WorldWideScience

Sample records for rostral fastigial nucleus

  1. Electro-stimulation of cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FNS) improves axonal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuyan; Zhang, Qinli; Zhang, John H; Qin, Xinyue

    2008-05-01

    This study focused on the effect of electro-stimulation of fastigial nucleus on the expression of NgR and on axonal regeneration after focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in rats. Cerebral ischemia and reperfusion was induced by nylon monofilament. Ninety-six male SD rats were randomly divided into sham group and ischemic insult groups at 12 hours, 24 hours, and 1 to 3 weeks after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine the changes of NgR mRNA expression. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of NgR protein and the state of axonal regeneration. Fastigial nucleus stimulation was applied at 2 hours after ischemia for one hour. The results demonstrated that NgR mRNA and protein in the infarcted cortex and hippocampus were significantly increased (p<0.01). The axons were grossly damaged at 24 h after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion when compared to the sham group. Fastigial nucleus stimulation decreased NgR mRNA and protein levels in the infarcted cortex and hippocampus (p<0.01) and improved axonal growth at 24 hours and 2 weeks after ischemia-reperfusion (p<0.05). These results suggest that electrostimulation of fastigial nucleus might provide a new strategy to promote CNS axonal regeneration.

  2. Tuning in caudal fastigial nucleus units during natural and galvanic labyrinth stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, H G; Guldin, W O; Grüsser, O J

    2001-05-25

    Neurons of the caudal fastigial nucleus were investigated by means of single unit recordings. Natural vestibular stimuli were applied as well as galvanic labyrinth polarization. One-third of the neurons showed a convergence of vertical and horizontal canals. More than 80% of the neurons responded to polarization of both the ipsilateral and contralateral canals (binaural responders). Most neurons had a limited response range. Two classes of neurons could be distinguished: up to 1 Hz responders and up to 10 Hz responders. In addition a group of fastigial cells showed a tuning within a small range of frequencies (sharp-tuning responders).

  3. Integrity of Cerebellar Fastigial Nucleus Intrinsic Neurons Is Critical for the Global Ischemic Preconditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene V. Golanov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Excitation of intrinsic neurons of cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN renders brain tolerant to local and global ischemia. This effect reaches a maximum 72 h after the stimulation and lasts over 10 days. Comparable neuroprotection is observed following sublethal global brain ischemia, a phenomenon known as preconditioning. We hypothesized that FN may participate in the mechanisms of ischemic preconditioning as a part of the intrinsic neuroprotective mechanism. To explore potential significance of FN neurons in brain ischemic tolerance we lesioned intrinsic FN neurons with excitotoxin ibotenic acid five days before exposure to 20 min four-vessel occlusion (4-VO global ischemia while analyzing neuronal damage in Cornu Ammoni area 1 (CA1 hippocampal area one week later. In FN-lesioned animals, loss of CA1 cells was higher by 22% compared to control (phosphate buffered saline (PBS-injected animals. Moreover, lesion of FN neurons increased morbidity following global ischemia by 50%. Ablation of FN neurons also reversed salvaging effects of five-minute ischemic preconditioning on CA1 neurons and morbidity, while ablation of cerebellar dentate nucleus neurons did not change effect of ischemic preconditioning. We conclude that FN is an important part of intrinsic neuroprotective system, which participates in ischemic preconditioning and may participate in naturally occurring neuroprotection, such as “diving response”.

  4. Clinical study on treating post-stroke sleep disorders by fastigial nucleus stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-wei LIU

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss the efficacy and safety of fastigial nucleus stimulation (FNS in the treatment of post-stroke sleep disorders (PSSD. Methods A total of 69 cases with PSSD were randomly divided into 3 groups: control group (N = 23, sham group (N = 23 and treatment group (N = 23. Control group received routine treatment, sham group received routine treatment plus sham FNS treatment, and treatment group received routine treatment plus FNS treatment. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI was used to evaluate the sleep quality of patients in 3 groups before and after 4-week treatment. Adverse reactions during the FNS treatment were also observed. Results There was statistical significance in PSQI scores among 3 groups before and after 4-week treatment (P = 0.020. PSQI score after 4-week treatment in treatment group was significantly lower than control group and sham group (P = 0.000, 0.000. Compared to before treatment, PSQI scores were significantly decreased in 3 groups after 4-week treatment (P = 0.000. Conclusions FNS safely and effectively improves the sleep quality of patients with PSSD, thus it can be used as one of the auxiliary treatments for curing PSSD. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.03.006

  5. Excitatory effect of histamine on neuronal activity of rat cerebellar fastigial nucleus in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Biao; ZHANG Jun; LI HongZhao; ZHU JingNing; WANG JianJun

    2007-01-01

    The cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN) holds an important role in motor control and body balance. Previous studies have revealed that the nucleus is innervated by direct hypothalamocerebellar histaminergic fibers. However, the functional role of histaminergic projection in cerebellar FN has never been established. In this study, we investigated the effect of histamine on neuronal firing of cerebellar FN by using slice preparations. Sixty-five FN cells were recorded from 47 cerebellar slices, and a vast majority of the cells responded to histamine stimulation with an excitatory response (58/65, 89.2%). Perfusing slices with low-Ca2+/high-Mg2+ medium did not block the histamine-induced excitation (n=10), supporting a direct postsynaptic action of histamine on the cells. Furthermore, the excitatory effect of histamine on FN neurons was not blocked by selective histamine H1 receptor antagonist triprolidine (n=15) or chlorpheniramine (n=10), but was effectively suppressed by ranitidine (n=15), a highly selective histamine H2 receptor antagonist. On the other hand, highly selective histamine H2 receptor agonist dimaprit (n=20) instead of histamine H1 receptor agonist 2-pyridylethylamine (n=16) mimicked the excitatory effect of histamine on FN neurons. The dimaprit-induced FN neuronal excitation was effectively antagonized by selective histamine H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (n=13) but not influenced by selective histamine H1 receptor antagonist triprolidine (n=15). These results demonstrate that histamine excites cerebellar FN cells via the histamine H2 receptor mechanism and suggest that the hypothalamocerebellar histaminergic fibers may modulate cerebellar FN-mediated sensorimotor integration through their excitatory innervations on FN neurons.

  6. Protective effect of histamine microinjected into cerebellar fastigial nucleus on stress gastric mucosal damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xiao; Yang, Jun; Fei, Su-Juan; Zhu, Jin-Zhou; Zhu, Sheng-Ping; Liu, Zhang-Bo; Li, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Jian-Fu

    2015-12-10

    In the study, we investigated the effect of histamine microinjected into cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN) on stress gastric mucosal damage (SGMD), and its mechanisms in rats. The model of SGMD was established by restraining and water (21±1°C)-immersion for 3h. The gastric mucosal damage index (GMDI) indicated the severity of gastric mucosal damage. Histamine or receptor antagonist was microinjected into the FN. The decussation of superior cerebellar peduncle (DSCP) and the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) were destroyed, respectively. The pathological changes of gastric mucosa were evaluated using biological signal acquisition system, Laser-Doppler flowmeter, and western blotting. We found that the microinjection of histamine (0.05, 0.5, and 5μg) into FN significantly attenuated the SGMD, in a dose-dependent manner, whereas, the microinjection of histamine H2 receptor antagonist, ranitidine, and glutamic acid decarboxylase antagonist, 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) exacerbated the SGMD. The protective effect of histamine on SGMD was abolished by electrical lesion of DSCP or chemical ablation of LHA. The microinjection of histamine decreased the discharge frequency of the greater splanchnic nerve, and the gastric mucosal blood flow was increased. In addition, the cellular proliferation was enhanced, but the cellular apoptosis was reduced in the gastric mucosa. Also the pro-apoptosis protein, Bax, and caspase-3 were down-regulated, and the anti-apoptosis protein, Bcl-2 was up-regulated following microinjection of histamine. In conclusion, the FN participated in the regulation of SGMD after histamine microinjected into FN, and cerebellar-hypothalamic circuits (include: DSCP, LHA) contribute to the process, which may provide a new therapeutic strategy for SGMD.

  7. Cerebellar Fastigial Nucleus Electrical Stimulation Alleviates Depressive-Like Behaviors in Post-Stroke Depression Rat Model and Potential Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the molecular mechanism of post-stroke depression (PSD, and observe the therapeutic effects of cerebellar fastigial nucleus electrical stimulation (FNS on the behaviors and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF in a PSD rat model. Methods: Healthy SD rats were randomly divided into four groups (sham, stroke, post-stroke depress and FNS group. Sham group (n = 6 underwent sham operation. The other three groups (n = 6*3 underwent MCAO. Rats were examined twice a week in open filed test. Moreover, neuroprotective effect on cerebellar Purkinje cells and expression of cytokines in hippocampal tissue were examined. Results: The PSD group showed a significant weight loss, decreased consumption of sucrose water, reduced rearing and locomotor activities. The FNS significantly alleviates the body weight loss and sucrose preference, locomotor and rearing activities. The bilateral rCBF was also restored after FNS treatment. Moreover, FNS improved the neuroprotection via suppressing apoptosis of cerebellar Purkinje cells. And the inflammatory cytokines mRNA level in hippocampus was significantly decreased. Conclusion: FNS treatment alleviates depressive-like behaviors and rCBF in PSD rats model, which could be attributed to its ability to protect cerebellar Purkinje cells and decrease the mRNA level of inflammatory cytokines.

  8. Intramedullary projections of the rostral nucleus of the solitary tract in the rat : Gustatory influences on autonomic output

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streefland, C; Jansen, K

    1999-01-01

    The efferent connections of the rostral nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in the rat were studied by anterograde transport of Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin. Rostral to the injection site, fibers travel through the rostral parvocellular reticular formation and deflect medially or laterally aro

  9. Caudal topographic nucleus isthmi and the rostral nontopographic nucleus isthmi in the turtle, Pseudemys scripta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereno, M I; Ulinski, P S

    1987-07-15

    Isthmotectal projections in turtles were examined by making serial section reconstructions of axonal and dendritic arborizations that were anterogradely or retrogradely filled with HRP. Two prominent tectal-recipient isthmic nuclei--the caudal magnocellular nucleus isthmi (Imc) and the rostral magnocellular nucleus isthmi (Imr)--exhibited strikingly different patterns of organization. Imc cells have flattened, bipolar dendritic fields that cover a few percent of the area of the cell plate constituting the nucleus and they project topographically to the ipsilateral tectum without local axon branches. The topography was examined explicitly at the single-cell level by using cases with two injections at widely separated tectal loci. Each Imc axon terminates as a compact swarm of several thousand boutons placed mainly in the upper central gray and superficial gray layers. One Imc terminal spans less that 1% of the tectal surface. Imr cells, by contrast, have large, sparsely branched dendritic fields overlapped by local axon collaterals while distally, their axons nontopographically innervate not only the deeper layers of the ipsilateral tectum but also ipsilateral Imc. Imr receives a nontopographic tectal input that contrasts with the topographic tectal input to Imc. Previous work on nucleus isthmi emphasized the role of the contralateral isthmotectal projection (which originates from a third isthmic nucleus in turtles) in mediating binocular interactions in the tectum. The present results on the two different but overlapping ipsilateral tecto-isthmo-tectal circuits set up by Imc and Imr are discussed in the light of physiological evidence for selective attention effects and local-global interactions in the tectum.

  10. Effect of extracranial electric stimulation at cerebellar fastigial nucleus on serum C-reactive protein of patients with acute cerebral infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some reports indicate that electric and/or chemical stimulation at various brain sites of experimental animals can raise regional cerebral blood flow and improve cerebral circulation; however, its mechanism is still unclear.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of electric stimulation at cerebellar fastigial nucleus on serum C-reactive protein of patients with acute cerebral infarction.DESIGN: Non-randomized synchronized contrast study.SETTING: The Second People's Hospital of Xinxiang City.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 54 patients with acute cerebral infarction were selected from the Department of Neurology, the Second People's Hospital of Xinxiang from December 2005 to December 2006. There were 31 males and 23 females, and their ages ranged from 56 to 80 years. All patients met the diagnostic criteria of the Fourth National Cerebrovascular Academic Meeting, were finally diagnosed by using CT examination,and provided the confirmed consent. Based on therapeutic demands, patients were divided into electric stimulation group and routine treatment group with 27 cases in each group. In addition, 21 healthy subjects,including 11 males and 10 females and aging 53 - 78 years, were selected as the control group. All the subjects in the control group did not have any histories of cerebrovascular diseases and severe body diseases.METHODS: Based on routine drug therapy, patients in the electric stimulation group were also treated by using CVFT-010M cerebral circulation function therapeutic device (made in Shanghai). Electrode was fixed at bilateral mastoid in the first group and at extensible sides of upper limbs in the second group. Electric stimulation was given twice a day and lasted for 30 minutes each time. Ten days were regarded as a course.Parameters of device: mode Ⅲ, frequency 198%, and intensity 90% - 110% (bionic current). Patients in the routine treatment group received the routine drug treatment. Content of serum C-reactive protein was measured in both

  11. 经颅电刺激小脑顶核在脑血管病中的应用%Clinical Application of Transcranial Cerebellar Fastigial Nucleus Electrostimulation in Cerebrovascular Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡艳丽

    2012-01-01

    自1969年发现"顶核加压反应"后,学者们不断探索小脑顶核的奥秘,其功能越来越受到关注.近年来,电刺激小脑顶核(FNS)的研究从基础实验拓展到临床应用.大量实验证实,经颅FNS是一种无创、安全、有效的治疗脑血管病的物理治疗方法,能提高临床疗效,改善预后.FNS的临床应用日趋成熟,成为脑血管病康复治疗的手段之一.%Since 'fastigial pressor response' was discovered in 1969 , the scholars have been working hard on exploring mystery of fastigial nucleus and paying attention to its function. Nowadays, researches on fastigial nucleus stimulation (FNS )have expanded from basic experiments to clinical application. A large number of experiments have confirmed that transcranial FJNS is noninvasive, safe, and effective for cerebrovascular disease , which can improve the therapeutic effect and the prognosis. It has become one of the means of rehabilitation of cerebrovascular disease along with the maturing of FJNS clinical application.

  12. Characteristics of rostral solitary tract nucleus neurons with identified afferent connections that project to the parabrachial nucleus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwabe, Takeshi; Bradley, Robert M

    2009-07-01

    Afferent information derived from oral chemoreceptors is transmitted to second-order neurons in the rostral solitary tract nucleus (rNST) and then relayed to other CNS locations responsible for complex sensory and motor behaviors. Here we investigate the characteristics of rNST neurons sending information rostrally to the parabrachial nucleus (PBN). Afferent connections to these rNST-PBN projection neurons were identified by anterograde labeling of the chorda tympani (CT), glossopharyngeal (IX), and lingual (LV) nerves. We used voltage- and current-clamp recordings in brain slices to characterize the expression of both the transient A-type potassium current, IKA and the hyperpolarization-activated inward current, Ih, important determinants of neuronal repetitive discharge characteristics. The majority of rNST-PBN neurons express IKA, and these IKA-expressing neurons predominate in CT and IX terminal fields but were expressed in approximately half of the neurons in the LV field. rNST-PBN neurons expressing Ih were evenly distributed among CT, IX and LV terminal fields. However, expression patterns of IKA and Ih differed among CT, IX, and LV fields. IKA-expressing neurons frequently coexpress Ih in CT and IX terminal fields, whereas neurons in LV terminal field often express only Ih. After GABAA receptor block all rNST-PBN neurons responded to afferent stimulation with all-or-none excitatory synaptic responses. rNST-PBN neurons had either multipolar or elongate morphologies and were distributed throughout the rNST, but multipolar neurons were more often encountered in CT and IX terminal fields. No correlation was found between the biophysical and morphological characteristics of the rNST-PBN projection neurons in each terminal field.

  13. Curative effect observation of electrical stimulation to cerebellar fastigial nucleus on nerve function recovery of cerebral infarction patients%电刺激小脑顶核对脑梗死患者神经功能恢复的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭昌鼎; 孙鸣; 王昌铭; 吉国泰; 姬向丽

    2002-01-01

    Objective To observe curative effect of electrical stimulation cerebellar fastigial nucleus on nerve function recovery of cerebral infarction patients.Method The patients were treated with electrical stimulation cerebellar fastigial nucleus except for routine drugs,the electrode were placed on the bilateral mastoid processes,giving pulse electric current for forty minutes two times per day,for a 10 day couse treatment.The parameter was set at model 1,frequency was 131% ~ 136% and intensity was 70% ~ 90% .Result Total effective rate of therapeutic group and control group were 91.7% and 71.4% separately.χ 2=4.860(P< 0.05).The nerver function defect score was manifestly decreased.There was a significant difference between the therapeutic group and control group,and between before and after treatment in therapeutic group(P< 0.01).Conclusion The experiment suggested that the treatment of cerebral infarction by drugs except adding electrical stimulation of cerebellar fastigial nucleus is better than by drugs along.The electrical stimulation of cerebellar fastigial nucleus has obvious protective effect.It can promote recovery of cerebral infarction.

  14. 小脑顶核电刺激治疗小儿中枢性协调障碍的研究%Research of fastigial nucleus electrical stimulation for central coordination disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈艳红; 赵晓冬; 洪菲; 许铖; 宋磊

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the advantages of fastigial nucleus electrical stimulation in the rehabilitation of central coordination disorder. Methods Totally 84 children with central coordination disorder were randomly divided into observation group(n=42) and control group(n=42). The control group only adopted with conventional rehabilitation comprehensive treatment , while the observation group was added with fastigial nucleus electrical stimulation based on the control group. After treatment ,the comparison was conducted between the two groups on total effective rate and developmental quotient (DQ) of Gesell developmen-tal scale. Results The total effective rate of the observation group (83.33%) was higher than that of the control group (57.14%). After treatment,the DQ score was(84.91±7.28) in the observation group and(71.97±5.74) in the control group,and the differ-ence between the two groups had statistical significance (P<0.05). Conclusion Conventional rehabilitation associated with fasti-gial nucleus electrical stimulation has remarkably efficacy in treating children with central coordination disorder.%目的:探讨小脑顶核电刺激治疗在小儿中枢性协调障碍康复治疗中的优势。方法选取2012年8月至2013年7月收治的84例中枢性协调障碍患儿随机分为观察组(42例)和对照组(42例),对照组仅采用常规康复综合治疗,观察组在此基础上加用小脑顶核电刺激疗法,对两组患儿治疗后总有效率及Gesell发育量表动作能之发育商(DQ)进行比较。结果观察组显效率(83.33%)高于对照组(57.14%),治疗后DQ评分观察组[(84.91±7.28)分]明显高于对照组[(71.97±5.74)分],差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论常规康复治疗联合小脑顶核电刺激治疗小儿中枢性协调障碍疗效显著。

  15. Effect of fastigial nucleus electric stimulation on executive function of patients with cerebral infarction%小脑顶核电刺激对脑梗死患者脑执行功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    隆昱洲; 雷进; 罗丽华; 刘姚; 尚正良

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨小脑顶核电刺激对脑梗死患者治疗前后脑执行功能的影响.方法 脑梗死患者270例,随机分成治疗组和对照组,各135例,均接受常规药物治疗,治疗组在此基础上加用小脑顶核电刺激,于治疗前和治疗后2周、3个月进行威斯康星卡片分类测验(WCST)、Strop色词测验、连线测验、词语流畅性测验.结果 治疗后2周,治疗组和对照组WCST分类次数、错误数、持续性错误数、非持续性错误数及Stroop色词测验的耗时数、正确数和连线测验A、语词流畅性均较治疗前有改善(P均<0.05);治疗后3个月,对照组在WCST分类次数、持续性错误数和Stroop色词测验的耗时数、正确数及连线测验、词语流畅性测验较治疗后2周下降(P均<0.01),治疗组在WCST持续性错误数、非持续性错误数和Stroop色词测验的耗时数、连线测验A较2周末时有改善(P均<0.05),其他测验无明显改善(P>0.05).结论 电刺激小脑顶核能改善脑梗死患者的脑执行功能.%Objective To investigate the effect of fastigial nucleus electric stimulation on executive function of patients with cerebral infarction. Methods A total of 270 patients with cerebral infarction were divided into treatment group and control group, with 135 cases in each, and treated with routine treatment. The treatment group was given fastigial nucleus electric stimulation. All patients were evaluated with Wisconsin card sorting test( WCST) , Stroop color word test (SCWT) , trail making test A, verbal fluency test before treatments and 2 weeks,3 months after treatments. Results At 2 weeks after treatment, WCST grade, SCWT, trail making test A, verbal fluency test of treatment groups and control group were significantly improved compared with beginning of treatment ( all P 0.05). Conclusion Executive function of patients with cerebral infarction can be increased by treatment of electric stimulaion on cerebellar fastigial nucleus.

  16. Effect of electrical stimulation of fastigial nucleus on cognitive ability in rats with vascular dementia%电刺激小脑顶核对血管性痴呆大鼠认知能力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范文辉

    2004-01-01

    背景:近年来血管性痴呆的治疗虽有许多进展,但多数药物效果并不能令人满意.慢性前脑灌注不足是血管性痴呆的主要原因,自发现刺激小脑顶核可使大脑血流量增加后,一些作者相继在大鼠脑梗死模型上使用顶核电刺激(fastigial nucleus stimulation,FNS)治疗并取得疗效.目的:研究电刺激小脑顶核对血管性痴呆(vascular dementia,VD)大鼠的治疗作用与机制.设计:完全随机设计,对照实验研究.地点和材料:第三军医大学中心实验室,材料为雄性Wistar老龄大鼠44只(>12月龄),体质量300~400 g.干预:随机分为假手术对照组、缺血2个月组、缺血4个月组;每组12~14只大鼠.持久性双侧颈总动脉结扎制备大鼠慢性前脑灌注不足模型.假手术对照组动物仅行颈前切开,不结扎颈总动脉.各组动物随机均分为FNS和非FNS两种处理.前者将电极插入双侧小脑顶核(以前囟为原点,坐标为:P11.8,L 0.5,H 5.7,单位:mm),并以电流强度50μA,频率50 Hz的直角方波脉冲连续刺激30 min,后者只插入电极,不予电刺激.主要观察指标:用电脑控制穿梭箱系统检测大鼠的认知能力,记录灯光刺激大鼠即完成穿梭动作的主动回避反应和经电刺激才能完成穿梭动作的被动回避反应.结果:大鼠学习能力检测的被动回避反应,非FNS缺血2个月成功率为15.3%,缺血4个月成功率为8.7%;FNS缺血2个月成功率为32.6%,缺血4个月成功率为38.3%.大鼠学习能力的检测的主动回避反应,非FNS缺血2个月成功率为34.8%;FNS缺血2个月成功率为60.1%,缺血4个月成功率为62.4%.慢性前脑灌注不足2个月后大鼠学习、记忆能力均下降,4个月后更明显;电刺激痴呆大鼠小脑顶核后,学习及记忆能力明显提高,学习提高更明显. 结论:电刺激小脑顶核可显著改善痴呆的大鼠的认知能力.%BACKGROUND: During recent years, many achievements have been made in medicinal

  17. 小脑顶核电刺激对脑梗死患者认知功能的影响%Effect of fastigial nucleus electric stimulation on cognitive function of patients with cerebral infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    隆昱洲; 雷进; 罗丽华; 尚正良; 刘姚

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨小脑顶核电刺激对脑梗死患者认知功能的影响.方法:脑梗死患者270例,随机分成治疗组和对照组各135例,均接受常规药物治疗,治疗组在此基础上加用小脑顶核电刺激,于治疗前和治疗后2周、3个月、6个月进行MoCA量表、威斯康星卡片分类测验(WCST)、Stroop色词测验(SCWT)、连线测验、语词流畅性测验、数字广度分测验、符号-数字分测验评定.结果:治疗后2周,两组在各项认知测验方面均较治疗前有改善,差异有统计学意义,治疗组分数较对照组提高更明显.治疗后3个月,治疗组在连线测验、SCWT测验耗时数方面均较治疗后2周有改善,差异有统计学意义,而在其余各项认知测验分数较2周时有改善,但差异无统计学意义.对照组在各项认知测验分数方面与治疗后2周相比,均有下降,差异有统计学意义.治疗后6个月,治疗组各项认知测验与治疗后3个月相比,差异无统计学意义,而对照组在各项认知测验分数均有下降,差异有统计学意义.治疗后2周、3个月、6个月两组间各项认知测验评分比较,存在差异,治疗组的评分好于对照组.结论:电刺激小脑顶核能改善脑梗死患者的认知功能.%Objective To investigate the effect of fastigial nucleus electric stimulation on cognitive function of patients with cerebral infarction. Methods 270 patients with cerebral infarction were divided into treatment and control group, and all be treated with routine treatment. The treatment group was given fastigial nucleus electric stimulation. All the patients were evaluated with Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST), Stroop color word test (SCWT), trail making test A, verbal fluency test, digit span, symbols-digital test before treatments, 2 weeks, 3 months and 6 months after treatments. Results 2 weeks after treatment, various cognitive test grades significantly improved in treatment

  18. Chronic infusion of lisinopril into hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus modulates cytokines and attenuates oxidative stress in rostral ventrolateral medulla in hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hong-Bao [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Xi' an Jiaotong University Cardiovascular Research Center, Xi' an Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Xi' an 710061 (China); Qin, Da-Nian, E-mail: dnqin@stu.edu.cn [Department of Physiology, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041 (China); Ma, Le [Department of Public Health, Xi' an Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Xi' an 710061 (China); Miao, Yu-Wang [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Xi' an Jiaotong University Cardiovascular Research Center, Xi' an Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Xi' an 710061 (China); Zhang, Dong-Mei [Department of Physiology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Lu, Yan [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Sanaitang Hospital, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Song, Xin-Ai [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Xi' an Jiaotong University Cardiovascular Research Center, Xi' an Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Xi' an 710061 (China); Zhu, Guo-Qing [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease and Molecular Intervention, Department of Physiology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Kang, Yu-Ming, E-mail: ykang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Xi' an Jiaotong University Cardiovascular Research Center, Xi' an Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Xi' an 710061 (China)

    2014-09-01

    The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a critical role in the generation and maintenance of sympathetic nerve activity. The renin–angiotensin system (RAS) in the brain is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. This study was designed to determine whether inhibition of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in the PVN modulates cytokines and attenuates oxidative stress (ROS) in the RVLM, and decreases the blood pressure and sympathetic activity in renovascular hypertensive rats. Renovascular hypertension was induced in male Sprague–Dawley rats by the two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) method. Renovascular hypertensive rats received bilateral PVN infusion with ACE inhibitor lisinopril (LSP, 10 μg/h) or vehicle via osmotic minipump for 4 weeks. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and plasma proinflammatory cytokines (PICs) were significantly increased in renovascular hypertensive rats. The renovascular hypertensive rats also had higher levels of ACE in the PVN, and lower level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) in the RVLM. In addition, the levels of PICs, the chemokine MCP-1, the subunit of NAD(P)H oxidase (gp91{sup phox}) and ROS in the RVLM were increased in hypertensive rats. PVN treatment with LSP attenuated those changes occurring in renovascular hypertensive rats. Our findings suggest that the beneficial effects of ACE inhibition in the PVN in renovascular hypertension are partly due to modulation cytokines and attenuation oxidative stress in the RVLM. - Highlights: • Chronic ACE inhibition in PVN on renovascular hypertension was investigated. • 2K1C resulted in sympathoexcitation, increased plasma PICs and hypertension. • 2K1C rats had higher levels of cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in RVLM. • Chronic inhibiting PVN ACE attenuates cytokines and ROS in RVLM in hypertension.

  19. Orexin in Rostral Hotspot of Nucleus Accumbens Enhances Sucrose 'Liking' and Intake but Scopolamine in Caudal Shell Shifts 'Liking' Toward 'Disgust' and 'Fear'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Daniel C; Terry, Rachel A; Berridge, Kent C

    2016-07-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc) contains a hedonic hotspot in the rostral half of medial shell, where opioid agonist microinjections are known to enhance positive hedonic orofacial reactions to the taste of sucrose ('liking' reactions). Within NAc shell, orexin/hypocretin also has been reported to stimulate food intake and is implicated in reward, whereas blockade of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by scopolamine suppresses intake and may have anti-reward effects. Here, we show that NAc microinjection of orexin-A in medial shell amplifies the hedonic impact of sucrose taste, but only within the same anatomically rostral site, identical to the opioid hotspot. By comparison, at all sites throughout medial shell, orexin microinjections stimulated 'wanting' to eat, as reflected by increases in intake of palatable sweet chocolates. At NAc shell sites outside the hotspot, orexin selectively enhanced 'wanting' to eat without enhancing sweetness 'liking' reactions. In contrast, microinjections of the antagonist scopolamine at all sites in NAc shell suppressed sucrose 'liking' reactions as well as suppressing intake of palatable food. Conversely, scopolamine increased aversive 'disgust' reactions elicited by bitter quinine at all NAc shell sites. Finally, scopolamine microinjections localized to the caudal half of medial shell additionally generated a fear-related anti-predator reaction of defensive treading and burying directed toward the corners of the transparent chamber. Together, these results confirm a rostral hotspot in NAc medial shell as a unique site for orexin induction of hedonic 'liking' enhancement, similar to opioid enhancement. They also reveal distinct roles for orexin and acetylcholine signals in NAc shell for hedonic reactions and motivated behaviors.

  20. Excitatory amino acid receptor blockade within the caudal pressor area and rostral ventrolateral medulla alters cardiovascular responses to nucleus raphe obscurus stimulation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva N.F.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressor responses elicited by stimulation of the nucleus raphe obscurus (NRO depend on the integrity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM. Therefore, to test the participation of excitatory amino acid (EAA receptors in the cardiovascular responses evoked by NRO stimulation (1 ms, 100 Hz, 40-70 µA, for 10 s, the EAA antagonist kynurenic acid (Kyn was microinjected at different sites in the ventrolateral medullar surface (2.7 nmol/200 nl of male Wistar rats (270-320 g, N = 39 and NRO stimulation was repeated. The effects of NRO stimulation were: hypertension (deltaMAP = +43 ± 1 mmHg, P<0.01, bradycardia (deltaHR = -30 ± 7 bpm, P<0.01 and apnea. Bilateral microinjection of Kyn into the RVLM, which did not change baseline parameters, almost abolished the bradycardia induced by NRO stimulation (deltaHR = -61 ± 3 before vs -2 ± 3 bpm after Kyn, P<0.01, N = 7. Unilateral microinjection of Kyn into the CVLM did not change baseline parameters or reduce the pressor response to NRO stimulation (deltaMAP = +46 ± 5 before vs +48 ± 5 mmHg after Kyn, N = 6. Kyn bilaterally microinjected into the caudal pressor area reduced blood pressure and heart rate and almost abolished the pressor response to NRO stimulation (deltaMAP = +46 ± 4 mmHg before vs +4 ± 2 mmHg after Kyn, P<0.01, N = 7. These results indicate that EAA receptors on the medullary ventrolateral surface play a role in the modulation of the cardiovascular responses induced by NRO stimulation, and also suggest that the RVLM participates in the modulation of heart rate responses and that the caudal pressor area modulates the pressor response following NRO stimulation.

  1. Phase-dependent activity of neurons in the rostral part of the thalamic reticular nucleus with saccharin intake in a cue-guided lever-manipulation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Ryuhei; Kato, Risako; Fujita, Satoshi; Shimada, Jun; Koshikawa, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Masayuki

    2017-03-01

    Neurons in the rostral part of the thalamic reticular nucleus (rTRN) receive somatosensory and motor information and regulate neural activities of the thalamic nuclei. Previous studies showed that when activity in visual TRN neurons is suppressed prior to the visual stimuli in a visual detection task, the performance of the task improves. However, little is known about such changes in the rTRN preceding certain events. In the present study, we performed unit recordings in the rTRN in alert rats during a cue-guided lever-manipulation task in which saccharin was provided as a reward. Changes in neural activity during saccharin intake were observed in 56% (51 of 91) of the recorded neurons; the firing rates increased in 21 neurons and decreased in 23 neurons. Seven neurons both increased and decreased their firing rates during saccharin intake. Changes in firing rates during the reward-waiting stage between task termination and saccharin intake were also observed in 73% (37 of 51) of the neurons that responded to saccharin intake. Increased activity during saccharin intake did not correlate with increased activity during lever-manipulation or activity during the reward-waiting stage. However, decreased activity during saccharin intake was correlated with activity during the reward-waiting stage. These results suggest that rTRN neurons have phase-dependent changes in their activity and regulate the thalamic activities. Furthermore, the decreased activity of rTRN neurons before reward may contribute to refine somatosensory and motor information processing in the thalamic nuclei depending on the status of mind such as expectation and attention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prearcuate cortex in the Cebus monkey has cortical and subcortical connections like the macaque frontal eye field and projects to fastigial-recipient oculomotor-related brainstem nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichnetz, G R; Gonzalo-Ruiz, A

    1996-01-01

    The cortical and subcortical connections of the prearcuate cortex were studied in capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella, albifrons) using the anterograde and retrograde transport capabilities of the horseradish peroxidase technique. The findings demonstrate remarkable similarities to those of the macaque frontal eye field and strongly support their homology. The report then focuses on specific prearcuate projections to oculomotor-related brainstem nuclei that were shown in a companion experiment to entertain connections with the caudal oculomotor portion of the cerebellar fastigial nucleus. The principal corticocortical connections of the cebus prearcuate cortex were with dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, lateral intraparietal sulcal cortex, posterior medial parietal cortex, and superior temporal sulcal cortex, which were for the most part reciprocal and columnar in organization. The connections of the dorsal prearcuate region were heavier to the dorsomedial prefrontal and posterior medial parietal cortices, and those of the ventral region were heavier to the superior temporal sulcal cortex. The prearcuate cortex projects to several brainstem areas which also receive projections from the caudal fastigial nucleus, including the supraoculomotor periaqueductal gray matter, superior colliculus, medial nucleus reticularis tegmenti pontis, dorsomedial basilar pontine nucleus, dorsolateral basilar pontine nucleus, nucleus reticularis pontis caudalis, pontine raphe, and nucleus prepositus hypoglossi. The findings define a neuroanatomical framework within which convergence of prearcuate (putative frontal eye field) and caudal fastigial nucleus connections might occur, facilitating their potential interaction in saccadic and smooth pursuit eye movement.

  3. Effect of the fastigial nucleus electrostimulation on the ability of learning and memory and the Apoptosis of the neurons in the hippocampal district in ratymodel of Alzheimer's Disease%电刺激小脑顶核对AD大鼠学习记忆能力及海马神经元凋亡的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王小林; 王永红; 罗晶; 程启慧; 朱琼

    2009-01-01

    目的:研究电刺激小脑顶核(Fastigial nucleus electrostimulation,FNS)对阿尔茨海默病(Alzheimer's diseases.AD)模型大鼠学习记忆能力及海马神经元凋亡的影响.方法:40只SD大鼠随机分成四组:AB1-40微量注射组(AD组)、假手术组(sC组)、AB1-40微量注射组+电刺激小脑顶核组(FNS组)和Aβ1-40.微量注射组+电刺激齿状核组(DNS组),采用Morris水迷宫检测电刺激小脑顶核对AD大鼠认知功能的的影响;通过尼氏染色观察电刺激小脑顶核对AD大鼠海马神经元形态的影响;采用TUNEL凋亡染色法观察电刺激小脑顶核对AD大鼠海马神经元凋亡的影响.结果:与SC组比较,AD组、FNS组和DNS组每天隐匿平台逃避潜伏期明显增长(P

  4. EFFECTS OF TRANSCRANIAL ELECTRIC STIMULATION OF CEREBELLAR FASTIGIAL NUCLEUS ON COGNITIVE DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE%经颅电刺激小脑顶核治疗帕金森病认知功能障碍效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建飞; 沈钢夫; 杜迅; 黄长耀; 计樱莹; 李志佳

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of transcranial electric stimulation (TES) of cerebellar fastigial nucleus (CFN) on cognitive function and depression in patients with Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). Methods Forty-eight PDD patients were evenly randomized to stimulation group and sham-stimulation group. The patients in stimulation group received TES of CFN by using cerebrovascular function therapy (CVFT), those who needed to take drugs still to remain as routine such as Madopar, and so on. Before therapy, the patients in both groups were scored by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), and Hamilton Depression (HAMD) Scales. Results After 60 days of the treatment, the fin-dings compared with on admission were as follows: total score of MMSE, scores of orientation, calculation, and speech, total score of MoCA, scores of interspace-execution function, naming, and speech orientation were higher (( = 2. 01 — 3. 02,P<0. 05). In sham-stimulation group, only the scores of MMSE and MoCA orientation, as well as interspace-execution were elevated (t = 2. 08 — 3. 34,P<0. 05). In stimulation group, HAMD score declined (t = 2. 82,P<0. 05), and that was lower than that in sham-stimulation group 0 = 3. 60,P<0. 05). Conclusion TES of CFN is conducive to improving cognitive dysfunction and depression in patients with PDD.%目的 探讨经颅电刺激小脑顶核对帕金森病痴呆(PDD)病人认知功能及抑郁症状的影响.方法 将48例PDD病人随机分为刺激组和伪刺激组,每组24例.刺激组病人采用脑循环治疗仪电刺激小脑顶核,需要服药的病人仍按常规服用美多芭等药物.两组于治疗前、后采用简易精神状态量表(MMSE)、蒙特利尔认知评价量表(MoCA)、汉密尔顿抑郁量表(HAMD)进行评分.结果 刺激组治疗60 d后,MMSE总分、定向力、计算力、语言评分、MoCA总分、空间-执行功能、命名及语言定向力评分较入组时提高(t=2.01~3.02,P

  5. Pronociception from the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus is mediated by the rostral ventromedial medulla in healthy controls but is absent in arthritic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Ribeiro, Filipa; Amorim, Diana; David-Pereira, Ana; Monteiro, Ana Maria; Costa, Patricio; Pertovaara, Antti; Almeida, Armando

    2013-10-01

    The dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH) has been proposed to participate in stress-induced hyperalgesia through facilitation of pronociceptive cells in the rostroventromedial medulla (RVM). We hypothesized that the DMH participates in hyperalgesia induced by arthritis. The DMH was pharmacologically manipulated while assessing heat-evoked nociceptive behavior or the discharge rates of pronociceptive RVM ON- and antinociceptive RVM OFF-like cells in NAIVE, SHAM and monoarthritic (ARTH) animals. In NAIVE and SHAM animals, the changes in nociceptive behavior induced by activation of the DMH by glutamate and inhibition by lidocaine were in line with earlier evidence indicating that the DMH has a nociceptive facilitating role. However, in ARTH animals, neither activation nor inhibition of the DMH influenced pain-like behavior evoked by stimulation of an uninflamed skin region (paw and tail). In accordance with these behavioral results, activation or inhibition of the DMH induced pronociceptive changes in the discharge rates of RVM cells in NAIVE and SHAM animals, which suggests that the DMH has a pronociceptive role mediated by the RVM in normal animals. However, in ARTH animals, both glutamate and lidocaine in the DMH failed to influence either pain-like behavior or noxious stimulation-evoked responses of RVM cells, while blocking the DMH increased spontaneous activity in the pronociceptive RVM ON cells. Our data indicate that the DMH participates in descending facilitation of cutaneous nociception in healthy controls, but it is not engaged in the regulation of cutaneous nociception in monoarthritic animals, while a minor role in tonic suppression of nociception in arthritis cannot be discarded.

  6. Reversible inactivation of rostral nucleus raphe pallidus attenuates acute autonomic responses but not their habituation to repeated audiogenic stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyhuis, Tara J; Masini, Cher V; Taufer, Kirsten L; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge

    2016-01-01

    The medullary nucleus raphe pallidus (RPa) mediates several autonomic responses evoked by acute stress exposure, including tachycardia and hyperthermia. The present study assessed whether the RPa contributes to the decline/habituation of these responses observed during repeated audiogenic stress. Adult male rats were implanted with cannulae aimed at the RPa, and abdominal E-mitters that wirelessly acquire heart rate and core body temperature. After surgical recovery, animals were injected with muscimol or vehicle (aCSF) in the RPa region, followed by 30 min of 95-dBA loud noise or no noise control exposures on 3 consecutive days at 24-h intervals. Forty-eight hours after the third exposure, animals were exposed to an additional, but injection-free, loud noise or no noise test to assess habituation of hyperthermia and tachycardia. Three days later, rats were restrained for 30-min to evaluate their ability to display normal acute autonomic responses following the repeated muscimol injection regimen. The results indicated that the inhibition of cellular activity induced by the GABAA-receptor agonist muscimol centered in the RPa region reliably attenuated acute audiogenic stress-evoked tachycardia and hyperthermia, compared with vehicle-injected rats. Animals in the stress groups exhibited similar attenuated tachycardia and hyperthermia during the injection-free fourth audiogenic stress exposure, and displayed similar and robust increases in these responses to the subsequent restraint test. These results suggest that cellular activity in neurons of the RPa region is necessary for the expression of acute audiogenic stress-induced tachycardia and hyperthermia, but may not be necessary for the acquisition of habituated tachycardic responses to repeated stress.

  7. Calcium-dependent plateau potentials in rostral ambiguus neurons in the newborn mouse brain stem in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Feldman, J L

    1997-01-01

    Calcium-dependent plateau potentials in rostral ambiguus neurons in the newborn mouse brain stem in vitro. J. Neurophysiol. 78: 2483-2492, 1997. The nucleus ambiguus contains vagal and glossopharyngeal motoneurons and preganglionic neurons involved in respiration, swallowing, vocalization......, and control of heart beat. Here we show that the rostral compact formation's ambiguus neurons, which control the esophageal phase of swallowing, display calcium-dependent plateau potentials in response to tetanic orthodromic stimulation or current injection. Whole cell recordings were made from visualized...... neurons in the rostral nucleus ambiguus using a slice preparation from the newborn mouse. Biocytin-labeling revealed dendritic trees with pronounced rostrocaudal orientations confined to the nucleus ambiguus, a morphological profile matching that of vagal motoneurons projecting to the esophagus. Single...

  8. Receptive field properties of trigeminothalamic neurons in the rostral trigeminal sensory nuclei of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, J Y; Capra, N F

    1994-01-01

    This study described topographic and receptive field representation in the region of the rostral trigeminal nuclei, and evaluated whether thalamic neurons from the principal sensory nucleus relay muscle afferent information to the thalamus. Extracellular single-unit activity was recorded from anesthetized cats. Units were tested for responses to natural stimuli (i.e., air bursts, brushing, light pressure, and pinch) applied to the face and oral cavity, electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve, and ramp-and-hold movements of the jaw. The receptive fields and physiological properties for 110 units were studied; we were able to verify the recording site for 96 of these units. Most of the units had discrete receptive fields in the oral cavity, skin, hair, and masseter muscle. Only 2 units received convergent inputs. Stimulation of the ipsilateral and contralateral ventroposteromedial nucleus of the thalamus was performed to identify antidromically activated units. The results showed that the dorsal principal sensory nucleus received its input primarily from the oral cavity. Most of the units (85%) that were activated by antidromic stimulation from the ipsilateral thalamus were located in this nucleus. In contrast, 82% of the units that projected to the contralateral thalamus were located in the ventral principal sensory nucleus. A complete somatotopic representation of the ipsilateral face and oral cavity was observed in the ventral principal sensory nucleus. Although 24 units had muscle receptive fields, none were activated by stimulation of the ipsilateral thalamus, and only 1 responded to stimulation of the contralateral thalamus. Most of the units that were not antidromically driven were recorded outside of the cytoarchitectural boundaries of the principal sensory nucleus. Retrograde labeling of the rostral trigeminal nuclei indicated that most of the neurons in the dorsal principal sensory nucleus projected to the ipsilateral thalamus, whereas those in the

  9. Development of Rostral Prefrontal Cortex and Cognitive and Behavioural Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumontheil, Iroise; Burgess, Paul W.; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2008-01-01

    Information on the development and functions of rostral prefrontal cortex (PFC), or Brodmann area 10, has been gathered from different fields, from anatomical development to functional neuroimaging in adults, and put forward in relation to three particular cognitive and behavioural disorders. Rostral PFC is larger and has a lower cell density in…

  10. Projections from the central amygdaloid nucleus to the precuneiform nucleus in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huazheng; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2015-01-01

    The mouse precuneiform nucleus has been proposed as the midbrain locomotion center, a function ascribed to its caudal neighbor, cuneiform nucleus, in the rat, cat and other species. The present study investigated the projections from the central amygdaloid nucleus to the precuneiform nucleus in the mouse using retrograde tracer injections (fluoro-gold) into the precuneiform nucleus and anterograde tracer injections (biotinylated dextran amine) into the central amygdaloid nucleus. The entire central amygdaloid nucleus except the rostral pole had retrogradely labeled neurons, especially in the middle portion where labeled neurons were densely packed. Anterogradely labeled amygdaloid fibers approached the precuneiform nucleus from the area ventrolateral to it and terminated in the entire precuneiform nucleus. Labeled fibers were also found in laminae 5 and 6 in the upper cervical cord on the ipsilateral side. The present study is the first demonstration of projections from the central amygdaloid nucleus to the precuneiform nucleus. This projection may underpin the role of the precuneiform nucleus in the modulation of the cardiovascular activity.

  11. BARREN STALK FASTIGIATE1 is an AT-hook protein required for the formation of maize ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallavotti, Andrea; Malcomber, Simon; Gaines, Craig; Stanfield, Sharon; Whipple, Clinton; Kellogg, Elizabeth; Schmidt, Robert J

    2011-05-01

    Ears are the seed-bearing inflorescences of maize (Zea mays) plants and represent a crucial component of maize yield. The first step in the formation of ears is the initiation of axillary meristems in the axils of developing leaves. In the classic maize mutant barren stalk fastigiate1 (baf1), first discovered in the 1950s, ears either do not form or, if they do, are partially fused to the main stalk. We positionally cloned Baf1 and found that it encodes a transcriptional regulator containing an AT-hook DNA binding motif. Single coorthologs of Baf1 are found in syntenic regions of brachypodium (Brachypodium distachyon), rice (Oryza sativa), and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), suggesting that the gene is likely present in all cereal species. Protein-protein interaction assays suggest that BAF1 is capable of forming homodimers and heterodimers with other members of the AT-hook family. Another transcriptional regulator required for ear initiation is the basic helix-loop-helix protein BARREN STALK1 (BA1). Genetic and expression analyses suggest that Baf1 is required to reach a threshold level of Ba1 expression for the initiation of maize ears. We propose that Baf1 functions in the demarcation of a boundary region essential for the specification of a stem cell niche.

  12. BARREN STALK FASTIGIATE1 Is an AT-Hook Protein Required for the Formation of Maize Ears[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallavotti, Andrea; Malcomber, Simon; Gaines, Craig; Stanfield, Sharon; Whipple, Clinton; Kellogg, Elizabeth; Schmidt, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Ears are the seed-bearing inflorescences of maize (Zea mays) plants and represent a crucial component of maize yield. The first step in the formation of ears is the initiation of axillary meristems in the axils of developing leaves. In the classic maize mutant barren stalk fastigiate1 (baf1), first discovered in the 1950s, ears either do not form or, if they do, are partially fused to the main stalk. We positionally cloned Baf1 and found that it encodes a transcriptional regulator containing an AT-hook DNA binding motif. Single coorthologs of Baf1 are found in syntenic regions of brachypodium (Brachypodium distachyon), rice (Oryza sativa), and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), suggesting that the gene is likely present in all cereal species. Protein–protein interaction assays suggest that BAF1 is capable of forming homodimers and heterodimers with other members of the AT-hook family. Another transcriptional regulator required for ear initiation is the basic helix-loop-helix protein BARREN STALK1 (BA1). Genetic and expression analyses suggest that Baf1 is required to reach a threshold level of Ba1 expression for the initiation of maize ears. We propose that Baf1 functions in the demarcation of a boundary region essential for the specification of a stem cell niche. PMID:21540434

  13. Cardiovascular inhibition of salusin α within the nucleus tractus solitarii originated from suppressing the activities of presympathetic neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla%salusin α在孤束核内的心血管效应可能通过抑制头端延髓腹外侧区前交感神经元活动介导

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宏宝; 郭雅琼; 鲁彦; 伏晓琳; 刘颖璐; 郑天珍

    2011-01-01

    Aim Salusin a and salusin β are newly I-dentified bioactive peptides of 28 and 20 amino acid, respectively, which are reported to widely distribute in hematopoietic system, endocrine system and the central nervous system ( CNS ). They are responsible for causing hypotension, bradycardia and mitogenic activities. The cardiovascular functions of salusin a in the nucleus tractus solitarii ( NTS ) are not fully defined. The present study is to comparatively determine the cardiovascular functions of salusin a into the NTS in anesthetized rats. Methods Ninety-four anesthetic male SD rats were employed in present study. The dose-dependant responses of blood pressure and heart rate of salusin a ( 0. 04 ~ 4 pmol ) in the NTS were determined by bilateral or unilateral microinjection salusin a or artificial cerebrospinal fluid ( aCSF ) into the NTS in 50 rats. In 33 rats, aCSF, KYN, bilateral vagotomy or aCSF/ muscimol in RVLM were prior applied before salusin a ( 4 pmol ) was microinjected. The arterial baroreflex( ABR ) functions of rats of pre-post injection of salusin a into the NTS were defined in 11 rats. Results Bilateral or unilateral microinjection of salusin a into the NTS produced dose-dependent hypotension and bradycardia. Bilateral microinjection of salusin a did not alter baroreflex sensitivity functions. Prior application of KYN( 1 nmol ) or bilateral vagotomy into the NTS did not alter the hypotension and bradycardia induced by intra-NTS salusin a( P >0. 05 ). But pretreatment with muscimol ( 5 pmol )within the RVLM almost completely abolished the hypotension and bradycardia evoked by intra-NTS salusin a( P 0.05).RVLM预先注射muscimol (5 pmol)能有效阻断salusin α(4 pmol)在孤束核产生的降低血压、减缓心率的效应(P<0.05).结论 NTS注射salusin α产生的降低血压、减缓心率的效应可能通过激动RVLM内GABA受体,抑制前交感神经元兴奋性发挥作用.

  14. A tall rostral hook in a medieval horse premolar tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viranta, Suvi; Mannermaa, Kristiina

    2017-06-01

    Development of dental abnormalities due to improper occlusal wear is common among modern domestic horses. This phenomenon often is attributed to jaw conformation. Rostral mandibular hooks may develop in horses with underjet or mandibular prognathism, a condition where the lower jaw protrudes forward, beyond the upper jaw. Less abrasive diet, free of phytoliths and matrix-like plant fibers, also may promote enamel and focal overgrowths of equine dentition. Here we report a rostral mandibular hook in a lower premolar tooth of a medieval horse, found in a spring deposit in Levänluhta, Osthrobothnia, Finland. To our knowledge, this is the first such report from a medieval horse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. MR imaging of psychosurgery: rostral atrophy following stereotacic subcaudate tractotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauley, K A; Waheed, W; Salmela, M; Filippi, C G

    2010-11-01

    There are few reports of MR imaging findings following psychosurgery. Here, we report the findings of 3T MR imaging of the sequelae of stereotactic subcaudate tractotomy (SST). Rostral atrophy is noted on conventional imaging. Diffusion tensor (DT) tractography demonstrated no communicating white matter tracts between the inferior frontal lobes, which appeared normally as thick fibre bundles in age-matched controls. DT tractography provides a unique tool for the evaluation of sequelae of ablative psychosurgical procedures.

  16. Leptin Responsive and GABAergic Projections to the Rostral Preoptic Area in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuure, W A; Quennell, J H; Anderson, G M

    2016-03-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin plays a critical role in the control of reproduction via signalling in hypothalamic neurones. The drivers of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones, do not have the receptors for leptin. Therefore, intermediate leptin responsive neurones must provide leptin-to-GnRH signalling. We investigated the populations of leptin responsive neurones that provide input to the rostral preoptic area (rPOA) where GnRH cell bodies reside. Fluorescent retrograde tracer beads (RetroBeads; Lumafluor Inc., Naples, FL, USA) were injected into the rPOA of transgenic leptin receptor enhanced green fluorescent protein (Lepr-eGFP) reporter mice. Uptake of the RetroBeads by Lepr-eGFP neurones was assessed throughout the hypothalamus. RetroBead uptake was most evident in the medial arcuate nucleus (ARC), the dorsomedial nucleus (DMN) and the ventral premammillary nucleus (PMV) of the hypothalamus. The uptake of RetroBeads specifically by Lepr-eGFP neurones was highest in the medial ARC (18% of tracer-labelled neurones Lepr-eGFP-positive). Because neurones that are both leptin responsive and GABAergic play a critical role in the regulation of fertility by leptin, we next focussed on the location of these populations. To address whether GABAergic neurones in leptin-responsive hypothalamic regions project to the rPOA, the experiment was repeated in GABA neurone reporter mice (Vgat-tdTomato). Between 10% and 45% of RetroBead-labelled neurones in the ARC were GABAergic, whereas uptake of tracer by GABAergic neurones in the DMN and PMV was very low (leptin responsive and GABAergic neurones from the ARC project to the region of the GnRH cell bodies. Our findings suggest that LEPR-expressing GABA neurones from the ARC may be mediators of leptin-to-GnRH signalling.

  17. N-acetylgalactosamine positive perineuronal nets in the saccade-related-part of the cerebellar fastigial nucleus do not maintain saccade gain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Mueller

    Full Text Available Perineuronal nets (PNNs accumulate around neurons near the end of developmental critical periods. PNNs are structures of the extracellular matrix which surround synaptic contacts and contain chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. Previous studies suggest that the chondroitin sulfate chains of PNNs inhibit synaptic plasticity and thereby help end critical periods. PNNs surround a high proportion of neurons in the cerebellar nuclei. These PNNs form during approximately the same time that movements achieve normal accuracy. It is possible that PNNs in the cerebellar nuclei inhibit plasticity to maintain the synaptic organization that produces those accurate movements. We tested whether or not PNNs in a saccade-related part of the cerebellar nuclei maintain accurate saccade size by digesting a part of them in an adult monkey performing a task that changes saccade size (long term saccade adaptation. We use the enzyme Chondroitinase ABC to digest the glycosaminoglycan side chains of proteoglycans present in the majority of PNNs. We show that this manipulation does not result in faster, larger, or more persistent adaptation. Our result indicates that intact perineuronal nets around saccade-related neurons in the cerebellar nuclei are not important for maintaining long-term saccade gain.

  18. Location of the rostral end of the longitudinal brain axis: review of an old topic in the light of marking experiments on the closing rostral neuropore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puelles, L; Domenech-Ratto, G; Martinez-de-la-Torre, M

    1987-11-01

    The rostral end of the forebrain was classically defined on the basis of descriptive data. Different assumptions on the mode of closure of the rostral neuropore caused three different theories of the rostral end of the forebrain to be formulated (His 1893a; von Kupffer, '06; Johnston, '09). Some recent descriptive and experimental data have put these theories into question. A piece of black nylon thread was inserted through the rostral neuropore of chick embryos and was fixed to its ventral lip. These operations were done at all intermediate stages during the process of closure of the rostral neuropore. The embryos were sacrificed at a later stage, by which time the neuropore had disappeared. In the cleared specimens the threads always lay at the same site, namely the upper border of lamina terminalis, irrespective of the stage at which the marker was inserted. These results stand against His's conception (1893a,b) of a sutura terminalis and support the single mechanism of sutura dorsalis during closure of the rostral neuropore. The marking data therefore imply that the topologic rostral end of the forebrain lies at the upper limit of lamina terminalis, as proposed by von Kupffer, '06).

  19. Effects of Prolactin and Lactation on A15 Dopamine Neurones in the Rostral Preoptic Area of Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R S E; Herbison, A E; Grattan, D R

    2015-09-01

    There are several distinct populations of dopamine neurones in the hypothalamus. Some of these, such as the A12 tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurones and the A14 periventricular dopamine neurones, are known to be regulated by the anterior pituitary hormone prolactin, whereas others, such as the A13 zona incerta dopaminergic neurones, are not. The present study aimed to investigate the role of prolactin in the regulation of a fourth population of hypothalamic dopamine neurones: the A15 dopamine population in the rostral hypothalamus. These neurones may play a role in the regulation of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion, and we hypothesised that they might contribute to the suppression of GnRH release and infertility caused by hyperprolactinaemia. Under basal (low prolactin) conditions, only 8% of A15 dopamine neurones in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) of vehicle-treated dioestrous mice expressed phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (pSTAT5), as labelled by immunohistochemistry. We have previously shown that this transcription factor can be used as an index of prolactin-receptor activation. Following acute prolactin administration, 35% of AVPV dopamine neurones co-expressed pSTAT5, whereas, during lactation, when endogenous prolactin levels are chronically elevated, 55% of AVPV dopamine neurones expressed pSTAT5. There was also a significant increase in dopamine turnover in the rostral hypothalamus, both in the diagonal band of Broca at the level of the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis and in the rostral preoptic area during lactation, with the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid/dopamine ratio increasing from 0.28 ± 0.04 and 0.14 ± 0.01 in dioestrous mice to 0.82 ± 0.06 and 0.38 ± 0.03, respectively, in day 7 lactating mice. It is not yet known whether this change is driven by the hyperprolactinaemia of lactation, or another lactation-specific signal. These data demonstrate that the A15

  20. The red nucleus and the rubrospinal projection in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huazheng; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2012-04-01

    We studied the organization and spinal projection of the mouse red nucleus with a range of techniques (Nissl stain, immunofluorescence, retrograde tracer injections into the spinal cord, anterograde tracer injections into the red nucleus, and in situ hybridization) and counted the number of neurons in the red nucleus (3,200.9 ± 230.8). We found that the rubrospinal neurons were mainly located in the parvicellular region of the red nucleus, more lateral in the rostral part and more medial in the caudal part. Labeled neurons were least common in the rostral and caudal most parts of the red nucleus. Neurons projecting to the cervical cord were predominantly dorsomedially placed and neurons projecting to the lumbar cord were predominantly ventrolaterally placed. Immunofluorescence staining with SMI-32 antibody showed that ~60% of SMI-32-positive neurons were cervical cord-projecting neurons and 24% were lumbar cord-projecting neurons. SMI-32-positive neurons were mainly located in the caudomedial part of the red nucleus. A study of vGluT2 expression showed that the number and location of glutamatergic neurons matched with those of the rubrospinal neurons. In the anterograde tracing experiments, rubrospinal fibers travelled in the dorsal portion of the lateral funiculus, between the lateral spinal nucleus and the calretinin-positive fibers of the lateral funiculus. Rubrospinal fibers terminated in contralateral laminae 5, 6, and the dorsal part of lamina 7 at all spinal cord levels. A few fibers could be seen next to the neurons in the dorsolateral part of lamina 9 at levels of C8-T1 (hand motor neurons) and L5-L6 (foot motor neurons), which is consistent with a view that rubrospinal fibers may play a role in distal limb movement in rodents.

  1. Trigeminal-Rostral Ventromedial Medulla circuitry is involved in orofacial hyperalgesia contralateral to tissue injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Bryan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous studies have shown that complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA-induced masseter inflammation and microinjection of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β into the subnucleus interpolaris/subnucleus caudalis transition zone of the spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vi/Vc can induce contralateral orofacial hyperalgesia in rat models. We have also shown that contralateral hyperalgesia is attenuated with a lesion of the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM, a critical site of descending pain modulation. Here we investigated the involvement of the RVM-Vi/Vc circuitry in mediating contralateral orofacial hyperalgesia after an injection of CFA into the masseter muscle. Results Microinjection of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (5 nmol, n=6 into the ipsilateral Vi/Vc attenuated the CFA-induced contralateral hyperalgesia but not the ipsilateral hyperalgesia. Intra-RVM post-treatment injection of the NK1 receptor antagonists, RP67580 (0.5-11.4 nmol and L-733,060 (0.5-11.4 nmol, attenuated CFA-induced bilateral hyperalgesia and IL-1β induced bilateral hyperalgesia. Serotonin depletion in RVM neurons prior to intra-masseter CFA injection prevented the development of contralateral hyperalgesia 1–3 days after CFA injection. Inhibition of 5-HT3 receptors in the contralateral Vi/Vc with direct microinjection of the select 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, Y-25130 (2.6-12.9 nmol, attenuated CFA-induced contralateral hyperalgesia. Lesions to the ipsilateral Vc prevented the development of ipsilateral hyperalgesia but did not prevent the development of contralateral hyperalgesia. Conclusions These results suggest that the development of CFA-induced contralateral orofacial hyperalgesia is mediated through descending facilitatory mechanisms of the RVM-Vi/Vc circuitry.

  2. Pulsatile compression of the rostral ventrolateral medulla in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, S; Sasaki, S; Miki, S; Kawa, T; Itoh, H; Nakata, T; Takeda, K; Nakagawa, M; Naruse, S; Maeda, T

    1997-01-01

    The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) has been known to be a major regulating center of sympathetic and cardiovascular activities. An association between essential hypertension and neurovascular compression of the RVLM has been reported in clinical observations, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. To reconfirm this relationship, we performed MRI using a high-resolution 512 x 512 matrix in patients with essential and secondary hypertension and in normotensive subjects. The duration of hypertension and the degree of organ damage by hypertension were not significantly different between the two hypertension groups. Neurovascular compression of the RVLM was observed in 74% of the essential hypertension group, and the incidence of compression was significantly higher than in the secondary hypertension group (11%) or in the normotensive group (13%) (P model has already been reported, its underlying mechanism is not well known. Accordingly, we performed experiments to investigate whether pulsatile compression of the RVLM would increase arterial pressure and to elucidate the mechanism of the pressor response in rats. Sympathetic nerve activity, arterial pressure, heart rate, and plasma levels of epinephrine and norepinephrine were increased by pulsatile compression of the RVLM. The pressor response was abolished by intravenous treatment with hexamethonium or RVLM injection of kainic acid. In summary, the results from the MRI studies suggest that neurovascular compression of the RVLM is, at least in part, causally related to essential hypertension. This was supported by the results from experimental studies using rats indicating that pulsatile compression of the RVLM increases arterial pressure by enhancing sympathetic outflow.

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals complex cognitive control representations in the rostral frontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlmann, J; Beckmann, I; Kuhlemann, I; Schweikard, A; Münte, T F

    2015-08-06

    Convergent evidence suggests that the lateral frontal cortex is at the heart of a brain network subserving cognitive control. Recent theories assume a functional segregation along the rostro-caudal axis of the lateral frontal cortex based on differences in the degree of complexity of cognitive control. However, the functional contribution of specific rostral and caudal sub-regions remains elusive. Here we investigate the impact of disrupting rostral and caudal target regions on cognitive control processes, using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). Participants performed three different task-switching conditions that assessed differences in the degree of complexity of cognitive control processes, after temporally disrupting rostral, or caudal target regions, or a control region. Disrupting the rostral lateral frontal region specifically impaired behavioral performance of the most complex task-switching condition, in comparison to the caudal target region and the control region. These novel findings shed light on the neuroanatomical architecture supporting control over goal-directed behavior.

  4. Trephination of the equine rostral maxillary sinus: efficacy and safety of two trephine sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakzai, Safia Z; Kane-Smyth, Justine; Lowles, Joanna; Townsend, Neil

    2008-04-01

    To examine 2 rostral maxillary sinus (RMS) trephine sites for safety and efficacy using skulls of horses of varying age. Descriptive study. Cadaveric equine skulls (n=40). Two RMS trephination sites (rostral, caudal) were made in each skull. Radiographic projections using markers at each site were used to determine if sites were within the RMS and directly overlying a cheek tooth. Sinusotomy in 14 skulls was used to determine correlation between radiographic and anatomic location of trephine sites, and of the rostrolateral aspect of the maxillary septum. Age-related risk of trephine site being directly over a cheek tooth was determined using logistic regression. Trephine site was within the RMS in 98% of skulls using the rostral portal and 68% using the caudal portal. The rostral site was over a cheek tooth in 18% of skulls compared with 10% using the caudal site. There was a significant negative relationship between the trephine site overlying a tooth and horse age for rostral (P=.02) and caudal (P=.03) sites. The radiographic appearance of the maxillary septum correlated to the rostrolateral portion of the septum in 12 of 14 skulls that had sinusotomy. The rostral RMS trephine portal is more reliable than the caudal site for entering the RMS. Horses trephine site overlying a cheek tooth and we advise that RMS trephination in this age group be performed with radiographic guidance.

  5. Comparison of sinoscopic techniques for examining the rostral maxillary and ventral conchal sinuses of horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Justin D; Bennett, Cees; Windley, Zoë; Schumacher, Jim

    2009-07-01

    To develop a reliable technique for sinoscopic examination of the ventral conchal (VCS) and rostral maxillary sinuses (RMS) of horses Descriptive study Cadaveric equine heads (n=40) The VCS and RMS were examined endoscopically using: (1) rostral trephination of the RMS (rostral RMS approach); (2) caudal trephination of the RMS (caudal RMS approach); (3) conchofrontal sinus (CFS) trephination followed by RMS trephination at a site identified by endoscopic transillumination of the maxillary bone at the most rostral aspect of the caudal maxillary sinus (CMS) (light-indicated RMS approach); (4) CFS trephination with fenestration of the ventral conchal bulla (VCB; frontal VCB approach); (5) CMS trephination with VCB fenestration (caudal VCB approach); and (6) CFS and CMS trephination with VCB fenestration (combined VCB approach). Success in observing the rostral and caudal aspects of the VCS and RMS with each approach were: (1) rostral RMS approach (0 horses; 16 horses [40%]); (2) caudal RMS approach (0 horses; 11 horses [28%]); (3) light-indicated RMS approach (3 horses [8%]; 24 horses [60%]); (4) frontal VCB approach (24 horses [60%]; 29 horses [73%] respectively); (5) caudal VCB approach (16 horses [40%] both structures); and (6) combined VCB approach (27 horses [68%]; 35 horses [88%]). Trephination into the CFS coupled with fenestration of the VCB provided consistent access to both the rostral and caudal aspects of the RMS and VCS. A trephine hole into the RMS provided poor access to the VCS, and placed the reserve crowns of the maxillary cheek teeth at risk of damage. The RMS and VCS can be best examined endoscopically using approaches with fenestration of the VCB.

  6. Experimental Cerebral Malaria Spreads along the Rostral Migratory Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Angelika; Pfeil, Johannes; Alfonso, Julieta; Kurz, Felix T.; Sahm, Felix; Heiland, Sabine; Monyer, Hannah; Bendszus, Martin; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Helluy, Xavier; Pham, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    It is poorly understood how progressive brain swelling in experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) evolves in space and over time, and whether mechanisms of inflammation or microvascular sequestration/obstruction dominate the underlying pathophysiology. We therefore monitored in the Plasmodium berghei ANKA-C57BL/6 murine ECM model, disease manifestation and progression clinically, assessed by the Rapid-Murine-Coma-and-Behavioral-Scale (RMCBS), and by high-resolution in vivo MRI, including sensitive assessment of early blood-brain-barrier-disruption (BBBD), brain edema and microvascular pathology. For histological correlation HE and immunohistochemical staining for microglia and neuroblasts were obtained. Our results demonstrate that BBBD and edema initiated in the olfactory bulb (OB) and spread along the rostral-migratory-stream (RMS) to the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles, the dorsal-migratory-stream (DMS), and finally to the external capsule (EC) and brainstem (BS). Before clinical symptoms (mean RMCBS = 18.5±1) became evident, a slight, non-significant increase of quantitative T2 and ADC values was observed in OB+RMS. With clinical manifestation (mean RMCBS = 14.2±0.4), T2 and ADC values significantly increased along the OB+RMS (p = 0.049/p = 0.01). Severe ECM (mean RMCBS = 5±2.9) was defined by further spread into more posterior and deeper brain structures until reaching the BS (significant T2 elevation in DMS+EC+BS (p = 0.034)). Quantitative automated histological analyses confirmed microglial activation in areas of BBBD and edema. Activated microglia were closely associated with the RMS and neuroblasts within the RMS were severely misaligned with respect to their physiological linear migration pattern. Microvascular pathology and ischemic brain injury occurred only secondarily, after vasogenic edema formation and were both associated less with clinical severity and the temporal course of ECM. Altogether, we identified a distinct spatiotemporal

  7. Rostral Agranular Insular Cortex Lesion with Motor Cortex Stimulation Enhances Pain Modulation Effect on Neuropathic Pain Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ho Jung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the insular cortex is involved in the processing of painful input. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pain modulation role of the insular cortex during motor cortex stimulation (MCS. After inducing neuropathic pain (NP rat models by the spared nerve injury method, we made a lesion on the rostral agranular insular cortex (RAIC unilaterally and compared behaviorally determined pain threshold and latency in 2 groups: Group A (NP + MCS; n=7 and Group B (NP + RAIC lesion + MCS; n=7. Also, we simultaneously recorded neuronal activity (NP; n=9 in the thalamus of the ventral posterolateral nucleus and RAIC to evaluate electrophysiological changes from MCS. The pain threshold and tolerance latency increased in Group A with “MCS on” and in Group B with or without “MCS on.” Moreover, its increase in Group B with “MCS on” was more than that of Group B without MCS or of Group A, suggesting that MCS and RAIC lesioning are involved in pain modulation. Compared with the “MCS off” condition, the “MCS on” induced significant threshold changes in an electrophysiological study. Our data suggest that the RAIC has its own pain modulation effect, which is influenced by MCS.

  8. BFKL Pomeron calculus: Nucleus-nucleus scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.contreras@usm.cl [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Avda. Espana 1680, and Centro Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Levin, Eugene, E-mail: leving@post.tau.ac.il [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Avda. Espana 1680, and Centro Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Department of Particle Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Miller, Jeremy S., E-mail: jeremy.miller@ist.utl.pt [Department of Particle Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2012-04-15

    In this paper the action of the BFKL Pomeron calculus is rewritten in momentum representation, and the equations of motion for nucleus-nucleus collisions are derived, in this representation. We found the semiclassical solutions to these equations, outside of the saturation domain. Inside this domain these equations reduce to the set of delay differential equations, and their asymptotic solutions are derived.

  9. Distinct effect of orphanin FQ in nucleus raphe magnus and nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis on the rat tail flick reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z; Zhang, Y; Wu, G

    2001-06-22

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of orphanin FQ (OFQ) microinjected into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) and the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NGC) on pain modulation. The tail-flick latency (TFL) was used as a behavioral index of nociceptive responsiveness. The result showed microinjection of OFQ into the NRM significantly increased the TFL, whereas microinjection of OFQ into the NGC decreased the TFL, suggesting the analgesic effect of OFQ in the NRM and the hyperalgesic effect of OFQ in the NGC. As there are three classes of putative pain modulating neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM), the hyperalgesic or analgesic effect of OFQ in the RVM might depend upon the different class of the neurons being acted.

  10. Adaptive coding of action values in the human rostral cingulate zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jocham, G.; Neumann, J.; Klein, T.A.; Danielmeier, C.; Ullsperger, M.

    2009-01-01

    Correctly selecting appropriate actions in an uncertain environment requires gathering experience about the available actions by sampling them over several trials. Recent findings suggest that the human rostral cingulate zone (RCZ) is important for the integration of extended action-outcome associat

  11. Frontal and rostral anterior cingulate (rACC) theta EEG in depression: implications for treatment outcome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arns, M.W.; Etkin, A.; Hegerl, U.; Williams, L.M.; DeBattista, C.; Palmer, D.M.; Fitzgerald, P.B.; Harris, A.; deBeuss, R.; Gordon, E.

    2015-01-01

    In major depressive disorder (MDD), elevated theta current density in the rostral anterior cingulate (rACC), as estimated by source localization of scalp-recorded electroencenphalogram (EEG), has been associated with response to antidepressant treatments, whereas elevated frontal theta has been link

  12. Neurotrophic requirements of rat embryonic catecholaminergic neurons from the rostral ventrolateral medulla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copray, JCVM; Gibbons, H; van Roon, WMC; Comer, AM; Lipski, J

    1999-01-01

    The factors that regulate the ontogeny and differentiation of C1 adrenergic neurons located in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) are completely unknown. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of a number of neurotrophic factors on the survival of E18-19 rat C1 adrenergic neuro

  13. Social and Nonsocial Functions of Rostral Prefrontal Cortex: Implications for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Sam J.; Burgess, Paul W.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the role of rostral prefrontal cortex (approximating Brodmann Area 10) in two domains relevant to education: executive function (particularly prospective memory, our ability to realize delayed intentions) and social cognition (particularly our ability to reflect on our own mental states and the mental states of others).…

  14. Social and Nonsocial Functions of Rostral Prefrontal Cortex: Implications for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Sam J.; Burgess, Paul W.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the role of rostral prefrontal cortex (approximating Brodmann Area 10) in two domains relevant to education: executive function (particularly prospective memory, our ability to realize delayed intentions) and social cognition (particularly our ability to reflect on our own mental states and the mental states of others).…

  15. Onuf's nucleus X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D

    1981-01-01

    in the length of the nucleus was observed. Based on the cytoarchitecture the nucleus could be divided in three parts, a cranial, a dorsomedial and a ventrolateral. All parts of the nucleus consisted of chromatin-rich medium-sized neurons, and apparent direct appositions between different cells bodies as well......The first, second and third sacral segments of 59 human spinal cords were examined in order to localize and describe Onuf's nucleus X. The nucleus was found to be situated in the ventral horn of the segments S2 and S3; only in very few spinal cords did it extend into S1. A significant variation...... as between cell bodies and large dendrites were observed. Characteristic findings in the neuropil surrounding the nucleus were the sparsity of myelinated fibers and the presence of dendritic bundles. The present observations are compared to the descriptions of a morphologically similar nucleus...

  16. Regenerative approach to bilateral rostral mandibular reconstruction in a case series of dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz eArzi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Extensive rostral mandibulectomy in dogs typically results in instability of the mandibles that may lead to malocclusion, difficulty in eating and drinking, food prehension, and pain of the temporomandibular joint. Large rostral mandibular defects are challenging to reconstruct due to the complex geometry of this region. In order to restore mandibular continuity and stability following extensive rostral mandibulectomy, we developed a surgical technique using a combination of intraoral and extraoral approaches, a locking titanium plate and a compression resistant matrix (CRM infused with rhBMP-2. Furthermore, surgical planning that consisted of computed tomographic (CT scanning and 3D model printing were utilized. We describe a regenerative surgical technique for immediate or delayed reconstruction of critical-size rostral mandibular defects in 5 dogs. Three dogs had healed with intact gingival covering over the mandibular defect and had immediate return to normal function and occlusion. Two dogs had the complication of focal plate exposure and dehiscence, which was corrected with mucosal flaps and suturing; these dogs have since healed with intact gingival covering over the mandibular defect. Mineralized tissue formation was palpated clinically within 2 weeks and solid bone formation within 3 months. Computed tomography findings at 6 months postoperatively demonstrated that the newly regenerated mandibular bone had increased in mineral volume with evidence of integration between the native bone, new bone and CRM compared to the immediate postoperative CT. We conclude that rostral mandibular reconstruction using a regenerative approach provides an excellent solution for restoring mandibular continuity and preventing mandibular instability in dogs.

  17. Afferent and efferent connections of the nucleus sphericus in the snake Thamnophis sirtalis: convergence of olfactory and vomeronasal information in the lateral cortex and the amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanuza, E; Halpern, M

    1997-09-08

    This paper is an account of the afferent and efferent projections of the nucleus sphericus (NS), which is the major secondary vomeronasal structure in the brain of the snake Thamnophis sirtalis. There are four major efferent pathways from the NS: 1) a bilateral projection that courses, surrounding the accessory olfactory tract, and innervates several amygdaloid nuclei (nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract, dorsolateral amygdala, external amygdala, and ventral anterior amygdala), the rostral parts of the dorsal and lateral cortices, and the accessory olfactory bulb; 2) a bilateral projection that courses through the medial forebrain bundle and innervates the olfactostriatum (rostral and ventral striatum); 3) a commissural projection that courses through the anterior commissure and innervates mainly the contralateral NS; and 4) a meager bilateral projection to the lateral hypothalamus. On the other hand, important afferent projections to the NS arise solely in the accessory olfactory bulb, the nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract, and the contralateral NS. This pattern of connections has three important implications: first, the lateral cortex probably integrates olfactory and vomeronasal information. Second, because the NS projection to the hypothalamus is meager and does not reach the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, vomeronasal information from the NS is not relayed directly to that nucleus, as previously reported. Finally, a structure located in the rostral and ventral telencephalon, the olfactostriatum, stands as the major tertiary vomeronasal center in the snake brain. These three conclusions change to an important extent our previous picture of how vomeronasal information is processed in the brain of reptiles.

  18. Early adverse events, HPA activity and rostral anterior cingulate volume in MDD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Treadway

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prior studies have independently reported associations between major depressive disorder (MDD, elevated cortisol concentrations, early adverse events and region-specific decreases in grey matter volume, but the relationships among these variables are unclear. In the present study, we sought to evaluate the relationships between grey matter volume, early adverse events and cortisol levels in MDD. METHODS/RESULTS: Grey matter volume was compared between 19 controls and 19 individuals with MDD using voxel-based morphometry. A history of early adverse events was assessed using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Subjects also provided salivary cortisol samples. Depressed patients showed decreased grey matter volume in the rostral ACC as compared to controls. Rostral ACC volume was inversely correlated with both cortisol and early adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest a key relationship between ACC morphology, a history of early adverse events and circulating cortisol in the pathophysiology of MDD.

  19. Transmissibility studies of vacuolar changes in the rostral colliculus of pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer Yvonne I

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histopathological examinations of brains from healthy pigs have revealed localised vacuolar changes, predominantly in the rostral colliculus, that are similar to the neuropil vacuolation featured in the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and have been described in pigs challenged parenterally with the agent causing bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE. Feedstuff containing BSE-contaminated meat and bone meal (MBM may have been fed to pigs prior to the ban of mammalian MBM in feed of farmed livestock in the United Kingdom in 1996, but there is no evidence of the natural occurrence of a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE in the domestic pig. Furthermore, experimental transmission of BSE to pigs by the oral route has been unsuccessful. A study was conducted to investigate whether the localised vacuolar changes in the porcine brain were associated with a transmissible aetiology and therefore biologically significant. Two groups of ten pigs were inoculated parenterally with vacuolated rostral colliculus from healthy pigs either born before 1996 or born after 1996. Controls included ten pigs similarly inoculated with rostral colliculus from New Zealand-derived pigs and nine pigs inoculated with a bovine BSE brain homogenate. Results None of the pigs inoculated with rostral colliculus developed a TSE-like neurological disease up to five years post inoculation when the study was terminated, and disease-associated prion protein, PrPd, was not detected in the brains of these pigs. By contrast, eight of nine BSE-inoculated pigs developed neurological signs, two of which had detectable PrPd by postmortem tests. No significant histopathological changes were detected to account for the clinical signs in the PrPd-negative, BSE-inoculated pigs. Conclusion The findings in this study suggest that vacuolation in the porcine rostral colliculus is not caused by a transmissible agent and is probably a clinically insignificant

  20. Molecular characterization of the mouse superior lateral parabrachial nucleus through expression of the transcription factor Runx1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrissandra J Zagami

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to precisely identify separate neuronal populations is essential to the understanding of the development and function of different brain structures. This necessity is particularly evident in regions such as the brainstem, where the anatomy is quite complex and little is known about the identity, origin, and function of a number of distinct nuclei due to the lack of specific cellular markers. In this regard, the gene encoding the transcription factor Runx1 has emerged as a specific marker of restricted neuronal populations in the murine central and peripheral nervous systems. The aim of this study was to precisely characterize the expression of Runx1 in the developing and postnatal mouse brainstem. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Anatomical and immunohistochemical studies were used to characterize mouse Runx1 expression in the brainstem. It is shown here that Runx1 is expressed in a restricted population of neurons located in the dorsolateral rostral hindbrain. These neurons define a structure that is ventromedial to the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus, dorsocaudal to the medial paralemniscal nucleus and rostral to the cerebellum. Runx1 expression in these cells is first observed at approximately gestational day 12.5, persists into the adult brain, and is lost in knockout mice lacking the transcription factor Atoh1, an important regulator of the development of neuronal lineages of the rhombic lip. Runx1-expressing neurons in the rostral hindbrain produce cholecystokinin and also co-express members of the Groucho/Transducin-like Enhancer of split protein family. CONCLUSION: Based on the anatomical and molecular characteristics of the Runx1-expressing cells in the rostral hindbrain, we propose that Runx1 expression in this region of the mouse brain defines the superior lateral parabrachial nucleus.

  1. Influence of fastigial nucleus electrostimulation on metabolites for magnetic resonance spectroscopy in Alzheimer disease%小脑顶核电刺激对阿尔茨海默病磁共振波谱代谢物的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜利伶; 赵建农; 周治明; 吴伟; 李小风; 姜柳米

    2016-01-01

    目的 采用MRS评价小脑顶核电刺激(FNS)对阿尔茨海默病(AD)患者后扣带回(PCC)代谢物的影响.方法 收集AD患者36例,随机分为治疗组和安慰组,各18例.治疗组给予小脑FNS治疗.治疗前、后采用MRS评估PCC代谢产物N-乙酰天门冬氨酸(NAA)/肌酸(Cr)值、肌醇(mI)/Cr值.比较两组治疗前、后代谢物的差异.结果 治疗组治疗后NAA/Cr值较治疗前轻度升高,但差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),mI/Cr值较治疗前降低,差异有统计学意义(t=-2.502,P<0.05);治疗后治疗组NAA/Cr值较安慰组升高,mI/Cr值降低,差异均有统计学意义(t=4.176、-4.987,P均<0.05).结论 FNS治疗后AD大脑代谢物发生了变化,MRS可作为观察AD的客观辅助手段.

  2. Effect of preconditioning electrostimulation of fastigial nucleus on neuronal mitochondrion of rat early after cerebral ischemia%小脑电刺激对大鼠脑缺血早期神经元线粒体的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王健; 董为伟; 何为

    2005-01-01

    目的观察小脑顶核电刺激预处理对大鼠脑缺血早期神经元线粒体的影响. 方法 40只Wistar大鼠随机分为5组,FNS预置组分别给予小脑顶核刺激(FNS)预处理1 h,1 d及7 d后通过线栓法建立大脑中动脉闭塞(MCAO)模型,3 h后取缺血侧大脑组织测定含水量,并通过电镜观察缺血区神经元线粒体,分析其体密度(Vv)、面密度(Sv)及比表面(Ss),结果与假FNS组比较.同时设立正常对照组.其他大鼠则应用鹅膏氨酸(IBO)预先毁损小脑顶核(FN),5 d后再予FNS,1 d后行MCAO. 结果与正常对照组比较,假FNS组MCAO后3 h,缺血侧脑含水量增加,神经功能评分降低,神经元线粒体Vv及Sv增加,而Ss降低,两组差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);与假FNS组比较,缺血前1 d或7 d给予FNS预置,脑含水量下降,神经功能评分增加,线粒体Vv及Sv降低,而Ss增高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).预先使用IBO损毁顶核者,FNS的预置保护效应则被消除. 结论预先小脑顶核刺激,可抑制大鼠脑缺血早期神经元线粒体的肿胀,改善缺血区组织水肿,从而减轻神经功能缺损.

  3. Neural set point for the control of arterial pressure: role of the nucleus tractus solitarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentinuzzi Max E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physiological experiments have shown that the mean arterial blood pressure (MAP can not be regulated after chemo and cardiopulmonary receptor denervation. Neuro-physiological information suggests that the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS is the only structure that receives information from its rostral neural nuclei and from the cardiovascular receptors and projects to nuclei that regulate the circulatory variables. Methods From a control theory perspective, to answer if the cardiovascular regulation has a set point, we should find out whether in the cardiovascular control there is something equivalent to a comparator evaluating the error signal (between the rostral projections to the NTS and the feedback inputs. The NTS would function as a comparator if: a its lesion suppresses cardiovascular regulation; b the negative feedback loop still responds normally to perturbations (such as mechanical or electrical after cutting the rostral afferent fibers to the NTS; c perturbation of rostral neural structures (RNS to the NTS modifies the set point without changing the dynamics of the elicited response; and d cardiovascular responses to perturbations on neural structures within the negative feedback loop compensate for much faster than perturbations on the NTS rostral structures. Results From the control theory framework, experimental evidence found currently in the literature plus experimental results from our group was put together showing that the above-mentioned conditions (to show that the NTS functions as a comparator are satisfied. Conclusions Physiological experiments suggest that long-term blood pressure is regulated by the nervous system. The NTS functions as a comparator (evaluating the error signal between its RNS and the cardiovascular receptor afferents and projects to nuclei that regulate the circulatory variables. The mean arterial pressure (MAP is regulated by the feedback of chemo and cardiopulmonary receptors and

  4. Posterior hypothalamic receptors involved in the cardiovascular changes elicited by electrical stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, H; Rivest, R; Marsden, C A

    1991-07-01

    The posterior hypothalamic receptors involved in the cardiovascular responses to electrical stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla were investigated in urethane-anaesthetized rats. Electrical stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla produced a significant increase in systolic blood pressure. This response was significantly attenuated by the prior administration of d,l-propranolol (20 micrograms), clonidine (8 micrograms), atropine (8 micrograms) or methysergide (10 micrograms) into the posterior hypothalamus, but not by cimetidine (11 micrograms), chlorpheniramine (12 micrograms), naloxone (10 micrograms) or a vasopressin V1 antagonist (100 ng). The effect of clonidine (8 micrograms) on the pressor response to stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla was antagonized by idazoxan (66 micrograms). These results confirm that the cardiovascular changes elicited by stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla area are, in part, centrally modulated by alpha 2 and beta-adrenoceptors in the posterior hypothalamus which exert respectively, inhibitory and stimulatory effect. Furthermore the results indicate the involvement of posterior hypothalamic cholinergic and serotonergic receptors in the pressor response produced by stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla.

  5. Efficacy of clonidine in patients with essential hypertension with neurovascular contact of the rostral ventrolateral medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Takao; Morimoto, Satoshi; Aota, Yasuko; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Toyoda, Nagaoki; Kosaki, Atsushi; Maehara, Minoru; Tanigawa, Noboru; Ikeda, Koshi; Sawada, Satoshi; Iwasaka, Toshiji

    2010-06-01

    The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) is an important center for regulation of sympathetic nerve activity. Several clinical studies have suggested an association between neurovascular contact (NVC) of RVLM and essential hypertension. Microvascular decompression (MVD) of RVLM decreases blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive patients with NVC of this region. Therefore, MVD could be a useful therapeutic strategy to reduce BP in these patients. However, as MVD is an invasive procedure, it is worthy to seek useful antihypertensive agents for hypertensive patients with NVC. It is reported that sympathetic nerve activity is elevated in patients with hypertension accompanied by NVC of RVLM. It is anticipated that sympatholytic agents could be effective in lowering BP in these patients. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of clonidine, an alpha2 adrenergic agonist, in essential hypertensives with NVC of RVLM. Thirty consecutive essential hypertensive patients with NVC and 30 consecutive essential hypertensive patients without contact were treated with clonidine for 4 weeks, and decreases in BP and plasma norepinephrine levels were compared between the two groups. Decreases in BP and plasma norepinephrine levels were significantly greater in patients with NVC than in those without contact. These results suggest that clonidine exhibits significantly greater reductions of BP and sympathetic nerve activity in essential hypertensive patients with NVC compared with those without contact of the rostral ventrolateral medulla.

  6. Rostral and caudal prefrontal contribution to creativity: A meta-analysis of functional imaging data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil eGonen-Yaacovi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Creativity is of central importance for human civilization, yet its neurocognitive bases are poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to integrate existing functional imaging data by using the meta-analysis approach. We reviewed 34 functional imaging studies that reported activation foci during tasks assumed to engage creative thinking in healthy adults. A coordinate-based meta-analysis using Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE first showed a set of predominantly left-hemispheric regions shared by the various creativity tasks examined. These regions included the caudal lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC, the medial and lateral rostral PFC, and the inferior parietal and posterior temporal cortices. Further analyses showed that tasks involving the combination of remote information (combination tasks activated more anterior areas of the lateral PFC than tasks involving the free generation of unusual responses (unusual generation tasks, although both types of tasks shared caudal prefrontal areas. In addition, verbal and non-verbal tasks involved the same regions in the left caudal prefrontal, temporal, and parietal areas, but also distinct domain-oriented areas. Taken together, these findings suggest that several frontal and parieto-temporal regions may support cognitive processes shared by diverse creativity tasks, and that some regions may be specialized for distinct types of processes. In particular, the lateral PFC appeared to be organized along a rostro-caudal axis, with rostral regions involved in combining ideas creatively and more posterior regions involved in freely generating novel ideas.

  7. [Comparative anatomic studies of the vomeronasal complex and the rostral palate of various mammals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöhrmann-Repenning, A

    1984-01-01

    The structures of the rostral palate in regard to the vomeronasal complex of different species of mammals were studied. In all cases, we find a very interesting system of furrows which preserves a connection between the nasopalatine ducts and the preoral surroundings. For rodents, lagomorphs, Solenodon, Setifer, and Echinops, we find a special situation in this part of the palate. Here the incisors are not separated by a diastema nor the oral openings of the nasopalatine ducts are overgrown by a bipartite caudal branch of the rhinarium. The results of the anatomic studies of the vomeronasal complex and the rostral palate of the mammals investigated are discussed: First of all, some elements of the vomeronasal complex needed to be analysed in regard to structure and nomenclature, specifically the cartilago paraseptalis with its outer bar, the cartilago ductus nasopalatini and the cartilago palatina. Because of 2 criterions, the vomeronasal complex could be classified as either primitive or progressive. We find a primitive one in Didelphis, Tupaia, Solenodon, Oryctolagus, and all rodents. In contrast, the other insectivores studied and all primates show progressive structures at their vomeronasal complex. Finally, conclusions in regard to the function of the organs of Jacobson are derived from these studies. The significance of the "flehmen" mechanism for the functioning of the organs is questioned.

  8. The rostral migratory stream and olfactory system: smell, disease and slippery cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Maurice A; Monzo, Hector J; Faull, Richard L M

    2009-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, olfaction is an important sense that is used to detect odors of different kinds that can warn of off food, to produce a mothering instinct in a flock or group of animals, and to warn of danger such as fire or poison. The olfactory system is made up of a long-distance rostral migratory stream that arises from the subventricular zone in the wall of the lateral ventricle, mainly comprises neuroblasts, and stretches all the way through the basal forebrain to terminate in the olfactory bulb. The olfactory bulb receives a constant supply of new neurons that allow ongoing integration of new and different smells, and these are integrated into either the granule cell layer or the periglomerular layer. The continuous turnover of neurons in the olfactory bulb allows us to study the proliferation, migration, and differentiation of neurons and their application in therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. In this chapter, we will examine the notion that the olfactory system might be the route of entry for factors that cause or contribute to neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. We will also discuss the enzymes that may be involved in the addition of polysialic acid to neural cell adhesion molecule, which is vital for allowing the neuroblasts to move through the rostral migratory stream. Finally, we will discuss a possible role of endosialidases for removing polysialic acid from neural cell adhesion molecules, which causes neuroblasts to stop migrating and terminally differentiate into olfactory bulb interneurons.

  9. Mapping and Analysis of the Connectome of Sympathetic Premotor Neurons in the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla of the Rat Using a Volumetric Brain Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Bowen; Le, Sheng; Turner, Anita; Bokiniec, Phil; Ramadas, Radhika; Bjaalie, Jan G.; Menuet, Clement; Neve, Rachael; Allen, Andrew M.; Goodchild, Ann K.; McMullan, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Spinally projecting neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a critical role in the generation of vasomotor sympathetic tone and are thought to receive convergent input from neurons at every level of the neuraxis; the factors that determine their ongoing activity remain unresolved. In this study we use a genetically restricted viral tracing strategy to definitively map their spatially diffuse connectome. We infected bulbospinal RVLM neurons with a recombinant rabies variant that drives reporter expression in monosynaptically connected input neurons and mapped their distribution using an MRI-based volumetric atlas and a novel image alignment and visualization tool that efficiently translates the positions of neurons captured in conventional photomicrographs to Cartesian coordinates. We identified prominent inputs from well-established neurohumoral and viscero-sympathetic sensory actuators, medullary autonomic and respiratory subnuclei, and supramedullary autonomic nuclei. The majority of inputs lay within the brainstem (88–94%), and included putative respiratory neurons in the pre-Bötzinger Complex and post-inspiratory complex that are therefore likely to underlie respiratory-sympathetic coupling. We also discovered a substantial and previously unrecognized input from the region immediately ventral to nucleus prepositus hypoglossi. In contrast, RVLM sympathetic premotor neurons were only sparsely innervated by suprapontine structures including the paraventricular nucleus, lateral hypothalamus, periaqueductal gray, and superior colliculus, and we found almost no evidence of direct inputs from the cortex or amygdala. Our approach can be used to quantify, standardize and share complete neuroanatomical datasets, and therefore provides researchers with a platform for presentation, analysis and independent reanalysis of connectomic data.

  10. A brain slice culture model for studies of endogenous and exogenous precursor cell migration in the rostral migratory stream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanvig, Mette; Blaabjerg, Morten; Andersen, Rikke K

    2009-01-01

    The rostral migratory stream (RMS) is the main pathway by which newly born subventricular zone (SVZ) cells reach the olfactory bulb (OB) in rodents. This migration has been well studied in vivo, but an organotypic in vitro model would facilitate more experimental investigations. Here we introduce...... a slice culture preparation of the rat forebrain including en suite the rostral part of the lateral ventricle, the RMS and the OB. The preparation was validated with regard to endogenous cell proliferation and migration by tracking bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labelled cells in newly established and 3 and 6...... week old cultures. For testing the migratory abilities of exogenous precursor cells, rat SVZ neurospheres and human neural (HNS1 cells) and mesenchymal (hMSC-TERT) stem cell lines were micrografted to the rostral SVZ of 1 and 7 day old cultures. Two weeks later graft derivatives were identified...

  11. The ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata): Afferent and efferent projections in relation to the control of reproductive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, J Martin

    2017-08-15

    Sex-specific mating behaviors occur in a variety of mammals, with the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) and the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) mediating control of male and female sexual behavior, respectively. In birds, likewise, POM is predominantly involved in the control of male reproductive behavior, but the degree to which VMH is involved in female reproductive behavior is unclear. Here, in male and female zebra finches, a combination of aromatase immunohistochemistry and conventional tract tracing facilitated the definition of two separate but adjacent nuclei in the basal hypothalamus: an oblique band of aromatase-positive (AR+) neurons, and ventromedial to this, an ovoid, aromatase-negative (AR-) nucleus. The AR- nucleus, but not the AR+ nucleus, was here shown to receive a projection from rostral parts of the thalamic auditory nucleus ovoidalis and from the nucleus of the tractus ovoidalis. The AR- nucleus also receives an overlapping, major projection from previously uncharted regions of the medial arcopallium and a minor projection from the caudomedial nidopallium. Both the AR- and the AR+ nuclei project to the intercollicular nucleus of the midbrain. No obvious sex differences in either the pattern of AR immunoreactivity or of the afferent projections to the AR- nucleus were observed. The significance of these results in terms of the acoustic control of avian reproductive behavior is discussed, and a comparison with the organization of VMH afferents in lizards suggests a homologous similarity of the caudal telencephalon in sauropsids. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Nucleus Driven Electronic Pulsation

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwig, H; Xue, S -S

    2014-01-01

    We derive and solve by the spectral method the equations for a neutral system of ultra-relativistic electrons that are compressed to the radius of the nucleus and subject to a driving force. This driving force can be thought of as originating from a nuclear breathing mode, a possibility we discuss in detail.

  13. Catecholaminergic projections from the solitary tract nucleus to the perifornical hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, P; Christolomme, A; Bosler, O; Perrin, J; Orsini, J C

    1994-01-01

    The source of adrenergic and other catecholaminergic fibers innervating the perifornical lateral hypothalamus was localized in the medulla after combination of Fluoro-Gold retrograde tracing and immunohistochemistry for either tyrosine-hydroxylase or phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase. Following perifornical injections, Fluoro-Gold-labeled neurons were observed mainly in regions including the noradrenergic and adrenergic cell groups. In the caudal solitary tract nucleus, two kinds of doubly labeled neurons were found: a) numerous noradrenergic neurons in the A2 group at the level of, or caudal to the area postrema; b) some adrenergic neurons in the C2 group at a level immediately rostral to the area postrema. These catecholaminergic neurons connecting the caudal solitary tract nucleus to the perifornical hypothalamus might convey feeding relevant information such as glycemic level or satiety signals.

  14. Nucleus accumbens functional connectivity discriminates medication-overuse headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M. Torta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Medication-overuse headache (MOH is a secondary form of headache related to the overuse of triptans, analgesics and other acute headache medications. It is believed that MOH and substance addiction share some similar pathophysiological mechanisms. In this study we examined the whole brain resting state functional connectivity of the dorsal and ventral striatum in 30 patients (15 MOH and 15 non-MOH patients to investigate if classification algorithms can successfully discriminate between MOH and non-MOH patients on the basis of the spatial pattern of resting state functional connectivity of the dorsal and ventral striatal region of interest. Our results indicated that both nucleus accumbens and dorsal rostral putamen functional connectivity could discriminate between MOH and non-MOH patients, thereby providing possible support to two interpretations. First, that MOH patients show altered reward functionality in line with drug abusers (alterations in functional connectivity of the nucleus accumbens. Second, that MOH patients show inability to break habitual behavior (alterations in functional connectivity of the dorsal striatum. In conclusion, our data showed that MOH patients were characterized by an altered functional connectivity of motivational circuits at rest. These differences could permit the blind discrimination between the two conditions using classification algorithms. Considered overall, our findings might contribute to the development of novel diagnostic measures.

  15. Formation of the avian nucleus magnocellularis from the auditory anlage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Susan J; Rubel, Edwin W; Nishi, Rae

    2006-10-01

    In the avian auditory system, the neural network for computing the localization of sound in space begins with bilateral innervation of nucleus laminaris (NL) by nucleus magnocellularis (NM) neurons. We used antibodies against the neural specific markers Hu C/D, neurofilament, and SV2 together with retrograde fluorescent dextran labeling from the contralateral hindbrain to identify NM neurons within the anlage and follow their development. NM neurons could be identified by retrograde labeling as early as embryonic day (E) 6. While the auditory anlage organized itself into NM and NL in a rostral-to-caudal fashion between E6 and E8, labeled NM neurons were visible throughout the extent of the anlage at E6. By observing the pattern of neuronal rearrangements together with the pattern of contralaterally projecting NM fibers, we could identify NL in the ventral anlage. Ipsilateral NM fibers contacted the developing NL at E8, well after NM collaterals had projected contralaterally. Furthermore, the formation of ipsilateral connections between NM and NL neurons appeared to coincide with the arrival of VIIIth nerve fibers in NM. By E10, immunoreactivity for SV2 was heavily concentrated in the dorsal and ventral neuropils of NL. Thus, extensive pathfinding and morphological rearrangement of central auditory nuclei occurs well before the arrival of cochlear afferents. Our results suggest that NM neurons may play a central role in formation of tonotopic connections in the auditory system.

  16. Rostral horn evolution among agamid lizards of the genus ceratophora endemic to Sri Lanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte II, James A.; Macey, J. Robert; Pethiyagoda, Rohan; Larson, Allan

    2001-07-10

    The first phylogenetic hypothesis for the Sri Lankan agamid lizard genus Ceratophora is presented based on 1670 aligned base positions (472 parsimony informative) of mitochondrial DNA sequences, representing coding regions for eight tRNAs, ND2, and portions of ND1 and COI. Phylogenetic analysis reveals multiple origins and possibly losses of rostral horns in the evolutionary history of Ceratophora. Our data suggest a middle Miocene origin of Ceratophora with the most recent branching of recognized species occurring at the Pliocene/Pleistocene boundary. Haplotype divergence suggests that an outgroup species, Lyriocephalus scutatus, dates at least to the Pliocene. These phylogenetic results provide a framework for comparative studies of the behavioral ecological importance of horn evolution in this group.

  17. Allometric growth of the trunk leads to the rostral shift of the pelvic fin in teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yumie; Tamura, Mika; Aita, Yusuke; Fujimura, Koji; Murakami, Yasunori; Okabe, Masataka; Okada, Norihiro; Tanaka, Mikiko

    2010-11-01

    The pelvic fin position among teleost fishes has shifted rostrally during evolution, resulting in diversification of both behavior and habitat. We explored the developmental basis for the rostral shift in pelvic fin position in teleost fishes using zebrafish (abdominal pelvic fins) and Nile tilapia (thoracic pelvic fins). Cell fate mapping experiments revealed that changes in the distribution of lateral plate mesodermal cells accompany the trunk-tail protrusion. Presumptive pelvic fin cells are originally located at the body wall adjacent to the anterior limit of hoxc10a expression in the spinal cord, and their position shifts rostrally as the trunk grows. We then showed that the differences in pelvic fin position between zebrafish and Nile tilapia were not due to changes in expression or function of gdf11. We also found that hox-independent motoneurons located above the pelvic fins innervate into the pelvic musculature. Our results suggest that there is a common mechanism among teleosts and tetrapods that controls paired appendage positioning via gdf11, but in teleost fishes the position of prospective pelvic fin cells on the yolk surface shifts as the trunk grows. In addition, teleost motoneurons, which lack lateral motor columns, innervate the pelvic fins in a manner independent of the rostral-caudal patterns of hox expression in the spinal cord. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The atypical cadherin Celsr1 functions non-cell autonomously to block rostral migration of facial branchiomotor neurons in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasco, Derrick M; Pike, Whitney; Qu, Yibo; Reustle, Lindsay; Misra, Kamana; Di Bonito, Maria; Studer, Michele; Fritzsch, Bernd; Goffinet, André M; Tissir, Fadel; Chandrasekhar, Anand

    2016-09-01

    The caudal migration of facial branchiomotor (FBM) neurons from rhombomere (r) 4 to r6 in the hindbrain is an excellent model to study neuronal migration mechanisms. Although several Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) components are required for FBM neuron migration, only Celsr1, an atypical cadherin, regulates the direction of migration in mice. In Celsr1 mutants, a subset of FBM neurons migrates rostrally instead of caudally. Interestingly, Celsr1 is not expressed in the migrating FBM neurons, but rather in the adjacent floor plate and adjoining ventricular zone. To evaluate the contribution of different expression domains to neuronal migration, we conditionally inactivated Celsr1 in specific cell types. Intriguingly, inactivation of Celsr1 in the ventricular zone of r3-r5, but not in the floor plate, leads to rostral migration of FBM neurons, greatly resembling the migration defect of Celsr1 mutants. Dye fill experiments indicate that the rostrally-migrated FBM neurons in Celsr1 mutants originate from the anterior margin of r4. These data suggest strongly that Celsr1 ensures that FBM neurons migrate caudally by suppressing molecular cues in the rostral hindbrain that can attract FBM neurons.

  19. Neutrino nucleus cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Singh, S K; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of our calculation which has been performed to study the nuclear effects in the quasielastic, inelastic and deep inelastic scattering of neutrinos(antineutrinos) from nuclear targets. These calculations are done in the local density approximation. We take into account the effect of Pauli blocking, Fermi motion, Coulomb effect, renormalization of weak transition strengths in the nuclear medium in the case of the quasielastic reaction. The inelastic reaction leading to production of pions is calculated in a $\\Delta $- dominance model taking into account the renormalization of $\\Delta$ properties in the nuclear medium and the final state interaction effects of the outgoing pions with the residual nucleus. We discuss the nuclear effects in the $F_{3}^{A}(x)$ structure function in the deep inelastic neutrino(antineutrino) reaction using a relativistic framework to describe the nucleon spectral function in the nucleus.

  20. Heavy flavor in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus: quenching, flow and correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Nardi, M; De Pace, A; Monteno, M; Prino, F

    2015-01-01

    We present recent results for heavy-flavor observables in nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC energies, obtained with the POWLANG transport setup. The initial creation of c-cbar and b-bbar pairs is simulated with a perturbative QCD approach (POWHEG+PYTHIA); their propagation in the medium (created in the nucleus-nucleus or in proton-nucleus collision) is studied with the relativistic Langevin equation, here solved using weak-coupling transport coefficients. Successively, the heavy quarks hadronize in the medium. We compute the nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow parameter of the final D mesons both in nucleus-nucleus and in (for the first time, in the POWLANG setup) proton-nucleus collisions and compare our results to experimental data.

  1. The pressor effect of angiotensin-(1-7 in the rat rostral ventrolateral medulla involves multiple peripheral mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita C. Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In the present study, the peripheral mechanism that mediates the pressor effect of angiotensin-(1-7 in the rostral ventrolateral medulla was investigated. METHOD: Angiotensin-(1-7 (25 pmol was bilaterally microinjected in the rostral ventrolateral medulla near the ventral surface in urethane-anesthetized male Wistar rats that were untreated or treated (intravenously with effective doses of selective autonomic receptor antagonists (atenolol, prazosin, methyl-atropine, and hexamethonium or a vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist [d(CH25 -Tyr(Me-AVP] given alone or in combination. RESULTS: Unexpectedly, the pressor response produced by angiotensin-(1-7 (16 ± 2 mmHg, n = 12, which was not associated with significant changes in heart rate, was not significantly altered by peripheral treatment with prazosin, the vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist, hexamethonium or methyl-atropine. Similar results were obtained in experiments that tested the association of prazosin and atenolol; methyl-atropine and the vasopressin V1 antagonist or methyl-atropine and prazosin. Peripheral treatment with the combination of prazosin, atenolol and the vasopressin V1 antagonist abolished the pressor effect of glutamate; however, this treatment produced only a small decrease in the pressor effect of angiotensin-(1-7 at the rostral ventrolateral medulla. The combination of hexamethonium with the vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist or the combination of prazosin, atenolol, the vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist and methyl-atropine was effective in blocking the effect of angiotensin-(1-7 at the rostral ventrolateral medulla. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that angiotensin-(1-7 triggers a complex pressor response at the rostral ventrolateral medulla that involves an increase in sympathetic tonus, release of vasopressin and possibly the inhibition of a vasodilatory mechanism.

  2. Neurogenetic and morphogenetic heterogeneity in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, S.A.

    1987-11-01

    Neurogenesis and morphogenesis in the rat bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (strial bed nucleus) were examined with (/sup 3/H)thymidine autoradiography. For neurogenesis, the experimental animals were the offspring of pregnant females given an injection of (/sup 3/H)thymidine on 2 consecutive gestational days. Nine groups of embryos were exposed to (/sup 3/H)thymidine on E13-E14, E14-E15,... E21-E22, respectively. On P60, the percentage of labeled cells and the proportion of cells originating during 24-hour periods were quantified at six anteroposterior levels in the strial bed nucleus. On the basis of neurogenetic gradients, the strial bed nucleus was divided into anterior and posterior parts. The anterior strial bed nucleus shows a caudal (older) to rostral (younger) neurogenetic gradient. Cells in the vicinity of the anterior commissural decussation are generated mainly between E13 and E16, cells just posterior to the nucleus accumbens mainly between E15 and E17. Within each rostrocaudal level, neurons originate in combined dorsal to ventral and medial to lateral neurogenetic gradients so that the oldest cells are located ventromedially and the youngest cells dorsolaterally. The most caudal level has some small neurons adjacent to the internal capsule that originate between E17 and E20. In the posterior strial bed nucleus, neurons extend ventromedially into the posterior preoptic area. Cells are generated simultaneously along the rostrocaudal plane in a modified lateral (older) to medial (younger) neurogenetic gradient. Ventrolateral neurons originate mainly between E13 and E16, dorsolateral neurons mainly between E15 and E16, and medial neurons mainly between E15 and E17. The youngest neurons are clumped into a medial core area just ventral to the fornix.

  3. Nucleus-nucleus potential with shell-correction contribution

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, V Yu

    2015-01-01

    The full relaxed-density potential between spherical nuclei is considered as a sum of the macroscopic and shell-correction contributions. The macroscopic part of the potential is related to a nucleus-nucleus potential obtained in the framework of the extended Thomas-Fermi approach with the Skyrme and Coulomb forces and the relaxed-density ansatz for evaluation of proton and neutron densities of interacting nuclei. A simple prescription for the shell-correction part of the total potential is discussed. The parameters of the shell-correction and macroscopic parts of the relaxed-density potential are found by fitting the empirical barrier heights of the 89 nucleus-nucleus systems as well as macroscopic potentials evaluated for 1485 nucleus-nucleus systems at 12 distances around touching points.

  4. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, H.; /Tufts U.; Garvey, G.; /Los Alamos; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  5. Antineutron-nucleus annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Botta, E

    2001-01-01

    The n-nucleus annihilation process has been studied by the OBELIX experiment at the CERN Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) in the (50-400) MeV/c projectile momentum range on C, Al, Cu, Ag, Sn, and Pb nuclear targets. A systematic survey of the annihilation cross- section, sigma /sub alpha /(A, p/sub n/), has been performed, obtaining information on its dependence on the target mass number and on the incoming n momentum. For the first time the mass number dependence of the (inclusive) final state composition of the process has been analyzed. Production of the rho vector meson has also been examined. (13 refs).

  6. Lack of serotonin reuptake during brain development alters rostral raphe-prefrontal network formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefine Storm Witteveen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Besides its ‘classical’ neurotransmitter function, serotonin (5-HT has been found to also act as a neurodevelopmental signal. During development, the 5-HT projection system represents one of the earliest neurotransmitter systems to innervate the brain. One of the targets of the 5-HT projection system, originating in the brainstem raphe nuclei, is the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, an area involved in higher cognitive functions and important in the etiology of many neurodevelopmental disorders. Little is known however about the exact role of 5-HT and its signaling molecules in the formation of the raphe-prefrontal network. Using explant essays, we here studied the role of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT, an important modulator of the 5-HT signal, in rostral raphe-prefrontal network formation. We found that the chemotrophic nature of the interaction between the origin (rostral raphe cluster and a target (mPFC of the 5-HT projection system was affected in rats lacking the 5-HTT (5-HTT-/-. While 5-HTT deficiency did not affect the dorsal raphe 5-HT-positive outgrowing neurites, the median raphe 5-HT neurites switched from a strong repulsive to an attractive interaction when co-cultured with the mPFC. Furthermore, the fasciculation of the mPFC outgrowing neurites was dependent on the amount of 5-HTT. In the mPFC of 5-HTT-/- pups, we observed clear differences in 5-HT innervation and the identity of a class of projection neurons of the mPFC. In the absence of the 5-HTT, the 5-HT innervation in all subareas of the early postnatal mPFC increased dramatically and the number of Satb2-positive callosal projection neurons was decreased. Together, these results suggest a 5-HTT dependency during early development of these brain areas and in the formation of the raphe-prefrontal network. The tremendous complexity of the 5-HT projection system and its role in several neurodevelopmental disorders highlights the need for further research in this largely

  7. Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  8. Anatomical and neurochemical definition of the nucleus of the stria terminalis in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aste, N; Balthazart, J; Absil, P; Grossmann, R; Mülhbauer, E; Viglietti-Panzica, C; Panzica, G C

    1998-06-29

    This study in birds provides anatomical, immunohistochemical, and hodological data on a prosencephalic region in which the nomenclature is still a matter of discussion. In quail, this region is located just dorsal to the anterior commissure and extends from the level of the medial part of the preoptic area at its most rostral end to the caudal aspects of the nucleus preopticus medialis. At this caudal level, it reaches its maximal elongation and extends from the ventral tip of the lateral ventricles to the dorsolateral aspects of the paraventricular nucleus. This area contains aromatase-immunoreactive cells and a sexually dimorphic population of small, vasotocinergic neurons. The Nissl staining of adjacent sections revealed the presence of a cluster of intensely stained cells outlining the same region delineated by the vasotocin-immunoreactive structures. Cytoarchitectonic, immunohistochemical, and in situ hybridization data support the notion that this area is similar and is probably homologous to the medial part of the nucleus of the stria terminalis of the mammalian brain. The present data provide a clear definition of this nucleus in quail: They show for the first time the presence of sexually dimorphic vasotocinergic neurons in this region of the quail brain and provide the first detailed description of this region in an avian species.

  9. Exaggerated sympathoexcitatory reflexes develop with changes in the rostral ventrolateral medulla in obese Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Domitila A; Schreihofer, Ann M

    2016-08-01

    Obesity leads to altered autonomic reflexes that reduce stability of mean arterial pressure (MAP). Sympathoinhibitory reflexes such as baroreflexes are impaired, but reflexes that raise MAP appear to be augmented. In obese Zucker rats (OZR) sciatic nerve stimulation evokes larger increases in MAP by unknown mechanisms. We sought to determine the autonomic underpinnings of this enhanced somatic pressor reflex and whether other sympathoexcitatory reflexes are augmented. We also determined whether their final common pathway, glutamatergic activation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), was enhanced in male OZR compared with lean Zucker rats (LZR). Sciatic nerve stimulation or activation of the nasopharyngeal reflex evoked larger rises in splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) (79% and 45% larger in OZR, respectively; P reflexes were still exaggerated in OZR (167% and 69% larger, respectively, P reflexes and physiological responses to RVLM activation were comparable. These data suggest that the ability of glutamate to activate the RVLM becomes enhanced in adult OZR and may contribute to the development of exaggerated sympathoexcitatory responses independent of impaired baroreflexes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Role of the oxytocin receptor expressed in the rostral medullary raphe in thermoregulation during cold conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki eKasahara

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent papers have reported that oxytocin (Oxt and the oxytocin receptor (Oxtr may be involved in the regulation of food intake in mammals. We therefore suspected the Oxt/Oxtr system to be involved in energy homeostasis. In previous studies, we found a tendency toward obesity in Oxtr-deficient mice, as well as impaired thermoregulation when these mice were exposed to cold conditions. In the present study, we observed the expression of Oxtr in the rostral medullary raphe (RMR, the brain region known to control thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue. Through immunohistochemistry, we detected neurons expressing Oxtr and c-Fos in the RMR of mice exposed to cold conditions. Up to 40% of Oxtr-positive neurons in RMR were classified as glutamatergic neurons, as shown by immunostaining using anti-VGLUT3 antibody. In addition, mice with exclusive expression of Oxtr in the RMR were generated by injecting an AAV-Oxtr vector into the RMR region of Oxtr-deficient mice. We confirmed the recovery of thermoregulatory ability in the manipulated mice during exposure to cold conditions. Moreover, mice with RMR-specific expression of Oxtr lost the typical morphological change in brown adipose tissue observed in Oxtr-deficient mice. Additionally, increased expression of the β3-adrenergic receptor gene, Adrb3 was observed in brown adipose tissue. These results are the first to show the critical role of RMR Oxtr expression in thermoregulation during cold conditions.

  11. Effect of moxonidine on putative sympathetic neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Antonio R

    2004-01-01

    We used an intracellular recording technique in vitro to investigate the effects of moxonidine on neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) with electrophysiological properties similar to premotor sympathetic neurons in vivo. These neurons were classified as firing regularly and irregularly, according to previous reports. Moxonidine is a sympathoinhibitory and antihypertensive agent that is thought to be a ligand of alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors and imidazoline type-1 receptors in the RVLM. Moxonidine (2-10 microM) was applied to the perfusate on 4 irregularly firing neurons, and 2 regularly firing neurons. Moxonidine (2 microM) produced only minor depolarization in 2 of these neurons. However, on 4 tested neurons, moxonidine (10 microM) elicited a profound inhibitory effect with hyperpolarization (near -20 mV); these neurons practically ceased firing. These changes were partially reversible. The results would indicate that neurons in the RVLM, recorded in vitro and with similar electrophysiological characteristics to a group of neurons previously identified in vivo in the same bulbar region as barosensitive premotor sympathetic neurons, can be modulated by imidazoline-derivative adrenergic agonists. These results could help to understand the hypotensive effects of moxonidine.

  12. Superoxide Mediates Depressive Effects Induced by Hydrogen Sulfide in Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyun Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S plays a crucial role in the regulation of blood pressure and oxidative stress. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that H2S exerts its cardiovascular effects by reducing oxidative stress via inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM. We examined cell distributions of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS and effects of H2S on reactive oxygen species (ROS and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs. We found that CBS was expressed in neurons of the RVLM, and the expression was lower in SHRs than in Wistar-Kyoto rats. Microinjection of NaHS (H2S donor, S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM, a CBS agonist, or Apocynin (NADPH oxidase inhibitor into the RVLM reduced the ROS level, NADPH oxidase activity, and MAP, whereas microinjection of hydroxylamine hydrochloride (HA, a CBS inhibitor increased MAP. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular infusion of NaHS inhibited phosphorylation of p47phox, a key step of NADPH oxidase activation. Since decreasing ROS level in the RVLM reduces MAP and heart rate and increasing H2S reduces ROS production, we conclude that H2S exerts an antihypertensive effect via suppressing ROS production. H2S, as an antioxidant, may be a potential target for cardiovascular diseases.

  13. The rostral migratory stream plays a key role in intranasal delivery of drugs into the CNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Scranton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The blood brain barrier (BBB is impermeable to most drugs, impeding the establishment of novel neuroprotective therapies and strategies for many neurological diseases. Intranasal administration offers an alternative path for efficient drug delivery into the CNS. So far, the anatomical structures discussed to be involved in the transport of intranasally administered drugs into the CNS include the trigeminal nerve, olfactory nerve and the rostral migratory stream (RMS, but the relative contributions are debated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present study we demonstrate that surgical transection, and the resulting structural disruption of the RMS, in mice effectively obstructs the uptake of intranasally administered radioligands into the CNS. Furthermore, using a fluorescent cell tracer, we demonstrate that intranasal administration in mice allows agents to be distributed throughout the entire brain, including olfactory bulb, hippocampus, cortex and cerebellum. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence of the vital role the RMS has in the CNS delivery of intranasally administered agents. The identification of the RMS as the major access path for intranasally administered drugs into the CNS may contribute to the development of treatments that are tailored for efficient transport within this structure. Research into the RMS needs to continue to elucidate its limitations, capabilities, mechanisms of transport and potential hazards before we are able to advance this technique into human research.

  14. The role of rostral Brodmann area 6 in mental-operation tasks: an integrative neuroimaging approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanakawa, Takashi; Honda, Manabu; Sawamoto, Nobukatsu; Okada, Tomohisa; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Fukuyama, Hidena; Shibasaki, Hiroshi

    2002-11-01

    Recent evidence indicates that classical 'motor' areas may also have cognitive functions. We performed three neuroimaging experiments to investigate the functional neuroanatomy underlying three types of nonmotor mental-operation tasks: numerical, verbal, and spatial. (i) Positron emission tomography showed that parts of the posterior frontal cortex, which are consistent with the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and the rostral part of the dorsolateral premotor cortex (PMdr), were active during all three tasks. We also observed activity in the posterior parietal cortex and cerebellar hemispheres during all three tasks. Electrophysiological monitoring confirmed that there were no skeletomotor, oculomotor or articulatory movements during task performance. (ii) Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) showed that PMdr activity during the mental-operation tasks was localized in the depths of the superior precentral sulcus, which substantially overlapped the region active during complex finger movements and was located dorsomedial to the presumptive frontal eye fields. (iii) Single-trial fMRI showed a transient increase in activity time-locked to the performance of mental operations in the pre-SMA and PMdr. The results of the present study suggest that the PMdr is important in the rule-based association of symbolic cues and responses in both motor and nonmotor behaviors.

  15. Differentiation of papillae and rostral sensory neurons in the larva of the ascidian Botryllus schlosseri (Tunicata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicci, Federico; Zaniolo, Giovanna; Burighel, Paolo; Degasperi, Valentina; Gasparini, Fabio; Manni, Lucia

    2010-02-15

    During the metamorphosis of tunicate ascidians, the swimming larva uses its three anterior papillae to detect the substrate for settlement, reabsorbs its chordate-like tail, and becomes a sessile oozooid. In view of the crucial role played by the anterior structures and their nerve relations, we applied electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry to study the larva of the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri, following differentiation of the anterior epidermis during late embryogenesis, the larval stage, and the onset of metamorphosis. Rudiments of the papillae appear in the early tail-bud stage as ectodermic protrusions, the apexes of which differentiate into central and peripheral bipolar neurons. Axons fasciculate into two nerves direct to the brain. Distally, the long, rod-like dendritic terminations extend during the larval stage, becoming exposed to sea water. After the larva selects and adheres to the substrate, these neurons retract and regress. Adjacent to the papillae, other scattered neurons insinuate dendrites into the tunic and form the net of rostral trunk epidermal neurons (RTENs) which fasciculate together with the papillary neurons. Our data indicate that the papillae are simple and coniform, the papillary neurons are mechanoreceptors, and the RTENs are chemoreceptors. The interpapillary epidermal area, by means of an apocrine secretion, provides sticky material for temporary adhesion of the larva to the substrate.

  16. Medial prefrontal depressor response: involvement of the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, N C; Verberne, A J

    2000-01-14

    The importance of neurones of the caudal and rostral ventrolateral medulla (CVLM and RVLM, respectively) in mediation of the medial prefrontal cortex depressor response was studied in halothane-anaesthetised rats. Blockade of GABA(A) receptors in the RVLM produced by microinjection of bicuculline (50 nl, 2 mM, n = 6) resulted in reversal of the depressor (-9.5 +/- 1.2 mm Hg) and lumbar sympathetic (-6.5 +/- 5.7 units) responses to pressor (+7.8 +/- 3.5 mm Hg) and sympathoexcitatory (+19.3 +/- 12.5 units) responses and simultaneous blockade of baroreceptor reflex-mediated sympathoinhibition. Baroreflex blockade was reflected by a significant reduction in the gain (slope of the blood pressure vs. lumbar sympathetic nerve discharge regression line) of the reflex. Microinjection of the excitatory amino acid antagonist kynurenic acid (100 nl, 50 mM, n = 6) into the CVLM blocked the baroreflex and significantly reduced the depressor (-9.6 +/- 0.4 to -6.9 +/- 0.6 mm Hg) and lumbar sympathetic (-4.0 +/- 2.1 to 2.9 +/- 1.9 units) responses to medial prefrontal cortex stimulation. These results support the hypothesis that the medial prefrontal cortex depressor response is mediated by a pathway which converges at the level of the RVLM and which is only partly dependent on an excitatory input to caudal ventrolateral medullary neurones.

  17. The generation of oligodendroglial cells is preserved in the rostral migratory stream during aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian eCapilla-Gonzalez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The subventricular zone (SVZ is the largest source of newly generated cells in the adult mammalian brain. SVZ-derived neuroblasts migrate via the rostral migratory stream (RMS to the olfactory bulb (OB, where they differentiate into mature neurons. Additionally, a small proportion of SVZ-derived cells contribute to the generation of myelinating oligodendrocytes. The production of new cells in the SVZ decreases during aging, affecting the incorporation of new neurons into the OB. However, the age-related changes that occur across the RMS are not fully understood. In this study we evaluate how aging affects the cellular organization of migrating neuroblast chains, the proliferation, and the fate of the newly generated cells in the SVZ-OB system. By using electron microscopy and immunostaining, we found that the RMS path becomes discontinuous and its cytoarchitecture is disorganized in aged mice (24-month-old mice. Subsequently, OB neurogenesis was impaired in the aged brain while the production of oligodendrocytes was not compromised. These findings provide new insight into oligodendrocyte preservation throughout life. Further exploration of this matter could help the development of new strategies to prevent neurological disorders associated with senescence.

  18. SPINAL CORD MECHANISMS MEDIATING BEHAVIORAL HYPERALGESIA INDUCED BY NEUROKININ-1 TACHYKININ RECEPTOR ACTIVATION IN THE ROSTRAL VENTROMEDIAL MEDULLA

    OpenAIRE

    Lagraize, S. C.; Guo, W; Yang, K.; Wei, F.; Ren, K; Dubner, R.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperalgesia in animal injury models is linked to activation of descending raphespinal modulatory circuits originating in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). A neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist microinjected into the RVM before or after inflammation produced by complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) resulted in an attenuation of thermal hyperalgesia. A transient (acute) or a continuous infusion of Substance P (SP) microinjected into the RVM of non-inflamed animals led to similar pain hype...

  19. Clarifying the role of the rostral dmPFC/dACC in fear/anxiety: learning, appraisal or expression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Maier

    Full Text Available Recent studies have begun to carve out a specific role for the rostral part of the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC and adjacent dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC in fear/anxiety. Within a novel general framework of dorsal mPFC/ACC areas subserving the appraisal of threat and concomitant expression of fear responses and ventral mPFC/ACC areas subserving fear regulation, the rostral dmPFC/dACC has been proposed to specifically mediate the conscious, negative appraisal of threat situations including, as an extreme variant, catastrophizing. An alternative explanation that has not been conclusively ruled out yet is that the area is involved in fear learning. We tested two different fear expression paradigms in separate fMRI studies (study 1: instructed fear, study 2: testing of Pavlovian conditioned fear with independent groups of healthy adult subjects. In both paradigms the absence of reinforcement precluded conditioning. We demonstrate significant BOLD activation of an identical rostral dmPFC/dACC area. In the Pavlovian paradigm (study 2, the area only activated robustly once prior conditioning had finished. Thus, our data argue against a role of the area in fear learning. We further replicate a repeated observation of a dissociation between peripheral-physiological fear responding and rostral dmPFC/dACC activation, strongly suggesting the area does not directly generate fear responses but rather contributes to appraisal processes. Although we succeeded in preventing extinction of conditioned responding in either paradigm, the data do not allow us to definitively exclude an involvement of the area in fear extinction learning. We discuss the broader implications of this finding for our understanding of mPFC/ACC function in fear and in negative emotion more generally.

  20. Neural Response Properties of Primary, Rostral, and Rostrotemporal Core Fields in the Auditory Cortex of Marmoset Monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Bendor, Daniel; WANG, Xiaoqin

    2008-01-01

    The core region of primate auditory cortex contains a primary and two primary-like fields (AI, primary auditory cortex; R, rostral field; RT, rostrotemporal field). Although it is reasonable to assume that multiple core fields provide an advantage for auditory processing over a single primary field, the differential roles these fields play and whether they form a functional pathway collectively such as for the processing of spectral or temporal information are unknown. In this report we compa...

  1. Source size determination in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, J.L.; Kumar, B.S.; Bennett, M.J.; Diebold, G.E.; Pope, J.K. (Yale University, A. W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8124 (United States)); Sorge, H.; Sullivan, J.P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

    1994-08-29

    We describe a technique whereby the freeze-out interaction volumes of nucleus-nucleus collisions are extracted from a cascade (plus coalescence) model, after comparison to measured abundances of light nuclei. We conclude that the interaction volume undergoes significant expansion before light nuclei are produced.

  2. The Galactic Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, Fulvio

    Exciting new broadband observations of the galactic nucleus have placed the heart of the Milky Way under intense scrutiny in recent years. This has been due in part to the growing interest from theorists motivated to study the physics of black hole accretion, magnetized gas dynamics, and unusual star formation. The center of our Galaxy is now known to harbor the most compelling supermassive black hole candidate, weighing in at 3-4 million solar masses. Its nearby environment is comprised of a molecular dusty ring, clusters of evolved and young stars, diffuse hot gas, ionized gas streamers, and several supernova remnants. This chapter will focus on the physical makeup of this dynamic region and the feasibility of actually imaging the black hole's shadow in the coming decade with mm interferometry.

  3. Evidence that urocortin is absent from neurons of the Edinger-Westphal nucleus in pigeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavani J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWN is a central preganglionic parasympathetic cell group that gives rise to cholinergic input to the ciliary ganglion, thereby regulating several neurovegetative ocular functions. Recently, the supposed presence of the neuropeptide urocortin (UCN has been reported in EWN neurons in rodent brain. The purpose of the present study was to examine the distribution of UCN in avian brain and to investigate by immunohistochemical analysis the possible use of this substance as an EWN marker in a non-mammalian class of vertebrates. Brain tissue of pigeons was incubated with a specific antibody against UCN and the results showed labeling of many small neurons, forming a double wing in the dorsal mesodiencephalic transition area. Their size and shape, however, differed from those of EWN neurons, and they were preferentially located rostral to the EWN. Double-label experiments employing an antibody against the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT showed that UCN is not localized to the cholinergic cells of the EWN and confirmed the rostral distributionof UCN never overlapping the ChAT+ EWN cells. Taken together, these results suggest that, at least in pigeons, the UCN+ population does not belong to the traditionally defined EWN.

  4. Leptin into the rostral ventral lateral medulla (RVLM augments renal sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J Barnes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is a hormone released from adipose tissue. While this hormone normally acts to reduce feeding behavior and increase energy expenditure, in obesity, resistance to these effects occurs even though the hormone is released in large amounts. Although leptin no longer works to suppress feeding in the obese, leptin retains its potent effects on other autonomic functions such as blood pressure regulation. Leptin has been associated with hypertension and increased sympathetic autonomic activity. Therefore, leptin is emerging as a major contributor to the hypertensive state observed in obesity. Sympathetic control of blood pressure is maintained principally by autonomic reflex control circuits in the caudal brainstem. The rostral ventral-lateral medulla (RVLM is the primary regulator of the sympathetic nervous system, sending excitatory fibers to sympathetic preganglionic neurons to regulate sympathetic control over resistance vessels and blood pressure. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that neurons in the ventral lateral medulla express leptin receptors (ObRb. Our present study using pseudo-rabies multi-synaptic retrograde tract tracing and immunohistochemical methods revealed that neurons within the RVLM that send sympathetic projections to the kidney express leptin receptors. Acute microinjection of leptin (1 and 3µg; 40nL into the RVLM evoked a significant increase in Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA. When the 3µg dose of leptin was preceded with a leptin antagonist, (SLAN-4; 1ng, it attenuated the cardiovascular response of leptin. Taken together, these data suggest that leptin’s actions within the RVLM may influence blood pressure and renal sympathetic nerve activity.

  5. EGF-induced expansion of migratory cells in the rostral migratory stream.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olle R Lindberg

    Full Text Available The presence of neural stem cells in the adult brain is currently widely accepted and efforts are made to harness the regenerative potential of these cells. The dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation, and the subventricular zone (SVZ of the anterior lateral ventricles, are considered the main loci of adult neurogenesis. The rostral migratory stream (RMS is the structure funneling SVZ progenitor cells through the forebrain to their final destination in the olfactory bulb. Moreover, extensive proliferation occurs in the RMS. Some evidence suggest the presence of stem cells in the RMS, but these cells are few and possibly of limited differentiation potential. We have recently demonstrated the specific expression of the cytoskeleton linker protein radixin in neuroblasts in the RMS and in oligodendrocyte progenitors throughout the brain. These cell populations are greatly altered after intracerebroventricular infusion of epidermal growth factor (EGF. In the current study we investigate the effect of EGF infusion on the rat RMS. We describe a specific increase of radixin(+/Olig2(+ cells in the RMS. Negative for NG2 and CNPase, these radixin(+/Olig2(+ cells are distinct from typical oligodendrocyte progenitors. The expanded Olig2(+ population responds rapidly to EGF and proliferates after only 24 hours along the entire RMS, suggesting local activation by EGF throughout the RMS rather than migration from the SVZ. In addition, the radixin(+/Olig2(+ progenitors assemble in chains in vivo and migrate in chains in explant cultures, suggesting that they possess migratory properties within the RMS. In summary, these results provide insight into the adaptive capacity of the RMS and point to an additional stem cell source for future brain repair strategies.

  6. Increased sympathetic nerve activity correlates with neurovascular compression at the rostral ventrolateral medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendeski, Mauricio M; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda Marciano; Leite, Claudia Costa; Rubira, Marcelo Custódio; Lessa, Patricia; Krieger, Eduardo Moacyr

    2006-05-01

    We used microneurography to measure muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in 25 hypertensive subjects and correlated these results with the presence or absence of signs of neurovascular compression (NVC) at the rostral ventrolateral (RVL) medulla on MRI. Subjects were divided into 3 groups based on MRI findings: NVC-, no MRI evidence of NVC (N=9); NVC+contact, image showing artery in contact but not compressing the RVL medulla (N=8); and NVC+compression, image showing arterial compression of the RVL medulla (N=8). The MSNA measurements were performed at rest, after a hypothermic stimulus, and during isometric exercise. The MSNA during rest in the NVC+compression group was significantly higher than that in the NVC+contact and NVC- groups (30.4+/-3.4 versus 17.5+/-1.1 and 21.4+/-3.2 spikes per minute, respectively). However, the blood pressure in the NVC+compression group was slightly but not significantly higher than that in the other 2 groups (183+/-7/115+/-8, 174+/-6/108+/-7, and 171+/-5/110+/-5 mm Hg, respectively). The increases in MSNA, blood pressure, and heart rate during the cold pressor and isometric exercise tests were similar. Our results show that, although resting MSNA is elevated in patients with true NVC of the RVL medulla, patients without NVC or with arterial contact but not overt compression of the RVL medulla have similar MSNA. These findings are important for identifying, among hypertensive patients with NVC, individuals who may have associated physiological repercussions, such as increased sympathetic activity.

  7. Activation of rostral ventromedial medulla neurons by noxious stimulation of cutaneous and deep craniofacial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasabov, Sergey G; Malecha, Patrick; Noack, Joseph; Tabakov, Janneta; Okamoto, Keiichiro; Bereiter, David A; Simone, Donald A

    2015-01-01

    The rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) projects to the medullary and spinal dorsal horns and is a major source of descending modulation of nociceptive transmission. Traditionally, neurons in the RVM are classified functionally as on, off, and neutral cells on the basis of responses to noxious cutaneous stimulation of the tail or hind paw. On cells facilitate nociceptive transmission, off cells are inhibitory, whereas neutral cells are unresponsive to noxious stimuli and their role in pain modulation is unclear. Classification of RVM neurons with respect to stimulation of craniofacial tissues is not well defined. In isoflurane-anesthetized male rats, RVM neurons first were classified as on (25.5%), off (25.5%), or neutral (49%) cells by noxious pinch applied to the hind paw. Pinching the skin overlying the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) altered the proportions of on (39.2%), off (42.2%), and neutral (19.6%) cells. To assess the response of RVM cells to specialized craniofacial inputs, adenosine triphosphate (ATP; 0.01-1 mM) was injected into the TMJ and capsaicin (0.1%) was applied to the ocular surface. TMJ and ocular surface stimulation also resulted in a reduced proportion of neutral cells compared with hind paw pinch. Dose-effect analyses revealed that on and off cells encoded the intra-TMJ concentration of ATP. These results suggest that somatotopy plays a significant role in the functional classification of RVM cells and support the notion that neutral cells likely are subgroups of on and off cells. It is suggested that a portion of RVM neurons serve different functions in modulating craniofacial and spinal pain conditions.

  8. AT1 receptor in rostral ventrolateral medulla mediating blunted baroreceptor reflex in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-ya GAO; Feng ZHANG; Ying HAN; Han-jun WANG; Ying ZHANG; Rui GUO; Guo-qing ZHU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the role of AT1 receptor in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in mediating the blunted baroreceptor reflex in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). METHODS: Intravenous injections of graded doses of phenylephrine (1, 5, 10, 20, and 40 μg/kg) increased the blood pressure to elicit the baroreceptor reflex in both SHR and normotensive Wistar rats anesthetized with urethane. The baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) was determined before and after microinjection of Ang Ⅱ, losartan, or AT1 receptor antisense oligodeoxynucleotides into the RVLM. AT1 receptor protein level in the RVLM was measured by Western blotting. RESULTS: The BRS was significantly decreased in SHR compared with normal rats. Bilateral microinjection of AT1 receptor antagonist losartan (250 nmol/h) into the RVLM partly reversed the blunted BRS in SHR, but had no significant effect on the BRS in normal rats. Ang Ⅱ (1.5 nmol/h) significantly inhibited the BRS in normal rats, which was completely abolished by pretreatment with losartan. However, no significant change in the BRS was observed after microinjection of Ang Ⅱ into the RVLM in SHR. Bilateral microinjection of AT1 receptor antisense oligodeoxynucleotides(ASODN) into the RVLM partially recovered the blunted BRS in SHR after 3 h, but no significant change in the BRS was observed in normal rats. The AT1 receptor protein level significantly decreased after administration of ASODN.CONCLUSION: Blockage of AT1 receptor or inhibition of AT1 receptor protein synthesis in the RVLM enhanced the BRS in SHR, suggesting that the enhanced activities of AT1 receptor in the RVLM contribute to the blunted BRS in SHR.

  9. Selective optogenetic activation of rostral ventrolateral medullary catecholaminergic neurons produces cardiorespiratory stimulation in conscious mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Stephen B G; DePuy, Seth D; Nguyen, Thanh; Coates, Melissa B; Stornetta, Ruth L; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2013-02-13

    Activation of rostral ventrolateral medullary catecholaminergic (RVLM-CA) neurons e.g., by hypoxia is thought to increase sympathetic outflow thereby raising blood pressure (BP). Here we test whether these neurons also regulate breathing and cardiovascular variables other than BP. Selective expression of ChR2-mCherry by RVLM-CA neurons was achieved by injecting Cre-dependent vector AAV2-EF1α-DIO-ChR2-mCherry unilaterally into the brainstem of dopamine-β-hydroxylase(Cre/0) mice. Photostimulation of RVLM-CA neurons increased breathing in anesthetized and conscious mice. In conscious mice, photostimulation primarily increased breathing frequency and this effect was fully occluded by hypoxia (10% O(2)). In contrast, the effects of photostimulation were largely unaffected by hypercapnia (3 and 6% CO(2)). The associated cardiovascular effects were complex (slight bradycardia and hypotension) and, using selective autonomic blockers, could be explained by coactivation of the sympathetic and cardiovagal outflows. ChR2-positive RVLM-CA neurons expressed VGLUT2 and their projections were mapped. Their complex cardiorespiratory effects are presumably mediated by their extensive projections to supraspinal sites such as the ventrolateral medulla, the dorsal vagal complex, the dorsolateral pons, and selected hypothalamic nuclei (dorsomedial, lateral, and paraventricular nuclei). In sum, selective optogenetic activation of RVLM-CA neurons in conscious mice revealed two important novel functions of these neurons, namely breathing stimulation and cardiovagal outflow control, effects that are attenuated or absent under anesthesia and are presumably mediated by the numerous supraspinal projections of these neurons. The results also suggest that RVLM-CA neurons may underlie some of the acute respiratory response elicited by carotid body stimulation but contribute little to the central respiratory chemoreflex.

  10. AT1 receptor in rostral ventrolateral medulla mediating blunted baroreceptor reflex in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-yaGAO; FengZHANG; YingHAN; Han-junWANG; YingZHANG; RuiGUO; Guo-qingZHU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the role of AT1 receptor in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in mediating the blunted baroreceptor reflex in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). METHODS: Intravenous injections of graded doses of phenylephrine (1, 5, 10, 20, and 40μg/kg) increased the blood pressure to elicit the baroreceptor reflex in both SHR and normotensive Wistar rats anesthetized with urethane. The baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) was determined before and after microinjection of Ang II, losartan, or AT1 receptor antisense oligodeoxynucleotides into the RVLM. AT1 receptor protein level in the RVLM was measured by Western blotting. RESULTS: The BRS was significantly decreased in SHR compared with normal rats. Bilateral microinjection of AT~ receptor antagonist losartan (250 nmol/h) into the RVLM partly reversed the blunted BRS in SHR, but had no significant effect on the BRS in normal rats. Ang II (1.5 nmol/h) significantly inhibited the BRS in normal rats, which was completely abolished by pretreatment with losartan. However, no significant change in the BRS was observed after microinjection of Ang Ⅱ into the RVLM in SHR. Bilateral microinjection of AT1 receptor antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASODN) into the RVLM partially recovered the blunted BRS in SHR after 3 h, but no significant change in the BRS was observed in normal rats. The AT1 receptor protein level significantly decreased after administration of ASODN. CONCLUSION: Blockage of AT1 receptor or inhibition of AT1 receptor protein synthesis in the RVLM enhanced the BRS in SHR, suggesting that the enhanced activities of AT1 receptor in the RVLM contribute to the blunted BRS in SHR.

  11. Mechanics of the Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus is the distinguishing feature of eukaryotic cells. Until recently, it was often considered simply as a unique compartment containing the genetic information of the cell and associated machinery, without much attention to its structure and mechanical properties. This article provides compelling examples that illustrate how specific nuclear structures are associated with important cellular functions, and how defects in nuclear mechanics can cause a multitude of human diseases. During differentiation, embryonic stem cells modify their nuclear envelope composition and chromatin structure, resulting in stiffer nuclei that reflect decreased transcriptional plasticity. In contrast, neutrophils have evolved characteristic lobulated nuclei that increase their physical plasticity, enabling passage through narrow tissue spaces in their response to inflammation. Research on diverse cell types further demonstrates how induced nuclear deformations during cellular compression or stretch can modulate cellular function. Pathological examples of disturbed nuclear mechanics include the many diseases caused by mutations in the nuclear envelope proteins lamin A/C and associated proteins, as well as cancer cells that are often characterized by abnormal nuclear morphology. In this article, we will focus on determining the functional relationship between nuclear mechanics and cellular (dys-)function, describing the molecular changes associated with physiological and pathological examples, the resulting defects in nuclear mechanics, and the effects on cellular function. New insights into the close relationship between nuclear mechanics and cellular organization and function will yield a better understanding of normal biology and will offer new clues into therapeutic approaches to the various diseases associated with defective nuclear mechanics. PMID:23737203

  12. Neurons of human nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazdanović Maja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Nucleus accumbens is a part of the ventral striatum also known as a drug active brain region, especially related with drug addiction. The aim of the study was to investigate the Golgi morphology of the nucleus accumbens neurons. Methods. The study was performed on the frontal and sagittal sections of 15 human brains by the Golgi Kopsch method. We classified neurons in the human nucleus accumbens according to their morphology and size into four types: type I - fusiform neurons; type II - fusiform neurons with lateral dendrite, arising from a part of the cell body; type III - pyramidal-like neuron; type IV - multipolar neuron. The medium spiny neurons, which are mostly noted regarding to the drug addictive conditions of the brain, correspond to the type IV - multipolar neurons. Results. Two regions of human nucleus accumbens could be clearly recognized on Nissl and Golgi preparations each containing different predominant neuronal types. Central part of nucleus accumbens, core region, has a low density of impregnated neurons with predominant type III, pyramidal-like neurons, with spines on secondary branches and rare type IV, multipolar neurons. Contrary to the core, peripheral region, shell of nucleus, has a high density of impregnated neurons predominantly contained of type I and type IV - multipolar neurons, which all are rich in spines on secondary and tertiary dendritic branches. Conclusion. Our results indicate great morphological variability of human nucleus accumbens neurons. This requires further investigations and clarifying clinical significance of this important brain region.

  13. Target neurons of floccular middle zone inhibition in medial vestibular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y; Kanda, K; Kawasaki, T

    1988-04-19

    Unitary activities of 288 neurons were recorded extracellularly in the medial vestibular nucleus (MV) in anesthetized cats. In 19 neurons, located in the rostral part of the MV adjacent to the stria acustica, floccular middle zone stimulation resulted in cessation of spontaneous discharges. Systematic microstimulation in the brainstem during recording of 16 of 19 target neurons of floccular middle zone inhibition revealed that the target neurons projected to the ipsilateral abducens nucleus (ABN), and not to the contralateral ABN nor the oculomotor nucleus. The conjugate ipsilateral horizontal eye movement elicited by middle zone stimulation may be mediated by this pathway to motoneurons and internuclear neurons in the ipsilateral ABN. In additional experiments, the MV neurons responding antidromically to ipsilateral ABN stimulation and orthodromically to ipsilateral 8 nerve stimulation were recorded extracellularly. In only 7 of 36 recorded neurons, middle zone stimulation depressed the orthodromic and spontaneous activities. Many neurons were free of floccular inhibition. As to the route of floccular inhibitory control over the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during visual-vestibular stimulation, we propose that the interaction of target and VOR relay neurons takes place at the ipsilateral ABN and modulates the VOR, in addition to well known Ito's proposal that the interaction of the floccular output and the VOR takes place at secondary vestibular neurons and modulates the VOR.

  14. Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in rostral ventrolateral medulla contribute to neurogenic hypertension induced by systemic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Kay LH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to systemic inflammation, neuroinflammation in the brain, which enhances sympathetic drive, plays a significant role in cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. Oxidative stress in rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM that augments sympathetic outflow to blood vessels is involved in neural mechanism of hypertension. We investigated whether neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in RVLM contribute to hypertension following chronic systemic inflammation. Methods In normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats, systemic inflammation was induced by infusion of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS into the peritoneal cavity via an osmotic minipump. Systemic arterial pressure and heart rate were measured under conscious conditions by the non-invasive tail-cuff method. The level of the inflammatory markers in plasma or RVLM was analyzed by ELISA. Protein expression was evaluated by Western blot or immunohistochemistry. Tissue level of superoxide anion (O2·- in RVLM was determined using the oxidation-sensitive fluorescent probe dihydroethidium. Pharmacological agents were delivered either via infusion into the cisterna magna with an osmotic minipump or microinjection bilaterally into RVLM. Results Intraperitoneal infusion of LPS (1.2 mg/kg/day for 14 days promoted sustained hypertension and induced a significant increase in plasma level of C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, or interleukin-1β (IL-1β. This LPS-induced systemic inflammation was accompanied by activation of microglia, augmentation of IL-1β, IL-6, or TNF-α protein expression, and O2·- production in RVLM, all of which were blunted by intracisternal infusion of a cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitor, NS398; an inhibitor of microglial activation, minocycline; or a cytokine synthesis inhibitor, pentoxifylline. Neuroinflammation in RVLM was also associated with a COX-2-dependent downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and an

  15. Processing Complex Sounds Passing through the Rostral Brainstem: The New Early Filter Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, John E; Campbell, Tom A

    2016-01-01

    The rostral brainstem receives both "bottom-up" input from the ascending auditory system and "top-down" descending corticofugal connections. Speech information passing through the inferior colliculus of elderly listeners reflects the periodicity envelope of a speech syllable. This information arguably also reflects a composite of temporal-fine-structure (TFS) information from the higher frequency vowel harmonics of that repeated syllable. The amplitude of those higher frequency harmonics, bearing even higher frequency TFS information, correlates positively with the word recognition ability of elderly listeners under reverberatory conditions. Also relevant is that working memory capacity (WMC), which is subject to age-related decline, constrains the processing of sounds at the level of the brainstem. Turning to the effects of a visually presented sensory or memory load on auditory processes, there is a load-dependent reduction of that processing, as manifest in the auditory brainstem responses (ABR) evoked by to-be-ignored clicks. Wave V decreases in amplitude with increases in the visually presented memory load. A visually presented sensory load also produces a load-dependent reduction of a slightly different sort: The sensory load of visually presented information limits the disruptive effects of background sound upon working memory performance. A new early filter model is thus advanced whereby systems within the frontal lobe (affected by sensory or memory load) cholinergically influence top-down corticofugal connections. Those corticofugal connections constrain the processing of complex sounds such as speech at the level of the brainstem. Selective attention thereby limits the distracting effects of background sound entering the higher auditory system via the inferior colliculus. Processing TFS in the brainstem relates to perception of speech under adverse conditions. Attentional selectivity is crucial when the signal heard is degraded or masked: e.g., speech in

  16. Heavy flavors in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardi Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A multi-step setup for heavy-flavor studies in high-energy nucleus-nucleus (AA and proton-nucleus (pA collisions is presented. The propagation of the heavy quarks in the medium is described in a framework provided by the relativistic Langevin equation, here solved using weak-coupling transport coefficients. Successively, the heavy quarks hadronize in the medium. We compute the nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow parameter of the final Dmesons both in AA and in pA collisions and compare our results to experimental data.

  17. Heavy flavors in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Marzia

    2016-11-01

    A multi-step setup for heavy-flavor studies in high-energy nucleus-nucleus (AA) and proton-nucleus (pA) collisions is presented. The propagation of the heavy quarks in the medium is described in a framework provided by the relativistic Langevin equation, here solved using weak-coupling transport coefficients. Successively, the heavy quarks hadronize in the medium. We compute the nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow parameter of the final Dmesons both in AA and in pA collisions and compare our results to experimental data.

  18. A scaling relation between proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Basar, Gokce; Teaney, Derek

    2014-01-01

    It is recently discovered that at high multiplicy, the proton-nucleus ($pA$) collisions give rise to two particle correlations that are strikingly similar to those of nucleus-nucleus ($AA$) collisions at the same multiplicity, although the system size is smaller in $pA$. Using an independent cluster model and a simple conformal scaling argument, where the ratio of the mean free path to the system size stays constant at fixed multiplicity, we argue that flow in $pA$ emerges as a collective res...

  19. The precerebellar linear nucleus in the mouse defined by connections, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, YuHong; Tvrdik, Petr; Makki, Nadja; Palombi, Olivier; Machold, Robert; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2009-05-19

    The linear nucleus (Li) is a prominent cell group in the caudal hindbrain, which was first described in a study of cerebellar afferents in the rat by [Watson, C.R.R., Switzer, R.C. III, 1978. Trigeminal projections to cerebellar tactile areas in the rat origin mainly from N. interpolaris and N. principalis. Neurosci. Lett. 10, 77-82.]. It was named for its elongated appearance in transverse sections. Since this original description in the rat, reference to the nucleus seems to have been largely absent from experimental studies of mammalian precerebellar nuclei. We therefore set out to define the cytoarchitecture, cerebellar connections, and molecular characteristics of Li in the mouse. In coronal Nissl sections at the level of the rostral inferior olive, it consists of two parallel bands of cells joined at their dorsal apex by a further band of cells, making the shape of the Greek capital letter pi. Our three-dimensional reconstruction demonstrated that the nucleus is continuous with the lateral reticular nucleus (LRt) and that the ambiguus nucleus sits inside the arch of Li. Cerebellar horseradish peroxidase injections confirmed that the cells of Li project to cerebellum. We have shown that Li cells express Atoh1 and Wnt1 lineage markers that are known to label the rhombic lip derived precerebellar nuclei. We have examined the relationship of Li cells to a number of molecular markers, and have found that many of the cells express a nonphosphorylated epitope in neurofilament H (SMI 32), a feature they share with the LRt. The mouse Li therefore appears to be a rostrodorsal extension of the LRt.

  20. Chronic Morphine Reduces Surface Expression of δ-Opioid Receptors in Subregions of Rostral Striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah, Paul M; Heath, Emily M L; Balleine, Bernard W; Christie, Macdonald J

    2016-03-01

    The delta opioid receptor (DOPr), whilst not the primary target of clinically used opioids, is involved in development of opioid tolerance and addiction. There is growing evidence that DOPr trafficking is involved in drug addiction, e.g., a range of studies have shown increased plasma membrane DOPr insertion during chronic treatment with opioids. The present study used a transgenic mouse model in which the C-terminal of the DOPr is tagged with enhanced-green fluorescence protein to examine the effects of chronic morphine treatment on surface membrane expression in striatal cholinergic interneurons that are implicated in motivated learning following both chronic morphine and morphine sensitization treatment schedules in male mice. A sex difference was noted throughout the anterior striatum, which was most prominent in the nucleus accumbens core region. Incontrast with previous studies in other neurons, chronic exposure to a high dose of morphine for 6 days had no effect, or slightly decreased (anterior dorsolateral striatum) surface DOPr expression. A morphine sensitization schedule produced similar results with a significant decrease in surface DOPr expression in nucleus accumbens shell. These results suggest that chronic morphine and morphine sensitisation treatment may have effects on instrumental reward-seeking behaviours and learning processes related to drug addiction, via effects on striatal DOPr function.

  1. Electrolytic lesion of the nucleus raphe magnus reduced the antinociceptive effects of bilateral morphine microinjected into the nucleus cuneiformis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghparast, Abbas; Ordikhani-Seyedlar, Mehdi; Ziaei, Maryam

    2008-06-27

    Several lines of investigation show that the rostral ventromedial medulla is a critical relay for midbrain regions, including the nucleus cuneiformis (CnF), which control nociception at the spinal cord. There is some evidence that local stimulation or morphine administration into the CnF produces the effective analgesia through the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM). The present study tries to determine the effect of morphine-induced analgesia following microinjection into the CnF in the absence of NRM. Seven days after the cannulae implantation, morphine was microinjected bilaterally into the CnF at the doses of 0.25, 1, 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 microg/0.3 microl saline per side. The morphine-induced antinociceptive effect measured by tail-flick test at 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after microinjection. The results showed that bilateral microinjection of morphine into the CnF dose-dependently causes increase in tail-flick latency (TFL). The 50% effective dose of morphine was determined and microinjected into the CnF (2.5 microg/0.3 microl saline per side) in rats after NRM electrolytic lesion (1 mA, 30 s). Lesion of the NRM significantly decreased TFLs, 30 (Peffects through the opioid receptors in the CnF. It is also appeared that morphine-induced antinociception decreases following the NRM lesion but it seems that there are some other descending pain modulatory pathways that activate in the absence of NRM.

  2. Charged pion anisotropy in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poitou, J.; L' Hote, D.; Cavata, C.; Babinet, R.; Demoulins, M.; Fanet, H.; Gosset, J.; Lemaire, M.C.; Le Merdy, A.; Lucas, B.; Terrien, Y.; Valette, O. (CEN Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Alard, J.P.; Augerat, J.; Bastid, N.; Charmensat, P.; Dupieux, P.; Fraysse, L.; Marroncle, J.; Montarou, G.; Parizet, M.J.; Rahmani, A. (LPC Clermont-Ferrand, 63 - Aubiere (France)); Brochard, F.; Gorodetzky, P.; Racca, C. (CRN, 67 - Strasbourg (France))

    1992-01-27

    The momentum distributions with respect to the reaction plane for charged pions emitted in Ne-nucleus and Ar-nucleus collisions have been measured with the 4{pi} detector Diogene at the Saturne synchrotron. The reaction plane is estimated from the baryon momenta, using a standard technique for flow analysis. The pions exhibit a non-zero flow. For asymmetric systems, there is a preferential emission in the direction of the lighter (projectile) nucleus. Such a behaviour contradicts the predictions of INC calculations and is underestimated by QMD calculations which include mean field effects. It can be interpreted with a simple geometrical model in terms of absorption by the spectator nuclear matter. (orig.).

  3. Quasielastic K-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Pace, A D; Oset, E

    1997-01-01

    Quasielastic K^+ - nucleus scattering data at q=290, 390 and 480 MeV/c are analyzed in a finite nucleus continuum random phase approximation framework, using a density-dependent particle-hole interaction. The reaction mechanism is consistently treated according to Glauber theory, keeping up to two-step inelastic processes. A good description of the data is achieved, also providing a useful constraint on the strength of the effective particle-hole interaction in the scalar-isoscalar channel at intermediate momentum transfers. We find no evidence for the increase in the effective number of nucleons participating in the reaction which has been reported in the literature.

  4. Projections of the cochlear nuclei and nucleus laminaris to the inferior colliculus of the barn owl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T T; Konishi, M

    1988-08-08

    The barn owl determines the directions from which sounds emanate by computing the interaural differences in the timing and intensity of sounds. These cues for sound localization are processed in independent channels originating at nucleus magnocellularis (NM) and nucleus angularis (NA), the cochlear nuclei. The cells of NM are specialized for encoding the phase of sounds in the ipsilateral ear. The cells of NA are specialized for encoding the intensity of sounds in the ipsilateral ear. NM projects solely, bilaterally, and tonotopically to nucleus laminaris (NL). NL and NA project to largely nonoverlapping zones in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICc), thus forming hodological subdivisions in which time and intensity information may be processed. The terminal field of NL occupies a discrete zone in the rostromedial portion of the contralateral ICc, which we have termed the "core" of ICc. The terminal field of NA surrounds the core of ICc and thus forms a "shell" around it. The projection from NL to the core conserves tonotopy. Low-frequency regions of NL project to the dorsal portions of the core whereas higher-frequency regions project to more ventral portions. This innervation pattern is consistent with earlier physiological studies of tonotopy. Physiological studies have also suggested that NL and the core of ICs contain a representation of the location of a sound source along the horizontal axis. Our data suggest that the projection from NL to the core preserves spatiotopy. Thus, the dorsal portion of NL on the left, which contains a representation of eccentric loci in the right hemifield, innervates the area of the right ICc core that represents eccentric right loci. The more ventral portion of the left NL, which represents loci close to the vertical meridian, innervates the more rostral portions of the right core, which also represents loci near the vertical meridian.

  5. Distributive characteristics of projection from vestibular nuclei to nucleus raphe magnus in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingyu Sun; Yulin Dong; Fuxing Zhang; Jianhua Qiu; Yunqing Li

    2007-01-01

    excluded due to the deviation of injected site, and the other 9 were involved in the final analysis of results. The concentrated region of TMR injection wasmainly restricted to nucleus raphes magnus, and diffused to the surrounding area to different extents. There were obvious differences in the distributions of the labeled neurons among the subdivisions in vestibular nuclei, as well as the distributions of the labeled neurons at different sites in the same subdivision. The majority of the labeled neurons distributed in the rostral levels of medial vestibular nucleus and the lateral vestibular nucleus, while fewer labeled neurons were observed in superior vestibular nucleus. CONCLUSION: ①There might be bi-directional association between vestibular nucli and nucleus raphe magnus, suggesting that nucleus raphe magnus played a role in the transmission and processing of vestibular information.②The projection from nucleus raphe magnus to vestibular nucleus has certain distributive characteristics in the region.

  6. Heavy-ion nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, M A; Haque, S

    2003-01-01

    Heavy ion-nucleus scattering is an excellent laboratory to probe high spin phenomena, exotic nuclei and for the analysis of various exit channels. The Strong Absorption Model or the generalized diffraction models, which are semi-classical in nature, have been employed in the description of various heavy ion-nucleus scattering phenomena with reasonable success. But one needs to treat the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically in the Wave Mechanical picture for the appropriate description of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering phenomena. We have brought the mathematics for the cross-section of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering to an analytic expression taking account of the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically. sup 9 Be, sup 1 sup 6 O, sup 2 sup 0 Ne and sup 3 sup 2 S heavy-ion beams elastic scattering from sup 2 sup 8 Si, sup 2 sup 4 Mg and sup 4 sup 0 Ca target nuclei at various projectile energies over the range 20-151 MeV have been analysed in terms of the 2-paramet...

  7. Computational modeling of pedunculopontine nucleus deep brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitella, Laura M.; Mohsenian, Kevin; Pahwa, Mrinal; Gloeckner, Cory; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) near the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been posited to improve medication-intractable gait and balance problems in patients with Parkinson's disease. However, clinical studies evaluating this DBS target have not demonstrated consistent therapeutic effects, with several studies reporting the emergence of paresthesia and oculomotor side effects. The spatial and pathway-specific extent to which brainstem regions are modulated during PPN-DBS is not well understood. Approach. Here, we describe two computational models that estimate the direct effects of DBS in the PPN region for human and translational non-human primate (NHP) studies. The three-dimensional models were constructed from segmented histological images from each species, multi-compartment neuron models and inhomogeneous finite element models of the voltage distribution in the brainstem during DBS. Main Results. The computational models predicted that: (1) the majority of PPN neurons are activated with -3 V monopolar cathodic stimulation; (2) surgical targeting errors of as little as 1 mm in both species decrement activation selectivity; (3) specifically, monopolar stimulation in caudal, medial, or anterior PPN activates a significant proportion of the superior cerebellar peduncle (up to 60% in the human model and 90% in the NHP model at -3 V) (4) monopolar stimulation in rostral, lateral or anterior PPN activates a large percentage of medial lemniscus fibers (up to 33% in the human model and 40% in the NHP model at -3 V) and (5) the current clinical cylindrical electrode design is suboptimal for isolating the modulatory effects to PPN neurons. Significance. We show that a DBS lead design with radially-segmented electrodes may yield improved functional outcome for PPN-DBS.

  8. Tritiated-nicotine- and /sup 125/I-alpha-bungarotoxin-labeled nicotinic receptors in the interpeduncular nucleus of rats. II. Effects of habenular destruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, P.B.; Hamill, G.S.; Nadi, N.S.; Jacobowitz, D.M.; Pert, A.

    1986-09-15

    The cholinergic innervation of the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN) is wholly extrinsic and is greatly attenuated by bilateral habenular destruction. We describe changes in the labeling of putative nicotinic receptors within this nucleus at 3, 5, or 11 days after bilateral habenular lesions. Adjacent tissue sections of the rat IPN were utilized for /sup 3/H-nicotine and /sup 125/I-alpha-bungarotoxin (/sup 125/I-BTX) receptor autoradiography. Compared to sham-operated controls, habenular destruction significantly reduced autoradiographic /sup 3/H-nicotine labeling in rostral (-25%), intermediate (-13%), and lateral subnuclei (-36%). Labeling in the central subnucleus was unchanged. Loss of labeling was maximal at the shortest survival time (3 days) and did not change thereafter. In order to establish whether this loss was due to a reduction in the number or the affinity of /sup 3/H-nicotine-binding sites, a membrane assay was performed on microdissected IPN tissue from rats that had received surgery 3 days previously. Bilateral habenular lesions produced a 35% reduction of high-affinity /sup 3/H-nicotine-binding sites, with no change in binding affinity. Bilateral habenular lesions reduced /sup 125/I-BTX labeling in the intermediate subnuclei, and a slight increase occurred in the rostral subnucleus. In the lateral subnuclei, /sup 125/I-BTX labeling was significantly reduced (27%) at 3 days but not at later survival times. In view of the known synaptic morphology of the habenulointerpeduncular tract, it is concluded that a subpopulation of /sup 3/H-nicotine binding sites within the IPN is located on afferent axons and/or terminals. This subpopulation, located within rostral, intermediate, and lateral subnuclei, may correspond to presynaptic nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Sites that bind /sup 125/I-BTX may include a presynaptic subpopulation located in the lateral and possibly the intermediate subnuclei.

  9. Effects of metabolites of the analgesic agent dipyrone (metamizol) on rostral ventromedial medulla cell activity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maione, Sabatino; Radanova, Lilyana; De Gregorio, Danilo; Luongo, Livio; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Imming, Peter

    2015-02-05

    The molecular mechanism of action of dipyrone, a widely used antipyretic and non-opioid analgesic drug, is still not fully understood. Actions upon peripheral inflamed tissues as well as the central nervous system, especially upon the PAG-RVM axis, have been suggested. Dipyrone is a prodrug and its activity is due to its immediate conversion to its active metabolites. We tested the effect of two recently discovered metabolites of dipyrone, the arachidonoyl amides of 4-methylaminoantipyrine and 4-aminoantipyrine, on the neurons of the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM), which are part of the descending pathway of antinociception. These compounds reduced the activity of ON-cells and increased the activity of OFF-cells. Both CB1 and TRPV1 blockade reversed these effects, suggesting that the endocannabinoid/endovanilloid system takes part in the analgesic effects of dipyrone. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. The coelacanth rostral organ is a unique low-resolution electro-detector that facilitates the feeding strike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berquist, Rachel M; Galinsky, Vitaly L; Kajiura, Stephen M; Frank, Lawrence R

    2015-03-11

    The cartilaginous and non-neopterygian bony fishes have an electric sense typically comprised of hundreds or thousands of sensory canals distributed in broad clusters over the head. This morphology facilitates neural encoding of local electric field intensity, orientation, and polarity, used for determining the position of nearby prey. The coelacanth rostral organ electric sense, however, is unique in having only three paired sensory canals with distribution restricted to the dorsal snout, raising questions about its function. To address this, we employed magnetic resonance imaging methods to map electrosensory canal morphology in the extant coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae, and a simple dipole 'rabbit ears' antennae model with toroidal gain function to approximate their directional sensitivity. This identified a unique focal region of electrosensitivity directly in front of the mouth, and is the first evidence of a low-resolution electro-detector that solely facilitates prey ingestion.

  11. Functional connectivity of the human rostral and caudal cingulate motor areas in the brain resting state at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habas, Christophe [CHNO des Quinze-Vingts, UPMC Paris 6, Service de NeuroImagerie, Paris (France)

    2010-01-15

    Three cingulate motor areas have been described in monkeys, the rostral, dorsal, and ventral cingulate motor areas, and would control limbic-related motor activity. However, little anatomical data are available in human about the functional networks these cingulate areas underlie. Therefore, networks anchored in the rostral and caudal cingulate motor areas (rCMA and cCMA, respectively) were studied in human using functional connectivity during the brain resting state. Since the rCMA and cCMA are located just under the pre-supplementary and supplementary motor areas (pre-SMA and SMA), the pre-SMA- and SMA-centered networks were also studied to ensure that these four circuits were correctly dissociated. Data from 14 right-handed healthy volunteers were acquired at rest and analyzed by region of interest (ROI)-based functional connectivity. The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations of separate ROIs located in rCMA, cCMA, pre-SMA, and SMA were successively used to identify significant temporal correlations with BOLD signal fluctuations of other brain regions. Low-frequency BOLD signal of the CMA was correlated with signal fluctuations in the prefrontal, cingulate, insular, premotor, motor, medial and inferior parietal cortices, putamen and thalamus, and anticorrelated with the default-mode network. rCMA was more in relation with prefrontal, orbitofrontal, and language-associated cortices than cCMA more related to sensory cortex. These cingulate networks were very similar to the pre-SMA- and SMA-centered networks, although pre-SMA and SMA showed stronger correlation with the prefrontal and inferior parietal cortices and with the cerebellum and the superior parietal cortex, respectively. The human cingulate motor areas constitute an interface between sensorimotor, limbic and executive systems, sharing common cortical, striatal, and thalamic relays with the overlying premotor medial areas. (orig.)

  12. Different cardiovascular neuron groups in the ventral reticular formation of the rostral medulla in rabbits: single neurone studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, E; Ootsuka, Y; Terui, N

    2000-03-15

    To examine whether the cardiovascular neurons of the ventral medulla consist of functionally different kinds of neurons, single neuronal activity of the ventral medulla, activity of the renal sympathetic nerves (RSNA), blood flow of the ear (EarBF) and arterial pressure (AP) were recorded in urethane-anesthetized, vagotomized and immobilized rabbits during electrical stimulation of the aortic nerve (AN, baroreceptor afferent fibers) and electrical stimulation of the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) that reduced EarBF but less affected on AP and RSNA. The dorsolateral funiculus of the second cervical cord was stimulated to evoke antidromic spikes of medullary neurons. Two kinds of reticulo-spinal neurons were identified. Activities of one kind of neurons were facilitated by stimulation of DMH (latency 48.6+/-27.6 ms, n=11) but they did not respond to stimulation of the AN. Therefore, it was presumed that these neurons controlled vasomotion of the ear through the vasoconstrictor neurons in the spinal cord but did not participate in regulation of systemic AP. Activities of the other neurons were inhibited by stimulation of the AN (latency 47.8+/-8 4 ms, n=16) but they did not respond to the DMH stimulation. These neurons were identical to those reported previously as the RVLM neurons, and they contributed to regulate systemic AP but might not participate in control of cutaneous vascular movement. The former neurons were located medially to the latter in the reticular formation of the rostral ventral medulla. These results provided evidence at the single neuronal level that the cardiovascular neurons in the ventral medulla were consisted of functionally different sympatho-excitatory neurons and they were located at the different sites in the rostral ventral medulla.

  13. Leptin signaling in the nucleus tractus solitarii increases sympathetic nerve activity to the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Allyn L; Agassandian, Khristofor; Morgan, Donald A; Liu, Xuebo; Cassell, Martin D; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2009-02-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus was initially regarded as the principal site of leptin action, but there is increasing evidence for functional leptin receptors in extrahypothalamic sites, including the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). We demonstrated previously that arcuate injection of leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to brown adipose tissue and kidney. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that leptin signaling in the NTS affects sympathetic neural outflow. Using a stereotaxic device in anesthetized rats, we microinjected leptin (0.25 to 1.00 microg) or saline into the NTS while recording SNA to kidney and brown adipose tissue. Microinjection of leptin into the commissural and medial subnuclei of the caudal NTS at the level of the area postrema in Sprague-Dawley rats produced a dose-related increase in renal SNA (+112+/-15% with leptin 1 microg; n=7; Pleptin receptors, because it was not observed in Zucker obese rats that have a missense mutation in the leptin receptor. Rostral NTS injection of leptin failed to increase SNA, indicating that leptin signaling in the NTS is probably confined to the caudal NTS at the level of the area postrema. In summary, this study demonstrates that leptin signaling in the caudal NTS increases SNA to the kidney but not to the brown adipose tissue. The study strengthens the concept of a distributed brain network of leptin action and demonstrates that these distributed brain sites can mediate contrasting sympathetic responses to leptin.

  14. Dimuon enhancement in nucleus-nucleus ultrarelativistic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordalo, Paula; Abreu, M.C.; Alessandro, B.; Alexa, C.; Arnaldi, R.; Astruc, J.; Atayan, M.; Baglin, C.; Baldit, A.; Bedjidian, M.; Bellaiche, F.; Beole, S.; Bohrani, A.; Boldea, V.; Bussiere, A.; Capelli, L.; Caponi, V.; Casagrande, L.; Castor, J.; Chambon, T.; Chaurand, B.; Chevrot, I.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalo, C.; Comets, M.P.; Constans, N.; Constantinescu, S.; Contardo, D.; Cruz, J.; De Falco, A.; De Marco, N.; Dellacasa, G.; Devaux, A.; Dita, S.; Drapier, O.; Ducroux, L.; Espagnon, B.; Fargeix, J.; Ferreira, R.; Filippov, S.N.; Fleuret, F.; Force, P.; Gallio, M.; Gavrilov, Y.K.; Gerschel, C.; Giubellino, P.; Golubeva, M.B.; Gonin, M.; Gorodetzky, P.; Grigorian, A.A.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Guber, F.F.; Guichard, A.; Gulkanyan, H.; Hakobyan, R.; Haroutunian, R.; Idzik, M.; Jouan, D.; Karavitcheva, T.L.; Kluberg, L.; Kossakowski, R.; Kurepin, A.B.; Landau, G.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lourenco, C.; Luquin, L.; Macciotta, P.; Mac Cormick, M.; Mandry, R.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Monteno, M.; Mourgues, S.; Musso, A.; Ohlsson-Malek, F.; Petiau, P.; Piccotti, A.; Pizzi, J.R.; Prado da Silva, W.L.; Puddu, G.; Quintans, C.; Racca, C.; Ramello, L.; Ramos, S.; Rato-Mendes, P.; Riccati, L.; Romana, A.; Ropotar, I.; Saturnini, P.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Shahoyan, R.; Silva, S.; Sitta, M.; Soave, C.; Sonderegger, P.; Tarrago, X.; Topilskaya, N.S.; Usai, G.L.; Varela, J.; Vercellin, E.; Villatte, L

    1999-12-27

    The study of muon pairs in the mass region 1.5 < M{sub {mu}}{sub {mu}} < 2.5 GeV/c{sup 2} in 450 GeV/c p-A, 200 GeV/nucleon S-U and 158 GeV/nucleon Pb-Pb collisions is presented. In p-A interactions, the dimuon signal mass spectra are well described by a superposition of Drell-Yan and charmed meson semi-leptonic decay contributions, in agreement with previous experiments when considering a linear A dependence. In nucleus-nucleus reactions, taking only into account these two physical ingredients, a dimuon enhancement both with increasing A{center_dot}B and centrality is observed.

  15. Azimuthal correlation and collective behavior in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mali, P.; Mukhopadhyay, A., E-mail: amitabha-62@rediffmail.com; Sarkar, S. [University of North Bengal, Department of Physics (India); Singh, G. [SUNY at Fredonia, Department of Computer and Information Science (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Various flow effects of nuclear and hadronic origin are investigated in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Nuclear emulsion data collected from {sup 84}Kr + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 1.52 GeV per nucleon and from {sup 28}Si + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 14.5 GeV per nucleon are used in the investigation. The transverse momentum distribution and the flow angle analysis show that collective behavior, like a bounce-off effect of the projectile spectators and a sidesplash effect of the target spectators, are present in our event samples. From an azimuthal angle analysis of the data we also see a direct flow of the projectile fragments and of the produced charged particles. On the other hand, for both data samples the target fragments exhibit a reverse flow, while the projectile fragments exhibit an elliptic flow. Relevant flow parameters are measured.

  16. Transverse Energy in nucleus-nucleus collisions: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tincknell, M.

    1988-11-15

    The status of Transverse Energy (E/sub T/) in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS is reviewed. The definition of E/sub T/ and its physical significance are discussed. The basic techniques and limitations of the experimental measurements are presented. The acceptances of the major experiments to be discussed are shown, along with remarks about their idiosyncrasies. The data demonstrate that the nuclear geometry of colliding spheres primarily determines the shapes of the observed spectra. Careful account of the acceptances is crucial to comparing and interpreting results. It is concluded that nuclear stopping power is high, and that the amount of energy deposited into the interaction volume is increasing with beam energy even at SPS energies. The energy densities believed to be obtained at the SPS are close to the critical values predicted for the onset of a quark-gluon plasma. 25 refs., 8 figs.

  17. May Functional Imaging be Helpful for Behavioral Assessment in Children? Regions of Motor and Associative Cortico-Subcortical Circuits Can be Differentiated by Laterality and Rostrality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    August, Julia M; Rothenberger, Aribert; Baudewig, Juergen; Roessner, Veit; Dechent, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cortico-subcortical circuits are organized into the sensorimotor, associative, and limbic loop. These neuronal preconditions play an important role regarding the understanding and treatment of behavioral problems in children. Differencing evidence argues for a lateralized organization of the sensorimotor loop and a bilateral (i.e., non-lateralized) organization of the associative loop. However, a firm behavioral-neurobiological distinction of these circuits has been difficult, specifically in children. Thus, the aim was a comprehensive functional visualization and differentiation of the sensorimotor and the associative circuit during childhood. As a new approach, laterality and rostrality features were used to distinguish between the two circuits within one single motor task. Twenty-four healthy boys performed self-paced index finger tapping with each hand separately during functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla. A contrast analysis for left against right hand movement revealed lateralized activation in typical sensorimotor regions such as primary sensorimotor cortex, caudal supplementary motor area (SMA), caudal putamen, and thalamus. A conjunction analysis confirmed bilateral involvement of known associative regions including pre-SMA, rostral SMA, and rostral putamen. A functional visualization of two distinct corticostriatal circuits is provided in childhood. Both the sensorimotor and associative circuit may be discriminated by their laterality characteristics already in minors. Additionally, the results support the concept of a modified functional subdivision of the SMA in a rostral (associative) and caudal (motor) part. A further development of this approach might help to nurture behavioral assessment and neurofeedback training in child mental health.

  18. Remedial action and feedback processing in a time-estimation task: Evidence for a role of the rostral cingulate zone in behavioral adjustments without learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, F.M. van der; Röder, C.H.; Mies, G.W.; Lugt, A. van der; Smits, M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the role of the rostral cingulate zone (RCZ) in feedback processing, and especially focused on effects of modality of the feedback stimulus and remedial action. Participants performed a time-estimation task in which they had to estimate a 1-second interval. After the estim

  19. Spatial segregation within the sacral parasympathetic nucleus of neurons innervating the bladder or the penis of the rat as revealed by three-dimensional reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banrezes, B; Andrey, P; Maschino, E; Schirar, A; Peytevin, J; Rampin, O; Maurin, Y

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigations was (1) to examine the spatial organization of preganglionic neurons of the sacral parasympathetic nucleus in the lumbosacral spinal cord of male adult rats and (2) to search, in this nucleus, for a possible segregation of sub-populations of neurons innervating the penis or the bladder, respectively. To estimate their spatial organization, neurons of the sacral parasympathetic nucleus were retrogradely labeled by wheat germ agglutinin coupled to horseradish peroxidase applied to the central end of the sectioned pelvic nerve. The sub-populations of lumbosacral neurons innervating the corpus cavernosum of the penis or the dome of the bladder were identified using transsynaptic retrograde labeling by pseudorabies virus injected into these organs in different rats. In both wheat germ agglutinin-labeled and pseudorabies virus-labeled rats, serial coronal sections were cut through the spinal L5-S1 segments. Labeled neurons were revealed by histochemistry (peroxidase experiments) or immunohistochemistry (pseudorabies virus experiments). By means of a three-dimensional reconstruction software developed in our laboratory, three-dimensional models were calculated from each spinal section image series. They revealed the spatial organization of (i) preganglionic neurons and (ii) neurons innervating the bladder or the penis. The different three-dimensional models were subsequently merged into a single one which revealed the segregation, within the sacral parasympathetic nucleus, of the sub-populations of neurons. Neurons labeled by virus injected into the penis extended predominantly from the rostral part of the L6 segment to the rostral part of the S1 segment while those labeled by bladder injections were distributed predominantly from the caudal part of the L6 segment to the caudal part of the S1 segment. These results support the hypothesis of a viscerotopic organization of sacral neurons providing the spinal control of pelvic organs.

  20. Genetic identity of thermosensory relay neurons in the lateral parabrachial nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerling, Joel C; Kim, Minjee; Mahoney, Carrie E; Abbott, Stephen B G; Agostinelli, Lindsay J; Garfield, Alastair S; Krashes, Michael J; Lowell, Bradford B; Scammell, Thomas E

    2016-01-01

    The parabrachial nucleus is important for thermoregulation because it relays skin temperature information from the spinal cord to the hypothalamus. Prior work in rats localized thermosensory relay neurons to its lateral subdivision (LPB), but the genetic and neurochemical identity of these neurons remains unknown. To determine the identity of LPB thermosensory neurons, we exposed mice to a warm (36°C) or cool (4°C) ambient temperature. Each condition activated neurons in distinct LPB subregions that receive input from the spinal cord. Most c-Fos+ neurons in these LPB subregions expressed the transcription factor marker FoxP2. Consistent with prior evidence that LPB thermosensory relay neurons are glutamatergic, all FoxP2+ neurons in these subregions colocalized with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in reporter mice for Vglut2, but not for Vgat. Prodynorphin (Pdyn)-expressing neurons were identified using a GFP reporter mouse and formed a caudal subset of LPB FoxP2+ neurons, primarily in the dorsal lateral subnucleus (PBdL). Warm exposure activated many FoxP2+ neurons within PBdL. Half of the c-Fos+ neurons in PBdL were Pdyn+, and most of these project into the preoptic area. Cool exposure activated a separate FoxP2+ cluster of neurons in the far-rostral LPB, which we named the rostral-to-external lateral subnucleus (PBreL). These findings improve our understanding of LPB organization and reveal that Pdyn-IRES-Cre mice provide genetic access to warm-activated, FoxP2+ glutamatergic neurons in PBdL, many of which project to the hypothalamus.

  1. Role of the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group in coughing and swallowing in guinea pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Keisuke; Mukudai, Shigeyuki; Umezaki, Toshiro; Sakaguchi, Hirofumi; Hisa, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    The retrotrapezoid/parafacial respiratory group (RTN/pFRG) located ventral to the facial nucleus plays a key role in regulating breathing, especially enhanced expiratory activity during hypercapnic conditions. To clarify the roles of the RTN/pFRG region in evoking coughing, during which reflexive enhanced expiration is produced, and in swallowing, during which the expiratory activity is consistently halted, we recorded extracellular activity from RTN/pFRG neurons during these fictive behaviors in decerebrate, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated guinea pigs. The activity of the majority of recorded respiratory neurons was changed in synchrony with coughing and swallowing. To further evaluate the contribution of RTN/pFRG neurons to these nonrespiratory behaviors, the motor output patterns during breathing, coughing, and swallowing were compared before and after brain stem transection at the caudal margin of RTN/pFRG region. In addition, the effects of transection at its rostral margin were also investigated to evaluate pontine contribution to these behaviors. During respiration, transection at the rostral margin attenuated the postinspiratory activity of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Meanwhile, the late expiratory activity of the abdominal nerve was abolished after caudal transection. The caudal transection also decreased the amplitude of the coughing-related abdominal nerve discharge but did not abolish the activity. Swallowing could be elicited even after the caudal end transection. These findings raise the prospect that the RTN/pFRG contributes to expiratory regulation during normal respiration, although this region is not an essential element of the neuronal networks involved in coughing and swallowing. PMID:26203106

  2. Atom as a "Dressed" Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Kalitvianski, V

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that electrostatic potential of atomic nucleus seen by a fast charged projectile at short distances is quite smeared due to nucleus motion around the atomic center of inertia. For example, the size of positive charge cloud in the Hydrogen ground state is much larger than the proper proton size. It is even bigger for the target atom in an excited state. Therefore the elastic scattering at large angles is generally weaker than the Rutherford one. In other words, the resulting elastic interaction with an atom at short distances is softer than the Colombian one due to a natural cutoff. In addition, the large angle scattering leads to the target atom excitations due to hitting the nucleus (inelastic processes). It is also shown that the Rutherford cross section is in fact the inclusive rather than the elastic one. These results are analogous to the QED ones. The difference and the value of the presented below non relativistic atomic calculations is in non perturbatively (exact) dressing that immediatel...

  3. Classifiers for centrality determination in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Altsybeev, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Centrality, as a geometrical property of the collision, is crucial for the physical interpretation of nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus experimental data. However, it cannot be directly accessed in event-by-event data analysis. Common methods for centrality estimation in A-A and p-A collisions usually rely on a single detector (either on the signal in zero-degree calorimeters or on the multiplicity in some semi-central rapidity range). In the present work, we made an attempt to develop an approach for centrality determination that is based on machine-learning techniques and utilizes information from several detector subsystems simultaneously. Different event classifiers are suggested and evaluated for their selectivity power in terms of the number of nucleons-participants and the impact parameter of the collision. Finer centrality resolution may allow to reduce impact from so-called volume fluctuations on physical observables being studied in heavy-ion experiments like ALICE at the LHC and fixed target exper...

  4. The anterior olfactory nucleus and piriform cortex of the echidna and platypus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Phillips, Jennifer M

    2006-01-01

    The cyto- and chemoarchitecture of the anterior olfactory nucleus and piriform cortex of the short-beaked echidna and platypus were studied to determine: (1) if these areas contain chemically distinct subdivisions, and (2) if the chemoarchitecture of those cortical olfactory regions differs from therians. Nissl and myelin staining were applied in conjunction with enzyme reactivity for NADPH diaphorase and acetylcholinesterase, and immunoreactivity for calcium-binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin) and tyrosine hydroxylase. Golgi impregnations were also available for the echidna. In the echidna, the anterior olfactory nucleus is negligible in extent and merges at very rostral levels with a four-layered piriform cortex. Several rostrocaudally running subregions of the echidna piriform lobe could be identified on the basis of Nissl staining and calcium-binding protein immunoreactivity. Laminar-specific differences in calcium-binding protein immunoreactivity and NADPH-d-reactive neuron distribution were also noted. Neuron types identified in echidna piriform cortex included pyramidal neurons predominating in layers II and III and non-pyramidal neurons (e.g., multipolar profusely spiny and neurogliaform cells) in deeper layers. Horizontal cells were identified in both superficial and deep layers. By contrast, the platypus had a distinct anterior olfactory nucleus and a three-layered piriform cortex with no evidence of chemically distinct subregions within the piriform cortex. Volume of the paleocortex of the echidna was comparable to prosimians of similar body weight and, in absolute volume, exceeded that for eutherian insectivores such as T. ecaudatus and E. europaeus. The piriform cortex of the echidna shows evidence of regional differentiation, which in turn suggests highly specialized olfactory function.

  5. Pion production and absorption in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senger, P. [GSI Planckstr.1, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1993-12-31

    In a relativistic nucleus-nucleus collision the projectile kinetic energy is not only converted into thermal and compressional energy of the nucleonic system, but also into internal excitation energy of the nucleons. At bombarding energies around 1 GeV/nucleon a substantial amount of baryonic resonances is produced which decay predominantly into pions. Thus the pion multiplicity, momentum and angular distributions provide information on the space time dynamics of the nuclear reaction system. In this paper the authors report on experiments which try to measure the `primordial` delta or pion abundancy. The idea is to compare the pion yields measured in a heavy and a light system: in the first case pion final-state interactions should happen much more frequently than in the second case. Both inclusive pion cross sections and pion multiplicities per participant nucleon are measured. In addition the authors study the pion emission pattern with respect to the reaction plane to sort out pions which are less affected by absorption and rescattering even in a heavy collision system.

  6. Relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions and the QCD phase diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Stock, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    A steep maximum occurs in the Wroblewski ratio between strange and non-strange quarks created in central nucleus-nucleus collisions, of about A=200, at the lower SPS energy square root s approximately= 7 GeV. By analyzing hadronic multiplicities within the grand canonical statistical hadronization model this maximum is shown to occur at a baryochemical potential of about 450 MeV. In comparison, recent QCD lattice calculations at finite baryochemical potential suggest a steep maximum of the light quark susceptibility, to occur at similar mu /sub B/, indicative of "critical fluctuation" expected to occur at or near the QCD critical endpoint. This endpoint had not been firmly pinned down but should occur in the 300 MeV < mu /sub B//sup c/ < 700 MeV interval. It is argued that central collisions within the low SPS energy range should exhibit a turning point between compression /heating, and expansion/cooling at energy density, temperature and mu /sub B/ close to the suspected critical point. Whereas from to...

  7. Resonances in -light nucleus systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Khemchandani; N G Kelkar; M Nowakowski; B K Jain

    2006-04-01

    We locate resonances in -light nucleus elastic scattering using the time delay method. We solve few-body equations within the finite rank approximation in order to calculate the -matrices and hence the time delay for the - 3He and - 4He systems. We find a resonance very close to the threshold in - 3 He elastic scattering, at about 0.5 MeV above threshold with a width of ∼ 2 MeV. The calculations also hint at the presence of sub-threshold states in both the cases.

  8. Turbulent mixing condensation nucleus counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavliev, Rashid

    The construction and operating principles of the Turbulent Mixing Condensation Nucleus Counter (TM CNC) are described. Estimations based on the semiempirical theory of turbulent jets and the classical theory of nucleation and growth show the possibility of detecting particles as small as 2.5 nm without the interference of homogeneous nucleation. This conclusion was confirmed experimentally during the International Workshop on Intercomparison of Condensation Nuclei and Aerosol Particle Counters (Vienna, Austria). Number concentration, measured by the Turbulent Mixing CNC and other participating instruments, is found to be essentially equal.

  9. Neuroprotective role of heat shock protein 70 in the rostral ventrolateral medulla during acute mevinphos intoxication in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi; Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Samuel H H

    2004-01-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP) is a family of highly conserved proteins that respond to stress and participate actively in cytoprotection. Within the HSP family, HSP70 is the major inducible member that confers protection against cell death. This study investigated whether HSP70 plays a neuroprotective role at the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the origin of sympathetic neurogenic vasomotor tone in the medulla oblongata where the organophosphate insecticide mevinphos (Mev) acts to elicit cardiovascular toxicity. Experiments were carried out in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats that were maintained under propofol anesthesia. Intravenous administration of Mev (960 microg/kg) induced a significant increase in the HSP70 level in the ventrolateral medulla during phase I ('pro-life' phase), and returned to baseline during phase II ('pro-death' phase) Mev intoxication. Compared to artificial cerebrospinal fluid, normal mouse serum (1:20), or sense hsp70 oligonucleotide (50 pmol) pretreatment, microinjection of an anti-HSP70 antiserum (1:20) or an antisense hsp70 oligonucleotide (50 pmol) bilaterally into the RVLM significantly increased mortality, shortened the duration of phase I intoxication and augmented the induced hypotension in rats that received Mev (960 microg/ kg, i.v.). These results suggest that HSP70 induced in the RVLM during Mev intoxication provides neuroprotection against the organophosphate poison via prevention of cardiovascular depression.

  10. Identification and characterization of neuroblasts in the subventricular zone and rostral migratory stream of the adult human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congmin; Liu, Fang; Liu, Ying-Ying; Zhao, Cai-Hong; You, Yan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jingxiao; Wei, Bin; Ma, Tong; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Yue; Chen, Rui; Song, Hongjun; Yang, Zhengang

    2011-01-01

    It is of great interest to identify new neurons in the adult human brain, but the persistence of neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the existence of the rostral migratory stream (RMS)-like pathway in the adult human forebrain remain highly controversial. In the present study, we have described the general configuration of the RMS in adult monkey, fetal human and adult human brains. We provide evidence that neuroblasts exist continuously in the anterior ventral SVZ and RMS of the adult human brain. The neuroblasts appear singly or in pairs without forming chains; they exhibit migratory morphologies and co-express the immature neuronal markers doublecortin, polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule and βIII-tubulin. Few of these neuroblasts appear to be actively proliferating in the anterior ventral SVZ but none in the RMS, indicating that neuroblasts distributed along the RMS are most likely derived from the ventral SVZ. Interestingly, no neuroblasts are found in the adult human olfactory bulb. Taken together, our data suggest that the SVZ maintains the ability to produce neuroblasts in the adult human brain. PMID:21577236

  11. Neurochemical properties of BDNF-containing neurons projecting to rostral ventromedial medulla in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Bin eYin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The periaqueductal gray (PAG modulates nociception via a descending pathway that relays in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM and terminates in the spinal cord. Previous behavioral pharmacology and electrophysiological evidence suggests that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays an important role in descending pain modulation, likely through the PAG-RVM pathway. However, there still lacks detailed information on the distribution of BDNF, activation of BDNF-containing neurons projecting to RVM in the condition of pain, and neurochemical properties of these neurons within the PAG. Through fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and immunofluorescent staining, the homogenous distributions of BDNF mRNA and protein were observed in the four subregions of PAG. Both neurons and astrocytes expressed BDNF, but not microglias. By combining retrograde tracing methods and formalin pain model, there were more BDNF-containing neurons projecting to RVM being activated in the ventrolateral PAG (vlPAG than other subregions of PAG. The neurochemical properties of BDNF-containing projection neurons in the vlPAG were investigated. BDNF-containing projection neurons expressed auto receptor Tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB in addition to serotonin (5-HT, neurotensin (NT, substance P (SP, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP, nitric oxide synthase (NOS, and parvalbumin (PV but not tyrosine decarboxylase (TH. It is speculated that BDNF released from projection neurons in the vlPAG might participate in the descending pain modulation through enhancing the presynaptic release of other neuroactive substances (NSs in the RVM.

  12. Alteration of GABAergic and glycinergic mechanisms by lidocaine injection in the rostral ventromedial medulla of neuropathic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadé, Nayef E; Al Amin, Hassen; Tchachaghian, Sima; Jabbur, Suhayl J; Atweh, Samir F

    2010-04-01

    Attenuation of neuropathic manifestations in experimental animals, by lidocaine injection in the rostral ventro-medial medulla (RVM), has been traditionally attributed to selective block of a descending pain facilitatory system. However, the presence of descending fibers carrying this effect and the selective action of lidocaine on the facilitatory neurons, have not been supported by convincing experimental evidence. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the hypoalgesic action of lidocaine injection in the brainstem. Several groups of rats were subjected to mononeuropathy on their left hind paws, according to the model of spared nerve injury, and were subsequently implanted with guide cannulae in the RVM. After recovery, rats received injections of lidocaine, GABA and glycine agonists or antagonists and their effects were assessed on behavioral tests of allodynia and hyperalgesia. Injections of lidocaine at doses ranging between 0.05% and 2% produced attenuation at high doses and no effects or increasing hyperalgesia at low doses. GABA and glycine agonists increased neuropathic manifestations while their antagonists elicited the opposite effects. A combined injection of GABA agonist or glycine with lidocaine (0.5%) prevented the inhibitory effects of lidocaine injection alone. Our results are in line with the abundant documentation on the alteration of the function of inhibitory neurons by lidocaine and reveal a possible action of the injected high doses on the GABAergic and glycinergic neurons in the RVM. The resulting block of the inhibitory tone exerted by these neurons can lead to a release of the descending pain inhibitory systems.

  13. Neurotoxic lesion of the rostral perirhinal cortex blocks stress-induced exploratory behavioral changes in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Klaus, Brigitte

    2009-03-01

    Exposure to stress leads to adaptive responses including both behavioral and physiological changes. This process is induced by the activation of multiple brain regions. The present study examined the role of the rostral perirhinal cortex (rPRh) in behavioral changes following electrical foot shock-induced stress. The rPRh of rats was lesioned bilaterally by local microinjections of 10 microg N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) before foot shocks (0.7 mA, 1 s). The effects of these lesions on foot shock-induced changes in exploratory behaviors were tested in the open field (4 h, 48 h, 72 h, and 14 days after foot shocks) and the light-dark box (7 days after foot shocks). Foot-shocked and sham-lesioned rats showed several well known behavioral changes in the open field (e.g., immobility, reduction of exploratory activity) most marked at 48 h after foot shocks, and the light-dark box (e.g., reduction of time spent and activity in the lit compartment). All these stress-induced behavioral changes were blocked by neurotoxic lesions of the rPRh. Furthermore, rPRh lesions did not affect behavior in the open field and the light-dark box in unstressed rats. Taken together, these data indicate that the rPRh is involved in neurophysiological mechanisms that mediate changes induced by foot-shock stress in exploratory behaviors which indicate unconditioned fear or anxiety.

  14. Nocifensive behavior-related laser heat-evoked component in the rostral agranular insular cortex revealed using morphine analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Yi; Liu, Chan-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Li; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2016-02-01

    The rostral agranular insular cortex (RAIC), an opioid-responsive site, is essential for modulating nociception in rats. Our previous studies have shown that morphine suppressed long latency laser heat-evoked nociceptive responses in the primary somatosensory cortex (SmI). By contrast, morphine significantly attenuated both short and long latency responses in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). The present study assessed the effect of morphine on laser heat-evoked responses in the RAIC. Laser heat irradiation applied to the rat forepaws at graded levels was used as a specific noxious stimulus. In the RAIC, the first part of the long latency component (140-250ms) of the laser heat-evoked response was enhanced by intraperitoneal morphine (5mg/kg). When the laser heat-evoked cortical responses were examined for trials showing strong nocifensive movement (paw licking), moderate nocifensive movement (paw lifting), and no nocifensive movement, a 140-250ms period enhancement was observed in the RAIC only for the paw lifting movement. This enhancement was absent in the SmI. Thus, our data suggest that the RAIC has a pain-related behavior-dependent neuronal component. Furthermore, the RAIC, ACC, and SmI are differentially modulated by morphine analgesia.

  15. Selective C1 Lesioning Slightly Decreases Angiotensin II type I Receptor Expression in the Rat Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla (RVLM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Erick A.; Stedenfeld, Kristen A.; Sved, Alan F.; Speth, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular homeostasis is regulated in large part by the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in mammals. Projections from the RVLM to the intermediolateral column of the thoracolumbar spinal cord innervate preganglionic neurons of the sympathetic nervous system causing elevation of blood pressure and heart rate. A large proportion, but not all, of the neurons in the RVLM contain the enzymes necessary for the production of epinephrine and are identified as the C1 cell group. Angiotensin II (Ang II) activates the RVLM acting upon AT1 receptors. To assess the proportion of AT1 receptors that are located on C1 neurons in the rat RVLM this study employed an antibody to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase conjugated to saporin, to selectively destroy C1 neurons in the RVLM. Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons in the RVLM was reduced by 57 % in the toxin injected RVLM compared to the contralateral RVLM. In contrast, densitometric analysis of autoradiographic images of 125I-sarcosine1, isoleucine8 Ang II binding to AT1 receptors of the injected side RVLM revealed a small (10%) reduction in AT1 receptor expression compared to the contralateral RVLM. These results suggest that the majority of AT1 receptors in the rat RVLM are located on non-C1 neurons or glia. PMID:26138553

  16. Identification and characterization of neuroblasts in the subventricular zone and rostral migratory stream of the adult human brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Congmin Wang; Qiangqiang Zhang; Yue Zhang; Rui Chen; Hongjun Song; Zhengang Yang; Fang Liu; Ying-Ying Liu; Cai-Hong Zhao; Yan You; Lei Wang; Jingxiao Zhang; Bin Wei; Tong Ma

    2011-01-01

    It is of great interest to identify new neurons in the adult human brain,but the persistence of neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the existence of the rostral migratory stream (RMS)-like pathway in the adult human forebrain remain highly controversial.In the present study,we have described the general configuration of the RMS in adult monkey,fetal human and adult human brains.We provide evidence that neuroblasts exist continuously in the anterior ventral SVZ and RMS of the adult human brain.The neuroblasts appear singly or in pairs without forming chains; they exhibit migratory morphologies and co-express the immature neuronal markers doublecortin,polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule and βI-tubulin.Few of these neuroblasts appear to be actively proliferating in the anterior ventral SVZ but none in the RMS,indicating that neuroblasts distributed along the RMS are most likely derived from the ventral SVZ.Interestingly,no neuroblasts are found in the adult human olfactory bulb.Taken together,our data suggest that the SVZ maintains the ability to produce neuroblasts in the adult human brain.

  17. Determination of Coil Inductances Cylindrical Iron Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azeddine Mazouz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the investigation and development of a structure and performance characteristics of a coil iron nucleus cylindrical (C.I.N.C. The coil iron nucleus cylindrical is a nonlinear electro radio in which the moving of the nucleus in a sense or in other causes change in inductance and can reach extreme values at the superposition of nucleus and coil centers. The variation of the inductance and the degree of freedom of movement of the nucleus can lead to a device with electromechanical conversion The aim of this paper is the determination and visualization of self inductance and mutual of the (C.I.N.C based on geometric dimensions and the displacement of the nucleus.  

  18. May functional imaging be helpful for behavioral assessment in children? Regions of motor and associative cortico-subcortical circuits can be differentiated by laterality and rostrality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M. August

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cortico-subcortical circuits are organized into the sensorimotor, associative and limbic loop. These neuronal preconditions play an important role regarding the understanding and treatment of behavioral problems in children. Differencing evidence argues for a lateralized organization of the sensorimotor loop and a bilateral (i.e. non-lateralized organization of the associative loop. However, a firm behavioral-neurobiological distinction of these circuits has been difficult, specifically in children. Objectives: Thus, the aim was a comprehensive functional visualization and differentiation of the sensorimotor and the associative circuit during childhood. As a new approach, laterality and rostrality features were used to distinguish between the two circuits within one single motor task. Methods: 24 healthy boys performed self-paced index finger tapping with each hand separately during functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla. Results: A contrast analysis for left against right hand movement revealed lateralized activation in typical sensorimotor regions such as primary sensorimotor cortex, caudal supplementary motor area (SMA, caudal putamen and thalamus. A conjunction analysis confirmed bilateral involvement of known associative regions including pre-SMA, rostral SMA and rostral putamen. Conclusion: A functional visualization of two distinct corticostriatal circuits is provided in childhood. Both, the sensorimotor and associative circuit may be discriminated by their laterality characteristics already in minors. Additionally, the results support the concept of a modified functional subdivision of the SMA in a rostral (associative and caudal (motor part. A further development of this approach might help to nurture behavioral assessment and neurofeedback training in child mental health.

  19. Vector-induced NT-3 expression in rats promotes collateral growth of injured corticospinal tract axons far rostral to a spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weishaupt, N; Mason, A L O; Hurd, C; May, Z; Zmyslowski, D C; Galleguillos, D; Sipione, S; Fouad, K

    2014-07-11

    Rewiring the injured corticospinal tract (CST) by promoting connections between CST axons and spared neurons is a strategy being explored experimentally to achieve improved recovery of motor function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Reliable interventions to promote and direct growth of collaterals from injured CST axons are in high demand to promote functionally relevant detour pathways. A promising tool is neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), which has shown growth-stimulating and chemo-attractive effects for spared CST axons caudal to a CST lesion. Yet, efforts to promote growth of injured CST axons rostral to a SCI with NT-3 have been less successful to date. Evidence indicates that immune activation in the local growth environment, either intrinsic or induced by the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), can play a decisive role in the CST's responsiveness to NT-3. Here, we test the potential of NT-3 as a tool to enhance and direct collateral growth from the injured CST rostral to a SCI (1) using long-term expression of NT-3 by adeno-associated viral vectors, (2) with and without stimulating the immune system with LPS. Our results indicate that inducing a growth response from injured CST axons into a region of vector-mediated NT-3 expression is possible in the environment of the spinal cord rostral to a SCI, but seems dependent on the distance between the responding axon and the source of NT-3. Our findings also suggest that injured CST axons do not increase their growth response to NT-3 after immune activation with LPS in this environment. In conclusion, this is to our knowledge the first demonstration that NT-3 can be effective at promoting growth of injured CST collaterals far rostral to a SCI. Making NT-3 available in close proximity to CST target axons may be the key to success when using NT-3 to rewire the injured CST in future investigations.

  20. Identification of proopiomelanocortin-related peptides in the rostral pars distalis of the pituitary in coelacanth: evolutional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Yasuda, Akikazu; Sullivan, Craig V; Kawauchi, Hiroshi

    2003-02-15

    The coelacanth fish, genus Latimeria, flourished during the Devonian Period and is considered among the closest living relatives of tetrapods. It may therefore provide important information on the evolution of fishes into tetrapods. However, little is known about the components of the endocrine system in this fish. Here we describe the structural characterization of pituitary hormones derived from proopiomelanocortin (POMC) in Latimeria chalumnae. We identified alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH), N-Des-acetyl-alpha-MSH, beta-MSH, N-terminal peptide containing gamma-MSH, corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide (CLIP), and N-acetyl-beta-endorpin (END) in an extract from the rostral pars distalis of the pituitary by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, amino acid sequence analysis, and mass spectrometry. The occurrence of three different MSHs and one beta-END indicates that the structural organization of coelacanth POMC is the same as that of lungfish, tetrapods, and primitive ray-finned fish. The coelacanth alpha-MSH is identical to its mammalian counterpart. The coelacanth beta-MSH shows the highest sequence identity with the amphibian counterpart, and gamma-MSH and CLIP show the highest sequence identity with their amphibian and bird counterparts, whereas coelacanth beta-END is most similar to the sturgeon peptide. The coexistence of tetrapod-type and fish-type characteristics in the putative coelacanth POMC molecule reflects the phylogenetic position of this fish. When each hormonal segment was compared between coelacanth, lungfish, and tetrapod, MSH and CLIP of coelacanth were closer to their tetrapod counterparts than those of lungfish, whereas beta-MSH and beta-END of coelacanth are less closely related to their tetrapod counterparts than those of lungfish. gamma-MSH and CLIP may have evolved at a different rate from beta-MSH and beta-END in both the coelacanth and lungfish.

  1. Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla EP3 Receptor Mediates the Sympathoexcitatory and Pressor Effects of Prostaglandin E2 in Conscious Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezq, Samar; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2016-11-01

    Whereas few studies have dealt with the central sympathoexcitatory action of the inflammatory prostanoid prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), there is no information on the expression and cardiovascular function of different PGE2 (EP) receptors in one of the major cardiovascular-regulating nuclei, the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). The current study aimed at filling this knowledge gap as well as elucidating the implicated molecular mechanisms. To achieve these goals, we showed the expression of EP2, EP3, and EP4 receptors in the RVLM and investigated their cardiovascular roles in conscious rats, ex vivo as well as in cultured PC12 cells. Intra-RVLM PGE2 significantly increased blood pressure and sympathetic dominance (spectral analysis). Studies with selective EP receptor subtype agonists and antagonists showed that these PGE2-evoked responses were only replicated by intra-RVLM activation of the EP3 receptor with its agonist sulprostone. The RVLM of PGE2-treated rats exhibited increases in c-Fos expression and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation along with oxidative stress, and PGE2 increased l-glutamate release in PC12 cells (surrogates of RVLM neurons). Abrogation of the PGE2-evoked pressor and biochemical responses only occurred following EP3 receptor blockade (N-[(5-Bromo-2-methoxyphenyl)sulfonyl]-3-[2-(2-naphthalenylmethyl)phenyl]-2-propenamide, L-798106). These findings suggest the dependence of RVLM PGE2-mediated sympathoexcitation/pressor response on local EP3 receptor signaling in conscious rats, and highlight central EP3 receptor blockade as a potential therapeutic modality for hypertension management. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  2. Responses of neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla to whole body rotations: comparisons in decerebrate and conscious cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destefino, V J; Reighard, D A; Sugiyama, Y; Suzuki, T; Cotter, L A; Larson, M G; Gandhi, N J; Barman, S M; Yates, B J

    2011-06-01

    The responses to vestibular stimulation of brain stem neurons that regulate sympathetic outflow and blood flow have been studied extensively in decerebrate preparations, but not in conscious animals. In the present study, we compared the responses of neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), a principal region of the brain stem involved in the regulation of blood pressure, to whole body rotations of conscious and decerebrate cats. In both preparations, RVLM neurons exhibited similar levels of spontaneous activity (median of ∼17 spikes/s). The firing of about half of the RVLM neurons recorded in decerebrate cats was modulated by rotations; these cells were activated by vertical tilts in a variety of directions, with response characteristics suggesting that their labyrinthine inputs originated in otolith organs. The activity of over one-third of RVLM neurons in decerebrate animals was altered by stimulation of baroreceptors; RVLM units with and without baroreceptor signals had similar responses to rotations. In contrast, only 6% of RVLM neurons studied in conscious cats exhibited cardiac-related activity, and the firing of just 1% of the cells was modulated by rotations. These data suggest that the brain stem circuitry mediating vestibulosympathetic reflexes is highly sensitive to changes in body position in space but that the responses to vestibular stimuli of neurons in the pathway are suppressed by higher brain centers in conscious animals. The findings also raise the possibility that autonomic responses to a variety of inputs, including those from the inner ear, could be gated according to behavioral context and attenuated when they are not necessary.

  3. "On-" and "off-" cells in the rostral ventromedial medulla of rats held in thermoneutral conditions: are they involved in thermoregulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bitar, Nabil; Pollin, Bernard; Le Bars, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    In thermal neutral condition, rats display cyclic variations of the vasomotion of the tail and paws, synchronized with fluctuations of blood pressure, heart rate, and core body temperature. "On-" and "off-" cells located in the rostral ventromedial medulla, a cerebral structure implicated in somatic sympathetic drive, 1) exhibit similar spontaneous cyclic activities in antiphase and 2) are activated and inhibited by thermal nociceptive stimuli, respectively. We aimed at evaluating the implication of such neurons in autonomic regulation by establishing correlations between their firing and blood pressure, heart rate, and skin and core body temperature variations. When, during a cycle, a relative high core body temperature was reached, the on-cells were activated and within half a minute, the off-cells and blood pressure were depressed, followed by heart rate depression within a further minute; vasodilatation of the tail followed invariably within ∼3 min, often completed with vasodilatation of hind paws. The outcome was an increased heat loss that lessened the core body temperature. When the decrease of core body temperature achieved a few tenths of degrees, sympathetic activation switches off and converse variations occurred, providing cycles of three to seven periods/h. On- and off-cell activities were correlated with inhibition and activation of the sympathetic system, respectively. The temporal sequence of events was as follows: core body temperature → on-cell → off-cell ∼ blood pressure → heart rate → skin temperature → core body temperature. The function of on- and off-cells in nociception should be reexamined, taking into account their correlation with autonomic regulations. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Role of nitric oxide synthase uncoupling at rostral ventrolateral medulla in redox-sensitive hypertension associated with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kay L H; Chao, Yung-Mei; Tsay, Shiow-Jen; Chen, Chen Hsiu; Chan, Samuel H H; Dovinova, Ima; Chan, Julie Y H

    2014-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS), which is rapidly becoming prevalent worldwide, is long known to be associated with hypertension and recently with oxidative stress. Of note is that oxidative stress in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), where sympathetic premotor neurons reside, contributes to sympathoexcitation and hypertension. This study sought to identify the source of tissue oxidative stress in RVLM and their roles in neural mechanism of hypertension associated with MetS. Adult normotensive rats subjected to a high-fructose diet for 8 weeks developed metabolic traits of MetS, alongside increases in sympathetic vasomotor activity and blood pressure. In RVLM of these MetS rats, the tissue level of reactive oxygen species was increased, nitric oxide (NO) was decreased, and mitochondrial electron transport capacity was reduced. Whereas the protein expression of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) or protein inhibitor of nNOS was increased, the ratio of nNOS dimer/monomer was significantly decreased. Oral intake of pioglitazone or intracisternal infusion of tempol or coenzyme Q10 significantly abrogated all those molecular events in high-fructose diet-fed rats and ameliorated sympathoexcitation and hypertension. Gene silencing of protein inhibitor of nNOS mRNA in RVLM using lentivirus carrying small hairpin RNA inhibited protein inhibitor of nNOS expression, increased the ratio of nNOS dimer/monomer, restored NO content, and alleviated oxidative stress in RVLM of high-fructose diet-fed rats, alongside significantly reduced sympathoexcitation and hypertension. These results suggest that redox-sensitive and protein inhibitor of nNOS-mediated nNOS uncoupling is engaged in a vicious cycle that sustains the production of reactive oxygen species in RVLM, resulting in sympathoexcitation and hypertension associated with MetS.

  5. Expression of the M3 Muscarinic Receptor on Orexin Neurons that Project to the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yu-Wen E; Lee, Yen-Hsien; Chen, Jennifer Y S; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Hwang, Ling-Ling

    2016-05-01

    Activation of central cholinergic receptors causes a pressor response in rats, and the hypothalamus is important for this response. Projections from hypothalamic orexin neurons to the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) are involved in sympatho-excitation of the cardiovascular system. A small population of orexin neurons is regulated by cholinergic inputs through M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3 R). To elucidate whether the M3 R on orexin neurons is involved in cardiosympathetic regulation through the RVLM, we examined the presence of the M3 R on retrograde-labeled RVLM-projecting orexin neurons. The retrograde tracer was unilaterally injected into the RVLM. Within the hypothalamus, retrograde-labeled neurons were located predominantly ipsilateral to the injection side. In the anterior hypothalamus (-1.5 to -2.3 mm to the bregma), retrograde-labeled neurons were densely distributed in the paraventricular nuclei and scattered in the retrochiasmatic area. At -2.3 to -3.5 mm from the bregma, labeled neurons were located in the regions where orexin neurons were situated, that is, the tuberal lateral hypothalamic area, perifornical area, and dorsomedial nuclei. Very few retrograde-labeled neurons were observed in the hypothalamus at -3.5 to -4.5 mm from the bregma. About 19.5% ± 1.6% of RVLM-projecting neurons in the tuberal hypothalamus were orexinergic. The M3 R was present on 18.7% ± 3.0% of RVLM-projecting orexin neurons. Injection of a muscarinic agonist, oxotremorine, in the perifornical area resulted in a pressor response, which was attenuated by a pretreatment of atropine. We conclude that cholinergic inputs to orexin neurons may be involved in cardiosympathetic regulation through the M3 R on the orexin neurons that directly project to the RVLM.

  6. Crossing axons in the third nerve nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienfang, D C

    1975-12-01

    The research presented in this paper studied the pathway taken by the crossed fibers of the third nerve nucleus in an animal whose nucleus has been well mapped and found to correlate well with higher mammals and man. Autoradiography using tritiated amino acid labeled the cell bodies an axons of the left side of the oculomotor nucleus of the cat. Axons so labeled could be seen emerging from the ventral portion of the left nucleus through the median longitudinal fasciculus (mlf) to join the left oculomotor nerve. Labeled axons were also seen to emerge from the medial border of the caudal left nucleus, cross the midline, and pass through the right nucleus and the right mlf to join the right oculomotor nerve. These latter axons must be the crossed axons of the superior rectus and levator palpebrae subnuclei. Since the path of these crossed axons is through the caudal portion of the nucleus of the opposite side, the destruction of one lateral half of the oculomotor nucleus would result in a bilateral palsy of the crossed subnuclei. Bilateral palsy of the superior rectus and bilateral assymetrical palsy of the levator palpebrae muscles would result.

  7. Neural histamine in the tuberomammillary nucleus regulates the onset of neurogenic pulmonary edema in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Dong; Xiaohong Zhang; Lijuan Shi

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of neural histamine in the tuberomammillary nucleus(TM) on neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) onset in rabbits and the function of the rostral ventrolateral medulla(RVLM) in the neural histamine modulation of NPE.Methods:NPE was produced by the intracisternal injections of fibrinogen and thrombin.The contents of histamine in the TM and RVLM in rabbits were measured with high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC).Rabbits were placed on a stereotaxic frame and microinjection cannulae were inserted into the TM and RVLM using brain atlas coordinates.Animals were pretreated with R-α-methylhistamine(MeHA) in the TM and chlorphenamine Mmaleate/cimetidine in the RVLM prior to establishing the NPE model.Changes in the lung water ratio and mean arterial pressure(MAP) were recorded,and paraffin sections of lung tissue were observed by light microscope.Results:We found that the contents of histamine(HA) in the TM and RVLM increased significantly with the onset of NPE.Pretreatment with MeHA in the TM and chlorphenamine Mmaleate in the RVLM significantly decreased MAP,and the lung water ratio and histological characteristics of the NPE in the rabbit model.Pretreatment with cimetidine in the RVLM had no effect on NPE.Conculsion:The results suggest that neural histamine in the TM is involved in the onset of NPE,and this effect of neural histamine is mediated by H receptor in the RVLM.

  8. Termination of vestibulospinal fibers arising from the spinal vestibular nucleus in the mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, H; Bácskai, T; Paxinos, G

    2015-05-21

    The present study investigated the vestibulospinal system which originates from the spinal vestibular nucleus (SpVe) with both retrograde and anterograde tracer injections. We found that fluoro-gold (FG) labeled neurons were found bilaterally with a contralateral predominance after FG injections into the upper lumbar cord. Anterogradely labeled fibers from the rostral SpVe traveled in the medial part of the ventral funiculus ipsilaterally and the dorsolateral funiculus bilaterally in the cervical cord. They mainly terminated in laminae 5-8, and 10 of the ipsilateral spinal cord. The contralateral side had fewer fibers and they were found in laminae 6-8, and 10. In the thoracic cord, fibers were also found to terminate in bilateral intermediolateral columns. In the lumbar and lower cord, fibers were mainly found in the dorsolateral funiculus bilaterally and they terminated predominantly in laminae 3-7 contralaterally. Anterogradely labeled fibers from the caudal SpVe did not travel in the medial part of the ventral funiculus but in the dorsolateral funiculus bilaterally. They mainly terminated in laminae 3-8 and 10 contralaterally. The present study is the first to describe the termination of vestibulospinal fibers arising from the SpVe in the spinal cord. It will lay the anatomical foundation for those who investigate the physiological role of vestibulospinal fibers and potentially target these fibers during rehabilitation after stroke, spinal cord injury, or vestibular organ injury.

  9. Early regulation of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus CART gene expression by short photoperiod in the Siberian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Julian G; Ellis, Claire; Moar, Kim M; Logie, Tracy J; Morgan, Peter J; Adam, Clare L

    2003-03-28

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) mRNA is expressed in a number of hypothalamic nuclei including the arcuate nucleus (ARC). An increase in CART gene expression in the ARC of juvenile female Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) 14 days after transfer to short photoperiod at weaning and prior to major divergence of body weight trajectory in this seasonal mammal implicates CART in the induction of programmed weight change. In the current series of experiments, elevated CART mRNA in short photoperiod juvenile female animals relative to long photoperiod controls was apparent throughout the caudal-rostral extent of the ARC after 14 days, but was not observed when short photoperiod exposure was limited to 4-7 days. Elevated CART gene expression was also observed in juvenile males 14 days after transfer to short photoperiod at weaning, in adult female hamsters 14 days after transfer to short photoperiod and in adult male hamsters 21 days after transfer to short photoperiod. There were no consistent trends in expression levels of other energy balance-related genes with these relatively short duration photoperiod manipulations, suggesting that CART may be involved in short photoperiod-programmed body weight regulation.

  10. Electrical and morphological characteristics of anteroventral periventricular nucleus kisspeptin and other neurons in the female mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducret, Eric; Gaidamaka, Galina; Herbison, Allan E

    2010-05-01

    Neurons in the rodent anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) play a key role in integrating circadian and gonadal steroid hormone information in the control of fertility. In particular, estradiol-sensitive kisspeptin neurons located in the AVPV, and adjacent structures [together termed the rostral periventricular area of the third ventricle (RP3V)], are critical for puberty onset and the preovulatory LH surge. The present study aimed to establish the morphological and electrical firing characteristics of RP3V neurons, including kisspeptin neurons, in the adult female mouse. Cell-attached electrical recordings, followed by juxtacellular dye filling, of 129 RP3V neurons in the acute brain slice preparation revealed these cells to exhibit multipolar (53%), bipolar (43%), or unipolar (4%) dendritic morphologies along with silent (16%), irregular (41%), bursting (25%), or tonic (34%) firing patterns. Postrecording immunocytochemistry identified 17 of 100 filled RP3V cells as being kisspeptin neurons, all of which exhibited complex multipolar dendritic trees and significantly (P neurons. The firing pattern of RP3V neurons fluctuated across the estrous cycle with a significant (P neurons. All RP3V neurons responded to gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate, about 10% to RFamide-related peptide-3, about 5% to vasopressin, 0% to vasoactive intestinal peptide, and 0% to kisspeptin. These studies provide a morphological and electrical description of AVPV/RP3V neurons and demonstrate their cycle-dependent firing patterns along with an unexpected lack of acute response to the circadian neuropeptides.

  11. A comparative neuroanatomical study of the red nucleus of the cat, macaque and human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Onodera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human red nucleus (Nr is comparatively less well-studied than that of cats or monkeys. Given the functional importance of reticular and midbrain structures in control of movement and locomotion as well as from an evolutionary perspective, we investigated the nature and extent of any differences in Nr projections to the olivary complex in quadrupedal and bipedal species. Using neuroanatomical tract-tracing techniques we developed a "neural sheet" hypothesis allowing us to propose how rubro-olivary relations differ among the three species. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase staining supports findings that the cat's nucleus accessories medialis of Bechtrew (NB projects mainly to the lateral bend of the principal olive. We clarified boundaries among nucleus of Darkschewitsch (ND, NB and parvicellular red nucleus (pNr of the cat's neural sheet. The macaque's ND-medial accessory olivary projection is rostro-caudally organized and the dorsomedial and ventrolateral parts of the macaque's pNr may project to the principal olive's rostral and caudal dorsal lamella; in cat it projects as well to pNr. Myelin- and Nissl-stained sections show that a well-developed dorsomedial part of the human Nr consists of densely packed cells, deriving small myelinated fibers that continue into the medial central tegmental tract. CONCLUSIONS: Based on these findings we suggest there are distinct bipedal-quadrupedal differences for Nr projections to the olivary complex. We propose the Nr of cats and monkeys comprise the ND, NB and pNr in a zonal sheet-like structure, retaining clear nuclear boundaries and an isolated, well-developed mNr. The human NB may be distinguished from its more specialised ND (ND lies alongside a well-developed pNr in the human central gray. Phylogenetically, the NB may have been translocated into a roll-shaped Nr in the reticular formation, the dorsomedial portion of which might correspond to the cat

  12. Autonomic processing of the cardiovascular reflexes in the nucleus tractus solitarii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado B.H.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS receives afferent projections from the arterial baroreceptors, carotid chemoreceptors and cardiopulmonary receptors and as a function of this information produces autonomic adjustments in order to maintain arterial blood pressure within a narrow range of variation. The activation of each of these cardiovascular afferents produces a specific autonomic response by the excitation of neuronal projections from the NTS to the ventrolateral areas of the medulla (nucleus ambiguus, caudal and rostral ventrolateral medulla. The neurotransmitters at the NTS level as well as the excitatory amino acid (EAA receptors involved in the processing of the autonomic responses in the NTS, although extensively studied, remain to be completely elucidated. In the present review we discuss the role of the EAA L-glutamate and its different receptor subtypes in the processing of the cardiovascular reflexes in the NTS. The data presented in this review related to the neurotransmission in the NTS are based on experimental evidence obtained in our laboratory in unanesthetized rats. The two major conclusions of the present review are that a the excitation of the cardiovagal component by cardiovascular reflex activation (chemo- and Bezold-Jarisch reflexes or by L-glutamate microinjection into the NTS is mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors, and b the sympatho-excitatory component of the chemoreflex and the pressor response to L-glutamate microinjected into the NTS are not affected by an NMDA receptor antagonist, suggesting that the sympatho-excitatory component of these responses is mediated by non-NMDA receptors.

  13. Music and the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavridis, Ioannis N

    2015-03-01

    Music is a universal feature of human societies over time, mainly because it allows expression and regulation of strong emotions, thus influencing moods and evoking pleasure. The nucleus accumbens (NA), the most important pleasure center of the human brain (dominates the reward system), is the 'king of neurosciences' and dopamine (DA) can be rightfully considered as its 'crown' due to the fundamental role that this neurotransmitter plays in the brain's reward system. Purpose of this article was to review the existing literature regarding the relation between music and the NA. Studies have shown that reward value for music can be coded by activity levels in the NA, whose functional connectivity with auditory and frontal areas increases as a function of increasing musical reward. Listening to music strongly modulates activity in a network of mesolimbic structures involved in reward processing including the NA. The functional connectivity between brain regions mediating reward, autonomic and cognitive processing provides insight into understanding why listening to music is one of the most rewarding and pleasurable human experiences. Musical stimuli can significantly increase extracellular DA levels in the NA. NA DA and serotonin were found significantly higher in animals exposed to music. Finally, passive listening to unfamiliar although liked music showed activations in the NA.

  14. Caudal Nucleus Accumbens Core Is Critical in the Regulation of Cue-Elicited Approach-Avoidance Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Laurie; Thangarasa, Tharshika; Samadi, Osai

    2017-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is thought to be a site of integration of positively and negatively valenced information and action selection. Functional differentiation in valence processing has previously been found along the rostrocaudal axis of the shell region of the NAc in assessments of unconditioned motivation. Given that the core region of the NAc has been implicated in the elicitation of motivated behavior in response to conditioned cues, we sought to assess the role of caudal, intermediate, and rostral sites within this subregion in cue-elicited approach-avoidance decisions. Rats were trained to associate visuo-tactile cues with appetitive, aversive, and neutral outcomes. Following the successful acquisition of the cue-outcome associations, rats received microinfusions of GABAA and GABAB receptor agonists (muscimol/baclofen) or saline into the caudal, intermediate, or rostral NAc core and were then exposed to a superimposition of appetitively and aversively valenced cues versus neutral cues in a “conflict test,” as well as to the appetitive versus neutral cues, and aversive cues versus neutral cues, in separate conditioned preference/avoidance tests. Disruption of activity in the intermediate to caudal parts of the NAc core resulted in a robust avoidance bias in response to motivationally conflicting cues, as well as a potentiated avoidance of aversive cues as compared with control animals, coupled with an attenuated conditioned preference for the appetitive cue. These results suggest that the caudal NAc core may have the capacity to exert bidirectional control over appetitively and aversively motivated responses to valence signals. PMID:28275709

  15. Imidazoline receptors associated with noradrenergic terminals in the rostral ventrolateral medulla mediate the hypotensive responses of moxonidine but not clonidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C K S; Burke, S L; Zhu, H; Piletz, J E; Head, G A

    2005-01-01

    We determined whether the cardiovascular actions of central anti-hypertensive agents clonidine and moxonidine are dependent on noradrenergic or serotonergic innervation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in conscious rabbits. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or 5,6-dihydroxytriptamine (5,6-DHT) was injected into the RVLM to deplete noradrenergic and serotonergic terminals respectively. One, 2 and 4 weeks later, responses to fourth ventricular (4V) clonidine (0.65 microg/kg) and moxonidine (0.44 microg/kg) were examined. Destruction of noradrenergic pathways in the RVLM by 6-OHDA reduced the hypotensive response to 4V moxonidine to 62%, 47% and 60% of that observed in vehicle treated rabbits at weeks 1, 2 and 4 respectively. The moxonidine induced bradycardia was similarly attenuated (to 46% of vehicle). Conversely, 6-OHDA had no effect on the hypotensive or bradycardic effects of 4V clonidine. Efaroxan (I(1)-imidazoline receptor/alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist; 3.5, 11, 35 microg/kg) and 2-methoxyidazoxan (alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist; 0.3, 0.9, 3 microg/kg) equally reversed the hypotension to 4V clonidine, suggesting a mainly alpha(2)-adrenoceptor mechanism. Efaroxan preferentially reversed responses to moxonidine in both vehicle and 5,6-DHT groups and in the 1st week after 6-OHDA, suggesting a mechanism involving mainly I(1)-imidazoline receptors. This selectivity was subsequently lost in the 2nd and 4th weeks when the remaining hypotension was mainly mediated by alpha(2)-adrenoceptors. Depletion of serotonergic terminals did not alter the responses to either agonist nor did it change the relative effectiveness of the antagonists. Western blots of RVLM tissues probed with imidazoline and alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antisera showed a pattern of bands close to that reported in other species. The main effect of 6-OHDA was an 18% lower level of the 42 kDa imidazoline protein (P<0.05). We conclude that the hypotensive and bradycardic actions of moxonidine but not

  16. Differential cardiovascular responses to blockade of nNOS or iNOS in rostral ventrolateral medulla of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Samuel H H; Wang, Ling-Lin; Wang, Shu-Huei; Chan, Julie Y H

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the contribution of neuronal or inducible nitric oxide synthase (nNOS or iNOS) at the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) to central cardiovascular regulation by endogenous nitric oxide (NO), using Sprague-Dawley rats anaesthetized and maintained with propofol.Microinjection bilaterally into the RVLM of a NO trapping agent, carboxy-2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-l-oxy-l-3-oxide (10, 50 or 100 nmoles) resulted in significant hypotension and bradycardia.Similar application of a selective antagonist of nNOS, 7-nitroindazole (1, 2.5 or 5 pmoles), or selective antagonists of iNOS, aminoguanidine (125, 250 or 500 pmoles), N6-(l-iminoethyl)-L-lysine (250 pmoles) or S-methylisothiourea (250 pmoles), induced respectively a reduction or an enhancement in systemic arterial pressure, heart rate and power density of the vasomotor components in the spectrum of arterial blood pressure signals, the experimental index for sympathetic neurogenic vasomotor tone.Both hypotension and bradycardia induced by the NO precursor, L-arginine (100 nmoles), were significantly blunted when aminoguanidine (250 pmoles) was co-microinjected bilaterally into the RVLM. On the other hand, co-administered 7-nitroindazole (2.5 pmoles) was ineffective.Whereas low doses of S-nitro-N-acetylpenicillamine (0.25 or 0.5 nmoles) elicited hypertension and tachycardia, high doses of this non-nitrate NO donor (5 nmoles) induced hypotension and bradycardia.Reverse transcription – polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that both iNOS and nNOS mRNA were expressed in the ventrolateral medulla.We conclude that the prevalence of nNOS over iNOS activity at the RVLM and the associated dominance of sympathoexcitation over sympathoinhibition may underlie the maintenance of sympathetic vasomotor outflow and stable systemic arterial pressure by the endogenous NO. PMID:11399678

  17. Orexins depolarize rostral ventrolateral medulla neurons and increase arterial pressure and heart rate in rats mainly via orexin 2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shang-Cheng; Dai, Yu-Wen E; Lee, Yen-Hsien; Chiou, Lih-Chu; Hwang, Ling-Ling

    2010-08-01

    An injection of orexin A or B into the cisterna magna or the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), where bulbospinal vasomotor neurons are located, elevated arterial pressure (AP) and heart rate (HR). We examined how orexins affected RVLM neurons to regulate cardiovascular functions by using in vitro recordings of neuronal activity of the RVLM and in vivo measurement of cardiovascular functions in rats. Orexin A and B concentration-dependently depolarized RVLM neurons. At 100 nM, both peptides excited 42% of RVLM neurons. Tetrodotoxin failed to block orexin-induced depolarization. In the presence of N-(2-methyl-6-benzoxazolyl)-N'-1, 5-naphthyridin-4-yl urea (SB-334867), an orexin 1 receptor (OX(1)R) antagonist, orexin A depolarized 42% of RVLM neurons with a smaller, but not significantly different, amplitude (4.9 +/- 0.8 versus 7.2 +/- 1.1 mV). In the presence of (2S)-1- (3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxy-2(1H)-isoquinolinyl)-3,3-dimethyl-2-[(4-pyridinylmethyl)amino]-1-butanone hydrochloride (TCS OX2 29), an orexin 2 receptor (OX(2)R) antagonist, orexin A depolarized 25% of RVLM neurons with a significantly smaller amplitude (1.7 +/- 0.5 mV). Coapplication of both antagonists completely eliminated orexin A-induced depolarization. An OX(2)R agonist, [Ala(11),D-Leu(15)]-orexin B, concentration-dependently depolarized RVLM neurons. Regarding neuronal phenotypes, orexins depolarized 88% of adrenergic, 43% of nonadrenergic, and 36 to 41% of rhythmically firing RVLM neurons. Intracisternal TCS OX2 29 (3 and 10 nmol) suppressed intracisternal orexin A-induced increases of AP and HR, whereas intracisternal SB-334867 (3 and 10 nmol) had no effect on the orexin A-induced increase of HR but suppressed the orexin A-induced pressor response at 10 nmol. We concluded that orexins directly excite RVLM neurons, which include bulbospinal vasomotor neurons, and regulate cardiovascular function mainly via the OX(2)R, with a smaller contribution from the OX(1)R.

  18. Study of Hadron Production in Hadron-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    Selyuzhenkov, I; Klochkov, V; Kowalski, S; Kaptur, E A; Kowalik, K L; Dominik, W M; Krasnoperov, A; Feofilov, G; Vinogradov, L; Kovalenko, V; Johnson, S R; Mills, G B; Planeta, R J; Rubbia, A; Marton, K; Messerly, B A; Puzovic, J; Bogomilov, M V; Bravar, A; Sgalaberna, D; Renfordt, R A E; Deveaux, M; Engel, R R; Grzeszczuk, A; Davis, N; Kuich, M; Lyubushkin, V; Kondratev, V; Kadija, K; Diakonos, F; Slodkowski, M A; Rauch, W H; Pistillo, C; Laszlo, A; Nakadaira, T; Hasegawa, T; Sadovskiy, A; Morozov, S; Petukhov, O; Szuba, M K; Mathes, H; Herve, A E; Roehrich, D; Marino, A D; Grebieszkow, K; Wlodarczyk, Z; Rybczynski, M A; Wojtaszek-szwarc, A; Nirkko, M C; Sakashita, K; Golubeva, M; Kurepin, A; Manic, D; Kolev, D I; Kisiel, J E; Rondio, E; Larsen, D T; Czopowicz, T R; Seyboth, P; Turko, L; Guber, F; Marin, V; Busygina, O; Taranenko, A; Cirkovic, M; Gazdzicki, M; Roth, M A; Pulawski, S M; Aduszkiewicz, A M; Bunyatov, S; Vechernin, V; Nagai, Y; Anticic, T; Dynowski, K M; Mackowiak-pawlowska, M K; Stefanek, G; Pavin, M; Fodor, Z P; Nishikawa, K; Tada, M; Kobayashi, T; Blondel, A P P; Damyanova, A; Stroebele, H W; Posiadala, M Z; Kolesnikov, V; Andronov, E; Zimmerman, E D; Antoniou, N; Majka, Z; Di luise, S; Veberic, D; Dumarchez, J; Naskret, M; Ivashkin, A; Tsenov, R V; Koziel, M G; Schmidt, K J; Melkumov, G; Popov, B; Panagiotou, A; Richter-was, E M; Ereditato, A; Paolone, V; Unger, M T; Wilczek, A G; Stepaniak, J M; Matulewicz, T N; Seryakov, A; Susa, T; Staszel, P P; Brzychczyk, J; Maksiak, B; Tefelski, D B; Kucewicz, W; Dorosz, P A

    2007-01-01

    The NA61/SHINE (SHINE = SPS Heavy Ion and Neutrino Experiment) experiment is a large acceptance hadron spectrometer at the CERN SPS for the study of the hadronic final states produced in interactions of various beam particles (pions, protons, C, S and In) with a variety of fixed targets at the SPS energies. The main components of the current detector were constructed and used by the NA49 experiment. The physics program of NA61/SHINE consists of three main subjects. In the first stage of data taking (2007-2009) measurements of hadron production in hadron-nucleus interactions needed for neutrino (T2K) and cosmic-ray (Pierre Auger and KASCADE) experiments will be performed. In the second stage (2009-2011) hadron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus interactions needed as reference data for a better understanding of nucleus-nucleus reactions will be studied. In the third stage (2009-2013) energy dependence of hadron production properties will be measured in nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as in p+p a...

  19. 早期电刺激小脑顶核改善急性脑梗死偏瘫患者的运动功能和脑血流量%Early electrostimulation on cerebellar fastigial nucleus improving motor function and cerebral blood flow of patients with hemiplegia induced by acute cerebral infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛腊梅; 成祥林; 章军建

    2004-01-01

    目的:观察早期电刺激小脑顶核对急性脑梗死偏瘫患者运动功能和脑血流量的影响.方法:将96例急性脑梗死患者,按入院先后顺序分为电刺激小脑治疗康复组(48例)和常规治疗对照组(48例).康复组在常规药物治疗的基础上同时接受电刺激小脑顶核治疗,对照组仅给予常规药物治疗.分别观察其临床疗效,治疗前后神经功能缺损程度恢复情况,两侧大脑前动脉、大脑中动脉刺激前后血流速度变化;所有数据进行统计学处理.结果:治疗组有效率为92%,与对照组44%比较,x2=23.67,P<0.01;神经功能缺损程度评分:康复组治疗前后比较[(27.47±5.14)比(8.98±6.34)分,t=14.57,P<0.01],刺激后康复组与对照组(18.95±10.32)分比较(t=9.47,P<0.01);脑动脉血流量:康复组患侧治疗后明显增加(t=7.06,t=6.59,P<0.01),与对照组比较(t=4.72,5.36,P<0.01);康复组健侧治疗前后比较(t=2.18,2.34,P<0.05).肢体运动功能评分:康复组治疗前后比较,上肢t=14.76,P<0.01,下肢t=10.24,P<0.01,治疗后康复组与对照组比较上肢t=9.72,P<0.01,下肢t=5.61,P<0.01,两组之间差异具有显著性意义.结论:电刺激小脑顶核治疗可显著改善急性脑梗死患者神经功能缺损症状,促进神经功能及患肢运动功能的恢复.

  20. Effect of electrostimulation to cerebellar fastigial nucleus on the cerebral blood flow of patients with mild cognitive impairment%电刺激小脑顶核对轻度认知障碍患者脑血流的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛腊梅; 闻红斌; 章军建

    2004-01-01

    目的:观察轻度认知障碍(mild cognitiveimpairment,MCI)患者电刺激小脑栽顶核后脑血流的变化情况,探讨慢性脑缺血与认知功能损害的相关性.方法:武汉大学中南医院神经科门诊与病房的MCI患者30例,符合美国Mayo神经病学研究中心提出的MCI诊断标准及国内张明圆等根据文化程度对痴呆的评分标准,无心脑血管疾病史,无神经功能缺损.30例MCI患者接受脑循环功能治疗仪治疗10 d,治疗前后行经颅多普勒(TCD)检查并对结果进行相应的统计学分析.结果:MCI患者治疗前TCD检查异常率为90%(27/30),治疗后大脑中动脉和基底动脉脑血流速度为(58.7 ±:9.9),(38.7±8.1)cm/s,比治疗前[(43.6±8.9),(28.6±5.1)cm/s]有明显改善,差异有显著性意义(t=7.369,5.376,P<0.05).结论:电刺激小脑顶核能增加MCI患者脑血流量,可能对MCI患者的认知有所改善.

  1. Large philipsite crystal as ferromanganese nodule nucleus

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ghosh, A.K.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    We report here the occurrence of, to date, the largest (21 x 10 x 8 mm) phillipsite crystal forming the nucleus of a diagenetically formed ferromanganese nodule from the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB). Assuming an average rate of ferromanganese...

  2. Medium effect in high density region probed by nucleus-nucleus elastic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Furumoto, T; Yamamoto, Y

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of the medium effect in the high density region on the nucleus-nucleus elastic scattering in the framework of the double-folding (DF) model with the complex $G$-matrix interaction. First, the evaluating position of the local density, which is an ambiguity of the DF model, is investigated. However, the effect has a minor role to the nucleus-nucleus system. Next, the medium effect including three-body-force (TBF) effect is investigated with two methods. In the both methods, the medium effect is clearly seen on the potential and the elastic cross section, but not on the total reaction cross section. Finally, we make clear the crucial role of the TBF effect up to $k_F =$ 1.6 fm$^{-1}$ in the nucleus-nucleus elastic scattering.

  3. Transport calculations of antiproton-nucleus interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Larionov, A B; Pshenichnov, I A; Satarov, L M; Greiner, W

    2010-01-01

    The Giessen Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport model is extended and applied to the antiproton-nucleus interactions in a wide beam momentum range. The model calculations are compared with the experimental data on $\\bar p$-absorption cross sections on nuclei with an emphasis on extraction of the real part of an antiproton optical potential. The possibility of the cold compression of a nucleus by an antiproton in-flight is also considered.

  4. Commissural axons of the mouse cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M Christian; Drottar, Marie; Benson, Thane E; Darrow, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The axons of commissural neurons that project from one cochlear nucleus to the other were studied after labeling with anterograde tracer. Injections were made into the dorsal subdivision of the cochlear nucleus in order to restrict labeling only to the group of commissural neurons that gave off collaterals to, or were located in, this subdivision. The number of labeled commissural axons in each injection was correlated with the number of labeled radiate multipolar neurons, suggesting radiate neurons as the predominant origin of the axons. The radiate commissural axons are thick and myelinated, and they exit the dorsal acoustic stria of the injected cochlear nucleus to cross the brainstem in the dorsal half, near the crossing position of the olivocochlear bundle. They enter the opposite cochlear nucleus via the dorsal and ventral acoustic stria and at its medial border. Reconstructions of single axons demonstrate that terminations are mostly in the core and typically within a single subdivision of the cochlear nucleus. Extents of termination range from narrow to broad along both the dorsoventral (i.e., tonotopic) and the rostrocaudal dimensions. In the electron microscope, labeled swellings form synapses that are symmetric (in that there is little postsynaptic density), a characteristic of inhibitory synapses. Our labeled axons do not appear to include excitatory commissural axons that end in edge regions of the nucleus. Radiate commissural axons could mediate the broadband inhibition observed in responses to contralateral sound, and they may balance input from the two ears with a quick time course.

  5. Sex differences in NMDA GluN1 plasticity in rostral ventrolateral medulla neurons containing corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptor following slow-pressor angiotensin II hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kempen, T A; Dodos, M; Woods, C; Marques-Lopes, J; Justice, N J; Iadecola, C; Pickel, V M; Glass, M J; Milner, T A

    2015-10-29

    There are profound, yet incompletely understood, sex differences in the neurogenic regulation of blood pressure. Both corticotropin signaling and glutamate receptor plasticity, which differ between males and females, are known to play important roles in the neural regulation of blood pressure. However, the relationship between hypertension and glutamate plasticity in corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-receptive neurons in brain cardiovascular regulatory areas, including the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), is not understood. In the present study, we used dual-label immuno-electron microscopy to analyze sex differences in slow-pressor angiotensin II (AngII) hypertension with respect to the subcellular distribution of the obligatory NMDA glutamate receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in the RVLM and PVN. Studies were conducted in mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) under the control of the CRF type 1 receptor (CRF1) promoter (i.e., CRF1-EGFP reporter mice). By light microscopy, GluN1-immunoreactivity (ir) was found in CRF1-EGFP neurons of the RVLM and PVN. Moreover, in both regions tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was found in CRF1-EGFP neurons. In response to AngII, male mice showed an elevation in blood pressure that was associated with an increase in the proportion of GluN1 on presumably functional areas of the plasma membrane (PM) in CRF1-EGFP dendritic profiles in the RVLM. In female mice, AngII was neither associated with an increase in blood pressure nor an increase in PM GluN1 in the RVLM. Unlike the RVLM, AngII-mediated hypertension had no effect on GluN1 localization in CRF1-EGFP dendrites in the PVN of either male or female mice. These studies provide an anatomical mechanism for sex-differences in the convergent modulation of RVLM catecholaminergic neurons by CRF and glutamate. Moreover, these results suggest that sexual dimorphism in

  6. BFKL Pomeron calculus: solution to equations for nucleus-nucleus scattering in the saturation domain

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras, Carlos; Meneses, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we solve the equation for nucleus-nucleus scattering in the BFKL Pomeron calculus, suggested by Braun. We find these solutions analytically at high energies as well as numerically in the entire region of energies inside the saturation region. The semi-classical approximation is used to select out the infinite set of the parasite solutions. The nucleus-nucleus cross sections at high energy are estimated and compared with the Glauber-Gribov approach. It turns out that the exact formula gives the estimates that are very close to the ones based on Glauber-Gribov formula which is important for the practical applications

  7. Increases in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and decreases the rostral prefrontal cortex activation after-8 weeks of focused attention based mindfulness meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasino, Barbara; Fabbro, Franco

    2016-02-01

    Mindfulness meditation is a form of attention control training. The training exercises the ability to repeatedly focus attention. We addressed the activation changes related to an 8-weeks mindfulness-oriented focused attention meditation training on an initially naïve subject cohort. Before and after training participants underwent an fMRI experiment, thus, although not strictly a cross over design, they served as their internal own control. During fMRI they exercised focused attention on breathing and body scan as compared to resting. We found increased and decreased activation in different parts of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) by comparing pre- vs. post-mindfulness training (MT) during breathing and body scan meditation exercises that were compared against their own resting state. In the post-MT (vs. pre-MT) meditation increased activation in the right dorsolateral PFC and in the left caudate/anterior insula and decreased activation in the rostral PFC and right parietal area 3b. Thus a brief mindfulness training caused increased activation in areas involved in sustaining and monitoring the focus of attention (dorsolateral PFC), consistent with the aim of mindfulness that is exercising focused attention mechanisms, and in the left caudate/anterior insula involved in attention and corporeal awareness and decreased activation in areas part of the "default mode" network and is involved in mentalizing (rostral PFC), consistent with the ability trained by mindfulness of reducing spontaneous mind wandering.

  8. Specification of embryonic stem cell-derived tissues into eye fields by Wnt signaling using rostral diencephalic tissue-inducing culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakura, Eriko; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Takata, Nozomu

    2016-08-01

    The eyes are subdivided from the rostral diencephalon in early development. How the neuroectoderm regulates this subdivision, however, is largely unknown. Taking advantage of embryonic stem cell (ESC) culture using a Rax reporter line to monitor rostral diencephalon formation, we found that ESC-derived tissues at day 7 grown in Glasgow Minimum Expression Media (GMEM) containing knockout serum replacement (KSR) exhibited higher levels of expression of axin2, a Wnt target gene, than those grown in chemically defined medium (CDM). Surprisingly, Wnt agonist facilitated eye field-like tissue specification in CDM. In contrast, the addition of Wnt antagonist diminished eye field tissue formation in GMEM+KSR. Furthermore, the morphological formation of the eye tissue anlage, including the optic vesicle, was accompanied by Wnt signaling activation. Additionally, using CDM culture, we developed an efficient method for generating Rax+/Chx10+ retinal progenitors, which could become fully stratified retina. Here we provide a new avenue for exploring the mechanisms of eye field specification in vitro.

  9. The rostral prefrontal cortex underlies individual differences in working memory capacity: An approach from the hierarchical model of the cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamoto, Takehiro; Yaoi, Ken; Osaka, Mariko; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2015-10-01

    Neuroimaging and behavioral evidence has suggested that the lateral prefrontal cortex is involved in individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC). However, few studies have localized the neural structures that differentiate high and low WMC individuals, considering the functional architecture of the prefrontal cortex. The present study aimed to identify a frontal region that underlies individual differences from the perspective of the hierarchical architecture of the frontal cortex. By manipulating an episodic factor of cognitive control (control in selecting an appropriate task set according to a temporal context) and using a parametric modulation analysis, we found that both high- and low- WMC individuals have similar activation patterns in the premotor cortex (BA6, 8), caudal prefrontal cortex (BA44, 45), and frontopolar cortex (BA10, 11), but differed in the rostral part of the prefrontal cortex (BA46/47); high WMC individuals showed greater activation in the higher episodic control condition, whereas low WMC individuals showed reduced activation when episodic control was required. Similar patterns of activation were found in the right inferior parietal and middle/inferior temporal cortices. These results indicate that the rostral prefrontal cortex, which supports episodic cognitive control, possibly by sending a weighting signal toward the inferior parietal and middle/inferior temporal cortices that modulate saliency and sensory processing, underlies individual differences in WMC. Episodic control account, which considers the organization of the prefrontal cortex, fits well with previous findings of individual differences in WMC.

  10. Stereotactic localization of the human pedunculopontine nucleus: atlas-based coordinates and validation of a magnetic resonance imaging protocol for direct localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrinzo, Ludvic; Zrinzo, Laurence V; Tisch, Stephen; Limousin, Patricia Dowsey; Yousry, Tarek A; Afshar, Farhad; Hariz, Marwan I

    2008-06-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a promising new target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in parkinsonian patients with gait disturbance and postural instability refractory to other treatment modalities. This region of the brain is unfamiliar territory to most functional neurosurgeons. This paper reviews the anatomy of the human PPN and describes novel, clinically relevant methods for the atlas-based and MRI-based localization of the nucleus. These two methods of PPN localization are evaluated and compared on stereotactic MRI data acquired from a diverse group of 12 patients undergoing implantation of deep brain electrodes at sites other than the PPN. Atlas-based coordinates of the rostral and caudal PPN poles in relation to fourth ventricular landmarks were established by amalgamating information sourced from two published human brain atlases. These landmarks were identified on acquired T1 images and atlas-derived coordinates used to plot the predicted PPN location on all 24 sides. Images acquired using a specifically modified, proton-density MRI protocol were available for each patient and were spatially fused to the T1 images. This widely available and rapid protocol provided excellent definition between gray and white matter within the region of interest. Together with an understanding of the regional anatomy, direct localization of the PPN was possible on all 24 sides. The coordinates for each directly localized nucleus were measured in relation to third and fourth ventricular landmarks. The mean (SD) of the directly localized PPN midpoints was 6.4 mm (0.5) lateral, 3.5 mm (1.0) posterior and 11.4 mm (1.2) caudal to the posterior commissure in the anterior commissure-posterior commissure plane. For the directly localized nucleus, there was similar concordance for the rostral pole of the PPN in relation to third and fourth ventricular landmarks (P>0.05). For the caudal PPN pole, fourth ventricular landmarks provided greater concordance with reference to the

  11. Brainstem neurons projecting to the rostral ventral respiratory group (VRG) in the medulla oblongata of the rat revealed by co-application of NMDA and biocytin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Y; Riche, D; Rekling, J C;

    1998-01-01

    axonal arborizations were seen in the same regions where retrogradely filled neurons were found as well as in a few other motor nuclei (the dorsal vagal motor nucleus and XII nucleus). Moreover, in the NTS and the PB/KF, efferent terminal varicosities were seen closely apposed to the soma and proximal...

  12. Onset of Deconfinement in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions - Past, Present and Future -

    CERN Document Server

    Gazdzicki, Marek

    2007-01-01

    In 2007 Mark I. Gorenstein celebrated his 60th birthday. This report is dedicated to Mark and it sketches the results obtained during the past ten years of our collaboration and friendship. They concern search for and study of the onset of deconfinement in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  13. High density QCD and nucleus-nucleus scattering deeply in the saturation region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormilitzin, Andrey; Levin, Eugene; Miller, Jeremy S.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we solve the equations that describe nucleus-nucleus scattering, in high density QCD, in the framework of the BFKL Pomeron Calculus. We found that (i) the contribution of short distances to the opacity for nucleus-nucleus scattering dies at high energies, (ii) the opacity tends to unity at high energy, and (iii) the main contribution that survives comes from soft (long distance) processes for large values of the impact parameter. The corrections to the opacity Ω(Y,b)=1 were calculated and it turns out that they have a completely different form, namely ( 1-Ω→exp(-Const √{Y} )) than the opacity that stems from the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation, which is ( 1-Ω→exp(-Const Y)). We reproduce the formula for the nucleus-nucleus cross section that is commonly used in the description of nucleus-nucleus scattering, and there is no reason why it should be correct in the Glauber-Gribov approach.

  14. Control of nucleus positioning in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonacid, Maria; Terret, Marie-Emilie; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

    2017-08-12

    The position of the nucleus in a cell can instruct morphogenesis in some cases, conveying spatial and temporal information and abnormal nuclear positioning can lead to disease. In oocytes from worm, sea urchin, frog and some fish, nucleus position regulates embryo development, it marks the animal pole and in Drosophila it defines the future dorso-ventral axis of the embryo and of the adult body plan. However, in mammals, the oocyte nucleus is centrally located and does not instruct any future embryo axis. Yet an off-center nucleus correlates with poor outcome for mouse and human oocyte development. This is surprising since oocytes further undergo two extremely asymmetric divisions in terms of the size of the daughter cells (enabling polar body extrusion), requiring an off-centering of their chromosomes. In this review we address not only the bio-physical mechanism controlling nucleus positioning via an actin-mediated pressure gradient, but we also speculate on potential biological relevance of nuclear positioning in mammalian oocytes and early embryos. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ANTERIOR OLFACTORY NUCLEUS IN THE HUMAN OLFACTORY BULB AND PEDUNCLE. Reconstrucción tridimiensional del núcleo olfatorio anterior en el bulbo y pedúnculo olfatorio humano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Berendsen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available El bulbo y pedúnculo olfatorio humano contienen muchos grupos celulares más o menos separados que habitualmente son considerados como parte del núcleo olfatorio anterior retro-bulbar (AON. La presunción que estos grupos celulares sean considerados como extensión rostral del AON en el hemisferio rostral retrocede a la descripción de un único caso por Crosby y Humphrey (1941. Para mejorar nuestra comprensión de la anatomía del AON bulbar y peduncular humano investigamos la morfología, forma y tamaño de estas partes en este núcleo en tejido post-mortem de individuos de edades conocidas. Se obtuvieron seis bulbos y pedúnculos olfatorios, incluyendo la sustancia perforada anterior (SPA, de cerebros donados; se realizaron cortes seriales horizontales a 40µm y se tiñó con substancia de Nissl. Las neuronas de tamaño mediano a grande de esta parte del AON se tiñeron intensamente y tenían un diámetro promedio de 16µm. La reconstruc-ción tridimensional demostró que en todos los casos, excepto uno, el AON bulbar y peduncular consistieron en una cadena discontinua de grupos celulares conectados por puentes de neuropilas pobres o libres de células. El número de grupos celulares y de puentes conectores difiere en cada individuo. Concluimos que las porciones bulbar y peduncular del AON humano debería ser considerado como una especialización humana más que como una extensión rostral del área AON retro-bulbar. Esto es acorde con las propiedades neuro-clínicas previamente publicadas y la degeneración temprana selectiva, pre-clínica, de estos nichos celulares en la enfermedad neuro-degenerativa. The human olfactory bulb and peduncle contain several more or less separated cell groups that are usually regarded to be part of the retrobulbar anterior olfactory nucleus (AON. The assumption that these cell groups are to be considered as the rostral extension of the AON in the rostral hemisphere goes back to the description of one single

  16. Organisation of the human dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutcherov, Yuri; Mai, Juergen K; Ashwell, Ken W; Paxinos, George

    2004-01-19

    This study used acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry to reveal the organization of the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DM) in the human. Topographically, the human DM is similar to DM in the monkey and rat. It is wedged between the paraventricular nucleus, dorsally, and the ventromedial nucleus, ventrally. Laterally, DM borders the lateral hypothalamic area while medially it approaches the 3rd ventricle. The AChE staining distinguished two subcompartments of the human DM: the larger diffuse and the smaller compact DM. The subcompartmental organization of the human DM appears homologous to that found in the monkey and less complex than that reported in rats. Understanding of the organization of DM creates meaningful anatomical reference for physiological and pharmacological studies in the human hypothalamus.

  17. The nucleus: a black box being opened.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel, R; Humbel, B; de Jong, L

    1991-12-01

    Until recently our knowledge about the structural and functional organization of the cell nucleus was very limited. Recent technical developments in the field of ultrastructural analysis, combined with ongoing research on the properties of the nuclear matrix, give new insight into how the nucleus is structured. Two types of observations shape our ideas about nuclear organization. First, most nuclear functions (replication, transcription, RNA processing, and RNA transport) are highly localized within the nucleus, rather than diffusely distributed. Moreover, they are associated with the nuclear matrix. Second, chromatin is organized in discrete loops, bordered by nuclear matrix attachment sequences (MARs). Each loop may contain one or several genes. The arrangement of chromatin in loops has profound consequences for the regulation of gene expression.

  18. Dirac Phenomenology and Hyperon-Nucleus Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    J., MARES; B. K., JENNINGS; E. D., COOPER; Triumf, 4004 Wesbrook Mall; Department of Physics, University College of the Fraser Valley

    1995-01-01

    We discuss various aspects of hyperon-nucleus interactions in the relativistic mean field theory. First, characteristics of Λ, Σ and Ξ hypernuclei, as well as multi-strange baryonic objects, are investigated. The spin-orbit splittings and magnetic moments are shown to be very sensitive to the value of the tensor coupling f_. Second, optical potentials for Λ and Σ scattering off nuclei are developed based on a global nucleon-nucleus Dirac optical potential and SU(3) symmetry. The tensor coupli...

  19. UNCOVERING THE NUCLEUS CANDIDATE FOR NGC 253

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günthardt, G. I.; Camperi, J. A. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (Argentina); Agüero, M. P. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, and CONICET (Argentina); Díaz, R. J.; Gomez, P. L.; Schirmer, M. [Gemini Observatory, AURA (United States); Bosch, G., E-mail: gunth@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: camperi@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: mpaguero@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: rdiaz@gemini.edu, E-mail: pgomez@gemini.edu, E-mail: mschirmer@gemini.edu, E-mail: guille@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (CONICET-UNLP) (Argentina)

    2015-11-15

    NGC 253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst that becomes the best candidate for studying the relationship between starburst and active galactic nucleus activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus to the point that there is no strong evidence that the galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole co-evolving with the starburst as was supposed earlier. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, especially NIR emission line analysis, could be advantageous in shedding light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis of the central structure and through the brightest infrared source. In this work, we present evidence showing that the brightest NIR and mid-infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a large stellar supercluster, in fact presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. Mentioning some distinctive aspects, it is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.″0 of the symmetry center of the galactic bar, as measured in the K-band emission. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H{sub 2} rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate, observed at 18.3 μm (Qa) and 12.8 μm ([Ne ii]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Brγ emission line profile shows a pronounced blueshift and this emission line also has the highest equivalent width at this

  20. Nucleus-Nucleus Potential at Near-Barrier Energies from Self Consistent Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Skalski, J

    2003-01-01

    We determine the static nucleus-nucleus potential from Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations with the Skyrme interaction. To this aim, HF equations are solved on a spatial mesh, with the initial configuration consisting of target and projectile positioned at various relative distances. For a number of reaction partners, the calculated barrier heights reasonably well compare with those extracted from the measured fusion and capture cross sections. At smaller target-projectile distances, our results show the intrinsic barriers to heavy compound nucleus formation. We speculate on their possible connection with the fusion hindrance observed for large Z sub T Z sub P.

  1. Inner Structure of Boiling Nucleus and Interfacial Energy Between Nucleus and Bulk Liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Dong; TIAN Yong; PENG Xiao-Feng; WANG Bu-Xuan

    2004-01-01

    @@ A model of two-region structure of a nucleus is proposed to describe nucleus evolution. The interfacial tension between bulk liquid phase and nucleus is dependent on the density gradient in the transition region and varies with the structure change of the transition region. With the interfacial tension calculated using this model, the predicted nucleation rate is very close to the experimental measurement. Furthermore, this model and associated analysis provide solid theoretical evidence to clarify the definition of nucleation rate and understand the nucleation phenomenon with insight into the physical nature.

  2. The rostral migratory stream generates hippocampal CA1 pyramidal-like neurons in a novel organotypic slice co-culture model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilyas Singec

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The mouse subventricular zone (SVZ generates large numbers of neuroblasts, which migrate in a distinct pathway, the rostral migratory stream (RMS, and replace specific interneurons in the olfactory bulb (OB. Here, we introduce an organotypic slice culture model that directly connects the RMS to the hippocampus as a new destination. RMS neuroblasts widely populate the hippocampus and undergo cellular differentiation. We demonstrate that RMS cells give rise to various neuronal subtypes and, surprisingly, to CA1 pyramidal neurons. Pyramidal neurons are typically generated before birth and are lost in various neurological disorders. Hence, this unique slice culture model enables us to investigate their postnatal genesis under defined in vitro conditions from the RMS, an unanticipated source for hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

  3. Nucleus-associated actin in Amoeba proteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdieva, Mariia; Bogolyubov, Dmitry; Podlipaeva, Yuliya; Goodkov, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The presence, spatial distribution and forms of intranuclear and nucleus-associated cytoplasmic actin were studied in Amoeba proteus with immunocytochemical approaches. Labeling with different anti-actin antibodies and staining with TRITC-phalloidin and fluorescent deoxyribonuclease I were used. We showed that actin is abundant within the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm of A. proteus cells. According to DNase I experiments, the predominant form of intranuclear actin is G-actin which is associated with chromatin strands. Besides, unpolymerized actin was shown to participate in organization of a prominent actin layer adjacent to the outer surface of nuclear envelope. No significant amount of F-actin was found in the nucleus. At the same time, the amoeba nucleus is enclosed in a basket-like structure formed by circumnuclear actin filaments and bundles connected with global cytoplasmic actin cytoskeleton. A supposed architectural function of actin filaments was studied by treatment with actin-depolymerizing agent latrunculin A. It disassembled the circumnuclear actin system, but did not affect the intranuclear chromatin structure. The results obtained for amoeba cells support the modern concept that actin is involved in fundamental nuclear processes that have evolved in the cells of multicellular organisms.

  4. An organism arises from every nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurullah Keklikoglu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The fact that, cloning using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT method has been performed, opened new horizons for cloning, and changed the way of our understanding and approach to cell and nucleus. The progress in cloning technology, brought the anticipation of the ability to clone an organism from each somatic cell nucleus. Therefore, the 'Cell Theory' is about to take the additional statement as "An organism arises from every nucleus". The development of gene targeting procedures which can be applied with SCNT, showed us that it may be possible to obtain different versions of the original genetic constitution of a cell. Because of this opportunity which is provided by SCNT, in reproductive cloning, it would be possible to clone enhanced organisms which can adapt to different environmental conditions and survive. Furthermore, regaining the genetic characteristics of ancestors or reverse herediter variations would be possible. On the other hand, in therapeutic cloning, more precise and easily obtainable alternatives for cell replacement therapy could be presented. However, while producing healthier or different organisms from a nucleus, it is hard to foresee the side effects influencing natural processes in long term is rather difficult.

  5. Uncovering the nucleus candidate for NGC 253

    CERN Document Server

    Günthardt, G I; Camperi, J A; Díaz, R J; Gomez, P L; Bosch, G; Schirmer, M

    2015-01-01

    NGC253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst which becomes the best candidate to study the relationship between starburst and AGN activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus. The near infrared spectroscopy could be advantageous in order to shed light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis and through the brightest infrared source. We present evidence showing that the brightest near infrared and mid infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a stellar supercluster, in fact, presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. It is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.0" of the symmetry center of the galactic bar. Moreover, our data indicate that this object i...

  6. Increased noradrenaline levels in the rostral pons can be reversed by M1 antagonist in a rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzioğlu, Berna; Kaleli, Melisa; Aydın, Banu; Ketenci, Sema; Cabadak, Hülya; Gören, M Zafer

    2013-08-01

    The dysregulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and noradrenergic, serotonergic and glutamatergic systems are thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of post-traumatic stress disorder. The effect of selective M1 muscarinic receptor antagonist, pirenzepine on anxiety indices was investigated by using elevated plus maze, following exposure to trauma reminder. Upon receiving the approval of ethics committee, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to dirty cat litter (trauma) for 10 min and 1 week later, the rats confronted to a trauma reminder (clean litter). The rats also received intraperitoneal pirenzepine (1 or 2 mg/kg/day) or saline for 8 days. Noradrenaline (NA) concentration in the rostral pons was analyzed by HPLC with electrochemical detection. The anxiety indices of the rats subjected to the trauma reminder were increased when compared to control rats (p Pirenzepine treatment in traumatized rats displayed similar anxiety indices of non-traumatized rats treated with physiological saline. Although freezing time was prolonged with pirenzepine in traumatized groups the change was not found statistically significant. The NA level was 1.5 ± 0.1 pg/mg in non-traumatized rats and increased to 2.4 ± 0.2 pg/mg in traumatized rats. Bonferroni post hoc test revealed that the NA content of the rostral pons of the traumatized rats treated with physiological saline was significantly higher than the content of other groups (p pirenzepine indicating the roles of M1 receptors.

  7. Vesicular glutamate transporter 2 is required for the respiratory and parasympathetic activation produced by optogenetic stimulation of catecholaminergic neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of mice in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Stephen B G; Holloway, Benjamin B; Viar, Kenneth E; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2014-01-01

    Catecholaminergic neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM-CA neurons; C1 neurons) contribute to the sympathetic, parasympathetic and neuroendocrine responses elicited by physical stressors such as hypotension, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, and infection. Most RVLM-CA neurons express vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT)2, and may use glutamate as a ionotropic transmitter, but the importance of this mode of transmission in vivo is uncertain. To address this question, we genetically deleted VGLUT2 from dopamine-β-hydroxylase-expressing neurons in mice [DβH(Cre/0) ;VGLUT2(flox/flox) mice (cKO mice)]. We compared the in vivo effects of selectively stimulating RVLM-CA neurons in cKO vs. control mice (DβH(Cre/0) ), using channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2-mCherry) optogenetics. ChR2-mCherry was expressed by similar numbers of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) neurons in each strain (~400 neurons), with identical selectivity for catecholaminergic neurons (90-99% colocalisation with tyrosine hydroxylase). RVLM-CA neurons had similar morphology and axonal projections in DβH(Cre/0) and cKO mice. Under urethane anesthesia, photostimulation produced a similar pattern of activation of presumptive ChR2-positive RVLM-CA neurons in DβH(Cre/0) and cKO mice. Photostimulation in conscious mice produced frequency-dependent respiratory activation in DβH(Cre/0) mice but no effect in cKO mice. Similarly, photostimulation under urethane anesthesia strongly activated efferent vagal nerve activity in DβH(Cre/0) mice only. Vagal responses were unaffected by α1 -adrenoreceptor blockade. In conclusion, two responses evoked by RVLM-CA neuron stimulation in vivo require the expression of VGLUT2 by these neurons, suggesting that the acute autonomic responses driven by RVLM-CA neurons are mediated by glutamate.

  8. Commissural nucleus of the solitary tract regulates the antihypertensive effects elicited by moxonidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totola, L T; Alves, T B; Takakura, A C; Ferreira-Neto, H C; Antunes, V R; Menani, J V; Colombari, E; Moreira, T S

    2013-10-10

    The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) contains the presympathetic neurons involved in cardiovascular regulation that has been implicated as one of the most important central sites for the antihypertensive action of moxonidine (an α2-adrenergic and imidazoline agonist). Here, we sought to evaluate the cardiovascular effects produced by moxonidine injected into another important brainstem site, the commissural nucleus of the solitary tract (commNTS). Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity (sSNA) and activity of putative sympathoexcitatory vasomotor neurons of the RVLM were recorded in conscious or urethane-anesthetized, and artificial ventilated male Wistar rats. In conscious or anesthetized rats, moxonidine (2.5 and 5 nmol/50 nl) injected into the commNTS reduced MAP, HR and sSNA. The injection of moxonidine into the commNTS also elicited a reduction of 28% in the activity of sympathoexcitatory vasomotor neurons of the RVLM. To further assess the notion that moxonidine could act in another brainstem area to elicit the antihypertensive effects, a group with electrolytic lesions of the commNTS or sham and with stainless steel guide-cannulas implanted into the 4th V were used. In the sham group, moxonidine (20 nmol/1 μl) injected into 4th V decreased MAP and HR. The hypotension but not the bradycardia produced by moxonidine into the 4th V was reduced in acute (1 day) commNTS-lesioned rats. These data suggest that moxonidine can certainly act in other brainstem regions, such as commNTS to produce its beneficial therapeutic effects, such as hypotension and reduction in sympathetic nerve activity.

  9. Nonequilibrium distribution functions of nucleons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Anchishkin, D; Cleymans, J; 10.5488/CMP.16.13201

    2013-01-01

    The collision smearing of the nucleon momenta about their initial values during relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is investigated. To a certain degree, our model belongs to the transport type, and we investigate the evolution of the nucleon system created at a nucleus-nucleus collision. However, we parameterize this development by the number of collisions of every particle during evolution rather than by the time variable. It is assumed that the group of nucleons which leave the system after the same number of collisions can be joined in a particular statistical ensemble. The nucleon nonequilibrium distribution functions, which depend on a certain number of collisions of a nucleon before freeze-out, are derived.

  10. Study of -nucleus interaction through the formation of -nucleus bound state

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Jha; B J Roy; A Chatterjee; H Machner

    2006-05-01

    The question of possible existence of -mesic nuclei is quite intriguing. Answer to this question will deeply enrich our understanding of -nucleus interaction which is not so well-understood. We review the experimental efforts for the search of -mesic nuclei and describe the physics motivation behind it. We present the description of an experiment for the search of -nucleus bound state using the GeV proton beam, currently being performed at COSY.

  11. Centrality Dependence of Flow in High-Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨红艳; 周代翠; 杨纯斌; 蔡勖

    2002-01-01

    Directed flow and elliptic flow of final state particles in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions in the EMU01 experiment have been studied. The dependences of directed flow and elliptic flow on incident energy and impact centrality of outgoing particles are presented. The results exhibit strong dependence of flow on centrality and energy. We also suggest a more reliable way to determine the event plane resolution here.

  12. Tolerance effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs microinjected into central amygdala, periaqueductal grey, and nucleus raphe Possible cellular mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Merab G. Tsagareli; Nana Tsiklauri; Ivliane Nozadze; Gulnaz Gurtskaia

    2012-01-01

    Pain is a sensation related to potential or actual damage in some tissue of the body. The mainstay of medical pain therapy remains drugs that have been around for decades, like non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or opiates. However, adverse effects of opiates, particularly tolerance, limit their clinical use. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic (intraperitoneal) administration of NSAIDs induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. In this review, we report that repeated microinjection of NSAIDs analgin, clodifen, ketorolac and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala, the midbrain periaqueductal grey matter and nucleus raphe magnus in the following 4 days result in progressively less antinociception compared to the saline control testing in the tail-flick reflex and hot plate latency tests. Hence, tolerance develops to these drugs and cross-tolerance to morphine in male rats. These findings strongly support the suggestion of endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain-control system. Moreover, the periaqueductal grey-rostral ventro-medial part of medulla circuit should be viewed as a pain-modulation system. These data are important for human medicine. In particular, cross-tolerance between non-opioid and opioid analgesics should be important in the clinical setting.

  13. [The analysis of the possible pathways of carrying information and its integration in the projection systems, connecting the basal ganglia with the rostromedial tegmental nucleus dog's brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbachevskaia, A I

    2014-05-01

    The structural foundation of processing of the information in the basal ganglia morphofunctional system was studied on the basis of the analysis of the projections between the separate parts of the rostral and thecaudal compartments of the rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTN) and the functionally different segments of the striatal and the pallidal structures, which were investigated by the method of the retrograde axonal transport. The elements of the topic, showing to opportunity of segregated carrying of the information between the limbic segments RMTN and the limbic striopallidal fields were revealed in the organization of the projections between the named structures in dog. But the convergence of the projection fibers, proceeding from the neurons of the functionally different parts of RMTN observed in the majority of striopallidal structures that testify about the opportunity of the integration of the functionally different information in them. The revealed labeled RMTN "reticular" neurons with sparsely branching dendrites and long axons, which are projected to the striopallidal structures, also testify about the integrative function of the investigated nucleus. The possible ways of carrying of the motor and the limbic information and its integration in the structures of the studied system and opportunity of the utilization of the received dates for making of the new models, which allow to understand better the mechanism of basal ganglia functioning in normal and pathological conditions are discussed.

  14. Morphology, classification, and distribution of the projection neurons in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus of the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changying Ling

    Full Text Available The morphology of confirmed projection neurons in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN of the rat was examined by filling these cells retrogradely with biotinylated dextran amine (BDA injected into the visual cortex. BDA-labeled projection neurons varied widely in the shape and size of their cell somas, with mean cross-sectional areas ranging from 60-340 µm(2. Labeled projection neurons supported 7-55 dendrites that spanned up to 300 µm in length and formed dendritic arbors with cross-sectional areas of up to 7.0 × 10(4 µm(2. Primary dendrites emerged from cell somas in three broad patterns. In some dLGN projection neurons, primary dendrites arise from the cell soma at two poles spaced approximately 180° apart. In other projection neurons, dendrites emerge principally from one side of the cell soma, while in a third group of projection neurons primary dendrites emerge from the entire perimeter of the cell soma. Based on these three distinct patterns in the distribution of primary dendrites from cell somas, we have grouped dLGN projection neurons into three classes: bipolar cells, basket cells and radial cells, respectively. The appendages seen on dendrites also can be grouped into three classes according to differences in their structure. Short "tufted" appendages arise mainly from the distal branches of dendrites; "spine-like" appendages, fine stalks with ovoid heads, typically are seen along the middle segments of dendrites; and "grape-like" appendages, short stalks that terminate in a cluster of ovoid bulbs, appear most often along the proximal segments of secondary dendrites of neurons with medium or large cell somas. While morphologically diverse dLGN projection neurons are intermingled uniformly throughout the nucleus, the caudal pole of the dLGN contains more small projection neurons of all classes than the rostral pole.

  15. Why do we have a caudate nucleus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villablanca, Jaime R

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand the physiological role of the caudate nucleus, we combine here our laboratory data on cats with reports of patients with selective damage to this nucleus. Cats with bilateral removal of the caudate nuclei showed a stereotyped behavior consisting of persistently approaching and then following a person, another cat, or any object, and attempting to contact the target. Simultaneously, the animals exhibited a friendly disposition and persistent docility together with purring and forelimbs treading/kneading. The magnitude and duration of this behavior was proportional to the extent of the removal reaching a maximum after ablations of 65% or more of the caudate tissue. These cats were hyperactive but they had lost the feline elegance of movements. Additional features of acaudate cats were: (1) postural and accuracy deficits (plus perseveration) in paw usage tasks including bar pressing for food reward; (2) cognitive and perceptual impairments on a T-maze battery of tasks and on the bar pressing tasks; (3) blockage or blunting of the species-specific behavioral response to a single injection of morphine; Unilateral caudate nucleus removal did not produce global behavioral effects, but only deficit in the contralateral paw contact placing reaction and paw usage/bar pressing. Moreover and surprisingly, we found hypertrophy of the ipsilateral caudate nucleus following prenatal focal neocortical removal. The findings in human were also behavioral (not neurological) and also occurred with unilateral caudate damage. The main manifestations consisted of loss of drive (apathy), obsessive-compulsive behavior, cognitive deficits, stimulus-bound perseverative behavior, and hyperactivity. Based on all of the above data we propose that the specific function of the caudate nucleus is to control approach-attachment behavior, ranging from plain approach to a target, to romantic love. This putative function would account well for the caudate involvement in the

  16. Transverse momentum spectra in high-energy nucleus-nucleus, proton-nucleus and proton-proton collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Jie

    2011-01-01

    The transverse momentum distributions of final-state particles produced in nucleus-nucleus (AA),proton-nucleus (pA),and proton-proton (pp) collisions at high energies are investigated using a multisource ideal gas model.Our calculated results show that the contribution of hard emission can be neglected in the study of transverse momentum spectra of charged pions and kaons produced in Cu-Cu collisions at (√SNN)=22.5 GeV.And if we consider the contribution of hard emission,the transverse momentum spectra of p and (P) produced in Cu-Cu collisions at (√SNN)=22.5 GeV,KsO produced in Pb-Pb collisions at 158 A GeV,J/ψ particles produced in p-Pb collisions at 400 GeV and π+,K+,p produced in proton-proton collisions at (√S)=200 GeV,can be described by the model,especially in the tail part of spectra.

  17. Rutherford, Radioactivity, and the Atomic Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Kragh, Helge

    2012-01-01

    Modern atomic and nuclear physics took its start in the early part of the twentieth century, to a large extent based upon experimental investigations of radioactive phenomena. Foremost among the pioneers of the new kind of physics was Ernest Rutherford, who made fundamental contributions to the structure of matter for more than three decades and, in addition, founded important research schools in Manchester and Cambridge. This paper reviews the most important aspects of Rutherford's scientific work in the period from about 1900 to 1920, and it also refers to some of his last experiments of the 1930s. The emphasis is on his theory of radioactive disintegration (1902), the discovery of the atomic nucleus (1911), and the first artificially produced element transformation (1919). Following the transmutation experiments, Rutherford developed elaborate models of the atomic nucleus, but these turned out to be unsuccessful. Other subjects could be included, but the three mentioned are undoubtedly those of the greates...

  18. Correlations in neutrino-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Van Cuyck, Tom; Jachowicz, Natalie; González-Jiménez, Raul; Martini, Marco; Ryckebusch, Jan; Van Dessel, Nils

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed study of charged-current quasielastic neutrino-nucleus scattering and of the influence of correlations on one- and two-nucleon knockout processes. The quasielastic neutrino-nucleus scattering cross sections, including the influence of long-range correlations, are evaluated within a continuum random phase approximation approach. The short-range correlation formalism is implemented in the impulse approximation by shifting the complexity induced by the correlations from the wave functions to the operators. The model is validated by confronting $(e,e^\\prime)$ cross-section predictions with electron scattering data in the kinematic region where the quasielastic channel is expected to dominate. Further, the $^{12}$C$(\

  19. Single pion production in neutrino nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, E; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2013-01-01

    We study one pion production in both charged and neutral current neutrino nucleus scattering for neutrino energies below 2 GeV. We use a theoretical model for one pion production at the nucleon level that we correct for medium effects. The results are incorporated into a cascade program that apart from production also includes the pion final state interaction inside the nucleus. Besides, in some specific channels coherent pion production is also possible and we evaluate its contribution as well. Our results for total and differential cross sections are compared with recent data from the MiniBooNE Collaboration. The model provides an overall acceptable description of data, better for NC than for CC channels, although theory is systematically below data. Differential cross sections, folded with the full neutrino flux, show that most of the missing pions lie on the forward direction and at high energies.

  20. Coherency in Neutrino-Nucleus Elastic Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kerman, S; Deniz, M; Wong, H T; Chen, J -W; Li, H B; Lin, S T; Liu, C -P; Yue, Q

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering provides a unique laboratory to study the quantum mechanical coherency effects in electroweak interactions, towards which several experimental programs are being actively pursued. We report results of our quantitative studies on the transitions towards decoherency. A parameter ($\\alpha$) is identified to describe the degree of coherency, and its variations with incoming neutrino energy, detector threshold and target nucleus are studied. The ranges of $\\alpha$ which can be probed with realistic neutrino experiments are derived, indicating complementarity between projects with different sources and targets. Uncertainties in nuclear physics and in $\\alpha$ would constrain sensitivities in probing physics beyond the standard model. The maximum neutrino energies corresponding to $\\alpha$>0.95 are derived.

  1. Protein quality control in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofie V.; Poulsen, Esben Guldahl; Rebula, Caio A.

    2014-01-01

    to aggregate, cells have evolved several elaborate quality control systems to deal with these potentially toxic proteins. First, various molecular chaperones will seize the misfolded protein and either attempt to refold the protein or target it for degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system...... to be particularly active in protein quality control. Thus, specific ubiquitin-protein ligases located in the nucleus, target not only misfolded nuclear proteins, but also various misfolded cytosolic proteins which are transported to the nucleus prior to their degradation. In comparison, much less is known about...... these mechanisms in mammalian cells. Here we highlight recent advances in our understanding of nuclear protein quality control, in particular regarding substrate recognition and proteasomal degradation....

  2. Neutrino-nucleus reactions in supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhioev, Alan A.; Vdovin, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    We study thermal effects on neutrino-nucleus reactions occurring under supernova conditions. The approach we use is based on the QRPA extended to finite temperature by the thermofield dynamics formalism. For the relevant supernova conditions we calculate inelastic neutrino scattering and neutrino absorption cross sections for two sample nuclei, 56Fe and 82Ge. In addition, we apply the approach to examine the rate of neutrino-antineutrino pair emission by hot nuclei.

  3. Neutrino-nucleus reactions in supernovae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzhioev Alan A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study thermal effects on neutrino-nucleus reactions occurring under supernova conditions. The approach we use is based on the QRPA extended to finite temperature by the thermofield dynamics formalism. For the relevant supernova conditions we calculate inelastic neutrino scattering and neutrino absorption cross sections for two sample nuclei, 56Fe and 82Ge. In addition, we apply the approach to examine the rate of neutrino-antineutrino pair emission by hot nuclei.

  4. Theoretical highlights of neutrino-nucleus interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Ruso, Luis

    2009-01-01

    The recent theoretical developments in the field of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the few-GeV region are reviewed based on the presentations made at the NuInt09 Workshop. The topics of electron scattering and its connections with neutrino interactions, neutrino induced quasielastic scattering and pion production (coherent and incoherent) are covered, with special emphasis on the challenges that arise in the comparison with new experimental data.

  5. Neutrino-nucleus CCQE-like scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Nieves, J; Simo, I Ruiz; Sanchez, F; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2014-01-01

    RPA correlations, spectral function and 2p2h (multi-nucleon) effects on charged-current neutrino-nucleus reactions without emitted pions are discussed. We pay attention to the influence of RPA and multi-nucleon mechanisms on the MiniBooNE and MINERvA flux folded differential cross sections, the MiniBooNE flux unfolded total cross section and the neutrino energy reconstruction.

  6. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kok, Gregory [Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States); Kulkarni, Gourihar [Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70°C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  7. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kok, Gregory; Kulkarni, Gourihar

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70 deg C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45 deg C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  8. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Three Advanced Design Projects have been completed this academic year at Penn State. At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into eight groups and given their choice of either a comet nucleus or an asteroid sample return mission. Once a mission had been chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These were evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into three separate mission plans, including a comet nucleus same return (CNSR), a single asteroid sample return (SASR), and a multiple asteroid sample return (MASR). To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form three mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission so that communication and information exchange would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Johnson Space Center Human/Robotic Spacecraft Office. Robotic sample return missions are widely considered valuable precursors to manned missions in that they can provide details about a site's environment and scientific value. For example, a sample return from an asteroid might reveal valuable resources that, once mined, could be utilized for propulsion. These missions are also more adaptable when considering the risk to humans visiting unknown and potentially dangerous locations, such as a comet nucleus.

  9. Differential distribution of glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 messenger RNAs in the entopeduncular nucleus of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, P Q; Grånäs, C; Källström, L; Yu, J; Huhman, K; Larhammar, D; Albers, H E; Johnson, A E

    1997-05-01

    The entopeduncular nucleus is one of the major output nuclei of the basal ganglia, with topographically organized projections to both motor and limbic structures. Neurons of the entopeduncular nucleus use GABA as the principal transmitter, and glutamic acid decarboxylase (the GABA synthetic enzyme) is widely distributed throughout the region. Previous studies have shown that glutamate decarboxylase exists in two forms (glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67), and that the messenger RNAs for these different enzymes are widely distributed in rat brain. The purpose of the present experiment was to describe the distribution of glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 and glutamic decarboxylase-67 messenger RNAs throughout the entopeduncular nucleus using recently developed oligodeoxynucleotide probes and in situ hybridization histochemical methods. In agreement with previous studies, northern analysis of rat brain poly(A)+ messenger RNA preparations showed that the glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 probes used in the present study hybridized to messenger RNAs of approximately 5.7 and 3.7 kb, respectively. Film autoradiographic analysis revealed large region-dependent, isoform-specific differences in the levels of expression of the two messenger RNAs, with glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 messenger RNA predominating in rostral and medial regions of the entopeduncular nucleus and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 messenger RNA most abundant in the caudal region. Cellular analysis showed that these region-dependent differences in labelling were due to differences in the relative amounts of glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 messenger RNAs expressed per cell rather than the number of cells expressing each form of glutamic acid decarboxylase messenger RNA. The differences in the distribution of glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 messenger RNAs are closely related to the

  10. Oscillations of moments in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨红艳; 周代翠; 钱琬燕; 王晓荣

    2001-01-01

    The definitions of density function and moment of multiplicity distribution are introduced,and the method of moment analysis in e+ e- and proton-proton (pp) interactions is extended into nu-cleus-nucleus (AA) interactions. We analyze the data for relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions and cal-culate the values of Hq for charged particle multiplicity distributions, by which we study systematically the dependences of Hq on incident energy, mass of colliding system, pseudorapidity interval, centrality and truncation of multiplicity. We compare the oscillation structures induced by e + e-, pp and AA inter-actions, and the comparison and analysis are carried out between experimental data and QCD predic-tion. The latest results are given in this paper.

  11. Columnar organization of estrogen receptor-alpha immunoreactive neurons in the periaqueductal gray projecting to the nucleus para-retroambiguus in the caudal brainstem of the female golden hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrits, P O; Krukerink, M; Veening, J G

    2009-06-30

    In the hamster brainstem estrogen receptor-alpha-immunoreactive neurons (ER-alpha-IR) are present in the nucleus para-retroambiguus (NPRA), located in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) ventrolaterally to the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA). NPRA neurons project mainly to the thoracic and upper lumbar cord and are probably involved in the autonomic adaptations during the estrous cycle. The periaqueductal gray (PAG), projecting to the CVLM, also contains ER-alpha-IR neurons. This raises the questions: how are these projections organized and are ER-alpha-IR neurons in PAG and NPRA linked directly? Combined retro- and anterograde tracing techniques, using wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP), were carried out to demonstrate neuronal relationships between PAG and NPRA and/or NRA. Finally, a double-label immunostaining was performed in ovariectomized hamsters combining anti-ER-alpha antibody immunocytochemistry with cholera toxin B injections into the CVLM, to differentiate between ER-alpha-IR projections from the PAG to either NRA or NPRA. The experiments showed that retrograde labeling from the NRA mainly occurred in the rostral and intermediate ipsilateral PAG, while injections involving both NRA and NPRA resulted in numerous labeled neurons in the ipsilateral rostral, intermediate and especially the caudal PAG. The anterograde tracing studies confirmed these projections: from the rostral PAG almost exclusively to the NRA and from the caudal PAG to the NPRA, while the intermediate lateral PAG projects to both NPRA and NRA. Our double-immunostudies revealed that ER-alpha-IR projections descend only towards the NPRA and mainly originate from the ipsilateral caudal PAG. Retrogradely labeled ER-alpha-IR neurons in the PAG were observed in two separate columns, laterally and ventrolaterally in the caudal half of the PAG. The results provide evidence for the existence of differentiated PAG-CVLM projections to NRA and NPRA, respectively, originating from

  12. Transverse energy distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 200 GeV/nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baglin, C.; Baldisseri, A.; Bussiere, A.; Guillaud, J.P.; Kossakowski, R.; Liaud, P.; Staley, F. (Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules, 74 - Annecy-le-Vieux (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules); Baldit, A.; Castor, J.; Chambon, T.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Felgeyrolles, X.; Force, P.; Fredj, L.; Landaud, G.; Vazeille, F. (Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (France)); Sonderegger, P. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Abreu, M.C.; Bordalo, P.; Ferreira, R.; Gago, J.M.; Lourenco, C.; Peralta, L.; Pimenta, M.; Ramos, S.; Silva, S.; Varela, J. (LIP, Lisbon (Portugal)); Gerschel, C.; Jouan, D.; Papillon, S.; Tarrago, X. (Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules, 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)); Bus; NA38 Collaboration

    1990-11-22

    The transverse energy E{sub T} distributions of nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied in the framework of a simple geometrical model. The distributions for inclusive production of J/{psi} and muon pairs in the mass continuum are analyzed. The shape of the E{sub T} distribution of the continuum agrees with the model. The previously observed decrease of the ratio (J/{psi})/continuum with increasing E{sub T} is due to the behavior of the J/{psi}. (orig.).

  13. Aspects of Coulomb dissociation and interference in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystrand, Joakim; Baltz, Anthony; Klein, Spencer R.

    2001-10-21

    Coherent vector meson production in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions is discussed. These interactions may occur for impact parameters much larger than the sum of the nuclear radii. Since the vector meson production is always localized to one of the nuclei, the system acts as a two-source interferometer in the transverse plane. By tagging the outgoing nuclei for Coulomb dissociation it is possible to obtain a measure of the impact parameter and thus the source separation in the interferometer. This is of particular interest since the life-time of the vector mesons are generally much shorter than the impact parameters of the collisions.

  14. Jet tomography of high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions at next-to-leading order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitev, Ivan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Ben - Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that jet observables are highly sensitive to the characteristics of the vacuum and the in-medium QCD parton showers and propose techniques that exploit this sensitivity to constrain the mechanism of quark and gluon energy loss in strongly-interacting plasmas. As a first example, we calculate the inclusive jet cross section in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions to {Omicron}({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3}). Theoretical predictions for the medium-induced jet broadening and the suppression of the jet production rate due to cold and hot nuclear matter effects in Au+Au and Cu+Cu reactions at RHIC are presented.

  15. Azimuthal correlations of hadrons and fragments in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Two-particle (two-fragment) azimuthal correlation functions are studied by using a simple formula which describes uniformly azimuthal distributions of final-state charged particles and nuclear fragments.This formula is obtained in the framework of a multi-source thermal model (or multi-source ideal gas model).The calculated results are compared and found to be in agreement with the experimental data of charged hadrons and nuclear fragments in nucleus-nucleus collisions at intermediate and high energies.

  16. The effect of the relative nuclear size on the nucleus-nucleus interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erofeeva, I. N.; Murzin, V. S.; Sivoklokov, S. Y.; Smirnova, L. N.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental data on the interactions of light nuclei (d, He(4), C(12)) at the momentum 4.2 GeV/cA with the carbon nuclei were taken in the 2-m propane bubble chamber. The distributions in the number of interacting nucleons, the spectra of protons, the mean energies of secondary pions and protons, the mean fractions of energy transferred to the pion and nucleon components are presented. The results of the investigation of the mechanism of nucleus-nucleus interactions can be used to calculate the nuclear cascades in the atmosphere.

  17. Electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions relating to space radiation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the papers within this report deal with electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions which are of concern in the space radiation program. In particular, the removal of one and two nucleons via both electromagnetic and strong interaction processes has been extensively investigated. The theory of relativistic Coulomb fission has also been developed. Several papers on quark models also appear. Finally, note that the theoretical methods developed in this work have been directly applied to the task of radiation protection of astronauts. This has been done by parameterizing the theoretical formalism in such a fashion that it can be used in cosmic ray transport codes.

  18. Recent results on (anti)nucleus and (anti)hyperon production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN SPS energies

    CERN Document Server

    Melkumov, G L; Anticic, T; Baatar, B; Barna, D; Bartke, J; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Bramm, R; Buncic, P; Cerny, V; Christakoglou, P; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Flierl, D; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Gazdzicki, M; Genchev, V; Georgopoulos, G; Grebieszkow, K; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kikola, D; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kliemant, M; Kniege, S; Kolesnikov, V I; Kornas, E; Korus, R; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; Laszlo, A; Lacey, R; Van Leeuwen, M; Lvai, P; Litov, L; Lungwitz, B; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A I; Mateev, M; Melkumov, G L; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M; Molnár, J; Mrówczynski, S; Nicolic, V; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Panayotov, D; Petridis, A; Peryt, W; Pikna, M; Pluta, J; Prindle, D; Pühlhofer, F; Renfordt, R; Roland, C; Roland5, G; Rybczynski, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T; Siklér, F; Sitár, B; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Seyboth, P; Strabel, C; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpetery, I; Sziklai, J; Szuba, M; Szymanski, P; Trubnikov, V; Varga, D; Vassiliou, M; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wlodarczyk, Z; Wojtaszek11, A; Yoo, I K; Zimnyi, J; Wetzler, A

    2007-01-01

    The NA49 experiment has collected comprehensive data on particle production in nucleus-nucleus collisions over the whole SPS beam energies range, the critical energy domain where the expected phase transition to a deconfined phase is expected to occur. The latest results from Pb+Pb collisions between 20$A$ GeV and 158$A$ GeV on baryon stopping and light nuclei production as well as those for strange hyperons are presented. The measured data on $p$, $\\bar{p}$, $\\Lambda$, $\\bar{\\Lambda}$, $\\Xi^-$ and $\\bar{\\Xi}^+$ production were used to evaluate the rapidity distributions of net-baryons at SPS energies and to compare with the results from the AGS and the RHIC for central Pb+Pb (Au+Au) collisions. The dependence of the yield ratios and the inverse slope parameter of the $m_t$ spectra on the collision energy and centrality, and the mass number of the produced nuclei $^3He$, $t$, $d$ and $\\bar{d}$ are discussed within coalescence and statistical approaches. Analysis of the total multiplicity exhibits remarkable a...

  19. Lmx1a is an activator of Rgs4 and Grb10 and is responsible for the correct specification of rostral and medial mdDA neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Elisa J; von Oerthel, Lars; van der Linden, Annemarie J A; Schellevis, Raymond D; Scheppink, Gerard; Holstege, Frank C P; Groot-Koerkamp, Marian J; van der Heide, Lars P; Smidt, Marten P

    2013-01-01

    The LIM homeodomain transcription factor Lmx1a is a very potent inducer of stem cells towards dopaminergic neurons. Despite several studies on the function of this gene, the exact in vivo role of Lmx1a in mesodiencephalic dopamine (mdDA) neuronal specification is still not understood. To analyse the genes functioning downstream of Lmx1a, we performed expression microarray analysis of LMX1A-overexpressing MN9D dopaminergic cells. Several interesting regulated genes were identified, based on their regulation in other previously generated expression arrays and on their expression pattern in the developing mdDA neuronal field. Post analysis through in vivo expression analysis in Lmx1a mouse mutant (dr/dr) embryos demonstrated a clear decrease in expression of the genes Grb10 and Rgs4, in and adjacent to the rostral and dorsal mdDA neuronal field and within the Lmx1a expression domain. Interestingly, the DA marker Vmat2 was significantly up-regulated as a consequence of increased LMX1A dose, and subsequent analysis on Lmx1a-mutant E14.5 and adult tissue revealed a significant decrease in Vmat2 expression in mdDA neurons. Taken together, microarray analysis of an LMX1A-overexpression cell system resulted in the identification of novel direct or indirect downstream targets of Lmx1a in mdDA neurons: Grb10, Rgs4 and Vmat2.

  20. Short-term anesthesia inhibits formalin-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex but not in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochiki, Keri K; Maiarù, Maria; Miller, James R C; Hunt, Stephen P; Géranton, Sandrine M

    2015-08-14

    The rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) has been implicated in the negative affective response to injury, and importantly, it has been shown that activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling in the rACC contributes to the full expression of the affective component of pain in rodents. In this study, we investigated whether administration of anesthesia at the time of injury could reduce phosphorylated-ERK (PERK) expression in the rACC, which might eliminate the negative affective component of noxious stimulation. Intraplantar hindpaw formalin stimulation, an aversive event in the awake animal, was given with or without general isoflurane anesthesia, and PERK expression was subsequently quantified in the rACC using immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, as numerous studies have demonstrated the importance of spinal ERK signaling in the regulation of nociceptive behaviour, we also examined PERK in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Formalin injection with and without short-term (anesthesia induced the same level of PERK expression in spinal cord laminae I-II. However, PERK expression was significantly inhibited across all laminae of the rACC in animals anesthetized during formalin injection. The effect of anesthesia was such that levels of PERK were the same in formalin and sham treated anesthesized animals. This study is the first to demonstrate that isoflurane anesthesia can inhibit formalin-induced PERK in the rACC and therefore might eliminate the unpleasantness of restraint associated with awake hindpaw injection.

  1. A subset of μ-opioid receptor-expressing cells in the rostral ventromedial medulla contribute to thermal hyperalgesia in experimental neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Hiroshi; Sakai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Atsuhiro; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2011-05-01

    The rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) is a major region for the descending modulation of pain at the spinal cord level, and neurons in the RVM have been implicated in the inhibition and facilitation of spinal nociceptive transmission. Although recent studies have established that the RVM facilitation of nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord contributes to neuropathic pain, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of kainic acid (KA)-induced RVM damage on neuropathic pain behavior and the expression of molecules implicated in pain modulation. KA was injected into the RVM midline region after neuropathic pain was established by chronic constrictive injury of the left sciatic nerve. Thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia, was persistently suppressed in the ipsilateral paw by a single KA injection into the RVM for at least the next 7 days in a rat neuropathic pain model. KA injection alone did not affect the nocifensive responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli on the intact side. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that KA injection into the RVM significantly reduced the number of immunoreactive neurons for μ-opioid receptors, but not tryptophan hydroxylase, in association with the analgesic effect. These results suggest that a subset of RVM neurons expressing μ-opioid receptors contribute to the maintenance of thermal hyperalgesia in neuropathic pain.

  2. Regulation of the sympathetic nervous system by nitric oxide and oxidative stress in the rostral ventrolateral medulla: 2012 Academic Conference Award from the Japanese Society of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Takuya

    2013-10-01

    Sympathoexcitation has an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Previous studies have demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) and/or oxidative stress in the brain are important for the regulation of the sympathetic nervous system. We have investigated the role of NO derived from an overexpression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) or oxidative stress in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), which is known as a vasomotor center in the brainstem, on the regulation of the sympathetic nervous system. Our results indicated that NO derived from an overexpression of eNOS in the RVLM caused sympathoinhibition via an increase in γ-amino butyric acid and that angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R)-induced oxidative stress in the RVLM caused sympathoexcitation. We also demonstrated that oxidative stress in the RVLM caused sympathoexcitation via interactions with NO, effects on the signal transduction or apoptosis of the astrocytes. Furthermore, several orally administered AT1R blockers have been found to cause sympathoinhibition via a reduction in oxidative stress through the blockade of AT1R in the RVLM of hypertensive rats. In conclusion, our studies suggest that the increase in AT1R-induced oxidative stress and/or the decrease in NO in the RVLM mainly cause sympathoexcitation in hypertension.

  3. Effects of a metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 negative allosteric modulator in the periaqueductal grey on pain responses and rostral ventromedial medulla cell activity in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Enza; Marabese, Ida; Luongo, Livio; Boccella, Serena; Bellini, Giulia; Giordano, Maria Elvira; Rossi, Francesca; Scafuro, Mariantonietta; Novellis, Vito de; Maione, Sabatino

    2013-09-03

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 (mGluR7) negative allosteric modulator, 6-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-3-pyridin-4-ylisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridin-4(5H)-one (MMPIP), was locally microinjected into the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (VL PAG) and the effect on pain responses in formalin and spare nerve injury (SNI) -induced neuropathic pain models was monitored in the rat. The activity of rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) "pronociceptive" ON and "antinociceptive" OFF cells was also evaluated. Intra-VL PAG MMPIP blocked the first and second phase of nocifensive behaviour in the formalin pain model. MMPIP increased the tail flick latency and simultaneously increased the activity of the OFF cells while inhibiting that of ON cells in rats with SNI of the sciatic nerve. MMPIP failed to modify nociceptive responses and associated RVM ON and OFF cell activity in sham rats. An increase in mGluR7 gene, protein and staining, the latter being associated with vesicular glutamate transporter-positive profiles, has been found in the VL PAG in SNI rats. Blockade of mGluR7 within the VL PAG has an antinociceptive effect in formalin and neuropathic pain models. VL PAG mGluR7 blockade offers a target for dis-inhibiting the VL PAG-RVM pathway and silencing pain in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models.

  4. Microinjection of resveratrol into rostral ventrolateral medulla decreases sympathetic vasomotor tone through nitric oxide and intracellular Ca2+in anesthetized male rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-juan MA; Ya-kun CAO; Yi-xian LIU; Ru WANG; Yu-ming WU

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To define the effect of resveratrol (RES) on the central regulation of blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Methods: RES was microinjected into the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), and BP, HR, and RSNA were recorded simultaneously in anesthetized rats. Results: A microinjection of RES (20, 40, and 80 μmol/L, 0.2μL) into the RVLM dose depen- dently decreased BP, HR, and RSNA. Pretreatment with an anti-estrogen tamoxifen (100 μmol/L, 0.2 μL) did not affect the effects of RES. Pretreatment with NG-nitro- L-arginine methyl ester (100/Jmol/L, 0.2 μL), an inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, could completely abolish the effect of RES. A prior microinjection of Bay K8644 (500 nmol/L, 0.2 μL), an agonist of calcium channels, could also abro- gate the effect of RES. Prior administration of a potent inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatase, sodium orthovanadate (l mmol/L, 0.2 μL), could partially attenuate the inhibitory effect of RES. Conclusion: The results suggest that a microinjec- tion of RES into the RVLM inhibits BE HR, and RSNA. The effects may be mediated by NO synthesis and a decrease in Ca2+ influx, in which protein tyrosine kinase is involved.

  5. Mechanical Stimulus-Induced Wthdrawal Behavior Increases Subsequent Pre-Stimulus Local Field Potential Power in the Rostral Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Unanesthetized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zui; Sun, Jing; Liu, Boyi; Jiang, Yongliang; Wu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jialing; Shao, Xiaomei; Fang, Jianqiao

    2017-03-02

    BACKGROUND The rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) is important in pain expectation. Previous studies demonstrated that mechanical stimulus-induced withdrawal behaviors are spinally-mediated nocifensive reflexes in rats, but it is not known whether pain expectation is influenced by withdrawal behaviors. MATERIAL AND METHODS We reanalyzed previous mechanosensitivity measurements of 244 rats measured 5 times in succession. To study neural oscillation in the rACC, 1 recording microwire array was surgically implanted. Then, we simultaneously recorded the local field potential (LFP) of the rACC over the course of multiple withdrawal behaviors in unanesthetized rats. RESULTS From our previous withdrawal behavioral data in 244 rats, we observed that the distributions of paw withdrawal thresholds (PWTs) were denser and more concentrated after the first withdrawal behavior. Compared to the first mechanical stimulus, increased neuronal synchrony and a stronger delta band component existed in each pre-stimulus LFP in the rACC during subsequent stimuli. CONCLUSIONS Pain expectation could be involved in withdrawal behaviors, which is related to increased total power and delta band power of the subsequent pre-stimulus LFPs in the rACC.

  6. Contemporary models of the atomic nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Nemirovskii, P E

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary Models of the Atomic Nucleus discusses nuclear structure and properties, expounding contemporary theoretical concepts of the low-energy nuclear processes underlying in nuclear models. This book focuses on subjects such as the optical nuclear model, unified or collective model, and deuteron stripping reaction. Other topics discussed include the basic nuclear properties; shell model; theoretical analysis of the shell model; and radiative transitions and alpha-decay. The deuteron theory and the liquid drop nuclear model with its application to fission theory are also mentioned, but o

  7. A thalamic input to the nucleus accumbens mediates opiate dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingjie; Wienecke, Carl F R; Nachtrab, Gregory; Chen, Xiaoke

    2016-02-11

    Chronic opiate use induces opiate dependence, which is characterized by extremely unpleasant physical and emotional feelings after drug use is terminated. Both the rewarding effects of a drug and the desire to avoid withdrawal symptoms motivate continued drug use, and the nucleus accumbens is important for orchestrating both processes. While multiple inputs to the nucleus accumbens regulate reward, little is known about the nucleus accumbens circuitry underlying withdrawal. Here we identify the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus as a prominent input to the nucleus accumbens mediating the expression of opiate-withdrawal-induced physical signs and aversive memory. Activity in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus to nucleus accumbens pathway is necessary and sufficient to mediate behavioural aversion. Selectively silencing this pathway abolishes aversive symptoms in two different mouse models of opiate withdrawal. Chronic morphine exposure selectively potentiates excitatory transmission between the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus and D2-receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons via synaptic insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors. Notably, in vivo optogenetic depotentiation restores normal transmission at these synapses and robustly suppresses morphine withdrawal symptoms. This links morphine-evoked pathway- and cell-type-specific plasticity in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus to nucleus accumbens circuit to opiate dependence, and suggests that reprogramming this circuit holds promise for treating opiate addiction.

  8. Ventromedial arcuate nucleus communicates peripheral metabolic information to the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, C.-X.; Vliet, J. van der; Dai, J.; Yin, G.; Ru, L.; Buijs, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    The arcuate nucleus (ARC) is crucial for the maintenance of energy homeostasis as an integrator of long- and short-term hunger and satiety signals. The expression of receptors for metabolic hormones, such as insulin, leptin, and ghrelin, allows ARC to sense information from the periphery and signal

  9. Experimental study of collective flow phenomena in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Chkhaidze, L V; Kharkhelauri, L L

    2002-01-01

    The results of the experimental study of collective flow phenomena, such as the sideward and elliptic flow of nuclear matter, discovered during the last 10-15 years in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions are presented in this review. Sideward (often termed directed) and elliptic flows have been observed for protons, antiprotons, light nuclei, pions, kaons, and lambdas emitted in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 0.1-1.8 GeV/nucleon of LBL Bevalac and GSI/SIS by Plastic-Ball, Streamer Chamber, EOS-NPC, FOPI, LAND, TAPS, and KAOS collaborations; at 2-4 GeV/nucleon of Dubna JINR by SKM-200-GIBS, Propane Buble Chamber, and Emulsion Chamber collaborations; at 2-14 GeV/nucleon of BNL AGS, by the E877, E895, and E917 collaborations; and at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon of CERN SPS, by the WA98 and NA49 collaborations and more recently by the STAR at RHIC BNL. In the review, the results of the SKM-200-GIBS collaboration of JINR are presented and compared with the results of different experiments by Bevalac, GSI/SIS, BNL, and...

  10. 5-hydroxytryptamine-mediated apnea caused by the habenular nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Weihong Lin; Jinghua Wang; Min Huang; Chunyong Wang; Mingxian Li; Shao Wang

    2011-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine contributes to the control of activities of the dilator muscle in the upper respiratory tract, and is derived from the raphe nuclei, in which the habenular nucleus exerts a sustained inhibitory effect. In the present study, respiratory motion curve of the genioglossus muscle and peripheral 5-hydroxytryptamine changes were observed following L-glutamate stimulation of the habenular nucleus of adult Wistar rats. Results showed that the rats had apnea and decreased plasma 5-hydroxytryptamine content after the neurons in habenular nucleus were excited. Genioglossus muscle electromyogram amplitude and integral were significantly reduced. The genioglossus myoelectric activity and respiratory motion curve were similar to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, thus confirming that the habenular nucleus is the key nucleus involved in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, and is the primary regulated center in the raphe nuclei. Stimulation of the habenular nucleus may suppress 5-hydroxytryptamine release and result in apnea, which is similar to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

  11. Nucleus properties of P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meech, Karen J.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Mueller, Beatrice E. A.; Dicksion, Matthew W.; Li, Heide R.

    1993-01-01

    Time series photometric measurements are presented of Comet P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 at a heliocentric distance of 5.886 AU when the comet possessed an extensive coma. The light curve shows a modulation caused by the rotation of the nucleus. The rotation period is considerably shorter than the 5 day period found by Whipple (1980), and we find substantial evidence that the nucleus may be in a complex spin state characterized by two periods 14.0 and 32.3 hr. Models of the rate at which the rotational light curve range decreases as a function of the amount of coma in the aperture have determined that the projected maximum to minimum axis ratio of the comet is 2.6 and that the product of the albedo times the rotationally averaged nucleus radius size is 9.54 +/- 0.3 sq km. Assuming a minimum geometric albedo of pR = 0.04, the maximum projected average nucleus radius is 15.44 +/-0.2 km, which is only 44 percent of the size estimated by Roemer (1966). However, using the albedo determined by Cruikshank & Brown (1983) of p = 0.13, the nucleus radius is only RN = 8.6 +/-0.l km. Because of the unknown nucleus orientation, these will be upper limits to the nucleus size. It appears that the nucleus of P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 is not the large nucleus that it has been believed to be for nearly 40 yr.

  12. Histogenesis of olfactory bulb and rostral migration stream in mice%小鼠嗅球以及吻侧迁移流的发生

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高文静; 王志新; 徐高磊; 邓锦波; 高晓群

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨嗅球结构和吻侧迁移流(RMS)的发生及其中神经干细胞的变化趋势.方法:利用H-E染色、Nissl染色标记嗅球形态结构,BrdU免疫荧光技术观察吻侧迁移流中增殖的神经干细胞.结果:嗅球组织结构的发生:胚胎期,嗅球各层的结构轮廓尚未发育完全;生后3d时,各层结构虽然发育完善,但层与层之间的交界处模糊不清,生后5d时,整个嗅球结构发育已经完善,也就意味着嗅觉系统发育成熟.迁移流的发生:胚胎初期,侧脑室是一个很大的空腔,管腔膜上布满了增殖的神经于细胞,脑室下区延伸入中空的嗅球中,之后管腔闭合,形成了原始的吻侧迁移流;出生时,吻侧迁移流中的细胞密度达到最大值,之后逐渐降低,直至消失.结论:嗅球片层化结构是从无到有,从不成熟到成熟的过程.吻侧迁移流的发生是侧脑室腔的闭合和室管下层上神经干细胞遗留的痕迹.%Objective:To discuss the structure of the olfactory bulb (OB), the occurrence of the rostral migration streams (RMS) and the change trend of neural stem cells in RMS. Methods: The histological structure of the OB was marked by the methods of HE staining and Nissl staining. Using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-immunofluorescence to observe the proliferation of neural stem cells in RMS. Results: (1)In the embryonic period, the outline of the structure of the OB layers was not fully developed yet. On the third day after birth the structure developed well, but the junctions between layers were blurred. In P5, the development of the entire olfactory bulb was improved. (2)In the early embryo, the lateral ventricle was a large cavity. The lumen membrance was full of the proliferation of neural stem cells. The subventricular zone extended into the hollow of OB, and then closed the lumen, forming the original rostral migration stream. In P0, the cell density in RMS reached its maximum value, then gradually reduced until it

  13. A quantification of the relationship between neuronal responses in the rat rostral ventromedial medulla and noxious stimulation-evoked withdrawal reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devonshire, I M; Kwok, C H T; Suvik, A; Haywood, A R; Cooper, A H; Hathway, G J

    2015-07-01

    The rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) regulates a range of involuntary behaviours but is most often associated with nociception via the action of pronociceptive ON cells and antinociceptive OFF cells. The phasic responses of ON and OFF cells determine whether or not incoming noxious signals provoke a withdrawal reflex, and previous studies have suggested that reflex RVM activity patterns actively shape motor output. Here we challenged the model by using juvenile rats, which are known to exhibit markedly different reflex responses compared with adults. By recording single-cell activity in the RVM and the electromyography responses of hindlimb flexor muscles to noxious thermal stimulation we found that the juvenile reflex had a shorter onset latency, was larger in amplitude and exhibited a decreased rise time compared with the adult reflex. The responses of ON and OFF cells faithfully tracked the shorter onset latency of the reflex by also responding earlier and, thus, still preceded the reflex. However, neither the reflex amplitude nor the ongoing response profile was predicted by the firing rate of RVM cells in either age group. Instead we found a close correspondence between RVM activity and the reflex only during the initiation of the response. Furthermore, the short rise time of the juvenile reflex was reflected in higher rates of change of both ON and OFF cell firing. Our data suggest that the RVM is associated only with the initiation of reflexes and does not shape ongoing muscle activity, which is more likely to be subserved by downstream spinal processes. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Oral L-histidine exerts antihypertensive effects via central histamine H3 receptors and decreases nitric oxide content in the rostral ventrolateral medulla in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toba, Hiroe; Nakamori, Ayako; Tanaka, Yoshimi; Yukiya, Ryosuke; Tatsuoka, Keisuke; Narutaki, Masako; Tokitaka, Masaaki; Hariu, Hitoshi; Kobara, Miyuki; Nakata, Tetsuo

    2010-01-01

    1. L-histidine is generally found in meat, poultry and fish. To investigate its effects on blood pressure, L-histidine was administered to 9-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). 2. Oral administration of L-histidine (100 mg / kg) increased histamine content in cerebrospinal fluid and reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP) in SHR. Intracerebroventricular injection of L-histidine (0.01 microg / 5 microL) also caused a decrease in MAP, which was reversed by cotreatment with the histamine H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide (20.4 microg / 5 microL, i.c.v.). There was a significant, time-dependent increase (over 6 h) in the NOx (NO2- + NO3-) content of the dialysate from the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), a major vasomotor centre, after oral administration of L-histidine. 3. In another experiment, SHR were treated with l-histidine (100 mg / kg) twice a day for 4 weeks. Chronic treatment with L-histidine inhibited the age-dependent increases in systolic blood pressure and urinary noradrenaline excretion seen in vehicle-treated SHR. Conversely, intracerebroventricular injection of thioperamide (20.4 microg / 5 microL, i.c.v.) reversed the decrease in MAP in response to L-histidine in SHR. 4. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the aortic expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme mRNA was suppressed by chronic treatment with L-histidine. 5. These results suggest that L-histidine decreases blood pressure by attenuating sympathetic output via the central histamine H3 receptor in SHR. In addition, the antihypertensive effects of L-histidine appear to be associated with an increase in nitric oxide in the RVLM.

  15. Nontranscriptional activation of PI3K/Akt signaling mediates hypotensive effect following activation of estrogen receptor β in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Kay LH

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen acts on the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, where sympathetic premotor neurons are located, to elicit vasodepressor effects via an estrogen receptor (ERβ-dependent mechanism. We investigated in the present study nontranscriptional mechanism on cardiovascular effects following activation of ERβ in the RVLM, and delineated the involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/serine/threonine kinase (Akt signaling pathway in the effects. Methods In male Sprague–Dawley rats maintained under propofol anesthesia, changes in arterial pressure, heart rate and sympathetic neurogenic vasomotor tone were examined after microinjection bilaterally into RVLM of 17β-estradiol (E2β or a selective ERα or ERβ agonist. Involvement of ER subtypes and PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in the induced cardiovascular effects were studied using pharmacological tools of antagonists or inhibitors, gene manipulation with antisense oligonucleotide (ASON or adenovirus-mediated gene transfection. Results Similar to E2β (1 pmol, microinjection of ERβ agonist, diarylpropionitrile (DPN, 1, 2 or 5 pmol, into bilateral RVLM evoked dose-dependent hypotension and reduction in sympathetic neurogenic vasomotor tone. These vasodepressive effects of DPN (2 pmol were inhibited by ERβ antagonist, R,R-tetrahydrochrysene (50 pmol, ASON against ERβ mRNA (250 pmol, PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (5 pmol, or Akt inhibitor (250 pmol, but not by ERα inhibitor, methyl-piperidino-pyrazole (1 nmol, or transcription inhibitor, actinomycin D (5 or 10 nmol. Gene transfer by microinjection into bilateral RVLM of adenovirus encoding phosphatase and tensin homologues deleted on chromosome 10 (5 × 108 pfu reversed the vasodepressive effects of DPN. Conclusions Our results indicate that vasodepressive effects following activation of ERβ in RVLM are mediated by nongenomic activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. This study provides new insight in the

  16. BLOCKADE OF ROSTRAL VENTROLATERAL MEDULLA (RVLM BOMBESIN RECEPTOR TYPE 1 DECREASES BLOOD PRESSURE AND SYMPATHETIC ACTIVITY IN ANESTHETIZED SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabella Silva De Jesus Pinto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available IIntrathecal injection of bombesin (BBS promoted hypertensive and sympathoexcitatory effects in normotensive (NT rats. However, the involvement of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM in these responses is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated: (1 the effects of BBS injected bilaterally into RVLM on cardiorespiratory and sympathetic activity in NT and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR; (2 the contribution of RVLM bombesin type 1 receptors (BB1 to the maintenance of hypertension in SHR. Urethane-anesthetized rats (1.2 g · kg−1, i.v. were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure (MAP, diaphragm (DIA motor and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA. In NT rats and SHR, BBS (0.3 mM nanoinjected into RVLM increased MAP (33.9 ± 6.6 mmHg and 37.1 ± 4.5 mmHg, respectively; p < 0.05 and RSNA (97.8 ± 12.9 % and 84.5 ± 18.1 %, respectively; p < 0.05. In SHR, BBS also increased DIA burst amplitude (115.3 ± 22.7 %; p < 0.05. BB1 receptors antagonist (BIM-23127; 3 mM reduced MAP (-19.9 ± 4.4 mmHg; p < 0.05 and RSNA (-17.7 ± 3.8 %; p < 0.05 in SHR, but not in NT rats (-2.5 ± 2.8 mmHg; -2.7 ± 5.6 %, respectively. These results show that BBS can evoke sympathoexcitatory and pressor responses by activating RVLM BB1 receptors. This pathway might be involved in the maintenance of high levels of arterial blood pressure in SHR.

  17. Differential engagements of glutamate and GABA receptors in cardiovascular actions of endogenous nNOS or iNOS at rostral ventrolateral medulla of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Samuel H H; Wang, Ling-Lin; Chan, Julie Y H

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated in Sprague–Dawley rats anaesthetized with propofol the engagement of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP cascade, glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in the cardiovascular actions of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) at the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Microinjection bilaterally into the RVLM of a selective iNOS inhibitor, S-methylisothiourea (SMT, 250 pmoles), or a selective nNOS inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, 5 pmoles), induced respectively an enhancement or a reduction in systemic arterial pressure, heart rate and power density of the vasomotor components in the spectrum of arterial blood pressure signals, our experimental index for sympathetic neurogenic vasomotor tone. The cardiovascular actions of SMT or 7-NI in the RVLM were significantly antagonized by co-administration into the RVLM of the sGC inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazole[4,3-α]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 250 or 500 pmoles). The cardiovascular excitatory effects after blockade of endogenous iNOS activity were significantly attenuated when N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, dizocilpine (20 or 50 pmoles), or non-NMDA receptor antagonist, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (250 or 500 pmoles), was co-microinjected bilaterally into the RVLM. On the other hand, the cardiovascular depressive responses to blockade of endogenous nNOS activity were significantly antagonized on co-administration of GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline methiodine (5 or 10 pmoles), but not GABAB receptor antagonist, 2-hydroxy saclofen (50 or 100 pmoles). We conclude that the cardiovascular actions of endogenous NO in the RVLM engage the sGC/cGMP pathway. In addition, whereas NO derived from nNOS induced sympathoexcitation via both NMDA and non-NMDA receptors in the RVLM, NO generated by iNOS elicited sympathoinhibition via GABAA receptors. PMID:12598412

  18. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex attenuates pain-related negative emotion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hong; Zang, Kai-Kai; Han, Mei; Zhao, Zhi-Qi; Wu, Gen-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Qiu

    2014-08-01

    The emotional components of pain are far less studied than the sensory components. Previous studies have indicated that the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) is implicated in the affective response to noxious stimuli. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the spinal cord has been documented to play an important role in diverse kinds of pathological pain states. We used formalin-induced conditioned place aversion (F-CPA) in rats, an animal model believed to reflect the emotional response to pain, to investigate the involvement of p38 MAPK in the rACC after the induction of affective pain. Intraplantar formalin injection produced a significant activation of p38 MAPK, as well as mitogen-activated kinase kinase (MKK) 3 and MKK6, its upstream activators, in the bilateral rACC. p38 MAPK was elevated in both NeuN-positive neurons and Iba1-positive microglia in the rACC, but not GFAP-positive cells. Blocking p38 MAPK activation in the bilateral rACC using its specific inhibitor SB203580 or SB239063 dose-dependently suppressed the formation of F-CPA. Inhibiting p38 MAPK activation did not affect formalin-induced two-phase spontaneous nociceptive response and low intensity electric foot-shock induced CPA. The present study demonstrated that p38 MAPK signaling pathway in the rACC contributes to pain-related negative emotion. Thus, a new pharmacological strategy targeted at the p38 MAPK cascade may be useful in treating pain-related emotional disorders.

  19. The dorsomedial hypothalamus mediates stress-induced hyperalgesia and is the source of the pronociceptive peptide cholecystokinin in the rostral ventromedial medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, K M; Roeder, Z; Desrochers, K; Buhler, A V; Heinricher, M M; Cleary, D R

    2013-05-15

    While intense or highly arousing stressors have long been known to suppress pain, relatively mild or chronic stress can enhance pain. The mechanisms underlying stress-induced hyperalgesia (SIH) are only now being defined. The physiological and neuroendocrine effects of mild stress are mediated by the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), which has documented connections with the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM), a brainstem region capable of facilitating nociception. We hypothesized that stress engages both the DMH and the RVM to produce hyperalgesia. Direct pharmacological activation of the DMH increased sensitivity to mechanical stimulation in awake animals, confirming that the DMH can mediate behavioral hyperalgesia. A behavioral model of mild stress also produced mechanical hyperalgesia, which was blocked by inactivation of either the DMH or the RVM. The neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK) acts in the RVM to enhance nociception and is abundant in the DMH. Using a retrograde tracer and immunohistochemical labeling, we determined that CCK-expressing neurons in the DMH are the only significant supraspinal source of CCK in the RVM. However, not all neurons projecting from the DMH to the RVM contained CCK, and microinjection of the CCK2 receptor antagonist YM022 in the RVM did not interfere with SIH, suggesting that transmitters in addition to CCK play a significant role in this connection during acute stress. While the RVM has a well-established role in facilitation of nociception, the DMH, with its well-documented role in stress, may also be engaged in a number of chronic or abnormal pain states. Taken as a whole, these findings establish an anatomical and functional connection between the DMH and RVM by which stress can facilitate pain.

  20. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P. (eds.)

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

  1. Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sherwood

    1997-12-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted by the Program Committee for presentation at the Workshop on Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples, held in Milpitas, California, January 16-18, 1989. Conveners are Sherwood Chang (NASA Ames Research Center) and Larry Nyquist (NASA Johnson Space Center). Program Committee members are Thomas Ahrens (ex-officio; California Institute of Technology), Lou Allamandola (NASA Ames Research Center), David Blake (NASA Ames Research Center), Donald Brownlee (University of Washington, Seattle), Theodore E. Bunch (NASA Ames Research Center), Humberto Campins (Planetary Science Institute), Jeff Cuzzi (NASA Ames Research Center), Eberhard Griin (Max-Plank-Institut fiir Kemphysik), Martha Hanner (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Alan Harris (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), John Kerrid-e (University of Califomia, Los Angeles), Yves Langevin (University of Paris), Gerhard Schwehm (ESTEC), and Paul Weissman (Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Logistics and administrative support for the workshop were provided by the Lunar and Planetary Institute Projects Office.

  2. Jet energy loss and bulk parton collectivity in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Huan-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    Nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC produce high temperature and high energy density matter which exhibits paxtonic degrees of freedom. We will discuss measurements of nuclear modification factors for light hadrons and non-photonic electrons from heavy quark decays, which reflect the flavor dependence of energy loss of high momentum partons traversing the dense QCD medium. The dense QCD medium responds to energy loss of high momentum patrons in a pattern consistent with that expected from a hydrodynamic fluid. The hadronization of bulk partonic matter exhibits collectivity with effective partonic degrees of freedom. Nuclear collisions at RHIC provide an intriguing environment, where many constituent quark ingredients are readily available for possible formation of exotic particles through quark coalescence or recombinations.

  3. Study of Strange and Multistrange Particles in Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    Vande vyvre, P; Feofilov, G; Snoeys, W; Hetland, K F; Campbell, M; Klempt, W

    2002-01-01

    % NA57\\\\ \\\\ The goal of the experiment is to study the production of strange and multi-strange particles in nucleus-nucleus collisions. This study was initiated at the OMEGA spectrometer, where three ion experiments have been performed: WA85 (S-W and p-W collisions at 200 A GeV/c), WA94 (S-S and p-S collisions at 200 A GeV/c) and WA97 (Pb-Pb, p-Pb and p-Be collisions at 160 A GeV/c).\\\\ \\\\ The experiment aims at extending the scope of WA97 by:\\\\ \\\\ - investigating the beam energy dependence of the enhancements of multi-strange particle production reported by the previous experiments, and by\\\\ \\\\\\\\ \\\\- measuring the yields of strange and multi-strange particles over an extended centrality range compared with the previous experiments.\\\\ \\\\ The apparatus consists mainly of silicon pixel detector planes.

  4. Heavy flavors in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardi Marzia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A multi-step setup for heavy-flavor studies in high-energy nucleus-nucleus (AA collisions — addressing within a comprehensive framework the initial QQ¯$Q\\overline Q $ production, the propagation in the hot medium until decoupling and the final hadronization and decays — is presented. The propagation of the heavy quarks in the medium is described in a framework provided by the relativistic Langevin equation and the corresponding numerical results are compared to experimental data from RHIC and the LHC. In particular, outcomes for the nuclear modification factor RAA and for the elliptic flow υ2 of D/B mesons, heavy-flavor electrons and non-prompt J/ψ’s are displayed.

  5. CASTOR: Centauro and strange object research in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelis, A.L.S.; Bartke, J.; Bogolyubsky, M.Yu.; Gadysz-Dziadus, E.; Kharlov, Yu.V.; Kurepin, A.B.; Maevskaya, A.I.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Sadovsky, S.A.; Stefanski, P.; Wodarczyk, Z

    2001-04-01

    We present a phenomenological model which describes the formation of a Centauro fireball in the baryon-rich projectile fragmentation region in nucleus-nucleus interactions in the upper atmosphere and at the LHC, and its decay to non-strange baryons and Strangelets. Strangelets are assimilated to the 'strongly penetrating component' frequently observed accompanying hadron-rich cosmic ray events. We describe the CASTOR subdetector for the ALICE experiment at the LHC. CASTOR will probe, in an event-by-event mode, the very forward, baryon-rich phase space 5.6 {<=} {eta} {<=} 7.2 in 5.5 x A TeV central Pb + Pb collisions. It will look for events with pronounced imbalance between hadronic and photonic content and for deeply penetrating objects. We present results of simulations for the response of the CASTOR calorimeter to the passage of Strangelets.

  6. CASTOR Centauro and Strange Object Research in nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bartke, Jerzy; Chileev, K; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Golubeva, M B; Guber, F F; Karavitcheva, T L; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Tiflov, V V; Wlodarczyk, Z

    2002-01-01

    We describe the CASTOR detector designed to probe the very forward, baryon-rich rapidity region in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC. We present a phenomenological model describing the formation of a QGP fireball in a high baryochemical potential environment, and its subsequent decay into baryons and strangelets. The model explains Centauros and the long-penetrating component and makes predictions for the LHC. Simulations of Centauro-type events were done. To study the response of the apparatus to new effects different exotic species (DCC, Centauros, strangelets etc.) were passed through the deep calorimeter. The energy deposition pattern in the calorimeter appears to be a new clear signature of the QGP.

  7. CASTOR Centauro And STrange Object Research in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bogolyubsky, M Yu; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Maevskaya, A I; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Stefanski, P; Wiodarczyk, Z

    2001-01-01

    We present a phenomenological model which describes the formation of a Centauro fireball in the baryon-rich projectile fragmentation region in nucleus-nucleus interactions in the upper atmosphere and at the LHC, and its decay to non-strange baryons and Strangelets. Strangelets are assimilated to the "strongly penetrating component" frequently observed accompanying hadron-rich cosmic ray events. We describe the CASTOR subdetector for the ALICE experiment at the LHC. CASTOR will probe, in an event-by-event mode, the very forward, baryon-rich phase space 5.6< eta <7.2 in 5.5*A TeV central Pb+Pb collisions. It will look for events with pronounced imbalance between hadronic and photonic content and for deeply penetrating objects. We present results of simulations for the response of the CASTOR calorimeter to the passage of Strangelets. (15 refs).

  8. Experimental and phenomenological investigations of QCD matter in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronic, Anton

    2014-07-15

    This thesis is heterogeneous, comprising experimental papers at low energies (SIS-18 at GSI) and at the LHC, papers on phenomenology of high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions, and papers on detectors. The overview covers the experimental papers and those on phenomenology. I have chosen to write it in a general manner, intended to be accessible to non-experts. It emphasizes recent measurements and their understanding at the LHC. The detector papers, which address many principle aspects of gaseous detectors, are summarized and placed in context in the review I co-wrote and which closes the stack. The detector papers included here are the outcome of an R and D program for the Transition Radiation Detector of ALICE.

  9. The Confined Hydrogen Atom with a Moving Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom confined to a spherical box with impenetrable walls but, unlike earlier pedagogical articles on the subject, we assume that the nucleus also moves. We obtain the ground-state energy approximately by means of first-order perturbation theory and show that it is greater than that for the case in which the nucleus is clamped…

  10. A Frame Nucleus on a Two-side Prequantale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUShao-xian; WANGShun-qin; MAFei-fei

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a Frame nucleus and prime elements in a Prequantale are defined. The concrete structure of a Frame prequantic quotient is considered, and the relation between the half-prime element and the Frame nucleus in a two-side Prequantale are obtained.

  11. The subthalamic nucleus : Part I: Development, cytology, topography and connections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marani, Enrico; Heida, Tjitske; Lakke, Egbert A.J.F.; Usunoff, Kamen G.

    2008-01-01

    This monograph on the subthalamic nucleus accentuates in Part I the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections. The light and electron microscopical cytology concerns the open nucleus concept and the neuronal types p

  12. The Confined Hydrogen Atom with a Moving Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom confined to a spherical box with impenetrable walls but, unlike earlier pedagogical articles on the subject, we assume that the nucleus also moves. We obtain the ground-state energy approximately by means of first-order perturbation theory and show that it is greater than that for the case in which the nucleus is clamped…

  13. Nucleus retroambiguus projections to the periaqueductal gray in the cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klop, EM; Mouton, LJ; Holstege, G

    2002-01-01

    The nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) of the caudal medulla is a relay nucleus by which neurons of the mesencephalic periaqueductal gray (PAG) reach motoneurons of pharynx, larynx, soft palate, intercostal and abdominal muscles, and several muscles of the hindlimbs. These PAG-NRA-motoneuronal projections

  14. Connections of the superior paraolivary nucleus of the rat: II. Reciprocal connections with the tectal longitudinal column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eViñuela

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The superior paraolivary nucleus (SPON, a prominent GABAergic center of the mammalian auditory brainstem, projects to the ipsilateral inferior colliculus (IC and sends axons through the commissure of the IC (CoIC. Herein we demonstrate that the SPON is reciprocally connected with the recently discovered tectal longitudinal column (TLC. The TLC is a long and narrow structure that spans nearly the entire midbrain tectum longitudinally, immediately above the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG and very close to the midline.Unilateral injections of biotinylated dextran into the SPON of the rat label abundant terminal fibers in the TLC of both sides, with an ipsilateral predominance. The SPON provides a dense innervation of the entire rostrocaudal extent of the ipsilateral TLC, and a relatively sparser innervation of the caudal and rostral portions of the contralateral TLC. SPON fibers reach the TLC by two routes: as collaterals of axons of the CoIC, and as axons that circumvent the ipsilateral IC before traveling in the deep layers of the superior colliculus.The density of these projections identifies SPON as a significant source of input to the TLC. Other targets of the SPON discovered in this study include the deep layers of the superior colliculus and the PAG. The same experiments reveal numerous labeled cell bodies in the TLC, interspersed among the labeled SPON fibers. This observation suggests that the SPON is a significant target of TLC projections.The discovery of novel reciprocal connections between the SPON and the TLC opens unexpected avenues for investigation of sound processing in mammalian brainstem circuits.

  15. Glycine immunoreactivity of multipolar neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus which project to the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, J R; Ross, A T; Gillespie, M B; Ryugo, D K

    1999-06-14

    Certain distinct populations of neurons in the dorsal cochlear nucleus are inhibited by a neural source that is responsive to a wide range of acoustic frequencies. In this study, we examined the glycine immunoreactivity of two types of ventral cochlear nucleus neurons (planar and radiate) in the rat which project to the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and thus, might be responsible for this inhibition. Previously, we proposed that planar neurons provided a tonotopic and narrowly tuned input to the DCN, whereas radiate neurons provided a broadly tuned input and thus, were strong candidates as the source of broadband inhibition (Doucet and Ryugo [1997] J. Comp. Neurol. 385:245-264). We tested this idea by combining retrograde labeling and glycine immunohistochemical protocols. Planar and radiate neurons were first retrogradely labeled by injecting biotinylated dextran amine into a restricted region of the dorsal cochlear nucleus. The labeled cells were visualized using streptavidin conjugated to indocarbocyanine (Cy3), a fluorescent marker. Sections that contained planar or radiate neurons were then processed for glycine immunocytochemistry using diaminobenzidine as the chromogen. Immunostaining of planar neurons was light, comparable to that of excitatory neurons (pyramidal neurons in the DCN), whereas immunostaining of radiate neurons was dark, comparable to that of glycinergic neurons (cartwheel cells in the dorsal cochlear nucleus and principal cells in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radiate neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus subserve the wideband inhibition observed in the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

  16. Cardiovascular and single-unit responses to microinjection of angiotensin II into the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafami, M; Nasimi, A

    2015-08-06

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) is part of the limbic system located in the rostral forebrain. BST is involved in behavioral, neuroendocrine and autonomic functions, including cardiovascular regulation. The angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor, AT1, was found in the BST, however its effects on the cardiovascular system and on single-unit responses have not been studied yet. In the present study, Ang II was microinjected into the BST of anesthetized rats and cardiovascular and single-unit responses were recorded simultaneously. Furthermore the responses were re-tested after the microinjection of a blocker of the AT1 receptor, losartan, into the BST. We found that microinjection of Ang II into the BST produced a pressor response of 11±1mmHg for a duration of 2-8min. Ang II had no consistent effect on heart rate. It also produced two types of single-unit responses in the BST, short excitatory and long inhibitory. Blockade of AT1 receptors abolished both the cardiovascular and single-unit responses, indicating that the responses were mediated through AT1 receptors. These findings imply that Ang II may be utilized as a neurotransmitter and may play a role in returning blood pressure toward normal during hypotension. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prenatal X-irradiation increases GFAP- and calbindin D28k-immunoreactivity in the medial subdivision of the nucleus of solitary tract in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquin, T D; Xie, Q; Miki, T; Satriotomo, I; Itoh, M; Takeuchi, Y

    2000-04-12

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein- (GFAP) and calbindin D28k-immunoreactivity (IR) were investigated in the medial subdivision of the nucleus of the solitary tract (mNST) of prenatally X-irradiated rats. Pregnant rats were exposed to a single whole-body X-irradiation on day 11 or 16 of gestation at a dose of 1. 3 Gy. The offspring were killed at 7-14 days of age for the immunohistochemical observations. Rat pups showed strong GFAP-IR at the level rostral to the obex when receiving X-rays on day 11 of gestation, with hypertrophy of astrocyte cell bodies and cytoplasmic processes, but weak GFAP-IR when receiving X-rays on day 16 of gestation. Calbindin D28k-IR was stronger in the animals receiving X-rays on day 11 or 16 of gestation compared to that in the control animals. In the present study, the increase of GFAP- and calbindin D28k-IR cells in the mNST might indicate that adaptative mechanisms are taking place to preserve integrated nervous system function and possibly, to provide neuroprotection.

  18. Beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic /sup 125/I-pindolol binding sites in the interpeduncular nucleus of the rat: Normal distribution and the effects of deafferentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battisti, W.P.; Artymyshyn, R.P.; Murray, M.

    1989-07-01

    The plasticity of the beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptor subtypes was examined in the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN) of the adult rat. The beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist 125I-pindolol (125I-PIN) was used in conjunction with the selective subtype antagonists ICI 118,551 and ICI 89,406 to determine the subnuclear distribution of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors in this nucleus and to correlate the receptor distribution with the distribution of both noradrenergic afferents from the locus coeruleus (LC) and non-noradrenergic afferents from the fasiculus retroflexus (FR). The density of these binding sites was examined following lesions that decreased (LC lesions) or increased (FR lesions) the density of the noradrenergic projection in the IPN. Quantitative radioautography indicated that beta 1-labeled binding sites account for the larger percentage of binding sites in the IPN. The beta 1-binding sites are densest in those subnuclei that receive a noradrenergic projection from the LC: the central, rostral, and intermediate subnuclei. beta 1-binding sites are algo homogeneously distributed throughout the lateral subnuclei, where there is no detectable noradrenergic innervation. beta 2-binding sites have a more restricted distribution. They are concentrated in the ventral half of the lateral subnuclei, where they account for 70% of total 125I-PIN binding sites. beta 2-binding sites are also present along the ventral border of the IPN. Some of this labeling extends into the central and intermediate subnuclei. Bilateral lesions of the LC, which selectively remove noradrenergic innervation to the IPN, result in an increase in the beta 1-binding sites. Bilateral lesions of the FR, which remove the major cholinergic and peptidergic input from the IPN, elicit an increase in noradrenergic projections and a decrease in beta 1-binding sites.

  19. Contribution of amygdala to the pressor response elicited by microinjection of angiotensin II into the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafami, Marzieh; Nasimi, Ali

    2016-10-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) is part of the limbic system located in the rostral forebrain. BST is involved in behavioral, neuroendocrine and autonomic functions, including cardiovascular regulation. The amygdala, plays an important role in mediating the behavioral and physiological responses associated with fear and anxiety, including cardiovascular responses. In a previous study, we showed that microinjection of AngII into the BST produced a pressor and two types of single-unit responses in the BST, short excitatory and long inhibitory. This study was performed to find possible involvement of amygdala in cardiovascular responses elicited by microinjection of AngII into the BST, using blockade of the central nucleus of amygdala (CeA) and single unit recording from the CeA, while injecting AngII into the BST in anesthetized rat. Blockade of CeA attenuated the pressor response to microinjection of AngII into the BST. Eighty-six AngII microinjections were given into the BST and 198 single unit responses were recorded from CeA simultaneously, from which 89 showed a short duration excitatory response and 109 showed no responses. In conclusion, microinjection of AngII into the BST produces a short excitatory single unit response in the CeA, resulting in contribution of amygdala to the resulted pressor response. Taken together, our study and previous studies suggest a plausible hypothesis that these two nuclei perform their cardiovascular functions in cooperation with each other. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Functional network inference of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, John H; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; St John, Peter C; Wang, Thomas J; Bales, Benjamin B; Doyle, Francis J; Herzog, Erik D; Petzold, Linda R

    2016-04-19

    In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), noisy cellular oscillators communicate within a neuronal network to generate precise system-wide circadian rhythms. Although the intracellular genetic oscillator and intercellular biochemical coupling mechanisms have been examined previously, the network topology driving synchronization of the SCN has not been elucidated. This network has been particularly challenging to probe, due to its oscillatory components and slow coupling timescale. In this work, we investigated the SCN network at a single-cell resolution through a chemically induced desynchronization. We then inferred functional connections in the SCN by applying the maximal information coefficient statistic to bioluminescence reporter data from individual neurons while they resynchronized their circadian cycling. Our results demonstrate that the functional network of circadian cells associated with resynchronization has small-world characteristics, with a node degree distribution that is exponential. We show that hubs of this small-world network are preferentially located in the central SCN, with sparsely connected shells surrounding these cores. Finally, we used two computational models of circadian neurons to validate our predictions of network structure.

  1. Spontaneous fission of superheavy nucleus $^{286}$Fl

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, Dorin N

    2016-01-01

    The decimal logarithm of spontaneous fission half-life of the superheavy nucleus $^{286}$Fl experimentally determined is $\\log_{10} T_f^{exp} (s) = -0.632$. We present a method to calculate the half-life based on the cranking inertia and the deformation energy, functions of two independent surface coordinates, using the best asymmetric two center shell model. In the first stage we study the statics. At a given mass asymmetry up to about $\\eta=0.5$ the potential barrier has a two hump shape, but for larger $\\eta$ it has only one hump. The touching point deformation energy versus mass asymmetry shows the three minima, produced by shell effects, corresponding to three decay modes: spontaneous fission, cluster decay and $\\alpha$~decay. The least action trajectory is determined in the plane $(R,\\eta)$ where $R$ is the separation distance of the fission fragments and $\\eta$ is the mass asymmetry. We may find a sequence of several trajectories one of which gives the least action. The parametrization with two deforma...

  2. Inside a plant nucleus: discovering the proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovská, Beáta; Šebela, Marek; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear proteins are a vital component of eukaryotic cell nuclei and have a profound effect on the way in which genetic information is stored, expressed, replicated, repaired, and transmitted to daughter cells and progeny. Because of the plethora of functions, nuclear proteins represent the most abundant components of cell nuclei in all eukaryotes. However, while the plant genome is well understood at the DNA level, information on plant nuclear proteins remains scarce, perhaps with the exception of histones and a few other proteins. This lack of knowledge hampers efforts to understand how the plant genome is organized in the nucleus and how it functions. This review focuses on the current state of the art of the analysis of the plant nuclear proteome. Previous proteome studies have generally been designed to search for proteins involved in plant response to various forms of stress or to identify rather a modest number of proteins. Thus, there is a need for more comprehensive and systematic studies of proteins in the nuclei obtained at individual phases of the cell cycle, or isolated from various tissue types and stages of cell and tissue differentiation. All this in combination with protein structure, predicted function, and physical localization in 3D nuclear space could provide much needed progress in our understanding of the plant nuclear proteome and its role in plant genome organization and function.

  3. Observation of the antimatter helium-4 nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    High-energy nuclear collisions create an energy density similar to that of the Universe microseconds after the Big Bang; in both cases, matter and antimatter are formed with comparable abundance. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions allows antimatter to decouple quickly from matter, and avoid annihilation. Thus, a high-energy accelerator of heavy nuclei provides an efficient means of producing and studying antimatter. The antimatter helium-4 nucleus (4He), also known as the anti-α (α), consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons (baryon number B = -4). It has not been observed previously, although the α-particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford and is present in cosmic radiation at the ten per cent level. Antimatter nuclei with B Collider (RHIC; ref. 6) in 10(9) recorded gold-on-gold (Au+Au) collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 200 GeV and 62 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair. The yield is consistent with expectations from thermodynamic and coalescent nucleosynthesis models, providing an indication of the production rate of even heavier antimatter nuclei and a benchmark for possible future observations of 4He in cosmic radiation.

  4. Functional network inference of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, John H.; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; St. John, Peter C.; Wang, Thomas J.; Bales, Benjamin B.; Doyle, Francis J.; Herzog, Erik D.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2016-04-04

    In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), noisy cellular oscillators communicate within a neuronal network to generate precise system-wide circadian rhythms. Although the intracellular genetic oscillator and intercellular biochemical coupling mechanisms have been examined previously, the network topology driving synchronization of the SCN has not been elucidated. This network has been particularly challenging to probe, due to its oscillatory components and slow coupling timescale. In this work, we investigated the SCN network at a single-cell resolution through a chemically induced desynchronization. We then inferred functional connections in the SCN by applying the maximal information coefficient statistic to bioluminescence reporter data from individual neurons while they resynchronized their circadian cycling. Our results demonstrate that the functional network of circadian cells associated with resynchronization has small-world characteristics, with a node degree distribution that is exponential. We show that hubs of this small-world network are preferentially located in the central SCN, with sparsely connected shells surrounding these cores. Finally, we used two computational models of circadian neurons to validate our predictions of network structure.

  5. Memory-enhancing intra-basolateral amygdala infusions of clenbuterol increase Arc and CaMKII-alpha protein expression in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal M Holloway-Erickson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Activation of β-adrenoceptors in the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA modulates memory through interactions with multiple memory systems. The cellular mechanisms for this interaction remain unresolved. Memory-modulating BLA manipulations influence expression of the protein product of the immediate early gene activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc in the dorsal hippocampus, and hippocampal expression of Arc protein is critically involved in memory consolidation and long-term potentiation. The present studies examined whether this influence of the BLA is specific to the hippocampus and to Arc protein. Like the hippocampus, the rostral portion of the anterior cingulate cortex (rACC is involved in the consolidation of inhibitory avoidance (IA memory, and IA training increases Arc protein in the rACC. Because the BLA interacts with the rACC in the consolidation of IA memory, the rACC is a potential candidate for further studies of BLA modulation of synaptic plasticity. The alpha isoform of the Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIα and the immediate early gene c-Fos are involved in long-term potentiation and memory. Both Arc and CaMKIIα proteins can be translated in isolated synapses, where the mRNA is localized, but c-Fos protein remains in the soma. To examine the influence of memory-modulating manipulations of the BLA on expression of these memory and plasticity-associated proteins in the rACC, male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on an IA task and given intra-BLA infusions of either clenbuterol or lidocaine immediately after training. Findings suggest that noradrenergic stimulation of the BLA may modulate memory consolidation through effects on both synaptic proteins Arc and CaMKIIα, but not the somatic protein c-Fos. Furthermore, protein changes observed in the rACC following BLA manipulations suggest that the influence of the BLA on synaptic proteins is not limited to those in the dorsal

  6. Development of the rostral migratory stream and its cell apoptosis%喙端迁移流的发生及其细胞凋亡

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    厉永强; 商超蔚; 宋敏; 高文静; 石贞玉; 邓锦波

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究生后不同日龄小鼠喙端迁移流(RMS)的发育,神经干细胞增殖和凋亡的规律. 方法 利用Caspase-8免疫荧光标记法和5'-溴脱氧尿嘧啶核苷(BrdU)法,对小鼠RMS内的神经干细胞增殖和凋亡进行研究(n=92). 结果 生后早期小鼠脑内,尤其是室管下区(SVZ)和RMS,存在大量的增殖细胞.随着小鼠年龄的增加,脑内干细胞逐渐减少,到成年,大脑皮质几乎见不到增殖的神经干细胞,但在SVZ和RMS仍可以看到许多增殖的神经干细胞.在RMS,神经干细胞增殖的同时伴随着细胞凋亡,干细胞的增殖与凋亡存在着正相关关系.结论 RMS的神经干细胞增殖与凋亡有重要的生理意义,通过细胞凋亡,RMS可以调节神经干细胞向嗅球迁移的数量,也可以调节干细胞向颗粒细胞分化.%Objective To study the development of the rostral migratory stream (RMS) of mice and the proliferation and apoptosis of neural stem cells in RMS at various postnatal ages. Methods With 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assay and Caspase-8 immunofluorescent staining, the neuroproliferation and cell apoptosis in RMS were investigated. Results In early postnatal phase, there were many proliferative cells in the brain, especially in subventricular zone (SVZ) and RMS. With age increasing, the stem cells in the brain decreased. In the adult, the stem cells in the neocortex were hardly found except in SVZ and RMS areas. When the proliferation of stem cells was companied with apoptosis during RMS development, there was a positive correlation between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Conclusion There is an important signification for the neuroproliferation and cell apoptosis in RMS. Through cell apoptosis, the migration and differentiation of neural stem cells in RMS are regulated.

  7. Catecholaminergic neurons in synaptic connections with pre-Bötzinger complex neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla in normoxic and daily acute intermittent hypoxic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jun-Jun; Liang, Wei-Hua; Lam, Chun-Sing; Huang, Xiao-Feng; Yang, Shou-Jing; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T; Fung, Man-Lung; Liu, Ying-Ying

    2017-01-01

    The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) contains cardiovascular-related catecholaminergic neurons and respiratory-related pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC) neurons, which are intermingled and functionally connected for coordinating cardiorespiratory activities. Daily acute intermittent hypoxia (dAIH) is known to elicit respiratory plasticity. However, it is unclear if the catecholaminergic neurons directly synapse onto pre-BötC neurons, and if the local circuitry exhibits plasticity when exposed to dAIH. The present study was aimed to determine the synaptic phenotypes between dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DβH)-immunoreactive (ir) catecholaminergic neurons and neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R)-ir pre-BötC neurons, and the effect of dAIH on the neuronal network. Immunofluorescence histochemistry was used to reveal immunoreactivities of DβH and NK1R in the RVLM of normoxic and dAIH rats. Synaptic phenotypes were examined with double-labeling immunoelectron microscopy. We found that DβH immunoreactivity was expressed in somata and processes, some of which were in close apposition to NK1R-ir pre-BötC neurons. DβH-ir gold particles were localized to somata, dendrites, and axonal terminals. DβH-ir terminals formed asymmetric synapses, and occasionally, symmetric synapses in the pre-BötC, featuring the local circuitry. Of the synapses, 28% in normoxic and 29.6% in dAIH groups were apposed to NK1R-ir dendrites. Significant increases in DβH expression and NK1R-ir processes were found in the dAIH group. Moreover, the area and number of processes in close appositions were significantly elevated, strongly suggesting that dAIH induced plasticity with increased connections and interactions between the cardiovascular- and respiratory-related neurons in the local circuitry. In conclusion, asymmetric synapses are predominant in the crosstalk between catecholaminergic and pre-BötC neurons in the RVLM, elaborating excitatory transmission driving the coupling of cardiorespiratory

  8. Development of the human dorsal nucleus of the vagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gang; Zhu, Hua; Zhou, Xiangtian; Qu, Jia; Ashwell, K W S; Paxinos, G

    2008-01-01

    The dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve plays an integral part in the control of visceral function. The aim of the present study was to correlate structural and chemical changes in the developing nucleus with available data concerning functional maturation of human viscera and reflexes. The fetal development (ages 9 to 26 weeks) of the human dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve has been examined with the aid of Nissl staining and immunocytochemistry for calbindin and tyrosine hydroxylase. By 13 weeks, the dorsal vagal nucleus emerges as a distinct structure with at least two subnuclei visible in Nissl stained preparations. By 15 weeks, three subnuclei (dorsal intermediate, centrointermediate and ventrointermediate) were clearly discernible at the open medulla level with caudal and caudointermediate subnuclei visible at the level of the area postrema. All subnuclei known to exist in the adult were visible by 21 weeks and cytoarchitectonic differentiation of the nucleus was largely completed by 25 weeks. The adult distribution pattern of calbindin and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons was also largely completed by 21 weeks, although morphological differentiation of labeled neurons continued until the last age examined (26 weeks). The structural development of the dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve appears to occur in parallel with functional maturation of the cardiovascular and gastric movements, which the nucleus controls.

  9. Restoration of quinine-stimulated Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the central nucleus of the amygdala and gustatory cortex following reinnervation or cross-reinnervation of the lingual taste nerves in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Camille Tessitore; Garcea, Mircea; Spector, Alan C

    2014-08-01

    Remarkably, when lingual gustatory nerves are surgically rerouted to inappropriate taste fields in the tongue, some taste functions recover. We previously demonstrated that quinine-stimulated oromotor rejection reflexes and neural activity (assessed by Fos immunoreactivity) in subregions of hindbrain gustatory nuclei were restored if the posterior tongue, which contains receptor cells that respond strongly to bitter compounds, was cross-reinnervated by the chorda tympani nerve. Such functional recovery was not seen if instead, the anterior tongue, where receptor cells are less responsive to bitter compounds, was cross-reinnervated by the glossopharyngeal nerve, even though this nerve typically responds robustly to bitter substances. Thus, recovery depended more on the taste field being reinnervated than on the nerve itself. Here, the distribution of quinine-stimulated Fos-immunoreactive neurons in two taste-associated forebrain areas was examined in these same rats. In the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a rostrocaudal gradient characterized the normal quinine-stimulated Fos response, with the greatest number of labeled cells situated rostrally. Quinine-stimulated neurons were found throughout the gustatory cortex, but a "hot spot" was observed in its anterior-posterior center in subregions approximating the dysgranular/agranular layers. Fos neurons here and in the rostral CeA were highly correlated with quinine-elicited gapes. Denervation of the posterior tongue eliminated, and its reinnervation by either nerve restored, numbers of quinine-stimulated labeled cells in the rostralmost CeA and in the subregion approximating the dysgranular gustatory cortex. These results underscore the remarkable plasticity of the gustatory system and also help clarify the functional anatomy of neural circuits activated by bitter taste stimulation.

  10. Nonthermal Fluctuations and Mechanics of the Active Cell Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, K; Byrd, H; MacKintosh, F C; Kilfoil, M L

    2013-01-01

    We present direct measurements of fluctuations in the nucleus of yeast cells. While prior work has shown these fluctuations to be active and non-thermal in character, their origin and time dependence are not understood. We show that nuclear fluctuations can be quantitatively understood by uncorrelated, active force fluctuations driving a nuclear medium that is dominated by an uncondensed DNA solution, for which we perform rheological measurements on an in vitro model system under similar conditions to what is expected in the nucleus. We conclude that the eukaryotic nucleus of living cells is a nonequilibrium soft material whose fluctuations are actively driven, and are far from thermal in their time dependence.

  11. Quarkonium-nucleus bound states from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beane, S.  R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chang, E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Cohen, S.  D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Detmold, W. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lin, H. -W. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Orginos, K. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Parreño, A. [Univ., de Barcelona, Marti Franques (Spain); Savage, M.  J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-11

    Quarkonium-nucleus systems are composed of two interacting hadronic states without common valence quarks, which interact primarily through multi-gluon exchanges, realizing a color van der Waals force. We present lattice QCD calculations of the interactions of strange and charm quarkonia with light nuclei. Both the strangeonium-nucleus and charmonium-nucleus systems are found to be relatively deeply bound when the masses of the three light quarks are set equal to that of the physical strange quark. Extrapolation of these results to the physical light-quark masses suggests that the binding energy of charmonium to nuclear matter is B < 40 MeV.

  12. Nucleas (hadron) nucleus elastic scattering and geometrical picture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleem F.; Ali, S.; Saleem, M. [Univ. of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan)

    1995-08-01

    A comprehensive explanation of nucleus-nucleus and hadron-nucleus elastic scattering is elusive ever since the measurements of these reactions were made. By proposing energy dependent hadronic form factors for deuteron and alpha, in analogy to that of the proton as suggested by Chou and Yang recently, the authors have fitted all the available data for alpha-alpha and deuteron-deuteron elastic scattering. In order to further verify the validity of the proposed form factor, they have also fitted the data for proton-alpha and proton-deuteron elastic scattering. It is concluded that the hadronic matter is expanding with an increase in energy. 30 refs., 11 figs.

  13. The Acasta Gneiss - a Hadean cratonic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprung, P.; Scherer, E. E.; Maltese, A.; Bast, R.; Bleeker, W.; Mezger, K.

    2016-12-01

    The known terrestrial rock record lacks undisputed, chemically intact Hadean crust. Direct evidence from this eon has been restricted to zircon grains within younger rocks [1]. The Acasta Gneiss Complex (AGC; NT, CA) has yielded zircon with Hadean domains [e.g., 2,3], but the time at which AGC rocks became closed chemical systems is unclear [4,5]. Determining this `time of last disturbance' (tld) would provide a minimum protolith age, and is crucial for using radiogenic isotope compositions of bulk rocks to trace crust-mantle evolution. Recent studies mostly focused on the `low-strain' eastern AGC [e.g., 6, 7], which records an evolving, early-mid Archean cratonic nucleus [7]. We also studied the `high-strain' banded gneiss in the western AGC, which hosts >4 Ga zircon domains [2,3], too. Our focusing lay on adjoining, lithologically distinct bands [8] of two distinct chemical groups: A) Mafic, chondrite-normalized LaN/YbN ≦20, slightly HFSE- depleted, and B) TTG-like, LaN/YbN up to 145, markedly HFSE-depleted. Six adjacent bands yield a well-defined 4 Ga Sm-Nd isochron with a ɛNd4Ga of +2 and ɛHf4Ga values from +1 to +6. Within-band Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf systematics imply younger mineral re-equilibration [9]. We interpret the 4 Ga Sm-Nd isochron to date the physical juxtaposition of bands in the gneiss unit and to define tld among bands for elements less mobile and diffusive than Sm and Nd. Contrasting Sm-Nd results from the same unit [10] likely are due to sampling at too fine a scale. Digestion of metamict pre-tld zircon likely caused the scatter in Lu-Hf. Both decay systems hint at the existence of a possibly local, strongly depleted Hadean mantle domain. The TTG-like bands are 0.4 Gyr older than similar rocks in the `low-strain' eastern AGC [7]. The AGC was thus an evolved cratonic nucleus already at 4 Ga, possibly with a depleted lithospheric keel. [1] Cavosie et al. (2004) Prec. Res. 135, 251-279 [2] Bowring & Williams (1999) CMP 134, 3-16 [3] Iizuka et al

  14. Structural Description of Polyaromatic Nucleus in Residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Huicheng; Yan Yongjie; Sun Wanfu; Wang Jifeng

    2007-01-01

    The proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy(1H-NMR),the synchronous fluorescence spectrometry(SFS)and the rutheniam ions catalyzed oxidation(RICO)method wen used to determine the chemical structure of polyaromatic nucleus in Oman residue fractions.The results of1H-NMR analyses showed that the average numbers of aromatic rings in the aromatics,resins and asphaltenes units were 3.2,5.6 and 8.2.respectively.SFS was used to investigate the distribution of aromatic tings in residue fractions,the main distribution range of aromatic rings in aromatics,resins and asphaltenes were 3-4 rings,3-5 rings and more than 5 tings,respectively.The aromatic network in residue fractions was oxidized to produce numerous carboxylic acids.The types and content of benzenepolycarboxylic acids,such as phthalic acid,benzenetricarboxylic acids,benzenetetracarbOxylic acids,benzenepentacarboxylic acid and benzenehexacarboxylic acid disclosed the condensed types of aromatic nuclei in the core.The biphenyl fraction(BIPH),the cata-condensed fraction(CATA),the peri-condensed fraction(PERI)and the condensed index(BCI)were calculated based on the benzenepolycarboxylic acids formed.The results implied that there was less biphenyl type structures in all residue fractions.The aromatics fraction was almost composed of the cata-condensed type system,and the asphaltenes fraction was wholly composed of the peri-condensed type system,while in the resins fraction co-existed the two types,herein the peri-condensed type Was predominant over the cata-condensed type.Based on the analytical results obtained in the study,the components-aromatics,resins and asphaltenes-were given the likely structural models.

  15. Nuclear mean field and double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Khoa, Dao T; Loan, Doan Thi; Loc, Bui Minh

    2016-01-01

    Realistic density dependent CDM3Yn versions of the M3Y interaction have been used in an extended Hartree-Fock (HF) calculation of nuclear matter (NM), with the nucleon single-particle potential determined from the total NM energy based on the Hugenholtz-van Hove theorem that gives rise naturally to a rearrangement term (RT). Using the RT of the single-nucleon potential obtained exactly at different NM densities, the density- and energy dependence of the CDM3Yn interactions was modified to account properly for both the RT and observed energy dependence of the nucleon optical potential. Based on a local density approximation, the double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential has been extended to take into account consistently the rearrangement effect and energy dependence of the nuclear mean-field potential, using the modified CDM3Yn interactions. The extended double-folding model was applied to study the elastic $^{12}$C+$^{12}$C and $^{16}$O+$^{12}$C scattering at the refractive energies, wher...

  16. Statistical Model of the Early Stage of nucleus-nucleus collisions with exact strangeness conservation

    CERN Document Server

    Poberezhnyuk, R V; Gorenstein, M I

    2015-01-01

    The Statistical Model of the Early Stage, SMES, describes a transition between confined and deconfined phases of strongly interacting matter created in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The model was formulated in the late 1990s for central Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN SPS energies. It predicted several signals of the transition (onset of deconfinement) which were later observed by the NA49 experiment. The grand canonical ensemble was used to calculate entropy and strangeness production. This approximation is valid for reactions with mean multiplicities of particles carrying conserved charges being significantly larger than one. Recent results of NA61/SHINE on hadron production in inelastic p+p interactions suggest that the deconfinement may also take place in these reactions. However, in this case mean multiplicity of particles with non-zero strange charge is smaller than one. Thus for the modeling of p+p interactions the exact strangeness conservation has to be implemented in the SMES. This extension of the SMES ...

  17. Heavy-flavor dynamics in nucleus-nucleus collisions: from RHIC to LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Monteno, M; Beraudo, A; De Pace, A; Molinari, A; Nardi, M; Prino, F

    2011-01-01

    The stochastic dynamics of c and b quarks in the fireball created in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC is studied employing a relativistic Langevin equation, based on a picture of multiple uncorrelated random collisions with the medium. Heavy-quark transport coefficients are evaluated within a pQCD approach, with a proper HTL resummation of medium effects for soft scatterings. The Langevin equation is embedded in a multi-step setup developed to study heavy-flavor observables in pp and AA collisions, starting from a NLO pQCD calculation of initial heavy-quark yields, complemented in the nuclear case by shadowing corrections, k_T-broadening and nuclear geometry effects. Then, only for AA collisions, the Langevin equation is solved numerically in a background medium described by relativistic hydrodynamics. Finally, the propagated heavy quarks are made hadronize and decay into electrons. Results for the nuclear modification factor R_AA of heavy-flavor hadrons and electrons from their semi-leptonic decays...

  18. EOS: A time projection chamber for the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Bevalac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, H.G.; Odyniec, G.; Rai, G.; Seidl, P.

    1986-12-01

    The conceptual design is presented for a detector to identify and measure (..delta..p/p approx. = 1%) most of the 200 or so mid-rapidity charged particles (p, d, t, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He, ..pi../sup + -/, K/sup + -/) produced in each central nucleus-nucleus collision (Au + Au) at Bevalac energies, as well as K/sub 3//sup 0/ and ..lambda../sup 0/. The beam particles and heavy spectator fragments are excluded from the detection volume by means of a central vacuum pipe. Particle identification is achieved by a combination of dE/dx measurements in the TPC, and of time-of-flight measurements in a scintillator array. The TPC is single-ended and its end cap is entirely covered with cathode pads (about 25,000 pads and about 1000 anode wires). A non-uniform pad distribution is proposed to accommodate the high multiplicity of particles emitted at forward angles. The performance of the detector is assessed with regard to multihit capability, tracking, momentum resolution, particle identification, ..lambda../sup 0/ reconstruction, space charge effects, field non-uniformity, dynamic range, data acquisition rate, and data analysis rate. 72 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Charm quarks as a probe of matter produced in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yasir

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Direct measurement of hadrons containing charm quark carries important information about the initial stage of the nucleus-nucleus collision at relativistic energies. The study of open charm in Pb-Pb collisions at SPS energies will be a powerful tool to investigate the production of heavy flavours and their interaction with the medium produced in such collisions. A feasibility study was initiated for the measurement of the D0 mesons (open charm by its two-body decay into pion and kaon in central Pb-Pb collision at SPS energies in NA61/SHINE experiment. To generate the physical input we used AMPT (A Multi Phase Transport Model event generator and employed GEANT4 application to describe particle transport through the NA61/SHINE experimental setup supplemented by a future vertex detector (VD that will allow for precise vertex reconstruction close to the primary interaction point. The results of the simulation shows that this measurement is feasible with a dedicated VD which allows the precise tracking close to the target.

  20. Formation and identification of Centauro and Strangelets in nucleus- nucleus collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bogolyubsky, M Yu; Filippov, S N; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Maevskaya, A I; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Stefanski, P; Wlodarczyk, Z

    1999-01-01

    We present a phenomenological model for the formation and decay of a cosmic ray Centauro fireball in the baryon-rich projectile fragmentation rapidity region in nucleus-nucleus interactions. Our model naturally incorporates the $9 possibility of strangelet formation, Strangelets being conjectured to be the "strongly penetrating component" observed in hadron-rich cosmic ray events. Based on this model we have performed Monte-Carlo simulations to study the $9 Centauro and strangelet dynamic and kinematic characteristics in central Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energies, as well as their identification by the detector system CASTOR. CASTOR is being developed for the ALICE heavy ion experiment at $9 the LHC and will probe the very forward pseudorapidity region 5.6

  1. Formation and identification of Centauro and strangelets in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelis, A.L.S.; Bartke, J.; Bogolyubsky, M.Yu.; Filippov, S.N.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Kharlov, Yu.V.; Kurepin, A.B.; Maevskaya, A.I.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Sadovsky, S.A.; Stefanski, P.; Wlodarczyk, Z

    1999-03-01

    We present a phenomenological model for the formation and decay of a cosmic ray Centauro fireball in the baryon-rich projectile fragmentation rapidity region in nucleus-nucleus interactions. Our model naturally incorporates the possibility of Strangelet formation, Strangelets being conjectured to be the 'strongly penetrating component' observed in hadron-rich cosmic ray events. Based on this model we have performed Monte-Carlo simulations to study the Centauro and Strangelet dynamic and kinematic characteristics in central Pb + Pb collisions at LHC energies, as well as their identification by the detector system CASTOR. CASTOR is being developed for the ALICE heavy ion experiment at the LHC and will probe the very forward pseudorapidity region 5.6 {<=} {eta} {<=} 7.2, characterized by very high baryon density. CASTOR is optimised to search for Centauro signatures and long penetrating objects. Simulations show that CASTOR is well able to distinguish events with abnormal values of E{sub em}/E{sub had} or N{sub {gamma}}/N{sub ch}. In addition simulations of the transition curves of Strangelets traversing the CASTOR calorimeter show long penetration and many-maxima structure such as observed in cosmic ray events.

  2. Quantitative analysis of the fusion cross sections using different microscopic nucleus-nucleus interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adel, A.; Alharbi, T.

    2017-01-01

    The fusion cross sections for reactions involving medium and heavy nucleus-nucleus systems are investigated near and above the Coulomb barrier using the one-dimensional barrier penetration model. The microscopic nuclear interaction potential is computed by four methods, namely: the double-folding model based on a realistic density-dependent M3Y NN interaction with a finite-range exchange part, the Skyrme energy density functional in the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi approximation, the generalized Proximity potential, and the Akyüz-Winther interaction. The comparison between the calculated and the measured values of the fusion excitation functions indicates that the calculations of the DFM give quite satisfactory agreement with the experimental data, being much better than the other methods. New parameterized forms for the fusion barrier heights and positions are presented. Furthermore, the effects of deformation and orientation degrees of freedom on the distribution of the Coulomb barrier characteristics as well as the fusion cross sections are studied for the reactions 16 O + 70 Ge and 28 Si + 100 Mo. The calculated values of the total fusion cross sections are compared with coupled channel calculations using the code CCFULL and compared with the experimental data. Our results reveal that the inclusion of deformations and orientation degrees of freedom improves the comparison with the experimental data.

  3. Constraining in-medium nucleon-nucleon interactions via nucleus-nucleus reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammarruca, Francesca; White, Larz

    2010-11-01

    The nuclear equation of state is a broadly useful tool. Besides being the main input of stellar structure calculations, it allows a direct connection to the physics of nuclei. For instance, an energy functional (such as a mass formula), together with the energy/particle in nuclear matter, can be used to predict nuclear energies and radii [1]. The single-particle properties are also a key point to link infinite nuclear matter and actual nuclei. The parameters of the single-particle potential, in particular the effective mass, enter the calculations of, for instance, in-medium effective cross sections. From the well-known Glauber reaction theory, the total nucleus-nucleus reaction cross section is expressed in terms of the nuclear transparency, which, in turn, depends on the overlap of the nuclear density distributions and the elementary nucleon-nucleon (NN) cross sections. We explore the sensitivity of the reaction calculation to medium modifications of the NN cross sections to estimate the likelihood of constraining the latter through nuclear reactions. Ultimately, we wish to incorporate isospin asymmetry in the reaction model, having in mind connections with rare isotopes. [1] F. Sammarruca, arXiv:1002.00146 [nucl-th]; International Journal of Modern Physics, in press.

  4. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Interaction with the Arcuate Nucleus; Essential for Organizing Physiological Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Ruiz, Mara

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is generally considered the master clock, independently driving all circadian rhythms. We recently demonstrated the SCN receives metabolic and cardiovascular feedback adeptly altering its neuronal activity. In the present study, we show that microcuts effectively removing SCN-arcuate nucleus (ARC) interconnectivity in Wistar rats result in a loss of rhythmicity in locomotor activity, corticosterone levels, and body temperature in constant dark (DD) conditions. Elimination of these reciprocal connections did not affect SCN clock gene rhythmicity but did cause the ARC to desynchronize. Moreover, unilateral SCN lesions with contralateral retrochiasmatic microcuts resulted in identical arrhythmicity, proving that for the expression of physiological rhythms this reciprocal SCN-ARC interaction is essential. The unaltered SCN c-Fos expression following glucose administration in disconnected animals as compared to a significant decrease in controls demonstrates the importance of the ARC as metabolic modulator of SCN neuronal activity. Together, these results indicate that the SCN is more than an autonomous clock, and forms an essential component of a larger network controlling homeostasis. The present novel findings illustrate how an imbalance between SCN and ARC communication through circadian disruption could be involved in the etiology of metabolic disorders. PMID:28374011

  5. Isotope Dependence of Superheavy Nucleus Formation Cross Section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zu-Hua; BAG Jing-Dong

    2006-01-01

    The dynamical process in the superheavy nucleus synthesis is studied on the basis of the two-dimensional Smolu-chowski equation. Special attention is paid to the isotope dependence of the cross section for the superheavy nucleus formation by means of making a comparison among the reaction systems of 54Fe + 204Pb, 56Fe + 206Pb, and 58Fe + 208Pb. It is found by this comparison that the formation cross section is very sensitive to the conditional saddle-point height and the neutron separation energy of the compound nucleus. Reaction systems with lower height of conditional saddle-point and smaller neutron separation energy are more favourable for the synthesis of the superheavy nucleus.

  6. Cytotoxicity of nucleus-targeting fluorescent gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing-Ya; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Mingxi; Xie, Zhi-Xiong; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell morphology, cell apoptosis/necrosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and mitochondrial membrane potential examinations were performed on different cell lines exposed to the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs. We found that the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs caused cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. A possible mechanism for the cytotoxicity of the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs was proposed as follows: the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs induce the production of ROS, resulting in the oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components, in turn leading to apoptosis via a mitochondrial damage pathway. This work facilitates a better understanding of the toxicity of AuNCs, especially nucleus-targeting AuNCs.Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell

  7. Nucleus management in manual small incision cataract surgery by phacosection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleus management is critical in manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS, as the integrity of the tunnel, endothelium and posterior capsule needs to be respected. Several techniques of nucleus management are in vogue, depending upon the specific technique of MSICS. Nucleus can be removed in toto or bisected or trisected into smaller segments. The pressure in the eye can be maintained at the desired level with the use of an anterior chamber maintainer or kept at atmospheric levels. In MSICS, unlike phacoemulsification, there is no need to limit the size of the tunnel or restrain the size of capsulorrhexis. Large well-structured tunnels and larger capsulorrhexis provide better control on the surgical maneuvers. Safety and simplicity of MSICS has made it extremely popular. The purpose of this article is to describe nucleus management by phacosection in MSICS.

  8. Low-energy antinucleon-nucleus interaction revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    2015-08-01

    Annihilation cross sections of antiprotons and antineutrons on the proton between 50 and 400 MeV/c show Coulomb focusing below 200 MeV/c and almost no charge-dependence above 200 MeV/c. Similar comparisons for heavier targets are not possible for lack of overlap between nuclear targets studied with and beams. Interpolating between -nucleus annihilation cross sections with the help of an optical potential to compare with -nucleus annihilation cross sections reveal unexpected features of Coulomb interactions in the latter. Direct comparisons between -nucleus and -nucleus annihilations at very low energies could be possible if cross sections are measured on the same targets and at the same energies as the available cross sections for . Such measurements may be feasible in the foreseeable future.

  9. The integrative role of the pedunculopontine nucleus in human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Brian; Welter, Marie-Laure; Belaid, Hayat; Fernandez Vidal, Sara; Bardinet, Eric; Grabli, David; Karachi, Carine

    2015-05-01

    The brainstem pedunculopontine nucleus has a likely, although unclear, role in gait control, and is a potential deep brain stimulation target for treating resistant gait disorders. These disorders are a major therapeutic challenge for the ageing population, especially in Parkinson's disease where gait and balance disorders can become resistant to both dopaminergic medication and subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Here, we present electrophysiological evidence that the pedunculopontine and subthalamic nuclei are involved in distinct aspects of gait using a locomotor imagery task in 14 patients with Parkinson's disease undergoing surgery for the implantation of pedunculopontine or subthalamic nuclei deep brain stimulation electrodes. We performed electrophysiological recordings in two phases, once during surgery, and again several days after surgery in a subset of patients. The majority of pedunculopontine nucleus neurons (57%) recorded intrasurgically exhibited changes in activity related to different task components, with 29% modulated during visual stimulation, 41% modulated during voluntary hand movement, and 49% modulated during imaginary gait. Pedunculopontine nucleus local field potentials recorded post-surgically were modulated in the beta and gamma bands during visual and motor events, and we observed alpha and beta band synchronization that was sustained for the duration of imaginary gait and spatially localized within the pedunculopontine nucleus. In contrast, significantly fewer subthalamic nucleus neurons (27%) recorded intrasurgically were modulated during the locomotor imagery, with most increasing or decreasing activity phasically during the hand movement that initiated or terminated imaginary gait. Our data support the hypothesis that the pedunculopontine nucleus influences gait control in manners extending beyond simply driving pattern generation. In contrast, the subthalamic nucleus seems to control movement execution that is not likely to be gait

  10. Shell Correction at the Saddle Point for Superheavy Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张炜; 张时声; 张双全; 孟杰

    2003-01-01

    The potential energy surface for superheavy nucleus has been studied within the framework of the constrained relativistic mean field theory, and the shell correction energy as a function of deformation has been extracted by the Strutinsky shell correction procedure. Contrary to the usual expectation, the shell correction energy at the saddle point is too important to be neglected, and it has essential contribution to the fission barrier in superheavy nucleus.

  11. Colour, albedo and nucleus size of Halley's comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Tholen, D. J.; Hartmann, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    Photometry of Halley's comet in the B, J, V, and K broadband filters during a time when the coma was very weak and presumed to contribute negligibly to the broadband photometry is reported. The V-J and J-K colors suggest that the color of the nucleus of Halley's comet is similar to that of the D-type asteroids, which in turn suggests that the surface of the nucleus has an albedo less than 0.1.

  12. Truncal ataxia from infarction involving the inferior olivary nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hyun; Ryoo, Sookyung; Moon, So Young; Seo, Sand Won; Na, Duk L

    2012-08-01

    Truncal ataxia in medullary infarction may be caused by involvement of the lateral part of the medulla; however, truncal ataxia in infarction involving the inferior olivary nucleus (ION) has received comparatively little attention. We report a patient with truncal ataxia due to medial medullary infarction located in the ION. A lesion in the ION could produce a contralateral truncal ataxia due to increased inhibitory input to the contralesional vestibular nucleus from the contralesional flocculus.

  13. A FIBER APPARATUS IN THE NUCLEUS OF THE YEAST CELL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinow, C. F.; Marak, J.

    1966-01-01

    The structure and mode of division of the nucleus of budding yeast cells have been studied by phase-contrast microscopy during life and by ordinary microscopy after Helly fixation. The components of the nucleus were differentially stained by the Feulgen procedure, with Giemsa solution after hydrolysis, and with iron alum haematoxylin. New information was obtained in cells fixed in Helly's by directly staining them with 0.005% acid fuchsin in 1% acetic acid in water. Electron micrographs have been made of sections of cells that were first fixed with 3% glutaraldehyde, then divested of their walls with snail juice, and postfixed with osmium tetroxide. Light and electron microscopy have given concordant information about the organization of the yeast nucleus. A peripheral segment of the nucleus is occupied by relatively dense matter (the "peripheral cluster" of Mundkur) which is Feulgen negative. The greater part of the nucleus is filled with fine-grained Feulgen-positive matter of low density in which chromosomes could not be identified. Chromosomes become visible in this region under the light microscope at meiosis. In the chromatin lies a short fiber with strong affinity for acid fuchsin. The nucleus divides by elongation and constriction, and during this process the fiber becomes long and thin. Electron microscopy has resolved it into a bundle of dark-edged 150 to 180 A filaments which extends between "centriolar plaques" that are attached to the nuclear envelope. PMID:5331666

  14. Separate populations of neurons within the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus of the rat project to vagal and thoracic autonomic preganglionic levels and express c-Fos protein induced by lithium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, F; Carrasco, M; Vallo, J J

    1998-03-01

    The role of different hypothalamic nuclei, particularly the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), in the control of food intake and feeding behaviour is well known. It is also well established that lithium chloride (LiCl) causes various disorders in feeding behaviour. In this study, we analyzed the precise distribution of hypothalamic neurons activated by i.p. LiCl administration (LCA neurons) and compared it to that of hypothalamic neurons which project to autonomic preganglionic levels (HAP neurons). We also analysed the possibility that some neurons belong to both populations of nerve cells. To this end, a multiple-labelling technique, using two retrograde fluorescent tracers together with c-Fos-like immunohistochemistry, was performed. Fast Blue was injected in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and Fluorogold (FG) in the thoracic intermedial-lateral cell column, to trace parasympathetic and sympathetic pathways, respectively. LiCl was used as stimulus for c-Fos-like immunohistochemistry. HAP neurons were located mainly in the dorsal, ventral and lateral regions of the parvocellular PVN, while LCA neurons were observed predominantly in the magnocellular region of the PVN rostrally to HAP neurons. A significant number of FG/Fos double-labelled neurons were located in the dorsal parvocellular subnucleus of the PVN (dp) in the LiCl-stimulated rats. We concluded that there is a clear segregation of LCA neurons from HAP neurons within the PVN. The presence of FG/Fos double-labelled neurons in the dp suggests that this nucleus could mediate a sympathetic response after LiCl administration.

  15. Stopping powers and cross sections due to two-photon processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Wang K.; Norbury, John W.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of electromagnetic-production processes due to two-photon exchange in nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed. Feynman diagrams for two-photon exchange are evaluated using quantum electrodynamics. The total cross section and stopping power for projectile and target nuclei of identical charge are found to be significant for heavy nuclei above a few GeV per nucleon-incident energy.

  16. Coherent production of the long-lived pionium nP states in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Gevokyan, S

    2015-01-01

    The coherent production of the $nP$ states of the $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ atoms ($A_{2\\pi}$) in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is considered as a possible source of the $A_{2\\pi}(nP)$ beam for the pionium Lamb-shift measurement. A general expression for estimation of the $A_{2\\pi}(nP)$ yields is derived in the framework of the equivalent photon approximation.

  17. The interfascicular trigeminal nucleus: a precerebellar nucleus in the mouse defined by retrograde neuronal tracing and genetic fate mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuhong; Tvrdik, Petr; Makki, Nadja; Machold, Robert; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2013-02-15

    We have found a previously unreported precerebellar nucleus located among the emerging fibers of the motor root of the trigeminal nerve in the mouse, which we have called the interfascicular trigeminal nucleus (IF5). This nucleus had previously been named the tensor tympani part of the motor trigeminal nucleus (5TT) in rodent brain atlases, because it was thought to be a subset of small motor neurons of the motor trigeminal nucleus innervating the tensor tympani muscle. However, following injection of retrograde tracer in the cerebellum, the labeled neurons in IF5 were found to be choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) negative, indicating that they are not motor neurons. The cells of IF5 are strongly labeled in mice from Wnt1Cre and Atoh1 CreER lineage fate mapping, in common with the major precerebellar nuclei that arise from the rhombic lip and that issue mossy fibers. Analysis of sections from mouse Hoxa3, Hoxb1, and Egr2 Cre labeled lineages shows that the neurons of IF5 arise from rhombomeres caudal to rhombomere 4, most likely from rhombomeres 6-8. We conclude that IF5 is a significant precerebellar nucleus in the mouse that shares developmental gene expression characteristics with mossy fiber precerebellar nuclei that arise from the caudal rhombic lip.

  18. Fluctuations and correlations in nucleus-nucleus collisions within transport approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konchakovski, Volodymyr P.

    2009-10-01

    The current thesis is devoted to a systematic study of fluctuations and correlations in heavy-ion collisions, which might be considered as probes for the phase transition and the critical point in the phase diagram, within the Hadron-String- Dynamics (HSD) microscopic transport approach. This is a powerful tool to study nucleus-nucleus collisions and allows to completely simulate experimental collisions on an event-by-event basis. Thus, the transport model has been used to study fluctuations and correlations including the influence of experimental acceptance as well as centrality, system size and collision energy. The comparison to experimental data can separate the effects induced by a phase transition since there is no phase transition in the HSD version used here. Firstly the centrality dependence of multiplicity fluctuations has been studied. Different centrality selections have been performed in the analysis in correspondence to the experimental situation. For the fixed target experiment NA49 events with fixed numbers of the projectile participants have been studied while in the collider experiment PHENIX centrality classes of events have been defined by the multiplicity in certain phase space region. A decrease of participant number fluctuations (and thus volume fluctuations) in more central collisions for both experiments has been obtained. Another area of this work addresses to transport model calculations of multiplicity fluctuations in nucleus-nucleus collisions as a function of colliding energy and system size. This study is in full correspondence to the experimental program of the NA61 Collaboration at the SPS. Central C+C, S+S, In+In, and Pb+Pb nuclear collisions at Elab = 10, 20, 30, 40, 80, 158 AGeV have been investigated. The expected enhanced fluctuations - attributed to the critical point and phase transition - can be observed experimentally on top of a monotonic and smooth 'hadronic background'. These findings should be helpful for the

  19. Questions and prospects in quarkonium polarization measurements from proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Faccioli, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Polarization measurements are the best instrument to understand how quark and antiquark combine into the different quarkonium states, but no model has so far succeeded in explaining the measured J/psi and Upsilon polarizations. On the other hand, the experimental data in proton-antiproton and proton-nucleus collisions are inconsistent, incomplete and ambiguous. New analyses will have to properly address often underestimated issues: the existence of azimuthal anisotropies, the dependence on the reference frame, the influence of the experimental acceptance on the comparison with other measurements and with theory. Additionally, a recently developed frame-invariant formalism will provide an alternative and often more immediate physical viewpoint and, at the same time, will help probing systematic effects due to experimental biases. The role of feed-down decays from heavier states, a crucial missing piece in the current experimental knowledge, will have to be investigated. Ultimately, quarkonium polarization meas...

  20. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-An; Natowitz, Joseph B.

    2013-03-01

    The 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012) was held from 27 May to 1 June 2012, in San Antonio, Texas, USA. It was jointly organized and hosted by The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University, College Station and The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Among the approximately 300 participants were a large number of graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. The Keynote Talk of the conference, 'The State of Affairs of Present and Future Nucleus-Nucleus Collision Science', was given by Dr Robert Tribble, University Distinguished Professor and Director of the TAMU Cyclotron Institute. During the conference a very well-received public lecture on neutrino astronomy, 'The ICEcube project', was given by Dr Francis Halzen, Hilldale and Gregory Breit Distinguished Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Scientific program continued in the general spirit and intention of this conference series. As is typical of this conference a broad range of topics including fundamental areas of nuclear dynamics, structure, and applications were addressed in 42 plenary session talks, 150 parallel session talks, and 21 posters. The high quality of the work presented emphasized the vitality and relevance of the subject matter of this conference. Following the tradition, the NN2012 International Advisory Committee selected the host and site of the next conference in this series. The 12th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2015) will be held 21-26 June 2015 in Catania, Italy. It will be hosted by The INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania and the Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia of the University of Catania. The NN2012 Proceedings contains the conference program and 165 articles organized into the following 10 sections 1. Heavy and Superheavy Elements 2. QCD and Hadron Physics 3. Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 4. Nuclear Structure 5. Nuclear Energy and Applications of

  1. Morphology of Human Nucleus Accumbens Neurons Based on the Immunohistochemical Expression of Gad67

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazdanovic Maja

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus accumbens is a part of the ventral striatum along with the caudate nucleus and putamen. The role of the human nucleus accumbens in drug addiction and other psychiatric disorders is of great importance. The aim of this study was to characterize medium spiny neurons in the nucleus accumbens according to the immunohistochemical expression of GAD67.

  2. Nucleus Pearl Coating Process of Freshwater Mussel Anodonta woodiana (Unionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WASMEN MANALU

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The limiting factor which is a weakness of sea water pearl production are high costs, the risk of major business failures and a long coating time. From the issue of freshwater pearls appear to have prospects of alternative substitution for sea water pearl. This present study aimed to evaluate effect of loads (the number and diameter nucleus on freshwater pearl coating process and the number and size of the appropriate nucleus diameter, to produce the optimum coating thickness of half-round pearls. The research consists of experimental implantation of 2, 4, and 6 nucleus number per individual mussel was maintained by the method stocked in hapa in bottom waters. Observation method and factorial randomized block design used in the study of the influence of the load to the successfulness of pearl coating and the pearl layer thickness. The results showed that A. woodiana can be utilized as a producer of freshwater pearls. In addition, the number of optimum nucleus that can be attached to the mussel A. woodiana was 2 grains/individuals with a diameter of 10 mm. Shells implanted with the optimum nucleus diameter and number of pearls produced the highest layer thickness of 17 m after 9 months cultivation. This result was good enough compared with the layer thickness of sea water pearl production after the same cultivation time.

  3. Alteration of Paramecium candatum germinal nucleus morphology after UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokin, S.I. (Leningradskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Biologicheskij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst.)

    1982-09-01

    A study was made on morphologic changes of micronucleus (Mi) after whole-body ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of paramecia as well as after local irradiation of this nucleus or the area of macronucleus (Ma). The whole-body irradiation of its Ma part leads to generative nucleus growth in sizes and chromatin structure change, which is expressed in occurence of large chromatin bodies. Aftereffects of local action on Mi for viable descendants are expressed in nucleus size transformation (usually in reduction), gaining ''comet-shaped'' form and probably in reduction of dna amount. Irradiation of Ma and total effect on cell cause Mi changes of reversible character. All morphologic changes of Mi after local ultraviolet irradiation are conserved in descendants and are not photoreactivated. Possible reasons for this phenomenon are discussed. The results obtained make it possible to speak about different mechanisms of action on Mi in the case of local and whole-body UV irradiation of cell. The effect of irradiated Ma on generative nucleus, but not direct damage of this nucleus is the reason for Mi morphologic reconstruction after whole-body action on paramecium.

  4. Effects of electroacupuncture on expression of c-fos protein and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 in the rostral ventromedia medulla of rats with chronic visceral hyperalgesia%电针对慢性内脏痛觉敏感大鼠延髓头端腹内侧核c-fos蛋白和NR1受体表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祁德波; 李为民

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:Acupuncture has been clinically proved to be effective in treating abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome ( IBS).However,its neurobiological mechanism remains largely unexplored.The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) in relieving chronic visceral hyperalgesia and the possible involvement of N-methyi-D-aspartate receptor 1 (NR1) in rostral ventromedia medulla (RVM) of the brain in an IBS rat model.METHODS:To establish the IBS rat model,male Sprague-Dawley neonatal rats received colon mechanical irritation on a daily basis from the 9th to the 22nd day after their birth.After a resting period of another two to four weeks,behavioral tests of pain threshold pressure (PTP)and abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) responding to colorectal distention (CRD) stimuli were conducted to judge the colorectal sensitive situation.Then administration of EA at acupoints of Zusanli (ST36) and Shangjuxu (ST37) bilaterally in the hind limbs was repeated four times every other day,while sham-EA was done by inserting needles at similar acupoints without electrical stimulation.Immunohistochemical method was used to display the expression of protooncogene protein c-fos and NR1 in RVM of rats.RESULTS:The results demonstrated that the PTP values and AWR scores,in response to the CRD stimuli,significantly decreased and increased,respectively (P<0.01,P<0.01),while the number of immunoreactive neurons of c-fos protein and NR1 significantly increased in nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (Gi),nucleus lateralis paragigantocellulari (LPGi),nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis pars alpha (GiA) and nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) of RVM in IBS model rats compared with the normal rats (P<0.05).After EA treatment,PTP values and AWR scores significantly increased and decreased,respectively (P<0.01,P<0.05) ; the number of immunoreactive neurons of c-fos and NR1 significantly decreased respectively in Gi,LPGi and GiA and in Gi

  5. The stellar population of the decoupled nucleus in M 31

    CERN Document Server

    Silchenko, O K; Vlasyuk, V V

    1998-01-01

    The results of a spectroscopic and photometric investigation of the central region of M 31 are presented. An analysis of absorption-index radial profiles involving magnesium, calcium, and iron lines has shown that the unresolved nucleus of M 31 is distinct by its increased metallicity; unexpectedly, among two nuclei of M 31, it is the faintest one located exactly in the dynamical center of the galaxy (and dynamically decoupled) which is chemically distinct. The Balmer absorption line H-beta has been included into the analysis to disentangle metallicity and age effects; an age difference by a factor 3 is detected between stellar populations of the nucleus and of the bulge, the nucleus being younger. The morphological analysis of CCD images has revealed the presence of a nuclear stellar-gaseous disk with a radius of some 100 pc, the gas component of which looks non-stationary, well inside the bulge of M 31.

  6. Low energy neutron inelastic scattering on /sup 152/Sm nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, D.J.R.; Cabezas, S.R.; Lopez, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of inelastic neutron scattering by the nucleus /sup 152/Sm at incident energies of 2.47 and 2.75 MeV using the coupled-channel method has been made. Consideration is made of the 2/sup +//0.122 MeV/, 4/sup +//0.366 MeV/ and 2/sup +//1.086 MeV/excited states. It is shown that in this energy range the process may be described satisfactorily considering /sup 152/Sm as a deformed nucleus with non-axial symmetry, given the quadrupole and hexadecapole deformations. The scattering process through the compound nucleus is calculated according to the Hauser-Feshbach formula with width fluctuation correction. It is shown that the presence of direct excitation process is partly due to the non-axiality of /sup 152/Sm.

  7. Separable Representation of Multichannel Nucleon-Nucleus Optical Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Hlophe, Linda

    2016-01-01

    One important ingredient for many applications of nuclear physics to astrophysics, nuclear energy, and stockpile stewardship are cross sections for reactions of neutrons with rare isotopes. Since direct measurements are often not feasible, indirect methods, e.g. (d,p) reactions, should be used. Those (d,p) reactions may be viewed as three-body reactions and described with Faddeev techniques. Faddeev equations in momentum space have a long tradition of utilizing separable interactions in order to arrive at sets of coupled integral equations in one variable. Optical potentials representing the effective interactions in the neutron (proton) nucleus subsystem are usually non-Hermitian as well as energy-dependent. Including excitations of the nucleus in the calculation requires a multichannel optical potential. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a separable, energy-dependent multichannel representation of complex, energy-dependent optical potentials that contain excitations of the nucleus and that fulfill r...

  8. Reaction cross sections of the deformed halo nucleus 31Ne

    CERN Document Server

    Urata, Y; Sagawa, H

    2012-01-01

    Using the Glauber theory, we calculate reaction cross sections for the deformed halo nucleus $^{31}$Ne. To this end, we assume that the $^{31}$Ne nucleus takes the $^{30}$Ne + $n$ structure. In order to take into account the rotational excitation of the core nucleus $^{30}$Ne, we employ the particle-rotor model (PRM). We compare the results to those in the adiabatic limit of PRM, that is, the Nilsson model, and show that the Nilsson model works reasonably well for the reaction cross sections of $^{31}$Ne. We also investigate the dependence of the reaction cross sections on the ground state properties of $^{31}$Ne, such as the deformation parameter and the p-wave component in the ground state wave function.

  9. Microinjection of limonene into caudate nucleus inhibits IMC of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Guo; Xin Yi Zhu; Yi Quan Wei; De Zhi Yang

    2000-01-01

    AIM We have discovered that Limonene modulates interdigestive myoelectrical complexes (IMCs) ofgastrointestinal tract in rats. In this research we will elucidate weather limonene affects acetylcholine M-receptor in caudate nucleus.METHODS Changes of IMCs were studied after limonene and/or atropine were microinjected into caudatenucleus. IMCs were recorded by a RM-6200 four-channel recorder and then delivered to Maclab and PowerMacintosh.RESULTS The active phases of IMCs occupied about 40% of total cycle in average. After microinjection oflimonene into caudate nucleus, the active phases were significantly shortened, while the cycle time of IMCswere not changed significantly. The inhibitory effects of limonene were abolished by pretreatment withatropine, whilst the atropine has no effect on IMCs.CONCLUSION It is suggested that limonene inhabits the gastrointestinal IMCs by affecting M-receptor incaudate nucleus.

  10. Extreme alpha-clustering in the 18O nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, E D; Goldberg, V Z; Brown, S; Robson, D; Crisp, A M; Cottle, P D; Fu, C; Giles, J; Green, B W; Kemper, K W; Lee, K; Roeder, B T; Tribble, R E

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the 18O nucleus at excitation energies above the alpha decay threshold was studied using 14C+alpha resonance elastic scattering. A number of states with large alpha reduced widths have been observed, indicating that the alpha-cluster degree of freedom plays an important role in this N not equal Z nucleus. However, the alpha-cluster structure of this nucleus is very different from the relatively simple pattern of strong alpha-cluster quasi-rotational bands in the neighboring 16O and 20Ne nuclei. A 0+ state with an alpha reduced width exceeding the single particle limit was identified at an excitation energy of 9.9+/-0.3 MeV. We discuss evidence that states of this kind are common in light nuclei and give possible explanations of this feature.

  11. New integral formula and its applications to light nucleus reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    A new integral formula, which has not been compiled in any integral tables or mathematical softwares, is proposed to obtain the analytical energy-angular spectra of the particles that are sequentially emitted from the discrete energy levels of the residual nuclei in the statistical theory of light nucleus reaction (STLN). In the cases of the neutron induced light nucleus reactions, the demonstration of the kinetic energy conservation in the sequential emission processes becomes straightforward thanks to this new integral formula and it is also helpful to largely reduce the volume of file-6 in nuclear reaction databases. Furthermore, taking p+$^9$Be reaction at 18 MeV as an example, this integral formula is extended to calculate the energy-angular spectra of the sequentially emitted neutrons for proton induced light nucleus reactions in the frame of STLN.

  12. Comparison of neuronal activities of external cuneate nucleus, spinocerebellar cortex and interpositus nucleus during passive movements of the rat's forelimb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabona, A; Valle, M S; Bosco, G; Perciavalle, V

    2008-11-11

    In this paper we examined the neuronal activities of external cuneate nucleus, spinocerebellar Purkinje cells and interpositus nucleus during passive forelimb movements in anesthetized rats with the aim of identifying common or different patterns of activation across structures. By means of principal components analysis, we identified two main patterns of discharge which explained most of the dataset variance. One component characterized the movement-related activity of external cuneate and spinocerebellar cortical neurons, while the other reflected neuronal activity of the interpositus nucleus. We also found that both principal components were related to global forelimb kinematics but, while most of the variance of the activity of external cuneate cells and spinocerebellar Purkinje cells was explained by the limb axis orientation and orientation velocity, interpositus neurons' firing was best related to length and length velocity. This difference in the forelimb kinematics representation observed in external cuneate nucleus and spinocerebellar cortex compared with the interpositus nucleus is discussed with respect to the specific role that these structures may play also during active control of limb movements.

  13. Immobility, inheritance and plasticity of shape of the yeast nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrulis Erik D

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since S. cerevisiae undergoes closed mitosis, the nuclear envelope of the daughter nucleus is continuous with that of the maternal nucleus at anaphase. Nevertheless, several constitutents of the maternal nucleus are not present in the daughter nucleus. The present study aims to identify proteins which impact the shape of the yeast nucleus and to learn whether modifications of shape are passed on to the next mitotic generation. The Esc1p protein of S. cerevisiae localizes to the periphery of the nucleoplasm, can anchor chromatin, and has been implicated in targeted silencing both at telomeres and at HMR. Results Upon increased Esc1p expression, cell division continues and dramatic elaborations of the nuclear envelope extend into the cytoplasm. These "escapades" include nuclear pores and associate with the nucleolus, but exclude chromatin. Escapades are not inherited by daughter nuclei. This exclusion reflects their relative immobility, which we document in studies of prezygotes. Moreover, excess Esc1p affects the levels of multiple transcripts, not all of which originate at telomere-proximal loci. Unlike Esc1p and the colocalizing protein, Mlp1p, overexpression of selected proteins of the inner nuclear membrane is toxic. Conclusion Esc1p is the first non-membrane protein of the nuclear periphery which – like proteins of the nuclear lamina of higher eukaryotes – can modify the shape of the yeast nucleus. The elaborations of the nuclear envelope ("escapades" which appear upon induction of excess Esc1p are not inherited during mitotic growth. The lack of inheritance of such components could help sustain cell growth when parental nuclei have acquired potentially deleterious characteristics.

  14. Morphometric study of dentate nucleus of cerebellum in Bangladeshi cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, M A; Khalil, M; Sultana, S Z; Mannan, S; Uddin, M M; Hossain, M; Ara, A; Choudhury, S; Shammi, N J

    2015-01-01

    This cross sectional descriptive study was done by using nonprobability sampling technique and performed by examining 63 (sixty three) cerebellum. Out of them 40 postmortem human cerebellum collected from Bangladeshi cadavers of both sexes (male 25 and female 15) age ranging from 5 to 60 years and 23 cerebellums from caesarian section of intrauterine death cases of both sexes (male 14 and female 9) age ranging from 34 to 41 weeks of gestation. Specimens were collected from dead bodies autopsied on different dates from April' 2009 to September' 2009 at the autopsy laboratory of department of Forensic Medicine and prenatal cases from Gynaecology and Obstetrics Department of Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh. The collected specimens were grouped into three age groups like Group A (28 to 42 weeks of gestation), Group B (5 to 30 years) and Group C (31 to 60 years) and, two sex groups (male and female) and two sides (right and left). A transverse section was made at the level of horizontal fissure, and length and breadth of dentate nucleus were measured by divider and scale. The mean (±SD) length and breadth of dentate nucleus was 8.619±2.995mm and 14.770±3.604mm respectively and it was observed that length and breadth of dentate nucleus increased with age upto certain level then slightly decreased in the late age Group C. In this study, differences of the mean length of dentate nucleus on both right and left sides were statistically moderately significant between age Groups A&B. The differences of mean breadth of dentate nucleus on both right and left side were statistically highly significant between age Groups A&B and moderately significant between age Groups A&C on right side and only significant on left side. The differences between male & female were statistically insignificant in length and breadth of dentate nucleus.

  15. Silk fibroin porous scaffolds for nucleus pulposus tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Chao; Yang, Qiang [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhu, Meifeng [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Du, Lilong [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhang, Jiamin [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Ma, Xinlong [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Xu, Baoshan, E-mail: xubaoshan99@126.com [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Wang, Lianyong, E-mail: wly@nankai.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are structurally complex tissue that hold the vertebrae together and provide mobility to spine. The nucleus pulposus (NP) degeneration often results in degenerative IVD disease that is one of the most common causes of back and neck pain. Tissue engineered nucleus pulposus offers an alternative approach to regain the function of the degenerative IVD. The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility of porous silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds fabricated by paraffin-sphere-leaching methods with freeze-drying in the application of nucleus pulposus regeneration. The prepared scaffold possessed high porosity of 92.38 ± 5.12% and pore size of 165.00 ± 8.25 μm as well as high pore interconnectivity and appropriate mechanical properties. Rabbit NP cells were seeded and cultured on the SF scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy, histology, biochemical assays and mechanical tests revealed that the porous scaffolds could provide an appropriate microstructure and environment to support adhesion, proliferation and infiltration of NP cells in vitro as well as the generation of extracellular matrix. The NP cell–scaffold construction could be preliminarily formed after subcutaneously implanted in a nude mice model. In conclusion, The SF porous scaffold offers a potential candidate for tissue engineered NP tissue. - Highlights: • Paraffin microsphere-leaching method is used to fabricate silk fibroin scaffold. • The scaffold has appropriate mechanical property, porosity and pore size • The scaffold supports growth and infiltration of nucleus pulposus cells. • Nucleus pulposus cells can secrete extracellular matrix in the scaffolds. • The scaffold is a potential candidate for tissue engineered nucleus pulposus.

  16. Slow flow of passive neutrophils and sequestered nucleus into micropipette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleridis, V; Athanassiou, G; Deligianni, D; Missirlis, Y

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the role of the nucleus and its contribution to the deformability of the passive neutrophils was investigated. To determine the rheological properties of the nucleus and of the neutrophil itself, deformation tests on single neutrophil and sequestered nucleus have been performed by micropipette under low aspiration pressure (80 Pa = 2-3 Pcr). The stiffness of the nucleus was found to be larger than that of the neutrophil, and its viscosity was found almost ten-fold higher. A subpopulation of neutrophils (Sub-A) showed two phases of deformation, a first rapid phase and a second phase with a constant deformation rate up to their full entrance, with an apparent viscosity mu app-second-Phase(N Sub-A) = 286 +/- 123 Pa x s, calculated by the liquid drop model. Another subpopulation (Sub-B) of the tested neutrophils displayed three deformation phases: a first one reflecting the rapid entry of cell into the micropipette, a second with constant deformation rate, and a third phase, with a slower, also constant, deformation rate were recorded. The corresponding apparent viscosities were found as mu app-second-Phase(N Sub-B) = 341 +/- 94 Pa x s and mu app-third-Phase(N Sub-B) = 1651 +/- 734 Pa x s. The apparent viscosity values of the neutrophilic nucleus, mu app (N nucl) = 2468 +/- 1345 Pa x s and of the whole neutrophil calculated in the third phase of deformation, mu app-third-Phase(N Sub-B) = 1651 +/- 734 Pa.s were comparable. These results support our hypothesis that the nucleus plays a significant role in the mechanical and rheological behavior of the neutrophil, especially when it has to pass through openings much smaller than its size.

  17. Brain networks modulated by subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accolla, Ettore A; Herrojo Ruiz, Maria; Horn, Andreas; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Draganski, Bogdan; Kühn, Andrea A

    2016-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an established treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Given the frequent occurrence of stimulation-induced affective and cognitive adverse effects, a better understanding about the role of the subthalamic nucleus in non-motor functions is needed. The main goal of this study is to characterize anatomical circuits modulated by subthalamic deep brain stimulation, and infer about the inner organization of the nucleus in terms of motor and non-motor areas. Given its small size and anatomical intersubject variability, functional organization of the subthalamic nucleus is difficult to investigate in vivo with current methods. Here, we used local field potential recordings obtained from 10 patients with Parkinson's disease to identify a subthalamic area with an analogous electrophysiological signature, namely a predominant beta oscillatory activity. The spatial accuracy was improved by identifying a single contact per macroelectrode for its vicinity to the electrophysiological source of the beta oscillation. We then conducted whole brain probabilistic tractography seeding from the previously identified contacts, and further described connectivity modifications along the macroelectrode's main axis. The designated subthalamic 'beta' area projected predominantly to motor and premotor cortical regions additional to connections to limbic and associative areas. More ventral subthalamic areas showed predominant connectivity to medial temporal regions including amygdala and hippocampus. We interpret our findings as evidence for the convergence of different functional circuits within subthalamic nucleus' portions deemed to be appropriate as deep brain stimulation target to treat motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Potential clinical implications of our study are illustrated by an index case where deep brain stimulation of estimated predominant non-motor subthalamic nucleus induced hypomanic behaviour.

  18. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge G. Morfín

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  19. Spectra Statistics for the Odd-Odd Nucleus 86Nb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Ren-Rong; ZHU Shun-Quan; CHENG Nan-Pu

    2001-01-01

    The energy levels of the odd-odd nucleus 86 Nb at low spins are calculated by using quasi-particles plus a rotor model. The distribution of the nearest-neighbour spacing and the spectral rigidity are studied. We find that the chaotic degree of the energy spectra increases with the increasing spin and reaches a maximum at I = 10; then it decreases gradually for spins above I = 10. The recoil term in the model Haniltonian makes the energy spectra slightly regular. The Coriolis force, however, makes the spectra chaotic and plays a major role in the spectral statistics of the odd-odd nucleus 86Nb.

  20. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morfín, Jorge G.; Nieves, Juan; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  1. Formation and decay of a hot compound nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, B.V.; Dalmolin, F.T.; Dutra, M.; Santos, T.J., E-mail: brett@ita.br [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos SP (Brazil); Souza, S.R. [Universidade Federal de Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre RS, (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Donangelo, R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de la Republica de Uruguay, Montevideo (Uruguay); Universidade Federal de Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre RS, (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The compound nucleus plays an important role in nuclear reactions over a wide range of projectile-target combinations and energies. The limits that angular momentum places on its formation and existence are, for the most part, well understood. The limits on its excitation energy are not as clear. Here we first analyze general geometrical and thermodynamical features of a hot compound nucleus. We then discuss the manners by which it can decay and close by speculating on the high energy limit to its formation and existence. (author)

  2. Separable Representation of Proton-Nucleus Optical Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Hlophe, L; Elster, Ch; Nunes, F M; Arbanas, G; Escher, J E; Thompson, I J

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a new approach for solving the three-body problem for (d,p) reactions in the Coulomb-distorted basis in momentum space was proposed. Important input quantities for such calculations are the scattering matrix elements for proton- and neutron-nucleus scattering. We present a generalization of the Ernst-Shakin-Thaler scheme in which a momentum space separable representation of proton-nucleus scattering matrix elements can be calculated in the Coulomb basis. The viability of this method is demonstrated by comparing S-matrix elements obtained for p$+^{48}$Ca and p$+^{208}$Pb for a phenomenological optical potential with corresponding coordinate space calculations.

  3. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Tomasz [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Juszczak, Cezary [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Sobczyk, Jan T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  4. Neurophysiological evaluation of the pedunculopontine nucleus in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profice, P; Mazzone, P; Pilato, F; Dileone, M; Insola, A; Ranieri, F; Di Lazzaro, V

    2011-10-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPTg) is constituted by a heterogeneous cluster of neurons located in caudal mesencephalic tegmentum which projects to the thalamus to trigger thalamocortical rhythms and the brainstem to modulate muscle tone and locomotion. It has been investigated as potential deep brain stimulation (DBS) target for treating Parkinson's disease (PD) symptoms. Neurophysiological studies conducted in humans using DBS electrodes for exploring functional properties of PPTg in vivo, reviewed in this paper, demonstrated that the functional connections between PPTg and cortex, basal ganglia, brainstem network involved in sleep/wake control, and spinal cord can be explored in vivo and provided useful insights about the physiology of this nucleus and pathophysiology of PD.

  5. Odd-Even Nucleus Calculation Using exp(S) Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaila, Bogdan; Heisenberg, Jochen

    1997-04-01

    We apply the equation of motion technique to calculate the ground state and excited states of the nucleus ^15N. First, we define a complete basis for ^15N relative to the reference ^16O ground state, | A >. Then, the eigenstate | (A-1)j > with energy Ej are given as a linear superposition of these basis configurations. Assuming that this state is an eigenstate of the many-body Hamiltonian, we solve an eigenvalue problem for the energies and wave functions describing the excited states of the ^15N nucleus.

  6. A light and electron microscopic study of the inferior olivary nucleus of the squirrel monkey, Saimiri sciureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, J G; Gwyn, D G

    1980-01-01

    This study provides a description of the normal morphology of the inferior olive of the squirrel monkey, Saimiri sciureus, at the light and electron imcroscopic level. The cytoarchitecture of the inferior olive was maped from serial transverse sections stained with cresyl violet. In common with other mammals, the inferior olive of the squirrel monkey consists of three subdivisions. The medial accessory olive includes seven subnuclei. Both the dorsal and medial accessory olives extend through approximately 90% of the total length of the inferior olivary complex. The principal olive, consisting of a dorsal and ventral lamella continuous with one another laterally, extends through the rostral 55% of the inferior olive. It is somewhat less convoluted than the principal olive of the macaque (Bowman and Sladek, '73). In most other respects, the inferior olive of the two primates is quite similar. Two patterns of dendritic arborization are noted in Golgi preparations from the caudal principal and accessory olives. Dendrites streaming away from the soma, and dendrites curling around the soma in a "ball-like" pattern were observed in all three subdivisions of the inferior olive caudally. Simple spines are occasionally seen on the soma, and a few simple or club-shaped spines were noted on the proximal portion of the dendritic arborization. Spines are more numerous on distal portions of the dendritic tree, however, and include simple, filiform, club-shaped and occasionally complex, or racemous, spiny appendages. Viewed in the electron microscope, most inferior olivary neurons are seen to contain the typical organelles with the usual conformation and distribution. Rarely, a neuron with an indented nucleus and a thin rim of cytoplasm containing a paucity of organelles and a wispy endoplasmic reticulum is encountered. Axon terminals containing either clear round or clear pleomorphic vesicles are seen in all three olivary subdivisions. In a random survey of 706 axon terminals, 54

  7. CASTOR The ALICE forward detector for identification of Centauros and Strangelets in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bogolyubsky, M Yu; Filippov, S N; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Maevskaya, A I; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Stefanski, P; Wlodarczyk, Z; Kharlov, Yu. V.

    1999-01-01

    The physics motivation for a very forward detector for the ALICE heavy ion experiment at the CERN LHC is discussed. A phenomenological model describing the formation and decay of a Centauro fireball in nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The CASTOR detector which is aimed to measure the hadronic and photonic content of an interaction and to identify deeply penetrating objects in the very forward, baryon-rich phase space 5.6 < eta < 7.2 in an event-by-event mode is described. Results of simulations of the expected response of the calorimeter, and in particular to the passage of strangelets, are presented.

  8. Altered morphology of the nucleus accumbens in persistent developmental stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neef, Nicole E; Bütfering, Christoph; Auer, Tibor; Metzger, F Luise; Euler, Harald A; Frahm, Jens; Paulus, Walter; Sommer, Martin

    2017-05-24

    Neuroimaging studies in persistent developmental stuttering repeatedly report altered basal ganglia functions. Together with thalamus and cerebellum, these structures mediate sensorimotor functions and thus represent a plausible link between stuttering and neuroanatomy. However, stuttering is a complex, multifactorial disorder. Besides sensorimotor functions, emotional and social-motivational factors constitute major aspects of the disorder. Here, we investigated cortical and subcortical gray matter regions to study whether persistent developmental stuttering is also linked to alterations of limbic structures. The study included 33 right-handed participants who stutter and 34 right-handed control participants matched for sex, age, and education. Structural images were acquired using magnetic resonance imaging to estimate volumetric characteristics of the nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, amygdala, pallidum, putamen, caudate nucleus, and thalamus. Volumetric comparisons and vertex-based shape comparisons revealed structural differences. The right nucleus accumbens was larger in participants who stutter compared to controls. Recent theories of basal ganglia functions suggest that the nucleus accumbens is a motivation-to-movement interface. A speaker intends to reach communicative goals, but stuttering can derail these efforts. It is therefore highly plausible to find alterations in the motivation-to-movement interface in stuttering. While behavioral studies of stuttering sought to find links between the limbic and sensorimotor system, we provide the first neuroimaging evidence of alterations in the limbic system. Thus, our findings might initialize a unified neurobiological framework of persistent developmental stuttering that integrates sensorimotor and social-motivational neuroanatomical circuitries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Inclusive jet production in ultrarelativistic proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Perepelitsa, Dennis

    High-$p_\\mathrm{T}$ processes in proton- and deuteron-nucleus collisions at TeV energies are the best presently available way to study the partonic structure of the nucleus in a high-density regime. Jet production over a wide range of phase space can significantly constrain the current knowledge of nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs), which are substantially less well understood than the corresponding PDFs in protons and which have only recently begun to be treated in a spatially-dependent way. An accurate knowledge of nPDFs is crucial for a definitive control of perturbative processes in a cold nuclear environment, since high-$p_\\mathrm{T}$ probes are used to quantitatively investigate the hot QCD matter created in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. Furthermore, jets from low Bjorken-$x$ partons can probe the transition from the dilute to saturated nuclear regimes. Jet production is investigated in $d$+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 200$ GeV with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Hea...

  10. RELATIVISTIC CALCULATIONS OF THE SUPERHEAVY NUCLEUS 114-298

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOERSMA, HF

    1993-01-01

    We investigate ground-state properties of the superheavy nucleus with N = 184 and Z = 114, (298)114, using conventional relativistic mean-field theory and density-dependent mean-field theory, which reproduces Dirac-Brueckner calculations in nuclear matter. Our calculations provide support for N = 18

  11. Empirical Example of Nucleus with Transitional Dynamical Symmetry X(5)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张大立; 赵惠英

    2002-01-01

    By analysing the energy spectrum, E2 transition rates and branching ratios, it is shown explicitly that the nucleus 150Nd provides an empirical example with X(5) symmetry at the critical point of the transition from U(5) to SU(3) symmetry.

  12. Rapid feedback processing in human nucleus accumbens and motor thalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schüller, T.; Gründler, T.O.J.; Jocham, G.; Klein, T.A.; Timmermann, L.; Visser-Vandewalle, V.E.R.M.; Kuhn, J.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and thalamus are integral parts in models of feedback processing. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been successfully employed to alleviate symptoms of psychiatric conditions including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette's syndrome (TS). Common target structu

  13. Calcium-regulated import of myosin IC into the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Ivan V; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2016-06-01

    Myosin IC is a molecular motor involved in intracellular transport, cell motility, and transcription. Its mechanical properties are regulated by calcium via calmodulin binding, and its functions in the nucleus depend on import from the cytoplasm. The import has recently been shown to be mediated by the nuclear localization signal located within the calmodulin-binding domain. In the present paper, it is demonstrated that mutations in the calmodulin-binding sequence shift the intracellular distribution of myosin IC to the nucleus. The redistribution is displayed by isoform B, described originally as the "nuclear myosin," but is particularly pronounced with isoform C, the normally cytoplasmic isoform. Furthermore, experimental elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration induces a rapid import of myosin into the nucleus. The import is blocked by the importin β inhibitor importazole. These findings are consistent with a mechanism whereby calmodulin binding prevents recognition of the nuclear localization sequence by importin β, and the steric inhibition of import is released by cell signaling leading to the intracellular calcium elevation. The results establish a mechanistic connection between the calcium regulation of the motor function of myosin IC in the cytoplasm and the induction of its import into the nucleus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Turn Up the Volume: Uncovering Nucleus Size Control Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Matthew C

    2015-06-08

    Reporting in Developmental Cell, Hara and Merten (2015) apply the use of microfabrication and in vitro analysis in cell-free extracts to the old problem of nuclear size control. The authors make insights into the regulation of nuclear growth that potentially explain the widely reported correlation between nucleus size and cell size. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Saturating Cronin effect in ultrarelativistic proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Papp, G; Fái, G; Papp, Gabor; Levai, Peter; Fai, George

    2000-01-01

    Pion and photon production cross sections are analyzed in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions at energies 20 GeV < s^1/2 < 60 GeV. We separate the proton-proton and nuclear contributions to transverse-momentum broadening and suggest a new mechanism for the nuclear enhancement in the high transverse-momentum region.

  16. Nucleus accumbens dopamine receptors in the consolidation of spatial memory.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mele, A.; Avena, M.; Roullet, P.; Leonibus, E. de; Mandillo, S.; Sargolini, F.; Coccurello, R.; Oliverio, A.

    2004-01-01

    Nucleus accumbens dopamine is known to play an important role in motor activity and in behaviours governed by drugs and natural reinforcers, as well as in non-associative forms of learning. At the same time, activation of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors has been suggested to promote intracellular event

  17. The nucleus of Darkschwitsch in Pantodactylus schreiberii Wiegmann (Lacertilia, Reptilia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, J C

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear mass considered the representative of the nucleus of Darkschwitsch in reptiles in studied. It is composed of small, stellate, pyriform or rounded cells, with two or three dendritic trunks resolved in a plexus near the cellular body. Its axons take an ascending direction to the posterior commissure, and not to be medial longitudinal fasciculus as has been conventionally described.

  18. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Ke-Mian [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Chang, Chia-Chun [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shen, Qing-Ji [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); Sung, Li-Ying, E-mail: liyingsung@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Ji-Long, E-mail: jilong.liu@dpag.ox.ac.uk [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  19. Physical interrelation of volatile and refractories in a cometary nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulle, Marco; Alice Team; Stern, Alan; CONSTERT Team; Kofman, Wlodek; COSIMA Team; Hilchenbach, Martin; GIADA Team; Rotundi, Alessandra; MIDAS Team; Bentley, Mark; MIRO Team; Hofstadter, Mark; OSIRIS Team; Sierks, Holger; ROSINA Team; Altwegg, Kathrin; RPC Team; Nilsson, Hans; Burch, James; Eriksson, Anders; Heinz-Glassmeier, Karl; Henri, Pierre; Carr, Christopher; RSI Team; Paetzold, Martin; , VIRTIS Team; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Lander Team; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; IDS Team; Gruen, Eberhard; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Weissman, Paul; Project Scientist Team; Taylor, Matt; Buratti, Bonnie; Altobelli, Nicolas; Choukroun, Mathieu; Ground-Based Observations Team; Snodgrass, Colin

    2016-10-01

    The Rosetta mission has been taking measurements of its target comet Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since early 2014 and will complete operations at the end of September 2016. The mission Science Management Plan, in 1994, laid out the the prime goals and themes of the mission. These five themes were: 1) To study the global characterisation of the Nuclues, the determination of the dynamics properties , surface morpholy and composition of the comet. 2) Examination of the Chemical, Mineralogical and isotopic compositions of volatiles and refractories in a cometary nucleus.3) Physical interrelation of volatile and refractories in a cometary nucleus4) Study the development of cometary activity and the process in the surface layer of the nucleus and in the inner coma5) The origins of comets, the relationship between cometary and interstellar material and the implications for the origin of the solar system,To cover all aspects of the Rosetta mission in this special Show case session, this abstracts is one of 5, with this particular presentation focusing on theme 3, in particular on a) The dust-to-gas ratio; b) distributed sources of volatiles; c) seasonal evolution of the dust size distribution.a) The dust-to-gas ratio has been provided by coma observations measuring the gas and dust loss rates from the nucleus surface. The ratio of these two loss rates provides a lower limit of the dust-to-gas ratio at the nucleus surface, since it does not take into account the largest chunks unable to leave the nucleus, or falling back due to the dominant gravity. We review the value inferred so far, its time evolution, and new techniques to directly measure it in the nucleus.b) Evidences offered by Rosetta observations of gas sublimating from dust particles are up to now faint. We report the few available observations and an estimate of the probable average water content in dust particles inferred by 3D gas-dynamical codes of 67P coma.c) The dust-size distribution tunes the sizes

  20. Brackett Gamma Imaging of the Nucleus of M83

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosthwaite, L. P.; Turner, J. L.; Beck, S. C.; Meier, D. S.

    2004-12-01

    The gas-rich nucleus of barred spiral galaxy, M83, is a hotbed of star formation, with a total infrared luminosity of 4 X 109 Lo. We have observed the nucleus of M83 with the near infrared spectrometer, NIRSPEC, on Keck 2 to obtain high resolution Brγ recombination line spectra of the nucleus. Simultaneous imaging with the SCAM camera in a broadband K filter shows the position of the slit on the near-infrared galaxy. This allows us to map the nucleus with a continuum reference. The SCAM image shows a bright peak at the nucleus and a complex semi-circular arc of emission to the southwest. We stepped the 0.5'' X 24'' length slit in small declination increments to map a 20'' X 20'' region just west of the nucleus. Individual spectra were used to form a ra-dec-lambda cube and an integrated intensity map of Brγ . A total of 1.1 X 10-16 W m-2 of Brγ emission is detected in the map, in good agreement with previous low resolution observations (Turner, Ho, & Beck 1987, ApJ, 313, 644). This is not corrected for extinction within the molecular clouds in M83 or to the nebulae themselves and is therefore a lower limit to the true Brγ flux. Extinction is estimated to be at least a magnitude in the near-IR as measured in larger (4'') beams (Turner et al.) The bulk of the Brγ emission extends along the northern portion of the near-IR continuum semi-circle. Twenty percent of the total Brγ emission comes from single a 3'' (FWHM) source located 5'' west of the near-IR nucleus. The complementary NIRSPEC Brα data we have obtained will eventually allow us to evaluate the near-IR extinction on subarcsecond sizescales and obtain an extinction-corrected estimate of the Lyman continuum rate and therefore the number of ionizing stars.

  1. Neural control of left ventricular contractility in the dog heart: synaptic interactions of negative inotropic vagal preganglionic neurons in the nucleus ambiguus with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, V J; Dickerson, L W; Gray, A L; Lauenstein, J M; Blinder, K J; Newsome, J T; Rodak, D J; Fleming, T J; Gatti, P J; Gillis, R A

    1998-08-17

    Recent physiological evidence indicates that vagal postganglionic control of left ventricular contractility is mediated by neurons found in a ventricular epicardial fat pad ganglion. In the dog this region has been referred to as the cranial medial ventricular (CMV) ganglion [J.L. Ardell, Structure and function of mammalian intrinsic cardiac neurons, in: J.A. Armour, J.L. Ardell (Eds.). Neurocardiology, Oxford Univ. Press, New York, 1994, pp. 95-114; B.X. Yuan, J.L. Ardell, D.A. Hopkins, A.M. Losier, J.A. Armour, Gross and microscopic anatomy of the canine intrinsic cardiac nervous system, Anat. Rec., 239 (1994) 75-87]. Since activation of the vagal neuronal input to the CMV ganglion reduces left ventricular contractility without influencing cardiac rate or AV conduction, this ganglion contains a functionally selective pool of negative inotropic parasympathetic postganglionic neurons. In the present report we have defined the light microscopic distribution of preganglionic negative inotropic neurons in the CNS which are retrogradely labeled from the CMV ganglion. Some tissues were also processed for the simultaneous immunocytochemical visualization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH: a marker for catecholaminergic neurons) and examined with both light microscopic and electron microscopic methods. Histochemically visualized neurons were observed in a long slender column in the ventrolateral nucleus ambiguus (NA-VL). The greatest number of retrogradely labeled neurons were observed just rostral to the level of the area postrema. TH perikarya and dendrites were commonly observed interspersed with vagal motoneurons in the NA-VL. TH nerve terminals formed axo-dendritic synapses upon negative inotropic vagal motoneurons, however the origin of these terminals remains to be determined. We conclude that synaptic interactions exist which would permit the parasympathetic preganglionic vagal control of left ventricular contractility to be modulated monosynaptically by

  2. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation in severe obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, Luc; Polosan, Mircea; Jaafari, Nematollah; Baup, Nicolas; Welter, Marie-Laure; Fontaine, Denys; du Montcel, Sophie Tezenas; Yelnik, Jérôme; Chéreau, Isabelle; Arbus, Christophe; Raoul, Sylvie; Aouizerate, Bruno; Damier, Philippe; Chabardès, Stephan; Czernecki, Virginie; Ardouin, Claire; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Bardinet, Eric; Chaynes, Patrick; Burbaud, Pierre; Cornu, Philippe; Derost, Philippe; Bougerol, Thierry; Bataille, Benoit; Mattei, Vianney; Dormont, Didier; Devaux, Bertrand; Vérin, Marc; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Pollak, Pierre; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Agid, Yves; Krack, Paul; Millet, Bruno; Pelissolo, Antoine

    2008-11-13

    Severe, refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a disabling condition. Stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, a procedure that is already validated for the treatment of movement disorders, has been proposed as a therapeutic option. In this 10-month, crossover, double-blind, multicenter study assessing the efficacy and safety of stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, we randomly assigned eight patients with highly refractory OCD to undergo active stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus followed by sham stimulation and eight to undergo sham stimulation followed by active stimulation. The primary outcome measure was the severity of OCD, as assessed by the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), at the end of two 3-month periods. General psychopathologic findings, functioning, and tolerance were assessed with the use of standardized psychiatric scales, the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale, and neuropsychological tests. After active stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, the Y-BOCS score (on a scale from 0 to 40, with lower scores indicating less severe symptoms) was significantly lower than the score after sham stimulation (mean [+/-SD], 19+/-8 vs. 28+/-7; P=0.01), and the GAF score (on a scale from 1 to 90, with higher scores indicating higher levels of functioning) was significantly higher (56+/-14 vs. 43+/-8, P=0.005). The ratings of neuropsychological measures, depression, and anxiety were not modified by stimulation. There were 15 serious adverse events overall, including 1 intracerebral hemorrhage and 2 infections; there were also 23 nonserious adverse events. These preliminary findings suggest that stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus may reduce the symptoms of severe forms of OCD but is associated with a substantial risk of serious adverse events. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00169377.) 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society

  3. Structures and functions in the crowded nucleus: new biophysical insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald eHancock

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Concepts and methods from the physical sciences have catalysed remarkable progress in understanding the cell nucleus in recent years. To share this excitement with physicists and encourage their interest in this field, this review offers an overview of how the physics which underlies structures and functions in the nucleus is becoming more clear thanks to methods which have been developed to simulate and study macromolecules, polymers, and colloids. The environment in the nucleus is very crowded with macromolecules, making entropic (depletion forces major determinants of interactions. Simulation and experiments are consistent with their key role in forming membraneless compartments such as nucleoli, PML and Cajal bodies, and discrete territories for chromosomes. The chromosomes, giant linear polyelectrolyte polymers, exist in vivo in a state like a polymer melt. Looped conformations are predicted in crowded conditions, and have been confirmed experimentally and are central to the regulation of gene expression. Polymer theory has revealed how the chromosomes are so highly compacted in the nucleus, forming a crumpled globule with fractal properties which avoids knots and entanglements in DNA while allowing facile accessibility for its replication and transcription. Entropic repulsion between looped polymers can explain the confinement of each chromosome to a discrete region of the nucleus. Crowding and looping are predicted to facilitate finding the specific targets of factors which modulate activities of DNA. Simulation shows that entropic effects contribute to finding and repairing potentially lethal double-strand breaks in DNA by increasing the mobility of the broken ends, favouring their juxtaposition for repair. Signaling pathways are strongly influenced by crowding, which favours a processive mode of response (consecutive reactions without releasing substrates. This new information contributes to understanding the sometimes counter

  4. Neuropathological changes in the nucleus basalis in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M R; Marsh, R; Macdonald, C D; Jain, J; Pearce, R K B; Hirsch, S R; Ansorge, O; Gentleman, S M; Maier, M

    2013-09-01

    The nucleus basalis has not been examined in detail in severe mental illness. Several studies have demonstrated decreases in glia and glial markers in the cerebral cortex in schizophrenia, familial bipolar disorder and recurrent depression. Changes in neocortical neuron size and shape have also been reported. The nucleus basalis is a collection of large cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain receiving information from the midbrain and limbic system, projecting to the cortex and involved with attention, learning and memory, and receives regulation from serotonergic inputs. Forty-one cases aged 41-60 years with schizophrenia or major depressive disorder with age-matched controls were collected. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded coronal nucleus basalis sections were histologically stained for oligodendrocyte identification with cresyl-haematoxylin counterstain, for neuroarchitecture with differentiated cresyl violet stain and astrocytes were detected by glial fibrillary acid protein immunohistochemistry. Cell density and neuroarchitecture were measured using Image Pro Plus. There were larger NB oval neuron soma in the combined schizophrenia and major depression disorder groups (p = 0.038), with no significant change between controls and schizophrenia and major depression disorder separately. There is a significant reduction in oligodendrocyte density (p = 0.038) in the nucleus basalis in schizophrenia. The ratio of gemistocytic to fibrillary astrocytes showed a greater proportion of the former in schizophrenia (18.1 %) and major depressive disorder (39.9 %) than in controls (7.9 %). These results suggest glial cell abnormalities in the nucleus basalis in schizophrenia possibly leading to cortical-limbic disturbance and subcortical dysfunction.

  5. Structures and functions in the crowded nucleus: new biophysical insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Ronald

    2014-09-01

    Concepts and methods from the physical sciences have catalysed remarkable progress in understanding the cell nucleus in recent years. To share this excitement with physicists and encourage their interest in this field, this review offers an overview of how the physics which underlies structures and functions in the nucleus is becoming more clear thanks to methods which have been developed to simulate and study macromolecules, polymers, and colloids. The environment in the nucleus is very crowded with macromolecules, making entropic (depletion) forces major determinants of interactions. Simulation and experiments are consistent with their key role in forming membraneless compartments such as nucleoli, PML and Cajal bodies, and discrete "territories" for chromosomes. The chromosomes, giant linear polyelectrolyte polymers, exist in vivo in a state like a polymer melt. Looped conformations are predicted in crowded conditions, and have been confirmed experimentally and are central to the regulation of gene expression. Polymer theory has revealed how the chromosomes are so highly compacted in the nucleus, forming a "crumpled globule" with fractal properties which avoids knots and entanglements in DNA while allowing facile accessibility for its replication and transcription. Entropic repulsion between looped polymers can explain the confinement of each chromosome to a discrete region of the nucleus. Crowding and looping are predicted to facilitate finding the specific targets of factors which modulate activities of DNA. Simulation shows that entropic effects contribute to finding and repairing potentially lethal double-strand breaks in DNA by increasing the mobility of the broken ends, favouring their juxtaposition for repair. Signaling pathways are strongly influenced by crowding, which favours a processive mode of response (consecutive reactions without releasing substrates). This new information contributes to understanding the sometimes counter-intuitive consequences.

  6. Influence of ionizing radiation on nucleus 24 cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenzner, T; Knapp, F; Röhner, F; von Wallenberg, E; Mauch, H; Pedersen, P; Aschendorff, A; Laszig, R; Lutterbach, J

    2005-07-01

    To evaluate the influence of conventional or hyperfractionated radiotherapy on Nucleus CI24M or CI24R(CS) implant systems. As a consequence of more than 70,000 cochlear implant recipients worldwide, the potential need for radiotherapy is an issue requiring consideration by both implantees and implantation centers. Conditions requiring radiotherapy of the head may include head, neck, or brain tumors. The study examines the effect of ionizing radiation on cochlear implant function. The implanted devices examined were the Nucleus CI24M and Nucleus CI24R(CS). In a modeled study, two implants of each type were treated with fraction schemes most frequently used in clinical routine (e.g., conventional fractionation [total dose, 120 Gy] and hyperfractionation [total dose, 116 Gy]). Parameters quantified were the implant output amplitude changes at high and low current level (current levels 255 and 100, respectively), the charge balance of the biphasic pulse, and the accuracy of the impedance telemetry function. Within the clinically relevant dose range (< 80 Gy), implant function in all four devices was normal. Failure occurred in one Nucleus CI24R(CS) device treated with hyperfractionation. A dramatic drop in the output amplitude at 106 Gy was observed, and the impedance measurement failed at a total dose of 111 Gy. The results suggest that conventional or hyperfractionated radiotherapy can be applied safely at Nucleus CI24M or CI24R(CS) implant systems in a patient-like setting. Therefore, the authors propose that the results of the study can be applicable in clinical practice.

  7. ARGININE VASOPRESSIN GENE EXPRESSION IN SUPRAOPTIC NUCLEUS AND PARAVENTRICULAR NUCLEUS OF HYPOTHALAMOUS FOLLOWING CEREBRAL ISCHEMIA AND REPERFUSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Background. Our previous studies indicated that the increased arginine vasopressin(AVP) in ischemic brain regions of gerbils could exacerbate the ischemic brain edema. This experiments is further clarify the relation between AVP and cerebral ischemia at the molecular level. Methods. The contents of AVP, AVP mRNA, AVP immunoreactive(ir) neurons in supraoptic nucleus(SON)and paraventricular nucleus(PVN) after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion were respectively determined by radioim-munoassay(RIA), immunocytochemistry( Ⅱ C), situ hybridization and computed image pattem analysis. Results. The contents of AVP in SON, PVN were increased, and the AVP ir positive neurons in SON and PVN were also significantly increased as compared with the controls after ischemia and reperfusion. And there were very light staining of AVP ir positive neurons in the other brain areas such as suprachiasmatic nucleus (SC) and periven-tricular hypothalamic nucleus (PE), but these have no significant changes as compared with the controls. During dif-ferent periods of cerebral ischemia (30~ 120 min) and reperfusion (30 min), AVP mRNA expression in SON and PVN were more markedly increased than the controls. Condusions. The transcription of AVP gene elevated, then promoting synthesis and release of AVP in SON,PVN. Under the specific condition of cerebral ischemia and repeffusion, the activity and contents of central AVP in-creased abnormally is one of the important factors which causes ischemia brain damage.

  8. Matrix mechanics controls FHL2 movement to the nucleus to activate p21 expression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nakazawa, Naotaka; Sathe, Aneesh R; Shivashankar, G. V; Sheetz, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    ...) between FAs and the nucleus depends on matrix mechanics. In particular, on soft surfaces or after the loss of force, FHL2 moves from FAs into the nucleus and concentrates at RNA polymerase (Pol...

  9. Preservation of the nucleus X-pelvic floor motosystem in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D; Reske-Nielsen, E

    1984-01-01

    Fourteen cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) were investigated neuropathologically, emphazising the sacral spinal cord which contains Onuf's nucleus X. The nucleus innervates the pelvic sphincters. In two cases, small striated pelvic muscles were studied. No changes characteristic of ALS...

  10. Functional identification of central afferent projections conveying information of acute "stress" to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, P.J.; Mikkelsen, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    c-fos, corticotropin-releasing factor, neurosecretory neurons, paraventricular nucleus, transcription factors, neuroendocrinology, cholera toxin subunit B, retrograde tracing......c-fos, corticotropin-releasing factor, neurosecretory neurons, paraventricular nucleus, transcription factors, neuroendocrinology, cholera toxin subunit B, retrograde tracing...

  11. Projections from the raphe nuclei to the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Vrang, N.; Larsen, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    Hypothalamus, Circadian rhythm, Serotonin, Nucleus, Neuronal connections, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin (PHA-L), Cholera toxin (ChB)......Hypothalamus, Circadian rhythm, Serotonin, Nucleus, Neuronal connections, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin (PHA-L), Cholera toxin (ChB)...

  12. Responses of primate caudal parabrachial nucleus and Kolliker-fuse nucleus neurons to whole body rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Carey D.; McGee, David M.; Zhou, Jianxun; Scudder, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    The caudal aspect of the parabrachial (PBN) and Kolliker-Fuse (KF) nuclei receive vestibular nuclear and visceral afferent information and are connected reciprocally with the spinal cord, hypothalamus, amygdala, and limbic cortex. Hence, they may be important sites of vestibulo-visceral integration, particularly for the development of affective responses to gravitoinertial challenges. Extracellular recordings were made from caudal PBN cells in three alert, adult female Macaca nemestrina through an implanted chamber. Sinusoidal and position trapezoid angular whole body rotation was delivered in yaw, roll, pitch, and vertical semicircular canal planes. Sites were confirmed histologically. Units that responded during rotation were located in lateral and medial PBN and KF caudal to the trochlear nerve at sites that were confirmed anatomically to receive superior vestibular nucleus afferents. Responses to whole-body angular rotation were modeled as a sum of three signals: angular velocity, a leaky integration of angular velocity, and vertical position. All neurons displayed angular velocity and integrated angular velocity sensitivity, but only 60% of the neurons were position-sensitive. These responses to vertical rotation could display symmetric, asymmetric, or fully rectified cosinusoidal spatial tuning about a best orientation in different cells. The spatial properties of velocity and integrated velocity and position responses were independent for all position-sensitive neurons; the angular velocity and integrated angular velocity signals showed independent spatial tuning in the position-insensitive neurons. Individual units showed one of three different orientations of their excitatory axis of velocity rotation sensitivity: vertical-plane-only responses, positive elevation responses (vertical plane plus ipsilateral yaw), and negative elevation axis responses (vertical plane plus negative yaw). The interactions between the velocity and integrated velocity components

  13. Nucleus downscaling in mouse embryos is regulated by cooperative developmental and geometric programs

    OpenAIRE

    Elina Tsichlaki; Greg FitzHarris

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining appropriate nucleus size is important for cell health, but the mechanisms by which this is achieved are poorly understood. Controlling nucleus size is a particular challenge in early development, where the nucleus must downscale in size with progressive reductive cell divisions. Here we use live and fixed imaging, micromanipulation approaches, and small molecule analyses during preimplantation mouse development to probe the mechanisms by which nucleus size is determined. We find a...

  14. File list: NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 No description Neural Nucleus Accumbens http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  15. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 Unclassified Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX698...29234,SRX029236 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 All antigens Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX791...SRX445333,SRX472711,SRX445335,SRX445331,SRX029231 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 All antigens Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX791...SRX445335,SRX209198,SRX445331,SRX209194,SRX029235 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  18. File list: InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 Input control Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX20...9803,SRX791596,SRX791600,SRX209801,SRX209802,SRX472711,SRX445333,SRX445335,SRX445331 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 Histone Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX791594,S...2,SRX029231,SRX029230,SRX029228,SRX209198,SRX209196 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 Histone Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX791595,S...0,SRX209199,SRX209196,SRX209197,SRX209198,SRX209194 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 All antigens Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX209...SRX472713,SRX445333,SRX472711,SRX445335,SRX445331 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 TFs and others Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX4...72713 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  3. File list: InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 Input control Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX20...9801,SRX209802,SRX209803,SRX791600,SRX791596,SRX472711,SRX445333,SRX445335,SRX445331 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 TFs and others Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX4...72713 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX2...09217,SRX209216,SRX209215,SRX209214,SRX209213,SRX209218 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  6. File list: Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 Unclassified Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX698...29238,SRX029235 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  7. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 Unclassified Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX029...98892,SRX029235 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 Unclassified Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX698...98892,SRX698891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX2...09217,SRX209216,SRX209214,SRX209218,SRX209215,SRX209213 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  10. File list: InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 Input control Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX20...9803,SRX209802,SRX791596,SRX791600,SRX209801,SRX445333,SRX472711,SRX445335,SRX445331 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  11. File list: NoD.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 No description Neural Nucleus Accumbens http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 Histone Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX791594,S...8,SRX209196,SRX209197,SRX209198,SRX209194,SRX029231 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.10.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX2...09217,SRX209216,SRX209218,SRX209215,SRX209213,SRX209214 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 TFs and others Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX4...72713 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  15. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 All antigens Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX791...SRX209196,SRX472711,SRX445333,SRX445335,SRX445331 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  16. File list: NoD.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 No description Neural Nucleus Accumbens http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Neu.20.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  17. File list: NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 No description Neural Nucleus Accumbens http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 Histone Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX209200,S...7,SRX209211,SRX029230,SRX029232,SRX029228,SRX029231 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 TFs and others Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX4...72713 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Nucleus Accumbens SRX2...09217,SRX209216,SRX209213,SRX209214,SRX209218,SRX209215 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Nucleus_Accumbens.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus hg19 Histone Neural Caudate Nucleus SRX998285,SRX9...98283 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.50.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus hg19 All antigens Neural Caudate Nucleus SRX998285...,SRX998283 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus hg19 Histone Neural Caudate Nucleus SRX998285,SRX9...98283 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.05.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus hg19 Histone Neural Caudate Nucleus SRX998283,SRX9...98285 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.05.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus hg19 All antigens Neural Caudate Nucleus SRX998283...,SRX998285 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus.bed ...

  6. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus hg19 All antigens Neural Caudate Nucleus SRX998285...,SRX998283 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus hg19 Histone Neural Caudate Nucleus SRX998285,SRX9...98283 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.10.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus.bed ...

  8. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus hg19 All antigens Neural Caudate Nucleus SRX998285...,SRX998283 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Caudate_Nucleus.bed ...

  9. 延髓腹外侧头端活性氧介导室旁核血管紧张素Ⅱ的交感兴奋作用%Reactive oxygen species in rostral ventrolateral medulla mediate sympatho-excitation induced by AngⅡ in rats′ PVN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟明奎

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) mediate the increased sympathetic activity caused by microinjection of angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ in paraventricular nucleus (PVN).Methods In anesthetized rats with sinoaortic denervation and cervical vagotomy, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP)and heart rate (HR) were recorded in vivo on a PowerLab data acquisition system.The coordinates for PVN and RVLM were determined in a stereotaxic instrument according to Paxinos and Watson rat atlas.Results Bilateral PVN microinjection of angiotensin Ⅱ ( Ang Ⅱ ) increased the levels of RSNA and MAP in a dose-dependent manner.Bilateral RVLM microinjection of tempol ( a superoxide anion scavenger)or polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase ( PEG-SOD, an analogue of endogenous superoxide dismutase) did not cause significant change in baseline levels of RSNA and MAP; NAD(P) H oxidase inhibitors apocynin or phenylarsine oxide (PAO) also showed similar effects.The RSNA and MAP responses of Ang Ⅱ in PVN were inhibited by the pretreatment with RVLM administration of tempol, PEG-SOD, apocynin or PAO.Conclusions The enhanced sympathetic activity caused by Ang Ⅱ in PVN is mediated by NAD (P)H oxidase-derived ROS in RVLM.%目的 探讨延髓腹外侧头端(RVLM)活性氧(ROS)是否介导室旁核(PVN)血管紧张素Ⅱ(AngⅡ)的交感兴奋作用.方法 实验在去压力感受器神经支配和双侧迷走神经切断的麻醉大鼠上进行.采用立体定位仪进行核团定位微量注射,在体记录肾交感神经放电活动(RSNA)、平均动脉压(MAP).结果 PVN内微量注射AngⅡ剂量依赖性地引起RSNA增强和MAP升高.应用超氧阴离子清除剂4-羟基-2,2,6,6-四甲基哌啶(Tempol)或内源性超氧化物歧化酶拟似物聚乙二醇-超氧化物歧化酶(PEG-SOD) 清除RLVM内ROS对RSNA和MAP没有显著影响,但可抑制PVN内微量注射AngⅡ引起的交感兴

  10. Experiments on parity violation in the compound nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, J.D.

    1996-09-01

    Results from experiments that measure parity-violating longitudinal asymmetries in the scattering of epithermal neutrons from compound-nuclear resonances at the Manuel Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos are discussed. Parity non-conserving asymmetries have been observed for many p-wave resonances in a single target. Measurements were performed on several nuclei in the mass region of A-100 and A-230. The statistical model of the compound nucleus provides a theoretical basis for extracting mean-squared matrix elements from the experimental asymmetry data, and for interpreting the mean-squared matrix elements. The constraints on the weak meson-exchange couplings calculated from the compound-nucleus asymmetry data agree qualitatively with the results from few-body and light-nuclei experiments. For all nuclei but {sup 232}Th measured asymmetries have random signs. For {sup 232}Th eight of eight measured asymmetries are positive. This phenomenon is discussed in terms or doorway models.

  11. Determination of the {\\eta}'-nucleus optical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Nanova, M; Paryev, E Ya; Bayadilov, D; Bantes, B; Beck, R; Beloglazov, Y A; Böse, S; Brinkmann, K -T; Challand, Th; Crede, V; Dahlke, T; Dietz, F; Drexler, P; Eberhardt, H; Elsner, D; Ewald, R; Fornet-Ponse, K; Friedrich, S; Frommberger, F; Funke, Ch; Gottschall, M; Gridnev, A; Grüner, M; Gutz, E; Hammann, Ch; Hammann, D; Hannappel, J; Hartmann, J; Hillert, W; Hoffmeister, P; Honisch, Ch; Jaegle, I; Kaiser, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kammer, S; Keshelashvili, I; Kleber, V; Klein, F; Klempt, E; Krusche, B; Lang, M; Lopatin, I V; Maghrbi, Y; Makonyi, K; Müller, J; Odenthal, T; Piontek, D; Schaepe, S; Schmidt, Ch; Schmieden, H; Schmitz, R; Seifen, T; Thiel, A; Thoma, U; van Pee, H; Walther, D; Wendel, Ch; Wiedner, U; Wilson, A; Winnebeck, A; Zenke, F

    2013-01-01

    The excitation function and momentum distribution of $\\eta^\\prime$ mesons have been measured in photon induced reactions on $^{12}{}$C in the energy range of 1250-2600 MeV. The experiment was performed with tagged photon beams from the ELSA electron accelerator using the Crystal Barrel and TAPS detectors. The data are compared to model calculations to extract information on the sign and magnitude of the real part of the $\\eta^\\prime$-nucleus potential. Within the model, the comparison indicates an attractive potential of -($37 \\pm 10(stat)\\pm10(syst)$) MeV depth at normal nuclear matter density. Since the modulus of this depth is larger than the modulus of the imaginary part of the $\\eta^\\prime$-nucleus potential of -($10\\pm2.5$) MeV, determined by transparency ratio measurements, a search for resolved $\\eta^\\prime$-bound states appears promising.

  12. Leading Neutrons From Polarized Proton-Nucleus Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeliovich, B Z; Schmidt, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Leading neutron production on protons is known to be subject to strong absorptive corrections, which have been under debate for a long time. On nuclear targets these corrections are significantly enhanced and push the partial cross sections of neutron production to the very periphery of the nucleus. As a result, the A-dependences of inclusive and diffractive neutron production turn out to be similar. The mechanism of \\pi-a_1 interference, which successfully explained the observed single-spin asymmetry of neutrons in polarized pp interactions, is extended here to polarized pA collisions. Corrected for nuclear effects it explains well the magnitude and sign of the asymmetry A_N observed in inelastic events, resulting in a violent break up of the nucleus. However the excessive magnitude of A_N observed in the diffractive sample, remains a challenge.

  13. Neutrino-nucleus interactions at the LBNF near detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosel, Ulrich [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    The reaction mechanisms for neutrino interactions with an {sup 40}Ar nucleus with the LBNF flux are calculated with the Giessen-Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) transport-theoretical implementation of these interactions. Quasielastic scattering, many-body effects, pion production and absorption and Deep Inelastic Scattering are discussed; they all play a role at the LBNF energies and are experimentally entangled with each other. Quasielastic scattering makes up for only about 1/3 of the total cross section whereas pion production channels make up about 2/3 of the total. This underlines the need for a consistent description of the neutrino-nucleus reaction that treats all channels on an equal, consistent footing. The results discussed here can also serve as useful guideposts for the Intermediate Neutrino Program.

  14. Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions at the LBNF Near Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mosel, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The reaction mechanisms for neutrino interactions with an $^{40}Ar$ nucleus with the LBNF flux are calculated with the Giessen-Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) transport-theoretical implementation of these interactions. Quasielastic scattering, many-body effects, pion production and absorption and Deep Inelastic Scattering are discussed; they all play a role at the LBNF energies and are experimentally entangled with each other. Quasielastic scattering makes up for only about 1/3 of the total cross section whereas pion production channels make up about 2/3 of the total. This underlines the need for a consistent description of the neutrino-nucleus reaction that treats all channels on an equal, consistent footing. The results discussed here can also serve as useful guideposts for the Intermediate Neutrino Program.

  15. Neutral current neutrino-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Leitner, T; Mosel, U

    2006-01-01

    We have extended our model for charged current neutrino-nucleus interactions to neutral current reactions. For the elementary neutrino-nucleon interaction, we take into account quasielastic scattering, Delta excitation and the excitation of the resonances in the second resonance region. Our model for the neutrino-nucleus collisions includes in-medium effects such as Fermi motion, Pauli blocking, nuclear binding, and final-state interactions. They are implemented by means of the Giessen Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) coupled-channel transport model. This allows us to study exclusive channels, namely pion production and nucleon knockout. We find that final-state interactions modify considerably the distributions through rescattering, charge-exchange and absorption. Side-feeding induced by charge-exchange scattering is important in both cases. In the case of pions, there is a strong absorption associated with the in-medium pionless decay modes of the Delta, while nucleon knockout exhibits a considerable enh...

  16. Exporting RNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Alwin; Hurt, Ed

    2007-10-01

    The transport of RNA molecules from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is fundamental for gene expression. The different RNA species that are produced in the nucleus are exported through the nuclear pore complexes via mobile export receptors. Small RNAs (such as tRNAs and microRNAs) follow relatively simple export routes by binding directly to export receptors. Large RNAs (such as ribosomal RNAs and mRNAs) assemble into complicated ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles and recruit their exporters via class-specific adaptor proteins. Export of mRNAs is unique as it is extensively coupled to transcription (in yeast) and splicing (in metazoa). Understanding the mechanisms that connect RNP formation with export is a major challenge in the field.

  17. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of the nucleus {sup 139}Ce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Cata-Danil, I.; Ivascu, M.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Mihailescu, L.C.; Rusu, C.; Suliman, G. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest (Romania)

    2006-03-15

    Gamma-ray coincidence techniques are used to determine new level structures in the N=81 nucleus {sup 139}Ce, at low spins and excitation energies with the {sup 139}La(p,n{gamma}) reaction at 5.0 and 6.0 MeV incident energy, and at high spins with the {sup 130}Te({sup 12}C,3n{gamma}) reaction at 50.5 MeV, respectively. Lifetime determinations are also made in the (p,n{gamma}) reaction with the centroid DSA method. The observed level structures are discussed by comparison with existing calculations and with those in the neighbouring nucleus {sup 140}Ce. (orig.)

  18. Shape transitions far from stability: The nucleus {sup 58}Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marginean, N. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy) and National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania)]. E-mail: nicolae.marginean@lnl.infn.it; Lenzi, S.M. [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Padova (Italy); Gadea, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy)] (and others)

    2006-02-23

    Excited states up to I{sup {pi}}=8{sup +} in the neutron-rich nucleus {sup 58}Cr have been identified by using a new experimental setup composed of the large acceptance magnetic spectrometer PRISMA and the highly efficient {gamma}-detector array CLARA. Interestingly, the excitation energy sequence of the ground-state band follows the one expected by the E(5) dynamical symmetry for a nucleus at the critical point of the shape phase transition from a spherical vibrator (U(5)) to a {gamma}-soft rotor (O(6)). For the first time, in the same physical system, large scale shell-model calculations in the full fp shell are compared to the E(5) analytical model results and to the Interacting Boson Model. The theoretical results are in excellent agreement with the present data.

  19. Efficient And Portable SDR Waveform Development: The Nucleus Concept

    CERN Document Server

    Ramakrishnan, Venkatesh; Kempf, Torsten; Kammler, David; Ascheid, Gerd; Meyr, Heinrich; Adrat, Marc; Antweiler, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Future wireless communication systems should be flexible to support different waveforms (WFs) and be cognitive to sense the environment and tune themselves. This has lead to tremendous interest in software defined radios (SDRs). Constraints like throughput, latency and low energy demand high implementation efficiency. The tradeoff of going for a highly efficient implementation is the increase of porting effort to a new hardware (HW) platform. In this paper, we propose a novel concept for WF development, the Nucleus concept, that exploits the common structure in various wireless signal processing algorithms and provides a way for efficient and portable implementation. Tool assisted WF mapping and exploration is done efficiently by propagating the implementation and interface properties of Nuclei. The Nucleus concept aims at providing software flexibility with high level programmability, but at the same time limiting HW flexibility to maximize area and energy efficiency.

  20. ηproduction in proton-nucleus collisions near threshold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG You-Chang; CHEN Hong; JIANG Huan-Qing

    2008-01-01

    The η-meson production in proton-nucleus(pA)collisions near threshold is studied within a relativistic meson-exchange model.The primary production amplitude is presented in the distorted-wave impulse approximation for the nucleus with isospin 0 or [1]by assuming that N*(1535)is excited via a meson exchange and then decays into η and nucleon pair(ηN).Taking 18O and 12C nuclei as examples,we evaluate the production cross sections as a function of the incident proton energy,and analyze the effects of nuclear medium and various meson-exchange contributions.Finally we discuss implications for further experimental studies at the Cooling Storage Ring(CSR)in Lanzhou.

  1. Relativistic Spin-Isospin Dependent Response Function of Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Liang-Gang; CHEN Wei; AI Bao-Quan; ZHENG Xiao-Ping; Masahiro Nakano

    2000-01-01

    A full relativistic formalism is employed to derive the relativistic particle-hole and delta-hole excitation polariza tion insertion of pion propagator in nuclear matter. The spin-isospin-dependent response function of nucleus at high energy-momentum transfer is calculated with the nuclear matter approximation. The short range correlation effect, two-nucleon absorption and nucleus form factor effects are included in the calculation. The position and width of the resonance peak of the spin-isospin mode are reproduced and found to be coincident with experiment data. The position of the peak and its width is sensitive to Landau-Migdal parameter g' which is about 0.6.

  2. Triple F - A Comet Nucleus Sample Return Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueppers, Michael; Keller, H. U.; Kuehrt, E.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Altwegg, K.; Bertrand, R.; Busemann, H.; Capria, M. T.; Colangeli, L.; Davidsson, B.; hide

    2008-01-01

    The Triple F (Fresh From the Fridge) mission, a Comet Nucleus Sample Return, has been proposed to ESA's Cosmic Vision program. A sample return from a comet enables us to reach the ultimate goal of cometary research. Since comets are the least processed bodies in the solar system, the proposal goes far beyond cometary science topics (like the explanation of cometary activity) and delivers invaluable information about the formation of the solar system and the interstellar molecular cloud from which it formed. The proposed mission would extract three sample cores of the upper 50 cm from three locations on a cometary nucleus and return them cooled to Earth for analysis in the laboratory. The simple mission concept with a touch-andgo sampling by a single spacecraft was proposed as an M-class mission in collaboration with the Russian space agency ROSCOSMOS.

  3. Proton emission from an oblate nucleus {sup 151}Lu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procter, M.G., E-mail: mark.procter@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cullen, D.M.; Taylor, M.J.; Alharshan, G.A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Ferreira, L.S. [Centro de Física das Interacções Fundamentais, Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Maglione, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Galilei”, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via Marzolo 8, I-3513, Padova (Italy); Auranen, K.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P.T.; Jakobsson, U.; Julin, R.; Herzáň, A.; Konki, J.; Leino, M. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, FIN-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Pakarinen, J. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Partanen, J. [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, D-50937, Köln (Germany); Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, FIN-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); and others

    2013-08-09

    Excited states in the proton-unbound nucleus {sup 151}Lu have been established using γ-ray coincidence techniques. The lifetime of the first excited state above the proton-emitting ground state has been measured using the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method combined with recoil-decay tagging. The experimental level scheme and extracted lifetime have been compared with state-of-the-art theoretical calculations based upon a non-adiabatic deformed Woods–Saxon potential. This comparison suggests that the proton-emitting ground state in {sup 151}Lu is mildly oblate with a deformation β=−0.11{sub −0.05}{sup +0.02} and represents the best evidence to date for proton emission from an oblate nucleus.

  4. Pairing reentrance in warm rotating $^{104}$Pd nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, N Quang; Agrawal, B K; Datar, V M; Mitra, A; Chakrabarty, D R

    2015-01-01

    Pairing reentrance phenomenon in the warm rotating $^{104}$Pd nucleus is studied within the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-based approach (the FTBCS1). The theory takes into account the effect of quasiparticle number fluctuations on the pairing field at finite temperature and angular momentum within the pairing model plus noncollective rotation along the symmetry axis. The numerical calculations for the pairing gaps and nuclear level densities (NLD), of which an anomalous enhancement has been experimentally observed at low excitation energy $E^*$ and high angular momentum $J$, show that the pairing reentrance is seen in the behavior of pairing gap obtained within the FTBCS1 at low $E$ and high $J$. This leads to the enhancement of the FTBCS1 level densities, in good agreement with the experimental observation. This agreement indicates that the observed enhancement of the NLD might be the first experimental detection of the pairing reentrance in a finite nucleus.

  5. Charge, neutron, and weak size of the atomic nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, G; Forssén, C; Jansen, G R; Nazarewicz, W; Papenbrock, T; Wendt, K A; Bacca, S; Barnea, N; Carlsson, B; Drischler, C; Hebeler, K; Hjorth-Jensen, M; Miorelli, M; Orlandini, G; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J

    2015-01-01

    What is the size of the atomic nucleus? This deceivably simple question is difficult to answer. While the electric charge distributions in atomic nuclei were measured accurately already half a century ago, our knowledge of the distribution of neutrons is still deficient. In addition to constraining the size of atomic nuclei, the neutron distribution also impacts the number of nuclei that can exist and the size of neutron stars. We present an ab initio calculation of the neutron distribution of the neutron-rich nucleus $^{48}$Ca. We show that the neutron skin (difference between radii of neutron and proton distributions) is significantly smaller than previously thought. We also make predictions for the electric dipole polarizability and the weak form factor; both quantities are currently targeted by precision measurements. Based on ab initio results for $^{48}$Ca, we provide a constraint on the size of a neutron star.

  6. The size-wise nucleus: nuclear volume control in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Michael D; Gerace, Larry

    2007-11-19

    Eukaryotic cells have an "awareness" of their volume and organellar volumes, and maintain a nuclear size that is proportional to the total cell size. New studies in budding and fission yeast have examined the relationship between cell and nuclear volumes. It was found that the size of the nucleus remains proportional to cell size in a wide range of genetic backgrounds and growth conditions that alter cell volume and DNA content. Moreover, in multinucleated fission yeast cells, Neumann and Nurse (see p. 593 of this issue) found that the sizes of individual nuclei are controlled by the relative amount of cytoplasm surrounding each nucleus. These results highlight a role of the cytoplasm in nuclear size control.

  7. The identification of musical instruments through nucleus cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasmeder, M L; Lutman, M E

    2006-09-01

    In this study, self-reported ability to recognize musical instruments was investigated by means of a questionnaire, which was sent to a group of adult Nucleus cochlear implant users and a group of normally hearing subjects. In addition, spectrograms and electrodograms were produced and analysed for samples of music played on 10 different musical instruments. Self-reported ability to recognize some instruments was poor in the group of implant users, particularly for the saxophone, tuba and clarinet. Electrodograms showed that these instruments could only be identified using distorted spectral information or reduced temporal information. Other instruments, such as the drum and piano, could be identified using temporal information. Limited spectral resolution makes the recognition of musical instruments difficult for Nucleus implant users.

  8. $K^+$-nucleus potentials from $K^+$-nucleon amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, E

    2016-01-01

    Optical potentials for $K^+$-nucleus interactions are constructed from $K^+$-nucleon amplitudes using recently developed algorithm based on $K^+$-N kinematics in the nuclear medium. With the deep penetration of $K^+$ mesons into the nucleus at momenta below 800~MeV/c it is possible to test this approach with greater sensitivity than hitherto done with $K^-$ and pions. The energy-dependence of experimental reaction and total cross sections on nuclei is better reproduced with this approach compared to fixed-energy amplitudes. The inclusion of Pauli correlations in the medium also improves the agreement between calculation and experiment. The absolute scale of the cross sections is reproduced very well for $^6$Li but for C, Si and Ca calculated cross sections are (23$\\pm4$)\\% smaller than experiment, in agreement with earlier analyses. Two phenomenological models that produce such missing strength suggest that the imaginary part of the potential needs about 40\\% enhancement.

  9. K+-nucleus potentials from K+-nucleon amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    2016-10-01

    Optical potentials for K+-nucleus interactions are constructed from K+-nucleon amplitudes using recently developed algorithm based on K+-N kinematics in the nuclear medium. With the deep penetration of K+ mesons into the nucleus at momenta below 800 MeV / c it is possible to test this approach with greater sensitivity than hitherto done with K- and pions. The energy-dependence of experimental reaction and total cross sections on nuclei is better reproduced with this approach compared to fixed-energy amplitudes. The inclusion of Pauli correlations in the medium also improves the agreement between calculation and experiment. The absolute scale of the cross sections is reproduced very well for 6Li but for C, Si and Ca calculated cross sections are (23 ± 4)% smaller than experiment, in agreement with earlier analyses. Two phenomenological models that produce such missing strength suggest that the imaginary part of the potential needs about 40% enhancement.

  10. Electromagnetic properties of the Beryllium-11 nucleus in Halo EFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammer H.-W.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We compute electromagnetic properties of the Beryllium-11 nucleus using an effective field theory that exploits the separation of scales in this halo system. We fix the parameters of the EFT from measured data on levels and scattering lengths in the 10Be plus neutron system. We then obtain predictions for the B(E1 strength of the 1/2+ to 1/2− transition in the 11Be nucleus. We also compute the charge radius of the ground state of 11Be. Agreement with experiment within the expected accuracy of a leading-order computation in this EFT is obtained. We also indicate how higher-order corrections that affect both s-wave and p-wave 10 Be-neutron interactions will affect our results.

  11. NPY and VGF Immunoreactivity Increased in the Arcuate Nucleus, but Decreased in the Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, of Type-II Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Saderi; Roberto Salgado-Delgado; Rafael Avendaño-Pradel; Maria del Carmen Basualdo; Gian-Luca Ferri; Laura Chávez-Macías; Juan E Olvera Roblera; Carolina Escobar; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2012-01-01

    Ample animal studies demonstrate that neuropeptides NPY and α-MSH expressed in Arcuate Nucleus and Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, modulate glucose homeostasis and food intake. In contrast is the absence of data validating these observations for human disease. Here we compare the post mortem immunoreactivity of the metabolic neuropeptides NPY, αMSH and VGF in the infundibular nucleus, and brainstem of 11 type-2 diabetic and 11 non-diabetic individuals. α-MSH, NPY and tyrosine hydroxylase i...

  12. Isospin effects in elastic proton-nucleus scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, C. R.; Elster, Ch.; Thaler, R. M.

    1993-05-01

    Isovector effects in proton-nucleus elastic scattering at medium energies are studied. The accuracy of the Kerman-McManus-Thaler isospin averaging procedure is found to be very good for nuclei larger than 4He. Studies of 40Ca and 208Pb suggest that the surface neutrons may be pulled in somewhat relative to the protons, although uncertainties in the detailed applicability of the present truncation of the multiple scattering treatment render firm conclusions premature.

  13. Isospin effects in elastic proton-nucleus scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, C.R. (Service de Physique et Techniques Nucleaires, Centre d' Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, B.P. No. 12, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France)); Elster, C. (Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics and Department of Physics, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States)); Thaler, R.M. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States) Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States))

    1993-05-01

    Isovector effects in proton-nucleus elastic scattering at medium energies are studied. The accuracy of the Kerman-McManus-Thaler isospin averaging procedure is found to be very good for nuclei larger than [sup 4]He. Studies of [sup 40]Ca and [sup 208]Pb suggest that the surface neutrons may be pulled in somewhat relative to the protons, although uncertainties in the detailed applicability of the present truncation of the multiple scattering treatment render firm conclusions premature.

  14. PHARMACOLOGIC TREATMENT OF HYPERALGESIA EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza Grava, André Luiz; Ferrari,Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of anti-inflammatory drugs (dexamethasone, indomethacin, atenolol and indomethacin plus atenolol) and analgesic drugs (morphine) on hyperalgesia experimentally induced by the nucleus pulposus (NP) in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats of weights ranging from 220 to 250 g were used in the study. Hyperalgesia was induced by means of a fragment of NP removed from the sacrococcygeal region that was placed in contact w...

  15. Methods and compositions for targeting macromolecules into the nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chook, Yuh Min

    2013-06-25

    The present invention includes compositions, methods and kits for directing an agent across the nuclear membrane of a cell. The present invention includes a Karyopherin beta2 translocation motif in a polypeptide having a slightly positively charged region or a slightly hydrophobic region and one or more R/K/H-X.sub.(2-5)-P-Y motifs. The polypeptide targets the agent into the cell nucleus.

  16. {alpha}-nucleus potentials and photon-induced nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galaviz, D. E-mail: redondo@ikp.tu-darmstadt.de; Babilon, M.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, Gy.; Hillier, R.; Mate, Z.; Mohr, P.; Rauscher, T.; Somorjai, E.; Zilges, A.; Zolnai, L

    2003-05-05

    New data for the {sup 112,124}Sn({alpha},{alpha}){sup 112,124}Sn reaction have been measured and are presently analyzed. Results of the {sup 112} Sn x {alpha} potential at the energy E{sub c.m.} {approx} 14 MeV are presented. The determination of this {alpha}-nucleus potential may allow a prediction of the {sup 112}Sn({alpha},{gamma}){sup 116}Te cross section.

  17. Theoretical Aspects of Coherent Elastic Neutrino Nucleus Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Gail

    2014-09-01

    We will discuss the physics potential of coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering. This standard model process has never been directly measured, although there are a number of experiments proposed at stopped pion/muon or reactor sites that could make such a first detection. Such a measurement opens up the possibility for a number of interesting physics probes. We will review these from a theoretical point of view, with a particular focus on the nuclear-neutron form factor.

  18. High-spin states in the {sup 97}Tc nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Cata-Danil, I.; Ivascu, M.; Marginean, N.; Rusu, C.; Stroe, L.; Ur, C.A. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest 76900 (Romania); Gadea, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy)

    2003-04-01

    High-spin states in the {sup 97}Tc nucleus have been studied by in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy with the reaction {sup 82}Se({sup 19}F,4n{gamma}) at 68 MeV incident energy. Excited states have been observed up to about 8 MeV excitation and spin 43/2{Dirac_h}. The observed level scheme is compared with results of shell model calculations. (orig.)

  19. Decay of the N =126 , 213Fr nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pragati, Deo, A. Y.; Podolyák, Zs.; Walker, P. M.; Algora, A.; Rubio, B.; Agramunt, J.; Fraile, L. M.; Al-Dahan, N.; Alkhomashi, N.; Briz, J. A.; Aguado, M. E. Estevez; Farrelly, G.; Gelletly, W.; Herlert, A.; Köster, U.; Maira, A.

    2016-12-01

    γ rays following the EC/β+ and α decay of the N = 126, 213Fr nucleus have been observed at the CERN isotope separator on-line (ISOLDE) facility with the help of γ -ray and conversion-electron spectroscopy. These γ rays establish several hitherto unknown excited states in 213Rn. Also, five new α -decay branches from the 213Fr ground state have been discovered. Shell model calculations have been performed to understand the newly observed states in 213Rn.

  20. Nucleus-associated intermediate filaments from chicken erythrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Chicken erythrocyte nuclei prepared by isolation in isotonic KCl and Nonidet P-40 detergent were found to contain numerous attached filaments with a mean diameter of 11.0 nm. In polypeptide content and solubility properties, they resembled the vimentin type of intermediate filament found in cells of mesenchymal origin. Examination of their association with the nucleus suggests that more than a simple membrane attachment is involved.

  1. How did nucleus and sexual reproduction come into being?

    OpenAIRE

    Ping Xie

    2016-01-01

    The origin of eukaryote is a fundamental, forbidding evolutionary puzzle, and the popular scenarios of eukaryogenesis are far from being clear. So far, there have been various theories (e.g., syntrophic model, autogenous model, viral eukaryogenesis model, exomembrane hypothesis), but few explain why. I observed that C-value (the amount of DNA contained within a haploid nucleus) increased by 3.5 orders of magnitude from prokaryote to eukaryotes, which is inconceivably close to the packing rati...

  2. Nucleus accumbens μ-opioid receptors mediate social reward

    OpenAIRE

    Trezza, Viviana; Damsteegt, Ruth; Achterberg, E J Marijke; Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J

    2011-01-01

    Positive social interactions are essential for emotional well-being and proper behavioral development of young individuals. Here, we studied the neural underpinnings of social reward, by investigating the involvement of opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in social play behavior, a highly rewarding social interaction in adolescent rats. Intra-NAc infusion of morphine (0.05–0.1 μg) increased pinning and pouncing, characteristic elements of social play behavior in rats, and ...

  3. High-spin states in the {sup 96}Tc nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Cata-Danil, I.; Ivascu, M.; Marginean, N.; Rusu, C.; Stroe, L.; Ur, C.A. [National Inst. of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Gizon, A.; Gizon, J. [Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires, IN2P3-CNRS/UPJ, Grenoble (France); Nyako, B.; Timar, J.; Zolnai, L. [Inst. of Nuclear Research, Debrecen (Hungary); Boston, A.J.; Joss, D.T.; Paul, E.S.; Semple, A.T. [Oliver Lodge Lab., Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom); Parry, C.M. [Dept. of Physics, York Univ., Heslington, York (United Kingdom)

    2001-03-01

    High-spin states in the {sup 96}Tc nucleus have been studied with the reactions {sup 82}Se({sup 19}F,5n{gamma}) at 68 MeV and Zn({sup 36}S,{alpha}pxn) at 130 MeV. Two {gamma}-ray cascades (irregular bandlike structures) have been observed up to an excitation energy of about 10 MeV and spin 21-22{Dirac_h}. (orig.)

  4. Altered mechanical properties of the nucleus in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Maria Lucia; Lammerding, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the nucleus is the largest and most rigid organelle. Therefore, its physical properties contribute critically to the biomechanical behavior of cells, e.g., during amoeboid migration or perfusion through narrow capillaries. Furthermore, it has been speculated that nuclear deformations could directly allow cells to sense mechanical stress, e.g., by modulating the access of specific transcription factors to their binding sites. Defects in nuclear mechanics have also been reported in a variety of muscular dystrophies caused by mutations in nuclear envelope proteins, indicating an important role in the maintenance of cells in mechanically stressed tissue. These findings have prompted the growing field of nuclear mechanics to develop advanced experimental methods to study the physical properties of the nucleus as a function of nuclear structure and organization, and to understand its role in physiology and disease. These experimental techniques include micropipette aspiration, atomic force microscopy of isolated nuclei, cellular strain and compression experiments, and microneedle manipulation of intact cells. These experiments have provided important insights into the mechanical behavior of the nucleus under physiological conditions, the distinct mechanical contributions of the nuclear lamina and interior, and how mutations in nuclear envelope proteins associated with a variety of human diseases can cause distinct alterations in the physical properties of the nucleus and contribute to the disease mechanism. Here, we provide a brief overview of the most common experimental techniques and their application and discuss the implication of their results on our current understanding of nuclear mechanics. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. K--Nucleus Potentials Consistent with Kaonic Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieply, A.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mares, J.

    2004-03-01

    Various models of the K- nucleus potential have been compared and tested in fits to kaonic atom data. The calculations give basically two vastly different predictions for the depth of the K- optical potential at the nuclear density. The study of the (K-stop, π ) reaction could help to distinguish between K- optical potentials as the Λ -hypernuclear formation rates are sensitive to the details of the initial-state K- wave function.

  6. Hidden Glashow resonance in neutrino–nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Alikhanov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Today it is widely believed that s-channel excitation of an on-shell W boson, commonly known as the Glashow resonance, can be initiated in matter only by the electron antineutrino in the process ν¯ee−→W− at the laboratory energy around 6.3 PeV. In this Letter we argue that the Glashow resonance within the Standard Model also occurs in neutrino–nucleus collisions. The main conclusions are as follows. 1 The Glashow resonance can be excited by both neutrinos and antineutrinos of all the three flavors scattering in the Coulomb field of a nucleus. 2 The Glashow resonance in a neutrino–nucleus reaction does not manifest itself as a Breit–Wigner-like peak in the cross section but the latter exhibits instead a slow logarithmic-law growth with the neutrino energy. The resonance turns thus out to be hidden. 3 More than 98% of W bosons produced in the sub-PeV region in neutrino-initiated reactions in water/ice will be from the Glashow resonance. 4 The vast majority of the Glashow resonance events in a neutrino detector are expected at energies from a few TeV to a few tens of TeV, being mostly initiated by the conventional atmospheric neutrinos dominant in this energy range. Calculations of the cross sections for Glashow resonance excitation on the oxygen nucleus as well as on the proton are carried out in detail. The results of this Letter can be useful for studies of neutrino interactions at large volume water/ice neutrino detectors. For example, in the IceCube detector one can expect 0.3 Glashow resonance events with shower-like topologies and the deposited energies above 300 TeV per year. It is therefore likely already to have at least one Glashow resonance event in the IceCube data set.

  7. Neutrino-Nucleus Cross Sections for Oscillation Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Katori, Teppei

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations physics is entered in the precision era. In this context accelerator-based neutrino experiments need a reduction of systematic errors to the level of a few percent. Today one of the most important sources of systematic errors are neutrino-nucleus cross sections which in the hundreds-MeV to few-GeV energy region are known with a precision not exceeding 20%. In this article we review the present experimental and theoretical knowledge of the neutrino-nucleus interaction physics. After introducing neutrino oscillation physics and accelerator-based neutrino experiments, we overview general aspects of the neutrino-nucleus cross sections, both theoretical and experimental views. Then we focus on these quantities in different reaction channels. We start with the quasielastic and quasielastic-like cross section, putting a special emphasis on multinucleon emission channel which attracted a lot of attention in the last few years. We review the main aspects of the different microscopic models for th...

  8. Integration of sensory quanta in cuneate nucleus neurons in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Bengtsson

    Full Text Available Discriminative touch relies on afferent information carried to the central nervous system by action potentials (spikes in ensembles of primary afferents bundled in peripheral nerves. These sensory quanta are first processed by the cuneate nucleus before the afferent information is transmitted to brain networks serving specific perceptual and sensorimotor functions. Here we report data on the integration of primary afferent synaptic inputs obtained with in vivo whole cell patch clamp recordings from the neurons of this nucleus. We find that the synaptic integration in individual cuneate neurons is dominated by 4-8 primary afferent inputs with large synaptic weights. In a simulation we show that the arrangement with a low number of primary afferent inputs can maximize transfer over the cuneate nucleus of information encoded in the spatiotemporal patterns of spikes generated when a human fingertip contact objects. Hence, the observed distributions of synaptic weights support high fidelity transfer of signals from ensembles of tactile afferents. Various anatomical estimates suggest that a cuneate neuron may receive hundreds of primary afferents rather than 4-8. Therefore, we discuss the possibility that adaptation of synaptic weight distribution, possibly involving silent synapses, may function to maximize information transfer in somatosensory pathways.

  9. Maturation of firing pattern in chick vestibular nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, M; Hirsch, J C; Peusner, K D

    2006-08-25

    The principal cells of the chick tangential nucleus are vestibular nucleus neurons participating in the vestibuloocular and vestibulocollic reflexes. In birds and mammals, spontaneous and stimulus-evoked firing of action potentials is essential for vestibular nucleus neurons to generate mature vestibular reflex activity. The emergence of spike-firing pattern and the underlying ion channels were studied in morphologically-identified principal cells using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from brain slices of late-term embryos (embryonic day 16) and hatchling chickens (hatching day 1 and hatching day 5). Spontaneous spike activity emerged around the perinatal period, since at embryonic day 16 none of the principal cells generated spontaneous action potentials. However, at hatching day 1, 50% of the cells fired spontaneously (range, 3 to 32 spikes/s), which depended on synaptic transmission in most cells. By hatching day 5, 80% of the principal cells could fire action potentials spontaneously (range, 5 to 80 spikes/s), and this activity was independent of synaptic transmission and showed faster kinetics than at hatching day 1. Repetitive firing in response to depolarizing pulses appeared in the principal cells starting around embryonic day 16, when calcium-dependent potassium current modulated both the spontaneous and evoked spike firing activity. Altogether, these in vitro studies showed that during the perinatal period, the principal cells switched from displaying no spontaneous spike activity at resting membrane potential and generating one spike on depolarization to the tonic firing of spontaneous and evoked action potentials.

  10. Clinical outcomes of sleeveless phacotip assisted levitation of dropped nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Amar; Narang, Priya; A Kumar, Dhivya; Agarwal, Ashvin

    2014-10-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a sleeveless phacotip-assisted approach to levitate dropped nucleus. This single-centre, retrospective, interventional, non-comparative case series reviewed the medical records of 34 eyes of 34 patients. Corrected and uncorrected distance visual acuity (CDVA, UDVA), early and late postoperative complications and ultrasound biomicroscopic (UBM) evaluation of the sclerotomy site was analysed. At 18 months follow-up, the mean postoperative UDVA and CDVA in Snellen's decimal equivalent was 0.42 ± 0.16 and 0.91 ± 0.2, respectively. There was a significant improvement in the UDVA (p=0.001) and CDVA (p=0.002). Nucleus drop occurred following intraoperative posterior capsular rupture in 25 eyes (73.5%), zonular weakness in 5 eyes (14.8%) and post-trauma in 4 eyes (11.7%). In the early postoperative period, corneal oedema was seen in 2 eyes, pigment dispersion in 3 eyes and vitritis in 2 eyes. There was loss of CDVA in 1 (2.9%) eye due to persistent cystoid macular oedema. UBM did not reveal any vitreous incarceration into the sclerotomy site. Dropped nucleus was successfully levitated into anterior chamber with this technique, resulting in a significant visual outcome with a favourable complication rate. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Coexistence of central nucleus, cores, and rods: Diagnostic relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinakaran, Sathiyabama; Kumar, Rashmi Santhosh; Thakkar, Ravindra; Narayanappa, Gayathri

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital myopathies (CMs) though considered distinct disorders, simultaneous occurrence of central nucleus, nemaline rods, and cores in the same biopsy are scarcely reported. Objective: A retrospective reassessment of cases diagnosed as CMs to look for multiple pathologies missed, if any, during the initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Enzyme histochemical, and immunohistochemical-stained slides from 125 cases diagnosed as congenital myopathy were reassessed. Results: The study revealed 15 cases (12%) of congenital myopathy with more than one morphological feature. Central nucleus with cores (n = 11), central nucleus, nemaline rods and cores (n = 3), and nemaline rods with cores (n = 1). 4/11 cases were diagnosed as centronuclear myopathy (CNM) in the first instance; in addition, cores were revealed on reassessment. Discussion: The prevalence of CMs of all neuromuscular disorders is approximately 6 in 100,000 live births, with regional variations. Three main defined CMs include centro nuclear myopathy (CNM), nemaline rod myopathy (NRM), and central core disease (CCD). However, they are more diverse with overlapping clinical and histopathological features, thus broadening the spectra within each category of congenital myopathy. Conclusion: Identification of cases with overlap of pathological features has diagnostic relevance. PMID:27293330

  12. An off-centered active galactic nucleus in NGC 3115

    CERN Document Server

    Menezes, R B; Ricci, T V

    2014-01-01

    NGC 3115 is an S0 galaxy that has always been considered to have a pure absorption-line spectrum. Some recent studies have detected a compact radio-emitting nucleus in this object, coinciding with the photometric center and with a candidate for the X-ray nucleus. This is evidence of the existence of a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the galaxy, although no emission line has ever been observed. We report the detection of an emission-line spectrum of a type 1 AGN in NGC 3115, with an H$\\alpha$ luminosity of $L_{H\\alpha} = (4.2 \\pm 0.4) \\times 10^{37}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Our analysis revealed that this AGN is located at a projected distance of $\\sim 0.29" \\pm 0.05"$ (corresponding to $\\sim 14.3 \\pm 2.5$ pc) from the stellar bulge center, which is coincident with the kinematic center of this object's stellar velocity map. The black hole corresponding to the observed off-centered AGN may form a binary system with a black hole located at the stellar bulge center. However, it is also possible that the dis...

  13. Nucleus- and cell-specific gene expression in monkey thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Karl D; Choudary, Prabhakara V; Jones, Edward G

    2007-02-06

    Nuclei of the mammalian thalamus are aggregations of neurons with unique architectures and input-output connections, yet the molecular determinants of their organizational specificity remain unknown. By comparing expression profiles of thalamus and cerebral cortex in adult rhesus monkeys, we identified transcripts that are unique to dorsal thalamus or to individual nuclei within it. Real-time quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization analyses confirmed the findings. Expression profiling of individual nuclei microdissected from the dorsal thalamus revealed additional subsets of nucleus-specific genes. Functional annotation using Gene Ontology (GO) vocabulary and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis revealed overrepresentation of GO categories related to development, morphogenesis, cell-cell interactions, and extracellular matrix within the thalamus- and nucleus-specific genes, many involved in the Wnt signaling pathway. Examples included the transcription factor TCF7L2, localized exclusively to excitatory neurons; a calmodulin-binding protein PCP4; the bone extracellular matrix molecules SPP1 and SPARC; and other genes involved in axon outgrowth and cell matrix interactions. Other nucleus-specific genes such as CBLN1 are involved in synaptogenesis. The genes identified likely underlie nuclear specification, cell phenotype, and connectivity during development and their maintenance in the adult thalamus.

  14. Study of the structure of borromean nucleus 17Ne

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Fei; HUA Hui; YE Yan-Lin; LI Zhi-Huan; JIANG Dong-Xing; MA Li-Ying; GE Yu-Cheng; ZHENG Tao; SONG Yu-Shou; LI Xiang-Qing; Qureshi Faisal-Jamil

    2009-01-01

    The 17Ne nucleus is a possible candidate with a two-proton borromean halo structure. Since the theoretical model is difficult to handle the three-body system, it is difficult to determine the two-proton halo structure in 17Ne. In the present research, we try to study the breakup reaction of 17Ne. For the Borromean nuclei, one-proton knockout results in an unstable nucleus which is decaying further by proton emission. This process will result in an angular correlation between the direction of the aligned recoiling unstable nucleus and its decay products. The angular correlations can give us information about the configuration of the valence proton in the 17Ne. Furthermore, theoretical calculations indicate that the momentum distributions of 16F c.m are sensitive to the structure of the halo in 17Ne. Thus the measurement of momentum distributions of 16F c.m may also give us conclusive information on the structure of 17Ne. The present experiment has been done at IMP in Lanzhou using the radioactive beam 17Ne at 30.8 MeV/u on a 43mg/cm2 12C target. The data analysis is under procedure and the primary results are provided.

  15. The size of the nucleus increases as yeast cells grow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Paul; Edgington, Nicholas P; Schneider, Brandt L; Rupes, Ivan; Tyers, Mike; Futcher, Bruce

    2007-09-01

    It is not known how the volume of the cell nucleus is set, nor how the ratio of nuclear volume to cell volume (N/C) is determined. Here, we have measured the size of the nucleus in growing cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of mutant yeast strains spanning a range of cell sizes revealed that the ratio of average nuclear volume to average cell volume was quite consistent, with nuclear volume being approximately 7% that of cell volume. At the single cell level, nuclear and cell size were strongly correlated in growing wild-type cells, as determined by three different microscopic approaches. Even in G1-phase, nuclear volume grew, although it did not grow quite as fast as overall cell volume. DNA content did not appear to have any immediate, direct influence on nuclear size, in that nuclear size did not increase sharply during S-phase. The maintenance of nuclear size did not require continuous growth or ribosome biogenesis, as starvation and rapamycin treatment had little immediate impact on nuclear size. Blocking the nuclear export of new ribosomal subunits, among other proteins and RNAs, with leptomycin B also had no obvious effect on nuclear size. Nuclear expansion must now be factored into conceptual and mathematical models of budding yeast growth and division. These results raise questions as to the unknown force(s) that expand the nucleus as yeast cells grow.

  16. The TLC: a novel auditory nucleus of the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña, Enrique; Viñuela, Antonio; Marshall, Allen F; Fitzpatrick, Douglas C; Aparicio, M-Auxiliadora

    2007-11-28

    We have identified a novel nucleus of the mammalian brain and termed it the tectal longitudinal column (TLC). Basic histologic stains, tract-tracing techniques and three-dimensional reconstructions reveal that the rat TLC is a narrow, elongated structure spanning the midbrain tectum longitudinally. This paired nucleus is located close to the midline, immediately dorsal to the periaqueductal gray matter. It occupies what has traditionally been considered the most medial region of the deep superior colliculus and the most medial region of the inferior colliculus. The TLC differs from the neighboring nuclei of the superior and inferior colliculi and the periaqueductal gray by its distinct connections and cytoarchitecture. Extracellular electrophysiological recordings show that TLC neurons respond to auditory stimuli with physiologic properties that differ from those of neurons in the inferior or superior colliculi. We have identified the TLC in rodents, lagomorphs, carnivores, nonhuman primates, and humans, which indicates that the nucleus is conserved across mammals. The discovery of the TLC reveals an unexpected level of longitudinal organization in the mammalian tectum and raises questions as to the participation of this mesencephalic region in essential, yet completely unexplored, aspects of multisensory and/or sensorimotor integration.

  17. Ground control to major TOM: mitochondria-nucleus communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg-Bord, Michal; Schuldiner, Maya

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria have crucial functions in the cell, including ATP generation, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, nucleotide biosynthesis, and amino acid metabolism. All of these functions require tight regulation on mitochondrial activity and homeostasis. As mitochondria biogenesis is controlled by the nucleus and almost all mitochondrial proteins are encoded by nuclear genes, a tight communication network between mitochondria and the nucleus has evolved, which includes signaling cascades, proteins which are dual-localized to the two compartments, and sensing of mitochondrial products by nuclear proteins. All of these enable a crosstalk between mitochondria and the nucleus that allows the 'ground control' to get information on mitochondria's status. Such information facilitates the creation of a cellular balance of mitochondrial status with energetic needs. This communication also allows a transcriptional response in case mitochondrial function is impaired aimed to restore mitochondrial homeostasis. As mitochondrial dysfunction is related to a growing number of genetic diseases as well as neurodegenerative conditions and aging, elucidating the mechanisms governing the mitochondrial/nuclear communication should progress a better understanding of mitochondrial dysfunctions. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Coexistence of central nucleus, cores, and rods: Diagnostic relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathiyabama Dhinakaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital myopathies (CMs though considered distinct disorders, simultaneous occurrence of central nucleus, nemaline rods, and cores in the same biopsy are scarcely reported. Objective: A retrospective reassessment of cases diagnosed as CMs to look for multiple pathologies missed, if any, during the initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Enzyme histochemical, and immunohistochemical-stained slides from 125 cases diagnosed as congenital myopathy were reassessed. Results: The study revealed 15 cases (12% of congenital myopathy with more than one morphological feature. Central nucleus with cores (n = 11, central nucleus, nemaline rods and cores (n = 3, and nemaline rods with cores (n = 1. 4/11 cases were diagnosed as centronuclear myopathy (CNM in the first instance; in addition, cores were revealed on reassessment. Discussion: The prevalence of CMs of all neuromuscular disorders is approximately 6 in 100,000 live births, with regional variations. Three main defined CMs include centro nuclear myopathy (CNM, nemaline rod myopathy (NRM, and central core disease (CCD. However, they are more diverse with overlapping clinical and histopathological features, thus broadening the spectra within each category of congenital myopathy. Conclusion: Identification of cases with overlap of pathological features has diagnostic relevance.

  19. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paves Heiti

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area.

  20. Pictures of Particle Production in Proton-Nucleus Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Alfred H

    2016-01-01

    This work focuses on gluon(jet) production in dilute(proton)-dense(nucleus) collisions. Depending on the frame and gauge, gluon production can be viewed as a freeing of gluons coming from either the proton wave function or from the nucleus wave function. These (apparently) very different pictures must lead to the same result and the purpose of this paper is to see how that happens. The focus is on gluons having $k_\\perp\\sim Q_S$ or gluons in the scaling region $k_\\perp/Q_S\\gg 1$. In the McLerran-Venugopalan(MV) model with $k_\\perp\\sim Q_S$ we are able to derive gluon production in a way that (graphically) manifestly shows $k_\\perp$-factorization in terms of the number density of gluons in the nuclear wave function. We presume that this picture, and $k_\\perp$-factorization, continues to hold in the presence of small-$x$ evolution although we have not been able to explicitly verify this. Our result is in agreement with usual $k_\\perp$-factorization where the gluon number density of the nucleus does not appear i...

  1. Formation of dense partonic matter in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC: Experimental evaluation by the PHENIX collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Adcox, K; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S V; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Yu A; Botelho, S S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N L; Bucher, D; Büsching, H; Bumazhnov, V A; Bunce, G M; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S K; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; Dávid, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Chenawi, K F; Enyo, H; Esumi, S C; Ewell, L A; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Zeev; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Sen-Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, Hans Åke; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R S; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B A; Khanzadeev, A V; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E P; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Bösing, C; Klinksiek, S A; Kochenda, L M; Kochetkov, D; Kochetkov, V; Köhler, D; Kohama, T; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R A; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu Zu Ping; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J R; Makdisi, Y I; Man'ko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martínez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E A; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A M; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Muhlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P O; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V A; Oskarsson, A; Österman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, Thomas; Petridis, A; Pinkenburg, C H; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M E; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saitô, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R K; Shea, T K; Shein, I V; Shibata, T A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiryak, Yu; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sørensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H A; Towell, R S; Tserruya, Itzhak; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjo, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; van Hecke, H; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A A; Vznuzdaev, E A; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2004-01-01

    Extensive experimental data from high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions were recorded using the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The comprehensive set of measurements from the first three years of RHIC operation includes charged particle multiplicities, transverse energy, yield ratios and spectra of identified hadrons in a wide range of transverse momenta (p_T), elliptic flow, two-particle correlations, non-statistical fluctuations, and suppression of particle production at high p_T. The results are examined with an emphasis on implications for the formation of a new state of dense matter. We find that the state of matter created at RHIC cannot be described in terms of ordinary color neutral hadrons.

  2. A transport set-up for heavy-flavour observables in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Nardi, Marzia; Beraudo, A; De Pace, A; Molinari, A; Monteno, M; Prino, F; Sitta, M

    2014-01-01

    A multi-step setup for heavy-flavour studies in high-energy nucleus–nucleus collisions is presented. The initial hard production of View the MathML sourceQ$\\bar{Q}$ pairs is simulated with the POWHEG pQCD event generator, interfaced with the PYTHIA parton shower. In a nucleus–nucleus collision the propagation of the heavy quarks in the medium is described through the relativistic Langevin equation. The numerical results are compared to experimental data from the RHIC and the LHC. In particular we show the comparisons of the nuclear modification factor of D-mesons, non-prompt J/ψJ/ψ's and heavy-flavour electrons. Furthermore, first results on azimuthal correlations of heavy quark pair and open charm/beauty meson pairs are presented.

  3. Formation of Centauro and Strangelets in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the LHC and their Identification by the ALICE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bogolyubsky, M Yu; Filippov, S N; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Maevskaya, A I; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Stefanski, P; Wlodarczyk, Z

    1999-01-01

    Presentation made at the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference, ICRC'99We present a phenomenological model which describes the formation of a Centauro fireball in nucleus-nucleus interactions in the upper atmosphere and at the LHC, and its decay to non-strange baryons and Strangelets. We describe the CASTOR detector for the ALICE experiment at the LHC. CASTOR will probe, in an event-by-event mode, the very forward, baryon-rich phase space 5.6eta7.2 in 5.5xA TeV central Pb+Pb collisions. We present results of simulations for the response of the CASTOR calorimeter and, in particular, to the transversal of Strangelets.

  4. CASTOR A Forward Detector for the Identification of Centauro and Strangelets in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bogolyubsky, M Yu; Filippov, S N; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Maevskaya, A I; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Stefanski, P; Wlodarczyk, Z

    2000-01-01

    Presentation made at the XXVIIIth Symposium on Multiparticle Dynamics, 6-11 September 1998, Delphi and published in World ScientificThe physics motivation for a very forward detector to be employed in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC is discussed. A phenomenological model describing the formation and decay of a Centauro fireball in nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The CASTOR detector which is aimed to measure the hadronic and photonic content of an interaction and to identify deeply penetrating objects in the very forward, baryon-rich phase space 5.6eta7.2 in an event-by-event mode is described. Results of simulations of the expected response of the calorimeter and, in particular, to the passage of strangelets, are presented.

  5. Nucleus-encoded periplastid-targeted EFL in chlorarachniophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gile, Gillian H; Keeling, Patrick J

    2008-09-01

    Chlorarachniophytes are cercozoan amoeboflagellates that acquired photosynthesis by enslaving a green alga, which has retained a highly reduced nucleus called a nucleomorph. The nucleomorph lacks many genes necessary for its own maintenance and expression, suggesting that some genes have been moved to the host nucleus and their products are now targeted back to the periplastid compartment (PPC), the reduced eukaryotic cytoplasm of the endosymbiont. Protein trafficking in chlorarachniophytes is therefore complex, including nucleus-encoded plastid-targeted proteins, nucleomorph-encoded plastid-targeted proteins, and nucleus-encoded periplastid-targeted proteins. A major gap in our understanding of this system is the PPC-targeted proteins because none have been described in any chlorarachniophytes. Here we describe the first such protein, the GTPase EFL. EFL was characterized from 7 chlorarachniophytes, and 2 distinct types were found. One is related to foraminiferan EFL and lacks an amino-terminal extension. The second, distantly related, type encodes an amino-terminal extension consisting of a signal peptide followed by sequence sharing many characteristics with transit peptides from nucleus-encoded plastid-targeted proteins and which we conclude is most likely PPC targeted. Western blotting with antibodies specific to putative host and PPC-targeted EFL from the chlorarachniophytes Bigelowiella natans and Gymnochlora stellata is consistent with posttranslational cleavage of the leaders from PPC-targeted proteins. Immunolocalization of both proteins in B. natans confirmed the cytosolic location of the leaderless EFL and a distinct localization pattern for the PPC-targeted protein but could not rule out a plastid location (albeit very unlikely). We sought other proteins with a similar leader and identified a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 1 encoding a bipartite extension with the same properties. Transit peptide sequences were characterized from all 3

  6. Serotonergic modulation of astrocytic activity in the hamster suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, J D; Chen, L

    1999-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the effects of central serotonin receptor activation on the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of Syrian hamsters. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical procedures were used to examine the effects of systemic application of the serotonin-1A and serotonin-7 receptor agonist, (+/-)-2-dipropyl-amino-8-hydroxyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT; 3.75 mg/kg) on the contents and distribution of glial fibrillary acidic protein in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Administration of 8-OH-DPAT at midday caused a significant reduction in immunoreactive glial fibrillary acidic protein content within 1 h of injection, compared to vehicle controls. This effect was not evident 3 h after drug injection. Treatment with 8-OH-DPAT during the late dark phase had little effect on glial fibrillary acidic protein content. The 8-OH-DPAT-induced reduction in glial fibrillary acidic protein content seen at midday was blocked partially by pretreatment with the serotonin-2 and serotonin-7 receptor antagonist, ritanserin, and more substantially by pretreatment with the serotonin-1A receptor antagonist, NAN-190. Treatment with 8-OH-DPAT also caused a significant redistribution of immunoreactive glial fibrillary acidic protein, such that the dense mesh-like appearance seen in vehicle controls was significantly reduced. The 8-OH-DPAT treatment also significantly decreased expression of polysialic acid, a cell-surface molecule associated with neural plasticity. Immunoblot assessments of glial fibrillary acidic protein contents 2 h before and 1 h after lights off revealed a significant time-of-day difference in glial fibrillary acidic protein expression, with lowest levels occurring at the latter time-point, associated with maximal endogenous serotonin release in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Collectively, these results indicate that acute plastic changes in glial fibrillary acidic protein

  7. Study of the peculiarities of multiparticle production via event-by-event analysis in asymmetric nucleus-nucleus interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosimova, Anastasiya; Gaitinov, Adigam; Grushevskaya, Ekaterina; Lebedev, Igor

    2017-06-01

    In this work the study on the peculiarities of multiparticle production in interactions of asymmetric nuclei to search for unusual features of such interactions, is performed. A research of long-range and short-range multiparticle correlations in the pseudorapidity distribution of secondary particles on the basis of analysis of individual interactions of nuclei of 197 Au at energy 10.7 AGeV with photoemulsion nuclei, is carried out. Events with long-range multiparticle correlations (LC), short-range multiparticle correlations (SC) and mixed type (MT) in pseudorapidity distribution of secondary particles, are selected by the Hurst method in accordance with Hurst curve behavior. These types have significantly different characteristics. At first, they have different fragmentation parameters. Events of LC type are processes of full destruction of the projectile nucleus, in which multicharge fragments are absent. In events of mixed type several multicharge fragments of projectile nucleus are discovered. Secondly, these two types have significantly different multiplicity distribution. The mean multiplicity of LC type events is significantly more than in mixed type events. On the basis of research of the dependence of multiplicity versus target-nuclei fragments number for events of various types it is revealed, that the most considerable multiparticle correlations are observed in interactions of the mixed type, which correspond to the central collisions of gold nuclei and nuclei of CNO-group, i.e. nuclei with strongly asymmetric volume, nuclear mass, charge, etc. Such events are characterised by full destruction of the target-nucleus and the disintegration of the projectile-nucleus on several multi-charged fragments.

  8. Superscaling in electron-nucleus scattering and its link to CC and NC QE neutrino-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Barbaro, M B; Caballero, J A; Donnelly, T W; Gonzalez-Jimenez, R; Ivanov, M; Udias, J M

    2013-01-01

    The superscaling approach (SuSA) to neutrino-nucleus scattering, based on the assumed universality of the scaling function for electromagnetic and weak interactions, is reviewed. The predictions of the SuSA model for bot CC and NC differential and total cross sections are presented and compared with the MiniBooNE data. The role of scaling violations, in particular the contribution of meson exchange currents in the two-particle two-hole sector, is explored.

  9. Superscaling in electron-nucleus scattering and its link to CC and NC QE neutrino-nucleus scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbaro, M. B. [Università di Torino and INFN, Sezione di Torino, 10125 Torino (Italy); Amaro, J. E. [Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Caballero, J. A.; González-Jiménez, R. [Universidad de Sevilla, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Donnelly, T. W. [CTP, LNS and Department of Physics, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Ivanov, M. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Udías, J. M. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The superscaling approach (SuSA) to neutrino-nucleus scattering, based on the assumed universality of the scaling function for electromagnetic and weak interactions, is reviewed. The predictions of the SuSA model for bot CC and NC differential and total cross sections are presented and compared with the MiniBooNE data. The role of scaling violations, in particular the contribution of meson exchange currents in the two-particle two-hole sector, is explored.

  10. Volumetric alterations in the nucleus accumbens and caudate nucleus in bulimia nervosa: a structural magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Joana; Ramos, Ana Filipa; Maia, Liliana; Castro, Liliana; Conceição, Eva; Geliebter, Allan; Machado, Paulo P P; Gonçalves, Óscar; Sampaio, Adriana

    2015-03-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) is an eating disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating and inappropriate compensatory behaviors (such as purging, fasting, or excessive exercise) to prevent weight gain. BN has been associated with deficits in inhibitory control processes. The basal ganglia specifically, the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the caudate nucleus (CN) are part of the frontostriatal circuits involved in inhibitory control. The main goal of this study was to investigate the presence of morphological alterations in the NAc and the CN in a sample of patients diagnosed with BN. Forty-one female participants, 21 diagnosed with BN and 20 healthy matched controls (HC), underwent a structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition and clinical assessment. The NAc and the CN were manually segmented using the software Slicer 3D. The results reveal a significant volumetric decrease in the CN and a preserved NAc volume in BN compared to the control group. These findings suggest a contributory role of the caudate nucleus part of the dorsal striatum in the psychopathology of BN. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The Double Nucleus and Central Black Hole of M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John; Bender, Ralf

    1999-09-01

    New spectroscopy of M31 supports Tremaine's model in which both nuclei are parts of a single eccentric disk of stars orbiting the black hole (BH). The kinematics and Hubble Space Telescope photometry are used to measure the offset of the BH from the center of mass. This confirms that the BH mass is ~3×107 Msolar by a technique that is nearly independent of stellar-dynamical models. We present spectroscopy of the nucleus of M31 obtained with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and Subarcsecond Imaging Spectrograph. Spectra at the Ca infrared triplet lines (seeing σ*=0.27") are used to measure the stellar kinematics, and spectra at the Mg I b lines (σ*=0.31") are used to measure metallicities. We also measure nonparametric line-of-sight velocity distributions (LOSVDs). All spectra confirm the steep rotation and velocity dispersion gradients that imply that M31 contains a 3.3×107 Msolar central dark object. At σ*=0.27", the maximum bulge-subtracted rotation velocity of the nucleus is 233+/-4 km s-1 on the P2 side, and the maximum velocity dispersion is 287+/-9 km s-1. The dispersion peak is displaced by 0.20"+/-0.03" from the velocity center in the direction opposite to P1, confirming a result by Bacon and coworkers. The higher surface brightness nucleus, P1, is colder than the bulge, with σ~=100 km s-1 at r~=1''. Cold light from P1 contributes at the velocity center; this explains part of the σ(r) asymmetry. The nucleus is cold at r>~1'' on both sides of the center. Our results are used to test Tremaine's model in which the double nucleus is a single eccentric disk of stars orbiting the BH. (1) The model predicts that the velocity center of the nucleus is displaced by 0.2" from P2 toward P1. Our observations show a displacement of 0.08"+/-0.01" before bulge subtraction and 0.10"+/-0.01" after bulge subtraction. (2) The model predicts a minimum σ~=135 km s-1 at P1. We observe σ=123+/-2 km s-1. Observations (1) and (2) may be reconciled with the model if its

  12. Stereotactic localization and visualization of the subthalamic nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wei-gao; WANG Hai-yang; LIN Zhi-guo; SHEN Hong; CHEN Xiao-guang; FU Yi-li; GAO Wen-peng

    2009-01-01

    Background The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is widely recognized as one of the most important and commonly targeted nuclei in stereotactic and functional neurosurgery. The success of STN surgery depends on accuracy in target determination. Construction of a digitalized atlas of STN based on stereotactic MRI will play an instrumental role in the accuracy of anatomical localization. The aim of this study was to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) target location of STN in stereotactic space and construct a digitalized atlas of STN to accomplish the visualization of the STN on stereotactic MRI, thus providing clinical guidance on the precise anatomical localization of STN.Methods One hundred and twenty healthy people volunteered to be scanned by 1.5 Tesla MRI scanning with 1-mm-thick slice in the standard stereotactic space between 2005 and 2006. One adult male was selected for 3D reconstruction of STN. The precess of 3D reconstruction included identification, manual segmentation, extraction,conservation and reconstruction.Results There was a significant correlation between the coordinates and age (P <0.05). The volume of left STN was significantly larger than the right STN, and there was a significant negative correlation between volume and age (P <0.05).The surface of the STN nucleus after 3D reconstruction appeared smooth, natural and realistic. The morphological feature of STN on the individual brain could be visualized directly in 3D. The 3D reconstructed STN could be rotated,zoomed and displayed at any direction in the stereotactic space. The anteroposterior diameter of the STN nucleus was longer than the vertical and transverse diameters in 3D space. The 3D reconstruction of STN manifested typical structure of the "dual lens".Conclusions The visualization of individual brain atlas based on stereotactic MRI is feasible. However, software for automated segmentation, extraction and registration of MR images need to be further developed.

  13. Tractography patterns of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas-Arroyave, Nora; Lauro, Peter M; Huang, Ling; Hallett, Mark; Horovitz, Silvina G; Zaghloul, Kareem A; Lungu, Codrin

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation therapy is an effective symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease, yet the precise mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic effects remain unclear. Although the targets of deep brain stimulation are grey matter structures, axonal modulation is known to play an important role in deep brain stimulation's therapeutic mechanism. Several white matter structures in proximity to the subthalamic nucleus have been implicated in the clinical benefits of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. We assessed the connectivity patterns that characterize clinically beneficial electrodes in Parkinson's disease patients, after deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. We evaluated 22 patients with Parkinson's disease (11 females, age 57 ± 9.1 years, disease duration 13.3 ± 6.3 years) who received bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus at the National Institutes of Health. During an initial electrode screening session, one month after deep brain stimulation implantation, the clinical benefits of each contact were determined. The electrode was localized by coregistering preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative computer tomography images and the volume of tissue activated was estimated from stimulation voltage and impedance. Brain connectivity for the volume of tissue activated of deep brain stimulation contacts was assessed using probabilistic tractography with diffusion-tensor data. Areas most frequently connected to clinically effective contacts included the thalamus, substantia nigra, brainstem and superior frontal gyrus. A series of discriminant analyses demonstrated that the strength of connectivity to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus were positively associated with clinical effectiveness. The connectivity patterns observed in our study suggest that the modulation of white matter tracts directed to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus is associated with favourable clinical

  14. Natural orbital description of the halo nucleus 6He

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinou, Ch; Vary, J P; Maris, P

    2016-01-01

    Ab initio calculations of nuclei face the challenge of simultaneously describing strong short-range internucleon correlations and the long-range properties of weakly-bound halo nucleons. Natural orbitals, which diagonalize the one-body density matrix, provide a basis which is better matched to the physical structure of the many-body wave function. We demonstrate that the use of natural orbitals significantly improves convergence for ab initio no-core configuration interaction calculations of the neutron halo nucleus 6He, relative to the traditional oscillator basis.

  15. Modelling of compound nucleus formation in fusion of heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz-Torres, A

    2004-01-01

    A new model that includes the time-dependent dynamics of the single-particle (s.p.) motion in conjunction with the macroscopic evolution of the system is proposed for describing the compound nucleus (CN) formation in fusion of heavy nuclei. The diabaticity initially keeps the entrance system around its contact configuration, but the gradual transition from the diabatic to the adiabatic potential energy surface (PES) leads to fusion or quasifission. Direct measurements of the probability for CN formation are crucial to discriminate between the current models.

  16. Neutrino-nucleus interactions and the determination of oscillation parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Benhar, Omar; Mariani, Camillo; Meloni, Davide

    2015-01-01

    We review the status and prospects of theoretical studies of neutrino-nucleus interactions, and discuss the influence of the treatment of nuclear effects on the determination of oscillation parameters. The models developed to describe the variety of reaction mechanisms contributing to the nuclear cross sections are analysed, with emphasis placed on their capability to reproduce the available electron scattering data.The impact of the uncertainties associated with the description of nuclear dynamics on the the oscillation parameters is illustrated through examples, and possible avenues towards a better understanding of the signals detected by long baseline experiments are outlined.

  17. Dopamine system, cerebellum, and nucleus ruber in fish and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hideaki

    2017-05-01

    Small teleost fish including zebrafish and medaka have been used as animal models for research because of their small body size, vast amounts of eggs produced, their rapid development, low husbandry costs, and transparency during embryogenesis. Although the body size and appearance seem different, fish and mammals including human still possess anatomical and functional similarities in their brains. This review summarizes the similarities of brain structures and functions between teleost fish and mammalian brains, focusing on the dopamine system, functional regionalization of the cerebellum, and presence of the nucleus ruber. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  18. Spatial regulation and organization of DNA replication within the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U

    2010-01-01

    Duplication of chromosomal DNA is a temporally and spatially regulated process. The timing of DNA replication initiation at various origins is highly coordinated; some origins fire early and others late during S phase. Moreover, inside the nuclei, the bulk of DNA replication is physically organized in replication factories, consisting of DNA polymerases and other replication proteins. In this review article, we discuss how DNA replication is organized and regulated spatially within the nucleus and how this spatial organization is linked to temporal regulation. We focus on DNA replication in budding yeast and fission yeast and, where applicable, compare yeast DNA replication with that in bacteria and metazoans.

  19. On the symmetries of the 12C nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Cseh, J

    2016-01-01

    The consequences of some symmetries of the three-alpha system are discussed. In particular, the recent description of the low-energy spectrum of the 12C nucleus in terms of the Algebraic Cluster Model (ACM) is compared to that of the Semimicroscopic Algebraic Cluster Model (SACM). The previous one applies interactions of a D3h geometric symmetry [1], while the latter one has a U(3) multichannel dynamical symmetry, that connects the shell and cluster pictures. The available data is in line with both descriptions.

  20. [Mutations in the personality nucleus at puberty and adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiopu, U

    1989-01-01

    The author considers that analysing the personality by means of concrete research, the axis "self-perceptual Ego and the prospective, ideal Ego" make up an operational axis included in personality nucleus. The selected interference of the alter image about the Ego permanently readjusts this axis. In this purpose an adjective checklist and the projective test TST in two alternative have been used. The author concludes that during puberty and adolescence several changes take place as far as the number of adjective used, descriptors prevailing characteristics, and affective finality are concerned.

  1. Spin Symmetry for Anti-Lambda Spectrum in atomic nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Chunyan; Meng, Jie

    2009-01-01

    The spin symmetry of anti-Lambda spectrum in nucleus ^{16}O has been studied in the relativistic mean field theory. The spin-orbit splittings of spin doublets are found to be around 0.03-0.07 MeV and the dominant components of the Dirac spinor for the anti-Lambda spin doublets are found to be near identical. It indicates that there is an even better spin symmetry in the anti-Lambda spectrum than that in the anti-nucleon spectrum.

  2. Active galactic nucleus feedback in clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Blanton, Elizabeth L; Sarazin, Craig L; Randall, Scott W; McNamara, Brian R; ),

    2010-01-01

    Observations made during the last ten years with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have shed much light on the cooling gas in the centers of clusters of galaxies and the role of active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating. Cooling of the hot intracluster medium in cluster centers can feed the supermassive black holes found in the nuclei of the dominant cluster galaxies leading to AGN outbursts which can reheat the gas, suppressing cooling and large amounts of star formation. AGN heating can come in the form of shocks, buoyantly rising bubbles that have been inflated by radio lobes, and the dissipation of sound waves.

  3. New method of estimation of cosmic ray nucleus energy

    CERN Document Server

    Korotkova, N A; Postnikov, E B; Roganova, T M; Sveshnikova, L G; Turundaevskij, A N

    2002-01-01

    The new approach to estimation of primary cosmic nucleus energy is presented. It is based on measurement of spatial density of secondary particles, originated in nuclear interactions in the target and strengthened by thin converter layer. The proposed method allows creation of relatively lightweight apparatus of large square with large geometrical factor and can be applied in satellite and balloon experiments for all nuclei in a wide energy range of 10 sup 1 sup 1 -10 sup 1 sup 6 eV/particle. The physical basis of the method, full Monte Carlo simulation, the field of application are presented

  4. Research Program towards Observation of Neutrino-Nucleus Coherent Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, H T

    2006-01-01

    The article describes the research program pursued by the TEXONO Collaboration towards an experiment to observe coherent scattering between neutrinos and the nucleus at the power reactor. The motivations of studying this process are surveyed. In particular, a threshold of 100-200 eV has been achieved with an ultra-low-energy germanium detector prototype. This detection capability at low energy can also be adapted to conduct searches of Cold Dark Matter in the low-mass region as well as to enhance the sensitivities in the study of neutrino magnetic moments.

  5. Spin Symmetry for Anti-Lambda Spectrum in Atomic Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Chun-Yan; YAO Jiang-Ming; MENG Jie

    2009-01-01

    The spin symmetry of the anti-Lambda spectrum in nucleus ~(16)O is studied in the relativistic mean field theory.The spin-orbit splittings of spin doublets are found to be around 0.03-0.07 MeV and the dominant components of the Dirac spinor for the anti-Lambda spin doublets are found to be near identical.It is indicated that there is an even better spin symmetry in the anti-Lambda spectrum than that in the anti-nucleon spectrum.

  6. Hypersexuality following subthalamic nucleus stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Paresh; Bhargava, Pranshu

    2008-01-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation is an established surgical treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). Though the motor benefits of STN stimulation are well understood, its cognitive and behavioral effects are still not fully understood. Manic psychosis, hypersexuality, pathological gambling and mood swings are associated with advanced PD. There have been reports to suggest improvement or worsening in these symptoms following STN deep brain stimulation (DBS). We report two cases as the sole behavioral side-effects of STN stimulation despite good clinical improvement on long-term follow-up. These patients and literature review suggests the complex role of STN stimulation in motor and behavioral control.

  7. Hypersexuality following subthalamic nucleus stimulation for Parkinson′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doshi Paresh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Subthalamic nucleus (STN stimulation is an established surgical treatment for Parkinson′s disease (PD. Though the motor benefits of STN stimulation are well understood, its cognitive and behavioral effects are still not fully understood. Manic psychosis, hypersexuality, pathological gambling and mood swings are associated with advanced PD. There have been reports to suggest improvement or worsening in these symptoms following STN deep brain stimulation (DBS. We report two cases as the sole behavioral side-effects of STN stimulation despite good clinical improvement on long-term follow-up. These patients and literature review suggests the complex role of STN stimulation in motor and behavioral control.

  8. Isospin symmetry violation, meson production and -nucleus interaction studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B J Roy; V Jha; A Chatterje; H Machner; GEM Collaboration

    2006-05-01

    We have studied isospin symmetry violation in nuclear reactions by measuring simultaneously the cross-section of the following two reactions + → 3H + and + → 3He 0. The experiment was perfomed at the cooler synchrotron accelerator. COSY, Jülich at several beam energies close to the corresponding production threshold. We also have ongoing programmes on -nucleus final-state interaction studies via + 6Li → 7Be + reactions, high resolution search for dibaryonic resonances and lambda-proton final state interaction studies. The experimental details and results obtained so far are presented here.

  9. Magnetic Moment of Proton Drip-Line Nucleus (9)C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuta, K.; Fukuda, M.; Tanigaki, M.; Minamisono, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Mihara, M.; Onishi, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Harada, A.; Sasaki, M.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetic moment of the proton drip-line nucleus C-9(I(sup (pi)) = 3/2, T(sub 1/2) = 126 ms) has been measured for the first time, using the beta-NMR detection technique with polarized radioactive beams. The measure value for the magnetic moment is 1mu(C-9)! = 1.3914 +/- 0.0005 (mu)N. The deduced spin expectation value of 1.44 is unusually larger than any other ones of even-odd nuclei.

  10. Sizing and shaping the nucleus: mechanisms and significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevtić, Predrag; Edens, Lisa J; Vuković, Lidija D; Levy, Daniel L

    2014-06-01

    The size and shape of the nucleus are tightly regulated, indicating the physiological significance of proper nuclear morphology, yet the mechanisms and functions of nuclear size and shape regulation remain poorly understood. Correlations between altered nuclear morphology and certain disease states have long been observed, most notably many cancers are diagnosed and staged based on graded increases in nuclear size. Here we review recent studies investigating the mechanisms regulating nuclear size and shape, how mitotic events influence nuclear morphology, and the role of nuclear size and shape in subnuclear chromatin organization and cancer progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Collective Band Structures in Neutron-Rich 108Mo Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Huai-Bo; WANG Jian-Guo; XU Qiang; ZHU Sheng-Jiang; J. H. Hamilton; A. V. Ramayya; J. K. Hwang; Y. X. Luo; J. O. Rasmussen; I. Y. Lee; CHE Xing-Lai

    2007-01-01

    High spin states in the neutron-rich 108Mo nucleus are studied by measuring prompt γ-rays following the spontaneous fission of 252Cf with a Gammasphere detector array. The ground-state band is confirmed, and the one-phonon γ-vibrational band is updated with spin up to 12 h. A new collective band with the band head level at 1422.4 keV is suggested as a two-phonon γ-vibrational band. Another new band is proposed as a two-quasi-proton excitation band. Systematic characteristics of the collective bands are discussed.

  12. Electric multipole response of the halo nucleus {sup 6}He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jagjit; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' ' G. Galilei' ' , Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Chatterjee, R. [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Roorkee (India)

    2016-07-15

    The role of different continuum components in the weakly bound nucleus {sup 6}He is studied by coupling unbound spd-waves of {sup 5}He by means of simple pairing contact-delta interaction. The results of our previous investigations in a model space containing only p-waves showed the collective nature of the ground state and allowed the calculation of the electric quadrupole transitions. We extend this simple model by including also sd-continuum neutron states and we investigate the electric monopole, dipole and octupole response of the system for transitions to the continuum, discussing the contribution of different configurations. (orig.)

  13. The exosome and RNA quality control in the nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Vanacova, Stepanka; Stef, Richard

    2007-01-01

    To control the quality of RNA biogenesis in the nucleus, cells use sophisticated molecular machines. These machines recognize and degrade not only RNA trimmings—the leftovers of RNA processing—but also incorrectly processed RNAs that contain defects. By using this mechanism, cells ensure that only high-quality RNAs are engaged in protein synthesis and other cellular processes. The exosome—a complex of several exoribonucleolytic and RNA-binding proteins—is the central 3′-end RNA degradation an...

  14. Anisomycin infusions in the parabrachial nucleus and taste neophobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian-You; Amodeo, Leslie Renee; Arthurs, Joe; Reilly, Steve

    2012-11-01

    To investigate whether de novo protein synthesis in the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) is required for recovery from taste neophobia, anisomycin (a protein synthesis inhibitor) was infused immediately after consumption of a novel saccharin solution (Experiment 1). Unexpectedly, this PBN treatment caused a reduction in saccharin intake. In addition, we found that the anisomycin-induced suppression of tastant intake was attenuated by prior intra-PBN infusions of lidocaine (Experiment 2). This pattern of results raises concerns about using anisomycin to investigate memory consolidation processes in the PBN. Thus, a different manipulation may be needed to examine the nature of the neuroplastic changes that occur in the PBN during taste memory formation.

  15. Hyperpolarisation effects on the electric field gradient at a nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, P. W.

    1989-04-01

    The electric field gradient at the nucleus of an atom or ion depends quadratically on the external electric field through the ɛ hyperpolarisability. Ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations on the He, Ne and Ar isoelectronic series show that ɛ is positive for s 2 and negative for p 6 electronic configurations, always having the opposite sign to the Sternheimer antishielding factor. The ab initio values for free atoms and ions conflict in sign with the effective hyperpolarisation term in one ionic model of nuclear quadrupole constants of gaseous alkali halides but the sign of the empirical parameter could change if overlap damping of the Sternheimer response were included in the model.

  16. Red nucleus and rubrospinal tract disorganization in the absence of Pou4f1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus E. eMartinez-Lopez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The red nucleus is a neuronal population that plays an important role in forelimb motor control and locomotion. Histologically it is subdivided into two subpopulations, the parvocellular red nucleus located in the diencephalon and the magnocellular red nucleus in the mesencephalon. The red nucleus integrates signals from motor cortex and cerebellum and projects to spinal cord interneurons and motor neurons through the rubrospinal tract. Pou4f1 is a transcription factor highly expressed in this nucleus that has been related to its specification. Here we profoundly analyzed consequences of Pou4f1 loss-of-function in development, maturation and axonal projection of the red nucleus. Surprisingly, red nucleus neurons are specified and maintained in the mutant, no cell death was detected. Nevertheless, the nucleus appeared disorganized with a strong delay in radial migration and with a wider neuronal distribution; the neurons did not form a compacted population as they do in controls, Robo1 and Slit2 were miss-expressed. Cplx1 and Npas1, expressed in the red nucleus, are transcription factors involved in neurotransmitter release, neuronal maturation and motor function processes among others. In our mutant mice, both transcription factors are lost, suggesting an abnormal maturation of the red nucleus. The resulting altered nucleus occupied a wider territory. Finally, we examined rubrospinal tract development and found that the red nucleus neurons were able to project to the spinal cord but their axons appeared defasciculated. These data suggest that Pou4f1 is necessary for the maturation of red nucleus neurons but not for their specification and maintenance.

  17. Nucleus-Dependent Valence-Space Approach to Nuclear Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroberg, S. R.; Calci, A.; Hergert, H.; Holt, J. D.; Bogner, S. K.; Roth, R.; Schwenk, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a nucleus-dependent valence-space approach for calculating ground and excited states of nuclei, which generalizes the shell-model in-medium similarity renormalization group to an ensemble reference with fractionally filled orbitals. Because the ensemble is used only as a reference, and not to represent physical states, no symmetry restoration is required. This allows us to capture three-nucleon (3 N ) forces among valence nucleons with a valence-space Hamiltonian specifically targeted to each nucleus of interest. Predicted ground-state energies from carbon through nickel agree with results of other large-space ab initio methods, generally to the 1% level. In addition, we show that this new approach is required in order to obtain convergence for nuclei in the upper p and s d shells. Finally, we address the 1+/3+ inversion problem in 22Na and 46V. This approach extends the reach of ab initio nuclear structure calculations to essentially all light- and medium-mass nuclei.

  18. Finding Hierarchical and Overlapping Dense Subgraphs using Nucleus Decompositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshadhri, Comandur [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Pinar, Ali [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sariyuce, Ahmet Erdem [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Catalyurek, Umit [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Finding dense substructures in a graph is a fundamental graph mining operation, with applications in bioinformatics, social networks, and visualization to name a few. Yet most standard formulations of this problem (like clique, quasiclique, k-densest subgraph) are NP-hard. Furthermore, the goal is rarely to nd the \\true optimum", but to identify many (if not all) dense substructures, understand their distribution in the graph, and ideally determine a hierarchical structure among them. Current dense subgraph nding algorithms usually optimize some objective, and only nd a few such subgraphs without providing any hierarchy. It is also not clear how to account for overlaps in dense substructures. We de ne the nucleus decomposition of a graph, which represents the graph as a forest of nuclei. Each nucleus is a subgraph where smaller cliques are present in many larger cliques. The forest of nuclei is a hierarchy by containment, where the edge density increases as we proceed towards leaf nuclei. Sibling nuclei can have limited intersections, which allows for discovery of overlapping dense subgraphs. With the right parameters, the nuclear decomposition generalizes the classic notions of k-cores and k-trusses. We give provable e cient algorithms for nuclear decompositions, and empirically evaluate their behavior in a variety of real graphs. The tree of nuclei consistently gives a global, hierarchical snapshot of dense substructures, and outputs dense subgraphs of higher quality than other state-of-theart solutions. Our algorithm can process graphs with tens of millions of edges in less than an hour.

  19. Lifetime measurements in shape transition nucleus {sup 188}Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohilla, Aman; Gupta, C.K.; Chamoli, S.K. [University of Delhi, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, New Delhi (India); Singh, R.P.; Muralithar, S. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi (India); Chakraborty, S.; Sharma, H.P. [Banaras Hindu University, Department of Physics, Varanasi (India); Kumar, A.; Govil, I.M. [Panjab University, Department of Physics, Chandigarh (India); Biswas, D.C. [Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Nuclear Physics Division, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    2017-04-15

    Nuclear level lifetimes of high spin states in yrast and non-yrast bands of {sup 188}Pt nucleus have been measured using recoil distance plunger setup present at IUAC, Delhi. In the experiment nuclear states of interest were populated via {sup 174}Yb({sup 18}O,4n){sup 188}Pt reaction at a beam energy of 79MeV provided by 15 UD Pelletron accelerator. The extracted B(E2 ↓) values show an initial rise up to 4{sup +} state and then a nearly constant behavior with spin along yrast band, indicating change of nuclear structure in {sup 188}Pt at low spins. The good agreement between experimental and TPSM model B(E2 ↓) values up to 4{sup +} state suggests an increase in axial deformation of the nucleus. The average absolute β{sub 2} = 0.20 (3) obtained from measured B(E2 ↓) values matches well the values predicted by CHFB and IBM calculations for oblate (β{sub 2} ∝ -0.19) and prolate (β{sub 2} ∝ 0.22) shapes. As the lifetime measurements do not yield the sign of β{sub 2}, no definite conclusion can be drawn on the prolate or oblate collectivity of {sup 188}Pt on the basis of present measurements. (orig.)

  20. Gas Accretion in the M32 Nucleus: Past & Present

    CERN Document Server

    Seth, Anil C

    2010-01-01

    Using adaptive optics assisted Gemini/NIFS data, I study the present and past gas accretion in the central 3" of the M32 nucleus. From changes in the spectral slope and CO line depths near the center, I find evidence for unresolved dust emission resulting from BH accretion. With a luminosity of ~2e38 erg/s, this dust emission appears to be the most luminous tracer of current BH accretion, two orders of magnitude more luminous than previously detected X-ray emission. These observations suggest that using high resolution infrared data to search for dust emission may be an effective way to detect other nearby, low luminosity BHs, such as those in globular clusters. I also examine the fossil evidence of gas accretion contained in the kinematics of the stars in the nucleus. The higher-order moments (h3 and h4) of the line-of-sight velocity distribution show patterns that are remarkably similar to those seen on larger scales in elliptical galaxies and in gas-rich merger simulations. The kinematics suggests the pres...