications for use, methods of application, and comparative effectiveness between the devices. Platelet-rich plasma also has potential to improve rotator cuff healing, but current limitations include the significant variation in preparation methods, biologic makeup, and application methods. Future work may help us understand whether application of platelet-rich plasma and its growth factors should be done at the time of surgery or later during a more advanced stage of healing. Regardless of the device or technique, mechanical and/or biologic augmentation of rotator cuff repairs requires the surgeon to be technically proficient in its use and aware of its associated increased operative time and cost. In order to justify the use of these technologies and their associated incremental

  2. Factors affecting healing after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abtahi, Amir M; Granger, Erin K; Tashjian, Robert Z

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff repair has been shown to have good long-term results. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of repairs still fail to heal. Many factors, both patient and surgeon related, can influence healing after repair. Older age, larger tear size, worse muscle quality, greater muscle-tendon unit retraction, smoking, osteoporosis, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia have all shown to negatively influence tendon healing. Surgeon related factors that can influence healing include repair construct-single vs double row, rehabilitation, and biologics including platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cells. Double-row repairs are biomechanically stronger and have better healing rates compared with single-row repairs although clinical outcomes are equivalent between both constructs. Slower, less aggressive rehabilitation programs have demonstrated improved healing with no negative effect on final range of motion and are therefore recommended after repair of most full thickness tears. Additionally no definitive evidence supports the use of platelet rich plasma or mesenchymal stem cells regarding improvement of healing rates and clinical outcomes. Further research is needed to identify effective biologically directed augmentations that will improve healing rates and clinical outcomes after rotator cuff repair. PMID:25793161

  3. Isolation and characterization of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from shoulder tissues involved in rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Hajime; Uchida, Soshi; Sekiya, Ichiro; Sakai, Akinori; Moridera, Kuniaki; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies report a relatively high failure rate for tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff repair. Several studies have investigated biologically augmented rotator cuff repair; however, none has shown the application of synovial mesenchymal stem cells for such repair. To demonstrate whether cells derived from shoulder tissues have mesenchymal stem cell properties and to identify which tissue is the best source of the mesenchymal stem cells. Controlled laboratory study. Forty-two patients with a diagnosed rotator cuff tear preoperatively were enrolled in this study. Human mesenchymal tissues were obtained during arthroscopic surgery for rotator cuff tears from 19 donors who met the inclusion criteria and had investigable amounts of tissue. Colony-forming units, yield obtained, expandability, differentiation potential, epitope profile, and gene expression were compared among the cells from 4 shoulder tissues: synovium of the glenohumeral joint, subacromial bursa, margin of the ruptured supraspinatus tendon, and residual tendon stump on the greater tuberosity (enthesis). The number of live passage 0 cells from whole tissue was significantly higher in cells derived from the subacromial bursa (P source. The findings indicate that the subacromial bursa is a good candidate for the source of mesenchymal stem cells in rotator cuff tears. Synovial cells from the subacromial bursa in patients with rotator cuff tears are a superior cell source in vitro, suggesting that mesenchymal stem cells from this tissue could be good candidates for biological augmentation of rotator cuff repair.

  4. Composition of Muscle Fiber Types in Rat Rotator Cuff Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yongjun; Pan, Feng; Mi, Jingyi

    2016-10-01

    The rat is a suitable model to study human rotator cuff pathology owing to the similarities in morphological anatomy structure. However, few studies have reported the composition muscle fiber types of rotator cuff muscles in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and distribution in rotator cuff muscles of the rat. It was found that rotator cuff muscles in the rat were of mixed fiber type composition. The majority of rotator cuff fibers labeled positively for MyHCII. Moreover, the rat rotator cuff muscles contained hybrid fibers. So, compared with human rotator cuff muscles composed partly of slow-twitch fibers, the majority of fast-twitch fibers in rat rotator cuff muscles should be considered when the rat model study focus on the pathological process of rotator cuff muscles after injury. Gaining greater insight into muscle fiber types in rotator cuff muscles of the rat may contribute to elucidate the mechanism of pathological change in rotator cuff muscles-related diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1397-1401, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Retracted: The clinical anatomy of the insertion of the rotator cuff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2nd March 2017 - Article Retracted. The Article THE CLINICAL ANATOMY OF THE INSERTION OF THE ROTATOR CUFF TENDON has been retracted from the Anatomy Journal of Africa on author request, and on the understanding that it was concurrently submitted and published in another journal. Managing Editor.

  6. Effect of methylprednisolone use on the rotator cuff in rats: biomechanical and histological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Vinícius Ghellioni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of treatment with different doses of methylprednisolone on the mechanical resistance and possible histological alterations of the rotator cuff tendon in rats.METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided randomly into four treatment groups: sham, vehicle or 0.6 mg/kg or 6.0 mg/kg of methylprednisolone. Changes to mechanical resistance (in N and histological parameters (fibrillar appearance, presence of collagen, edema and vascular proliferation of the rotator cuff tendon were evaluated. The analyses were conducted after administration of one treatment (24 h afterwards, two treatments (7 days afterward or three treatments (14 days afterwards, into the subacromial space.RESULTS: Seven and fourteen days after the treatments were started, it was found that in a dose-dependent manner, methylprednisolone reduced the mechanical resistance of the rotator cuff tendon (p < 0.05 in relation to the vehicle group. Modifications to the histological parameters were observed on the 7th and 14th days after the first infiltration, especially regarding the presence of collagen and vascular proliferation, for the dose of 0.6 mg/kg of methylprednisolone, and also regarding the presence of collagen, edema and vascular proliferation for the dose of 6.0 mg/kg of corticoid.CONCLUSION: The results obtained demonstrated a relationship between methylprednisolone use through infiltration into the subacromial space and reduction of the mechanical resistance of and histological modifications to the rotator cuff tendon in rats.

  7. Rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents: experience at a large pediatric hospital

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    Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Emery, Kathleen H. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Maeder, Matthew E. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lenox Hill Hospital, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Salisbury, Shelia R. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Prior literature, limited to small case series and case reports, suggests that rotator cuff tears are rare in adolescents. However, we have identified rotator cuff tears in numerous children and adolescents who have undergone shoulder MRI evaluation. The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence and characteristics of rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents referred for MRI evaluation of the shoulder at a large pediatric hospital and to correlate the presence of rotator cuff tears with concurrent labral pathology, skeletal maturity and patient activity and outcomes. We reviewed reports from 455 consecutive non-contrast MRI and magnetic resonance arthrogram examinations of the shoulder performed during a 2-year period, and following exclusions we yielded 205 examinations in 201 patients (ages 8-18 years; 75 girls, 126 boys). Rotator cuff tears were classified by tendon involved, tear thickness (partial or full), surface and location of tear (when partial) and presence of delamination. We recorded concurrent labral pathology when present. Physeal patency of the proximal humerus was considered open, closing or closed. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate for a relationship between rotator cuff tears and degree of physeal patency. We obtained patient activity at the time of injury, surgical reports and outcomes from clinical records when available. Twenty-five (12.2%) rotator cuff tears were identified in 17 boys and 7 girls (ages 10-18 years; one patient had bilateral tears). The supraspinatus tendon was most frequently involved (56%). There were 2 full-thickness and 23 partial-thickness tears with articular-side partial-thickness tears most frequent (78%). Insertional partial-thickness tears were more common (78%) than critical zone tears (22%) and 10 (43%) partial-thickness tears were delamination tears. Nine (36%) patients with rotator cuff tears had concurrent labral pathology. There was no statistically significant relationship between

  8. Rotator cuff tears: assessment with MR arthrography in 275 patients with arthroscopic correlation

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    Waldt, S.; Bruegel, M.; Mueller, D.; Holzapfel, K.; Rummeny, E.J.; Woertler, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Imhoff, A.B. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Sports Orthopedics, Munich (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    We assessed the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears in a large symptomatic population. MR arthrograms obtained in 275 patients including a study group of 139 patients with rotator cuff tears proved by arthroscopy and a control group of 136 patients with arthroscopically intact rotator cuff tendons were reviewed in random order. MR imaging was performed on a 1.0 T system (Magnetom Expert, Siemens). MR arthrograms were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus for articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis tendons. At arthroscopy, 197 rotator cuff tears were diagnosed, including 105 partial-thickness (93 supraspinatus, nine infraspinatus, three subscapularis) and 92 full-thickness (43 supraspinatus, 20 infraspinatus, 29 subscapularis) tendon tears. For full-thickness tears, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 96%, 99%, and 98%, respectively, and for partial tears 80%, 97%, and 95%, respectively. False negative and positive assessments in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears were predominantly [78% (35/45)] observed with small articular-sided (Ellman grade1) tendon tears. MR arthrography is highly accurate in the diagnosis of full-thickness rotator cuff tears and is accurate in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears. Limitations in the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears are mainly restricted to small articular-sided tears (Ellman grade 1) due to difficulties in differentiation between fiber tearing, tendinitis, synovitic changes, and superficial fraying at tendon margins. (orig.)

  9. Glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps: a rare complication of traumatic rotator cuff tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Moraes Agnollitto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present report describes a case where typical findings of traumatic glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps were surgically confirmed. This condition is a rare complication of shoulder trauma. Generally, it occurs in high-energy trauma, frequently in association with glenohumeral joint dislocation. Radiography demonstrated increased joint space, internal rotation of the humerus and coracoid process fracture. In addition to the mentioned findings, magnetic resonance imaging showed massive rotator cuff tear with interposition of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and subscapularis stumps within the glenohumeral joint. Surgical treatment was performed confirming the injury and the rotator cuff stumps interposition. It is important that radiologists and orthopedic surgeons become familiar with this entity which, because of its rarity, might be neglected in cases of shoulder trauma.

  10. Simvastatin Exposure and Rotator Cuff Repair in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deren, Matthew E; Ehteshami, John R; Dines, Joshua S; Drakos, Mark C; Behrens, Steve B; Doty, Stephen; Coleman, Struan H

    2017-03-01

    Simvastatin is a common medication prescribed for hypercholesterolemia that accelerates local bone formation. It is unclear whether simvastatin can accelerate healing at the tendon-bone interface after rotator cuff repair. This study was conducted to investigate whether local and systemic administration of simvastatin increased tendon-bone healing of the rotator cuff as detected by maximum load to failure in a controlled animal-based model. Supraspinatus tendon repair was performed on 120 Sprague-Dawley rats. Sixty rats had a polylactic acid membrane overlying the repair site. Of these, 30 contained simvastatin and 30 did not contain medication. Sixty rats underwent repair without a polylactic acid membrane. Of these, 30 received oral simvastatin (25 mg/kg/d) and 30 received a regular diet. At 4 weeks, 5 rats from each group were killed for histologic analysis. At 8 weeks, 5 rats from each group were killed for histologic analysis and the remaining 20 rats were killed for biomechanical analysis. One rat that received oral simvastatin died of muscle necrosis. Average maximum load to failure was 35.2±6.2 N for those receiving oral simvastatin, 36.8±9.0 N for oral control subjects, 39.5±12.8 N for those receiving local simvastatin, and 39.1±9.3 N for control subjects with a polylactic acid membrane. No statistically significant differences were found between any of the 4 groups (P>.05). Qualitative histologic findings showed that all groups showed increased collagen formation and organization at 8 weeks compared with 4 weeks, with no differences between the 4 groups at each time point. The use of systemic and local simvastatin offered no benefit over control groups. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e288-e292.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. [Repair of rotator cuff tear by allogenic cortical bone anchor with suture bridge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-xin; Liu, Yu-jie; He, Wei; Li, Hai-feng; An, Bai-jing

    2012-07-03

    To evaluate the repair of rotator cuff tear by allogenic cortical bone anchors with the technique of suture bridge. A total of 18 patients with rotator cuff tear were recruited during the period of June 2006 to June 2009. There were 7 males and 11 females with an average age of 45.2 years old (range: 34 - 65). The locations included left shoulder (n = 11) and right shoulder (n = 7). Rotator cuff tear was repaired by allogenic cortical bone anchors with the technique of suture bridge under arthroscopy. The efficacy was evaluated by University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) standard score. The average follow-up period was 17.6 months (range: 12 - 36). The excellent rate of treatment was 100%. All rotator cuff tears were healed. Only 2 cases had minor pain and there was no limitation of joint activity. The bone anchor fully integrated with the subject area at Month 3 post-operation. The advantages of repairing rotator cuff tear by allograft cortical bone anchors with the technique of suture bridge includes minimal trauma, a large tendon bone area, firm fixation and a low cost. It is a better approach of repairing rotator cuff tear.

  12. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Shoulder Mri during Active Motion for Investigation of Rotator Cuff Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Tempelaere

    Full Text Available MRI is the standard methodology in diagnosis of rotator cuff diseases. However, many patients continue to have pain despite treatment, and MRI of a static unloaded shoulder seems insufficient for best diagnosis and treatment. This study evaluated if Dynamic MRI provides novel kinematic data that can be used to improve the understanding, diagnosis and best treatment of rotator cuff diseases.Dynamic MRI provided real-time 3D image series and was used to measure changes in the width of subacromial space, superior-inferior translation and anterior-posterior translation of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active abduction. These measures were investigated for consistency with the rotator cuff diseases classifications from standard MRI.The study included: 4 shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears, 5 shoulders with an isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tear, 5 shoulders with tendinopathy and 6 normal shoulders. A change in the width of subacromial space greater than 4mm differentiated between rotator cuff diseases with tendon tears (massive cuff tears and supraspinatus tear and without tears (tendinopathy (p = 0.012. The range of the superior-inferior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears group (6.4mm than in normals (3.4mm (p = 0.02. The range of the anterior-posterior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears (9.2 mm and supraspinatus tear (9.3 mm shoulders compared to normals (3.5mm and tendinopathy (4.8mm shoulders (p = 0.05.The Dynamic MRI enabled a novel measure; 'Looseness', i.e. the translation of the humeral head on the glenoid during an abduction cycle. Looseness was better able at differentiating different forms of rotator cuff disease than a simple static measure of relative glenohumeral position.

  13. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff: state of the art in diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merolla, Giovanni; Singh, Sanjay; Paladini, Paolo; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a painful shoulder disorder characterised by either single or multiple deposits in the rotator cuff tendon. Although the disease subsides spontaneously in most cases, a subpopulation of patients continue to complain of pain and shoulder dysfunction and the deposits do not show any signs of resolution. Although several treatment options have been proposed, clinical results are controversial and often the indication for a given therapy remains a matter of clinician choice. Herein, we report on the current state of the art in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff.

  14. Rotator cuff tears noncontrast MRI compared to MR arthrography

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    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jee Young [Chungang University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chungang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jae Chul [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To compare the accuracy of indirect magnetic resonance arthrography and noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. In total, 333 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were included retrospectively. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of supraspinatus-infraspinatus and subscapularis tendon tears. The overall diagnostic performance was calculated using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Statistical differences between the diagnostic performances of the two methods were analyzed. Ninety-six and 237 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging and indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were assigned into groups A and B, respectively. Sensitivity for diagnosing articular-surface partial-thickness supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon tear was slightly higher in group B than in group A. Statistical significance was confirmed by multivariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation (p = 0.046). The specificity for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear (85 % vs. 68 %, p = 0.012) and grading accuracy (57 % vs. 40 %, p = 0.005) was higher in group B than in group A; the differences were statistically significant for one out of two readers. Univariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation showed that the accuracy for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear in group B was higher than in group A (p = 0.042). There were no statistically significant differences between the diagnostic performances of both methods for any other parameters. Indirect magnetic resonance arthrography may facilitate more accurate diagnosis and grading of subscapularis tendon tears compared with noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  15. Reverse Fosbury Flop Tear of the Rotator Cuff

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    Jérôme Tirefort

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. “Fosbury flop” tear is an avulsion of the posterosuperior rotator cuff from the bone with reversal healing on its medial bursal-side. This case report describes a unique variant of Fosbury flop tear with a lesion of the musculotendinous junction that healed, for its tendon part, on the anterior humerus and coracoid process. Case Presentation. A 62-year-old man developed a posttraumatic painful shoulder with active loss of range of motion. Magnetic resonance arthrography demonstrated a lesion of the musculotendinous junction of the supraspinatus with healing of the tendon on the above-mentioned structures (reverse Fosbury flop. During arthroscopic evaluation, tendon repair was not possible and a debridement to avoid subacromial and anterior impingement associated with a tenotomy of the long head of the biceps were carried out. One year postoperatively, the patient had complete range of motion and was satisfied with the clinical results. Discussion and Conclusion. Different Fosbury flop tears exist. Radiologists and orthopedic surgeons should be aware of these tear patterns as failure to recognize them may lead to inadequate treatment.

  16. Interposition Dermal Matrix Xenografts: A Successful Alternative to Traditional Treatment of Massive Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Julie A; Zgonis, Miltiadis H; Rickert, Kathleen D; Bradley, Kendall E; Kremen, Thomas J; Boggess, Blake R; Toth, Alison P

    2017-05-01

    Management of massive rotator cuff tears in shoulders without glenohumeral arthritis remains problematic for surgeons. Repairs of massive rotator cuff tears have failure rates of 20% to 94% at 1 to 2 years postoperatively as demonstrated with arthrography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, inconsistent outcomes have been reported with debridement alone of massive rotator cuff tears, and limitations have been seen with other current methods of operative intervention, including arthroplasty and tendon transfers. The use of interposition porcine acellular dermal matrix xenograft in patients with massive rotator cuff tears will result in improved subjective outcomes, postoperative pain, function, range of motion, and strength. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Sixty patients (61 shoulders) were prospectively observed for a mean of 50.3 months (range, 24-63 months) after repair of massive rotator cuff tears with porcine acellular dermal matrix xenograft as an interposition graft. Subjective outcome data were obtained with visual analog scale for pain score (0-10, 0 = no pain) and Modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (MASES) score. Active range of motion in flexion, external rotation, and internal rotation were recorded. Strength in the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles was assessed manually on a 10-point scale and by handheld dynamometer. Ultrasound was used to assess the integrity of the repair during latest follow-up. Mean visual analog scale pain score decreased from 4.0 preoperatively to 1.0 postoperatively ( P massive rotator cuff tears with interposition porcine acellular dermal matrix graft have good subjective function as assessed by the MASES score. Patients have significant improvement in pain, range of motion, and manual muscle strength. Postoperative ultrasound demonstrated that the repair was completely intact in 91.8% of patients, a vast improvement compared with results previously reported for primary repairs of

  17. Shoulder stiffness and rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; Vasta, Sebastiano; Gallo, Andrea; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Shoulder stiffness is a frequent complication of surgical repair of rotator cuff tears. Post-operative stiffness negatively affects surgical outcomes leading to a substantial comorbidity and to the failure of surgical treatment. Also, a stiff shoulder could commonly be concomitant with an rotator cuff tear (RCT). We performed a comprehensive search of CINAHL, Embase, Medline and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials, from inception of the database to 31 July 2011. Sixteen articles published in peer-reviewed journals were included in this comprehensive review. The management of shoulder stiffness is still controversial. The role of rehabilitation programs (standard versus early passive mobilization) after RCT repair on the development of stiffness is not clear, while the role of arthroscopic capsular release for post-operative stiffness is better defined, although a threshold of decreased the range of movement for which capsular release is advised has not been identified. Several factors have been identified to predispose the development of shoulder stiffness. There is also evidence in favor of surgical management of RCTs even when accompanied by shoulder stiffness, and there are strong evidences that arthroscopic capsular release is reliable and effective in managing shoulder stiffness. The post-operative rehabilitation protocol remains controversial. We are still far from definitive guidelines for the management of pre- and post-operative stiffness, and prospective double-blinded randomized clinical trials are needed to obtain evidence allowing to establish a reliable and effective management plan for shoulder stiffness.

  18. Long-Term MRI Findings in Operated Rotator Cuff Tear

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    Kyroelae, K.; Niemitukia, L.; Jaroma, H.; Vaeaetaeinen, U. [Kuopio Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Orthopaedics and Traumatology

    2004-08-01

    Purpose: To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings at long-term follow-up after rotator cuff (RC) tear using standard MRI sequences without fat saturation. Material and Methods: Twenty-eight patients aged 55.8{+-}7.6 underwent MRI examination 4.6{+-}2.1 years after surgery for RC tear. Standard sequences in oblique coronal, oblique sagittal, and axial planes were obtained. The RC, including re-tears and tendon degeneration, was independently evaluated by two observers. Thickness of the supraspinatus tendon and narrowing of the subacromial space were measured. The clinical outcome was evaluated with the Constant score and compared with the MRI findings. Results: The RC tear was traumatic in 18 (64%) patients and degenerative in 10 (36%). At follow-up, 11 (39%) had normal RC tendons with good clinical outcome. Four (14%) patients had painful tendinosis without RC tear. A full-thickness RC tear was found in 7 (25%) patients and a partial tear in 6 (21%). In one patient with a full-thickness tear, and in two with partial tear, tendinosis was found in another of the RC tendons. The subacromial space was narrowed in 13 (46%) of the patients. A narrowing of the subacromial space correlated with re-tear (P<0.05). Conclusions: The RC may be evaluated with standard MRI sequences without fat saturation at long-term follow-up. A normal appearance of the RC is correlated with good clinical outcome, while re-tear and tendinosis are associated with pain.

  19. Arthroscopic repair for subacromial incarceration of a torn rotator cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Nakamizo

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: Arthroscopic reduction and repair are applicable for inverted flap tears of the rotator cuff. The findings of the present study indicated that patients with a heel-type acromion in the anteroposterior view of radiographs are at greater risk for inverted flap tears of the rotator cuff.

  20. Rotator Cuff Disease and Injury--Evaluation and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Randy

    This presentation considers the incidence, evaluation, and management of rotator cuff disease and injury. Pathogenesis, symptoms, physical findings, treatment (therapeutic and surgical), and prevention are discussed. It is noted that rotator cuff problems, common in athletes, are usually related to an error in training or lack of training. They…

  1. Surgery or conservative treatment for rotator cuff tear: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryösä, Anssi; Laimi, Katri; Äärimaa, Ville; Lehtimäki, Kaisa; Kukkonen, Juha; Saltychev, Mikhail

    2017-07-01

    Comparative evidence on treating rotator cuff tear is inconclusive. The objective of this review was to evaluate the evidence on effectiveness of tendon repair in reducing pain and improving function of the shoulder when compared with conservative treatment of symptomatic rotator cuff tear. Search on CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science and Pedro databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCT) comparing surgery and conservative treatment of rotator cuff tear. Study selection and extraction based on the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic reviews of Interventions. Random effects meta-analysis. Three identified RCTs involved 252 participants (123 cases and 129 controls). The risk of bias was considered low for all three RCTs. For Constant score, statistically insignificant effect size was 5.6 (95% CI -0.41 to 11.62) points in 1-year follow up favouring surgery and below the level of minimal clinically important difference. The respective difference in pain reduction was -0.93 (95% CI -1.65 to -0.21) cm on a 0-10 pain visual analogue scale favouring surgery. The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.012) in 1-year follow up but below the level of minimal clinically important difference. There is limited evidence that surgery is not more effective in treating rotator cuff tear than conservative treatment alone. Thus, a conservative approach is advocated as the initial treatment modality. Implications for Rehabilitation There is limited evidence that surgery is not more effective in treating rotator cuff tear than conservative treatment alone. There was no clinically significant difference between surgery and active physiotherapy in 1-year follow-up in improving Constant score or reducing pain caused by rotator cuff tear. As physiotherapy is less proneness to complications and less expensive than surgery, a conservative approach is advocated as the initial treatment modality to rotator cuff tears.

  2. Validation of the western ontario rotator cuff index in patients with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: A study protocol

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    van Mameren Henk

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is described as being a successful procedure. These results are often derived from clinical general shoulder examinations, which are then classified as 'excellent', 'good', 'fair' or 'poor'. However, the cut-off points for these classifications vary and sometimes modified scores are used. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is performed to improve quality of life. Therefore, disease specific health-related quality of life patient-administered questionnaires are needed. The WORC is a quality of life questionnaire designed for patients with disorders of the rotator cuff. The score is validated for rotator cuff disease, but not for rotator cuff repair specifically. The aim of this study is to investigate reliability, validity and responsiveness of WORC in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Methods/Design An approved translation of the WORC into Dutch is used. In this prospective study three groups of patients are used: 1. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair; 2. Disorders of the rotator cuff without rupture; 3. Shoulder instability. The WORC, SF-36 and the Constant Score are obtained twice before therapy is started to measure reliability and validity. Responsiveness is tested by obtaining the same tests after therapy.

  3. Rotator cuff injuries and factors associated with reoperation

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    Alexandre Litchina Carvalho

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of rotator cuff tears and describe the profile of reoperated patients, causes of repeated tendon tears, tear evolution and range of times between surgical procedures. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study involving 604 surgical procedures performed at two regional referral hospitals between January 2006 and December 2012. After approval by the ethics committee, data describing the patients' epidemiological profile were gathered at a single time, using Cofield's classification to measure the extent of the tears, all of which underwent arthroscopic surgery. The data were entered into Epi Info 3.5.3 and were analyzed using SPSS version 18.0. RESULTS: Among the 604 surgical procedures, females were affected in more cases (351; 58.1%. When the dominant limb was the right limb, it was affected in 90% of the cases (p < 0.05. The supraspinatus tendon was affected in 574 cases (95% and the tears were of medium size in 300 cases (49.7%. Eighteen reoperations were performed (2.98% and the upper right limb was the most affected (66.6%. The cause was non-traumatic in 12 patients. The repeated tears were mostly smaller (44%, and the length of time between the two surgical procedures ranged from 6 to 298 weeks. CONCLUSION: Female gender, smaller extent in the second procedure and non-traumatic cause were found in most of the cases analyzed.

  4. Long Head of the Biceps Pathology Combined with Rotator Cuff Tears

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    Ditsios, Konstantinos; Agathangelidis, Filon; Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karataglis, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, Pericles

    2012-01-01

    The long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) is an anatomic structure commonly involved in painful shoulder conditions as a result of trauma, degeneration, or overuse. Recent studies have pointed out the close correlation between LHBT lesions and rotator cuff (RCT) tears. Clinicians need to take into account the importance of the LHBT in the presence of other shoulder pathologies. This paper provides an up-to-date overview of recent publications on anatomy, pathophysiology, diagnosis, classifica...

  5. Primary and Secondary Consequences of Rotator Cuff Injury on Joint Stabilizing Tissues in the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Hafizur; Currier, Eric; Johnson, Marshall; Goding, Rick; Johnson, Amy Wagoner; Kersh, Mariana E

    2017-11-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are one of the primary causes of shoulder pain and dysfunction in the upper extremity accounting over 4.5 million physician visits per year with 250,000 rotator cuff repairs being performed annually in the U.S. While the tear is often considered an injury to a specific tendon/tendons and consequently treated as such, there are secondary effects of RCTs that may have significant consequences for shoulder function. Specifically, RCTs have been shown to affect the joint cartilage, bone, the ligaments, as well as the remaining intact tendons of the shoulder joint. Injuries associated with the upper extremities account for the largest percent of workplace injuries. Unfortunately, the variable success rate related to RCTs motivates the need for a better understanding of the biomechanical consequences associated with the shoulder injuries. Understanding the timing of the injury and the secondary anatomic consequences that are likely to have occurred are also of great importance in treatment planning because the approach to the treatment algorithm is influenced by the functional and anatomic state of the rotator cuff and the shoulder complex in general. In this review, we summarized the contribution of RCTs to joint stability in terms of both primary (injured tendon) and secondary (remaining tissues) consequences including anatomic changes in the tissues surrounding the affected tendon/tendons. The mechanical basis of normal shoulder joint function depends on the balance between active muscle forces and passive stabilization from the joint surfaces, capsular ligaments, and labrum. Evaluating the role of all tissues working together as a system for maintaining joint stability during function is important to understand the effects of RCT, specifically in the working population, and may provide insight into root causes of shoulder injury.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of rotator cuff tears in shoulder impingement syndrome.

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    Freygant, Magdalena; Dziurzyńska-Białek, Ewa; Guz, Wiesław; Samojedny, Antoni; Gołofit, Andrzej; Kostkiewicz, Agnieszka; Terpin, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder joint is a common site of musculoskeletal pain caused, among other things, by rotator cuff tears due to narrowing of subacromial space, acute trauma or chronic shoulder overload. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent modality for imaging of soft tissues of the shoulder joint considering a possibility of multiplanar image acquisition and non-invasive nature of the study. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of partial and complete rotator cuff tears in magnetic resonance images of patients with shoulder impingement syndrome and to review the literature on the causes and classification of rotator cuff tears. We retrospectively analyzed the results of 137 shoulder MRI examinations performed in 57 women and 72 men in Magnetic Resonance facility of the Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging at the St. Jadwiga the Queen Regional Hospital No. 2 in Rzeszow between June 2010 and February 2013. Examinations were performed using Philips Achieva 1.5T device, including spin echo and gradient echo sequences with T1-, T2- and PD-weighted as well as fat saturation sequences in transverse, frontal and sagittal oblique planes. Patients were referred from hospital wards as well as from outpatient clinics of the subcarpathian province. The most frequently reported injuries included partial supraspinatus tendon tear and complete tearing most commonly involved the supraspinatus muscle tendon. The smallest group comprised patients with complete tear of subscapularis muscle tendon. Among 137 patients in the study population, 129 patients suffered from shoulder pain, including 57 patients who reported a history of trauma. There was 44% women and 56% men in a group of patients with shoulder pain. Posttraumatic shoulder pain was predominantly reported by men, while women comprised a larger group of patients with shoulder pain not preceded by injury. Rotator cuff injury is a very common pathology in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome

  7. A Canine Non-Weight-Bearing Model with Radial Neurectomy for Rotator Cuff Repair.

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    Xiaoxi Ji

    Full Text Available The major concern of using a large animal model to study rotator cuff repair is the high rate of repair retears. The purpose of this study was to test a non-weight-bearing (NWB canine model for rotator cuff repair research.First, in the in vitro study, 18 shoulders were randomized to 3 groups. 1 Full-width transections repaired with modified Mason-Allen sutures using 3-0 polyglactin suture, 2 Group 1 repaired using number 2 (#2 polyester braid and long-chain polyethylene suture, and 3 Partial-width transections leaving the superior 2 mm infraspinatus tendon intact without repair. In the in vivo study of 6 dogs, the infraspinatus tendon was partially transected as the same as the in vitro group 3. A radial neurectomy was performed to prevent weight bearing. The operated limb was slung in a custom-made jacket for 6 weeks.In the in vitro study, mean ultimate tensile load and stiffness in Group 2 were significantly higher than Group 1 and 3 (p<0.05. In the in vivo study, gross inspection and histology showed that the preserved superior 2-mm portion of the infraspinatus tendon remained intact with normal structure.Based on the biomechanical and histological findings, this canine NWB model may be an appropriate and useful model for studies of rotator cuff repair.

  8. A Comparison of Rehabilitation Methods After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Anthony; Villacis, Diego; Yalamanchili, Raj; Hatch, George F. Rick

    2015-01-01

    Context: Despite the significant attention directed toward optimizing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, there has been less focus on rehabilitation after rotator cuff repair surgery. Objective: To determine the effect of different rehabilitation protocols on clinical outcomes by comparing early versus late mobilization approaches and continuous passive mobilization (CPM) versus manual therapy after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Data Sources: PubMed was searched for relevant articles using the keywords rotator cuff, rotator, cuff, tears, lacerations, and rehabilitation to identify articles published from January 1980 to March 2014. Study Selection: Inclusion criteria consisted of articles of level 1 or 2 evidence, written in the English language, and with reported outcomes for early versus late mobilization or rehabilitation with CPM versus manual therapy after primary arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Exclusion criteria consisted of articles of level 3, 4, or 5 evidence, non-English language, and those with significantly different demographic variables between study groups. Included studies were evaluated with the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials criteria. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 2. Data Extraction: Level of evidence, study type, number of patients enrolled, number of patients at final follow-up, length of follow-up, age, sex, rotator cuff tear size, surgical technique, and concomitant operative procedures were extracted from included articles. Postoperative data included clinical outcome scores, visual analog score for pain, shoulder range of motion, strength, and rotator cuff retear rates. Results: A total of 7 studies met all criteria and were included in the final analysis. Five studies compared early and late mobilization. Two studies compared CPM and manual therapy. Conclusion: In general, current data do not definitively demonstrate a significant difference between postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation

  9. Repair of rotator cuff injuries using different composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopiz, Y; Arvinius, C; García-Fernández, C; Rodriguez-Bobada, M C; González-López, P; Civantos, A; Marco, F

    Rotator cuff repairs have shown a high level of re-ruptures. It is hypothesised that the use of rhBMP-2 in a carrier could improve the biomechanical and histological properties of the repair. Controlled experimental study conducted on 40 rats with section and repair of the supraspinatus tendon and randomisation to one of five groups: Group 1 (control) only suture; Group 2 (double control), suture and alginate-chitin carrier; Group 3 (alginate-control), the rhBMP-2 was added to the alginate; Group 4 (chitin-control) application of the rhBMP-2 to the chitin, and Group 5 (double sample): The two components of the carrier (alginate and chitin) have rhBMP-2. A biomechanical and histological analysis was performed at 4 weeks. A gap was observed in all cases 4 weeks after supraspinatus detachment. The re-rupture rate was 7.5%, with 20% of them in the control-alginate Group. Histologically the best results were obtained in the double sample group: 4.5 (3.3-5.0). Double sample were also able to support higher loads to failure: 62.9N (59.8 to 69.4) with lower rigidity 12.7 (9.7 to 15.9). The use of alginate-chitin carrier with rhBMP-2 improves the biomechanical and histological properties of the repair site in a chronic rotator cuff tear. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a prospective randomized trial of immobilization compared with early motion.

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    Keener, Jay D; Galatz, Leesa M; Stobbs-Cucchi, Georgia; Patton, Rebecca; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The influence of rehabilitation on the outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare clinical results and tendon healing rates following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair utilizing two distinct rehabilitation protocols. Over a thirty-month period, 124 patients under the age of sixty-five years underwent arthroscopic repair of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear measuring rehabilitation program with early range of motion or to an immobilization group with delayed range of motion for six weeks. Clinical outcomes assessment included visual analog pain scale score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Simple Shoulder Test (SST), relative Constant score, and strength measurements at six, twelve, and twenty-four months. Tendon integrity was assessed with ultrasonography at a minimum of twelve months postoperatively. There were no significant differences in patient age, tear size, or measures of preoperative function between groups at baseline. Final clinical follow-up was available for 114 subjects (92%). Active elevation and external rotation were better in the traditional rehabilitation group at three months. No significant differences were seen in functional scores, active motion, and shoulder strength between rehabilitation groups at later time points. Functional outcomes plateaued at six or twelve months except for the relative Constant score, which improved up to twenty-four months following surgery. Ninety-two percent of the tears were healed, with no difference between rehabilitation protocols (p = 0.46). Arthroscopic repair of small and medium full-thickness rotator cuff tears results in reliable improvements in clinical outcomes and a high rate of tendon integrity using a double-row repair technique in patients under the age of sixty-five years. There is no apparent advantage or disadvantage of early passive range of motion compared with immobilization with regard to healing or functional

  11. Arthroscopic Changes of the Biceps Pulley in Rotator Cuff Tear and Its Clinical Significance in Relation to Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang Hyuk; Kim, Se Sik; Kim, Seok Jun; Lee, Ju Hwan

    2015-09-01

    In the case of rotator cuff tears, the biceps pulley can be stressed by the unstable biceps tendon, and this can subsequently affect the stability of the subscapularis tendon. Therefore, it is important to distinguish between normal variations and lesions of the biceps pulley that affect anterosuperior lesions in cases of rotator cuff tears. From January 2002 through November 2010, we observed biceps pulley and associated anterosuperior lesions in 589 of 634 cases (93%) of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, including 72 cases (12.2%) of small tears, 219 cases (37.2%) of medium tears, 134 cases (22.8%) of large tears, and 164 cases (27.8%) of massive tears. We classified normal stretched biceps pulleys as type I, stretched biceps pulleys with mild changes as type II, those with a partial tear as type III, and torn pulleys as type IV. We were able to classify 589 cases of biceps pulleys as type I, II, III, or IV associated lesions in rotator cuff tears. Type I was seen in 91 cases (15.4%), type II in 216 cases (36.7%), type III in 157 cases (26.7%), and type IV in 101 cases (17.1%); unidentified cases numbered 24 (4.1%). Nearly three-quarters, 73.3%, of the cases (432/589) had associated anterosuperior lesions, and combined treatment for the associated lesions was administered in 29.2% (172/589) of cases. Biceps pulley lesions with more than partial tears were identified in 48% of rotator cuff tear cases. The incidence and severity of pulley lesions were related to the rotator cuff tear size, the status of the long head of the biceps tendon and subscapularis tendon lesion, and the treatment methods.

  12. Critical period and risk factors for retear following arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Johannes; Andrieu, Kevin; Fotiadis, Elias; Hannink, Gerjon; Barthelemy, Renaud; Saffarini, Mo

    2017-07-01

    The incidence of retear following rotator cuff repair remains a major concern, and the cause and timing of retear remain unclear. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate the timing of retears following rotator cuff repair at multiple time intervals. The hypothesis was that the 'critical period' for retears extends beyond the first three post-operative months. The authors prospectively studied 206 shoulders that underwent arthroscopic double-row (without suture bridge) suture anchor repair for rotator cuff tears. Patients were recalled to three follow-up visits at the following post-operative time intervals: 3, 6, and 12 months or longer. Ultrasonography was performed at each visit, and Constant score was collected during the last visit. A total of 176 shoulders attended all required follow-up visits with mean age 56.0 years. Ultrasonography revealed retears in 16 shoulders (9.1 %) at 3 months, in 6 shoulders (3.4 %) at 6 months, and in 5 others (2.8 %) at the last follow-up, while it confirmed intact rotator cuffs in 149 shoulders (84.7 %) at the last follow-up (median 35.5; range 12-61). The incidence of retears was significantly associated with tear size (p = 0.001) and tendon degeneration (p = 0.003). The 'critical period' for healing following rotator cuff repair, during which risks of retears are high, extends to the first 6 months. The risk of retear is greatest for massive 3-tendon tears, which may require longer periods of protection. The clinical relevance of this study is the identification of patients at risk of retear and the adjustment of their rehabilitation strategy and time for return to work. III.

  13. Electrotherapy modalities for rotator cuff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Matthew J; Green, Sally; Mrocki, Marshall A; Surace, Stephen J; Deitch, Jessica; McBain, Brodwen; Lyttle, Nicolette; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2016-06-10

    Management of rotator cuff disease may include use of electrotherapy modalities (also known as electrophysical agents), which aim to reduce pain and improve function via an increase in energy (electrical, sound, light, or thermal) into the body. Examples include therapeutic ultrasound, low-level laser therapy (LLLT), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMF). These modalities are usually delivered as components of a physical therapy intervention. This review is one of a series of reviews that form an update of the Cochrane review, 'Physiotherapy interventions for shoulder pain'. To synthesise available evidence regarding the benefits and harms of electrotherapy modalities for the treatment of people with rotator cuff disease. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 3), Ovid MEDLINE (January 1966 to March 2015), Ovid EMBASE (January 1980 to March 2015), CINAHL Plus (EBSCOhost, January 1937 to March 2015), ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP clinical trials registries up to March 2015, unrestricted by language, and reviewed the reference lists of review articles and retrieved trials, to identify potentially relevant trials. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised trials, including adults with rotator cuff disease (e.g. subacromial impingement syndrome, rotator cuff tendinitis, calcific tendinitis), and comparing any electrotherapy modality with placebo, no intervention, a different electrotherapy modality or any other intervention (e.g. glucocorticoid injection). Trials investigating whether electrotherapy modalities were more effective than placebo or no treatment, or were an effective addition to another physical therapy intervention (e.g. manual therapy or exercise) were the main comparisons of interest. Main outcomes of interest were overall pain, function, pain on motion, patient-reported global assessment of treatment success

  14. Arthroscopic suture bridge technique for intratendinous tear of rotator cuff in chronically painful calcific tendinitis of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Shafi, Mohamed; Moon, Chang-Yun; Park, Sang-Eun; Kim, Yeon-Jun; Kim, Sung-Eun

    2013-11-01

    Arthroscopic removal, now the main treatment option, has almost replaced open surgery for treatment of resistant calcific tendinitis. In some cases of chronic calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, the calcific materials are hard and adherent to the tendon. Removal of these materials can cause significant intratendinous tears between the superficial and deep layers of the degenerated rotator cuff. Thus far, there are no established surgical techniques for removing the calcific materials while ensuring cuff integrity. Good clinical results for rotator cuff repair were achieved by using an arthroscopic suture bridge technique in patients with long-standing calcific tendinitis. Intact rotator cuff integrity and recovery of signal change on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans were confirmed. This is a technical note about a surgical technique and its clinical results with a review of relevant published reports. © 2013 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Repair of the rotator cuff. Mini-open and arthroscopic repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, F B; Field, L D; Savoie, F H

    2000-01-01

    The repair of rotator cuff tears by traditional open subacromial decompression and rotator cuff tendon reapproximation has proved successful in restoring function and decreasing pain, but open rotator cuff repair has some inherent disadvantages. Postoperative detachment of the deltoid repair has been reported and results in significant morbidity. The open technique may also require a longer period of limited motion resulting in greater stiffness. Arthroscopically assisted mini-open repairs and, more recently, completely arthroscopic repairs of the rotator cuff have been developed and increasingly are being applied. Both techniques avoid detachment of the deltoid. The mini-open and arthroscopic approaches to rotator cuff repair have the added benefit of arthroscopic evaluation of the glenohumeral joint. The mini-open technique has the advantage of allowing the direct visualization of the cuff repair and allows surgeons to place the stitches in an open fashion, which is familiar to all surgeons. The mini-open technique also allows the placement of tension-absorbing stitches in the rare cases that they are needed. Mini-open techniques also allow the choice of bone anchors or osseous tunnels for fixation. The completely arthroscopic cuff repair has several potential advantages over the open and mini-open cuff repair techniques; first is the decreased disruption of the soft tissues, which may result in less scarring and adhesions. The procedure is the most cosmetically appealing of the techniques. Reduced postoperative pain is also cited as an advantage but has been demonstrated only in a single, nonrandomized study. Finally, if technical difficulties arise, the conversion to a mini-open repair can be done easily. In a few studies, arthroscopic cuff repair techniques have shown promise as an alternative to mini-open or open repair, but these results have been at the hands of a few surgeons who have extensive experience in arthroscopy of the shoulder. In contrast, the

  16. Restoration of shoulder biomechanics according to degree of repair completion in a cadaveric model of massive rotator cuff tear: importance of margin convergence and posterior cuff fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Joo Han; McGarry, Michelle H; Jun, Bong Jae; Gupta, Akash; Chung, Kyung Chil; Hwang, James; Lee, Thay Q

    2012-11-01

    Complete repair in massive rotator cuff tear may not be possible, allowing for only partial repair. However, the effect of partial repair on glenohumeral biomechanics has not been evaluated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the rotational range of motion (ROM), glenohumeral kinematics, and gap formation at the repaired tendon edge following massive cuff tear and repair according to the degree of repair completion. Posterior fixation will restore the altered biomechanics of massive rotator cuff tear. Controlled laboratory study. Eight cadaveric shoulders were tested at 0°, 30°, and 60° of abduction in the scapular plane. Muscle loading was applied based on physiological muscle cross-sectional area ratios. Maximum internal (MaxIR) and external rotations (MaxER) were measured. Humeral head apex (HHA) position and gap formation at the repaired tendon edge were measured using a MicroScribe from MaxIR to MaxER in 30° increments. Testing was performed for intact, massive cuff tear, complete repair, and 4 types of partial repair. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to determine significant differences. Massive tear significantly increased ROM and shifted HHA superiorly in MaxIR at all abduction angles (P biomechanical environment for healing.

  17. Rotator cuff troublemakers: pitfalls of MRI and ultrasound

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    Christina M Chingkoe

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Christina M Chingkoe1, Jeremy H White2, Luck J Louis2, Gordon Andrews2, Bruce B Forster21Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada; 2Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, CanadaAbstract: Rotator cuff pathology is routinely evaluated in many imaging centers with both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and ultrasound. Despite good diagnostic accuracy using each of these modalities, certain limitations persist. In this pictorial essay, we describe five potential “troublemakers” of rotator cuff pathology which are recurrent themes in our busy shoulder referral center. The comparison of imaging findings on MRI and ultrasound are discussed. An awareness of these potential pitfalls will help improve radiologists’ diagnostic accuracy of rotator cuff pathology, and allow the clinician to optimize imaging referral and better interpret the subsequent report.Keywords: rotator cuff, ultrasound, MRI, correlation, shoulder

  18. Partial rotator cuff injury in athletes: bursal or articular?

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Cassiano Diniz; Cohen, Carina; Belangero, Paulo Santoro [UNIFESP; de Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Monteiro, Gustavo Cará; POCHINI, ALBERTO DE CASTRO; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTA painful shoulder is a very common complaint among athletes, especially in the case of those in sports involving throwing. Partial lesions of the rotator cuff may be very painful and cause significant functional limitation to athletes' sports practice. The incidence of partial lesions of the cuff is variable (13-37%). It is difficult to make the clinical and radiological diagnosis, and this condition should be borne in mind in the cases of all athletes who present symptoms of rotator...

  19. Rotator cuff related shoulder pain: Assessment, management and uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jeremy

    2016-06-01

    Rotator cuff related shoulder pain (RCRSP) is an over-arching term that encompasses a spectrum of shoulder conditions including; subacromial pain (impingement) syndrome, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and symptomatic partial and full thickness rotator cuff tears. For those diagnosed with RCRSP one aim of treatment is to achieve symptom free shoulder movement and function. Findings from published high quality research investigations suggest that a graduated and well-constructed exercise approach confers at least equivalent benefit as that derived from surgery for; subacromial pain (impingement) syndrome, rotator cuff tendinopathy, partial thickness rotator cuff (RC) tears and atraumatic full thickness rotator cuff tears. However considerable deficits in our understanding of RCRSP persist. These include; (i) cause and source of symptoms, (ii) establishing a definitive diagnosis, (iii) establishing the epidemiology of symptomatic RCRSP, (iv) knowing which tissues or systems to target intervention, and (v) which interventions are most effective. The aim of this masterclass is to address a number of these areas of uncertainty and it will focus on; (i) RC function, (ii) symptoms, (iii) aetiology, (iv) assessment and management, (v) imaging, and (vi) uncertainties associated with surgery. Although people experiencing RCRSP should derive considerable confidence that exercise therapy is associated with successful outcomes that are comparable to surgery, outcomes may be incomplete and associated with persisting and recurring symptoms. This underpins the need for ongoing research to; better understand the aetiology, improve methods of assessment and management, and eventually prevent these conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical, socio-demographic and radiological predictors of short-term outcome in rotator cuff disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engebretsen Kaia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder pain is common with rotator cuff disease as the most frequently used clinical diagnosis. There is a wide range of treatment options for this condition, but limited evidence to guide patients and clinicians in the choice of treatment strategy. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible prognostic factors of short-term outcome after corticosteroid injection for rotator cuff disease. Methods We performed analyses of data from 104 patients who had participated in a randomized controlled study. Socio-demographic, clinical and radiographic baseline factors were assessed for association with outcome at six-weeks follow-up evaluated by Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI and patient perceived outcome. Factors with significant univariate association were entered into multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses. Results In the multivariate analyses; a high SPADI score indicating pain and disability at follow-up was associated with decreasing age, male gender, high baseline pain and disability, being on sick-leave, and using regular pain medication. A successful patient perceived outcome was associated with not being on sick-leave, high active abduction, local corticosteroid injection and previous cortisone injections. Structural findings of rotator cuff tendon pathology on MRI and bursal exudation or thickening on ultrasonography did not contribute to the predictive model. Conclusions Baseline characteristics were associated with outcome after corticosteroid injection in rotator cuff disease. Sick-leave was the best predictor of poor short-term outcome. Trial registration: Clinical trials NCT00640575

  1. Rotator cuff injury: fat suppression MR image

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    Won, Jong Yoon; Suh, Jin Suck; Park, Chang Yun; Lee, Yeon Hee [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Soo [Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    We performed the study prospectively to evaluate the advantage of fat suppression MR in the diagnosis of rotator cuff injury. Ten symptomatic patients were studied with both conventional T2WI and FST2WI using chemical shift technique. Each image was analyzed for the assessment of injuries, conspicuity of the lesion, the presence of effusion in subacromical bursae and joint space, and presence of humeral head injury. Arthroscopy was done in 4 patients following MRI. We could made presumptive diagnoses on FSMR as identical as on conventional MR in six cases(1 normal, 2 tendinitis, 2 partial thickness tear, 1 full thickness tear), two of them were confirmed by arthroscopic procedures. Two cases of partial thickness tear proved by arthroscopy were detected on FST2WI, whereas they were considered tendinitis on conventional T2WI. There were another 2 cases who showed tendinitis on FSMR, but normal on conventional T2WI. They, however, were not confirmed by either arthroscopy or surgical procedure. We found the FSMR were superior to conventional T2WI in the conspicuity of lesions and detection of joint effusion and abnormalities on the humeral head. We think FSMR of the shoulder could have significant diagnostic advantages over the conventional spin-echo MR imaging.

  2. Biomechanical validation of rotator cuff repair techniques and considerations for a "technical efficiency ratio".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Maxwell C

    2013-07-01

    Biomechanical studies are commonly used to validate new or modified rotator cuff repair techniques. Additional knots, more tendon suture passes, and obligatory suture management requirements are often the "cost" for improved biomechanical results. This cost can amount to increased technical difficulty and surgical times. However, technical ease or difficulty as a measurable variable has not been quantified. A basic measure for technical ease would allow surgeons the ability to objectively assess and compare rotator cuff repair practicality and potentially help in the design of future studies to standardize repair techniques alongside biomechanical measures. A proposed rotator cuff repair "technical efficiency ratio" is defined as follows: (No. of knots + No. of tendon suture passes + No. of suture limbs)/No. of pilot holes created. This can give a measure of "work" or utility achieved per fixation point created for a particular type of repair (e.g., single or double row), with a smaller number representing relatively more efficiency per anchor or fixation point used. If repairs validated in the laboratory are too cumbersome to perform in vivo from a practical standpoint, technical ease should be a prerequisite measure, and the success of a repair technique should not necessarily be based on biomechanics alone. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effectiveness of shock wave therapy as an alternative to the rotator cuff injury treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Joaquín Del Gordo-D´Amato

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff injuries are reason for consultation frequent in elderly patients. Most of the time there are no background traumatic acute generating progressive limitations in activities of daily living (ADLS. The objective of this study is to show results in tendonitis of the rotator cuff, in patients treated with extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT. It is a prospective descriptive observational study which presents clinical and functional outcomes in patients with described lesion, treated with ESWT with poor response to conventional treatments and clinical pictures of longstanding through implementing visual analog scale (VAS of pain and evaluation of range of motion. The greater presence of lesion is present in women 63.6%. Mostly affected shoulder was right in a 63.6%. Found significant changes in VAS pre and post treatment with averages of 7.9 and 0.5 respectively and different statistical p < 0.001. We were conclude that the ESWT is an effective method in the treatment of the tendonitis of the rotator cuff with relief from pain and return to functional levels.

  4. Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair With Absorbable Sutures in the Medial-Row Anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Makoto; Hayashida, Kenji; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Kakiuchi, Masaaki

    2015-11-01

    To report the retear rate and retear pattern after double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (DR-ARCR) with the use of absorbable sutures as medial anchor sutures and to address the advantage of the use of absorbable sutures in medial-row anchors. Fifty-seven shoulders (22 male and 35 female patients; mean age, 66.1 years) with complete rotator cuff tears treated with DR-ARCR using absorbable mattress sutures as medial-row anchor sutures were included in the study. They included 35 medium, 17 large, and 5 massive tears. For the medial row, medial anchor sutures were replaced with absorbable mattress sutures. High-strength simple sutures were used for the lateral anchors. We evaluated retear patterns by magnetic resonance imaging examinations performed at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. The clinical conditions of all patients preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively were assessed by the University of California, Los Angeles rating scale and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons shoulder index. A complete retear of the tendon at the footprint was observed in 5 shoulders. Complete discontinuity at the middle of the tendon around the medial-row anchors with a footprint remnant was observed in 1 shoulder. A thinned repaired rotator cuff was observed in 2 shoulders because of a partial retear of the deep layer. The overall retear rate was 14%. From before to after surgery, the University of California, Los Angeles score significantly improved from 18.4 to 32.9 (P sutures as medial-row anchors were 8.8% for complete retears of the tendon at the footprint and 1.7% for complete discontinuity of tendon around the medial-row anchors. This procedure provided a low retear rate around the medial-row anchors. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of grafts in rotator cuff re-rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Martín, A; Santos-Yubero, F J; Najarro-Cid, F J; Navarro-Martínez, S; Zurera-Carmona, M; Pérez-Hidalgo, S

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff re-ruptures appear in 38-65% of cases. In order to reduce this rate, many studies have been performed using different types of biomaterial for purely mechanical aims (re-inforce the suture) and/or biological agents (growth factor transporterts). The aim of this study is to review 22 cases treated with xenografts and analyse various current alternatives. A descriptive and retrospective study was conducted using the variables of age, sex, laterality, time of surgery, involvement in MRI, number of anchors, and final mobility results on the Constant and the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) validated scales. The study included 22 patients, with a mean age of 51.7±4.6 years. A mean of 2 anchors were used and 13 patients were treated with a porcine intestinal submucosa implant, 6 with equine pericardium, and 3 with porcine dermis. Final results were: 37.6±13 points for the Constant test, and 16.9±3.9 points on the UCLA scale. The follow up was 36±10.2 months. In our experience, xenografts could provide good functional results and they would be a surgical alternative to tendon transfers in cases of massive tears. Further studies should be conducted with other biomaterials. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanical risk of rotator cuff repair failure during passive movements: A simulation-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haering, Diane; Blache, Yoann; Raison, Maxime; Begon, Mickael

    2015-12-01

    Despite improvements in rotator cuff surgery techniques, re-tear rate remains above 20% and increases with tear severity. Mechanical stresses to failure of repaired tendons have been reported. While optimal immobilization postures were proposed to minimize this stress, post-operative rehabilitation protocols have never been assessed with respect to these values. Purpose was to use musculoskeletal simulation to predict when the stress in repaired tendons exceeds safety limits during passive movements. Hence, guidelines could be provided towards safer post-operative exercises. Sixteen healthy participants volunteered in passive three-dimensional shoulder range-of-motion and passive rehabilitation exercises assessment. Stress in all rotator cuff tendons was predicted during each movement by means of a musculoskeletal model using simulations with different type and size of tears. Safety stress thresholds were defined based on repaired tendon loads to failure reported in the literature and used to discriminate safe from unsafe ranges-of-motion. Increased tear size and multiple tendons tear decreased safe range-of-motion. Mostly, glenohumeral elevations below 38°, above 65°, or performed with the arm held in internal rotation cause excessive stresses in most types and sizes of injury during abduction, scaption or flexion. Larger safe amplitudes of elevation are found in scapular plane for supraspinatus alone, supraspinatus plus infraspinatus, and supraspinatus plus subscapularis tears. This study reinforces that passive early rehabilitation exercises could contribute to re-tear due to excessive stresses. Recommendations arising from this study, for instance to keep the arm externally rotated during elevation in case of supraspinatus or supraspinatus plus infraspinatus tear, could help prevent re-tear. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reliability of diagnostic tests in rotator cuff muscle pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sadenbergh

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several tests to assist it in the diagnoses of rota-tor cuff impairment have been described in the literature but controversystill exists as to the accuracy of these tests. A study was therefore conducted to determine the reliability of the rotator cuff muscle tests (empty can, full can, lift off and external rotation as a diagnostic tool.Methodology: Fifty three patients experiencing shoulder pain were assessedusing manual muscle tests (empty can; full can; lift off and external rotationtests. Both pain and weakness were recorded using numerical scales adapted from tests performed by Itoi et al, (1999. These results were compared to ultrasonic diagnoses made by a surgeon. Informed consent was obtained and anonymity was ensured for all participants.Results: A test was false positive when ultrasonic diagnosis indicated no tear in the muscle (although oedema or calcification may have been present, but the manual muscle test was positive regarding pain and weakness. A test on the other hand was false negative when the ultrasonic diagnosis indicated a muscle tear but the manual muscle tests indicated no pain or muscle weakness. Reliability was tested using sensitivity and specificity tests. The sensitivity of all four tests was high (80%, but the specificity was low (20% to 40%, implying that a large number of false positive diagnoses can be made. The major contributors to the false positive results were sub-acromial sub-deltoid bursitis and a decreased acromio-humeral space. When considering pain alone for a positive result the correlation increased a  little, however, taking both pain and muscle weakness into account, the correlation increased even more.Conclusion: The manual muscle tests were not as reliable as expected, but concurrent pathologies may be the main factor influencing the results of the tests. The combination of muscle strength and pain could be recommendedas criteria for a positive test. The empty can and full can

  8. Successful treatment of rotator cuff tear using Fascial Manipulation(®) in a stroke patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintucci, Marco; Simis, Marcel; Imamura, Marta; Pratelli, Elisa; Stecco, Antonio; Ozcakar, Levent; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo

    2017-07-01

    Rotator cuff tear is a common disease affecting patients after stroke. It's a cause of pain and dysfunction that may compromise normal stroke rehabilitation. For many cases there is still controversy between whether to use surgical or conservative intervention. Treatment for cuff tears range from physical therapy to surgery. This paper describes for the first time the effect of Fascial Manipulation(®) (FM(®)) on rotator cuff tear in a post stroke patient. A 69 year old female stroke patient with full absence of distal components of the tendons of the rotator cuff, functional limitations on active movement of shoulder flexion and abduction of the left arm and perceived pain scored 10/10 on the Visual Analogic Scale, was assessed and treat with one session of FM(®) A basic theory that explains the healing results of FM(®) is that mechanoreceptors, such as spindle cells and other receptors, are located in the deep fascia and activated when movement are performed. Increased viscosity of the deep fascia and muscles due to increased viscosity of hyaluronic acid (HA) molecules prevents the normal gliding of fascia during movement inhibiting normal proprioception and muscle function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence and characteristics of asymptomatic tears of the rotator cuff: an ultrasonographic and clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosmayer, S; Smith, H-J; Tariq, R; Larmo, A

    2009-02-01

    We undertook clinical and ultrasonographic examination of the shoulders of 420 asymptomatic volunteers aged between 50 and 79 years. MRI was performed in selected cases. Full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff were detected in 32 subjects (7.6%). The prevalence increased with age as follows: 50 to 59 years, 2.1%; 60 to 69 years, 5.7%; and 70 to 79 years, 15%. The mean size of the tear was less than 3 cm and tear localisation was limited to the supraspinatus tendon in most cases (78%). The strength of flexion was reduced significantly in the group with tears (p = 0.01). Asymptomatic tears of the rotator cuff should be regarded as part of the normal ageing process in the elderly but may be less common than hitherto believed.

  10. Electromyographic analysis of the rotator cuff in postoperative shoulder patients during passive rehabilitation exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Cynthia A; McDermott, William J; Petersen, Roger K; Johnson, Scott E; Baxter, Stephanie A

    2013-01-01

    Numerous rehabilitation protocols exist for postoperative rotator cuff repairs. Because the goal of early rehabilitation is to prevent postoperative adhesions while protecting the repaired tendons, it would be advantageous to know which range-of-motion exercises allow the rotator cuff to remain the most passive in a painful, guarded, postsurgical shoulder. Twenty-six subjects who had undergone subacromial decompression, distal clavicle resection, or a combination of both procedures volunteered to participate within the first 4 days after surgery. Fine-wire electrodes were inserted into the subject's supraspinatus (SS) and infraspinatus (IS). Muscle activity was recorded at resting baseline (BL) and during 14 exercises that have been found in the passive phase of rotator cuff protocols and tested in healthy subjects. Each exercise was compared with BL activity as well as with other exercises in the same movement group. The SS remained as passive as BL during therapist- and self-assisted external rotation, therapist-assisted elevation, pendulums, and isometric internal rotation and adduction. The IS was activated greater than BL for all 14 exercises studied. Of the 14 exercises studied, 6 allowed the SS and 0 allowed the IS to remain as passive as quiet-stance BL in postsurgical subacromial decompression/distal clavicle resection patients. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Rotator Cuff Strength Ratio and Injury in Glovebox Workers

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    Weaver, Amelia M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-30

    Rotator cuff integrity is critical to shoulder health. Due to the high workload imposed upon the shoulder while working in an industrial glovebox, this study investigated the strength ratio of the rotator cuff muscles in glovebox workers and compared this ratio to the healthy norm. Descriptive statistics were collected using a short questionnaire. Handheld dynamometry was used to quantify the ratio of forces produced in the motions of shoulder internal and external rotation. Results showed this population to have shoulder strength ratios that were significantly different from the healthy norm. The deviation from the normal ratio demonstrates the need for solutions designed to reduce the workload on the rotator cuff musculature of glovebox workers in order to improve health and safety. Assessment of strength ratios can be used to screen for risk of symptom development.

  12. Are delayed operations effective for patients with rotator cuff tears and concomitant stiffness? An analysis of immediate versus delayed surgery on outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yang-Soo; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Park, In; Im, Jin-Hyung; Park, Kwang-Sun; Lee, Seung-Bin

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of immediate rotator cuff repair with capsular release and those of rotator cuff repair after the stiffness was treated with rehabilitative therapy. Between June 2007 and December 2010, we recruited 63 patients with rotator cuff tears and stiffness. In 33 patients arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was performed with capsular release simultaneously (group I). In 30 patients arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was performed after 6 months of preoperative rehabilitation for stiffness (group II). The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Simple Shoulder Test score, Constant score, and visual analog scale score for pain and range of motion (ROM) were assessed at the start of the study; at 3, 6, and 12 months; and at the last visit. The postoperative cuff tendon integrity was assessed between 6 and 12 months using magnetic resonance or ultrasound images. There were no significant differences in preoperative demographic data between the groups (P > .05). The mean follow-up period was 21.54 months. After treatment, there was significant improvement in ROM and functional scores in both groups, as measured at the last follow-up (P .05). On assessment of the magnetic resonance or ultrasound images taken 6 to 12 months postoperatively, the retear rate for the repaired cuff tendon in each group was 12.1% in group I and 13.4% in group II. In the treatment of rotator cuff tears with stiffness, satisfactory results can be achieved either by repairing the tear with simultaneous capsular release or by waiting to perform the repair after preoperative rehabilitation for stiffness. Because a delayed rotator cuff repair after improving ROM offered no clear advantage over an immediate operation, we recommend surgically treating rotator cuff tears with concomitant stiffness early using a simultaneous capsular release method to save time and to avoid unnecessary rehabilitation. Level II, prospective comparative study

  13. Stabilizing characteristics of rotator cuff muscles: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwan, Sangeeta; Green, Rodney A; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2015-01-01

    To systematically review the evidence in support of the purported function of the rotator cuff muscles as dynamic stabilizers of the glenohumeral joint. Electronic searches were conducted using AMED, CINAHL, Medline and SPORT Discus. Studies were required to include at least one characteristic of a stabilizer muscle. Quality analysis was completed by two assessors independently. Data were extracted for four main characteristics of stabilizer muscles: (1) moment arm length, (2) onset of muscle activity, (3) joint stiffness as measured by contribution of muscle activity to prevent joint translation, (4) co-contraction as demonstrated by electromyography muscle activity and co-activation ratio. Twenty of the 1726 identified studies were selected for the review. Rotator cuff muscles can limit joint translation (five studies) and contribute to joint stiffness (one study), possess shorter moment arms in some movements (three studies), but show limited evidence for stabilizing characteristics of early onset (seven studies) and co-contraction (seven studies). The rotator cuff muscles exhibited some stabilization characteristics but not all. On the basis of our current low to moderate quality evidence, the most likely, but as yet unverified, stabilization role for the rotator cuff muscles appears to be limiting of translation in a direction-specific manner. Diagnostic tests currently used are based largely on the assumption that the muscles of the rotator cuff can be individually recruited as prime movers. Our findings demonstrate the need for more research into the proposed stabilizing mechanisms of the rotator cuff muscles to increase diagnostic accuracy and more targeted shoulder rehabilitation programs. It may be that the rotator cuff muscles have a role in limiting glenohumeral joint translation which is not reflected in the current diagnostic tests and rehabilitation protocols. Further research is required to establish this stabilizing characteristic in living

  14. Retrospective study of sonographic findings in bone involvement associated with rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy: preliminary results of a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello H. Nogueira-Barbosa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The present study was aimed at investigating bone involvement secondary to rotator cuff calcific tendonitis at ultrasonography. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study of a case series. The authors reviewed shoulder ultrasonography reports of 141 patients diagnosed with rotator cuff calcific tendonitis, collected from the computer-based data records of their institution over a four-year period. Imaging findings were retrospectively and consensually analyzed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists looking for bone involvement associated with calcific tendonitis. Only the cases confirmed by computed tomography were considered for descriptive analysis. Results: Sonographic findings of calcific tendinopathy with bone involvement were observed in 7/141 (~ 5% patients (mean age, 50.9 years; age range, 42-58 years; 42% female. Cortical bone erosion adjacent to tendon calcification was the most common finding, observed in 7/7 cases. Signs of intraosseous migration were found in 3/7 cases, and subcortical cysts in 2/7 cases. The findings were confirmed by computed tomography. Calcifications associated with bone abnormalities showed no acoustic shadowing at ultrasonography, favoring the hypothesis of resorption phase of the disease. Conclusion: Preliminary results of the present study suggest that ultrasonography can identify bone abnormalities secondary to rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, particularly the presence of cortical bone erosion.

  15. Proteomics perspectives in rotator cuff research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejersen, Maria Hee Jung; Frost, Poul; Hansen, Torben Bæk

    2015-01-01

    tendinopathies, and to evaluate perspectives of proteomics – the comprehensive study of protein composition - in tendon research. Materials and Methods We conducted a systematic search of the literature published between 1 January 1990 and 18 December 2012 in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. We included...... proteomics technologies may be a way to identify protein profiles (including non-prespecified proteins) that characterise specific tendon disorders or stages of tendinopathy. Thus, our results suggested an untapped potential for proteomics in tendon research....

  16. A Survey of Expert Opinion Regarding Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Daniel C; Paxton, E Scott; Williams, Gerald R; Abboud, Joseph A

    2014-07-16

    Many patients with rotator cuff tears have questions for their surgeons regarding the surgical procedure, perioperative management, restrictions, therapy, and ability to work after a rotator cuff repair. The purpose of our study was to determine common clinical practices among experts regarding rotator cuff repair and to assist them in counseling patients. We surveyed 372 members of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and the Association of Clinical Elbow and Shoulder Surgeons (ACESS); 111 members (29.8%) completed all or part of the survey, and 92.8% of the respondents answered every question. A consensus response (>50% agreement) was achieved on 49% (24 of 49) of the questions. Variability in responses likely reflects the fact that clinical practices have evolved over time based on clinical experience. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  17. Comorbidities in rotator cuff disease: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titchener, Andrew G; White, Jonathan J E; Hinchliffe, Sally R; Tambe, Amol A; Hubbard, Richard B; Clark, David I

    2014-09-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a common condition in the general population, but relatively little is known about its associated risk factors. We have undertaken a large case-control study using The Health Improvement Network database to assess and to quantify the relative contributions of some constitutional and environmental risk factors for rotator cuff disease in the community. Our data set included 5000 patients with rotator cuff disease who were individually matched with a single control by age, sex, and general practice (primary care practice). The median age at diagnosis was 55 years (interquartile range, 44-65 years). Multivariate analysis showed that the risk factors associated with rotator cuff disease were Achilles tendinitis (odds ratio [OR] = 1.78), trigger finger (OR = 1.99), lateral epicondylitis (OR = 1.71), and carpal tunnel syndrome (OR = 1.55). Oral corticosteroid therapy (OR = 2.03), oral antidiabetic use (OR = 1.66), insulin use (OR = 1.77), and "overweight" body mass index of 25.1 to 30 (OR = 1.15) were also significantly associated. Current or previous smoking history, body mass index of greater than 30, any alcohol intake, medial epicondylitis, de Quervain syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis were not found to be associated with rotator cuff disease. We have identified a number of comorbidities and risk factors for rotator cuff disease. These include lateral epicondylitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, trigger finger, Achilles tendinitis, oral corticosteroid use, and diabetes mellitus. The findings should alert the clinician to comorbid pathologic processes and guide future research into the etiology of this condition. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterizing the macro and micro mechanical properties of scaffolds for rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard D J; Zargar, Nasim; Brown, Cameron P; Nagra, Navraj S; Dakin, Stephanie G; Snelling, Sarah J B; Hakimi, Osnat; Carr, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    Retearing after rotator cuff surgery is a major clinical problem. Numerous scaffolds are being used to try to reduce retear rates. However, few have demonstrated clinical efficacy. We hypothesize that this lack of efficacy is due to insufficient mechanical properties. Therefore, we compared the macro and nano/micro mechanical properties of 7 commercially available scaffolds to those of the human supraspinatus tendons, whose function they seek to restore. The clinically approved scaffolds tested were X-Repair, LARS ligament, Poly-Tape, BioFiber, GraftJacket, Permacol, and Conexa. Fresh frozen cadaveric human supraspinatus tendon samples were used. Macro mechanical properties were determined through tensile testing and rheometry. Scanning probe microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were performed to assess properties of materials at the nano/microscale (morphology, Young modulus, loss tangent). None of the scaffolds tested adequately approximated both the macro and micro mechanical properties of human supraspinatus tendon. Macroscale mechanical properties were insufficient to restore load-bearing function. The best-performing scaffolds on the macroscale (X-Repair, LARS ligament) had poor nano/microscale properties. Scaffolds approximating tendon properties on the nano/microscale (BioFiber, biologic scaffolds) had poor macroscale properties. Existing scaffolds failed to adequately approximate the mechanical properties of human supraspinatus tendons. Combining the macroscopic mechanical properties of a synthetic scaffold with the micro mechanical properties of biologic scaffold could better achieve this goal. Future work should focus on advancing techniques to create new scaffolds with more desirable mechanical properties. This may help improve outcomes for rotator cuff surgery patients. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Long Head of the Biceps Pathology Combined with Rotator Cuff Tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Ditsios

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT is an anatomic structure commonly involved in painful shoulder conditions as a result of trauma, degeneration, or overuse. Recent studies have pointed out the close correlation between LHBT lesions and rotator cuff (RCT tears. Clinicians need to take into account the importance of the LHBT in the presence of other shoulder pathologies. This paper provides an up-to-date overview of recent publications on anatomy, pathophysiology, diagnosis, classification, and current treatment strategies.

  20. The optimum tension for bridging sutures in transosseous-equivalent rotator cuff repair: a cadaveric biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Soon; McGarry, Michelle H; Campbell, Sean T; Seo, Hyuk Jun; Lee, Yeon Soo; Kim, Sae Hoon; Lee, Thay Q; Oh, Joo Han

    2015-09-01

    Transosseous-equivalent (TOE) rotator cuff repair can increase contact area and contact pressure between the repaired cuff tendon and bony footprint and can show higher ultimate loads to failure and smaller gap formation compared with other repair techniques. However, it has been suggested that medial rotator cuff failure after TOE repair may result from increased bridging suture tension. To determine optimum bridging suture tension in TOE repair by evaluating footprint contact and construct failure characteristics at different tensions. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 18 fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders, randomly divided into 3 groups, were constructed with a TOE configuration using the same medial suture anchor and placing a Tekscan sensing pad between the repaired rotator cuff tendon and footprint. Nine of the 18 shoulders were used to measure footprint contact characteristics. With use of the Tekscan measurement system, the contact pressure and area between the rotator cuff tendon and greater tuberosity were quantified for bridging suture tensions of 60, 90, and 120 N with glenohumeral abduction angles of 0° and 30° and humeral rotation angles of 30° (internal), 0°, and 30° (external). TOE constructs of all 18 shoulders then underwent construct failure testing (cyclic loading and load to failure) to determine the yield load, ultimate load, stiffness, hysteresis, strain, and failure mode at 60 and 120 N of tension. As bridging suture tension increased, contact force, contact pressure, and peak pressure increased significantly at all positions (P .05 for all). Increasing bridging suture tension to over 90 N did not improve contact area but did increase contact force and pressure. Bridging suture tension did not significantly affect ultimate failure loads. Considering the risks of overtensioning bridging sutures, it may be clinically more beneficial to keep bridging suture tension below 90 N. © 2015 The Author(s).

  1. A new method for measurement of subcoracoid outlet and its relationship to rotator cuff pathology at MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, N.A.; Singh, J.; Tins, B.J.; Lalam, R.K.; Tyrrell, P.N.M.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Orthopaedic surgical studies have shown that variations in the vertical distance between the tip of the coracoid process and the supra-glenoid tubercle alter the shape of the subcoracoid outlet. Our objective was to measure the vertical distance between the coracoid tip and the supra-glenoid tubercle (CTGT) on MR and to assess whether this showed better correlation with rotator cuff pathology compared with the axial coraco-humeral distance. A retrospective review was performed of 100 consecutive shoulder MR arthrograms. Vertical distance between the coracoid tip and the supraglenoid tubercle was measured in the sagittal oblique plane. Separate assessment was then made of tendon pathology of the subscapularis, supraspinatus and long head of biceps tendons. Axial coraco-humeral distance was then measured. Correlation between tendon abnormalities and the two measurements was then made. Of the 100 cases, 42 had subscapularis tendon lesions, 21 had lesions of the long head of biceps and 53 had supraspinatus tendon lesions. Mean vertical distance from the coracoid tip to supraglenoid tubercle was greater in those with lesions of any of these tendons and was statistically significant for the supraspinatus group (P = 0.005). Reduced axial coraco-humeral distance was also seen in patients with tendinopathy, although with less statistically significant difference (p = 0.059). Our results support orthopaedic studies that have shown that the vertical distance between the coracoid tip and the supraglenoid tubercle increases the incidence and risk of rotator cuff disease by altering the shape of the subcoracoid outlet. (orig.)

  2. Expression of bioactive bone morphogenetic proteins in the subacromial bursa of patients with chronic degeneration of the rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwirth, Jana; Fuhrmann, Renée A E; Veit, Amanda; Aurich, Matthias; Stonâns, Ilmars; Trommer, Tilo; Hortschansky, Peter; Chubinskaya, Susanna; Mollenhauer, Juergen A

    2006-01-01

    Degeneration of the rotator cuff is often associated with inflammation of the subacromial bursa and focal mineralization of the supraspinatus tendon. Portions of the supraspinatus tendon distant from the insertion site could transform into fibrous cartilage, causing rotator-cuff tears owing to mechanical instability. Indirect evidence is presented to link this pathology to ectopic production and secretion of bioactive bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) from sites within the subacromial bursa. Surgically removed specimens of subacromial bursa tissue from patients with chronic tears of the rotator cuff were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-PCR. Bioactive BMP was detected in bursa extracts by a bioassay based on induction of alkaline phosphatase in the osteogenic/myogenic cell line C2C12. Topical and differential expression of BMP-2/4 and BMP-7 mRNA and protein was found in bursa tissue. The bioassay of C2C12 cells revealed amounts of active BMP high enough to induce osteogenic cell types, and blocking BMP with specific antibodies or soluble BMP receptors Alk-3 and Alk-6 abolished the inductive properties of the extract. Sufficient information was gathered to explain how ectopic expression of BMP might induce tissue transformation into ectopic bone/cartilage and, therefore, promote structural degeneration of the rotator cuff. Early surgical removal of the subacromial bursa might present an option to interrupt disease progression.

  3. Ultrasound and Functional Assessment of Transtendinous Repairs of Partial-Thickness Articular-Sided Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrander, Roger V; Klauser, Jeffrey M; Menon, Sanjay; Hackel, Joshua G

    2017-03-01

    Partial-thickness articular-sided rotator cuff tears are a frequent source of shoulder pain. Despite conservative measures, some patients continue to be symptomatic and require surgical management. However, there is some controversy as to which surgical approach results in the best outcomes for grade 3 tears. The purpose of this study was to evaluate repair integrity and the clinical results of patients treated with transtendinous repair of high-grade partial-thickness articular-sided rotator cuff tears. Our hypothesis was that transtendinous repairs would result in reliable healing and acceptable functional outcomes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Twenty patients with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included in the study. All patients underwent arthroscopic repair of high-grade partial-thickness rotator cuff tears utilizing a transtendinous technique by a single surgeon. At latest follow-up, the repair integrity was evaluated using ultrasound imaging, and functional scores were calculated. Ultrasound evaluation demonstrated that 18 of 20 patients had complete healing with a normal-appearing rotator cuff. Two patients had a minor residual partial tear. Sixteen of 20 patients had no pain on visual analog scale. Four patients complained of mild intermittent residual pain. All patients were rated as "excellent" by both the University of California at Los Angeles Shoulder Score and the Simple Shoulder Test. The transtendon technique for the repair of articular-sided high-grade partial rotator cuff tears results in reliable tendon healing and excellent functional outcomes.

  4. The factor validity of the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mewa Yasmin

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC is a self-report questionnaire developed specifically to evaluate disability in persons with pathology of the rotator cuff of the shoulder. The authors created items in 5 categories based on a model of quality of life, but never validated this structure. The purpose of this study was to examine the validity of the original 5-domain model of the WORC by performing factor analysis. Methods Three hundred twenty nine subjects (age, mean: 52, SD: 12 were tested prior to undergoing surgery for rotator cuff pathologies. They completed the WORC, a self-report questionnaire, which has 21 items on the effect of the rotator cuff problem on symptoms, activities and emotions. Statistical calculations included correlations between items, Cronbach's alpha of the total scale and subscales, and principal component factor analysis with oblique rotation. Results Correlations ranged from .09 to .70 between all the items, from .29 to .70 between items within a subscale, and from .53 to .72 between subscale scores. Cronbach's alpha was .93 for the total scale, and .72 to .82 for the subscales. The factor analysis produced 3 factors that explained 57% of the variance. The first factor included symptoms and emotional items, the second included strength items and the third included daily activities. Conclusion The results of this study did not support the 5-domain model of the WORC.

  5. Role of ultrasound in the evaluation of rotator cuff muscle quality: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The evaluation of the quality of rotator cuff muscles has become an important part of the preoperative ultrasound examination. Ultrasound is accurate in the evaluation of rotator cuff integrity, but has been found to be insufficient compared to magnetic resonant imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of rotator cuff muscle quality.

  6. Release of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines from Muscle and Bone Causes Tenocyte Death in a Novel Rotator Cuff In Vitro Explant Culture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2018-02-15

    Tendinopathy is a significant clinical problem thought to be associated with altered mechanical loading. Explant culture models allow researchers to alter mechanical loading in a controlled in vitro environment while maintaining tenocytes in their native matrix. However, current models do not accurately represent commonly injured tendons, ignoring contributions of associated musculature and bone, as well as regional collagen structure. This study details the characterization of a mouse rotator cuff explant culture model, including bone, tendon, and muscle (BTM). Following harvest, BTM explants were maintained in stress-deprived culture for one week and tendon was then assessed for changes in cell viability, metabolism, matrix structure and content. Matrix turnover occurred throughout culture as manifested in both gene expression and biosynthesis, but this did not translate to net changes in total collagen or sulfated glycosaminoglycan content. Furthermore, tendon structure was not significantly altered throughout culture. However, we found significant cell death in BTM tendons after 3 days in culture, which we hypothesize is cytokine-induced. Using a targeted multiplex assay, we found high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines released to the culture medium from muscle and bone, levels that did cause cell death in tendon-alone controls. Overall, this model presents an innovative approach to understanding rotator cuff injury and tenocyte mechanobiology in a clinically-relevant tendon structure. Our model can be a powerful tool to investigate how mechanical and biological stimuli can alter normal tendon health and lead to tendon degeneration, and may provide a testbed for therapeutics for tendon repair.

  7. Management of rotator cuff calcific tendinosis guided by ultrasound elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Huai Lin

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Ultrasound elastography is a useful modality for evaluation of rotator cuff calcific tendinosis, and as an aid to guide management. If elastography shows the calcified area as a non-dark pattern, then fine-needle aspiration should be performed.

  8. A comparative study of the identification of rotator cuff calcifications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calcifications are often associated with significant pain and restriction of shoulder movement. The hypothesis of this retrospective, descriptive study is that ultrasound is more sensitive to detect calcifications in the rotator cuff than x-rays. The study was done on the records of 60 patients aged between 30 and 72 years of age.

  9. The molecular pathophysiology of subacromial bursitis in rotator cuff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaine, Theodore A; Kim, Yang-Soo; Voloshin, Ilya; Chen, Darwin; Murakami, Koko; Chang, Seong-Sil; Winchester, Robert; Lee, Francis Y; O'keefe, Regis J; Bigliani, Louis U

    2005-01-01

    Little information exists on the molecular and biochemical pathophysiology of subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff disease. We investigated the pattern of expression of cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1beta, IL-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor [TNF] alpha, small inducible cytokines), metalloproteases, and cyclooxygenases in the subacromial bursa in patients with rotator cuff disease. Subacromial bursa specimens were prepared for molecular and biochemical analysis in patients undergoing shoulder surgery following an institutional review board-approved protocol. Specimens were analyzed for the presence of cytokines, metalloproteases, and cyclooxygenases by use of microarray for gene expression and immunohistocytochemistry. Microarray analysis for gene expression and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the expression of several cytokine genes (TNF, IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6) was increased in patients with subacromial bursitis compared with control specimens. Furthermore, the expression of metalloproteases (MMP-1 and MMP-9) and cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) in the bursitis group was found to be increased as compared with controls. Although further investigation is required, these studies suggest that inflammation of the subacromial bursa does occur in patients with rotator cuff disease. These findings support the role of anti-inflammatory agents in the treatment of subacromial impingement and emphasize the importance of subacromial bursectomy to reduce inflammation in rotator cuff disease.

  10. Ultrasonography and arthrography in rotator cuff lesions: algorithmic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eui Jong; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon; Rhee, Yong Girl [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Pil Mun [Dankuk University College of Medicine, Chenona (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-11-15

    Twenty-six patients with chief complaint of shoulder pain who underwent both ultrasonographic examination and arthrography of the shoulder were analyzed. Ten out of 12 cases with clinical impression of frozen shoulder, showed normal findings on the ultrasonographic examination of the shoulder. Among these ten cases, nine cases showed adhesive capsulitis and one case showed rotator cuff tear on arthrography. Among six cases with the clinical impression of rotator cuff tear, five cases showed rotator cuff tear and one case showed combined calcific tendinitis and adhesive capsulitis on ultrasonographic examination. In arthrography, four cases of rotator cuff tear, one case of calcific tendinitis and biceps tendinitis and one case of normal finding were diagnosed. For the remaining eight cases in the ultrasonographic examination, normal finding or biceps tendinitis were found and for the remaining of the cases in arthrography adhesive capsulitis were found. With the above results, we recommend that the shoulder ultrasonography as the first line diagnostic modality for a patient with chief complaint of shoulder pain.

  11. Open versus arthroscopic treatment of chronic rotator cuff impingement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröder, J.; van Dijk, C. N.; Wielinga, A.; Kerkhoffs, G. M.; Marti, R. K.

    2001-01-01

    We report the results of 238 consecutive patients who underwent in total 261 acromioplasties because of chronic rotator cuff impingement. The procedure was performed either in conventional open technique (80) or arthroscopically (181). Two years (1-10) after the operation 68% of the patients treated

  12. Effect of Postoperative Passive Motion on Rotator Cuff Reconstruction With Acellular Dermal Matrix Grafts in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uezono, Keiji; Ide, Junji; Tokunaga, Takuya; Arimura, Hitoshi; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Nakanishi, Yoshitaka; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Although postoperative rehabilitation is critical for rotator cuff tendon-to-bone healing and shoulder function recovery, no standardized protocol has been established. Postoperative immediate passive motion is detrimental to tendon-to-bone remodeling and tendon maturation after rotator cuff acellular dermal matrix (ADM) grafting, although postoperative delayed passive motion does no harm. Controlled laboratory study. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent rotator cuff reconstruction with ADM grafts. Their shoulders were immobilized for 2 weeks thereafter. The rats were assigned to 3 different rehabilitation protocols: (1) immobilization without passive motion (nonpassive motion [N-PM], controls), (2) immobilization with immediate passive motion (I-PM), and (3) immobilization with delayed passive motion (D-PM). Specimens obtained 2, 6, and 12 weeks postoperatively were analyzed histologically, and semiquantitative histomorphological measurements of collagen organization, vascularity, and cellularity were obtained; the area of interest was divided into 2 zones, the midsubstance of the graft and the graft-bone interface. Another set of samples taken at 12 weeks was subjected to biomechanical analysis. At 2 weeks, there was no significant difference among the groups in terms of semiquantitative histomorphological measurements of collagen organization, vascularity, and cellularity. At 6 weeks, collagen organization at the insertion site was significantly poorer in I-PM than in N-PM and D-PM rats (P = .0095). At 12 weeks, collagen organization at the insertion site and midsubstance of ADM grafts was also significantly poorer in I-PM rats (P = .0125 and P = .0018, respectively), and ultimate load-to-failure was lower in this group (P = .0043). While postoperative immediate passive motion was detrimental to remodeled tendon-to-bone healing and to the tendon maturation of ADM grafts placed in the rotator cuff tendon defects, delayed passive motion did no harm. For patients

  13. A biomechanical comparison of tendon-bone interface motion and cyclic loading between single-row, triple-loaded cuff repairs and double-row, suture-tape cuff repairs using biocomposite anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Drew, Otis R

    2012-09-01

    To compare tendon-bone interface motion and cyclic loading in a single-row, triple-loaded anchor repair with a suture-tape, rip-stop, double-row rotator cuff repair. Using 18 human shoulders from 9 matched cadaveric pairs, we created 2 groups of rotator cuff repairs. Group 1 was a double-row, rip-stop, suture-tape construct. Group 2 was a single-row, triple-loaded construct. Before mechanical testing, the supraspinatus footprint was measured with calipers. A superiorly positioned digital camera optically measured the tendon footprint motion during 60° of humeral internal and external rotation. Specimens were secured at a fixed angle not exceeding 45° in reference to the load. After preloading, each sample was cycled between 10 N and 100 N for 200 cycles at 1 Hz, followed by destructive testing at 33 mm/s. A digital camera with tracking software measured the repair displacement at 100 and 200 cycles. Ultimate load and failure mode for each sample were recorded. The exposed anterior footprint border (6.5% ± 6%) and posterior footprint border (0.9% ± 1.7%) in group 1 were statistically less than the exposed anterior footprint border (30.3% ± 17%) and posterior footprint border (29.8% ± 14%) in group 2 (P = .003 and P footprint displacements in group 1 (1.6 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively) were less than those in group 2 (both 3.6 mm) (P = .007 and P = .004, respectively). Mean displacement after 100 cycles for group 1 and group 2 was 2.0 mm and 3.2 mm, respectively, and at 200 cycles, mean displacement was 2.5 mm and 4.2 mm, respectively (P = .02). The mean ultimate failure load in group 1 (586 N) was greater than that in group 2 (393 N) (P = .02). The suture-tendon interface was the site of most construct failures. The suture-tape, rip-stop, double-row rotator cuff repair had greater footprint coverage, less rotational footprint displacement, and a greater mean ultimate failure load than the triple-loaded, single-row repair on mechanical testing. No double-row or

  14. Efficacy of a Subacromial Corticosteroid Injection for Persistent Pain After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Do, Nam-Hoon; Lee, Juyeob; Ko, Young-Won

    2016-09-01

    Corticosteroid injections have been widely used for reducing shoulder pain. However, catastrophic complications induced by corticosteroid such as infections and tendon degeneration have made surgeons hesitant to use a corticosteroid injection as a pain control modality, especially during the postoperative recovery phase. To determine the effectiveness and safety of a subacromial corticosteroid injection for persistent pain control during the recovery period and to analyze the factors causing persistent pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 458 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included in this study. Patient-specific parameters, tear size and pattern, and pain intensity were reviewed. Seventy-two patients were administered a postoperative subacromial corticosteroid injection under ultrasound guidance. The corticosteroid injection was administered to patients who awakened overnight because of constant severe shoulder pain or whose pain was exacerbated at the time of rehabilitation exercises within 8 weeks after surgery. Pain intensity, patient satisfaction, and functional outcomes using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and Constant scores were compared between the patients with and without a subacromial corticosteroid injection. The retear rate was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging at 6 months postoperatively. In patients with an injection, the mean (±SD) visual analog scale for pain (pVAS) score was 7.7 ± 1.2 at the time of the injection. This significantly decreased to 2.3 ± 1.4 at the end of the first month after the injection, demonstrating a 70.2% reduction in pain (P rotator cuff tears (41.8%) showed a higher occurrence of severe postoperative persistent pain. Preoperative shoulder stiffness was revealed as a predisposing factor for persistent pain (odds ratio, 0.2; P = .04). A subacromial corticosteroid injection can be considered as a useful and safe

  15. The 50 Most Cited Articles in Rotator Cuff Repair Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeutler, Matthew J; Freedman, Kevin B; MacLeod, Robert A; Schrock, John B; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; McCarty, Eric C

    2016-11-01

    Analysis of the number of citations within a given specialty provides information on the classic publications of that specialty. The goals of this study were to identify the 50 most cited articles on rotator cuff repair and to analyze various characteristics of these articles. The ISI Web of Science (Thomson Reuters, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was used to conduct a search for the term rotator cuff repair. The 50 most cited articles were retrieved, and the following objective characteristics of each article were recorded: number of times cited, citation density, journal, country of origin, and language. The following subjective characteristics of each article were also recorded: article type (clinical vs basic science), article subtype, and level of evidence for clinical articles. Of the 50 most cited articles on rotator cuff repair, the number of citations ranged from 138 to 677 (mean, 232±133 citations) and citation density ranged from 3.8 to 53.5 citations per year (mean, 16.9±9.2 citations per year). The articles were published between 1974 and 2011, with most of the articles published in the 2000s (29 articles), followed by the 1990s (16 articles). The articles originated from 8 countries, with the United States accounting for 30 articles (60%). Overall, 66% of the articles were clinical and 34% were basic science. The most common article subtype was the clinical case series (48%). Of the 33 clinical articles, 24 (73%) were level IV. Among the 50 most cited articles on rotator cuff repair, the case series was the most common article subtype, showing the effect that publication of preliminary outcomes and new surgical techniques has had on surgeons performing rotator cuff repair. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1045-e1051.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Infection Rates in Arthroscopic Versus Open Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jonathan D; Hughes, Jessica L; Bartley, Justin H; Hamilton, William P; Brennan, Kindyle L

    2017-07-01

    The prevalence of rotator cuff repair continues to rise, with a noted transition from open to arthroscopic techniques in recent years. One reported advantage of arthroscopic repair is a lower infection rate. However, to date, the infection rates of these 2 techniques have not been directly compared with large samples at a single institution with fully integrated medical records. To retrospectively compare postoperative infection rates between arthroscopic and open rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. From January 2003 until May 2011, a total of 1556 patients underwent rotator cuff repair at a single institution. These patients were divided into an arthroscopic repair group and an open group. A Pearson chi-square test and Fisher exact test were used, with a subgroup analysis to segment the open repair group into mini-open and open procedures. The odds ratio and 95% CI of developing a postoperative infection was calculated for the 2 groups. A multiple-regressions model was then utilized to identify predictors of the presence of infection. Infection was defined as only those treated with surgical intervention, thus excluding superficial infections treated with antibiotics alone. A total of 903 patients had an arthroscopic repair, while 653 had open repairs (600 mini-open, 53 open). There were 4 confirmed infections in the arthroscopic group and 16 in the open group (15 mini-open, 1 open), resulting in postoperative infection rates of 0.44% and 2.45%, respectively. Subgroup analysis of the mini-open and open groups demonstrated a postoperative infection rate of 2.50% and 1.89%, respectively. The open group had an odds ratio of 5.645 (95% CI, 1.9-17.0) to develop a postoperative infection compared with the arthroscopic group. Patients undergoing open rotator cuff repair had a significantly higher rate of postoperative infection compared with those undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

  17. Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. .org Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis cont. Page ( 2 ) Symptoms Rotator cuff pain commonly causes local swelling and tenderness in the ...

  18. Stem cell therapy in the management of shoulder rotator cuff disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Maria Valencia; Ibán, Miguel A Ruiz; Heredia, Jorge Díaz; Laakso, Raul Barco; Cuéllar, Ricardo; Arranz, Mariano García

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are frequent shoulder problems that are usually dealt with surgical repair. Despite improved surgical techniques, the tendon-to-bone healing rate is unsatisfactory due to difficulties in restoring the delicate transitional tissue between bone and tendon. It is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms that determine this failure. The study of the molecular environment during embryogenesis and during normal healing after injury is key in devising strategies to get a successful repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can differentiate into different mesodermal tissues and have a strong paracrine, anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory and angiogenic potential. Stem cell therapy is thus a potentially effective therapy to enhance rotator cuff healing. Promising results have been reported with the use of autologous MSC of different origins in animal studies: they have shown to have better healing properties, increasing the amount of fibrocartilage formation and improving the orientation of fibrocartilage fibers with less immunologic response and reduced lymphocyte infiltration. All these changes lead to an increase in biomechanical strength. However, animal research is still inconclusive and more experimental studies are needed before human application. Future directions include expanded stem cell therapy in combination with growth factors or different scaffolds as well as new stem cell types and gene therapy. PMID:26029341

  19. The influence of intraoperative factors and postoperative rehabilitation compliance on the integrity of the rotator cuff after arthroscopic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shahrulazua; Haber, Mark; Bokor, Desmond J

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine when cuff re-tear commonly occurs in the postoperative period and to investigate the clinical factors that might predispose to an early cuff re-tear. All patients with rotator cuff (supraspinatus ± infraspinatus) tear that required arthroscopic repair during the period between June 1, 2010, and May 31, 2012, with completed serial ultrasound examinations at 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 26 weeks postoperatively were included. Intraoperative findings were noted. Functional clinical outcomes were assessed by Constant score, Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index, and Oxford score. Compliance of patients with postoperative rehabilitation was established. There were 127 cases; the mean age of patients was 60 years. Overall re-tear rate was 29.1%. The percentage of new re-tears was significantly higher in the first 12 weeks than in the second 12 weeks postoperatively (25.2% and 3.9%, respectively). The patient's postoperative compliance was a significant prognostic factor for re-tearing. Significant associations were also found between re-tear and primary tear size, tendon quality, repair tension, cuff retraction, and footprint coverage. Poor compliance of patients was highest (17.3%) during the second 6 weeks postoperatively. Better functional outcomes were noted in patients who had re-torn their cuffs at the 12-week period (Oxford mean scores, P = .04). Understanding of the predisposing factors will assist in predicting the prognosis of the repaired rotator cuff. Despite the progress of patients' functions postoperatively, an early significant improvement of the clinical outcome should be a warning sign to a surgeon that the patient's compliance may be suboptimal, resulting in an increased risk of the cuff's re-tearing. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Partial rotator cuff injury in athletes: bursal or articular?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassiano Diniz Carvalho

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTA painful shoulder is a very common complaint among athletes, especially in the case of those in sports involving throwing. Partial lesions of the rotator cuff may be very painful and cause significant functional limitation to athletes' sports practice. The incidence of partial lesions of the cuff is variable (13-37%. It is difficult to make the clinical and radiological diagnosis, and this condition should be borne in mind in the cases of all athletes who present symptoms of rotator cuff syndrome, including in patients who are diagnosed only with tendinopathy. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the epidemiological behavior of partial lesions of the rotator cuff in both amateur and professional athletes in different types of sports. METHODS: We evaluated 720 medical files on athletes attended at the shoulder service of the Discipline of Sports Medicine at the Sports Traumatology Center, Federal University of São Paulo. The majority of them were men (65%. Among all the patients, 83 of them were diagnosed with partial lesions of the rotator cuff, by means of ultrasonography or magnetic resonance, or in some cases using both. We applied the binomial test to compare the proportions found. RESULT: It was observed that intra-articular lesions predominated (67.6% and that these occurred more frequently in athletes in sports involving throwing (66%. Bursal lesions occurred in 32.4% of the athletes, predominantly in those who did muscle building (75%. CONCLUSION: Intra-articular lesions are more frequent than bursal lesions and they occur predominantly in athletes in sports involving throwing, while bursal lesions were more prevalent in athletes who did muscle building.

  1. The effect of glenoid cavity depth on rotator cuff tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkoc, Melih; Korkmaz, Ozgur; Ormeci, Tugrul; Sever, Cem; Kara, Adna; Mahirogulları, Mahir

    2016-03-01

    Some of the most important causes of shoulder pain are inflammation and degenerative changes in the rotator cuff (RC). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive and safe imaging modality. MRI can be used for the evaluation of cuff tendinopathy. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between glenoid cavity depth and cuff tendinopathy and we investigated glenoid cavity depth on the pathogenesis of cuff tendinopathy. We retrospectively evaluated 215 patients who underwent MRI. Of these, 60 patients showed cuff tendinopathy (group A) and 54 patients showed no pathology (group B). Glenoid cavity depth was calculated in the coronal and transverse planes. The mean axial depth was 1.7 ± 0.9 and the mean coronal depth 3.8 ± 0.9, for group A. The mean axial depth was 3.5 ± 0.7 and the mean coronal depth 1.5 ± 0.8, for group B. There were significant differences in the axial and coronal depths between the two groups. High coronal and low axial depth of the glenoid cavity can be used to diagnose RC tendinitis.

  2. Is the arthroscopic suture bridge technique suitable for full-thickness rotator cuff tears of any size?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Hyun; Kim, Jeong Woo; Kim, Tae Kyun; Kweon, Seok Hyun; Kang, Hong Je; Kim, Se Jin; Park, Jin Sung

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare functional outcomes and tendon integrity between the suture bridge and modified tension band techniques for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A consecutive series of 128 patients who underwent the modified tension band (MTB group; 69 patients) and suture bridge (SB group; 59 patients) techniques were enrolled. The pain visual analogue scale (VAS), Constant, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores were determined preoperatively and at the final follow-up. Rotator cuff hypotrophy was quantified by calculating the occupation ratio (OR). Rotator cuff integrity and the global fatty degeneration index were determined by using magnetic resonance imaging at 6 months postoperatively. The average VAS, Constant, and ASES scores improved significantly at the final follow-up in both groups (p bridge groups (7.0 vs. 6.8%, respectively; p = n.s.). The retear rate of large-to-massive tears was significantly lower in the suture bridge group than in the modified tension band group (33.3 vs. 70%; p = 0.035). Fatty infiltration (postoperative global fatty degeneration index, p = 0.022) and muscle hypotrophy (postoperative OR, p = 0.038) outcomes were significantly better with the suture bridge technique. The retear rate was lower with the suture bridge technique in the case of large-to-massive rotator cuff tears. Additionally, significant improvements in hypotrophy and fatty infiltration of the rotator cuff were obtained with the suture bridge technique, possibly resulting in better anatomical outcomes. The suture bridge technique was a more effective method for the repair of rotator cuff tears of all sizes as compared to the modified tension band technique. Retrospective Cohort Design, Treatment Study, level III.

  3. Real-time sonoelastography in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Uk; Joo, Sun Young; Kim, Sun Ki; Lee, Sang-Ho; Park, Sung-Ryeoll; Jeong, Changhoon

    2016-05-01

    Real-time sonoelastography can be used to assess tissue elasticity. The present study evaluated the relationship between tendon stiffness on sonoelastography and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tendinosis grade in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. The study included 39 patients with chronic pain and no history of trauma or rotator cuff tear. The supraspinatus tendons were graded according to MRI findings (grade 0, normal; grade 1, mild tendinosis; grade 2, moderate tendinosis; grade 3, marked tendinosis), and the subcutaneous fat-to-tendon (Fat/T) and gel pad-to-tendon (Pad/T) strain ratios were assessed. We used the trend test to analyze the relationship of the MRI grade with the Fat/T strain ratio and the Pad/T strain ratio. Of the 39 patients, 9 had grade 0, 17 had grade 1, 12 had grade 2, and 1 had grade 3 tendinosis. The mean real-time elastography Fat/T and Pad/T strain ratios were 2.92 ± 2.13 and 20.77 ± 21.78 in patients with grade 0 tendinosis, 4.08 ± 4.09 and 21.78 ± 17.16 in patients with grade 1 tendinosis, 13.48 ± 10.19 and 83.00 ± 48.26 in patients with grade 2 tendinosis, and 12.3 ± 0.00 and 16.58 ± 0.00 in patients with grade 3 tendinosis, respectively. The Fat/T and Pad/T strain ratios were positively associated with the MRI grade (P tendinosis grade is associated with stiffness assessed using sonoelastography in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Therefore, sonoelastography might be a useful diagnostic tool for supraspinatus tendinopathy. Level III; Diagnostic Study. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The prevalence of neovascularity in patients clinically diagnosed with rotator cuff tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raza Syed A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder dysfunction is common and pathology of the rotator cuff tendons and subacromial bursa are considered to be a major cause of pain and morbidity. Although many hypotheses exist there is no definitive understanding as to the origin of the pain arising from these structures. Research investigations from other tendons have placed intra-tendinous neovascularity as a potential mechanism of pain production. The prevalence of neovascularity in patients with a clinical diagnosis of rotator cuff tendinopathy is unknown. As such the primary aim of this pilot study was to investigate if neovascularity could be identified and to determine the prevalence of neovascularity in the rotator cuff tendons and subacromial bursa in subjects with unilateral shoulder pain clinically assessed to be rotator cuff tendinopathy. The secondary aims were to investigate the association between the presence of neovascularity and pain, duration of symptoms, and, neovascularity and shoulder function. Methods Patients with a clinical diagnosis of unilateral rotator cuff tendinopathy referred for a routine diagnostic ultrasound (US scan in a major London teaching hospital formed the study population. At referral patients were provided with an information document. On the day of the scan (on average, at least one week later the patients agreeing to participate were taken through the consent process and underwent an additional clinical examination prior to undergoing a bilateral grey scale and colour Doppler US examination (symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulder using a Philips HDI 5000 Sono CT US machine. The ultrasound scans were performed by one of two radiologists who recorded their findings and the final assessment was made by a third radiologist blinded both to the clinical examination and the ultrasound examination. The findings of the radiologists who performed the scans and the blinded radiologist were compared and any disagreements were resolved

  5. Prognosis Driven Rehabilitation After Rotator Cuff Repair Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokmeyer, Dirk; Dube, Eric; Millett, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Rehabilitation after rotator cuff repair surgery has been the focus of several clinical trials in the past decade. Many illuminate new evidence with regard to the prognosis of structural and functional success after surgery. A selective literature search was performed and personal physiotherapeutic and surgical experiences are reported. Post-operative rehabilitation parameters, namely the decision to delay or allow early range of motion after surgery, play a large role in the overall success after surgery. Using a prognosis driven rehabilitation program offers clinicians a means of prescribing optimal rehabilitation parameters while ensuring structural and functional success. This commentary aims to synthesize the evidence in a spectrum of prognostic factors to guide post-operative rehabilitation. The optimal rehabilitation program after rotator cuff repair surgery is debatable; therefore, we suggest using a spectrum of prognostic factors to determine a rehabilitation program suited to ensure structural and functional success, quickly and safely.

  6. I.S.Mu.L.T - Rotator Cuff Tears Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Francesco; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Bossa, Michela; Via, Alessio Giai; Colombo, Alessandra; Chillemi, Claudio; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Pellicciari, Leonardo; Franceschetti, Edoardo; Rugiero, Clelia; Scialdoni, Alessandro; Vittadini, Filippo; Brancaccio, Paola; Creta, Domenico; Buono, Angelo Del; Garofalo, Raffaele; Franceschi, Francesco; Frizziero, Antonio; Mahmoud, Asmaa; Merolla, Giovanni; Nicoletti, Simone; Spoliti, Marco; Osti, Leonardo; Padulo, Johnny; Portinaro, Nicola; Tajana, Gianfranco; Castagna, Alex; Foti, Calogero; Masiero, Stefano; Porcellini, Giuseppe; Tarantino, Umberto; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high level achieved in the field of shoulder surgery, a global consensus on rotator cuff tears management is lacking. This work is divided into two main sessions: in the first, we set questions about hot topics involved in the rotator cuff tears, from the etiopathogenesis to the surgical treatment. In the second, we answered these questions by mentioning Evidence Based Medicine. The aim of the present work is to provide easily accessible guidelines: they could be considered as recommendations for a good clinical practice developed through a process of systematic review of the literature and expert opinion, in order to improve the quality of care and rationalize the use of resources. PMID:26958532

  7. Evaluation of Internet Information About Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Kevin A; Codella, Stephen; Ciccotti, Michael G; Kane, Patrick W; Duncan, Ian C; Cohen, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    The content and quality of Internet websites are not governed or regulated. Therefore, patients who consult the Internet may receive outdated or incorrect medical information. Researchers have analyzed the quality of web information about various orthopedic surgeries, but no such analysis has been performed on websites covering rotator cuff repair. We conducted a study to evaluate and analyze rotator cuff repair information available to the general public through the Internet; to assess changes in the quality of information over time; to determine if sites sponsored by academic institutions offered higher-quality information; and to assess whether the readability of the material varied according to DISCERN scores. Two Internet searches were conducted, in 2011 and 2014. The 3 most commonly used search engines were used to search for rotator cuff repair. The first 50 websites from each search engine were evaluated for authorship and content. The DISCERN instrument was used to analyze the quality of each website's health information. The 2011 search revealed 21% of websites were associated with an academic institution, 38% were authored by a hospital or physician group, and 11.5% were industry-sponsored. The 2014 search revealed a similar distribution of contributors. The highest DISCERN scores were given to academic institution websites (51.6) and public education websites (49). There was no correlation between readability and DISCERN scores. Websites associated with academic institutions produced the highest-quality medical information. Over the past few years, authorship and content have changed little with respect to Internet information about rotator cuff repair.

  8. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty for massive rotator cuff tear: risk factors for poor functional improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, Robert U; Steen, Brandon M; Hussey, Michael M; Cusick, Michael C; Cottrell, Benjamin J; Clark, Rachel E; Frankle, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    Some patients unexpectedly have poor functional improvement after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) for massive rotator cuff tear without glenohumeral arthritis. Our aim was to identify risk factors for this outcome. We also assessed the value of RSA for cases with poor functional improvement vs. The study was a retrospective case-control analysis for primary RSA performed for massive rotator cuff tear without glenohumeral arthritis with minimum 2-year follow-up. Cases were defined as Simple Shoulder Test (SST) score improvement of ≤1, whereas controls improved SST score ≥2. Risk factors were chosen on the basis of previous association with poor outcomes after shoulder arthroplasty. Latissimus dorsi tendon transfer results were analyzed as a subgroup. Value was defined as improvement in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score per $10,000 hospital cost. In a multivariate binomial logistic regression analysis, neurologic dysfunction (P = .006), age <60 years (P = .02), and high preoperative SST score (P = .03) were independently associated with poor functional improvement. Latissimus dorsi tendon transfer patients significantly improved in active external rotation (-0.3° to 38.7°; P < .01). The value of RSA (ΔASES/$10,000 cost) for cases was 0.8 compared with 17.5 for controls (P < .0001). Young age, high preoperative function, and neurologic dysfunction were associated with poor functional improvement. Surgeons should consider these associations in counseling and selection of patients. Concurrent latissimus dorsi transfer was successful in restoring active external rotation in a subgroup of patients. The critical economic importance of improved patient selection is emphasized by the very low value of the procedure in the case group. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Management of rotator cuff calcific tendinosis guided by ultrasound elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Huai; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Wang, Hsin-Kai; Lai, Yi-Chen; Chou, Yi-Hong; Chang, Cheng-Yen

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound (US) elastography can provide information about the hardness of calcification and might help decide treatment strategy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hardness of the calcific area within rotator cuffs by US elastography as an aid for the selection of aspiration or fine-needle repeated puncture for the treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinosis. This prospective study included 39 patients (32 males, 7 females; mean age, 52.9 years) who received US elastography and gray-scale ultrasonography before US-guided treatment for rotator cuff calcific tendinosis. The morphology of the calcifications was classified as arc, fragmented, nodular, and cystic types. US elastography using virtual touch imaging (acoustic radiation force impulse) technique was performed to examine the calcified region to obtain an elastogram that was graded dark, intermediate, or bright. The hardness of the calcifications were recorded, and graded as hard, sand-like, or fluid-like tactile patterns during the US-guided treatment, and the tactile patterns were compared with the results of US elastography and gray-scale ultrasonography. Though the morphologies of the calcifications were significantly related to the tactile pattern of the needle punctures (p tendinosis, and as an aid to guide management. If elastography shows the calcified area as a non-dark pattern, then fine-needle aspiration should be performed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  10. Diagnosis of long head of biceps tendinopathy in rotator cuff tear patients: correlation of imaging and arthroscopy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rol, Morgane; Favard, Luc; Berhouet, Julien

    2017-08-25

    The goal of this prospective study was to assess the reliability of pre-operative cross-sectional imaging for the diagnosis of long head of biceps (LHB) tendinopathy in patients with a rotator cuff tear. Cross-sectional imaging with MRI or CT arthrography data from 25 patients operated upon because of a rotator cuff tear between 1 October 2015 and 1 April 2016 was analysed by one experienced orthopaedic surgeon, one experienced radiologist and one orthopaedic resident. The analysis consisted of determining whether the LHB was present, the extrinsic tendon abnormalities (dislocation, tendon coverage) and intrinsic abnormalities (fraying, inflammation, degeneration). These findings were then compared to intra-operative arthroscopy findings, which were used as the benchmark. The interobserver correlation between the three different examiners for the cross-sectional imaging analysis as well as the correlation between the imaging and arthroscopy data were determined. The correlation between the imaging and arthroscopy data was the highest (80%) for the determination of LHB dislocation from the bicipital groove. The other diagnostic elements (subluxation, coverage and tendon degeneration) were difficult to discern with preoperative imaging, and correlated poorly with the arthroscopy findings (45% to 65%). The interobserver correlation was moderate to strong for the diagnosis of extrinsic tendon abnormalities. It was low to moderate for intrinsic abnormalities. Except for LHB dislocation, pre-operative imaging is not sufficient to make a reliable diagnosis of LHB tendinopathy. Arthroscopy remains the gold standard for the management of LHB tendinopathy, as diagnosed intra-operatively.

  11. Rotator Cuff Tears: Surgical Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repair, this shoulder muscle is detached to provide better access to the rotator cuff. It is stitched back into place at the end of the procedure. It is very important to protect this area a er surgery and during rehabilitation to allow it to heal. • Stiffness. Early rehabilitation ...

  12. TGF-β Small Molecule Inhibitor SB431542 Reduces Rotator Cuff Muscle Fibrosis and Fatty Infiltration By Promoting Fibro/Adipogenic Progenitor Apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Davies

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff tears represent a large burden of muscle-tendon injuries in our aging population. While small tears can be repaired surgically with good outcomes, critical size tears are marked by muscle atrophy, fibrosis, and fatty infiltration, which can lead to failed repair, frequent re-injury, and chronic disability. Previous animal studies have indicated that Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β signaling may play an important role in the development of these muscle pathologies after injury. Here, we demonstrated that inhibition of TGF-β1 signaling with the small molecule inhibitor SB431542 in a mouse model of massive rotator cuff tear results in decreased fibrosis, fatty infiltration, and muscle weight loss. These observed phenotypic changes were accompanied by decreased fibrotic, adipogenic, and atrophy-related gene expression in the injured muscle of mice treated with SB431542. We further demonstrated that treatment with SB431542 reduces the number of fibro/adipogenic progenitor (FAP cells-an important cellular origin of rotator cuff muscle fibrosis and fatty infiltration, in injured muscle by promoting apoptosis of FAPs. Together, these data indicate that the TGF-β pathway is a critical regulator of the degenerative muscle changes seen after massive rotator cuff tears. TGF-β promotes rotator cuff muscle fibrosis and fatty infiltration by preventing FAP apoptosis. TGF-β regulated FAP apoptosis may serve as an important target pathway in the future development of novel therapeutics to improve muscle outcomes following rotator cuff tear.

  13. Medial grasping sutures significantly improve load to failure of the rotator cuff suture bridge repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awwad, George E; Eng, Kevin; Bain, Gregory I; McGuire, Duncan; Jones, Claire F

    2014-05-01

    The suture bridge (SB) transosseous-equivalent rotator cuff repair reduces re-tear rates compared with single-row or other double-row constructs. However, failure rates continue to be high, especially in large and massive tears. The aim of this study was to assess the biomechanical performance of a new SB repair with use of a medial grasping suture compared with the traditional SB repair. Seven matched pairs of sheep infraspinatus tendons were randomly assigned to either SB or suture bridge with grasping suture (SBGS) repair. Each construct was subjected to cyclic loading and then loaded until failure under displacement control in a materials testing machine. Footprint displacement, ultimate load to failure, and mode of failure were assessed. The rotator cuff footprint displacement was less during tensile loading with the addition of the medial grasping suture. The ultimate load to failure was significantly greater for the SBGS repair group than for the SB repair group (334.0 N vs 79.8 N). The mode of failure was the tendon pulling off the footprint in all cases (type 1 tear). There were no failures in which the tendon tore at the medial row of anchors, leaving part of the tendon still on the footprint (type 2 tear). The addition of a medial grasping suture significantly improved the ultimate load to failure and reduced the footprint displacement of the SB rotator cuff repair in a biomechanical model. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical and radiological outcome of conservative vs. surgical treatment of atraumatic degenerative rotator cuff rupture: design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Akker-Scheek Inge

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subacromial impingement syndrome is a frequently observed disorder in orthopedic practice. Lasting symptoms and impairment may occur when a subsequent atraumatic rotator cuff rupture is also present. However, degenerative ruptures of the rotator cuff can also be observed in asymptomatic elderly individuals. Treatment of these symptomatic degenerative ruptures may be conservative or surgical. Acceptable results are reported for both treatment modalities. No evidence-based level-1 studies have been conducted so far to compare these treatment modalities. The objective of this study is to determine whether there is a difference in outcome between surgical reconstruction and conservative treatment of a degenerative atraumatic rotator cuff tendon rupture. Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial will be conducted. Patients aged between 45 and 75 with a symptomatic atraumatic rotator cuff rupture as diagnosed by MRI will be included. Exclusion criteria are traumatic rotator cuff rupture, frozen shoulder and diabetes mellitus. Patients will be randomized into two groups. Conservative treatment includes physical therapy according to a standardized protocol, NSAIDs and, if indicated, subacromial infiltration with a local anesthetic and corticosteroids. Surgical reconstruction is performed under general anesthesia in combination with an interscalenus plexus block. An acromioplasty with reconstruction of the rotator cuff tendon is performed, as described by Rockwood et al. Measurements take place preoperatively and 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. The primary outcome measure is the Constant score. Secondary measures include both disease-specific and generic outcome measures, and an economic evaluation. Additionally, one year after inclusion a second MRI will be taken of all patients in order to determine whether extent and localization of the rupture as well as the amount of fatty degeneration are prognostic

  15. Fast MR arthrography using VIBE sequences to evaluate the rotator cuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandevenne, Jan E. [Ziekenhuizen Oost-Limburg, Department of Radiology, Genk (Belgium); Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Vanhoenacker, Filip; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Mahachie John, Jestinah M. [University of Hasselt, Centre for Statistics, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Gelin, Geert [Ziekenhuizen Oost-Limburg, Department of Radiology, Genk (Belgium)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate if short volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences can be used as a substitute for T1-weighted with fat saturation (T1-FS) sequences when performing magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography to diagnose rotator cuff tears. Eighty-two patients underwent direct MR arthrography of the shoulder joint using VIBE (acquisition time of 13 s) and T1-FS (acquisition time of 5 min) sequences in the axial and paracoronal plane on a 1.0-T MR unit. Two radiologists scored rotator cuff tendons on VIBE and T1-FS images separately as normal, small/large partial thickness and full thickness tears with or without geyser sign. T1-FS sequences were considered the gold standard. Surgical correlation was available in a small sample. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of VIBE were greater than 92% for large articular-sided partial thickness and full thickness tears. For detecting fraying and articular-sided small partial thickness tears, these parameters were 55%, 94%, 94%, and 57%, respectively. The simple kappa value was 0.76, and the weighted kappa value was 0.86 for agreement between T1-FS and VIBE scores. All large partial and full thickness tears at surgery were correctly diagnosed using VIBE or T1-FS MR images. Fast MR arthrography of the shoulder joint using VIBE sequences showed good concordance with the classically used T1-FS sequences for the appearance of the rotator cuff, in particular for large articular-sided partial thickness tears and for full thickness tears. Due to its very short acquisition time, VIBE may be especially useful when performing MR arthrography in claustrophobic patients or patients with a painful shoulder. (orig.)

  16. ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF LARGE AND MASSIVE ROTATOR CUFF TEARS: CLINICAL OUTCOMES AND POSTOPERATIVE MRI FINDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Dokolin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study – to identify incidence rate of recurrent rotator cuff (RC tears, to evaluate outcomes of arthroscopic bone-tendon anchor suture, to determine the factors influencing arthroscopic treatment outcomes.Materials and methods. Medical history data, pre-operative x-rays and MRI of shoulder joints of 305 patients (main group who underwent arthroscopic bone-tendon anchor suture repair of large or massive RC tears during 2010-2016 were included in the study. Follow up period ranged from 1 to 6 years postoperatively with mean value of 25,6±4,5 months. Telephone survey of patients was conducted after the surgery as well as a single examination of patients with evaluation by functional scales – UCLA, ASES, CS, VAS, DN4. Preoperative standard x-rays in AP and axial views were done in all patients. Arthropathy severity was evaluated by K.Hamada classification. Comparison of patient specific data, features of RC lesions and surgical treatment was made by Kruskal-Wallis test.Results. Good outcomes by ASES, CS and UCLA functional scales were obtained in 15 (5% of patients, satisfactory – in 213 (69.8%, poor – in 77 (25.2%. Postoperative MRI data provided the following sub-distribution of patients: 49 (41.1% patients with complete repair of RC tendons lesions, 38 (31.9% patients with partial repair and 33 (27.0% patients with recurrent tear of reconstructed tendon. Correlation analysis allowed to establish the limits for achieving good outcomes of arthroscopic bone-tendon anchor suturing for significant association with infraspinatus muscle atrophy (not exceeding 40% and fatty infiltration of supraspinatus muscle (not exceeding 23.5%. 

  17. Comparison of three dimensional isotropic and two dimensional conventional indirect MR arthrography for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears

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    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoo, Jae Chul [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jang Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Jee, Suk Kyoung [Joeun Madi Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To compare the accuracy between a three-dimensional (3D) indirect isotropic T1-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography and a conventional two-dimensional (2D) T1-weighted sequences of indirect MR arthrography for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. The study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. In total, 205 patients who had undergone indirect shoulder MR arthrography followed by arthroscopic surgery for 206 shoulders were included in this study. Both conventional 2D T1-weighted FSE sequences and 3D isotropic T1-weighted FSE sequence were performed in all patients. Two radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of full- or partial-thickness tears in the supraspinatus-infraspinatus (SSP-ISP) tendons and tears in the subscapularis (SSC) tendons. Using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard, the diagnostic performances of both methods were analyzed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Arthroscopy confirmed 165 SSP-ISP tendon tears and 103 SSC tendon tears. For diagnosing SSP-ISP tendon tears, the AUC values were 0.964 and 0.989 for the 2D sequences and 3D T1-weighted FSE sequence, respectively, in reader I and 0.947 and 0.963, respectively, in reader II. The AUC values for diagnosing SSC tendon tears were 0.921 and 0.925, respectively, for reader I and 0.856 and 0.860, respectively, for reader II. There was no significant difference between the AUC values of the 2D and 3D sequences in either reader for either type of tear. 3D indirect isotropic MR arthrography with FSE sequence and the conventional 2D arthrography are not significantly different in terms of accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff tears.

  18. The effect of diclofenac on matrix metalloproteinase levels in the rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabuk, Haluk; Avci, Arzu; Durmaz, Hüseyin; Cabuk, Fatmagül Kuşku; Ertem, Fatih; Muhittin Şener, I

    2014-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in physiological events such as restructuring of the tissue, morphogenesis, wound healing and normal developmental process. Use of diclofenac sodium following rotator cuff repair can disrupt healing of tendon through acting on MMPs. Supraspinatus tendons of rats (n = 84) were detached from their insertion on humerus, and repaired to anatomic footprint. Rats were divided into study group (n = 42) and control group (n = 42). Study group received a dose of 1 mg/kg daily diclofenac sodium subcutaneously. The rats were killed at weeks 1, 3 and 6, and seven rats from each groups were included in biomechanical and immunohistological examinations. Immunohistological staining of MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP13 were used. Maximum load was reduced in the study group at the end of week 1 (8.76 vs. 5.28 N) (p = 0.01). MMP-3 level was statistically significantly lower in the study group at the end of week 1. MMP-13 level and stiffness decreased towards week 6 in the study group while in the control group the level of MMP-2 decreased towards week 6. Diclofenac has an impact on the levels of MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-13, which are needed for normal healing process, and it can also lead to disruption of tendon healing.

  19. Augmented Fixation With Biodegradable Subacromial Spacer After Repair of Massive Rotator Cuff Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Murat; Akkaya, Mustafa; Gursoy, Safa; Isik, Cetin

    2015-10-01

    Unsuccessful outcomes after repair of massive rotator cuff ruptures accompanied by muscle atrophy and fatty degeneration are frequently associated with inadequate management and secondary tears. We report the functional differences after rotator cuff rupture repair with a biodegradable spacer application. In these patients, rotator cuff rupture repair should provide coverage of the humeral head. Subsequently, acromioplasty should be performed to allow adequate space for the subacromial spacer. Thereafter measurement of the intra-articular space required for application of the biodegradable spacer is performed. Using this method can decrease the rate of tears by providing a safe subacromial space in cases of massive rotator cuff rupture.

  20. Fatty degeneration and atrophy of the rotator cuff muscles after arthroscopic repair: does it improve, halt or deteriorate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Gokmen; Kose, Ozkan; Tugay, Ali; Guler, Ferhat; Turan, Adil

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in fatty degeneration and atrophy of rotator cuff muscles after arthroscopic repair. We further assessed the factors affecting the functional outcomes and integrity of the rotator cuff. One hundred and two prospectively followed patients who underwent single-row arthroscopic repair for full-thickness rotator cuff tears between 2008 and 2010 in our institution were included. All patients underwent shoulder MRI examination before the arthroscopic repair and at the final follow-up at least 2 years after the surgical repair. Supraspinatus muscle atrophy was measured and evaluated according to the Thomazeau classification. The fatty degeneration of the cuff muscles was graded according to the Goutallier classification. Functional outcomes were assessed with the Constant shoulder score. The changes in fatty degeneration and atrophy were analyzed during the treatment period. Correlation coefficients (Pearson r) and stepwise, multiple linear regression were used to determine the relationship between the outcome variables (final Constant score and integrity of the cuff), and the predictor variables, age, sex, follow-up duration, initial muscle atrophy, final muscle atrophy, initial fatty degeneration and final fatty degeneration. Of the 102 patients reviewed, 87 patients responded and concluded the final clinical follow-up and MRI examination (85.2 % follow-up rate). There were 67 females and 20 males with a mean age of 62.5 ± 8.3 years (range 40-80 years). Mean follow-up period was 30.1 ± 5.8 months (range 24-43 months). At the final follow-up, the mean Constant shoulder score was 94.2 ± 8.2 (range 70-100), and 66 (75.9 %) patients rated as excellent, 14 (16.1 %) as good, and 7 (8.0 %) as fair. No patient had poor results. There was re-rupture in 26 (29.9 %) patients on final MRI examination. No patient had improvement in muscle atrophy and fatty degeneration. The atrophic changes between intact tendon and re

  1. Effect of prolotherapy on hemiplegic shoulder pain due to rotator cuff tendinopathy: a pilot study

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    Serdar Kesikburun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prolotherapy on pain and shoulder range of motion in stroke patients with hemiplegic shoulder pain due to rotator cuff tendinopathy. Material and Methods: The data of 10 patients (mean age, 64.2+/-11.6 years who had a history stroke of more than six months and underwent prolotherapy treatment were collected retrospectively. The treatment included 3 sessions of dextrose pr olotherapy injections applied to rotator cuff tendon. Visual analogue scale pain scores and shoulder range of motions measured at baseline and two weeks later after end of the treatment were assessed. Results: Visual analogue scale shoulder pain scores of the patients decreased from 8.2+/-1.1 at baseline to 4.8+/-1.9 after prolotherapy The degrees of shoulder flexion and abduction increased significantly after the treatment. Conclusion: Preliminary results in this pilot study suggested the beneficial effect of proloterapi in the treatmentof hemiplegicshoulderpain. [Cukurova Med J 2017; 42(1.000: 13-18

  2. Recovery of Muscle Strength After Intact Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair According to Preoperative Rotator Cuff Tear Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Chung, Jaeyoon; Lee, Juyeob; Ko, Young-Won

    2016-04-01

    The recovery of muscle strength after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair based on the preoperative tear size has not yet been well described. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the recovery period of muscle strength by a serial assessment of isometric strength after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair based on the preoperative tear size. The hypothesis was that muscle strength in patients with small and medium tears would recover faster than that in those with large-to-massive tears. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 164 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included. Isometric strength in forward flexion (FF), internal rotation (IR), and external rotation (ER) was evaluated preoperatively and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after surgery. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans were assessed to evaluate the quality of the rotator cuff muscle, including fatty infiltration, occupation ratio, and tangent sign. Patient satisfaction as well as visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and Constant scores were assessed at every follow-up. Muscle strength demonstrated the slowest recovery in pain relief and the restoration of shoulder function. To reach the strength of the uninjured contralateral shoulder in all 3 planes of motion, recovery took 6 months in patients with small tears and 18 months in patients with medium tears. Patients with large-to-massive tears showed continuous improvement in strength up to 18 months; however, they did not reach the strength of the contralateral shoulder at final follow-up. At final follow-up, mean strength in FF, IR, and ER was 113.0%, 118.0%, and 112.6% of the contralateral shoulder in patients with small tears, respectively; 105.0%, 112.1%, and 102.6% in patients with medium tears, respectively; and 87.6%, 89.5%, and 85.2% in patients with large-to-massive tears, respectively. Muscle strength in any direction did not significantly correlate with

  3. Stimulation of Rotator Cuff Repair by Sustained Release of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-7 Using a Gelatin Hydrogel Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabuto, Yukichi; Morihara, Toru; Sukenari, Tsuyoshi; Kida, Yoshikazu; Oda, Ryo; Arai, Yuji; Sawada, Koshiro; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-07-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) promotes not only osteogenesis but also matrix production in chondrocytes and tenocytes. However, because of its short half-life, maintaining local concentrations of BMP-7 is difficult. We examined the use of a gelatin hydrogel sheet (GHS) for the sustained release of BMP-7 in stimulating rotator cuff repair at the tendon-to-bone insertion. Twelve-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Radiolabeled BMP-7 ((125)I-BMP-7) was injected into the subacromial bursa in the (125)I-BMP-7 group, whereas a GHS impregnated with (125)I-BMP-7 was implanted on the tendon attached to the tendon-to-bone insertion in the (125)I-BMP-7+GHS group. Levels of (125)I-BMP-7 in the tendon-to-bone insertion were assessed at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 postoperative days. The BMP-7 concentrations were significantly higher in the (125)I-BMP-7+GHS group than in the (125)I-BMP-7 group. Next, the bilateral supraspinatus tendons were resected and sutured to the greater tuberosity of the humerus using the Mason-Allen technique. Treatment groups were created as follows: either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or BMP-7 was injected into the subacromial bursa in the PBS and BMP-7 groups, whereas a GHS impregnated with either PBS or BMP-7 was implanted on the repaired tendon attached to the tendon-to-bone insertion in the PBS+GHS and BMP-7+GHS groups. The resected specimens were stained at 2, 4, and 8 postoperative weeks with hematoxylin and eosin as well as Safranin O, and tissue repair was evaluated histologically by using the tendon-to-bone maturing score. Tissue repair was assessed biomechanically at 4 and 8 postoperative weeks. The BMP-7+GHS group at 8 postoperative weeks demonstrated a favorable cartilage matrix production and tendon orientation; moreover, the tendon-to-bone maturing score and the ultimate force-to-failure were the highest in this group. The ability of GHS to provide controlled release of various growth factors has been previously reported. We

  4. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repair [the UK Rotator Cuff Surgery (UKUFF) randomised trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Andrew J; Cooper, Cushla D; Campbell, Marion K; Rees, Jonathan L; Moser, Jane; Beard, David J; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Gray, Alastair; Dawson, Jill; Murphy, Jacqueline; Bruhn, Hanne; Cooper, David; Ramsay, Craig R

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainty exists regarding the best management of patients with degenerative tears of the rotator cuff. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic and open rotator cuff repair in patients aged ≥ 50 years with degenerative rotator cuff tendon tears. Two parallel-group randomised controlled trial. Nineteen teaching and district general hospitals in the UK. Patients (n = 273) aged ≥ 50 years with degenerative rotator cuff tendon tears. Arthroscopic surgery and open rotator cuff repair, with surgeons using their usual and preferred method of arthroscopic or open repair. Follow-up was by telephone questionnaire at 2 and 8 weeks after surgery and by postal questionnaire at 8, 12 and 24 months after randomisation. The Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) at 24 months was the primary outcome measure. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of the shoulder was made at 12 months after surgery to assess the integrity of the repair. The mean OSS improved from 26.3 [standard deviation (SD) 8.2] at baseline to 41.7 (SD 7.9) at 24 months for arthroscopic surgery and from 25.0 (SD 8.0) at baseline to 41.5 (SD 7.9) at 24 months for open surgery. When effect sizes are shown for the intervention, a negative sign indicates that an open procedure is favoured. For the intention-to-treat analysis, there was no statistical difference between the groups, the difference in OSS score at 24 months was -0.76 [95% confidence interval (CI) -2.75 to 1.22; p = 0.452] and the CI excluded the predetermined clinically important difference in the OSS of 3 points. There was also no statistical difference when the groups were compared per protocol (difference in OSS score -0.46, 95% CI -5.30 to 4.39; p = 0.854). The questionnaire response rate was > 86%. At 8 months, 77% of participants reported that shoulder problems were much or slightly better, and at 24 months this increased to 85%. There were no significant differences in mean cost between the arthroscopic group and

  5. Isometric evaluation of rotator cuff muscles in volleyball athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, G; Ciccarone, G; Grazzini, G; Signorini, M; Urgelli, S

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in a group of semi-professional volleyball players, the function of the rotator cuff muscles with a new specific device. We have studied 30 asymptomatic volleyball players, 15 females and 15 males, all right handed central or lateral spikers, with some specific functional tests. Every subject was evaluated by some common clinical tests to detect shoulder range of motion (ROM) and rotator cuff muscles strength in both sides. Athletes were also submitted to an isometric bilateral shoulder strength test, with a specific upper limb dynamometer (Dynatorq), in three different positions: 1) arm 0° abducted; 2) arm 90° abducted and 90° external rotation, to try to reproduce the spike gesture; 3) arm behind the thorax, as a simulation of clinical lift-off test. All clinical and instrumental data were collected in male and female groups and, in each group, comparisons between dominant and non dominant shoulders. Our data show in all athletes an initial postero-superior impingement with significant weakness of the subscapularis muscle in the dominant shoulder. In all overhead athletes, and in particular in volleyball spikers, a pre-clinical diagnosis of lack of strength of the subscapularis muscle in the dominant side, before the occurrence of pain or discomfort signs, could be an important diagnostic aspect to avoid or delay the back-retraction of the joint capsule of the shoulder.

  6. Dextrose Prolotherapy Versus Control Injections in Painful Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Helene; Reeves, Kenneth Dean; Bennett, Cameron J; Bicknell, Simon; Cheng, An-Lin

    2016-01-01

    To compare the effect of dextrose prolotherapy on pain levels and degenerative changes in painful rotator cuff tendinopathy against 2 potentially active control injection procedures. Randomized controlled trial, blinded to participants and evaluators. Outpatient pain medicine practice. Persons (N=73) with chronic shoulder pain, examination findings of rotator cuff tendinopathy, and ultrasound-confirmed supraspinatus tendinosis/tear. Three monthly injections either (1) onto painful entheses with dextrose (Enthesis-Dextrose), (2) onto entheses with saline (Enthesis-Saline), or (3) above entheses with saline (Superficial-Saline). All solutions included 0.1% lidocaine. All participants received concurrent programmed physical therapy. Primary: participants achieving an improvement in maximal current shoulder pain ≥2.8 (twice the minimal clinically important difference for visual analog scale pain) or not. Secondary: improvement in the Ultrasound Shoulder Pathology Rating Scale (USPRS) and a 0-to-10 satisfaction score (10, completely satisfied). The 73 participants had moderate to severe shoulder pain (7.0±2.0) for 7.6±9.6 years. There were no baseline differences between groups. Blinding was effective. At 9-month follow-up, 59% of Enthesis-Dextrose participants maintained ≥2.8 improvement in pain compared with Enthesis-Saline (37%; P=.088) and Superficial-Saline (27%; P=.017). Enthesis-Dextrose participants' satisfaction was 6.7±3.2 compared with Enthesis-Saline (4.7±4.1; P=.079) and Superficial-Saline (3.9±3.1; P=.003). USPRS findings were not different between groups (P=.734). In participants with painful rotator cuff tendinopathy who receive physical therapy, injection of hypertonic dextrose on painful entheses resulted in superior long-term pain improvement and patient satisfaction compared with blinded saline injection over painful entheses, with intermediate results for entheses injection with saline. These differences could not be attributed to a

  7. Effects of Rotator Cuff Pathology and Physical Therapy on In Vivo Shoulder Motion and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With a Symptomatic Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Timothy G; Chan, Derek; Mende, Veronica; Dischler, Jack; Zauel, Roger; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Siegal, Daniel S; Divine, George; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Bey, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Physical therapy (PT) is often prescribed for patients with rotator cuff tears. The extent to which PT influences strength, range of motion (ROM), and patient-reported outcomes has been studied extensively, but the effect of PT on in vivo joint kinematics is not well understood. To assess the influence of symptomatic rotator cuff pathology and the effects of PT on shoulder motion, strength, and patient-reported outcomes. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-five patients with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear and 25 age-matched asymptomatic control subjects were recruited. Shoulder motion was measured using a biplane radiography imaging system, strength was assessed with a Biodex dynamometer, and patient-reported outcomes were assessed using the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores. Data were acquired from the patients before and after 8 weeks of physical therapy. Data were acquired at 1 time point for the control subjects. Compared with the control subjects, patients with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear had significantly worse pain/function scores (P rotation (ER), and internal rotation (IR) strength (P rotator cuff tears.

  8. Predicting rotator cuff tears using data mining and Bayesian likelihood ratios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Yi Lu

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff tear is a common cause of shoulder diseases. Correct diagnosis of rotator cuff tears can save patients from further invasive, costly and painful tests. This study used predictive data mining and Bayesian theory to improve the accuracy of diagnosing rotator cuff tears by clinical examination alone.In this retrospective study, 169 patients who had a preliminary diagnosis of rotator cuff tear on the basis of clinical evaluation followed by confirmatory MRI between 2007 and 2011 were identified. MRI was used as a reference standard to classify rotator cuff tears. The predictor variable was the clinical assessment results, which consisted of 16 attributes. This study employed 2 data mining methods (ANN and the decision tree and a statistical method (logistic regression to classify the rotator cuff diagnosis into "tear" and "no tear" groups. Likelihood ratio and Bayesian theory were applied to estimate the probability of rotator cuff tears based on the results of the prediction models.Our proposed data mining procedures outperformed the classic statistical method. The correction rate, sensitivity, specificity and area under the ROC curve of predicting a rotator cuff tear were statistical better in the ANN and decision tree models compared to logistic regression. Based on likelihood ratios derived from our prediction models, Fagan's nomogram could be constructed to assess the probability of a patient who has a rotator cuff tear using a pretest probability and a prediction result (tear or no tear.Our predictive data mining models, combined with likelihood ratios and Bayesian theory, appear to be good tools to classify rotator cuff tears as well as determine the probability of the presence of the disease to enhance diagnostic decision making for rotator cuff tears.

  9. [Diagnostic value of a predictive model for complete ruptures of the rotator cuff associated to subacromial impingement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Águila-Ledesma, I R; Córdova-Fonseca, J L; Medina-Pontaza, O; Núñez-Gómez, D A; Calvache-García, C; Pérez-Atanasio, J M; Torres-González, R

    2017-01-01

    Pathology related to the rotator cuff remains among the most prevalent musculoskeletal diseases. There is an increasing need for imaging studies (MRI, US, arthroscopy) to test the diagnostic performance of the medical history and physical examination. To prove the diagnostic value of a clinical-radiographic predictive model to find complete ruptures of the rotator cuff. Descriptive, observational, prospective, transversal and analytical study. Fifty-five patients with preoperative shoulder pain were evaluated with 13 predictive variables: age > 50 years, nocturnal pain, muscle weakness, clinical signs of Neer, Hawkins, Jobe, external rotation lag (ERLS), belly-press, bear hug, and lift-off, radiographic measurement of subacromial space, acromial index and critical shoulder angle. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were measured in each variable, comparing the results of each one against the postoperative findings. Of the 55 patients evaluated, 42 had a complete rupture of the rotator cuff in the postoperative period. The eight variables with a higher diagnostic value were selected and a ROC curve was performed, providing an area under the curve of 0.88. This predictive model uses eight variables (age > 50 years, nocturnal pain, muscle weakness, Jobe, Hawkins, ERLS, subacromial space ≤ 6 mm, and critical shoulder angle > 35°), which together add the predictive value of 0.88 (AUC) to diagnose complete ruptures of the supraspinatus tendon.

  10. A Prospective, Quantitative Evaluation of Fatty Infiltration Before and After Rotator Cuff Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdown, Drew A.; Lee, Sonia; Sam, Craig; Krug, Roland; Feeley, Brian T.; Ma, C. Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Current evaluation of muscle fatty infiltration has been limited by subjective classifications. Quantitative fat evaluation through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may allow for an improved longitudinal evaluation of the effect of surgical repair on the progression of fatty infiltration. Hypotheses: We hypothesized that (1) patients with isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears would have less progression in fatty infiltration compared with patients with full-thickness tears of multiple tendons and (2) patients with eventual failed repair would have higher baseline levels of fatty infiltration. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Thirty-five patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears were followed longitudinally. All patients received a shoulder MRI, including the iterative decomposition of echoes of asymmetric length (IDEAL) sequence for fat measurement, prior to surgical treatment and at 6 months after surgical repair. Fat fractions were recorded for all 4 rotator cuff muscles from measurements on 4 sagittal slices centered at the scapular-Y. Demographics and tear characteristics were recorded. Baseline and follow-up fat fractions were compared for patients with isolated supraspinatus tears versus multitendon tears and for patients with intact repairs versus failed repairs. Statistical significance was set at P < .05. Results: The mean fat fractions were significantly higher at follow-up than at baseline for the supraspinatus (9.8% ± 7.0% vs 8.3% ± 5.7%; P = .025) and infraspinatus (7.4% ± 6.1% vs 5.7% ± 4.4%; P = .027) muscles. Patients with multitendon tears showed no significant change for any rotator cuff muscle after repair. Patients with isolated supraspinatus tears showed a significant progression in the supraspinatus fat fraction from baseline to follow-up (from 6.8% ± 4.9% to 8.6% ± 6.8%; P = .0083). Baseline supraspinatus fat fractions were significantly higher in patients with eventual failed

  11. Increased substance P in subacromial bursa and shoulder pain in rotator cuff diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, M; Hamada, K; Yamakawa, H; Inoue, A; Fukuda, H

    1998-09-01

    The subacromial bursa is recognized as a site associated with the shoulder pain caused by rotator cuff disease in the middle-aged and elderly. Substance P is contained in primary afferent nerves, and its quantity increases during chronic pain. The amount of substance P in the subacromial bursa of patients with rotator cuff disease was examined. Radioimmunoassay and immunohistochemistry were employed to quantify and localize substance P. The preoperative pain level was measured with a visual analogue scale with 0 as no pain, 5 as moderate, and 10 as severe. Thirty-seven patients that had undergone operation were divided into two groups: one composed of 19 patients with subacromial bursitis and a partial-thickness tear of the rotator cuff (nonperforated cuff) and the other composed of 18 patients with a full-thickness tear (perforated cuff). Subacromial bursae obtained from seven fresh cadavers with no shoulder pain before death were used as controls. The visual analogue scale showed significantly greater pain in the group with the nonperforated rotator cuff than in the group with the perforated cuff. Consistent with these results, the amount of substance P in the subacromial bursa was significantly greater in the former group than in the latter. Nerve fibers immunoreactive to substance P were localized around the vessels, with a larger number of fibers in the group with the nonperforated rotator cuff. Therefore, an increased amount of substance P in the subacromial bursa appears to correlate with the pain caused by rotator cuff disease.

  12. From the RSNA refresher courses: US of the rotator cuff: pitfalls, limitations, and artifacts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.J.C.M.; Jager, G.J.; Blickman, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography (US) has gained increasing popularity as a diagnostic tool for assessment of the soft tissues in shoulder impingement syndrome. US is a powerful and accurate method for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears and other rotator cuff abnormalities, provided the examiner has a

  13. Critical period and risk factors for retear following arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, J.; Andrieu, K.; Fotiadis, E.; Hannink, G.J.; Barthelemy, R.; Saffarini, M.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The incidence of retear following rotator cuff repair remains a major concern, and the cause and timing of retear remain unclear. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate the timing of retears following rotator cuff repair at multiple time intervals. The hypothesis was that

  14. Rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: current concepts review and evidence-based guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meijden, Olivier A; Westgard, Paul; Chandler, Zachary; Gaskill, Trevor R; Kokmeyer, Dirk; Millett, Peter J

    2012-04-01

    To provide an overview of the characteristics and timing of rotator cuff healing and provide an update on treatments used in rehabilitation of rotator cuff repairs. The authors' protocol of choice, used within a large sports medicine rehabilitation center, is presented and the rationale behind its implementation is discussed. If initial nonsurgical treatment of a rotator cuff tear fails, surgical repair is often the next line of treatment. It is evident that a successful outcome after surgical rotator cuff repair is as much dependent on surgical technique as it is on rehabilitation. To this end, rehabilitation protocols have proven challenging to both the orthopaedic surgeon and the involved physical therapist. Instead of being based on scientific rationale, traditionally most rehabilitation protocols are solely based on clinical experience and expert opinion. A review of currently available literature on rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair on PUBMED / MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed to illustrate the available evidence behind various postoperative treatment modalities. There is little high-level scientific evidence available to support or contest current postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation protocols. Most existing protocols are based on clinical experience with modest incorporation of scientific data. Little scientific evidence is available to guide the timing of postsurgical rotator cuff rehabilitation. To this end, expert opinion and clinical experience remains a large facet of rehabilitation protocols. This review describes a rotator cuff rehabilitation protocol that incorporates currently available scientific literature guiding rehabilitation.

  15. From the RSNA refresher courses - US of the rotator cuff : Pitfalls, limitations, and artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Matthieu J. C. M.; Jager, Gerrit J.; Blickman, Johan G.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography (US) has gained increasing popularity as a diagnostic tool for assessment of the soft tissues in shoulder impingement syndrome. US is a powerful and accurate method for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears and other rotator cuff abnormalities, provided the examiner has a

  16. Extensive Heterotopic Ossification After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspey, Brad; Park, Howard Young; Ostrander, Roger

    2015-01-01

    A sixty-three-year-old woman who underwent routine arthroscopic rotator cuff repair developed extensive heterotopic ossification postoperatively. She required a reoperation for excision. Heterotopic ossification should be included in the differential diagnosis for postoperative stiffness after an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

  17. Eccentric versus conventional exercise therapy in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy: a randomized, single blinded, clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dejaco, B.; Habets, B.; Loon, C.J.M. van; Grinsven, S. van; Cingel, R.E. van

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effectiveness of isolated eccentric versus conventional exercise therapy in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. METHODS: Thirty-six patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy, diagnosed by an orthopaedic surgeon, were included and randomly allocated to an isolated

  18. Adhesion of the subacromial bursa may cause subacromial impingement in patients with rotator cuff tears: pressure measurements in 18 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Akitoshi; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Miyamoto, Takashi; Inui, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Tetsu; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2004-02-01

    In order to determine whether adhesion of the subacromial bursa leads to impingement, we measured the subacromial contact pressures before and after release of adhesion of this bursa. 18 shoulders with cuff tears and adhesion of the subacromial bursa were evaluated in 8 male and 10 female patients, of mean age 62 (53-71) years and who had no particular limitation of shoulder motion. We recorded subacromial pressures using a very sensitive film inserted under the acromion during surgery. In passive scapular plane elevation (scaption) at 100 degrees, the mean subacromial contact pressure and area declined from 1.43 (SD 0.23) MPa before release to 1.14 (SD 0.35) MPa after release (p bursa increases impingement between the acromion and the insertion of rotator cuff tendons.

  19. Delamination tearing of the rotator cuff: prospective analysis of the influence of delamination tearing on the outcome of arthroscopically assisted mini open rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougal, Graeme A; Todhunter, Chad R

    2010-10-01

    Limited information regarding the effect of delamination tearing on the outcome of rotator cuff repair is available in the literature. Studies have reported equally good results for rotator cuff repair using an open, mini-open, and arthroscopic repair techniques. Negative results have been reported for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair when delamination is present. The purpose of this study was to assess the affect of delamination on the outcome of the arthroscopically assisted mini-open technique. Two-hundred sixty-three consecutive operations were followed prospectively in this study. All underwent arthroscopically assisted mini-open repairs by a single surgeon. Patient demographics, compensation status, and tear characteristics were investigated. Variables were compared using the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC) pre-operatively and at 1 and 2 years postoperative. The incidence of delamination was 71% of rotator cuff tears. Patient demographics did not affect the incidence of delamination. The presence of delamination did not affect the outcome of mini-open rotator cuff repair. We believe this technique is better able to produce reliable outcomes in the presence of delamination tearing. Copyright © 2010 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Arthroscopic proximal versus open subpectoral biceps tenodesis with arthroscopic repair of small- or medium-sized rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Young; Lee, Jong-Myoung; Kwon, Seok Hyun; Kim, Jeong-Woo

    2016-12-01

    The study was aimed to compare arthroscopic proximal biceps tenodesis and open subpectoral biceps tenodesis in repair of small or medium rotator cuff tears. Eighty-five patients underwent biceps tenodesis with arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear, and 66 patients were followed for median of 26.8 (18-42) months with ultrasonography were reviewed. The arthroscopic biceps tenodesis group included 34 cases, and the open subpectoral biceps group included 32 cases. Patients were evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and constant scores. Rotator cuff repair and fixation of the biceps tendon were assessed by ultrasonography. Fixation failure and degree of deformity were evaluated by the pain in the bicipital groove and biceps apex distance (BAD). VAS score and tenderness at the bicipital groove decreased significantly in the open subpectoral group at 3 months postoperative. In both groups, the range of motion, ASES score, and constant score increased significantly (P tendinitis and using intra-bicipital groove tenodesis technique. III.

  1. Role of Serum Fibrinogen Levels in Patients with Rotator Cuff Tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umile Giuseppe Longo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although rotator cuff (RC tendinopathy is a frequent pathology of the shoulder, the real understanding of its aetiopathogenesis is still unclear. Several studies showed that RC tendinopathy is more frequent in patients with hyperglycemia, diabetes, obesity, or metabolic syndrome. This paper aims to evaluate the serum concentration of fibrinogen in patients with RC tears. Metabolic disorders have been related to high concentration of serum fibrinogen and the activity of fibrinogen has been proven to be crucial in the development of microvascular damage. Thus, it may produce progression of RC degeneration by reducing the vascular supply of tendons. We report the results of a cross-sectional frequency-matched case-control study comparing the serum concentration of fibrinogen of patients with RC tears with that of a control group of patients without history of RC tears who underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy. We choose to enrol in the control group patients with pathology of the lower limb with a likely mechanic, not metabolic, cause, different from tendon pathology. We found no statistically significant differences in serum concentration of fibrinogen when comparing patients with RC tears and patients who underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy (P = 0.5. Further studies are necessary to clarify the role of fibrinogen in RC disease.

  2. [Use of adipose-derived stem cells in an experimental rotator cuff fracture animal model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barco, R; Encinas, C; Valencia, M; Carrascal, M T; García-Arranz, M; Antuña, S

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff repairs have shown a high level of re-ruptures. We hypothesized that the use of adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) could improve the biomechanical and histological properties of the repair. Controlled experimental study conducted on 44 BDIX rats with section and repair of the supraspinatus tendon and randomization to one of three groups: group A, no intervention (control); group B, local applications of a fibrin sealant; and group C, application of the fibrin sealant with 2 x 10(6) ASC. At 4 and 8 weeks a biomechanical and histological analysis was performed. There were no differences in load-to-failure at 4 and 8 weeks between groups. The load-to-failure did increase between week 4 and week 8. Histologically the tendon-to bone union showed a disorganized fibrovascular tissue. Group C showed a different inflammatory pattern, with less presence of neutrophils and more presence of plasma cells. The use of ASC does not improve the biomechanical or histological properties of the repair site. More studies are needed to improve techniques that enhance the healing site of the repair. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING EVALUATION OF ROTATOR CUFF IMPINGEMENT

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    Chandrakanth K. S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Shoulder pain is a common clinical problem. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder is believed to be the most common cause of shoulder pain. The term ‘impingement syndrome’ was first used by Neer to describe a condition of shoulder pain associated with chronic bursitis and partial thickness tear of Rotator Cuff (RC. The incidence of Rotator Cuff (RC tear is estimated to be about 20.7% in the general population. This study is intended to analyse various extrinsic and intrinsic causes of shoulder impingement. MATERIALS AND METHODS 110 consecutive patients referred for MRI with clinical suspicion of shoulder impingement were prospectively studied. All the patients were evaluated for Rotator Cuff (RC degeneration and various extrinsic factors that lead to degeneration like acromial shape, down-sloping acromion, Acromioclavicular (AC joint degeneration and acromial enthesophyte. Intrinsic factors like degeneration and its correlation with age of the patients were evaluated. RESULTS Of the total 110 patients, 19 (17.3% patients had FT RC tear and 31 (28.2% had PT (both bursal and articular surface tears. There was no statistically significant correlation (p=0.76 between acromion types and RC tear. Down-sloping acromion and enthesophytes had statistically significant association with RC tear (p=0.008 and 0.008, respectively. Statistically significant (0.008 correlation between the severity of AC joint degeneration and RC tears was noted. AC joint degeneration and RC pathologies also showed a correlation with the age of the patients with p values of <0.001 and 0.001, respectively. CONCLUSION No statistically significant correlation between RC pathologies with hooked acromion was found, that makes the role played by hooked acromion in FT RC tear questionable. AC joint degeneration association with RC tear is due to the association of both RC tear and AC joint degeneration with age of the patient. Down-sloping acromion, AC joint degeneration

  4. A Prospective, Quantitative MRI-Based Assessment on the Progression of Fatty Infiltration after Rotator Cuff Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdown, Drew Anderson; Lee, Sonia; Sam, Craig; Krug, Roland; Feeley, Brian T.; Ma, Chunbong Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Fatty infiltration is a negative prognostic factor for outcomes after rotator cuff repair. Efforts on evaluating fatty infiltration have been limited by the reproducibility of the Goutallier classification. The objective of this study is to evaluate the progression of fatty infiltration before and after surgical treatment using IDEAL MRI, which accurately measures intra-muscular fat content. We hypothesized that patients with isolated supraspinatus tears would show less progression of fatty infiltration than patients with tears involving multiple tendons. We also hypothesized that patients with eventual repair failure would have higher baseline levels of intramuscular fat. Methods: A total of 35 patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears (61.5 ± 10.5 years, 17 female) underwent a baseline MRI prior to repair and a repeat scan 6 months after rotator cuff repair. Imaging sequences included standard clinical sequences and sagittal six-point IDEAL. The supraspinatus (SS), infraspinatus (IS), subscapularis, and teres minor muscles were segmented on four consecutive sagittal slices, centered at the scapular-Y. The intramuscular fat fraction was calculated from the IDEAL map. Pre-operative tear size and post-operative repair integrity were recorded. Fat fractions before and after rotator cuff repair were compared with t-tests. To investigate the effect of tear size, patients were divided into two groups based on intra-operative findings: isolated supraspinatus tears and multi-tendon tears. Fat fractions were compared between groups based on repair integrity. Statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05. Results: There were 19 patients with an isolated supraspinatus tear, 15 patients with a multi-tendon tear, and 1 patient with an isolated subscapuarlis tear. Intact repairs were present for 26 patients at 6 months, while a failed repair was present in 9 patients. The follow-up fat fractions were significantly higher than baseline fat fractions for the

  5. Early Incorporation of an Evidence-Based Aquatic-Assisted Approach to Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Rehabilitation: Prospective Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmaster, Chris; Eckenrode, Brian J; Stiebel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Both traditional and progressive rotator cuff repair rehabilitation protocols often delay active motion of the shoulder for 6 weeks or more. The early inclusion of a comprehensive aquatic-assisted exercise program presents a unique approach to postoperative management. The purpose of this case study is to describe a comprehensive evidence-based, aquatic-assisted rehabilitation program following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A 73-year-old woman with a nonretracted, medium-size, full-thickness tear (2.5 cm) of the supraspinatus tendon underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and was referred for postoperative physical therapy. The rehabilitation program was initiated at 2 weeks postoperatively and consisted of concurrent land- and aquatic-based interventions over 6 weeks for a total of 18 physical therapy visits. Improvements were made in all 5 patient-reported outcome measures that were recorded weekly over the course of care. Improvements reached or exceeded minimal detectable change levels for the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index and the Penn Shoulder Score. Her numeric pain rating scale score at rest decreased from 4/10 at the initial evaluation to 2/10 at 8 weeks postoperatively and with activity decreased from 9/10 to 6/10. Shoulder strength and range of motion values also exhibited improvement over the course of care. No adverse events occurred during the case study. This case study illustrates the safe inclusion of low-stress aquatic exercises as an early adjunct to traditional land-based rotator cuff repair rehabilitation programs in small- to medium-size repairs. Further studies are needed to determine the long-term effectiveness of adding aquatic therapy to traditional postoperative programs. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  6. Single-row vs. double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: clinical and 3 Tesla MR arthrography results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudisco, Cosimo; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Savarese, Eugenio; Fiori, Roberto; Bartolucci, Dario A; Masala, Salvatore; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-01-27

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has become popular in the last few years because it avoids large skin incisions and deltoid detachment and dysfunction. Earlier arthroscopic single-row (SR) repair methods achieved only partial restoration of the original footprint of the tendons of the rotator cuff, while double-row (DR) repair methods presented many biomechanical advantages and higher rates of tendon-to-bone healing. However, DR repair failed to demonstrate better clinical results than SR repair in clinical trials. MR imaging at 3 Tesla, especially with intra-articular contrast medium (MRA), showed a better diagnostic performance than 1.5 Tesla in the musculoskeletal setting. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and 3 Tesla MRA results in two groups of patients operated on for a medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear with two different techniques. The first group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the SR technique; the second group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the DR technique. All patients were evaluated at a minimum of 3 years after surgery. The primary end point was the re-tear rate at 3 Tesla MRA. The secondary end points were the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, surgical time and implant expense. The mean follow-up was 40 months in the SR group and 38.9 months in the DR group. The mean postoperative CMS was 70 in the SR group and 68 in the DR group. The mean SST score was 9.4 in the SR group and 10.1 in the DR group. The re-tear rate was 60% in the SR group and 25% in the DR group. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in all patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3 Tesla MRA in the evaluation of two different techniques of rotator cuff repair. DR repair resulted in a statistically significant lower re-tear rate, with longer surgical time and higher implant expense, despite no difference in clinical outcomes. We think that

  7. Single-row vs. double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: clinical and 3 Tesla MR arthrography results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudisco Cosimo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has become popular in the last few years because it avoids large skin incisions and deltoid detachment and dysfunction. Earlier arthroscopic single-row (SR repair methods achieved only partial restoration of the original footprint of the tendons of the rotator cuff, while double-row (DR repair methods presented many biomechanical advantages and higher rates of tendon-to-bone healing. However, DR repair failed to demonstrate better clinical results than SR repair in clinical trials. MR imaging at 3 Tesla, especially with intra-articular contrast medium (MRA, showed a better diagnostic performance than 1.5 Tesla in the musculoskeletal setting. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and 3 Tesla MRA results in two groups of patients operated on for a medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear with two different techniques. Methods The first group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the SR technique; the second group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the DR technique. All patients were evaluated at a minimum of 3 years after surgery. The primary end point was the re-tear rate at 3 Tesla MRA. The secondary end points were the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS, the Simple Shoulder Test (SST scores, surgical time and implant expense. Results The mean follow-up was 40 months in the SR group and 38.9 months in the DR group. The mean postoperative CMS was 70 in the SR group and 68 in the DR group. The mean SST score was 9.4 in the SR group and 10.1 in the DR group. The re-tear rate was 60% in the SR group and 25% in the DR group. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in all patients. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3 Tesla MRA in the evaluation of two different techniques of rotator cuff repair. DR repair resulted in a statistically significant lower re-tear rate, with longer surgical time and higher implant

  8. Diclofenac Patch for Treatment of Mild to Moderate Tendonitis or Bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-05

    Rotator Cuff Tendonitis; Bicipital Tendonitis; Subdeltoid Bursitis of the Shoulder; Subacromial Bursitis of the Shoulder; Medial Epicondylitis of the Elbow; Lateral Epicondylitis of the Elbow; DeQuervain's Tenosynovitis of the Wrist

  9. Perioperative Serum Lipid Status and Statin Use Affect the Revision Surgery Rate After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Brockmeier, Stephen F; Rodeo, Scott A; Werner, Brian C

    2017-11-01

    Recent animal studies have demonstrated that hyperlipidemia is associated with poor tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff repair; however, these findings have not been substantiated in human studies. To examine any association between hyperlipidemia and the failure of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair requiring revision surgery and to investigate whether the use of statin lipid-lowering agents had any influence on observed associations. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. From a national insurance database, patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with perioperative lipid levels (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein [LDL], and triglycerides) recorded were reviewed. For each lipid test, patients were stratified into normal, moderate, and high groups based on published standards. For the total cholesterol and LDL cohorts, a subgroup analysis of patients stratified by statin use was performed. The primary outcome measure was ipsilateral revision rotator cuff surgery, including revision repair or debridement. A logistic regression analysis controlling for patient demographics and comorbidities was utilized for comparison. There were 30,638 patients included in the study. The rate of revision rotator cuff surgery was significantly increased in patients with moderate (odds ratio [OR], 1.20; 95% CI, 1.03-1.40; P = .022) and high total cholesterol levels (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.10-1.55; P = .006) compared with patients with normal total cholesterol levels perioperatively. Within each of these groups, patients without statin use had significantly higher rates of revision surgery, while those with statin prescriptions did not. The absolute risk reduction for statin use ranged from 0.24% to 1.87% when stratified by the total cholesterol level, yielding a number needed to treat from 54 to 408 patients. The rate of revision surgery was significantly increased in patients with moderate (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.10-1.41; P = .001) and high LDL levels (OR, 1.46; 95

  10. Shoulder surface temperature and bone scintigraphy findings in patients with rotator cuff tears

    OpenAIRE

    Koike, Yoichi; Sano, Hirotaka; Kinjyo, Takeshi; Imamura, Itaru; Masahiro, Onuma; Goto, Masako; Ooyama, Masamizu; Kita, Atushi; Itoi, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    Background Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is one of the serious complications after surgical treatment of a rotator cuff tear. Both a measurement of body surface temperature and bone scintigraphy have been used as diagnostic tools for the early phase of CRPS.Unfortunately, few studies have been carried out that applied these methods to the patients after rotator cuff repair. Purposes To clarify both shoulder surface temperature and bone scintigraphy findings in patients with rotator cu...

  11. Long-term functional evaluation of videoarthroscopic treatment of partial injuries of the rotator cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaydson Gomes Godinho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the functional results from high and low-grade isolated partial lesions of the supraspinatus tendon of bursal and articular types, after arthroscopic treatment.METHODS: Sixty-four patients with isolated partial lesions of the supraspinatus tendon were evaluated. The mean length of follow-up was 76 months (range: 29-193. The mean age was 59 years (range: 36-82. The dominant side was affected in 44 patients (68.8%. There were 35 bursal lesions (54.7% and 29 articular lesions (45.3%. We used the Ellman classification and characterized the lesions as low or high-grade according to whether they affected less than or more than 50% of the tendon thickness, respectively. Debridement was performed in 15 patients (23.5%, repair without completing the lesion in 11 (17% and repair after completing the lesion in 38 (59.5%. The functional assessments on the patients were done using the Constant & Murley and UCLA scores.RESULTS: The mean Constant & Murley score among the patients with bursal lesions was 82.64 ± 6.98 (range: 59.3-99 and among those with articular lesions, 83.57 ± 7.58 (range: 66-95, while the mean UCLA score in the bursal lesions was 33.37 ± 2.85 (range: 21-35 and in the articular lesions, 32.83 ± 2.95 (range: 22-35.CONCLUSION: Videoarthroscopic treatment of partial lesions of the rotator cuff presents good or excellent results when the low-grade lesions are debrided and the high-grade lesions are completed and repaired. These results are maintained over the long term, with a high satisfaction rate and few complications.

  12. Rotator Cuff Repair Rehabilitation: A Level I and II Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Keith M; Vidal, Armando F; Wright, Rick W

    2009-03-01

    There is no consensus for the optimal postoperative rehabilitation protocol after rotator cuff repairs. To determine if there is sufficient level I or II evidence available in the literature for establishment of a uniform, optimal rotator cuff rehabilitation protocol. A systematic review of level I and II English-language, prospective, randomized controlled trials published between 1966 and 2008 was performed. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and secondary references were appraised for studies that met the inclusion criteria. Search terms included rotator cuff, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, teres minor, rehab, rehabilitation, physical therapy, and physiotherapy. Inclusion criteria were English-language level I or level II studies, including randomized clinical trials involving the rehabilitation of rotator cuff repairs. Exclusion criteria were non-English language, level IV or V studies, or studies involving shoulder rehabilitation of diagnoses other than rotator cuff repairs. Three independent reviewers arrived at a consensus for including 4 studies in this review out of 12 studies identified by the literature search. Included studies underwent worksheet quality appraisal independently by each of the 3 authors identifying strengths, weaknesses, and biases. The quality appraisal was then discussed among the authors and consensus reached regarding the strengths, weaknesses, and value of the included studies. Two studies examined the use of continuous passive motion for rotator cuff rehabilitation, and 2 studies compared an unsupervised, standardized rehabilitation program to a supervised, individualized rehabilitation program. These studies did not support the use of continuous passive motion in rotator cuff rehabilitation, and no advantage was shown with a supervised, individualized rehabilitation protocol compared to an unsupervised, standardized home program. Each investigation had weaknesses in study design that

  13. A Comparison of Rehabilitation Methods After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Anthony; Villacis, Diego; Yalamanchili, Raj; Hatch, George F Rick

    2015-07-01

    Despite the significant attention directed toward optimizing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, there has been less focus on rehabilitation after rotator cuff repair surgery. To determine the effect of different rehabilitation protocols on clinical outcomes by comparing early versus late mobilization approaches and continuous passive mobilization (CPM) versus manual therapy after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. PubMed was searched for relevant articles using the keywords rotator cuff, rotator, cuff, tears, lacerations, and rehabilitation to identify articles published from January 1980 to March 2014. Inclusion criteria consisted of articles of level 1 or 2 evidence, written in the English language, and with reported outcomes for early versus late mobilization or rehabilitation with CPM versus manual therapy after primary arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Exclusion criteria consisted of articles of level 3, 4, or 5 evidence, non-English language, and those with significantly different demographic variables between study groups. Included studies were evaluated with the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials criteria. Systematic review. Level 2. Level of evidence, study type, number of patients enrolled, number of patients at final follow-up, length of follow-up, age, sex, rotator cuff tear size, surgical technique, and concomitant operative procedures were extracted from included articles. Postoperative data included clinical outcome scores, visual analog score for pain, shoulder range of motion, strength, and rotator cuff retear rates. A total of 7 studies met all criteria and were included in the final analysis. Five studies compared early and late mobilization. Two studies compared CPM and manual therapy. In general, current data do not definitively demonstrate a significant difference between postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation protocols that stress different timing of mobilization and use of CPM.

  14. Supervised versus uncontrolled rehabilitation of patients after rotator cuff repair-clinical and neurophysiological comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisinski, Przemyslaw; Huber, Juliusz; Wilkosz, Piotr; Witkowska, Alicja; Wytrazek, Marcin; Samborski, Wlodzimierz; Zagloba, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the evaluation of the effectiveness of supervised rehabilitation in comparison to uncontrolled exercise therapy after surgical reconstruction of rotator cuff interrupted tendons. Twenty two patients with comparable level of disability after the same type of surgery were randomly divided into two equal groups. The first group took part in a supervised therapy and the second one performed simple exercises without supervision. Clinical and neurophysiological examinations were performed prior to rehabilitation and after 20 and 40 days of treatment. The evaluation included the assessment of the pain level with visual analog scale, active range of motion with gonio-meter, activity of muscle's motor units at rest and during maximal effort with electromyography and transmission of motor fibers in brachial plexus with electroneurography (M-wave stimulation studies). In the group of supervised patients the active range of movement changed significantly from 26.4º to 101.5º on average for flexion with adduction while flexion with abduction improved from 21º to 95.5º. Pain sensation changed from 6.4 to 3.2. The mean resting electromyogram amplitude decreased to the greatest degree from 80.9 µV to 36.8 µV in trapezius muscle while maximal effort electromyogram amplitude increased in this muscle from 381.8 µV to 790.9 µV. The mean values of amplitudes in electroneurographical suprascapular nerve examinations increased from 536.4µV to 1691µV. No significant differences at P=0.05 were found in these parameters recorded in the patients performing uncontrolled exercises. The supervised exercise therapy is more effective than uncontrolled one after the rotator cuff surgical reconstruction.

  15. Quantitative assessment of fatty infiltration and muscle volume of the rotator cuff muscles using 3-dimensional 2-point Dixon magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Noboru; Oguro, Sota; Okuda, Shigeo; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Nagura, Takeo

    2017-10-01

    In patients with rotator cuff tears, muscle degeneration is known to be a predictor of irreparable tears and poor outcomes after surgical repair. Fatty infiltration and volume of the whole muscles constituting the rotator cuff were quantitatively assessed using 3-dimensional 2-point Dixon magnetic resonance imaging. Ten shoulders with a partial-thickness tear, 10 shoulders with an isolated supraspinatus tear, and 10 shoulders with a massive tear involving supraspinatus and infraspinatus were compared with 10 control shoulders after matching age and sex. With segmentation of muscle boundaries, the fat fraction value and the volume of the whole rotator cuff muscles were computed. After reliabilities were determined, differences in fat fraction, muscle volume, and fat-free muscle volume were evaluated. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliabilities were regarded as excellent for fat fraction and muscle volume. Tendon rupture adversely increased the fat fraction value of the respective rotator cuff muscle (P muscle volume was significantly decreased in the infraspinatus (P = .035) and increased in the teres minor (P = .039). With subtraction of fat volume, a significant decrease of fat-free volume of the supraspinatus muscle became apparent with a massive tear (P = .003). Three-dimensional measurement could evaluate fatty infiltration and muscular volume with excellent reliabilities. The present study showed that chronic rupture of the tendon adversely increases the fat fraction of the respective muscle and indicates that the residual capacity of the rotator cuff muscles might be overestimated in patients with severe fatty infiltration. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Do Matrix Metalloproteases and Tissue Inhibitors of Metalloproteases in Tenocytes of the Rotator Cuff Differ with Varying Donor Characteristics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatte-Schulz, Franka; Aleyt, Thomas; Pauly, Stephan; Geißler, Sven; Gerhardt, Christian; Scheibel, Markus; Wildemann, Britt

    2015-01-01

    An imbalance between matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases (TIMPs) may have a negative impact on the healing of rotator cuff tears. The aim of the project was to assess a possible relationship between clinical and radiographic characteristics of patients such as the age, sex, as well as the degenerative status of the tendon and the MMPs and TIMPs in their tenocyte-like cells (TLCs). TLCs were isolated from ruptured supraspinatus tendons and quantitative Real-Time PCR and ELISA was performed to analyze the expression and secretion of MMPs and TIMPs. In the present study, MMPs, mostly gelatinases and collagenases such as MMP-2, -9 and -13 showed an increased expression and protein secretion in TLCs of donors with higher age or degenerative status of the tendon. Furthermore, the expression and secretion of TIMP-1, -2 and -3 was enhanced with age, muscle fatty infiltration and tear size. The interaction between MMPs and TIMPs is a complex process, since TIMPs are not only inhibitors, but also activators of MMPs. This study shows that MMPs and TIMPs might play an important role in degenerative tendon pathologies. PMID:26068238

  17. Are We Getting Any Better? A Study on Repair Integrity in 1600 Consecutive Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McColl, Hayden; Lam, Patrick Hong; Murrell, George A

    2016-01-01

    ... have impacted post-operative re tear rate. Methods: This observational single cohort study used running average analysis to examine 1600 consecutive patients who underwent primary arthroscopic rotator cuff repair by a single surgeon, and had cuff...

  18. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using a triple-loaded suture anchor and a modified Mason-Allen technique (Alex stitch).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Alessandro; Garofalo, Raffaele; Conti, Marco; Borroni, Mario; Snyder, Stephen J

    2007-04-01

    Surgical repair of the rotator cuff must have good resistance and should restore the tendon footprint. To attain this goal, a stitch with a strong biomechanical profile that avoids tissue strangulation should be used. We describe an arthroscopic suture technique undertaken to repair rotator cuff tears with a single triple-loaded suture anchor. The technique consists of a combination of a horizontal mattress and 2 vertical simple sutures that are positioned medial to the mattress suture. The suture anchor used is the 5-mm self-tapping ThRevo (Linvatec). This anchor is loaded with 3 sutures: 2 No. 2 nonabsorbable braided polyester sutures of different colors and a central high-strength No. 2 polyethylene suture. The shape of the anchor eyelet permits all 3 sutures to glide freely. A modified Mason-Allen technique (Alex stitch) that combines a horizontal side-to-side suture and 2 simples sutures as vertical loops is used. With use of the Spectrum suture passing device and shuttle relay system (Linvatec), both limbs of the centrally located polyethylene suture are passed through the cuff from bottom to top, approximately 1 cm from the tendon edge. This suture is not immediately tied. Next, with use of the same system, the other 2 sutures are placed medially and over the previous horizontal suture. Simple sutures are placed at an approximately 30 degrees angle from the center of the anchor; 1 is placed anterior and the other posterior. The sutures are tied through the lateral portal. The mattress horizontal central stitch is always tied first, followed by the 2 vertical sutures. The horizontal mattress suture serves as a "rip stop stitch" and theoretically reduces the possibility of cutting out of the simple sutures.

  19. Management of degenerative rotator cuff tears: a review and treatment strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Nicholas D

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this review was to present an over view of degenerative rotator cuff tears and a suggested management protocol based upon current evidence. Degenerative rotator cuff tears are common and are a major cause of pain and shoulder dysfunction. The management of these tears is controversial, as to whether they should be managed non-operatively or operatively. In addition when operative intervention is undertaken, there is question as to what technique of repair should be used. This review describes the epidemiology and natural history of degenerative rotator cuff tears. The management options, and the evidence to support these, are reviewed. We also present our preferred management protocol and method, if applicable, for surgical fixation of degenerative rotator cuff tears.

  20. Manual therapy and exercise for rotator cuff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Matthew J; Green, Sally; McBain, Brodwen; Surace, Stephen J; Deitch, Jessica; Lyttle, Nicolette; Mrocki, Marshall A; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2016-06-10

    Management of rotator cuff disease often includes manual therapy and exercise, usually delivered together as components of a physical therapy intervention. This review is one of a series of reviews that form an update of the Cochrane review, 'Physiotherapy interventions for shoulder pain'. To synthesise available evidence regarding the benefits and harms of manual therapy and exercise, alone or in combination, for the treatment of people with rotator cuff disease. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 3), Ovid MEDLINE (January 1966 to March 2015), Ovid EMBASE (January 1980 to March 2015), CINAHL Plus (EBSCO, January 1937 to March 2015), ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP clinical trials registries up to March 2015, unrestricted by language, and reviewed the reference lists of review articles and retrieved trials, to identify potentially relevant trials. We included randomised and quasi-randomised trials, including adults with rotator cuff disease, and comparing any manual therapy or exercise intervention with placebo, no intervention, a different type of manual therapy or exercise or any other intervention (e.g. glucocorticoid injection). Interventions included mobilisation, manipulation and supervised or home exercises. Trials investigating the primary or add-on effect of manual therapy and exercise were the main comparisons of interest. Main outcomes of interest were overall pain, function, pain on motion, patient-reported global assessment of treatment success, quality of life and the number of participants experiencing adverse events. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted the data, performed a risk of bias assessment and assessed the quality of the body of evidence for the main outcomes using the GRADE approach. We included 60 trials (3620 participants), although only 10 addressed the main comparisons of interest. Overall risk of bias was low in three, unclear in 14 and high in

  1. The impact of faulty posture on rotator cuff tears with and without symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Takagishi, Kenji; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Shitara, Hitoshi; Ichinose, Tsuyoshi; Takasawa, Eiji; Shimoyama, Daisuke; Osawa, Toshihisa

    2015-03-01

    We hypothesized that the prevalence of rotator cuff tears would be higher among individuals with poor posture, regardless of the presence of symptoms. The study initially comprised 525 residents of a mountain village who participated in an annual health check. Participants completed a background questionnaire, and physical examinations were performed to evaluate shoulder function. Ultrasonographic examinations were also performed to identify rotator cuff tears, and participants were grouped according to the presence or absence of tears. Posture was classified by 2 observers into 4 types according to the classification of Kendall, as follows: ideal alignment, kyphotic-lordotic posture, flat-back posture, and sway-back posture. Univariate analyses were performed to compare differences in background characteristics between groups, then multivariate analysis was performed to identify those factors associated with rotator cuff tears. Final analysis was performed for 379 participants (135 men, 244 women; mean age, 62.0 years; range, 31-94 years) showing the same posture classification from both observers. Of these, 93 (24.5%) showed rotator cuff tear in one shoulder and 45 (11.9%) showed tears in both. Prevalence of rotator cuff tears was 2.9% with ideal alignment, 65.8% with kyphotic-lordotic posture, 54.3% with flat-back posture, and 48.9% with sway-back posture. Logistic regression analysis identified increased age, abnormal posture, and past pain as factors associated with rotator cuff tears. Postural abnormality represented an independent predictor of both symptomatic and asymptomatic rotator cuff tears. These results may help define preventive measures for rotator cuff tears and in design ing rehabilitation therapies for shoulder disease. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The clinical utility of ultrasonography for rotator cuff disease, shoulder impingement syndrome and subacromial bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awerbuch, Mark S

    2008-01-07

    Periarticular shoulder disorders are common in clinical practice, and diagnosis is often difficult. Medicare statistics indicate that between 2001 and 2006 the use of diagnostic shoulder ultrasonography increased significantly. Rotator cuff disease, shoulder impingement syndrome and subacromial bursitis are among the most common diagnoses reported on shoulder ultrasonography. Shoulder ultrasonography is useful in the diagnosis of full thickness tears, but its utility for other rotator cuff disorders, shoulder impingement syndrome and subacromial bursitis is less well established.

  3. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the subdeltoid, subacromial bursa in painful and painless rotator cuff tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Hensor, E M A; Barron, D; Robinson, P

    2012-01-01

    Objective Although shoulder pain is often associated with rotator cuff tears, many tears are asymptomatic and are not the cause of the patient's pain. This may explain the persistence of symptoms in some patients despite technically successful rotator cuff repair. It has been proposed that rotator cuff tears cause pain through subdeltoid/subacromial bursal inflammation. The aim of this study was to determine whether bursal inflammation seen on MRI is associated with pain in patients with rotator cuff tears of the shoulder. Methods The shoulders of 255 patients were screened with ultrasound. 33 full-thickness rotator cuff tears (18 with shoulder pain and 15 without pain) were identified and subsequently studied using contrast-enhanced MRI of the shoulder. Enhancement of the subacromial bursa was scored independently by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Logistic regression was used to determine whether bursal enhancement was independently associated with pain. Results There was a significant association between pain and age, with greater likelihood of pain in younger patients. Bursal enhancement was common in both painful and painless tears. No statistically significant link between pain and bursal enhancement was seen, even after accounting for age. Conclusion Although enhancement of the subdeltoid/subacromial bursa was common, no evidence was found to support the hypothesis that bursal enhancement is associated with pain in rotator cuff tears. It is therefore unlikely to determine reliably which patients would benefit from rotator cuff repair. Advances in knowledge Bursal enhancement and thickening does not reliably correlate with symptoms or presence of rotator cuff tear. PMID:23091289

  4. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING (MRI) SPECTRUM OF Rotator Cuff Tears, with Arthroscopic – MRI Contextualizations

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, Alexandre; Bagulho, Cecília

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of rotator cuff (RC) pathogenesis and the optimal management of RC pathology is evolving and shoulder magnetic imaging (MRI) has a crucial role in this development, as it functionally depicts pathology in the painful shoulder patient, conveys optimal sensitivity and specificity rates in rotator cuff tear evaluation and characterization, and allows useful additional information in terms of patient management, namely regarding muscle atrophy, reducing unnecessary arthroscopic ...

  5. Impact of cyclic mechanical stimulation on the expression of extracellular matrix proteins in human primary rotator cuff fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohberger, Birgit; Kaltenegger, Heike; Stuendl, Nicole; Rinner, Beate; Leithner, Andreas; Sadoghi, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    Mechanical stimulation plays an important role in the development and remodelling of tendons. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of mechanical stimulation on the expression of extracellular matrix proteins in human primary rotator cuff (RC) fibroblasts. RC fibroblasts were isolated from patients with degenerative RC tears and characterized using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cells were stimulated using the Flexcell FX5K™ Tension System. The stimulation regime was a uniaxial sinusoidal waveform with 10 % elongation and a frequency of 0.5 Hz, whereby each cycle consists of 10-s strain and 30-s relaxation. Data were normalized to mechanically unstimulated control groups for every experimental condition. RT-qPCR was performed to determine relative mRNA levels, and collagen production was measured by a colorimetric assay. The positive expression of CD91 and CD10, and negativity for CD45 and CD4 confirmed the fibroblast phenotype of RC primary cells. RT-qPCR revealed that 10 % continuous cyclic strain for 7 and 14 days induced a significant increase in the mRNA expression both on the matrix metalloproteinases MMP1, MMP3, MMP13, and MMP14 and on the extracellular matrix proteins decorin, tenascin-C, and scleraxis. Furthermore, mechanically stimulated groups produced significantly higher amounts of total collagen. These results may contribute to a better understanding of strain-induced tendon remodelling and will form the basis for the correct choice of applied force in rehabilitation after orthopaedic surgery. These findings underline the fact that early passive motion of the joint in order to induce remodelling of the tendon should be included within a rehabilitation protocol for rotator cuff repair.

  6. Structural Characteristics Are Not Associated With Pain and Function in Rotator Cuff Tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Emily J.; Matzkin, Elizabeth E.; Dong, Yan; Higgins, Laurence D.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Jain, Nitin B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Structural characteristics of rotator cuff tears are used in surgical decision making. However, data on the association of tear size with patient-reported pain and function are sparse. Purpose: To assess the association of tear size, fatty infiltration, and muscle atrophy with shoulder pain/function in patients with cuff tears undergoing operative and nonoperative treatment. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 67 patients with rotator cuff tears were recruited for this longitudinal cohort study. Patients were determined to have a cuff tear using clinical assessment and blinded magnetic resonance imaging review. The Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) was used as a measure of shoulder pain and function. Results: Tear size and thickness were not significantly associated with pain (SPADI pain score, 60.6 [95% CI, 49.8-71.5] for partial-thickness tear; 56.8 [95% CI, 42.8-70.7] for rotator cuff tears undergoing operative and nonoperative treatment, pain and functional status were not associated with tear size and thickness, fatty infiltration, and muscle atrophy. Conversely, factors unrelated to cuff anatomy such as mental health, comorbidities, age, and sex were associated with pain/function. These findings have clinical implications during surgical decision making and suggest that pain and functional disability in patients with rotator cuff tears is multifactorial and should not solely be attributed to structural characteristics. PMID:26675985

  7. Rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair: a survey of current UK practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Chris; Bateman, Marcus

    2015-07-01

    Rotator cuff disorders, including rotator cuff tears, are common and can be treated conservatively or surgically. Data suggest that the incidence of surgery to repair the rotator cuff is rising. Despite this rise, the most effective approach to postoperative rehabilitation, a critical component of the recovery process, is not well developed. The present study aimed to describe current practice in the UK in relation to rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair. An electronic survey was developed and disseminated to UK based physiotherapists and surgeons involved with rotator cuff repair. One hundred valid responses were received. Although there is a degree of variation, current practice for the majority of respondents consists of sling immobilization for 4 weeks to 6 weeks. During this time, passive movement would be commenced before active movement is introduced towards the end of this phase. Resisted exercise begins 7 weeks to 12 weeks postoperatively, alongside return to light work. A progressive resumption of function, including manual work and sport, is advised from approximately 13 weeks. In the context of the current literature, it might be suggested that the current approach to rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair for the majority of respondents is somewhat cautious and has not progressed for over a decade.

  8. Arthroscopic vs mini-open rotator cuff repair. A quality of life impairment study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Paganelli, Massimo; Denaro, Enzo

    2009-01-01

    We compared the clinical and quality of life related outcome of rotator cuff repair performed using either a mini-open or an arthroscopic technique for rotator cuff tears of less than 3 cm. The records of 64 patients who underwent rotator cuff repair between September 2003 and September 2005 were evaluated. Thirty-two patients underwent a mini-open rotator cuff repair, and 32 patients underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The mean follow-up period was 31 months in the mini-open group and 30.6 months in the arthroscopic group (P > 0.05). The UCLA rating system, range of motion examination and the self-administered SF-36 used for postoperative evaluation showed a statistically significant improvement from the preoperative to the final score for both groups (P  0.05). This study suggests that there is no difference in terms of subjective and objective outcomes between the two surgical procedures studied if patients have rotator cuff tears of less than 3 cm. PMID:19424692

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination features for identifying large rotator cuff tears in primary health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadogan, Angela; McNair, Peter; Laslett, Mark; Hing, Wayne; Taylor, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Rotator cuff tears are a common and disabling complaint. The early diagnosis of medium and large size rotator cuff tears can enhance the prognosis of the patient. The aim of this study was to identify clinical features with the strongest ability to accurately predict the presence of a medium, large or multitendon (MLM) rotator cuff tear in a primary care cohort. Methods: Participants were consecutively recruited from primary health care practices (n = 203). All participants underwent a standardized history and physical examination, followed by a standardized X-ray series and diagnostic ultrasound scan. Clinical features associated with the presence of a MLM rotator cuff tear were identified (Protator cuff tear and thereafter diagnostic accuracy was calculated. Results: A MLM rotator cuff tear was identified in 24 participants (11.8%). Constant pain and a painful arc in abduction were the strongest predictors of a MLM tear (adjusted odds ratio 3.04 and 13.97 respectively). Combinations of ten history and physical examination variables demonstrated highest levels of sensitivity when five or fewer were positive [100%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.86–1.00; negative likelihood ratio: 0.00, 95% CI: 0.00–0.28], and highest specificity when eight or more were positive (0.91, 95% CI: 0.86–0.95; positive likelihood ratio 4.66, 95% CI: 2.34–8.74). Discussion: Combinations of patient history and physical examination findings were able to accurately detect the presence of a MLM rotator cuff tear. These findings may aid the primary care clinician in more efficient and accurate identification of rotator cuff tears that may require further investigation or orthopedic consultation. PMID:24421626

  10. Suture Anchor Biomechanics After Rotator Cuff Footprint Decortication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Adam E; Lavery, Kyle; Mino, Christopher; Dhawan, Aman

    2016-04-01

    To identify the biomechanical consequences of violating the cortical shelf when preparing the greater tuberosity for suture anchor repair. Demographic information and bone mineral density were obtained for 20 fresh-frozen human humeri (10 matched pairs). Suture anchors were placed at a predetermined location in decorticated and non-decorticated settings after randomization. Anchors were tested under cyclic loads followed by load-to-failure testing. The number of cycles, failure mode, stiffness, and final pullout strength were recorded. Nineteen specimens met the inclusion criteria for final testing. A significant difference in mean ultimate load to failure was seen between the non-decorticated specimens (244.04 ± 89.06 N/mm) and the decorticated humeri (62.84 ± 38.04 N/mm, P suture anchor. Gender and bone mineral density also play a significant role in bone-anchor biomechanics and should be considered during repair. Caution should be exercised when preparing the rotator cuff footprint before suture anchor placement because of the significant risk of early repair failure at the bone-anchor interface. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Multivariate analyses of rotator cuff pathologies in shoulder disability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan F Henseler

    Full Text Available Disability of the shoulder joint is often caused by a tear in the rotator cuff (RC muscles. Four RC muscles coordinate shoulder movement and stability, among them the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle which are predominantly torn. The contribution of each RC muscle to tear pathology is not fully understood. We hypothesized that muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration, features of RC muscle degeneration, are predictive of superior humeral head translation and shoulder functional disability.Shoulder features, including RC muscle surface area and fatty infiltration, superior humeral translation and RC tear size were obtained from a consecutive series of Magnetic Resonance Imaging with arthrography (MRA. We investigated patients with superior (supraspinatus, n = 39 and posterosuperior (supraspinatus and infraspinatus, n = 30 RC tears, and patients with an intact RC (n = 52 as controls. The individual or combinatorial contribution of RC measures to superior humeral translation, as a sign of RC dysfunction, was investigated with univariate or multivariate models, respectively.Using the univariate model the infraspinatus surface area and fatty infiltration in both the supraspinatus and infraspinatus had a significant contribution to RC dysfunction. With the multivariate model, however, the infraspinatus surface area only affected superior humeral translation (p<0.001 and discriminated between superior and posterosuperior tears. In contrast neither tear size nor fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus or infraspinatus contributed to superior humeral translation.Our study reveals that infraspinatus atrophy has the strongest contribution to RC tear pathologies. This suggests a pivotal role for the infraspinatus in preventing shoulder disability.

  12. Serial MRI evaluation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in double-row technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahnke, Katharina; Nikulka, Constanze; Diederichs, Gerd; Haneveld, Hendrik; Scheibel, Markus; Gerhardt, Christian

    2016-05-01

    So far, recurrent rotator cuff defects are described to occur in the early postoperative period after arthroscopic repair. The aim of this study was to evaluate the musculotendinous structure of the supraspinatus, as well as bone marrow edema or osteolysis after arthroscopic double-row repair. Therefore, magnetic resonance (MR) images were performed at defined intervals up to 2 years postoperatively. Case series; Level of evidence, 3. MR imaging was performed within 7 days, 3, 6, 12, 26, 52 and 108 weeks after surgery. All patients were operated using an arthroscopic modified suture bridge technique. Tendon integrity, tendon retraction ["foot-print-coverage" (FPC)], muscular atrophy and fatty infiltration (signal intensity analysis) were measured at all time points. Furthermore, postoperative bone marrow edema and signs of osteolysis were assessed. MR images of 13 non-consecutive patients (6f/7m, ∅ age 61.05 ± 7.7 years) could be evaluated at all time points until ∅ 108 weeks postoperatively. 5/6 patients with recurrent defect at final follow-up displayed a time of failure between 12 and 24 months after surgery. Predominant mode of failure was medial cuff failures in 4/6 cases. The initial FPC increased significantly up to 2 years follow-up (p = 0.004). Evaluations of muscular atrophy or fatty infiltration were not significant different comparing the results of all time points (p > 0.05). Postoperative bone marrow edema disappeared completely at 6 months after surgery, whereas signs of osteolysis appeared at 3 months follow-up and increased to final follow-up. Recurrent defects after arthroscopic reconstruction of supraspinatus tears in modified suture bridge technique seem to occur between 12 and 24 months after surgery. Serial MRI evaluation shows good muscle structure at all time points. Postoperative bone marrow edema disappears completely several months after surgery. Signs of osteolysis seem to appear caused by bio-absorbable anchor

  13. Characteristics and stimulation potential with BMP-2 and BMP-7 of tenocyte-like cells isolated from the rotator cuff of female donors.

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    Franka Klatte-Schulz

    Full Text Available Tendon bone healing of the rotator cuff is often associated with non-healing or recurrent defects, which seems to be influenced by the patient's age and sex. The present study aims to examine cellular biological characteristics of tenocyte-like cells that may contribute to this impaired rotator cuff healing. Moreover, a therapeutic approach using growth factors could possibly stimulate tendon bone healing. Therefore, our second aim was to identify patient groups who would particularly benefit from growth factor stimulation. Tenocyte-like cells isolated from supraspinatus tendons of female donors younger and older than 65 years of age were characterized with respect to different cellular biological parameters, such as cell density, cell count, marker expression, collagen-I protein synthesis, and stem cell potential. Furthermore, cells of the donor groups were stimulated with BMP-2 and BMP-7 (200 and 1000 ng/ml in 3D-culture and analyzed for cell count, marker expression and collagen-I protein synthesis. Female donors older than 65 years of age showed significantly decreased cell count and collagen-I protein synthesis compared to cells from donors younger than 65 years. Cellular biological parameters including cell count, collagen-I and -III expression, and collagen-I protein synthesis of cells from both donor groups were stimulated with BMP-2 and BMP-7. The cells from donors older than 65 years revealed a decreased stimulation potential for cell count compared to the younger group. Cells from female donors older than 65 years of age showed inferior cellular biological characteristics. This may be one reason for a weaker healing potential observed in older female patients and should be taken into consideration for tendon bone healing of the rotator cuff.

  14. Subacromial injection of autologous platelet-rich plasma versus corticosteroid for the treatment of symptomatic partial rotator cuff tears.

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    Shams, Ahmed; El-Sayed, Mohamed; Gamal, Osama; Ewes, Waled

    2016-12-01

    Rotator cuff tears are one of the most common causes of chronic shoulder pain and disability. They significantly affect the quality of life. Reduced pain and improved function are the goals of conventional therapy, which includes relative rest, pain therapy, physical therapy, corticosteroid injections and surgical intervention. Tendons have a relative avascular nature; hence, their regenerative potential is limited. There is some clinical evidence that the application of autologous platelets may help to revascularize the area of injury in rotator cuff pathologies. This prospective randomized controlled study was done to evaluate the results of subacromial injection of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) versus corticosteroid injection therapy in 40 patients with symptomatic partial rotator cuff tears. All patients were assessed before injection, 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months after injection, using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Standardized Shoulder Assessment Form (ASES), the Constant-Murley Score (CMS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain. An MRI was performed before and 6 months after the injection for all the included patients and was graded on 0-5 scale. Both injection groups showed statistically significantly better clinical outcomes over time compared with those before injection. There was a statistically significant difference between RPP group and corticosteroid group 12 weeks after injection, regarding VAS, ASES, CMS and SST in favor of the RPP group. MRI showed an overall slight nonsignificant improvement in grades of tendinopathy/tear in both groups, however, without statistically significant differences between the two groups. PRP injections showed earlier better results as compared to corticosteroid injections, although statistically significant better results after 6 months could not be found. Therefore, subacromial RPP injection could be considered as a good alternative to corticosteroid injection, especially in

  15. CURRENT CONCEPTS ON THE GENETIC FACTORS IN ROTATOR CUFF PATHOLOGY AND FUTURE IMPLICATIONS FOR SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPISTS.

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    Orth, Travis; Paré, Jessica; Froehlich, John E

    2017-04-01

    Recent advances within the field of genetics are currently changing many of the methodologies in which medicine is practiced. These advances are also beginning to influence the manner in which physical therapy services are rendered. Rotator cuff pathology is one of the most common diagnoses treated by the sports physical therapist. The purpose of this commentary is to educate sports physical therapists on the recent advances regarding how genetics influences rotator cuff pathology, including rotator cuff tears, and provide a perspective on how this information will likely influence post-operative shoulder rehabilitation in the near future. A comprehensive review of the literature was completed using the Medline database along with individual searches of relevant physical therapy, surgical, cell biology, and sports medicine journals. Search terms included: shoulder, rotator cuff pathology, genetics, apoptosis, and physical therapy. Search results were compiled and evaluated; relevant primary studies and review articles were gathered; the results from this comprehensive review are summarized here. Clinical Commentary, Review of the Literature. Recent advances within the understanding of rotator cuff pathology have further elucidated the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with rotator cuff tears. There appears to be a hypoxic-induced apoptotic cellular pathway that contributes to rotator cuff tears. Activation of specific proteins termed matrix metalloproteinases appear to be involved in not only primary rotator cuff tears, but also may influence the re-tear rate after surgical intervention. Further advancements in the understanding of the cellular mechanisms contributing to rotator cuff tears and postoperative techniques to help prevent re-tears, may soon influence the methodology in which physical therapy services are provided to patients sustaining a rotator cuff injury. At this time continued research is required to more fully develop a comprehensive

  16. Disability and satisfaction after Rotator Cuff decompression or repair: a sex and gender analysis

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    Davis Aileen M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotator-cuff pathology is the most common cause of pain and disability in the shoulder. Examining the combined effect of biological and societal factors on disability would potentially identify existing differences between men and women with rotator cuff pathology which would help to provide suggestions for better models of care. Purpose of this study was to determine the overall differences in disability between men and women and to examine the relationship between factors that represent sex (biological factors and gender (non-biological factors with disability and satisfaction with surgical outcome 6 months after rotator cuff surgery. Methods Patients with impingement syndrome and/or rotator cuff tear who underwent rotator cuff surgery completed the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC index, the American Shoulder & Elbow Surgeons (ASES assessment form, and the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH outcome measures prior to surgery and 6 months post-operatively. They also rated their satisfaction with surgery at their follow-up appointment. Results and Discussion One hundred and seventy patients entered into the study (85 men and 85 women. One hundred and sixty patients (94% completed the 6-month assessment. Women reported more disability both prior to and after surgery. Disability at 6 months was associated with pain-limited range of motion, participation limitation, age and strength. Satisfaction with surgery was associated with level of reported disability, expectations for improved pain, pain-limited range of motion and strength. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that women with rotator cuff pathology suffer from higher levels of pre- and post-operative disability and sex and gender qualities contribute to these differences. Gender-sensitive approach will help to identify existing differences between men and women which will help to promote more effective and tailored care by health

  17. Rehabilitation protocol after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: early versus delayed motion.

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    Chen, Long; Peng, Kun; Zhang, Dagang; Peng, Jing; Xing, Fei; Xiang, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of early and delayed motion in rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using a meta-analysis from randomized controlled trials. Electronic searches of the CENTRAL, PUBMED, and EMBASE were used to identify randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effectiveness and safety of early and delayed motion for rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed by the Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias. Four randomized controlled trials involving a total of 348 shoulders were included. Of these, two were rated as high quality and two were rated as moderate quality. No significant publication bias was detected by Egger's test and sensitivity analysis demonstrates a statistically robust result. Our meta-analysis indicated that early motion after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair resulted in a significantly greater recovery of external rotation from pre-operation to 3, 6, and 12 months post-operation (P 0.05) in the rate of recurrence, compared to delayed motion. In addition, there were statistically higher rating scale of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores at 12 months post-operation (P rotator cuff repair, compared with early motion. Our meta-analysis included data from randomized controlled trials and demonstrated that delayed motion after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair resulted in higher healing rates and ASES scores than early motion. Alternatively, early motion increased range of motion (ROM) recovery, but also increased the rate of recurrence compared to delayed motion.

  18. Tears at the rotator cuff footprint: Prevalence and imaging characteristics in 305 MR arthrograms of the shoulder

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    Schaeffeler, Christoph; Mueller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kirchhoff, Chlodwig [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Munich (Germany); Wolf, Petra [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    To evaluate the prevalence, imaging characteristics and anatomical distribution of tears at the rotator cuff (RC) footprint with MR arthrography (MR-A) of the shoulder. MR arthrograms obtained in 305 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Partial articular-sided supraspinatus tendon avulsions (PASTA), concealed interstitial delaminations (CID), reverse PASTA lesions and full-thickness tears (FT) at the humeral tendon insertion were depicted. Anatomical locations were determined and depths of tears were classified. 112/305 patients showed RC tears, including 63 patients with 68 footprint tears. 34 PASTA lesions were detected with 20/34 involving the anterior supraspinatus (SSP) tendon and 17/34 PASTA lesions were grade I lesions. Most CID lesions (14/23) occurred at the posterior SSP and 20/23 were classified as grade I or II. 9 FT and 2 reverse PASTA lesions were found. Statistical analysis revealed no difference in anatomical location (p = 0.903) and no correlation with overhead sports activity (p = 0.300) or history of trauma (p=0.928). There were significantly more PASTA lesions in patients <40 years of age (p = 0.029). Most RC tears detected with MR-A involve the SSP footprint and are articular-sided with predominance in younger patients, but concealed lesions are not as uncommon as previously thought. (orig.)

  19. A review of biomechanics of the shoulder and biomechanical concepts of rotator cuff repair

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    Nobuyuki Yamamoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe the basic knowledge about shoulder biomechanics, which is thought to be useful for surgeons. Some clinical reports have described that the excellent outcome after cuff repair without acromioplasty and a limited acromioplasty might be enough for subacromial decompression. It was biomechanically demonstrated that a 10-mm medial shift of the tendon repair site has a minimum effect on biomechanics. Many biomechanical studies reported that the transosseous equivalent repair was superior to other techniques, although the tendon may lose its inherent elasticity. We herein introduce our recent experiment data and latest information on biomechanics.

  20. A review of biomechanics of the shoulder and biomechanical concepts of rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Itoi, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we describe the basic knowledge about shoulder biomechanics, which is thought to be useful for surgeons. Some clinical reports have described that the excellent outcome after cuff repair without acromioplasty and a limited acromioplasty might be enough for subacromial decompression. It was biomechanically demonstrated that a 10-mm medial shift of the tendon repair site has a minimum effect on biomechanics. Many biomechanical studies reported that the transosseous equivalent repair was superior to other techniques, although the tendon may lose its inherent elasticity. We herein introduce our recent experiment data and latest information on biomechanics.

  1. Clinical and radiologic results of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with suture anchor in the setting of rotator cuff tear.

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    Lee, Hyun Il; Shon, Min Soo; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Tae Kang; Heo, Jaewon; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to report clinical and radiologic results of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with 1 suture anchor in rotator cuff tear patients. During a 2-year period, 84 consecutive patients (45 men; 39 women) who underwent arthroscopic tenodesis were evaluated retrospectively. Mean age was 58 years. The primary indication for surgery was rotator cuff tear in 96.4%. Tenodesis was performed with 1 suture anchor placed in the bicipital groove with 2 knots, 1 lasso-type and 1 that pierced the tendon. At final follow-up at a mean of 33.2 months, visual analog scale pain (pain-VAS) score, shoulder scores (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES] and Constant score), Popeye deformity (PD), anterior arm pain, and elbow flexion power were evaluated. Postoperative magnetic resonance images were evaluated in 60 patients to determine the integrity of the tenodesis and the location of the suture anchor. The average pain-VAS decreased from 5.3 to 1.4 (P suture anchor within the bicipital groove. Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with 1 suture anchor resulted in good clinical outcomes at 2 years postoperatively. PD was seen in 12.9% of the patients. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Does early motion lead to a higher failure rate or better outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair? A systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses.

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    Saltzman, Bryan M; Zuke, William A; Go, Beatrice; Mascarenhas, Randy; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A; Forsythe, Brian

    2017-09-01

    The aims of the study were as follows: to perform a systematic review of meta-analyses comparing "early motion" and "delayed motion" after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair; to provide a framework to analyze the best available evidence to develop recommendations; and to identify gaps where suggestions could be made for future investigations. Literature searches were performed to identify meta-analyses examining arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with early-motion vs. delayed-motion rehabilitation protocols. Clinical data were extracted, and meta-analysis quality was assessed using the Quality of Reporting of Meta-analyses and Oxman-Guyatt scales. Nine meta-analyses met inclusion criteria. No clear superiority was noted in clinical outcome scores for early-motion or delayed-motion rehabilitation. Results of tendon healing were found to be either no different or in favor of delayed motion, but no differences were noted in rotator cuff tear recurrence rates postoperatively. The majority of meta-analyses found significantly better range of motion with early motion up to a year postoperatively for forward elevation and up to 6 months for external rotation, but significant differences were not reported for functional improvements and strength at 12 months postoperatively. Subgroup analyses suggested that larger preoperative tear sizes have significantly greater retear rates with early-motion rehabilitation. The current highest level of evidence suggests that early-motion rehabilitation after rotator cuff repair results in superior postoperative range of motion up to 1 year. Whereas early motion and delayed motion after cuff repair may lead to comparable functional outcomes and retear rates, concern exists that early motion may result in greater retear rates, particularly with larger tear sizes. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Basic mechanisms of tendon fatigue damage

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    Neviaser, Andrew; Andarawis-Puri, Nelly; Flatow, Evan

    2012-01-01

    Pathologic processes intrinsic and extrinsic to the tendons have been proposed as the underlying cause of rotator cuff disease, but the precise etiology is not known. Tear formation is, in part, attributable to the accumulation of subrupture tendon fatigue damage. We review the molecular, mechanical, and structural changes induced in tendons subjected to controlled amounts of fatigue loading in an animal model of early tendinopathy. The distinct tendon responses to low and moderate levels of ...

  4. Acute Calcific Bursitis After Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Barbotage of Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendinopathy: A Case Report.

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    Kang, Bo-Sung; Lee, Seung Hak; Cho, Yung; Chung, Sun Gun

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous barbotage is an effective treatment for rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, providing rapid and substantial pain relief. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with aggravated pain early after ultrasound-guided barbotage of a large calcific deposit in the supraspinatus tendon. Subsequent examination revealed a thick calcification spreading along the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa space, suggesting acute calcific bursitis complicated by barbotage. Additional barbotage alleviated her pain completely. Therefore, a high index of suspicion for acute calcific bursitis is required in patients with unresolved or aggravated pain after barbotage. Repeated barbotage could be effective for this condition. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Shoulder surface temperature and bone scintigraphy findings in patients with rotator cuff tears.

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    Koike, Yoichi; Sano, Hirotaka; Kinjyo, Takeshi; Imamura, Itaru; Masahiro, Onuma; Goto, Masako; Ooyama, Masamizu; Kita, Atushi; Itoi, Eiji

    2011-05-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is one of the serious complications after surgical treatment of a rotator cuff tear. Both a measurement of body surface temperature and bone scintigraphy have been used as diagnostic tools for the early phase of CRPS.Unfortunately, few studies have been carried out that applied these methods to the patients after rotator cuff repair. To clarify both shoulder surface temperature and bone scintigraphy findings in patients with rotator cuff tears. Subjects comprised patients with unilateral rotator cuff tears (five men and five women, mean age 61 years). For measurements of shoulder surface temperature, a Thermochron was attached to both shoulders. As for bone scintigraphy, intravenous injection of technetium-labelled hydroxymethylenebisphosphonic acid (99mTc-HMDP)was performed, and then images were taken with a gamma camera. During the measurements, the changes in body surface temperature for the affected and healthy shoulders remained within the standard deviation of the reference group. The intensity of radioisotope (RI) uptake for the affected shoulder joint was significantly increased compared to that for the healthy shoulder joint (P < 0.05). RI uptake is increased in shoulders with rotator cuff tears, whereas shoulder surface temperature shows no differences on the affected and unaffected sides.

  6. Functional and Sports-Specific Outcome After Surgical Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears in Rock Climbers.

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    Simon, Michael; Popp, Dominik; Lutter, Christoph; Schöffl, Volker

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the general (Constant Murley score) and sports-specific (change in International Climbing and Mountaineering Federation [UIAA] grade) outcome after surgical repair of rotator cuff injuries in rock climbers. In a retrospective study, 12 rock climbers (10 men, 2 women; age 55 years; SD±9; range 28-66 years [mean±SD with range] with rotator cuff lesions were re-evaluated 27±16 (12-72) months after arthroscopic surgical repair of the rotator cuff of the shoulder. The etiology of the rotator cuff pathology was equally chronic (age 61±12 [28-66] years) and acute (age 53±5 [51-65] years). The postoperative general outcome, including the Constant Murley score, was assessed with a standardized questionnaire and clinical examination. The postoperative sports-specific outcome was analyzed using the UIAA metric scale. The postoperative Constant Murley score was 92±7 (80-98). All participants had already started climbing again; 11 of 12 climbers regained a climbing level within ±1.33 UIAA metric grades of their initial capability. Arthroscopic repair of acute and chronic rotator cuff tears shows a good functional outcome, enabling most patients to regain a high level of rock climbing ability. Copyright © 2017 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Creatinine and nonprotein nitrogen plasma levels: possible etiopathogenetic factors in rotator cuff tears.

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    Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Leonardi, Francesco; Osti, Leonardo; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2011-05-01

    To determine the plasma levels of nonprotein nitrogen (NPN) and creatinine in healthy patients with rotator cuff tears. The study included 400 subjects. The study group included 200 patients (93 men and 107 women; mean age, 56.8 years; range, 23-81 years) who underwent arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear from 2004 to 2007. The control group included 200 patients (93 men and 107 women; mean age, 53.9 years; range, 20-81 years) who underwent arthroscopy for management of a meniscal tear, with or without articular cartilage damage, in the same period. The 2 groups were frequency-matched by age and sex. Measurement of plasma levels of NPN and creatinine were performed in all patients. Patients with rotator cuff tears showed higher plasma NPN levels within the normal range (P = 0.035) than patients with knee disorders (control group). Creatinine levels were comparable (P = 0.66) in both groups. There appears to be an association between plasma NPN levels and rotator cuff tears. On the basis of our findings, plasma NPN could be involved in the pathogenesis of rotator cuff tears, although we advocate further research to draw more definitive conclusions.

  8. Pain, Disability and Sleep Quality in Patients With Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy and Concurrent Myofascial Pain

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    Morteza Nakhaei Amroodi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Rotator cuff tendinopathy and concurrent myofascial pain may result in sleep disturbances, poor quality of life, and social dysfunction along with chronic annoying pain and progressive physical disability. Objectives The present study aimed to assess severity of pain, physical disability, and sleep quality in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy and concurrent myofascial pain. Patients and Methods This case-control study was conducted on 30 consecutive patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy without tear (impingement syndrome and concurrent myofascial pain referred to the shoulder clinic in Shafa-Yahyaian Hospital during year 2014 (January to April. Eighteen gender and age-matched healthy individuals without any history of rotator cuff tendinopathy were included as controls. Along with baseline assessment, for determining the level of arm, shoulder and hand disability, the quick disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire was also used. Sleep quality was assessed by the pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI. Results Compared to healthy individuals, the mean shoulder disability score was significantly higher in the patient group (P = 0.001. Also, regarding sleep quality, the mean score was significantly higher in the patient group when compared with healthy subjects (P = 0.002. Conclusions Patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy concurrent with myofascial pain experienced low level of sleep quality along with severe pain and physical disability. In order to improve clinical outcome of these patients, improving physical function and sleep quality in these patients is necessary.

  9. Can arthroscopic rotator cuff repair prevent proximal migration of the humeral head?

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    Pablo Sanz-Ruiz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Shoulder arthroscopy has become increasingly used in recent years, especially in rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to determine whether arthroscopic rotator cuff repair could prevent proximal migration of the humeral head. Material and Methods: We performed a retrospective study of 56 patients suffering from shoulder pain. They were divided into two groups, one comprising patients with impingement syndrome who underwent acromioplasty only and another comprising patients with rotator cuff tear who underwent acromioplasty combined with rotator cuff repair. The pre-operative Hirooka angle and the results of the simple shoulder test (SST were compared after 1 year. Results: We found no differences between the groups for the Hirooka angle or SST results. We did find a significant difference (P<0.05 between pre-operative and post-operative SST results. Conclusions: Rotator cuff repair using arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure that improves function and prevents proximal migration of the humeral head after 1 year of follow-up. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(4.000: 190-195

  10. What is the prevalence of senior-athlete rotator cuff injuries and are they associated with pain and dysfunction?

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    McMahon, Patrick J; Prasad, Amitesh; Francis, Kimberly A

    2014-08-01

    Older individuals with rotator cuff injuries may have difficulties not only with activities of daily living, but also with sports activities. (1) How frequent and severe are rotator cuff abnormalities, as identified by ultrasound, in senior athletes? (2) To what degree does the severity of ultrasound-identified rotator cuff pathology correlate with pain and shoulder dysfunction? We assessed pain and shoulder function in 141 elite athletes older than 60 years of age (median age, 70 years; range 60-84) at the Senior Olympics who volunteered to participate. An ultrasound evaluation of the rotator cuff of the dominant shoulder was performed by an experienced musculoskeletal radiologist in all of these elite athletes. We then determined the relationship between ultrasound findings and shoulder pain and shoulder function as assessed with the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores. There were 20 shoulders with a normal cuff (14.2% [20 of 141], of which 5% [one of 20] were painful), 23 with tendinosis (16.3% [23 of 141], of which 30% [six of 20] were painful), 68 with a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear (48.2% [68 of 141], of which 32% [20 of 63] were painful), and 30 with a full-thickness rotator cuff tear (21.3% [30 of 141], of which 25% [seven of 28] were painful). Only 5% of athletes (one of 20) with a normal cuff on ultrasound evaluation reported shoulder pain, whereas 30% of athletes (33 of 111) with any degree of rotator cuff damage on ultrasound evaluation reported shoulder pain, This resulted in an odds ratio of 8.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-62.5). The proportion of patients who had pain was not different in those with different severities of rotator cuff pathology. Neither the ASES nor the DASH was different in those with different severities. The frequency of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in senior athletes was 21.3% (30 of 141). Pain was a predictor of rotator cuff injury but not of its

  11. Chronic massive rotator cuff tear in rats: in vivo evaluation of muscle force and three-dimensional histologic analysis.

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    Ditsios, Konstantinos; Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Kapoukranidou, Dorothea; Chatzisotiriou, Athanasios; Kalpidis, Ioannis; Albani, Maria; Christodoulou, Anastasios

    2014-12-01

    Massive rotator cuff tear repair is frequently complicated by unsatisfactory clinical results due to possible tendon retraction, muscle atrophy, and fatty degeneration. The objective of this study was the development of a chronic massive tear in a rat model and the evaluation of the muscle force in vivo and of the histologic changes in a 3- dimensional manner. To simulate massive rotator cuff tears, both the supraspinatus (SS) and the infraspinatus (IS) tendons were surgically detached from the right humerus of 15 male adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Twelve weeks postoperatively, all animals underwent isometric tension recordings of both the SS and IS muscles. Histologic analysis and image deconvolution processing were performed to estimate the presence and the distribution of atrophy in 3 dimensions. An overall 30% and 35% reduction in muscle force of the SS and IS muscles, respectively, was observed compared with the left uninjured shoulder (P muscle groups. These results show that functional impairment of SS and IS muscles after chronic massive tendon tears could be attributed to the decrease in muscle force production during their repair on the greater tuberosity and, second, to the comparatively greater degeneration of their dorsal part. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Biomechanical Comparison of Modified Suture Bridge Using Rip-Stop versus Traditional Suture Bridge for Rotator Cuff Repair

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    ZiYing Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the biomechanical properties of 3 suture-bridge techniques for rotator cuff repair. Methods. Twelve pair-matched fresh-frozen shoulder specimens were randomized to 3 groups of different repair types: the medially Knotted Suture Bridge (KSB, the medially Untied Suture Bridge (USB, and the Modified Suture Bridge (MSB. Cyclic loading and load-to-failure test were performed. Parameters of elongation, stiffness, load at failure, and mode of failure were recorded. Results. The MSB technique had the significantly greatest load to failure (515.6±78.0 N, P=0.04 for KSB group; P<0.001 for USB group, stiffness (58.0±10.7 N/mm, P=0.005 for KSB group; P<0.001 for USB group, and lowest elongation (1.49±0.39 mm, P=0.009 for KSB group; P=0.001 for USB group among 3 groups. The KSB repair had significantly higher ultimate load (443.5±65.0 N than USB repair (363.5±52.3 N, P=0.024. However, there was no statistical difference in stiffness and elongation between KSB and USB technique (P=0.396 for stiffness and P=0.242 for elongation, resp.. The failure mode for all specimens was suture pulling through the cuff tendon. Conclusions. Our modified suture bridge technique (MSB may provide enhanced biomechanical properties when compared with medially knotted or knotless repair. Clinical Relevance. Our modified technique may represent a promising alternative in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

  13. Outcomes following arthroscopic transosseous equivalent suture bridge double row rotator cuff repair: a prospective study and short-term results

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    Imam Mohamed Abdelnabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The transosseous-equivalent cross bridge double row (TESBDR rotator cuff (RC repair technique has been developed to optimize healing biology at a repaired RC tendon insertion. It has been shown in the laboratory to improve pressurized contact area and mean foot print pressure when compared with a double row anchor technique. Pressure has been shown to influence healing between tendon and bone, and the tendon compression vector provided by the transosseous-equivalent suture bridges may enhance healing. The purpose was to prospectively evaluate the outcomes of arthroscopic TESBDR RC repair. Methods: Single center prospective case series study. Sixty-nine patients were selected to undergo arthroscopic TESBDR RC repair and were included in the current study. Primary outcome measures included the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS, the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA score, the Constant-Murley (CM Score and Range of motion (ROM. Secondary outcome measures included a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS for pain, another VAS for patient satisfaction from the operative procedure, EuroQoL 5-Dimensions Questionnaire (EQ-5D for quality of life assessment. Results: At 24 months post-operative, average OSS score was 44, average UCLA score was 31, average CM score was 88, average forward flexion was 145°, average internal rotation was 35°, average external rotation was 79°, average abduction was 150°, average EQ-5D score was 0.73, average VAS for pain was 2.3, and average VAS for patient satisfaction was 9.2. Conclusion: Arthroscopic TESBDR RC repair is a procedure with good post-operative functional outcome and low re-tear rate based on a short term follow-up.

  14. Arginine L-alpha-ketoglutarate, methylsulfonylmethane, hydrolyzed type I collagen and bromelain in rotator cuff tear repair: a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumina, S; Passaretti, D; Gurzì, M D; Candela, V

    2012-11-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair generally provides satisfactory result, in terms of decreasing shoulder pain, resulting in improvement in range of motion. Unfortunately, imaging studies have shown that after surgical repair re-rupture rate is potentially high. Literature data indicate that each of the components present in a commercial supplement sold in Italy as Tenosan * (arginine L-alpha-ketoglutarate, methylsulfonylmethane, hydrolyzed type I collagen and bromelain) have a potential role in tendon healing and mitigating the pain due to tendonitis. We evaluated the clinical and MRI results of rotator cuff repair with and without the employment of this oral supplement in patients with a large, postero-superior rotator cuff tear (RCT). We enrolled 90 consecutive patients who had a large, postero-superior RCT. All the lesions were managed with an arthroscopic repair. Patients were randomized and treated either with (Group I) or without (Group II) the supplement. The primary outcomes were the difference between the pre- and post-operative Constant score and repair integrity assessed by MRI according to Sugaya's classification. The secondary outcome was the pre- and post-operative Simple Shoulder Test. No statistically significant differences were identified between the two groups for each considered variable, except for shoulder pain (follow-up: 6 months) and repair integrity (final follow-up). Intensity of shoulder pain was lower in the Group I patients (p < 0.001). Analogously, in Group I, the percentage of patients with a better repair integrity result was significantly higher than Group II. The use of the supplement for 3 months after cuff repair decreases shoulder post-operative pain and leads to a slight improvement in repair integrity. This improvement does not seem to correlate with an better objective functional outcome. However, these effects could facilitate and abbreviate the post-operative rehabilitation program and reduce re-rupture rate. The main

  15. Rehabilitation of symptomatic atraumatic degenerative rotator cuff tears: A clinical commentary on assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleichert, Sarah; Renaud, Genevieve; MacDermid, Joy; Watson, Lyn; Faber, Ken; Lenssen, Ross; Saulnier, Marie; Phillips, Paul; Evans, Tyler; Sadi, Jackie

    Clinical Commentary. Atraumatic rotator cuff (RC) disease, is one of the most common cause of shoulder pain, which encompasses a continuum from tendinopathy to full thickness cuff tears. Extrinsic, intrinsic and environmental factors have been implicated in the pathophysiology of this disorder, affecting the clinical presentation of symptoms including pain and irritability. Successful rehabilitation of symptomatic atraumatic degenerative rotator cuff (SADRC) tears must address the underlying mechanisms causing dysfunction and correct modifiable factors. The purpose of this paper is to review the shoulder complex anatomy, introduce atraumatic degenerative RC pathology, differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic degenerative RC tears, propose an assessment and introduce the Rotator Cuff Protocol 1 (RCP1) designed by the clinical reasoning of one of the lead authors (LW) as a rehabilitation management approach for those clients who present with SADRC tears. N/A for clinical commentary. The ability to identify SADRC tears should consider shoulder anatomy, extrinsic, intrinsic and environmental factors, and the consideration for the natural history of atraumatic partial and full thickness tears in the general population. A thorough clinical history and examination, which includes shoulder symptom modification tests, allows the examiner to determine at what phase the patient may start their exercise program. The RCP1 is a program that has been used clinically by many therapists and clients over the years and research is underway to test this protocol in atraumatic rotator cuff disease including SADRC tears. 5. Copyright © 2017 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rotator cuff injuries: current perspectives and trends for treatment and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Fabio Antonio; Olawa, Paul Juma; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    To map out the approaches used by Brazilian orthopedists in treating complete tears of the rotator cuff. A multiple-choice questionnaire was handed out to 232 orthopedists at the 45th Brazilian Congress of Orthopedics and Traumatology. Of these, 207 were returned but five were incomplete and were excluded. Thus, 202 questionnaires were used. Among the orthopedists who answered the questionnaires, around 60% were from the southeastern region and 46% were shoulder and elbow surgeons. There was a significant association (p rotator cuff repairs performed per year. There was also a significant association (p rehabilitation, return to sport and indication of irreparable injuries. Brazilian shoulder surgeons have well-established approaches toward treating rotator cuff injuries. Most of these approaches differ significantly from those of other specialties. This shows the importance of placing value on training in preparing shoulder specialists in this country.

  17. Physical therapist management following rotator cuff repair for a patient with postpolio syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Mary; Hadlock, Tana

    2007-02-01

    Postpoliomyelitis sequelae, such as gait instability and progressive weakness, predispose people with postpolio syndrome to secondary disabilities. With aging, people who depend on their upper extremities to accommodate lower-extremity deficits may anticipate overuse injuries. The purpose of this case report is to describe the use of mobilization and exercise in postoperative rehabilitation of rotator cuff surgery on a patient with postpolio syndrome. A 48-year-old woman with postpolio syndrome had rotator cuff surgical repair followed by physical therapy intervention. Maitland mobilization and mild functional exercises were chosen to avoid triggering fatigue. Measurements taken preoperatively, before and after physical therapy intervention, and 2 years after intervention showed return to independent status with excellent retention. No fatigue or overuse weakness was encountered. This is the first case report to document physical therapy following rotator cuff repair in a patient with postpolio syndrome.

  18. Synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial bursa causing a bursal-sided rotator cuff tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Julie A; Garrigues, Grant E

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is an uncommon condition, and involvement of the shoulder is even more rare. We report on a 39-year-old female who presented with symptoms, radiographic features, and intraoperative findings consistent with multiple subacromial loose bodies resulting in a partial-thickness, bursal-sided rotator cuff tear of the supraspinatus muscle. She was treated with an arthroscopic removal of loose bodies, complete excision of the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa, acromioplasty, and rotator cuff repair. To our knowledge, this is the first report of arthroscopic treatment for a bursal-sided, partial-thickness rotator cuff tear treated with greater than two-year clinical and radiographic follow-up. We utilized shoulder scores, preoperative and postoperative range of motion, and imaging to assess the results of treatment and surveillance for recurrence in our patient after two-year follow-up.

  19. Genetic and familial predisposition to rotator cuff disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabija, Dominique I; Gao, Chan; Edwards, Todd L; Kuhn, John E; Jain, Nitin B

    2017-06-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a common disorder leading to shoulder pain and loss of function. Its etiology in atraumatic cases is uncertain and is likely to extend beyond repetitive microtrauma or overuse. Our objective was to determine whether there is a genetic or familial predisposition to rotator cuff disease. A literature search of PubMed and Embase databases identified 251 citations. After review of the titles, abstracts, and full articles, 7 met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. Four studies assessed familial predisposition to rotator cuff disease. One of these demonstrated that siblings of an individual with a rotator cuff tear were more likely to develop a full-thickness tear and more likely to be symptomatic. A 5-year follow-up showed that the relative risks were increased for the siblings to have a full-thickness tear, for a tear to progress in size, and for being symptomatic. Another study demonstrated that a significantly higher number of individuals with tears had family members with a history of tears or surgery than those without tears did. The other 3 studies investigated whether a genetic predisposition to rotator cuff disease exists and found significant association of haplotypes in DEFB1, FGFR1, FGF3, ESRRB, and FGF10 and 2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms within SAP30BP and SASH1. Prior studies provide preliminary evidence for genetic and familial predisposition to rotator cuff disease. However, there is a lack of large genome-wide studies that can provide more definitive information and guide early detection of individuals at risk, prophylactic rehabilitation, and potential gene therapies and regenerative medicine interventions. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Imaging Algorithms for Evaluating Suspected Rotator Cuff Disease: Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound Consensus Conference Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Jon A.; Benson, Carol B.; Bancroft, Laura W.; Bedi, Asheesh; McShane, John M.; Miller, Theodore T.; Parker, Laurence; Smith, Jay; Steinbach, Lynne S.; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Thiele, Ralf G.; Tuite, Michael J.; Wise, James N.; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound convened a panel of specialists from a variety of medical disciplines to reach a consensus about the recommended imaging evaluation of painful shoulders with clinically suspected rotator cuff disease. The panel met in Chicago, Ill, on October 18 and 19, 2011, and created this consensus statement regarding the roles of radiography, ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography. The consensus panel consisted of two co-moderators, a facilitator, a statistician and health care economist, and 10 physicians who have specialty expertise in shoulder pain evaluation and/or treatment. Of the 13 physicians on the panel, nine were radiologists who were chosen to represent a broad range of skill sets in diagnostic imaging, different practice types (private and academic), and different geographical regions of the United States. Five of the radiologists routinely performed musculoskeletal US as part of their practice and four did not. There was also one representative from each of the following clinical specialties: rheumatology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, orthopedic surgery, and nonoperative sports medicine. The goal of this conference was to construct several algorithms with which to guide the imaging evaluation of suspected rotator cuff disease in patients with a native rotator cuff, patients with a repaired rotator cuff, and patients who have undergone shoulder replacement. The panel hopes that these recommendations will lead to greater uniformity in rotator cuff imaging and more cost-effective care for patients suspected of having rotator cuff abnormality. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:23401583

  1. A systematic review of cost-effective treatment of postoperative rotator cuff repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Rebecca N; Kuhn, John E; Bergner, Jamie L; Rizzone, Katherine H

    2017-05-01

    The Bundled Payments for Care Improvement initiative combines payment of multiple services for episodes of care into 1 bundle. Rotator cuff repair is a likely candidate for future inclusion. The objective of this study was to determine cost-effective, high-quality postoperative rehabilitation dosing and cryotherapy for patients undergoing rotator cuff repair based on systematic review of the literature. Systematic review of level I and level II articles was performed in PubMed, Cochrane Databases, and PEDro. Conference references and bibliographies were also reviewed. For postoperative therapy, keywords included rotator cuff, rotator cuff repair, exercise therapy, exercise, unsupervised, self-care, postoperative period, physical therapy, and physiotherapy; for cryotherapy, keywords included rotator cuff repair, shoulder, cryotherapy, and ice. Five studies compared postoperative outcomes in participants assigned to supervised therapy vs. unsupervised therapy. Three found no difference between groups. One found improved outcomes in supervised therapy. Limitations included that therapies were not consistently defined and significant methodologic issues were present, decreasing the applicability and validity of the results. Five articles examined cryotherapy outcomes in the postoperative shoulder. Two studies showed improved patient outcomes with cryotherapy vs. no cryotherapy; 2 studies showed no decrease in joint space temperatures at 90 minutes but decrease in temperature at 4 to 23 hours postoperatively. One study indicated that an ice bag and Ace bandage might be as effective as continuous, compressive cryotherapy units using patient-reported outcomes. Further studies are needed to determine effective dosing of physical therapy after rotator cuff repair. Cryotherapy is favorable and cost-effective using simple methods for delivery. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Outcome of Expedited Rotator Cuff Surgery in Injured Workers: Determinants of Successful Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmjou, Helen; Boljanovic, Dragana; Lincoln, Sandra; Holtby, Richard; Gallay, Stephen; Henry, Patrick; Macritchie, Iona; Borthwick, Cheryl; Mayer, Lauren; Roknic, Carolyn; Shore, Deborah; Kamino, Allison; Grossman, Julie; Hill, Joanne; Singh, Gargi; Travers, Niki; Yanofsky, Loraine; Wilson, Marni; Sumar, Shellina; Savona, Alicia; De Medeiros, Filomena; Mann, Helen; Champsi, Aisha; Chau, Stefanie; Medeiros, Danielle; Richards, Robin R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Work-related rotator cuff injuries are a common cause of disability and employee time loss. Purpose: To examine the effectiveness of expedited rotator cuff surgery in injured workers who underwent rotator cuff decompression or repair and to explore the impact of demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors in predicting the outcome of surgery. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Injured workers who were seen at a shoulder specialty program and who underwent expedited arthroscopic rotator cuff decompression or repair were observed for a period of 6 to 12 months based on their type of surgery and recovery trajectory. The primary outcome measure was the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) Standardized Shoulder Assessment Form. The impact of surgery was assessed by whether the change in the ASES score exceeded the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) of 17 points. Secondary outcomes were range of motion (ROM), medication consumption, and work status. Results: One hundred forty-six patients (43 women [29%], 103 men [71%]; mean age, 52 years; SD, 8 years) completed the study. Sixty-seven (46%) patients underwent rotator cuff repair. The mean time between the date the patient consented to have surgery and the date of surgery was 82 (SD, 44) days. There was a statistically significant improvement in ASES score and ROM and work status (52 returned to regular duties and 59 to modified duties) (P MCID of 17 points. Individual factors that affected patient overall disability were preoperative ASES, work status prior to surgery, access to care, and autonomy at work. Achieving a minimal clinically meaningful change was influenced by perceived access to care, autonomy and stress at work, and overall satisfaction with the job. Conclusion: Expedited rotator cuff surgery improved disability, ROM, and work status in injured workers. Successful recovery after work-related shoulder injuries may further be facilitated by improving

  3. Advantages of Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair With a Transosseous Suture Technique: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randelli, Pietro; Stoppani, Carlo Alberto; Zaolino, Carlo; Menon, Alessandra; Randelli, Filippo; Cabitza, Paolo

    2017-07-01

    Rotator cuff tear is a common finding in patients with painful, poorly functioning shoulders. The surgical management of this disorder has improved greatly and can now be fully arthroscopic. To evaluate clinical and radiological results of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using 2 different techniques: single-row anchor fixation versus transosseous hardware-free suture repair. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. Sixty-nine patients with rotator cuff tears were enrolled: 35 patients were operated with metal anchors and 34 with standardized transosseous repair. The patients were clinically evaluated before surgery, during the 28 days after surgery, and at least 1 year after the operation by the use of validated rating scores (Constant score, QuickDASH, and numerical rating scale [NRS]). Final follow-up was obtained at more than 3 years by a QuickDASH evaluation to detect any difference from the previous follow-up. During the follow-up, rotator cuff integrity was determined through magnetic resonance imaging and was classified according to the 5 Sugaya categories. Patients operated with the transosseous technique had significantly less pain, especially from the 15th postoperative day: In the third week, the mean NRS value for the anchor group was 3.00 while that for transosseous group was 2.46 ( P = .02); in the fourth week, the values were 2.44 and 1.76, respectively ( P < .01). No differences in functional outcome were noted between the 2 groups at the final evaluation. In the evaluation of rotator cuff repair integrity, based on Sugaya magnetic resonance imaging classification, no significant difference was found between the 2 techniques in terms of retear rate ( P = .81). No significant differences were found between the 2 arthroscopic repair techniques in terms of functional and radiological results. However, postoperative pain decreased more quickly after the transosseous procedure, which therefore emerges as a possible improvement in the surgical

  4. Outcome of Expedited Rotator Cuff Surgery in Injured Workers: Determinants of Successful Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmjou, Helen; Boljanovic, Dragana; Lincoln, Sandra; Holtby, Richard; Gallay, Stephen; Henry, Patrick; Macritchie, Iona; Borthwick, Cheryl; Mayer, Lauren; Roknic, Carolyn; Shore, Deborah; Kamino, Allison; Grossman, Julie; Hill, Joanne; Singh, Gargi; Travers, Niki; Yanofsky, Loraine; Wilson, Marni; Sumar, Shellina; Savona, Alicia; De Medeiros, Filomena; Mann, Helen; Champsi, Aisha; Chau, Stefanie; Medeiros, Danielle; Richards, Robin R

    2017-05-01

    Work-related rotator cuff injuries are a common cause of disability and employee time loss. To examine the effectiveness of expedited rotator cuff surgery in injured workers who underwent rotator cuff decompression or repair and to explore the impact of demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors in predicting the outcome of surgery. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Injured workers who were seen at a shoulder specialty program and who underwent expedited arthroscopic rotator cuff decompression or repair were observed for a period of 6 to 12 months based on their type of surgery and recovery trajectory. The primary outcome measure was the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) Standardized Shoulder Assessment Form. The impact of surgery was assessed by whether the change in the ASES score exceeded the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) of 17 points. Secondary outcomes were range of motion (ROM), medication consumption, and work status. One hundred forty-six patients (43 women [29%], 103 men [71%]; mean age, 52 years; SD, 8 years) completed the study. Sixty-seven (46%) patients underwent rotator cuff repair. The mean time between the date the patient consented to have surgery and the date of surgery was 82 (SD, 44) days. There was a statistically significant improvement in ASES score and ROM and work status (52 returned to regular duties and 59 to modified duties) ( P work status prior to surgery, access to care, and autonomy at work. Achieving a minimal clinically meaningful change was influenced by perceived access to care, autonomy and stress at work, and overall satisfaction with the job. Expedited rotator cuff surgery improved disability, ROM, and work status in injured workers. Successful recovery after work-related shoulder injuries may further be facilitated by improving the psychosocial work environment and increasing access to care.

  5. Identifiable risk factors for thirty-day complications following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyer, Jessica H; Kuang, Xiangyu; Amdur, Richard L; Pandarinath, Rajeev

    2018-02-01

    Shoulder arthroscopy has increased in frequency over the past decade, with rotator cuff repair comprising the majority of cases performed. Prior studies have detailed risk factors for 30-day complications and readmission rates after arthroscopic shoulder surgery using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database, but no study has specifically looked at arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the risk factors for 30-day complications following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using the NSQIP database. The NSQIP database was queried for all patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair from 2006-2015. Demographics and thirty-day outcomes for these patients were analyzed using univariate analyses and multivariate regression analysis to determine the risk factors for complications. 21,143 patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, with 147 patients (0.70%) having a complication within 30-days. Univariate analysis found age >65 (p = 0.0028), male gender (p = 0.0053), elevated BMI (p = 0.0054), ASA class >2 (p 90 min (p = 0.0316) to be associated with increased risk of complications. Multivariate analysis found female sex to be protective or complication (OR 0.56, p = 0.0017), while American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) class >2 (OR 1.51, p = 0.0335) and history of COPD (OR 2.41, p = 0.0030) and dyspnea (OR 1.89, p = 0.0359) to be risk factors for complication. The most common complication is venothromboembolic events, accounting for 36.7% of all complications. Male sex, ASA class > 2, and history of COPD and dyspnea were independent risk factors for thirty-day complications following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. IV.

  6. Mental Health Has a Stronger Association with Patient-Reported Shoulder Pain and Function Than Tear Size in Patients with Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, James D; Suter, Thomas; Potter, Michael Q; Granger, Erin K; Tashjian, Robert Z

    2016-02-17

    Patient-reported outcome measures have increasingly accompanied objective examination findings in the evaluation of orthopaedic interventions. Our objective was to determine whether a validated measure of mental health (Short Form-36 Mental Component Summary [SF-36 MCS]) or measures of tear severity on magnetic resonance imaging were more strongly associated with self-assessed shoulder pain and function in patients with symptomatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears. One hundred and sixty-nine patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears were prospectively enrolled. Patients completed the Short Form-36, visual analog scales for shoulder pain and function, the Simple Shoulder Test (SST), and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) instrument at the time of diagnosis. Shoulder magnetic resonance imaging examinations were reviewed to document the number of tendons involved, tear size, tendon retraction, and tear surface area. Age, sex, body mass index, number of medical comorbidities, smoking status, and Workers' Compensation status were recorded. Bivariate correlations and multivariate regression models were calculated to identify associations with baseline shoulder scores. The SF-36 MCS had the strongest correlation with the visual analog scale for shoulder pain (Pearson correlation coefficient, -0.48; p shoulder function (Pearson correlation coefficient, -0.33; p shoulder function; the Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.19 for tear size (p = 0.018), 0.18 for tendon retraction (p = 0.025), 0.18 for tear area (p = 0.022), and 0.20 for the number of tendons involved (p = 0.011). Tear severity did not correlate with other scores in bivariate correlations (all p > 0.05). In all multivariate models, the SF-36 MCS had the strongest association with the visual analog scale for shoulder pain, the visual analog scale for shoulder function, the SST, and the ASES score (all p pain and function in patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Further studies are

  7. Increased Upper Trapezius Muscle Stiffness in Overhead Athletes with Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Hio Teng; Hug, François; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2016-01-01

    Although excessive tension of the upper trapezius (UT) is thought to contribute to rotator cuff tendinopathy, no study examined UT tension in athletes with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Here we used UT shear modulus measured using ultrasound shear wave elastography as an index of muscle stiffness/tension. The aims of this study were twofold: 1) to determine whether the UT muscle shear modulus is altered in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy compared to asymptomatic athletes, and 2) to detect optimal cut-off points of UT shear modulus in identifying athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Forty-three male volleyball players (17 asymptomatic and 26 with rotator cuff tendinopathy, mean age = 22.9±3.5 years) participated in the study. UT shear modulus was quantified during active arm holding at 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction and passive arm positioning at 0°, 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction. During the active tasks, the UT shear modulus was higher in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy than the asymptomatic athletes (p = 0.002), regardless the arm position. During the passive tasks, athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy exhibited a higher UT shear modulus than asymptomatic athletes only at 0° of shoulder abduction (13.0±2.5 kPa vs 10.2±1.8 kPa, p = 0.001). When considering the active task, an optimal cut-off shear modulus of 12.0 kPa at 30° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.84, specificity = 0.57, AUC = 0.757, p = 0.008) and 9.5 kPa at 60° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.67, AUC = 0.816, p = 0.002) was detected. When considering the passive task at 0° of shoulder abduction, a cut-off of 12.2 kPa was found (sensitivity = 0.73, AUC = 0.817, p = 0.001). Findings from the present study show that monitoring passive and active UT muscle shear modulus may provide important information for the prevention/rehabilitation of rotator cuff tendinopathy.

  8. Increased Upper Trapezius Muscle Stiffness in Overhead Athletes with Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hio Teng Leong

    Full Text Available Although excessive tension of the upper trapezius (UT is thought to contribute to rotator cuff tendinopathy, no study examined UT tension in athletes with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Here we used UT shear modulus measured using ultrasound shear wave elastography as an index of muscle stiffness/tension. The aims of this study were twofold: 1 to determine whether the UT muscle shear modulus is altered in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy compared to asymptomatic athletes, and 2 to detect optimal cut-off points of UT shear modulus in identifying athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Forty-three male volleyball players (17 asymptomatic and 26 with rotator cuff tendinopathy, mean age = 22.9±3.5 years participated in the study. UT shear modulus was quantified during active arm holding at 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction and passive arm positioning at 0°, 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction. During the active tasks, the UT shear modulus was higher in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy than the asymptomatic athletes (p = 0.002, regardless the arm position. During the passive tasks, athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy exhibited a higher UT shear modulus than asymptomatic athletes only at 0° of shoulder abduction (13.0±2.5 kPa vs 10.2±1.8 kPa, p = 0.001. When considering the active task, an optimal cut-off shear modulus of 12.0 kPa at 30° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.84, specificity = 0.57, AUC = 0.757, p = 0.008 and 9.5 kPa at 60° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.67, AUC = 0.816, p = 0.002 was detected. When considering the passive task at 0° of shoulder abduction, a cut-off of 12.2 kPa was found (sensitivity = 0.73, AUC = 0.817, p = 0.001. Findings from the present study show that monitoring passive and active UT muscle shear modulus may provide important information for the prevention/rehabilitation of rotator cuff tendinopathy.

  9. The influence of simulated rotator cuff tears on the risk for impingement in handbike and handrim wheelchair propulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Drongelen, S.; Schlussel, M.; Arnet, U.; Veeger, H.E.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tears strongly affect the biomechanics of the shoulder joint in their role to regulate the joint contact force needed to prevent the joint from dislocation. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of simulated progressed rotator cuff tears on the (in)stability

  10. Use of cuff tear arthroplasty head prosthesis for rotator cuff arthropathy treatment in elderly patients with comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cassiano Diniz; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Ejnisman, Benno

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical and functional behavior of patients undergoing cuff tear arthroplasty at different stages of the disease. Cuff tear arthroplasty hemiarthroplasties were performed in 34 patients with rotator cuff arthropathy and associated comorbidities, classified according to Seebauer. The mean age was 76.3 years, and the sample comprised 23 females (67.6%) and 11 males (32.4%). The mean follow-up period was 21.7 months, and evaluations were performed using the Visual Analog Scale for pain and the Constant scale. There were no statistically significant differences in the mean reduction in the Visual Analog Scale or in the Constant scale increase between the female and male groups. The variation between the pre- and postoperative Visual Analog Scale and Constant scale evaluations was significant. There was also no statistically significant difference between the Seebauer classification groups regarding the mean Visual Analog Scale reduction, or the mean Constant scale increase. Cuff tear arthroplasty shoulder hemiarthroplasty is a good option for rotator cuff arthropathy in patients with comorbidities. Avaliar o comportamento clínico e funcional dos pacientes submetidos à artroplastia do tipo cuff tear arthroplasty para o tratamento da artropatia do manguito rotador em diferentes estágios da afecção. Foram realizadas 34 hemiartroplastias do tipo cuff tear arthroplasty em 34 pacientes com artropatia do manguito rotador e comorbidades associadas, classificadas de acordo com Seebauer. A média de idade foi de 76,3 anos, sendo 23 pacientes do sexo feminino (67,6%) e 11 do sexo masculino (32,4%). O seguimento médio foi de 21,7 meses e a avaliação foi realizada por meio da Escala Visual Analógica da dor e pela escala de Constant. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significante entre os grupos feminino e masculino, tanto nas médias de redução na Escala Visual Analógica quanto nas de aumento na escala de Constant. A variação entre as avalia

  11. Fatty Infiltration of Rotator Muscles: A Comparison of Cuff Tear Arthropathy and Glenohumeral Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan L. Scott

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rotator cuff tear arthropathy (CTA and glenohumeral osteoarthritis (OA are age-related chronic diseases of the shoulder representing debilitating, painful conditions with functional loss. Surgical intervention provides the most reliable treatment, but studies have shown that prognosis is contingent upon a variety of factors, one of the most reliable of which is fatty infiltration of the rotator cuff muscles. This study tests the hypothesis that fatty infiltration (FI is increased in CTA subjects compared with OA subjects. METHODS: CTA subjects (n = 22, age 71.9 ± 7.8 years and OA subjects (n = 22, age 62.9 ± 9.6 years were evaluated for extent of fatty infiltration by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Computed Tomography (CT imaging using Goutallier’s classification system and a novel scoring system of % FI. RESULTS: Goutallier classification showed that FI of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus rotator cuff muscles in CTA subjects was greater than those in OA subjects (p = 0.0001, p = 0.003, respectively. The % FI method revealed similar results (p = 0.003, p = 0.0008, respectively. Neither classification system revealed significant differences in FI for the subscapularis or teres minor cuff muscles (Goutallier: p = 0.123, p=0.890; % FI: p = 0.142, p = 0.666, respectively. Analysis using age-matched controls revealed similar results. There was a strong correlation in scores for the two classification systems (Spearman r = 0.96, p < 0.0001. CONCLUSION: Extent of fatty infiltration of the rotator cuff muscles in subjects suffering from rotator cuff tear arthropathy is significantly greater than in subjects with osteoarthritis. Level of evidence: Level IV, Case Controlled.

  12. Early versus delayed rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Brian P; Bishop, Meghan E; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Freedman, Kevin B

    2015-05-01

    Early passive range of motion (ROM) following arthroscopic cuff repair is thought to decrease postoperative stiffness and improve functionality. However, early aggressive rehabilitation may compromise repair integrity. Our purpose was to perform a systematic review to determine if there are differences between early and delayed rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in terms of clinical outcomes and healing. We performed a literature search with the terms 'arthroscopic rotator cuff', 'immobilization', 'early', 'delayed', 'late', and 'rehabilitation' using PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and EMBASE. Selection criteria included: level I/II evidence ≤ 6 months in duration, comparing early versus delayed rehabilitation following arthroscopic repair. Data regarding demographics, sample sizes, duration, cuff pathology, surgery, rehabilitation, functional outcomes, pain, ROM and anatomic assessment of healing were analyzed. PRIMSA criteria were followed. We identified six articles matching our criteria. Three reported significantly increased functional scores within the first 3-6 months with early rehabilitation compared to the delayed group, only one of which continued to observe a difference at a final follow-up of 15 months. Four articles showed improved ROM in the first 3-6 months post-operatively with early rehabilitation. One noted transient differences in pain scores. Only one study noted significant differences in ROM at final follow-up. No study reported any significant difference in rates of rotator cuff re-tear. However, two studies noted a trend towards increased re-tear with early rehabilitation that did not reach significance. This was more pronounced in studies including medium-large tears. Early rehabilitation after arthroscopic cuff repair is associated with some initial improvements in ROM and function. Ultimately, similar clinical and anatomical outcomes between groups existed at 1 year. While there was no

  13. Effects of slow and accelerated rehabilitation protocols on range of motion after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzgün, İrem; Baltacı, Gül; Turgut, Elif; Atay, O Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of the early initiation of passive and active range of motion exercises following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The study included 40 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Patients were quasi-randomly assigned into accelerated (ACCEL) protocol (n=19) and slow (SLOW) protocol (n=21) groups. Patients in both groups were treated with the same protocol. Active range of motion was begun at the 3rd week in the ACCEL group and the 6th week in the SLOW group. Range of motion was recorded at postoperative weeks 3, 5, 8, 12, and 24. While active range of motion for all measurements improved across weeks, there were no differences between groups, with the exception of active total elevation which was greater at all time point measurements in the ACCEL group (protator cuff repairs does not appear to affect range of motion in the first 6 postoperative months.

  14. COMPARISON OF ASTYM THERAPY AND KINESIOTAPING FOR ROTATOR CUFF TENDINOPATHY IN DIABETIC PATIENTS: RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

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    Azza Atya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rotator cuff tendinopathy is a significant problem among diabetics that frequently restricts patient’s activity in terms of pain and disability. The purpose of this study was to compare between the effect of Astym therapy and kinesiotaping in treating diabetic patients with chronic rotator cuff tendinopathy. Methods: 56 diabetic patients diagnosed with chronic rotator cuff tendinopathy were randomly assigned into Astym therapy group (n=28 or kinesiotaping group (n= 28. All patients received conventional program in addition to Astym treatment or Kinesiotaping for 24 sessions (2times/week. Patients were assessed at baseline and at the end of corresponding intervention with visual analogy scale (VAS for pain intensity, shoulder disability questioner (SDQ for shoulder disability, and electrogoniometer for shoulder range of motion. Results: For the 56 study participants (21 males and 35 females; mean age=41.9±6.9 years there were significant differences in all measuring outcomes in both group when compared to baseline measurements (p 0.05. Conclusion: kinesiotaping appears to be more effective than Astym therapy in reducing pain for diabetic patients with chronic rotator cuff tendinopathy.

  15. Outcomes of Rotator Cuff Repair in Patients with Comorbid Disability in the Extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Joo Han; Kim, Woo; Kim, Jung Youn; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2017-03-01

    Rehabilitation and overuse of the shoulder after rotator cuff repair are a concern in patients with comorbid disability in other extremities. Improvement of outcomes can be hampered in this situation. This study was to describe the clinical outcomes of rotator cuff repair in patients with comorbid disability in other extremities. In two tertiary institutions, 16 patients with comorbid disability (9 men and 7 women; mean age of 57.1 years [range, 45 to 71 years]; 14 dominant arms; mean follow-up of 18 months [range, 12 to 38 months]) underwent rotator cuff repair. There were 5 massive tears, 1 large tear, 9 medium tears, and 1 small tear. Open repair was performed in 3 patients and arthroscopic repair in 13. The most common comorbid condition was paralysis (n = 7). Eight patients walked with crutches preoperatively. Anatomical outcome was investigated in 12 patients using either magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasonography at least 6 months postoperatively. Range of motion, visual analogue scale for pain and satisfaction, and all functional scores improved significantly. Healing failure occurred in 4 patients (2 large-to-massive and 2 medium size tears), but none required revision surgery. All 4 retears involved the dominant side, and 3 patients were crutch users. The current data suggested favorable outcome of rotator cuff repair in patients with comorbid disability. Careful surgical planning and rehabilitation is particularly important for crutch users and in the case of dominant arm involvement in disabled patients.

  16. Therapeutic exercise for rotator cuff tendinopathy: a systematic review of contextual factors and prescription parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Chris; Malliaras, Peter; Chance-Larsen, Ken

    2015-06-01

    Exercise is widely regarded as an effective intervention for symptomatic rotator cuff tendinopathy but the prescription is diverse and the important components of such programmes are not well understood. The objective of this study was to systematically review the contextual factors and prescription parameters of published exercise programmes for rotator cuff tendinopathy, to generate recommendations based on current evidence. An electronic search of AMED, CiNAHL, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, PEDro and SPORTDiscus was undertaken from their inception to June 2014 and supplemented by hand searching. Eligible studies included randomized controlled trials evaluating the effectiveness of exercise in participants with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Included studies were appraised using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and synthesized narratively. Fourteen studies were included, and suggested that exercise programmes are widely applicable and can be successfully designed by physiotherapists with varying experience; whether the exercise is completed at home or within a clinic setting does not appear to matter and neither does pain production or pain avoidance during exercise; inclusion of some level of resistance does seem to matter although the optimal level is unclear, the optimal number of repetitions is also unclear but higher repetitions might confer superior outcomes; three sets of exercise are preferable to two or one set but the optimal frequency is unknown; most programmes should demonstrate clinically significant outcomes by 12 weeks. This systematic review has offered preliminary guidance in relation to contextual factors and prescription parameters to aid development and application of exercise programmes for rotator cuff tendinopathy.

  17. Factors influencing direct clinical costs of outpatient arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashjian, Robert Z; Belisle, Jeffrey; Baran, Sean; Granger, Erin K; Nelson, Richard E; Burks, Robert T; Greis, Patrick E

    2017-09-28

    Very limited information exists about factors affecting direct clinical costs of rotator cuff repair surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the direct cost of outpatient arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery using a unique value-driven outcomes tool and to identify patient- and treatment-related variables affecting cost. Cost data were derived for arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs performed by 3 surgeons from March 2014 to June 2015 using the value-driven outcomes tool. Costs included overall total direct cost, which included facility utilization costs, medication costs, supply costs, and other ancillary costs. Univariate and multivariate regressions were performed to determine the effect of various patient-related and surgical-related factors on costs. There were 170 arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs performed during the study period. Multivariate analysis showed significant correlations between higher total direct cost and the presence of a subscapularis repair being performed (P = .015) and total number of anchors used (P costs (P costs (P supply costs (P cost perspective, implementation of strategies to reduce overall costs should focus on reducing overall anchor quantity or price. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff as a cause of drooping shoulder

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    Prato, N.; Banderali, A. [Department of Radiology, San Carlo Hospital, Piazzale Gianasso, 16158 Genoa (Italy); Neumaier, C.E. [Department of Radiology, National Cancer Institute, Viale Benedetto XV 10, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Dahmane, M.; Martinoli, C.; Derchi, L.E. [Department of Radiology, University of Genoa, Viale Benedetto XV 10, 16132 Genoa (Italy)

    2003-02-01

    We describe a case of inferior glenohumeral subluxation or drooping shoulder secondary to acute calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff. The various etiologies of drooping shoulder and the specific causes determining glenohumeral widening in our report are discussed. The importance in recognizing this uncommon complication of a common abnormal finding and correction by aspiration is stressed. (orig.)

  19. Ultrasound: Can it replace MRI in the evaluation of the rotator cuff tears?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Saraya

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Ultrasound and MRI are comparable in both sensitivity and specificity. Since US is less expensive and more available, it could be considered as the screening method when rotator cuff integrity is the main question, if well-trained radiologists and high resolution equipments are available.

  20. RC-QOL score for rotator cuff pathology: adaptation to Italian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Rocco; Osti, Leonardo; Leonardi, Francesco; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-10-01

    We translated and adapted the English RC-QOL (rotator cuff quality of life) questionnaire into Italian and performed reliability and validity evaluations of the Italian RC-QOL version in patients with rotator cuff tears. The RC-QOL English version was translated into Italian by a bilingual orthopaedic surgeon. The back translation of the Italian version into English was performed by another bilingual orthopaedic surgeon. The original version was compared with the back translation. The RC-QOL questionnaire was then administered to 22 subjects (range 45-74 years) with a diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. For test-retest evaluation, the 22 patients were asked to complete the questionnaire at first examination, and 30 min following the end of this examination. The intraclass correlation coefficient for the 22 patients was 0.94 (95% CI = 0.85-0.98), indicating a high reliability. There were no significant differences between the scores immediately after the consultation and 30 min later. The Italian and the English versions of the RC-QOL questionnaire evaluate the same aspects of clinical severity in patients with rotator cuff tears.

  1. [Eccentric strength training for the rotator cuff tendinopathies with subacromial impingement. Current evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Hernández, Salvador Israel; Pérez-Ramírez, Luis Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are the leading cause of pain and functional disability of the shoulder. Conservative treatment is an essential part of their management. Despite the limited evidence, rehabilitation is the mainstay of the treatment for rotator cuff tears associated to impingement syndrome. There are current reports on the utility of strengthening with resistance, particularly by eccentric exercise. This report aims to present an overview of the efficacy of eccentric exercises in tendinopathies and current evidence of its benefit in rotator cuff tears. We describe the information available in tendinopathy and analyzed four studies published on eccentric strengthening for rotator cuff tears. There is theoretical evidence about its usefulness in this pathology, but only a controlled clinical trial has been published with data on improvement in strength but not in pain or functionality. More studies are needed with better methodological designs in order to generate evidence of their utility and recommendation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  2. Effect of two rehabilitation protocols on range of motion and healing rates after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: aggressive versus limited early passive exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bong Gun; Cho, Nam Su; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2012-01-01

    To compare range of motion and healing rates between 2 different rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic single-row repair for full-thickness rotator cuff tear. Sixty-four shoulders available for postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were enrolled in this study. Aggressive early passive rehabilitation (manual therapy [2 times per day] and unlimited self-passive stretching exercise) was performed in 30 shoulders (group A) and limited early passive rehabilitation (limited continuous passive motion exercise and limited self-passive exercise) in 34 shoulders (group B). A postoperative MRI scan was performed at a mean of 7.6 months (range, 6 to 12 months) after surgery. Regarding range of motion, group A improved more rapidly in forward flexion, external rotation at the side, internal and external rotation at 90° of abduction, and abduction than group B until 3 months postoperatively with significant differences. However, there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups at 1-year follow-up (P = .827 for forward flexion, P = .132 for external rotation at the side, P = .661 for external rotation at 90° of abduction, and P = .252 for abduction), except in internal rotation at 90° of abduction (P = .021). In assessing the repair integrity with postoperative MRI scans, 7 of 30 cases (23.3%) in group A and 3 of 34 cases (8.8%) in group B had retears, but the difference was not statistically significant (P = .106). Pain, range of motion, muscle strength, and function all significantly improved after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, regardless of early postoperative rehabilitation protocols. However, aggressive early motion may increase the possibility of anatomic failure at the repaired cuff. A gentle rehabilitation protocol with limits in range of motion and exercise times after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair would be better for tendon healing without taking any substantial risks

  3. Conventional En Masse Repair Versus Separate Double-Layer Double-Row Repair for the Treatment of Delaminated Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yang-Soo; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Jin, Hong-Ki; Kim, Sung-Eun; Lee, Jin-Woo

    2016-05-01

    The rotator cuff tendon is known to exert a shear force between the superficial and deep layers. Owing to this characteristic, separate repair of delaminated rotator cuff tears has been introduced for the restoration of the physiological biomechanics of the rotator cuff. However, whether conventional en masse repair or separate repair is superior is controversial in terms of outcomes. To compare clinical outcomes between conventional en masse repair and separate double-layer double-row repair for the treatment of delaminated rotator cuff tears. Randomized controlled study; Level of evidence, 2. Between August 2007 and March 2014, a total of 82 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair of a delaminated tear were enrolled and randomized into 2 groups. In group 1 (n = 48), arthroscopic conventional en masse repair was performed. In group 2 (n = 34), separate double-layer double-row repair was performed. The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Constant score, Simple Shoulder Test score, and visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain and range of motion (ROM) were assessed before surgery; at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery; and at the last follow-up visit. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at 12 months postoperatively to examine the retear rate and pattern. There was no significant difference between groups in the preoperative demographic data, including patient age, sex, symptom duration, tear size, and functional scores (P > .05). The mean follow-up period was 25.9 ± 1.2 months. Significant improvements in functional and pain scores were observed in both groups at the last follow-up visit. However, no significant differences in functional scores and ROM were found between the 2 groups at each time point, except that group 2 had significantly lower VAS pain scores (P .05). Both conventional en masse repair and separate double-layer double-row repair were effective in improving clinical outcomes in the treatment of delaminated rotator

  4. Infections following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: incidence, risk factors, and prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzenberger, Leo; Grieb, Annemarie; Hexel, Michael; Laky, Brenda; Anderl, Werner; Heuberer, Philipp

    2017-02-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of infections following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in a single department over a 10-year period. Secondary goals included the evaluation of potential risk factors for infections and to investigate the efficacy of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in the reduction of infectious complications. A retrospective evaluation of 3294 all-arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs performed between 2004 and 2014 at a single institution was conducted to determine the rate of infection in all-arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs. Detailed data including demographics, co-morbidities, initial surgical procedure, time from index surgery to infection, clinical presentation, isolated pathogens, and subsequent treatment were recorded of patients with infections. Univariate logistic regression was performed, and a multivariate model was developed to identify variables that were predictive of infections following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The rate of infection was 8.5/1000 in whom rotator cuff repairs were performed (95 % CI 0.58-1.23 %) during the study period. The most commonly identified pathogen was Staphylococcus epidermidis (n = 11, 39.3 %), followed by Propionibacterium acnes (n = 8, 28.6 %) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 2, 7.1 %). Patients presented at our institution with signs of infection an average of 28.9 ± 14.7 days after the index surgery. The leading symptom that was present in all patients was diffuse or localized shoulder pain, followed by local signs of infection in 19 (67.9 %), secretion in 14 (50 %), and fever in 9 (32.1 %) patients, respectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified the male gender, age over 60, and duration of surgery over 90 min as predictive factors for infection. Administration of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis was an independent mitigating factor for postoperative infection and reduced the infection rate from 1.54 % (95 % CI 0

  5. Efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for rotator cuff tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmeules, F; Boudreault, J; Roy, J S; Dionne, C E; Frémont, P; MacDermid, J C

    2016-03-01

    To perform a systematic review on the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy in adults. A literature search was conducted in four databases (CINAHL, Embase, PubMed and PeDRO) for randomised controlled trials published from date of inception until April 2015, comparing the efficacy of TENS for the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy with placebo or any other intervention. Risk of bias was evaluated using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Results were summarised qualitatively. Six studies were included in this review. The mean methodological score was 49% (standard deviation 16%), indicating an overall high risk of bias. One placebo-controlled trial reported that a single TENS session provided immediate pain reduction for patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy, but did not follow the participants in the short, medium or long term. Two trials that compared ultrasound therapy with TENS reported discrepancy and contradictory results in terms of pain reduction and shoulder range of motion. Corticosteroid injections were found to be superior to TENS for pain reduction in the short term, but the differences were not clinically important. Other studies included in this review concluded that TENS was not superior to heat or pulsed radiofrequency. Due to the limited number of studies and the overall high risk of bias of the studies included in this review, no conclusions can be drawn on the efficacy of TENS for the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy. More methodologically sound studies are needed to document the efficacy of TENS. Until then, clinicians should prefer other evidence-based rehabilitation interventions proven to be efficacious to treat patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Graft Utilization in the Augmentation of Large-to-Massive Rotator Cuff Repairs: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Devin P; Lewington, Matthew R; Smith, T Duncan; Wong, Ivan H

    2016-11-01

    Current treatment options for symptomatic large-to-massive rotator cuff tears can reduce pain, but failure rates remain high. Surgeons have incorporated synthetic and biologic grafts to augment these repairs, with promising results. Multiple reviews exist that summarize these products; however, no systematic review has investigated the grafts' ability to maintain structural integrity after augmentation of large-to-massive rotator cuff repairs. To systematically review and evaluate the effectiveness of grafts in the augmentation of large-to-massive rotator cuff repairs. Systematic review. A comprehensive search of 4 reputable databases was completed. Inclusion criteria were (1) large-to-massive rotator cuff tear, (2) graft augmentation of primary repairs ± primary repair control group, and (3) minimum clinical and radiologic follow-up of 12 months. Two reviewers screened the titles, abstracts, and full articles and extracted the data from eligible studies. Results were summarized into evidence tables stratified by graft origin and level of evidence. Ten studies fit the inclusion criteria. Allograft augmentation was functionally and structurally superior to primary repair controls, with intact repairs in 85% versus 40% of patients (P data. Xenograft augmentation failed to demonstrate superiority to primary repair controls, with worse structural healing rates (27% vs 60%; P =.11). Both comparative studies supported this finding. There have also been many reports of inflammatory reactions with xenograft use. Polypropylene patches are associated with improved structural (83% vs 59% and 49%; P data are lacking. Augmentation of large-to-massive rotator cuff repairs with human dermal allografts is associated with superior functional and structural outcome when compared with conventional primary repair. Xenograft augmentation failed to demonstrate a statistically significant difference and may be associated with worse rerupture rates and occasional severe inflammatory

  7. Early Versus Delayed Motion After Rotator Cuff Repair: A Systematic Review of Overlapping Meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Darby A; Kraeutler, Matthew J; Schuette, Hayden B; McCarty, Eric C; Bravman, Jonathan T

    2017-10-01

    Previous meta-analyses have been conducted to compare outcomes of early versus delayed motion after rotator cuff repair. To conduct a systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses comparing early versus delayed motion rehabilitation protocols after rotator cuff repair to determine which meta-analyses provide the best available evidence. Systematic review. A systematic review was performed by searching PubMed and Cochrane Library databases. Search terms included "rotator cuff repair," "early passive motion," "immobilization," "rehabilitation protocol," and "meta-analysis." Results were reviewed to determine study eligibility. Patient outcomes and structural healing were extracted from these meta-analyses. Meta-analysis quality was assessed using the Oxman-Guyatt and Quality of Reporting of Meta-analyses (QUOROM) systems. The Jadad decision algorithm was then used to determine which meta-analyses provided the best level of evidence. Seven meta-analyses containing a total of 5896 patients met the eligibility criteria (1 Level I evidence, 4 Level II evidence, 2 Level III evidence). None of these meta-analyses found immobilization to be superior to early motion; however, most studies suggested that early motion would increase range of motion (ROM), thereby reducing time of recovery. Three of these studies suggested that tear size contributed to the choice of rehabilitation to ensure proper healing of the shoulder. A study by Chan et al in 2014 received the highest QUOROM and Oxman-Guyatt scores, and therefore this meta-analysis appeared to have the highest level of evidence. Additionally, a study by Riboh and Garrigues in 2014 was selected as the highest quality study in this systematic review according to the Jadad decision algorithm. The current, best available evidence suggests that early motion improves ROM after rotator cuff repair but increases the risk of rotator cuff retear. Lower quality meta-analyses indicate that tear size may provide a better strategy in

  8. Alterations of the Deltoid Muscle After Open Versus Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam Su; Cha, Sang Won; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2015-12-01

    Open repair can be more useful than arthroscopic repair for immobile and severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears. However, it is not known whether the deltoid muscle is altered after open repair or to what extent the deltoid origin remains detached after surgery. To compare postoperative alterations of the deltoid muscle in open versus arthroscopic repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Enrolled in this study were 135 patients who underwent surgical repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears and who had routine follow-up MRIs at least 6 months after surgery. Open repairs were performed in 56 cases and arthroscopic repairs in 79 cases. The detachment and thickness of the deltoid muscle at its proximal origin were recorded in 5 zones on MRI. The alterations of the deltoid muscle and postoperative integrity of the repaired rotator cuff were evaluated. Partial detachment of the deltoid occurred in 1 patient (1.8%) in the open group and in 2 patients (2.5%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .80). All the partial detachments occurred in zones 2 and 3. Attenuation of the proximal origin of the deltoid was found in 3 patients (5.4%) in the open group and in 4 patients (5.1%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .87). Atrophy of the deltoid muscle was shown in 3 patients (5.4%) in the open group and 4 patients (5.1%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .61). The retear rate of the repaired cuff was 30.4% (17/56) in the open group and 38.0% (30/79) in the arthroscopic group (P = .74). Between open and arthroscopic repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears, there was no significant difference in detachment of the deltoid origin and alterations of the deltoid muscle after repair. Postoperative alterations of the deltoid occurred in arthroscopic surgery as well as in open surgery. For immobile massive rotator cuff tear, open repair is an acceptable technique

  9. Four-week exercise program does not change rotator cuff muscle activation and scapular kinematics in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yin-Liang; Karduna, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    Rotator cuff and scapular muscle strengthening exercises are an essential part of shoulder rehabilitation and sports training. Although the effect of exercise training on pain and function have been widely investigated, few studies have focused on the changes in shoulder kinematics and muscle activity after exercise training. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of rotator cuff and scapular strengthening exercises on shoulder kinematics and the activation of rotator cuff and scapular muscles in healthy subjects. Thirty-six healthy subjects were recruited and randomly assigned into either a training or control group. Subjects in the training group were trained with rotator cuff and scapular strengthening exercises for 4 weeks. Scapular kinematics and shoulder muscle activity during arm elevation were measured before and after exercise training. After the 4-week training protocol, there was an increase in strength and a decrease in upper trapezius activation in the training group, which is consistent with previous studies. However, no difference was found in scapular kinematics and activation of rotator cuff muscles between the control and training groups after the training protocol. Although the exercise protocol resulted in strength gains for the rotator cuff, these gains did not transfer to an increase in muscle activation during motion. These results demonstrate the difficulty in changing activation patterns of the rotator cuff muscles. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2079-2088, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Performance after rotator cuff tear and operative treatment: a case-control study of major league baseball pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdari, Surena; Baldwin, Keith; Ahn, Albert; Huffman, G Russell; Sennett, Brian J

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about pitching performance or lack of it among Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers who undergo operative treatment of rotator cuff tears. To assess pitching performance outcomes in MLB players who needed operative treatment of rotator cuff tears and to compare performance in these athletes with that in a control group of MLB players. Case-control study. Publicly available player profiles, press releases, and team injury reports. Thirty-three MLB pitchers with documented surgery to treat rotator cuff tears and 117 control pitchers who did not have documented rotator cuff tears were identified. Major League Baseball pitching attrition and performance variables. Players who underwent rotator cuff surgery were no more likely not to play than control players. Performance variables of players who underwent surgery improved after surgery but never returned to baseline preoperative status. Players who needed rotator cuff surgery typically were more experienced and had better earned run averages than control players. Pitchers who had symptomatic rotator cuff tears that necessitated operative treatment tended to decline gradually in performance leading up to their operations and to improve gradually over the next 3 seasons. In contrast to what we expected, they did not have a greater attrition rate than their control counterparts; however, their performances did not return to preoperative levels over the course of the study.

  11. Evaluation of the Trends, Concomitant Procedures, and Complications With Open and Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs in the Medicare Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Andrew R; Cha, Peter S; Devana, Sai K; Ishmael, Chad; Di Pauli von Treuheim, Theo; D'Oro, Anthony; Wang, Jeffrey C; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2017-10-01

    Medicare insures the largest population of patients at risk for rotator cuff tears in the United States. To evaluate the trends in incidence, concomitant procedures, and complications with open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs in Medicare patients. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. All Medicare patients who had undergone open or arthroscopic rotator cuff repair from 2005 through 2011 were identified with a claims database. Annual incidence, concomitant procedures, and postoperative complications were compared between these 2 groups. In total, 372,109 rotator cuff repairs were analyzed. The incidence of open repairs decreased (from 6.0 to 4.3 per 10,000 patients, P arthroscopic repairs increased (from 4.5 to 7.8 per 10,000 patients, P arthroscopic group were more likely to have undergone concomitant subacromial decompression than those in the open group (87% vs 35%, P arthroscopic, P arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs have increased in incidence and now represent the majority of rotator cuff repair surgery. Among concomitant procedures, subacromial decompression was most commonly performed despite evidence suggesting a lack of efficacy. Infections and stiffness were rare complications that were slightly but significantly more frequent in open rotator cuff repairs.

  12. Rotator cuff repair in the Brazilian Unified Health System: Brazilian trends from 2003 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Assunção, Jorge Henrique; Beraldo, Rodrigo Alves; Pinto, Gustavo de Mello Ribeiro; Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Ferreira Neto, Arnaldo Amado

    2017-01-01

    To assess the historical trend of rotator cuff repairs in Brazil between 2003 and 2015, using the database of the Brazilian Unified Health System's (Sistema Único de Saúde [SUS]) Department of Informatics (DataSUS). Historical series using DataSUS. Surgeries performed between 2003 and 2015 were included and data relating to cuff tear repair were assessed, including decompression procedures were included. The numerator was the total number of rotator cuff repair and the denominator, the total population of the assessed locality. Population data were based on information from the Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística (IBGE). During the period, 50,207 surgeries were performed. The rate was presented as number of procedures per 100,000 inhabitants, and increased from 0.83 to 2.81, a growth of 238%. In 2015, the South region had the highest rate, 6.32, followed by the Southeast, 3.62, while the North had the lowest rate, 0.13. The growing trend can be observed in the Southeast, South, and Midwest, while the rate is stable in the North and Northeast. The rate of rotator cuff repairs in Brazil performed through the SUS increased from 0.83 to 2.81 between 2003 and 2015, representing a growth of 238%, but remains lower than that of developed countries. A trend of growth can be observed in the Southeast, South, and Midwest, while the rate is stable in the North and Northeast.

  13. Are Pulley Exercises Initiated 6 Weeks After Rotator Cuff Repair a Safe and Effective Rehabilitative Treatment? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Keith M; Osborn, Roy; Schweinle, Will E; Zens, Matthew J; Helsper, Elizabeth A

    2016-07-01

    There are few level 1 or 2 evidence studies that examine rehabilitation after rotator cuff repair. Pulleys have been used in postoperative shoulder rehabilitation with the intention of improving range of motion and developing strength. There is a concern that the use of pulleys in rehabilitation of rotator cuff repairs may contribute to excessive scapular motion (scapular substitution) and potentially inferior outcomes. Rotator cuff repair patients treated with pulley exercises would have increased scapular substitution and inferior patient-determined outcome scores, range of motion, and strength compared with patients treated with an alternative rehabilitation program without pulleys. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. A total of 27 patients who underwent rotator cuff repair were randomized to a rehabilitation group that used pulleys initiated 6 weeks postoperatively, and 26 patients followed a rehabilitation protocol without pulleys. Inclusion criteria were patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Exclusion criteria were large to massive rotator cuff tears, revision rotator cuff repair, glenohumeral osteoarthritis, adhesive capsulitis, and a symptomatic contralateral shoulder. Outcomes of intervention were patient-determined outcome scores (Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index [WORC], American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES] Shoulder Score, Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation [SANE], Shoulder Activity Level, and Simple Shoulder Test [SST]), range of motion, scapular substitution, and strength. Outcomes were determined at 6, 12, 18, 26, and 52 weeks. A power analysis determined that 22 patients were needed per group to have a power of 0.80, α = 0.05, and effect size of f = 0.5. Both groups had statistically significant improvements in WORC, ASES Shoulder Score, SST, and SANE scores over time after rotator cuff repair (P pulleys does not result in inferior outcomes, as determined by patient-determined outcome scores, measurements of

  14. Evaluation of the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries in patients aged 65 years and over

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Naoki Miyazaki

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries in patients aged 65 years and over.METHODS: Between 1998 and 2009, 168 patients underwent operations. Five cases were excluded. The remaining 163 patients were stratified according to their age group: 65-69 years (49.1%, 70-74 (26.4% and 75 years and over (24.5%. Their mean age was 71 years (range: 65-83. There were 63 male patients (38.7%. The mean length of time with pain, from the onset of symptoms to the surgery, was 23 months (range: 2 days to 240 months. Sixty-two patients (38% reported histories of trauma and 26 (16% reported that their pain worsened through exertion.RESULTS: From the UCLA criteria, 80.4% of the results were excellent, 16% good, 1.8% fair and 1.8% poor. Complications occurred in 11%. The final clinical result did not show any correlation with age progression, injury size or tendons affected. However, there was a significant association (p < 0.001 between the presence of trauma and larger injuries. The length of time between the onset of symptoms and the surgical procedure had a significant relationship (p < 0.027 with the postoperative results: the longer this time was, the worse the results were.CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff injuries in patients aged 65 years and over presented excellent and good results in 96.4% of the cases, according to the UCLA assessment, with a low complication rate. Advanced age did not show any influence on the postoperative clinical evolution, but the earlier the surgical treatment was instituted, the better the results were.

  15. [Functional results of type A botulinum toxin versus oral anti-inflammatory agents in the rehabilitation of painful shoulder syndrome caused by rotator cuff lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Bautista P; Negrete-Corona, J; Chávez-Hinojosa, E

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff conditions are characterized by unspecific signs, as well as anatomic alterations and symptoms. They have a multifactorial etiology and may include everything from tendinitis to massive, full thickness tears of the rotator cuff tendon that compromise the normal biomechanics of the involved shoulder. They usually occur in people over 40 years of age but lesions resulting from trauma may vary according to the mechanism of injury and are not directly related with the age at onset of symptoms. Vascular factors have been described as related with rotator cuff tendon damage in conditions affecting the microcirculation. However, recent studies have not proven that the tendon under direct observation shows hypovascularity. Type A botulinum toxin acts by blocking the release of acetylcholine in the neuromuscular plate; in the joints it releases capsular tension and reduces proinflammatory factors such as interleukin-1 (IL-1). There are only a few papers on its intraarticular benefit; in muscle and tendon groups it not only has a muscle relaxant effect, but several publications support its utility for pain management. It has been widely used in the rehabilitation of this group of patients at low doses. Material and methods: Prospective, investigational and longitudinal study involving the follow-up of 24 patients with a diagnosis of painful shoulder syndrome proven clinically and with imaging tests, and caused by rotator cuff lesions. The patients either did not meet the criteria for immediate surgical repair or had already undergone such a repair. Type A botulinum toxin was applied to 12 patients in the subacromial space around the rotator cuff conjoint tendon, as well as in the painful spots and in the muscle contracture in the shoulder. The total dose of Type A botulinum toxin was 200 IU. The control group, also composed of 12 patients, was given a COX-2 oral antiinflammatory agent for 6 weeks (Celecoxib, 100 mg BID). Both groups followed a pre

  16. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder following double row suture anchor technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambani Rohit

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff is a demanding surgery. Accurate placement of anchors is key to success. Case presentation A 38-year-old woman received arthroscopic repair of her rotator cuff using a double row suture anchor technique. Postoperatively, she developed impingement syndrome which resulted from vertical displacement of a suture anchor once the shoulder was mobilised. The anchor was removed eight weeks following initial surgery and the patient had an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Impingement syndrome following arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuffs using double row suture anchor has not been widely reported. This is the first such case where anchoring has resulted in impingement syndrome.

  17. Cross-sectional and longitudinal construct validity of two rotator cuff disease-specific outcome measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Osnabrugge Varda

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disease-specific Quality Of Life (QOL measures are devised to assess the impact of a specific disease across a spectrum of important domains of life. The purpose of this study was to examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal construct validity (sensitivity to change of two rotator cuff disease-specific measures, the Rotator Cuff-Quality Of Life (RC-QOL and the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC index, in relation to one another and to other joint and limb specific measures in the same population of the patients suffering from rotator cuff pathology. Methods Participants enrolled were consecutive patients who received physical therapy for management of impingement syndrome or received treatment following rotator cuff repair, acromioplasty or decompression surgeries. All subjects received physical therapy treatment and completed four outcome measures at 3 single points (initial, interim, and final. Cross-sectional convergent validity was assessed at each of the 3 time-points by correlating the WORC and RC-QOL's scores to each other and to two alternative scales; a joint-specific scale, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES standardized shoulder assessment form and a limb-specific measure, the Upper Extremity Functional Index (UEFI. Non-parametric statistics (Spearman's rho and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests examined the construct validity. The standardized response mean (SRM was used to examine sensitivity to change. Results Forty-one participants entered the study and their scores were compared at 3 cross sectional single points. The correlation coefficients among the 4 measures varied from 0.60 to 0.91. Correlation between corresponding domains of the WORC and RC-QOL varied from 0.45 to 0.85. The known group validity was not significantly different among individual sub-scores and total scores. The final SRMs were (1.42, (1.43, (1.44, and (1.54 for the ASES, RCQOL, WORC, and UEFI respectively. Conclusion The WORC and

  18. Comparison of self-report and interview administration methods based on the Brazilian versions of the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire in patients with rotator cuff disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Diniz Lopes

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to compare self-report and interview administration methods using the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire (DASH in patients with rotator cuff disorders. METHODS: Thirty male and female patients over 18 years of age with rotator cuff disorders (tendinopathy or rotator cuff tear and Brazilian Portuguese as their primary language were recruited for assessment via administration of the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire. A randomization method was used to determine whether the questionnaires would be self-reported (n=15 or administered by an interviewer (n=15. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to evaluate the correlation between the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire in each group. The t-test was used to determine whether the difference in mean questionnaire scores and administration time was statistically significant. For statistical analysis, the level of significance was set at 5%. RESULTS: The mean subject age was 55.07 years, ranging from 27 to 74 years. Most patients had a diagnosis of tendinopathy (n=21. With regard to level of schooling, the majority (n=26 of subjects had completed a college degree or higher. The mean questionnaire scores and administration times did not significantly differ between the two groups (p>0.05. There were statistically significant correlations (p<0.05 between Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire, and strong correlations were found between the questionnaires in both groups. CONCLUSION: There are no differences between the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire administration methods with regard to administration time or correlations between the

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of muscle usage associated with three exercises for rotator cuff rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrigan, J M; Shellock, F G; Mink, J H; Deutsch, A L

    1999-10-01

    Methods of determining muscle usage for exercises involving rotator cuff muscles are limited. Therefore, this investigation used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate the effect of three different exercises used for rehabilitation of the rotator cuff. Five normal volunteer subjects (3 men, 2 women, mean age 31.4 yr) were studied. The exercises were scaption with internal rotation (SIR), military press (MP), and side-lying 45 degrees abduction (SLA). MR imaging was performed immediately before and after exercise using a "fast" spin echo STIR sequence and oblique coronal plane imaging. Changes in signal intensity pre- and post-exercise were measured at comparable section locations for the MR images of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, subscapularis, deltoid, and trapezius. The SLA showed the greatest increase in signal intensity in all the muscles (percent change, P < 0.01) except for the trapezius, which was used more by the MP and SIR. None of the exercises activated the teres minor (percent change, P = not significant). These findings have important implications in efficacy of physical rehabilitation of the rotator cuff and avoidance of subacromial impingement exercise motions.

  20. Relationship between clinical and surgical findings and reparability of large and massive rotator cuff tears: a longitudinal study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holtby, Richard; Razmjou, Helen

    2014-01-01

    ...) to explore the value of clinical and surgical factors in predicting reparability. This was a secondary data analysis of consecutive patients with large or massive rotator cuff tear who required surgical treatment...

  1. Three Months of Progressive High-Load Versus Traditional Low-Load Strength Training Among Patients With Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Kim Gordon; Jensen, Steen Lund; Sørensen, Lilli

    2017-01-01

    benefit from PHLE over traditional LLE among patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Further investigation of the possible interaction between exercise type and corticosteroid injection is needed to establish optimal and potentially synergistic combinations of these 2 factors. REGISTRATION: NCT01984203...

  2. Increased vascularization during early healing after biologic augmentation in repair of chronic rotator cuff tears using autologous leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF): a prospective randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumstein, Matthias A; Rumian, Adam; Lesbats, Virginie; Schaer, Michael; Boileau, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs using leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) in a standardized, modified protocol is technically feasible and results in a higher vascularization response and watertight healing rate during early healing. Twenty patients with chronic rotator cuff tears were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups. In the test group (N = 10), L-PRF was added in between the tendon and the bone during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The second group served as control (N = 10). They received the same arthroscopic treatment without the use of L-PRF. We used a double-row tension band technique. Clinical examinations including subjective shoulder value, visual analog scale, Constant, and Simple Shoulder Test scores and measurement of the vascularization with power Doppler ultrasonography were made at 6 and 12 weeks. There have been no postoperative complications. At 6 and 12 weeks, there was no significant difference in the clinical scores between the test and the control groups. The mean vascularization index of the surgical tendon-to-bone insertions was always significantly higher in the L-PRF group than in the contralateral healthy shoulders at 6 and 12 weeks (P = .0001). Whereas the L-PRF group showed a higher vascularization compared with the control group at 6 weeks (P = .001), there was no difference after 12 weeks of follow-up (P = .889). Watertight healing was obtained in 89% of the repaired cuffs. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with the application of L-PRF is technically feasible and yields higher early vascularization. Increased vascularization may potentially predispose to an increased and earlier cellular response and an increased healing rate. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David; Maerz, Tristan; Lynch, Jamie; Norris, Sarah; Baker, Kevin; Anderson, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has conventionally involved a 4- to 6-week period of immobilization; there are two schools of thought regarding activity level during this period. Some authors encourage early, more aggressive rehabilitation along with the use of a continuous passive motion device; others propose later, more conservative rehabilitation. Although some studies report trends in improved early range of motion, pain relief, and outcomes scores with aggressive rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair, no definitive consensus exists supporting a clinical difference resulting from rehabilitation timing in the early stages of healing. Rehabilitation timing does not affect outcomes after 6 to 12 months postoperatively. Given the lack of information regarding which patient groups benefit from aggressive rehabilitation, individualized patient care is warranted.

  4. Arthroscopic treatment of secondary rotator cuff damage after shoulder hemiarthroplasty (case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Dokolin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anatomical shoulder arthroplasty is an effective treatment for patients with primary deforming arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and aseptic necrosis of the humeral head. However this kind of surgery is associated with high risk of complications, and within five-year follow-up the incidence of complications increases. The authors described a clinical case illustrating one of these complications - secondary rotator cuff damage after shoulder hemiarthroplasty. The tear was verified using radiological methods and arthroscopy. They performed arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using suture anchors in order to alleviate pain and preserve shoulder functions. If there are no signs of endoprosthetic instability and coracoacromial ligament is preserved, arthroscopic treatment of such damages extends the time of limb function preserving the endoprosthesis. Patients should not raise their arms above the horizontal level.

  5. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder following double row suture anchor technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Rambani Rohit; Hackney Roger G

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff is a demanding surgery. Accurate placement of anchors is key to success. Case presentation A 38-year-old woman received arthroscopic repair of her rotator cuff using a double row suture anchor technique. Postoperatively, she developed impingement syndrome which resulted from vertical displacement of a suture anchor once the shoulder was mobilised. The anchor was removed eight weeks following initial surgery and the patient had an u...

  6. Case report - calcification of the medial collateral ligament of the knee with simultaneous calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff

    OpenAIRE

    Kamawal, Yama; Steinert, Andre F; Boris M. Holzapfel; Rudert, Maximilian; Barthel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Calcification of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) of the knee is a very rare disease. We report on a case of a patient with a calcifying lesion within the MCL and simultaneous calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff in both shoulders. Case presentation Calcification of the MCL was diagnosed both via x-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and was successfully treated surgically. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff was successfully treated applying conservative method...

  7. Use of a shoulder abduction brace after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: A study on gait performance and falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, Yuma; Nishioka, Takashi; Nakajima, Ryo; Imai, Shinji; Vigers, Piers; Kawasaki, Taku

    2017-03-01

    Fall prevention is essential in patients after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair because of the high risk of re-rupture. However, there are no reports related to falls that occur during the early postoperative period, while the affected limb is immobilized. This study assessed gait performance and falls in patients using a shoulder abduction brace after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Prospective cohort and postoperative repeated measures. This study included 29 patients (mean age, 67.1 ± 7.4 years) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair followed by rehabilitation. The timed up and go test, Geriatric Depression Scale, and Falls Efficacy Scale were measured, and the numbers of falls were compared between those shoulder abduction brace users and patients who had undergone total hip or knee arthroplasty. In arthroscopic rotator cuff repair patients, there were significant improvements in timed up and go test and Geriatric Depression Scale, but no significant differences in Falls Efficacy Scale, between the second and fifth postoperative weeks ( p arthroscopic rotator cuff repair patients fell more often than patients with total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty during the same period. The findings suggest that rehabilitation in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair patients is beneficial, but decreased gait performance due to the immobilizing shoulder abduction brace can lead to falls. Clinical relevance Although rehabilitation helps motor function and mental health after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, shoulder abduction brace use is associated with impaired gait performance, high Falls Efficacy Scale scores, and risk of falls, so awareness of risk factors including medications and lower limb dysfunctions is especially important after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

  8. Results of reconstruction of massive irreparable rotator cuff tears using a fascia lata allograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Varvitsiotis

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Despite advances in surgical methods, there is still not a universally accepted treatment for massive and irreparable rotator cuff tears, because the standard methods have dubious results, with excessive retear rates and poor outcomes, necessitating the need for new repair strategies. We documented significant clinical improvement using fascia lata allograft in the repair of massive irreparable r-c tear, acting as scaffold to bridge the defect, enhancing the healing at the repair site.

  9. Early active rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a prospective randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschhofer, Rudolf; Poulios, Nikos; Schimetta, Wolfgang; Kisling, Rüdiger; Mittermaier, Christian

    2017-10-01

    To compare two different rehabilitation strategies, primary passive motion versus early isometric loading of the rotator cuff. Prospective randomized controlled observer-blinded pilot study. Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Thirty patients after rotator cuff surgery. All participants were randomly assigned to one of the two outpatient treatment groups: primary passive motion versus early isometric loading of the rotator cuff. Both groups were treated for 12 weeks and performed additionally a home exercise program. The primary outcome measure for functional assessment was the Constant Murley score. The secondary outcome measures were the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score (DASH), active range of motion, pain level and strength. Patients were assessed before, 6, 12 and 24 weeks after surgery. Repeatedly measured metric variables were compared by the Quade rank analysis of covariance and revealed substantially better Constant Murley scores in the early activated group at all 3 assessments (6 weeks: 41 [31;45] versus 30 [23;37]; 12 weeks: 68 [56;77] versus 59 [53;62]; 24 weeks: 79 [76;81] versus 66 [62;74]; data as median [25%;75%]). Postoperative changes of Constant score were in favour of the active group with the biggest difference at week 12 (28 [38;12] versus 9 [27;-4]). Maximal pain levels showed clear more reduction 6 and 24 weeks after surgery in the early activated group. This pilot study with early isometric loading of the rotator cuff shows better function and less maximal pain. Further research is warranted to confirm our results.

  10. Efficacy of exercise therapy in workers with rotator cuff tendinopathy: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Desmeules, Fran?ois; Boudreault, Jennifer; Dionne, Clermont E; Fr?mont, Pierre; Lowry, V?ronique; MacDermid, Joy C.; Roy, Jean-S?bastien

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To perform a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the efficacy of therapeutic exercises for workers suffering from rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy. Methods: A literature search in four bibliographical databases (Pubmed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PEDro) was conducted from inception up to February 2015. RCTs were included if participants were workers suffering from RC tendinopathy, the outcome measures included work-related outcomes, and at least one of the interventi...

  11. Quantitative assessment of rotator cuff muscle elasticity: Reliability and feasibility of shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, Taku; Giambini, Hugo; Uehara, Kosuke; Okamoto, Seiji; Chen, Shigao; Sperling, John W; Itoi, Eiji; An, Kai-Nan

    2015-11-05

    Ultrasound imaging has been used to evaluate various shoulder pathologies, whereas, quantification of the rotator cuff muscle stiffness using shear wave elastography (SWE) has not been verified. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and feasibility of SWE measurements for the quantification of supraspinatus (SSP) muscle elasticity. Thirty cadaveric shoulders (18 intact and 12 with torn rotator cuff) were used. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was evaluated on an established SWE technique for measuring the SSP muscle elasticity. To assess the effect of overlying soft tissues above the SSP muscle, SWE values were measured with the transducer placed on the skin, on the subcutaneous fat after removing the skin, on the trapezius muscle after removing the subcutaneous fat, and directly on the SSP muscle. In addition, SWE measurements on 4 shoulder positions (0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° abduction) were compared in those with/without rotator cuff tears. Intra- and inter-observer reliability of SWE measurements were excellent for all regions in SSP muscle. Also, removing the overlying soft tissue showed no significant difference on SWE values measured in the SSP muscle. The SSP muscle with 0° abduction showed large SWE values, whereas, shoulders with large-massive tear showed smaller variation throughout the adduction-abduction positions. SWE is a reliable and feasible tool for quantitatively assessing the SSP muscle elasticity. This study also presented SWE measurements on the SSP muscle under various shoulder abduction positions which might help characterize patterns in accordance to the size of rotator cuff tears. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The accurate assessment and physiotherapeutic treatment of rotator cuff myofascial Pain Syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Barker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Management  of  patients  with  rotator  cuff  myofascial  pain syndrome varies  and  successful  intervention  is  dependent  on accurate assessment. The aim of this case report is to show the importance of accurate assessment  and  clinical  reasoning  in  the  physiotherapeutic management  of a  patient  suffering  from  ante-cubital  and  anterior shoulder  pain.  The  patient was  referred  for  physiotherapy  after proving refractory  to  treatment  with  non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication. The physiotherapist diagnosed a rotator cuff myofascial pain syndrome and treatment proceeded on that basis. Treatment consisted of twitch-obtaining dry needling, myofascial release and exercise therapy.  The result was a change in the harryman rotator cuff functional Assessment Scale score from 22/52 to 43/52 over eight treatments. Strength was regained and subjective pain report on the visual rating scale was improved to 1/10. The case study highlights the importance of accurate assessment and consideration of alternative myofascial sources for pain even in circumstances which initially seem trauma related. Precise diagnosis of the cause - in this case rotator cuff myofascial pain syndrome – will result in effective treatment being administered.

  13. Septic arthritis and arthropathy of the rotator cuff: remember this association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Sobreira

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To describe occurrences of septic glenohumeral arthritis among patients with arthropathy of the rotator cuff, and to highlight the importance of correct diagnosis and surgical procedures. METHODOLOGy: Eight surgical drains were installed in seven patients with glenohumeral pyoarthritis. All the patients presented arthropathy of the rotator cuff (four males and three females. Six patients presented pyoarthritis in the dominant shoulder. The age range was from 53 to 93 years (mean: 74 years. The mean duration of the symptoms before the surgical lavage was six weeks. Six patients underwent treatment consisting of a combination of arthroscopic irrigation and debridement, and one patient was treated by means of open arthrotomy. All the patients received systemic antibiotic therapy in accordance with their bacterial sensitivity. RESULTS: All seven patients achieved satisfactory results, taking into consideration especially the improvement of pain and the patients' satisfaction. The functional assessment was performed using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA scale. Only one patient needed to go through another arthroscopic procedure. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from four cultures and Escherichia coli from one culture. There were two situations in which the patients used empirical antibiotic therapy and the cultures showed negative results. Among the associated procedures, tenotomy of the biceps was performed in four cases, resection of the lateral third of the clavicle due to osteomyelitis in one case and arthrotomy of the knee in one case. CONCLUSION: Surgical treatment was effective in the cases of arthritis associated with arthropathy of the rotator cuff. In patients with arthropathy of the rotator cuff and subclinically altered laboratory signs, the possibility of pyoarthritis should always be suspected.

  14. Efficacy of informed versus uninformed physiotherapy on postoperative retear rates of medium-sized and large rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chin-Tsai; Hu, Weichih; Wen, Che-Sheng; Wang, Su-Fan; Lieu, Fu-Kong; Teng, Jyh-Tong

    2015-09-01

    It is important to perform the first 12 weeks of rehabilitation without risk of tearing a cuff tendon from its repair site. Our hypothesis was that performing early postoperative rehabilitation with a limitable pendulum exercise device can produce lower retear rate outcomes when it is combined with safe, informed physiotherapy compared with a standardized protocol of rehabilitation performed at home. By using an asymmetric arm support brace and an advanced accelerometer, we attempted to determine the benefits of small pendulum exercises (proposed by Long et al). This study enrolled 24 patients to use a monitoring device in standardized small pendulum exercises. Clinical outcomes and magnetic resonance images were evaluated preoperatively and 12 weeks after surgery. While a patient performed pendulum exercises, a therapist used computer imagery to observe whether vertical acceleration was over a given threshold (identified as physiologic tremors), as a warning of and precaution associated with the increased risk of repair failure. Similar self-reported functional outcomes were reported in 2 areas. The rate of recurrent tears was significantly higher for both the medium-sized and large areas in the uninformed home rehabilitation group compared with the informed group. The results of monitoring of pendulum exercises to develop informed physical therapeutic methodology were consistent with those of previously published literature. In this study, use of a monitoring device during early rehabilitation was associated with lower retear rates after rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. EXERCISE REHABILITATION IN THE NON-OPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF ROTATOR CUFF TEARS: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Peter; Ebert, Jay; Joss, Brendan; Bhabra, Gev; Ackland, Tim; Wang, Allan

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of rotator cuff tears increases with age, with full-thickness rotator cuff tears present in approximately 25% of individuals in their sixties, and more than 50% of those in their eighties. While surgery is considered an effective treatment, recurrent tears at the insertion site are common, especially with degenerative tears, which are frequent in the older population. More recently, there has been increasing interest in exercise rehabilitation and physical therapy as a means to manage partial and full thickness tears of the rotator cuff by addressing weakness and functional deficits. Recent studies have suggested that patients opting for physical therapy have demonstrated high satisfaction, an improvement in function, and success in avoiding surgery. When considering the increasing rate of shoulder surgery and the associated economic and social burden rotator cuff surgery places on both the patient and the health care system, non-surgical management such as physical therapy and exercise may, in selected cases, be a treatment alternative to surgical repair. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide an overview of rotator cuff pathology and pathogenesis, and to present an evidence-based case for the role of conservative rehabilitation in the management of rotator cuff injuries. Level 5.

  16. Genome-wide association study for rotator cuff tears identifies two significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashjian, Robert Z; Granger, Erin K; Farnham, James M; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Teerlink, Craig C

    2016-02-01

    The precise etiology of rotator cuff disease is unknown, but prior evidence suggests a role for genetic factors. Limited data exist identifying specific genes associated with rotator cuff tearing. The purpose of this study was to identify specific genes or genetic variants associated with rotator cuff tearing by a genome-wide association study with an independent set of rotator cuff tear cases. A set of 311 full-thickness rotator cuff tear cases genotyped on the Illumina 5M single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) platform were used in a genome-wide association study with 2641 genetically matched white population controls available from the Illumina iControls database. Tests of association were performed with GEMMA software at 257,558 SNPs that compose the intersection of Illumina SNP platforms and that passed general quality control metrics. SNPs were considered significant if P development of rotator cuff tearing. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Electromyographic study of rotator cuff muscle activity during full and empty can tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Kai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The empty can (EC and full can (FC tests are used as diagnostic tools for patients with rotator cuff disease. However, recently concerns have been raised that these tests do not selectively activate the muscle. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the rotator cuff muscle activation levels during the EC and FC tests in various positions using electromyography. Twelve healthy, right-handed men without shoulder complaints (mean age: 26.1 years, range: 23–35 years were included. The tests were performed isometrically with the shoulder elevated at 45° and 90° in the sagittal, scapular, and coronal planes, either in the thumb-up (FC test or thumb-down (EC test positions. During these positions, the electromyographic signal was recorded simultaneously from the four shoulder muscles using a combination of surface and intramuscular fine-wire electrodes. The average activation of the supraspinatus and subscapularis was greater during the EC test than during the FC test and in the scapular and coronal planes than in the sagittal plane at 90°. For the infraspinatus, there were no significant differences in any positions between the two tests. Thus, the rotator cuff muscles are influenced by arm position and the elevation plane during the EC and FC tests.

  18. Comparison of slow and accelerated rehabilitation protocol after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: pain and functional activity.

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    Düzgün, Irem; Baltacı, Gül; Atay, O Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we sought to compare the effects of the slow and accelerated protocols on pain and functional activity level after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The study included 29 patients (3 men, 26 women) who underwent arthroscopic repair of stage 2 and 3 rotator cuff tears. Patients were randomized in two groups: the accelerated protocol group (n=13) and slow protocol group (n=16). Patients in the accelerated protocol group participated in a preoperative rehabilitation program for 4-6 weeks. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and for 24 weeks postoperatively. Pain was assessed by visual analog scale, and functional activity level was assessed by The Disabilities of The Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. The active range of motion was initiated at week 3 after surgery for the accelerated rehabilitation protocol and at week 6 for the slow protocol. The rehabilitation program was completed by the 8th week with the accelerated protocol and by the 22nd week with the slow protocol. There was no significant difference between the slow and accelerated protocols with regard to pain at rest (p>0.05). However, the accelerated protocol was associated with less pain during activity at weeks 5 and 16, and with less pain at night during week 5 (prehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair to prevent the negative effects of immobilization and to support rapid reintegration to daily living activities.

  19. COMPREHENSIVE STRENGTH TRAINING PROGRAM FOR A RECREATIONAL SENIOR GOLFER 11-MONTHS AFTER A ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR

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    Meira, Erik P.; En Gilpin, Hui; Brunette, Meredith

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Golf is a popular sport played by hundreds of thousands of individuals of all ages and of varying skill levels. An orthopedic or sports-related injury and/or surgery may limit an individual's sport participation, require him/her to complete a course of rehabilitation, and initiate (or resume) a sport-specific training program. Unlike the availability of evidence to guide postsurgical rehabilitation and sport-specific training of athletes from sports other than golf, there have only been two reports describing outcomes after surgery and for golfers. The purpose of this case report is to present a post-rehabilitation return to sport-training program for a recreational golfer 11-months after a rotator cuff repair. Case Description: The subject, a 67-year old female, injured her right shoulder requiring a rotator cuff repair 11-months prior to her participation in a golf fitness training program. The subject participated in six training sessions over seven week period consisting of general strengthening exercises (including exercises for the rotator cuff), exercises for the core, plyometrics, and power exercises. Outcomes: The subject made improvements in power and muscular endurance of the core. She was able to resume golf at the completion of the training program. Discussion: The subject was able to make functional improvements and return to golf after participation in a comprehensive strength program. Additional studies are necessary to improve program design for golfers who wish to return to sport after shoulder surgery. PMID:22163096

  20. Proinflammatory cytokines and metalloproteases are expressed in the subacromial bursa in patients with rotator cuff disease.

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    Voloshin, Ilya; Gelinas, Jill; Maloney, Michael D; O'Keefe, Regis J; Bigliani, Louis U; Blaine, Theodore A

    2005-09-01

    The pathophysiology of subacromial impingement syndrome is poorly understood. We investigated the expression of inflammatory cytokines, metalloproteases, and the cyclooxygenases in the subacromial bursa in control patients and in patients with rotator cuff tear. Basic science evaluation. Eighteen patients undergoing shoulder surgery had a subacromial bursa biopsy examination. Patients were divided into 2 groups. Group I (study group) had 10 patients with a full-thickness rotator cuff tear (RCT). Group II (control group) had 8 patients. Seven of 8 underwent shoulder arthroscopy with anterior capsular reconstruction for instability; 1 of 8 underwent open reduction internal fixation for acute proximal humerus fracture. None of the patients in group II had any history of symptoms or signs consistent with subacromial impingement. H&E and immunohistochemical antibody (MMP-1, MMP-9, IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, COX-1, and COX-2) stained specimens were examined by 2 blinded observers using a histologic scale (grade 0 = no staining to grade 4 = intense staining). Histologic evidence of inflammation was present in all patients with RCT (group I). No or mild inflammation was noted in group II. The average staining grade for inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha) and proteinases (MMP-1 and MMP-9) was significantly more pronounced in the RCT group (P bursa of patients with rotator cuff tear. These findings support the role of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids in RCT treatment, and emphasize the importance of subacromial bursectomy to reduce inflammation in RCT surgery.

  1. Rotator cuff injuries: current perspectives and trends for treatment and rehabilitation

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    Fabio Antonio Vieira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To map out the approaches used by Brazilian orthopedists in treating complete tears of the rotator cuff. METHODS: A multiple-choice questionnaire was handed out to 232 orthopedists at the 45th Brazilian Congress of Orthopedics and Traumatology. Of these, 207 were returned but five were incomplete and were excluded. Thus, 202 questionnaires were used. RESULTS: Among the orthopedists who answered the questionnaires, around 60% were from the southeastern region and 46% were shoulder and elbow surgeons. There was a significant association ( p < 0.05 between length of experience and number of rotator cuff repairs performed per year. There was also a significant association ( p < 0.05 between shoulder specialty and the following variables: arthroscopic technique, use of anchors in a single-row configuration, mean time taken for an indication for surgery to be made in cases of traumatic and degenerative lesions, use of a specific protocol for postsurgical rehabilitation, return to sport and indication of irreparable injuries. CONCLUSIONS: Brazilian shoulder surgeons have well-established approaches toward treating rotator cuff injuries. Most of these approaches differ significantly from those of other specialties. This shows the importance of placing value on training in preparing shoulder specialists in this country.

  2. Is posterior delamination in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair hidden to the posterior viewing portal?

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    Han, Yung; Shin, Jin-Hyup; Seok, Chang-Woo; Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Seung-Ho

    2013-11-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to examine whether posterior delamination is hidden to the most commonly used posterior viewing portal compared with differential rotator cuff portals and (2) to observe posterior delamination patterns so that a treatment-based classification system may be proposed. One-hundred thirty consecutive patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair by 4 different surgeons were evaluated for the presence of posterior delamination viewable through the posterior, posterolateral, and lateral portals. Randomized arthroscopic pictures were viewed by 2 independent blinded observers, and the Fleiss κ was used to assess inter-reliability agreement. In addition, patterns of posterior delamination and surgical treatment were assessed. The incidence of posterior delamination was 88%. Only 11% of cases were visualized through the posterior portal, whereas 70% and 100% were visualized through the posterolateral and lateral portals, respectively. The Fleiss κ was 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.73 to 0.83), indicating substantial agreement. Three general patterns of posterior delamination with specific surgical repair strategies were identified and subclassified into 5 types: type A1, full-thickness tears with extensive posterior delamination separating the rotator cuff into 2 layers and sometimes with dissociation of the rotator cable; type A2, bursal-sided partial-thickness tears with posterior delamination; type B1, delamination with an L-shaped bursal layer tear and crescent-shaped articular layer tear; type B2, a partial-thickness articular-sided tear with extensive posterior delamination; and type C, extensive degeneration with multiple longitudinal bursal-sided tears. The incidence of posterior delamination is extremely high, and most of these lesions are missed if one is viewing from just the posterior portal. Differential rotator cuff portals are needed to appreciate and treat posterior delamination. Patterns of delamination can be

  3. Patient reported activities after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty in rotator cuff arthropathy patients.

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    Alcobía-Díaz, B; Lópiz, Y; García-Fernández, C; Rizo de Álvaro, B; Marco, F

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty in rotator cuff arthropathy patients, improves anteversion and abduction, but not rotational, outcomes. The main aim of this study is to determine its repercussions on daily life activities in our patients. Between 2009 and 2011 we implanted 210 shoulder arthroplasties, 126 of them were reverse total shoulder arthroplasty in a rotator cuff arthropathy context. About 88% were women, with a mean age at time of surgery of 81 years, 95% were retired. The mean follow up was 53 months. The Constant scale, Visual Analogue Scale, Charlson Comorbidity Index, range of motion were measured for each patient and whether they could manage 40 daily life activities by means of a new questionnaire, classifying them according toshoulder functional demand. Mean normalized by sex and age Constant value was 81.2%. Mean Visual Analogue Scale and Charlson Index were 3.56 and 1.69 respectively. Improvement in anteversion and abduction, not in rotational range of motion. Limitation was found in low and high functional demand activities in 20% and 51% respectively, especially those which involved internal rotation. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty treatment for RCA in the elderly, achieves adequate pain management and good functional outcomes. Nevertheless, an important risk of DLA limitation must be accepted in those which involve internal rotation or shoulder high functional demand. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Does Pure Platelet-Rich Plasma Affect Postoperative Clinical Outcomes After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Flury, Matthias; Rickenbacher, Dominik; Schwyzer, Hans-Kaspar; Jung, Christian; Schneider, Marco M; Stahnke, Katharina; Goldhahn, Jörg; Audigé, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    The exact role of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in rotator cuff tendon reconstruction remains unclear. This study investigated whether an intraoperative pure PRP injection, compared with a local anesthetic injection, improves patient-reported outcomes at 3 and 6 months after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The hypothesis was that pure PRP improves patient-reported outcomes (Oxford Shoulder Score [OSS]) at 3 and 6 months after surgery and has the same pain-reducing effect compared with a postoperative subacromial local anesthetic (ropivacaine) injection. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. Between January 2011 and November 2012, a total of 120 patients who underwent arthroscopic double-row repair of a supraspinatus tendon rupture were randomized to receive either pure PRP by an injection at the footprint (PRP group; n = 60) or ropivacaine injected in the subacromial region (control group; n = 60). Seventy-eight percent of patients had other concomitant tears. All patients, surgeons, and follow-up investigators were blinded. Clinical parameters and various outcome scores (Constant-Murley shoulder score; OSS; patient American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score; quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score; EuroQol 5 dimensions) were documented preoperatively and at 3, 6, and 24 months postoperatively. The repair integrity was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound at 24 months. Furthermore, a pain diary was completed within the first 10 postoperative days, and adverse events were recorded. Group outcome differences were analyzed using t tests, Fisher exact tests, and mixed models. The final follow-up rate was 91%. An associated tear of the subscapularis tendon was diagnosed in 23% of PRP-treated patients and 36% of control patients. Three months after surgery, the mean (±SD) OSS was 32.9 ± 8.6 in PRP-treated patients and 30.7 ± 10.0 in control patients (P = .221). No significant differences were noted for other outcome

  5. Increased IL-1beta expression and myofibroblast recruitment in subacromial bursa is associated with rotator cuff lesions with shoulder stiffness.

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    Ko, Jih-Yang; Wang, Feng-Sheng; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Wang, Ching-Jen; Tseng, Shin-Ling; Hsu, Chin

    2008-08-01

    We evaluated whether proinflammatory cytokine expression and myofibroblast recruitment in subacromial bursa was linked to rotator cuff lesions with shoulder stiffness. We analyzed expressions of IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha in subacromial bursa and joint fluid collected from 14 patients with cuff tears with stiffness as a study group (Group I) and 14 patients with rotator cuff tears without shoulder stiffness as a control group (Group II) using real-time RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and ELISA. Myofibroblast apoptosis in subacromial bursa was analyzed using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase -mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) and alpha-smooth muscle actin immunofluorescence staining. Shoulder function was evaluated using the Constant score. Group I had higher mRNA expression (p bursa and IL-1beta levels in joint fluid were correlated with a preoperative deficit in shoulder motion (p bursa in rotator cuff lesions are linked to shoulder stiffness.

  6. Arthroscopic treatment for synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial bursa associated with partial rotator cuff tear.

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    Xu, Caiqi; Yang, Xingguang; Zhao, Jinzhong

    2015-02-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is characterized by benign synovial proliferation that leads to chondral or osteochondral foci formation. In this case report, a right-handed female suffered from progressively worsening pain and limited mobility of forward elevation, abduction and external rotation in her right shoulder. A shoulder arthroscopy was conducted, during which, thickened bursal synovium and several loose bodies were observed, associated with bursal side tear of rotator cuff. A thorough synovectomy, subacromial debridement and acromioplasty were conducted. The pathological findings were consistent with synovial chondromatosis. After systematic rehabilitation, the patient had relief of shoulder pain and full range of motions in 14-months follow-up. Case report, Level IV.

  7. Rotator cuff repair in the Brazilian Unified Health System: Brazilian trends from 2003 to 2015

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    Eduardo Angeli Malavolta

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To assess the historical trend of rotator cuff repairs in Brazil between 2003 and 2015, using the database of the Brazilian Unified Health System's (Sistema Único de Saúde [SUS] Department of Informatics (DataSUS. METHODS: Historical series using DataSUS. Surgeries performed between 2003 and 2015 were included and data relating to cuff tear repair were assessed, including decompression procedures were included. The numerator was the total number of rotator cuff repair and the denominator, the total population of the assessed locality. Population data were based on information from the Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística (IBGE. RESULTS: During the period, 50,207 surgeries were performed. The rate was presented as number of procedures per 100,000 inhabitants, and increased from 0.83 to 2.81, a growth of 238%. In 2015, the South region had the highest rate, 6.32, followed by the Southeast, 3.62, while the North had the lowest rate, 0.13. The growing trend can be observed in the Southeast, South, and Midwest, while the rate is stable in the North and Northeast. CONCLUSION: The rate of rotator cuff repairs in Brazil performed through the SUS increased from 0.83 to 2.81 between 2003 and 2015, representing a growth of 238%, but remains lower than that of developed countries. A trend of growth can be observed in the Southeast, South, and Midwest, while the rate is stable in the North and Northeast.

  8. Surgical treatment of the impingement syndrome and of the rotator cuff tears: personal experience in 134 cases

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    A. Rioda

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The time-course covered by the original definition of scapulo-humeral periarthritis suggested by Duplay through the more recent term of subacromial impingement syndrome coined by Neer, follows the identification of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to chronic subacromial impingement and degenerative tears of the rotator cuff. The Authors recall the functional-anatomic development evolution of the shoulder and the disequilibrium between the depressor and the elevator muscles which may promote the chronic friction against the acromion. However, the actual pathogenesis of the impingement still remains controversial. We evaluated 134 patients (81F, 53M, mean age 56.4 years with chronic subacromial impingement syndrome. In 92 cases (69% non traumatic tears of the rotator cuff were also present as confirmed by ultrasonography in 94 cases, CT in18 cases and magnetic resonance in 102 cases. The different tear patterns of the rotator cuff were classified as suggested by Ellman (L shaped, L reverse, triangular, trapezoidal and massive with retraction and clinical results were analysed following Sahlstrand clinical criteria and Costant numerical scale. According to the anatomical damage, patients were divided into those with impingement without severe cuff tendinopathy (42 cases, those with rotator cuff tears without loss of motion of the shoulder (32 cases and those with cuff tears and loss of active motion (60 cases. The different surgical techniques and rehabilitation procedures after surgery are also reported. After a mean follow-up of 1.3 years (range 8 months - 2 years, good or excellent results were obtained in 91% of the patients without rotator cuff tears, in 87% of the patients with tears but without loss of motion and in 75% of the cases with loss of active motion. Our data demonstrate that in the majority of patients with chronic impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tears, surgical treatment shows high success rates. When surgery is

  9. Do overhead sports increase risk for rotator cuff tears in wheelchair users?

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    Akbar, Michael; Brunner, Manuela; Ewerbeck, Volker; Wiedenhöfer, Bernd; Grieser, Thomas; Bruckner, Thomas; Loew, Markus; Raiss, Patric

    2015-03-01

    To analyze whether frequent overhead-sports activity increases the risk for rotator cuff disease in patients with spinal cord injuries (SCIs) who are wheelchair dependent. Cross-sectional study, risk analysis. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury. Patients (N=296) with SCI requiring the full-time use of a manual wheelchair were recruited for this study. The total population was divided into 2 groups (sports vs no sports), among them 103 patients playing overhead sports on a regular basis (at least 1-2 times/wk) and 193 patients involved in overhead sports less than once a week or in no sports activity at all. The mean age of the sports group was 49.1 years. The mean duration of wheelchair dependence was 26.5 years. The mean age of the no-sports group was 48 years. The mean duration of wheelchair dependence was 25.2 years. Each individual completed a questionnaire designed to identify overhead-sports activity on a regular basis and was asked about shoulder problems. Magnetic resonance imaging scans of both shoulders were performed in each patient and analyzed in a standardized fashion. None. Possible differences in continuous data between patients with and without rotator cuff tear were evaluated. The relative risk of suffering from a rotator cuff tear between patients playing overhead sports and those not playing overhead sports was calculated. One hundred three patients played overhead sports regularly and 193 did not. There was no difference between groups regarding age, sex, level of SCI, and duration of wheelchair dependence. The body mass index was significantly lower in the sports group than in the no-sports group (Protator cuff tear was present in 75.7% of the patients in the sports group and in 36.3% of the patients in the no-sports group (PRotator cuff tears were symptomatic in 92.6% of the patients. The estimated risk increase for the sports group to develop rotator cuff tears was twice as high as for the no

  10. Increased blood flow in the anterior humeral circumflex artery correlates with night pain in patients with rotator cuff tear.

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    Terabayashi, Nobuo; Watanabe, Tsuneo; Matsumoto, Kazu; Takigami, Iori; Ito, Yoshiki; Fukuta, Masashi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2014-09-01

    Night pain is a particularly vexing symptom in patients with rotator cuff tear. It disturbs sleep and decreases quality of life, and there is no consensus regarding its etiology. Based on arthroscopic surgical observations of synovitis around the rotator interval or capsule surface in rotator cuff tear, we hypothesized that blood flow from the artery feeding the capsule increases blood supply to the synovium. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between blood flow and night pain using pulse Doppler ultrasonography. A series of 47 consecutive patients with rotator cuff tear was evaluated. The peak systolic velocity and resistance index of blood flow in the ascending branch of the anterior humeral circumflex artery were evaluated using pulse Doppler ultrasonography. We also investigated 20 normal shoulders in healthy volunteers. The peak systolic velocity and resistance index were compared between affected and unaffected sides in patients and between dominant and nondominant sides in controls. Anterior humeral circumflex artery peak systolic velocity and resistance index did not differ between sides in control subjects or in patients with rotator cuff tear without night pain. However, anterior humeral circumflex artery peak systolic velocity and resistance index did differ significantly between sides in patients with rotator cuff tear with night pain. This study revealed anterior humeral circumflex artery hemodynamics in patients with rotator cuff tear and normal subjects using Doppler ultrasonography. Night pain, particularly involving aching, appears to be related to the hemodynamics. These findings suggest that investigating the hemodynamics of patients with rotator cuff tear with night pain may lead to greater understanding of the etiology of this symptom.

  11. Low-term results from non-conventional partial arthroplasty for treating rotator cuff arthroplasthy

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    Antônio Carlos Tenor Júnior

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the evolution of the functional results from CTA(rhemiarthroplasty for surgically treating degenerative arthroplathy of the rotator cuff, with a mean follow-up of 5.4 years.METHODS: Eighteen patients who underwent CTA(r partial arthroplasty to treat degenerative arthroplathy of the rotator cuff between April 2007 and June 2009 were reevaluated, with minimum and mean follow-ups of 4.6 years and 5.4 years, respectively. Pre and postoperative parameters for functionality and patient satisfaction were used (functional scale of the University of California in Los Angeles, UCLA. All the patients underwent prior conservative treatment for 6 months and underwent surgical treatment because of the absence of satisfactory results. Patients were excluded if they presented any of the following: previous shoulder surgery; pseudoparalysis; insufficiency of the coracoacromial arch (type 2 B in Seebauer's classification; neurological lesions; or insufficiency of the deltoid muscle and the subscapularis muscle.RESULTS: With a mean follow-up of 5.4 years, 14 patients considered that they were satisfied with the surgery (78%; the mean range of joint motion for active elevation improved from 55.8° before the operation to 82.0° after the operation; the mean external rotation improved from 18.9° before the operation to 27.3° after the operation; and the mean medial rotation remained at the level of the third lumbar vertebra. The mean UCLA score after the mean follow-up of 5.4 years was 23.94 and this was an improvement in comparison with the preoperative mean and the mean 1 year after the operation.CONCLUSION: The functional results from CTA(r hemiarthroplasty for treating rotator cuff arthroplasty in selected patients remained satisfactory after a mean follow-up of 5.4 years.

  12. A novel technique of rotator cuff repair using spinal needle and suture loop

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    Muzaffar Nasir

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present a simple technique of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using a spinal needle and suture loop. Methods With the arthroscope laterally, a spinal needle looped with PDS is inserted percutaneously into the shoulder posteriorly and penetrated through the healthy posterior cuff tear margin. Anteriorly, another spinal needle loaded with PDS is inserted percutaneously to engage the healthy tissue at the anterior tear margin. The suture in the anterior needle is then delivered into the suture loop of the posterior needle using a suture retriever. The posterior needle and loop are then pulled out carrying the anterior suture with it. The two limbs of this suture are then retrieved through a cannula for knotting. The same procedure is then repeated for additional suturing. Suture anchors placed over the greater tuberosity are used to complete the repair. Conclusion This is an easy method of rotator cuff repair using simple instruments and lesser time, hence can be employed at centers with less equipment and at reduced cost to the patient.

  13. The temporal outcomes of open versus arthroscopic knotted and knotless rotator cuff repair over 5 years.

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    Lucena, Thomas R; Lam, Patrick H; Millar, Neal L; Murrell, George Ac

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to determine how repair technique influenced structural and clinical outcomes at 5 years post-surgery. Three cohorts of patients had repair of a symptomatic rotator cuff tear using (i) an open double-row mattress repair technique (n = 25); (ii) arthroscopic single-row simple suture knotted technique (n = 25); or (iii) arthroscopic single-row inverted mattress knotless technique (n = 36) by one surgeon. Standardized patient- and examiner-determined outcomes were obtained pre-operatively and postoperatively with a validated protocol, ultrasound were also performed at the same time. Retear occurred more often after open repair (48%) at 5 years than after arthroscopic knotted (33%) and arthroscopic knotless (26%) repair. Retear was associated with increasing age, pre-operative tear size and weaker pre-operative and 5 years postoperative cuff strength. Between 2 years and 5 years, the open repair group experienced an increase in the frequency of pain during activity, as well as in the difficulty experienced and the severity of pain during overhead activities (p arthroscopic knotless repair group. At 5-year follow-up, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair techniques resulted in fewer retears and better outcomes compared to an open double-row technique.

  14. Evaluation of functional results from shoulders after arthroscopic repair of complete rotator cuff tears associated with traumatic anterior dislocation

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    Glaydson Gomes Godinho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical outcome of arthroscopic rotator cuff fixation and, when present, simultaneous repair of the Bankart lesion caused by traumatic dislocation; and to assess whether the size of the rotator cuff injury caused by traumatic dislocation has any influence on the postoperative clinical outcomes. METHODS: Thirty-three patients with traumatic shoulder dislocation and complete rotator cuff injury, with at least two years of follow up, were retrospectively evaluated. For analysis purposes, the patients were divided into groups: presence of fixed Bankart lesion or absence of this lesion, and rotator cuff lesions smaller than 3.0 cm (group A or greater than or equal to 3.0 cm (group B. All the patients underwent arthroscopic repair of the lesions and were evaluated postoperatively by means of the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles score and strength measurements. RESULTS: The group with Bankart lesion repair had a postoperative UCLA score of 33.96, while the score of the group without Bankart lesion was 33.7, without statistical significance (p = 0.743. Group A had a postoperative UCLA score of 34.35 and group B, 33.15, without statistical significance (p = 0.416. CONCLUSION: The functional outcomes of the patients who only presented complete rotator cuff tearing after traumatic shoulder dislocation, which underwent arthroscopic repair, were similar to the outcomes of those who presented an associated with a Bankart lesion that was corrected simultaneously with the rotator cuff injury. The extent of the original rotator cuff injury did not alter the functional results in the postoperative evaluation.

  15. [Risk factors for rotator cuff injury among dentists].

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    Tchicaya, A F; Kouassi, Y M; Ina, A; Guiegui, C P; Wognin, S B; Yeboue-Kouame, B Y; Bonny, J S

    2011-06-01

    The survey appears in the setting of the politics of improvement for prevention of professional risks in hospital environment in Ivory Coast. To identify the influence factors of the coif of rotators pathology among dentist surgeons and to improve the preventive measures. It was a prospective case/witness survey type. It had for setting, public hospitals and private clinics in Abidjan. We enrolled two types of population (case/witness) comparable with the criteria's of age, sex, bodily mass indication (BMI) and laterality. The data have been collected on a standardized questionnaire named "Nordic questionnaire" and have been enriched. That informed on the bodily mass indication calculated according to the method: weight/T2 (m), on the epidemiological data and the specifics data of the shoulder and the coif of the rotators. The statistical tests have been done by the test of the Khi2 of Pearson, the test of T Student, the exact test of Fischer and the test of the gap reduces. The study included 100 cases and as many witnesses. The middle age of apparition of the tendinitis of the shoulder was of 38,83 years. Age, sex, bodily mass and professional experience didn't have any influence on the apparition of the lesion of the shoulder. The analysis of the results established that the professional seniority encourages the apparition of the lesion of the shoulder. The length on average some seniority is of 12,7 years with extremes of 2 and 30 years. This observation rests on the fact that the risks of intervening of musculo-skeletal unrests of the superior member is equal to the length of work (effort, repetitive acts and stance) returned to the functional capacities. The tendinitis of the shoulder, because of its importance must be recognized and repaired as an indemnisable professional disease.

  16. The effect of in vivo rotator cuff muscle contraction on glenohumeral joint translation: An ultrasonographic and electromyographic study.

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    Rathi, Sangeeta; Taylor, Nicholas F; Green, Rodney A

    2016-12-08

    The proposed stabilizing mechanism of rotator cuff muscles is to limit excessive humeral head translation. However, an accurate measurement of glenohumeral joint translation in vivo has been challenging. We aimed to measure the effect of rotator cuff muscle contraction on glenohumeral joint translation using real time ultrasound (RTUS) and electromyography. Twenty healthy adults with no history of shoulder pathology were recruited. Six intramuscular electrodes were inserted in the rotator cuff muscles (supraspinatus, upper and lower infraspinatus, teres minor, upper and lower subscapularis). Anterior and posterior glenohumeral translations were measured in testing conditions (with and without translation force, with and without isometric internal and external rotation), in two positions (shoulder neutral, abduction) and views (anterior, posterior). There was reduced glenohumeral translation with rotator cuff muscle contraction in the neutral anterior (F 2,38 =17.8, pmuscles in response to anterior and posterior translation forces (pmuscles, infraspinatus and teres minor, appeared to tether anterior translation of the humeral head. Our results confirm that the rotator cuff functions as a stabilizer of the glenohumeral joint by limiting humeral head translation and this is likely to be in a direction-specific manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional evaluation of arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in patients with pseudoparalysis,

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    Alberto Naoki Miyazaki

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the functional result from arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in patients with pseudoparalysis, defined as incapacity to actively raise the arm above 90◦ , while complete passive elevation was possible.METHODS: we reevaluated 38 patients with a mean follow-up of 51 months (minimum of 24. We analyzed the pseudoparalysis reversion rate and the functional result obtained.RESULTS: according to the assessment criteria of the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA, 31 (82% patients had good and excellent results, two (5% had fair results and five (13% had poor results. The mean active elevation went from 39◦ before the operation to 139◦ after the operation (p < 0.05; the mean active lateral rotation went from 30◦ to 48◦ (p < 0.05 and the mean active medial rotation went from level L3 to T12 (p < 0.05.CONCLUSION: arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries produced good and excellent results in 82% of the cases and a statistically significant improvement of active range of motion, with reversion of the pseudoparalysis in 97.4% of the cases. It is therefore a good treatment option.

  18. Quantitative Assessment of Fat Infiltration in the Rotator Cuff Muscles using water-fat MRI

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    Nardo, Lorenzo; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.; Lansdown, Drew A.; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Lee, Sonia; Maroldi, Roberto; Ma, C. Benjamin; Link, Thomas M.; Krug, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate a chemical shift-based fat quantification technique in the rotator cuff muscles in comparison with the semi-quantitative Goutallier fat infiltration classification (GC) and to assess their relationship with clinical parameters. Materials and Methods The shoulders of 57 patients were imaged using a 3T MR scanner. The rotator cuff muscles were assessed for fat infiltration using GC by two radiologists and an orthopedic surgeon. Sequences included oblique-sagittal T1-, T2- and proton density-weighted fast spin echo, and six-echo gradient echo. The iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation (IDEAL) was used to measure fat fraction. Pain and range of motion of the shoulder were recorded. Results Fat fraction values were significantly correlated with GC grades (p0.9) showing consistent increase with GC grades (grade=0, 0%–5.59%; grade=1, 1.1%–9.70%; grade=2, 6.44%–14.86%; grade=3, 15.25%–17.77%; grade=4, 19.85%–29.63%). A significant correlation between fat infiltration of the subscapularis muscle quantified with IDEAL versus a) deficit in internal rotation (Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient=0.39, 95% CI 0.13–0.60, pquantitative fat infiltration measures of the supraspinatus muscle were significantly correlated with a deficit in abduction (Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient=0.45, 95% CI 0.20–0.60, p<0.01). Conclusion We concluded that an accurate and highly reproducible fat quantification in the rotator cuff muscles using water-fat MRI techniques is possible and significantly correlates with shoulder pain and range of motion. PMID:24115490

  19. Delayed versus early motion after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kevin; MacDermid, Joy C; Hoppe, Daniel J; Ayeni, Olufemi R; Bhandari, Mohit; Foote, Clary J; Athwal, George S

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized trials to compare delayed vs early motion therapy on function after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We searched 4 electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Cochrane, and Physiotherapy Evidence Database [PEDro]). The methodologic quality of the included studies was assessed, and the relevant data were extracted. Data were pooled for functional outcomes, rotator cuff tear recurrence, and shoulder range of motion. Complications were reported descriptively. Three level I and 1 level II randomized trials were eligible and included. Pooled analysis revealed no statistically significant differences in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores between delayed vs early motion rehabilitation (mean difference [MD], 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.8 to 4.7; P = .38, I(2) = 34%). The risk of retears after surgery did not differ statistically between treatment groups (risk ratio, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.63-1.64; P = .95). Early passive motion led to a statistically significant, although clinically unimportant, improvement in forward elevation between groups (MD, -1°; 95% CI, -2° to 0°; P = 0.04, I(2) = 0%). There was no difference in external rotation between treatment groups (MD, 1°; 95% CI, -2° to 4°; P = 0.63, I(2) = 0%). None of the included studies identified any cases of postoperative shoulder stiffness. The current meta-analysis did not identify any significant differences in functional outcomes and relative risks of recurrent tears between delayed and early motion in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs. A statistically significant difference in forward elevation range of motion was identified; however, this difference is likely clinically unimportant. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of the therapeutic effects of ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma injection and dry needling in rotator cuff disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rha, Dong-wook; Park, Gi-Young; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Kim, Min Tae; Lee, Sang Chul

    2013-02-01

    To compare the effects of platelet-rich plasma injection with those of dry needling on shoulder pain and function in patients with rotator cuff disease. A single-centre, prospective, randomized, double-blinded, controlled study. University rehabilitation hospital. Thirty-nine patients with a supraspinatus tendon lesion (tendinosis or a partial tear less than 1.0 cm, but not a complete tear) who met the inclusion criteria recruited between June 2010 and February 2011. Two dry needling procedures in the control group and two platelet-rich plasma injections in the experimental group were applied to the affected shoulder at four-week intervals using ultrasound guidance. The Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, passive range of motion of the shoulder, a physician global rating scale at the six-month follow-up, adverse effects monitoring and an ultrasound measurement were used as outcome measures. The clinical effect of the platelet-rich plasma injection was superior to the dry needling from six weeks to six months after initial injection (P dry needling group (P dry needling. This benefit is certainly still present at six months after treatment. These findings suggest that treatment with platelet-rich plasma injections is safe and useful for rotator cuff disease.

  1. Effect of sodium hyaluronate/carboxymethyl cellulose (Guardix-sol) on retear rate and postoperative stiffness in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair patients: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jeung Yeol; Chung, Pill Ku; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2017-01-01

    Hyaluronate-based anti-adhesive agents are expected to enhance rotator cuff healing; however, their effect on the incidence and extent of postoperative complications such as stiffness and retears has not been investigated. From July 2012 to February 2013, 80 patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery were prospectively enrolled. Forty patients were assigned to the control group, while the other 40 were assigned to the injection group and received a Guardix-sol injection immediately after surgery. Passive range of motion, pain visual analog scale, and functional score were assessed at 8 weeks, 6 months, and 24 months postoperatively. Gliding motion between the deltoid muscle and the greater tuberosity of the proximal humerus was evaluated using ultrasonography at 2 and 8 weeks postoperatively, and tendon integrity was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging at 6 months postoperatively. We found no significant difference between the groups regarding gliding motion at 2 weeks postoperatively. However, at 8 weeks, the incidence of poor gliding motion was 2.5% and 15% for the injected patients and control group, respectively, which was statistically significant. At 6 months after surgery, the retear rate between the two groups was not statistically significant. We found no statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding retear rate and clinical score throughout the follow-up period. We noted no complications related to the use of Guardix-sol. Patients who received the Guardix-sol injection showed improved gliding motion between the deltoid muscle and the greater tuberosity in the early postoperative period.

  2. The central nervous system--an additional consideration in 'rotator cuff tendinopathy' and a potential basis for understanding response to loaded therapeutic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Chris; Malliaras, Peter; Bateman, Marcus; Stace, Richmond; May, Stephen; Walters, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Tendinopathy is a term used to describe a painful tendon disorder but despite being a well-recognised clinical presentation, a definitive understanding of the pathoaetiology of rotator cuff tendinopathy remains elusive. Current explanatory models, which relate to peripherally driven nocioceptive mechanisms secondary to structural abnormality, or failed healing, appear inadequate on their own in the context of current literature. In light of these limitations this paper presents an extension to current models that incorporates the integral role of the central nervous system in the pain experience. The role of the central nervous system (CNS) is described and justified along with a potential rationale to explain the favourable response to loaded therapeutic exercises demonstrated by previous studies. This additional consideration has the potential to offer a useful way to explain pain to patients, for clinicians to prescribe appropriate therapeutic management strategies and for researchers to advance knowledge in relation to this clinically challenging problem. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A novel suture anchor constructed of cortical bone for rotator cuff repair: a biomechanical study on sheep humerus specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qi; Li, Chunbao; Qi, Wei; Li, Hongliang; Lu, Xi; Shen, Xuezhen; Qu, Feng; Liu, Yujie

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate biomechanical properties of a new type of suture anchors constructed of human cortical allograft bone and compare it with the similar standard titanium screw anchor for rotator cuff tears in sheep humerus model. Twenty-four paired sheep humeri were harvested from 12 male sheep aged 18 months. Specimens were divided into cortical bone anchor group and titanium screw anchor group. The anchors loaded with two sutures were placed at the footprint of infraspinatus tendon. Cyclic loading test was performed from 10 to 60 N at 1 Hz for 500 cycles and followed by a load-to-failure test at 33 mm/sec. A paired t-test was used to compare the biomechanical properties of the anchors of each type. No anchors failed during the cyclic phase, and the cortical bone anchors were all pulled out intact. The cyclic displacement of the cortical bone anchor was not significantly greater than that of the titanium screw anchor (P > 0.05). Student's t test showed no statistically significant difference between anchors in terms of failure load (cortical bone anchor: 304.74 ± 64.46 N versus titanium screw anchor: 328.45 ± 89.58 N; P = 0.213), ultimate load (cortical bone anchor: 325.82 ± 76.45 N versus titanium screw anchor: 345.61 ± 83.56 N; P = 0.183), yield load (cortical bone anchor: 273.78 ± 44.75 N versus titanium screw anchor: 284.72 ± 56.37 N; P = 0.326) or stiffness (cortical bone anchor: 52.97 ± 14.28 N/mm versus titanium screw anchor: 62.38 ± 18.35 N/mm; P = 0.112). In vitro, this experimental study suggested no statistically significant difference in initial fixation stability between the new type anchor and titanium screw anchor at a chosen level of significance (P suture anchor constructed of cortical bone provides comparable initial fixation strength to a similar metallic anchor for rotator cuff repair.

  4. Biomechanical Comparison of Standard and Linked Single-Row Rotator Cuff Repairs in a Human Cadaver Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Adam F; Henninger, Heath B; Barber, F Alan; Getelman, Mark H

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the time zero cyclic and failure loading properties of a linked single-row rotator cuff repair compared with a standard simple suture single-row repair using triple-loaded suture anchors. Eighteen human cadaveric shoulders from 9 matched pairs were dissected, and full-thickness supraspinatus tears were created. The tendon cross-sectional area was recorded. In each pair, one side was repaired with a linked single-row construct and the other with a simple suture single-row construct, both using 2 triple-loaded suture anchors. After preloading, specimens were cycled to 1 MPa of effective stress at 1 Hz for 500 cycles, and gap formation was recorded with a digital video system. Samples were then loaded to failure, and modes of failure were recorded. There was no statistical difference in peak gap formation between the control and linked constructs (3.6 ± 0.9 mm and 3.6 ± 1.2 mm, respectively; P = .697). Both constructs averaged below a 5-mm cyclic failure threshold. There was no statistical difference in ultimate load to failure between the control and linked repair (511.1 ± 139.0 N and 561.2 ± 131.8 N, respectively; P = .164), and both groups reached failure at loads similar to previous studies. Constructs failed predominantly via tissue tearing parallel to the medial suture line. The linked repair performed similarly to the simple single-row repair. Both constructs demonstrated high ultimate load to failure and good resistance to gap formation with cyclic loading, validating the time zero strength of both constructs in a human cadaveric model. The linked repair provided equivalent resistance to gap formation and failure loads compared with simple suture single-row repairs with triple-loaded suture anchors. This suggests that the linked repair is a simplified rip-stop configuration using the existing suture that may perform similarly to current rotator cuff repair techniques. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy

  5. Initial treatment of complete rotator cuff tear and transition to surgical treatment: systematic review of the evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Wahab, Taiceer A.; Betancourt, Jean P.; Hassan, Fadi; Thani, Saeed Al.; Choueiri, Hened; Jain, Nitin B.; Malanga, Gerard A.; Murrell, William D.; Prasad, Anil; Verborgt, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background rotator cuff tear affects many people. Natural history, and evidence for non-operative treatment remains limited. Our objective is to assess evidence available for the efficacy and morbidity of commonly used systemic medications, physiotherapy, and injections alongside evaluating any negative long-term effects. Methods a systematic search was performed of PubMed, Cochrane, EMBASE and CINAHL dates (1 January 1960 – 1 December 2014), search terms: ‘rotator cuff tear’, ‘natural history’, ‘atraumatic’, ‘injection’, ‘physiotherapy’ or ‘physical therapy’, ‘injection’, ‘corticosteroid’, ‘PRP‘, ‘MSC’, risk of conservative treatment’, and ‘surgical indication’. Results eleven studies were included. The mean Coleman Methodology Score modified for conservative therapy is 69.21 (range 88–44) (SD 12.31). This included 2 RCTs, 7 prospective, and 2 retrospective studies. Evidence suggests it is safe to monitor symptomatic rotator cuff tears, as tear size and symptoms are not correlated with pain, function, and/or ultimate outcome. Conclusions complete rotator cuff tears may be effectively treated with injections, exercise in the short and intermediate terms respectively. Negative effect of corticosteroids on rotator cuff tissue has not been demonstrated. Timing to end conservative treatment is unknown, but likely indicated when a patient demonstrates increased weakness and loss of function not recoverable by physiotherapy. PMID:27331030

  6. Towards predictive diagnosis and management of rotator cuff disease: using curvelet transform for edge detection and segmentation of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai Raikar, Vipul; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2016-04-01

    Degradation and injury of the rotator cuff is one of the most common diseases of the shoulder among the general population. In orthopedic injuries, rotator cuff disease is only second to back pain in terms of overall reduced quality of life for patients. Clinically, this disease is managed via pain and activity assessment and diagnostic imaging using ultrasound and MRI. Ultrasound has been shown to have good accuracy for identification and measurement of rotator cuff tears. In our previous work, we have developed novel, real-time techniques to biomechanically assess the condition of the rotator cuff based on Musculoskeletal Ultrasound. Of the rotator cuff tissues, supraspinatus is the first that sees degradation and is the most commonly affected. In our work, one of the challenges lies in effectively segmenting and characterizing the supraspinatus. We are exploring the possibility of using curvelet transform for improving techniques to segment tissue in ultrasound. Curvelets have been shown to give optimal multi-scale representation of edges in images. They are designed to represent edges and singularities along curves in images which makes them an attractive proposition for use in ultrasound segmentation. In this work, we present a novel approach to the possibility of using curvelet transforms for automatic edge and feature extraction for the supraspinatus.

  7. Effect of subacromial sodium hyaluronate injection on rotator cuff disease: A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtaderi, Alireza; Sajadiyeh, Sepideh; Khosrawi, Saeid; Dehghan, Farnaz; Bateni, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a common cause of shoulder pain. There are studies about the effectiveness of sodium hyaluronate injection on shoulder and knee pain, but few studies demonstrating the efficacy of sodium hyaluronate ultrasonography guided injection for rotator cuff disease. This study evaluates effectiveness of ultrasonography guided subacromial sodium hyaluronate injection in patients with impingment syndrome without rotator cuff complete tear. This prospective, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial study was performed among 40 patients with subacromial impingement syndrome without complete tear of rotator cuff. Patients randomly injected ultrasonography guided in 2 groups: Case group by 20 mg of sodium hyaluronate (Fermathron™) and control group by 0.9% normal saline. Both groups received 3 weekly injections. The pain score (100 mm visual analogue score [VAS]) was evaluated before first injection and one week after each injection. The constant score was evaluated before first and 12 week after last injection. Data was analyzed statistically by Independent t-test. In both groups mean VAS has decreased, but more significantly in case group (P hyaluronate are effective in treating rotator cuff disease without complete tears.

  8. Clavicular hook plate may induce subacromial shoulder impingement and rotator cuff lesion--dynamic sonographic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Yu; Wong, Poo-Kuang; Ho, Wei-Pin; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Liao, Yi-Shyan; Wong, Chin-Chean

    2014-02-06

    Clavicular hook plates are effective fixation devices for distal clavicle fractures and severe acromioclavicular joint dislocations. However, increasing number of studies has revealed that subacromial portion of the hook may induce acromial bony erosion, shoulder impingement, or even rotator cuff damage. By sonographic evaluation, we thus intended to determine whether the presence of hook plate may induce subacromial shoulder impingement and its relationship relative to surrounding subacromial structures. We prospectively followed 40 patients with either distal clavicle fracture or acromioclavicular joint dislocation that had surgery using the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) clavicular hook plate. All patients were evaluated by monthly clinical and radiographic examinations. Static and dynamic musculoskeletal sonography examinations were performed at final follow-up before implant removal. Clinical results for pain, shoulder function, and range of motion were evaluated using Constant-Murley and Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scores. Clinically, 15 out of 40 patients (37.5%) presented with subacromial impingement syndrome and their functional scores were poorer than the non-impinged patients. Among them, six patients were noted to have rotator cuff lesion. Acromial erosion caused by hook pressure developed in 20 patients (50%). We demonstrated by musculoskeletal sonography that clavicular hook plate caused subacromial shoulder impingement and rotator cuff lesion. The data also suggest an association between hardware-induced impingement and poorer functional scores. To our knowledge, the only solution is removal of the implant after bony consolidation/ligamentous healing has taken place. Thus, we advocate the removal of the implant as soon as bony union and/or ligamentous healing is achieved.

  9. Clavicular hook plate may induce subacromial shoulder impingement and rotator cuff lesion - dynamic sonographic evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Clavicular hook plates are effective fixation devices for distal clavicle fractures and severe acromioclavicular joint dislocations. However, increasing number of studies has revealed that subacromial portion of the hook may induce acromial bony erosion, shoulder impingement, or even rotator cuff damage. By sonographic evaluation, we thus intended to determine whether the presence of hook plate may induce subacromial shoulder impingement and its relationship relative to surrounding subacromial structures. Methods We prospectively followed 40 patients with either distal clavicle fracture or acromioclavicular joint dislocation that had surgery using the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) clavicular hook plate. All patients were evaluated by monthly clinical and radiographic examinations. Static and dynamic musculoskeletal sonography examinations were performed at final follow-up before implant removal. Clinical results for pain, shoulder function, and range of motion were evaluated using Constant-Murley and Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scores. Results Clinically, 15 out of 40 patients (37.5%) presented with subacromial impingement syndrome and their functional scores were poorer than the non-impinged patients. Among them, six patients were noted to have rotator cuff lesion. Acromial erosion caused by hook pressure developed in 20 patients (50%). Conclusions We demonstrated by musculoskeletal sonography that clavicular hook plate caused subacromial shoulder impingement and rotator cuff lesion. The data also suggest an association between hardware-induced impingement and poorer functional scores. To our knowledge, the only solution is removal of the implant after bony consolidation/ligamentous healing has taken place. Thus, we advocate the removal of the implant as soon as bony union and/or ligamentous healing is achieved. PMID:24502688

  10. Agreement, reliability and validity in 3 shoulder questionnaires in patients with rotator cuff disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juel Niels G

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-report questionnaires play an important role as outcome measures in shoulder research. Having an estimate of the measurement error of these questionnaires is of importance when assessing follow-up results after treatment and when planning intervention studies. The aim of this study was to cross-culturally adapt the Norwegian version of the OSS and WORC questionnaire and examine and compare agreement, reliability and construct validity of the disease-specific shoulder questionnaire WORC with two commonly used shoulder questionnaires, SPADI and OSS, in patients with rotator cuff disease. Methods 74 patients with rotator cuff disease were recruited from the outpatient clinic of the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department at Ullevaal University Hospital in Oslo, Norway. A test-retest design was used, and the questionnaires were filled out by the patients at the clinic, with a one week interval between test administrations. Agreement (repeatability coefficient, reliability (ICC and construct validity were examined and compared for WORC, SPADI and OSS. Results Reliability analysis was restricted to the 55 patients (51 ± 10 yrs who reported no change between test administrations according to scoring on a global scale. The agreement, reliability and construct validity was moderate for all three questionnaires with ICC ranging from 0.83 to 0.85, repeatability coefficient from 16.1 to 19.7 and Spearman rank correlations between total scores from r = 0.57 to 0.69. There was a lower degree of floor and ceiling effects in SPADI compared to WORC and OSS. Conclusion We conclude that the agreement and reliability of the three shoulder questionnaires examined, WORC index, SPADI and OSS are acceptable and that differences between scores were small. The Norwegian version of the questionnaires is acceptable for assessing Norwegian-speaking patients with rotator cuff disease. The moderate agreement and construct validity should be

  11. Long-term effect of Prolotherapy on symptomatic rotator cuff tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suad Trebinjac

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to assess a long-term clinical effect of Prolotherapy on chronic symptomatic rotator cuff tendinopathy.Methods: We conducted a retrospective, uncontrolled study in the outpatient setting with 12 months follow-up. Adults diagnosed clinically and radiologically with rotator cuff tendinopathy that has been persisting for a minimum of six months were included. Patients received 15% extra-articular and 25% intra-articular hyperosmolar dextrose injections, repeated at weeks 5, 9, 13, 17 and 21. Primary outcome measure was validated Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI. Secondary outcome measure was validated visual pain analogue scale (VAS 0-10. The third outcome measures were patient’s satisfaction with Prolotherapy and adverse reactions after injections.Results: Twenty-one patients, 14 male and 7 female were treated with 6 sessions of hyperosmolar dextrose Prolotherapy repeated every 4 weeks. Average SPADI before starting the treatment was 73.995 ± 13.6, while 12 months after completed treatment was 20.84 ± 26.03 (P< 0.0001. Average VAS score before starting the treatment was 8.14 ± 1.2, while 12 months after completed treatment was 2.29 ± 2.8 (P<0.0001. Out of 21 patients, 18 (85.71% would recommend Prolotherapy to other people with the similar condition, and no one participant reported any side effect that was not resolved within one week after the treatment.Conclusion: Hyperosmolar dextrose Prolotherapy may result in significant reduction of pain and disability index in adult patients with chronic rotator cuff tendinopathy, without eliciting long-lasting side effects. Results of this pilot study need to be validated in prospective controlled randomized trials.

  12. Deltoid muscular flap transfer for the treatment of irreparable rotator cuff tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justus Gille

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of deltoid muscle flap transfer for the treatment of irreparable rotator cuff tears. In a retrospective study 20 consecutive patients were evaluated. The index procedure took place between 2000 and 2003. Fifteen patients were male, mean age was 62 years. Inclusion criterion was a rotator cuff defect Bateman grade IV. Exclusion criteria were smaller defects, shoulder instability and fractures of the injured shoulder. An open reconstruction with acromioplasty and a pedicled delta flap was performed. Follow up period was mean 42 months. Follow-up included clinical examination, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and the Constant and Simple (CS shoulder tests. According to the Constant shoulder test the results were good in 13 patients, fair in 5 and unsatisfactory in 2. The pre-operative Constant Score improved from mean 25.7 points (±5.3 to 72.3 (±7.8 at follow-up. The mean values for the subcategories of CS increased significantly from 3.9 to 14.4 points for pain and from 4.2 to 15.9 points for activities daily routine (p0.05. Results of the Simple Shoulder Test showed a significant increase of the mean values from pre-operative 4.3 to 14.7 points post-operatively. MRI showed a subacromial covering of the defect in all cases, all flaps where intact on MRI but always the flap showed marked fatty degeneration. In conclusion, the delta flap is a simple method for the repair of large defects of the rotator cuff leading to satisfying medium results.

  13. Immediate costs of mini-open versus arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in an Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Yik Jing; Teo, Alex Quok An; Sharma, Siddharth; Tan, Bryan Hsi Ming; Kumar, V Prem

    2017-01-01

    While there has been increasing interest in minimally invasive surgery, the expenses incurred by patients undergoing this form of surgery have not been comprehensively studied. The authors compared the costs borne by patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with the standard mini-open repair at a tertiary hospital in an Asian population. This was a retrospective cohort study. The authors studied the inpatient hospital bills of patients following rotator cuff tear repair between January 2010 and October 2014 via the hospital electronic medical records system. 148 patients had arthroscopic repair and 78 had mini-open repair. The cost of implants, consumables, and the total cost of hospitalization were analyzed. Operative times and length of stay for both procedures were also studied. Constant scores and American Shoulder Elbow Scores (ASES) were recorded preoperatively and at 1 year postoperatively. Three fellowship-trained surgeons performed arthroscopic repairs and one performed the mini-open repair. The cost of implants and consumables was significantly higher with arthroscopic repair. The duration of surgery was also significantly longer with that technique. There was no difference in length of stay between the two techniques. There was also no difference in Constant scores or ASES scores, both preoperatively and at 1 year postoperatively. The immediate costs of mini-open repair of rotator cuff tears are significantly less than that of arthroscopic repair. Most of the difference arises from the cost of implants and consumables. Equivalent functional outcomes from both techniques suggest that mini-open repair may be more cost-effective.

  14. Effect of 3 months of progressive high-load strength training in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy: Primary results from the double-blind, randomised, controlled Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy Exercise (RoCTEx) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Kim Gordon; Jensen, Steen Lund; Sørensen, Lilli

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progressive high-load exercise (PHLE) has led to positive clinical results in patients with patellar and Achilles tendinopathy. However, its effects on rotator cuff tendinopathy still need to be investigated. PURPOSE: To assess the clinical effects of PHLE versus low-load exercise (LLE......) among patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. METHODS: Patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy were recruited and randomized to 12 weeks of PHLE or LLE, stratified for concomitant administration of corticosteroid injection. The primary...... outcome measure was change from baseline to 12 weeks in the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, assessed in the intention-to-treat population. RESULTS: A total of 100 patients were randomized to PHLE (n = 49) or LLE (n = 51). Mean changes in the DASH questionnaire were 7...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance arthrography and ultrasonography for assessing rotator cuff tears in people with shoulder pain for whom surgery is being considered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenza, Mário; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Takwoingi, Yemisi; Johnston, Renea V; Hanchard, Nigel Ca; Faloppa, Flávio

    2013-09-24

    Shoulder pain is a very common symptom. Disorders of the rotator cuff tendons due to wear or tear are among the most common causes of shoulder pain and disability. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) and ultrasound (US) are increasingly being used to assess the presence and size of rotator cuff tears to assist in planning surgical treatment. It is not known whether one imaging method is superior to any of the others. To compare the diagnostic test accuracy of MRI, MRA and US for detecting any rotator cuff tears (i.e. partial or full thickness) in people with suspected rotator cuff tears for whom surgery is being considered. We searched the Cochrane Register of Diagnostic Test Accuracy Studies, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS from inception to February 2011. We also searched trial registers, conference proceedings and reference lists of articles to identify additional studies. No language or publication restrictions were applied. We included all prospective diagnostic accuracy studies that assessed MRI, MRA or US against arthroscopy or open surgery as the reference standard, in people suspected of having a partial or full thickness rotator cuff tear. We excluded studies that selected a healthy control group, or participants who had been previously diagnosed with other specific causes of shoulder pain such as osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. Studies with an excessively long period (a year or longer) between the index and reference tests were also excluded. Two review authors independently extracted data on study characteristics and results of included studies, and performed quality assessment according to QUADAS criteria. Our unit of analysis was the shoulder. For each test, estimates of sensitivity and specificity from each study were plotted in ROC space and forest plots were constructed for visual examination of variation in test accuracy. Meta-analyses were performed using the bivariate model to produce summary estimates of

  16. Mechanical properties of all-suture anchors for rotator cuff repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargar, N.; Smith, R. D. J.; Carr, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives All-suture anchors are increasingly used in rotator cuff repair procedures. Potential benefits include decreased bone damage. However, there is limited published evidence for the relative strength of fixation for all-suture anchors compared with traditional anchors. Materials and Methods A total of four commercially available all-suture anchors, the ‘Y-Knot’ (ConMed), Q-FIX (Smith & Nephew), ICONIX (Stryker) and JuggerKnot (Zimmer Biomet) and a traditional anchor control TWINFIX Ultra PK Suture Anchor (Smith & Nephew) were tested in cadaveric human humeral head rotator cuff repair models (n = 24). This construct underwent cyclic loading applied by a mechanical testing rig (Zwick/Roell). Ultimate load to failure, gap formation at 50, 100, 150 and 200 cycles, and failure mechanism were recorded. Significance was set at p anchor (181.0 N, standard error (se) 17.6) compared with the all-suture anchors (mean 133.1 N se 16.7) (p = 0.04). The JuggerKnot anchor had greatest displacement at 50, 100 and 150 cycles, and at failure, reaching statistical significance over the control at 100 and 150 cycles (22.6 mm se 2.5 versus 12.5 mm se 0.3; and 29.6 mm se 4.8 versus 17.0 mm se 0.7). Every all-suture anchor tested showed substantial (> 5 mm) displacement between 50 and 100 cycles (6.2 to 14.3). All-suture anchors predominantly failed due to anchor pull-out (95% versus 25% of traditional anchors), whereas a higher proportion of traditional anchors failed secondary to suture breakage. Conclusion We demonstrate decreased failure load, increased total displacement, and variable failure mechanisms in all-suture anchors, compared with traditional anchors designed for rotator cuff repair. These findings will aid the surgeon’s choice of implant, in the context of the clinical scenario. Cite this article: N. S. Nagra, N. Zargar, R. D. J. Smith, A. J. Carr. Mechanical properties of all-suture anchors for rotator cuff repair. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:82–89. DOI: 10

  17. A Prospective Evaluation of Survivorship of Asymptomatic Degenerative Rotator Cuff Tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, Jay D.; Galatz, Leesa M.; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Middleton, William D.; Steger-May, Karen; Stobbs-Cucchi, Georgia; Patton, Rebecca; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this prospective study was to report the long-term risks of rotator cuff tear enlargement and symptom progression associated with degenerative asymptomatic tears. Methods: Subjects with an asymptomatic rotator cuff tear in one shoulder and pain due to rotator cuff disease in the contralateral shoulder enrolled as part of a prospective longitudinal study. Two hundred and twenty-four subjects (118 initial full-thickness tears, fifty-six initial partial-thickness tears, and fifty controls) were followed for a median of 5.1 years. Validated functional shoulder scores were calculated (visual analog pain scale, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES], and simple shoulder test [SST] scores). Subjects were followed annually with shoulder ultrasonography and clinical evaluations. Results: Tear enlargement was seen in 49% of the shoulders, and the median time to enlargement was 2.8 years. The occurrence of tear-enlargement events was influenced by the severity of the final tear type, with enlargement of 61% of the full-thickness tears, 44% of the partial-thickness tears, and 14% of the controls (p pain. The final tear type was associated with a greater risk of pain development, with the new pain developing in 28% of the controls, 46% of the shoulders with a partial-thickness tear, and 50% of those with a full-thickness tear (p pain (p shoulders with a stable tear compared with 30% of the shoulders with tear enlargement (p shoulders with a stable tear showed increased infraspinatus muscle degeneration compared with 28% of those in which the tear had enlarged (p = 0.07). Conclusions: This study demonstrates the progressive nature of degenerative rotator cuff disease. The risk of tear enlargement and progression of muscle degeneration is greater for shoulders with a full-thickness tear, and tear enlargement is associated with a greater risk of pain development across all tear types. Level of Evidence: Prognostic Level II. See Instructions for

  18. The critical shoulder angle is associated with osteoarthritis in the shoulder but not rotator cuff tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnison, Arnar O; Sørensen, Thomas J; Kallemose, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2013 Moor et al introduced the concept of the critical shoulder angle (CSA) and suggested that an abnormal CSA was a leading factor in development of rotator cuff tear (RCT) and osteoarthritis (OA) of the shoulder. This study assessed whether the CSA was associated with RCT and OA...... of the acromion to make the CSA smaller because it might increase the risk of developing OA without decreasing the risk of developing RCT. The CSA measurements showed excellent intra- and inter-rater reliability....

  19. Imaging of the rotator cuff following repair: human and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Hollis G; Jawetz, Shari T; Foo, Li Foong

    2007-01-01

    Imaging of the rotator cuff following repair may be challenging due to the type of fixation, surgical manipulation of the tissue and the presence of residual defects that may exist in the presence of good functional outcome. Both ultrasound and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging present unique advantages in evaluation of the postoperative tissue. MR imaging has superior soft tissue contrast and provides a more global shoulder assessment, including the degree of arthrosis, while ultrasound enables a more dynamic testing of the repaired tissue. Power Doppler ultrasound and new contrast agents provide insight into the degree of vascular recruitment following repair.

  20. Return to Sport After Rotator Cuff Tear Repair: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klouche, Shahnaz; Lefevre, Nicolas; Herman, Serge; Gerometta, Antoine; Bohu, Yoann

    2016-07-01

    One of the most frequent demands from athletes after rotator cuff tear repair is to return to sport, if possible at the same level of play. The main goal of this study was to determine the rate of return to sport after treatment of rotator cuff tears. Meta-analysis and systematic review. The PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines were followed to perform this systematic review and meta-analysis of the results in the literature, as well as for the presentation of results. A search of the literature was performed on the electronic databases MEDLINE, Scopus, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. The quality of the included studies was evaluated according to the MINORS (Methodological Index for Nonrandomized Studies) checklist. Inclusion criteria were studies in English evaluating return to sport after treatment of traumatic, degenerative, partial or full-thickness rotator cuff tears in patients practicing a sport regularly, whatever the level, all ages and sports included. The main judgment criterion was the number of patients who returned to a sports activity after treatment of a rotator cuff tear. The criterion was analyzed in 2 ways: return to sport (yes/no) and the level of play (identical or higher/lower level). Twenty-five studies were reviewed, including 859 patients (683 athletes), all treated surgically after a mean follow-up of 3.4 years (range, 0.3-13.4 years). The level of sports was recorded in 23 studies or 635 (93%) athletes and included 286 competitive or professional athletes and 349 recreational athletes. The most commonly practiced sports were baseball (224 participants), tennis (104 participants), and golf (54 participants). The overall rate of return to sport was 84.7% (95% CI, 77.6%-89.8%), including 65.9% (95% CI, 54.9%-75.4%) at an equivalent level of play, after 4 to 17 months. Of the professional and competitive athletes, 49.9% (95% CI, 35.3-64.6%) returned to the same level of play. Most

  1. Satisfaction, function and repair integrity after arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, L A Fink; Kim, H M; Caldwell, J-M; Buza, J; Ahmad, C S; Bigliani, L U; Levine, W N

    2017-02-01

    Advances in arthroscopic techniques for rotator cuff repair have made the mini-open approach less popular. However, the mini-open approach remains an important technique for repair for many surgeons. The aims of this study were to compare the integrity of the repair, the function of the shoulder and satisfaction post-operatively using these two techniques in patients aged > 50 years. We identified 22 patients treated with mini-open and 128 patients treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair of July 2007 and June 2011. The mean follow-up was two years (1 to 5). Outcome was assessed using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, and satisfaction. The integrity of the repair was assessed using ultrasonography. A power analysis ensured sufficient enrolment. There was no statistically significant difference between the age, function, satisfaction, or pain scores (p > 0.05) of the two groups. The integrity of the repair and the mean SST scores were significantly better in the mini-open group (91% of mini-open repairs were intact versus 60% of arthroscopic repairs, p = 0.023; mean SST score 10.9 (standard deviation (sd) 1.3) in the mini-open group; 8.9 (sd 3.5) in arthroscopic group; p = 0.003). The ASES scores were also higher in the mini-open group (mean ASES score 91.0 (sd 10.5) in mini-open group; mean 82.70 (sd 19.8) in the arthroscopic group; p = 0.048). The integrity of the repair and function of the shoulder were better after a mini-open repair than after arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear in these patients. The functional difference did not translate into a difference in satisfaction. Mini-open rotator cuff repair remains a useful technique despite advances in arthroscopy. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:245-9. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  2. Development of a self-managed loaded exercise programme for rotator cuff tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Chris; Malliaras, Peter; Mawson, Sue; May, Stephen; Walters, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes a self-managed loaded exercise programme which has been designed to address the pain and disability associated with rotator cuff tendinopathy. The intervention has been developed with reference to current self-management theory and with reference to the emerging benefit of loaded exercise for tendinopathy. This self-managed loaded exercise programme is being evaluated within the mixed methods SELF study (ISRCTN 84709751) which includes a pragmatic randomised controlled trial conducted within the UK National Health Service. Copyright © 2012 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound for rotator cuff tears in adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T.O., E-mail: toby.smith@uea.ac.uk [Department of Physiotherapy, University of East Anglia (United Kingdom); Back, T. [Department of Physiotherapy, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Toms, A.P. [Department of Radiology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Hing, C.B. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, St George' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Aim: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound to detect partial and complete thickness rotator cuff tears based on all available clinical trials. Materials and methods: An electronic search of databases registering published and unpublished literature was conducted. All diagnostic accuracy studies that directly compared the accuracy of ultrasound (the index test) to either arthroscopic or open surgical findings (the reference test) for rotator cuff tear were included. The methodological quality of each included study was assessed using the QUADAS form. When appropriate, pooled sensitivity and specificity analysis was conducted, with an assessment of the summary receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for each analysis. Results: Sixty-two studies assessing 6007 patients and 6066 shoulders were included. Ultrasonography had good sensitivity and specificity for the assessment of partial thickness (sensitivity 0.84; specificity 0.89), and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.93). However, the literature poorly described population characteristics, assessor blinding, and was based on limited sample sizes. The literature assessing transducer frequency was particularly small in size. Conclusion: Ultrasonography is an appropriate radiological technique for the assessment of rotator cuff tears with an acceptable sensitivity and specificity. The diagnostic test accuracy of ultrasound is superior for the detection of full-thickness compared to partial-thickness cuff tears. Further study assessing the effect of transducer frequency is warranted.

  4. Biomechanics of latissimus dorsi transfer for irreparable posterosuperior rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, H Y; Angeles, J G; Horodyski, M B

    2009-03-01

    Latissimus dorsi transfer is the treatment most frequently used for restoring function in shoulders with irreparable posterosuperior rotator cuff tears. Yet, functional outcomes of the transfers are unpredictable and vary among patients. A three-dimensional upper-extremity computational model was used to simulate and analyze the biomechanical consequences of transferring the latissimus dorsi to four attachment sites: the infraspinatus, supraspinatus, subscapularis and teres minor insertions. Functions of a normal shoulder were simulated, as well as those and of a shoulder with a posterosuperior rotator cuff tear before and after muscle transfers were simulated. Parameters such as active and passive moment-generating capacity, and the moment arm and fiber excursion ratio of the transferred muscle were analyzed. All muscle transfers resulted in a large increase in shoulder external rotation strength. The latissimus dorsi was an external rotator after the transfer, but the fiber excursion ratio decreased accordingly. When the latissimus dorsi was transferred to the infraspinatus, supraspinatus or subscapularis insertion, it changed from extensor to flexor at the beginning of flexion. The flexion moment arm of the latissimus dorsi after the transfers was generally decreased. Shoulder abduction strength did not improve. Decrease in fiber excursion ratio during abduction and flexion was observed after the transfer. Side effects of the muscle transfers, such as the reduction of active adduction, extension and internal rotation of the shoulder, were explored. A transfer to teres minor insertion was not recommended. Infraspinatus insertion was found to be a preferred attachment site in latissimus dorsi transfer, provided that the patient had a strong deltoid.

  5. Propionibacterium acnes Suture Contamination in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: A Prospective Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakado, Kotaro

    2018-01-17

    To examine the contamination rate of the anchor-suture and to determine the efficacy of 2 different surgical skin preparation solutions with or without a plastic adhesive drape from suture contamination in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A prospective randomized study was undertaken to evaluate 126 consecutive patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Each shoulder was prepared with one of 2 randomly selected solutions according to an assigned envelope that indicated the procedure to be used: chlorhexidine-alcohol (1% chlorhexidine gluconate and 70% isopropyl alcohol) or povidone-iodine. Then, each group was further divided according to the usage of a plastic drape. The first cut-tails of the anchor-suture after cuff fixation were submitted to aerobic and anaerobic cultures. The overall rate of Propionibacterium acnes-positive cultures was 47% (14 of 31 cases) in the povidone-iodine group, 33% (11 of 33 cases) in the povidone-iodine with a drape group, 33% (10 of 30 cases) in the chlorhexidine-alcohol group, and 9.3% (3 of 32 cases) in the chlorhexidine-alcohol with a drape group. The positive culture rate in the chlorhexidine-alcohol with a drape group was lower than that in the povidone-iodine group (relative risk, 0.2; 95% confidence interval: 0.064-0.63; number needed to treat, 2.7; P suture contamination. However, the usage of a plastic drape slightly increased the risk of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus proliferation. Level I, therapeutic, prospective, randomized trial. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. MR imaging after rotator cuff repair: full-thickness defects and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities in asymptomatic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanetti, M.; Hodler, J. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Jost, B.; Gerber, C. [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, University Hospital Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2000-06-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities on MR images after rotator cuff repair in asymptomatic subjects, and to define the clinical relevance of these findings.Design and patients. Fourteen completely asymptomatic patients and 32 patients with residual symptoms were investigated 27-53 months (mean 39 months) after open transosseous reinsertion of the rotator cuff. Coronal T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and turbo STIR or T2-weighted fat-suppressed MR images were obtained. The prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears of the rotator cuff and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities were determined.Results. Residual defects or retears were detected in three (21%) and bursitis-like abnormalities in 14 (100%) of the 14 asymptomatic patients. Fifteen (47%) residual defects or retears and 31 (97%) bursitis-like abnormalities were diagnosed in the 32 patients with residual symptoms. The size of the residual defects/retears was significantly smaller in the asymptomatic group (mean 8 mm, range 6-11 mm) than in the symptomatic group (mean 32 mm, range 7-50 mm) (t-test, P=0.001). The extent of the bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities did not significantly differ (t-test, P>0.05) between asymptomatic (mean 28 x 3 mm) and symptomatic patients (mean 32 x 3 mm).Conclusion. Small residual defects or retears (<1 cm) of the rotator cuff are not necessarily associated with clinical symptoms. Subacromial bursitis-like MR abnormalities are almost always seen after rotator cuff repair even in patients without residual complaints. They may persist for several years after rotator cuff repair and appear to be clinically irrelevant. (orig.)

  7. Biomechanical effects of a 2 suture-pass medial inter-implant mattress on transosseous-equivalent rotator cuff repair and considerations for a "technical efficiency ratio".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Maxwell C; Peterson, Alexander; Patton, John; McGarry, Michelle H; Park, Chong J; Lee, Thay Q

    2014-03-01

    Rotator cuff repair involving fewer tendon suture passes without compromising biomechanical performance would represent a technical advancement. An inter-implant "medial pulley-mattress" transosseous-equivalent (MP-TOE) repair requiring fewer tendon suture-passes was hypothesized to provide equivalent biomechanical characteristics compared to the control. In 6 human cadaveric shoulders, a transosseous-equivalent (TOE) repair (control) was performed utilizing 2 separate medial mattresses resulting in 4 tendon-bridging sutures. In 6 matched-pairs, 2 single-loaded anchors were used to create a medial inter-implant mattress construct (all sutures shuttled in 1 tendon pass per anchor)-after knot-tying, the same tendon-bridging pattern as the control was created. A materials testing machine cyclically loaded each repair from 10-180 N for 30 cycles; each repair subsequently underwent failure testing. Gap and strain were measured with a video digitizing system. A "technical efficiency ratio" (TER) was defined as: (#knots + #suture passes + #suture limbs)/#fixation points. Cyclic and failure testing demonstrated no significant differences between constructs. Gap formation at cycle 30 was 5.3 ± 0.8 mm (TOE) and 5.0 ± 0.3 mm (MP-TOE) (P = .62). Cycle 30 anterior strain values were -16.0 ± 7.3% (TOE) and -15.8 ± 6.6% (MP-TOE) (P = .99). Yield loads were 208.7 ± 2.7 N (TOE) and 204.0 ± 1.3 N (MP-TOE) (P = .17). Mode of failure demonstrated less tendon cut-out with the MP-TOE repair. The MP-TOE repair has a TER of 2.0 vs 2.5 for the control. The MP-TOE repair requiring fewer tendon suture passes, yet creating an additional inter-implant mattress configuration, is biomechanically equivalent to the original TOE technique, and may limit failure with improved medial load-sharing capacity. A TER may help quantify technical ease and help standardize comparisons between repair techniques. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. All rights

  8. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR ON ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES AMONG PATIENTS UNDER 50 YEARS OF AGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Santos, Ruy Mesquita Maranhão; de Souza, Adriano; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries among patients under 50 years of age. Methods: Sixty-three patients with rotator cuff injuries who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment performed by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, in the Fernandinho Simonsen wing of Santa Casa Medical School, São Paulo, between August 1998 and December 2007, were reassessed. The study included all patients with rotator cuff injuries who were under 50 years of age and had been followed up postoperatively for at least 24 months. Results: According to the UCLA evaluation criteria, 59 patients (92%) showed excellent and good results; five (8%) showed fair results; and none showed poor results. The postoperative evaluation showed that the mean range of motion was 145° for elevation, 47° for lateral rotation and T10 for medial rotation. Unsatisfactory results were associated with prolonged duration of the injury, with a statistically significant relationship. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in young patients produces excellent or good results for most patients. PMID:27047819

  9. Early mobilisation following mini-open rotator cuff repair: a randomised control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheps, D M; Bouliane, M; Styles-Tripp, F; Beaupre, L A; Saraswat, M K; Luciak-Corea, C; Silveira, A; Glasgow, R; Balyk, R

    2015-09-01

    This study compared the clinical outcomes following mini-open rotator cuff repair (MORCR) between early mobilisation and usual care, involving initial immobilisation. In total, 189 patients with radiologically-confirmed full-thickness rotator cuff tears underwent MORCR and were randomised to either early mobilisation (n = 97) or standard rehabilitation (n = 92) groups. Patients were assessed at six weeks and three, six, 12 and 24 months post-operatively. Six-week range of movement comparisons demonstrated significantly increased abduction (p = 0.002) and scapular plane elevation (p = 0.006) in the early mobilisation group, an effect which was not detectable at three months (p > 0.51) or afterwards. At 24 months post-operatively, patients who performed pain-free, early active mobilisation for activities of daily living showed no difference in clinical outcomes from patients immobilised for six weeks following MORCR. We suggest that the choice of rehabilitation regime following MORCR may be left to the discretion of the patient and the treating surgeon. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  10. Repair of Rotator Cuff Tear With Delamination: Independent Repairs of the Infraspinatus and Articular Capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Tomoyuki; Nimura, Akimoto; Miyamoto, Takashi; Koga, Hideyuki; Akita, Keiichi; Muneta, Takeshi

    2016-10-01

    We propose a technique to repair delamination, which often occurs during rotator cuff repair surgery. We have reported that the infraspinatus occupies most of the greater tuberosity with the articular capsule attached to a very wide area, and that the superficial layer is mainly composed of the infraspinatus, and the deep layer is mainly composed of the articular capsule. To repair such delamination with consideration of the detailed anatomy, we developed the following repair method with independent repair of the superficial layer (infraspinatus) and the deep layer (articular capsule): (1) the deep layer is pulled laterally and joined to the medial margin of the greater tuberosity using 4 simple sutures from 2 anchors; (2) the paired limbs (same color) of 4 knots are passed over the posterior leaf of the superficial layer at intervals; (3) a push-in anchor loaded with 1 thread each of 4 knots is placed on the anterolateral corner of the greater tuberosity to pull the superficial layer anterolaterally; (4) another push-in anchor (remaining threads) is pushed on the posterior corner of the greater tuberosity. We believe that this technique can recover the function of both the articular capsule and rotator cuff, thereby facilitating better treatment outcomes after surgery.

  11. The efficacy of therapeutic ultrasound for rotator cuff tendinopathy: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmeules, François; Boudreault, Jennifer; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Dionne, Clermont; Frémont, Pierre; MacDermid, Joy C

    2015-08-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis on the efficacy of therapeutic ultrasound (US) in adults suffering from rotator cuff tendinopathy. A literature search was conducted in four databases for randomized controlled trials (RCT) published until 12/2013, comparing the efficacy of US to any other interventions in adults suffering from rotator cuff tendinopathy. The Cochrane Risk of Bias tool was used to evaluate the risk of bias of included studies. Data were summarized qualitatively or quantitatively. Eleven RCTs with a low mean methodological score (50.0% ± 15.6%) were included. Therapeutic US did not provide greater benefits than a placebo intervention or advice in terms of pain reduction and functional improvement. When provided in conjunction with exercise, US therapy is not superior to exercise alone in terms of pain reduction and functional improvement (pooled mean difference of the Constant-Murley score: -0.26 with 95% confidence interval of -3.84 to 3.32). Laser therapy was found superior to therapeutic US in terms of pain reduction. Based on low to moderate level evidence, therapeutic US does not provide any benefit compared to a placebo or advice, to laser therapy or when combined to exercise. More methodologically sound studies on the efficacy of therapeutic US are warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Different Rotator Cuff Lesions Using Shoulder Musculoskeletal Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ruey-Feng; Lee, Chung-Chien; Lo, Chung-Ming

    2016-09-01

    The lifetime prevalence of shoulder pain approaches 70%, which is mostly attributable to rotator cuff lesions such as inflammation, calcific tendinitis and tears. On clinical examination, shoulder ultrasound is recommended for the detection of lesions. However, there exists inter-operator variability in diagnostic accuracy because of differences in the experience and expertise of operators. In this study, a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system was developed to assist ultrasound operators in diagnosing rotator cuff lesions and to improve the practicality of ultrasound examination. The collected cases included 43 cases of inflammation, 30 cases of calcific tendinitis and 26 tears. For each case, the lesion area and texture features were extracted from the entire lesions and combined in a multinomial logistic regression classifier for lesion classification. The proposed CAD achieved an accuracy of 87.9%. The individual accuracy of this CAD system was 88.4% for inflammation, 83.3% for calcific tendinitis and 92.3% for tears. Cohen's k was 0.798. On the basis of its diagnostic performance, clinical use of this CAD technique has promise. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Arthroscopic in Situ Repair of Partial Bursal Rotator Cuff Tears Without Acromioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranalletta, Maximiliano; Rossi, Luciano A; Atala, Nicolas A; Bertona, Agustin; Maignon, Gastón D; Bongiovanni, Santiago L

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate functional outcomes and complications in a consecutive group of patients with partial bursal rotator cuff tears (PBRCTs) treated with insitu repair without acromioplasty. Seventy-four patients who had undergone an arthroscopic single row in situ repair for bursal-sided rotator cuff tears were evaluated. Clinical assessment consisted of glenohumeral range of motion measurement, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, and the University of California at Los Angeles score. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. Postoperative complications were also assessed. Mean age was 55.2 years (±6.3) with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. After arthroscopic repair, all active range of motion parameters improved significantly (P In the midterm follow-up (42 months), arthroscopic in situ repair of PBRCTs without acromioplasty is a reliable procedure that produces significant functional improvements and pain relief. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Rehabilitation after shoulder rotator cuff surgery: in-patient or day-hospitalization (about 76 cases)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbrouck, C; Dauty, M; Huguet, D; Dubois, C

    2003-05-01

    To define criteria of orientation in day-hospitalized or in-patient after shoulder rotator cuff surgery. Population of 71 patients (53.2 years +/-7) (76 shoulders) operated for rotator cuff tear by the same surgeon, then treated by physical therapy either in day-hospitalization or in-patient. Weekly, evaluation until the second month after surgery by setting as criteria: pain, passive and active range of motion and complications. Fifty-three shoulders benefited from rehabilitation therapy in hospitalization and 23 in day-hospitalization. There is no significant difference for criteria studied between the 2 populations except for pains at the fifteenth day after surgery. Pain and articular steepness seem more frequent if the surgery is complex. Day-hospitalization and in-patient give equivalent results, which explain themselves by the possibility of identical physical medicine and rehabilitation performances. The knowledge of the social context is important to choose the most adapted rehabilitation type because patients can benefit from assistance for the acts of the daily life and the domestic tasks. In-patient allows more comfort but implies a familial break.

  15. Results of surgical management of symptomatic shoulders with partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; Del Buono, Angelo; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    The optimal management of partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff (PTRCT) is still controversial. A literature search, on PubMed, Cochrane and Google Scholar databases, identified 273 relevant abstracts of articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Twenty-three clinical studies reporting the outcomes of surgically treated patients affected by PTRCTs were selected. The different repair approaches results in variable functional outcomes. The Coleman Methodology Score (CMS) used to asses the quality of the studies showed great heterogeneity in study design, the sample, pre- and post-operative diagnostic assessments and the score used to evaluate outcomes. The mean CMS value was 67.95 (ranging from 30 to 82). The heterogeneity of the treatment options and of the outcome assessment methods makes it difficult to compare the results of the different studies. There is a need to use standardized pre- and post-operative assessment methods and functional outcome scores. To improve the diagnosis and to choose the best treatment, it may be useful to measure the thickness of the rotator cuff to ascertain whether the size correlates with outcome. There is a lack of scientifically based guidelines, probably a result of the relatively low levels of evidence of the studies. There is a need for adequately powered randomized clinical trials, using standard diagnostic assessment, common and validated scoring system comparing reported outcomes and duration of follow-up greater than 2 years.

  16. Knowing the speed limit: weighing the benefits and risks of rehabilitation progression after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thigpen, Charles A; Shaffer, Michael A; Kissenberth, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    Rotator cuff repairs have increased. Although clinical trials have examined the effect of immobilization and timing of passive range of motion (ROM) on patient outcomes and structural integrity, there is controversy as to the timing and progression for therapy. Primary goals are restoring function while maintaining the structural integrity of the repair. We advocate for a protocol of 4 to 6 weeks of immobilization, followed by protected passive ROM, which is followed by a gradual progression to active ROM and then appropriate resistance exercise program for most all rotator cuff repairs. The rate of progression should be adjusted individually. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Computed tomography of the soft tissues of the shoulder. Pt. 3. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dihlmann, W.; Bandick, J.

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography of the soft tissue of the shoulder in cases of calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff provides the following information: 1. Localisation of the calcium deposits within the rotator cuff. 2. Contours and density of the calcium deposits correlated with the clinical findings as described by Uhthoff et al. Ill-defined contours and non-homogeneous deposits are associated with more severe clinical features. 3. Computed tomography shows that apatite particles, which are not visible radiologically, may penetrate into the shoulder joint and produce synovitis with an effusion. This is of importance in local therapy.

  18. The diagnostic value of the combination of patient characteristics, history, and clinical shoulder tests for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kampen, D.A.; van den Berg, T.; van der Woude, H.J.; Castelein, R.M.; Scholtes, V.A.B.; Terwee, C.B.; Willems, W.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is unknown which combination of patient information and clinical tests might be optimal for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. This study aimed to determine the diagnostic value of nine individual clinical tests for evaluating rotator cuff tear and to develop a prediction model for

  19. Clinical and radiological outcome of conservative vs. surgical treatment of atraumatic degenerative rotator cuff rupture : design of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerspink, Frederik O. Lambers; Hoogeslag, Roy A. G.; Diercks, Ron L.; van Eerden, Pepijn J. M.; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; van Raay, Jos J. A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Subacromial impingement syndrome is a frequently observed disorder in orthopedic practice. Lasting symptoms and impairment may occur when a subsequent atraumatic rotator cuff rupture is also present. However, degenerative ruptures of the rotator cuff can also be observed in asymptomatic

  20. Evaluation of the functional results after rotator cuff arthroscopic repair with the suture bridge technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Naoki Miyazaki

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results of arthroscopic treatment of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries (RCI that involved the supra and infraspinatus muscles using the suture bridge (SB technique. METHODS: Between July 2010 and November 2014, 37 patients with RCI who were treated with SB technique were evaluated. The study included all patients with a minimum follow-up of 12 months who underwent primary surgery of the shoulder. Twenty-four patients were male and 13 were female. The mean age was 60 years (45-75. The dominant side was affected in 32 cases. The most common cause of injury was trauma (18 cases. The mean preoperative motion was 123°, 58°, T11. Through magnetic resonance imaging, 36 fatty degenerations were classified according to Goutallier. Patients underwent rotator cuff repair with SB technique, which consists of using a medial row anchor with two Corkscrew(r fibertape(r or fiberwire(r at the articular margin, associated with lateral fixation without stitch using PushLocks(r or SwiveLocks(r. RESULTS: The mean age was 60 years and mean fatty degeneration was 2.6. The mean range of motion (following the AAOS in the postoperative evaluation was 148° of forward elevation, 55° in lateral rotation and medial rotation in T9. Using the criteria of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA, 35 (94% patients had excellent and good results; one (2.7%, fair; and one (2.7%, poor. CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic repair of a large and extensive RCI using SB technique had good and excellent results in 94% of the patients.

  1. Evaluation of the functional results after rotator cuff arthroscopic repair with the suture bridge technique.

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    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Santos, Pedro Doneux; Sella, Guilherme do Val; Checchia, Caio Santos; Salata, Thiago Roncoletta; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the results of arthroscopic treatment of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries (RCI) that involved the supra and infraspinatus muscles using the suture bridge (SB) technique. Between July 2010 and November 2014, 37 patients with RCI who were treated with SB technique were evaluated. The study included all patients with a minimum follow-up of 12 months who underwent primary surgery of the shoulder. Twenty-four patients were male and 13 were female. The mean age was 60 years (45-75). The dominant side was affected in 32 cases. The most common cause of injury was trauma (18 cases). The mean preoperative motion was 123°, 58°, T11. Through magnetic resonance imaging, 36 fatty degenerations were classified according to Goutallier. Patients underwent rotator cuff repair with SB technique, which consists of using a medial row anchor with two Corkscrew(®) fibertape(®) or fiberwire(®) at the articular margin, associated with lateral fixation without stitch using PushLocks(®) or SwiveLocks(®). The mean age was 60 years and mean fatty degeneration was 2.6. The mean range of motion (following the AAOS) in the postoperative evaluation was 148° of forward elevation, 55° in lateral rotation and medial rotation in T9. Using the criteria of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), 35 (94%) patients had excellent and good results; one (2.7%), fair; and one (2.7%), poor. Arthroscopic repair of a large and extensive RCI using SB technique had good and excellent results in 94% of the patients.

  2. Translation of the humeral head scale is associated with success of rotator cuff repair for large-massive tears.

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    Taniguchi, Noboru; D'Lima, Darryl D; Suenaga, Naoki; Ishida, Yasuyuki; Lee, Deokcheol; Goya, Isoya; Chosa, Etsuo

    2017-12-04

    Although a loss of rotator cuff integrity leads to the superior migration of the humeral head, the parameters that characterize the anterolateral migration of the humeral head have not been established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between the translation of the humeral head scale (T-scale) and clinical outcomes of rotator cuff repair, as well as the correlation between the T-scale and radiologic parameters. One hundred thirty-five consecutive patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears underwent primary rotator cuff repair. The T-scale, which indicates the distance from the center of the humeral head to the lateral coracoacromial arch, was measured on axial computed tomography scans, and the acromiohumeral interval (AHI) was measured radiographically. The correlation of the two parameters with the clinical scores of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association and University of California-Los Angeles scores and active forward elevation (FE) were evaluated at the preoperative and postoperative stages, respectively. The postoperative T-scale and AHI correlated well with the postoperative FE and clinical scores in the patients with large-massive tears but not in those patients with small-medium tears and preoperative large-massive tears. A significant correlation was observed between the postoperative T-scale and AHI. The T-scale was subject to cuff repair integrity. We demonstrated that the postoperative T-scale was well correlated with the clinical results and postoperative AHI after rotator cuff repair for large-massive tears, indicating that poor outcomes are associated with combined superior and anterolateral migration of the humeral head following retears.

  3. Concurrent Rotator Cuff Tear and Axillary Nerve Palsy Associated with Anterior Dislocation of the Shoulder and Large Glenoid Rim Fracture: A “Terrible Tetrad”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Takase

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of concurrent rotator cuff tear and axillary nerve palsy resulting from anterior dislocation of the shoulder and a large glenoid rim fracture—a “terrible tetrad.” A 61-year-old woman fell on her right shoulder. Radiographs showed anterior dislocation of the shoulder with a glenoid rim fracture, and an MRI two months after injury revealed a rotator cuff tear. Upon referral to our hospital, physical and electrophysiological examinations revealed axillary nerve palsy. The axillary nerve palsy was incomplete and recovering, and displacement of the glenoid rim fracture was minimal and already united; therefore, we surgically repaired only the rotator cuff tear three months after injury. The patient recovered satisfactorily following the operation. In patients whose axillary nerve palsy is recovering, surgeons should consider operating on rotator cuff tears in an attempt to prevent rotator cuff degeneration.

  4. Early rehabilitation affects functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report.

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    Shimo, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuta; Tokiyoshi, Akinari; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The effect of early rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is currently unknown. We examined short-term effects of early rehabilitation on functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. [Subject and Methods] An 82-year-old male fell during a walk, resulting in a supraspinatus tear. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was performed using a single-row technique. He wore an abduction brace for 6 weeks after surgery. [Results] From day 1 after surgery, passive range of motion exercises, including forward flexion and internal and external rotation were performed twice per day. Starting at 6 weeks after surgery, active range of motion exercises and muscle strengthening exercises were introduced gradually. At 6 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 150°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 36 points. At 20 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 120°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 0 points. [Conclusion] These protocols are recommended to physical therapists during rehabilitation for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair to support rapid reintegration into activities of daily living.

  5. Effectiveness of open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (UKUFF): a randomised controlled trial.

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    Carr, A; Cooper, C; Campbell, M K; Rees, J; Moser, J; Beard, D J; Fitzpatrick, R; Gray, A; Dawson, J; Murphy, J; Bruhn, H; Cooper, D; Ramsay, C

    2017-01-01

    The appropriate management for patients with a degenerative tear of the rotator cuff remains controversial, but operative treatment, particularly arthroscopic surgery, is increasingly being used. Our aim in this paper was to compare the effectiveness of arthroscopic with open repair of the rotator cuff. A total of 273 patients were recruited to a randomised comparison trial (136 to arthroscopic surgery and 137 to open surgery) from 19 teaching and general hospitals in the United Kingdom. The surgeons used their usual preferred method of repair. The Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS), two years post-operatively, was the primary outcome measure. Imaging of the shoulder was performed at one year after surgery. The trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials, ISRCTN97804283. The mean OSS improved from 26.3 (standard deviation (sd) 8.2) at baseline, to 41.7 (sd 7.9) two years post-operatively for arthroscopic surgery and from 25.0 (sd 8.0) to 41.5 (sd 7.9) for open surgery. Intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis showed no statistical difference between the groups at two years (difference in OSS score -0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.75 to 1.22; p = 0.452). The confidence interval excluded the pre-determined clinically important difference in the OSS of three points. The rate of re-tear was not significantly different between the two groups (46.4% for arthroscopic and 38.6% for open surgery; 95% CI -6.9 to 25.8; p = 0.256). Healed repairs had the most improved OSS. These findings were the same when analysed per-protocol. There is no evidence of difference in effectiveness between open and arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears. The rate of re-tear is high in both groups, for all sizes of tear and ages and this adversely affects the outcome. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:107-15. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  6. Are degenerative rotator cuff disorders a cause of shoulder pain? Comparison of prevalence of degenerative rotator cuff disease to prevalence of nontraumatic shoulder pain through three syste