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Sample records for ros1 5-methylcytosine dna

  1. ROS1 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylase is a slow-turnover catalyst that initiates DNA demethylation in a distributive fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponferrada-Marín, María Isabel; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Ariza, Rafael R

    2009-07-01

    Arabidopsis ROS1 belongs to a family of plant 5-methycytosine DNA glycosylases that initiate DNA demethylation through base excision. ROS1 displays the remarkable capacity to excise 5-meC, and to a lesser extent T, while retaining the ability to discriminate effectively against C and U. We found that replacement of the C5-methyl group by halogen substituents greatly decreased excision of the target base. Furthermore, 5-meC was excised more efficiently from mismatches, whereas excision of T only occurred when mispaired with G. These results suggest that ROS1 specificity arises by a combination of selective recognition at the active site and thermodynamic stability of the target base. We also found that ROS1 is a low-turnover catalyst because it binds tightly to the abasic site left after 5-meC removal. This binding leads to a highly distributive behaviour of the enzyme on DNA substrates containing multiple 5-meC residues, and may help to avoid generation of double-strand breaks during processing of bimethylated CG dinucleotides. We conclude that the biochemical properties of ROS1 are consistent with its proposed role in protecting the plant genome from excess methylation.

  2. AP endonucleases process 5-methylcytosine excision intermediates during active DNA demethylation in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jiyoon; Jang, Hosung; Shin, Hosub; Choi, Woo Lee; Mok, Young Geun; Huh, Jin Hoe

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a primary epigenetic modification regulating gene expression and chromatin structure in many eukaryotes. Plants have a unique DNA demethylation system in that 5-methylcytosine (5mC) is directly removed by DNA demethylases, such as DME/ROS1 family proteins, but little is known about the downstream events. During 5mC excision, DME produces 3?-phosphor-?, ?-unsaturated aldehyde and 3?-phosphate by successive ?- and ?-eliminations, respectively. The kinetic studies revealed tha...

  3. AP endonucleases process 5-methylcytosine excision intermediates during active DNA demethylation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyoon; Jang, Hosung; Shin, Hosub; Choi, Woo Lee; Mok, Young Geun; Huh, Jin Hoe

    2014-10-01

    DNA methylation is a primary epigenetic modification regulating gene expression and chromatin structure in many eukaryotes. Plants have a unique DNA demethylation system in that 5-methylcytosine (5mC) is directly removed by DNA demethylases, such as DME/ROS1 family proteins, but little is known about the downstream events. During 5mC excision, DME produces 3'-phosphor-α, β-unsaturated aldehyde and 3'-phosphate by successive β- and δ-eliminations, respectively. The kinetic studies revealed that these 3'-blocking lesions persist for a significant amount of time and at least two different enzyme activities are required to immediately process them. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis AP endonucleases APE1L, APE2 and ARP have distinct functions to process such harmful lesions to allow nucleotide extension. DME expression is toxic to E. coli due to excessive 5mC excision, but expression of APE1L or ARP significantly reduces DME-induced cytotoxicity. Finally, we propose a model of base excision repair and DNA demethylation pathway unique to plants. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. The SRA domain of UHRF1 flips 5-methylcytosine out of the DNA helix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, H.; Horton, J.R.; Zhang, X.; Bostick, M.; Jacobsen, S.; Cheng, X. (Emory-MED); (UCLA)

    2008-11-13

    Maintenance methylation of hemimethylated CpG dinucleotides at DNA replication forks is the key to faithful mitotic inheritance of genomic methylation patterns. UHRF1 (ubiquitin-like, containing PHD and RING finger domains 1) is required for maintenance methylation by interacting with DNA nucleotide methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), the maintenance methyltransferase, and with hemimethylated CpG, the substrate for DNMT1 (refs 1 and 2). Here we present the crystal structure of the SET and RING-associated (SRA) domain of mouse UHRF1 in complex with DNA containing a hemimethylated CpG site. The DNA is contacted in both the major and minor grooves by two loops that penetrate into the middle of the DNA helix. The 5-methylcytosine has flipped completely out of the DNA helix and is positioned in a binding pocket with planar stacking contacts, Watson-Crick polar hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions specific for 5-methylcytosine. Hence, UHRF1 contains a previously unknown DNA-binding module and is the first example of a non-enzymatic, sequence-specific DNA-binding protein domain to use the base flipping mechanism to interact with DNA.

  5. Intragenome distribution of 5-methylcytosine in DNA of healthy and wilt-infected cotton plants (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guseinov, V A; Kiryanov, G I; Vanyushin, B F

    1975-03-01

    Fractionation of DNA of healthy and wilt-infected cotton plants has been carried out according to the reassociation kinetics and the content of GC and 5-methylcytosine in the resulting fractions has been studied. The genome of cotton plant was found to be methylated quite unevenly. The GC rich (GC equals 64.7 mole%) fraction of highly reiterated sequences (Cot equals 0-3.7 times 10- minus 2) has a high content of 5-methylcytosine (5.8 mole%), whereas the methylation degree of the fraction of unique sequences (Cot larger than or equal to 487) is very low (the 5-methylcytosine content is about 0.5 mole%). In plants being infected with wilt, the 5-methylcytosine content in DNA or cotton leaves decreases two-fold; no changes in the structure and molecular population of DNA has been found. The sharp change in the 5-methylcytosine content in DNA of infected plants takes place at the expense of the decrease in the 5-methylcytosine content in fractions of highly reiterated sequences. The methylation degree of unique sequences (structural genes) remains unchanged.

  6. Hydroxyl-radical-induced oxidation of 5-methylcytosine in isolated and cellular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madugundu, Guru S; Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J Richard

    2014-06-01

    The methylation and oxidative demethylation of cytosine in CpG dinucleotides plays a critical role in the regulation of genes during cell differentiation, embryogenesis and carcinogenesis. Despite its low abundance, 5-methylcytosine (5mC) is a hotspot for mutations in mammalian cells. Here, we measured five oxidation products of 5mC together with the analogous products of cytosine and thymine in DNA exposed to ionizing radiation in oxygenated aqueous solution. The products can be divided into those that arise from hydroxyl radical (•OH) addition at the 5,6-double bond of 5mC (glycol, hydantoin and imidazolidine products) and those that arise from H-atom abstraction from the methyl group of 5mC including 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and 5-formylcytosine (5fC). Based on the analysis of these products, we show that the total damage at 5mC is about 2-fold greater than that at C in identical sequences. The formation of hydantoin products of 5mC is favored, compared to analogous reactions of thymine and cytosine, which favor the formation of glycol products. The distribution of oxidation products is sequence dependent in specific ODN duplexes. In the case of 5mC, the formation of 5hmC and 5fC represents about half of the total of •OH-induced oxidation products of 5mC. Several products of thymine, cytosine, 5mC, as well as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8oxoG), were also estimated in irradiated cells.

  7. 5-Methylcytosine in Chlorelle pyrenoidosa DNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayen, M; Dalmon, J

    1976-05-19

    The presence of 5-methylcytosine in Chlorella pyrenoidosa (strain 211/8b) DNA's has been investigated by means of paper chromatography and thermal chromatography on hydroxyapatite. It has been shown that nuclear DNA contains 3.5 mol% 5-methylcytosine whereas no significant amount of this base can be detected in chloroplast DNA. The thermal chromatography of nuclear DNA labelled from [6-3H]- or [Me-14C] methionine lead us to conclude that the 5-methylcytosine content is directly proportional to the G + C content of the various DNA fractions. The existence of methylated sequences in DNA is postulated and the biological function of the 5-methylcytosine is discussed.

  8. A 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylase/lyase demethylates the retrotransposon Tos17 and promotes its transposition in rice

    KAUST Repository

    La, Honggui

    2011-09-06

    DNA 5-methylcytosine (5-meC) is an important epigenetic mark for transcriptional gene silencing in many eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, 5-meC DNA glycosylase/lyases actively remove 5-meC to counter-act transcriptional gene silencing in a locus-specific manner, and have been suggested to maintain the expression of transposons. However, it is unclear whether plant DNA demethylases can promote the transposition of transposons. Here we report the functional characterization of the DNA glycosylase/lyase DNG701 in rice. DNG701 encodes a large (1,812 amino acid residues) DNA glycosylase domain protein. Recombinant DNG701 protein showed 5-meC DNA glycosylase and lyase activities in vitro. Knockout or knockdown of DNG701 in rice plants led to DNA hypermethylation and reduced expression of the retrotransposon Tos17. Tos17 showed less transposition in calli derived from dng701 knockout mutant seeds compared with that in wild-type calli. Overexpression of DNG701 in both rice calli and transgenic plants substantially reduced DNA methylation levels of Tos17 and enhanced its expression. The overexpression also led to more frequent transposition of Tos17 in calli. Our results demonstrate that rice DNG701 is a 5-meC DNA glycosylase/lyase responsible for the demethylation of Tos17 and this DNA demethylase plays a critical role in promoting Tos17 transposition in rice calli.

  9. Pre-analytical variables of circulating cell-free nucleosomes containing 5-methylcytosine DNA or histone modification H3K9Me3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Louise; Herzog, Marielle; Rømer, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate pre-analytical variables of circulating cell-free nucleosomes containing 5-methylcytosine DNA (5mC) or histone modification H3K9Me3 (H3K9Me3). Materials and methods: Six studies were designed to assess the possible influence of pre-analytical variables. Study 1: influence of stasis...

  10. Determination of 5-methylcytosine from plant DNA by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, I; Capesius, I

    1981-06-26

    The relative amounts of the five nucleosides (deoxycytidine, 5-methyldeoxycytidine, deoxyadenosine, deoxyguanosine and thymidine) in the DNA of nine plant species, one plant satellite DNA, and one animal species were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. The method allows the clean separation of the nucleosides from 10 microgram samples with 15 min. The following values for the proportion of methylated cytosines among all cytosines were obtained: Lobularia maritima 18.5%, Nicotiana tabacum 32.6%, Pisum sativum 23.2%, Rhinanthus minor 29.2%, Sinapsis alba 12.2%, Vicia faba 30.5%, Viscum album 23.2%, Cymbidium pumilum 18.8%, Cymbidium pumilum AT-rich satellite DNA 15.8%, Triticum aestivum 22.4%. DNA of an animal, the gerbil, Meriones unguiculatus, had a methylation percentage of 3.1%. An estimate of the GC content based on the buoyant density of DNA tends to be lower than the actual value, an estimate based on the melting temperature tends to be higher. This supports the finding by other authors that DNA methylation decreases the buoyant density and may increase the melting temperature at high m5C concentration.

  11. Structural genes of wheat and barley 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases and their potential applications for human health.

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    Wen, Shanshan; Wen, Nuan; Pang, Jinsong; Langen, Gregor; Brew-Appiah, Rhoda A T; Mejias, Jaime H; Osorio, Claudia; Yang, Mingming; Gemini, Richa; Moehs, Charles P; Zemetra, Robert S; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Liu, Bao; Wang, Xingzhi; von Wettstein, Diter; Rustgi, Sachin

    2012-12-11

    Wheat supplies about 20% of the total food calories consumed worldwide and is a national staple in many countries. Besides being a key source of plant proteins, it is also a major cause of many diet-induced health issues, especially celiac disease. The only effective treatment for this disease is a total gluten-free diet. The present report describes an effort to develop a natural dietary therapy for this disorder by transcriptional suppression of wheat DEMETER (DME) homeologs using RNA interference. DME encodes a 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylase responsible for transcriptional derepression of gliadins and low-molecular-weight glutenins (LMWgs) by active demethylation of their promoters in the wheat endosperm. Previous research has demonstrated these proteins to be the major source of immunogenic epitopes. In this research, barley and wheat DME genes were cloned and localized on the syntenous chromosomes. Nucleotide diversity among DME homeologs was studied and used for their virtual transcript profiling. Functional conservation of DME enzyme was confirmed by comparing the motif and domain structure within and across the plant kingdom. Presence and absence of CpG islands in prolamin gene sequences was studied as a hallmark of hypo- and hypermethylation, respectively. Finally the epigenetic influence of DME silencing on accumulation of LMWgs and gliadins was studied using 20 transformants expressing hairpin RNA in their endosperm. These transformants showed up to 85.6% suppression in DME transcript abundance and up to 76.4% reduction in the amount of immunogenic prolamins, demonstrating the possibility of developing wheat varieties compatible for the celiac patients.

  12. Natural Larval Diet Differently Influences the Pattern of Developmental Changes in DNA 5-Methylcytosine Levels in Apis mellifera Queens as Compared with Workers and Drones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachecka, A; Olszewski, K; Bajda, M; Demetraki-Paleolog, J

    2015-08-01

    The principal mechanism of gene activation/silencing is DNA 5-methylcytosine methylation. This study was aimed at determining global DNA methylation levels in larvae, prepupae, pupae, and 1-day-old adults of Apis mellifera queens, workers and drones. The Imprint Methylated DNA Quantification Kit MDQ1 was used. Percentages of DNA 5-methylcytosine were low and relatively similar in the larvae of all the castes until 4th day of larval development (3-5%). However, they were higher in the drone and worker larvae than in the queen larvae. Generally, the developmental patterns of changes in the DNA methylation levels were different in the queens in comparison with the drones and workers. While methylation increased in the queens, it decreased in the drones and workers. Methylated DNA methylcytosine percentages and weights in the queen prepupae (15%, 9.18 ng) and pupae (21%, 10.74 ng) were, respectively, three and four times higher than in the worker/drone brood of the same age (2.5-4%, 0.03-0.07 ng). Only in the queens, after a substantial increase, did DNA methylation decrease almost twice between the pupal stage and queen emergence (from 21% and 10.74 ng to 12% and 6.78 ng). This finding seems very interesting, particularly for experimental gerontology.

  13. TET1 is a DNA-binding protein that modulates DNA methylation and gene transcription via hydroxylation of 5-methylcytosine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haikuo Zhang; Xin Zhang; Erin Clark; Michelle Mulcahey; Stephen Huang; Yujiang Geno Shi

    2010-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, DNA methylation, which often occurs at the 5-carbon position of cytosine (5mC) located in CpG dinucleotide, is a key epigenetic hallmark and serves as a major epigenetic mechanism for establishing X-inactivation, paren tal imprinting and silencing retrotransposable elements during early embryogenesis in mammals.

  14. Deamination of 5-methylcytosine residues in Mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromenko, E V; Spirin, P V; Kubareva, E A; Romanova, E A; Prassolov, V S; Shpanchenko, O V; Dontsova, O A

    2009-10-01

    DNA demethylation in mammalia occurs after fertilization and during embryogenesis and accompanies cell aging and cancer transformation. With the help of the primer extension reaction, MALDI MS and DNA cleavage by thymine DNA glycosylase deamination of 5-methylcytosine residues has been shown to take place when the model methylated DNA duplexes are treated with nuclear extracts from the cell lines CHO, HeLa, and Skov3. The hypothesis that deamination of 5-methylcytosine is the first stage of demethylation in mammalia has been postulated.

  15. Accurate measurement of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in human cerebellum DNA by oxidative bisulfite on an array (OxBS-array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah F Field

    Full Text Available The Infinium 450K Methylation array is an established tool for measuring methylation. However, the bisulfite (BS reaction commonly used with the 450K array cannot distinguish between 5-methylcytosine (5mC and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC. The oxidative-bisulfite assay disambiguates 5mC and 5hmC. We describe the use of oxBS in conjunction with the 450K array (oxBS-array to analyse 5hmC/5mC in cerebellum DNA. The "methylation" level derived by the BS reaction is the combined level of 5mC and 5hmC at a given base, while the oxBS reaction gives the level of 5mC alone. The level of 5hmC is derived by subtracting the oxBS level from the BS level. Here we present an analysis method that distinguishes genuine positive levels of 5hmC at levels as low as 3%. We performed four replicates of the same sample of cerebellum and found a high level of reproducibility (average r for BS = 98.3, and average r for oxBS = 96.8. In total, 114,734 probes showed a significant positive measurement for 5hmC. The range at which we were able to distinguish 5hmC occupancy was between 3% and 42%. In order to investigate the effects of multiple replicates on 5hmC detection we also simulated fewer replicates and found that decreasing the number of replicates to two reduced the number of positive probes identified by > 50%. We validated our results using qPCR in conjunction with glucosylation of 5hmC sites followed by MspI digestion and we found good concordance with the array estimates (r = 0.94. This experiment provides a map of 5hmC in the cerebellum and a robust dataset for use as a standard in future 5hmC analyses. We also provide a novel method for validating the presence of 5hmC at low levels, and highlight some of the pitfalls associated with measuring 5hmC and 5mC.

  16. 大豆DNA去甲基化酶ROS1的生物信息学分析%Bioinformatics Analysis of DNA Demethylase ROS1 in Soybean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁喜龙; 李国兰; 崔洪秋; 鞠世杰; 洪艳华; 方淑梅; 郑殿峰

    2014-01-01

    利用NCBI、Phytozome、ExPASy等网站及其数据库,初步确定了大豆DNA去甲基化酶ROS1的蛋白及基因序列、基因拷贝数、理化特性等,并进一步预测分析了二级结构及结构域,同时结合ClustalX2.0和MEGA4.0等软件进行多重序列比对和分子系统进化关系研究.结果显示,大豆ROS1包括6个拷贝,ROS1各拷贝的分子量相近,等电点酸性,具有相似的潜在磷酸化位点,属于不稳定的疏水性蛋白,都位于细胞核内,且不含信号序列.α螺旋是主要的二级结构,均含有DNA_glycosylase,HhH-GPD_domain和HTH_base_excis_C三个结构域.

  17. Enhancement of RNA-directed DNA methylation of a transgene by simultaneously downregulating a ROS1 orthologue using a virus vector in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shungo eOtagaki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cytosine methylation can be induced by double-stranded RNAs through the RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM pathway. A DNA glycosylase REPRESSOR OF SILENCING 1 (ROS1 participates in DNA demethylation in Arabidopsis and may possibly counteract RdDM. Here, we isolated an orthologue of ROS1 (NbROS1 from Nicotiana benthamiana and examined the antagonistic activity of NbROS1 against virus-induced RdDM by simultaneously inducing RdDM and NbROS1 knockdown using a vector based on Cucumber mosaic virus. Plants were inoculated with a virus that contained a portion of the CaMV 35S promoter, which induced RdDM of the promoter integrated in the plant genome and transcriptional silencing of the green fluorescent protein gene driven by the promoter. Plants were also inoculated with a virus that contained a portion of NbROS1, which induced downregulation of NbROS1. Simultaneous induction of RdDM and NbROS1 knockdown resulted in an increase in the level of cytosine methylation of the target promoter. These results provide evidence for the presence of antagonistic activity of NbROS1 against virus-induced RdDM and suggest that the simultaneous induction of promoter-targeting RdDM and NbROS1 knockdown by a virus vector is useful as a tool to enhance targeted DNA methylation.

  18. File list: Oth.Oth.05.5-Methylcytosine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Oth.05.5-Methylcytosine.AllCell hg19 TFs and others 5-Methylcytosine Others htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Oth.05.5-Methylcytosine.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Gon.50.5-Methylcytosine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.50.5-Methylcytosine.AllCell hg19 TFs and others 5-Methylcytosine Gonad http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Gon.50.5-Methylcytosine.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Oth.05.5-Methylcytosine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Oth.05.5-Methylcytosine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others 5-Methylcytosine Others http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Oth.05.5-Methylcytosine.AllCell.bed ...

  1. Folic acid functionalized surface highlights 5-methylcytosine-genomic content within circulating tumor cells

    KAUST Repository

    Malara, Natalia

    2014-07-01

    Although the detection of methylated cell free DNA represents one of the most promising approaches for relapse risk assessment in cancer patients, the low concentration of cell-free circulating DNA constitutes the biggest obstacle in the development of DNA methylation-based biomarkers from blood. This paper describes a method for the measurement of genomic methylation content directly on circulating tumor cells (CTC), which could be used to deceive the aforementioned problem. Since CTC are disease related blood-based biomarkers, they result essential to monitor tumor\\'s stadiation, therapy, and early relapsing lesions. Within surface\\'s bio-functionalization and cell\\'s isolation procedure standardization, the presented approach reveals a singular ability to detect high 5-methylcytosine CTC-subset content in the whole CTC compound, by choosing folic acid (FA) as transducer molecule. Sensitivity and specificity, calculated for FA functionalized surface (FA-surface), result respectively on about 83% and 60%. FA-surface, allowing the detection and characterization of early metastatic dissemination, provides a unique advance in the comprehension of tumors progression and dissemination confirming the presence of CTC and its association with high risk of relapse. This functionalized surface identifying and quantifying high 5-methylcytosine CTC-subset content into the patient\\'s blood lead significant progress in cancer risk assessment, also providing a novel therapeutic strategy.© 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. *H atom and *OH radical reactions with 5-methylcytosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand, A; Morell, C; Labet, V; Cadet, J; Eriksson, L A

    2007-09-20

    The reactions between either a hydrogen atom or a hydroxyl radical and 5-methylcytosine (5-MeCyt) are studied by using the hybrid kinetic energy meta-GGA functional MPW1B95. *H atom and *OH radical addition to positions C5 and C6 of 5-MeCyt, or *OH radical induced H-abstraction from the C5 methyl group, are explored. All systems are optimized in bulk solvent. The data presented show that the barriers to reaction are very low: ca. 7 kcal/mol for the *H atom additions and 1 kcal/mol for the reactions involving the *OH radical. Thermodynamically, the two C6 radical adducts and the *H-abstraction product are the most stable ones. The proton hyperfine coupling constants (HFCC), computed at the IEFPCM/MPW1B95/6-311++G(2d,2p) level, agree well with B3LYP results and available experimental and theoretical data on related thymine and cytosine radicals.

  3. Widespread occurrence of 5-methylcytosine in human coding and non-coding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Jeffrey E; Patel, Hardip R; Nousch, Marco; Sibbritt, Tennille; Humphreys, David T; Parker, Brian J; Suter, Catherine M; Preiss, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    The modified base 5-methylcytosine (m(5)C) is well studied in DNA, but investigations of its prevalence in cellular RNA have been largely confined to tRNA and rRNA. In animals, the two m(5)C methyltransferases NSUN2 and TRDMT1 are known to modify specific tRNAs and have roles in the control of cell growth and differentiation. To map modified cytosine sites across a human transcriptome, we coupled bisulfite conversion of cellular RNA with next-generation sequencing. We confirmed 21 of the 28 previously known m(5)C sites in human tRNAs and identified 234 novel tRNA candidate sites, mostly in anticipated structural positions. Surprisingly, we discovered 10,275 sites in mRNAs and other non-coding RNAs. We observed that distribution of modified cytosines between RNA types was not random; within mRNAs they were enriched in the untranslated regions and near Argonaute binding regions. We also identified five new sites modified by NSUN2, broadening its known substrate range to another tRNA, the RPPH1 subunit of RNase P and two mRNAs. Our data demonstrates the widespread presence of modified cytosines throughout coding and non-coding sequences in a transcriptome, suggesting a broader role of this modification in the post-transcriptional control of cellular RNA function.

  4. TET proteins and 5-methylcytosine oxidation in hematological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Myunggon; An, Jungeun; Pastor, William A; Koralov, Sergei B; Rajewsky, Klaus; Rao, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation has pivotal regulatory roles in mammalian development, retrotransposon silencing, genomic imprinting, and X-chromosome inactivation. Cancer cells display highly dysregulated DNA methylation profiles characterized by global hypomethylation in conjunction with hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands that presumably lead to genome instability and aberrant expression of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. The recent discovery of ten-eleven-translocation (TET) family dioxygenases that oxidize 5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in DNA has led to profound progress in understanding the mechanism underlying DNA demethylation. Among the three TET genes, TET2 recurrently undergoes inactivating mutations in a wide range of myeloid and lymphoid malignancies. TET2 functions as a bona fide tumor suppressor particularly in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies resembling chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in human. Here we review diverse functions of TET proteins and the novel epigenetic marks that they generate in DNA methylation/demethylation dynamics and normal and malignant hematopoietic differentiation. The impact of TET2 inactivation in hematopoiesis and various mechanisms modulating the expression or activity of TET proteins are also discussed. Furthermore, we also present evidence that TET2 and TET3 collaborate to suppress aberrant hematopoiesis and hematopoietic transformation. A detailed understanding of the normal and pathological functions of TET proteins may provide new avenues to develop novel epigenetic therapies for treating hematological malignancies.

  5. Transcriptional activation of transposable elements in mouse zygotes is independent of Tet3-mediated 5-methylcytosine oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Azusa Inoue; Shogo Matoba; Yi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The methylation state of the paternal genome is rapidly reprogrammed shortly after fertilization.Recent studies have revealed that loss of 5-methylcytosine(5mC)in zygotes correlates with appearance of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC),5-formylcytosine(5fC),and 5-carboxylcytosine(5caC).This process is mediated by Tet3 and the 5mC oxidation products generated in zygotes are gradually lost during preimplantation development through a replicationdependent dilution process.Despite these findings,the biological significance of Tet3-mediated oxidation of 5mC to 5hmC/5fC/5caC in zygotes is unknown.DNA methylation plays an important role in silencing gene expression including the repression of transposable elements(TEs).Given that the activation of TEs during preimplantation development correlates with loss of DNA methylation,it is believed that paternal DNA demethylation may have an important role in TE activation.Here we examined this hypothesis and found that Tet3-mediated 5mC oxidation does not have a significant contribution to TE activation.We show that the expression of LINE-1(long interspersed nucleotide element 1)and ERVL(endogenous retroviruses class Ⅲ)are activated from both paternal and maternal genomes in zygotes.Inhibition of 5mC oxidation by siRNA-mediated depletion of Tet3 affected neither TE activation,nor global transcription in zygotes.Thus,our study provides the first evidence demonstrating that activation of both TEs and global transcription in zygotes are independent of Tet3-mediated 5mC oxidation.

  6. Distribution of 5-methylcytosine residues in 5S rRNA genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Secale cereale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulnecek, J; Matyásek, R; Kovarík, A

    2002-12-01

    Bisulfite genomic sequencing was used to localise 5-methylcytosine residues (mC) in 5S rRNA genes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Secale cereale. The maps of mC distribution were compared with the previously published map of the corresponding region in Nicotiana tabacum. In all three species, the level of methylation of 5S rRNA genes was generally higher than the average for the entire genome. The ratio of 5S rDNA methylation to average overall methylation was 44%/30-33% for N. tabacum, 27%/4-6% for A. thaliana and 24%/20-22% for S. cereale. With the exception of one clone from S. cereale, no methylation-free 5S rDNA was detected. The level of methylation at different sequence motifs in 5S rDNA was calculated for N. tabacum/A. thaliana/ S. cereale, and this analysis yielded the following values (expressed as a percentage of total C): mCG 90%/78%/85%, mCWG 89%/41%/53%, mCmCG 72%/32%/16%, mCCG 4%/2%/0%, mCHH 15%/6%/1%, where W=A or T, and H=A or C or T. Non-symmetrical methylation was almost negligible in the large genome of S. cereale but relatively frequent in N. tabacum and A. thaliana, suggesting that the strict correlation between genome size and cytosine methylation might be violated for this type of methylation. Among non-symmetrical motifs the mCWA triplets were significantly over-represented in Arabidopsis, while in tobacco this preference was not as pronounced. The differences in methylation levels in different sequence contexts might be of phylogenetic significance, but further species in related and different taxa need to be studied before firm conclusions can be drawn.

  7. Chromosomal distribution of H3K4me2, H3K9me2 and 5-methylcytosine: variations associated with polyploidy and hybridization in Brachiaria (Poaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, Cristina Maria Pinto; Souza Sobrinho, Fausto; Techio, Vânia Helena

    2016-06-01

    Assessment of chromosomal distribution of modified histones and 5-methylcytosine shown that there are diversification of chromosomal types among species of Brachiaria and its interspecific hybrids. Histone post-translational modifications and DNA methylation are epigenetic processes that are involved in structural and functional organization of the genome. This study compared the chromosomal distribution of modified histones and 5-methylcytosine (5-mCyt) in species and interspecific hybrids of Brachiaria with different ploidy levels and reproduction modes. The relation between H3K9me2 and 5-mCyt was observed in the nucleolus organizer region, centromeric central domain and pericentromeric region. H3K4me2 was detected in euchromatic domains, mainly in the terminal chromosomal regions. Comparison of chromosomal distribution among species and hybrids showed greater variation of chromosomal types for the H3K9me2 in B. decumbens (tetraploid and apomictic species) and the 963 hybrid, while, for the H3K4me2, the variation was higher in B. brizantha and B. decumbens (tetraploid and apomictic species) and 963 hybrid. The chromosome distribution of 5-mCyt was similar between B. brizantha and B. decumbens, which differ from the distribution observed in B. ruziziensis (diploid and sexual species). Significant alterations in DNA methylation were observed in the artificially tetraploidized B. ruziziensis and in the interspecific hybrids, possibly as result of hybridization and polyploidization processes. The monitoring of histone modifications and DNA methylation allowed categorizing nuclear and chromosomal distribution of these epigenetic marks, thus contributing to the knowledge of composition and structure of the genome/epigenome of Brachiaria species and hybrids. These data can be useful for speciation and genome evolution studies in genus Brachiaria, and represent important markers to explore relationships between genomes.

  8. New themes in the biological functions of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Erika L; Mariani, Christopher J; Zullow, Hayley; Jeff-Eke, Meselle; Litwin, Edward; Nikitas, John N; Godley, Lucy A

    2015-01-01

    5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) play a critical role in development and normal physiology. Alterations in 5-mC and 5-hmC patterns are common events in hematopoietic neoplasms. In this review, we begin by emphasizing the importance of 5-mC, 5-hmC, and their enzymatic modifiers in hematological malignancies. Then, we discuss the functions of 5-mC and 5-hmC at distinct genic contexts, including promoter regions, gene bodies, intron-exon boundaries, alternative promoters, and intragenic microRNAs. Recent advances in technology have allowed for the study of 5-mC and 5-hmC independently and specifically permitting distinction between the bases that show them to have transcriptional effects that vary by their location relative to gene structure. We extend these observations to their functions at enhancers and transcription factor binding sites. We discuss dietary influences on 5-mC and 5-hmC levels and summarize the literature on the effects of folate and vitamin C on 5-mC and 5-hmC, respectively. Finally, we discuss how these new themes in the functions of 5-mC and 5-hmC will likely influence the broader research field of epigenetics.

  9. Overproduction of stomatal lineage cells in Arabidopsis mutants defective in active DNA demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamuro, Chizuko; Miki, Daisuke; Zheng, Zhimin; Ma, Jun; Wang, Jing; Yang, Zhenbiao; Dong, Juan; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2014-06-05

    DNA methylation is a reversible epigenetic mark regulating genome stability and function in many eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, active DNA demethylation depends on the function of the ROS1 subfamily of genes that encode 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases/lyases. ROS1-mediated DNA demethylation plays a critical role in the regulation of transgenes, transposable elements and some endogenous genes; however, there have been no reports of clear developmental phenotypes in ros1 mutant plants. Here we report that, in the ros1 mutant, the promoter region of the peptide ligand gene EPF2 is hypermethylated, which greatly reduces EPF2 expression and thereby leads to a phenotype of overproduction of stomatal lineage cells. EPF2 gene expression in ros1 is restored and the defective epidermal cell patterning is suppressed by mutations in genes in the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway. Our results show that active DNA demethylation combats the activity of RNA-directed DNA methylation to influence the initiation of stomatal lineage cells.

  10. Acceleration of 5-methylcytosine deamination in cyclobutane dimers by G and its implications for UV-induced C-to-T mutation hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannistraro, Vincent J; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2009-10-01

    Sunlight-induced C-->T mutation hotspots occur most frequently at methylated CpG sites in tumor suppressor genes and are thought to arise from translesion synthesis past deaminated cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). While it is known that methylation enhances CPD formation in sunlight, little is known about the effect of methylation and sequence context on the deamination of 5-methylcytosine ((m)C) and its contribution to mutagenesis at these hotspots. Using an enzymatic method, we have determined the yields and deamination rates of C and (m)C in CPDs and find that the frequency of UVB-induced CPDs correlates with the oxidation potential of the flanking bases. We also found that the deamination of T(m)C and (m)CT CPDs is about 25-fold faster when flanked by G's than by A's, C's or T's in duplex DNA and appears to involve catalysis by the O6 group of guanine. In contrast, the first deamination of either C or (m)C in AC(m)CG with a flanking G was much slower (t(1/2) >250 h) and rate limiting, while the second deamination was much faster. The observation that C(m)CG dimers deaminate very slowly but at the same time correlate with C-->T mutation hotspots suggests that their repair must be slow enough to allow sufficient time for deamination. There are, however, a greater number of single C-->T mutations than CC-->TT mutations at C(m)CG sites even though the second deamination is very fast, which could reflect faster repair of doubly deaminated dimers.

  11. The inactive X chromosome in the human female is enriched in 5-methylcytosine to an unusual degree and appears to contain more of this modified nucleotide than the remainder of the genome

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepti D. Deobagkar; H. Sharat Chandra

    2003-04-01

    By employing a procedure that combines ELISA and photoacoustic spectroscopy, we have examined the content of 5-methylcytosine (m5C) in DNA of individuals who differed from one another in the number of X chromosomes in their genomes. The results show that the human inactive X chromosome (Xi) contains very high amounts of this modified nucleotide. We estimate that in the 46,XX female there is more m5C in Xi (∼3.6 × 107) than in all the remaining chromosomes put together (∼2.1 × 107). Our results also suggest that nearly one-fifth of all cytosines in Xi are methylated and that, in addition to CpG methylation, there is extensive non-CpG methylation as well.

  12. Raman spectroscopy and quantum-mechanical analysis of tautomeric forms in cytosine and 5-methylcytosine on gold surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dinh Bao; Nguyen, Thanh Danh; Kim, Sangsoo; Joo, Sang-Woo

    2017-03-01

    Spectral differences between cytosine (Cyt) and 5-methylcytosine (5MC) were investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy with a combination of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) revealed discriminating peaks of 5MC from those of Cyt upon adsorption on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Among the notable features, the multiple bands between 850 and 700 cm- 1 for the ring-breathing modes of 5MC and Cyt could be correlated well with the simulated spectra based on the DFT calculations of the adsorbates on the gold cluster atoms. The relative energetic stabilities of the enol/keto and the amino/imino tautomeric forms of Cyt and 5MC have been estimated using DFT calculations, before and after binding six atom gold clusters. Among the six tautomeric forms, the 7H keto amino and the 4H imino trans forms are expected to be predominant in binding gold atoms, whereas the enol trans/cis conformers would coexist in the free gas phase. Our approach may provide useful theoretical guidelines for identifying 5MC from Cyt by analyzing Raman spectra on gold surfaces on the basis of quantum-mechanical calculations.

  13. Structural genes of wheat and barley 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases and their potential applications for human health

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Wheat supplies about 20% of the total food calories consumed worldwide and is a national staple in many countries. Besides being a key source of plant proteins, it is also a major cause of many diet-induced health issues, especially celiac disease. The only effective treatment for this disease is a total gluten-free diet. The present report describes an effort to develop a natural dietary therapy for this disorder by transcriptional suppression of wheat DEMETER (DME) homeologs using RNA inter...

  14. A bridged nucleic acid, 2',4'-BNA COC: synthesis of fully modified oligonucleotides bearing thymine, 5-methylcytosine, adenine and guanine 2',4'-BNA COC monomers and RNA-selective nucleic-acid recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuoka, Yasunori; Kodama, Tetsuya; Ohnishi, Ryo; Hari, Yoshiyuki; Imanishi, Takeshi; Obika, Satoshi

    2009-03-01

    Recently, we synthesized pyrimidine derivatives of the 2'-O,4'-C-methylenoxymethylene-bridged nucleic-acid (2',4'-BNA(COC)) monomer, the sugar conformation of which is restricted in N-type conformation by a seven-membered bridged structure. Oligonucleotides (BNA(COC)) containing this monomer show high affinity with complementary single-stranded RNA and significant resistance to nuclease degradation. Here, BNA(COC) consisting of 2',4'-BNA(COC) monomers bearing all four bases, namely thymine, 5-methylcytosine, adenine and guanine was efficiently synthesized and properties of duplexes containing the 2',4'-BNA(COC) monomers were investigated by UV melting experiments and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The UV melting curve analyses showed that the BNA(COC)/BNA(COC) duplex possessed excellent thermal stability and that the BNA(COC) increased thermal stability with a complementary RNA strand. On the other hand, BNA(COC)/DNA heteroduplexes showed almost the same thermal stability as RNA/DNA heteroduplexes. Furthermore, mismatched sequence studies showed that BNA(COC) generally improved the sequence selectivity with Watson-Crick base-pairing compared to the corresponding natural DNA and RNA. A CD spectroscopic analysis indicated that the BNA(COC) formed duplexes with complementary DNA and RNA in a manner similar to natural RNA.

  15. Pan-cancer analysis of ROS1 genomic aberrations

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yidan; 王奕丹

    2015-01-01

    The ROS proto-oncogene 1 (ROS1) encodes the ROS1 receptor kinase. ROS1 rearrangements are known to be oncogenic in glioblastoma, non–small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and cholangiocarcinoma. The clinical relevance of ROS1 genomic aberrations in other human cancers is largely unexamined. Here, we performed a pan-cancer analysis of ROS1 genomic aberrations across 20 cancer sites by interrogating the whole-exome sequencing data of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) via the cBioportal (www.cbioportal...

  16. Regulation of Active DNA Demethylation by a Methyl-CpG-Binding Domain Protein in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Active DNA demethylation plays crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression in both plants and animals. In Arabidopsis thaliana, active DNA demethylation is initiated by the ROS1 subfamily of 5-methylcytosine-specific DNA glycosylases via a base excision repair mechanism. Recently, IDM1 and IDM2 were shown to be required for the recruitment of ROS1 to some of its target loci. However, the mechanism(s by which IDM1 is targeted to specific genomic loci remains to be determined. Affinity purification of IDM1- and IDM2- associating proteins demonstrated that IDM1 and IDM2 copurify together with two novel components, methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 7 (MBD7 and IDM2-like protein 1 (IDL1. IDL1 encodes an α-crystallin domain protein that shows high sequence similarity with IDM2. MBD7 interacts with IDM2 and IDL1 in vitro and in vivo and they form a protein complex associating with IDM1 in vivo. MBD7 directly binds to the target loci and is required for the H3K18 and H3K23 acetylation in planta. MBD7 dysfunction causes DNA hypermethylation and silencing of reporter genes and a subset of endogenous genes. Our results suggest that a histone acetyltransferase complex functions in active DNA demethylation and in suppression of gene silencing at some loci in Arabidopsis.

  17. DNA Methylation

    OpenAIRE

    Alokail, Majed S.; Alenad, Amal M.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication e...

  18. Comparative dynamics of 5-methylcytosine reprogramming and TET family expression during preimplantation mammalian development in mouse and sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarpour, F; Hosseini, S M; Ostadhosseini, S; Abbasi, H; Dalman, A; Nasr-Esfahani, M H

    2017-02-01

    Despite previous assumption that paternal active DNA demethylation is an evolutionary conserved phenomenon in mammals, emerging studies in other species, particularly sheep, do not support this issue. Recently, ten eleven translocation (TET) enzymes have been suggested as intermediates in genome-wide DNA demethylation through the iterative conversion of five methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC)/5-formylcytosine/5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) derivatives. This study investigated whether TET enzymes and 5mC derivatives are also involved in dynamic reprogramming of early sheep embryos derived by fertilization. Mouse zygotes and developing embryos were considered as control. Obtained results reported substantial differences in dynamics of parent-of-origin-specific patterns of 5mC reprogramming and generation/dilution of 5mC derivatives (5hmC and 5caC) between mouse and sheep early zygotes. Sheep zygotes reported a gradual and insignificant decrease pattern of parental pronucleus 5mC, which was notably replication independent, coincided with gradual generation of 5hmC and 5caC. Although the expression profiles of TET family of enzymes (Tet1, Tet2, and Tet3), with the main exception being Tet2 at later developmental stages, were similar between mouse and sheep developing embryos. In addition, although the expression level of Tet3 was higher than Tet1 and Tet2 in MII oocytes and zygotes in both mouse and sheep, the expression of Tet3 in mouse was higher than sheep in both MII oocytes and zygotes. The contrasting dynamics of 5mC reprogramming between these two species may be associated with the particular evolutionary differences that exist between developmental program of rodents and ruminants, particularly during peri-implantation stages.

  19. Structural insight into selectivity and resistance profiles of ROS1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davare, Monika A; Vellore, Nadeem A; Wagner, Jacob P; Eide, Christopher A; Goodman, James R; Drilon, Alexander; Deininger, Michael W; O'Hare, Thomas; Druker, Brian J

    2015-09-29

    Oncogenic ROS1 fusion proteins are molecular drivers in multiple malignancies, including a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The phylogenetic proximity of the ROS1 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) catalytic domains led to the clinical repurposing of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved ALK inhibitor crizotinib as a ROS1 inhibitor. Despite the antitumor activity of crizotinib observed in both ROS1- and ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients, resistance due to acquisition of ROS1 or ALK kinase domain mutations has been observed clinically, spurring the development of second-generation inhibitors. Here, we profile the sensitivity and selectivity of seven ROS1 and/or ALK inhibitors at various levels of clinical development. In contrast to crizotinib's dual ROS1/ALK activity, cabozantinib (XL-184) and its structural analog foretinib (XL-880) demonstrate a striking selectivity for ROS1 over ALK. Molecular dynamics simulation studies reveal structural features that distinguish the ROS1 and ALK kinase domains and contribute to differences in binding site and kinase selectivity of the inhibitors tested. Cell-based resistance profiling studies demonstrate that the ROS1-selective inhibitors retain efficacy against the recently reported CD74-ROS1(G2032R) mutant whereas the dual ROS1/ALK inhibitors are ineffective. Taken together, inhibitor profiling and stringent characterization of the structure-function differences between the ROS1 and ALK kinase domains will facilitate future rational drug design for ROS1- and ALK-driven NSCLC and other malignancies.

  20. Role of TET enzymes in DNA methylation, development, and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kasper Dindler; Helin, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of DNA methylation at cytosine bases in the genome is tightly linked to gene expression, and DNA methylation abnormalities are often observed in diseases. The ten eleven translocation (TET) enzymes oxidize 5-methylcytosines (5mCs) and promote locus-specific reversal of DNA methylation...

  1. Advances in DNA methylation: 5-hydroxymethylcytosine revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Christina; Grønbæk, Kirsten; Guldberg, Per

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian DNA contains two modified cytosine bases; 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). Both of these have been known for decades but have received very different levels of attention in the scientific literature. 5mC has been studied extensively, and its role as an epigenet...

  2. DEMETER DNA glycosylase establishes MEDEA polycomb gene self-imprinting by allele-specific demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Mary; Huh, Jin Hoe; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Penterman, Jon; Choi, Yeonhee; Harada, John J; Goldberg, Robert B; Fischer, Robert L

    2006-02-10

    MEDEA (MEA) is an Arabidopsis Polycomb group gene that is imprinted in the endosperm. The maternal allele is expressed and the paternal allele is silent. MEA is controlled by DEMETER (DME), a DNA glycosylase required to activate MEA expression, and METHYLTRANSFERASE I (MET1), which maintains CG methylation at the MEA locus. Here we show that DME is responsible for endosperm maternal-allele-specific hypomethylation at the MEA gene. DME can excise 5-methylcytosine in vitro and when expressed in E. coli. Abasic sites opposite 5-methylcytosine inhibit DME activity and might prevent DME from generating double-stranded DNA breaks. Unexpectedly, paternal-allele silencing is not controlled by DNA methylation. Rather, Polycomb group proteins that are expressed from the maternal genome, including MEA, control paternal MEA silencing. Thus, DME establishes MEA imprinting by removing 5-methylcytosine to activate the maternal allele. MEA imprinting is subsequently maintained in the endosperm by maternal MEA silencing the paternal allele.

  3. Studying Epigenetic DNA Modifications in Undergraduate Laboratories Using Complementary Bioinformatic and Molecular Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militello, Kevin T.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic inheritance is the inheritance of genetic information that is not based on DNA sequence alone. One type of epigenetic information that has come to the forefront in the last few years is modified DNA bases. The most common modified DNA base in nature is 5-methylcytosine. Herein, we describe a laboratory experiment that combines…

  4. Construction of a repeat-free dual color fluorescent in situ hybridization probe for ROS1 gene in non-small cell lung cancer diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程弘夏

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish a repeat-free ROS1 gene fluorescence in situ hybridization(FISH)probe,and to compare its efficacy with those of commercial FISH probes in non-small cell lung cancer.Methods The probe was constructed by combining human Cot-1 DNA genome into double-stranded sequence,and then digested by duples specific nuclease to establish a repeat-free sequene.The final repeat-free ROS1 FISH probe was labeled by red and green fluoresceins.Results Compared

  5. ROS1 rearrangements in lung adenocarcinoma: prognostic impact, therapeutic options and genetic variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixido, Cristina; Michels, Sebastian; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Viteri, Santiago; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Fischer, Rieke; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Fassunke, Jana; Sebastian, Martin; Serke, Monika; Kaminsky, Britta; Randerath, Winfried; Gerigk, Ulrich; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Krüger, Stefan; Schnell, Roland; Rothe, Achim; Kropf-Sanchen, Cornelia; Heukamp, Lukas; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Background While recent data show that crizotinib is highly effective in patients with ROS1 rearrangement, few data is available about the prognostic impact, the predictive value for different treatments, and the genetic heterogeneity of ROS1-positive patients. Patients and Methods 1137 patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung were analyzed regarding their ROS1 status. In positive cases, next-generation sequencing (NGS) was performed. Clinical characteristics, treatments and outcome of these patients were assessed. Overall survival (OS) was compared with genetically defined subgroups of ROS1-negative patients. Results 19 patients of 1035 evaluable (1.8%) had ROS1-rearrangement. The median OS has not been reached. Stage IV patients with ROS1-rearrangement had the best OS of all subgroups (36.7 months, p < 0.001). 9 of 14 (64.2%) patients had at least one response to chemotherapy. Estimated mean OS for patients receiving chemotherapy and crizotinib was 5.3 years. Ten patients with ROS1-rearrangement (52.6%) harbored additional aberrations. Conclusion ROS1-rearangement is not only a predictive marker for response to crizotinib, but also seems to be the one of the best prognostic molecular markers in NSCLC reported so far. In stage IV patients, response to chemotherapy was remarkable high and overall survival was significantly better compared to other subgroups including EGFR-mutated and ALK-fusion-positive NSCLC. PMID:25868855

  6. Hypomethylation of DNA in meiotic and postmeiotic rooster testis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocamora, N; Mezquita, C

    1984-11-05

    To study whether changes in methylation of DNA are related to the structural and functional changes that chromatin undergoes throughout rooster spermatogenenis, we analyzed, by high-performance liquid chromatography, the 5-methylcytosine content of DNA purified from rooster testis cell nuclei at successive stages of the cell differentiation process. The DNA of meiotic and postmeiotic cells appears partially under-methylated, containing approximately 30% less methylcytosines than the DNA obtained from premeiotic and somatic cells.

  7. Non - small cell lung cancer novel target ROS1 fusion%非小细胞肺癌新靶点 ROS1融合基因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张东芳; 魏万里

    2016-01-01

    Non - small cell lung cancer(NSCLC)is one of the biggest killers all over the world,and its five - year survival rate low than 20% . Screening and confirmed the tumor drive genes has become a top priority of the future re-search and development of targeted drugs. Recently,more and more scholars focus shifted to ROS1 gene fusion,and have the relevant data and studies have shown that ROS1 fusion genes have been confirmed for NSCLC new potential therapeutic targets. In this review,we summarize the research progress of ROS1 fusion gene in NSCLC.%非小细胞肺癌(non - small cell lung cancer,NSCLC)是造成人类死亡最多的恶性肿瘤之一,其五年生存率一直徘徊在20%以下。自肺癌领域首个分子靶向药物吉非替尼上市以来,靶向药物因其低毒、高效、便于给药的临床特点,己逐渐成为治疗 NSCLC 的重要选择之一。因此,筛选和证实肿瘤驱动基因已经成为未来靶向药物研发的重中之重。近来,越来越多的学者把焦点转移到 ROS1融合基因上,并且已经有相关数据及研究表明 ROS1融合基因被证实为 NSCLC 新的有潜力的治疗靶点,因此我们现就 ROS1融合基因在NSCLC 中的相关研究进展做一综述。

  8. Altered Mitochondrial DNA Methylation Pattern in Alzheimer Disease-Related Pathology and in Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, Marta; Mosquera, Jose Luis; Ansoleaga, Belén; Ferrer, Isidre; Barrachina, Marta

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is linked with the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles essential for cell viability and are characterized by the presence of the mitochondrial (mt)DNA. DNA methylation is a well-known epigenetic mechanism that regulates nuclear gene transcription. However, mtDNA methylation is not the subject of the same research attention. The present study shows the presence of mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine in CpG and non-CpG sites in the entorhinal cortex and substantia nigra of control human postmortem brains, using the 454 GS FLX Titanium pyrosequencer. Moreover, increased mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine levels are found in the D-loop region of mtDNA in the entorhinal cortex in brain samples with Alzheimer disease-related pathology (stages I to II and stages III to IV of Braak and Braak; n = 8) with respect to control cases. Interestingly, this region shows a dynamic pattern in the content of mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine in amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 mice along with Alzheimer disease pathology progression (3, 6, and 12 months of age). Finally, a loss of mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine levels in the D-loop region is found in the substantia nigra in Parkinson disease (n = 10) with respect to control cases. In summary, the present findings suggest mtDNA epigenetic modulation in human brain is vulnerable to neurodegenerative disease states.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA: A Blind Spot in Neuroepigenetics

    OpenAIRE

    Manev, Hari; Dzitoyeva, Svetlana; Chen, Hu

    2012-01-01

    Neuroepigenetics, which includes nuclear DNA modifications such as 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydoxymethylcytosine and modifications of nuclear proteins such as histones, is emerging as the leading field in molecular neuroscience. Historically, a functional role for epigenetic mechanisms, including in neuroepigenetics, has been sought in the area of the regulation of nuclear transcription. However, one important compartment of mammalian cell DNA, different from nuclear but equally important for p...

  10. DNA methylation is altered in B and NK lymphocytes in obese and type 2 diabetic human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simar, David; Versteyhe, Soetkin; Donkin, Ida;

    2014-01-01

    were recruited. Global DNA methylation levels were measured in a cell type-specific manner by flow cytometry. We validated the assay against mass spectrometry measures of the total 5-methylcytosine content in cultured cells treated with the hypomethylation agent decitabine (r = 0.97, p

  11. Programming and inheritance of parental DNA methylomes in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ci, Weimin; Liu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    5-Methylcytosine (5mC) is a major epigenetic modification in animals. The programming and inheritance of parental DNA methylomes ensures the compatibility for totipotency and embryonic development. In vertebrates, the DNA methylomes of sperm and oocyte are significantly different. During early embryogenesis, the paternal and maternal methylomes will reset to the same state. Herein, we focus on recent advances in how offspring obtain the DNA methylation information from parents in vertebrates.

  12. Mouse models for ROS1-fusion-positive lung cancers and their application to the analysis of multikinase inhibitor efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Maki; Toki, Hideaki; Matsui, Junko; Togashi, Yuki; Dobashi, Akito; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Gondo, Yoichi; Minowa, Osamu; Tanaka, Norio; Mori, Seiichi; Takeuchi, Kengo; Noda, Tetsuo

    2016-05-01

    ROS1-fusion genes, resulting from chromosomal rearrangement, have been reported in 1-2% of human non-small cell lung cancer cases. More than 10 distinct ROS1-fusion genes, including break-point variants, have been identified to date. In this study, to investigate the in vivo oncogenic activities of one of the most frequently detected fusions, CD74-ROS1, as well as another SDC4-ROS1 fusion that has also been reported in several studies, we generated transgenic (TG) mouse strains that express either of the two ROS1-fusion genes specifically in lung alveolar type II cells. Mice in all TG lines developed tumorigenic nodules in the lung, and a few strains of both TG mouse lines demonstrated early-onset nodule development (multiple tumor lesions present in the lung at 2-4 weeks after birth); therefore, these two strains were selected for further investigation. Tumors developed progressively in the untreated TG mice of both lines, whereas those receiving oral administration of an ALK/MET/ROS1 inhibitor, crizotinib, and an ALK/ROS1 inhibitor, ASP3026, showed marked reduction in the tumor burden. Collectively, these data suggest that each of these two ROS1-fusion genes acts as a driver for the pathogenesis of lung adenocarcinoma in vivo The TG mice developed in this study are expected to serve as valuable tools for exploring novel therapeutic agents against ROS1-fusion-positive lung cancer.

  13. DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is involved in key cellular processes, including X-chromosome inactivation, imprinting and transcriptional silencing of specific genes and repetitive elements. DNA methylation patterns are frequently perturbed in human diseases such as imprinting disorders and cancer. The recent...... discovery that the three members of the TET protein family can convert 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has provided a potential mechanism leading to DNA demethylation. Moreover, the demonstration that TET2 is frequently mutated in haematopoietic tumours suggests that the TET...... proteins are important regulators of cellular identity. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the function of the TET proteins, and discuss various mechanisms by which they contribute to transcriptional control. We propose that the TET proteins have an important role in regulating DNA methylation...

  14. AtROS1 overexpression provides evidence for epigenetic regulation of genes encoding enzymes of flavonoid biosynthesis and antioxidant pathways during salt stress in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Poonam; Mahajan, Monika; Vishwakarma, Ajay K; Bhardwaj, Jyoti; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2015-09-01

    In plants, epigenetic changes have been identified as regulators of developmental events during normal growth as well as environmental stress exposures. Flavonoid biosynthetic and antioxidant pathways play a significant role in plant defence during their exposure to environmental cues. The aim of this study was to unravel whether genes encoding enzymes of flavonoid biosynthetic and antioxidant pathways are under epigenetic regulation, particularly DNA methylation, during salt stress. For this, a repressor of silencing from Arabidopsis, AtROS1, was overexpressed in transgenic tobacco. Generated transgenics were evaluated to examine the influence of AtROS1 on methylation status of promoters as well as on coding regions of genes encoding enzymes of flavonoids biosynthesis and antioxidant pathways. Overexpression of AtROS1 increases the demethylation levels of both promoters as well as coding regions of genes encoding chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase, flavanone 3-hydroxylase, flavonol synthase, dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, and anthocyanidin synthase of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway, and glutathione S-transferase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase of the antioxidant pathway during control conditions. The level of demethylation was further increased at promoters as well as coding regions of these genes during salt-stress conditions. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing AtROS1 showed tolerance to salt stress that could have been due to the higher expression levels of the genes encoding enzymes of the flavonoid biosynthetic and antioxidant pathways. This is the first comprehensive study documenting the epigenetic regulation of flavonoid biosynthetic and antioxidant pathways during salt-stress exposure of plants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. Active DNA demethylation by oxidation and repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhizhong Gong; Jian-Kang Zhu

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation and demethylation are increasingly recognized as important epigenetic factors in both plants and animals.DNA methylation,which is catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs),is a relatively stable and heritable modification that controls gene expression,cellular differentiation,genomic imprinting,paramutation,transposon movement,X-inactivation,and embryogenesis [1].The methylation of cytosine to 5-methylcytosine (5mC) is an important example of DNA modification in animals and plants.This highlight concerns DNA demethylation mechanisms in mammals and whether they are similar to that in plants.

  16. Multiplexed transcriptome analysis to detect ALK, ROS1 and RET rearrangements in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Toni-Maree; Arnau, Gisela Mir; Ryland, Georgina L.; Huang, Stephen; Lira, Maruja E.; Emmanuel, Yvette; Perez, Omar D.; Irwin, Darryl; Fellowes, Andrew P.; Wong, Stephen Q.; Fox, Stephen B.

    2017-01-01

    ALK, ROS1 and RET gene fusions are important predictive biomarkers for tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer. Currently, the gold standard method for gene fusion detection is Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) and while highly sensitive and specific, it is also labour intensive, subjective in analysis, and unable to screen a large numbers of gene fusions. Recent developments in high-throughput transcriptome-based methods may provide a suitable alternative to FISH as they are compatible with multiplexing and diagnostic workflows. However, the concordance between these different methods compared with FISH has not been evaluated. In this study we compared the results from three transcriptome-based platforms (Nanostring Elements, Agena LungFusion panel and ThermoFisher NGS fusion panel) to those obtained from ALK, ROS1 and RET FISH on 51 clinical specimens. Overall agreement of results ranged from 86–96% depending on the platform used. While all platforms were highly sensitive, both the Agena panel and Thermo Fisher NGS fusion panel reported minor fusions that were not detectable by FISH. Our proof–of–principle study illustrates that transcriptome-based analyses are sensitive and robust methods for detecting actionable gene fusions in lung cancer and could provide a robust alternative to FISH testing in the diagnostic setting. PMID:28181564

  17. Effect of DNA methylation on protein-DNA interaction of HL-60 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何忠效; 白坚石; 张昱

    1999-01-01

    HL-60 cells have been induced with differentiation index 16 % by S-adenosyl-L-rnethionine (SAM) as inducer in the presence of optimum conceptration of 10 μmol/L. The methylation level of genorne DNA determined by HPLC is increased during cell differentiation. When restriction endonuclease Hae Ⅲ, Sma I, Sal I, XhoI and Hind Ⅲ which are sensitive to 5-methylcytosine were used to cleave the genorne DNA, a resistance effect was found. The interaction between DNA and DNA binding proteins is changed by using gel retarding test.

  18. ALK和ROS1:肺癌治疗的联合靶点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raimon Puig de la Bellacasa; Niki Karachaliou; Roger Estrada-Tejedor; Jordi Teixidó; Carlota Costa; José I.Borrell; 吴冠楠

    2014-01-01

    间变性淋巴瘤激酶(anaplastic lymphoma kinase,ALK)基因重排可见于包括非小细胞肺癌(non-small cell lung cancer,NSCLC)在内的多种恶性肿瘤中.ALK融合基因使激酶具有异常活性,而野生型ALK激酶域突变也可使它被激活.ALK基因重排使得NSCLC中出现了新的分子亚型,该亚型对ALK抑制剂高度耐药.克唑替尼(crizotinib)是一个口服小分子ATP模拟化合物,它最初作为MET抑制剂被开发,随后被发现具有抗ALK活性的脱靶效应(off-target),并被美国FDA批准用于治疗ALK阳性的NSCLC患者.近来在NSCLC患者中还发现了ROS1受体酪氨酸激酶染色体重排,而克唑替尼正处于治疗该分子亚型NSCLC患者的临床试验中.任何计算机辅助药物设计都是依赖其分子结构和配体的药物设计方法,每种方法的详细信息中均应重点强调利用这二者,以开发多靶点小分子激酶抑制剂.此类多靶点小分子激酶抑制剂均可对ROS1和ALK重排的NSCLC有抑制增殖作用.因此,本综述重点强调了关于靶向这些激酶的重要性,以及在优化出效能更佳、选择性更强的ROS1和ALK激酶抑制剂中所取得的进步.

  19. ROS1基因非重复序列双色荧光原位杂交探针建立及在非小细胞肺癌组织检测中的应用%Construction of a repeat-free dual color fluorescent in situ hybridization probe for ROS1 gene in non-small cell lung cancer diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程弘夏; 叶伦; 薛力泉

    2014-01-01

    目的 建立ROS1基因的非重复序列荧光原位杂交(FISH)探针,比较其与商品化普通探针在非小细胞肺癌检测方面的差异.方法 探针制备的过程中加入Human Cot-1 DNA,与基因组中的重复序列复性结合成双链,用双链特异性酶特异性的切除重复序列.用红色和绿色荧光素分别标记BAC克隆片段化的PCR产物,最终混合得到ROS1基因不含重复序列的双色探针.将制备的非重复序列FISH探针用于2009至2013年收集的经基因测序检测确定的53例ROS1基因重排的非小细胞肺癌标本,并与传统探针测定结果比较.结果 与商品化的重复序列探针比较,非重复序列FISH探针背景清晰,仅在目的区域存在明亮的荧光杂交信号,噪音明显低于商品化探针.两种探针间的杂交率差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);两组探针之间的准确率差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 经比较显示,非重复序列的ROS1双色FISH探针在对非小细胞肺癌样本检测中明显改善探针的杂交效率和信噪比,有利于提高检测的准确度.%Objective To establish a repeat-free ROS1 gene fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probe,and to compare its efficacy with those of commercial FISH probes in non-small cell lung cancer.Methods The probe was constructed by combining human Cot-1 DNA genome into double-stranded sequence,and then digested by duples specific nuclease to establish a repeat-free sequence.The final repeat-free ROS1 FISH probe was labeled by red and green fluoresceins.Results Compared with the commercialized probe,repeat-free FISH probe exhibited excellent efficiency and low signal to noise ratio (SNR) in samples.There was statistical significance in the difference between the hybridization rate of these two probes(P<0.05),but there was no difference between the accuracy rate (P>0.05).Conclusion The repeat-free ROS1 FISH probe significantly improves the probe hybridization efficiency and SNR in nonsmall

  20. ALK和ROS1:肺癌治疗的联合靶点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raimon Puig de la Bellacasa; Niki Karachaliou; Roger Estrada-Tejedor; Jordi Teixido; Carlota Costa; Jose I. Borrell; 吴冠楠(译); 宋勇(审校)

    2014-01-01

    间变性淋巴瘤激酶(anaplasticlymphomakinase,ALK)基因重排可见于包括非小细胞肺癌non-smallcelllungcancer,NSCLC)在内的多种恶性肿瘤中。ALK融合基因使激酶具有异常活性,而野生型ALK激酶域突变也可使它被激活。ALK基因重排使得NSCLC中出现了新的分子亚型,该亚型对ALK抑制剂高度耐药。克唑替尼(crizotinib)是一个口服小分子ATP模拟化合物,它最初作为MET抑制剂被开发,随后被发现具有抗ALK活性的脱靶效应(off-target),并被美国FDA批准用于治疗ALK阳性的NSCLC患者。近来在NSCLC患者中还发现了ROSl受体酪氨酸激酶染色体重排,而克唑替尼正处于治疗该分子亚型NSCLC患者的临床试验中。任何计算机辅助药物设计都是依赖其分子结构和配体的药物设计方法,每种方法的详细信息中均应重点强调利用这二者,以开发多靶点小分子激酶抑制剂。此类多靶点小分子激酶抑制剂均可对ROS1和ALK重排的NSCLC有抑制增殖作用。因此,本综述重点强调了关于靶向这些激酶的重要性,以及在优化出效能更佳、选择性更强的ROS1和ALK激酶抑制剂中所取得的进步。

  1. Identificación de proteínas que participan en una ruta de desmetilación activa de DNA en Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Macías, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine, 5-meC) is an important epigenetic mark for transcriptional gene silencing that plays critical roles in regulation of developmental genes, genomic imprinting, X chromosome inactivation and transposon silencing. Methylation landscapes are established by the combined actions of methylation and demethylation reactions. The mechanisms responsible for active DNA demethylation in mammalian cells are still poorly understood. However, in plants ther...

  2. Molecular Characterization of Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumors With Frequent ALK and ROS1 Gene Fusions and Rare Novel RET Rearrangement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonescu, Cristina R.; Suurmeijer, Albert J. H.; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Jungbluth, Achim A.; Travis, William D.; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Fletcher, Christopher D. M.; Alaggio, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 50% of conventional inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMTs) harbor ALK gene rearrangement and overexpress ALK. Recently, gene fusions involving other kinases have been implicated in the pathogenesis of IMT, including ROS1 and in 1 patient PDGFRB. However, it remains uncertain whethe

  3. The WOPR Protein Ros1 Is a Master Regulator of Sporogenesis and Late Effector Gene Expression in the Maize Pathogen Ustilago maydis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollot, Marie; Assmann, Daniela; Becker, Christian; Altmüller, Janine; Dutheil, Julien Y.; Wegner, Carl-Eric; Kahmann, Regine

    2016-01-01

    The biotrophic basidiomycete fungus Ustilago maydis causes smut disease in maize. Hallmarks of the disease are large tumors that develop on all aerial parts of the host in which dark pigmented teliospores are formed. We have identified a member of the WOPR family of transcription factors, Ros1, as major regulator of spore formation in U. maydis. ros1 expression is induced only late during infection and hence Ros1 is neither involved in plant colonization of dikaryotic fungal hyphae nor in plant tumor formation. However, during late stages of infection Ros1 is essential for fungal karyogamy, massive proliferation of diploid fungal cells and spore formation. Premature expression of ros1 revealed that Ros1 counteracts the b-dependent filamentation program and induces morphological alterations resembling the early steps of sporogenesis. Transcriptional profiling and ChIP-seq analyses uncovered that Ros1 remodels expression of about 30% of all U. maydis genes with 40% of these being direct targets. In total the expression of 80 transcription factor genes is controlled by Ros1. Four of the upregulated transcription factor genes were deleted and two of the mutants were affected in spore development. A large number of b-dependent genes were differentially regulated by Ros1, suggesting substantial changes in this regulatory cascade that controls filamentation and pathogenic development. Interestingly, 128 genes encoding secreted effectors involved in the establishment of biotrophic development were downregulated by Ros1 while a set of 70 “late effectors” was upregulated. These results indicate that Ros1 is a master regulator of late development in U. maydis and show that the biotrophic interaction during sporogenesis involves a drastic shift in expression of the fungal effectome including the downregulation of effectors that are essential during early stages of infection. PMID:27332891

  4. The WOPR Protein Ros1 Is a Master Regulator of Sporogenesis and Late Effector Gene Expression in the Maize Pathogen Ustilago maydis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Tollot

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The biotrophic basidiomycete fungus Ustilago maydis causes smut disease in maize. Hallmarks of the disease are large tumors that develop on all aerial parts of the host in which dark pigmented teliospores are formed. We have identified a member of the WOPR family of transcription factors, Ros1, as major regulator of spore formation in U. maydis. ros1 expression is induced only late during infection and hence Ros1 is neither involved in plant colonization of dikaryotic fungal hyphae nor in plant tumor formation. However, during late stages of infection Ros1 is essential for fungal karyogamy, massive proliferation of diploid fungal cells and spore formation. Premature expression of ros1 revealed that Ros1 counteracts the b-dependent filamentation program and induces morphological alterations resembling the early steps of sporogenesis. Transcriptional profiling and ChIP-seq analyses uncovered that Ros1 remodels expression of about 30% of all U. maydis genes with 40% of these being direct targets. In total the expression of 80 transcription factor genes is controlled by Ros1. Four of the upregulated transcription factor genes were deleted and two of the mutants were affected in spore development. A large number of b-dependent genes were differentially regulated by Ros1, suggesting substantial changes in this regulatory cascade that controls filamentation and pathogenic development. Interestingly, 128 genes encoding secreted effectors involved in the establishment of biotrophic development were downregulated by Ros1 while a set of 70 "late effectors" was upregulated. These results indicate that Ros1 is a master regulator of late development in U. maydis and show that the biotrophic interaction during sporogenesis involves a drastic shift in expression of the fungal effectome including the downregulation of effectors that are essential during early stages of infection.

  5. 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-mediated DNA demethylation in stem cells and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjia; Guan, Minxin; Li, Xuekun

    2014-05-01

    The pursuit of DNA demethylation has a colorful history, but it was not until 2009 that the stars of this story, the Ten-eleven-translocation (Tet) family of proteins, were really identified. Tet proteins convert 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), which can be further oxidized to 5-formylcytosine and 5-cyboxycytosine by Tet proteins to achieve DNA demethylation. Recent studies have revealed that 5hmC-mediated DNA demethylation can play essential roles in diverse biological processes, including development and diseases. Here, we review recent discoveries in 5hmC-mediated DNA demethylation in the context of stem cells and development.

  6. Entrectinib, a Pan-TRK, ROS1, and ALK Inhibitor with Activity in Multiple Molecularly Defined Cancer Indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardini, Elena; Menichincheri, Maria; Banfi, Patrizia; Bosotti, Roberta; De Ponti, Cristina; Pulci, Romana; Ballinari, Dario; Ciomei, Marina; Texido, Gemma; Degrassi, Anna; Avanzi, Nilla; Amboldi, Nadia; Saccardo, Maria Beatrice; Casero, Daniele; Orsini, Paolo; Bandiera, Tiziano; Mologni, Luca; Anderson, David; Wei, Ge; Harris, Jason; Vernier, Jean-Michel; Li, Gang; Felder, Eduard; Donati, Daniele; Isacchi, Antonella; Pesenti, Enrico; Magnaghi, Paola; Galvani, Arturo

    2016-04-01

    Activated ALK and ROS1 tyrosine kinases, resulting from chromosomal rearrangements, occur in a subset of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) as well as other tumor types and their oncogenic relevance as actionable targets has been demonstrated by the efficacy of selective kinase inhibitors such as crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib. More recently, low-frequency rearrangements of TRK kinases have been described in NSCLC, colorectal carcinoma, glioblastoma, and Spitzoid melanoma. Entrectinib, whose discovery and preclinical characterization are reported herein, is a novel, potent inhibitor of ALK, ROS1, and, importantly, of TRK family kinases, which shows promise for therapy of tumors bearing oncogenic forms of these proteins. Proliferation profiling against over 200 human tumor cell lines revealed that entrectinib is exquisitely potent in vitro against lines that are dependent on the drug's pharmacologic targets. Oral administration of entrectinib to tumor-bearing mice induced regression in relevant human xenograft tumors, including the TRKA-dependent colorectal carcinoma KM12, ROS1-driven tumors, and several ALK-dependent models of different tissue origins, including a model of brain-localized lung cancer metastasis. Entrectinib is currently showing great promise in phase I/II clinical trials, including the first documented objective responses to a TRK inhibitor in colorectal carcinoma and in NSCLC. The drug is, thus, potentially suited to the therapy of several molecularly defined cancer settings, especially that of TRK-dependent tumors, for which no approved drugs are currently available. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(4); 628-39. ©2016 AACR.

  7. Lung cancer with concurrent EGFR mutation and ROS1 rearrangement: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu YC

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available You-cai Zhu,1,2,* Chun-wei Xu,3,* Xiao-qian Ye,4 Man-xiang Yin,4 Jin-xian Zhang,2 Kai-qi Du,2 Zhi-hao Zhang,2 Jian Hu1 1Department of Thoracic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 2Department of Thoracic Surgery, Chinese People’s Armed Police Force, Zhejiang Corps Hospital, Jiaxing, Zhejiang, 3Department of Pathology, Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing, 4Department of Pathology, Chinese People’s Armed Police Force, Zhejiang Corps Hospital, Jiaxing, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: ROS1 rearrangement has recently emerged as a new molecular subtype in non-small cell lung cancer, and is predominantly found in lung adenocarcinomas compared with other oncogenes such as EGFR, KRAS, or ALK. Patients who have both mutations are extremely rare. Here we report a 50-year-old female diagnosed with adenocarcinoma with sarcomatoid differentiation, who was shown to have EGFR and ROS1 mutations. The patient was treated surgically and received three cycles of adjuvant postoperative chemotherapy. In addition, we reviewed the previously reported cases and related literature. This presentation will provide further understanding of the underlying molecular biology and optimal treatment for non-small cell lung cancer patients with more than one driver mutation. Keywords: non-small cell lung cancer, EGFR gene mutation, ROS1 fusion gene

  8. Divergent mechanisms for enzymatic excision of 5-formylcytosine and 5-carboxylcytosine from DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Maiti, Atanu; Michelson, Anna Zhachkina; Armwood, Cherece J; Lee, Jeehiun K.; Drohat, Alexander C.

    2013-01-01

    5-methylcytosine (mC) is an epigenetic mark that impacts transcription, development, and genome stability, and aberrant DNA methylation contributes to aging and cancer. Active DNA demethylation involves stepwise oxidation of mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine (fC), and potentially 5-carboxylcytosine (caC), excision of fC or caC by thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG), and restoration of cytosine via follow-on base excision repair. Here, we investigate the mechanism for TDG excision of f...

  9. CG methylation in DNA transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chela-Flores, J.; Migoni, R. L.

    1990-08-01

    A simple model of DNA is considered in which the nucleotides cytosine (C) and guanine (G) are not assumed to be identical, and in which macroscopic thermodynamic quantities may be calculated exactly. The H bonds between the C and G nucleotides are assumed to be Morse potentials. We discuss the statistical mechanics of the DNA molecule in the configuration (5'...GGG ...3'; 3'...CCC ...5'), which may be copied by RNA polymerase into a messenger RNA (mRNA) strand (5'...CCC ...3'). This model suggests that replacements of C by 5-methylcytosine (5mC) may be a secondary effect in the inhibition of genetic expression, not interfering directly with the formation of an open state. An experimental test is suggested. The implications of this result are discussed for a related system, in which the enzyme methylase is known to methylate almost exclusively those Cs that are followed by Gs as a regulatory strategy employed by some eukaryotes.

  10. The emerging role of DNA methylation in epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobow, Katja; Blümcke, Ingmar

    2012-12-01

    DNA methylation is a covalent chromatin modification, characterized by the biochemical addition of a methyl group (-CH3) to cytosine nucleotides via a DNA methyltransferase enzyme. 5'-Methylcytosine (5-mC), frequently called the fifth base, has been implicated in genome stability, silencing of transposable elements, and repression of gene expression. Through the latter, DNA methylation dynamics broadly influence brain development, function, and aging. Aberrant DNA methylation patterns, either localized to specific gene regions or scattered throughout the genome, are associated with many neurologic disorders. Herein, we discuss the emerging role of DNA methylation in epileptogenesis and the perspectives arising from epigenetic medicine as new therapeutic strategy in difficult-to-treat epilepsies.

  11. Synthesis and preliminary PET imaging of 11C and 18F isotopologues of the ROS1/ALK inhibitor lorlatinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Thomas Lee; Normandin, Marc D.; Stephenson, Nickeisha A.; Livni, Eli; Liang, Steven H.; Wooten, Dustin W.; Esfahani, Shadi A.; Stabin, Michael G.; Mahmood, Umar; Chen, Jianqing; Wang, Wei; Maresca, Kevin; Waterhouse, Rikki N.; El Fakhri, Georges; Richardson, Paul; Vasdev, Neil

    2017-06-01

    Lorlatinib (PF-06463922) is a next-generation small-molecule inhibitor of the orphan receptor tyrosine kinase c-ros oncogene 1 (ROS1), which has a kinase domain that is physiologically related to anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), and is undergoing Phase I/II clinical trial investigations for non-small cell lung cancers. An early goal is to measure the concentrations of this drug in brain tumour lesions of lung cancer patients, as penetration of the blood-brain barrier is important for optimal therapeutic outcomes. Here we prepare both 11C- and 18F-isotopologues of lorlatinib to determine the biodistribution and whole-body dosimetry assessments by positron emission tomography (PET). Non-traditional radiolabelling strategies are employed to enable an automated multistep 11C-labelling process and an iodonium ylide-based radiofluorination. Carbon-11-labelled lorlatinib is routinely prepared with good radiochemical yields and shows reasonable tumour uptake in rodents. PET imaging in non-human primates confirms that this radiotracer has high brain permeability.

  12. Role of TET enzymes in DNA methylation, development, and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Kasper Dindler

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of DNA methylation at cytosine bases in the genome is tightly linked to gene expression, and DNA methylation abnormalities are often observed in diseases. The ten eleven translocation (TET) enzymes oxidize 5-methylcytosines (5mCs) and promote locus-specific reversal of DNA methylation. TET genes, and especially TET2, are frequently mutated in various cancers, but how the TET proteins contribute to prevent the onset and maintenance of these malignancies is largely unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances in understanding the physiological function of the TET proteins and their role in regulating DNA methylation and transcription. In addition, we discuss some of the key outstanding questions in the field. PMID:27036965

  13. Exposure of JB-6 mouse epidermal cells to 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate is not accompanied by a significant change in total DNA-cytosine methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, G P; Denhardt, D T

    1983-12-01

    The extent of methylation of the cytosine bases in DNA is believed to be a major factor influencing gene expression in eukaryotic cells. We have asked whether the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) alters the amount of 5-methylcytosine in DNA. The amount and relative distribution of 5-methylcytosine in the DNA of two subclones of the JB-6 mouse epidermal cell line were determined respectively by high performance liquid chromatography and digestion with the restriction enzymes MspI and HpaII. Exposure to TPA for up to several cell generations had no detectable effect on the degree of DNA methylation (3.9% of the total cytosine) in the two JB-6 lines or Friend erythroleukemia cells. Reduced methylation was readily detected in DNA extracted from cells exposed to 5-azacytidine. The data suggest that tumor promotion (at least that induced by TPA) is likely not the consequence of a generalized elevation or reduction in the amount of 5-methyl-cytosine in the DNA.

  14. Association of Global DNA Methylation and Global DNA Hydroxymethylation with Metals and Other Exposures in Human Blood DNA Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wan-yee; Shang, Yan; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Ledesma, Marta; Leon, Montserrat; Laclaustra, Martin; Pollak, Jonathan; Guallar, Eliseo; Cole, Shelley A.; Fallin, M. Dani; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association between human blood DNA global methylation and global hydroxymethylation has not been evaluated in population-based studies. No studies have evaluated environmental determinants of global DNA hydroxymethylation, including exposure to metals. Objective: We evaluated the association between global DNA methylation and global DNA hydroxymethylation in 48 Strong Heart Study participants for which selected metals had been measured in urine at baseline and DNA was available from 1989–1991 (visit 1) and 1998–1999 (visit 3). Methods: We measured the percentage of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) in samples using capture and detection antibodies followed by colorimetric quantification. We explored the association of participant characteristics (i.e., age, adiposity, smoking, and metal exposure) with both global DNA methylation and global DNA hydroxymethylation. Results: The Spearman’s correlation coefficient for 5-mC and 5-hmC levels was 0.32 (p = 0.03) at visit 1 and 0.54 (p Ledesma M, Leon M, Laclaustra M, Pollak J, Guallar E, Cole SA, Fallin MD, Navas-Acien A. 2014. Association of global DNA methylation and global DNA hydroxymethylation with metals and other exposures in human blood DNA samples. Environ Health Perspect 122:946–954; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306674 PMID:24769358

  15. P-loop conformation governed crizotinib resistance in G2032R-mutated ROS1 tyrosine kinase: clues from free energy landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyong Sun

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine kinases are regarded as excellent targets for chemical drug therapy of carcinomas. However, under strong purifying selection, drug resistance usually occurs in the cancer cells within a short term. Many cases of drug resistance have been found to be associated with secondary mutations in drug target, which lead to the attenuated drug-target interactions. For example, recently, an acquired secondary mutation, G2032R, has been detected in the drug target, ROS1 tyrosine kinase, from a crizotinib-resistant patient, who responded poorly to crizotinib within a very short therapeutic term. It was supposed that the mutation was located at the solvent front and might hinder the drug binding. However, a different fact could be uncovered by the simulations reported in this study. Here, free energy surfaces were characterized by the drug-target distance and the phosphate-binding loop (P-loop conformational change of the crizotinib-ROS1 complex through advanced molecular dynamics techniques, and it was revealed that the more rigid P-loop region in the G2032R-mutated ROS1 was primarily responsible for the crizotinib resistance, which on one hand, impaired the binding of crizotinib directly, and on the other hand, shortened the residence time induced by the flattened free energy surface. Therefore, both of the binding affinity and the drug residence time should be emphasized in rational drug design to overcome the kinase resistance.

  16. P-loop conformation governed crizotinib resistance in G2032R-mutated ROS1 tyrosine kinase: clues from free energy landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huiyong; Li, Youyong; Tian, Sheng; Wang, Junmei; Hou, Tingjun

    2014-07-01

    Tyrosine kinases are regarded as excellent targets for chemical drug therapy of carcinomas. However, under strong purifying selection, drug resistance usually occurs in the cancer cells within a short term. Many cases of drug resistance have been found to be associated with secondary mutations in drug target, which lead to the attenuated drug-target interactions. For example, recently, an acquired secondary mutation, G2032R, has been detected in the drug target, ROS1 tyrosine kinase, from a crizotinib-resistant patient, who responded poorly to crizotinib within a very short therapeutic term. It was supposed that the mutation was located at the solvent front and might hinder the drug binding. However, a different fact could be uncovered by the simulations reported in this study. Here, free energy surfaces were characterized by the drug-target distance and the phosphate-binding loop (P-loop) conformational change of the crizotinib-ROS1 complex through advanced molecular dynamics techniques, and it was revealed that the more rigid P-loop region in the G2032R-mutated ROS1 was primarily responsible for the crizotinib resistance, which on one hand, impaired the binding of crizotinib directly, and on the other hand, shortened the residence time induced by the flattened free energy surface. Therefore, both of the binding affinity and the drug residence time should be emphasized in rational drug design to overcome the kinase resistance.

  17. Regulation and function of DNA methylation in plants and animals

    KAUST Repository

    He, Xinjian

    2011-02-15

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark involved in diverse biological processes. In plants, DNA methylation can be established through the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway, an RNA interference pathway for transcriptional gene silencing (TGS), which requires 24-nt small interfering RNAs. In mammals, de novo DNA methylation occurs primarily at two developmental stages: during early embryogenesis and during gametogenesis. While it is not clear whether establishment of DNA methylation patterns in mammals involves RNA interference in general, de novo DNA methylation and suppression of transposons in germ cells require 24-32-nt piwi-interacting small RNAs. DNA methylation status is dynamically regulated by DNA methylation and demethylation reactions. In plants, active DNA demethylation relies on the repressor of silencing 1 family of bifunctional DNA glycosylases, which remove the 5-methylcytosine base and then cleave the DNA backbone at the abasic site, initiating a base excision repair (BER) pathway. In animals, multiple mechanisms of active DNA demethylation have been proposed, including a deaminase- and DNA glycosylase-initiated BER pathway. New information concerning the effects of various histone modifications on the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation has broadened our understanding of the regulation of DNA methylation. The function of DNA methylation in plants and animals is also discussed in this review. © 2011 IBCB, SIBS, CAS All rights reserved.

  18. Gamma and ion-beam irradiation of DNA: Free radical mechanisms, electron effects, and radiation chemical track structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, Michael D.; Becker, David; Kumar, Anil; Adhikary, Amitava

    2016-11-01

    The focus of our laboratory's investigation is to study the direct-type DNA damage mechanisms resulting from γ-ray and ion-beam radiation-induced free radical processes in DNA which lead to molecular damage important to cellular survival. This work compares the results of low LET (γ-) and high LET (ion-beam) radiation to develop a chemical track structure model for ion-beam radiation damage to DNA. Recent studies on protonation states of cytosine cation radicals in the N1-substituted cytosine derivatives in their ground state and 5-methylcytosine cation radicals in ground as well as in excited state are described. Our results exhibit a radical signature of excitations in 5-methylcytosine cation radical. Moreover, our recent theoretical studies elucidate the role of electron-induced reactions (low energy electrons (LEE), presolvated electrons (epre-), and aqueous (or, solvated) electrons (eaq-)). Finally DFT calculations of the ionization potentials of various sugar radicals show the relative reactivity of these species.

  19. [DNA methylation and epigenetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniushin, B F

    2006-09-01

    In eukaryotic cells, nuclear DNA is subject to enzymatic methylation with the formation of 5-methylcytosine residues, mostly within the CG and CNG sequences. In plants and animals this DNA methylation is species-, tissue-, and organelle-specific. It changes (decreases) with age and is regulated by hormones. On the other hand, genome methylation can control hormonal signal. Replicative and post-replicative DNA methylation types are distinguished. They are mediated by multiple DNA methyltransferases with different site-specificity. Replication is accompanied by the appearance of hemimethylated DNA sites. Pronounced asymmetry of the DNA strand methylation disappears to the end of the cell cycle. A model of methylation-regulated DNA replication is proposed. DNA methylation controls all genetic processes in the cell (replication, transcription, DNA repair, recombination, and gene transposition). It is the mechanism of cell differentiation, gene discrimination and silencing. In animals, suppression of DNA methylation stops development (embryogenesis), switches on apoptosis, and is usually lethal. Disruption of DNA methylation pattern results in the malignant cell transformation and serves as one of the early diagnostic features of carcinogenesis. In malignant cell the pattern of DNA methylation, as well as the set of DNA methyltransferase activities, differs from that in normal cell. In plants inhibition of DNA methylation is accompanied by the induction of seed storage and florescence genes. In eukaryotes one and the same gene can be simultaneously methylated both at cytosine and adenine residues. It can be thus suggested, that the plant cell contains at least two different, and probably, interdependent systems of DNA methylation. The first eukaryotic adenine DNA methyltransferase was isolated from plants. This enzyme methylates DNA with the formation of N6-methyladenine residues in the sequence TGATCA (TGATCA-->TGm6ATCA). Plants possess AdoMet-dependent endonucleases

  20. Alterations in genes other thanEGFR/ALK/ROS1 in non-small cell lung cancer:trials and treatment options

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arpita Desai; Smitha P Menon; Grace K Dy

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, we have seen tremendous progress in the therapy of lung cancer. Discovery of actionable mutations in EGFR and translocations inALK andROS1 have identified subsets of patients with excellent tumor response to oral targeted agents with manageable side effects. In this review, we highlight treatment options including corresponding clinical trials for oncogenic alterations affecting the receptor tyrosine kinases MET, FGFR, NTRK, RET, HER2, HER3, and HER4 as well as components of the RAS-RAF-MEK signaling pathway.

  1. DNA immunoprecipitation semiconductor sequencing (DIP-SC-seq) as a rapid method to generate genome wide epigenetic signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, John P; Fawkes, Angie; Ottaviano, Raffaele; Hunter, Jennifer M; Shukla, Ruchi; Mjoseng, Heidi K; Clark, Richard; Coutts, Audrey; Murphy, Lee; Meehan, Richard R

    2015-05-14

    Modification of DNA resulting in 5-methylcytosine (5 mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has been shown to influence the local chromatin environment and affect transcription. Although recent advances in next generation sequencing technology allow researchers to map epigenetic modifications across the genome, such experiments are often time-consuming and cost prohibitive. Here we present a rapid and cost effective method of generating genome wide DNA modification maps utilising commercially available semiconductor based technology (DNA immunoprecipitation semiconductor sequencing; "DIP-SC-seq") on the Ion Proton sequencer. Focussing on the 5hmC mark we demonstrate, by directly comparing with alternative sequencing strategies, that this platform can successfully generate genome wide 5hmC patterns from as little as 500 ng of genomic DNA in less than 4 days. Such a method can therefore facilitate the rapid generation of multiple genome wide epigenetic datasets.

  2. DNA Modifications and Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rebecca G; Lunnon, Katie

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disease, affecting millions of people worldwide. While a number of studies have focused on identifying genetic variants that contribute to the development and progression of late-onset AD, the majority of these only have a relatively small effect size. There are also a number of other risk factors, for example, age, gender, and other comorbidities; however, how these influence disease risk is not known. Therefore, in recent years, research has begun to investigate epigenetic mechanisms for a potential role in disease etiology. In this chapter, we discuss the current state of play for research into DNA modifications in AD, the most well studied being 5-methylcytosine (5-mC). We describe the earlier studies of candidate genes and global measures of DNA modifications in human AD samples, in addition to studies in mouse models of AD. We focus on recent epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) in human AD, using microarray technology, examining a number of key study design issues pertinent to such studies. Finally, we discuss how new technological advances could further progress the research field.

  3. Characterisation of DNA methylation status using spectroscopy (mid-IR versus Raman) with multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Jemma G; Najand, Ghazal M; Martin, Francis L

    2011-05-01

    Methylation status plays important roles in the regulation of gene expression and significantly influences the dynamics, bending and flexibility of DNA. The aim of this study was to determine whether attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) or Raman spectroscopy with subsequent multivariate analysis could determine methylation patterning in oligonucleotides variously containing 5-methylcytosine, cytosine and guanine bases. Applied to Low-E reflective glass slides, 10 independent spectral acquisitions were acquired per oligonucleotide sample. Resultant spectra were baseline-corrected and vector normalised over the 1750 cm(-1) -760 cm(-1) (for ATR-FTIR spectroscopy) or the 1750 cm(-1) -600 cm(-1) (for Raman spectroscopy) regions. Data were then analysed using principal component analysis (PCA) coupled with linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Exploiting this approach, biomolecular signatures enabling sensitive and specific discrimination of methylation patterning were derived. For DNA sequence and methylation analysis, this approach has the potential to be an important tool, especially when material is scarce.

  4. Genomic DNA methylation patterns in bovine preim-plantation embryos derived from in vitro fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    By using the approach of immunofluorescence staining with an antibody against 5-methylcytosine (5MeC), the present study detected the DNA methylation patterns of bovine zygotes and preimplanta-tion embryos derived from oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM), in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo in vitro culture (IVC). The results showed that: a) paternal-specific demethylation occurred in 61.5% of the examined zygotes, while 34.6% of them showed no demethylation; b) decreased methylation level was observed after the 8-cell stage and persisted through the morula stage, however methylation levels were different between blastomeres within the same embryos; c) at the blastocyst stage, the methyla-tion level was very low in inner cell mass, but high in trophectoderm cells. The present study suggests, at least partly, that IVM/IVF/IVC may have effects on DNA methylation reprogramming of bovine zygotes and early embryos.

  5. Genomic DNA methylation patterns in bovine preimplantation embryos derived from in vitro fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Jian; LIU Lei; LEI TingHua; CUI XiuHong; AN XiaoRong; CHEN YongFu

    2007-01-01

    By using the approach of immunofluorescence staining with an antibody against 5-methylcytosine (5MeC), the present study detected the DNA methylation patterns of bovine zygotes and preimplantation embryos derived from oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM), in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo in vitro culture (IVC). The results showed that: a) paternal-specific demethylation occurred in 61.5% of the examined zygotes, while 34.6% of them showed no demethylation; b) decreased methylation level was observed after the 8-cell stage and persisted through the morula stage, however methylation levels were different between blastomeres within the same embryos; c) at the blastocyst stage, the methylation level was very low in inner cell mass, but high in trophectoderm cells. The present study suggests, at least partly, that IVM/IVF/IVC may have effects on DNA methylation reprogramming of bovine zygotes and early embryos.

  6. Global DNA hypomethylation has no impact on lung function or serum inflammatory and fibrosis cytokines in asbestos-exposed population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min; Lou, Jianlin; Xia, Hailing; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Yixiao; Chen, Junqiang; Zhang, Xing; Ying, Shibo; Zhu, Lijin; Liu, Lihong; Jia, Guang

    2017-04-01

    To examine the effect of asbestos exposure on global DNA methylation and determine whether lung function and inflammatory and fibrosis biomarkers are correlated with the methylation state. A total of 26 healthy subjects without asbestos exposure (Group 1), 47 healthy subjects with exposure (Group 2), and 52 subjects with benign asbestos-related disorders (ARDs) (Group 3) participated in this cross-sectional study. Blood global 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and serum TNF-α, collagen IV, CCL5 and CC16 concentrations were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-like assays. Spirometric maneuvers were performed to assess lung function. Decreased 5mC levels were observed in Groups 2 and 3 compared to Group 1, irrespective of lung function (p asbestos exposure. Asbestos exposure causes global DNA hypomethylation. DNA hypomethylation has no influence on serum biomarkers and lung function in asbestos-exposed population with or without pleural and pulmonary parenchymal abnormalities.

  7. Methylglyoxal induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and DNA demethylation in the Keap1 promoter of human lens epithelial cells and age-related cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsamy, Periyasamy; Bidasee, Keshore R; Ayaki, Masahiko; Augusteyn, Robert C; Chan, Jefferson Y; Shinohara, Toshimichi

    2014-07-01

    Age-related cataracts are a leading cause of blindness. Previously, we have demonstrated the association of the unfolded protein response with various cataractogenic stressors. However, DNA methylation alterations leading to suppression of lenticular antioxidant protection remains unclear. Here, we report the methylglyoxal-mediated sequential events responsible for Keap1 promoter DNA demethylation in human lens epithelial cells, because Keap1 is a negative regulatory protein that regulates the Nrf2 antioxidant protein. Methylglyoxal induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and activates the unfolded protein response leading to overproduction of reactive oxygen species before human lens epithelial cell death. Methylglyoxal also suppresses Nrf2 and DNA methyltransferases but activates the DNA demethylation pathway enzyme TET1. Bisulfite genomic DNA sequencing confirms the methylglyoxal-mediated Keap1 promoter DNA demethylation leading to overexpression of Keap1 mRNA and protein. Similarly, bisulfite genomic DNA sequencing shows that human clear lenses (n = 15) slowly lose 5-methylcytosine in the Keap1 promoter throughout life, at a rate of 1% per year. By contrast, diabetic cataractous lenses (n = 21) lose an average of 90% of the 5-methylcytosine regardless of age. Overexpressed Keap1 protein is responsible for decreasing Nrf2 by proteasomal degradation, thereby suppressing Nrf2-dependent stress protection. This study demonstrates for the first time the associations of unfolded protein response activation, Nrf2-dependent antioxidant system failure, and loss of Keap1 promoter methylation because of altered active and passive DNA demethylation pathway enzymes in human lens epithelial cells by methylglyoxal. As an outcome, the cellular redox balance is altered toward lens oxidation and cataract formation.

  8. DNA Modifications: Function and Applications in Normal and Disease States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vichithra R. B. Liyanage

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics refers to a variety of processes that have heritable effects on gene expression programs without changes in DNA sequence. Key players in epigenetic control are chemical modifications to DNA, histone, and non-histone chromosomal proteins, which establish a complex regulatory network that controls genome function. Methylation of DNA at the fifth position of cytosine in CpG dinucleotides (5-methylcytosine, 5mC, which is carried out by DNA methyltransferases, is commonly associated with gene silencing. However, high resolution mapping of DNA methylation has revealed that 5mC is enriched in exonic nucleosomes and at intron-exon junctions, suggesting a role of DNA methylation in the relationship between elongation and RNA splicing. Recent studies have increased our knowledge of another modification of DNA, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC, which is a product of the ten-eleven translocation (TET proteins converting 5mC to 5hmC. In this review, we will highlight current studies on the role of 5mC and 5hmC in regulating gene expression (using some aspects of brain development as examples. Further the roles of these modifications in detection of pathological states (type 2 diabetes, Rett syndrome, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and teratogen exposure will be discussed.

  9. Genetic variants involved in oxidative stress, base excision repair, DNA methylation, and folate metabolism pathways influence myeloid neoplasias susceptibility and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Alves, Raquel; Baldeiras, Inês; Cortesão, Emília; Carda, José Pedro; Branco, Claudia C; Oliveiros, Bárbara; Loureiro, Luísa; Pereira, Amélia; Nascimento Costa, José Manuel; Sarmento-Ribeiro, Ana Bela; Mota-Vieira, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) share common features: elevated oxidative stress, DNA repair deficiency, and aberrant DNA methylation. We performed a hospital-based case-control study to evaluate the association in variants of genes involved in oxidative stress, folate metabolism, DNA repair, and DNA methylation with susceptibility and prognosis of these malignancies. To that end, 16 SNPs (one per gene: CAT, CYBA, DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, GPX1, KEAP1, MPO, MTRR, NEIL1, NFE2F2, OGG1, SLC19A1, SOD1, SOD2, and XRCC1) were genotyped in 191 patients (101 MDS and 90 AML) and 261 controls. We also measured oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species/total antioxidant status ratio), DNA damage (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine), and DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine) in 50 subjects (40 MDS and 10 controls). Results showed that five genes (GPX1, NEIL1, NFE2L2, OGG1, and SOD2) were associated with MDS, two (DNMT3B and SLC19A1) with AML, and two (CYBA and DNMT1) with both diseases. We observed a correlation of CYBA TT, GPX1 TT, and SOD2 CC genotypes with increased oxidative stress levels, as well as NEIL1 TT and OGG1 GG genotypes with higher DNA damage. The 5-methylcytosine levels were negatively associated with DNMT1 CC, DNMT3A CC, and MTRR AA genotypes, and positively with DNMT3B CC genotype. Furthermore, DNMT3A, MTRR, NEIL1, and OGG1 variants modulated AML transformation in MDS patients. Additionally, DNMT3A, OGG1, GPX1, and KEAP1 variants influenced survival of MDS and AML patients. Altogether, data suggest that genetic variability influence predisposition and prognosis of MDS and AML patients, as well AML transformation rate in MDS patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Aberrant DNA methylation in cloned ovine embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lei; HOU Jian; LEI TingHua; BAI JiaHua; GUAN Hong; AN XiaoRong

    2008-01-01

    By using the approach of immunofluorescence staining with an antibody against 5-methylcytosine (5MeC), the present study detected the DNA methylation patterns of cloned ovine embryos. The em-bryos derived from in vitro fertilization were also examined for reference purpose. The results showed that: (1) during the pre-implantation development, cloned embryos displayed a similar demethylation profile to the fertilized embryos; that is, the methylation level decreased to the lowest at 8-cell stage, and then increased again at morulae stage. However, methylation level was obviously higher in cloned embryos than in stage-matched fertilized embryos, especially at 8-cell stage and afterwards; (2) at blastocyst stage, the methylation pattern in cloned embryos was different from that in fertilized em-bryos. In cloned blastocyst, inner cell mass (ICM) exhibited a comparable level to trophectoderm cells (TE), while in in-vitro fertilized blastocyst the methylation level of ICM was lower than that of TE, which is not consistent with that reported by other authors. These results indicate that DNA methylation is abnormally reprogrammed in cloned embryos, implying that aberrant DNA methylation reprogramming may be one of the factors causing cloned embryos developmental failure.

  11. Gibberellic Acid enhancement of DNA turnover in barley aleurone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiz, L; Starks, J E

    1977-08-01

    When imbibed, deembryonated halfseeds from barley (Hordeum vulgare L., var. Himalaya) are incubated in buffer, the DNA content of the aleurone layer increases 25 to 40% over a 24-hour period. In contrast, the DNA of isolated aleurone layers declines by 20% over the same time period. Gibberellic acid (GA) causes a reduction in DNA levels in both halfseed aleurone layers and isolated aleurone layers. GA also increases the specific radioactivity of [(3)H]thymidine-labeled halfseed aleurone layer DNA during the first 12 hours of treatment. Pulse-chase studies demonstrated that the newly synthesized DNA is metabolically labile.The buoyant density on CsCl density gradients of hormone-treated aleurone DNA is identical with that of DNA extracted from whole seedlings. After density-labeling halfseed DNA with 5-bromodeoxyuridine, a bimodal absorption profile is obtained in neutral CsCl. The light band (1.70 g/ml) corresponds to unsubstituted DNA, while the heavy band (1.725-1.74 g/ml) corresponds to a hybrid density-labeled species. GA increases the relative amount of the heavy (hybrid) peak in halfseed aleurone layer DNA, further suggesting that the hormone enhances semiconservative replication in halfseeds.DNA methylation was also demonstrated. Over 60% of the radioactivity from [(3)H-Me]methionine is incorporated into 5-methylcytosine. GA has no effect on the percentage distribution of label among the bases.It was concluded that GA enhances the rate of DNA degradation and DNA synthesis (turnover) in halfseeds, but primarily DNA degradation in isolated aleurone layers. Incorporation by isolated aleurone layers is due to DNA repair. Semiconservative replication apparently plays no physiological role in the hormone response, since both isolated aleurone layers and gamma-irradiated halfseeds respond normally. The hypothesis was advanced that endoreduplication and DNA degradation are means by which the seed stores and mobilizes deoxyribonucleotides for the embryo during

  12. Mitochondrial DNA copy number is regulated by DNA methylation and demethylation of POLGA in stem and cancer cells and their differentiated progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W; Johnson, J; Gough, D J; Donoghue, J; Cagnone, G L M; Vaghjiani, V; Brown, K A; Johns, T G; St John, J C

    2015-02-26

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number is strictly regulated during differentiation so that cells with a high requirement for ATP generated through oxidative phosphorylation have high mtDNA copy number, whereas those with a low requirement have few copies. Using immunoprecipitation of DNA methylation on 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), which distinguish between de novo DNA methylation and demethylation, respectively, we set out to determine whether DNA methylation at exon 2 of the human mtDNA-specific polymerase (DNA polymerase gamma A (POLGA)) regulates cell-specific mtDNA copy number in highly proliferative and terminally differentiated cells. Highly proliferative cancer and pluripotent and multipotent cells possessed low mtDNA copy number and were highly methylated at exon 2 of POLGA in contrast to post-mitotic cells. Unlike neural stem cells, cancer cells were unable to differentiate and remained extensively DNA methylated at exon 2 of POLGA. However, mtDNA depletion of cancer cells reduced DNA methylation at exon 2 of POLGA as they replenished mtDNA to form tumours in mice. Glioblastoma cells treated with the DNA demethylation agent 5-azacytidine over 28 days of astrocyte-induced differentiation demethylated exon 2 of POLGA leading to increased mtDNA copy number and expression of the astrocyte endpoint marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). However, the demethylation agent vitamin C (VitC) was unable to sustain increased mtDNA copy number and differentiation, as was the case when VitC was withdrawn after short-term treatment. These data demonstrate that DNA demethylation of POLGA is an essential regulator of mtDNA copy number and cellular fate and that cancer cells are only able to modulate DNA methylation of POLGA and mtDNA copy number in the presence of a DNA demethylation agent that inhibits de novo methyltransferase 1 activity.

  13. [DNA degradation during standard alkaline of thermal denaturation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozhdeniuk, A P; Sulimova, G E; Vaniushin, B F

    1976-01-01

    Essential degradation 8 DNA (up to 10 per cent) with liberation of acid-soluble fragments takes place on the standard alkaline (0,01 M sodium phosphate, pH 12, 60 degrees, 15 min) or thermal (0.06 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.8, 102 degrees C, 15 min) denaturation. This degradation is more or less selective: fraction of low molecular weight fragments, isolated by hydroxyapatite cromatography and eluted by 0.06 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.8 is rich in adenine and thymine and contains about 2 times less 5-methylcytosine than the total wheat germ DNA. The degree of degradation of DNA on thermal denaturation is higher than on alkaline degradation. Therefore while studying reassociation of various DNA, one and the same standard method of DNA denaturation should be used. Besides, both the level of DNA degradation and the nature of the resulting products (fragments) should be taken into account.

  14. DNA methyltransferase 1 mutations and mitochondrial pathology: is mtDNA methylated?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eMaresca

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN and Hereditary sensory neuropathy with dementia and hearing loss (HSN1E are two rare, overlapping neurodegenerative syndromes that have been recently linked to allelic dominant pathogenic mutations in the DNMT1 gene, coding for DNA (cytosine-5-methyltransferase 1. DNMT1 is the enzyme responsible for maintaining the nuclear genome methylation patterns during the DNA replication and repair, thus regulating gene expression. The mutations responsible for ADCA-DN and HSN1E affect the replication foci targeting sequence domain, which regulates DNMT1 binding to chromatin. DNMT1 dysfunction is anticipated to lead to a global alteration of the DNA methylation pattern with predictable downstream consequences on gene expression. Interestingly, ADCA-DN and HSN1E phenotypes share some clinical features typical of mitochondrial diseases, such as optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy and deafness, and some biochemical evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction. The recent discovery of a mitochondrial isoform of DNMT1 and its proposed role in methylating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA suggests that DNMT1 mutations may directly affect mtDNA and mitochondrial physiology. On the basis of this latter finding the link between DNMT1 abnormal activity and mitochondrial dysfunction in ADCA-DN and HSN1E appears intuitive, however mtDNA methylation remains highly debated. In the last years several groups demonstrated the presence of 5-methylcytosine in mtDNA by different approaches, but, on the other end, the opposite evidence that mtDNA is not methylated has also been published. Since over 1500 mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the nuclear genome, the altered methylation of these genes may well have a critical role in leading to the mitochondrial impairment observed in ADCA-DN and HSN1E. Thus, many open questions still remain unanswered, such as why mtDNA should be methylated, and how this process is

  15. Characterization of Interstrand DNA-DNA Cross-Links Using the α-Hemolysin Protein Nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyue; Price, Nathan E; Fang, Xi; Yang, Zhiyu; Gu, Li-Qun; Gates, Kent S

    2015-12-22

    Nanopore-based sensors have been studied extensively as potential tools for DNA sequencing, characterization of epigenetic modifications such as 5-methylcytosine, and detection of microRNA biomarkers. In the studies described here, the α-hemolysin protein nanopore embedded in a lipid bilayer was used for the detection and characterization of interstrand cross-links in duplex DNA. Interstrand cross-links are important lesions in medicinal chemistry and toxicology because they prevent the strand separation that is required for read-out of genetic information from DNA in cells. In addition, interstrand cross-links are used for the stabilization of duplex DNA in structural biology and materials science. Cross-linked DNA fragments produced unmistakable current signatures in the nanopore experiment. Some cross-linked substrates gave irreversible current blocks of >10 min, while others produced long current blocks (10-100 s) before the double-stranded DNA cross-link translocated through the α-hemolysin channel in a voltage-driven manner. The duration of the current block for the different cross-linked substrates examined here may be dictated by the stability of the duplex region left in the vestibule of the nanopore following partial unzipping of the cross-linked DNA. Construction of calibration curves measuring the frequency of cross-link blocking events (1/τon) as a function of cross-link concentration enabled quantitative determination of the amounts of cross-linked DNA present in samples. The unique current signatures generated by cross-linked DNA in the α-HL nanopore may enable the detection and characterization of DNA cross-links that are important in toxicology, medicine, and materials science.

  16. DNA methylation levels associated with race and childhood asthma severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Marcia A; Ciaccio, Christina E; Gigliotti, Nicole M; Rezaiekhaligh, Mo; Siedlik, Jacob A; Kennedy, Kevin; Barnes, Charles S

    2016-12-08

    Asthma is a common chronic childhood disease worldwide. Socioeconomic status, genetic predisposition and environmental factors contribute to its incidence and severity. A disproportionate number of children with asthma are economically disadvantaged and live in substandard housing with potential indoor environmental exposures such as cockroaches, dust mites, rodents and molds. These exposures may manifest through epigenetic mechanisms that can lead to changes in relevant gene expression. We examined the association of global DNA methylation levels with socioeconomic status, asthma severity and race/ethnicity. We measured global DNA methylation in peripheral blood of children with asthma enrolled in the Kansas City Safe and Healthy Homes Program. Inclusion criteria included residing in the same home for a minimum of 4 days per week and total family income of less than 80% of the Kansas City median family income. DNA methylation levels were quantified by an immunoassay that assessed the percentage of 5-methylcytosine. Our results indicate that overall, African American children had higher levels of global DNA methylation than children of other races/ethnicities (p = 0.029). This difference was more pronounced when socioeconomic status and asthma severity were coupled with race/ethnicity (p = 0.042) where low-income, African American children with persistent asthma had significantly elevated methylation levels relative to other races/ethnicities in the same context (p = 0.006, Hedges g = 1.14). Our study demonstrates a significant interaction effect among global DNA methylation levels, asthma severity, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.

  17. Techniques of DNA methylation analysis with nutritional applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansego, Maria L; Milagro, Fermín I; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are likely to play an important role in the regulation of metabolism and body weight through gene-nutrient interactions. This review focuses on methods for analyzing one of the most important epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation, from single nucleotide to global measurement depending on the study goal and scope. In addition, this study highlights the major principles and methods for DNA methylation analysis with emphasis on nutritional applications. Recent developments concerning epigenetic technologies are showing promising results of DNA methylation levels at a single-base resolution and provide the ability to differentiate between 5-methylcytosine and other nucleotide modifications such as 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. A large number of methods can be used for the analysis of DNA methylation such as pyrosequencing™, primer extension or real-time PCR methods, and genome-wide DNA methylation profile from microarray or sequencing-based methods. Researchers should conduct a preliminary analysis focused on the type of validation and information provided by each technique in order to select the best method fitting for their nutritional research interests.

  18. An oligodeoxyribonucleotide containing 5-formyl-2'-deoxycytidine (fC) at the CpG site forms a covalent complex with DNA cytosine-5 methyltransferases (DNMTs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kousuke; Kawamoto, Kyoji; Shimamura, Shintaro; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Matsuda, Akira

    2016-11-15

    5-Methylcytosine (mC) is known to induce epigenetic changes. Ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes produce the further oxidized 5-substituted cytosine derivatives, 5-formylcytosine (fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (caC). However, their roles are unclear thus far. Here, we synthesized oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) containing 5-formyl-2'-deoxycytidine and examined their interactions with DNA cytosine-5 methyltransferase (DNMT). We found that the ODN sequence containing fCpG formed a covalent complex with both bacterial and mouse recombinant DNMTs in the absence of any cofactors. The covalent bonding with DNMT suggests that the fCpG sequence in DNA may play a role in epigenetic regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Tet3 and DNA replication mediate demethylation of both the maternal and paternal genomes in mouse zygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Inoue, Azusa; He, Jin; Liu, Yuting; Lu, Falong; Zhang, Yi

    2014-10-02

    With the exception of imprinted genes and certain repeats, DNA methylation is globally erased during preimplantation development. Recent studies have suggested that Tet3-mediated oxidation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and DNA replication-dependent dilution both contribute to global paternal DNA demethylation, but demethylation of the maternal genome occurs via replication. Here we present genome-scale DNA methylation maps for both the paternal and maternal genomes of Tet3-depleted and/or DNA replication-inhibited zygotes. In both genomes, we found that inhibition of DNA replication blocks DNA demethylation independently from Tet3 function and that Tet3 facilitates DNA demethylation largely by coupling with DNA replication. For both genomes, our data indicate that replication-dependent dilution is the major contributor to demethylation, but Tet3 plays an important role, particularly at certain loci. Our study thus defines the respective functions of Tet3 and DNA replication in paternal DNA demethylation and reveals an unexpected contribution of Tet3 to demethylation of the maternal genome.

  20. Characterization of cytosine methylated regions and 5-cytosine DNA methyltransferase (Ehmeth) in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ohad; Siman-Tov, Rama; Ankri, Serge

    2004-01-01

    The DNA methylation status of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica was heretofore unknown. In the present study, we developed a new technique, based on the affinity of methylated DNA to 5-methylcytosine antibodies, to identify methylated DNA in this parasite. Ribosomal DNA and ribosomal DNA circles were isolated by this method and we confirmed the validity of our approach by sodium bisulfite sequencing. We also report the identification and the characterization of a gene, Ehmeth, encoding a DNA methyltransferase strongly homologous to the human DNA methyltransferase 2 (Dnmt2). Immunofluorescence microscopy using an antibody raised against a recombinant Ehmeth showed that Ehmeth is concentrated in the nuclei of trophozoites. The recombinant Ehmeth has a weak but significant methyltransferase activity when E.histolytica genomic DNA is used as substrate. 5-Azacytidine (5-AzaC), an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferase, was used to study in vivo the role of DNA methylation in E.histolytica. Genomic DNA of trophozoites grown with 5-AzaC (23 microM) was undermethylated and the ability of 5-AzaC-treated trophozoites to kill mammalian cells or to cause liver abscess in hamsters was strongly impaired.

  1. DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  2. Global methylation of blood leukocyte DNA and risk of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Song, Renduo; Wan, Jie; Huff, Chad; Fang, Shenying; Lee, Jeffrey E; Zhao, Hua

    2017-04-01

    Global DNA methylation, possibly influenced by lifestyle and environmental factors, has been suggested to play an active role in carcinogenesis. However, its role in melanoma has rarely been explored. The aims of this study were to evaluate the relationship between melanoma risk and levels of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC), a marker for global DNA methylation, in blood leukocyte DNA, and to determine whether this 5-mC level is influenced by pigmentation and sun exposure. This case-control study included 540 melanoma cases and 540 healthy controls. Overall, melanoma cases had significantly lower levels of 5-mC% than healthy controls (median: 3.24 vs. 3.91, p melanoma (OR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.08, 1.37). A significant dose-response relationship was observed in quartile analysis (p = 0.001). Our results suggest that global hypomethylation in blood leukocyte DNA is associated with increased risk of melanoma and that the level of methylation is influenced by pigmentation and sun exposure. © 2016 UICC.

  3. Whole genome methylation profiling by immunoprecipitation of methylated DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    I provide a protocol for DNA methylation profiling based on immunoprecipitation of methylated DNA using commercially available monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize 5-methylcytosine. Quantification of the level of enrichment of the resulting DNA enables DNA methylation to be assayed for any genomic locus, including entire chromosomes or genomes if appropriate microarray or high-throughput sequencing platforms are used. In previous studies (1, 2), I have used hybridization to oligonucleotide arrays from Roche Nimblegen Inc, which allow any genomic region of interest to be interrogated, dependent on the array design. For example, using modern tiling arrays comprising millions of oligonucleotide probes, several complete human chromosomes can be assayed at densities of one probe per 100 bp or greater, sufficient to yield high-quality data. However, other methods such as quantitative real-time PCR or high-throughput sequencing can be used, giving either measurement of methylation at a single locus or across the entire genome, respectively. While the data produced by single locus assays is relatively simple to analyze and interpret, global assays such as microarrays or high-throughput sequencing require more complex statistical approaches in order to effectively identify regions of differential methylation, and a brief outline of some approaches is given.

  4. Cistrome and Epicistrome Features Shape the Regulatory DNA Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ronan C; Huang, Shao-Shan Carol; Song, Liang; Lewsey, Mathew G; Bartlett, Anna; Nery, Joseph R; Galli, Mary; Gallavotti, Andrea; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-05-19

    The cistrome is the complete set of transcription factor (TF) binding sites (cis-elements) in an organism, while an epicistrome incorporates tissue-specific DNA chemical modifications and TF-specific chemical sensitivities into these binding profiles. Robust methods to construct comprehensive cistrome and epicistrome maps are critical for elucidating complex transcriptional networks that underlie growth, behavior, and disease. Here, we describe DNA affinity purification sequencing (DAP-seq), a high-throughput TF binding site discovery method that interrogates genomic DNA with in-vitro-expressed TFs. Using DAP-seq, we defined the Arabidopsis cistrome by resolving motifs and peaks for 529 TFs. Because genomic DNA used in DAP-seq retains 5-methylcytosines, we determined that >75% (248/327) of Arabidopsis TFs surveyed were methylation sensitive, a property that strongly impacts the epicistrome landscape. DAP-seq datasets also yielded insight into the biology and binding site architecture of numerous TFs, demonstrating the value of DAP-seq for cost-effective cistromic and epicistromic annotation in any organism.

  5. Crizotinib Treatment Combined with Resection and Whole-brain Radiation Therapy 
in A ROS1 Rearranged Lung Adenocarcinoma with Brain Metastasis: 
Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min ZHANG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer with brain metastasis had poor prognosis. Crizotinib had been confirmed to be used in ROS1 (C-ros oncogene 1 receptor tyrosine kinase rearranged lung adenocarcinoma, but its efficacy in lung cancer with brain metastasis was poor due to the blood brain barrier. In the present study, we reported one case of ROS1 fusion lung adenocarcinoma with symptomatic brain matastasis, who was treated with brain metastases resection, crizotinib, and whole brain radiotherapy plus boost to residual brain metastasis. The safety and efficacy was summarized. Methods At first, surgical resection was used to relive mass effect and to biopsy. Then crizotinib (250 mg, bid was chosen for the existence of ROS1 fusion gene. Whole brain radiotherapy plus boost to residual brain metastasis were used after surgery. Objective response was evaluated by Response Evaluation Criteriation in Solid Tumours (RECIST v1.1 and brain metastasis were evaluated by computer tomography (CT/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI image. Adverse events were evaluated according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTC AE v4.0. Results After taking crizotinib for 3 months, the lung lesions were close to complete response (CR, the brain metastasis were partial response (PR, the abdomen metastasis were CR and the symptom of blurred vision relieved. Conclusion Crizotinib combined with palliative operation and radiation therapy (WBRT plus boost to residual brain metastasis in the treatment of ROS1 fusion gene positive lung adenocarcinoma with symptomatic brain metastases, can effectively control intracranial lesions with good tolerance.

  6. Different Levels of DNA Methylation Detected in Human Sperms after Morphological Selection Using High Magnification Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nino Guy Cassuto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze DNA methylation levels between two groups of spermatozoa taken from the same sample, following morphological selection by high magnification (HM at 6100x microscopy. A prospective study was conducted and studied 876 spermatozoa from 10 randomly selected men. Sperm morphology was characterized at HM according to criteria previously established. High-scoring Score 6 and low-scoring Score 0 sperm were selected. Sperm DNA methylation level was assessed using an immunoassay method targeting 5-methylcytosine residues by fluorescence microscopy with imaging analysis system to detect DNA methylation in single spermatozoon. Results. In total, 448 S6 spermatozoa and 428 S0 spermatozoa were analyzed. A strong relationship was found between sperm DNA methylation levels and sperm morphology observed at HM. Sperm DNA methylation level in the S6 group was significantly lower compared with that in the S0 group (p<10-6, OR = 2.4; and p<0.001, as determined using the Wilcoxon test. Conclusion. Differences in DNA methylation levels are associated with sperm morphology variations as observed at HM, which allows spermatozoa with abnormal levels to be discarded and ultimately decrease birth defects, malformations, and epigenetic diseases that may be transmitted from sperm to offspring in ICSI.

  7. miRNA gene promoters are frequent targets of aberrant DNA methylation in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrba, Lukas; Muñoz-Rodríguez, José L; Stampfer, Martha R; Futscher, Bernard W

    2013-01-01

    miRNAs are important regulators of gene expression that are frequently deregulated in cancer, with aberrant DNA methylation being an epigenetic mechanism involved in this process. We previously identified miRNA promoter regions active in normal mammary cell types and here we analyzed which of these promoters are targets of aberrant DNA methylation in human breast cancer cell lines and breast tumor specimens. Using 5-methylcytosine immunoprecipitation coupled to miRNA tiling microarray hybridization, we performed comprehensive evaluation of DNA methylation of miRNA gene promoters in breast cancer. We found almost one third (55/167) of miRNA promoters were targets for aberrant methylation in breast cancer cell lines. Breast tumor specimens displayed DNA methylation of majority of these miRNA promoters, indicating that these changes in DNA methylation might be clinically relevant. Aberrantly methylated miRNA promoters were, similar to protein coding genes, enriched for promoters targeted by polycomb in normal cells. Detailed analysis of selected miRNA promoters revealed decreased expression of miRNA linked to increased promoter methylation for mir-31, mir-130a, let-7a-3/let-7b, mir-155, mir-137 and mir-34b/mir-34c genes. The proportion of miRNA promoters we found aberrantly methylated in breast cancer is several fold larger than that observed for protein coding genes, indicating an important role of DNA methylation in miRNA deregulation in cancer.

  8. Effects of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility and nucleosome mechanical stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Thuy T. M.; Yoo, Jejoong; Dai, Qing; Zhang, Qiucen; He, Chuan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-02-01

    Cytosine can undergo modifications, forming 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and its oxidized products 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Despite their importance as epigenetic markers and as central players in cellular processes, it is not well understood how these modifications influence physical properties of DNA and chromatin. Here we report a comprehensive survey of the effect of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility. We find that even a single copy of 5-fC increases DNA flexibility markedly. 5-mC reduces and 5-hmC enhances flexibility, and 5-caC does not have a measurable effect. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these modifications promote or dampen structural fluctuations, likely through competing effects of base polarity and steric hindrance, without changing the average structure. The increase in DNA flexibility increases the mechanical stability of the nucleosome and vice versa, suggesting a gene regulation mechanism where cytosine modifications change the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA through their effects on DNA flexibility.

  9. Feasibility study of molecular memory device based on DNA using methylation to store information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liming; Qiu, Wanzhi; Al-Dirini, Feras; Hossain, Faruque M.; Evans, Robin; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-07-01

    DNA, because of its robustness and dense information storage capability, has been proposed as a potential candidate for next-generation storage media. However, encoding information into the DNA sequence requires molecular synthesis technology, which to date is costly and prone to synthesis errors. Reading the DNA strand information is also complex. Ideally, DNA storage will provide methods for modifying stored information. Here, we conduct a feasibility study investigating the use of the DNA 5-methylcytosine (5mC) methylation state as a molecular memory to store information. We propose a new 1-bit memory device and study, based on the density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method, the feasibility of electrically reading the information. Our results show that changes to methylation states lead to changes in the peak of negative differential resistance which can be used to interrogate memory state. Our work demonstrates a new memory concept based on methylation state which can be beneficial in the design of next generation DNA based molecular electronic memory devices.

  10. Different Levels of DNA Methylation Detected in Human Sperms after Morphological Selection Using High Magnification Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassuto, Nino Guy; Montjean, Debbie; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre; Bouret, Dominique; Marzouk, Flora; Copin, Henri; Benkhalifa, Moncef

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To analyze DNA methylation levels between two groups of spermatozoa taken from the same sample, following morphological selection by high magnification (HM) at 6100x microscopy. A prospective study was conducted and studied 876 spermatozoa from 10 randomly selected men. Sperm morphology was characterized at HM according to criteria previously established. High-scoring Score 6 and low-scoring Score 0 sperm were selected. Sperm DNA methylation level was assessed using an immunoassay method targeting 5-methylcytosine residues by fluorescence microscopy with imaging analysis system to detect DNA methylation in single spermatozoon. Results. In total, 448 S6 spermatozoa and 428 S0 spermatozoa were analyzed. A strong relationship was found between sperm DNA methylation levels and sperm morphology observed at HM. Sperm DNA methylation level in the S6 group was significantly lower compared with that in the S0 group (p < 10−6), OR = 2.4; and p < 0.001, as determined using the Wilcoxon test. Conclusion. Differences in DNA methylation levels are associated with sperm morphology variations as observed at HM, which allows spermatozoa with abnormal levels to be discarded and ultimately decrease birth defects, malformations, and epigenetic diseases that may be transmitted from sperm to offspring in ICSI. PMID:27148551

  11. Artifactual mutations resulting from DNA lesions limit detection levels in ultrasensitive sequencing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeithuber, Barbara; Makova, Kateryna D; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The need in cancer research or evolutionary biology to detect rare mutations or variants present at very low frequencies (DNA lesions introduce important error sources in ultrasensitive technologies such as single molecule PCR (smPCR) applications (e.g. droplet-digital PCR), or next-generation sequencing (NGS) based methods. Using templates with known amplifiable lesions (8-oxoguanine, deaminated 5-methylcytosine, uracil, and DNA heteroduplexes), we assessed with smPCR and duplex sequencing that templates with these lesions were amplified very efficiently by proofreading polymerases (except uracil), leading to G->T, and to a lesser extent, to unreported G->C substitutions at 8-oxoguanine lesions, and C->T transitions in amplified uracil containing templates. Long heat incubations common in many DNA extraction protocols significantly increased the number of G->T substitutions. Moreover, in ∼50-80% smPCR reactions we observed the random amplification preference of only one of both DNA strands explaining the known 'PCR jackpot effect', with the result that a lesion became indistinguishable from a true mutation or variant. Finally, we showed that artifactual mutations derived from uracil and 8-oxoguanine could be significantly reduced by DNA repair enzymes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  12. DNA replication factor C1 mediates genomic stability and transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Qian

    2010-07-01

    Genetic screening identified a suppressor of ros1-1, a mutant of REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 (ROS1; encoding a DNA demethylation protein). The suppressor is a mutation in the gene encoding the largest subunit of replication factor C (RFC1). This mutation of RFC1 reactivates the unlinked 35S-NPTII transgene, which is silenced in ros1 and also increases expression of the pericentromeric Athila retrotransposons named transcriptional silent information in a DNA methylationindependent manner. rfc1 is more sensitive than the wild type to the DNA-damaging agent methylmethane sulphonate and to the DNA inter- and intra- cross-linking agent cisplatin. The rfc1 mutant constitutively expresses the G2/M-specific cyclin CycB1;1 and other DNA repair-related genes. Treatment with DNA-damaging agents mimics the rfc1 mutation in releasing the silenced 35S-NPTII, suggesting that spontaneously induced genomic instability caused by the rfc1 mutation might partially contribute to the released transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). The frequency of somatic homologous recombination is significantly increased in the rfc1 mutant. Interestingly, ros1 mutants show increased telomere length, but rfc1 mutants show decreased telomere length and reduced expression of telomerase. Our results suggest that RFC1 helps mediate genomic stability and TGS in Arabidopsis thaliana. © 2010 American Society of Plant Biologists.

  13. Changes in the pattern of DNA methylation associate with twin discordance in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javierre, Biola M.; Fernandez, Agustin F.; Richter, Julia; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Martin-Subero, J. Ignacio; Rodriguez-Ubreva, Javier; Berdasco, Maria; Fraga, Mario F.; O'Hanlon, Terrance P.; Rider, Lisa G.; Jacinto, Filipe V.; Lopez-Longo, F. Javier; Dopazo, Joaquin; Forn, Marta; Peinado, Miguel A.; Carreño, Luis; Sawalha, Amr H.; Harley, John B.; Siebert, Reiner; Esteller, Manel; Miller, Frederick W.; Ballestar, Esteban

    2010-01-01

    Monozygotic (MZ) twins are partially concordant for most complex diseases, including autoimmune disorders. Whereas phenotypic concordance can be used to study heritability, discordance suggests the role of non-genetic factors. In autoimmune diseases, environmentally driven epigenetic changes are thought to contribute to their etiology. Here we report the first high-throughput and candidate sequence analyses of DNA methylation to investigate discordance for autoimmune disease in twins. We used a cohort of MZ twins discordant for three diseases whose clinical signs often overlap: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, and dermatomyositis. Only MZ twins discordant for SLE featured widespread changes in the DNA methylation status of a significant number of genes. Gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment in categories associated with immune function. Individual analysis confirmed the existence of DNA methylation and expression changes in genes relevant to SLE pathogenesis. These changes occurred in parallel with a global decrease in the 5-methylcytosine content that was concomitantly accompanied with changes in DNA methylation and expression levels of ribosomal RNA genes, although no changes in repetitive sequences were found. Our findings not only identify potentially relevant DNA methylation markers for the clinical characterization of SLE patients but also support the notion that epigenetic changes may be critical in the clinical manifestations of autoimmune disease. PMID:20028698

  14. DNA methylation temporal profiling following peripheral versus central nervous system axotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Ricco; Puttagunta, Radhika; Nguyen, Tuan; Di Giovanni, Simone

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms responsible for the gene expression pattern associated with axotomy-dependent signaling affecting the neuronal phenotype, including the axonal regenerative program, remain unclear. To further this understanding, we recently performed DNA methylation temporal profiling in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after axotomy of the central spinal (non-regenerating) and of the peripheral sciatic nerve (regenerating) axonal branches. DNA methylation microarrays for mouse gene promoters and CpG islands (Roche/NimbleGen) were employed after immunoprecipitation of 5-methylcytosine-DNA. Here we provide a detailed data descriptor of this DNA methylation dataset, which allows in depth evaluation of the experimental design, assessment of data reproducibility and a full interactive operator-based systematic data analysis. In fact, we offer a methylation 'hit' scoring map of the whole microarray data in a workable spreadsheet that allows data sorting by genes, conditions or hits of interests that is ready for functional gene annotation and classification. This dataset allows investigators bioinformatic comparison to other epigenetic and gene expression datasets and further experimental characterization of the role of DNA methylation in axotomy-dependent pathways.

  15. Sensing DNA methylation in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Tal; Isakov, Elada; Harony, Hala; Fisher, Ohad; Siman-Tov, Rama; Ankri, Serge

    2006-12-01

    In the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, 5-methylcytosine (m5C) was found predominantly in repetitive elements. Its formation is catalysed by Ehmeth, a DNA methyltransferase that belongs to the Dnmt2 subfamily. Here we describe a 32 kDa nuclear protein that binds in vitro with higher affinity to the methylated form of a DNA encoding a reverse transcriptase of an autonomous non-long-terminal repeat retrotransposon (RT LINE) compared with the non-methylated RT LINE. This protein, named E. histolytica-methylated LINE binding protein (EhMLBP), was purified from E. histolytica nuclear lysate, identified by mass spectrometry, and its corresponding gene was cloned. EhMLBP corresponds to a gene of unknown function that shares strong homology with putative proteins present in Entamoeba dispar and Entamoeba invadens. In contrast, the homology dropped dramatically when non-Entamoebidae sequences were considered and only a weak sequence identity was found with Trypanosoma and several prokaryotic histone H1. Recombinant EhMLBP showed the same binding preference for methylated RT LINE as the endogenous EhMLBP. Deletion mapping analysis localized the DNA binding region at the C-terminal part of the protein. This region is sufficient to assure the binding to methylated RT LINE with high affinity. Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy, using an antibody raised against EhMLBP, showed that it has a nuclear localization. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) confirmed that EhMLBP interacts with RT LINE in vivo. Finally, we showed that EhMLBP can also bind rDNA episome, a DNA that is methylated in the parasite. This suggests that EhMLBP may serve as a sensor of methylated repetitive DNA. This is the first report of a DNA-methylated binding activity in protozoa.

  16. Novel photodynamic effect of a psoralen-conjugated oligonucleotide for the discrimination of the methylation of cytosine in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamayoshi, Asako; Matsuyama, Yohei; Kushida, Mikihiko; Kobori, Akio; Murakami, Akira

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation and demethylation significantly affect the deactivation and activation processes of gene expression significantly. In particular, C-5-methylation of cytosine in the CpG islands is important for the epigenetic modification in genes, which plays a key role in regulating gene expression. The determination of the location and frequency of DNA methylation is important for the elucidation of the mechanisms of cell differentiation and carcinogenesis. Here we designed a psoralen-conjugated oligonucleotide (PS-oligo) for the discrimination of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) in DNA. The cross-linking behavior of psoralen derivatives with pyrimidine bases, such as thymine, uracil and cytosine has been well discussed, but there are no reports which have examined whether cross-linking efficiency of psoralen with cytosine would be changed with or without C-5 methylation. We found that the cross-linking efficiency of PS-oligo with target-DNA containing 5-mC was greatly increased compared to the case of target-DNA without 5-mC, approximately seven-fold higher. Here we report a new aspect of the photocross-linking behavior of psoralen with 5-mC that is applicable to a simple, sequence-specific and quantitative analysis for the discrimination of 5-mC in DNA, which can be applicable to study the epigenetic behavior of gene expressions.

  17. Changes in liver cell DNA methylation status in diabetic mice affect its FT-IR characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedicto de Campos Vidal

    Full Text Available Lower levels of cytosine methylation have been found in the liver cell DNA from non-obese diabetic (NOD mice under hyperglycemic conditions. Because the Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR profiles of dry DNA samples are differently affected by DNA base composition, single-stranded form and histone binding, it is expected that the methylation status in the DNA could also affect its FT-IR profile.The DNA FT-IR signatures obtained from the liver cell nuclei of hyperglycemic and normoglycemic NOD mice of the same age were compared. Dried DNA samples were examined in an IR microspectroscope equipped with an all-reflecting objective (ARO and adequate software.Changes in DNA cytosine methylation levels induced by hyperglycemia in mouse liver cells produced changes in the respective DNA FT-IR profiles, revealing modifications to the vibrational intensities and frequencies of several chemical markers, including νas -CH3 stretching vibrations in the 5-methylcytosine methyl group. A smaller band area reflecting lower energy absorbed in the DNA was found in the hyperglycemic mice and assumed to be related to the lower levels of -CH3 groups. Other spectral differences were found at 1700-1500 cm(-1 and in the fingerprint region, and a slight change in the DNA conformation at the lower DNA methylation levels was suggested for the hyperglycemic mice. The changes that affect cytosine methylation levels certainly affect the DNA-protein interactions and, consequently, gene expression in liver cells from the hyperglycemic NOD mice.

  18. Fiber optofluidic biosensor for the label-free detection of DNA hybridization and methylation based on an in-line tunable mode coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ran; Lu, Dan-Feng; Cheng, Jin; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Lan; Xu, Jian-Dong; Qi, Zhi-Mei

    2016-12-15

    An optical fiber optofluidic biosensor for the detection of DNA hybridization and methylation has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. An in-line fiber Michelson interferometer was formed in the photonic crystal fiber. A micrhole in the collapsed region, which combined the tunable mode coupler and optofluidic channel, was fabricated by using femtosecond laser micromachining. The mode field diameter of the guided light is changed with the refractive index in the optofluidic channel, which results in the tunable coupling ratio. Label-free detections of the DNA hybridization and methylation have been experimentally demonstrated. The probe single stranded DNA (ssDNA) was bound with the surface of the optofluidic channel through the Poly-l-lysine layer, and the hybridization between a short 22-mer probe ssDNA and a complementary target ssDNA was carried out and detected by interrogating the fringe visibility of the reflection spectrum. Then, the DNA methylation was also detected through the binding between the methylated DNA and the 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) monoclonal antibody. The experiments results demonstrate that the limit of detection of 5nM is achieved, establishing the tunable mode coupler as a sensitive and versatile biosensor. The sensitive optical fiber optofluidic biosensor possesses high specificity and low temperature cross-sensitivity.

  19. DNA methylation is a determinative element of photosynthesis gene expression in amyloplasts from liquid-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngernprasirtsiri, J; Kobayashi, H; Akazawa, T

    1990-10-01

    Transcriptional regulation has been shown to operate as a selective control mechanism of expression of photosynthetic genes in the nonphotosynthetic plastids, amyloplasts, of a white-wild cell line of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.). To elaborate the mechanisms governing the transcriptional regulation at the molecular level, we have examined the template activity of the amyloplast DNA compared to the chloroplast DNA by using the in vitro run-off transcription assay system with extracts of the two plastid types. The results of these assays clearly indicate that most of the amyloplast DNA regions do not serve as a template for the in vitro transcription regardless of the plastid extracts; this is in contrast to the chloroplast DNA which serves as an active template. It is highly likely that the template activity of amyloplast DNA per se is the modulating element of transcriptional regulation. Parallel experiments determining the DNA base content by HPLC analysis have shown that a variety of methylated bases, especially 5-methylcytosine, are localized in the DNA regions containing suppressed genes of the amyloplast genome. In sharp contrast, methylated bases were undetectable in the expressed gene regions of amyloplast and whole chloroplast genomes. The overall findings strongly support the notion that DNA methylation is involved in the selective suppression of photosynthetic genes in the nonphotosynthetic plastids of cultured sycamore cells.

  20. The role of DNA methylation in aging, rejuvenation, and age-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Adiv A; Akman, Kemal; Calimport, Stuart R G; Wuttke, Daniel; Stolzing, Alexandra; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-10-01

    DNA methylation is a major control program that modulates gene expression in a plethora of organisms. Gene silencing through methylation occurs through the activity of DNA methyltransferases, enzymes that transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the carbon 5 position of cytosine. DNA methylation patterns are established by the de novo DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) DNMT3A and DNMT3B and are subsequently maintained by DNMT1. Aging and age-related diseases include defined changes in 5-methylcytosine content and are generally characterized by genome-wide hypomethylation and promoter-specific hypermethylation. These changes in the epigenetic landscape represent potential disease biomarkers and are thought to contribute to age-related pathologies, such as cancer, osteoarthritis, and neurodegeneration. Some diseases, such as a hereditary form of sensory neuropathy accompanied by dementia, are directly caused by methylomic changes. Epigenetic modifications, however, are reversible and are therefore a prime target for therapeutic intervention. Numerous drugs that specifically target DNMTs are being tested in ongoing clinical trials for a variety of cancers, and data from finished trials demonstrate that some, such as 5-azacytidine, may even be superior to standard care. DNMTs, demethylases, and associated partners are dynamically shaping the methylome and demonstrate great promise with regard to rejuvenation.

  1. Analysis of the machinery and intermediates of the 5hmC-mediated DNA demethylation pathway in aging on samples from the MARK-AGE Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Elisabetta; Zampieri, Michele; Malavolta, Marco; Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Calabrese, Roberta; Guastafierro, Tiziana; Reale, Anna; Franceschi, Claudio; Hervonen, Antti; Koller, Bernhard; Bernhardt, Jürgen; Slagboom, P. Eline; Toussaint, Olivier; Sikora, Ewa; Gonos, Efstathios S.; Breusing, Nicolle; Grune, Tilman; Jansen, Eugène; Dollé, Martijn E.T.; Moreno-Villanueva, María; Sindlinger, Thilo; Bürkle, Alexander; Ciccarone, Fabio; Caiafa, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Gradual changes in the DNA methylation landscape occur throughout aging virtually in all human tissues. A widespread reduction of 5-methylcytosine (5mC), associated with highly reproducible site-specific hypermethylation, characterizes the genome in aging. Therefore, an equilibrium seems to exist between general and directional deregulating events concerning DNA methylation controllers, which may underpin the age-related epigenetic changes. In this context, 5mC-hydroxylases (TET enzymes) are new potential players. In fact, TETs catalyze the stepwise oxidation of 5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC), driving the DNA demethylation process based on thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG)-mediated DNA repair pathway. The present paper reports the expression of DNA hydroxymethylation components, the levels of 5hmC and of its derivatives in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of age-stratified donors recruited in several European countries in the context of the EU Project ‘MARK-AGE’. The results provide evidence for an age-related decline of TET1, TET3 and TDG gene expression along with a decrease of 5hmC and an accumulation of 5caC. These associations were independent of confounding variables, including recruitment center, gender and leukocyte composition. The observed impairment of 5hmC-mediated DNA demethylation pathway in blood cells may lead to aberrant transcriptional programs in the elderly. PMID:27587280

  2. A reusable laser wrapped graphene-Ag array based SERS sensor for trace detection of genomic DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Lei; Hu, Yaowu; Zhu, Lihua; Cheng, Gary J; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2017-06-15

    Methylation is an important epigenetic DNA modification that governs gene expression. The genomic level of methylated DNA and its derivatives may serve as important indicators for the initiation and progression of cancers among other diseases. In this effort we propose a new laser wrapped graphene-Ag array as a highly sensitive Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensor for the detection of methylated DNA (5-methylcytosine, 5mC) and its oxidation derivatives namely 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Excellent sensitivity and reproducibility were achieved with the laser wrapped graphene-Ag array as a substrate, with the graphene layer acting as an enhancer of the SERS signal due to the effective coupling of the electromagnetic field. In summary, fast (less than 60min) and sensitive (at a limit of detection 0.2pgμL(-1), ie. 1.8pmolL(-1)) detection of methylated DNA and its derivatives was realized with the ability to distinguish methylation levels from a mixture at 0.1%. The sensitive and accurate detection in DNA extracted from cells was also accomplished. Furthermore our graphene wrapped approach circumvents the direct interaction between Ag array and the analytes, thus improving the reusability of the SERS substrate even after five cycles of use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantitative sequencing of 5-formylcytosine in DNA at single-base resolution

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    Booth, Michael J.; Marsico, Giovanni; Bachman, Martin; Beraldi, Dario; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the cytosine modifications 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and 5-formylcytosine (5fC) were found to exist in the genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of a wide range of mammalian cell types. It is now important to understand their role in normal biological function and disease. Here we introduce reduced bisulfite sequencing (redBS-Seq), a quantitative method to decode 5fC in DNA at single-base resolution, based on a selective chemical reduction of 5fC to 5hmC followed by bisulfite treatment. After extensive validation on synthetic and genomic DNA, we combined redBS-Seq and oxidative bisulfite sequencing (oxBS-Seq) to generate the first combined genomic map of 5-methylcytosine, 5hmC and 5fC in mouse embryonic stem cells. Our experiments revealed that in certain genomic locations 5fC is present at comparable levels to 5hmC and 5mC. The combination of these chemical methods can quantify and precisely map these three cytosine derivatives in the genome and will help provide insights into their function.

  4. Suppression of TET1-Dependent DNA Demethylation Is Essential for KRAS-Mediated Transformation

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    Bo-Kuan Wu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypermethylation-mediated tumor suppressor gene (TSG silencing is a central epigenetic alteration in RAS-dependent tumorigenesis. Ten-eleven translocation (TET enzymes can depress DNA methylation by hydroxylation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC bases to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC. Here, we report that suppression of TET1 is required for KRAS-induced DNA hypermethylation and cellular transformation. In distinct nonmalignant cell lines, oncogenic KRAS promotes transformation by inhibiting TET1 expression via the ERK-signaling pathway. This reduces chromatin occupancy of TET1 at TSG promoters, lowers levels of 5hmC, and increases levels of 5mC and 5mC-dependent transcriptional silencing. Restoration of TET1 expression by ERK pathway inhibition or ectopic TET1 reintroduction in KRAS-transformed cells reactivates TSGs and inhibits colony formation. KRAS knockdown increases TET1 expression and diminishes colony-forming ability, whereas KRAS/TET1 double knockdown bypasses the KRAS dependence of KRAS-addicted cancer cells. Thus, suppression of TET1-dependent DNA demethylation is critical for KRAS-mediated transformation.

  5. DNA Hydroxymethylation Profiling Reveals that WT1 Mutations Result in Loss of TET2 Function in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Raajit Rampal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations in IDH1/IDH2 and TET2 result in impaired TET2-mediated conversion of 5-methylcytosine (5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC. The observation that WT1 inactivating mutations anticorrelate with TET2/IDH1/IDH2 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML led us to hypothesize that WT1 mutations may impact TET2 function. WT1 mutant AML patients have reduced 5hmC levels similar to TET2/IDH1/IDH2 mutant AML. These mutations are characterized by convergent, site-specific alterations in DNA hydroxymethylation, which drive differential gene expression more than alterations in DNA promoter methylation. WT1 overexpression increases global levels of 5hmC, and WT1 silencing reduced 5hmC levels. WT1 physically interacts with TET2 and TET3, and WT1 loss of function results in a similar hematopoietic differentiation phenotype as observed with TET2 deficiency. These data provide a role for WT1 in regulating DNA hydroxymethylation and suggest that TET2 IDH1/IDH2 and WT1 mutations define an AML subtype defined by dysregulated DNA hydroxymethylation.

  6. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated phage resistance is not impeded by the DNA modifications of phage T4.

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    Stephanie J Yaung

    Full Text Available Bacteria rely on two known DNA-level defenses against their bacteriophage predators: restriction-modification and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR-CRISPR-associated (Cas systems. Certain phages have evolved countermeasures that are known to block endonucleases. For example, phage T4 not only adds hydroxymethyl groups to all of its cytosines, but also glucosylates them, a strategy that defeats almost all restriction enzymes. We sought to determine whether these DNA modifications can similarly impede CRISPR-based defenses. In a bioinformatics search, we found naturally occurring CRISPR spacers that potentially target phages known to modify their DNA. Experimentally, we show that the Cas9 nuclease from the Type II CRISPR system of Streptococcus pyogenes can overcome a variety of DNA modifications in Escherichia coli. The levels of Cas9-mediated phage resistance to bacteriophage T4 and the mutant phage T4 gt, which contains hydroxymethylated but not glucosylated cytosines, were comparable to phages with unmodified cytosines, T7 and the T4-like phage RB49. Our results demonstrate that Cas9 is not impeded by N6-methyladenine, 5-methylcytosine, 5-hydroxymethylated cytosine, or glucosylated 5-hydroxymethylated cytosine.

  7. The dynamics of DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation during amelogenesis.

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    Yoshioka, Hirotaka; Minamizaki, Tomoko; Yoshiko, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    Amelogenesis is a multistep process that relies on specific temporal and spatial signaling networks between the dental epithelium and mesenchymal tissues. Epigenetic modifications of key developmental genes in this process may be closely linked to a network of molecular events. However, the role of epigenetic regulation in amelogenesis remains unclear. Here, we have uncovered the spatial distributions of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) to determine epigenetic events in the mandibular incisors of mice. Immunohistochemistry and dot blotting showed that 5-hmC in ameloblasts increased from the secretory stage to the later maturation stage. We also demonstrated the distribution of 5-mC-positive ameloblasts with punctate nuclear labeling from sometime after the initiation of the secretory stage to the later maturation stage; however, dot blotting failed to detect this change. No obvious alteration of 5-mC/5-hmC staining in odontoblasts and dental pulp cells was observed. Concomitant with quantitative expression data, immunohistochemistry showed that maintenance DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 was highly expressed in immature dental epithelial cells and subsequently decreased at later stages of development. Meanwhile, de novo DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b and DNA demethylase Tet family genes were universally expressed, except Tet1 that was highly expressed in immature dental epithelial cells. Thus, DNMT1 may sustain the undifferentiated status of dental epithelial cells through the maintenance of DNA methylation, while the hydroxylation of 5-mC may occur through the whole differentiation process by TET activity. Taken together, these data indicate that the dynamic changes of 5-mC and 5-hmC may be critical for the regulation of amelogenesis.

  8. TALEored Epigenetics: A DNA-Binding Scaffold for Programmable Epigenome Editing and Analysis.

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    Kubik, Grzegorz; Summerer, Daniel

    2016-06-02

    Epigenetic modification of the cytosine 5-position is an important regulator of gene expression with essential roles in genome stability, development, and disease. In addition to 5-methylcytosine (mC), the oxidized mC derivatives 5-hydroxymethyl-, 5-formyl-, and 5-carboxylcytosine (hmC, fC, and caC) have recently been discovered. These are intermediates of an active demethylation pathway but might also represent new epigenetic marks with individual biological roles. This increase in chemical complexity of DNA-encoded information has created a pressing need for new approaches that allow reading and editing of this information. Transcription-activator-like effectors (TALEs) are DNA-binding domains with programmable sequence selectivity that enable the direct reading of epigenetic cytosine modifications but can also guide enzymatic editing domains to genomic loci of choice. Here, we review recent advances in employing TALEs for these applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. [Novel Approaches in DNA Methylation Studies - MS-HRM Analysis and Electrochemistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartošík, M; Ondroušková, E

    Cytosine methylation in DNA is an epigenetic mechanism regulating gene expression and plays a vital role in cell differentiation or proliferation. Tumor cells often exhibit aberrant DNA methylation, e.g. hypermethylation of tumor suppressor gene promoters. New methods, capable of determining methylation status of specific DNA sequences, are thus being developed. Among them, MS-HRM (methylation-specific high resolution melting) and electrochemistry offer relatively inexpensive instrumentation, fast assay times and possibility of screening multiple samples/DNA regions simultaneously. MS-HRM is due to its sensitivity and simplicity an interesting alternative to already established techniques, including methylation-specific PCR or bisulfite sequencing. Electrochemistry, when combined with suitable electroactive labels and electrode surfaces, has been applied in several unique strategies for discrimination of cytosines and methylcytosines. Both techniques were successfully tested in analysis of DNA methylation within promoters of important tumor suppressor genes and could thus help in achieving more precise diagnostics and prognostics of cancer. Aberrant methylation of promoters has already been described in hundreds of genes associated with tumorigenesis and could serve as important biomarker if new methods applicable into clinical practice are sufficiently advanced.Key words: DNA methylation - 5-methylcytosine - HRM analysis - melting temperature - DNA duplex - electrochemistry - nucleic acid hybridizationThis work was supported by MEYS - NPS I - LO1413.The authors declare they have no potential conflicts of interest concerning drugs, products, or services used in the study.The Editorial Board declares that the manuscript met the ICMJE recommendation for biomedical papers.Submitted: 6. 5. 2016Accepted: 16. 5. 2016.

  10. Strategies for discovery and validation of methylated and hydroxymethylated DNA biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhov-Mitsel, Ekaterina; Bapat, Bharati

    2012-10-01

    DNA methylation, consisting of the addition of a methyl group at the fifth-position of cytosine in a CpG dinucleotide, is one of the most well-studied epigenetic mechanisms in mammals with important functions in normal and disease biology. Disease-specific aberrant DNA methylation is a well-recognized hallmark of many complex diseases. Accordingly, various studies have focused on characterizing unique DNA methylation marks associated with distinct stages of disease development as they may serve as useful biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, prediction of response to therapy, or disease monitoring. Recently, novel CpG dinucleotide modifications with potential regulatory roles such as 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine, and 5-carboxylcytosine have been described. These potential epigenetic marks cannot be distinguished from 5-methylcytosine by many current strategies and may potentially compromise assessment and interpretation of methylation data. A large number of strategies have been described for the discovery and validation of DNA methylation-based biomarkers, each with its own advantages and limitations. These strategies can be classified into three main categories: restriction enzyme digestion, affinity-based analysis, and bisulfite modification. In general, candidate biomarkers are discovered using large-scale, genome-wide, methylation sequencing, and/or microarray-based profiling strategies. Following discovery, biomarker performance is validated in large independent cohorts using highly targeted locus-specific assays. There are still many challenges to the effective implementation of DNA methylation-based biomarkers. Emerging innovative methylation and hydroxymethylation detection strategies are focused on addressing these gaps in the field of epigenetics. The development of DNA methylation- and hydroxymethylation-based biomarkers is an exciting and rapidly evolving area of research that holds promise for potential applications in diverse clinical

  11. Distinctive Klf4 mutants determine preference for DNA methylation status

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    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Wang, Dongxue; Steves, Alyse N.; Jin, Peng; Blumenthal, Robert M.; Zhang, Xing; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2016-09-04

    Reprogramming of mammalian genome methylation is critically important but poorly understood. Klf4, a transcription factor directing reprogramming, contains a DNA binding domain with three consecutive C2H2 zinc fingers. Klf4 recognizes CpG or TpG within a specific sequence. Mouse Klf4 DNA binding domain has roughly equal affinity for methylated CpG or TpG, and slightly lower affinity for unmodified CpG. The structural basis for this key preference is unclear, though the side chain of Glu446 is known to contact the methyl group of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) or thymine (5-methyluracil). We examined the role of Glu446 by mutagenesis. Substituting Glu446 with aspartate (E446D) resulted in preference for unmodified cytosine, due to decreased affinity for 5mC. In contrast, substituting Glu446 with proline (E446P) increased affinity for 5mC by two orders of magnitude. Structural analysis revealed hydrophobic interaction between the proline's aliphatic cyclic structure and the 5-methyl group of the pyrimidine (5mC or T). As in wild-type Klf4 (E446), the proline at position 446 does not interact directly with either the 5mC N4 nitrogen or the thymine O4 oxygen. In contrast, the unmethylated cytosine's exocyclic N4 amino group (NH2) and its ring carbon C5 atom hydrogen bond directly with the aspartate carboxylate of the E446D variant. Both of these interactions would provide a preference for cytosine over thymine, and the latter one could explain the E446D preference for unmethylated cytosine. Finally, we evaluated the ability of these Klf4 mutants to regulate transcription of methylated and unmethylated promoters in a luciferase reporter assay.

  12. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Inhibited Tumor Growth via Preventing the Decrease of Genomic DNA Methylation in Colorectal Cancer Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qionglin; Wen, Juan; Chen, Guangzhao; Ge, Miaomiao; Gao, Yihua; Ye, Xiaoxia; Liu, Chunan; Cai, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Omge-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exhibited significant effect in inhibiting various tumors. However, the mechanisms of its anticancer role have not been fully demonstrated. The declination of 5-methylcytosine (5 mC) was closely associated with poor prognosis of tumors. To explore whether omega-3 PUFAs influences on DNA methylation level in tumors, colorectal cancer (CRC) rat model were constructed using N-methyl phosphite nitrourea and omega-3 PUFAs were fed to part of the rats during tumor induction. The PUFAs contents in the rats of 3 experimental groups were measured using gas chromatography and 5 mC level were detected by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The results showed that tumor incidence in omega-3 treated rats was much lower than in CRC model rats, which confirmed significant antitumor role of omega-3 PUFAs. Six PUFA members categorized to omega-3 and omega-6 families were quantified and the ratio of omega-6/omega-3 PUFAs was remarkably lower in omega-3 PUFAs treatment group than in CRC model group. 5 mC content in omega-3 PUFAs treated rats was higher than in CRC model rats, suggesting omega-3 PUFAs promoted 5 mC synthesis. Therefore, omega-3 PUFAs probably inhibited tumor growth via regulating DNA methylation process, which provided a novel anticancer mechanism of omega-3 PUFAs from epigenetic view.

  13. Genomic organization and dynamics of repetitive DNA sequences in representatives of three Fagaceae genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Sofia; Ribeiro, Teresa; Inácio, Vera; Rocheta, Margarida; Morais-Cecílio, Leonor

    2012-05-01

    Oaks, chestnuts, and beeches are economically important species of the Fagaceae. To understand the relationship between these members of this family, a deep knowledge of their genome composition and organization is needed. In this work, we have isolated and characterized several AFLP fragments obtained from Quercus rotundifolia Lam. through homology searches in available databases. Genomic polymorphisms involving some of these sequences were evaluated in two species of Quercus, one of Castanea, and one of Fagus with specific primers. Comparative FISH analysis with generated sequences was performed in interphase nuclei of the four species, and the co-immunolocalization of 5-methylcytosine was also studied. Some of the sequences isolated proved to be genus-specific, while others were present in all the genera. Retroelements, either gypsy-like of the Tat/Athila clade or copia-like, are well represented, and most are dispersed in euchromatic regions of these species with no DNA methylation associated, pointing to an interspersed arrangement of these retroelements with potential gene-rich regions. A particular gypsy-sequence is dispersed in oaks and chestnut nuclei, but its confinement to chromocenters in beech evidences genome restructuring events during evolution of Fagaceae. Several sequences generated in this study proved to be good tools to comparatively study Fagaceae genome organization.

  14. The Vsr endonuclease of Escherichia coli: an efficient DNA repair enzyme and a potent mutagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintyre, G; Doiron, K M; Cupples, C G

    1997-01-01

    The Vsr endonuclease of Escherichia coli initiates the repair of T/G mismatches caused by deamination of 5-methylcytosine to thymine. In this paper, we examine the capacity of Vsr to prevent CG-to-TA mutations in cells with increased transcription of the cytosine methylase gene (dcm). We find that sufficient Vsr is produced by a single chromosomal copy of vsr to prevent mutagenesis. We also investigate the cause of the transition and frameshift mutations in cells overproducing Vsr. Neither the absence of the dcm methylase nor its overproduction affects Vsr-stimulated mutagenesis. However, addition of mutS, mutL, or mutH on multicopy plasmids has a significant effect: mutL or mutH decreases the number of mutations, while mutS stimulates mutagenesis. The mut-containing plasmids have the same effect in cells treated with 2-aminopurine and in cells made defective in DNA proofreading, two experimental situations known to cause transition and frameshift mutations by saturating mismatch repair. PMID:9324251

  15. Oxidatively generated base modifications in DNA: Not only carcinogenic risk factor but also regulatory mark?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifermann, Marco; Epe, Bernd

    2017-06-01

    The generation of DNA modifications in cells is in most cases accidental and associated with detrimental consequences such as increased mutation rates and an elevated risk of malignant transformation. Accordingly, repair enzymes involved in the removal of the modifications have primarily a protective function. Among the well-established exceptions of this rule are 5-methylcytosine and uracil, which are generated in DNA enzymatically under controlled conditions and fulfill important regulatory functions in DNA as epigenetic marks and in antibody diversification, respectively. More recently, considerable evidence has been obtained that also 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG), a frequent pro-mutagenic DNA modification generated by endogenous or exogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), has distinct roles in the regulation of both transcription and signal transduction. Thus, the activation of transcription by the estrogen receptor, NF-κB, MYC and other transcription factors was shown to depend on the presence of 8-oxoG in the promoter regions and its recognition by the DNA repair glycosylase OGG1. The lysine-specific histone demethylase LSD1, which produces H2O2 as a by-product, was indentified as a local generator of 8-oxoG in some of these cases. In addition, a complex of OGG1 with the excised free substrate base was demonstrated to act as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for small GTPases such as Ras, Rac and Rho, thus stimulating signal transduction. The various findings and intriguing novel mechanisms suggested will be described and compared in this review. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. DNA binding of the p21 repressor ZBTB2 is inhibited by cytosine hydroxymethylation

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    Lafaye, Céline; Barbier, Ewa; Miscioscia, Audrey; Saint-Pierre, Christine [Laboratoire Lésions des Acides Nucléiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, UMR E_3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France); Kraut, Alexandra; Couté, Yohann [Etude de la Dynamique des Protéomes, Biologie à Grande Echelle, UMR S_1038 CEA/INSERM/UJF-Grenoble 1, iRTSV, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France); Plo, Isabelle [INSERM, U1009, Institut Gustave Roussy, Université Paris 11, 114 rue Edouard Vaillant, Villejuif F-94805 (France); Gasparutto, Didier; Ravanat, Jean-Luc [Laboratoire Lésions des Acides Nucléiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, UMR E_3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France); Breton, Jean, E-mail: jean.breton@cea.fr [Laboratoire Lésions des Acides Nucléiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, UMR E_3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • 5-hmC epigenetic modification is measurable in HeLa, SH-SY5Y and UT7-MPL cell lines. • ZBTB2 binds to DNA probes containing 5-mC but not to sequences containing 5-hmC. • This differential binding is verified with DNA sequences involved in p21 regulation. - Abstract: Recent studies have demonstrated that the modified base 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) is detectable at various rates in DNA extracted from human tissues. This oxidative product of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) constitutes a new and important actor of epigenetic mechanisms. We designed a DNA pull down assay to trap and identify nuclear proteins bound to 5-hmC and/or 5-mC. We applied this strategy to three cancerous cell lines (HeLa, SH-SY5Y and UT7-MPL) in which we also measured 5-mC and 5-hmC levels by HPLC-MS/MS. We found that the putative oncoprotein Zinc finger and BTB domain-containing protein 2 (ZBTB2) is associated with methylated DNA sequences and that this interaction is inhibited by the presence of 5-hmC replacing 5-mC. As published data mention ZBTB2 recognition of p21 regulating sequences, we verified that this sequence specific binding was also alleviated by 5-hmC. ZBTB2 being considered as a multifunctional cell proliferation activator, notably through p21 repression, this work points out new epigenetic processes potentially involved in carcinogenesis.

  17. Detection of oxidation products of 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine in Arabidopsis DNA.

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    Shuo Liu

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulations play important roles in plant development and adaptation to environmental stress. Recent studies from mammalian systems have demonstrated the involvement of ten-eleven translocation (Tet family of dioxygenases in the generation of a series of oxidized derivatives of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC in mammalian DNA. In addition, these oxidized 5-mC nucleobases have important roles in epigenetic remodeling and aberrant levels of 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5-HmdC were found to be associated with different types of human cancers. However, there is a lack of evidence supporting the presence of these modified bases in plant DNA. Here we reported the use of a reversed-phase HPLC coupled with tandem mass spectrometry method and stable isotope-labeled standards for assessing the levels of the oxidized 5-mC nucleosides along with two other oxidatively induced DNA modifications in genomic DNA of Arabidopsis. These included 5-HmdC, 5-formyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5-FodC, 5-carboxyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5-CadC, 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine (5-HmdU, and the (5'S diastereomer of 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyguanosine (S-cdG. We found that, in Arabidopsis DNA, the levels of 5-HmdC, 5-FodC, and 5-CadC are approximately 0.8 modifications per 10(6 nucleosides, with the frequency of 5-HmdC (per 5-mdC being comparable to that of 5-HmdU (per thymidine. The relatively low levels of the 5-mdC oxidation products suggest that they arise likely from reactive oxygen species present in cells, which is in line with the lack of homologous Tet-family dioxygenase enzymes in Arabidopsis.

  18. Cerebellar oxidative DNA damage and altered DNA methylation in the BTBR T+tf/J mouse model of autism and similarities with human post mortem cerebellum.

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    Svitlana Shpyleva

    Full Text Available The molecular pathogenesis of autism is complex and involves numerous genomic, epigenomic, proteomic, metabolic, and physiological alterations. Elucidating and understanding the molecular processes underlying the pathogenesis of autism is critical for effective clinical management and prevention of this disorder. The goal of this study is to investigate key molecular alterations postulated to play a role in autism and their role in the pathophysiology of autism. In this study we demonstrate that DNA isolated from the cerebellum of BTBR T+tf/J mice, a relevant mouse model of autism, and from human post-mortem cerebellum of individuals with autism, are both characterized by an increased levels of 8-oxo-7-hydrodeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG, 5-methylcytosine (5mC, and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC. The increase in 8-oxodG and 5mC content was associated with a markedly reduced expression of the 8-oxoguanine DNA-glycosylase 1 (Ogg1 and increased expression of de novo DNA methyltransferases 3a and 3b (Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b. Interestingly, a rise in the level of 5hmC occurred without changes in the expression of ten-eleven translocation expression 1 (Tet1 and Tet2 genes, but significantly correlated with the presence of 8-oxodG in DNA. This finding and similar elevation in 8-oxodG in cerebellum of individuals with autism and in the BTBR T+tf/J mouse model warrant future large-scale studies to specifically address the role of OGG1 alterations in pathogenesis of autism.

  19. Cerebellar oxidative DNA damage and altered DNA methylation in the BTBR T+tf/J mouse model of autism and similarities with human post mortem cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpyleva, Svitlana; Ivanovsky, Samuil; de Conti, Aline; Melnyk, Stepan; Tryndyak, Volodymyr; Beland, Frederick A; James, S Jill; Pogribny, Igor P

    2014-01-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of autism is complex and involves numerous genomic, epigenomic, proteomic, metabolic, and physiological alterations. Elucidating and understanding the molecular processes underlying the pathogenesis of autism is critical for effective clinical management and prevention of this disorder. The goal of this study is to investigate key molecular alterations postulated to play a role in autism and their role in the pathophysiology of autism. In this study we demonstrate that DNA isolated from the cerebellum of BTBR T+tf/J mice, a relevant mouse model of autism, and from human post-mortem cerebellum of individuals with autism, are both characterized by an increased levels of 8-oxo-7-hydrodeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), 5-methylcytosine (5mC), and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). The increase in 8-oxodG and 5mC content was associated with a markedly reduced expression of the 8-oxoguanine DNA-glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) and increased expression of de novo DNA methyltransferases 3a and 3b (Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b). Interestingly, a rise in the level of 5hmC occurred without changes in the expression of ten-eleven translocation expression 1 (Tet1) and Tet2 genes, but significantly correlated with the presence of 8-oxodG in DNA. This finding and similar elevation in 8-oxodG in cerebellum of individuals with autism and in the BTBR T+tf/J mouse model warrant future large-scale studies to specifically address the role of OGG1 alterations in pathogenesis of autism.

  20. Repair of DNA Alkylation Damage by the Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AlkB as Studied by ESI-TOF Mass Spectrometry

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    Deyu Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA alkylation can cause mutations, epigenetic changes, and even cell death. All living organisms have evolved enzymatic and non-enzymatic strategies for repairing such alkylation damage. AlkB, one of the Escherichia coli adaptive response proteins, uses an α-ketoglutarate/Fe(II-dependent mechanism that, by chemical oxidation, removes a variety of alkyl lesions from DNA, thus affording protection of the genome against alkylation. In an effort to understand the range of acceptable substrates for AlkB, the enzyme was incubated with chemically synthesized oligonucleotides containing alkyl lesions, and the reaction products were analyzed by electrospray ionization time-of-flight (ESI-TOF mass spectrometry. Consistent with the literature, but studied comparatively here for the first time, it was found that 1-methyladenine, 1,N 6-ethenoadenine, 3-methylcytosine, and 3-ethylcytosine were completely transformed by AlkB, while 1-methylguanine and 3-methylthymine were partially repaired. The repair intermediates (epoxide and possibly glycol of 3,N 4-ethenocytosine are reported for the first time. It is also demonstrated that O 6-methylguanine and 5-methylcytosine are refractory to AlkB, lending support to the hypothesis that AlkB repairs only alkyl lesions attached to the nitrogen atoms of the nucleobase. ESI-TOF mass spectrometry is shown to be a sensitive and efficient tool for probing the comparative substrate specificities of DNA repair proteins in vitro.

  1. Development and validation of a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for the assessment of genomic DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossella, Federica; Polledri, Elisa; Bollati, Valentina; Baccarelli, Andrea; Fustinoni, Silvia

    2009-09-01

    A method for the determination of DNA global methylation, taken as the ratio (%) of 5-methylcytosine (5mCyt) versus the sum of cytosine (Cyt) and 5mCyt, via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), was developed and validated. DNA (2.5 microg) was hydrolyzed with aqueous formic acid 88%, spiked with cytosine-2,4-(13)C(2),(15)N(3) and 5-methyl-(2)H(3)-cytosine-6-(2)H(1) as internal standards, and derivatized with N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide and 1% tert-butyldimethylchlorosilane, in the presence of acetonitrile and pyridine. GC/MS, operating in single ion monitoring mode, separated and specifically detected all nucleobases as tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives, without interferences, with the exception of guanosine. The method was linear throughout the range of clinical interest and had good sensitivity, with a limit of quantification of 3.2 pmol for Cyt and 0.056 pmol for 5mCyt, the latter corresponding to a methylation level of 0.41%. Intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy were below 4.0% for both analytes and methylation. The matrix absolute effect, process efficiency and coefficient of variation ranged from 96.5 to 101.2%. The matrix relative effect was below 1%. The method was applied to the analysis of different human DNAs, including: nonmethylated DNA from PCR (methylation 0.00%), hypermethylated DNA prepared using M.SssI CpG methyltransferase (methylation 18.05%), DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of healthy subjects (N = 6, median methylation 5.45%), DNA from bone marrow of leukemia patients (N = 5, 3.58%) and DNA from myeloma cell lines (N = 4, 2.74%).

  2. The degree of global DNA hypomethylation in peripheral blood correlates with that in matched tumor tissues in several neoplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Maria Barciszewska

    Full Text Available There are no good blood and serum biomarkers for detection, follow up, or prognosis of brain tumors. However, they are needed for more detailed tumor classification, better prognosis estimation and selection of an efficient therapeutic strategy. The aim of this study was to use the epigenetic changes in DNA of peripheral blood samples as a molecular marker to diagnose brain tumors as well as other diseases. We have applied a very precise thin-layer chromatography (TLC analysis of the global amount of 5-methylcytosine (m(5C in DNA from brain tumors, colon and breast cancer tissues and peripheral blood samples of the same patients. The m(5C level in tissue DNA from different brain tumor types, expressed as R coefficient, changes within the range of 0.2-1.6 and overlaps with R of that of blood samples. It negatively correlates with the WHO malignancy grade. The global DNA hypomethylation quantitative measure in blood, demonstrates a big potential for development of non-invasive applications for detection of a low and a high grade brain tumors. We have also used this approach to analyze patients with breast and colon cancers. In all these cases the m(5C amount in DNA cancer tissue match with data of blood. This study is the first to demonstrate the potential role of global m(5C content in blood DNA for early detection of brain tumors and others diseases. So, genomic DNA hypomethylation is a promising marker for prognosis of various neoplasms as well as other pathologies.

  3. Epigenetic changes of Arabidopsis genome associated with altered DNA methyltransferase and demethylase expressions after gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Eun; Cho, Eun Ju; Kim, Ji Hong; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jin Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    DNA methylation at carbon 5 of cytosines is a hall mark of epigenetic inactivation and heterochromatin in both plants and mammals. In Arabidopsis, DNA methylation has two roles that protect the genome from selfish DNA elements and regulate gene expression. Plant genome has three types of DNA methyltransferase, METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (MET1), DOMAINREARRANGED METHYLASE (DRM) and CHROMOMETHYLASE 3 (CMT3) that are capable of methylating CG, CHG (where H is A, T, or C) and CHH sites, respectively. MET1 is a maintenance DNA methyltransferase that controls CG methylation. Two members of the DRM family, DRM1 and DRM2, are responsible for de novo methylation of CG, CHG, and CHH sites but show a preference for CHH sites. Finally, CMT3 principally carries out CHG methylation and is involved in both de novo methylation and maintenance. Alternatively, active DNA demethylation may occur through the glycosylase activity by removing the methylcytosines from DNA. It may have essential roles in preventing transcriptional silencing of transgenes and endogenous genes and in activating the expression of imprinted genes. DNA demetylation in Arabidopsis is mediated by the DEMETER (DME) family of bifunctional DNA glycosylase. Three targets of DME are MEA (MEDEA), FWA (FLOWERING WAGENINGEN), and FIS2 (FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED 2). The DME family contains DEMETER-LIKE 2 (DML2), DML3, and REPRESSOR OF SILENING 1 (ROS1). DNA demetylation by ROS1, DML2, and DML3 protect the hypermethylation of specific genome loci. ROS1 is necessary to suppress the promoter methylation and the silencing of endogenous genes. In contrast, the function of DML2 and DML3 has not been reported. Several recent studies have suggested that epigenetic alterations such as change in DNA methylation and histone modification should be caused in plant genomes upon exposure to ionizing radiation. However, there is a lack of data exploring the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, the present study aims to characterize and

  4. Kinetic analysis of oligodeoxyribonucleotide-directed triple-helix formation on DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, L J; Dervan, P B; Wold, B J

    1990-09-18

    Pyrimidine oligonucleotides recognize extended purine sequences in the major groove of double-helical DNA by triple-helix formation. The resulting local triple helices are relatively stable and can block DNA recognition by sequence-specific DNA binding proteins such as restriction endonucleases. Association and dissociation kinetics for the oligodeoxyribonucleotide 5'-CTCTTTCCTCTCTTTTTCCCC (bold C's indicate 5-methylcytosine residues) are now measured with a restriction endonuclease protection assay. When oligonucleotides are present in greater than 10-fold excess over the DNA target site, the binding reaction kinetics are pseudo first order in oligonucleotide concentration. Under our standard conditions (37 degrees C, 25 mM Tris-acetate, pH 6.8, 70 mM sodium chloride, 20 mM magnesium chloride, 0.4 mM spermine tetrahydrochloride, 10 mM beta-mercaptoethanol, 0.1 mg/mL bovine serum albumin) the value of the observed pseudo-first-order association rate constant, k2obs, is 1.8 x 10(3) +/- 1.9 x 10(2) L.(mol of oligomer-1.s-1. Measurement of the dissociation rate constant yields an equilibrium dissociation constant of approximately 10 nM. Increasing sodium ion concentration slightly decreased the association rate, substantially increased the dissociation rate, and thereby reduced the equilibrium binding constant. This effect was reversible by increasing multivalent cation concentration, confirming the significant role of multivalent cations in oligonucleotide-directed triple-helix formation under these conditions. Finally, a small reduction in association rate, a large increase in dissociation rate, and a resulting reduction in the equilibrium binding constant were observed upon increasing the pH between 6.8 and 7.2.

  5. DNA methylation as a risk factor in the effects of early life stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnally, Erin L; Feinberg, Caroline; Kim, David; Ferguson, Kerel; Leibel, Rudolph; Coplan, Jeremy D; John Mann, J

    2011-11-01

    Epigenetic marks (e.g., DNA 5-methylcytosine [5mC] content or CpG methylation) within specific gene regulatory regions have been demonstrated to play diverse roles in stress adaptation and resulting health trajectories following early adversity. Yet the developmental programming of the vast majority of the epigenome has not yet been characterized, and its role in the impact of early stress largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the relationships among early life stress, whole-epigenome and candidate stress pathway gene (serotonin transporter, 5-HTT) methylation patterns, and adult behavioral stress adaptation in a non-human primate model. Early in life, experimental variable foraging demand (VFD) stress or control conditions were administered to two groups each of 10 female bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata) and their mothers. As adults (3-13 years of age), these females were assessed for behavioral adaptation to stress across four conditions of increasing intensity. Blood DNA 5-HTT 5mC status was determined using sodium bisulfite pyrosequencing and total 5mC content was determined using ELISA. Neither stress reactivity nor DNA methylation differed based on early life stress. However, we found that both greater 5-HTT and whole-genome 5mC was associated with enhanced behavioral stress reactivity following early life stress, but not control conditions. Therefore, regardless of developmental origin, greater DNA methylation conferred a genomic background of "risk" in the context of early stress. We suggest that this may arise from constrained plasticity in gene expression needed for stress adaptation early in development. This risk may have wider implications for psychological and physical stress adaptation and health. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. DNA hydroxymethylation in malignant melanoma%DNA羟甲基化在恶性黑素瘤的进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹; 杨盛波; 黄进华

    2016-01-01

    DNA hydroxymethylation refers to a chemical modification process in which 5-methylcytosine (5mC) is converted to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) by the ten-eleven translocation (TET) protein family.This conversion is an important intermediate step in active DNA demethylation,which can influence gene expressions by dynamically regulating DNA methylation levels.DNA hydroxymethylation can be modulated by TET proteins,the Krebs cycle-related enzymes,vitamin C,miRNAs,etc.Like patients with hematological malignancies or other solid cancers,those with cutaneous malignant melanoma have been reported to have decreased 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels and abnormal DNA hydroxymethylation,hinting that DNA hydroxymethylation is related to the occurrence,development and prognosis of cutaneous malignant melanoma.%DNA羟甲基化指在TET蛋白酶家族催化下,将5甲基胞嘧啶氧化成5羟甲基胞嘧啶的过程,是DNA主动去甲基化的关键中间步骤,主要通过动态调节DNA甲基化水平,影响基因表达.DNA羟甲基化过程可被TET蛋白、三羧酸循环相关酶、维生素C、微小RNA等多种因素调控.研究发现,和血液系统恶性肿瘤及多种实体肿瘤类似,恶性黑素瘤中同样存在5羟甲基胞嘧啶含量降低,DNA羟甲基化调控因素异常等现象,提示DNA羟甲基化可能与恶性黑素瘤的发生发展及预后等相关.

  7. Methyl-dependent and spatial-specific DNA recognition by the orthologous transcription factors human AP-1 and Epstein-Barr virus Zta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Samuel; Wang, Dongxue; Horton, John R.; Zhang, Xing; Speck, Samuel H.; Blumenthal, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a transcription factor that recognizes two versions of a 7-base pair response element, either 5΄-TGAGTCA-3΄ or 5΄-MGAGTCA-3΄ (where M = 5-methylcytosine). These two elements share the feature that 5-methylcytosine and thymine both have a methyl group in the same position, 5-carbon of the pyrimidine, so each of them has two methyl groups at nucleotide positions 1 and 5 from the 5΄ end, resulting in four methyl groups symmetrically positioned in duplex DNA. Epstein-Barr Virus Zta is a key transcriptional regulator of the viral lytic cycle that is homologous to AP-1. Zta recognizes several methylated Zta-response elements, including meZRE1 (5΄-TGAGMCA-3΄) and meZRE2 (5΄-TGAGMGA-3΄), where a methylated cytosine occupies one of the inner thymine residues corresponding to the AP-1 element, resulting in the four spatially equivalent methyl groups. Here, we study how AP-1 and Zta recognize these methyl groups within their cognate response elements. These methyl groups are in van der Waals contact with a conserved di-alanine in AP-1 dimer (Ala265 and Ala266 in Jun), or with the corresponding Zta residues Ala185 and Ser186 (via its side chain carbon Cβ atom). Furthermore, the two ZRE elements differ at base pair 6 (C:G versus G:C), forming a pseudo-symmetric sequence (meZRE1) or an asymmetric sequence (meZRE2). In vitro DNA binding assays suggest that Zta has high affinity for all four sequences examined, whereas AP-1 has considerably reduced affinity for the asymmetric sequence (meZRE2). We ascribe this difference to Zta Ser186 (a unique residue for Zta) whose side chain hydroxyl oxygen atom interacts with the two half sites differently, whereas the corresponding Ala266 of AP-1 Jun protein lacks such flexibility. Our analyses demonstrate a novel mechanism of 5mC/T recognition in a methylation-dependent, spatial and sequence-specific approach by basic leucine-zipper transcriptional factors. PMID:28158710

  8. DNA双加氧酶TET在中枢神经系统的研究进展%Research progress of DNA dioxygenase TET in the central nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洁; 米亚静

    2015-01-01

    DNA双加氧酶TET家族是新发现的一类表观遗传修饰蛋白,能够将DNA的5-甲基胞嘧啶氧化为5-羟甲基胞嘧啶,进而调控基因的表达。多项研究显示,TET1-3在中枢神经系统表达丰富,其潜在的生物功能也被广泛关注。本文从TET蛋白结构功能概述、TET蛋白在中枢神经系统的表达及功能以及针对TET家族的基因敲除小鼠实验三方面作一综述。%DNA dioxygenase TET family is a recently discovered proteins involved epigenetic modification, which can oxidize the 5-methylcytosine of DNA into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and thereby regulate gene expression. Accumulative studies have shown that TET1-3 was abundantly expressed in the central nervous system, and its poten-tial functions were beginning to be studied. This paper gives an overview of the structure and functions of TET, its po-tential roles in the central nervous system, and also the TET gene knockout experiments.

  9. Association of hypomethylation of LINE-1 repetitive element in blood leukocyte DNA with an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-zhong DI; Xiao-dong HAN; Wen-ye GU; Yu WANG; Qi ZHENG; Pin ZHANG; Hui-min WU; Zhong-zheng ZHU

    2011-01-01

    Global DNA hypomethylation has been associated with increased risk for cancers of the colorectum,bladder,breast,head and neck,and testicular germ cells.The aim of this study was to examine whether global hypomethylation in blood leukocyte DNA is associated with the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).A total of 315HCC cases and 356 age-,sex- and HBsAg status-matched controls were included.Global methylation in blood leukocyte DNA was estimated by analyzing long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1) repeats using bisulfite-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and pyrosequencing.We observed that the median methylation level in HCC cases (percentage of 5-methylcytosine (5mC)=77.7%) was significantly lower than that in controls (79.5% 5mC) (P=0.004,Wilcoxon rank-sum test).The odds ratios (ORs) of HCC for individuals in the third,second,and first (lowest) quartiles of LINE-1methylation were 1.1 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-1.8),1.4 (95% CI 0.8-2.2),and 2.6 (95% CI 1.7-4.1) (P for trend <0.001),respectively,compared to individuals in the fourth (highest) quartile.A 1.9-fold (95% CI 1.4-2.6) increased risk of HCC was observed among individuals with LINE-1 methylation below the median compared to individuals with higher (>median) LINE-1 methylation.Our results demonstrate for the first time that individuals with global hypomethylation measured in LINE-1 repeats in blood leukocyte DNA have an increased risk for HCC.Our data provide the evidence that global hypomethylation detected in the easily obtainable DNA source of blood leukocytes may help identify individuals at risk of HCC.

  10. Simultaneous quantitative determination of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine genomic incorporation and DNA demethylation by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry as exposure-response measures of nucleoside analog DNA methyltransferase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Nicole M; Liu, Jianyong; Wanjiku, Teresia; Giovinazzo, Hugh; Zhou, Jianya; Vaghasia, Ajay; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Rudek, Michelle A

    2016-06-01

    The epigenetic and anti-cancer activities of the nucleoside analog DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors decitabine (5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, DAC), azacitidine, and guadecitabine are thought to require cellular uptake, metabolism to 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine triphosphate, and incorporation into DNA. This genomic incorporation can then lead to trapping and degradation of DNMT enzymes, and ultimately, passive loss of DNA methylation. To facilitate measurement of critical exposure-response relationships of nucleoside analog DNMT inhibitors, a sensitive and reliable method was developed to simultaneously quantitate 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine genomic incorporation and genomic 5-methylcytosine content using LC-MS/MS. Genomic DNA was extracted and digested into single nucleosides. Chromatographic separation was achieved with a Thermo Hyperpcarb porous graphite column (100mm×2.1mm, 5μm) and isocratic elution with a 10mM ammonium acetate:acetonitrile with 0.1% formic acid (70:30, v/v) mobile phase over a 5min total analytical run time. An AB Sciex 5500 triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in positive electrospray ionization mode was used for the detection of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, 2'-deoxycytidine, and 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine. The assay range was 2-400ng/mL for 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, 50-10,000ng/mL for 2'-deoxycytidine, and was 5-1000ng/mL for 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine. The assay proved to be accurate (93.0-102.2%) and precise (CV≤6.3%) across all analytes. All analytes exhibited long-term frozen digest matrix stability at -70°C for at least 117 days. The method was applied for the measurement of genomic 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine content following exposure of in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal models to decitabine.

  11. Structure of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-specific restriction enzyme, AbaSI, in complex with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, John R.; Borgaro, Janine G.; Griggs, Rose M.; Quimby, Aine; Guan, Shengxi; Zhang, Xing; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Zheng, Yu; Zhu, Zhenyu; Cheng, Xiaodong (Emory-MED); (NE Biolabs)

    2014-07-03

    AbaSI, a member of the PvuRts1I-family of modification-dependent restriction endonucleases, cleaves DNA containing 5-hydroxymethylctosine (5hmC) and glucosylated 5hmC (g5hmC), but not DNA containing unmodified cytosine. AbaSI has been used as a tool for mapping the genomic locations of 5hmC, an important epigenetic modification in the DNA of higher organisms. Here we report the crystal structures of AbaSI in the presence and absence of DNA. These structures provide considerable, although incomplete, insight into how this enzyme acts. AbaSI appears to be mainly a homodimer in solution, but interacts with DNA in our structures as a homotetramer. Each AbaSI subunit comprises an N-terminal, Vsr-like, cleavage domain containing a single catalytic site, and a C-terminal, SRA-like, 5hmC-binding domain. Two N-terminal helices mediate most of the homodimer interface. Dimerization brings together the two catalytic sites required for double-strand cleavage, and separates the 5hmC binding-domains by ~ 70 Å, consistent with the known activity of AbaSI which cleaves DNA optimally between symmetrically modified cytosines ~ 22 bp apart. The eukaryotic SET and RING-associated (SRA) domains bind to DNA containing 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in the hemi-methylated CpG sequence. They make contacts in both the major and minor DNA grooves, and flip the modified cytosine out of the helix into a conserved binding pocket. In contrast, the SRA-like domain of AbaSI, which has no sequence specificity, contacts only the minor DNA groove, and in our current structures the 5hmC remains intra-helical. A conserved, binding pocket is nevertheless present in this domain, suitable for accommodating 5hmC and g5hmC. We consider it likely, therefore, that base-flipping is part of the recognition and cleavage mechanism of AbaSI, but that our structures represent an earlier, pre-flipped stage, prior to actual recognition.

  12. Structure of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-specific restriction enzyme, AbaSI, in complex with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, John R; Borgaro, Janine G; Griggs, Rose M; Quimby, Aine; Guan, Shengxi; Zhang, Xing; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Zheng, Yu; Zhu, Zhenyu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2014-07-01

    AbaSI, a member of the PvuRts1I-family of modification-dependent restriction endonucleases, cleaves deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) containing 5-hydroxymethylctosine (5hmC) and glucosylated 5hmC (g5hmC), but not DNA containing unmodified cytosine. AbaSI has been used as a tool for mapping the genomic locations of 5hmC, an important epigenetic modification in the DNA of higher organisms. Here we report the crystal structures of AbaSI in the presence and absence of DNA. These structures provide considerable, although incomplete, insight into how this enzyme acts. AbaSI appears to be mainly a homodimer in solution, but interacts with DNA in our structures as a homotetramer. Each AbaSI subunit comprises an N-terminal, Vsr-like, cleavage domain containing a single catalytic site, and a C-terminal, SRA-like, 5hmC-binding domain. Two N-terminal helices mediate most of the homodimer interface. Dimerization brings together the two catalytic sites required for double-strand cleavage, and separates the 5hmC binding-domains by ∼70 Å, consistent with the known activity of AbaSI which cleaves DNA optimally between symmetrically modified cytosines ∼22 bp apart. The eukaryotic SET and RING-associated (SRA) domains bind to DNA containing 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in the hemi-methylated CpG sequence. They make contacts in both the major and minor DNA grooves, and flip the modified cytosine out of the helix into a conserved binding pocket. In contrast, the SRA-like domain of AbaSI, which has no sequence specificity, contacts only the minor DNA groove, and in our current structures the 5hmC remains intra-helical. A conserved, binding pocket is nevertheless present in this domain, suitable for accommodating 5hmC and g5hmC. We consider it likely, therefore, that base-flipping is part of the recognition and cleavage mechanism of AbaSI, but that our structures represent an earlier, pre-flipped stage, prior to actual recognition.

  13. Epigenetic DNA Methylation Mediating Octopus vulgaris Early Development: Effect of Essential Fatty Acids Enriched Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo García-Fernández

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The common octopus, Octopus vulgaris, is a good candidate for aquaculture but a sustainable production is still unviable due to an almost total mortality during the paralarvae stage. DNA methylation regulates gene expression in the eukaryotic genome, and has been shown to exhibit plasticity throughout O. vulgaris life cycle, changing profiles from paralarvae to adult stages. This pattern of methylation could be sensitive to small alterations in nutritional and environmental conditions during the species early development, thus impacting on its health, growth and survival. In this sense, a full understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms operating during O. vulgaris development would contribute to optimizing the culture conditions for this species. Paralarvae of O. vulgaris were cultured over 28 days post-hatching (dph using two different Artemia sp. based diets: control and a long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA enriched diet. The effect of the diets on the paralarvae DNA global methylation was analyzed by Methyl-Sensitive Amplification Polymorphism (MSAP and global 5-methylcytosine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA approaches. The analysis of different methylation states over the time revealed a global demethylation phenomena occurring along O. vulgaris early development being directly driven by the age of the paralarvae. A gradual decline in methylated loci (hemimethylated, internal cytosine methylated, and hypermethylated parallel to a progressive gain in non-methylated (NMT loci toward the later sampling points was verified regardless of the diet provided and demonstrate a pre-established and well-defined demethylation program during its early development, involving a 20% of the MSAP loci. In addition, a differential behavior between diets was also observed at 20 dph, with a LC-PUFA supplementation effect over the methylation profiles. The present results show significant differences on the paralarvae methylation profiles

  14. A phosphate group at the cos ends of phage lambda DNA is not a prerequisite for in vitro packaging: an alternative method for constructing genomic libraries using a new phasmid vector, lambda pGY97.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincze, E; Kiss, G B

    1990-11-30

    It is shown here that the phosphate groups at the cos ends of phage lambda DNA are not a prerequisite for in vitro packaging. Molecules with phosphatase-treated cos ends are packaged in vitro as efficiently as native lambda DNA. This observation can be used for an alternative strategy to improve the efficiency of gene library construction, since cos-cos ligation decreases in vitro encapsidation and infectivity. Dephosphorylated cos ends and a new phasmid vector lambda pGY97 have been used to construct a representative gene bank of alfalfa in a Mcr- (5-methylcytosine restriction deficient) Escherichia coli host strain. These recombinant clones can be propagated as phages or more conveniently as plasmids in recA- E. coli, to prevent possible homologous recombination events between repetitive sequences of the insert that would otherwise interfere with clone stability. The 5-19-kb inserts can be easily recloned as plasmids from the recombinant phasmids with simple EcoRI digestion and re-ligation. This observation also implies that the construction of gene libraries in cosmid vectors can be made more efficient if cos-cos ligates were cleaved by lambda terminase just before in vitro packaging.

  15. Hypermethylation and post-transcriptional regulation of DNA methyltransferases in the ovarian carcinomas of the laying hen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Young; Jeong, Wooyoung; Lim, Whasun; Lim, Chul-Hong; Bae, Seung-Min; Kim, Jinyoung; Bazer, Fuller W; Song, Gwonhwa

    2013-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) are key regulators of DNA methylation and have crucial roles in carcinogenesis, embryogenesis and epigenetic modification. In general, DNMT1 has enzymatic activity affecting maintenance of DNA methylation, whereas DNMT3A and DNMT3B are involved in de novo methylation events. Although DNMT genes are well known in mammals including humans and mice, they are not well studied in avian species, especially the laying hen which is recognized as an excellent animal model for research on human ovarian carcinogenesis. Results of the present study demonstrated that expression of DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B genes was significantly increased, particularly in the glandular epithelia (GE) of cancerous ovaries, but not normal ovaries. Consistent with this result, immunoreactive 5-methylcytosine protein was predominantly abundant in nuclei of stromal and GE cells of cancerous ovaries, but it was also found that, to a lesser extent, in nuclei of stromal cells of normal ovaries. Methylation-specific PCR analysis detected hypermethylation of the promoter regions of the tumor suppressor genes in the initiation and development of chicken ovarian cancer. Further, several microRNAs, specifically miR-1741, miR-16c, and miR-222, and miR-1632 were discovered to influence expression of DNMT3A and DNMT3B, respectively, via their 3'-UTR which suggests post-transcriptional regulation of their expression in laying hens. Collectively, results of the present study demonstrated increased expression of DNMT genes in cancerous ovaries of laying hens and post-transcriptional regulation of those genes by specific microRNAs, as well as control of hypermethylation of the promoters of tumor suppressor genes.

  16. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  17. Molecular Process Producing Oncogene Fusion in Lung Cancer Cells by Illegitimate Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Seki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Constitutive activation of oncogenes by fusion to partner genes, caused by chromosome translocation and inversion, is a critical genetic event driving lung carcinogenesis. Fusions of the tyrosine kinase genes ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase, ROS1 (c-ros oncogene 1, or RET (rearranged during transfection occur in 1%–5% of lung adenocarcinomas (LADCs and their products constitute therapeutic targets for kinase inhibitory drugs. Interestingly, ALK, RET, and ROS1 fusions occur preferentially in LADCs of never- and light-smokers, suggesting that the molecular mechanisms that cause these rearrangements are smoking-independent. In this study, using previously reported next generation LADC genome sequencing data of the breakpoint junction structures of chromosome rearrangements that cause oncogenic fusions in human cancer cells, we employed the structures of breakpoint junctions of ALK, RET, and ROS1 fusions in 41 LADC cases as “traces” to deduce the molecular processes of chromosome rearrangements caused by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs and illegitimate joining. We found that gene fusion was produced by illegitimate repair of DSBs at unspecified sites in genomic regions of a few kb through DNA synthesis-dependent or -independent end-joining pathways, according to DSB type. This information will assist in the understanding of how oncogene fusions are generated and which etiological factors trigger them.

  18. Nanopore DNA sequencing and epigenetic detection with a MspA nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, Andrew H.

    epigenetic base modifications such as DNA methylation and describe challenges in detecting such modifications. I then introduce nanopore sequencing and discuss how it has potential to address challenges in both sequencing and modified base detection. Chapter 1 concludes with a summary of previous nanopore work that has formed the foundation for this thesis. Chapter 2 describes our work using a DNA polymerase to control DNA translocation through the pore. Chapter 3 discusses how the DNA polymerase/MspA based system developed in Chapter 2 can be used to detect epigenetically modified bases 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. In Chapter 4 I describe our work to generate and decode long nanopore reads of DNA. Homemade alignment algorithms are used to align nanopore reads to known sequence with applications ranging from species identification to hybrid genome assembly. Chapter 5 concludes the thesis and lays out a road map for the ultimate realization of de novo nanopore DNA sequencing and commercialization of an MspA-based device.

  19. The DNA methylation level against the background of the genome size and t-heterochromatin content in some species of the genus Secale L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinka, Anna; Poter, Paulina

    2017-01-01

    Methylation of cytosine in DNA is one of the most important epigenetic modifications in eukaryotes and plays a crucial role in the regulation of gene activity and the maintenance of genomic integrity. DNA methylation and other epigenetic mechanisms affect the development, differentiation or the response of plants to biotic and abiotic stress. This study compared the level of methylation of cytosines on a global (ELISA) and genomic scale (MSAP) between the species of the genus Secale. We analyzed whether the interspecific variation of cytosine methylation was associated with the size of the genome (C-value) and the content of telomeric heterochromatin. MSAP analysis showed that S. sylvestre was the most distinct species among the studied rye taxa; however, the results clearly indicated that these differences were not statistically significant. The total methylation level of the studied loci was very similar in all taxa and ranged from 60% in S. strictum ssp. africanum to 66% in S. cereale ssp. segetale, which confirmed the lack of significant differences in the sequence methylation pattern between the pairs of rye taxa. The level of global cytosine methylation in the DNA was not significantly associated with the content of t-heterochromatin and did not overlap with the existing taxonomic rye relationships. The highest content of 5-methylcytosine was found in S. cereale ssp. segetale (83%), while very low in S. strictum ssp. strictum (53%), which was significantly different from the methylation state of all taxa, except for S. sylvestre. The other studied taxa of rye had a similar level of methylated cytosine ranging from 66.42% (S. vavilovii) to 74.41% in (S. cereale ssp. afghanicum). The results obtained in this study are evidence that the percentage of methylated cytosine cannot be inferred solely based on the genome size or t-heterochromatin. This is a significantly more complex issue. PMID:28149679

  20. Structure of Naegleria Tet-like dioxygenase (NgTet1) in complexes with a reaction intermediate 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Pais, June E; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Ivan R; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Yu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-12-15

    The family of ten-eleven translocation (Tet) dioxygenases is widely distributed across the eukaryotic tree of life, from mammals to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi. Like mammalian Tet proteins, the Naegleria Tet-like protein, NgTet1, acts on 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and generates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in three consecutive, Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxidation reactions. The two intermediates, 5hmC and 5fC, could be considered either as the reaction product of the previous enzymatic cycle or the substrate for the next cycle. Here we present a new crystal structure of NgTet1 in complex with DNA containing a 5hmC. Along with the previously solved NgTet1-5mC structure, the two complexes offer a detailed picture of the active site at individual stages of the reaction cycle. In the crystal, the hydroxymethyl (OH-CH2-) moiety of 5hmC points to the metal center, representing the reaction product of 5mC hydroxylation. The hydroxyl oxygen atom could be rotated away from the metal center, to a hydrophobic pocket formed by Ala212, Val293 and Phe295. Such rotation turns the hydroxyl oxygen atom away from the product conformation, and exposes the target CH2 towards the metal-ligand water molecule, where a dioxygen O2 molecule would occupy to initiate the next round of reaction by abstracting a hydrogen atom from the substrate. The Ala212-to-Val (A212V) mutant profoundly limits the product to 5hmC, probably because the reduced hydrophobic pocket size restricts the binding of 5hmC as a substrate. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. 5-METHYLCYTOSINE IN CPG SITES AND THE REACTIVITY OF NEAREST NEIGHBORING GUANINES TOWARD THE CARCINOGEN AFLATOXIN B1-8,9-EPOXIDE. (R825809)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. 5-METHYLCYTOSINE IN CPG SITES AND THE REACTIVITY OF NEAREST NEIGHBORING GUANINES TOWARD THE CARCINOGEN AFLATOXIN B1-8,9-EPOXIDE. (R825809)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  3. Scriptaid Treatment Decreases DNA Methyltransferase 1 Expression by Induction of MicroRNA-152 Expression in Porcine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Liang

    Full Text Available Abnormal epigenetic reprogramming of donor nuclei after somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT is thought to be the main cause of low cloning efficiencies. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated a positive role of Scriptaid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi that belongs to an existing class of hydroxamic acid-containing HDACis, on the development competence of cloned embryos in many species. The present study investigated the effects of Scriptaid on the development of porcine SCNT embryos in vitro and its mechanism. Treatment with 300 or 500 nM Scriptaid for 20 h after activation significantly increased the percentage of SCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage and the total number of cells per blastocyst and significantly decreased the percentage of apoptotic cells in blastocysts. Scriptaid treatment significantly increased the level of histone H3 acetylated at K9 and the conversion of 5-methylcytosine into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and significantly decreased the level of histone H3 trimethylated at K9 at the pronuclear stage. As a potential mechanism for the DNA methylation changes, our results showed that the expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 was frequently down-regulated in Scriptaid-treated embryos in comparison with untreated embryos and was inversely correlated to endogenous microRNA-152 (miR-152. Taken together, these findings illustrated a crucial functional crosstalk between miR-152 and DNMT1. Meanwhile, mRNA and protein levels of POU5F1 and CDX2 were increased in Scriptaid-treated embryos. mRNA levels of Caspase3, and Bax were significantly decreased and that of Bcl-xL was significantly increased in Scriptaid-treated embryos. In conclusion, these observations would contribute to uncover the nuclear reprogramming mechanisms underlying the effects of Scriptaid on the improvement of porcine SCNT embryos.

  4. Hepatic deficiency of the pioneer transcription factor FoxA restricts hepatitis B virus biosynthesis by the developmental regulation of viral DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa C McFadden

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The FoxA family of pioneer transcription factors regulates hepatitis B virus (HBV transcription, and hence viral replication. Hepatocyte-specific FoxA-deficiency in the HBV transgenic mouse model of chronic infection prevents the transcription of the viral DNA genome as a result of the failure of the developmentally controlled conversion of 5-methylcytosine residues to cytosine during postnatal hepatic maturation. These observations suggest that pioneer transcription factors such as FoxA, which mark genes for expression at subsequent developmental steps in the cellular differentiation program, mediate their effects by reversing the DNA methylation status of their target genes to permit their ensuing expression when the appropriate tissue-specific transcription factor combinations arise during development. Furthermore, as the FoxA-deficient HBV transgenic mice are viable, the specific developmental timing, abundance and isoform type of pioneer factor expression must permit all essential liver gene expression to occur at a level sufficient to support adequate liver function. This implies that pioneer transcription factors can recognize and mark their target genes in distinct developmental manners dependent upon, at least in part, the concentration and affinity of FoxA for its binding sites within enhancer and promoter regulatory sequence elements. This selective marking of cellular genes for expression by the FoxA pioneer factor compared to HBV may offer the opportunity for the specific silencing of HBV gene expression and hence the resolution of chronic HBV infections which are responsible for approximately one million deaths worldwide annually due to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  5. Dynamics of DNA methylation during early development of the preimplantation bovine embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle B Dobbs

    Full Text Available There is species divergence in control of DNA methylation during preimplantation development. The exact pattern of methylation in the bovine embryo has not been established nor has its regulation by gender or maternal signals that regulate development such as colony stimulating factor 2 (CSF2. Using immunofluorescent labeling with anti-5-methylcytosine and embryos produced with X-chromosome sorted sperm, it was demonstrated that methylation decreased from the 2-cell stage to the 6-8 cell stage and then increased thereafter up to the blastocyst stage. In a second experiment, embryos of specific genders were produced by fertilization with X- or Y-sorted sperm. The developmental pattern was similar to the first experiment, but there was stage × gender interaction. Methylation was greater for females at the 8-cell stage but greater for males at the blastocyst stage. Treatment with CSF2 had no effect on labeling for DNA methylation in blastocysts. Methylation was lower for inner cell mass cells (i.e., cells that did not label with anti-CDX2 than for trophectoderm (CDX2-positive. The possible role for DNMT3B in developmental changes in methylation was evaluated by determining gene expression and degree of methylation. Steady-state mRNA for DNMT3B decreased from the 2-cell stage to a nadir for D 5 embryos >16 cells and then increased at the blastocyst stage. High resolution melting analysis was used to assess methylation of a CpG rich region in an intronic region of DNMT3B. Methylation percent decreased between the 6-8 cell and the blastocyst stage but there was no difference in methylation between ICM and TE. Results indicate that DNA methylation undergoes dynamic changes during the preimplantation period in a manner that is dependent upon gender and cell lineage. Developmental changes in expression of DNMT3B are indicative of a possible role in changes in methylation. Moreover, DNMT3B itself appears to be under epigenetic control by methylation.

  6. DNA Methylation Changes in Valproic Acid-Treated HeLa Cells as Assessed by Image Analysis, Immunofluorescence and Vibrational Microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronezi, Giovana M. B.; Felisbino, Marina Barreto; Gatti, Maria Sílvia V.; Vidal, Benedicto de Campos

    2017-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), a well-known histone deacetylase inhibitor, has been reported to affect the DNA methylation status in addition to inducing histone hyperacetylation in several cell types. In HeLa cells, VPA promotes histone acetylation and chromatin remodeling. However, DNA demethylation was not checked in this cell model for standing effects longer than those provided by histone acetylation, which is a rapid and transient phenomenon. Demonstration of VPA-induced DNA demethylation in HeLa cells would contribute to understanding the effect of VPA on an aggressive tumor cell line. In the present work, DNA demethylation in VPA-treated HeLa cells was assessed by image analysis of chromatin texture, the abundance of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) immunofluorescence signals and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy centered on spectral regions related to the vibration of–CH3 groups. Image analysis indicated that increased chromatin unpacking promoted by a 4-h-treatment with 1.0 mM VPA persisted for 24 h in the absence of the drug, suggesting the occurrence of DNA demethylation that was confirmed by decreased 5mC immunofluorescence signals. FT-IR spectra of DNA samples from 1 mM or 20 mM VPA-treated cells subjected to a peak fitting analysis of the spectral window for–CH3 stretching vibrations showed decreased vibrations and energy of these groups as a function of the decreased abundance of 5mC induced by increased VPA concentrations. Only the 20 mM-VPA treatment caused an increase in the ratio of -CH3 bending vibrations evaluated at 1375 cm-1 in relation to in-plane vibrations of overall cytosines evaluated at 1492 cm-1. CH3 stretching vibrations showed to be more sensitive than–CH3 bending vibrations, as detected with FT-IR microspectroscopy, for studies aiming to associate vibrational spectroscopy and changes in DNA 5mC abundance. PMID:28114349

  7. An SGS3-like protein functions in RNA-directed DNA methylation and transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Zhimin

    2010-01-06

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is an important epigenetic mechanism for silencing transgenes and endogenous repetitive sequences such as transposons. The RD29A promoter-driven LUCIFERASE transgene and its corresponding endogenous RD29A gene are hypermethylated and silenced in the Arabidopsis DNA demethylase mutant ros1. By screening for second-site suppressors of ros1, we identified the RDM12 locus. The rdm12 mutation releases the silencing of the RD29A-LUC transgene and the endogenous RD29A gene by reducing the promoter DNA methylation. The rdm12 mutation also reduces DNA methylation at endogenous RdDM target loci, including transposons and other repetitive sequences. In addition, the rdm12 mutation affects the levels of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) from some of the RdDM target loci. RDM12 encodes a protein with XS and coiled-coil domains, and is similar to SGS3, which is a partner protein of RDR6 and can bind to double-stranded RNAs with a 5′ overhang, and is required for several post-transcriptional gene silencing pathways. Our results show that RDM12 is a component of the RdDM pathway, and suggest that RdDM may involve double-stranded RNAs with a 5′ overhang and the partnering between RDM12 and RDR2. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Paramutation-like interaction of T-DNA loci in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiya Xue

    Full Text Available In paramutation, epigenetic information is transferred from one allele to another to create a gene expression state which is stably inherited over generations. Typically, paramutation describes a phenomenon where one allele of a gene down-regulates the expression of another allele. Paramutation has been described in several eukaryotes and is best understood in plants. Here we describe an unexpected paramutation-like trans SALK T-DNA interaction in Arabidopsis. Unlike most of the previously described paramutations, which led to gene silencing, the trans SALK T-DNA interaction caused an increase in the transcript levels of the endogenous gene (COBRA where the T-DNA was inserted. This increased COBRA expression state was stably inherited for several generations and led to the partial suppression of the cobra phenotype. DNA methylation was implicated in this trans SALK T-DNA interaction since mutation of the DNA methyltransferase 1 in the suppressed cobra caused a reversal of the suppression. In addition, null mutants of the DNA demethylase ROS1 caused a similar COBRA transcript increase in the cobra SALK T-DNA mutant as the trans T-DNA interaction. Our results provide a new example of a paramutation-like trans T-DNA interaction in Arabidopsis, and establish a convenient hypocotyl elongation assay to study this phenomenon. The results also alert to the possibility of unexpected endogenous transcript increase when two T-DNAs are combined in the same genetic background.

  9. Global DNA Methylation patterns on marsupial and devil facial tumour chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingles, Emory D; Deakin, Janine E

    2015-01-01

    Despite DNA methylation being one of the most widely studied epigenetic modifications in eukaryotes, only a few studies have examined the global methylation status of marsupial chromosomes. The emergence of devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), a clonally transmissible cancer spreading through the Tasmanian devil population, makes it a particularly pertinent time to determine the methylation status of marsupial and devil facial tumour chromosomes. DNA methylation perturbations are known to play a role in genome instability in human tumours. One of the interesting features of the devil facial tumour is its remarkable karyotypic stability over time as only four strains with minor karyotypic differences having been reported. The cytogenetic monitoring of devil facial tumour (DFT) samples collected over an eight year period and detailed molecular cytogenetic analysis performed on the different DFT strains enables chromosome rearrangements to be correlated with methylation status as the tumour evolves. We used immunofluorescent staining with an antibody to 5-methylcytosine on metaphase chromosomes prepared from fibroblast cells of three distantly related marsupials, including the Tasmanian devil, as well as DFTD chromosomes prepared from samples collected from different years and representing different karyotypic strains. Staining of chromosomes from male and female marsupial cell lines indicate species-specific differences in global methylation patterns but with the most intense staining regions corresponding to telomeric and/or centromeric regions of autosomes. In males, the X chromosome was hypermethylated as was one X in females. Similarly, telomeric regions on DFTD chromosomes and regions corresponding to material from one of the two X chromosomes were hypermethylated. No difference in global methylation in samples of the same strain taken in different years was observed. The methylation patterns on DFTD chromosomes suggests that the hypermethylated active X was

  10. Spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and sleep deprivation differently induce Bdnf1, Bdnf4 and Bdnf9a DNA methylation and transcripts levels in the basal forebrain and frontal cortex in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventskovska, Olena; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Karpova, Nina N

    2015-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) regulates neuronal plasticity, slow wave activity and sleep homeostasis. Environmental stimuli control Bdnf expression through epigenetic mechanisms, but there are no data on epigenetic regulation of Bdnf by sleep or sleep deprivation. Here we investigated whether 5-methylcytosine (5mC) DNA modification at Bdnf promoters p1, p4 and p9 influences Bdnf1, Bdnf4 and Bdnf9a expression during the normal inactive phase or after sleep deprivation (SD) (3, 6 and 12 h, end-times being ZT3, ZT6 and ZT12) in rats in two brain areas involved in sleep regulation, the basal forebrain and cortex. We found a daytime variation in cortical Bdnf expression: Bdnf1 expression was highest at ZT6 and Bdnf4 lowest at ZT12. Such variation was not observed in the basal forebrain. Also Bdnf p1 and p9 methylation levels differed only in the cortex, while Bdnf p4 methylation did not vary in either area. Factorial analysis revealed that sleep deprivation significantly induced Bdnf1 and Bdnf4 with the similar pattern for Bdnf9a in both basal forebrain and cortex; 12 h of sleep deprivation decreased 5mC levels at the cortical Bdnf p4 and p9. Regression analysis between the 5mC promoter levels and the corresponding Bdnf transcript expression revealed significant negative correlations for the basal forebrain Bdnf1 and cortical Bdnf9a transcripts in only non-deprived rats, while these correlations were lost after sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that Bdnf transcription during the light phase of undisturbed sleep-wake cycle but not after SD is regulated at least partially by brain site-specific DNA methylation. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  11. Vitamin C protects against UV irradiation-induced apoptosis through reactivating silenced tumor suppressor genes p21 and p16 in a Tet-dependent DNA demethylation manner in human skin cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-ran; Qin, Hai-hong; Wu, Wen-yu; He, Shu-juan; Xu, Jin-hua

    2014-08-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in various kinds of carcinogenesis. Vitamin C could induce Tet-dependent DNA demethylation in embryonic stem cells. Therefore, the antagonizing activity of vitamin C on ultraviolet (UV)-induced apoptosis was investigated in this study. Apoptosis of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells and p16-knockout (KO) or p21-KO fibroblasts was assessed by a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Real-time PCR and western blot were used to determine the relative expression levels of p12, p21, and Tet1/2/3 genes. The global DNA methylation levels were determined using MethylFlash Methylated DNA Quantification Kit in A431 cells with or without vitamin C treatment. To examine the DNA demethylation activity of vitamin C, DNA immunoprecipitation (DIP)-qPCR was performed to determine the relative levels of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) in p16 and p21 promoter regions containing cytosine-phosphorothiolated guanine (CpG) islands. The increasing apoptosis of A431 cells under prolonged UV irradiation was remarkably decreased by the combination of vitamin C treatment, suggesting that vitamin C protects against UV-induced apoptosis. Concurrently, vitamin C induced a significant reduction of global DNA methylation in a time- and dose-dependent manner in A431 cells. Vitamin C also reactivated the expression of p16 and p21 at mRNA and protein levels. Mechanistically, about 27% 5hmC-positive cells were observed in vitamin C-treated A431 cells, and the 5hmC enrichment at p16 and p21 promoter regions was also largely increased by vitamin C. Moreover, the expression of p16 and p21 was decreased in Tet1/2 double-knockdown cells, in which the inhibitory effect of vitamin C on UV-induced apoptosis was dismissed. Furthermore, the inhibition of UV-induced apoptosis on vitamin C treatment nearly disappeared in p16- or p21-knockout primary cultured fibroblasts. These results demonstrate that vitamin C effectively antagonizes UV

  12. RNA-directed DNA methylation and demethylation in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHINNUSAMY Viswanathan; ZHU Jian-Kang

    2009-01-01

    A-dlrected DNA methylation (RdDM) Is a nuclear process in which small Interfering RNAs (siRNAs)direct the cytosine methylation of DNA sequences that are complementary to the siRNAs. In plants,double stranded-RNAs (dsRNAs) generated by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2) serve as precursors for Dicer-like 3 dependent biogenesis of 24-nt siRNAs. Plant specific RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV) is presumed to generate the initial RNA transcripts that are substrates for RDR2. siRNAs are loaded onto an argonaute4-containlng RlSC (RNA-induced silencing complex) that targets the de novo DNA methyltransferase DRM2 to RdDM target locl. Nascent RNA transcripts from the target loci are generated by another plant-specific RNA polymerase, Pol V, and these transcripts help recruit com-plementary siRNAs and the associated RdDM effector complex to the target loci in a transcrip-tion-coupled DNA methylation process. Small RNA binding proteins such as ROS3 may direct tar-get-specific DNA demethyiation by the ROS1 family of DNA demethylases. Chromatin remodeling en-zymes and histone modifying enzymes also participate in DNA methylation and possibly demethylation.One of the well studied functions of RdOM is transposon silencing and genome stability. In addition,RdDM is important for paramutation, imprinting, gene regulation, and plant development. Locus-specific DNA methylation and demethylation, and transposon activation under abiotic stresses suggest that RdDM is also important in stress responses of plants. Further studies will help illuminate the functions of RdDM in the dynamic control of epigenomes during development and environmental stress responses.

  13. RNA-directed DNA methylation and demethylation in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHINNUSAMY; Viswanathan

    2009-01-01

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is a nuclear process in which small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) direct the cytosine methylation of DNA sequences that are complementary to the siRNAs. In plants, double stranded-RNAs (dsRNAs) generated by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2) serve as precursors for Dicer-like 3 dependent biogenesis of 24-nt siRNAs. Plant specific RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV) is presumed to generate the initial RNA transcripts that are substrates for RDR2. siRNAs are loaded onto an argonaute4-containing RISC (RNA-induced silencing complex) that targets the de novo DNA methyltransferase DRM2 to RdDM target loci. Nascent RNA transcripts from the target loci are generated by another plant-specific RNA polymerase, Pol V, and these transcripts help recruit com- plementary siRNAs and the associated RdDM effector complex to the target loci in a transcrip- tion-coupled DNA methylation process. Small RNA binding proteins such as ROS3 may direct tar- get-specific DNA demethylation by the ROS1 family of DNA demethylases. Chromatin remodeling en- zymes and histone modifying enzymes also participate in DNA methylation and possibly demethylation. One of the well studied functions of RdDM is transposon silencing and genome stability. In addition, RdDM is important for paramutation, imprinting, gene regulation, and plant development. Lo- cus-specific DNA methylation and demethylation, and transposon activation under abiotic stresses suggest that RdDM is also important in stress responses of plants. Further studies will help illuminate the functions of RdDM in the dynamic control of epigenomes during development and environmental stress responses.

  14. DNA Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2002-11-01

    DNA is one candidate of promising molecules for molecular electronic devices, since it has the double helix structure with pi-electron bases for electron transport, the address at 0.4 nm intervals, and the self-assembly. Electrical conductivity and nanostructure of DNA and modified DNA molecules are investigated in order to research the application of DNA in nanoelectronic devices. It has been revealed that DNA is a wide-gap semiconductor in the absence of doping. The conductivity of DNA has been controlled by chemical doping, electric field doping, and photo-doping. It has found that Poly(dG)[middle dot]Poly(dC) has the best conductivity and can function as a conducting nanowire. The pattern of DNA network is controlled by changing the concentration of the DNA solution.

  15. Dna Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  16. DNA glue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Astakhova, Irina V.; Malakhov, Andrei D.

    2008-01-01

    Significant alterations in thermal stability of parallel DNA triplexes and antiparallel duplexes were observed upon changing the attachment of ethynylpyrenes from para to ortho in the structure of phenylmethylglycerol inserted as a bulge into DNA (TINA). Insertions of two ortho-TINAs as a pseudo...

  17. DNA data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Raw DNA chromatogram data produced by the ABI 373, 377, 3130 and 3730 automated sequencing machines in ABI format. These are from fish (primarily Sebastes spp.,...

  18. DNA adductomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbo, Silvia; Turesky, Robert J; Villalta, Peter W

    2014-03-17

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the (32)P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LC-MS(n)), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LC-MS(n) instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology.

  19. DNA expressions - A formal notation for DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, Rudy van

    2015-01-01

    We describe a formal notation for DNA molecules that may contain nicks and gaps. The resulting DNA expressions denote formal DNA molecules. Different DNA expressions may denote the same molecule. Such DNA expressions are called equivalent. We examine which DNA expressions are minimal, which

  20. DNA expressions - A formal notation for DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, Rudy van

    2015-01-01

    We describe a formal notation for DNA molecules that may contain nicks and gaps. The resulting DNA expressions denote formal DNA molecules. Different DNA expressions may denote the same molecule. Such DNA expressions are called equivalent. We examine which DNA expressions are minimal, which

  1. A Pre-mRNA-splicing factor is required for RNA-directed DNA methylation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Feng Huang

    Full Text Available Cytosine DNA methylation is a stable epigenetic mark that is frequently associated with the silencing of genes and transposable elements (TEs. In Arabidopsis, the establishment of DNA methylation is through the RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM pathway. Here, we report the identification and characterization of RDM16, a new factor in the RdDM pathway. Mutation of RDM16 reduced the DNA methylation levels and partially released the silencing of a reporter gene as well as some endogenous genomic loci in the DNA demethylase ros1-1 mutant background. The rdm16 mutant had morphological defects and was hypersensitive to salt stress and abscisic acid (ABA. Map-based cloning and complementation test led to the identification of RDM16, which encodes a pre-mRNA-splicing factor 3, a component of the U4/U6 snRNP. RNA-seq analysis showed that 308 intron retention events occurred in rdm16, confirming that RDM16 is involved in pre-mRNA splicing in planta. RNA-seq and mRNA expression analysis also revealed that the RDM16 mutation did not affect the pre-mRNA splicing of known RdDM genes, suggesting that RDM16 might be directly involved in RdDM. Small RNA expression analysis on loci showing RDM16-dependent DNA methylation suggested that unlike the previously reported putative splicing factor mutants, rdm16 did not affect small RNA levels; instead, the rdm16 mutation caused a decrease in the levels of Pol V transcripts. ChIP assays revealed that RDM16 was enriched at some Pol V target loci. Our results suggest that RDM16 regulates DNA methylation through influencing Pol V transcript levels. Finally, our genome-wide DNA methylation analysis indicated that RDM16 regulates the overall methylation of TEs and gene-surrounding regions, and preferentially targets Pol IV-dependent DNA methylation loci and the ROS1 target loci. Our work thus contributes to the understanding of RdDM and its interactions with active DNA demethylation.

  2. DNA and RNA sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Tao; LIN; Lin; ZHAO; Hong; JIANG; Long

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes recent advances in DNA sensor. Major areas of DNA sensor covered in this review include immobilization methods of DNA, general techniques of DNA detection and application of nanoparticles in DNA sensor.

  3. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  4. DNA vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  5. DNA nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadrian C Seeman

    2003-01-01

    We are all aware that the DNA found in cells is a double helix consisting of two antiparallel strands held together by specific hydrogen-bonded base pairs; adenine (A always pairs with thymine (T, and guanine (G always pairs with cytosine (C. The specificity of this base pairing and the ability to ensure that it occurs in this fashion (and not some other1 is key to the use of DNA in materials applications. The double helical arrangement of the two molecules leads to a linear helix axis, linear not in the geometrical sense of being a straight line, but in the topological sense of being unbranched. Genetic engineers discovered in the 1970s how to splice together pieces of DNA to add new genes to DNA molecules2, and synthetic chemists worked out convenient syntheses for short pieces of DNA (up to ∼100–150 units in the 1980s3. Regardless of the impact of these technologies on biological systems, hooking together linear molecules leads only to longer linear molecules, with circles, knots, and catenanes perhaps resulting from time to time.

  6. Alterations of 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine in Human Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yesilkanal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Prior to 2009, 5-methylcytosine (5-mC was thought to be the only biologically significant cytosine modification in mammalian DNA. With the discovery of the TET enzymes, which convert 5-methylcytosine (5-mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC, however, intense interest has emerged in determining the biological function of 5-hmC. Here, we review the techniques used to study 5-hmC and evidence that alterations to 5-hmC physiology play a functional role in the molecular pathogenesis of human cancers.

  7. DNA origami nanopores for controlling DNA translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Bell, Nicholas A W; Thacker, Vivek V; Göpfrich, Kerstin; Misiunas, Karolis; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2013-07-23

    We combine DNA origami structures with glass nanocapillaries to reversibly form hybrid DNA origami nanopores. Trapping of the DNA origami onto the nanocapillary is proven by imaging fluorescently labeled DNA origami structures and simultaneous ionic current measurements of the trapping events. We then show two applications highlighting the versatility of these DNA origami nanopores. First, by tuning the pore size we can control the folding of dsDNA molecules ("physical control"). Second, we show that the specific introduction of binding sites in the DNA origami nanopore allows selective detection of ssDNA as a function of the DNA sequence ("chemical control").

  8. DNA nanostructure immobilization to lithographic DNA arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrete, Omar D.

    Although DNA is well known for its genetic role in biology, DNA has also been sought-after as a material for the self-assembly of biological and electronic devices. Examples of DNA nanostructure construction include DNA tiled self-assembly and DNA Origami, where by controlling the sequence and concentration of DNA molecules, the rational design of geometric DNA nanostructures is possible. The assembly of DNA nanostructures takes place in solution and thus they are in disorder and require further organization to construct circuitry or devices. Hence, it is essential for future applications of this technology to develop methods to direct the placement of DNA nanostructures on a surface. To address this challenge my research examines the use of DNA microarrays to capture DNA nanostructures via DNA hybridization. Modern DNA arrays offer a high-density of sequence-specific molecular recognition sites where the addressable placement of DNA nanostructures can be achieved. Using Maskless Array Synthesizer (MAS) technology, I have characterized photolithographic DNA arrays for the hybridization of DNA complexes like large DNA molecules (> 1 kb), DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates, and DNA Origami. Although modern photolithographic DNA arrays can possess a high-density of sequence (106/cm2), the printed DNA areas are on the order of tens of microns. Thus, I have also developed a method to reduce the DNA array spot size to nanoscale dimensions through the combined use of electron beam lithography with photolithographic DNA synthesis. This work addresses the key elements towards developing a surface patterning technology that takes advantage of DNA base-pairing for both molecular sub-assembly and surface patterning.

  9. The construction of Streptomyces cyaneus genomic libraries in Escherichia coli is dependent upon the use of Mcr-deficient strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P; Harvey, S S; Sims, P F; Broda, P

    1992-09-21

    Streptomyces cyaneus genomic DNA ligated into either lambda phage or plasmid vectors was very inefficiently cloned into standard Escherichia coli host strains. However, the same material could be efficiently cloned using Mcr-deficient E. coli strains. These results suggest that the S. cyaneus genome contains 5-methylcytosine residues, some of which occur within the recognition sequences of the E. coli Mcr restriction system.

  10. DNA nanostructure meets nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guomei; Surwade, Sumedh P; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Haitao

    2013-04-07

    Recent advances in DNA nanotechnology have made it possible to construct DNA nanostructures of almost arbitrary shapes with 2-3 nm of precision in their dimensions. These DNA nanostructures are ideal templates for bottom-up nanofabrication. This review highlights the challenges and recent advances in three areas that are directly related to DNA-based nanofabrication: (1) fabrication of large scale DNA nanostructures; (2) pattern transfer from DNA nanostructure to an inorganic substrate; and (3) directed assembly of DNA nanostructures.

  11. DNA ligase I, the replicative DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Timothy R L; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2012-01-01

    Multiple DNA ligation events are required to join the Okazaki fragments generated during lagging strand DNA synthesis. In eukaryotes, this is primarily carried out by members of the DNA ligase I family. The C-terminal catalytic region of these enzymes is composed of three domains: a DNA binding domain, an adenylation domain and an OB-fold domain. In the absence of DNA, these domains adopt an extended structure but transition into a compact ring structure when they engage a DNA nick, with each of the domains contacting the DNA. The non-catalytic N-terminal region of eukaryotic DNA ligase I is responsible for the specific participation of these enzymes in DNA replication. This proline-rich unstructured region contains the nuclear localization signal and a PCNA interaction motif that is critical for localization to replication foci and efficient joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I initially engages the PCNA trimer via this interaction motif which is located at the extreme N-terminus of this flexible region. It is likely that this facilitates an additional interaction between the DNA binding domain and the PCNA ring. The similar size and shape of the rings formed by the PCNA trimer and the DNA ligase I catalytic region when it engages a DNA nick suggest that these proteins interact to form a double-ring structure during the joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I also interacts with replication factor C, the factor that loads the PCNA trimeric ring onto DNA. This interaction, which is regulated by phosphorylation of the non-catalytic N-terminus of DNA ligase I, also appears to be critical for DNA replication.

  12. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps = 0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps = 0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps = 0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on

  13. Synthesis of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2008-11-18

    A method of synthesizing a desired double-stranded DNA of a predetermined length and of a predetermined sequence. Preselected sequence segments that will complete the desired double-stranded DNA are determined. Preselected segment sequences of DNA that will be used to complete the desired double-stranded DNA are provided. The preselected segment sequences of DNA are assembled to produce the desired double-stranded DNA.

  14. Dynamic heterogeneity of DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation in embryonic stem cell populations captured by single-cell 3D high-content analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajbakhsh, Jian, E-mail: tajbakhshj@cshs.org [Chromatin Biology Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Translational Cytomics Group, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Stefanovski, Darko [Translational Cytomics Group, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19348 (United States); Tang, George [Chromatin Biology Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Translational Cytomics Group, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Wawrowsky, Kolja [Translational Cytomics Group, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Liu, Naiyou; Fair, Jeffrey H. [Department of Surgery and UF Health Comprehensive Transplant Center, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32608 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Cell-surface markers and transcription factors are being used in the assessment of stem cell fate and therapeutic safety, but display significant variability in stem cell cultures. We assessed nuclear patterns of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC, associated with pluripotency), a second important epigenetic mark, and its combination with 5-methylcytosine (5mC, associated with differentiation), also in comparison to more established markers of pluripotency (Oct-4) and endodermal differentiation (FoxA2, Sox17) in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) over a 10-day differentiation course in vitro: by means of confocal and super-resolution imaging together with 3D high-content analysis, an essential tool in single-cell screening. In summary: 1) We did not measure any significant correlation of putative markers with global 5mC or 5hmC. 2) While average Oct-4 levels stagnated on a cell-population base (0.015 lnIU/day), Sox17 and FoxA2 increased 22-fold and 3-fold faster, respectively (Sox17: 0.343 lnIU/day; FoxA2: 0.046 lnIU/day). In comparison, global DNA methylation levels increased 4-fold faster (0.068 lnIU/day), and global hydroxymethylation declined at 0.046 lnIU/day, both with a better explanation of the temporal profile. 3) This progression was concomitant with the occurrence of distinct nuclear codistribution patterns that represented a heterogeneous spectrum of states in differentiation; converging to three major coexisting 5mC/5hmC phenotypes by day 10: 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup −}, 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup +}, and 5hmC{sup −}/5mC{sup +} cells. 4) Using optical nanoscopy we could delineate the respective topologies of 5mC/5hmC colocalization in subregions of nuclear DNA: in the majority of 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup +} cells 5hmC and 5mC predominantly occupied mutually exclusive territories resembling euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, respectively. Simultaneously, in a smaller subset of cells we observed a tighter colocalization of the two cytosine variants, presumably

  15. Molecular DNA switches and DNA chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Berkey, Cristin; Lavi, Uri; Cantor, Charles R.; Smith, Cassandra L.

    1999-06-01

    We present an assay to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms on a chip using molecular DNA switches and isothermal rolling- circle amplification. The basic principle behind the switch is an allele-specific oligonucleotide circularization, mediated by DNA ligase. A DNA switch is closed when perfect hybridization between the probe oligonucleotide and target DNA allows ligase to covalently circularize the probe. Mismatches around the ligation site prevent probe circularization, resulting in an open switch. DNA polymerase is then used to preferentially amplify the closed switches, via rolling-circle amplification. The stringency of the molecular switches yields 102 - 103 fold discrimination between matched and mismatched sequences.

  16. Mutations induced by ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Gerd P. [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)]. E-mail: gpfeifer@coh.org; You, Young-Hyun [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Besaratinia, Ahmad [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)

    2005-04-01

    The different ultraviolet (UV) wavelength components, UVA (320-400 nm), UVB (280-320 nm), and UVC (200-280 nm), have distinct mutagenic properties. A hallmark of UVC and UVB mutagenesis is the high frequency of transition mutations at dipyrimidine sequences containing cytosine. In human skin cancers, about 35% of all mutations in the p53 gene are transitions at dipyrimidines within the sequence 5'-TCG and 5'-CCG, and these are localized at several mutational hotspots. Since 5'-CG sequences are methylated along the p53 coding sequence in human cells, these mutations may be derived from sunlight-induced pyrimidine dimers forming at sequences that contain 5-methylcytosine. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) form preferentially at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine when cells are irradiated with UVB or sunlight. In order to define the contribution of 5-methylcytosine to sunlight-induced mutations, the lacI and cII transgenes in mouse fibroblasts were used as mutational targets. After 254 nm UVC irradiation, only 6-9% of the base substitutions were at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine. However, 24-32% of the solar light-induced mutations were at dipyrimidines that contain 5-methylcytosine and most of these mutations were transitions. Thus, CPDs forming preferentially at dipyrimidines with 5-methylcytosine are responsible for a considerable fraction of the mutations induced by sunlight in mammalian cells. Using mouse cell lines harboring photoproduct-specific photolyases and mutational reporter genes, we showed that CPDs (rather than 6-4 photoproducts or other lesions) are responsible for the great majority of UVB-induced mutations. An important component of UVB mutagenesis is the deamination of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine within CPDs. The mutational specificity of long-wave UVA (340-400 nm) is distinct from that of the shorter wavelength UV and is characterized mainly by G to T transversions presumably arising through mechanisms

  17. Dynamics of phytohormone and DNA methylation patterns changes during dormancy induction in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Xinzhong; Zhang, Min; Han, Deguo; Qiu, Changpeng; Han, Zhenhai

    2012-01-01

    Changes in endogenous phytohormone levels, DNA methylation patterns, and expression levels of related genes during induction of dormancy in two strawberry cultivars, Darselect and All Star, were studied under controlled environmental conditions. At 12°C, regardless of day length, potted, runner-derived plants of both cultivars gradually exhibited morphological traits typical of dormancy after treatment for 8 weeks. These morphological changes were accompanied by a synchronous significant decline in indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) level and increases in abscisic acid (ABA) content and global genomic DNA methylation in young leaves. Exposed at 15°C and a short-day photoperiod, the changes in morphology, phytohormone levels and DNA methylation of both cultivars were similar to those observed at 12°C. Slight but non-significant changes in IAA and ABA levels and genomic DNA methylation occurred in young leaves at both 15°C with long days and 18°C with short days. These results indicated that temperature alone was sufficient to induce strawberry to enter the typical dormant phase, and day length had no impact at 12°C. The higher temperature permissible for dormancy induction in strawberry was 15°C, but at this temperature dormancy induction was modified by day length. The expression patterns of FaPIN1, FaNCED1, FaDRM and FaROS1 were coincident with the changes in phytohormone levels and DNA methylation. Although the two tested cultivars have different temporal responses with the different degree of cold tolerance and depth of dormancy, both the endogenous phytohormone and DNA methylation were changed when induced by external environmental factors.

  18. DNA fragmentation in apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Cleavage of chromosomal DNA into oligonucleosomal size fragments is an integral part of apoptosis. Elegant biochemical work identified the DNA fragmentation factor (DFF) as a major apoptotic endonuclease for DNA fragmentation in vitro. Genetic studies in mice support the importance of DFF in DNA fragmentation and possibly in apoptosis in vivo. Recent work also suggests the existence of additional endonucleases for DNA degradation. Understanding the roles of individual endonucleases in apoptosis, and how they might coordinate to degrade DNA in different tissues during normal development and homeostasis, as well as in various diseased states, will be a major research focus in the near future.

  19. ex vivo DNA assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Even with decreasing DNA synthesis costs there remains a need for inexpensive, rapid and reliable methods for assembling synthetic DNA into larger constructs or combinatorial libraries. Advances in cloning techniques have resulted in powerful in vitro and in vivo assembly of DNA. However, monetary and time costs have limited these approaches. Here, we report an ex vivo DNA assembly method that uses cellular lysates derived from a commonly used laboratory strain of Escherichia coli for joining double-stranded DNA with short end homologies embedded within inexpensive primers. This method concurrently shortens the time and decreases costs associated with current DNA assembly methods.

  20. [Uracil-DNA glycosylases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Dariusz; Słupianek, Artur; Ksiazek, Dominika; Skórski, Tomasz; Błasiak, Janusz

    2008-01-01

    Uracil is one of four nitrogen bases, most frequently found in normal RNA. Uracyl can be found also in DNA as a result of enzymatic or non-enzymatic deamination of cytosine as well as misincorporation of dUMP instead of dTMP during DNA replication. Uracil from DNA can be removed by DNA repair enzymes with apirymidine site as an intermediate. However, if uracil is not removed from DNA a pair C:G in parental DNA can be changed into a T:A pair in the daughter DNA molecule. Therefore, uracil in DNA may lead to a mutation. Uracil in DNA, similarly to thymine, forms energetically most favorable hydrogen bonds with adenine, therefore uracil does not change the coding properties of DNA. Uracil in DNA is recognized by uracil DNA glycosylase (UDGs), which initiates DNA base excision repair, leading to removing of uracil from DNA and replacing it by thymine or cytosine, when arose as a result of cytosine deamination. Eukaryotes have at least four nuclear UDGs: UNG2, SMUG1, TDG i MBD4, while UNG1 operates in the mitochondrium. UNG2 is involved in DNA repair associated with DNA replication and interacts with PCNA and RPA proteins. Uracil can also be an intermediate product in the process of antigen-dependent antibody diversification in B lymphocytes. Enzymatic deamination of viral DNA by host cells can be a defense mechanism against viral infection, including HIV-1. UNG2, MBD4 and TDG glycosylases may cooperate with mismatch repair proteins and TDG can be involved in nucleotide excision repair system.

  1. Force induced DNA melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; Maiti, Prabal K [Center for Condensed Matter Theory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-12 (India)], E-mail: santosh@physics.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: maiti@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2009-01-21

    When pulled along the axis, double-strand DNA undergoes a large conformational change and elongates by roughly twice its initial contour length at a pulling force of about 70 pN. The transition to this highly overstretched form of DNA is very cooperative. Applying a force perpendicular to the DNA axis (unzipping), double-strand DNA can also be separated into two single-stranded DNA, this being a fundamental process in DNA replication. We study the DNA overstretching and unzipping transition using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and argue that the conformational changes of double-strand DNA associated with either of the above mentioned processes can be viewed as force induced DNA melting. As the force at one end of the DNA is increased the DNA starts melting abruptly/smoothly above a critical force depending on the pulling direction. The critical force f{sub m}, at which DNA melts completely decreases as the temperature of the system is increased. The melting force in the case of unzipping is smaller compared to the melting force when the DNA is pulled along the helical axis. In the case of melting through unzipping, the double-strand separation has jumps which correspond to the different energy minima arising due to sequence of different base pairs. The fraction of Watson-Crick base pair hydrogen bond breaking as a function of force does not show smooth and continuous behavior and consists of plateaus followed by sharp jumps.

  2. DNA damage and autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely [Redox Biology Center and School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States); Panayiotidis, Mihalis I. [School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Franco, Rodrigo, E-mail: rfrancocruz2@unl.edu [Redox Biology Center and School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response.

  3. DNA tagged microparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  4. Modeling DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  5. DNA computing models

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatova, Zoya; Zimmermann, Karl-Heinz

    2008-01-01

    In this excellent text, the reader is given a comprehensive introduction to the field of DNA computing. The book emphasizes computational methods to tackle central problems of DNA computing, such as controlling living cells, building patterns, and generating nanomachines.

  6. Forensic DNA and bioinformatics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bianchi, Lucia; Liò, Pietro

    The field of forensic science is increasingly based on biomolecular data and many European countries are establishing forensic databases to store DNA profiles of crime scenes of known offenders and apply DNA testing...

  7. DNA tagged microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  8. Click chemistry with DNA

    OpenAIRE

    El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Brown, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The advent of click chemistry has led to an influx of new ideas in the nucleic acids field. The copper catalysed alkyne–azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction is the method of choice for DNA click chemistry due to its remarkable efficiency. It has been used to label oligonucleotides with fluorescent dyes, sugars, peptides and other reporter groups, to cyclise DNA, to synthesise DNA catenanes, to join oligonucleotides to PNA, and to produce analogues of DNA with modified nucleobases and backbone...

  9. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  10. Three-Dimensional DNA Nanostructures Assembled from DNA Star Motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Cheng; Zhang, Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Tile-based DNA self-assembly is a promising method in DNA nanotechnology and has produced a wide range of nanostructures by using a small set of unique DNA strands. DNA star motif, as one of DNA tiles, has been employed to assemble varieties of symmetric one-, two-, three-dimensional (1, 2, 3D) DNA nanostructures. Herein, we describe the design principles, assembly methods, and characterization methods of 3D DNA nanostructures assembled from the DNA star motifs.

  11. Modulation of DNA methylation and gene expression in cultured sycamore cells treated by hypomethylating base analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngernprasirtsiri, J; Akazawa, T

    1990-12-12

    The selective suppression of photosynthetic genes in both the nuclear and plastid genomes of the nonphotosynthetic white wild-type cell line of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) has been found to be inversely related to the presence of a variety of methylated bases, especially 5-methylcytosine (5-MeCyt) and N6-methyladenine (N6-MeAde), localized in regions of the plastid genome containing silent genes. We used hypomethylating base analogs to manipulate the level of cytosine and adenine methylation in the white cells of sycamore, and examined the effects of changes in methylation on gene expression. Treatment with 5-azacytidine (5-AzaCyd) and N6-benzyladenine (N6-BzlAde) decreased cytosine and adenine methylation. This was accompanied by restoration of transcriptional activity in photosynthetic genes which are usually suppressed. Both 5-MeCyt and N6-MeAde suppressed nuclear gene expression, but only 5-MeCyt suppressed plastid gene expression.

  12. Using DNA Computing in Classification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abd El-Menem Abd El-Bary; Roshdy AbdelRassoul; Aya Mohamed El-Ebshihy

    2016-01-01

    ... to demonstrate better accuracy and predict some objects for example boys. In addition the explanation of DNA computing, Boolean Circuit using DNA, Molecular Beacons, also DNA logic gates and some applications using DNA computing...

  13. Fast phylogenetic DNA barcoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Kasper Munch; Boomsma, Wouter Krogh; Willerslev, Eske

    2008-01-01

    We present a heuristic approach to the DNA assignment problem based on phylogenetic inferences using constrained neighbour joining and non-parametric bootstrapping. We show that this method performs as well as the more computationally intensive full Bayesian approach in an analysis of 500 insect...... DNA sequences obtained from GenBank. We also analyse a previously published dataset of environmental DNA sequences from soil from New Zealand and Siberia, and use these data to illustrate the fact that statistical approaches to the DNA assignment problem allow for more appropriate criteria...... for determining the taxonomic level at which a particular DNA sequence can be assigned....

  14. DNA-Mediated Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Buzzeo, Marisa C.

    2009-01-01

    The base pair stack of DNA has been demonstrated as a medium for long range charge transport chemistry both in solution and at DNA-modified surfaces. This chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to structural perturbations in the base pair stack as occur with lesions, single base mismatches, and protein binding. We have exploited this sensitivity for the development of reliable electrochemical assays based on DNA charge transport at self-assembled DNA monolayers. Here we discuss the characteristic features, applications, and advantages of DNA-mediated electrochemistry. PMID:18980370

  15. Archaeal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  16. Racemic DNA crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Pradeep K; Collie, Gavin W; Kauffmann, Brice; Huc, Ivan

    2014-12-22

    Racemates increase the chances of crystallization by allowing molecular contacts to be formed in a greater number of ways. With the advent of protein synthesis, the production of protein racemates and racemic-protein crystallography are now possible. Curiously, racemic DNA crystallography had not been investigated despite the commercial availability of L- and D-deoxyribo-oligonucleotides. Here, we report a study into racemic DNA crystallography showing the strong propensity of racemic DNA mixtures to form racemic crystals. We describe racemic crystal structures of various DNA sequences and folded conformations, including duplexes, quadruplexes, and a four-way junction, showing that the advantages of racemic crystallography should extend to DNA.

  17. DNA barcoding for plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vere, Natasha; Rich, Tim C G; Trinder, Sarah A; Long, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcoding uses specific regions of DNA in order to identify species. Initiatives are taking place around the world to generate DNA barcodes for all groups of living organisms and to make these data publically available in order to help understand, conserve, and utilize the world's biodiversity. For land plants the core DNA barcode markers are two sections of coding regions within the chloroplast, part of the genes, rbcL and matK. In order to create high quality databases, each plant that is DNA barcoded needs to have a herbarium voucher that accompanies the rbcL and matK DNA sequences. The quality of the DNA sequences, the primers used, and trace files should also be accessible to users of the data. Multiple individuals should be DNA barcoded for each species in order to check for errors and allow for intraspecific variation. The world's herbaria provide a rich resource of already preserved and identified material and these can be used for DNA barcoding as well as by collecting fresh samples from the wild. These protocols describe the whole DNA barcoding process, from the collection of plant material from the wild or from the herbarium, how to extract and amplify the DNA, and how to check the quality of the data after sequencing.

  18. DNA: Structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinden, Richard R.; E. Pearson, Christopher; N. Potaman, Vladimir

    1998-01-01

    for a long period of time before its information is accessed by the cell. Although DNA plays a critical role as an informational storage molecule, it is by no means as unexciting as a computer tape or disk drive. The structure of the DNA described by Watson and Crick in 1953 is a right handed helix of two......This chapter discusses the structure and function of DNA. DNA occupies a critical role in cells, because it is the source of all intrinsic genetic information. Chemically, DNA is a very stable molecule, a characteristic important for a macromolecule that may have to persist in an intact form...... individual antiparallel DNA strands. Hydrogen bonds provide specificity that allows pairing between the complementary bases (A.T and G.C) in opposite strands. Base stacking occurs near the center of the DNA helix and provides a great deal of stability to the helix (in addition to hydrogen bonding). The sugar...

  19. Biophysics of DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Surveying the last sixty years of research, this book describes the physical properties of DNA in the context of its biological functioning. It is designed to enable both students and researchers of molecular biology, biochemistry and physics to better understand the biophysics of DNA, addressing key questions and facilitating further research. The chapters integrate theoretical and experimental approaches, emphasising throughout the importance of a quantitative knowledge of physical properties in building and analysing models of DNA functioning. For example, the book shows how the relationship between DNA mechanical properties and the sequence specificity of DNA-protein binding can be analyzed quantitatively by using our current knowledge of the physical and structural properties of DNA. Theoretical models and experimental methods in the field are critically considered to enable the reader to engage effectively with the current scientific literature on the physical properties of DNA.

  20. DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rex, A S; Aagaard, J.; Fedder, J

    2017-01-01

    Sperm DNA Fragmentation has been extensively studied for more than a decade. In the 1940s the uniqueness of the spermatozoa protein complex which stabilizes the DNA was discovered. In the fifties and sixties, the association between unstable chromatin structure and subfertility was investigated....... In the seventies, the impact of induced DNA damage was investigated. In the 1980s the concept of sperm DNA fragmentation as related to infertility was introduced as well as the first DNA fragmentation test: the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA). The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labelling...... (TUNEL) test followed by others was introduced in the nineties. The association between DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa and pregnancy loss has been extensively investigated spurring the need for a therapeutic tool for these patients. This gave rise to an increased interest in the aetiology of DNA damage...

  1. Novel DNA probes for sensitive DNA detection

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, James Alistair

    2010-01-01

    The ability to detect and interrogate DNA sequences allows further understanding and\\ud diagnosis of genetic disease. The ability to perform such analysis of genetic material\\ud requires highly selective and reliable technologies. Furthermore techniques which can use\\ud simple and cheap equipment allow the use of such technologies for point of care analysis.\\ud \\ud Described in this thesis are two novel DNA probe systems designed for mutation\\ud discrimination and sequence recognition of PCR ...

  2. DNA profiles from fingermarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Jennifer E L; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Criminal investigations would be considerably improved if DNA profiles could be routinely generated from single fingermarks. Here we report a direct DNA profiling method that was able to generate interpretable profiles from 71% of 170 fingermarks. The data are based on fingermarks from all 5 digits of 34 individuals. DNA was obtained from the fingermarks using a swab moistened with Triton-X, and the fibers were added directly to one of two commercial DNA profiling kits. All profiles were obtained without increasing the number of amplification cycles; therefore, our method is ideally suited for adoption by the forensic science community. We indicate the use of the technique in a criminal case in which a DNA profile was generated from a fingermark on tape that was wrapped around a drug seizure. Our direct DNA profiling approach is rapid and able to generate profiles from touched items when current forensic practices have little chance of success.

  3. DNA media storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christy M.Bogard; Eric C.Rouchka; Benjamin Arazi

    2008-01-01

    In 1994. University of Southern California computer scientist,Dr.Leonard Adleman solved the Hamiltonian path problem using DNA as a computational mechanism.He proved the principle that DNA computing could be used to solve computationally complex problems.Because of the limitations in discovery time,resource requirements,and sequence mismatches,DNA computing has not yet become a commonly accepted practice.However,advancements are continually being discovered that are evolving the field of DNA computing.Practical applications of DNA are not restricted to computation alone.This research presents a novel approach in which DNA could be used as a means of storing files.Through the use of multiple sequence alignment combined with intelligent heuristics,the most probabilistic file contents can be determined with minimal errors.

  4. DNA supercoiling during transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D

    2016-11-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  5. DNA topology and transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions. PMID:24755522

  6. DNA topology and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions.

  7. DNA Media Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Christy M; Rouchka, Eric C

    2007-09-01

    In 1994, University of Southern California computer scientist Dr. Leonard Adelman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using DNA as a computational mechanism. He proved the principle that DNA computing could be used to solve computationally complex problems. Because of the limitations in discovery time, resource requirements, and sequence mismatches, DNA computing has not yet become a commonly accepted practice. However, advancements are continually being discovered that are evolving the field of DNA Computing. Practical applications of DNA are not restricted to computation alone. This research presents a novel approach in which DNA could be used as a means of storing files. Through the use of Multiple Sequence Alignment combined with intelligent heuristics, the most probabilistic file contents can be determined with minimal errors.

  8. DNA supercoiling during transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  9. DNA based computers II

    CERN Document Server

    Landweber, Laura F; Baum, Eric B

    1998-01-01

    The fledgling field of DNA computers began in 1994 when Leonard Adleman surprised the scientific community by using DNA molecules, protein enzymes, and chemicals to solve an instance of a hard computational problem. This volume presents results from the second annual meeting on DNA computers held at Princeton only one and one-half years after Adleman's discovery. By drawing on the analogy between DNA computing and cutting-edge fields of biology (such as directed evolution), this volume highlights some of the exciting progress in the field and builds a strong foundation for the theory of molecular computation. DNA computing is a radically different approach to computing that brings together computer science and molecular biology in a way that is wholly distinct from other disciplines. This book outlines important advances in the field and offers comprehensive discussion on potential pitfalls and the general practicality of building DNA based computers.

  10. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  11. Aberrant DNA methylation patterns in cultured mouse embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Jian; CUI Xiuhong; LEI Tinghua; LIU Lei; AN Xiaorong; CHEN Yongfu

    2005-01-01

    Mouse early embryos undergo genome-wide demethylation and remethylation events during pre-implantation development. Abnormal methylation reprogramming is thought to be associated with development arrest. Using immunofiuorescence staining with an antibody against 5-methylcytosine (MeC), we examined the genome methylation patterns of mouse embryos cultured in vitro. The results did not show the difference in staining patterns between development-blocked two-cell embryos that cultured in vitro and the two-cell embryos that were freshly collected from the donor mice. But in vitro-arrested morulae displayed a strong positive staining when compared to the morulae freshly collected from the donor mice. At the blastocyst stage, although most embryos showed the expected methylation patterns, with highly stained inner cell mass (ICM) and weekly stained trophectoderm (TE), a proportion of embryos were dimly stained in both ICM and TE. These results indicated that the methylation profile of the embryos could be changed by culturing in vitro when the embryos were in the transition from morulae to blastocyst.

  12. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  13. DNA Media Storage

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    In 1994, University of Southern California computer scientist Dr. Leonard Adelman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using DNA as a computational mechanism. He proved the principle that DNA computing could be used to solve computationally complex problems. Because of the limitations in discovery time, resource requirements, and sequence mismatches, DNA computing has not yet become a commonly accepted practice. However, advancements are continually being discovered that are evolving the field...

  14. Late-occurring chromosome aberrations and global DNA methylation in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells of CBA/CaJ mice exposed to silicon ({sup 28}Si) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy, E-mail: kanokporn.rithidech@stonybrookmedicine.edu [Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8691 (United States); Honikel, Louise M. [Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8691 (United States); Reungpathanaphong, Paiboon [Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8691 (United States); Department of Applied Radiation and Isotopes, Faculty of Sciences, Kasetsart University, Chatuchuck, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Tungjai, Montree [Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8691 (United States); Department of Radiologic Technology, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Center of Excellence for Molecular Imaging, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Jangiam, Witawat [Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8691 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Burapha University, Chonburi 20131 (Thailand); Whorton, Elbert B. [StatCom, PO Box 3041, Galveston, TX 77551 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Late-occurring chromosome aberrations were found in HSPCs of exposed CBA/CaJ mice. • A dose-dependent reduction in the level of global 5hmC was detected in HSPCs. • There is a link between reduced global 5hmC levels and genomic instability in vivo. • The level of global 5hmC is a better marker of radiation exposure than that of 5mC. - Abstract: Although myeloid leukemia (ML) is one of the major health concerns from exposure to space radiation, the risk prediction for developing ML is unsatisfactory. To increase the reliability of predicting ML risk, a much improved understanding of space radiation-induced changes in the target cells, i.e. hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), is important. We focused on the in vivo induction of late-occurring damage in HSPCs of mice exposed to {sup 28}Si ions since such damage is associated with radiation-induced genomic instability (a key event of carcinogenesis). We gave adult male CBA/CaJ mice, known to be sensitive to radiation-induced ML, a whole-body exposure (2 fractionated exposures, 15 days apart, that totaled each selected dose, delivered at the dose-rate of 1 cGy/min) to various doses of 300 MeV/n {sup 28}Si ions, i.e. 0 (sham controls), 0.1, 0.25, or 0.5 Gy. At 6 months post-irradiation, we collected bone marrow cells from each mouse (five mice per treatment-group) for obtaining the myeloid-lineage of HSPC-derived clones for analyses. We measured the frequencies of late-occurring chromosome aberrations (CAs), using the genome-wide multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization method. The measurement of CAs was coupled with the characterization of the global DNA methylation patterns, i.e. 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). A dose-dependent increase in the frequencies of CAs was detected (Analysis of Variance or ANOVA, p < 0.01), indicating the induction of genomic instability after exposure of mice to 300 MeV/n {sup 28}Si ions. Slight increases in the levels of 5m

  15. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  16. Disentangling DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  17. Disentangling DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  18. DNA ELECTROPHORESIS AT SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAFAILOVICH, MIRIAM; SOKOLOV, JONATHAN; GERSAPPE, DILIP

    2003-09-01

    During this year we performed two major projects: I. We developed a detailed theoretical model which complements our experiments on surface DNA electrophoresis. We found that it was possible to enhance the separation of DNA chains by imposing a chemical nanoscale pattern on the surface. This approach utilized the surface interaction effect of the DNA chains with the substrate and is a refinement to our previous method in which DNA chains were separated on homogeneous flat surfaces. By introducing the nano-patterns on the surface, the conformational changes of DNA chains of different lengths can be amplified, which results in the different friction strengths with the substrate surface. Our results also show that, when compared to the DNA electrophoresis performed on homogeneous flat surfaces, nanopatterned surfaces offer a larger window in choosing different surface interactions to achieve separation. II. In collaboration with a large international manufacturer of skin care products we also embarked on a project involving photo toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, which are a key ingredient in sunscreen and cosmetic lotions. The results clearly implicated the nanoparticles in catalyzing damage to chromosomal DNA. We then used this knowledge to develop a polymer/anti-oxidant coating which prevented the photocatalytic reaction on DNA while still retaining the UV absorptive properties of the nanoparticles. The standard gel electrophoresis was not sufficient in determining the extent of the DNA damage. The conclusions of this study were based predominantly on analysis obtained with the surface electrophoresis method.

  19. DNA Microarray Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakare SP

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA Microarray is the emerging technique in Biotechnology. The many varieties of DNA microarray or DNA chip devices and systems are described along with their methods for fabrication and their use. It also includes screening and diagnostic applications. The DNA microarray hybridization applications include the important areas of gene expression analysis and genotyping for point mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and short tandem repeats (STRs. In addition to the many molecular biological and genomic research uses, this review covers applications of microarray devices and systems for pharmacogenomic research and drug discovery, infectious and genetic disease and cancer diagnostics, and forensic and genetic identification purposes.

  20. DNA Based Molecular Scale Nanofabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-04

    water adsorption on DNA origami template and its impact on DNA- mediated chemical reactions. We also extended the concept of DNA- mediated reaction to...addition, we have expanded our efforts to include DNA- mediated HF etching of SiÜ2, DNA- mediated nanoimprinting lithography, DNA-based patterning of self...detailed kinetics study of DNA- mediated chemical reactions. Examples of such reactions include chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of inorganic oxide and HF

  1. Characterization of muntjac DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.C.

    1981-05-27

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in muntjac chromosomes is generally proportional to the chromosomal DNA content, but the SCE frequency is reduced in the heterochromatic neck region of the X chromosome. The physical properties of muntjac DNA and the kinetics of repair of UV damage in muntjac heterochromatin and euchromatin were examined and compared with the distribution of sister chromatid exchange.

  2. Workshop on DNA repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Lehmann (Alan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A.A. van Zeeland (Albert); C.M.P. Backendorf (Claude); B.A. Bridges; A. Collins; R.P.D. Fuchs; G.P. Margison; R. Montesano; E. Moustacchi; A.T. Natarajan; M. Radman; A. Sarasin; E. Seeberg; C.A. Smith; M. Stefanini (Miria); L.H. Thompson; G.P. van der Schans; C.A. Weber (Christine); M.Z. Zdzienika

    1992-01-01

    textabstractA workshop on DNA repair with emphasis on eukaryotic systems was held, under the auspices of the EC Concerted Action on DNA Repair and Cancer, at Noordwijkerhout (The Netherlands) 14-19 April 1991. The local organization of the meeting was done under the auspices of the Medical Genetic C

  3. DNA-cell conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-05-03

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  4. Extended DNA Tile Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Martin; Kryger, Mille; Zhang, Zhao

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic linear DNA tile actuator is expanded to three new structures of higher complexity. The original DNA actuator was constructed from a central roller strand which hybridizes with two piston strands by forming two half-crossover junctions. A linear expansion of the actuator is obtained...

  5. DNA sequences encoding erythropoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, F.K.

    1987-10-27

    A purified and isolated DNA sequence is described consisting essentially of a DNA sequence encoding a polypeptide having an amino acid sequence sufficiently duplicative of that of erythropoietin to allow possession of the biological property of causing bone marrow cells to increase production of reticulocytes and red blood cells, and to increase hemoglobin synthesis or iron uptake.

  6. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  7. Premeltons in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, Henry M

    2016-03-01

    Premeltons are examples of emergent-structures (i.e., structural-solitons) that arise spontaneously in DNA due to the presence of nonlinear-excitations in its structure. They are of two kinds: B-B (or A-A) premeltons form at specific DNA-regions to nucleate site-specific DNA melting. These are stationary and, being globally-nontopological, undergo breather-motions that allow drugs and dyes to intercalate into DNA. B-A (or A-B) premeltons, on the other hand, are mobile, and being globally-topological, act as phase-boundaries transforming B- into A-DNA during the structural phase-transition. They are not expected to undergo breather motions. A key feature of both types of premeltons is the presence of an intermediate structural-form in their central regions (proposed as being a transition-state intermediate in DNA-melting and in the B- to A-transition), which differs from either A- or B-DNA. Called beta-DNA, this is both metastable and hyperflexible--and contains an alternating sugar-puckering pattern along the polymer backbone combined with the partial unstacking (in its lower energy-forms) of every-other base-pair. Beta-DNA is connected to either B- or to A-DNA on either side by boundaries possessing a gradation of nonlinear structural-change, these being called the kink and the antikink regions. The presence of premeltons in DNA leads to a unifying theory to understand much of DNA physical chemistry and molecular biology. In particular, premeltons are predicted to define the 5' and 3' ends of genes in naked-DNA and DNA in active-chromatin, this having important implications for understanding physical aspects of the initiation, elongation and termination of RNA-synthesis during transcription. For these and other reasons, the model will be of broader interest to the general-audience working in these areas. The model explains a wide variety of data, and carries with it a number of experimental predictions--all readily testable--as will be described in this review.

  8. Whose DNA is this?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taroni, Franco; Biedermann, Alex; Vuille, Joëlle;

    2013-01-01

    This communication seeks to draw the attention of researchers and practitioners dealing with forensic DNA profiling analyses to the following question: is a scientist's report, offering support to a hypothesis according to which a particular individual is the source of DNA detected during...... evoked during the international conference "The hidden side of DNA profiles. Artifacts, errors and uncertain evidence" held in Rome (April 27th to 28th, 2012). Indeed, despite the fact that this conference brought together some of the world's leading forensic DNA specialists, it appeared clearly....... This paper intends to emphasize the actuality of this topic and suggest beneficial ways ahead towards a more reasoned use of forensic DNA in criminal proceedings....

  9. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...

  10. Whose DNA is this?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taroni, Franco; Biedermann, Alex; Vuille, Joëlle

    2013-01-01

    This communication seeks to draw the attention of researchers and practitioners dealing with forensic DNA profiling analyses to the following question: is a scientist's report, offering support to a hypothesis according to which a particular individual is the source of DNA detected during...... evoked during the international conference "The hidden side of DNA profiles. Artifacts, errors and uncertain evidence" held in Rome (April 27th to 28th, 2012). Indeed, despite the fact that this conference brought together some of the world's leading forensic DNA specialists, it appeared clearly...... talk considerably different languages. It thus is fundamental to address this issue of communication about results of forensic DNA analyses, and open a dialogue with practicing non-scientists at large who need to make meaningful use of scientific results to approach and help solve judicial cases...

  11. Left-handed DNA crossovers. Implications for DNA-DNA recognition and structural alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timsit, Y; Shatzky-Schwartz, M; Shakked, Z

    1999-02-01

    The close approach of DNA segments participates in many biological functions including DNA condensation and DNA processing. Previous crystallographic studies have shown that B-DNA self-fitting by mutual groove-backbone interaction produces right-handed DNA crossovers. These structures have opened new perspectives on the role of close DNA-DNA interactions in the architecture and activity the DNA molecule. In the present study, the analysis of the crystal packing of two B-DNA decamer duplexes d(CCIIICCCGG) and d(CCGCCGGCGG) reveals the existence of new modes of DNA crossing. Symmetric left-handed crossovers are produced by mutual fitting of DNA grooves at the crossing point. New sequence patterns contribute to stabilize longitudinal fitting of the sugar-phosphate backbone into the major groove. In addition, the close approach of DNA segments greatly influences the DNA conformation in a sequence dependent manner. This study provides new insights into the role of DNA sequence and structure in DNA-DNA recognition. In providing detailed molecular views of DNA crossovers of opposite chirality, this study can also help to elucidate the role of symmetry and chirality in the recognition of complex DNA structures by protein dimers or tetramers, such as topoisomerase II and recombinase enzymes. These results are discussed in the context of the possible relationships between DNA condensation and DNA processing.

  12. DNA extraction from crayfish exoskeleton

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Yanhe; Wang, Weimin; Liu, Xiaolian; Luo, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Gul, Yasmeen

    2011-01-01

    .... However, it is difficult to extract DNA from them. This study was intended to investigate CE as a DNA source and design an easy and efficient DNA extraction protocol for polymerase chain reactions...

  13. Simple & Safe Genomic DNA Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for purifying DNA using either bacteria or rat liver is presented. Directions for doing a qualitative DNA assay using diphenylamine and a quantitative DNA assay using spectroscopy are included. (KR)

  14. Multiplexed DNA-Modified Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Slinker, Jason D.; Muren, Natalie B.; Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of silicon chips with 16 DNA-modified electrodes (DME chips) utilizing DNA-mediated charge transport for multiplexed detection of DNA and DNA-binding protein targets. Four DNA sequences were simultaneously distinguished on a single DME chip with fourfold redundancy, including one incorporating a single base mismatch. These chips also enabled investigation of the sequence-specific activity of the restriction enzyme Alu1. DME chips supported dense DNA monolayer formation with ...

  15. DNA mini-barcodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; McKenna, Charly

    2012-01-01

    Conventional DNA barcoding uses an approximately 650 bp DNA barcode of the mitochondrial gene COI for species identification in animal groups. Similar size fragments from chloroplast genes have been proposed as barcode markers for plants. While PCR amplification and sequencing of a 650 bp fragment is consistent in freshly collected and well-preserved specimens, it is difficult to obtain a full-length barcode in older museum specimens and samples which have been preserved in formalin or similar DNA-unfriendly preservatives. A comparable issue may prevent effective DNA-based authentication and testing in processed biological materials, such as food products, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals. In these cases, shorter DNA sequences-mini-barcodes-have been robustly recovered and shown to be effective in identifying majority of specimens to a species level. Furthermore, short DNA regions can be utilized via high-throughput sequencing platforms providing an inexpensive and comprehensive means of large-scale species identification. These properties of mini-barcodes, coupled with the availability of standardized and universal primers make mini-barcodes a feasible option for DNA barcode analysis in museum samples and applied diagnostic and environmental biodiversity analysis.

  16. What Controls DNA Looping?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela J. Perez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The looping of DNA provides a means of communication between sequentially distant genomic sites that operate in tandem to express, copy, and repair the information encoded in the DNA base sequence. The short loops implicated in the expression of bacterial genes suggest that molecular factors other than the naturally stiff double helix are involved in bringing the interacting sites into close spatial proximity. New computational techniques that take direct account of the three-dimensional structures and fluctuations of protein and DNA allow us to examine the likely means of enhancing such communication. Here, we describe the application of these approaches to the looping of a 92 base-pair DNA segment between the headpieces of the tetrameric Escherichia coli Lac repressor protein. The distortions of the double helix induced by a second protein—the nonspecific nucleoid protein HU—increase the computed likelihood of looping by several orders of magnitude over that of DNA alone. Large-scale deformations of the repressor, sequence-dependent features in the DNA loop, and deformability of the DNA operators also enhance looping, although to lesser degrees. The correspondence between the predicted looping propensities and the ease of looping derived from gene-expression and single-molecule measurements lends credence to the derived structural picture.

  17. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  18. DNA vaccines against influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Genetic vaccine technology has been considerably developed within the last two decades. This cost effective and promising strategy can be applied for therapy of cancers and for curing allergy, chronic and infectious diseases, such as a seasonal and pandemic influenza. Despite numerous advantages, several limitations of this technology reduce its performance and can retard its commercial exploitation in humans and its veterinary applications. Inefficient delivery of the DNA vaccine into cells of immunized individuals results in low intracellular supply of suitable expression cassettes encoding an antigen, in its low expression level and, in turn, in reduced immune responses against the antigen. Improvement of DNA delivery into the host cells might significantly increase effectiveness of the DNA vaccine. A vast array of innovative methods and various experimental strategies have been applied in order to enhance the effectiveness of DNA vaccines. They include various strategies improving DNA delivery as well as expression and immunogenic potential of the proteins encoded by the DNA vaccines. Researchers focusing on DNA vaccines against influenza have applied many of these strategies. Recent examples of the most successful modern approaches are discussed in this review.

  19. DNA Import into Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, Yu M; Dietrich, A; Weber-Lotfi, F; Ibrahim, N; Klimenko, E S; Tarasenko, V I; Bolotova, T A; Koulintchenko, M V

    2016-10-01

    In recent decades, it has become evident that the condition for normal functioning of mitochondria in higher eukaryotes is the presence of membrane transport systems of macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids). Natural competence of the mitochondria in plants, animals, and yeasts to actively uptake DNA may be directly related to horizontal gene transfer into these organelles occurring at much higher rate compared to the nuclear and chloroplast genomes. However, in contrast with import of proteins and tRNAs, little is known about the biological role and molecular mechanism underlying import of DNA into eukaryotic mitochondria. In this review, we discuss current state of investigations in this area, particularly specificity of DNA import into mitochondria and its features in plants, animals, and yeasts; a tentative mechanism of DNA import across the mitochondrial outer and inner membranes; experimental data evidencing several existing, but not yet fully understood mechanisms of DNA transfer into mitochondria. Currently available data regarding transport of informational macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) into the mitochondria do not rule out that the mechanism of protein and tRNA import as well as tRNA and DNA import into the mitochondria may partially overlap.

  20. DNA Bending elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivak, David Alexander

    DNA bending elasticity on length scales of tens of basepairs is of critical importance in numerous biological contexts. Even the simplest models of DNA bending admit of few simple analytic results, thus there is a need for numerical methods to calculate experimental observables, such as distance distributions, forces, FRET efficiencies, and timescales of particular large-scale motions. We have implemented and helped develop a coarse-grained representation of DNA and various other covalently-linked groups that allows simple calculation of such observables for varied experimental systems. The simple freely-jointed chain (FJC) model and extremely coarse resolution proved useful in understanding DNA threading through nanopores, identifying steric occlusion by other parts of the chain as a prime culprit for slower capture as distance to the pore decreased. Enhanced sampling techniques of a finer resolution discrete wormlike chain (WLC) model permitted calculation of cyclization rates for small chains and identified the ramifications of a thermodynamically-sound treatment of thermal melts. Adding treatment of double-stranded DNA's helical nature and single-stranded DNA provided a model system that helped demonstrate the importance of statistical fluctuations in even highly-stressed DNA mini-loops, and allowed us to verify that even these constructs show no evidence of excitation-induced softening. Additional incorporation of salt-sensitivity to the model allowed us to calculate forces and FRET efficiencies for such mini-loops and their uncircularized precursors, thereby furthering the understanding of the nature of IHF binding and bending of its recognition sequence. Adding large volume-excluding spheres linked to the ends of the dsDNA permits calculation of distance distributions and thus small-angle X-ray scattering, whereby we demonstrated the validity of the WLC in describing bending fluctuations in DNA chains as short as 42 bp. We also make important connections

  1. DNA-PK assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carl W.; Connelly, Margery A.

    2004-10-12

    The present invention provides a method for detecting DNA-activated protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity in a biological sample. The method includes contacting a biological sample with a detectably-labeled phosphate donor and a synthetic peptide substrate defined by the following features to provide specific recognition and phosphorylation by DNA-PK: (1) a phosphate-accepting amino acid pair which may include serine-glutamine (Ser-Gln) (SQ), threonine-glutamine (Thr-Gln) (TQ), glutamine-serine (Gln-Ser) (QS), or glutamine-threonine (Gln-Thr) (QT); (2) enhancer amino acids which may include glutamic acid or glutamine immediately adjacent at the amino- or carboxyl- side of the amino acid pair and forming an amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (3) a first spacer sequence at the amino terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (4) a second spacer sequence at the carboxyl terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit, which spacer sequences may include any combination of amino acids that does not provide a phosphorylation site consensus sequence motif; and, (5) a tag moiety, which may be an amino acid sequence or another chemical entity that permits separating the synthetic peptide from the phosphate donor. A compostion and a kit for the detection of DNA-PK activity are also provided. Methods for detecting DNA, protein phosphatases and substances that alter the activity of DNA-PK are also provided. The present invention also provides a method of monitoring protein kinase and DNA-PK activity in living cells. -A composition and a kit for monitoring protein kinase activity in vitro and a composition and a kit for monitoring DNA-PK activities in living cells are also provided. A method for identifying agents that alter protein kinase activity in vitro and a method for identifying agents that alter DNA-PK activity in living cells are also provided.

  2. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  3. Apoptosis and DNA Methylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Huan X.; Hackett, James A. [MRC Human Genetics Unit, IGMM, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Nestor, Colm [MRC Human Genetics Unit, IGMM, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Breakthrough Research Unit, University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Dunican, Donncha S.; Madej, Monika; Reddington, James P. [MRC Human Genetics Unit, IGMM, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Pennings, Sari [Queen' s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Harrison, David J. [Breakthrough Research Unit, University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Meehan, Richard R., E-mail: Richard.Meehan@hgu.mrc.ac.uk [MRC Human Genetics Unit, IGMM, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Breakthrough Research Unit, University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms assist in maintaining gene expression patterns and cellular properties in developing and adult tissues. The molecular pathology of disease states frequently includes perturbation of DNA and histone methylation patterns, which can activate apoptotic pathways associated with maintenance of genome integrity. This perspective focuses on the pathways linking DNA methyltransferases and methyl-CpG binding proteins to apoptosis, and includes new bioinformatic analyses to characterize the evolutionary origin of two G/T mismatch-specific thymine DNA glycosylases, MBD4 and TDG.

  4. "Artifactual" arsenate DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    The recent claim by Wolfe-Simon et al. that the Halomonas bacterial strain GFAJ-1 when grown in arsenate-containing medium with limiting phosphate is able to substitute phosphate with arsenate in biomolecules including nucleic acids and in particular DNA(1) arose much skepticism, primarily due...... to the very limited chemical stability of arsenate esters (see ref. 2 and references therein). A major part of the criticisms was concerned with the insufficient (bio)chemical evidence in the Wolfe-Simon study for the actual chemical incorporation of arsenate in DNA (and/or RNA). Redfield et al. now present...... evidence that the identification of arsenate DNA was artifactual....

  5. Apoptosis and DNA Methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard R. Meehan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms assist in maintaining gene expression patterns and cellular properties in developing and adult tissues. The molecular pathology of disease states frequently includes perturbation of DNA and histone methylation patterns, which can activate apoptotic pathways associated with maintenance of genome integrity. This perspective focuses on the pathways linking DNA methyltransferases and methyl-CpG binding proteins to apoptosis, and includes new bioinformatic analyses to characterize the evolutionary origin of two G/T mismatch-specific thymine DNA glycosylases, MBD4 and TDG.

  6. Characterization of a unique methyl-specific restriction system in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Streptomyces avermitilis contains a unique restriction system that restricts plasmid DNA containing N6-methyladenine or 5-methylcytosine. Shuttle vectors isolated from Escherichia coli RR1 or plasmids isolated from modification-proficient Streptomyces spp. cannot be directly introduced into S. avermitilis. This restriction barrier can be overcome by first transferring plasmids into Streptomyces lividans or a modification-deficient E. coli strain and then into S. avermitilis. The transformatio...

  7. Crystal structure of the Escherichia coli 23S rRNA:m5C methyltransferase RlmI (YccW) reveals evolutionary links between RNA modification enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunita, S; Tkaczuk, Karolina L; Purta, Elzbieta

    2008-01-01

    Methylation is the most common RNA modification in the three domains of life. Transfer of the methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) to specific atoms of RNA nucleotides is catalyzed by methyltransferase (MTase) enzymes. The rRNA MTase RlmI (rRNA large subunit methyltransferase gene I...... that the evolutionary paths of RNA and DNA 5-methyluridine and 5-methylcytosine MTases have been closely intertwined....

  8. DNA from keratinous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Camilla F.; Olsen, Maja E.; Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    2011-01-01

    Keratinous tissues such as nail, hair, horn, scales and feather have been used as a source of DNA for over 20 years. Particular benefits of such tissues include the ease with which they can be sampled, the relative stability of DNA in such tissues once sampled, and, in the context of ancient...... genetic analyses, the fact that sampling generally causes minimal visual damage to valuable specimens. Even when freshly sampled, however, the DNA quantity and quality in the fully keratinized parts of such tissues is extremely poor in comparison to other tissues such as blood and muscle – although little...... systematic research has been undertaken to characterize how such degradation may relate to sample source. In this review paper we present the current understanding of the quality and limitations of DNA in two key keratinous tissues, nail and hair. The findings indicate that although some fragments of nuclear...

  9. Experimental DNA computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkel, Christiaan

    2005-01-01

    Because of their information storing and processing capabilities, nucleic acids are interesting building blocks for molecular scale computers. Potential applications of such DNA computers range from massively parallel computation to computational gene therapy. In this thesis, several implementations

  10. DNA-templated nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Héctor A; Woolley, Adam T

    2009-02-01

    Nanofabrication, or the organizational control over matter at the nanometre scale, is an intriguing scientific challenge requiring multidisciplinary tools for its solution. DNA is a biomolecule that can be combined with other nanometre-scale entities through chemical self-assembly to form a broad variety of nanomaterials. In this tutorial review we present the principles that allow DNA to interact with other chemical species, and describe the challenges and potential applications of DNA as a template for making both biological and inorganic features with nanometre resolution. As such, this report should be of interest to chemists, surface and materials scientists, biologists, and nanotechnologists, as well as others who seek to use DNA in nanofabrication.

  11. DNA damage and carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelow, R B

    1980-01-01

    Although cancer may arise as a result of many different types of molecular changes, there is little reason to doubt that changes to DNA are one of the more important ones in cancer initiation. Although DNA repair mechanisms seem able to eliminate a very large fraction of deleterious changes to DNA, we not only have little insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in such repair, but have a negligible amount of information to permit us to estimate the shape of dose response relations at low doses. The case of skin cancer is a special one, in that the average population is exposed to sufficient solar uv so that the effects of small increments in uv dose may be estimated. An approximate 85% reduction in DNA repair increases skin cancer incidence 10/sup 4/ fold.

  12. DNA complexes: Durable binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbach, Adam R.

    2011-11-01

    A tetra-intercalator compound that threads through a DNA double-helix to form a remarkably stable complex exhibits an unusual combination of sequence specificity and rapid association yet slow dissociation.

  13. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, R.M. [Georgetown Univ., Kennedy Inst. of Ethics, Washington, DC (United States); Venter, J.C. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gilbert, W. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Mulligan, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mansfield, B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  14. Kink solitons in DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Zdravković, S; Daniel, M

    2012-01-01

    We here examine the nonlinear dynamics of artificial homogeneous DNA chain relying on the plain-base rotator model. It is shown that such dynamics can exhibit kink and antikink solitons of sine-Gordon type. In that respect we propose possible experimental assays based on single molecule micromanipulation techniques. The aim of these experiments is to excite the rotational waves and to determine their speeds along excited DNA. We propose that these experiments should be conducted either for the case of double stranded (DS) or single stranded (SS) DNA. A key question is to compare the corresponding velocities of the rotational waves indicating which one is bigger. The ratio of these velocities appears to be related with the sign of the model parameter representing ratio of the hydrogen-bonding and the covalent-bonding interaction within the considered DNA chain.

  15. DNA Sampling Hook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The DNA Sampling Hook is a significant improvement on a method of obtaining a tissue sample from a live fish in situ from an aquatic environment. A tissue sample...

  16. Evolution of DNA sequencing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tipu, Hamid Nawaz; Shabbir, Ambreen

    2015-01-01

    Sanger and coworkers introduced DNA sequencing in 1970s for the first time. It principally relied on termination of growing nucleotide chain when a dideoxythymidine triphosphate (ddTTP) was inserted...

  17. DNA-Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Niels Vinther; Tørring, Thomas; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2010-01-01

    DNA-nanostrukturer giver nye muligheder for studier af individuelle molekyler. Ved at udnytte DNAs unikke selvsamlende egenskaber kan man designe systemer, hvorpå der kan studeres kemiske reaktioner, fluoroforer og biiomolekyler på enkeltmolekyle-niveau....

  18. Gomphid DNA sequence data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — DNA sequence data for several genetic loci. This dataset is not publicly accessible because: It's already publicly available on GenBank. It can be accessed through...

  19. Close encounters with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffeo, C.; Yoo, J.; Comer, J.; Wells, D. B.; Luan, B.; Aksimentiev, A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, the all-atom molecular dynamics method has grown in the scale of both systems and processes amenable to it and in its ability to make quantitative predictions about the behavior of experimental systems. The field of computational DNA research is no exception, witnessing a dramatic increase in the size of systems simulated with atomic resolution, the duration of individual simulations and the realism of the simulation outcomes. In this topical review, we describe the hallmark physical properties of DNA from the perspective of all-atom simulations. We demonstrate the amazing ability of such simulations to reveal the microscopic physical origins of experimentally observed phenomena and we review the frustrating limitations associated with imperfections of present atomic force fields and inadequate sampling. The review is focused on the following four physical properties of DNA: effective electric charge, response to an external mechanical force, interaction with other DNA molecules and behavior in an external electric field. PMID:25238560

  20. Interaction of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to fibronectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.C.; Simpson, W.A.; Raghow, R.; Hasty, K.

    1986-03-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) is a large multidomain glycoprotein found in the basement membrane, on cell surface and in plasma. The interactions of Fn with DNA may be significant in glomerular deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The authors examined the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn by a solid phase assay in which Fn was coated to microtiter plates and reacted with (/sup 3/H)DNA or DNA complexes with a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody. The optimal interaction of DNA with Fn occurs at <0.1M NaCl suggesting that the binding is charge dependent; the specificity of this binding was shown by competitive inhibition and locking experiments using anti-Fn. The binding was maximum at pH 6.5 and in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. The addition of Clq enhanced the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn, whereas heparan sulfate inhibited such binding. The monomeric or aggregated IgC did not bind Fn but aggregated IgG bound to Fn in the presence of Clq. Furthermore, DNA-anti-DNA complexes in sera from active SLE patients bound Fn which was enhanced in the presence of Clq; DNase abolished this binding indicating that the interaction of these complexes was mediated by DNA. These observations may partially explain the molecular mechanism(s) of the deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in basement membrane.

  1. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Shara Carol

    2003-09-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices

  2. PDA: Pooled DNA analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chin-Yu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association mapping using abundant single nucleotide polymorphisms is a powerful tool for identifying disease susceptibility genes for complex traits and exploring possible genetic diversity. Genotyping large numbers of SNPs individually is performed routinely but is cost prohibitive for large-scale genetic studies. DNA pooling is a reliable and cost-saving alternative genotyping method. However, no software has been developed for complete pooled-DNA analyses, including data standardization, allele frequency estimation, and single/multipoint DNA pooling association tests. This motivated the development of the software, 'PDA' (Pooled DNA Analyzer, to analyze pooled DNA data. Results We develop the software, PDA, for the analysis of pooled-DNA data. PDA is originally implemented with the MATLAB® language, but it can also be executed on a Windows system without installing the MATLAB®. PDA provides estimates of the coefficient of preferential amplification and allele frequency. PDA considers an extended single-point association test, which can compare allele frequencies between two DNA pools constructed under different experimental conditions. Moreover, PDA also provides novel chromosome-wide multipoint association tests based on p-value combinations and a sliding-window concept. This new multipoint testing procedure overcomes a computational bottleneck of conventional haplotype-oriented multipoint methods in DNA pooling analyses and can handle data sets having a large pool size and/or large numbers of polymorphic markers. All of the PDA functions are illustrated in the four bona fide examples. Conclusion PDA is simple to operate and does not require that users have a strong statistical background. The software is available at http://www.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/%7Ecsjfann/first%20flow/pda.htm.

  3. Toward larger DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Alexandria N; Saaem, Ishtiaq; Vogen, Briana N; Brown, Stanley; LaBean, Thomas H

    2014-10-08

    Structural DNA nanotechnology, and specifically scaffolded DNA origami, is rapidly developing as a versatile method for bottom-up fabrication of novel nanometer-scale materials and devices. However, lengths of conventional single-stranded scaffolds, for example, 7,249-nucleotide circular genomic DNA from the M13mp18 phage, limit the scales of these uniquely addressable structures. Additionally, increasing DNA origami size generates the cost burden of increased staple-strand synthesis. We addressed this 2-fold problem by developing the following methods: (1) production of the largest to-date biologically derived single-stranded scaffold using a λ/M13 hybrid virus to produce a 51 466-nucleotide DNA in a circular, single-stranded form and (2) inexpensive DNA synthesis via an inkjet-printing process on a chip embossed with functionalized micropillars made from cyclic olefin copolymer. We have experimentally demonstrated very efficient assembly of a 51-kilobasepair origami from the λ/M13 hybrid scaffold folded by chip-derived staple strands. In addition, we have demonstrated two-dimensional, asymmetric origami sheets with controlled global curvature such that they land on a substrate in predictable orientations that have been verified by atomic force microscopy.

  4. DNA vaccines and intradermal vaccination by DNA tattooing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhuis, K; van den Berg, J H; Schumacher, T N; Haanen, J B A G

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, DNA vaccination has been developed as a method for the induction of immune responses. However, in spite of high expectations based on their efficacy in preclinical models, immunogenicity of first generation DNA vaccines in clinical trials was shown to be poor, and no DNA vaccines have yet been licensed for human use. In recent years significant progress has been made in the development of second generation DNA vaccines and DNA vaccine delivery methods. Here we review the key characteristics of DNA vaccines as compared to other vaccine platforms, and recent insights into the prerequisites for induction of immune responses by DNA vaccines will be discussed. We illustrate the development of second generation DNA vaccines with the description of DNA tattooing as a novel DNA delivery method. This technique has shown great promise both in a small animal model and in non-human primates and is currently under clinical evaluation.

  5. Superimposed Code Theorectic Analysis of DNA Codes and DNA Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Bounds for DNA Codes Based on Fibonacci Ensembles of DNA Sequences ”, 2008 IEEE Proceedings of International Symposium on Information Theory, pp. 2292...5, June 2008, pp. 525-34. 32 28. A. Macula, et al., “Random Coding Bounds for DNA Codes Based on Fibonacci Ensembles of DNA Sequences ”, 2008...combinatorial method of bio-memory design and detection that encodes item or process information as numerical sequences represented in DNA. ComDMem is a

  6. Simultaneous RNA-DNA FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Lan-Tian; Meng, Zhenyu; Shao, Fangwei; Zhang, Li-Feng

    2016-01-01

    A highly useful tool for studying lncRNAs is simultaneous RNA-DNA FISH, which reveals the localization and quantitative information of RNA and DNA in cellular contexts. However, a simple combination of RNA FISH and DNA FISH often generates disappointing results because the fragile RNA signals are often damaged by the harsh conditions used in DNA FISH for denaturing the DNA. Here, we describe a robust and simple RNA-DNA FISH protocol, in which amino-labeled nucleic acid probes are used for RNA FISH. The method is suitable to detect single-RNA molecules simultaneously with DNA.

  7. Defects of mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William C

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is replicated by DNA polymerase γ in concert with accessory proteins such as the mitochondrial DNA helicase, single-stranded DNA binding protein, topoisomerase, and initiating factors. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication or nucleotide metabolism can cause mitochondrial genetic diseases due to mitochondrial DNA deletions, point mutations, or depletion, which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These genetic diseases include mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mitochondrial DNA deletion disorders, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy. This review focuses on our current knowledge of genetic defects of mitochondrial DNA replication (POLG, POLG2, C10orf2, and MGME1) that cause instability of mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial disease.

  8. Initiation of adenovirus DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Reiter, T; Fütterer, J; Weingärtner, B; Winnacker, E L

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to study the mechanism of initiation of adenovirus DNA replication, an assay was developed to investigate the pattern of DNA synthesis in early replicative intermediates of adenovirus DNA. By using wild-type virus-infected cells, it was possible to place the origin of adenovirus type 2 DNA replication within the terminal 350 to 500 base pairs from either of the two molecular termini. In addition, a variety of parameters characteristic of adenovirus DNA replication were compared ...

  9. Forensic DNA profiling and database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneerchelvam, S; Norazmi, M N

    2003-07-01

    The incredible power of DNA technology as an identification tool had brought a tremendous change in crimnal justice . DNA data base is an information resource for the forensic DNA typing community with details on commonly used short tandem repeat (STR) DNA markers. This article discusses the essential steps in compilation of COmbined DNA Index System (CODIS) on validated polymerase chain amplified STRs and their use in crime detection.

  10. Forensic DNA Profiling and Database

    OpenAIRE

    Panneerchelvam, S.; Norazmi, M. N.

    2003-01-01

    The incredible power of DNA technology as an identification tool had brought a tremendous change in crimnal justice . DNA data base is an information resource for the forensic DNA typing community with details on commonly used short tandem repeat (STR) DNA markers. This article discusses the essential steps in compilation of COmbined DNA Index System (CODIS) on validated polymerase chain amplified STRs and their use in crime detection.

  11. Cyclization of short DNA fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Pui-Man; Zhen, Yi

    2017-09-01

    From the per unit length free energy for DNA under tension, we have calculated an effective contour length dependent persistence length for short DNA. This effective persistence length results from the enhanced fluctuations in short DNA. It decreases for shorter DNA, making shorter DNA more flexible. The results of the J-factor calculated using this effective persistence length are in good agreement with experimental data.

  12. Local chromatin microenvironment determines DNMT activity : from DNA methyltransferase to DNA demethylase or DNA dehydroxymethylase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijst, Monique G. P.; Venkiteswaran, Muralidhar; Chen, Hui; Xu, Guo-Liang; Plosch, Torsten; Rots, Marianne G.

    2015-01-01

    Insights on active DNA demethylation disproved the original assumption that DNA methylation is a stable epigenetic modification. Interestingly, mammalian DNA methyltransferases 3A and 3B (DNMT-3A and -3B) have also been reported to induce active DNA demethylation, in addition to their well-known fun

  13. Programmable Quantitative DNA Nanothermometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareau, David; Desrosiers, Arnaud; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis

    2016-07-13

    Developing molecules, switches, probes or nanomaterials that are able to respond to specific temperature changes should prove of utility for several applications in nanotechnology. Here, we describe bioinspired strategies to design DNA thermoswitches with programmable linear response ranges that can provide either a precise ultrasensitive response over a desired, small temperature interval (±0.05 °C) or an extended linear response over a wide temperature range (e.g., from 25 to 90 °C). Using structural modifications or inexpensive DNA stabilizers, we show that we can tune the transition midpoints of DNA thermometers from 30 to 85 °C. Using multimeric switch architectures, we are able to create ultrasensitive thermometers that display large quantitative fluorescence gains within small temperature variation (e.g., > 700% over 10 °C). Using a combination of thermoswitches of different stabilities or a mix of stabilizers of various strengths, we can create extended thermometers that respond linearly up to 50 °C in temperature range. Here, we demonstrate the reversibility, robustness, and efficiency of these programmable DNA thermometers by monitoring temperature change inside individual wells during polymerase chain reactions. We discuss the potential applications of these programmable DNA thermoswitches in various nanotechnology fields including cell imaging, nanofluidics, nanomedecine, nanoelectronics, nanomaterial, and synthetic biology.

  14. Electroeluting DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzosa-Alvarez, Ana L; Sandoval-Cabrera, Antonio; Torres-Huerta, Ana L; Bermudez-Cruz, Rosa M

    2010-09-05

    Purified DNA fragments are used for different purposes in Molecular Biology and they can be prepared by several procedures. Most of them require a previous electrophoresis of the DNA fragments in order to separate the band of interest. Then, this band is excised out from an agarose or acrylamide gel and purified by using either: binding and elution from glass or silica particles, DEAE-cellulose membranes, "crush and soak method", electroelution or very often expensive commercial purification kits. Thus, selecting a method will depend mostly of what is available in the laboratory. The electroelution procedure allows one to purify very clean DNA to be used in a large number of applications (sequencing, radiolabeling, enzymatic restriction, enzymatic modification, cloning etc). This procedure consists in placing DNA band-containing agarose or acrylamide slices into sample wells of the electroeluter, then applying current will make the DNA fragment to leave the agarose and thus be trapped in a cushion salt to be recovered later by ethanol precipitation.

  15. Eukaryotic DNA Replicases

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, Manal S.

    2014-11-21

    The current model of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork includes three replicative DNA polymerases, polymerase α/primase complex (Pol α), polymerase δ (Pol δ), and polymerase ε (Pol ε). The primase synthesizes 8–12 nucleotide RNA primers that are extended by the DNA polymerization activity of Pol α into 30–35 nucleotide RNA-DNA primers. Replication factor C (RFC) opens the polymerase clamp-like processivity factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and loads it onto the primer-template. Pol δ utilizes PCNA to mediate highly processive DNA synthesis, while Pol ε has intrinsic high processivity that is modestly stimulated by PCNA. Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand in a division of labor that is not strict. The three polymerases are comprised of multiple subunits and share unifying features in their large catalytic and B subunits. The remaining subunits are evolutionarily not related and perform diverse functions. The catalytic subunits are members of family B, which are distinguished by their larger sizes due to inserts in their N- and C-terminal regions. The sizes of these inserts vary among the three polymerases, and their functions remain largely unknown. Strikingly, the quaternary structures of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε are arranged similarly. The catalytic subunits adopt a globular structure that is linked via its conserved C-terminal region to the B subunit. The remaining subunits are linked to the catalytic and B subunits in a highly flexible manner.

  16. Strandwise translocation of a DNA glycosylase on undamaged DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yan; Nam, Kwangho; Spong, Marie C.; Banerjee, Anirban; Sung, Rou-Jia; Zhang, Michael; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L. (Harvard)

    2012-05-14

    Base excision repair of genotoxic nucleobase lesions in the genome is critically dependent upon the ability of DNA glycosylases to locate rare sites of damage embedded in a vast excess of undamaged DNA, using only thermal energy to fuel the search process. Considerable interest surrounds the question of how DNA glycosylases translocate efficiently along DNA while maintaining their vigilance for target damaged sites. Here, we report the observation of strandwise translocation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, MutM, along undamaged DNA. In these complexes, the protein is observed to translocate by one nucleotide on one strand while remaining untranslocated on the complementary strand. We further report that alterations of single base-pairs or a single amino acid substitution (R112A) can induce strandwise translocation. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that MutM can translocate along DNA in a strandwise fashion. These observations reveal a previously unobserved mode of movement for a DNA-binding protein along the surface of DNA.

  17. DNA Origami with Double Stranded DNA as a Unified Scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Han, Dongran; Nangreave, Jeanette; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2013-01-01

    Scaffolded DNA origami is a widely used technology for self-assembling precisely structured nanoscale objects that contain a large number of addressable features. Typical scaffolds are long, single strands of DNA (ssDNA) that are folded into distinct shapes through the action of many, short ssDNA staples that are complementary to several different domains of the scaffold. However, sources of long single stranded DNA are scarce, limiting the size and complexity of structures that can be assembled. Here we demonstrated that dsDNA scaffolds can be directly used to fabricate integrated DNA origami structures that incorporate both of the constituent ssDNA molecules. Two basic principles were employed in the design of scaffold folding paths – folding path asymmetry and periodic convergence of the two ssDNA scaffold strands. Asymmetry in the folding path minimizes unwanted complementarity between staples, and incorporating an offset between the folding paths of each ssDNA scaffold strand reduces the number of times that complementary portions of the strands are brought into close proximity with one another, both of which decrease the likelihood of dsDNA scaffold recovery. Meanwhile, the folding paths of the two ssDNA scaffold strands were designed to periodically converge to promote the assembly of a single, unified structure rather than two individual ones. Our results reveal that this basic strategy can be used to reliably assemble integrated DNA nanostructures from dsDNA scaffolds. PMID:22830653

  18. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Devika; Bradford, William D; Freeland, Amy; Cady, Gillian; Wang, Jianmin; Pruitt, Steven C; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2017-09-15

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in budding yeast are encoded by ~100-200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how "normal" copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen the yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2)-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a "normal" rDNA copy number.

  19. DNA methylation in obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Pokrywka

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The number of overweight and obese people is increasing at an alarming rate, especially in the developed and developing countries. Obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, and in consequence for premature death. The development of obesity results from the interplay of both genetic and environmental factors, which include sedentary life style and abnormal eating habits. In the past few years a number of events accompanying obesity, affecting expression of genes which are not directly connected with the DNA base sequence (e.g. epigenetic changes, have been described. Epigenetic processes include DNA methylation, histone modifications such as acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, as well as non-coding micro-RNA (miRNA synthesis. In this review, the known changes in the profile of DNA methylation as a factor affecting obesity and its complications are described.

  20. Duplication in DNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masami; Kari, Lila; Kincaid, Zachary; Seki, Shinnosuke

    The duplication and repeat-deletion operations are the basis of a formal language theoretic model of errors that can occur during DNA replication. During DNA replication, subsequences of a strand of DNA may be copied several times (resulting in duplications) or skipped (resulting in repeat-deletions). As formal language operations, iterated duplication and repeat-deletion of words and languages have been well studied in the literature. However, little is known about single-step duplications and repeat-deletions. In this paper, we investigate several properties of these operations, including closure properties of language families in the Chomsky hierarchy and equations involving these operations. We also make progress toward a characterization of regular languages that are generated by duplicating a regular language.

  1. Optimality in DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Morgiane; Fryett, Matthew; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian; Grebogi, Celso; Moura, Alessandro

    2012-01-07

    DNA within cells is subject to damage from various sources. Organisms have evolved a number of mechanisms to repair DNA damage. The activity of repair enzymes carries its own risk, however, because the repair of two nearby lesions may lead to the breakup of DNA and result in cell death. We propose a mathematical theory of the damage and repair process in the important scenario where lesions are caused in bursts. We use this model to show that there is an optimum level of repair enzymes within cells which optimises the cell's response to damage. This optimal level is explained as the best trade-off between fast repair and a low probability of causing double-stranded breaks. We derive our results analytically and test them using stochastic simulations, and compare our predictions with current biological knowledge.

  2. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  3. DNA display I. Sequence-encoded routing of DNA populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Halpin

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently reported technologies for DNA-directed organic synthesis and for DNA computing rely on routing DNA populations through complex networks. The reduction of these ideas to practice has been limited by a lack of practical experimental tools. Here we describe a modular design for DNA routing genes, and routing machinery made from oligonucleotides and commercially available chromatography resins. The routing machinery partitions nanomole quantities of DNA into physically distinct subpools based on sequence. Partitioning steps can be iterated indefinitely, with worst-case yields of 85% per step. These techniques facilitate DNA-programmed chemical synthesis, and thus enable a materials biology that could revolutionize drug discovery.

  4. DNA templated magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Joseph M.

    Recent discoveries in nanoscience are predicted to potentially revolutionize future technologies in an extensive number of fields. These developments are contingent upon discovering new and often unconventional methods to synthesize and control nanoscale components. Nature provides several examples of working nanotechnology such as the use of programmed self assembly to build and deconstruct complex molecular systems. We have adopted a method to control the one dimensional assembly of magnetic nanoparticles using DNA as a scaffold molecule. With this method we have demonstrated the ability to organize 5 nm particles into chains that stretch up to ˜20 mum in length. One advantage of using DNA compared is the ability of the molecule to interact with other biomolecules. After assembling particles onto DNA we have been able to cleave the molecule into smaller fragments using restriction enzymes. Using ligase enzymes we have re-connected these fragments, coated with either gold or iron oxide, to form long one-dimensional arrangements of the two different types of nanoparticles on a single molecular guide. We have also created a sensitive magnetic field sensor by incorporating magnetic nanoparticle coated DNA strands with microfabricated electrodes. The IV characteristics of the aligned nanoparticles are dependant on the magnitude of an externally applied magnetic field. This transport phenomenon known as tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) shows room temperature resistance of our devices over 80% for cobalt ferrite coated DNA when a field of 20 kOe is applied. In comparison, studies using two dimensional nanoparticle films of irox oxides xii only exhibit a 35% MR effect. Confinement into one dimension using the DNA guide produces a TMR mechanism which produces significant increases in magnetoresistance. This property can be utilized for applications in magnetic field sensing, data storage, and logic elements.

  5. Rigidity of melting DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M.

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of DNA flexibility is studied in the presence of stretching and unzipping forces. Two classes of models are considered. In one case the origin of elasticity is entropic due to the polymeric correlations, and in the other the double-stranded DNA is taken to have an intrinsic rigidity for bending. In both cases single strands are completely flexible. The change in the elastic constant for the flexible case due to thermally generated bubbles is obtained exactly. For the case of intrinsic rigidity, the elastic constant is found to be proportional to the square root of the bubble number fluctuation.

  6. Quantification of human mitochondrial DNA using synthesized DNA standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavlick, Mark F; Lawrence, Helen S; Merritt, R Travis; Fisher, Constance; Isenberg, Alice; Robertson, James M; Budowle, Bruce

    2011-11-01

    Successful mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) forensic analysis depends on sufficient quantity and quality of mtDNA. A real-time quantitative PCR assay was developed to assess such characteristics in a DNA sample, which utilizes a duplex, synthetic DNA to ensure optimal quality assurance and quality control. The assay's 105-base pair target sequence facilitates amplification of degraded DNA and is minimally homologous to nonhuman mtDNA. The primers and probe hybridize to a region that has relatively few sequence polymorphisms. The assay can also identify the presence of PCR inhibitors and thus indicate the need for sample repurification. The results show that the assay provides information down to 10 copies and provides a dynamic range spanning seven orders of magnitude. Additional experiments demonstrated that as few as 300 mtDNA copies resulted in successful hypervariable region amplification, information that permits sample conservation and optimized downstream PCR testing. The assay described is rapid, reliable, and robust.

  7. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  8. Field Deployable DNA analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, E; Christian, A; Marion, J; Sorensen, K; Arroyo, E; Vrankovich, G; Hara, C; Nguyen, C

    2005-02-09

    This report details the feasibility of a field deployable DNA analyzer. Steps for swabbing cells from surfaces and extracting DNA in an automatable way are presented. Since enzymatic amplification reactions are highly sensitive to environmental contamination, sample preparation is a crucial step to make an autonomous deployable instrument. We perform sample clean up and concentration in a flow through packed bed. For small initial samples, whole genome amplification is performed in the packed bed resulting in enough product for subsequent PCR amplification. In addition to DNA, which can be used to identify a subject, protein is also left behind, the analysis of which can be used to determine exposure to certain substances, such as radionuclides. Our preparative step for DNA analysis left behind the protein complement as a waste stream; we determined to learn if the proteins themselves could be analyzed in a fieldable device. We successfully developed a two-step lateral flow assay for protein analysis and demonstrate a proof of principle assay.

  9. DNA tagged microparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farquar, George R.; Leif, Roald N.; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2016-03-22

    In one embodiment, a product includes a plurality of particles, each particle including: a carrier that includes a non-toxic material; and at least one DNA barcode coupled to the carrier, where the particles each have a diameter in a range from about 1 nanometer to about 100 microns.

  10. DNA adsorption on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshehri, Mansoor H.; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2013-11-01

    Here we use classical applied mathematical modeling to determine surface binding energies between both single-strand and double-strand DNA molecules interacting with a graphene sheet. We adopt basic mechanical principles to exploit the 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential function and the continuum approximation, which assumes that intermolecular interactions can be approximated by average atomic line or surface densities. The minimum binding energy occurs when the single-strand DNA molecule is centred 20.2 Å from the surface of the graphene and the double-strand DNA molecule is centred 20.3 Å from the surface, noting that these close values apply for the case when the axis of the helix is perpendicular to the surface of graphene. For the case when the axis of the helix is parallel to the surface, the minimum binding energy occurs when the axis of the single-strand molecule is 8.3 Å from the surface, and the double-strand molecule has axis 13.3 Å from the surface. For arbitrary tilted axis, we determine the optimal angles Ω of the axis of the helix, which give the minimum values of the binding energies, and we observe that the optimal angles tend to occur in the intervals Ω ∈ ( π /4 ,π/2) and Ω ∈ ( π /7 ,π/5) for the single and double-strand DNA molecules, respectively.

  11. Making environmental DNA count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    The arc of reception for a new technology or method--like the reception of new information itself--can pass through predictable stages, with audiences' responses evolving from 'I don't believe it', through 'well, maybe' to 'yes, everyone knows that' to, finally, 'old news'. The idea that one can sample a volume of water, sequence DNA out of it, and report what species are living nearby has experienced roughly this series of responses among biologists, beginning with the microbial biologists who developed genetic techniques to reveal the unseen microbiome. 'Macrobial' biologists and ecologists--those accustomed to dealing with species they can see and count--have been slower to adopt such molecular survey techniques, in part because of the uncertain relationship between the number of recovered DNA sequences and the abundance of whole organisms in the sampled environment. In this issue of Molecular Ecology Resources, Evans et al. (2015) quantify this relationship for a suite of nine vertebrate species consisting of eight fish and one amphibian. Having detected all of the species present with a molecular toolbox of six primer sets, they consistently find DNA abundances are associated with species' biomasses. The strength and slope of this association vary for each species and each primer set--further evidence that there is no universal parameter linking recovered DNA to species abundance--but Evans and colleagues take a significant step towards being able to answer the next question audiences tend to ask: 'Yes, but how many are there?'

  12. DNA ligase I selectively affects DNA synthesis by DNA polymerases delta and epsilon suggesting differential functions in DNA replication and repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Mossi, R; Ferrari, E; Hübscher, U

    1998-01-01

    The joining of single-stranded breaks in double-stranded DNA is an essential step in many important processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and genetic recombination. Several data implicate a role for DNA ligase I in DNA replication, probably coordinated by the action of other enzymes and proteins. Since both DNA polymerases delta and epsilon show multiple functions in different DNA transactions, we investigated the effect of DNA ligase I on various DNA synthesis events catalyzed by th...

  13. Fungal DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianping

    2016-11-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous in both natural and human-made environments. They play important roles in the health of plants, animals, and humans, and in broad ecosystem functions. Thus, having an efficient species-level identification system could significantly enhance our ability to treat fungal diseases and to monitor the spatial and temporal patterns of fungal distributions and migrations. DNA barcoding is a potent approach for rapid identification of fungal specimens, generating novel species hypothesis, and guiding biodiversity and ecological studies. In this mini-review, I briefly summarize (i) the history of DNA sequence-based fungal identification; (ii) the emergence of the ITS region as the consensus primary fungal barcode; (iii) the use of the ITS barcodes to address a variety of issues on fungal diversity from local to global scales, including generating a large number of species hypothesis; and (iv) the problems with the ITS barcode region and the approaches to overcome these problems. Similar to DNA barcoding research on plants and animals, significant progress has been achieved over the last few years in terms of both the questions being addressed and the foundations being laid for future research endeavors. However, significant challenges remain. I suggest three broad areas of research to enhance the usefulness of fungal DNA barcoding to meet the current and future challenges: (i) develop a common set of primers and technologies that allow the amplification and sequencing of all fungi at both the primary and secondary barcode loci; (ii) compile a centralized reference database that includes all recognized fungal species as well as species hypothesis, and allows regular updates from the research community; and (iii) establish a consensus set of new species recognition criteria based on barcode DNA sequences that can be applied across the fungal kingdom.

  14. The Dynamic Interplay Between DNA Topoisomerases and DNA Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yeonee; Neuman, Keir C

    2016-09-01

    Topological properties of DNA influence its structure and biochemical interactions. Within the cell DNA topology is constantly in flux. Transcription and other essential processes including DNA replication and repair, alter the topology of the genome, while introducing additional complications associated with DNA knotting and catenation. These topological perturbations are counteracted by the action of topoisomerases, a specialized class of highly conserved and essential enzymes that actively regulate the topological state of the genome. This dynamic interplay among DNA topology, DNA processing enzymes, and DNA topoisomerases, is a pervasive factor that influences DNA metabolism in vivo. Building on the extensive structural and biochemical characterization over the past four decades that established the fundamental mechanistic basis of topoisomerase activity, the unique roles played by DNA topology in modulating and influencing the activity of topoisomerases have begun to be explored. In this review we survey established and emerging DNA topology dependent protein-DNA interactions with a focus on in vitro measurements of the dynamic interplay between DNA topology and topoisomerase activity.

  15. DNA polymerase beta can substitute for DNA polymerase I in the initiation of plasmid DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mammalian DNA polymerase beta can substitute for DNA polymerase I of Escherichia coli in DNA replication and in base excision repair. We have now obtained genetic evidence suggesting that DNA polymerase beta can substitute for E. coli DNA polymerase I in the initiation of replication of a plasmid containing a pMB1 origin of DNA replication. Specifically, we demonstrate that a plasmid with a pMB1 origin of replication can be maintained in an E. coli polA mutant ...

  16. Conformation-dependent DNA attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifeng; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Zhou, Ruhong; Mu, Yuguang

    2014-05-01

    Understanding how DNA molecules interact with other biomolecules is related to how they utilize their functions and is therefore critical for understanding their structure-function relationships. For a long time, the existence of Z-form DNA (a left-handed double helical version of DNA, instead of the common right-handed B-form) has puzzled the scientists, and the definitive biological significance of Z-DNA has not yet been clarified. In this study, the effects of DNA conformation in DNA-DNA interactions are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Using umbrella sampling, we find that for both B- and Z-form DNA, surrounding Mg2+ ions always exert themselves to screen the Coulomb repulsion between DNA phosphates, resulting in very weak attractive force. On the contrary, a tight and stable bound state is discovered for Z-DNA in the presence of Mg2+ or Na+, benefiting from their hydrophobic nature. Based on the contact surface and a dewetting process analysis, a two-stage binding process of Z-DNA is outlined: two Z-DNA first attract each other through charge screening and Mg2+ bridges to phosphate groups in the same way as that of B-DNA, after which hydrophobic contacts of the deoxyribose groups are formed via a dewetting effect, resulting in stable attraction between two Z-DNA molecules. The highlighted hydrophobic nature of Z-DNA interaction from the current study may help to understand the biological functions of Z-DNA in gene transcription.Understanding how DNA molecules interact with other biomolecules is related to how they utilize their functions and is therefore critical for understanding their structure-function relationships. For a long time, the existence of Z-form DNA (a left-handed double helical version of DNA, instead of the common right-handed B-form) has puzzled the scientists, and the definitive biological significance of Z-DNA has not yet been clarified. In this study, the effects of DNA conformation in DNA-DNA interactions are explored by

  17. Esitleti kakskeelset luulekogu "Luule DNA"

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Magrelli, Valerio. Luule DNA = Il DNA della poesia / tõlkinud [ja saatesõna:] Maarja Kangro ja Kalju Kruusa. Tallinn : Koma, 2006. Sisaldab autori teksti. Esitlus 24. jaan. Kirjanike majas Tallinnas

  18. Mitochondrial Myopathy with DNA Deletions

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1992-01-01

    Deletions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are reported in 19 of 56 patients with mitochondrial myopathy examined in the Department of Neurology and Neuromuscular Research Laboratory, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

  19. Multiplexed DNA-modified electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slinker, Jason D; Muren, Natalie B; Gorodetsky, Alon A; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2010-03-03

    We report the use of silicon chips with 16 DNA-modified electrodes (DME chips) utilizing DNA-mediated charge transport for multiplexed detection of DNA and DNA-binding protein targets. Four DNA sequences were simultaneously distinguished on a single DME chip with 4-fold redundancy, including one incorporating a single base mismatch. These chips also enabled investigation of the sequence-specific activity of the restriction enzyme Alu1. DME chips supported dense DNA monolayer formation with high reproducibility, as confirmed by statistical comparison to commercially available rod electrodes. The working electrode areas on the chips were reduced to 10 microm in diameter, revealing microelectrode behavior that is beneficial for high sensitivity and rapid kinetic analysis. These results illustrate how DME chips facilitate sensitive and selective detection of DNA and DNA-binding protein targets in a robust and internally standardized multiplexed format.

  20. Esitleti kakskeelset luulekogu "Luule DNA"

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Magrelli, Valerio. Luule DNA = Il DNA della poesia / tõlkinud [ja saatesõna:] Maarja Kangro ja Kalju Kruusa. Tallinn : Koma, 2006. Sisaldab autori teksti. Esitlus 24. jaan. Kirjanike majas Tallinnas

  1. Functionalizing Designer DNA Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard

    Three-dimensional crystals have been self-assembled from a DNA tensegrity triangle via sticky end interaction. The tensegrity triangle is a rigid DNA motif containing three double helical edges connected pair-wise by three four-arm junctions. The symmetric triangle contains 3 unique strands combined in a 3:3:1 ratio: 3 crossover, 3 helical and 1 central. The length of the sticky end reported previously was two nucleotides (nt) (GA:TC) and the motif with 2-helical turns of DNA per edge diffracted to 4.9 A at beam line NSLS-X25 and to 4 A at beam line ID19 at APS. The purpose of these self-assembled DNA crystals is that they can be used as a framework for hosting external guests for use in crystallographic structure solving or the periodic positioning of molecules for nanoelectronics. This thesis describes strategies to improve the resolution and to incorporate guests into the 3D lattice. The first chapter describes the effect of varying sticky end lengths and the influence of 5'-phosphate addition on crystal formation and resolution. X-ray diffraction data from beam line NSLS-X25 revealed that the crystal resolution for 1-nt (G:C) sticky end was 3.4 A. Motifs with every possible combination of 1-nt and 2-nt sticky-ended phosphorylated strands were crystallized and X-ray data were collected. The position of the 5'-phosphate on either the crossover (strand 1), helical (strand 2), or central strand (3) had an impact on the resolution of the self-assembled crystals with the 1-nt 1P-2-3 system diffracting to 2.62 A at APS and 3.1 A at NSLS-X25. The second chapter describes the sequence-specific recognition of DNA motifs with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs). This study examined the feasibility of using TFOs to bind to specific locations within a 3-turn DNA tensegrity triangle motif. The TFO 5'-TTCTTTCTTCTCT was used to target the tensegrity motif containing an appropriately embedded oligopurine.oligopyrimidine binding site. As triplex formation involving cytidine

  2. Efficient DNA ligation in DNA-RNA hybrid helices by Chlorella virus DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Gregory J S; Zhang, Yinhua; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M; Cantor, Eric J; Evans, Thomas C

    2014-02-01

    Single-stranded DNA molecules (ssDNA) annealed to an RNA splint are notoriously poor substrates for DNA ligases. Herein we report the unexpectedly efficient ligation of RNA-splinted DNA by Chlorella virus DNA ligase (PBCV-1 DNA ligase). PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated ssDNA splinted by RNA with kcat ≈ 8 x 10(-3) s(-1) and K(M) DNA ligase produced only 5'-adenylylated DNA with a 20-fold lower kcat and a K(M) ≈ 300 nM. The rate of ligation increased with addition of Mn(2+), but was strongly inhibited by concentrations of NaCl >100 mM. Abortive adenylylation was suppressed at low ATP concentrations (8, leading to increased product yields. The ligation reaction was rapid for a broad range of substrate sequences, but was relatively slower for substrates with a 5'-phosphorylated dC or dG residue on the 3' side of the ligation junction. Nevertheless, PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated all sequences tested with 10-fold less enzyme and 15-fold shorter incubation times than required when using T4 DNA ligase. Furthermore, this ligase was used in a ligation-based detection assay system to show increased sensitivity over T4 DNA ligase in the specific detection of a target mRNA.

  3. Statistical Approaches for DNA Barcoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Matz, M.

    2006-01-01

    The use of DNA as a tool for species identification has become known as "DNA barcoding" (Floyd et al., 2002; Hebert et al., 2003; Remigio and Hebert, 2003). The basic idea is straightforward: a small amount of DNA is extracted from the specimen, amplified and sequenced. The gene region sequenced...

  4. Interfacing DNA nanodevices with biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Mathias; Kjems, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    in biology and biomedicine acting as a molecular ‘nanorobot’ or smart drug interacting with the cellular machinery. In this review, we will explore and examine the perspective of DNA nanotechnology for such use. We summarize which requirements DNA nanostructures must fulfil to function in cellular...... environments and inside living organisms. In addition, we highlight recent advances in interfacing DNA nanostructures with biology....

  5. Environmental influences on DNA curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Higgins, C.F.; Bolshoy, A.

    1999-01-01

    DNA curvature plays an important role in many biological processes. To study environmentalinfluences on DNA curvature we compared the anomalous migration on polyacrylamide gels ofligation ladders of 11 specifically-designed oligonucleotides. At low temperatures (25 degreesC and below) most...... for DNAcurvature and for environmentally-sensitive DNA conformations in the regulation of geneexpression....

  6. DNA Origami-Graphene Hybrid Nanopore for DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati Farimani, Amir; Dibaeinia, Payam; Aluru, Narayana R

    2017-01-11

    DNA origami nanostructures can be used to functionalize solid-state nanopores for single molecule studies. In this study, we characterized a nanopore in a DNA origami-graphene heterostructure for DNA detection. The DNA origami nanopore is functionalized with a specific nucleotide type at the edge of the pore. Using extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we computed and analyzed the ionic conductivity of nanopores in heterostructures carpeted with one or two layers of DNA origami on graphene. We demonstrate that a nanopore in DNA origami-graphene gives rise to distinguishable dwell times for the four DNA base types, whereas for a nanopore in bare graphene, the dwell time is almost the same for all types of bases. The specific interactions (hydrogen bonds) between DNA origami and the translocating DNA strand yield different residence times and ionic currents. We also conclude that the speed of DNA translocation decreases due to the friction between the dangling bases at the pore mouth and the sequencing DNA strands.

  7. DNA Sequential Logic Gate Using Two-Ring DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Shen, Linjing; Liang, Chao; Dong, Yafei; Yang, Jing; Xu, Jin

    2016-04-13

    Sequential DNA detection is a fundamental issue for elucidating the interactive relationships among complex gene systems. Here, a sequential logic DNA gate was achieved by utilizing the two-ring DNA structure, with the ability to recognize "before" and "after" triggering sequences of DNA signals. By taking advantage of a "loop-open" mechanism, separations of two-ring DNAs were controlled. Three triggering pathways with different sequential DNA treatments were distinguished by comparing fluorescent outputs. Programmed nanoparticle arrangement guided by "interlocked" two-ring DNA was also constructed to demonstrate the achievement of designed nanostrucutres. Such sequential logic DNA operation may guide future molecular sensors to monitor more complex gene network in biological systems.

  8. DNA fusion gene vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2010-01-01

    DNA vaccines are versatile and safe, but limited immunogenicity has prevented their use in the clinical setting. Experimentally, immunogenicity may be enhanced by the use of new delivery technologies, by coadministration of cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, or by fusion...... of antigens into molecular domains that enhance antigen presentation. More specifically, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines may benefit from increased protein synthesis, increased T-cell help and MHC class I presentation, and the addition of a range of specific cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular...... patterns that increase activation of the innate immune system. Importantly, viral-vectored vaccines that act through the induction of one or more of these factors also may benefit from cytokine coadministration and increased antigen presentation. In order to increase immunogenicity to the level achieved...

  9. Fleet DNA (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walkokwicz, K.; Duran, A.

    2014-06-01

    The Fleet DNA project objectives include capturing and quantifying drive cycle and technology variation for the multitude of medium- and heavy-duty vocations; providing a common data storage warehouse for medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fleet data across DOE activities and laboratories; and integrating existing DOE tools, models, and analyses to provide data-driven decision making capabilities. Fleet DNA advantages include: for Government - providing in-use data for standard drive cycle development, R&D, tech targets, and rule making; for OEMs - real-world usage datasets provide concrete examples of customer use profiles; for fleets - vocational datasets help illustrate how to maximize return on technology investments; for Funding Agencies - ways are revealed to optimize the impact of financial incentive offers; and for researchers -a data source is provided for modeling and simulation.

  10. DNA Methylation in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pries, Lotta-Katrin; Gülöksüz, Sinan; Kenis, Gunter

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable psychiatric condition that displays a complex phenotype. A multitude of genetic susceptibility loci have now been identified, but these fail to explain the high heritability estimates of schizophrenia. In addition, epidemiologically relevant environmental risk factors for schizophrenia may lead to permanent changes in brain function. In conjunction with genetic liability, these environmental risk factors-likely through epigenetic mechanisms-may give rise to schizophrenia, a clinical syndrome characterized by florid psychotic symptoms and moderate to severe cognitive impairment. These pathophysiological features point to the involvement of epigenetic processes. Recently, a wave of studies examining aberrant DNA modifications in schizophrenia was published. This chapter aims to comprehensively review the current findings, from both candidate gene studies and genome-wide approaches, on DNA methylation changes in schizophrenia.

  11. DNA repair. [UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals. (HLW)

  12. Adenovirus DNA Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeben, Rob C.; Uil, Taco G.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted much attention as probes to study biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and cellular transformation. More recently these viruses have been used as gene-transfer vectors and oncolytic agents. On the other hand, adenoviruses are notorious pathogens in people with compromised immune functions. This article will briefly summarize the basic replication strategy of adenoviruses and the key proteins involved and will deal with the new deve...

  13. Repulsive DNA-DNA interactions accelerate viral DNA packaging in phage phi29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Nicholas; delToro, Damian; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    We use optical tweezers to study the effect of attractive versus repulsive DNA-DNA interactions on motor-driven viral packaging. Screening of repulsive interactions accelerates packaging, but induction of attractive interactions by spermidine3+ causes heterogeneous dynamics. Acceleration is observed in a fraction of complexes, but most exhibit slowing and stalling, suggesting that attractive interactions promote nonequilibrium DNA conformations that impede the motor. Thus, repulsive interactions facilitate packaging despite increasing the energy of the theoretical optimum spooled DNA conformation. PMID:24996111

  14. Repulsive DNA-DNA interactions accelerate viral DNA packaging in phage Phi29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Nicholas; delToro, Damian; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J; Smith, Douglas E

    2014-06-20

    We use optical tweezers to study the effect of attractive versus repulsive DNA-DNA interactions on motor-driven viral packaging. Screening of repulsive interactions accelerates packaging, but induction of attractive interactions by spermidine(3+) causes heterogeneous dynamics. Acceleration is observed in a fraction of complexes, but most exhibit slowing and stalling, suggesting that attractive interactions promote nonequilibrium DNA conformations that impede the motor. Thus, repulsive interactions facilitate packaging despite increasing the energy of the theoretical optimum spooled DNA conformation.

  15. Geant4-DNA simulations using complex DNA geometries generated by the DnaFabric tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylan, S.; Vimont, U.; Incerti, S.; Clairand, I.; Villagrasa, C.

    2016-07-01

    Several DNA representations are used to study radio-induced complex DNA damages depending on the approach and the required level of granularity. Among all approaches, the mechanistic one requires the most resolved DNA models that can go down to atomistic DNA descriptions. The complexity of such DNA models make them hard to modify and adapt in order to take into account different biological conditions. The DnaFabric project was started to provide a tool to generate, visualise and modify such complex DNA models. In the current version of DnaFabric, the models can be exported to the Geant4 code to be used as targets in the Monte Carlo simulation. In this work, the project was used to generate two DNA fibre models corresponding to two DNA compaction levels representing the hetero and the euchromatin. The fibres were imported in a Geant4 application where computations were performed to estimate the influence of the DNA compaction on the amount of calculated DNA damage. The relative difference of the DNA damage computed in the two fibres for the same number of projectiles was found to be constant and equal to 1.3 for the considered primary particles (protons from 300 keV to 50 MeV). However, if only the tracks hitting the DNA target are taken into account, then the relative difference is more important for low energies and decreases to reach zero around 10 MeV. The computations were performed with models that contain up to 18,000 DNA nucleotide pairs. Nevertheless, DnaFabric will be extended to manipulate multi-scale models that go from the molecular to the cellular levels.

  16. Compressive Sensing DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Baraniuk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing microarrays (CSMs are DNA-based sensors that operate using group testing and compressive sensing (CS principles. In contrast to conventional DNA microarrays, in which each genetic sensor is designed to respond to a single target, in a CSM, each sensor responds to a set of targets. We study the problem of designing CSMs that simultaneously account for both the constraints from CS theory and the biochemistry of probe-target DNA hybridization. An appropriate cross-hybridization model is proposed for CSMs, and several methods are developed for probe design and CS signal recovery based on the new model. Lab experiments suggest that in order to achieve accurate hybridization profiling, consensus probe sequences are required to have sequence homology of at least 80% with all targets to be detected. Furthermore, out-of-equilibrium datasets are usually as accurate as those obtained from equilibrium conditions. Consequently, one can use CSMs in applications in which only short hybridization times are allowed.

  17. Next generation DNA led technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Jyothsna, G; Kashyap, Amita

    2016-01-01

    This brief highlights advances in DNA technologies and their wider applications. DNA is the source of life and has been studied since a generation, but very little is known as yet. Several sophisticated technologies of the current era have laid their foundations on the principle of DNA based mechanisms. DNA based technologies are bringing a new revolution of Advanced Science and Technology. Forensic Investigation, Medical Diagnosis, Paternity Disputes, Individual Identity, Health insurance, Motor Insurance have incorporated the DNA testing and profiling technologies for settling the issues.

  18. DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schueder, Florian; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Jungmann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology allow researchers to use the unique molecular recognition properties of DNA strands to construct nanoscale objects with almost arbitrary complexity in two and three dimensions. Abstracted as molecular breadboards, DNA nanostructures enable nanometer-precise placement of guest molecules such as proteins, fluorophores, or nanoparticles. These assemblies can be used to study biological phenomena with unprecedented control over number, spacing, and molecular identity. Here, we give a general introduction to structural DNA nanotechnology and more specifically discuss applications of DNA nanostructures in the field of fluorescence and plasmonics.

  19. A physicist's view of DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Mashaghi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acids, like DNA and RNA, are molecules that are present in any life form. Their most notable function is to encode biological information. Why then would a physicist be interested in these molecules? As we will see, DNA is an interesting molecular tool for physicists to test and explore physical laws and theories, like the ergodic theorem, the theory of elasticity and information theory. DNA also has unique material properties, which attract material scientists, nanotechnologists and engineers. Among interesting developments in this field are DNA-based hybrid materials and DNA origami.

  20. DNA adducts-chemical addons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T R Rajalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA adduct is a piece of DNA covalently bond to a chemical (safrole, benzopyrenediol epoxide, acetaldehyde. This process could be the start of a cancerous cell. When a chemical binds to DNA, it gets damaged resulting in abnormal replication. This could be the start of a mutation and without proper DNA repair, this can lead to cancer. It is this chemical that binds with the DNA is our prime area of concern. Instead of performing the whole body analysis for diagnosing cancer, this test could be carried out for early detection of cancer. When scanning tunneling microscope is used, the DNA results can be obtained earlier. DNA adducts in scientific experiments are used as biomarkers.

  1. DNA adducts-chemical addons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, T. R.; AravindhaBabu, N.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Masthan, K. M. K.

    2015-01-01

    DNA adduct is a piece of DNA covalently bond to a chemical (safrole, benzopyrenediol epoxide, acetaldehyde). This process could be the start of a cancerous cell. When a chemical binds to DNA, it gets damaged resulting in abnormal replication. This could be the start of a mutation and without proper DNA repair, this can lead to cancer. It is this chemical that binds with the DNA is our prime area of concern. Instead of performing the whole body analysis for diagnosing cancer, this test could be carried out for early detection of cancer. When scanning tunneling microscope is used, the DNA results can be obtained earlier. DNA adducts in scientific experiments are used as biomarkers. PMID:26015708

  2. Forensic trace DNA: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    DNA analysis is frequently used to acquire information from biological material to aid enquiries associated with criminal offences, disaster victim identification and missing persons investigations. As the relevance and value of DNA profiling to forensic investigations has increased, so too has the desire to generate this information from smaller amounts of DNA. Trace DNA samples may be defined as any sample which falls below recommended thresholds at any stage of the analysis, from sample detection through to profile interpretation, and can not be defined by a precise picogram amount. Here we review aspects associated with the collection, DNA extraction, amplification, profiling and interpretation of trace DNA samples. Contamination and transfer issues are also briefly discussed within the context of trace DNA analysis. Whilst several methodological changes have facilitated profiling from trace samples in recent years it is also clear that many opportunities exist for further improvements. PMID:21122102

  3. Touch DNA-The prospect of DNA profiles from cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sharon; Subhani, Zuhaib; Daniel, Barbara; Frascione, Nunzianda

    2016-05-01

    Metal theft in the railroad industry poses significant challenges to transport investigators. Cable sheaths left behind at crime scenes, if appropriately analysed, could provide valuable evidence in a forensic investigation, but attempts at recovering DNA are not routinely made. Experiments were set up to ascertain the success in DNA recovery from the surface of cable sheaths after deposition of (a) sweat, (b) extracted DNA and (c) fingermarks. Since investigators try to collect fingermarks and often treat the cables with cyanoacrylate fuming (CNA fuming) or wet powder suspensions (WPS) to enhance the marks this study investigated the recovery of DNA from fingermarks pre- and post-enhancement. The double-swab technique and mini-taping were compared as options to recover DNA from the cable sheaths. Results demonstrate that generally, there is no significant difference between using swabs or mini-tapes to recover the DNA from the non-porous cables (p>0.05). It was also illustrated that CNA fuming performed better than WPS in terms of subsequent recovery and profiling of DNA. CNA fuming resulted in an average increase in DNA recovered via swabbing and taping (more than 4× and 8×, respectively), as compared to no treatment, with 50% of the DNA recovered after CNA fuming generating full DNA profiles.

  4. Chiral DNA packaging in DNA-cationic liposome assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidam, N J; Barenholz, Y; Minsky, A

    1999-09-03

    Recent studies have indicated that the structural features of DNA-lipid assemblies, dictated by the lipid composition and cationic lipid-to-DNA ratio, critically affect the efficiency of these complexes in acting as vehicles for cellular delivery of genetic material. Using circular dichroism we find that upon binding DNA, positively-charged liposomes induce a secondary conformational transition of the DNA molecules from the native B form to the C motif. Liposomes composed of positively-charged and neutral 'helper' lipids, found to be particularly effective as transfecting agents, induce - in addition to secondary conformational changes - DNA condensation into a left-handed cholesteric-like phase. A structural model is presented according to which two distinct, yet inter-related modes of DNA packaging coexist within such assemblies. The results underline the notion that subtle changes in the components of a supramolecular assembly may substantially modulate the interplay of interactions which dictate its structure and functional properties.

  5. Mechanism of DNA damage tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin; Bi

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage may compromise genome integrity and lead to cell death. Cells have evolved a variety of processes to respond to DNA damage including damage repair and tolerance mechanisms, as well as damage checkpoints. The DNA damage tolerance(DDT) pathway promotes the bypass of single-stranded DNA lesions encountered by DNA polymerases during DNA replication. This prevents the stalling of DNA replication. Two mechanistically distinct DDT branches have been characterized. One is translesion synthesis(TLS) in which a replicative DNA polymerase is temporarily replaced by a specialized TLS polymerase that has the ability to replicate across DNA lesions. TLS is mechanistically simple and straightforward, but it is intrinsically error-prone. The other is the error-free template switching(TS) mechanism in which the stalled nascent strand switches from the damaged template to the undamaged newly synthesized sister strand for extension past the lesion. Error-free TS is a complex but preferable process for bypassing DNA lesions. However, our current understanding of this pathway is sketchy. An increasing number of factors are being found to participate or regulate this important mechanism, which is the focus of this editorial.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA maintenance: an appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmedov, Alexander T; Marín-García, José

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in a variety of cellular processes ranging from energy metabolism, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and Ca(2+) handling to stress responses, cell survival, and death. Malfunction of the organelle may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuromuscular disorders, cancer, premature aging, and cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial ischemia, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. Mitochondria are unique as they contain their own genome organized into DNA-protein complexes, so-called mitochondrial nucleoids, along with multiprotein machineries, which promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, transcription, and repair. Although the organelle possesses almost all known nuclear DNA repair pathways, including base excision repair, mismatch repair, and recombinational repair, the proximity of mtDNA to the main sites of ROS production and the lack of protective histones may result in increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and other types of mtDNA damage. Defects in the components of these highly organized machineries, which mediate mtDNA maintenance (replication and repair), may result in accumulation of point mutations and/or deletions in mtDNA and decreased mtDNA copy number impairing mitochondrial function. This review will focus on the mechanisms of mtDNA maintenance with emphasis on the proteins implicated in these processes and their functional role in various disease conditions and aging.

  7. Dynamics of DNA conformations and DNA-protein interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, R.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen;

    2005-01-01

    in a denaturation bubble are shown to involve an interesting competition of time scales, varying between kinetic blocking of protein binding up to full binding protein-induced denaturation of the DNA. We will also address the potential to use DNA physics for the design of nanosensors. Finally, we report recent...... findings on the search process of proteins for a specific target on the DNA. © 2006 Materials Research Society....

  8. DNA Movies and Panspermia

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    There are several ways that our species might try to send a message to another species separated from us by space and/or time. Synthetic biology might be used to write an epitaph to our species, or simply “Kilroy was here”, in the genome of a bacterium via the patterns of either (1) the codons to exploit Life's non-equilibrium character or (2) the bases themselves to exploit Life's quasi-equilibrium character. We suggest here how DNA movies might be designed using such patterns. We ...

  9. The DNA Files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-09

    The DNA Files is a radio documentary which disseminates genetics information over public radio. The documentaries explore subjects which include the following: How genetics affects society. How human life began and how it evolved. Could new prenatal genetic tests hold the key to disease prevention later in life? Would a national genetic data base sacrifice individual privacy? and Should genes that may lead to the cure for cancer be privately owned? This report serves as a project update for the second quarter of 1998. It includes the spring/summer 1998 newsletter, the winter 1998 newsletter, the program clock, and the latest flyer.

  10. Protein-DNA complexes: specificity and DNA readout mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shestopalova A. V.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein-nucleic acid recognition is essential in a number of cellular processes, in particular, gene regulation, DNA replication and compaction. Studies on the recognition mechanisms show that DNA sequence carries information which is read out by proteins that selectively bind to specific DNA sites. The review is focused on the processes taking place during formation of specific and nonspecific complexes of proteins and DNA. Special attention is paid to direct and indirect mechanisms of sequence-specific recognition. Several examples of protein-nucleic acid complexes are given to illustrate the variety of recognition mechanisms

  11. Properties of DnaB helicase in [lambda] DNA replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    A tailed nicked-circle DNA substrate was used to measure the rapid replication fork (RF) movement catalyzed by E. Coli DnaB helicase and DNA polymerase III holoenzyme (pol III HE) (DnaB-RFs) (30 DnaB hexamers/substrate). The DnaB RFs can efficiently utilize the DNA substrate (60% in 5 min at 30C), and the forks move at a rapid rate (550-780 bp/sec at 30C). The DnaB-RFs have an average maximal processivity of 40,000 nt, and addition of either SSB or primase increase the processivity (150,000 nt + SSB, 70,000-140,000 nt + primase). However, SSB and primase do not affect the rate of fork movement or the amount of substrate utilized in the assay. The [lambda] SS proteins are effective at transferring DnaB onto the DNA substrate (8 DnaB hexamers/substrate). The [lambda] SS proteins do not change the rate of RF movement or the amount of substrate utilized. However, the amount of synthesis measured in the assay is [approximately]2-fold higher in the presence of the [lambda] SS proteins. Therefore, the [lambda] SS proteins increase the processivity of DnaB at the RF (100,000 nt). The [lambda] SS proteins do not appear to play a role in elongation because the processivity of the RF in the presence of SSB and primase is equivalent to the processivity of the [lambda] SS-RFs. [lambda] P protein blocks DnaB helicase activity if added to the RF assay prior to initiation or during elongation. DnaB helicase is more resistant to P inhibition, if the helicase is allowed to bind to the substrate prior to addition of [lambda] P or if primase and rNTPs are included in the assay. These results suggest that the conformation of the RF complex (DNA or nucleoprotein structure) blocks the attack of P on DnaB helicase. The heat shock proteins may play an auxiliary role in mediating the effects of [lambda] P if the concentration of P protein in the cells are high.

  12. Homologous recombination in DNA repair and DNA damage tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan Li; Wolf-Dietrich Heyer

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) comprises a series of interrelated pathways that function in the repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). In addition, recombination provides critical sup-port for DNA replication in the recovery of stalled or broken replication forks, contributing to tolerance of DNA damage. A central core of proteins, most critically the RecA homolog Rad51, catalyzes the key reactions that typify HR: homology search and DNA strand invasion. The diverse functions of recombination are reflected in the need for context-specific factors that perform supplemental functions in conjunction with the core proteins. The inability to properly repair complex DNA damage and resolve DNA replication stress leads to genomic instability and contributes to cancer etiology. Mutations in the BRCA2 recombination gene cause predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer as well as Fanconi anemia, a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a defect in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks. The cellular functions of recombination are also germane to DNA-based treatment modaUties of cancer, which target replicating cells by the direct or indirect induction of DNA lesions that are substrates for recombination pathways. This review focuses on mechanistic aspects of HR relating to DSB and ICL repair as well as replication fork support.

  13. Applications of mass spectrometry to DNA fingerprinting and DNA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, K.B.; Buchanan, M.V.; Chen, C.H.; Doktycz, M.J.; McLuckey, S.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Arlinghaus, H.F. (Atom Sciences, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

    1993-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting and sequencing rely on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the sizes of the DNA fragments. Innovative altematives to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis are under investigation for characterization of such fingerprinting and sequencing. One method uses stable isotopes of tin and other elements to label the DNAwhereas other procedures do not require labels. The detectors in each case are mass spectrometers that detect either the stable isotopes or the DNA fragments themselves. If successful, these methods will speed up the rate of DNA analysis by one or two orders of magnitude.

  14. Applications of mass spectrometry to DNA fingerprinting and DNA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, K.B.; Buchanan, M.V.; Chen, C.H.; Doktycz, M.J.; McLuckey, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Arlinghaus, H.F. [Atom Sciences, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-06-01

    DNA fingerprinting and sequencing rely on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the sizes of the DNA fragments. Innovative altematives to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis are under investigation for characterization of such fingerprinting and sequencing. One method uses stable isotopes of tin and other elements to label the DNAwhereas other procedures do not require labels. The detectors in each case are mass spectrometers that detect either the stable isotopes or the DNA fragments themselves. If successful, these methods will speed up the rate of DNA analysis by one or two orders of magnitude.

  15. Recent progress in DNA origami technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    DNA origami is an emerging technology for designing defined two-dimensional DNA nanostructures. In this review, we focus on and describe several types of DNA origami-related studies, as follows: (1) programmed DNA origami assembly, (2) DNA origami-templated molecular assembly, (3) design and construction of various three-dimensional DNA origami structures, (4) programmed functionalization of DNA origami and combination with top-down nanotechnology, (5) single molecular observation on a designed DNA origami, and (6) DNA nanomachines working on a DNA origami.

  16.  Oxidation and deamination of nucleobases as an epigenetic tool

    OpenAIRE

    Jolanta Guz; Marek Jurgowiak; Ryszard Oliński

    2012-01-01

     Recent discoveries have demonstrated that 5-methylcytosine (5mC) may be hydroxymethylated to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) in mammals and that genomic DNA may contain about 0.02–0.7�0of 5hmC. The aforementioned modification is the key intermediate of active DNA demethylation and has been named “the sixth base in DNA”.Although active DNA demethylation in mammals is still controversial, the most plausible mechanism/s of active 5mC demethylation include involvement of three families of enzymes...

  17. Ancient and modern environmental DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikkel Winther; Overballe-Petersen, Søren; Ermini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    DNA obtained from environmental samples such as sediments, ice or water (environmental DNA, eDNA), represents an important source of information on past and present biodiversity. It has revealed an ancient forest in Greenland, extended by several thousand years the survival dates for mainland....../Holocene transition, with implications for the extinction of megafauna. Furthermore, eDNA can reflect the biodiversity of extant flora and fauna, both qualitatively and quantitatively, allowing detection of rare species. As such, trace studies of plant and vertebrate DNA in the environment have revolutionized our...... knowledge of biogeography. However, the approach remains marred by biases related to DNA behaviour in environmental settings, incomplete reference databases and false positive results due to contamination. We provide a review of the field....

  18. Labeling nuclear DNA using DAPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazotte, Brad

    2011-01-01

    A number of fluorescent stains are available that label DNA and allow easy visualization of the nucleus in interphase cells and chromosomes in mitotic cells, including Hoechst, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), ethidium bromide, propidium iodide, and acridine orange. Although not as bright as the vital Hoechst stains for DNA, DAPI has greater photostability. It is believed that DAPI associates with the minor groove of double-stranded DNA, with a preference for the adenine-thymine clusters. Cells must be permeabilized and/or fixed for DAPI to enter the cell and to bind DNA. Fluorescence increases approximately 20-fold when DAPI is bound to double-stranded DNA. This protocol describes the use of DAPI to label nuclear DNA of cells grown in culture.

  19. DNA-based hybrid catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioz-Martínez, Ana; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, DNA-based hybrid catalysis has merged as a promising novel approach to homogeneous (asymmetric) catalysis. A DNA hybrid catalysts comprises a transition metal complex that is covalently or supramolecularly bound to DNA. The chiral microenvironment and the second coordination sphere interactions provided by the DNA are key to achieve high enantioselectivities and, often, additional rate accelerations in catalysis. Nowadays, current efforts are focused on improved designs, understanding the origin of the enantioselectivity and DNA-induced rate accelerations, expanding the catalytic scope of the concept and further increasing the practicality of the method for applications in synthesis. Herein, the recent developments will be reviewed and the perspectives for the emerging field of DNA-based hybrid catalysis will be discussed.

  20. DNA vaccine for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Benjamin; Jeang, Jessica; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccination has emerged as an attractive immunotherapeutic approach against cancer due to its simplicity, stability, and safety. Results from numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that DNA vaccines are well tolerated by patients and do not trigger major adverse effects. DNA vaccines are also very cost effective and can be administered repeatedly for long-term protection. Despite all the practical advantages, DNA vaccines face challenges in inducing potent antigen specific cellular immune responses as a result of immune tolerance against endogenous self-antigens in tumors. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of DNA vaccines against self-antigens have been investigated including encoding of xenogeneic versions of antigens, fusion of antigens to molecules that activate T cells or trigger associative recognition, priming with DNA vectors followed by boosting with viral vector, and utilization of immunomodulatory molecules. This review will focus on discussing strategies that circumvent immune tolerance and provide updates on findings from recent clinical trials.

  1. DNA denaturation in ionic solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Arghya; Singh, Amar; Singh, Navin

    2016-05-01

    Salt or cations, present in solution play an important role in DNA denaturation and folding kinetics of DNA helix. In this work we study the thermal melting of double stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecule using Peyrard Bishop Dauxois (PBD) model. We modify the potential of H-bonding between the bases of the complimentary strands to introduce the salt and solvent effect. We choose different DNA sequences having different contents of GC pairs and calculate the melting temperatures. The melting temperature increases logarithmically with the salt concentration of the solution. The more GC base pairs in the chain enhance the stability of DNA chain at a fix salt concentration. The obtained results are in good accordance with experimental findings.

  2. Monitoring Biodiversity using Environmental DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Philip Francis

    DNA). Especially the advance in DNA sequencing technology has revolutionized this field and opened new frontiers in ecology, evolution and environmental sciences. Also, it is becoming a powerful tool for field biologist, with new and efficient methods for monitoring biodiversity. This thesis focuses on the use...... of eDNA in monitoring of biodiversity in different settings. First, it is shown that a diversity of rare freshwater animals – representing amphibians, fish, mammals, insects and crustaceans – can be detected based on eDNA obtained directly from 15 ml water samples of lakes, ponds and streams...... setting, showing that eDNA obtained directly from ½ l seawater samples can account for marine fish biodiversity using NGS. Promisingly, eDNA covered the fish diversity better than any of 9 methods, conventionally used in marine fish surveys. Additionally, it is shown that even short 100-bp. fish e...

  3. DNA recognition by synthetic constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Elena; Mosquera, Jesús; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2011-09-05

    The interaction of transcription factors with specific DNA sites is key for the regulation of gene expression. Despite the availability of a large body of structural data on protein-DNA complexes, we are still far from fully understanding the molecular and biophysical bases underlying such interactions. Therefore, the development of non-natural agents that can reproduce the DNA-recognition properties of natural transcription factors remains a major and challenging goal in chemical biology. In this review we summarize the basics of double-stranded DNA recognition by transcription factors, and describe recent developments in the design and preparation of synthetic DNA binders. We mainly focus on synthetic peptides that have been designed by following the DNA interaction of natural proteins, and we discuss how the tools of organic synthesis can be used to make artificial constructs equipped with functionalities that introduce additional properties to the recognition process, such as sensing and controllability.

  4. DNA vaccine: the miniature miracle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Kaliaperumal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA, the essential part of the life is making way in to new vaccine technology. Plasmid vectors from the bacteria have revolutionized the world of vaccine design by its new technology – DNA vaccines. Small portion of the nucleotides from the pathogen held under the control of promoter in a plasmid vector can be used as a vaccine. DNA vaccines alleviate the odds of the other vaccines by having good hold on both the faces of the immunity. The key to the success of DNA vaccine lies in the route of administration of the vaccine which can be done in many ways. Prime boost strategy is an approach used to boost the action of DNA vaccine. To date there are only four DNA vaccine available in the market. [Vet World 2013; 6(4.000: 228-232

  5. Development of dengue DNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danko, Janine R; Beckett, Charmagne G; Porter, Kevin R

    2011-09-23

    Vaccination with plasmid DNA against infectious pathogens including dengue is an active area of investigation. By design, DNA vaccines are able to elicit both antibody responses and cellular immune responses capable of mediating long-term protection. Great technical improvements have been made in dengue DNA vaccine constructs and trials are underway to study these in the clinic. The scope of this review is to highlight the rich history of this vaccine platform and the work in dengue DNA vaccines accomplished by scientists at the Naval Medical Research Center. This work resulted in the only dengue DNA vaccine tested in a clinical trial to date. Additional advancements paving the road ahead in dengue DNA vaccine development are also discussed.

  6. Cryptography with DNA binary strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leier, A; Richter, C; Banzhaf, W; Rauhe, H

    2000-06-01

    Biotechnological methods can be used for cryptography. Here two different cryptographic approaches based on DNA binary strands are shown. The first approach shows how DNA binary strands can be used for steganography, a technique of encryption by information hiding, to provide rapid encryption and decryption. It is shown that DNA steganography based on DNA binary strands is secure under the assumption that an interceptor has the same technological capabilities as sender and receiver of encrypted messages. The second approach shown here is based on steganography and a method of graphical subtraction of binary gel-images. It can be used to constitute a molecular checksum and can be combined with the first approach to support encryption. DNA cryptography might become of practical relevance in the context of labelling organic and inorganic materials with DNA 'barcodes'.

  7. DNA sequencing by CE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karger, Barry L; Guttman, András

    2009-06-01

    Sequencing of human and other genomes has been at the center of interest in the biomedical field over the past several decades and is now leading toward an era of personalized medicine. During this time, DNA-sequencing methods have evolved from the labor-intensive slab gel electrophoresis, through automated multiCE systems using fluorophore labeling with multispectral imaging, to the "next-generation" technologies of cyclic-array, hybridization based, nanopore and single molecule sequencing. Deciphering the genetic blueprint and follow-up confirmatory sequencing of Homo sapiens and other genomes were only possible with the advent of modern sequencing technologies that were a result of step-by-step advances with a contribution of academics, medical personnel and instrument companies. While next-generation sequencing is moving ahead at breakneck speed, the multicapillary electrophoretic systems played an essential role in the sequencing of the Human Genome, the foundation of the field of genomics. In this prospective, we wish to overview the role of CE in DNA sequencing based in part of several of our articles in this journal.

  8. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L; Tomkinson, Alan E; Tainer, John A; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-08-18

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation.

  9. Human DNA Ligase III Recognizes DNA Ends by Dynamic Switching between Two DNA-Bound States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom (Scripps); (Maryland-MED); (WU-MED); (LBNL)

    2010-09-13

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a 'jackknife model' in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers.

  10. Loss of maintenance DNA methylation results in abnormal DNA origin firing during DNA replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haruta, Mayumi [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Shimada, Midori, E-mail: midorism@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Nishiyama, Atsuya; Johmura, Yoshikazu [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Le Tallec, Benoît; Debatisse, Michelle [Institut Curie, Centre de Recherche, 26 rue d’Ulm, CNRS UMR 3244, 75248 ParisCedex 05 (France); Nakanishi, Makoto, E-mail: mkt-naka@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan)

    2016-01-22

    The mammalian maintenance methyltransferase DNMT1 [DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 1] mediates the inheritance of the DNA methylation pattern during replication. Previous studies have shown that depletion of DNMT1 causes a severe growth defect and apoptosis in differentiated cells. However, the detailed mechanisms behind this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here we show that conditional ablation of Dnmt1 in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) resulted in an aberrant DNA replication program showing an accumulation of late-S phase replication and causing severely defective growth. Furthermore, we found that the catalytic activity and replication focus targeting sequence of DNMT1 are required for a proper DNA replication program. Taken together, our findings suggest that the maintenance of DNA methylation by DNMT1 plays a critical role in proper regulation of DNA replication in mammalian cells. - Highlights: • DNMT1 depletion results in an abnormal DNA replication program. • Aberrant DNA replication is independent of the DNA damage checkpoint in DNMT1cKO. • DNMT1 catalytic activity and RFT domain are required for proper DNA replication. • DNMT1 catalytic activity and RFT domain are required for cell proliferation.

  11. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  12. Robust DNA Damage Response and Elevated Reactive Oxygen Species in TINF2-Mutated Dyskeratosis Congenita Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Pereboeva

    Full Text Available Dyskeratosis Congenita (DC is an inherited multisystem premature aging disorder with characteristic skin and mucosal findings as well as a predisposition to cancer and bone marrow failure. DC arises due to gene mutations associated with the telomerase complex or telomere maintenance, resulting in critically shortened telomeres. The pathogenesis of DC, as well as several congenital bone marrow failure (BMF syndromes, converges on the DNA damage response (DDR pathway and subsequent elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Historically, DC patients have had poor outcomes following bone marrow transplantation (BMT, perhaps as a consequence of an underlying DNA hypersensitivity to cytotoxic agents. Previously, we demonstrated an activated DDR and increased ROS, augmented by chemotherapy and radiation, in somatic cells isolated from DC patients with a mutation in the RNA component of telomerase, TERC. The current study was undertaken to determine whether previous findings related to ROS and DDR in TERC patients' cells could be extended to other DC mutations. Of particular interest was whether an antioxidant approach could counter increased ROS and decrease DC pathologies. To test this, we examined lymphocytes from DC patients from different DC mutations (TERT, TINF2, and TERC for the presence of an active DDR and increased ROS. All DC mutations led to increased steady-state p53 (2-fold to 10-fold and ROS (1.5-fold to 2-fold. Upon exposure to ionizing radiation (XRT, DC cells increased in both DDR and ROS to a significant degree. Exposing DC cells to hydrogen peroxide also revealed that DC cells maintain a significant oxidant burden compared to controls (1.5-fold to 3-fold. DC cell culture supplemented with N-acetylcysteine, or alternatively grown in low oxygen, afforded significant proliferative benefits (proliferation: maximum 2-fold increase; NAC: 5-fold p53 decrease; low oxygen: maximum 3.5-fold p53 decrease. Together, our data supports a

  13. Biosensors for DNA sequence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; Akeson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    DNA biosensors are being developed as alternatives to conventional DNA microarrays. These devices couple signal transduction directly to sequence recognition. Some of the most sensitive and functional technologies use fibre optics or electrochemical sensors in combination with DNA hybridization. In a shift from sequence recognition by hybridization, two emerging single-molecule techniques read sequence composition using zero-mode waveguides or electrical impedance in nanoscale pores.

  14. DNA controlled assembly of liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stefan; Jakobsen, Ulla; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2009-01-01

    DNA-encoding of solid nanoparticles requires surfacechemistry, which is often tedious and not generally applicable. In the present study non-covalently attached DNA are used to assemble soft nanoparticles (liposomes) in solution. This process displays remarkably sharp thermal transitions from...... assembled to disassembled state for which reason this method allows easy and fast detection of polynucleotides (e.g. DNA or RNA), including single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as insertions and deletions....

  15. [Legal implication of DNA profiling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutremepuich, Christian

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, DNA profiling has been used regularly by the justice system, and has seen a number of improvements, with the need for fewer cells, more efficient DNA extraction and purification, and more rapid genotyping. These methods can now identify an individual more rapidly, from a corpse, blood stain, sperm or epithelial cells, by comparison with familial profiles. In France, DNA profiling can only be ordered by a judge.

  16. Quantitative assessment of DNA condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, V S; Slattum, P M; Hagstrom, J E; Wolff, J A; Budker, V G

    1999-02-15

    A fluorescent method is proposed for assessing DNA condensation in aqueous solutions with variety of condensing agents. The technique is based on the effect of concentration-dependent self-quenching of covalently bound fluorophores upon DNA collapse. The method allows a more precise determination of charge equivalency in titration experiments with various polycations. The technique's ability to determine the number of DNA molecules that are condensed together in close proximity is under further investigation.

  17. The Breast Cancer DNA Interactome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    digested nuclei were diluted in 7 ml of 1.16T4 DNA ligase buffer in the presence of 1% Triton X-100 and incubated for 1 h at 37uC. Ligation was performed...by adding 800 U of T4 DNA Ligase (2,000,000 U/ml; New England Biolabs) to the diluted mixture of digested nuclei and incubating in a 16uC H2O bath for...by phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipita- tion. Ligations were performed in 14 ml of 16 T4 DNA ligase buffer with 2000 U of T4 DNA

  18. Stabbing simulations and DNA transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samie, Lydie; Hicks, Tacha; Castella, Vincent; Taroni, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Technical developments have made it possible to analyze very low amounts of DNA. This has many advantages, but the drawback of this technological progress is that interpretation of the results becomes increasingly complex: the number of mixed DNA profiles increased relatively to single source DNA profiles and stochastic effects in the DNA profile, such as drop-in and drop-out, are more frequently observed. Moreover, the relevance of low template DNA material regarding the activities alleged is not as straightforward as it was a few years ago, when for example large quantities of blood were recovered. The possibility of secondary and tertiary transfer is now becoming an issue. The purpose of this research is twofold: first, to study the transfer of DNA from the handler and secondly, to observe if handlers would transfer DNA from persons closely connected to them. We chose to mimic cases where the offender would attack a person with a knife. As a first approach, we envisaged that the defense would not give an alternative explanation for the origin of the DNA. In our transfer experiments (4 donors, 16 experiments each, 64 traces), 3% of the traces were single DNA profiles. Most of the time, the DNA profile of the person handling the knife was present as the major profile: in 83% of the traces the major contributor profile corresponded to the stabber's DNA profile (in single stains and mixtures). Mixture with no clear major/minor fraction (12%) were observed. 5% of the traces were considered of insufficient quality (more than 3 contributors, presence of a few minor peaks). In that case, we considered that the stabber's DNA was absent. In our experiments, no traces allowed excluding the stabber, however it must be noted that precautions were taken to minimize background DNA as knives were cleaned before the experiments. DNA profiles of the stabber's colleagues were not observed. We hope that this study will allow for a better understanding of the transfer mechanism and

  19. Mediators of homologous DNA pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelensky, Alex; Kanaar, Roland; Wyman, Claire

    2014-10-09

    Homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange are at the core of homologous recombination. These reactions are promoted by a DNA-strand-exchange protein assembled into a nucleoprotein filament comprising the DNA-pairing protein, ATP, and single-stranded DNA. The catalytic activity of this molecular machine depends on control of its dynamic instability by accessory factors. Here we discuss proteins known as recombination mediators that facilitate formation and functional activation of the DNA-strand-exchange protein filament. Although the basics of homologous pairing and DNA-strand exchange are highly conserved in evolution, differences in mediator function are required to cope with differences in how single-stranded DNA is packaged by the single-stranded DNA-binding protein in different species, and the biochemical details of how the different DNA-strand-exchange proteins nucleate and extend into a nucleoprotein filament. The set of (potential) mediator proteins has apparently expanded greatly in evolution, raising interesting questions about the need for additional control and coordination of homologous recombination in more complex organisms. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  20. DNA nanotechnology-enabled biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jie; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Yinan; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-02-15

    Biosensors employ biological molecules to recognize the target and utilize output elements which can translate the biorecognition event into electrical, optical or mass-sensitive signals to determine the quantities of the target. DNA-based biosensors, as a sub-field to biosensor, utilize DNA strands with short oligonucleotides as probes for target recognition. Although DNA-based biosensors have offered a promising alternative for fast, simple and cheap detection of target molecules, there still exist key challenges including poor stability and reproducibility that hinder their competition with the current gold standard for DNA assays. By exploiting the self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, researchers have dedicated to make versatile DNA nanostructures in a highly rigid, controllable and functionalized manner, which offers unprecedented opportunities for developing DNA-based biosensors. In this review, we will briefly introduce the recent advances on design and fabrication of static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and summarize their applications for fabrication and functionalization of DNA-based biosensors.

  1. DNA repair: keeping it together

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2004-01-01

    A protein scaffold has been identified that holds a chromosome together in the event of a DNA double-strand break. This scaffold is dependent on Rad52 and the Rad50-Mre11-Xrs2 complex and withstands the pulling forces of the mitotic spindle during DNA damage checkpoint arrest.......A protein scaffold has been identified that holds a chromosome together in the event of a DNA double-strand break. This scaffold is dependent on Rad52 and the Rad50-Mre11-Xrs2 complex and withstands the pulling forces of the mitotic spindle during DNA damage checkpoint arrest....

  2. DNA structure: Yet another avatar?

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, Manju

    1999-01-01

    Everytime the story of DNA structure seems to reach a conclusion, it bounces back to centre stage by appearing in yet another incarnation. The latest avatar to manifest itself is a stretched and overwound form of DNA reported recently by a French group-1, working with single DNA molecules. When a moderately large stretching force (of about 3 pico Newtons) is applied, the DNA molecule apparently becomes highly twisted and extended, but even more amazingly it takes up an inside-out structure in...

  3. Aging and DNA repair capability. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tice, R R

    1977-01-01

    A review of the literature on DNA repair processes in relation to aging is presented under the following headings: DNA repair processes; age-related occurrence of unrepaired DNA lesions; DNA repair capability as a function of age; tissue-specific DNA repair capability; acceleration of the aging process by exposure to DNA damaging agents; human genetic syndromes; and longevity and DNA repair processes. (HLW)

  4. DNA extraction from formalin-fixed material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Paula F; Gilbert, Thomas M P

    2012-01-01

    The principal challenges facing PCR-based analyses of DNA extracted from formalin-fixed materials are fragmentation of the DNA and cross-linked protein-DNA complexes. Here, we present an efficient protocol to extract DNA from formalin-fixed or paraffin-embedded tissues (FFPE). In this protocol, protein-DNA cross-links are reversed using heat and alkali treatment, yielding significantly longer fragments and larger amounts of PCR-amplifiable DNA than standard DNA extraction protocols.

  5. DNA Ladder的制备%Preparation of DNA Ladder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俐; 董卫华; 张俊河; 王天云

    2011-01-01

    背景:目前,制备DNA 分子量标准的方法主要有2 种,一种是用限制性内切酶消化某种DNA,另一种是利用PCR 扩增,2 种方法各有优缺点.在前期采用PCR 技术在前期扩增100~500 bp 片段的基础上,实验室又成功扩增出600~1 000 bp片段,PCR 产物经过纯化,混匀,制备的DNA Ladder,结果制备DNA Ladder 的条带清晰,易于识别,可完全与公司商品化的DNA Ladder 相比,完全可用于分子生物学实验.目的:利用PCR 扩增技术制备DNA 分子量标准参照物.方法:自行构建了一种特殊适宜扩增的质粒pUC-DNA,根据pUC-DNA 的基因序列,利用primer5.0 设计能特异扩增100~1 000 bp 的PCR 引物.PCR 扩增出100~1 000 bp 大小的DNA 片段,在2%琼脂糖凝胶中电泳观察结果.用凝胶回收试剂盒回收目的PCR 产物,测序结果与pUC-DNA 上基因序列进行序列比对,Blast 进行同源性分析.将PCR 产物用酚/氯仿抽提,乙醇沉淀,按比例混匀,即可使用.结果与结论:利用PCR 技术能够成功扩增出100~1 000 bp 条带,片段大小与预期结果相符,片段序列与GenBank 序列完全一致,利用回收片段制备的DNA Ladder 条带清晰,可与同类产品相比.%BACKGROUND: DNA molecular weight standard (DNA Ladder) is one of necessary reagents in molecular biological laboratory.It can correctly measure the length of DNA fragments and serve as the DNA molecular weight standard. Now, there are two methods to prepare the DNA Ladder, one is PCR technique, the other is through DNA digestion by restriction enzyme. The two methods all have some merits and drawbacks. The first one can produce standard bands, but is difficult to obtain large bands.The second method is to prepare DNA Ladder restriction digestion of plasmid or phage DNA. In previous study, we have amplified 100-500 bp DNA fragments by using PCR technique, then purified the PCR product and prepared DNA Ladder. The bands of the prepared DNA Ladder were clear, higher

  6. Clinical strains of acinetobacter classified by DNA-DNA hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjernberg, I.; Ursing, J. (Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Lund, Malmoe General Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden))

    1989-01-01

    A collection of Acinetobacter strains consisting of 168 consecutive clinical strains and 30 type and reference strains was studied by DNA-DNA hybridization and a few phenotypic tests. The field strains could be allotted to 13 DNA groups. By means of reference strains ten of these could be identified with groups described by Bouvet and Grimont (1986), while three groups were new; they were given the numbers 13-15. The type strain of A. radioresistens- recently described by Nishimura et al. (1988) - was shown to be a member of DNA group 12, which comprised 31 clinical isolates. Of the 19 strains of A. junii, eight showed hemolytic acitivity on sheep and human blood agar and an additional four strains on human blood agar only. Strains of this species have previously been regarded as non-hemolytic. Reciprocal DNA pairing data for the reference strains of the DNA gropus were treated by UPGMA clustering. The reference strains for A. calcoaceticus, A. baumannii and DNA groups 3 and 13 formed a cluster with about 70% relatedness within the cluster. Other DNA groups joined at levels below 60%. (author).

  7. Dancing on DNA : Kinetic Aspects of Search Processes on DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tafvizi, Anahita; Mirny, Leonid A.; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2011-01-01

    Recognition and binding of specific sites on DNA by proteins is central for many cellular functions such as transcription, replication, and recombination. In the search for its target site, the DNA-associated protein is facing both thermodynamic and kinetic difficulties. The thermodynamic challenge

  8. Flexible DNA bending in HU-DNA cocrystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinger, Kerren K; Lemberg, Kathryn M; Zhang, Ying; Rice, Phoebe A

    2003-07-15

    HU and IHF are members of a family of prokaryotic proteins that interact with the DNA minor groove in a sequence-specific (IHF) or non-specific (HU) manner to induce and/or stabilize DNA bending. HU plays architectural roles in replication initiation, transcription regulation and site-specific recombination, and is associated with bacterial nucleoids. Cocrystal structures of Anabaena HU bound to DNA (1P71, 1P78, 1P51) reveal that while underlying proline intercalation and asymmetric charge neutralization mechanisms of DNA bending are similar for IHF and HU, HU stabilizes different DNA bend angles ( approximately 105-140 degrees ). The two bend angles within a single HU complex are not coplanar, and the resulting dihedral angle is consistent with negative supercoiling. Comparison of HU-DNA and IHF-DNA structures suggests that sharper bending is correlated with longer DNA binding sites and smaller dihedral angles. An HU-induced bend may be better modeled as a hinge, not a rigid bend. The ability to induce or stabilize varying bend angles is consistent with HU's role as an architectural cofactor in many different systems that may require differing geometries.

  9. Pea amyloplast DNA is qualitatively similar to pea chloroplast DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Amyloplast DNA (apDNA), when subjected to digestion with restriction endonucleases, yields patterns nearly identical to that of DNA from mature pea chloroplasts (ctDNA). Southern transfers of apDNA and ctDNA, probed with the large subunit (LS) gene of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), shows hybridization to the expected restriction fragments for both apDNA and ctDNA. However, Northern transfers of total RNA from chloroplasts and amyloplasts, probed again with the LS gene of Rubisco, shows that no detectable LS meggage is found in amyloplasts although LS expression in mature chloroplasts is high. Likewise, two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of etiolated gravisensitive pea tissue shows that both large and small subunits of Rubisco are conspicuously absent; however, in greening tissue these two constitute the major soluble proteins. These findings suggest that although the informational content of these two organelle types is equivalent, gene expression is quite different and is presumably under nuclear control.

  10. Loss of maintenance DNA methylation results in abnormal DNA origin firing during DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Mayumi; Shimada, Midori; Nishiyama, Atsuya; Johmura, Yoshikazu; Le Tallec, Benoît; Debatisse, Michelle; Nakanishi, Makoto

    2016-01-22

    The mammalian maintenance methyltransferase DNMT1 [DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 1] mediates the inheritance of the DNA methylation pattern during replication. Previous studies have shown that depletion of DNMT1 causes a severe growth defect and apoptosis in differentiated cells. However, the detailed mechanisms behind this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here we show that conditional ablation of Dnmt1 in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) resulted in an aberrant DNA replication program showing an accumulation of late-S phase replication and causing severely defective growth. Furthermore, we found that the catalytic activity and replication focus targeting sequence of DNMT1 are required for a proper DNA replication program. Taken together, our findings suggest that the maintenance of DNA methylation by DNMT1 plays a critical role in proper regulation of DNA replication in mammalian cells.

  11. Influence of DNA methylation on positioning and DNA flexibility of nucleosomes with pericentric satellite DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakabe, Akihisa; Adachi, Fumiya; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-10-01

    DNA methylation occurs on CpG sites and is important to form pericentric heterochromatin domains. The satellite 2 sequence, containing seven CpG sites, is located in the pericentric region of human chromosome 1 and is highly methylated in normal cells. In contrast, the satellite 2 region is reportedly hypomethylated in cancer cells, suggesting that the methylation status may affect the chromatin structure around the pericentric regions in tumours. In this study, we mapped the nucleosome positioning on the satellite 2 sequence in vitro and found that DNA methylation modestly affects the distribution of the nucleosome positioning. The micrococcal nuclease assay revealed that the DNA end flexibility of the nucleosomes changes, depending on the DNA methylation status. However, the structures and thermal stabilities of the nucleosomes are unaffected by DNA methylation. These findings provide new information to understand how DNA methylation functions in regulating pericentric heterochromatin formation and maintenance in normal and malignant cells.

  12. Repetitive DNA in three Gramineae species with low DNA content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, V G; Ranjekar, P K

    1980-08-01

    The genomes of three Gramineae species, namely finger millet (Eleusine coracana), pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum) and rice (Oryza sativa) are characterized by studying their DNA denaturation-reassociation properties. The reassociation kinetics measurement of the sonicated DNA (500--700 nucleotide pairs) indicate the presence of a heterogeneous, repetitive DNA fraction accounting for 49--54% of the total DNA in all three species. From the cot 1/2 value of the slow reassociating DNA, the genome size is estimated as 3.0 X 10(8) np in finger millet, 7.8 X 10(8) np in pearl millet and 9.0 X 10(8) np in rice. The melting patterns of the total DNAs reveal Tm value of 88.6 degrees C in the case of pearl millet and 85.0 degrees C in the case of finger millet and rice. Total repetitive and cot 1.0 DNA fractions in all the three species are isolated and their melting properties are compared with those of respective sonicated DNAs. In finger millet, the Tm values of cot 25 and cot 1 fractions are lower by 10.8 degrees C and 12.8 degrees C, respectively, than that of sonicated DNA and thus exhibit the presence of a base pair mismatch in the range of 10.8--12.8%. In rice, the Tm values of the fractions cot 50 and cot 1 are slightly lower than that of sonicated DNA and reveal a nucleotide mismatching of only 1.8--3.8%. In the case of pearl millet cot 10 DNA fraction a high-melting DNA component (Tm = 92 degrees C) representing 12% of the total cot 10 DNA and a low-melting component with a Tm of 78 degrees C are present. In cot 1 DNA fraction of pearl millet the proportion of the high-melting component is 35% and it has a Tm or 94.8 degrees C. Optical reassociation studies of cot 1.0 DNA fractions have revealed the presence of two kinetically distinct components, namely minor fast-reassociating and major slow-reassociating, having complexities in the range of 330--390 np and 1.28 X 10(5)--6.0 X 10(5) np, respectively in pearl millet and rice and only one DNA fraction with an

  13. Repulsive DNA-DNA interactions accelerate viral DNA packaging in phage phi29

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Nicholas; delToro, Damian; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    We use optical tweezers to study the effect of attractive versus repulsive DNA-DNA interactions on motor-driven viral packaging. Screening of repulsive interactions accelerates packaging, but induction of attractive interactions by spermidine3+ causes heterogeneous dynamics. Acceleration is observed in a fraction of complexes, but most exhibit slowing and stalling, suggesting that attractive interactions promote nonequilibrium DNA conformations that impede the motor. Thus, repulsive interacti...

  14. Master equation approach to DNA breathing in heteropolymer DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Banik, Suman K; Lomholt, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    After crossing an initial barrier to break the first base-pair (bp) in double-stranded DNA, the disruption of further bps is characterized by free energies up to a few k(B)T. Thermal motion within the DNA double strand therefore causes the opening of intermittent single-stranded denaturation zones......, the DNA bubbles. The unzipping and zipping dynamics of bps at the two zipper forks of a bubble, where the single strand of the denatured zone joins the still intact double strand, can be monitored by single molecule fluorescence or NMR methods. We here establish a dynamic description of this DNA breathing...... in a heteropolymer DNA with given sequence in terms of a master equation that governs the time evolution of the joint probability distribution for the bubble size and position along the sequence. The transfer coefficients are based on the Poland-Scheraga free energy model. We derive the autocorrelation function...

  15. Master equation approach to DNA breathing in heteropolymer DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Banik, Suman K; Lomholt, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    After crossing an initial barrier to break the first base-pair (bp) in double-stranded DNA, the disruption of further bps is characterized by free energies up to a few k(B)T. Thermal motion within the DNA double strand therefore causes the opening of intermittent single-stranded denaturation zones......, the DNA bubbles. The unzipping and zipping dynamics of bps at the two zipper forks of a bubble, where the single strand of the denatured zone joins the still intact double strand, can be monitored by single molecule fluorescence or NMR methods. We here establish a dynamic description of this DNA breathing...... in a heteropolymer DNA with given sequence in terms of a master equation that governs the time evolution of the joint probability distribution for the bubble size and position along the sequence. The transfer coefficients are based on the Poland-Scheraga free energy model. We derive the autocorrelation function...

  16. DNA damage in neurodegenerative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppedè, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.coppede@med.unipi.it; Migliore, Lucia, E-mail: lucia.migliore@med.unipi.it

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in the neurodegenerative process. • The mitochondrial DNA is more vulnerable to oxidative attack than the nuclear DNA. • Cytogenetic damage has been largely documented in Alzheimer's disease patients. • The question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of neurodegeneration is still open. • Increasing evidence links DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena. - Abstract: Following the observation of increased oxidative DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA extracted from post-mortem brain regions of patients affected by neurodegenerative diseases, the last years of the previous century and the first decade of the present one have been largely dedicated to the search of markers of DNA damage in neuronal samples and peripheral tissues of patients in early, intermediate or late stages of neurodegeneration. Those studies allowed to demonstrate that oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in neurodegeneration, but also revealed cytogenetic damage in neurodegenerative conditions, such as for example a tendency towards chromosome 21 malsegregation in Alzheimer's disease. As it happens for many neurodegenerative risk factors the question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of the neurodegenerative process is still open, and probably both is true. The research interest in markers of oxidative stress was shifted, in recent years, towards the search of epigenetic biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders, following the accumulating evidence of a substantial contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to learning, memory processes, behavioural disorders and neurodegeneration. Increasing evidence is however linking DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena, thereby opening the way to a very attractive and timely research topic in neurodegenerative diseases. We will address those issues in the context of Alzheimer's disease

  17. DNA movies and panspermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Victor; Grondin, Yohann

    2011-10-20

    There are several ways that our species might try to send a message to another species separated from us by space and/or time. Synthetic biology might be used to write an epitaph to our species, or simply "Kilroy was here", in the genome of a bacterium via the patterns of either (1) the codons to exploit Life's non-equilibrium character or (2) the bases themselves to exploit Life's quasi-equilibrium character. We suggest here how DNA movies might be designed using such patterns. We also suggest that a search for mechanisms to create and preserve such patterns might lead to a better understanding of modern cells. Finally, we argue that the cutting-edge microbiology and synthetic biology needed for the Kilroy project would put origin-of-life studies in the vanguard of research.

  18. DNA Movies and Panspermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Norris

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available There are several ways that our species might try to send a message to another species separated from us by space and/or time. Synthetic biology might be used to write an epitaph to our species, or simply “Kilroy was here”, in the genome of a bacterium via the patterns of either (1 the codons to exploit Life's non-equilibrium character or (2 the bases themselves to exploit Life's quasi-equilibrium character. We suggest here how DNA movies might be designed using such patterns. We also suggest that a search for mechanisms to create and preserve such patterns might lead to a better understanding of modern cells. Finally, we argue that the cutting-edge microbiology and synthetic biology needed for the Kilroy project would put origin-of-life studies in the vanguard of research.

  19. Tumorigenic DNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, G.

    1989-01-01

    The eighth volume of Advances in Viral Oncology focuses on the three major DNA virus groups with a postulated or proven tumorigenic potential: papillomaviruses, animal hepatitis viruses, and the Epstein-Bar virus. In the opening chapters, the contributors analyze the evidence that papillomaviruses and animal hepatitis viruses are involved in tumorigenesis and describe the mechanisms that trigger virus-host cell interactions. A detailed section on the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) - comprising more than half the book - examines the transcription and mRNA processing patterns of the virus genome; the mechanisms by which EBV infects lymphoid and epithelial cells; the immunological aspects of the virus; the actions of EBV in hosts with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; and the involvement of EBV in the etiology of Burkitt's lymphoma.

  20. DNA: Polymer and molecular code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivashankar, G. V.

    1999-10-01

    The thesis work focusses upon two aspects of DNA, the polymer and the molecular code. Our approach was to bring single molecule micromanipulation methods to the study of DNA. It included a home built optical microscope combined with an atomic force microscope and an optical tweezer. This combined approach led to a novel method to graft a single DNA molecule onto a force cantilever using the optical tweezer and local heating. With this method, a force versus extension assay of double stranded DNA was realized. The resolution was about 10 picoN. To improve on this force measurement resolution, a simple light backscattering technique was developed and used to probe the DNA polymer flexibility and its fluctuations. It combined the optical tweezer to trap a DNA tethered bead and the laser backscattering to detect the beads Brownian fluctuations. With this technique the resolution was about 0.1 picoN with a millisecond access time, and the whole entropic part of the DNA force-extension was measured. With this experimental strategy, we measured the polymerization of the protein RecA on an isolated double stranded DNA. We observed the progressive decoration of RecA on the l DNA molecule, which results in the extension of l , due to unwinding of the double helix. The dynamics of polymerization, the resulting change in the DNA entropic elasticity and the role of ATP hydrolysis were the main parts of the study. A simple model for RecA assembly on DNA was proposed. This work presents a first step in the study of genetic recombination. Recently we have started a study of equilibrium binding which utilizes fluorescence polarization methods to probe the polymerization of RecA on single stranded DNA. In addition to the study of material properties of DNA and DNA-RecA, we have developed experiments for which the code of the DNA is central. We studied one aspect of DNA as a molecular code, using different techniques. In particular the programmatic use of template specificity makes

  1. DNA Extraction Techniques for Use in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, R. P.; Arblaster, K. E.

    2010-01-01

    DNA extraction provides a hands-on introduction to DNA and enables students to gain real life experience and practical knowledge of DNA. Students gain a sense of ownership and are more enthusiastic when they use their own DNA. A cost effective, simple protocol for DNA extraction and visualization was devised. Buccal mucosal epithelia provide a…

  2. Automated Extraction of DNA from clothing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Hjort, Benjamin Benn; Nøhr Hansen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Presence of PCR inhibitors in extracted DNA may interfere with the subsequent quantification and short tandem repeat (STR) reactions used in forensic genetic DNA typing. We have compared three automated DNA extraction methods based on magnetic beads with a manual method with the aim of reducing...... the amount of PCR inhibitors in the DNA extracts and increasing the proportion of reportable DNA profiles....

  3. Polymer induced condensation of dna supercoils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bessa Ramos Jr., J.E.; Ruggiero Neto, J.; Vries, de R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Macromolecular crowding is thought to be a significant factor driving DNA condensation in prokaryotic cells. Whereas DNA in prokaryotes is supercoiled, studies on crowding-induced DNA condensation have so far focused on linear DNA. Here we compare DNA condensation by poly(ethylene oxide) for superco

  4. DNA Extraction Techniques for Use in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, R. P.; Arblaster, K. E.

    2010-01-01

    DNA extraction provides a hands-on introduction to DNA and enables students to gain real life experience and practical knowledge of DNA. Students gain a sense of ownership and are more enthusiastic when they use their own DNA. A cost effective, simple protocol for DNA extraction and visualization was devised. Buccal mucosal epithelia provide a…

  5. Authenticity in ancient DNA studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, M Thomas P; Willerslev, Eske

    2006-01-01

    Ancient DNA studies represent a powerful tool that can be used to obtain genetic insights into the past. However, despite the publication of large numbers of apparently successful ancient DNA studies, a number of problems exist with the field that are often ignored. Therefore, questions exist as ...

  6. Mitochondrial DNA inheritance after SCNT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiendleder, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis and function is under dual genetic control and requires extensive interaction between biparentally inherited nuclear genes and maternally inherited mitochondrial genes. Standard SCNT procedures deprive an oocytes' mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the corresponding maternal nuclear DNA and require it to interact with an entirely foreign nucleus that is again interacting with foreign somatic mitochondria. As a result, most SCNT embryos, -fetuses, and -offspring carry somatic cell mtDNA in addition to recipient oocyte mtDNA, a condition termed heteroplasmy. It is thus evident that somatic cell mtDNA can escape the selective mechanism that targets and eliminates intraspecific sperm mitochondria in the fertilized oocyte to maintain homoplasmy. However, the factors responsible for the large intra- and interindividual differences in heteroplasmy level remain elusive. Furthermore, heteroplasmy is probably confounded with mtDNA recombination. Considering the essential roles of mitochondria in cellular metabolism, cell signalling, and programmed cell death, future experiments will need to assess the true extent and impact of unorthodox mtDNA transmission on various aspects of SCNT success.

  7. DNA End Resection: Facts and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, which arise following exposure to a number of endogenous and exogenous agents, can be repaired by either the homologous recombination (HR or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ pathways in eukaryotic cells. A vital step in HR repair is DNA end resection, which generates a long 3′ single-stranded DNA (ssDNA tail that can invade the homologous DNA strand. The generation of 3′ ssDNA is not only essential for HR repair, but also promotes activation of the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR. Multiple factors, including the MRN/X complex, C-terminal-binding protein interacting protein (CtIP/Sae2, exonuclease 1 (EXO1, Bloom syndrome protein (BLM/Sgs1, DNA2 nuclease/helicase, and several chromatin remodelers, cooperate to complete the process of end resection. Here we review the basic machinery involved in DNA end resection in eukaryotic cells.

  8. DNA nanotechnology: a future perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its genetic function, DNA is one of the most distinct and smart self-assembling nanomaterials. DNA nanotechnology exploits the predictable self-assembly of DNA oligonucleotides to design and assemble innovative and highly discrete nanostructures. Highly ordered DNA motifs are capable of providing an ultra-fine framework for the next generation of nanofabrications. The majority of these applications are based upon the complementarity of DNA base pairing: adenine with thymine, and guanine with cytosine. DNA provides an intelligent route for the creation of nanoarchitectures with programmable and predictable patterns. DNA strands twist along one helix for a number of bases before switching to the other helix by passing through a crossover junction. The association of two crossovers keeps the helices parallel and holds them tightly together, allowing the assembly of bigger structures. Because of the DNA molecule's unique and novel characteristics, it can easily be applied in a vast variety of multidisciplinary research areas like biomedicine, computer science, nano/optoelectronics, and bionanotechnology. PMID:23497147

  9. DNA controlled assembly of liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stefan; Jakobsen, Ulla; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2009-01-01

    DNA-encoding of solid nanoparticles requires surfacechemistry, which is often tedious and not generally applicable. In the present study non-covalently attached DNA are used to assemble soft nanoparticles (liposomes) in solution. This process displays remarkably sharp thermal transitions from...

  10. Context dependent DNA evolutionary models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Ledet

    This paper is about stochastic models for the evolution of DNA. For a set of aligned DNA sequences, connected in a phylogenetic tree, the models should be able to explain - in probabilistic terms - the differences seen in the sequences. From the estimates of the parameters in the model one can...

  11. DNA/chitosan electrostatic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Anaya, Lourdes Mónica; Soltero, J F Armando; Rinaudo, Marguerite

    2016-07-01

    Up to now, chitosan and DNA have been investigated for gene delivery due to chitosan advantages. It is recognized that chitosan is a biocompatible and biodegradable non-viral vector that does not produce immunological reactions, contrary to viral vectors. Chitosan has also been used and studied for its ability to protect DNA against nuclease degradation and to transfect DNA into several kinds of cells. In this work, high molecular weight DNA is compacted with chitosan. DNA-chitosan complex stoichiometry, net charge, dimensions, conformation and thermal stability are determined and discussed. The influence of external salt and chitosan molecular weight on the stoichiometry is also discussed. The isoelectric point of the complexes was found to be directly related to the protonation degree of chitosan. It is clearly demonstrated that the net charge of DNA-chitosan complex can be expressed in terms of the ratio [NH3(+)]/[P(-)], showing that the electrostatic interactions between DNA and chitosan are the main phenomena taking place in the solution. Compaction of DNA long chain complexed with low molar mass chitosan gives nanoparticles with an average radius around 150nm. Stable nanoparticles are obtained for a partial neutralization of phosphate ionic sites (i.e.: [NH3(+)]/[P(-)] fraction between 0.35 and 0.80).

  12. Isothermal Amplification of Insect DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The loop-mediated isothermal amplification of DNA (LAMP) method can amplify a target DNA sequence at a constant temperature in about one hour. LAMP has broad application in agriculture and medicine because of the need for rapid and inexpensive diagnoses. LAMP eliminates the need for temperature cycl...

  13. Authenticity in ancient DNA studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, M Thomas P; Willerslev, Eske

    2006-01-01

    Ancient DNA studies represent a powerful tool that can be used to obtain genetic insights into the past. However, despite the publication of large numbers of apparently successful ancient DNA studies, a number of problems exist with the field that are often ignored. Therefore, questions exist as ...

  14. LEGO-like DNA Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2012-01-01

    -dimensional (3D) DNA structures by self-assembly of single-stranded DNA “bricks.” The method opens a new route to complex self-assembled (3D) nanostructures that may serve as addressable templates for placing guest molecules with high precision, with possible applications in biophysics, medicine...

  15. Aktionslæringens DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Benedicte

    Aktionslæringen DNA giver en række redskaber til læring i fællesskaber, uanset om der arbejdes med individuelle eller kollektive projekter i offentlig eller privat regi. Metoden danner modvægt til de mere individuelistiske traditioner inden for voksenpædagogikken. DNA-metaforen bruges bogen igennem...

  16. Forensic trace DNA: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.H. van Oorschot (Roland ); K. Ballantyne (Kaye); R.J. Mitchell (R. John)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractDNA analysis is frequently used to acquire information from biological material to aid enquiries associated with criminal offences, disaster victim identification and missing persons investigations. As the relevance and value of DNA profiling to forensic investigations has increased, so

  17. The journey of DNA repair

    OpenAIRE

    Saini, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    21 years ago, the DNA Repair Enzyme was declared “Molecule of the Year”. Today, we are celebrating another “year of repair”, with the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry being awarded to Aziz Sancar, Tomas Lindahl and Paul Modrich for their collective work on the different DNA repair pathways.

  18. The war within our DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, F.

    Throughout evolution, the human DNA has been invaded by multiple classes of ancient retroviruses. These viruses have become extinct long ago, but their DNA traces still linger in our genome, where they have given rise to what we now call retrotransposons. These virus-like genetic elements have

  19. Forensic DNA phenotyping : Regulatory issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, E.J.; Schellekens, M.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Forensic DNA phenotyping is an interesting new investigation method: crime-scene DNA is analyzed to compose a description of the unknown suspect, including external and behavioral features, geographic origin and perhaps surname. This method is allowed in some countries but prohibited in a few

  20. Event extraction for DNA methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohta Tomoko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We consider the task of automatically extracting DNA methylation events from the biomedical domain literature. DNA methylation is a key mechanism of epigenetic control of gene expression and implicated in many cancers, but there has been little study of automatic information extraction for DNA methylation. Results We present an annotation scheme for DNA methylation following the representation of the BioNLP shared task on event extraction, select a set of 200 abstracts including a representative sample of all PubMed citations relevant to DNA methylation, and introduce manual annotation for this corpus marking nearly 3000 gene/protein mentions and 1500 DNA methylation and demethylation events. We retrain a state-of-the-art event extraction system on the corpus and find that automatic extraction of DNA methylation events, the methylated genes, and their methylation sites can be performed at 78% precision and 76% recall. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that reliable extraction methods for DNA methylation events can be created through corpus annotation and straightforward retraining of a general event extraction system. The introduced resources are freely available for use in research from the GENIA project homepage http://www-tsujii.is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp/GENIA.

  1. Forensic DNA phenotyping : Regulatory issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, E.J.; Schellekens, M.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Forensic DNA phenotyping is an interesting new investigation method: crime-scene DNA is analyzed to compose a description of the unknown suspect, including external and behavioral features, geographic origin and perhaps surname. This method is allowed in some countries but prohibited in a few others

  2. Bubble coalescence in breathing DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novotný, Tomas; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Ambjörnsson, Tobias;

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the coalescence of two DNA bubbles initially located at weak segments and separated by a more stable barrier region in a designed construct of double-stranded DNA. The characteristic time for bubble coalescence and the corresponding distribution are derived, as well as the distribu...

  3. Wireframe and tensegrity DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmel, Stephanie S; Nickels, Philipp C; Liedl, Tim

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Not only can triangulated wireframe network and tensegrity design be found in architecture, but it is also essential for the stability and organization of biological matter. Whether the scaffolding material is metal as in Buckminster Fuller's geodesic domes and Kenneth Snelson's floating compression sculptures or proteins like actin or spectrin making up the cytoskeleton of biological cells, wireframe and tensegrity construction can provide great stability while minimizing the material required. Given the mechanical properties of single- and double-stranded DNA, it is not surprising to find many variants of wireframe and tensegrity constructions in the emerging field of DNA nanotechnology, in which structures of almost arbitrary shape can be built with nanometer precision. The success of DNA self-assembly relies on the well-controlled hybridization of complementary DNA strands. Consequently, understanding the fundamental physical properties of these molecules is essential. Many experiments have shown that double-stranded DNA (in its most commonly occurring helical form, the B-form) behaves in a first approximation like a relatively stiff cylindrical beam with a persistence length of many times the length of its building blocks, the base pairs. However, it is harder to assign a persistence length to single-stranded DNA. Here, normally the Kuhn length is given, a measure that describes the length of individual rigid segments in a freely jointed chain. This length is on the order of a few nucleotides. Two immediate and important consequences arise from this high flexibility: single-stranded DNA is almost always present in a coiled conformation, and it behaves, just like all flexible polymers in solution, as an entropic spring. In this Account, we review the relation between the mechanical properties of DNA and design considerations for wireframe and tensegrity structures built from DNA. We illustrate various aspects of the successful evolution of DNA

  4. Quantitative detection of single DNA molecules on DNA tetrahedron decorated substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenguang; Xue, Qingwang; Tian, Wenzhi; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2012-10-01

    A single DNA molecule detection method on DNA tetrahedron decorated substrates has been developed. DNA tetrahedra were introduced onto substrates for both preventing nonspecific adsorption and sensitive recognition of single DNA molecules.

  5. DNA vaccines for viral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donnelly J.J.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA plasmids encoding foreign proteins may be used as immunogens by direct intramuscular injection alone, or with various adjuvants and excipients, or by delivery of DNA-coated gold particles to the epidermis through biolistic immunization. Antibody, helper T lymphocyte, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses have been induced in laboratory and domesticated animals by these methods. In a number of animal models, immune responses induced by DNA vaccination have been shown to be protective against challenge with various infectious agents. Immunization by injection of plasmids encoding foreign proteins has been used successfully as a research tool. This review summarizes the types of DNA vaccine vectors in common use, the immune responses and protective responses that have been obtained in animal models, the safety considerations pertinent to the evaluation of DNA vaccines in humans and the very limited information that is available from early clinical studies.

  6. DNA Computer; Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Abbaszadeh Sori

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA computers use strands of DNA to perform computing operations. The computer consists of two types of strands – the instruction strands and the input data strands. The instruction strands splice together the input data strands to generate the desired output data strand. DNA computing holds out the promise of important and significant connections between computers and living systems, as well as promising massively parallel computations. Before these promises are fulfilled, however, important challenges related to errors and practicality has to be addressed. On the other hand, new directions toward a synthesis of molecular evolution and DNA computing might circumvent the problems that have hindered development, so far. This paper represent present and future DNA computer.

  7. DNA Translocation through Graphene Nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Grégory F; Calado, Victor E; Pandraud, Grégory; Zandbergen, Henny W; Vandersypen, Lieven M K; Dekker, Cees

    2010-01-01

    Nanopores -- nanosized holes that can transport ions and molecules -- are very promising devices for genomic screening, in particular DNA sequencing. Both solid-state and biological pores suffer from the drawback, however, that the channel constituting the pore is long, viz. 10-100 times the distance between two bases in a DNA molecule (0.5 nm for single-stranded DNA). Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to realize and use ultrathin nanopores fabricated in graphene monolayers for single-molecule DNA translocation. The pores are obtained by placing a graphene flake over a microsize hole in a silicon nitride membrane and drilling a nanosize hole in the graphene using an electron beam. As individual DNA molecules translocate through the pore, characteristic temporary conductance changes are observed in the ionic current through the nanopore, setting the stage for future genomic screening.

  8. Information Theory of DNA Sequencing

    CERN Document Server

    Motahari, Abolfazl; Tse, David

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequencing is the basic workhorse of modern day biology and medicine. Shotgun sequencing is the dominant technique used: many randomly located short fragments called reads are extracted from the DNA sequence, and these reads are assembled to reconstruct the original sequence. By drawing an analogy between the DNA sequencing problem and the classic communication problem, we define an information theoretic notion of sequencing capacity. This is the maximum number of DNA base pairs that can be resolved reliably per read, and provides a fundamental limit to the performance that can be achieved by any assembly algorithm. We compute the sequencing capacity explicitly for a simple statistical model of the DNA sequence and the read process. Using this framework, we also study the impact of noise in the read process on the sequencing capacity.

  9. DNA methylation in metabolic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barres, Romain; Zierath, Juleen R

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification that controls gene expression in physiologic and pathologic states. Metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity are associated with profound alterations in gene expression that are caused by genetic and environmental factors. Recent reports...... have provided evidence that environmental factors at all ages could modify DNA methylation in somatic tissues, which suggests that DNA methylation is a more dynamic process than previously appreciated. Because of the importance of lifestyle factors in metabolic disorders, DNA methylation provides...... a mechanism by which environmental factors, including diet and exercise, can modify genetic predisposition to disease. This article considers the current evidence that defines a role for DNA methylation in metabolic disorders....

  10. Forensic DNA typing in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Y P

    2009-04-01

    In the field of forensic genetics, essential developmental impulses come from the advances of the molecular biology and human genome projects. This paper overviews existing technologies for forensic genetics in China and gives a perspective of forensic DNA analysis. In China, work has been done in the development of blood group serology of the conventional markers. Forensic scientists in China also contributed to the progress of DNA analysis by the validation of numerous test methods and by optimization of these methods. During these years, forensic DNA analysis in China has experienced tremendous progress towards development of robust, efficient and precise protocols, including the development of short tandem repeat analysis, mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome analysis. Forensic scientists are constantly looking for new methods to further improve DNA typing. Therefore, this paper also focuses on emerging new technologies in China, which represent an interest for forensic genetics.

  11. DNA typing by capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, N.

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis is becoming more and more important in nucleic acid analysis including DNA sequencing, typing and disease gene measurements. This work summarized the background of DNA typing. The recent development of capillary electrophoresis was also discussed. The second part of the thesis showed the principle of DNA typing based on using the allelic ladder as the absolute standard ladder in capillary electrophoresis system. Future work will be focused on demonstrating DNA typing on multiplex loci and examples of disease diagnosis in the on-line format of PCR-CE. Also capillary array electrophoresis system should allow high throughput, fast speed DNA typing. Only the introduction and conclusions for this report are available here. A reprint was removed for separate processing.

  12. Multiscale modelling of DNA mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dršata, Tomáš; Lankaš, Filip

    2015-08-01

    Mechanical properties of DNA are important not only in a wide range of biological processes but also in the emerging field of DNA nanotechnology. We review some of the recent developments in modeling these properties, emphasizing the multiscale nature of the problem. Modern atomic resolution, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations have contributed to our understanding of DNA fine structure and conformational polymorphism. These simulations may serve as data sources to parameterize rigid base models which themselves have undergone major development. A consistent buildup of larger entities involving multiple rigid bases enables us to describe DNA at more global scales. Free energy methods to impose large strains on DNA, as well as bead models and other approaches, are also briefly discussed.

  13. Re-entrant DNA gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomboi, Francesca; Romano, Flavio; Leo, Manuela; Fernandez-Castanon, Javier; Cerbino, Roberto; Bellini, Tommaso; Bordi, Federico; Filetici, Patrizia; Sciortino, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    DNA is acquiring a primary role in material development, self-assembling by design into complex supramolecular aggregates, the building block of a new-materials world. Using DNA nanoconstructs to translate sophisticated theoretical intuitions into experimental realizations by closely matching idealized models of colloidal particles is a much less explored avenue. Here we experimentally show that an appropriate selection of competing interactions enciphered in multiple DNA sequences results into the successful design of a one-pot DNA hydrogel that melts both on heating and on cooling. The relaxation time, measured by light scattering, slows down dramatically in a limited window of temperatures. The phase diagram displays a peculiar re-entrant shape, the hallmark of the competition between different bonding patterns. Our study shows that it is possible to rationally design biocompatible bulk materials with unconventional phase diagrams and tuneable properties by encoding into DNA sequences both the particle shape and the physics of the collective response.

  14. DNA-Based Nanopore Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2016-12-05

    Nanopore sensing is an attractive, label-free approach that can measure single molecules. Although initially proposed for rapid and low-cost DNA sequencing, nanopore sensors have been successfully employed in the detection of a wide variety of substrates. Early successes were mostly achieved based on two main strategies by 1) creating sensing elements inside the nanopore through protein mutation and chemical modification or 2) using molecular adapters to enhance analyte recognition. Over the past five years, DNA molecules started to be used as probes for sensing rather than substrates for sequencing. In this Minireview, we highlight the recent research efforts of nanopore sensing based on DNA-mediated characteristic current events. As nanopore sensing is becoming increasingly important in biochemical and biophysical studies, DNA-based sensing may find wider applications in investigating DNA-involving biological processes. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerema, Stephanie J.; Dekker, Cees

    2016-02-01

    Fast, cheap, and reliable DNA sequencing could be one of the most disruptive innovations of this decade, as it will pave the way for personalized medicine. In pursuit of such technology, a variety of nanotechnology-based approaches have been explored and established, including sequencing with nanopores. Owing to its unique structure and properties, graphene provides interesting opportunities for the development of a new sequencing technology. In recent years, a wide range of creative ideas for graphene sequencers have been theoretically proposed and the first experimental demonstrations have begun to appear. Here, we review the different approaches to using graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing, which involve DNA passing through graphene nanopores, nanogaps, and nanoribbons, and the physisorption of DNA on graphene nanostructures. We discuss the advantages and problems of each of these key techniques, and provide a perspective on the use of graphene in future DNA sequencing technology.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of DNA photodamage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starrs, S.M

    2000-05-01

    Photodamage in DNA, caused by ultraviolet (UV) light, can occur by direct excitation of the nucleobases or indirectly via the action of photosensitisers. Such, DNA photodamage can be potentially mutagenic or lethal. Among the methods available for detecting UV-induced DNA damage, gel sequencing protocols, utilising synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides as targets for UV radiation, allow photolesions to be mapped at nucleotide resolution. This approach has been applied to investigate both DNA damage mechanisms. Following a general overview of DNA photoreactivity, and a description of the main experimental procedures, Chapter 3 identifies the origin of an anomalous mobility shift observed in purine chemical sequence ladders that can confuse the interpretation of DNA cleavage results; measures to abolish this shift are also described. Chapters 4 and 5 examine the alkali-labile DNA damage photosensitised by representative nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Suprofen was the most photoactive NSAID studied, producing different patterns of guanine-specific damage in single-stranded and duplex DNA. Uniform modification of guanine bases, typifying attack by singlet oxygen, was observed in single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides. In duplex molecules, modification was limited to the 5'-G of GG doublets, which is indicative of an electron transfer. The effect of quenchers and photoproduct analysis substantiated these findings. The quinolone, nalidixic acid, behaves similarly. The random base cleavage photosensitised by the fluoroquinolones, has been attributed to free radicals produced during their photodecomposition. Chapter 6 addresses the photoreactivity of purines within unusual DNA structures formed by the repeat sequences (GGA){sub n} and (GA){sub n}, and a minihairpin. There was no definitive evidence for enhanced purine reactivity caused by direct excitation. Finally, Chapter 7 investigates the mutagenic potential of a

  17. Fluoroquinolone-Gyrase-DNA Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustaev, Arkady; Malik, Muhammad; Zhao, Xilin; Kurepina, Natalia; Luan, Gan; Oppegard, Lisa M.; Hiasa, Hiroshi; Marks, Kevin R.; Kerns, Robert J.; Berger, James M.; Drlica, Karl

    2014-01-01

    DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV control bacterial DNA topology by breaking DNA, passing duplex DNA through the break, and then resealing the break. This process is subject to reversible corruption by fluoroquinolones, antibacterials that form drug-enzyme-DNA complexes in which the DNA is broken. The complexes, called cleaved complexes because of the presence of DNA breaks, have been crystallized and found to have the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring system facing the GyrB/ParE subunits. As expected from x-ray crystallography, a thiol-reactive, C-7-modified chloroacetyl derivative of ciprofloxacin (Cip-AcCl) formed cross-linked cleaved complexes with mutant GyrB-Cys466 gyrase as evidenced by resistance to reversal by both EDTA and thermal treatments. Surprisingly, cross-linking was also readily seen with complexes formed by mutant GyrA-G81C gyrase, thereby revealing a novel drug-gyrase interaction not observed in crystal structures. The cross-link between fluoroquinolone and GyrA-G81C gyrase correlated with exceptional bacteriostatic activity for Cip-AcCl with a quinolone-resistant GyrA-G81C variant of Escherichia coli and its Mycobacterium smegmatis equivalent (GyrA-G89C). Cip-AcCl-mediated, irreversible inhibition of DNA replication provided further evidence for a GyrA-drug cross-link. Collectively these data establish the existence of interactions between the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring and both GyrA and GyrB. Because the GyrA-Gly81 and GyrB-Glu466 residues are far apart (17 Å) in the crystal structure of cleaved complexes, two modes of quinolone binding must exist. The presence of two binding modes raises the possibility that multiple quinolone-enzyme-DNA complexes can form, a discovery that opens new avenues for exploring and exploiting relationships between drug structure and activity with type II DNA topoisomerases. PMID:24497635

  18. Underwound DNA under tension: L-DNA vs. plectoneme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Anmin; Kwon, Ah-Young; Johner, Albert; Hong, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Nam-Kyung

    2014-02-01

    In many biological processes DNA experiences force in the pN range and torque that underwinds it. Magnetic tweezers experiments show that the superhelicity(\\sigma) -extension curve, the so-called bell curve, is asymmetric with respect to the inversion of σ. We study the case of underwound DNA which was not addressed theoretically before. While the case of overwound DNA is fully explained by the formation of supercoil, the extension of underwound DNA reveals non-trivial tension dependence. We show that plectonemic coils form at moderate tension, whereas left-handed DNA, so-called “L-DNA”, prevails at high tension (above \\approx 0.5\\ \\text{pN} ). In a narrow but physiologically relevant crossover range of tension, that is between 0.4 pN and 0.7 pN, extra unwinding turns are statistically distributed to either plectoneme or L-DNA. In this regime the states of a torsionally stressed DNA should be most sensitive to external mechanical stimuli.

  19. DNA Topology and the Initiation of Virus DNA Packaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon Seok Oh

    Full Text Available During progeny assembly, viruses selectively package virion genomes from a nucleic acid pool that includes host nucleic acids. For large dsDNA viruses, including tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses, immature viral DNA is recognized and translocated into a preformed icosahedral shell, the prohead. Recognition involves specific interactions between the viral packaging enzyme, terminase, and viral DNA recognition sites. Generally, viral DNA is recognized by terminase's small subunit (TerS. The large terminase subunit (TerL contains translocation ATPase and endonuclease domains. In phage lambda, TerS binds a sequence repeated three times in cosB, the recognition site. TerS binding to cosB positions TerL to cut the concatemeric DNA at the adjacent nicking site, cosN. TerL introduces staggered nicks in cosN, generating twelve bp cohesive ends. Terminase separates the cohesive ends and remains bound to the cosB-containing end, in a nucleoprotein structure called Complex I. Complex I docks on the prohead's portal vertex and translocation ensues. DNA topology plays a role in the TerSλ-cosBλ interaction. Here we show that a site, I2, located between cosN and cosB, is critically important for an early DNA packaging step. I2 contains a complex static bend. I2 mutations block DNA packaging. I2 mutant DNA is cut by terminase at cosN in vitro, but in vivo, no cos cleavage is detected, nor is there evidence for Complex I. Models for what packaging step might be blocked by I2 mutations are presented.

  20. DNA Topology and the Initiation of Virus DNA Packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Choon Seok; Sippy, Jean; Charbonneau, Bridget; Crow Hutchinson, Jennifer; Mejia-Romero, Olga Esther; Barton, Michael; Patel, Priyal; Sippy, Rachel; Feiss, Michael

    2016-01-01

    During progeny assembly, viruses selectively package virion genomes from a nucleic acid pool that includes host nucleic acids. For large dsDNA viruses, including tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses, immature viral DNA is recognized and translocated into a preformed icosahedral shell, the prohead. Recognition involves specific interactions between the viral packaging enzyme, terminase, and viral DNA recognition sites. Generally, viral DNA is recognized by terminase's small subunit (TerS). The large terminase subunit (TerL) contains translocation ATPase and endonuclease domains. In phage lambda, TerS binds a sequence repeated three times in cosB, the recognition site. TerS binding to cosB positions TerL to cut the concatemeric DNA at the adjacent nicking site, cosN. TerL introduces staggered nicks in cosN, generating twelve bp cohesive ends. Terminase separates the cohesive ends and remains bound to the cosB-containing end, in a nucleoprotein structure called Complex I. Complex I docks on the prohead's portal vertex and translocation ensues. DNA topology plays a role in the TerSλ-cosBλ interaction. Here we show that a site, I2, located between cosN and cosB, is critically important for an early DNA packaging step. I2 contains a complex static bend. I2 mutations block DNA packaging. I2 mutant DNA is cut by terminase at cosN in vitro, but in vivo, no cos cleavage is detected, nor is there evidence for Complex I. Models for what packaging step might be blocked by I2 mutations are presented.

  1. Characterization of ribosomal DNA (rDNA in Drosophila arizonae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Tovar

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Ribosomal DNA (rDNA is a multigenic family composed of one or more clusters of repeating units (RU. Each unit consists of highly conserved sequences codifying 18S, 5.8S and 28S rRNA genes intercalated with poorly conserved regulatory sequences between species. In this work, we analyzed the rDNA of Drosophila arizonae, a member of the mulleri complex (Repleta group. Using genomic restriction patterns, cloning and mapping of some representative rDNA fragments, we were able to construct a representative restriction map. RU in this species are 13.5-14 kb long, restriction sites are completely conserved compared with other drosophilids and the rDNA has an R1 retrotransposable element in some RU. We were unable to detect R2 elements in this species.O DNA ribossômico (rDNA é uma família multigênica composta de um ou mais aglomerados de unidades de repetição (RU. Cada unidade consiste de seqüências altamente conservadas que codificam os rRNAs 18S, 5.8S e 28S, intercaladas com seqüências regulatórias pouco conservadas entre as espécies. Neste trabalho analisamos o rDNA de Drosophila arizonae, um membro do complexo mulleri (grupo Repleta. Usando padrões de restrição genômicos, clonagem e mapeamento de alguns fragmentos de rDNA representativos, estabelecemos um mapa de restrição do rDNA representativo desta espécie. Neste drosofilídeo, a RU tem um tamanho médio de 13.5-14 kb e os sítios de restrição estão completamente conservados com relação a outras drosófilas. Além disto, este rDNA possui um elemento transponível tipo R1 presente em algumas unidades. Neste trabalho não tivemos evidências da presença de elementos R2 no rDNA desta espécie.

  2. The role of DNA dependent protein kinase in synapsis of DNA ends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.P.W.C. Weterings (Eric); N.S. Verkaik (Nicole); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D.C. van Gent (Dik)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractDNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) plays a central role in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA double strand break repair. Its catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) functions as a serine/threonine protein kinase. We show that DNA-PK forms a stable complex at DNA termini that blocks

  3. The role of DNA dependent protein kinase in synapsis of DNA ends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.P.W.C. Weterings (Eric); N.S. Verkaik (Nicole); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); D.C. van Gent (Dik); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractDNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) plays a central role in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA double strand break repair. Its catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) functions as a serine/threonine protein kinase. We show that DNA-PK forms a stable complex at DNA termini that blocks

  4. Preparation of genomic DNA from bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreou, Lefkothea-Vasiliki

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this protocol is the isolation of bulk cellular DNA from bacteria (alternatively see Preparation of genomic DNA from Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Isolation of Genomic DNA from Mammalian Cells protocols). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ligand inducible assembly of a DNA tetrahedron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohno, Chikara; Atsumi, Hiroshi; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2011-03-28

    Here we show that a small synthetic ligand can be used as a key building component for DNA nanofabrication. Using naphthyridinecarbamate dimer (NCD) as a molecular glue for DNA hybridization, we demonstrate NCD-triggered formation of a DNA tetrahedron.

  6. DNA hybridization on silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Shalini, E-mail: shalinsin@gmail.co [Electronic Materials Division, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India); Faculty of Life Science, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202001 (India); Zack, Jyoti [Dr. B.R Ambedkar Center for Biomedical Research, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007 (India); Kumar, Dinesh; Srivastava, S.K.; Govind [Electronic Materials Division, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India); Saluja, Daman [Dr. B.R Ambedkar Center for Biomedical Research, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007 (India); Khan, M.A. [Faculty of Life Science, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202001 (India); Singh, P.K. [Electronic Materials Division, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India)

    2010-11-30

    Nanowire-based detection strategies provide promising new routes to bioanalysis and indeed are attractive to conventional systems because of their small size, high surface-to-volume ratios, electronic, and optical properties. A sequence-specific detection of single-stranded oligonucleotides using silicon nanowires (SiNWs) is demonstrated. The surface of the SiNWs is functionalized with densely packed organic monolayer via hydrosilylation for covalent attachment. Subsequently, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is immobilized to recognize the complementary target DNA. The biomolecular recognition properties of the nanowires are tested via hybridization with {sup {gamma}P32} tagged complementary and non-complementary DNA oligonucleotides, showing good selectivity and reversibility. No significant non-specific binding to the incorrect sequences is observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, fluorescence imaging, and nanodrop techniques are used to characterize the modified SiNWs and covalent attachment with DNA. The results show that SiNWs are excellent substrates for the absorption, stabilization and detection of DNA sequences and could be used for DNA microarrays and micro fabricated SiNWs DNA sensors.

  7. DNA condensation in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardatscher, Günther; Bracha, Dan; Daube, Shirley S.; Vonshak, Ohad; Simmel, Friedrich C.; Bar-Ziv, Roy H.

    2016-12-01

    DNA can be programmed to assemble into a variety of shapes and patterns on the nanoscale and can act as a template for hybrid nanostructures such as conducting wires, protein arrays and field-effect transistors. Current DNA nanostructures are typically in the sub-micrometre range, limited by the sequence space and length of the assembled strands. Here we show that on a patterned biochip, DNA chains collapse into one-dimensional (1D) fibres that are 20 nm wide and around 70 µm long, each comprising approximately 35 co-aligned chains at its cross-section. Electron beam writing on a photocleavable monolayer was used to immobilize and pattern the DNA molecules, which condense into 1D bundles in the presence of spermidine. DNA condensation can propagate and split at junctions, cross gaps and create domain walls between counterpropagating fronts. This system is inherently adept at solving probabilistic problems and was used to find the possible paths through a maze and to evaluate stochastic switching circuits. This technique could be used to propagate biological or ionic signals in combination with sequence-specific DNA nanotechnology or for gene expression in cell-free DNA compartments.

  8. Minisequencing mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of well-known mutations responsible of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diseases. In order to overcome technical problems related to the analysis of complete mtDNA genomes, a variety of different techniques have been proposed that allow the screening of coding region pathogenic mutations. Methods We here propose a minisequencing assay for the analysis of mtDNA mutations. In a single reaction, we interrogate a total of 25 pathogenic mutations distributed all around the whole mtDNA genome in a sample of patients suspected for mtDNA disease. Results We have detected 11 causal homoplasmic mutations in patients suspected for Leber disease, which were further confirmed by standard automatic sequencing. Mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C occur at higher frequency than expected by change in the Galician (northwest Spain patients carrying haplogroup J lineages (Fisher's Exact test, P-value Conclusion We here developed a minisequencing genotyping method for the screening of the most common pathogenic mtDNA mutations which is simple, fast, and low-cost. The technique is robust and reproducible and can easily be implemented in standard clinical laboratories.

  9. The bacteriophage DNA packaging machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiss, Michael; Rao, Venigalla B

    2012-01-01

    Large dsDNA bacteriophages and herpesviruses encode a powerful ATP-driven DNA-translocating machine that encapsidates a viral genome into a preformed capsid shell or prohead. The key components of the packaging machine are the packaging enzyme (terminase, motor) and the portal protein that forms the unique DNA entrance vertex of prohead. The terminase complex, comprised of a recognition subunit (small terminase) and an endonuclease/translocase subunit (large terminase), cuts viral genome concatemers. The terminase-viral DNA complex docks on the portal vertex, assembling a motor complex containing five large terminase subunits. The pentameric motor processively translocates DNA until the head shell is full with one viral genome. The motor cuts the DNA again and dissociates from the full head, allowing head-finishing proteins to assemble on the portal, sealing the portal, and constructing a platform for tail attachment. A body of evidence from molecular genetics and biochemical, structural, and biophysical approaches suggests that ATP hydrolysis-driven conformational changes in the packaging motor (large terminase) power DNA motion. Various parts of the motor subunit, such as the ATPase, arginine finger, transmission domain, hinge, and DNA groove, work in concert to translocate about 2 bp of DNA per ATP hydrolyzed. Powerful single-molecule approaches are providing precise delineation of steps during each translocation event in a motor that has a speed as high as a millisecond/step. The phage packaging machine has emerged as an excellent model for understanding the molecular machines, given the mechanistic parallels between terminases, helicases, and numerous motor proteins.

  10. Application of Ammonium Persulfate for Selective Oxidation of Guanines for Nucleic Acid Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafen Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids can be sequenced by a chemical procedure that partially damages the nucleotide positions at their base repetition. Many methods have been reported for the selective recognition of guanine. The accurate identification of guanine in both single and double regions of DNA and RNA remains a challenging task. Herein, we present a new, non-toxic and simple method for the selective recognition of guanine in both DNA and RNA sequences via ammonium persulfate modification. This strategy can be further successfully applied to the detection of 5-methylcytosine by using PCR.

  11. Role of DNA profiling in forensic odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakari, S Leena; Jimson, Sudha; Masthan, K M K; Jacobina, Jenita

    2015-04-01

    The recent advances in DNA profiling have made DNA evidence to be more widely accepted in courts. This has revolutionized the aspect of forensic odontology. DNA profiling/DNA fingerprinting has come a long way from the conventional fingerprints. DNA that is responsible for all the cell's activities, yields valuable information both in the healthy and diseased individuals. When other means of traditional identification become impossible following mass calamities or fire explosions, teeth provide a rich source of DNA as they have a high chemical as well as physical resistance. The recent evolution in the isolation of DNA and the ways of running a DNA fingerprint are highlighted in this literature review.

  12. Automated Extraction of DNA from clothing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Hjort, Benjamin Benn; Nøhr Hansen, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    Presence of PCR inhibitors in extracted DNA may interfere with the subsequent quantification and short tandem repeat (STR) reactions used in forensic genetic DNA typing. We have compared three automated DNA extraction methods based on magnetic beads with a manual method with the aim of reducing t...... the amount of PCR inhibitors in the DNA extracts and increasing the proportion of reportable DNA profiles.......Presence of PCR inhibitors in extracted DNA may interfere with the subsequent quantification and short tandem repeat (STR) reactions used in forensic genetic DNA typing. We have compared three automated DNA extraction methods based on magnetic beads with a manual method with the aim of reducing...

  13. DNA UPTAKE BY TRANSFORMABLE BACTERIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LACKS,S.A.

    1999-09-07

    The various processes of DNA uptake by cells can be categorized as: viral DNA entry, conjugation, or transformation. Within each category, a variety of mechanisms have been found. However, considerable similarities occur among the different mechanisms of conjugation and, especially, transformation. All of these natural mechanisms of DNA transfer are quite elaborate and involve multiple protein components, as the case may be, of the virus, the donor cell, and the recipient cell. The mechanisms of viral infection and conjugation will be discussed mainly with respect to their relevance to transformation.

  14. DNA Uptake by Transformable Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1999-03-31

    The various processes of DNA uptake by cells can be categorized as: viral DNA entry, conjugation, or transformation. Within each category, a variety of mechanisms have been found. However, considerable similarities occur among the different mechanisms of conjugation and, especially, transformation. All of these natural mechanisms of DNA transfer are quite elaborate and involve multiple protein components, as the case may be, of the virus, the donor cell, and the recipient cell. The mechanisms of viral infection and conjugation will be discussed mainly with respect to their relevance to transformation.

  15. [DNA examination for criminal investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masanori

    2008-11-30

    The main purpose of DNA examination in a criminal investigation is identification from biological specimen material (sample). Occasionally, DNA genotyping of the sample in which decomposition, pollution, mixture, degeneration, etc., have progressed is requested for identification. In addition, in cases of a small amount of sample, it is not possible to conduct checks many times. The Police Agency in Japan introduced the multiplex PCR system that can detect 15 kinds of STR genotyping and perform sex determination simultaneously using only a small amount of DNA.

  16. Mechanical design of DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Carlos E; Su, Hai-Jun; Marras, Alexander E; Zhou, Lifeng; Johnson, Joshua

    2015-04-14

    Structural DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging field that has demonstrated great potential for applications such as single molecule sensing, drug delivery, and templating molecular components. As the applications of DNA nanotechnology expand, a consideration of their mechanical behavior is becoming essential to understand how these structures will respond to physical interactions. This review considers three major avenues of recent progress in this area: (1) measuring and designing mechanical properties of DNA nanostructures, (2) designing complex nanostructures based on imposed mechanical stresses, and (3) designing and controlling structurally dynamic nanostructures. This work has laid the foundation for mechanically active nanomachines that can generate, transmit, and respond to physical cues in molecular systems.

  17. Normalized cDNA libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marcelo B.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  18. Recoiling DNA Molecule Simulation & Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, J C; Mesquita, O N; Neto, Jose Coelho; Dickman, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    Many recent experiments with single DNA molecules are based on force versus extension measurements and involve tethering a microsphere to one of its extremities and the other to a microscope coverglass. In this work we show that similar results can also be obtained by studying the recoil dynamics of the tethered microspheres. Computer simulations of the corresponding Langevin equation indicate which assumptions are required for a reliable analysis of the experimental recoil curves. We have measured the persistence length A of single naked DNA molecules and DNA-Ethidium Bromide complexes using this approach.

  19. DNA-Conjugated Organic Chromophores in DNA Stacking Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard

    2009-01-01

    Since the discovery of the intercalation of acridine derivatives into DNA (1961), chemists have synthesized many intercalators tethered to DNA. Advances in the chemical synthesis of modified nucleosides along with progress in oligonucleotide synthesis have made it possible to introduce organic...... review presents those efforts in the design of intercalators/organic chromophores as oligonucleotide conjugates that form a foundation for the generation of novel nucleic acid architectures...

  20. Efficient DNA ligation in DNA–RNA hybrid helices by Chlorella virus DNA ligase

    OpenAIRE

    Lohman, Gregory J. S.; Zhang, Yinhua; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M.; Cantor, Eric J.; Evans, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA molecules (ssDNA) annealed to an RNA splint are notoriously poor substrates for DNA ligases. Herein we report the unexpectedly efficient ligation of RNA-splinted DNA by Chlorella virus DNA ligase (PBCV-1 DNA ligase). PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated ssDNA splinted by RNA with kcat ≈ 8 x 10−3 s−1 and KM < 1 nM at 25°C under conditions where T4 DNA ligase produced only 5′-adenylylated DNA with a 20-fold lower kcat and a KM ≈ 300 nM. The rate of ligation increased with addition of M...

  1. New insights on single-stranded versus double-stranded DNA library preparation for ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wales, Nathan; Carøe, Christian; Sandoval-Velasco, Marcela

    2015-01-01

    An innovative single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) library preparation method has sparked great interest among ancient DNA (aDNA) researchers, especially after reports of endogenous DNA content increases >20-fold in some samples. To investigate the behavior of this method, we generated ss......DNA and conventional double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) libraries from 23 ancient and historic plant and animal specimens. We found ssDNA library preparation substantially increased endogenous content when dsDNA libraries contained...

  2. DNA Sequence Optimization Based on Continuous Particle Swarm Optimization for Reliable DNA Computing and DNA Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Khalid

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In DNA based computation and DNA nanotechnology, the design of good DNA sequences has turned out to be an essential problem and one of the most practical and important research topics. Basically, the DNA sequence design problem is a multi-objective problem and it can be evaluated using four objective functions, namely, Hmeasure, similarity, continuity and hairpin. Approach: There are several ways to solve multi-objective problem, however, in order to evaluate the correctness of PSO algorithm in DNA sequence design, this problem is converted into single objective problem. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO is proposed to minimize the objective in the problem, subjected to two constraints: melting temperature and GCcontent. A model is developed to present the DNA sequence design based on PSO computation. Results: Based on experiments and researches done, 20 particles are used in the implementation of the optimization process, where the average values and the standard deviation for 100 runs are shown along with comparison to other existing methods. Conclusion: The results achieve verified that PSO can suitably solves the DNA sequence design problem using the proposed method and model, comparatively better than other approaches.

  3. Synchronization of DNA array replication kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manturov, Alexey O.; Grigoryev, Anton V.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work we discuss the features of the DNA replication kinetics at the case of multiplicity of simultaneously elongated DNA fragments. The interaction between replicated DNA fragments is carried out by free protons that appears at the every nucleotide attachment at the free end of elongated DNA fragment. So there is feedback between free protons concentration and DNA-polymerase activity that appears as elongation rate dependence. We develop the numerical model based on a cellular automaton, which can simulate the elongation stage (growth of DNA strands) for DNA elongation process with conditions pointed above and we study the possibility of the DNA polymerases movement synchronization. The results obtained numerically can be useful for DNA polymerase movement detection and visualization of the elongation process in the case of massive DNA replication, eg, under PCR condition or for DNA "sequencing by synthesis" sequencing devices evaluation.

  4. DNA vaccines for aquacultured fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; LaPatra, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) vaccination is based on the administration of the gene encoding the vaccine antigen, rather than the antigen itself. Subsequent expression of the antigen by cells in the vaccinated hosts triggers the host immune system. Among the many experimental DNA vaccines tested...... in various animal species as well as in humans, the vaccines against rhabdovirus diseases in fish have given some of the most promising results. A single intramuscular (IM) injection of microgram amounts of DNA induces rapid and long-lasting protection in farmed salmonids against economically important...... viruses such as infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). DNA vaccines against other types of fish pathogens, however, have so far had limited success. The most efficient delivery route at present is IM injection, and suitable delivery strategies...

  5. Ensuring safety of DNA vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessels Stephen

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 1990 a new approach for vaccination was invented involving injection of plasmid DNA in vivo, which elicits an immune response to the encoded protein. DNA vaccination can overcome most disadvantages of conventional vaccine strategies and has potential for vaccines of the future. However, today 15 years on, a commercial product still has not reached the market. One possible explanation could be the technique's failure to induce an efficient immune response in humans, but safety may also be a fundamental issue. This review focuses on the safety of the genetic elements of DNA vaccines and on the safety of the microbial host for the production of plasmid DNA. We also propose candidates for the vaccine's genetic elements and for its microbial production host that can heighten the vaccine's safety and facilitate its entry to the market.

  6. DNA vaccines for aquacultured fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; LaPatra, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    of licensing and public acceptance of the technology. The potential benefits of DNA vaccines for farmed fish include improved animal welfare, reduced environmental impacts of aquaculture activities, increased food quality and quantity, and more sustainable production. Testing under commercial production...

  7. Glass slides to DNA microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel D Conzone

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A tremendous interest in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA characterization tools was spurred by the mapping and sequencing of the human genome. New tools were needed, beginning in the early 1990s, to cope with the unprecedented amount of genomic information that was being discovered. Such needs led to the development of DNA microarrays; tiny gene-based sensors traditionally prepared on coated glass microscope slides. The following review is intended to provide historical insight into the advent of the DNA microarray, followed by a description of the technology from both the application and fabrication points of view. Finally, the unmet challenges and needs associated with DNA microarrays will be described to define areas of potential future developments for the materials researcher.

  8. Mitogenomic analyses from ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paijmans, Johanna L.A.; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Hofreiter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    . To date, at least 124 partially or fully assembled mitogenomes from more than 20 species have been obtained, and, given the rapid progress in sequencing technology, this number is likely to dramatically increase in the future. The increased information content offered by analysing full mitogenomes has...... (mitogenomes). Such studies were initially limited to analyses of extant organisms, but developments in both DNA sequencing technologies and general methodological aspects related to working with degraded DNA have resulted in complete mitogenomes becoming increasingly popular for ancient DNA studies as well...... analyses (whether using modern or ancient DNA) were largely restricted to the analysis of short fragments of the mitochondrial genome. However, due to many technological advances during the past decade, a growing number of studies have explored the power of complete mitochondrial genome sequences...

  9. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  10. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    : homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Ataxia telangiectasia and related disorders with defects in these pathways illustrate that such defects can lead to early childhood neurodegeneration. Aging is a risk factor for neurodegeneration and accumulation of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage......Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...

  11. Three Decades of Recombinant DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Jackie

    1985-01-01

    Discusses highlights in the development of genetic engineering, examining techniques with recombinant DNA, legal and ethical issues, GenBank (a national database of nucleic acid sequences), and other topics. (JN)

  12. Ancient DNA from marine mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foote, Andrew David; Hofreiter, Michael; Morin, Philip A.

    2012-01-01

    Marine mammals have long generation times and broad, difficult to sample distributions, which makes inferring evolutionary and demographic changes using field studies of extant populations challenging. However, molecular analyses from sub-fossil or historical materials of marine mammals...... such as bone, tooth, baleen, skin, fur, whiskers and scrimshaw using ancient DNA (aDNA) approaches provide an oppor- tunity for investigating such changes over evolutionary and ecological timescales. Here, we review the application of aDNA techniques to the study of marine mammals. Most of the studies have...... in distribution and range of marine mammal species; we review these studies and discuss the limitations of such ‘presence only’ studies. Combining aDNA data with stable isotopes can provide further insights into changes in ecology and we review past studies and suggest future potential applications. We also...

  13. Rethinking transcription coupled DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Nudler, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved, multistep process that can detect a wide variety of DNA lesions. Transcription coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of NER that repairs the transcribed DNA strand faster than the rest of the genome. RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalled at DNA lesions mediates the recruitment of NER enzymes to the damage site. In this review we focus on a newly identified bacterial TCR pathway in which the NER enzyme UvrD, in conjunction with NusA, plays a major role in initiating the repair process. We discuss the tradeoff between the new and conventional models of TCR, how and when each pathway operates to repair DNA damage, and the necessity of pervasive transcription in maintaining genome integrity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reaction mechanisms of DNA photolyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettel, Klaus; Byrdin, Martin

    2010-12-01

    DNA photolyase uses visible light and a fully reduced flavin cofactor FADH(-) to repair major UV-induced lesions in DNA, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Electron transfer from photoexcited FADH(-) to CPD, splitting of the two intradimer bonds, and back electron transfer to the transiently formed flavin radical FADH° occur in overall 1ns. Whereas the kinetics of FADH° was resolved, the DNA-based intermediates escaped unambiguous detection yet. Another light reaction, named photoactivation, reduces catalytically inactive FADH° to FADH(-) without implication of DNA. It involves electron hopping along a chain of three tryptophan residues in 30ps, as elucidated in detail by transient absorption spectroscopy. The same triple tryptophan chain is found in cryptochrome blue-light photoreceptors and may be involved in their primary photoreaction.

  15. Human RAD52 Captures and Holds DNA Strands, Increases DNA Flexibility, and Prevents Melting of Duplex DNA: Implications for DNA Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke Brouwer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Human RAD52 promotes annealing of complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA. In-depth knowledge of RAD52-DNA interaction is required to understand how its activity is integrated in DNA repair processes. Here, we visualize individual fluorescent RAD52 complexes interacting with single DNA molecules. The interaction with ssDNA is rapid, static, and tight, where ssDNA appears to wrap around RAD52 complexes that promote intra-molecular bridging. With double-stranded DNA (dsDNA, interaction is slower, weaker, and often diffusive. Interestingly, force spectroscopy experiments show that RAD52 alters the mechanics dsDNA by enhancing DNA flexibility and increasing DNA contour length, suggesting intercalation. RAD52 binding changes the nature of the overstretching transition of dsDNA and prevents DNA melting, which is advantageous for strand clamping during or after annealing. DNA-bound RAD52 is efficient at capturing ssDNA in trans. Together, these effects may help key steps in DNA repair, such as second-end capture during homologous recombination or strand annealing during RAD51-independent recombination reactions.

  16. New insights on single-stranded versus double-stranded DNA library preparation for ancient DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, Nathan; Carøe, Christian; Sandoval-Velasco, Marcela; Gamba, Cristina; Barnett, Ross; Samaniego, José Alfredo; Madrigal, Jazmín Ramos; Orlando, Ludovic; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2015-12-01

    An innovative single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) library preparation method has sparked great interest among ancient DNA (aDNA) researchers, especially after reports of endogenous DNA content increases >20-fold in some samples. To investigate the behavior of this method, we generated ssDNA and conventional double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) libraries from 23 ancient and historic plant and animal specimens. We found ssDNA library preparation substantially increased endogenous content when dsDNA libraries contained DNA, but this enrichment is less pronounced when dsDNA preparations successfully recover short endogenous DNA fragments (mean size < 70 bp). Our findings can help researchers determine when to utilize the time- and resource-intensive ssDNA library preparation method.

  17. DNA typing from cigarette butts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Takayama, Tomohiro; Hirata, Keiji; Yamada, Sadao; Nagai, Atsushi; Nakamura, Isao; Bunai, Yasuo; Ohya, Isao

    2003-03-01

    We performed DNA typing for D1S80, HLADQA1, TH01 and PM using the butts of 100 cigarettes that were smoked by ten different individuals (ten cigarettes per individual). The results obtained from DNA typing for D1S80 agreed with the results obtained using bloodstains in 76 cigarette butt samples. Sixteen samples produced false results, showing the loss of the longer allelic hetero-band. When examined using agarose gel electrophoresis, high-molecular weight DNA was not observed in these samples. The same results were also observed for buccal swab samples and saliva stains obtained from the same individuals. In the remaining eight cigarette butt samples, PCR products were not detected. The results obtained from DNA typing for TH01, HLADQA1 and PM agreed with the results obtained using bloodstains in 90 samples. In the remaining ten samples of a specific kind of cigarette (Marlboro), the PCR products were not detected. The extracts from the ends of the Marlboro cigarettes were stained yellow. When the DNA extracted from Marlboro cigarette butts was treated with Microcon-100 (amicon) or SizeSep 400 Span Columns (Amersham Pharmacia Biotech), PCR products could be detected. When PCR amplification was performed after adding extracts from the ends of unsmoked Marlboro cigarettes to DNA extracted from bloodstains, PCR products could not be detected. The present data indicate that the degradation of high-molecular weight DNA and the inhibition of PCR by dyes of the cigarette end should be kept in mind when performing DNA typing using cigarette ends.

  18. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H. (Nestle Research Centre, Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1990-06-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled probe.

  19. Putting muscle in DNA methylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James P Reddington; Richard R Meehan

    2011-01-01

    Over 25 years ago seminal experiments from the labs of Peter Jones and Harold Weintraub demonstrated that alteration in the DNA modification state underlie the myogenic conversion of fibroblast cell lines [1,2].This paved the way for the identification of myogenic helix-loop-helix (HLH) proteins in muscle differentiation,but the mechanism by which DNA methylation regulates muscle differentiation has remained elusive [3].

  20. Multiscaffold DNA Origami Nanoparticle Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    DNA origami templated self-assembly has shown its potential in creating rationally designed nanophotonic devices in a parallel and repeatable manner. In this investigation, we employ a multiscaffold DNA origami approach to fabricate linear waveguides of 10 nm diameter gold nanoparticles. This approach provides independent control over nanoparticle separation and spatial arrangement. The waveguides were characterized using atomic force microscopy and far-field polarization spectroscopy. This work provides a path toward large-scale plasmonic circuitry. PMID:23841957

  1. DNA Development and its Importance

    OpenAIRE

    Artur Gaxhi

    2011-01-01

    As we all are aware now the discovery of DNA is the most significant biological discovery of the 20th century. This discovery has had a tremendous impact on science and medicine. In the field of modern medicine and genetic research, the discovery of DNA has allowed for the improved ability to diagnosis disease, detect genetic predisposition to disease, create new drugs to treat disease, use gene therapy as treatment, and design “custom drugs” based on individual genetic profiles. In criminal ...

  2. DNA Charge Transport within the Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodick, Michael A.; Muren, Natalie B.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    The unique characteristics of DNA charge transport (CT) have prompted an examination of roles for this chemistry within a biological context. Not only can DNA CT facilitate long range oxidative damage of DNA, but redox-active proteins can couple to the DNA base stack and participate in long range redox reactions using DNA CT. DNA transcription factors with redox-active moieties such as SoxR and p53 can use DNA CT as a form of redox sensing. DNA CT chemistry also provides a means to monitor the integrity of the DNA, given the sensitivity of DNA CT to perturbations in base stacking as arise with mismatches and lesions. Enzymes that utilize this chemistry include an interesting and ever-growing class of DNA-processing enzymes involved in DNA repair, replication, and transcription that have been found to contain 4Fe-4S clusters. DNA repair enzymes containing 4Fe-4S clusters, that include Endonuclease III (EndoIII), MutY, and DinG from bacteria, as well as XPD from archaea, have been shown to be redox-active when bound to DNA, share a DNA-bound redox potential, and can be reduced and oxidized at long range via DNA CT. Interactions between DNA and these proteins in solution, in addition to genetics experiments within E. coli, suggest that DNA-mediated CT can be used as a means of cooperative signaling among DNA repair proteins that contain 4Fe-4S clusters as a first step in finding DNA damage, even within cells. Based on these data, we can consider also how DNA-mediated CT may be used as a means of signaling to coordinate DNA processing across the genome. PMID:25606780

  3. DNA-scaffolded nanoparticle structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoegberg, Bjoern; Olin, Haakan [Department of Engineering Physics and Mathematics, Mid Sweden University, SE-851 70 Sundsvall, Sweden (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    DNA self-assembly is a powerful route to the production of very small, complex structures. When used in combination with nanoparticles it is likely to become a key technology in the production of nanoelectronics in the future. Previously, demonstrated nanoparticle assemblies have mainly been periodic and highly symmetric arrays, unsuited as building blocks for any complex circuits. With the invention of DNA-scaffolded origami reported earlier this year (Rothemund P W K 2006 Nature 440 (7082) 297-302), a new route to complex nanostructures using DNA has been opened. Here, we give a short review of the field and present the current status of our experiments were DNA origami is used in conjunction with nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles are functionalized with thiolated single stranded DNA. Strands that are complementary to the gold particle strands can be positioned on the self-assembled DNA-structure in arbitrary patterns. This property should allow an accurate positioning of the particles by letting them hybridize on the lattice. We report on our recent experiments on this system and discuss open problems and future applications.

  4. Cigarette smoking and DNA methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ken W. K.; Pausova, Zdenka

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is the most studied epigenetic modification, capable of controlling gene expression in the contexts of normal traits or diseases. It is highly dynamic during early embryogenesis and remains relatively stable throughout life, and such patterns are intricately related to human development. DNA methylation is a quantitative trait determined by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Genetic variants at a specific locus can influence both regional and distant DNA methylation. The environment can have varying effects on DNA methylation depending on when the exposure occurs, such as during prenatal life or during adulthood. In particular, cigarette smoking in the context of both current smoking and prenatal exposure is a strong modifier of DNA methylation. Epigenome-wide association studies have uncovered candidate genes associated with cigarette smoking that have biologically relevant functions in the etiology of smoking-related diseases. As such, DNA methylation is a potential mechanistic link between current smoking and cancer, as well as prenatal cigarette-smoke exposure and the development of adult chronic diseases. PMID:23882278

  5. DNA damage in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppedè, Fabio; Migliore, Lucia

    2015-06-01

    Following the observation of increased oxidative DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA extracted from post-mortem brain regions of patients affected by neurodegenerative diseases, the last years of the previous century and the first decade of the present one have been largely dedicated to the search of markers of DNA damage in neuronal samples and peripheral tissues of patients in early, intermediate or late stages of neurodegeneration. Those studies allowed to demonstrate that oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in neurodegeneration, but also revealed cytogenetic damage in neurodegenerative conditions, such as for example a tendency towards chromosome 21 malsegregation in Alzheimer's disease. As it happens for many neurodegenerative risk factors the question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of the neurodegenerative process is still open, and probably both is true. The research interest in markers of oxidative stress was shifted, in recent years, towards the search of epigenetic biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders, following the accumulating evidence of a substantial contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to learning, memory processes, behavioural disorders and neurodegeneration. Increasing evidence is however linking DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena, thereby opening the way to a very attractive and timely research topic in neurodegenerative diseases. We will address those issues in the context of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, which represent three of the most common neurodegenerative pathologies in humans.

  6. Initiation of lymphocyte DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, F D; Fresa, K L; Cohen, S

    1991-01-01

    The initiation of DNA replication in T lymphocytes appears to be regulated by two distinct activities: one associated with proliferation which mediates initiation, and another associated with quiescence which blocks initiation. Activated lymphocytes and proliferating lymphoid cell lines produce an activity, termed ADR, which can initiate DNA replication in isolated, quiescent nuclei. ADR is heat-labile, has protease activity or interacts closely with a protease, and is distinct from the DNA polymerases. ADR activity is absent in quiescent lymphocytes and appears in mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes after IL-2 binding. The generation of active ADR appears to be mediated by phosphorylation of a precursor which is present in resting cells. Nuclei from mitogen-unresponsive lymphocytes fail to initiate DNA replication in response to ADR, of potential importance in the age-related decline of immunity. Quiescent lymphocytes lack ADR and synthesize an ADR-inhibitory activity. The ADR inhibitor is a heat-stable protein which suppresses the initiation of DNA synthesis, but is ineffective at suppressing elongation once DNA strand replication has begun. Nuclei from several neoplastic cell lines fail to respond to the ADR inhibitor, which may play a role in the continuous proliferation of these cells. At least one of these neoplastic cell lines produces both ADR and an inhibitory factor. These findings suggest that the regulation of proliferation is dependent on the balance between activating and inhibitory pathways.

  7. Differential recruitment of DNA Ligase I and III to DNA repair sites

    OpenAIRE

    Mortusewicz, O; Rothbauer, U.; Cardoso, M C; Leonhardt, H.

    2006-01-01

    DNA ligation is an essential step in DNA replication, repair and recombination. Mammalian cells contain three DNA Ligases that are not interchangeable although they use the same catalytic reaction mechanism. To compare the recruitment of the three eukaryotic DNA Ligases to repair sites in vivo we introduced DNA lesions in human cells by laser microirradiation. Time lapse microscopy of fluorescently tagged proteins showed that DNA Ligase III accumulated at microirradiated sites before DNA Liga...

  8. Salmon redd identification using environmental DNA (eDNA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilliod, David S.; Laramie, Matthew B.

    2016-06-10

    IntroductionThe purpose of this project was to develop a technique to use environmental DNA (eDNA) to distinguish between redds made by Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and redds made by Coho salmon (O. kisutch) and to distinguish utilized redds from test/abandoned redds or scours that have the appearance of redds. The project had two phases:Phase 1. Develop, test, and optimize a molecular assay for detecting and identifying Coho salmon DNA and differentiating it from Chinook salmon DNA.Phase 2. Demonstrate the efficacy of the technique.Collect and preserve water samples from the interstitial spaces of 10 known redds (as identified by expert observers) of each species and 10 gravel patches that do not include a redd of either species.Collect control samples from the water column adjacent to each redd to establish background eDNA levels.Analyze the samples using the developed molecular assays for Coho salmon (phase I) and Chinook salmon (Laramie and others, 2015).Evaluate whether samples collected from Chinook and Coho redds have significantly higher levels of eDNA of the respective species than background levels (that is, from gravel, water column).Evaluate whether samples collected from the interstitial spaces of gravel patches that are not redds are similar to background eDNA levels.The Sandy River is a large tributary of the Columbia River. The Sandy River meets the Columbia River approximately 23 km upstream of Portland, Oregon. The Sandy River Basin provides overlapping spawning habitat for both Chinook and Coho salmon.Samples provided by Portland Water Bureau for analysis were collected from the Bull Run River, Sixes Creek, Still Creek, Arrah Wanna Side Channel, and Side Channel 18.

  9. Coordinate expression of Escherichia coli dnaA and dnaN genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, T; Sakakibara, Y

    1980-01-01

    The defects of temperature-sensitive dnaA and dnaN mutants of Escherichia coli are complemented by a recombinant lambda phage, which carries the bacterial DNA segment composed of two EcoRI segments of 1.0 and 3.3 kilobases. Derivatives of the phage, which have an insertion segment of Tn3 in the dnaA gene, are much less active in expressing the dnaN gene function than the parent phage. The dnaN gene activity was determined as the efficiency of superinfecting phage to suppress loss of the viability of lambda lysogenic dnaN59 cells at the non-permissive temperature. Deletions that include the end of the dnaA gene distal to the dnaN gene also reduce the expression of the dnaN gene function. Deletion and insertion in the dnaN gene do not affect the expression of the dnaA gene function. The expression of the dnaN gene function by the dnaA- dnaN+ phages remains weak upon simultaneous infection with dnaA+ dnaN- phages. Thus the insertion and deletion of the dnaA gene influence in cis the expresion of the dnaN gene. We propose that the dnaA and dnaN genes constitute an operon, where the former is upstream to the latter.

  10. ESR study of the direct radiolysis of DNA, DNA-histones and DNA-intercalators complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucitano, A.; Buttafava, A.; Martinotti, F.; Pedraly-Noy, G.

    The nature of the radicals contributing to the room temperature spectrum of irradiated "dry" DNA, with special reference to the central structure, is discussed, and the thesis of their ionic origin tested by irradiation experiments with intercalators. The mechanism of spin transfer protein→DNA has been investigated through a comparative ESR study on the DNA-histones complex, the structureless random molecular mixture of the DNA-histones and the neat components. The yield of spin transfer is enhanced in the random mixture, presumably because of the greater efficiency of molecular contacts. Evidence of the scavenging of electrons by the thymine and cytosine bases, as a key mechanism for the spin transfer, has been obtained.

  11. Mechanism for CCC DNA synthesis in hepadnaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji A Sohn

    Full Text Available Hepadnavirus replication requires the synthesis of a covalently closed circular (CCC DNA from the relaxed circular (RC viral genome by an unknown mechanism. CCC DNA formation could require enzymatic activities of the viral reverse transcriptase (RT, or cellular DNA repair enzymes, or both. Physical mapping of the 5' and 3' ends of RC DNA and sequence analysis of CCC DNA revealed that CCC DNA synthesis requires the removal of the RT and an RNA oligomer from the 5' ends of minus and plus strand DNA, respectively, removal of sequences from the terminally redundant minus strand, completion of the less than full-length plus strand, and ligation of the ends. Two models have been proposed that could explain CCC DNA formation. The first (model 1 invokes a role for the RT to catalyze a cleavage-ligation reaction leading to the formation of a unit length minus strand in CCC DNA and a DNA repair reaction for the completion and ligation of plus strand DNA; the second (model 2 predicts that CCC DNA formation depends entirely on cellular DNA repair enzymes. To determine which mechanism is utilized, we developed cell lines expressing duck hepatitis B virus genomes carrying mutations permitting us to follow the fate of viral DNA sequences during their conversion from RC to CCC DNA. Our results demonstrated that the oligomer at the 5' end of minus strand DNA is completely or at least partially removed prior to CCC DNA synthesis. The results indicated that both RC DNA strands undergo DNA repair reactions carried out by the cellular DNA repair machinery as predicted by model 2. Thus, our study provided the basis for the identification of the cellular components required for CCC DNA formation.

  12. Extreme exercise and oxidative DNA modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, H E; Loft, S; Vistisen, K

    1996-01-01

    increased the rate of oxidative DNA modification by 33% (95% confidence limits, 3-67%; P DNA repair, oxidation of the nucleotide pool from mitochondrial...... DNA and/or from cell turnover. Oxidative stress to DNA points to a risk for the development of cancer and premature ageing from extreme exercise....

  13. DNA damage in plant herbarium tissue.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staats, M.; Cuenca, A.; Richardson, J.E.; Ginkel, R.V.; Petersen, G.; Seberg, O.; Bakker, F.T.

    2011-01-01

    Dried plant herbarium specimens are potentially a valuable source of DNA. Efforts to obtain genetic information from this source are often hindered by an inability to obtain amplifiable DNA as herbarium DNA is typically highly degraded. DNA post-mortem damage may not only reduce the number of amplif

  14. Anti-DNA antibodies in SLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 8 chapters. Some of the titles are: Anti-DNA Antibodies in SLE: Historical Perspective; Specificity of Anti-DNA Antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Monoclonial Autoimmune Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Structure--Function Analyses of Anti-DNA Autoantibodies.

  15. Mammalian satellite DNA: a speaking dumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enukashvily, Natella I; Ponomartsev, Nikita V

    2013-01-01

    The tandemly organized highly repetitive satellite DNA is the main DNA component of centromeric/pericentromeric constitutive heterochromatin. For almost a century, it was considered as "junk DNA," only a small portion of which is used for kinetochore formation. The current review summarizes recent data about satellite DNA transcription. The possible functions of the transcripts are discussed.

  16. Repeated extraction of DNA from FTA cards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Ferrero, Laura; Børsting, Claus;

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. However, the yield of extracted DNA from FTA-cards is typically low. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible ...

  17. DNA Fingerprinting in a Forensic Teaching Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Stacy A.; Carlson, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an experiment designed to provide students, in a classroom laboratory setting, a hands-on demonstration of the steps used in DNA forensic analysis by performing DNA extraction, DNA fingerprinting, and statistical analysis of the data. This experiment demonstrates how DNA fingerprinting is performed and how long it takes. It…

  18. Extracellular DNA metabolism in Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eChimileski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA is found in all environments and is a dynamic component of the micro-bial ecosystem. Microbial cells produce and interact with extracellular DNA through many endogenous mechanisms. Extracellular DNA is processed and internalized for use as genetic information and as a major source of macronutrients, and plays several key roles within prokaryotic biofilms. Hypersaline sites contain some of the highest extracellular DNA con-centrations measured in nature–a potential rich source of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus for halophilic microorganisms. We conducted DNA growth studies for the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii DS2 and show that this model Halobacteriales strain is capable of using exogenous double-stranded DNA as a nutrient. Further experiments with varying medium composition, DNA concentration and DNA types revealed that DNA is utilized primarily as a phosphorus source, that growth on DNA is concentration-dependent and that DNA isolated from different sources is metabolized selectively, with a bias against highly divergent methylated DNA sources. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy experiments showed that labeled DNA colocalized with Haloferax volcanii cells. The gene Hvo_1477 was also identified using a comparative genomic approach as a factor likely to be involved in extracellular DNA processing at the cell surface, and deletion of Hvo_1477 created an H. volcanii strain deficient in its ability to grow on extracellular DNA. Widespread distribution of Hvo_1477 homologs in archaea suggests metabolism of extracellular DNA may be of broad ecological and physiological relevance in this domain of life.

  19. Modified "DMC" technique for stretching DNA molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A modified "dynamic molecular combing"(DMC)technique used for stretching double-strandedDNA is reported. DNA molecules were stretched on the silanized mica surface by thistechnique, its speed being precisely controlled with a computer. This approachcombinedthe precise DNA stretching method with high resolution AFM imaging at nanometer scale,thusmaking it useful for DNA alignment manipulation and subsequent gene research.

  20. DNA Fingerprinting in a Forensic Teaching Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Stacy A.; Carlson, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an experiment designed to provide students, in a classroom laboratory setting, a hands-on demonstration of the steps used in DNA forensic analysis by performing DNA extraction, DNA fingerprinting, and statistical analysis of the data. This experiment demonstrates how DNA fingerprinting is performed and how long it takes. It…