WorldWideScience

Sample records for room acoustics computer

  1. Room Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  2. Predicting Acoustics in Class Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    Typical class rooms have fairly simple geometries, even so room acoustics in this type of room is difficult to predict using today's room acoustic computer modeling software. The reasons why acoustics of class rooms are harder to predict than acoustics of complicated concert halls might...

  3. Computer simulations in room acoustics: concepts and uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorländer, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Geometrical acoustics are used as a standard model for room acoustic design and consulting. Research on room acoustic simulation focuses on a more accurate modeling of propagation effects such as diffraction and other wave effects in rooms, and on scattering. Much progress was made in this field so that wave models also (for example, the boundary element method and the finite differences in time domain) can now be used for higher frequencies. The concepts and implementations of room simulation methods are briefly reviewed. After all, simulations in architectural acoustics are indeed powerful tools, but their reliability depends on the skills of the operator who has to create an adequate polygon model and has to choose the correct input data of boundary conditions such as absorption and scattering. Very little is known about the uncertainty of this input data. With the theory of error propagation of uncertainties it can be shown that prediction of reverberation times with accuracy better than the just noticeable difference requires input data in a quality which is not available from reverberation room measurements.

  4. Treatment of early and late reflections in a hybrid computer model for room acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naylor, Graham

    1992-01-01

    The ODEON computer model for acoustics in large rooms is intended for use both in design (by predicting room acoustical indices quickly and easily) and in research (by forming the basis of an auralization system and allowing study of various room acoustical phenomena). These conflicting demands...... preclude the use of both ``pure'' image source and ``pure'' particle tracing methods. A hybrid model has been developed, in which rays discover potential image sources up to a specified order. Thereafter, the same ray tracing process is used in a different way to rapidly generate a dense reverberant decay....... In this paper the computational model is described. Particular attention is paid to alternative methods of implementing the reverberant tail, and to the problems that arise when joining early and late parts of a reflectogram generated with different algorithms. A companion paper presents the features...

  5. A room acoustical computer model for industrial environments - the model and its verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge; Foged, Hans Torben

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an extension to the traditional room acoustic modelling methods allowing computer modelling of huge machinery in industrial spaces. The program in question is Odeon 3.0 Industrial and Odeon 3.0 Combined which allows the modelling of point sources, surface sources and line...... of an omnidirectional sound source and a microphone. This allows the comparison of simulated results with the ones measured in real rooms. However when simulating the acoustic environment in industrial rooms, the sound sources are often far from being point like, as they can be distributed over a large space...... in the room and may indeed contribute surfaces to the room. Examples of such sources could be ventilation tubes or the surfaces of two turbines as presented in this paper....

  6. Comparisons between Computer Simulations of Room Acoustical Parameters and those Measured in Concert Halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Shiokawa, Hiroyoshi; Christensen, Claus Lynge

    1999-01-01

    A number of European concert halls were surveyed in 1989. In this paper comparisons are made between measured room acoustical parameters and those obtained from computer simulations using the ODEON program version 3.1 on two concert halls. One is Musikverein in Vienna and the other is Concertgebouw...... in Amsterdam. Comparisons are also made between the results obtained from computer simulations using models with high geometrical fidelity and those from models with simplifications to geometry on both concert halls....

  7. Parametric Room Acoustic Workflows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Svidt, Kjeld; Molin, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The paper investigates and assesses different room acoustics software and the opportunities they offer to engage in parametric acoustics workflow and to influence architectural designs. The first step consists in the testing and benchmarking of different tools on the basis of accuracy, speed...

  8. Real-time virtual room acoustic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneal, James P.; Johnson, Jan; Johnson, Troge; Johnson, Marty

    2003-10-01

    A realistic virtual room acoustic simulation has been implemented on a PC-based computer in near real-time. Room acoustics are calculated by the image source method using realistic absorption coefficients for a variety of realistic surfaces and programmed in MATLAB. The resulting impulse response filters are then applied in near real-time using fast convolution DSP techniques using data being read from a CD-ROM. The system was implemented in a virtual acoustic room facility. Optimizations have been performed to retain the realistic virtual room effect while minimizing computations through limited psycho-acoustic testing. In general, realistic anechoic to reverberant virtual rooms have been re-created with six 8192 coefficient filters. To provide realistic simulations, special care must be taken to accurately reproduce the low frequency acoustics. Since the virtual room acoustic facility was not totally anechoic (as are most anechoic chambers), inverse filters were applied to compensate for over-amplified acoustics at frequencies below 350 Hz.

  9. Electroacoustical simulation of listening room acoustics for project ARCHIMEDES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Søren

    1989-01-01

    the influence of listening room acoustics on the timbre of reproduced sound. For simulation of the acoustics of a standard listening room, an electroacoustic setup has been built in an anechoic chamber. The setup is based on a computer model of the listening room, and it consists of a number of loudspeakers...

  10. Comparisons between computer simulations of room acoustical parameters and those measured in concert halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Shiokawa, Hiroyoshi; Christensen, Claus Lynge

    1999-01-01

    is the reverberation time, and this is mainly used to adjust the absorption data of the surfaces in the computer model. But five additional parameters are calculated and compared with measured data as well. In order to determine the sensitivity of the computer model, comparisons are also made between the results...

  11. An Optimisation Approach for Room Acoustics Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Jørgensen, Kristian; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, Lars

    2005-01-01

    This paper discuss on a conceptual level the value of optimisation techniques in architectural acoustics room design from a practical point of view. It is chosen to optimise one objective room acoustics design criterium estimated from the sound field inside the room. The sound field is modeled...... using the boundary element method where absorption is incorporated. An example is given where the geometry of a room is defined by four design modes. The room geometry is optimised to get a uniform sound pressure....

  12. Auditory modelling for assessing room acoustics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dorp Schuitman, J.

    2011-01-01

    The acoustics of a concert hall, or any other room, are generally assessed by measuring room impulse responses for one or multiple source and receiver location(s). From these responses, objective parameters can be determined that should be related to various perceptual attributes of room acoustics.

  13. Computer simulation techniques for acoustical design of rooms - How to treat reflections in sound field simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger

    1997-01-01

    to finite size of surfaces, scattering due to rough structure of surfaces, angle dependent absorption, phase shift at reflection, surfaces divided into reflecting and absorbing parts, partly transparent surfaces, reflector arrays. Due to the wave nature of sound it is very important for the quality......The paper presents a number of problems related to sound reflections, and possible solutions or approximations that can be used in computer models. The problems include: specular and diffuse reflections, early and late reflections, curved surfaces, convex and concave surfaces, diffraction due...

  14. Relationship between room shape and acoustics of rectangular concert halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klosak, Andrzej K.; Gade, Anders Christian

    2008-01-01

    Extensive acoustics computer simulations have been made using Odeon computer simulation software. In 24 rectangular rooms representing "shoe-box" type concert halls with volumes of 8 000 m3, 12 000 m3 and 16 000 m3 from 300 to 850 measurements positions have been analysed. Only room averaged...

  15. Diffraction and diffusion in room acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Rasmussen, Birgit

    1996-01-01

    Diffraction and diffusion are two phenomena that are both related to the wave nature of sound. Diffraction due to the finite size of reflecting surfaces and the design of single reflectors and reflector arrays are discussed. Diffusion is the result of scattering of sound reflected from surfaces...... that are not plane but curved or irregular. The importance of diffusion has been demonstrated in concert halls. Methods for the design of diffusing surfaces and the development of new types of diffusers are reviewed. Finally, the importance of diffraction and diffusion in room acoustic computer models is discussed....

  16. Room acoustic properties of concert halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian

    1996-01-01

    A large database of values of various room acoustic parameters has provided the basis for statistical analyses of how and how much the acoustic properties of concert halls are influenced by their size, shape, and absorption area (as deduced from measured reverberation time). The data have been...

  17. Computational Ocean Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Finn B; Porter, Michael B; Schmidt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the computer has played an increasingly pivotal role in the field of ocean acoustics. Faster and less expensive than actual ocean experiments, and capable of accommodating the full complexity of the acoustic problem, numerical models are now standard research tools in ocean laboratories. The progress made in computational ocean acoustics over the last thirty years is summed up in this authoritative and innovatively illustrated new text. Written by some of the field's pioneers, all Fellows of the Acoustical Society of America, Computational Ocean Acoustics presents the latest numerical techniques for solving the wave equation in heterogeneous fluid–solid media. The authors discuss various computational schemes in detail, emphasizing the importance of theoretical foundations that lead directly to numerical implementations for real ocean environments. To further clarify the presentation, the fundamental propagation features of the techniques are illustrated in color. Computational Ocean A...

  18. Room acoustics for the aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomp, R; Duquesnoy, A J

    1980-12-01

    This article deals with the combined effects of noise and reverberation on the speech-reception threshold for sentences. It is based on a series of current investigations on: (1) the modulation-transfer function as a measure of speech intelligibility in rooms, (2) the applicability of this concept to hearing-impaired persons, and (3) hearing loss for speech in quiet and in noise as a function of age. It is shown that, generally, in auditoria, classrooms, etc. the reverberation time T, acceptable for normal-hearing listeners, has to be reduced to (0.75)DT in order to be acceptable for elderly subjects with a hearing loss of D dB for speech in noise; for listening conditions as in lounges, restaurants, etc. the corresponding value is (0.82)DT.

  19. Prediction of room acoustical parameters (A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian

    1991-01-01

    During a 6-yr period, detailed room acoustical measurements have been carried out in 35 halls in Denmark and in other European countries. By subjecting these data to statistical analyses, it has been possible to confirm old and establish new relationships between design variables and the position......-averaged acoustical data. The results are presented in the form of linear, multiple regression formulas that may be used to predict the values of the newer measures of level, clarity, spaciousness, and musicians' conditions on the orchestra platform in halls with given RT and geometry....

  20. Low-cost acoustic design of a bat test room

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, R.; Faneca, C.; Albuquerque, D.; Vieira, J.; Bastos, C.; Fonseca, C.; Ramos Pereira, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with captive bats need a flight room that is acoustically neutral, especially when recording and analysing bat calls or the response of bats to certain sound stimuli. Our aim was to identify an isolation material with the best quality–price relationship to acoustically coat such a flight room. For this, we built a flight room divided into two compartments that were to be acoustically isolated from one another. Audible and infrasonic waves are difficult to attenuate ...

  1. Estimation of acoustic resonances for room transfer function equalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil-Cacho, Pepe; van Waterschoot, Toon; Moonen, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Strong acoustic resonances create long room impulse responses (RIRs) which may harm the speech transmission in an acoustic space and hence reduce speech intelligibility. Equalization is performed by cancelling the main acoustic resonances common to multiple room transfer functions (RTFs), i.......e., common-acoustical-poles, in the room. This paper discusses the utilization of different norms (i.e., 2-norm and 1-norm) and models (i.e., all-pole and pole-zero) for RTF modelling and then equalization. Acoustic resonances may be modelled by means of the poles of the RTF. In the literature, however...

  2. Parametric Room Acoustic workflows with real-time acoustic simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario

    2017-01-01

    The paper investigates and assesses the opportunities that real-time acoustic simulation offer to engage in parametric acoustics workflow and to influence architectural designs from early design stages......The paper investigates and assesses the opportunities that real-time acoustic simulation offer to engage in parametric acoustics workflow and to influence architectural designs from early design stages...

  3. Equal autophonic level curves under different room acoustics conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelegrin Garcia, David; Mendizábal, Oier Fuentes; Brunskog, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    The indirect auditory feedback from one’s own voice arises from sound reflections at the room boundaries or from sound reinforcement systems. The relative variations of indirect auditory feedback are quantified through room acoustic parameters such as the room gain and the voice support, rather...... curves. These curves give an indication of the amount of variation in voice level induced by the acoustic environment as a consequence of the sidetone compensation or Lombard effect. In the range of typical rooms for speech, the variations in overall voice level that result in a constant autophonic level...

  4. Three-dimensional point-cloud room model for room acoustics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Milos; Olesen, Søren Krarup; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    acquisition and its representation with a 3D point-cloud model, as well as utilization of such a model for the room acoustics simulations. A room is scanned with a commercially available input device (Kinect for Xbox360) in two different ways; the first one involves the device placed in the middle of the room...

  5. Three-dimensional point-cloud room model in room acoustics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Milos; Olesen, Søren Krarup; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    acquisition and its representation with a 3D point-cloud model, as well as utilization of such a model for the room acoustics simulations. A room is scanned with a commercially available input device (Kinect for Xbox360) in two different ways; the first one involves the device placed in the middle of the room...

  6. Evaluation of room acoustic qualities and defects by use of auralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger

    2004-01-01

    Auralizations generated by room acoustic computer modeling programs may be used as a tool for evaluation of acoustic qualities and defects, some of which are not easily detected by objective measures. Examples include reverberance, flutter echoes, perceived room size and distance, apparent source...... that the modeling of source directivity and the late room reflections (the reverberation tail) need careful consideration in order to achieve reliable and realistic sounding results. However, when implemented in the software the application for practical use can be simple and quick....

  7. Equal autophonic level curves under different room acoustics conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrín-García, David; Fuentes-Mendizábal, Oier; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2011-07-01

    The indirect auditory feedback from one's own voice arises from sound reflections at the room boundaries or from sound reinforcement systems. The relative variations of indirect auditory feedback are quantified through room acoustic parameters such as the room gain and the voice support, rather than the reverberation time. Fourteen subjects matched the loudness level of their own voice (the autophonic level) to that of a constant and external reference sound, under different synthesized room acoustics conditions. The matching voice levels are used to build a set of equal autophonic level curves. These curves give an indication of the amount of variation in voice level induced by the acoustic environment as a consequence of the sidetone compensation or Lombard effect. In the range of typical rooms for speech, the variations in overall voice level that result in a constant autophonic level are on the order of 2 dB, and more than 3 dB in the 4 kHz octave band. By comparison of these curves with previous studies, it is shown that talkers use acoustic cues other than loudness to adjust their voices when speaking in different rooms. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  8. Simulating environmental and psychological acoustic factors of the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Christopher L; Dudaryk, Roman; Ayers, Andrew L; McNeer, Richard R

    2015-12-01

    In this study, an operating room simulation environment was adapted to include quadraphonic speakers, which were used to recreate a composed clinical soundscape. To assess validity of the composed soundscape, several acoustic parameters of this simulated environment were acquired in the presence of alarms only, background noise only, or both. These parameters were also measured for comparison from size-matched operating rooms at Jackson Memorial Hospital. The parameters examined included sound level, reverberation time, and predictive metrics of speech intelligibility in quiet and noise. It was found that the sound levels and acoustic parameters were comparable between the simulated environment and the actual operating rooms. The impact of the background noise on the perception of medical alarms was then examined, and was found to have little impact on the audibility of the alarms. This study is a first in kind report of a comparison between the environmental and psychological acoustical parameters of a hospital simulation environment and actual operating rooms.

  9. Effects of Various Architectural Parameters on Six Room Acoustical Measures in Auditoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wei-Hwa

    The effects of architectural parameters on six room acoustical measures were investigated by means of correlation analyses, factor analyses and multiple regression analyses based on data taken in twenty halls. Architectural parameters were used to estimate acoustical measures taken at individual locations within each room as well as the averages and standard deviations of all measured values in the rooms. The six acoustical measures were Early Decay Time (EDT10), Clarity Index (C80), Overall Level (G), Bass Ratio based on Early Decay Time (BR(EDT)), Treble Ratio based on Early Decay Time (TR(EDT)), and Early Inter-aural Cross Correlation (IACC80). A comprehensive method of quantifying various architectural characteristics of rooms was developed to define a large number of architectural parameters that were hypothesized to effect the acoustical measurements made in the rooms. This study quantitatively confirmed many of the principles used in the design of concert halls and auditoria. Three groups of room architectural parameters such as the parameters associated with the depth of diffusing surfaces were significantly correlated with the hall standard deviations of most of the acoustical measures. Significant differences of statistical relations among architectural parameters and receiver specific acoustical measures were found between a group of music halls and a group of lecture halls. For example, architectural parameters such as the relative distance from the receiver to the overhead ceiling increased the percentage of the variance of acoustical measures that was explained by Barron's revised theory from approximately 70% to 80% only when data were taken in the group of music halls. This study revealed the major architectural parameters which have strong relations with individual acoustical measures forming the basis for a more quantitative method for advancing the theoretical design of concert halls and other auditoria. The results of this study provide

  10. Obtaining objective, content-specific room acoustical parameters using auditory modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dorp Schuitman, J.; De Vries, D.

    2013-01-01

    The acoustical properties of rooms are generally described using objective parameters as determined from measured – or simulated – roomimpulse responses. However, this method has some disadvantages. Forexample, room impulse responses are generally measured in empty rooms, while the acoustical

  11. Automatic detection of unattended changes in room acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Johannes Daniel; Wendt, Mike; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the human auditory system continuously monitors its acoustic environment, detecting a variety of irregularities (e.g., deviance from prior stimulation regularity in pitch, loudness, duration, and (perceived) sound source location). Detection of irregularities can be inferred from a component of the event-related brain potential (ERP), referred to as the mismatch negativity (MMN), even in conditions in which participants are instructed to ignore the auditory stimulation. The current study extends previous findings by demonstrating that auditory irregularities brought about by a change in room acoustics elicit a MMN in a passive oddball protocol (acoustic stimuli with differing room acoustics, that were otherwise identical, were employed as standard and deviant stimuli), in which participants watched a fiction movie (silent with subtitles). While the majority of participants reported no awareness for any changes in the auditory stimulation, only one out of 14 participants reported to have become aware of changing room acoustics or sound source location. Together, these findings suggest automatic monitoring of room acoustics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Measurements of different acoustic conditions in small rectangular rooms

    OpenAIRE

    González Pacheco, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Impulse response measurements are carried out in laboratory facilities at Ecophon, Sweden, simulating a typical classroom with varying suspended ceilings and furniture arrangements. The aim of these measurements is to build a reliable database of acoustical parameters in order to have enough data to validate the new acoustical simulation tool which is under development at Danmarks Tekniske Universitet, Denmark. The different classroom configurations are also simulated using ODEON Room A...

  13. Effects of room impulse responses to stereophonic acoustic echo cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeonghee

    2000-09-01

    Teleconferencing provides people the ability to hold meetings in different locations without traveling. Currently, most teleconferencing systems use full duplex single channel for voice communication. These systems use an acoustic echo canceller to reduce echoes resulting from the coupling between the microphone and the speaker. To provide a more realistic presence and spatial realism that one-channel systems cannot offer, future teleconferencing systems are expected to have at least two channels (stereophonic sound) of full duplex voice communication. However stereophonic acoustic echo cancellation (AEC) is fundamentally different from monophonic AEC. In this work, we review some of adaptive filters used for the AEC systems and develop exponentially weighted step size for two-channel normalized least mean square (2C- NLMS) and generalized normalized least mean square (2C- GNLMS or APA: affine projection algorithm) adaptive algorithms based on the statistics of room impulse response. In one-channel AEC systems, there is only one acoustic echo path to identify. However, there are four acoustic echo paths to identify in two-channel AEC systems, so non-uniqueness problems exist. These problems are presented and some approaches done by researchers are shown with simulations. Finally, effects of room impulse responses, transmission room and receiving room impulse responses, and returning echoes into the transmission room to the performance of adaptive filters are simulated. A comparison of error performance with echoes and without echoes is presented.

  14. Acoustical criteria for hospital patient rooms: Resolving competing requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Bennett M.

    2003-10-01

    The acoustical criteria for patient rooms in hospitals, nursing homes, and rehabilitation facilities may be based on several needs. One important requirement is that noise levels in the room be conducive to restful sleep. Also, caregivers must have easy auditory and visual access to the patients, and be able to hear vital sign monitor alarms. This often means that patient rooms are located near central nurse stations and that patient room doors are left open. Further, the recently published federal privacy standards developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HSS) under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) require that ``appropriate physical safeguards'' be put in place to protect the confidentiality of patient health information. The simultaneous and competing requirements for speech privacy, caregiver access, and good sleeping conditions present a serious acoustical challenge to health care facility designers. Specific facility design issues and potential solution strategies are presented.

  15. Modeling Large sound sources in a room acoustical calculation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge

    1999-01-01

    A room acoustical model capable of modelling point, line and surface sources is presented. Line and surface sources are modelled using a special ray-tracing algorithm detecting the radiation pattern of the surfaces in the room. Point sources are modelled using a hybrid calculation method combinin...... this ray-tracing method with Image source modelling. With these three source types, it is possible to model large and complex sound sources in workrooms....

  16. Nested sampling applied in Bayesian room-acoustics decay analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasa, Tomislav; Xiang, Ning

    2012-11-01

    Room-acoustic energy decays often exhibit single-rate or multiple-rate characteristics in a wide variety of rooms/halls. Both the energy decay order and decay parameter estimation are of practical significance in architectural acoustics applications, representing two different levels of Bayesian probabilistic inference. This paper discusses a model-based sound energy decay analysis within a Bayesian framework utilizing the nested sampling algorithm. The nested sampling algorithm is specifically developed to evaluate the Bayesian evidence required for determining the energy decay order with decay parameter estimates as a secondary result. Taking the energy decay analysis in architectural acoustics as an example, this paper demonstrates that two different levels of inference, decay model-selection and decay parameter estimation, can be cohesively accomplished by the nested sampling algorithm.

  17. Scattering from objects and surfaces in room acoustical simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2016-01-01

    In room acoustical simulations, scattering objects are often modeled as impenetrable boxes with high scattering coefficients assigned to the surfaces. In some cases, a cluster of objects is modeled as a virtual impenetrable box, such that no sound propagation can take place between the objects....... Thus, the scattering only takes place on the boundary surfaces of the box and the acoustic volume of the room is reduced. Another challenge with representing scattering objects by reflecting surfaces is that it increases the number of surfaces, which greatly increases the calculation complexity...... for methods such as the image source method. In this paper a modeling method where the scattering from objects takes place in certain parts of the room volume is proposed. In this method, sound can still travel through scattering objects, but be partly scattered. This volume scattering method has at present...

  18. Integrated assessment of thermal performance and room acoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephane, C.; Iain, M. [Energy Systems Research Unit, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2002-07-01

    The acoustical and thermal properties of materials have contradictory behaviour. Constructions, which provide good acoustic absorption usually, have a low thermal inertia and vice versa. It is therefore important to find a balance between acoustic absorption and thermal inertia in order to deliver well designed buildings. This paper presents an integrated solution, developed to assess the room acoustics performance of a building within the ESP-r environment. The approach used in this work applies the diffuse-sound field theory to calculate the reverberation time via three analytical equations: Sabine, Eyring and Millington approaches. The calculation includes the absorption of the space boundaries, the occupants and furniture. Also included is the air absorption, which takes into account the air temperature and humidity from the thermal simulation. Finally, a case study has been analysed. The simulation results have been compared with measurements from a monitored building to verify the validity of the approach. (author)

  19. Reverberant acoustic energy in auditoria that comprise systems of coupled rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Jason E.

    2003-11-01

    A frequency-dependent model for reverberant energy in coupled rooms is developed and compared with measurements for a 1:10 scale model and for Bass Hall, Ft. Worth, TX. At high frequencies, prior statistical-acoustics models are improved by geometrical-acoustics corrections for decay within sub-rooms and for energy transfer between sub-rooms. Comparisons of computational geometrical acoustics predictions based on beam-axis tracing with scale model measurements indicate errors resulting from tail-correction assuming constant quadratic growth of reflection density. Using ray tracing in the late part corrects this error. For mid-frequencies, the models are modified to account for wave effects at coupling apertures by including power transmission coefficients. Similarly, statical-acoustics models are improved through more accurate estimates of power transmission measurements. Scale model measurements are in accord with the predicted behavior. The edge-diffraction model is adapted to study transmission through apertures. Multiple-order scattering is theoretically and experimentally shown inaccurate due to neglect of slope diffraction. At low frequencies, perturbation models qualitatively explain scale model measurements. Measurements confirm relation of coupling strength to unperturbed pressure distribution on coupling surfaces. Measurements in Bass Hall exhibit effects of the coupled stage house. High frequency predictions of statistical acoustics and geometrical acoustics models and predictions of coupling apertures all agree with measurements.

  20. Using acoustic information to perceive room size: effects of blindness, room reverberation time, and stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarik, Andrew J; Pardhan, Shahina; Cirstea, Silvia; Moore, Brian C J

    2013-01-01

    Blind participants greatly rely on sound for spatial information regarding the surrounding environment. It is not yet established whether lack of vision to calibrate audition in far space affects blind participants' internal spatial representation of acoustic room size. Furthermore, blind participants may rely more on farthest distance estimates to sound sources compared with sighted participants when perceiving room size. Here we show that judgments of apparent room size and sound distance are correlated, more so for blind than for sighted participants. Sighted participants judged a reverberant virtual room to be larger for speech than for music or noise stimuli, whereas blind participants did not. The results suggest that blindness affects the use of room reverberation for distance and room-size judgments.

  1. Simultaneous measurements of room acoustic parameters using different measuring equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halmrast, Tor; Gade, Anders Christian; Winsvold, Bjørn

    1996-01-01

    In a cooperation between Stattsbyg, Norway, Norsonic, Norway, and Department of Acoustic Technology, a number of room acoustic parameters have been determined in Oslo Concert Hall. All measurements were carried out on the same day, using the same amplifier, microphone and loudspeaker, and the sam...... measurement positions, but the three partners had their own measurement system. Very good agreement was obtained in the measurements of reverberation time and early decay time, but the agreement between the different measurement of 'clarity' (C80) was poorer....

  2. Uncertainty of input data for room acoustic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Marbjerg, Gerd; Brunskog, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Although many room acoustic simulation models have been well established, simulation results will never be accurate with inaccurate and uncertain input data. This study addresses inappropriateness and uncertainty of input data for room acoustic simulations. Firstly, the random incidence absorption......-included input data are proven to produce perceptually noticeable changes in the objective parameters, such as the sound pressure level, and loudness-based reverberation time. Surfaces should not be assumed to be locally reacting, particularly for multi-layered absorbers having air cavities. Secondly......, the current measurement techniques produce uncertain input data. For example, Sabine absorption coefficients according to ISO 354 measured in reverberation chambers have a poor reproducibility. The same happens for sound scattering and transmission, which depend greatly on the test chamber. This study...

  3. On Architectural Acoustics Design using Computer Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2004-01-01

    room acoustic simulation programs it is now possible to subjectively analyze and evaluate acoustic properties prior to the actual construction of a facility. With the right tools applied, the acoustic design can become an integrated part of the architectural design process. The aim of the present paper...... is to investigate the field of application an acoustic simulation program can have during an architectural acoustics design process. A case study is carried out in order to represent the iterative working process of an architect. The working process is divided into five phases and represented by typical results...... in each phase ? exemplified by Bagsværd Church by Jørn Utzon - and a description of which information would be beneficial to progress in the work. Among other things the applicability as a tool giving inspiration for finding forms of structures and rooms for an architect compared with an architect without...

  4. Optimal acoustical design of commercial meeting and teleconference rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, Angelo

    2002-05-01

    Along with a quiet NC-25 environment, speech communication among multiple individuals in a conference room, especially for teleconferencing, should be enhanced. Conferees are often located around a table and along the room perimeter. Speech propagation among all is enhanced by a flat ceiling reflector placed as low as practical over the table and the seated participants. This reinforces direct sound with a first-bounce reflection between all parties and microphones. Ceiling perimeter, 50%-75% of the ceiling area, is absorptive. This arrangement works for a speaker-phone and for microphones placed on the ceiling reflector avoiding paper shuffling noise. In the latter case, loudspeakers are placed on the absorbing perimeter acoustical tile. Absorption must be placed on the sidewalls to avoid flutter echoes. Uneven absorber distribution among surfaces is evaluated with the Fitzroy reverberation time [D. Fitzroy, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 31, 893-897 (1959)]. It was found that this RT at 500 Hz should be [1+log(V)]/10 (about 1/2 s) to avoid a ``hollow'' timbre in purveyed speech. Examples of good and troublesome teleconference rooms are discussed.

  5. Evaluating the auralization of a small room in a virtual sound environment using objective room acoustic measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrens, Axel; Marschall, Marton; Dau, Torsten

    ) & reverberation time (T20, T30); - clarity (C7, C50, C80); - interaural cross-correlation (IACC); - speech transmission index (STI); - direct-to-reverberant ratio (DRR). Impulse responses (IRs) were measured in an IEC listening room. The room was then modeled in the room acoustics software ODEON, and the same...

  6. Computational simulation in architectural and environmental acoustics methods and applications of wave-based computation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Shinichi; Otsuru, Toru

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews a variety of methods for wave-based acoustic simulation and recent applications to architectural and environmental acoustic problems. Following an introduction providing an overview of computational simulation of sound environment, the book is in two parts: four chapters on methods and four chapters on applications. The first part explains the fundamentals and advanced techniques for three popular methods, namely, the finite-difference time-domain method, the finite element method, and the boundary element method, as well as alternative time-domain methods. The second part demonstrates various applications to room acoustics simulation, noise propagation simulation, acoustic property simulation for building components, and auralization. This book is a valuable reference that covers the state of the art in computational simulation for architectural and environmental acoustics.  

  7. Topology optimization applied to room acoustic problems and surface acoustic wave devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    and O. Sigmund, “Systematic design of photonic crystal structures using topology optimization: low-loss waveguide bends”, Applied Physics Letters, 84(12), 2022-2024 (2004) [3] M. B. Dühring, “Topology optimization for acoustic problems”, IUTAM Symposium on Topological Design Optimization of Structures......The work of this PhD-project is concerned with the method of topology optimization1, which has been developed and used since the late eighties to optimize the material distribution of structures in order to minimize static compliance. Since then it has successfully been applied to a range...... of engineering fields such as mechanism design, fluid problems and photonic and phononic band-gap materials and structures [1,2]. In this project topology optimization is first applied to control acoustic properties in a room [3]. It is shown how the squared sound pressure amplitude in a certain part of a room...

  8. Intelligibility Assessment of Ideal Binary-Masked Noisy Speech with Acceptance of Room Acoustic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimír, Sedlak; Daniela, Durackova; Roman, Zalusky; Tomas, Kovacik

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the intelligibility of ideal binary-masked noisy signal is evaluated for different signal to noise ratio (SNR), mask error, masker types, distance between source and receiver, reverberation time and local criteria for forming the binary mask. The ideal binary mask is computed from time-frequency decompositions of target and masker signals by thresholding the local SNR within time-frequency units. The intelligibility of separated signal is measured using different objective measures computed in frequency and perceptual domain. The present study replicates and extends the findings which were already presented but mainly shows impact of room acoustic on the intelligibility performance of IBM technique.

  9. A theoretical approach to room acoustic simulations based on a radiative transfer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz-Navarro, Juan-Miguel; Jacobsen, Finn; Escolano, José

    2010-01-01

    by incorporating a propagation medium that absorbs and scatters radiation, handling both diffuse and non-diffuse reflections on boundaries and objects in the room. The main scope of this model is to provide a proper foundation for a wide number of room acoustic simulation models, in order to establish and unify...... their principles. It is shown that this room acoustic modeling technique establishes the basis of two recently proposed algorithms, the acoustic diffusion equation and the room acoustic rendering equation. Both methods are derived in detail using an analytical approximation and a simplified integral equation...

  10. Predicting the perceived reverberation in different room acoustic environments using a binaural auditory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osses Vecchi, Alejandro; Kohlrausch, Armin; Lachenmayr, Winfried; Mommertz, Eckard

    2017-04-01

    In this paper a binaural auditory model was used to compute reverberance estimates in four simulated halls. For three of the halls different absorption conditions were evaluated. The model estimates (pRev) were obtained using music excerpts of an orchestra consisting of 23 instrument sections and then compared with the room acoustic parameters of reverberation time (T30) and early decay time (EDT) at mid frequencies. Although the results showed that pRev has a higher correlation with EDT rather than with T30, this relationship depends on the properties of the instruments. The simulations show that pRev depends on the presentation level and that for instruments with similar critical-band spectrum, pRev follows a similar trend across acoustic conditions. A computational framework and sound stimuli are provided to encourage the search of experimental evidence of the aspects addressed in this study.

  11. Listeners' expectation of room acoustical parameters based on visual cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Daniel L.

    Despite many studies investigating auditory spatial impressions in rooms, few have addressed the impact of simultaneous visual cues on localization and the perception of spaciousness. The current research presents an immersive audio-visual study, in which participants are instructed to make spatial congruency and quantity judgments in dynamic cross-modal environments. The results of these psychophysical tests suggest the importance of consilient audio-visual presentation to the legibility of an auditory scene. Several studies have looked into audio-visual interaction in room perception in recent years, but these studies rely on static images, speech signals, or photographs alone to represent the visual scene. Building on these studies, the aim is to propose a testing method that uses monochromatic compositing (blue-screen technique) to position a studio recording of a musical performance in a number of virtual acoustical environments and ask subjects to assess these environments. In the first experiment of the study, video footage was taken from five rooms varying in physical size from a small studio to a small performance hall. Participants were asked to perceptually align two distinct acoustical parameters---early-to-late reverberant energy ratio and reverberation time---of two solo musical performances in five contrasting visual environments according to their expectations of how the room should sound given its visual appearance. In the second experiment in the study, video footage shot from four different listening positions within a general-purpose space was coupled with sounds derived from measured binaural impulse responses (IRs). The relationship between the presented image, sound, and virtual receiver position was examined. It was found that many visual cues caused different perceived events of the acoustic environment. This included the visual attributes of the space in which the performance was located as well as the visual attributes of the performer

  12. Accounting for delay of energy transfer between coupled rooms in statistical-acoustics models of reverberant-energy decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Jason E

    2012-08-01

    A statistical-acoustics model for energy decay in systems of two or more coupled rooms is introduced, which accounts for the distribution of delay in the transfer of energy between subrooms that results from the finite speed of sound. The method extends previous models based on systems of coupled ordinary differential equations by using functional differential equations to explicitly model dependence on prior values of energy in adjacent subrooms. Predictions of the model are illustrated for a two-room coupled system and compared with the predictions of a benchmark computational geometrical-acoustics model.

  13. Speech intelligibility in rooms: Effect of prior listening exposure interacts with room acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahorik, Pavel; Brandewie, Eugene J

    2016-07-01

    There is now converging evidence that a brief period of prior listening exposure to a reverberant room can influence speech understanding in that environment. Although the effect appears to depend critically on the amplitude modulation characteristic of the speech signal reaching the ear, the extent to which the effect may be influenced by room acoustics has not been thoroughly evaluated. This study seeks to fill this gap in knowledge by testing the effect of prior listening exposure or listening context on speech understanding in five different simulated sound fields, ranging from anechoic space to a room with broadband reverberation time (T60) of approximately 3 s. Although substantial individual variability in the effect was observed and quantified, the context effect was, on average, strongly room dependent. At threshold, the effect was minimal in anechoic space, increased to a maximum of 3 dB on average in moderate reverberation (T60 = 1 s), and returned to minimal levels again in high reverberation. This interaction suggests that the functional effects of prior listening exposure may be limited to sound fields with moderate reverberation (0.4 ≤ T60 ≤ 1 s).

  14. On the Road to Computational Acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hogge, H

    1978-01-01

    ...) because of the success of the linearized normal-mode approach and because the numerical viscosity inherent in traditional computational methods damps out acoustic disturbances at an unrealistic rate...

  15. Time Delay Estimation in Room Acoustic Environments: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benesty Jacob

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Time delay estimation has been a research topic of significant practical importance in many fields (radar, sonar, seismology, geophysics, ultrasonics, hands-free communications, etc.. It is a first stage that feeds into subsequent processing blocks for identifying, localizing, and tracking radiating sources. This area has made remarkable advances in the past few decades, and is continuing to progress, with an aim to create processors that are tolerant to both noise and reverberation. This paper presents a systematic overview of the state-of-the-art of time-delay-estimation algorithms ranging from the simple cross-correlation method to the advanced blind channel identification based techniques. We discuss the pros and cons of each individual algorithm, and outline their inherent relationships. We also provide experimental results to illustrate their performance differences in room acoustic environments where reverberation and noise are commonly encountered.

  16. Information transfer in auditoria and room-acoustical quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Jason E

    2013-04-01

    It is hypothesized that room-acoustical quality correlates with the information-transfer rate. Auditoria are considered as multiple-input multiple-output communication channels and a theory of information-transfer is outlined that accounts for time-variant multipath, spatial hearing, and distributed directional sources. Source diversity and spatial hearing are shown to be the mechanisms through which multipath increases the information-transfer rate by overcoming finite spatial resolution. In addition to predictions that are confirmed by recent and historical findings, the theory provides explanations for the influence of factors such as musical repertoire and ensemble size on subjective preference and the influence of multisource, multichannel auralization on perceived realism.

  17. Deriving content-specific measures of room acoustic perception using a binaural, nonlinear auditory model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dorp Schuitman, J.; De Vries, D.; Lindau, A.

    2013-01-01

    Acousticians generally assess the acoustic qualities of a concert hall or any other room using impulse response-based measures such as the reverberation time, clarity index, and others. These parameters are used to predict perceptual attributes related to the acoustic qualities of the room. Various

  18. Monaural room acoustic parameters from music and speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Paul; Cox, Trevor J; Li, Francis F; Zhang, Yonggang; Chambers, Jonathon A

    2008-07-01

    This paper compares two methods for extracting room acoustic parameters from reverberated speech and music. An approach which uses statistical machine learning, previously developed for speech, is extended to work with music. For speech, reverberation time estimations are within a perceptual difference limen of the true value. For music, virtually all early decay time estimations are within a difference limen of the true value. The estimation accuracy is not good enough in other cases due to differences between the simulated data set used to develop the empirical model and real rooms. The second method carries out a maximum likelihood estimation on decay phases at the end of notes or speech utterances. This paper extends the method to estimate parameters relating to the balance of early and late energies in the impulse response. For reverberation time and speech, the method provides estimations which are within the perceptual difference limen of the true value. For other parameters such as clarity, the estimations are not sufficiently accurate due to the natural reverberance of the excitation signals. Speech is a better test signal than music because of the greater periods of silence in the signal, although music is needed for low frequency measurement.

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Room Air Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2004-01-01

    on the mass fraction transport equation. The importance of ?false? or numerical diffusion is also addressed in connection with the simple description of a supply opening. The different aspects of boundary conditions in the indoor environment as e.g. the simulation of Air Terminal Devices and the simulation......Nielsen, P.V. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Room Air Movement. Indoor Air, International Journal of Indoor Environment and Health, Vol. 14, Supplement 7, pp. 134-143, 2004. ABSTRACT Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and new developments of CFD in the indoor environment as well as quality...... considerations are important elements in the study of energy consumption, thermal comfort and indoor air quality in buildings. The paper discusses the quality level of Computational Fluid Dynamics and the involved schemes (first, second and third order schemes) by the use of the Smith and Hutton problem...

  20. Studies of edge diffraction and scattering: Applications to room acoustics and auralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Rendell Reyes

    This thesis examines ways of including edge diffraction and surface scattering to improve room acoustics auralization, i.e., the binaural replication of an acoustic environment. The approach combines numerical and psychoacoustical studies to discern what level of computational accuracy is necessary to obtain perceptually adequate replication. In Paper I, a psychoacoustical investigation is performed on the ear's sensitivity to frequency-dependent changes in Lambert-modeled surface scattering. Using auralizations of a simulated concert hall, one finds that the frequency-dependent changes can be clearly audible over a wide frequency region and that its particular quality depends on the input signal. Frequency-dependent scattering, therefore, should be modeled, although not all auralization programs currently do this. Paper II delves into accurate modeling of edge diffraction. Using a validated time-domain model, computations are extended to include reflection/diffraction combinations, which significantly improve agreement with scale-model measurements of a stage house. Additionally, listening tests show that coloration changes due to edge diffraction are audible even for the conservative test geometry, but that second- order diffraction to non-shadowed receivers can often be neglected. Finally, a practical implementation for binaural simulation is proposed, completing a first major step toward computing edge diffraction for more accurate auralization. In Paper III, scattering is measured from various reflector arrays to allow study of physical diffraction phenomena and to gain new perspectives on modeling. This investigation also reveals general trends that can be of practical use in room acoustics when the wavelength is comparable to or greater than the individual panels. Results demonstrate (1)how the scattering from the array spreads over a considerably greater spatial extent than the ``specular reflection zone'' would predict, (2)how multi-element arrays

  1. Optimizing acoustic conditions for two lecture rooms in Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soha Eldakdoky

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the acoustic conditions inside two lecture rooms in faculty of agriculture, Cairo University, based on field measurements and simulation technique. Ambient noise and reverberation time were measured in the unoccupied rooms. The measurement results were utilized for validating the results of CATT software that was used to estimate occupied reverberation time, STI and C50. These parameters were analysed in comparison with rooms’ properties, optimal reverberation time and maximum acceptable noise for learning spaces. The results demonstrated that acoustic design of the first room is far from the recommended values, whereas the second room includes many defects. For optimizing the rooms’ performance, acoustic treatments were proposed and explored. Results clarified that reducing the excessive reverberation to the optimal value, either by increasing room absorption or decreasing room volume, significantly optimizes speech intelligibility. The results also clarified that reforming the ceiling eliminated the shadow and increased the early reflections.

  2. Acoustic parameters of sound insulating materials investigation in small reverberation rooms on rubber plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.О. Козлітін

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available  The new method of sound insulating materials acoustic characteristics investigation in small reverberation rooms was elaborated. The research of sound insulating materials on rubber plates was done. The analysis of obtained results of acoustic parameters of materials being a part of the composite real structures of airplane was carried out.

  3. Acoustical Design Guidelines for Living Rooms for Adults with intellectual Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saher, K.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate the effects of building design tools on acoustical quality parameters in living rooms for adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) and develop acoustical design guidelines for architects. This study is specifically concerned with the validation of

  4. Low frequency sound reproduction in irregular rooms using CABS (Control Acoustic Bass System)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian; Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal

    2011-01-01

    loudspeakers well positioned at the end of the room a virtual array is formed propagating plane waves along the length of the room in one direction. This will correct the sound field distribution in the room. When plane wave arrives to the end wall two more loudspeakers have to be placed connected......Early investigations on low frequency sound reproduction in rectangular rooms using CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) have shown good results on simulations and measurements in real rooms. CABS takes the advantage of having a rectangular room with parallel walls. By using two low frequency...... with the same signal in counter phase and with a delay corresponding to approximately the length of the room. This is to cancel the reflection and maintain the plane wave propagating along the room. Real life rooms are not necessary rectangular and can be of different shapes. In this paper simulations...

  5. Room acoustic transition time based on reflection overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas; Jacobsen, Finn

    2013-01-01

    at time t, which is mainly controlled by the absorption characteristics of the boundary surfaces of the room. Scattering, diffuse reflections, and diffraction, which facilitate the overlapping process, have not been taken into account. Measured impulse responses show that the transition occurs earlier......A transition time is defined based on the temporal overlap of reflected pulses in room impulse responses. Assuming specular reflections only, the temporal distance between adjacent reflections, which is proportional to the volume of a room, is compared with the characteristic width of a pulse...... in a room with nonuniform absorption and furniture than in a room that satisfies the underlying assumptions....

  6. Room acoustic transition time based on reflection overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas; Jacobsen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    at time t, which is mainly controlled by the absorption characteristics of the boundary surfaces of the room. Scattering, diffuse reflections, and diffraction, which facilitate the overlapping process, have not been taken into account. Measured impulse responses show that the transition occurs earlier......A transition time is defined based on the temporal overlap of reflected pulses in room impulse responses. Assuming specular reflections only, the temporal distance between adjacent reflections, which is proportional to the volume of a room, is compared with the characteristic width of a pulse...... in a room with nonuniform absorption and furniture than in a room that satisfies the underlying assumptions....

  7. Changes in room acoustics elicit a Mismatch Negativity in the absence of overall interaural intensity differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Johannes Daniel; Wendt, Mike; Löw, Andreas; Möller, Stephan; Zölzer, Udo; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2017-02-15

    Changes in room acoustics provide important clues about the environment of sound source-perceiver systems, for example, by indicating changes in the reflecting characteristics of surrounding objects. To study the detection of auditory irregularities brought about by a change in room acoustics, a passive oddball protocol with participants watching a movie was applied in this study. Acoustic stimuli were presented via headphones. Standards and deviants were created by modelling rooms of different sizes, keeping the values of the basic acoustic dimensions (e.g., frequency, duration, sound pressure, and sound source location) as constant as possible. In the first experiment, each standard and deviant stimulus consisted of sequences of three short sounds derived from sinusoidal tones, resulting in three onsets during each stimulus. Deviant stimuli elicited a Mismatch Negativity (MMN) as well as two additional negative deflections corresponding to the three onset peaks. In the second experiment, only one sound was used; the stimuli were otherwise identical to the ones used in the first experiment. Again, an MMN was observed, followed by an additional negative deflection. These results provide further support for the hypothesis of automatic detection of unattended changes in room acoustics, extending previous work by demonstrating the elicitation of an MMN by changes in room acoustics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Room Acoustic Conditions of Performers in AN Old Opera House

    Science.gov (United States)

    IANNACE, GINO; IANNIELLO, CARMINE; MAFFEI, LUIGI; ROMANO, ROSARIO

    2000-04-01

    Proposed objective criteria related to the acoustic conditions for instrumentalists and singers have not received a sufficiently wide consent yet. In spite of this situation, it is the opinion of the authors that the measurement of existing criteria is useful for analysis and comparison. This paper reports the results of various acoustic measurements carried out in the Teatro di San Carlo, Naples-Italy, with the aim of obtaining objective information about its acoustics for performers. A first set of measurements was carried out when the theater was fitted for a symphonic concert and a second one when it was fitted for an opera performance.

  9. Coherent active methods for applications in room acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guicking, D; Karcher, K; Rollwage, M

    1985-10-01

    An adjustment of reverberation time in rooms is often desired, even for low frequencies where passive absorbers fail. Among the active (electroacoustic) systems, incoherent ones permit lengthening of reverberation time only, whereas coherent active methods will allow sound absorption as well. A coherent-active wall lining consists of loudspeakers with microphones in front and adjustable control electronics. The microphones pick up the incident sound and drive the speakers in such a way that the reflection coefficient takes on prescribed values. An experimental device for the one-dimensional case allows reflection coefficients between almost zero and about 1.5 to be realized below 1000 Hz. The extension to three dimensions presents problems, especially by nearfield effects. Experiments with a 3 X 3 loudspeaker array and computer simulations proved that the amplitude reflection coefficient can be adjusted between 10% and 200% for sinusoidal waves at normal and oblique incidence. Future developments have to make the system work with broadband excitation and in more diffuse sound fields. It is also planned to combine the active reverberation control with active diffusion control.

  10. Computational acoustic modeling of cetacean vocalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Michael Dixon

    A framework for computational acoustic modeling of hypothetical vocal production mechanisms in cetaceans is presented. As a specific example, a model of a proposed source in the larynx of odontocetes is developed. Whales and dolphins generate a broad range of vocal sounds, but the exact mechanisms they use are not conclusively understood. In the fifty years since it has become widely accepted that whales can and do make sound, how they do so has remained particularly confounding. Cetaceans' highly divergent respiratory anatomy, along with the difficulty of internal observation during vocalization have contributed to this uncertainty. A variety of acoustical, morphological, ethological and physiological evidence has led to conflicting and often disputed theories of the locations and mechanisms of cetaceans' sound sources. Computational acoustic modeling has been used to create real-time parametric models of musical instruments and the human voice. These techniques can be applied to cetacean vocalizations to help better understand the nature and function of these sounds. Extensive studies of odontocete laryngeal morphology have revealed vocal folds that are consistently similar to a known but poorly understood acoustic source, the ribbon reed. A parametric computational model of the ribbon reed is developed, based on simplified geometrical, mechanical and fluid models drawn from the human voice literature. The physical parameters of the ribbon reed model are then adapted to those of the odontocete larynx. With reasonable estimates of real physical parameters, both the ribbon reed and odontocete larynx models produce sounds that are perceptually similar to their real-world counterparts, and both respond realistically under varying control conditions. Comparisons of acoustic features of the real-world and synthetic systems show a number of consistencies. While this does not on its own prove that either model is conclusively an accurate description of the source, it

  11. Perceptually relevant parameters for virtual listening simulation of small room acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahorik, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Various physical aspects of room-acoustic simulation techniques have been extensively studied and refined, yet the perceptual attributes of the simulations have received relatively little attention. Here a method of evaluating the perceptual similarity between rooms is described and tested using 15 small-room simulations based on binaural room impulse responses (BRIRs) either measured from a real room or estimated using simple geometrical acoustic modeling techniques. Room size and surface absorption properties were varied, along with aspects of the virtual simulation including the use of individualized head-related transfer function (HRTF) measurements for spatial rendering. Although differences between BRIRs were evident in a variety of physical parameters, a multidimensional scaling analysis revealed that when at-the-ear signal levels were held constant, the rooms differed along just two perceptual dimensions: one related to reverberation time (T60) and one related to interaural coherence (IACC). Modeled rooms were found to differ from measured rooms in this perceptual space, but the differences were relatively small and should be easily correctable through adjustment of T60 and IACC in the model outputs. Results further suggest that spatial rendering using individualized HRTFs offers little benefit over nonindividualized HRTF rendering for room simulation applications where source direction is fixed. PMID:19640043

  12. Effect of stimuli presentation method on perception of room size using only acoustic cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Jeffrey Barnabas

    People listen to music and speech in a large variety of rooms and many room parameters, including the size of the room, can drastically affect how well the speech is understood or the music enjoyed. While multi-modal (typically hearing and sight) tests may be more realistic, in order to isolate what acoustic cues listeners use to determine the size of a room, a listening-only tests is conducted here. Nearly all of the studies to-date on the perception of room volume using acoustic cues have presented the stimuli only over headphones and these studies have reported that, in most cases, the perceived room volume is more highly correlated with the perceived reverberation (reverberance) than with actual room volume. While reverberance may be a salient acoustic cue used for the determination or room size, the actual sound field in a room is not accurately reproduced when presented over headphones and it is thought that some of the complexities of the sound field that relate to perception of geometric volume, specifically directional information of reflections, may be lost. It is possible that the importance of reverberance may be overemphasized when using only headphones to present stimuli so a comparison of room-size perception is proposed where the sound field (from modeled and recorded impulse responses) is presented both over headphones and also over a surround system using higher order ambisonics to more accurately produce directional sound information. Major results are that, in this study, no difference could be seen between the two presentation methods and that reverberation time is highly correlated to room-size perception while real room size is not.

  13. Prospectives to tractor cabin design with computational acoustics tools

    OpenAIRE

    Mönkölä, Sanna; Airaksinen, Tuomas; Makkonen, Pekka; Tuovinen, Tero; Neittaanmäki, Pekka

    2011-01-01

    Computational acoustical models allow automated optimization of tractor design with respect to acoustic properties, which could speed up significantly the design process of tractor cabin prototypes. This article gives insightful prospectives to the tractor design process by considering modern computational acoustics technology. Mathematical formulation for a system consisting of vibrating elastic tractor structure and airfilled acoustic enclosure are given and a related numerical solution tec...

  14. Scattering from objects and surfaces in room acoustical simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2016-01-01

    been implemented in the simulation tool PARISM (Phased Acoustical Radiosity and Image Source Method). Scattering from objects and surfaces is likely to be strongly frequency dependent and the frequency dependence can depend on their sizes, shapes and structure. The importance of the frequency...

  15. A numerical investigation of the Fick's law of diffusion in room acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visentin, Chiara; Prodi, Nicola; Valeau, Vincent; Picaut, Judicaël

    2012-11-01

    In this paper the validity of the Fick's law of diffusion in room acoustics is investigated in the stationary state. The Fick's law, underlying the room-acoustics diffusion model, assumes a proportionality relationship between the local sound intensity and the energy density gradient, the proportionality constant being the so-called diffusion coefficient. This relationship, based on an analogy with the behavior of real particles in a scattering medium, is assessed by using a numerical tool simulating the actual dynamics of sound particles in a room. Two types of room geometries are considered: rooms with proportionate dimensions and long rooms. Concerning proportionate rooms the numerical analysis highlights the presence of weak variations of the reverberant energy density, generating an intensity vector pattern which is shown to be correctly described by the theoretical Fick's law and homogeneous diffusion. Conversely, inside long rooms, an estimate of the local value of the diffusion coefficient is carried out, showing that the reverberant sound field is well described by a spatially varying diffusion coefficient (non-homogeneous diffusion). The rate of increase of the estimated diffusion coefficient depends on the cross-sectional area of the room and on the boundaries absorption coefficient.

  16. Speech intelligibility for normal hearing and hearing-impaired listeners in simulated room acoustic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arweiler, Iris; Dau, Torsten; Poulsen, Torben

    Speech intelligibility depends on many factors such as room acoustics, the acoustical properties and location of the signal and the interferers, and the ability of the (normal and impaired) auditory system to process monaural and binaural sounds. In the present study, the effect of reverberation...... on spatial release from masking was investigated in normal hearing and hearing impaired listeners using three types of interferers: speech shaped noise, an interfering female talker and speech-modulated noise. Speech reception thresholds (SRT) were obtained in three simulated environments: a listening room...... intelligibility and when binaural cues are effective. (Poster). Partly from HEARCOM project....

  17. Hearing Aids and Room Acoustics: an Entrepreneurial Physics Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caner, Edward

    2002-10-01

    We present an acoustics-based physics entrepreneurship project that identifies problems associated with hearing aids and listening environments such as restaurants and churches. The proposed company "Earcrafters" deals with the alarmingly low market penetration of hearing aids--especially amongst baby boomers--in two key ways: 1) Offering hearing instruments that "sound better" by way of improved frequency response throughout the audio spectrum and 2) applying marketing forces to effectively change the public perception that hearing aids are bulky and tinny-sounding. In contrast, the proposed company "US Sound" recognizes low hearing aid market penetration as a trend that will continue. The company is developing efficient methods to improve the acoustical environment of public areas such as restaurants and churches in order to fill the demand of baby boomers with hearing impairment--a number that has reached staggering proportions.

  18. A modified diffusion equation for room-acoustic predication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yun; Xiang, Ning

    2007-06-01

    This letter presents a modified diffusion model using an Eyring absorption coefficient to predict the reverberation time and sound pressure distributions in enclosures. While the original diffusion model [Ollendorff, Acustica 21, 236-245 (1969); J. Picaut et al., Acustica 83, 614-621 (1997); Valeau et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 1504-1513 (2006)] usually has good performance for low absorption, the modified diffusion model yields more satisfactory results for both low and high absorption. Comparisons among the modified model, the original model, a geometrical-acoustics model, and several well-established theories in terms of reverberation times and sound pressure level distributions, indicate significantly improved prediction accuracy by the modification.

  19. Active low frequency sound field control in a listening room using CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) will also reduce the sound transmitted to neighbour rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    is possible at modal frequencies. For that reason the modal frequencies in the source room will also have big impact on the transmission to neighbour rooms. These low frequency resonance frequencies are very audible in the source room but also in neighbour rooms as a booming bass. CABS (Controlled Acoustic......Sound in rooms and transmission of sound between rooms gives the biggest problems at low frequencies. Rooms with rectangular boundaries have strong resonance frequencies and will give big spatial variations in sound pressure level (SPL) in the source room, and an increase in SPL of 20 dB at a wall...... Bass System) is a time based room correction system for reproduced sound using loudspeakers. The system can remove room modes at low frequencies, by active cancelling the reflection from at the rear wall to a normal stereo setup. Measurements in a source room using CABS and in two neighbour rooms have...

  20. Nano-structured TiO2 film fabricated at room temperature and its acoustic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Cao, Wenwu; Jiang, Bei; Zhang, D S; Zheng, H; Zhou, Q; Shung, K K

    2009-01-01

    Nano-structured TiO2 thin film has been successfully fabricated at room temperature. Using a quarter wavelength characterization method, we have measured the acoustic impedance of this porous film, which can be adjusted from 5.3 to 7.19 Mrayl by curing it at different temperatures. The uniform microstructure and easy fabrication at room temperature make this material an excellent candidate for matching layers of ultra-high frequency ultrasonic imaging transducers. PMID:19672322

  1. Predicting and auralizing acoustics in classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge

    2005-01-01

    Although classrooms have fairly simple geometries, this type of room is known to cause problems when trying to predict their acoustics using room acoustics computer modeling. Some typical features from a room acoustics point of view are: Parallel walls, low ceilings (the rooms are flat), uneven...

  2. Room acoustics modeling using a point-cloud representation of the room geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Milos; Olesen, Søren Krarup; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    geometry acquisition is presented. The method exploits a depth sensor of the Kinect device that provides a point based information of a scanned room interior. After post-processing of the Kinect output data, a 3D point-cloud model of the room is obtained. Sound transmission between two selected points...

  3. Low frequency sound field control for loudspeakers in rectangular rooms using CABS (Controlled Acoustical Bass System)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Rectangular rooms are the most common shape for sound reproduction, but at low frequencies the reflections from the boundaries of the room cause large spatial variations in the sound pressure level.  Variations up to 30 dB are normal, not only at the room modes, but basically at all frequencies....... As sound propagates in time, it seems natural that the problems can best be analyzed and solved in the time domain. A time based room correction system named CABS (Controlled Acoustical Bass System) has been developed for sound reproduction in rectangular listening rooms. It can control the sound...... distribution in the room at low frequencies by using multiple loudspeakers together with an optimal placement of the loudspeakers.  At low frequencies CABS will create a plane wave from the front wall loudspeakers which will be absorbed by additional loudspeakers at the rear wall giving an almost homogeneous...

  4. Acoustic method for measuring air temperature and humidity in rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanev, N. G.

    2014-05-01

    A method is proposed to determine air temperature and humidity in rooms with a system of sound sources and receivers, making it possible to find the sound velocity and reverberation time. Nomograms for determining the air temperature and relative air humidity are constructed from the found sound velocity and time reverberation values. The required accuracy of measuring these parameters is estimated.

  5. Perceptual Adaptation to Room Acoustics and Effects on Speech Intelligibility in Hearing-Impaired Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahorik, Pavel; Brandewie, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Summary Recent evidence suggests that brief listening exposure to a reverberant room environment can improve closed-set speech intelligibility in that same environment. For normal-hearing populations, this room adaptation effect can result in improvements in intelligibility of as much as 20%, but depends strongly on the reverberation time of the room, and appears to require binaural input. Because poor speech intelligibility in reverberation is a common complaint for hearing-impaired listeners, it is important to determine how room adaptation might impact speech intelligibility for hearing-impaired populations. Here, room adaptation was quantified for a sample of listeners with sensorineural hearing loss that varied in severity and configuration. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were measured both with and without prior listening exposure to the room environment. Headphone-based auralization techniques were used to simulate the acoustics of various listening rooms, ranging from anechoic to highly reverberant space (broadband T60 = 3 s). Although SRTs both with and without prior room exposure were found to be generally elevated relative to normal-hearing listeners, the room adaptation effect, as defined by the relative decrease in SRT with room exposure, was comparable on average to that observed for normal-hearing listeners. This result is consistent with the view that room adaptation effects result from central auditory processing mechanisms. PMID:23455358

  6. Perceptual Adaptation to Room Acoustics and Effects on Speech Intelligibility in Hearing-Impaired Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahorik, Pavel; Brandewie, Eugene

    2011-06-27

    Recent evidence suggests that brief listening exposure to a reverberant room environment can improve closed-set speech intelligibility in that same environment. For normal-hearing populations, this room adaptation effect can result in improvements in intelligibility of as much as 20%, but depends strongly on the reverberation time of the room, and appears to require binaural input. Because poor speech intelligibility in reverberation is a common complaint for hearing-impaired listeners, it is important to determine how room adaptation might impact speech intelligibility for hearing-impaired populations. Here, room adaptation was quantified for a sample of listeners with sensorineural hearing loss that varied in severity and configuration. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were measured both with and without prior listening exposure to the room environment. Headphone-based auralization techniques were used to simulate the acoustics of various listening rooms, ranging from anechoic to highly reverberant space (broadband T60 = 3 s). Although SRTs both with and without prior room exposure were found to be generally elevated relative to normal-hearing listeners, the room adaptation effect, as defined by the relative decrease in SRT with room exposure, was comparable on average to that observed for normal-hearing listeners. This result is consistent with the view that room adaptation effects result from central auditory processing mechanisms.

  7. Relaxation of sound fields in rooms of diffusely reflecting boundaries and its application in acoustical radiosity simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honghu

    2006-04-01

    The acoustical radiosity method is a computationally expensive acoustical simulation algorithm that assumes an enclosure with ideal diffuse reflecting boundaries. Miles observed that for such an enclosure, the sound energy decay of every point on the boundaries will gradually converge to exponential manner with a uniform decay rate. Therefore, the ratio of radiosity between every pair of points on the boundaries will converge to a constant, and the radiosity across the boundaries will approach a fixed distribution during the sound decay process, where radiosity is defined as the acoustic power per unit area leaving (or being received by) a point on a boundary. We call this phenomenon the "relaxation" of the sound field. In this paper, we study the relaxation in rooms of different shapes with different boundary absorptions. Criteria based on the relaxation of the sound field are proposed to terminate the costly and unnecessary radiosity computation in the later phase, which can then be replaced by a fast regression step to speed up the acoustical radiosity simulation.

  8. Sparse Linear Parametric Modeling of Room Acoustics with Orthonormal Basis Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vairetti, G.; von Waterschoot, T.; Moonen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Orthonormal Basis Function (OBF) models provide a stable and well-conditioned representation of a linear system. When used for the modeling of room acoustics, useful information about the true dynamics of the system can be introduced by a proper selection of a set of poles, which however appear non...

  9. From Architectural Acoustics to Acoustical Architecture Using Computer Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2005-01-01

    to the design of Bagsvaerd Church by Jørn Utzon. The paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the programme in each phase compared to the works of architects not using acoustic simulation programmes. The conclusion of the paper points towards the need to apply the acoustic simulation programmes...... properties prior to the actual construction of a building. With the right tools applied, acoustic design can become an integral part of the architectural design process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the field of application that an acoustic simulation programme can have during an architectural...... acoustic design process and to set up a strategy to develop future programmes. The emphasis is put on the first three out of four phases in the working process of the architect and a case study is carried out in which each phase is represented by typical results ? as exemplified with reference...

  10. Room acoustic enhancement in a small hall with very low natural reverberation time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian

    1996-01-01

    In small multipurpose halls to be equipped with electronic reverberation enhancement systems, selecting a very low natural reverberation time is advantageous for several reasons. It will 1) reduce the risk of feedback, 2) increase the possible range of room acoustic variation and 3) allow for more...... natural combinations of room acoustic properties. Consequently, the natural reverberation time in a newly opened 350 seat multipurpose hall in Denmark was designed as low as 0.7 sec. Two different reverberation enhancement systems were considered and tested in the hall. The objective and subjective...... testing results are reported and compared with previous results obtained in another small hall supplied with a similar enhancement system. The results concerning 'realism' are also compared with acoustic properties found in 'natural' halls of different sizes and reverberation times....

  11. Measurement Combination for Acoustic Source Localization in a Room Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertilä Pasi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of time delay estimation (TDE is well understood and therefore attractive to apply in acoustic source localization (ASL. A time delay between microphones maps into a hyperbola. Furthermore, the likelihoods for different time delays are mapped into a set of weighted nonoverlapping hyperbolae in the spatial domain. Combining TDE functions from several microphone pairs results in a spatial likelihood function (SLF which is a combination of sets of weighted hyperbolae. Traditionally, the maximum SLF point is considered as the source location but is corrupted by reverberation and noise. Particle filters utilize past source information to improve localization performance in such environments. However, uncertainty exists on how to combine the TDE functions. Results from simulated dialogues in various conditions favor TDE combination using intersection-based methods over union. The real-data dialogue results agree with the simulations, showing a 45% RMSE reduction when choosing the intersection over union of TDE functions.

  12. Measurement Combination for Acoustic Source Localization in a Room Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi Pertilä

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of time delay estimation (TDE is well understood and therefore attractive to apply in acoustic source localization (ASL. A time delay between microphones maps into a hyperbola. Furthermore, the likelihoods for different time delays are mapped into a set of weighted nonoverlapping hyperbolae in the spatial domain. Combining TDE functions from several microphone pairs results in a spatial likelihood function (SLF which is a combination of sets of weighted hyperbolae. Traditionally, the maximum SLF point is considered as the source location but is corrupted by reverberation and noise. Particle filters utilize past source information to improve localization performance in such environments. However, uncertainty exists on how to combine the TDE functions. Results from simulated dialogues in various conditions favor TDE combination using intersection-based methods over union. The real-data dialogue results agree with the simulations, showing a 45% RMSE reduction when choosing the intersection over union of TDE functions.

  13. The effect of room acoustics on the sleep quality of healthy sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietze, Ingo; Barthe, Charlotte; Hölzl, Matthias; Glos, Martin; Zimmermann, Sandra; Bauer-Diefenbach, Ralf; Penzel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Noise is one of the factors that can seriously disturb sleep, and sound volume is an important factor in this context. One strategy involves avoiding exposure to sounds in the night, while entail the minimization of background noise in a bedroom. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of systematic sound attenuation on nocturnal sleep by influencing sound volume and reverberation within the context of room acoustics. On this basis, we designed a randomized, controlled crossover trial investigating 24 healthy sleepers (15 men and 9 women, aged 24.9 ± 4.1 years) with a body mass index (BMI) of 21.9 ± 1.6 kg/m2. Each participant slept for three consecutive nights at three different locations: (a) at our sleep lab, (b) at the participant's home, and (c) at an acoustically isolated room. In addition to conduct of polysomnography (PSG), subjective sleep quality and nocturnal noise level were measured at each location. We likewise measured room temperature and relative humidity. Under conditions of equal sleep efficiency, a significant increase in deep sleep, by 16-34 min, was determined in an acoustically isolated room in comparison to the two other sleep locations. Fewer arousal events and an increase in rapid eye movement (REM) latency became evident in an acoustically isolated environment. Sleep in a domestic environment was subjectively better than sleep under the two test conditions. For healthy sleepers, room acoustics influence the microstructure of sleep, without subjective morning benefit. Reduction of noise level and of reverberation leads to an increase in the amount of deep sleep and to reduction of nocturnal arousal events, which is especially important for poor sleepers.

  14. Factors Affecting Acoustics and Speech Intelligibility in the Operating Room: Size Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeer, Richard R; Bennett, Christopher L; Horn, Danielle Bodzin; Dudaryk, Roman

    2017-06-01

    Noise in health care settings has increased since 1960 and represents a significant source of dissatisfaction among staff and patients and risk to patient safety. Operating rooms (ORs) in which effective communication is crucial are particularly noisy. Speech intelligibility is impacted by noise, room architecture, and acoustics. For example, sound reverberation time (RT60) increases with room size, which can negatively impact intelligibility, while room objects are hypothesized to have the opposite effect. We explored these relationships by investigating room construction and acoustics of the surgical suites at our institution. We studied our ORs during times of nonuse. Room dimensions were measured to calculate room volumes (VR). Room content was assessed by estimating size and assigning items into 5 volume categories to arrive at an adjusted room content volume (VC) metric. Psychoacoustic analyses were performed by playing sweep tones from a speaker and recording the impulse responses (ie, resulting sound fields) from 3 locations in each room. The recordings were used to calculate 6 psychoacoustic indices of intelligibility. Multiple linear regression was performed using VR and VC as predictor variables and each intelligibility index as an outcome variable. A total of 40 ORs were studied. The surgical suites were characterized by a large degree of construction and surface finish heterogeneity and varied in size from 71.2 to 196.4 m (average VR = 131.1 [34.2] m). An insignificant correlation was observed between VR and VC (Pearson correlation = 0.223, P = .166). Multiple linear regression model fits and β coefficients for VR were highly significant for each of the intelligibility indices and were best for RT60 (R = 0.666, F(2, 37) = 39.9, P < .0001). For Dmax (maximum distance where there is <15% loss of consonant articulation), both VR and VC β coefficients were significant. For RT60 and Dmax, after controlling for VC, partial correlations were 0.825 (P

  15. Deriving content-specific measures of room acoustic perception using a binaural, nonlinear auditory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dorp Schuitman, Jasper; de Vries, Diemer; Lindau, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Acousticians generally assess the acoustic qualities of a concert hall or any other room using impulse response-based measures such as the reverberation time, clarity index, and others. These parameters are used to predict perceptual attributes related to the acoustic qualities of the room. Various studies show that these physical measures are not able to predict the related perceptual attributes sufficiently well under all circumstances. In particular, it has been shown that physical measures are dependent on the state of occupation, are prone to exaggerated spatial fluctuation, and suffer from lacking discrimination regarding the kind of acoustic stimulus being presented. Accordingly, this paper proposes a method for the derivation of signal-based measures aiming at predicting aspects of room acoustic perception from content specific signal representations produced by a binaural, nonlinear model of the human auditory system. Listening tests were performed to test the proposed auditory parameters for both speech and music. The results look promising; the parameters correlate with their corresponding perceptual attributes in most cases.

  16. Aero-acoustic Computations of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Michelsen, Jess; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2002-01-01

    A numerical algorithm for acoustic noise generation is extended to 3D flows. The approach involves two parts comprising a viscous incompressible flow part and an inviscid acoustic part. In order to simulate noise generated from a wind turbine, the incompressible and acoustic equations are written...

  17. An acoustic on-chip goniometer for room temperature macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, C G; Axford, D; Edwards, A M J; Gildea, R J; Morris, R H; Newton, M I; Orville, A M; Prince, M; Topham, P D; Docker, P T

    2017-11-10

    This paper describes the design, development and successful use of an on-chip goniometer for room-temperature macromolecular crystallography via acoustically induced rotations. We present for the first time a low cost, rate-tunable, acoustic actuator for gradual in-fluid sample reorientation about varying axes and its utilisation for protein structure determination on a synchrotron beamline. The device enables the efficient collection of diffraction data via a rotation method from a sample within a surface confined droplet. This method facilitates efficient macromolecular structural data acquisition in fluid environments for dynamical studies.

  18. A novel method for perceptual assessment of small room acoustics using rapid sensory analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplanis, Neofytos; Bech, Søren; Lokki, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    small rooms and car cabins. In-situ measurements were performed to obtain a range of possible acoustical settings, by varying physically the spaces under investigation. The measured responses were spatiallyanalyzed and synthesized to reproduce the observed fields in the laboratory. Expert listeners were...... presented with auralized sound over a loudspeaker array and followed a rapid sensory analysis protocol. The elicited attributes and ratings are analyzed and possible links to the acoustical properties of these spaces are discussed. [This study is a part of Marie Curie Network on Dereverberation...

  19. Speech Adjustments for Room Acoustics and Their Effects on Vocal Effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottalico, Pasquale

    2017-05-01

    The aims of the present study are (1) to analyze the effects of the acoustical environment and the voice style on time dose (Dt_p) and fundamental frequency (mean f0 and standard deviation std_f0) while taking into account the effect of short-term vocal fatigue and (2) to predict the self-reported vocal effort from the voice acoustical parameters. Ten male and ten female subjects were recorded while reading a text in normal and loud styles, in three rooms-anechoic, semi-reverberant, and reverberant-with and without acrylic glass panels 0.5 m from the mouth, which increased external auditory feedback. Subjects quantified how much effort was required to speak in each condition on a visual analogue scale after each task. (Aim1) In the loud style, Dt_p, f0, and std_f0 increased. The Dt_p was higher in the reverberant room compared to the other two rooms. Both genders tended to increase f0 in less reverberant environments, whereas a more monotonous speech was produced in rooms with greater reverberation. All three voice parameters increased with short-term vocal fatigue. (Aim2) A model of the vocal effort to acoustic vocal parameters is proposed. The sound pressure level contributed to 66% of the variance explained by the model, followed by the f0 (30%) and the modulation in amplitude (4%). The results provide insight into how voice acoustical parameters can predict vocal effort. In particular, it increased when SPL and f0 increased and when the amplitude voice modulation decreased. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. High Performance Computing Assets for Ocean Acoustics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-18

    can be tested against theory , practicality of computational methods can be determined, and studies of underwater acoustics phenomena can be...our models. APPROACH As outlined above, each processor in the acoustic calculation must access a large amount of memory at tills time. This is

  1. On architectural acoustic design using computer simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2004-01-01

    acoustic design process. The emphasis is put on the first three out of five phases in the working process of the architect and a case study is carried out in which each phase is represented by typical results ? as exemplified with reference to the design of Bagsværd Church by Jørn Utzon. The paper...... discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the programme in each phase compared to the works of architects not using acoustic simulation programmes. The conclusion of the paper is that the application of acoustic simulation programs is most beneficial in the last of three phases but an application...... properties prior to the actual construction of a building. With the right tools applied, acoustic design can become an integral part of the architectural design process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the field of application that an acoustic simulation programme can have during an architectural...

  2. Subjective rating and objective evaluation of the acoustic and indoor climate conditions in video conferencing rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauervig-Jørgensen, Charlotte; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Toftum, Jørn

    2017-01-01

    Today, face-to-face meetings are frequently replaced by video conferences in order to reduce costs and carbon footprint related to travels and to increase the company efficiency. Yet, complaints about the difficulty of understanding the speech of the participants in both rooms of the video...... conference occur. The aim of this study is to find out the main causes of difficulties in speech communication. Correlation studies between subjective perceptions were conducted through questionnaires and objective acoustic and indoor climate parameters related to video conferencing. Based on four single......-room and three combined-room measurements, it was found that the traditional measure of speech, such as the speech transmission index, was not correlated with the subjective classifications. Thus, a correlation analysis was conducted as an attempt to find the hidden factors behind the subjective perceptions...

  3. Assessment of vocal intensity in lecturers depending on acoustic properties of lecture rooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Mikulski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lombard’s effect increases the level of vocal intensity in the environment, in which noise occurs. This article presents the results of the author’s own study of vocal intensity level and A-weighted sound pressure level of background noise during normal lectures. The aim of the study was to define whether above-mentioned parameters depend on acoustic properties of rooms (classrooms or lecture rooms and to define how many lectors speak with raised voice. Material and Methods: The study was performed in a group of 50 teachers and lecturers in 10 classrooms with cubature of 160–430 m3 and reverberation time of 0.37–1.3 s (group A consisted of 3 rooms which fulfilled, group B consisted of 3 rooms which almost fulfilled and group C consisted of 4 rooms which did not fulfill criteria based on reverberation time (maximum permissible value is 0.6–0.8 s according to PN-B-02151-4:2015. Criteria of raising voice were based on vocal intensity level (maximum value: 65 dB according to EN ISO 9921:2003. The values of above-mentioned parameters were determined from modes of A-weighted sound pressure level distributions during lectures. Results: Great differentiation of vocal intensity level between lectors was found. In classrooms of group A lectors were not using raised voice, in group B – 21%, and in group C – 60% of lectors were using raised voice. Conclusions: It was observed that acoustic properties of classrooms (defined by reverberation time exert their effect on lecturer’s vocal intensity level (i.e., raising voice, which may contribute to the increased risk of vocal tract illnesses. The occurrence of Lombard’s effect in groups of teachers and lecturers, conducting lectures in rooms, was evidenced. Med Pr 2015;66(4:487–496

  4. [Assessment of vocal intensity in lecturers depending on acoustic properties of lecture rooms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulski, Witold

    2015-01-01

    Lombard's effect increases the level of vocal intensity in the environment, in which noise occurs. This article presents the results of the author's own study of vocal intensity level and A-weighted sound pressure level of background noise during normal lectures. The aim of the study was to define whether above-mentioned parameters depend on acoustic properties of rooms (classrooms or lecture rooms) and to define how many lectors speak with raised voice. The study was performed in a group of 50 teachers and lecturers in 10 classrooms with cubature of 160-430 m3 and reverberation time of 0.37-1.3 s (group A consisted of 3 rooms which fulfilled, group B consisted of 3 rooms which almost fulfilled and group C consisted of 4 rooms which did not fulfill criteria based on reverberation time (maximum permissible value is 0.6-0.8 s according to PN-B-02151-4:2015). Criteria of raising voice were based on vocal intensity level (maximum value: 65 dB according to EN ISO 9921:2003). The values of above-mentioned parameters were determined from modes of A--weighted sound pressure level distributions during lectures. Great differentiation of vocal intensity level between lectors was found. In classrooms of group A lectors were not using raised voice, in group B--21%, and in group C--60% of lectors were using raised voice. It was observed that acoustic properties of classrooms (defined by reverberation time) exert their effect on lecturer's vocal intensity level (i.e., raising voice), which may contribute to the increased risk of vocal tract illnesses. The occurrence of Lombard's effect in groups of teachers and lecturers, conducting lectures in rooms, was evidenced. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  5. Computer codes for evaluation of control room habitability (HABIT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stage, S.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the Computer Codes for Evaluation of Control Room Habitability (HABIT). HABIT is a package of computer codes designed to be used for the evaluation of control room habitability in the event of an accidental release of toxic chemicals or radioactive materials. Given information about the design of a nuclear power plant, a scenario for the release of toxic chemicals or radionuclides, and information about the air flows and protection systems of the control room, HABIT can be used to estimate the chemical exposure or radiological dose to control room personnel. HABIT is an integrated package of several programs that previously needed to be run separately and required considerable user intervention. This report discusses the theoretical basis and physical assumptions made by each of the modules in HABIT and gives detailed information about the data entry windows. Sample runs are given for each of the modules. A brief section of programming notes is included. A set of computer disks will accompany this report if the report is ordered from the Energy Science and Technology Software Center. The disks contain the files needed to run HABIT on a personal computer running DOS. Source codes for the various HABIT routines are on the disks. Also included are input and output files for three demonstration runs.

  6. Effects of speech style, room acoustics, and vocal fatigue on vocal effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottalico, Pasquale; Graetzer, Simone; Hunter, Eric J

    2016-05-01

    Vocal effort is a physiological measure that accounts for changes in voice production as vocal loading increases. It has been quantified in terms of sound pressure level (SPL). This study investigates how vocal effort is affected by speaking style, room acoustics, and short-term vocal fatigue. Twenty subjects were recorded while reading a text at normal and loud volumes in anechoic, semi-reverberant, and reverberant rooms in the presence of classroom babble noise. The acoustics in each environment were modified by creating a strong first reflection in the talker position. After each task, the subjects answered questions addressing their perception of the vocal effort, comfort, control, and clarity of their own voice. Variation in SPL for each subject was measured per task. It was found that SPL and self-reported effort increased in the loud style and decreased when the reflective panels were present and when reverberation time increased. Self-reported comfort and control decreased in the loud style, while self-reported clarity increased when panels were present. The lowest magnitude of vocal fatigue was experienced in the semi-reverberant room. The results indicate that early reflections may be used to reduce vocal effort without modifying reverberation time.

  7. Simultaneous measurements of room-acoustic parameters using different measuring equipment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halmrast, Tor; Gade, Anders Christian; Winsvold, Bjorn

    1998-01-01

    known room-acoustic parameters. For the reverberation time parameters RT and EDT, very good agreement was found between the three main measuring equipments. For Ts and C80 the agreement between these three is good/fair for the higher frequencies, but less good for the bass, especially C80....... The measurements with Electric Pulse and Pistol as signals (analyzed through Norsonic+MatLab) indicate good agreement for the reverberation times, but EDT is somewhat higher for the Pistol. For Ts and C80 the Electric Impulse and especially the Pistol give less clearness (higher Ts and lower C80), compared...

  8. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject.

  9. Requirements for Control Room Computer-Based Procedures for use in Hybrid Control Rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Blanc, Katya Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Oxstrand, Johanna Helene [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey Clark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Many plants in the U.S. are currently undergoing control room modernization. The main drivers for modernization are the aging and obsolescence of existing equipment, which typically results in a like-for-like replacement of analogue equipment with digital systems. However, the modernization efforts present an opportunity to employ advanced technology that would not only extend the life, but enhance the efficiency and cost competitiveness of nuclear power. Computer-based procedures (CBPs) are one example of near-term advanced technology that may provide enhanced efficiencies above and beyond like for like replacements of analog systems. Researchers in the LWRS program are investigating the benefits of advanced technologies such as CBPs, with the goal of assisting utilities in decision making during modernization projects. This report will describe the existing research on CBPs, discuss the unique issues related to using CBPs in hybrid control rooms (i.e., partially modernized analog control rooms), and define the requirements of CBPs for hybrid control rooms.

  10. Aero-Acoustic Computations of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun

    2008-01-01

    both for laminar and turbulent flows. Results have shown that sound generation is due to the unsteadiness of the flow field and the spectrum of sound has a strong relation with fluctuating forces on the solid body. Flow and acoustic simulation were also carried out for a wind turbine where general...

  11. Control of Computer Room Air Conditioning using IT Equipment Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, Geoffrey C.; Storey, Bill; Patterson, Michael K.

    2009-09-30

    The goal of this demonstration was to show how sensors in IT equipment could be accessed and used to directly control computer room air conditioning. The data provided from the sensors is available on the IT network and the challenge for this project was to connect this information to the computer room air handler's control system. A control strategy was developed to enable separate control of the chilled water flow and the fans in the computer room air handlers. By using these existing sensors in the IT equipment, an additional control system is eliminated (or could be redundant) and optimal cooling can be provided saving significant energy. Using onboard server temperature sensors will yield significant energy reductions in data centers. Intel hosted the demonstration in its Santa Clara, CA data center. Intel collaborated with IBM, HP, Emerson, Wunderlich-Malec Engineers, FieldServer Technologies, and LBNL to install the necessary components and develop the new control scheme. LBNL also validated the results of the demonstration.

  12. Room acoustic analysis of blower unit and noise control plan in the typical steel industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the steel industry,air blowers used to supply compressed air are considered as sources of annoying noise. This study aims to acoustics analysis of theairblower workroomand sound source characteristics in order to present noise controlmeasuresinthe steel industry. .Material and Method: Measurement of noiselevel and its frequency analysis was performed usingsound levelmetermodelof CASELLA-Cell.450. Distribution of noise level in the investigated workroom in form of noise map was provided using Surfer software. In addition, acoustic analysis of workroom and control room was performed in view point of soundabsorption andinsulation. Redesignofdoor and window of controlroom and installation of soundabsorbing materialson theceiling of the workroom were proposed and the efficiency of these interventionswasestimated. .Result: The totalsound pressurelevelin the blower workroom was 95.4 dB(L and the dominant frequency was 2000Hz. Sound pressure level inside the room control was 80.1dB(A. The average absorption coefficient and reverberation time in the blower workroom was estimated equal to 0.082 Sab.m2 and 3.9 seconds respectively. These value in control room was 0.04 Sab.m2 and 3/4 seconds respectively. In control room, sound transmission loss between the two parts of the wall dividing was 13.7 dB(A. The average of noise dose in blower operators was 230%. With the installation of sound absorber on ceiling of workroom, average of absorption coefficient can increase to 0.33 Sab.m2 and sound transmission loss of the new designed door and window was estimated equal to 20dB. . Conclusion: The main cause of noise leakage in the control room was insufficient insulation properties of door and windows. By replacing the door and window and installation of sound absorbing on ceiling of workroom, the noise dose can reduce to 49.6%. New Improved door and window of control room can reduce noise dose to 69.65% solely.

  13. Low frequency sound field control in rectangular listening rooms using CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) will also reduce sound transmission to neighbor rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    from the rear wall, and thereby leaving only the plane wave in the room. With a room size of (7.8 x 4.1 x 2.8) m. it is possible to prevent modal frequencies up to 100 Hz. An investigation has shown that the sound transmitted to a neighbour room also will be reduced if CABS is used. The principle......Sound reproduction is often taking place in small and medium sized rectangular rooms. As rectangular rooms have 3 pairs of parallel walls the reflections at especially low frequencies will cause up to 30 dB spatial variations of the sound pressure level in the room. This will take place not only...... at resonance frequencies, but more or less at all frequencies. A time based room correction system named CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) has been developed and is able to create a homogeneous sound field in the whole room at low frequencies by proper placement of multiple loudspeakers. A normal setup...

  14. Low frequency sound field control in rectangular listening rooms using CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) will also reduce sound transmission to neighbor rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    at resonance frequencies, but more or less at all frequencies. A time based room correction system named CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) has been developed and is able to create a homogeneous sound field in the whole room at low frequencies by proper placement of multiple loudspeakers. A normal setup......Sound reproduction is often taking place in small and medium sized rectangular rooms. As rectangular rooms have 3 pairs of parallel walls the reflections at especially low frequencies will cause up to 30 dB spatial variations of the sound pressure level in the room. This will take place not only...... from the rear wall, and thereby leaving only the plane wave in the room. With a room size of (7.8 x 4.1 x 2.8) m. it is possible to prevent modal frequencies up to 100 Hz. An investigation has shown that the sound transmitted to a neighbour room also will be reduced if CABS is used. The principle...

  15. Research on OpenStack of open source cloud computing in colleges and universities’ computer room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Dandan

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, the cloud computing technology has a rapid development, especially open source cloud computing. Open source cloud computing has attracted a large number of user groups by the advantages of open source and low cost, have now become a large-scale promotion and application. In this paper, firstly we briefly introduced the main functions and architecture of the open source cloud computing OpenStack tools, and then discussed deeply the core problems of computer labs in colleges and universities. Combining with this research, it is not that the specific application and deployment of university computer rooms with OpenStack tool. The experimental results show that the application of OpenStack tool can efficiently and conveniently deploy cloud of university computer room, and its performance is stable and the functional value is good.

  16. The acoustical history of Hagia Sophia revived through computer simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Weitze, C.A.; Christensen, Claus Lynge

    2002-01-01

    The present paper deals with acoustic computer simulations of Hagia Sophia, which is characterized not only by being one of the largest worship buildings in the world, but also by – in its 1500 year history – having served three purposes: as a church, as a mosque and today as a museum...

  17. Examination of the Measurement of Absorption Using the Reverberant Room Method for Highly Absorptive Acoustic Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; Chris Nottoli; Eric Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    The absorption coefficient for material specimens are needed to quantify the expected acoustic performance of that material in its actual usage and environment. The ASTM C423-09a standard, "Standard Test Method for Sound Absorption and Sound Absorption Coefficients by the Reverberant Room Method" is often used to measure the absorption coefficient of material test specimens. This method has its basics in the Sabine formula. Although widely used, the interpretation of these measurements are a topic of interest. For example, in certain cases the measured Sabine absorption coefficients are greater than 1.0 for highly absorptive materials. This is often attributed to the diffraction edge effect phenomenon. An investigative test program to measure the absorption properties of highly absorbent melamine foam has been performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratories. This paper will present and discuss the test results relating to the effect of the test materials' surface area, thickness and edge sealing conditions. A follow-on paper is envisioned that will present and discuss the results relating to the spacing between multiple piece specimens, and the mounting condition of the test specimen.

  18. Evaluating the auralization of a small room in a virtual sound environment using objective room acoustic measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrens, Axel; Marschall, Marton; Dau, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    of the room. The auralizations were generated using the loudspeaker-based room auralization toolbox (LoRA; Favrot and Buchholz, 2010) and reproduced in a 64-channel loudspeaker array, set up in an anechoic chamber. Differences between the objective measures evaluated in the real and the virtual room were...

  19. Computational studies of steady-state sound field and reverberant sound decay in a system of two coupled rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Mirosław

    2007-09-01

    The acoustical properties of an irregularly shaped room consisting of two connected rectangular subrooms were studied. An eigenmode method supported by a numerical implementation has been used to predict acoustic characteristics of the coupled system, such as the distribution of the sound pressure in steady-state and the reverberation time. In the theoretical model a low-frequency limit was considered. In this case the eigenmodes are lightly damped, thusthey were approximated by normal acoustic modes of a hard-walled room. The eigenfunctions and eigenfrequencies were computed numerically via application of a forced oscillator method with a finite difference algorithm. The influence of coupling between subrooms on acoustic parameters of the enclosure was demonstrated in numerical simulations where different distributions of absorbing materials on the walls of the subrooms and various positions of the sound source were assumed. Calculation results have shown that for large differences in the absorption coefficient in the subrooms the effect of modal localization contributes to peaks of RMS pressure in steady-state and a large increase in the reverberation time.

  20. Room acoustics analysis using circular arrays: an experimental study based on sound field plane-wave decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ana M; Lopez, Jose J; Pueo, Basilio; Cobos, Maximo

    2013-04-01

    Plane-wave decomposition (PWD) methods using microphone arrays have been shown to be a very useful tool within the applied acoustics community for their multiple applications in room acoustics analysis and synthesis. While many theoretical aspects of PWD have been previously addressed in the literature, the practical advantages of the PWD method to assess the acoustic behavior of real rooms have been barely explored so far. In this paper, the PWD method is employed to analyze the sound field inside a selected set of real rooms having a well-defined purpose. To this end, a circular microphone array is used to capture and process a number of impulse responses at different spatial positions, providing angle-dependent data for both direct and reflected wavefronts. The detection of reflected plane waves is performed by means of image processing techniques applied over the raw array response data and over the PWD data, showing the usefulness of image-processing-based methods for room acoustics analysis.

  1. Controlled Acoustic Bass System (CABS) A Method to Achieve Uniform Sound Field Distribution at Low Frequencies in Rectangular Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian; Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal

    2008-01-01

    ), is introduced. The system utilizes front loudspeakers and extra loudspeakers on the opposite wall of the room processed to cancel out the rear-wall reflections, which effectively conveys a more uniform sound field. The system works in the time domain and presents good performance over the loudspeaker low......The sound field produced by loudspeakers at low frequencies in small- and medium-size rectangular listening rooms is highly nonuniform due to the multiple reflections and diffractions of sound on the walls and different objects in the room. A new method, called controlled acoustic bass system (CABS...

  2. Computational dynamics of acoustically-driven microsphere systems

    CERN Document Server

    Glosser, Connor A; Dault, Daniel L; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2015-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the inter-particle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of non-dissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities, and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation ...

  3. Anaesthetists' role in computer keyboard contamination in an operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, T; Iwakiri, H; Ozaki, M

    2008-10-01

    To store anaesthetic records in computers, anaesthetists usually input data while still wearing dirty wet gloves. No studies have explored computer contamination in the operating room (OR) or anaesthetists' awareness of the importance of handwashing or hand hygiene. We investigated four components of keyboard contamination: (1) degree of contamination, (2) effect of cleaning with ethyl alcohol, (3) bacterial transmission between gloves and keyboards by tapping keys, and (4) frequency of anaesthetists' performing hand hygiene. Most of the bacteria on keyboards were coagulase-negative staphylococci and Bacillus spp.; however, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was also found. Cleaning keyboards with ethyl alcohol effectively reduced bacterial counts. Wet contaminated gloves and keyboards transmitted meticillin-susceptible Staphylococcus epidermidis from one to the other more readily than dry contaminated gloves and keyboards. Only 17% of anaesthetists performed hand hygiene before anaesthesia, although 64% or 69% of anaesthetists performed hand hygiene after anaesthesia or before lunch. To prevent cross-contamination, keyboards should be routinely cleaned according to the manufacturer's instructions and disinfected once daily, or, when visibly soiled with blood or secretions. Moreover, anaesthetists should be aware that they could spread microbes that might cause healthcare-associated infection in the OR. Anaesthetists should perform hand hygiene before and after anaesthesia and remove gloves after each procedure and before using the computer.

  4. Human Computer Interaction in the ALMA Control Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, M.; Primet, R.; Pietriga, E.; Schwarz, J.

    2012-09-01

    The article describes the ALMA Operations Monitoring and Control (OMC) software and its next generation user interfaces, used by operators and astronomers to monitor and control the observing facility. These user interfaces bring state-of-the-art Human Computer Interaction (HCI) techniques to the ALMA Control Room: map visualisation, semantic zooming, navigation gestures, multiple coordinated views, and decrease of time-to-point. They enable users to stay in control of dozens of antennas, hundreds of devices, and thousands of baselines. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), an international radio-astronomy facility, is a partnership of North America, Europe and East Asia in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. It is located at the Altiplano de Chajnantor and is being operated from the Operations Support Facilities (OSF) near San Pedro de Atacama.

  5. Noise disturbance in open-plan study environments: a field study on noise sources, student tasks and room acoustic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braat-Eggen, P Ella; van Heijst, Anne; Hornikx, Maarten; Kohlrausch, Armin

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to gain more insight in the assessment of noise in open-plan study environments and to reveal correlations between noise disturbance experienced by students and the noise sources they perceive, the tasks they perform and the acoustic parameters of the open-plan study environment they work in. Data were collected in five open-plan study environments at universities in the Netherlands. A questionnaire was used to investigate student tasks, perceived sound sources and their perceived disturbance, and sound measurements were performed to determine the room acoustic parameters. This study shows that 38% of the surveyed students are disturbed by background noise in an open-plan study environment. Students are mostly disturbed by speech when performing complex cognitive tasks like studying for an exam, reading and writing. Significant but weak correlations were found between the room acoustic parameters and noise disturbance of students. Practitioner Summary: A field study was conducted to gain more insight in the assessment of noise in open-plan study environments at universities in the Netherlands. More than one third of the students was disturbed by noise. An interaction effect was found for task type, source type and room acoustic parameters.

  6. Energy- and wave-based beam-tracing prediction of room-acoustical parameters using different boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefzadeh, Behrooz; Hodgson, Murray

    2012-09-01

    A beam-tracing model was used to study the acoustical responses of three empty, rectangular rooms with different boundary conditions. The model is wave-based (accounting for sound phase) and can be applied to rooms with extended-reaction surfaces that are made of multiple layers of solid, fluid, or poroelastic materials-the acoustical properties of these surfaces are calculated using Biot theory. Three room-acoustical parameters were studied in various room configurations: sound strength, reverberation time, and RApid Speech Transmission Index. The main objective was to investigate the effects of modeling surfaces as either local or extended reaction on predicted values of these three parameters. Moreover, the significance of modeling interference effects was investigated, including the study of sound phase-change on surface reflection. Modeling surfaces as of local or extended reaction was found to be significant for surfaces consisting of multiple layers, specifically when one of the layers is air. For multilayers of solid materials with an air-cavity, this was most significant around their mass-air-mass resonance frequencies. Accounting for interference effects made significant changes in the predicted values of all parameters. Modeling phase change on reflection, on the other hand, was found to be relatively much less significant.

  7. Dry sand as a specialized layer to improve the acoustic insulation between rooms one above another

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz, C.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents and analyses the experimental field results of the sound insulation from airborne and impact noise of the horizontal separating elements commonly used in the past, in which a uniform layer of sand was placed on top of the floor construction to serve as a base for the ceramic tiling. The results of the acoustic measurements show that when there is an intermediate layer of sand in the horizontal separating element between rooms, the sound insulation is greater than would be obtained with other construction systems with equal mass per unit area, where the floor is joined rigidly to the floor construction. The effect on the sound insulation between the rooms produced by this layer of sand placed between the floor construction and the tiling is that of a cushioning layer, and demonstrates that this type of structure acts as a floating floor.En este trabajo se exponen y se analizan los resultados experimentales in situ del aislamiento acústico a ruido aéreo y a ruido de impactos de elementos de separación horizontales, habituales hace años, en los que sobre el forjado se coloca una capa uniforme de arena que sirve de asiento al suelo cerámico. Los resultados de las mediciones acústicas muestran que, cuando en el elemento de separación horizontal entre los recintos hay una capa intermedia de arena, el aislamiento acústico es mejor que el que se obtendría con otros sistemas constructivos de igual masa por unidad de superficie, con el suelo unido rígidamente al forjado. El efecto de la capa de arena colocada entre el forjado y el suelo, en el aislamiento acústico entre los recintos, es el de una capa amortiguadora, que hace que este tipo de suelo pueda considerarse como flotante.

  8. Gradient computation for VTI acoustic wavefield tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Vladimir

    2016-09-06

    Wavefield tomography can handle complex subsurface geology better than ray-based techniques and, ultimately, provide a higher resolution. Here, we implement forward and adjoint wavefield extrapolation for VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) media using a pseudospectral operator that employes a separable approximation of the P-wave dispersion relation. This operator is employed to derive the gradients of the differential semblance optimization (DSO) and modified stack-power objective functions. We also obtain the gradient expressions for the data-domain objective function, which can incorporate borehole information necessary for stable VTI velocity analysis. These gradients are compared to the ones obtained with a space-time finite-difference (FD) scheme for a system of coupled wave equations. Whereas the kernels computed with the two wave-equation operators are similar, the pseudospectral method is not hampered by the imprint of the shear-wave artifact. Numerical examples also show that the modified stack-power objective function produces cleaner gradients than the more conventional DSO operator.

  9. Effects of room acoustics on the intelligibility of speech in classrooms for young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W; Bradley, J S

    2009-02-01

    This paper reports new measurements of the intelligibility of speech in conditions representative of elementary school classrooms. The speech test material was binaurally recorded in simulated classroom conditions and played back to subjects over headphones. Subjects included grade 1, 3, and 6 students (6, 8, and 11 year olds) as well as adults. Recognizing that reverberation time is not a complete descriptor of room acoustics conditions, simulated conditions included realistic early-to-late arriving sound ratios as well as varied reverberation time. For conditions of constant signal-to-noise ratio, intelligibility scores increased with decreasing reverberation time. However, for conditions including realistic increases in speech level with varied reverberation time for constant noise level, intelligibility scores were near maximum for a range of reverberation times. Young children's intelligibility scores benefited from added early reflections of speech sounds similar to adult listeners. The effect of varied reverberation time on the intelligibility of speech for young children was much less than the effect of varied signal-to-noise ratio. The results can be used to help to determine ideal conditions for speech communication in classrooms for younger listeners.

  10. Physical and numerical constraints in source modeling for finite difference simulation of room acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheaffer, Jonathan; van Walstijn, Maarten; Fazenda, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    In finite difference time domain simulation of room acoustics, source functions are subject to various constraints. These depend on the way sources are injected into the grid and on the chosen parameters of the numerical scheme being used. This paper addresses the issue of selecting and designing sources for finite difference simulation, by first reviewing associated aims and constraints, and evaluating existing source models against these criteria. The process of exciting a model is generalized by introducing a system of three cascaded filters, respectively, characterizing the driving pulse, the source mechanics, and the injection of the resulting source function into the grid. It is shown that hard, soft, and transparent sources can be seen as special cases within this unified approach. Starting from the mechanics of a small pulsating sphere, a parametric source model is formulated by specifying suitable filters. This physically constrained source model is numerically consistent, does not scatter incoming waves, and is free from zero- and low-frequency artifacts. Simulation results are employed for comparison with existing source formulations in terms of meeting the spectral and temporal requirements on the outward propagating wave.

  11. Effects of damping on the low-frequency acoustics of listening rooms based on an analytical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dance, Stephen M.; Van Buuren, Gil

    2013-12-01

    A study of the effects of damping on the low-frequency acoustics of listening rooms has been undertaken. The study was carried out using a new numerical implementation of an analytical solution based on a model developed by Bistafa and Morrissey. The model was designed to simulate the sound field in rectangular enclosures below the Schroeder cut-off frequency. Four hypothetical rooms were studied, a lightly damped room, a well damped room, a statistically compliant European Broadcast Union control room and a compliant European Broadcast Union control room. The most important result from the study using the proposed model was the influence of modes above the Schroeder cut-off frequency on reverberation time. This was caused by the variations in damping between mode types and variations in the modal coupling between the source and receiver. The research suggests that Schroeder's 1954 cut-off frequency for the influence of modes was more correct for highly damped rooms, in comparison with the Schroeder's 1964 relation.

  12. HOSPITAL SOUNDSCAPE: ACOUSTICS EVALUATION IN NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT (NICU ROOM OF A NATIONAL HOSPITAL IN JAKARTA, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SARWONO R. Sugeng Joko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Acoustics comfort in a room is one of the most important building physics aspect that should be observed. in public spaces like hospital, especially in an intensive care unit such as NICU. Researches on the acoustic conditions of NICU in Indonesia are still limited. The acoustical study conducted in this research is using objective, subjective, and simulation methods based on soundscape concept with the concern on the nurse’s perception. This research was conducted at a national hospital in Jakarta. According to National Standardization Agency of Indonesia (SNI and World Health Organization (WHO, the suitable sound pressure level (SPL for noise in patient’s room is 35 dBA. From the study, it was found that the equivalent SPL value exceeded the standard. Soundscape in NICU can be improve with the addition of curtain on the incubator’s side, installation of glass partition, and ceiling absorber in the nurse station area. The result of simulation showed that the SPL in the room decreased with average value 8.9 dBA for sound source alarm ventilator and 8.2 dBA for sound source medical officer conversations. And the speech transmission index (STI increased from “bad” to “good” range became “fair” to “excellent” range.

  13. Low frequency sound reproduction in irregular rooms using CABS (Control Acoustic Bass System)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian; Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal

    2011-01-01

    of an irregular room model using the FDTD (Finite Difference Time Domain) method has been presented. CABS has been simulated in the irregular room model. Measurements of CABS in a real irregular room have been performed. The performance of CABS was affected by the irregular shape of the room due to the corner...

  14. Applying a Wearable Voice-Activated Computer to Instructional Applications in Clean Room Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Corey A.; Lupisella, Mark L.

    2004-01-01

    The use of wearable computing technology in restrictive environments related to space applications offers promise in a number of domains. The clean room environment is one such domain in which hands-free, heads-up, wearable computing is particularly attractive for education and training because of the nature of clean room work We have developed and tested a Wearable Voice-Activated Computing (WEVAC) system based on clean room applications. Results of this initial proof-of-concept work indicate that there is a strong potential for WEVAC to enhance clean room activities.

  15. Measurement of the sound power incident on the walls of a reverberation room with near field acoustic holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Tiana Roig, Elisabet

    2010-01-01

    The conventional method of measuring the insertion loss of a partition relies on an assumption of the sound field in the source room being diffuse combined with the classical relation between the spatial average of the mean square pressure in the source room and the incident sound power per unit...... area; and it has always been regarded as impossible to measure the sound power that is incident on a wall directly. This paper examines a new method of determining this quantity from sound pressure measurements at positions on the wall using 'statistically optimised near field acoustic holography......' (SONAH). The purpose is to examine whether one should use a correction similar to the well-known 'Waterhouse correction' when the incident sound power is deduced from the sound pressure in the source room....

  16. ESTIMATION METHODS FOR ACOUSTIC IMPROVEMENT OF ROOMS USING MEASUREMENTS OF REVERBERATION TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya S. Shevchenko

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available  Estimation methods for reverberation time as a main approach for evaluation of premise acoustic characteristics has been considered. The veracity of results, obtained in reverberation camera has been proved. Assessment of acoustic characteristics of lecture-hall has been carried out. 

  17. Computational studies of steady-state sound field and reverberant sound decay in a system of two coupled rooms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meissner, Mirosław

    2007-01-01

    ... and the reverberation time. In the theoretical model a low-frequency limit was considered. In this case the eigenmodes are lightly damped, thusthey were approximated by normal acoustic modes of a hard-walled room...

  18. Ultrasonic acoustic levitation for fast frame rate X-ray protein crystallography at room temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Tomizaki, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    ... of biomolecules and structure-based drug developments. Using lysozyme model crystals, we demonstrated the rapid acquisition of X-ray diffraction datasets by combining a high frame rate pixel array detector with ultrasonic acoustic levitation of protein...

  19. Development of a pressure based room acoustic model using impedance descriptions of surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    and acoustic radiosity will account for the diffuse reflections. This paper presents the motivation for the new model in the form of results in literature, which show the importance of retaining the angle dependence and phase information in reflections along with simple examples of angle dependent reflection...... absorption coefficient, thus retaining the phase and the angle dependence. The approach of the proposed model will be to calculate the pressure impulse response using a combination of the image source method and acoustic radiosity. The image source method will account for the specular reflections...

  20. What's a Computer Doing in My Music Room?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, James L.

    1983-01-01

    Computers and humans use similar methods to process information. Advantages of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) include individual instruction, immediate positive reinforcement, high motivation, consistency, and organized instruction. Disadvantages of CAI include inadequate instructional programs, time needed to develop software,…

  1. Prospects for Computational Fluid Dynamics in Room Air Contaminant Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    The fluid dynamics research is strongly influenced by the increasing computer power which has been available for the last decades. This development is obvious from the curve in figure 1 which shows the computation cost as a function of years. It is obvious that the cost for a given job will decre...

  2. Room escape at class: Escape games activities to facilitate the motivation and learning in computer science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Borrego

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Real-life room-escape games are ludic activities in which participants enter a room in order to get out of it only after solving some riddles. In this paper, we explain a Room Escape teaching experience developed in the Engineering School at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. The goal of this activity is to increase student’s motivation and to improve their learning on two courses of the second year in the Computer Engineering degree: Computer Networksand Information and Security.

  3. Influence of sensory interactions between vision and audition on the perceptual characterisation of room acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nathanail, Crysantie; Lavandier, Catherine; Polack, Jean-Dominique

    1999-01-01

    Visual information available to listeners-spectators in concert hall interferes in the evaluation process of the acoustical quality. The influence of the stage visual distance on the auditory apparent distance was studied in four magnitude estimation paradigms. The main result is that the same...

  4. Dynamic acoustics for the STAR-100. [computer algorithms for time dependent sound waves in jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, A.; Turkel, E.

    1979-01-01

    An algorithm is described to compute time dependent acoustic waves in a jet. The method differs from previous methods in that no harmonic time dependence is assumed, thus permitting the study of nonharmonic acoustical behavior. Large grids are required to resolve the acoustic waves. Since the problem is nonstiff, explicit high order schemes can be used. These have been adapted to the STAR-100 with great efficiencies and permitted the efficient solution of problems which would not be feasible on a scalar machine.

  5. Transmitting Information by Propagation in an Ocean Waveguide: Computation of Acoustic Field Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-17

    OFDM systems in highly dispersive channels ,” J. Electr. Comput. Eng. 2012, 1–15 (2012). 14. T. Hayward and T. C. Yang, “Single and multi- channel ... Systems Branch Acoustics Division earl WilliamS Senior Scientist for Structural Acoustics Acoustics Division i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form...of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering

  6. Spatial analysis and auralization of room acoustics using a tetrahedral microphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amengual Garí, Sebastià V; Lachenmayr, Winfried; Mommertz, Eckard

    2017-04-01

    A compact tetrahedral microphone array is used to measure several controlled sound fields and compare the analysis of spatial room impulse responses with two methods: spatial decomposition method (SDM) and IRIS, a commercial system based on sound intensity vector analysis. Results suggest that the spatial accuracy of both methods is similar and in most cases the error is comparable to the localization uncertainty of human listeners. Furthermore, a listening test is conducted comparing three 3D-sound fields and their SDM auralizations. Results suggest that the similarity of the auralized and original sound fields depends on the target room and stimulus.

  7. Time domain finite element method for the calculation of impulse response of enclosed spaces. Room acoustics application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Nikos; Stavroulakis, Georgios E.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the accuracy and applicability of the Time Domain Finite Element Method (TDFEM) for sound-field analysis of enclosed spaces. An outline of the method is displayed for the calculation of the impulse response of a reverberant room. Frequency response and cumulative spectral decay which are useful for the representation of spaces can be derived from the impulse response. Room impulse response of an actual room was first measured with the Maximum Length Sequence (MLS) technique and then calculated with the time domain finite element method in the low frequency range. Frequency response and cumulative spectral decay are extracted from the calculated impulse response and then compared with the measured ones. The computed parameters agree well with the measured ones. The time domain finite element method is a valuable technique for accurate prediction of the sound field of enclosed spaces.

  8. Computational analysis of acoustic transmission through periodically perforated interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan E.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to demonstrate the homogenization approach applied to modelling the acoustic transmission on perforated interfaces embedded in the acoustic fluid. We assume a layer, with periodically perforated obstacles, separating two half-spaces filled with the fluid. The homogenization method provides limit transmission conditions which can be prescribed at the homogenized surface representing the "limit" interface. The conditions describe relationship between jump of the acoustic pressures and the transversal acoustic velocity, on introducing the "in-layer pressure" which describes wave propagation in the tangent directions with respect to the interface.This approach may serve as a relevant tool for optimal design of devices aimed at attenuation of the acoustic waves, such as the engine exhaust mufflers or other structures fitted with sieves and grillages. We present numerical examples of wave propagation in a muffler-like structure illustrating viability of the approach when complex 3D geometries of the interface perforation are considered.

  9. Binaural room simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, H.; Blauert, Jens; Pompetzki, W.

    1991-01-01

    In every-day listening the auditory event perceived by a listener is determined not only by the sound signal that a sound emits but also by a variety of environmental parameters. These parameters are the position, orientation and directional characteristics of the sound source, the listener's position and orientation, the geometrical and acoustical properties of surfaces which affect the sound field and the sound propagation properties of the surrounding fluid. A complete set of these parameters can be called an Acoustic Environment. If the auditory event perceived by a listener is manipulated in such a way that the listener is shifted acoustically into a different acoustic environment without moving himself physically, a Virtual Acoustic Environment has been created. Here, we deal with a special technique to set up nearly arbitrary Virtual Acoustic Environments, the Binaural Room Simulation. The purpose of the Binaural Room Simulation is to compute the binaural impulse response related to a virtual acoustic environment taking into account all parameters mentioned above. One possible way to describe a Virtual Acoustic Environment is the concept of the virtual sound sources. Each of the virtual sources emits a certain signal which is correlated but not necessarily identical with the signal emitted by the direct sound source. If source and receiver are non moving, the acoustic environment becomes a linear time-invariant system. Then, the Binaural Impulse Response from the source to a listener' s eardrums contains all relevant auditory information related to the Virtual Acoustic Environment. Listening into the simulated environment can easily be achieved by convolving the Binaural Impulse Response with dry signals and representing the results via headphones.

  10. Good acoustics of auditoria; Design by means of computer simulation and model mesaurement. Gute Akustik von Auditorien; Planung mittels Rechnersimulation und Modelmesstechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasold, W. (Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Bauphysik, Stuttgart (Germany)); Stephenson, U. (Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Bauphysik, Stuttgart (Germany))

    1993-03-01

    The field of knowledge concerning ''good acoustics'' of auditoria which is the aim of roomacoustic design will be discussed. A comparison between measurements and subjective judgements received in two concert halls of the same mean reverberation time underlines that this alone cannot be enough for characterizing rooms for music performances. Sufficient criteria can be derived above all from the impulse response of the room. This can be predicted exactly with respect to roomacoustic optimization by the use of methods for computer simultion (especially sound particle simulation method) and for model measurement. (orig.)

  11. Virtual Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokki, Tapio; Savioja, Lauri

    The term virtual acoustics is often applied when sound signal is processed to contain features of a simulated acoustical space and sound is spatially reproduced either with binaural or with multichannel techniques. Therefore, virtual acoustics consists of spatial sound reproduction and room acoustics modeling.

  12. The acoustic response of rooms with open windows to airborne sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, P. G.

    1972-01-01

    The objective of the work described in this and the companion paper was to establish a theory for predicting the sound field generated in a room by a sonic boom incident on an open window. In this paper, some basic theoretical results are presented. First, the case of a normally incident harmonic wave was considered. Expressions for the pressure field were obtained by viewing the room as a terminated duct and by using a Green function method. The concept of mode excitation distribution functions was formulated and used to match the boundary conditions. This concept has been extended for oblique incidence. A modified form of Laplace transform technique was used to obtain expressions in the time domain for transient signals.

  13. Room acoustic simulation system considered wave motion chacteristic; Hadosei wo koryoshita shitsunai onba simulation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuboi, M.; Watanabe, M.; Hirano, S. [Obayashi Corp., Osaka (Japan). Technical Research Inst.

    1996-03-20

    A practical calculating method is developed, which includes data of all audible frequencies used as the basic data for visible and audible acoustic evaluation of the sound field for supporting acoustic designing, and can calculate long term impulse responses covering those of reverberation. By the face integration method which performs calculation by dividing the responses from the face elements, at each sound input to the boundary surface, into geometrical wave components and scattered wave components, it is shown that long time impulse response can be calculated with no need for drastic increase in the calculating time. No extreme deterioration of the accuracy is observed even when the face elements are divided roughly, and the method can be applied to response calculation even in a limited time with less divided number of the wave face elements for certain items to be investigated. Sound field is visualized by three dimensional image sound source distribution in which the frequency characteristics of the initial reflected sound are displayed in color, and a series of systems are developed which enable virtual experience of estimated sound field with three dimensional spread by binaural hearing based on OSS (orthostereophonic system). 9 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Timbral constancy and compensation for spectral distortion caused by loudspeaker and room acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Cleopatra Diana

    On its path to the ear the spectral envelope of a sound is modified by transmission channels. These modifications can distort, or colour, sound timbre preventing recognition. Research by Olive et al. (1995) suggests that perceptual mechanisms remove spectral colouration caused by loudspeakers and rooms. This compensation is apparent when listening in the real-world but not in laboratory tests and may be a result of the longer time courses involved in real-world listening. Experiments conducted as part of this thesis confirm that compensation for loudspeaker/room colouration occurs using a real-world listening experimental paradigm and is perceptually moderate to large. This is partly caused by mechanisms that are sensitive to the time gaps between hearing different loudspeakers/rooms, common in real-world listening, and partly due to mechanisms that are not sensitive to these time gaps. A research process was set out to further investigate mechanisms behind the time-gap sensitive component of real-world compensation. A literature review of mechanisms that might explain this compensation was undertaken. A peripheral enhancement mechanism and a central spectral compensation mechanism cause compensation for spectral distortion caused by vocal tract (VT) characteristics in speech perception. These mechanisms are time-gap sensitive and were shown to have a number of features that mean they have the potential to cause the time-gap sensitive real-world compensation for loudspeakers and rooms. However, mechanisms that compensate for VT when listening to speech may not compensate for other channels when listening to non-speech. Laboratory tests were conducted to show that enhancement and spectral compensation also occur with non-speech sounds and therefore have the potential to contribute to any time-gap sensitive compensation for loudspeakers/rooms when listening to non-speech as well as speech. Therefore, these mechanisms can explain the real-world compensation seen in

  15. Differences in directional sound source behavior and perception between assorted computer room models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeant, M. C.; Wang, L. M.; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2004-01-01

    time. However, for the three other parameters evaluated (sound-pressure level, clarity index, and lateral fraction), the changing diffusivity of the room does not diminish the importance of the directivity. The study therefore shows the importance of considering source directivity when using computer...

  16. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  17. Application of modified integration rule to time-domain finite-element acoustic simulation of rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuzono, Takeshi; Otsuru, Toru; Tomiku, Reiji; Okamoto, Noriko

    2012-08-01

    The applicability of the modified integration rule for time-domain finite-element analysis is tested in sound field analysis of rooms involving rectangular elements, distorted elements, and finite impedance boundary conditions. Dispersion error analysis in three dimensions is conducted to evaluate the dispersion error in time-domain finite-element analysis using eight-node hexahedral elements. The results of analysis confirmed that fourth-order accuracy with respect to dispersion error is obtainable using the Fox-Goodwin method (FG) with a modified integration rule, even for rectangular elements. The stability condition in three-dimensional analysis using the modified integration rule is also presented. Numerical experiments demonstrate that FG with a modified integration rule performs much better than FG with the conventional integration rule for problems with rectangular elements, distorted elements, and with finite impedance boundary conditions. Further, as another advantage, numerical results revealed that the use of modified integration rule engenders faster convergence of the iterative solver than a conventional rule for problems with the same degrees of freedom.

  18. A filtered convolution method for the computation of acoustic wave fields in very large spatiotemporal domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, M.D.; Huijssen, J.

    2009-01-01

    The full-wave computation of transient acoustic fields with sizes in the order of 100x100x100 wavelengths by 100 periods requires a numerical method that is extremely efficient in terms of storage and computation. Iterative integral equation methods offer a good performance on these points, provided

  19. Computer programs for forward and inverse modeling of acoustic and electromagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    A suite of computer programs was developed by U.S. Geological Survey personnel for forward and inverse modeling of acoustic and electromagnetic data. This report describes the computer resources that are needed to execute the programs, the installation of the programs, the program designs, some tests of their accuracy, and some suggested improvements.

  20. Creating Innovative Solutions for Future Hotel Rooms with Intelligent Multimedia and Pervasive Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharda, Nalin K.

    Pervasive computing and intelligent multimedia technologies are becoming increasingly important to the modern way of living. However, many of their potential applications have not been fully realized yet. This chapter explores how innovative applications can be developed to meet the needs of the next generation hotels. Futuristic hotel rooms aim to be more than “home-away-from-home,” and as a consequence, offer tremendous opportunities for developing innovative applications of pervasive computing and intelligent multimedia. Next generation hotels will make increased use of technology products to attract new customers. High end TV screens, changeable room ambiance, biometric guest recognition, and electronic check-in facilities are some of the features already being implemented by some hotels. Entirely futuristic hotels in the sea, the stratosphere or the outer space, are also being proposed. All of these provide many novel opportunities for developing innovative solutions using intelligent multimedia and ubiquitous computing.

  1. Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography in the Assessment of Acute Chest Pain in the Emergency Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prazeres, Carlos Eduardo Elias dos; Cury, Roberto Caldeira; Carneiro, Adriano Camargo de Castro [Hospital do Coração - HCor, Associação do Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo, E-mail: rochitte@cardiol.br [Hospital do Coração - HCor, Associação do Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto do Coração - InCor - HCFMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-12-15

    The coronary computed tomography angiography has recently emerged as an accurate diagnostic tool in the evaluation of coronary artery disease, providing diagnostic and prognostic data that correlate directly with the data provided by invasive coronary angiography. The association of recent technological developments has allowed improved temporal resolution and better spatial coverage of the cardiac volume with significant reduction in radiation dose, and with the crucial need for more effective protocols of risk stratification of patients with chest pain in the emergency room, recent evaluation of the computed tomography coronary angiography has been performed in the setting of acute chest pain, as about two thirds of invasive coronary angiographies show no significantly obstructive coronary artery disease. In daily practice, without the use of more efficient technologies, such as coronary angiography by computed tomography, safe and efficient stratification of patients with acute chest pain remains a challenge to the medical team in the emergency room. Recently, several studies, including three randomized trials, showed favorable results with the use of this technology in the emergency department for patients with low to intermediate likelihood of coronary artery disease. In this review, we show data resulting from coronary angiography by computed tomography in risk stratification of patients with chest pain in the emergency room, its diagnostic value, prognosis and cost-effectiveness and a critical analysis of recently published multicenter studies.

  2. Coronary computed tomography angiography in the assessment of acute chest pain in the emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazeres, Carlos Eduardo Elias dos; Cury, Roberto Caldeira; Carneiro, Adriano Camargo de Castro; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    The coronary computed tomography angiography has recently emerged as an accurate diagnostic tool in the evaluation of coronary artery disease, providing diagnostic and prognostic data that correlate directly with the data provided by invasive coronary angiography. The association of recent technological developments has allowed improved temporal resolution and better spatial coverage of the cardiac volume with significant reduction in radiation dose, and with the crucial need for more effective protocols of risk stratification of patients with chest pain in the emergency room, recent evaluation of the computed tomography coronary angiography has been performed in the setting of acute chest pain, as about two thirds of invasive coronary angiographies show no significantly obstructive coronary artery disease. In daily practice, without the use of more efficient technologies, such as coronary angiography by computed tomography, safe and efficient stratification of patients with acute chest pain remains a challenge to the medical team in the emergency room. Recently, several studies, including three randomized trials, showed favorable results with the use of this technology in the emergency department for patients with low to intermediate likelihood of coronary artery disease. In this review, we show data resulting from coronary angiography by computed tomography in risk stratification of patients with chest pain in the emergency room, its diagnostic value, prognosis and cost-effectiveness and a critical analysis of recently published multicenter studies.

  3. Upgrading of the Air-conditioning of the Computer Room in the Computer Centre for the LHC era

    CERN Document Server

    Lindroos, J

    2001-01-01

    Built in the beginning of 1970's, the Computer Centre air-conditioning and cooling systems were designed to be modular and easily adaptable to the unpredictable future needs of computing. The infrastructure of LHC-computing that will be housed in the existing Computer Room with its five Computing farms and over 11000 PC's increases the requirements of cooling and air-conditioning power to a new level. The nominal thermal loads from the equipment rise from the current design maximum of 1MW to estimated maximum of 2MW in the future. This paper presents calculations and proposes solutions to meet the new nominal requirements. The air-conditioning system must also be able to cope with a situation of power cut in the main supply. A calculation of the temperature evolution during the power cut and a justified operation strategy for this scenario is also presented.

  4. Computational Acoustic Beamforming for Noise Source Identification for Small Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a computational acoustic beamforming (CAB methodology for identification of sources of small wind turbine noise. This methodology is validated using the case of the NACA 0012 airfoil trailing edge noise. For this validation case, the predicted acoustic maps were in excellent conformance with the results of the measurements obtained from the acoustic beamforming experiment. Following this validation study, the CAB methodology was applied to the identification of noise sources generated by a commercial small wind turbine. The simulated acoustic maps revealed that the blade tower interaction and the wind turbine nacelle were the two primary mechanisms for sound generation for this small wind turbine at frequencies between 100 and 630 Hz.

  5. Computational Acoustic Beamforming for Noise Source Identification for Small Wind Turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ping; Lien, Fue-Sang; Yee, Eugene

    2017-01-01

    This paper develops a computational acoustic beamforming (CAB) methodology for identification of sources of small wind turbine noise. This methodology is validated using the case of the NACA 0012 airfoil trailing edge noise. For this validation case, the predicted acoustic maps were in excellent conformance with the results of the measurements obtained from the acoustic beamforming experiment. Following this validation study, the CAB methodology was applied to the identification of noise sources generated by a commercial small wind turbine. The simulated acoustic maps revealed that the blade tower interaction and the wind turbine nacelle were the two primary mechanisms for sound generation for this small wind turbine at frequencies between 100 and 630 Hz.

  6. Computational Acoustic Beamforming for Noise Source Identification for Small Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Fue-Sang

    2017-01-01

    This paper develops a computational acoustic beamforming (CAB) methodology for identification of sources of small wind turbine noise. This methodology is validated using the case of the NACA 0012 airfoil trailing edge noise. For this validation case, the predicted acoustic maps were in excellent conformance with the results of the measurements obtained from the acoustic beamforming experiment. Following this validation study, the CAB methodology was applied to the identification of noise sources generated by a commercial small wind turbine. The simulated acoustic maps revealed that the blade tower interaction and the wind turbine nacelle were the two primary mechanisms for sound generation for this small wind turbine at frequencies between 100 and 630 Hz. PMID:28378012

  7. Interactive Computational Algorithms for Acoustic Simulation in Complex Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-19

    arrays on aerostats, and dynamic routing of surveillance aircraft such as helicopters and UAVs to minimize audibility. (a) Papers published in peer...of this printing . List the papers, including journal references, in the following categories: 30.00 21.00 22.00 24.00 25.00 26.00 14.00 15.00 16.00...Albert, Keith Wilson, Dinesh Manocha. Validation of 3D numerical simulation for acoustic pulse propagation in an urban environment, The Journal of

  8. Consulting room computers and their effect on general practitioner-patient communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordman, Janneke; Verhaak, Peter; van Beljouw, Ilse; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2010-12-01

    in the western medical world, computers form part of the standard equipment in the consulting rooms of most GPs. As the use of a computer requires time and attention from GPs, this may well interfere with the communication process. Yet, the information accessed on the computer may also enhance communication. the present study affords insight into the relationship between computer use and GP-patient communication recorded by the same GPs over two periods. videotaped GP consultations collected in 2001 and 2008 were used to observe computer use and GP-patient communication. In addition, patients questionnaires about their experiences with communication by the GP were analysed using multilevel models with patients (Level 1) nested within GPs (Level 2). both in 2008 and in 2001, GPs used their computer in almost every consultation. Still, our study showed a change in computer use by the GPs over time. In addition, the results indicate that computer use is negatively related to some communication aspects: the patient-directed gaze of the GP and the amount of information given by GPs. There is also a negative association between computer use and the body posture of the GP. Computer use by GPs is not associated with other (analysed) non-verbal and verbal behaviour of GPs and patients. Moreover, computer use is scarcely related to patients' experiences with the communication behaviour of the GP. GPs show greater reluctance to use computers in 2008 compared to 2001. Computer use can indeed affect the communication between GPs and patients. Therefore, GPs ought to remain aware of their computer use during consultations and at the same time keep the interaction with the patient alive.

  9. Acoustic and Perceptual Effects of Left-Right Laryngeal Asymmetries Based on Computational Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samlan, Robin A.; Story, Brad H.; Lotto, Andrew J.; Bunton, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Computational modeling was used to examine the consequences of 5 different laryngeal asymmetries on acoustic and perceptual measures of vocal function. Method: A kinematic vocal fold model was used to impose 5 laryngeal asymmetries: adduction, edge bulging, nodal point ratio, amplitude of vibration, and starting phase. Thirty /a/ and /?/…

  10. Contextual Computing: A Bluetooth based approach for tracking healthcare providers in the emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Joshua; Smith, Vernon; Traub, Stephen; Patel, Vimla L

    2017-01-01

    Hospital Emergency Departments (EDs) frequently experience crowding. One of the factors that contributes to this crowding is the "door to doctor time", which is the time from a patient's registration to when the patient is first seen by a physician. This is also one of the Meaningful Use (MU) performance measures that emergency departments report to the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Current documentation methods for this measure are inaccurate due to the imprecision in manual data collection. We describe a method for automatically (in real time) and more accurately documenting the door to physician time. Using sensor-based technology, the distance between the physician and the computer is calculated by using the single board computers installed in patient rooms that log each time a Bluetooth signal is seen from a device that the physicians carry. This distance is compared automatically with the accepted room radius to determine if the physicians are present in the room at the time logged to provide greater precision. The logged times, accurate to the second, were compared with physicians' handwritten times, showing automatic recordings to be more precise. This real time automatic method will free the physician from extra cognitive load of manually recording data. This method for evaluation of performance is generic and can be used in any other setting outside the ED, and for purposes other than measuring physician time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Development and validation of a combined phased acoustical radiosity and image source model for predicting sound fields in rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2015-01-01

    A model, combining acoustical radiosity and the image source method, including phase shifts on reflection, has been developed. The model is denoted Phased Acoustical Radiosity and Image Source Method (PARISM), and it has been developed in order to be able to model both specular and diffuse reflec...

  12. The research and application of green computer room environmental monitoring system based on internet of things technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wang; Chongchao, Pan; Yikai, Liang; Gang, Li

    2017-11-01

    With the rapid development of information technology, the scale of data center increases quickly, and the energy consumption of computer room also increases rapidly, among which, energy consumption of air conditioning cooling makes up a large proportion. How to apply new technology to reduce the energy consumption of the computer room becomes an important topic of energy saving in the current research. This paper study internet of things technology, and design a kind of green computer room environmental monitoring system. In the system, we can get the real-time environment data from the application of wireless sensor network technology, which will be showed in a creative way of three-dimensional effect. In the environment monitor, we can get the computer room assets view, temperature cloud view, humidity cloud view, microenvironment view and so on. Thus according to the condition of the microenvironment, we can adjust the air volume, temperature and humidity parameters of the air conditioning for the individual equipment cabinet to realize the precise air conditioning refrigeration. And this can reduce the energy consumption of air conditioning, as a result, the overall energy consumption of the green computer room will reduce greatly. At the same time, we apply this project in the computer center of Weihai, and after a year of test and running, we find that it took a good energy saving effect, which fully verified the effectiveness of this project on the energy conservation of the computer room.

  13. Report: EPA’s Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory Should Improve Its Computer Room Security Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #12-P-0847, September 21, 2012.Our review of the security posture and in-place environmental controls of EPA’s Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory computer room disclosed an array of security and environmental control deficiencies.

  14. The role of simulated small-scale ocean variability in inverse computations for ocean acoustic tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dushaw, Brian D; Sagen, Hanne

    2017-12-01

    Ocean acoustic tomography depends on a suitable reference ocean environment with which to set the basic parameters of the inverse problem. Some inverse problems may require a reference ocean that includes the small-scale variations from internal waves, small mesoscale, or spice. Tomographic inversions that employ data of stable shadow zone arrivals, such as those that have been observed in the North Pacific and Canary Basin, are an example. Estimating temperature from the unique acoustic data that have been obtained in Fram Strait is another example. The addition of small-scale variability to augment a smooth reference ocean is essential to understanding the acoustic forward problem in these cases. Rather than a hindrance, the stochastic influences of the small scale can be exploited to obtain accurate inverse estimates. Inverse solutions are readily obtained, and they give computed arrival patterns that matched the observations. The approach is not ad hoc, but universal, and it has allowed inverse estimates for ocean temperature variations in Fram Strait to be readily computed on several acoustic paths for which tomographic data were obtained.

  15. Computation of 2D vibroacoustic wave's dispersion for optimizing acoustic power flow in interaction with adaptive metacomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, M.; Ouisse, M.; Ichchou, M.; Ohayon, R.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents an integrated methodology for optimizing vibroacoustic energy flow in interaction between an adaptive metacomposite made of periodically distributed shunted piezoelectric material glued onto passive plate and open acoustic domain. The computation of interacting Floquet-Bloch propagators is also used to optimize vibroacoustic behavior. The main purpose of this work is first to propose a numerical methodology to compute the fluid-structure multi-modal wave dispersions. In a second step, optimization of electric circuit is used to control the acoustic power flow. 3D standard computation is used to confirm the efficiency of the designed metacomposite in terms of acoustic emissivity and absorption.

  16. Room acoustics computer modelling: Study of the effect of source directivity on auralizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeant, Michelle C.; Wang, Lily M.; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2006-01-01

    auralizations made with one, four and thirteen channels, with three different instrument types and subjects rated differences in realism. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to determine the effect of the number of channels and instrument on realism. The primary result from this study...

  17. Computed tomography to operating room in less than 3 hours minimizes complications from appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Laura A; Davis, Matthew L; Jupiter, Daniel C; Frazee, Richard C; Regner, Justin L

    2016-08-01

    The aim of our study is to select patients with nonperforated appendicitis verified by computed tomography (CT) scan and to determine if there is a temporal component to perforation. A retrospective cohort study of patients with CT scan evidence of nonperforated appendicitis from 2007 to 2012. 411 patients, aged 39.7 ± 16.25 years (47.5% male) were included in the study. 330 patients (80.3%) were nonperforated at surgery. Analysis of 3-hour intervals from CT scan to operating room (OR) revealed an absolute reduction in the rate of perforation from 27% at the 6- to 9-hour interval, to 17% and 10% at the 3- to 6-hour and 0- to 3-hour intervals, respectively, (P appendicitis patients (P appendicitis had shorter hospitalization and fewer postoperative wound infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Demonstration of Intelligent Control and Fan Improvements in Computer Room Air Handlers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, Henry [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Greenberg, Steve [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Vita, Corinne [Vigilent, Oakland, CA (United States)

    2012-11-30

    This report documents a demonstration of the energy-efficiency improvement provided by a new control system for computer room air handling devices. It also analyzes measured and reported air handling device fan power associated with changing the fan type. A 135,000 square foot commercial data center was used for the demonstration. All air handling units were upgraded with improved efficiency fans, and a control system that automatically adjusts the fan speed for the air handling units was added. Power measurements were collected for a baseline and for a period with the fan speed control system active. Changing the fan type resulted in a savings of 47 percent of energy used by the air handling equipment and associated chiller plant energy needed to cool the air handlers themselves. The addition of the fan speed control resulted in an additional 37 percent savings in the same two categories. The combined savings for the two improvements for the same categories was 66 percent compared to the data center fitted with the original fans without a control system. The energy use reduction provided by the complete air handling device improvement program for the whole data center site is estimated to be 2.9 million kilowatt hours per year—an overall data center site savings of 8.0 percent. The reduced electrical energy use at the site provides a 1.9 million pound yearly reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. This demonstration showed that fan upgrades and a control system addition provide cost-effective improvements for data centers, with a payback reported to be under two years without utility incentives. In addition to the control system providing energy savings, the data collection and visual analysis capabilities provided immediate and long-term benefits. It is recommended that data center operators consider investing in fan upgrades and/or adding fan speed control for computer room air handlers.

  19. The PAC-MAN model: Benchmark case for linear acoustics in computational physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegelwanger, Harald; Reiter, Paul

    2017-10-01

    Benchmark cases in the field of computational physics, on the one hand, have to contain a certain complexity to test numerical edge cases and, on the other hand, require the existence of an analytical solution, because an analytical solution allows the exact quantification of the accuracy of a numerical simulation method. This dilemma causes a need for analytical sound field formulations of complex acoustic problems. A well known example for such a benchmark case for harmonic linear acoustics is the ;Cat's Eye model;, which describes the three-dimensional sound field radiated from a sphere with a missing octant analytically. In this paper, a benchmark case for two-dimensional (2D) harmonic linear acoustic problems, viz., the ;PAC-MAN model;, is proposed. The PAC-MAN model describes the radiated and scattered sound field around an infinitely long cylinder with a cut out sector of variable angular width. While the analytical calculation of the 2D sound field allows different angular cut-out widths and arbitrarily positioned line sources, the computational cost associated with the solution of this problem is similar to a 1D problem because of a modal formulation of the sound field in the PAC-MAN model.

  20. Using computers to overcome math-phobia in an introductory course in musical acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacsek, Andrew A.

    2002-11-01

    In recent years, the desktop computer has acquired the signal processing and visualization capabilities once obtained only with expensive specialized equipment. With the appropriate A/D card and software, a PC can behave like an oscilloscope, a real-time signal analyzer, a function generator, and a synthesizer, with both audio and visual outputs. In addition, the computer can be used to visualize specific wave behavior, such as superposition and standing waves, refraction, dispersion, etc. These capabilities make the computer an invaluable tool to teach basic acoustic principles to students with very poor math skills. In this paper I describe my approach to teaching the introductory-level Physics of Musical Sound at Central Washington University, in which very few science students enroll. Emphasis is placed on how vizualization with computers can help students appreciate and apply quantitative methods for analyzing sound.

  1. A Fast Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for the Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics Analysis of Indoor Substation Rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L. W.; Zou, A. X.

    2017-05-01

    In order to find a high efficiency, energy saving structure of the indoor substation room, a novel computational fluid dynamics method is proposed to model its flow and heat transfer characteristics. As an automatic optimization system, the efficient methods for mesh generation and numerical calculation are necessary. The mesh of the whole room including the transformer and its heat transfer fins is created using a structured mesh scheme, and a detection technology is adopted to recognize all the obstacles. In order to improve the numerical efficiency, a fast computational fluid dynamics (FFD) method is adopted to establish the three dimensional dynamic model with heat source. The comparisons between the FFD model and the experimental data show that the FFD can model the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the indoor substation efficiently. By modifying the related parameters in the model, this method can be used in the simulation of other indoor substation rooms to optimize their structure and operation.

  2. Randomized clinical trial comparing the effect of computed tomography in the trauma room versus the radiology department on injury outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saltzherr, T. P.; Bakker, F. C.; Beenen, L. F. M.; Dijkgraaf, M. G. W.; Reitsma, J. B.; Goslings, J. C.; Bossuyt, P. M.; Jin, P. H. P. Fung Kon; Luitse, J. S. K.; Ponsen, K. J.; Henny, C. P.; Giannakopoulos, G. F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Computed tomography (CT) of injured patients in the radiology department requires potentially dangerous and time-consuming patient transports and transfers. It was hypothesized that CT in the trauma room would improve patient outcome and workflow. Methods: A randomized trial compared the

  3. Indirect Prediction of Welding Fume Diffusion inside a Room Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Dahal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Welding is an important and widely used process in the manufacturing and maintenance of various works involving metals and alloys. While welding has broad applications, the welding fume generated during the process has impacts on workers’ health, which needs to be addressed. One of the major steps that can be undertaken to take care of this issue is the use of ventilation, which requires knowledge of characteristics and dispersion of the welding fume in the workers’ breathing zone. It is difficult to assess welding fume dispersion from manual measurement due to numerous welding processes and sufficient data requirement. Numerical prediction of welding fume is dubious due to several errors. This paper considers the use of numerically predicted CO2 concentrations to indirectly predict welding fume distribution in workshops. This is based on the assumption that if the particles are sufficiently small size, they follow the diffusion pattern of gases. Experiments are carried out in a room with an opening and a welding fume generation system for measurement of CO2 and fume diffusion. The results show high possibility of predicting welding fume concentration based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulated CO2 concentration with a correlation coefficient of 0.74.

  4. Computational Modeling of Fluid–Structure–Acoustics Interaction during Voice Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weili; Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian

    2017-01-01

    The paper presented a three-dimensional, first-principle based fluid–structure–acoustics interaction computer model of voice production, which employed a more realistic human laryngeal and vocal tract geometries. Self-sustained vibrations, important convergent–divergent vibration pattern of the vocal folds, and entrainment of the two dominant vibratory modes were captured. Voice quality-associated parameters including the frequency, open quotient, skewness quotient, and flow rate of the glottal flow waveform were found to be well within the normal physiological ranges. The analogy between the vocal tract and a quarter-wave resonator was demonstrated. The acoustic perturbed flux and pressure inside the glottis were found to be at the same order with their incompressible counterparts, suggesting strong source–filter interactions during voice production. Such high fidelity computational model will be useful for investigating a variety of pathological conditions that involve complex vibrations, such as vocal fold paralysis, vocal nodules, and vocal polyps. The model is also an important step toward a patient-specific surgical planning tool that can serve as a no-risk trial and error platform for different procedures, such as injection of biomaterials and thyroplastic medialization. PMID:28243588

  5. A Time-Series Phrase Correlation Computing System With Acoustic Signal Processing For Music Media Creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi Tsuneyama

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a system that analyzes the time-series impression change in the acoustic signal by a unit of music phrase. The aim is to support the music creation using a computer (computer music by bringing out composers' potentially existing knowledge and skills. Our goal is to realize the cross-genre/cross-cultural music creation. Our system realizes the automatic extraction of musical features from acoustic signals by dividing and decomposing them into “phrases” and “three musical elements” (rhythm, melody, and harmony, which are meaningful for human recognition. By calculating the correlation between the target “target music piece” and the “typical phrase” in each musical genre, composers are able to grasp the time-series impression change of music media by the unit of music phrase. The system leads to a new creative and efficient environment for cross-genre/cross-cultural music creation based on the potentially existing knowledge on the music phrase and structure.

  6. Computational helioseismology in the frequency domain: acoustic waves in axisymmetric solar models with flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizon, Laurent; Barucq, Hélène; Duruflé, Marc; Hanson, Chris S.; Leguèbe, Michael; Birch, Aaron C.; Chabassier, Juliette; Fournier, Damien; Hohage, Thorsten; Papini, Emanuele

    2017-04-01

    Context. Local helioseismology has so far relied on semi-analytical methods to compute the spatial sensitivity of wave travel times to perturbations in the solar interior. These methods are cumbersome and lack flexibility. Aims: Here we propose a convenient framework for numerically solving the forward problem of time-distance helioseismology in the frequency domain. The fundamental quantity to be computed is the cross-covariance of the seismic wavefield. Methods: We choose sources of wave excitation that enable us to relate the cross-covariance of the oscillations to the Green's function in a straightforward manner. We illustrate the method by considering the 3D acoustic wave equation in an axisymmetric reference solar model, ignoring the effects of gravity on the waves. The symmetry of the background model around the rotation axis implies that the Green's function can be written as a sum of longitudinal Fourier modes, leading to a set of independent 2D problems. We use a high-order finite-element method to solve the 2D wave equation in frequency space. The computation is embarrassingly parallel, with each frequency and each azimuthal order solved independently on a computer cluster. Results: We compute travel-time sensitivity kernels in spherical geometry for flows, sound speed, and density perturbations under the first Born approximation. Convergence tests show that travel times can be computed with a numerical precision better than one millisecond, as required by the most precise travel-time measurements. Conclusions: The method presented here is computationally efficient and will be used to interpret travel-time measurements in order to infer, e.g., the large-scale meridional flow in the solar convection zone. It allows the implementation of (full-waveform) iterative inversions, whereby the axisymmetric background model is updated at each iteration.

  7. Three-dimensional computer-controlled acoustic pressure scanning and quantification of focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Joonho; Koizumi, Norihiro; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Sugita, Naohikoa; Nomiya, Akira; Homma, Yukio; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Mitsuishi, Mamoru

    2010-04-01

    We propose an automated needle hydrophone-based scanning system to measure high-resolution 3-D acoustic pressure distributions generated by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). The hardware consists of a host computer, subsystems for HIFU generation, and an oscilloscope to sample the pressure response from a sensor in a water tank. Software was developed to control the hardware subsystems, to search for the initial scan position, and to design the scanning path and volume. A preoperative scanning plan with three perpendicular planes is used to manipulate the position of the HIFU transducer and to automate the acquisition of the spatial acoustic pressure distribution. The post-processing process displays the scanning results, compensates time delays caused by continuous linear scans, and quantifies the focal region. A method to minimize the displacement error induced by the time delay improves the scanning speed of a conventional needle hydrophone-based scanning system. Moreover, a noise-robust, automatic-focus searching algorithm using Gaussian function fitting reduces the total number of iterations and prevents the initial scanning position search from diverging. Finally, the minimum-volume enclosing ellipsoid approximation is used to quantify the size and orientation of the 3-D focal region thresholded by the minimum pressure of interest for various input conditions and to test the reproducibility of the scanning system.

  8. Modification of computational auditory scene analysis (CASA) for noise-robust acoustic feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Minseok

    While there have been many attempts to mitigate interferences of background noise, the performance of automatic speech recognition (ASR) still can be deteriorated by various factors with ease. However, normal hearing listeners can accurately perceive sounds of their interests, which is believed to be a result of Auditory Scene Analysis (ASA). As a first attempt, the simulation of the human auditory processing, called computational auditory scene analysis (CASA), was fulfilled through physiological and psychological investigations of ASA. CASA comprised of Zilany-Bruce auditory model, followed by tracking fundamental frequency for voice segmentation and detecting pairs of onset/offset at each characteristic frequency (CF) for unvoiced segmentation. The resulting Time-Frequency (T-F) representation of acoustic stimulation was converted into acoustic feature, gammachirp-tone frequency cepstral coefficients (GFCC). 11 keywords with various environmental conditions are used and the robustness of GFCC was evaluated by spectral distance (SD) and dynamic time warping distance (DTW). In "clean" and "noisy" conditions, the application of CASA generally improved noise robustness of the acoustic feature compared to a conventional method with or without noise suppression using MMSE estimator. The intial study, however, not only showed the noise-type dependency at low SNR, but also called the evaluation methods in question. Some modifications were made to capture better spectral continuity from an acoustic feature matrix, to obtain faster processing speed, and to describe the human auditory system more precisely. The proposed framework includes: 1) multi-scale integration to capture more accurate continuity in feature extraction, 2) contrast enhancement (CE) of each CF by competition with neighboring frequency bands, and 3) auditory model modifications. The model modifications contain the introduction of higher Q factor, middle ear filter more analogous to human auditory system

  9. Passive element enriched photoacoustic computed tomography (PER PACT) for simultaneous imaging of acoustic propagation properties and light absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, Jithin; Jose, J.; Willemink, Rene; Willemink, Rene G.H.; Resink, Steffen; Piras, D.; van Hespen, Johannes C.G.; van Hespen, J.C.G.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-01-01

    We present a ‘hybrid’ imaging approach which can image both light absorption properties and acoustic transmission properties of an object in a two-dimensional slice using a computed tomography (CT) photoacoustic imager. The ultrasound transmission measurement method uses a strong optical absorber of

  10. Passive element enriched photoacoustic computed tomography (PER PACT) for simultaneous imaging of acoustic propagation properties and light absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, J.; Willemink, R.G.H.; Resink, S.; Piras, D.; van Hespen, J.C.G.; Slump, C.H.; van Steenbergen, W.; van Leeuwen, T.G.; Manohar, S.

    2011-01-01

    We present a 'hybrid' imaging approach which can image both light absorption properties and acoustic transmission properties of an object in a two-dimensional slice using a computed tomography (CT) photoacoustic imager. The ultrasound transmission measurement method uses a strong optical absorber of

  11. An iterative method for the computation of nonlinear, wide-angle, pulsed acoustic fields of medical diagnostic transducers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijssen, J.; Verweij, M.D.

    2010-01-01

    The development and optimization of medical ultrasound transducers and imaging modalities require a computational method that accurately predicts the nonlinear acoustic pressure field. A prospective method should provide the wide-angle, pulsed field emitted by an arbitrary planar source distribution

  12. Effect of non-uniform mean flow field on acoustic propagation problems in computational aeroacoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Si, Haiqing; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in the presence of a non-uniform mean flow is studied numerically by using two different acoustic propagating models, which solve linearized Euler equations (LEE) and acoustic perturbation equations (APE). As noise induced by turbulent flows often propagates from near field t...

  13. Room acoustic investigation of actors’ positions and orientations for various theatre configurations in a moderate-sized drama theatre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil-Reyes, Berti; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    of the directive human voice, an early energy ratio, Definition (D50), is higher within this azimuth angle range. By changing the orientation and/or the position of an actor, the mean D50 over the audience can be improved by more than one just noticeable difference (JND). In terms of uniformity and degree...... numerically investigated after calibrating computer models with experimental data. An analysis of a human voice pattern in a free-field concluded that a speech in a range of the azimuth angle [50, 50] with respect to the performer’s frontal direction is equally loud in a statistical sense. As a consequence...

  14. Differences in directional sound source behavior and perception between assorted computer room models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeant, Michelle C.; Wang, Lily M.; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2004-01-01

    considering reverberation time. However, for the three other parameters evaluated (sound pressure level, clarity index and lateral fraction), the changing diffusivity of the room does not diminish the importance of the directivity. The study therefore shows the importance of considering source directivity...

  15. Studio-based courses in architectural acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebein, Gary W.

    2003-04-01

    Examples of 4 nontraditional, elective courses offered to students in the Master of Architecture, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degree programs in architecture are presented. Listening to Buildings involves experiential exercises in architectural acoustics for undergraduate students in a required large lecture course to form links between what people hear in a room and the architectural shapes and materials of the room that affects what is heard. The Applied Acoustics Design Lab takes students through each of the major components of an actual consulting project. Student work includes room acoustic design, sound isolation design, sound system design and HVAC noise control design for an actual building project. An Acoustical History of Theaters and Concert Halls teaches fundamentals of computer-based acoustic modeling and has students compare the physical design and aural simulations of a historic and a contemporary performance space. Graduate design studio in acoustics examines sound and silence as potential form-givers in architecture and as generative ideas for the basis of architectural interventions in complex sites and programs. Interior and exterior soundscapes and phenomenological philosophy form the background research for the studio.

  16. X-ray acoustic computed tomography with pulsed x-ray beam from a medical linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Han, Bin; Carpenter, Colin; Pratx, Guillem; Kuang, Yu; Xing, Lei

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of medical imaging using a medical linear accelerator to generate acoustic waves is investigated. This modality, x-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT), has the potential to enable deeper tissue penetration in tissue than photoacoustic tomography via laser excitation. Short pulsed (μs-range) 10 MV x-ray beams with dose-rate of approximately 30 Gy∕min were generated from a medical linear accelerator. The acoustic signals were collected with an ultrasound transducer (500 KHz central frequency) positioned around an object. The transducer, driven by a computer-controlled step motor to scan around the object, detected the resulting acoustic signals in the imaging plane at each scanning position. A pulse preamplifier, with a bandwidth of 20 KHz-2 MHz at -3 dB, and switchable gains of 40 and 60 dB, received the signals from the transducer and delivered the amplified signals to a secondary amplifier. The secondary amplifier had bandwidth of 20 KHz-30 MHz at -3 dB, and a gain range of 10-60 dB. Signals were recorded and averaged 128 times by an oscilloscope. A sampling rate of 100 MHz was used to record 2500 data points at each view angle. One set of data incorporated 200 positions as the receiver moved 360°. The x-ray generated acoustic image was then reconstructed with the filtered back projection algorithm. The x-ray generated acoustic signals were detected from a lead rod embedded in a chicken breast tissue. The authors found that the acoustic signal was proportional to the x-ray dose deposition, with a correlation of 0.998. The two-dimensional XACT images of the lead rod embedded in chicken breast tissue were found to be in good agreement with the shape of the object. The first x-ray acoustic computed tomography image is presented. The new modality may be useful for a number of applications, such as providing the location of a fiducial, or monitoring x-ray dose distribution during radiation therapy. Although much work is needed to improve the

  17. Computer modeling and design of diagnostic workstations and radiology reading rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Amato, Carlos L.; Balbona, Joseph A.; Boots, Kevin; Valentino, Daniel J.

    2000-05-01

    We used 3D modeling techniques to design and evaluate the ergonomics of diagnostic workstation and radiology reading room in the planning phase of building a new hospital at UCLA. Given serious space limitations, the challenge was to provide more optimal working environment for radiologists in a crowded and busy environment. A particular attention was given to flexibility, lighting condition and noise reduction in rooms shared by multiple users performing diagnostic tasks as well as regular clinical conferences. Re-engineering workspace ergonomics rely on the integration of new technologies, custom designed cabinets, indirect lighting, sound-absorbent partitioning and geometric arrangement of workstations to allow better privacy while optimizing space occupation. Innovations included adjustable flat monitors, integration of videoconferencing and voice recognition, control monitor and retractable keyboard for optimal space utilization. An overhead compartment protecting the monitors from ambient light is also used as accessory lightbox and rear-view projection screen for conferences.

  18. A Well-Mixed Computational Model for Estimating Room Air Levels of Selected Constituents from E-Vapor Product Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Rostami

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Concerns have been raised in the literature for the potential of secondhand exposure from e-vapor product (EVP use. It would be difficult to experimentally determine the impact of various factors on secondhand exposure including, but not limited to, room characteristics (indoor space size, ventilation rate, device specifications (aerosol mass delivery, e-liquid composition, and use behavior (number of users and usage frequency. Therefore, a well-mixed computational model was developed to estimate the indoor levels of constituents from EVPs under a variety of conditions. The model is based on physical and thermodynamic interactions between aerosol, vapor, and air, similar to indoor air models referred to by the Environmental Protection Agency. The model results agree well with measured indoor air levels of nicotine from two sources: smoking machine-generated aerosol and aerosol exhaled from EVP use. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increasing air exchange rate reduces room air level of constituents, as more material is carried away. The effect of the amount of aerosol released into the space due to variability in exhalation was also evaluated. The model can estimate the room air level of constituents as a function of time, which may be used to assess the level of non-user exposure over time.

  19. Computational Search for Two-Dimensional MX2 Semiconductors with Possible High Electron Mobility at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhishuo Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neither of the two typical two-dimensional materials, graphene and single layer MoS 2 , are good enough for developing semiconductor logical devices. We calculated the electron mobility of 14 two-dimensional semiconductors with composition of MX 2 , where M (=Mo, W, Sn, Hf, Zr and Pt are transition metals, and Xs are S, Se and Te. We approximated the electron phonon scattering matrix by deformation potentials, within which long wave longitudinal acoustical and optical phonon scatterings were included. Piezoelectric scattering in the compounds without inversion symmetry is also taken into account. We found that out of the 14 compounds, WS 2 , PtS 2 and PtSe 2 are promising for logical devices regarding the possible high electron mobility and finite band gap. Especially, the phonon limited electron mobility in PtSe 2 reaches about 4000 cm 2 ·V - 1 ·s - 1 at room temperature, which is the highest among the compounds with an indirect bandgap of about 1.25 eV under the local density approximation. Our results can be the first guide for experiments to synthesize better two-dimensional materials for future semiconductor devices.

  20. Prospects of Passive Element enRiched PhotoAcoustic Computed Tomography (PER-PACT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, J.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and development of a hybrid photoacoustic-ultrasound transmission tomographic imager optimised for small animal imaging (mice). The system allows imaging of ultrasound transmission properties (speed of sound (SOS) and acoustic attenuation (AA) ) simultaneously with

  1. Computational Design of Novel Compounds and Room-temperature Superconductors at High Pressure Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanming

    Pressure, which is a fundamental thermodynamic control on materials' properties, reduces inter-atomic distances and profoundly modifies electronic orbitals and bonding patterns. High pressure has been a versatile tool for creating exotic materials that are not accessible at ambient conditions. Recently, crystal structure prediction has played a leading role in major high-pressure discoveries. Among various structure prediction methods, CALYPSO method (http://www.calypso.cn) is developed on top of swarm-intelligence algorithms by taking the advantage of swarm structures smart learning. Application of CALYPSO into prediction of high-pressure structures has generated a number of exciting discoveries. Examples point to the predicted chemical reactions of Fe/Ni-Xe and Au-Li at high pressures with the formation of unusual compounds Fe3/Ni3Xe and AuLi4/Li5, respectively. Motivated by our theory, the Fe3/Ni3Xe compounds were recently experimentally synthesized, providing a possible solution on ``missing Xe paradox'' towards to Xe storage inside Earth core. Here, Au loses its chemical identity, and acts as a 6p element by achieving high negative oxidation state (>=-2). Our prediction of high-Tc superconductivity on highly compressed H2S initiated the recent experimental observation of record high 200 K superconductivity in H3S. Perspective towards to the design of room-T superconductors in compressed H-rich materials will be presented, including design of high Tc (>100 K) superconductor of TeH4, the highest H-content superconductor in chalcogen hydrides.

  2. A room temperature CO$_2$ line list with ab initio computed intensities

    CERN Document Server

    Zak, Emil; Polyansky, Oleg L; Lodi, Lorenzo; Zobov, Nikolay F; Tashkun, Sergey A; Perevalov, Valery I

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are being closely monitored by remote sensing experiments which rely on knowing line intensities with an uncertainty of 0.5% or better. We report a theoretical study providing rotation-vibration line intensities substantially within the required accuracy based on the use of a highly accurate {\\it ab initio} dipole moment surface (DMS). The theoretical model developed is used to compute CO$_2$ intensities with uncertainty estimates informed by cross comparing line lists calculated using pairs of potential energy surfaces (PES) and DMS's of similar high quality. This yields lines sensitivities which are utilized in reliability analysis of our results. The final outcome is compared to recent accurate measurements as well as the HITRAN2012 database. Transition frequencies are obtained from effective Hamiltonian calculations to produce a comprehensive line list covering all $^{12}$C$^{16}$O$_2$ transitions below 8000 cm$^{-1}$ and stronger than 10$^{-30}$ cm / molecule at ...

  3. Coronary computed tomographic angiography in the emergency room: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheezum, Michael K; Bittencourt, Marcio S; Hulten, Edward A; Scirica, Benjamin M; Villines, Todd C; Blankstein, Ron

    2014-02-01

    Chest pain is a common complaint in the emergency department often necessitating testing to exclude underlying obstructive coronary artery disease. While the traditional evaluation of patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome often consists of serial electrocardiograms and cardiac biomarkers, followed by selective use of stress testing for further risk stratification, this approach is costly and inefficient. Recently, coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) has offered an alternative approach with a high sensitivity and negative predictive value to exclude obstructive coronary artery disease that can rapidly identify patients with low rates of downstream major adverse cardiac events. In this review, the authors provide an overview of available data on the use of CTA for evaluating acute chest pain, while emphasizing its advantages and disadvantages compared to existing strategies. In addition, we provide a suggested algorithm to identify how CTA can be incorporated into the evaluation of acute chest pain and discuss tips for successful implementation of CTA in the emergency department.

  4. Single- and multi-channel underwater acoustic communication channel capacity: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Thomas J; Yang, T C

    2007-09-01

    Acoustic communication channel capacity determines the maximum data rate that can be supported by an acoustic channel for a given source power and source/receiver configuration. In this paper, broadband acoustic propagation modeling is applied to estimate the channel capacity for a time-invariant shallow-water waveguide for a single source-receiver pair and for vertical source and receiver arrays. Without bandwidth constraints, estimated single-input, single-output (SISO) capacities approach 10 megabitss at 1 km range, but beyond 2 km range they decay at a rate consistent with previous estimates by Peloquin and Leinhos (unpublished, 1997), which were based on a sonar equation calculation. Channel capacities subject to source bandwidth constraints are approximately 30-90% lower than for the unconstrained case, and exhibit a significant wind speed dependence. Channel capacity is investigated for single-input, multi-output (SIMO) and multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) systems, both for finite arrays and in the limit of a dense array spanning the entire water column. The limiting values of the SIMO and MIMO channel capacities for the modeled environment are found to be about four times higher and up to 200-400 times higher, respectively, than for the SISO case. Implications for underwater acoustic communication systems are discussed.

  5. The Geneva Minimalistic Acoustic Parameter Set (GeMAPS) for Voice Research and Affective Computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyben, Florian; Scherer, Klaus; Schuller, Björn; Sundberg, Johan; André, Elisabeth; Busso, Carlos; Devillers, Laurence; Epps, Julien; Laukka, Petri; Narayanan, Shrikanth; Truong, Khiet Phuong

    Work on voice sciences over recent decades has led to a proliferation of acoustic parameters that are used quite selectively and are not always extracted in a similar fashion. With many independent teams working in different research areas, shared standards become an essential safeguard to ensure

  6. Tips: Improving Acoustics for Music Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerdes, Harold P.

    A specifications pamphlet offers methods, ideas, and suggestions on how music educators can upgrade their existing music facilities or design new ones correctly. Guidelines address room acoustic fundamentals, how to critique a music room, hints on upgrading acoustic weaknesses, and general tips to follow when trying to maximize acoustics when…

  7. [Acoustic characteristics of classrooms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszarny, Zbigniew; Chyla, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Quality and usefulness of school rooms for transmission of verbal information depends on the two basic parameters: form and quantity of the reverberation time, and profitable line measurements of school rooms from the acoustic point of view. An analysis of the above-mentioned parameters in 48 class rooms and two gymnasiums in schools, which were built in different periods, shows that the most important problem is connected with too long reverberation time and inappropriate acoustic proportions. In schools built in the 1970s, the length of reverberation time is mostly within a low frequency band, while in schools built contemporarily, the maximum length of disappearance time takes place in a quite wide band of 250-2000 Hz. This exceeds optimal values for that kind of rooms at least twice, and five times in the newly built school. A long reverberation time is connected with a low acoustic absorption of school rooms. Moreover, school rooms are characterised by inappropriate acoustic proportions. The classrooms, in their relation to the height, are too long and too wide. It is connected with deterioration of the transmission of verbal information. The data show that this transmission is unequal. Automatically, it leads to a speech disturbance and difficulties with understanding. There is the need for adaptation of school rooms through increase of an acoustic absorption.

  8. Operating room radiation exposure in cone beam computed tomography-based, image-guided spinal surgery: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottmeier, Eric W; Pirris, Stephen M; Edwards, Steven; Kimes, Sherri; Bowman, Cammi; Nelson, Kevin L

    2013-08-01

    Surgeon and operating room (OR) staff radiation exposure during spinal surgery is a concern, especially with the increasing use of multiplanar fluoroscopy in minimally invasive spinal surgery procedures. Cone beam computed tomography (cbCT)-based, 3D image guidance does not involve the use of active fluoroscopy during instrumentation placement and therefore decreases radiation exposure for the surgeon and OR staff during spinal fusion procedures. However, the radiation scatter of a cbCT device can be similar to that of a standard 64-slice CT scanner and thus could expose the surgeon and OR staff to radiation during image acquisition. The purpose of the present study was to measure radiation exposure at several unshielded locations in the OR when using cbCT in conjunction with 3D image-guided spinal surgery in 25 spinal surgery cases. Five unshielded badge dosimeters were placed at set locations in the OR during 25 spinal surgery cases in which cbCT-based, 3D image guidance was used. The cbCT device (O-ARM) was used in conjunction with the Stealth S7 image-guided platform. The radiology department analyzed the badge dosimeters after completion of the last case. Fifty high-definition O-ARM spins were performed in 25 patients for spinal registration and to check instrumentation placement. Image-guided placement of 124 screws from C-2 to the ileum was accomplished without complication. Badge dosimetry analysis revealed minimal radiation exposure for the badges 6 feet from the gantry in the area of the anesthesiology equipment, as well as for the badges located 10-13 feet from the gantry on each side of the room (mean 0.7-3.6 mrem/spin). The greatest radiation exposure occurred on the badge attached to the OR table within the gantry (mean 176.9 mrem/spin), as well as on the control panel adjacent to the gantry (mean 128.0 mrem/spin). Radiation scatter from the O-ARM was minimal at various distances outside of and not adjacent to the gantry. Although the average

  9. Handbook of Engineering Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Möser, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book examines the physical background of engineering acoustics, focusing on empirically obtained engineering experience as well as on measurement techniques and engineering methods for prognostics. Its goal is not only to describe the state of art of engineering acoustics but also to give practical help to engineers in order to solve acoustic problems. It deals with the origin, the transmission and the methods of the abating different kinds of air-borne and structure-borne sounds caused by various mechanisms – from traffic to machinery and flow-induced sound. In addition the modern aspects of room and building acoustics, as well as psychoacoustics and active noise control, are covered.

  10. Binaural prediction of speech intelligibility in reverberant rooms with multiple noise sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavandier, Mathieu; Jelfs, Sam; Culling, John F; Watkins, Anthony J; Raimond, Andrew P; Makin, Simon J

    2012-01-01

    When speech is in competition with interfering sources in rooms, monaural indicators of intelligibility fail to take account of the listener's abilities to separate target speech from interfering sounds using the binaural system. In order to incorporate these segregation abilities and their susceptibility to reverberation, Lavandier and Culling [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 387-399 (2010)] proposed a model which combines effects of better-ear listening and binaural unmasking. A computationally efficient version of this model is evaluated here under more realistic conditions that include head shadow, multiple stationary noise sources, and real-room acoustics. Three experiments are presented in which speech reception thresholds were measured in the presence of one to three interferers using real-room listening over headphones, simulated by convolving anechoic stimuli with binaural room impulse-responses measured with dummy-head transducers in five rooms. Without fitting any parameter of the model, there was close correspondence between measured and predicted differences in threshold across all tested conditions. The model's components of better-ear listening and binaural unmasking were validated both in isolation and in combination. The computational efficiency of this prediction method allows the generation of complex "intelligibility maps" from room designs. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.

  11. A computationally efficient technique to model depth, orientation and alignment via ray tracing in acoustic power transfer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, David B.; Basaeri, Hamid; Roundy, Shad

    2017-12-01

    In acoustic power transfer systems, a receiver is displaced from a transmitter by an axial depth, a lateral offset (alignment), and a rotation angle (orientation). In systems where the receiver’s position is not fixed, such as a receiver implanted in biological tissue, slight variations in depth, orientation, or alignment can cause significant variations in the received voltage and power. To address this concern, this paper presents a computationally efficient technique to model the effects of depth, orientation, and alignment via ray tracing (DOART) on received voltage and power in acoustic power transfer systems. DOART combines transducer circuit equivalent models, a modified version of Huygens principle, and ray tracing to simulate pressure wave propagation and reflection between a transmitter and a receiver in a homogeneous medium. A reflected grid method is introduced to calculate propagation distances, reflection coefficients, and initial vectors between a point on the transmitter and a point on the receiver for an arbitrary number of reflections. DOART convergence and simulation time per data point is discussed as a function of the number of reflections and elements chosen. Finally, experimental data is compared to DOART simulation data in terms of magnitude and shape of the received voltage signal.

  12. Absorption boundary conditions for geomertical acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Defining accurate acoustical boundary conditions is of crucial importance for room acoustic simulations. In predicting sound fields using phased geometrical acoustics methods, the absorption coefficients or surface impedances of the boundary surfaces can be used, but no guideline has been developed...... solutions. Two rectangular rooms with uniform and non-uniform absorption distributions are tested. It is concluded that the impedance and random incidence absorption boundary conditions produce reasonable results with some exceptions at low frequencies for acoustically soft materials....

  13. QRev—Software for computation and quality assurance of acoustic doppler current profiler moving-boat streamflow measurements—User’s manual for version 2.8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, David S.

    2016-05-12

    The software program, QRev computes the discharge from moving-boat acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements using data collected with any of the Teledyne RD Instrument or SonTek bottom tracking acoustic Doppler current profilers. The computation of discharge is independent of the manufacturer of the acoustic Doppler current profiler because QRev applies consistent algorithms independent of the data source. In addition, QRev automates filtering and quality checking of the collected data and provides feedback to the user of potential quality issues with the measurement. Various statistics and characteristics of the measurement, in addition to a simple uncertainty assessment are provided to the user to assist them in properly rating the measurement. QRev saves an extensible markup language file that can be imported into databases or electronic field notes software. The user interacts with QRev through a tablet-friendly graphical user interface. This report is the manual for version 2.8 of QRev.

  14. Improved low frequency room responses by considering finiteness of room boundary surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    For room acoustic simulations, the acoustic characteristics of room boundary surfaces are typically calculated under the assumption that the surfaces are sufficiently large. In this study, a reflection coefficient for finite surfaces is suggested and its performance is assessed through case studi...

  15. Vibro-Acoustic Analysis of Computer Disk Drive Components with Emphasis on Electro-Mechanical Noise Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Ran

    Vibro-acoustic characteristics of compact electro -mechanical devices are not well understood. This study examines fundamental research issues in this area through the example case of a 3.5" personal computer hard disk drive. In particular, a narrow band mathematical model of the drive has been developed to predict prominent pure tones over the high frequency range (1-6.5 KHz). Through detailed analytical studies, it has been found that the motor torque pulsation of the brushless d.c. motor is the source for this noise problem. Accordingly, a simplified disk drive model consisting of motor driving a single disk is used to investigate key components, with emphasis on the development of new mathematical models to describe the source, path and radiator characteristics. Two different mathematical models have been developed for brushless d.c. motor to predict the torque spectrum associated with invertor switching logic, pulse width modulation control scheme, eccentricity, and magnetic saturation. Frequency contents of predicted variables are identified and matched with measured sound data. Additionally, the Galerkin's method (or modified harmonic balance) is also employed successfully to develop an efficient computational scheme which predicts the Fourier coefficients of torque pulsations directly including various effects associated with inductance harmonics and the fluctuation of rotor angular velocity. For the radiator (annular disk), modal base formulations of sound radiation have been developed by approximating disk eigen-functions. Specifically, the effects of modal coupling and source rotation on radiated sound are investigated. Analytical predictions match well with numerical results obtained by using a boundary element program. New mobility transfer functions (path) are derived to couple the source and radiator formulations in order to construct an overall vibro-acoustic model. Potential areas of further research including experimental validation are discussed.

  16. Analysis and Computation of Acoustic and Elastic Wave Equations in Random Media

    KAUST Repository

    Motamed, Mohammad

    2014-01-06

    We propose stochastic collocation methods for solving the second order acoustic and elastic wave equations in heterogeneous random media and subject to deterministic boundary and initial conditions [1, 4]. We assume that the medium consists of non-overlapping sub-domains with smooth interfaces. In each sub-domain, the materials coefficients are smooth and given or approximated by a finite number of random variable. One important example is wave propagation in multi-layered media with smooth interfaces. The numerical scheme consists of a finite difference or finite element method in the physical space and a collocation in the zeros of suitable tensor product orthogonal polynomials (Gauss points) in the probability space. We provide a rigorous convergence analysis and demonstrate different types of convergence of the probability error with respect to the number of collocation points under some regularity assumptions on the data. In particular, we show that, unlike in elliptic and parabolic problems [2, 3], the solution to hyperbolic problems is not in general analytic with respect to the random variables. Therefore, the rate of convergence is only algebraic. A fast spectral rate of convergence is still possible for some quantities of interest and for the wave solutions with particular types of data. We also show that the semi-discrete solution is analytic with respect to the random variables with the radius of analyticity proportional to the grid/mesh size h. We therefore obtain an exponential rate of convergence which deteriorates as the quantity h p gets smaller, with p representing the polynomial degree in the stochastic space. We have shown that analytical results and numerical examples are consistent and that the stochastic collocation method may be a valid alternative to the more traditional Monte Carlo method. Here we focus on the stochastic acoustic wave equation. Similar results are obtained for stochastic elastic equations.

  17. The sound power emitted by a source of low acoustic impedance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Verholt, Lars M.

    1998-01-01

    Several authors have maintained that a source of low acoustic impedance (which includes standardised reference sources of the aerodynamic type) would radiate less than the free field power in a reverberation room. However, neither computer simulations nor experiments have confirmed this assertion....

  18. Baffling or Baffled: Improve Your Acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoo, Frank B.

    1981-01-01

    Presents techniques for evaluating the acoustics (reverberation time, and standing waves and resonance phenomena) of a band performance room. Gives instructions for building and placing inexpensive baffles (free-standing, portable sound barriers) to correct room defects. (SJL)

  19. Perceived Speech Privacy in Computer Simulated Open-plan Offices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Claudiu B.; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    In open plan offices the lack of speech privacy between the workstations is one of the major acoustic problems. Improving the speech privacy in an open plan design is therefore the main concern for a successful open plan environment. The project described in this paper aimed to find an objective...... parameter that correlates well with the perceived degree of speech privacy and to derive a clear method for evaluating the acoustic conditions in open plan offices. Acoustic measurements were carried out in an open plan office, followed by data analysis at the Acoustic Department, DTU. A computer model...... of the actual office was developed using the ODEON room acoustic software, and this allowed a systematic investigation of the possible influence of various acoustic conditions on the speech privacy. Four different versions of acoustic treatment of the office were used and three different distances from...

  20. A computational study for investigating acoustic streaming and tissue heating during high intensity focused ultrasound through blood vessel with an obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvin, Salma; Sultana, Aysha

    2017-06-01

    The influence of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) on the obstacle through blood vessel is studied numerically. A three-dimensional acoustics-thermal-fluid coupling model is employed to compute the temperature field around the obstacle through blood vessel. The model construction is based on the linear Westervelt and conjugate heat transfer equations for the obstacle through blood vessel. The system of equations is solved using Finite Element Method (FEM). We found from this three-dimensional numerical study that the rate of heat transfer is increasing from the obstacle and both the convective cooling and acoustic streaming can considerably change the temperature field.

  1. A High Order Accuracy Computational Tool for Unsteady Turbulent Flows and Acoustics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Accurate simulations of unsteady turbulent flows for aerodynamics applications, such as accurate computation of heat loads on space vehicles as well the interactions...

  2. Perceptual Optimization of Room-In-Room Reproduction with Spatially Distributed Loudspeakers

    OpenAIRE

    Grosse, Julian; van de Par, Steven

    2014-01-01

    It is often desirable to reproduce a specific room-acoustic scene, e.g. a concert hall in a playback room, in such a way that the listener has a plausible and authentic spatial impression of the original sound source including the room acoustical properties. In this study a perceptually motivated approach for spatial audio reproduction is developed. This approach optimizes the spatial and monaural cues of the direct and reverberant sound separately. More specifically, the (monaural) spectral ...

  3. Auditory virtual environment with dynamic room characteristics for music performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Daniel Dhaham

    A room-adaptive system was designed to simulate an electro-acoustic space that changes room characteristics in real-time according to the content of sound. In this specific case, the focus of the sound components is on the different styles and genres of music. This system is composed of real-time music recognition algorithms that analyze the different elements of music, determine the desired room characteristics, and output the acoustical parameters via multi-channel room simulation mechanisms. The system modifies the acoustic properties of a space and enables it to "improvise" its acoustical parameters based on the sounds of the music performances.

  4. Decrease in case duration required to complete an additional case during regularly scheduled hours in an operating room suite: a computer simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, F; Macario, A

    1999-01-01

    We used Monte-Carlo computer simulation to determine whether surgical or anesthetic interventions to achieve small decreases in case duration may create enough new open operating room (OR) time to permit an additional case to be scheduled for completion in an OR suite during regular working hours. We used rules for scheduling of cases assuming that OR personnel are compensated so that the OR suite can profit financially from decreasing case duration to complete an additional case during regularly scheduled hours. The decreases in each case's duration required to create enough new open OR time to reliably (> or =95%) schedule another case were 30-39 min, 79-110 min, and 105-206 min for OR suites with 1-15 ORs and mean case durations of 1, 2, or 3 h, respectively. Computer simulation shows decreasing case duration is unlikely to create sufficient operating room time to reliably permit an additional case to be scheduled for completion during working hours. Additional cases may best be added to the operating room suite schedule by optimizing case scheduling, not by decreasing the duration of all cases in the suite.

  5. Increase in voice level and speaker comfort in lecture rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas; Gade, Anders Christian; Bellester, Gaspar Payá

    2009-01-01

    Teachers often suffer from health problems related to their voice. These problems are related to their working environment, including the acoustics of the lecture rooms. However, there is a lack of studies linking the room acoustic parameters to the voice produced by the speaker. In this pilot...... study, the main goals are to investigate whether objectively measurable parameters of the rooms can be related to an increase in the voice sound power produced by speakers and to the speakers’ subjective judgments about the rooms. In six different rooms with different sizes, reverberation times...... that in different rooms significant changes in the sound power produced by the speaker can be found. It is also found that these changes mainly have to do with the size of the room and to the gain produced by the room. To describe this quality, a new room acoustic quantity called “room gain” is proposed....

  6. Low-Complexity Adaptive Filtering Implementation for Acoustic Echo Cancellation

    OpenAIRE

    Schüldt, Christian; Lindström, Fredric; Claesson, Ingvar

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic echo cancellation is generally achieved with adaptive FIR filters. Due to the often large dimensionality of the adaptive filters, required to model rooms with standard reverberation time, the adaptation process can be computationally demanding. This paper presents a block based selective updating method which reduces the complexity with nearly a half in practical situations, while showing superior convergence speed performance as compared to conventional partial update complexity red...

  7. Hypoxia Room

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypoxia Room is a 8x8x8 ft. clear vinyl plastic and aluminum frame construction enclosure located within USAREIM laboratory 028. The Hypoxia Room (manufactured...

  8. Reliability of estimating the room volume from a single room impulse response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuster, M.

    2008-01-01

    The methods investigated for the room volume estimation are based on geometrical acoustics, eigenmode, and diffuse field models and no data other than the room impulse response are available. The measurements include several receiver positions in a total of 12 rooms of vastly different sizes and

  9. A general-purpose computer program for studying ultrasonic beam patterns generated with acoustic lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberti, Dino; Ludwig, Reinhold; Looft, Fred J.

    1988-03-01

    A 3-D computer model of a piston radiator with lenses for focusing and defocusing is presented. To achieve high-resolution imaging, the frequency of the transmitted and received ultrasound must be as high as 10 MHz. Current ultrasonic transducers produce an extremely narrow beam at these high frequencies and thus are not appropriate for imaging schemes such as synthetic-aperture focus techniques (SAFT). Consequently, a numerical analysis program has been developed to determine field intensity patterns that are radiated from ultrasonic transducers with lenses. Lens shapes are described and the field intensities are numerically predicted and compared with experimental results.

  10. Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system for the computer room of the CERN Control Centre

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system for the computer room of the CERN Control Centre

  11. Outdoor Acoustics as a General Discipline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1999-01-01

    A tutorial paper exploring the characteristics of sound outdoors. Outdoor acoustics is contrasted to room acoustics. A number of important aspects of outdoor acoustics are exemplified and theoretical approaches are outlined. These are influence of ground impedance, influence of weather, screening...

  12. Perceptual effects in auralization of virtual rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, Mendel; Larsson, Pontus; Vastfjall, Daniel; Torres, Rendell R.

    2002-05-01

    By using various types of binaural simulation (or ``auralization'') of physical environments, it is now possible to study basic perceptual issues relevant to room acoustics, as well to simulate the acoustic conditions found in concert halls and other auditoria. Binaural simulation of physical spaces in general is also important to virtual reality systems. This presentation will begin with an overview of the issues encountered in the auralization of room and other environments. We will then discuss the influence of various approximations in room modeling, in particular, edge- and surface scattering, on the perceived room response. Finally, we will discuss cross-modal effects, such as the influence of visual cues on the perception of auditory cues, and the influence of cross-modal effects on the judgement of ``perceived presence'' and the rating of room acoustic quality.

  13. Speaker comfort and increase of voice level in lecture rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas; Gade, Anders Christian; Bellester, G P

    2008-01-01

    Teachers often suffer health problems or tension related to their voice. These problems may be related to there working environment, including room acoustics of the lecture rooms which forces them to stress their voices. The present paper describes a first effort in finding relationships between...... the objectively measurable parameters of the rooms and the objective voice power produced by speakers. In rooms with different sizes, reverberation time and other physical attributes, the sound power levels produced by six speakers where measured while giving a short lecture. Relevant room acoustic parameters...... that these changes were mainly related to the size of the room and to the gain or support produced by the room. To describe this quality, a new room acoustic quantity called 'room gain' is proposed....

  14. The acoustics of public squares/places: A comparison between results from a computer simulation program and measurements in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paini, Dario; Rindel, Jens Holger; Gade, Anders

    2004-01-01

    In the contest of a PhD thesis, in which the main purpose is to analyse the importance of the public square/place (“agora”) as a meeting point of sound and music, with particular regard to its use for concerts (amplified or not), a first step was done, making comparisons between measurement in situ...... or a band during, for instance, music summer festivals) and the best position for the audience. A further result could be to propose some acoustic adjustments to achieve better acoustic quality by considering the acoustic parameters which are typically used for concert halls and opera houses....

  15. Topology optimization for acoustic problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a method to control acoustic properties in a room with topology optimization is presented. It is shown how the squared sound pressure amplitude in a certain part of a room can be minimized by distribution of material in a design domain along the ceiling in 2D and 3D. Nice 0-1 designs...

  16. Analysis of Reverberation Time Field Measurement Results in Building Acoustics

    OpenAIRE

    D. Mašović; M. Öğüç

    2013-01-01

    Sound level difference between two rooms depends on both sound reduction between the rooms and their acoustical properties, such as the absorption in the receiving room. In order to abstract the influence of the rooms and assess only the sound reduction between them, relevant building acoustics standards offer two ways of normalizing a measured sound level difference – according to the reverberation time and the equivalent sound absorption area in the receiving room. In both cases measurement...

  17. Springer handbook of acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and electronics. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is also in his 2nd edition an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents. This new edition of the Handbook features over 11 revised and expanded chapters, new illustrations, and 2 new chapters covering microphone arrays  and acoustic emission.  Updated chapters contain the latest research and applications in, e.g. sound propagation in the atmosphere, nonlinear acoustics in fluids, building and concert hall acoustics, signal processing, psychoacoustics, computer music, animal bioacousics, sound intensity, modal acoustics as well as new chapters on microphone arrays an...

  18. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of an 840 ft/sec Tip Speed Advanced Ducted Propulsor Fan System Model for Acoustic Methods Assessment and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational Aerodynamic simulations of an 840 ft/sec tip speed, Advanced Ducted Propulsor fan system were performed at five different operating points on the fan operating line, in order to provide detailed internal flow field information for use with fan acoustic prediction methods presently being developed, assessed and validated. The fan system is a sub-scale, lownoise research fan/nacelle model that has undergone extensive experimental testing in the 9- by 15- foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center, resulting in quality, detailed aerodynamic and acoustic measurement data. Details of the fan geometry, the computational fluid dynamics methods, the computational grids, and various computational parameters relevant to the numerical simulations are discussed. Flow field results for three of the five operating conditions simulated are presented in order to provide a representative look at the computed solutions. Each of the five fan aerodynamic simulations involved the entire fan system, excluding a long core duct section downstream of the core inlet guide vane. As a result, only fan rotational speed and system bypass ratio, set by specifying static pressure downstream of the core inlet guide vane row, were adjusted in order to set the fan operating point, leading to operating points that lie on a fan operating line and making mass flow rate a fully dependent parameter. The resulting mass flow rates are in good agreement with measurement values. The computed blade row flow fields for all five fan operating points are, in general, aerodynamically healthy. Rotor blade and fan exit guide vane flow characteristics are good, including incidence and deviation angles, chordwise static pressure distributions, blade surface boundary layers, secondary flow structures, and blade wakes. Examination of the computed flow fields reveals no excessive boundary layer separations or related secondary-flow problems. A few spanwise comparisons between

  19. Sick building syndrome in relation to air exchange rate, CO(2), room temperature and relative air humidity in university computer classrooms: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbäck, Dan; Nordström, Klas

    2008-10-01

    To study the effects of ventilation and temperature changes in computer classrooms on symptoms in students. Technical university students participated in a blinded study. Two classrooms had higher air exchange (4.1-5.2 ac/h); two others had lower (2.3-2.6 ac/h) air exchange. After 1 week, ventilation conditions were interchanged between the rooms. The students reported symptoms during the last hour, on a seven-step rating scale. Room temperature, relative air humidity (RH) carbon dioxide (CO(2)), PM10 and ultra-fine particles (UFP) were measured simultaneously (1 h). Illumination, air velocity, operative temperature, supply air temperature, formaldehyde, NO(2) and O(3) were measured. Multiple logistic regression was applied in cross-sectional analysis of the first answer (N = 355). Those participating twice (N = 121) were analysed longitudinally. Totally 31% were females, 2.9% smokers and 3.8% had asthma. Mean CO(2) was 993 ppm (674-1,450 ppm), temperature 22.7 degrees C (20-25 degrees C) and RH 24% (19-35%). Lower and higher air exchange rates corresponded to a personal outdoor airflow of 7 l/s*p and 10-13 L/s*P, respectively. Mean PM10 was 20 microg/m(3) at lower and 15 microg/m(3) at higher ventilation flow. Ocular, nasal and throat symptoms, breathlessness, headache and tiredness were significantly more common at higher CO(2) and temperature. After mutual adjustment, ocular (OR = 1.52 per 1 degrees C), nasal (OR = 1.62 per 1 degrees C) and throat symptoms (OR = 1.53 per 1 degrees C), headache (OR = 1.51 per 1 degrees C) and tiredness (OR = 1.54 per 1 degrees C) were significantly associated with temperature; headache was associated only with CO(2) (OR = 1.19 per 100 ppm CO(2)). Longitudinal analysis demonstrated that increased room temperature was related to tiredness (P < 0.05). Computer classrooms may have CO(2) above 1,000 ppm and temperatures above 22 degrees C. Increased temperature and CO(2) may affect mucosal membrane symptoms, headaches and tiredness

  20. Principles of musical acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, William M

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Musical Acoustics focuses on the basic principles in the science and technology of music. Musical examples and specific musical instruments demonstrate the principles. The book begins with a study of vibrations and waves, in that order. These topics constitute the basic physical properties of sound, one of two pillars supporting the science of musical acoustics. The second pillar is the human element, the physiological and psychological aspects of acoustical science. The perceptual topics include loudness, pitch, tone color, and localization of sound. With these two pillars in place, it is possible to go in a variety of directions. The book treats in turn, the topics of room acoustics, audio both analog and digital, broadcasting, and speech. It ends with chapters on the traditional musical instruments, organized by family. The mathematical level of this book assumes that the reader is familiar with elementary algebra. Trigonometric functions, logarithms and powers also appear in the book, but co...

  1. Using Computer Vision and Depth Sensing to Measure Healthcare Worker-Patient Contacts and Personal Protective Equipment Adherence Within Hospital Rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junyang; Cremer, James F; Zarei, Kasra; Segre, Alberto M; Polgreen, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    Background.  We determined the feasibility of using computer vision and depth sensing to detect healthcare worker (HCW)-patient contacts to estimate both hand hygiene (HH) opportunities and personal protective equipment (PPE) adherence. Methods.  We used multiple Microsoft Kinects to track the 3-dimensional movement of HCWs and their hands within hospital rooms. We applied computer vision techniques to recognize and determine the position of fiducial markers attached to the patient's bed to determine the location of the HCW's hands with respect to the bed. To measure our system's ability to detect HCW-patient contacts, we counted each time a HCW's hands entered a virtual rectangular box aligned with a patient bed. To measure PPE adherence, we identified the hands, torso, and face of each HCW on room entry, determined the color of each body area, and compared it with the color of gloves, gowns, and face masks. We independently examined a ground truth video recording and compared it with our system's results. Results.  Overall, for touch detection, the sensitivity was 99.7%, with a positive predictive value of 98.7%. For gowned entrances, sensitivity was 100.0% and specificity was 98.15%. For masked entrances, sensitivity was 100.0% and specificity was 98.75%; for gloved entrances, the sensitivity was 86.21% and specificity was 98.28%. Conclusions.  Using computer vision and depth sensing, we can estimate potential HH opportunities at the bedside and also estimate adherence to PPE. Our fine-grained estimates of how and how often HCWs interact directly with patients can inform a wide range of patient-safety research.

  2. Case studies of computer model applications in consulting practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebein, Gary; Paek, Hyun; Lorang, Mark; McGuinnes, Courtney

    2002-05-01

    Six case studies of computer model applications in a consulting practice will be presented to present the range of issues that can be studied with computer models as well as to understand the limitations of the technique at the present time. Case studies of elliptical conference rooms demonstrate basic acoustic ray principles and suggest remediation strategies. Models of a large themed entertainment venue with multiple amplified sound sources show how visualization of the acoustic ray paths can assist a consultant and client in value engineering locations and amounts of acoustic materials. The acoustic problems with an angled ceiling and large rear wall were studied when an historic church was converted to a music performance hall. The computer model of an historic hall did not present enough detailed information and was supplemented with physical model studies and full size mock-up tests of the insertion of an elevator door that would open directly into the concert room. Studies to demonstrate the amount of room model detail to obtain realistic auralizations were also conducted. The integration of architectural acoustic design and audio system design were studied in computer models of a large church sanctuary.

  3. Architectural acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Long, Marshall

    2014-01-01

    .... Beginning with a brief history, it reviews the fundamentals of acoustics, human perception and reaction to sound, acoustic noise measurements, noise metrics, and environmental noise characterization...

  4. Computed tomography angiography of lower extremities in the emergency room for evaluation of patients with gunshot wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adibi, Ali; Plotnik, Adam N.; Mohajer, Kiyarash; Arellano, Cesar; Ruehm, Stefan G. [University of California, Diagnostic Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Krishnam, Mayil S.; Dissanayake, Sumudu [University of California, Cardiovascular and Thoracic Imaging, Department of Radiology, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    To assess the role of CT angiography in the evaluation of patients with lower extremity gunshot wounds in the emergency room. Eighty patients (73 male, 7 female, mean age 26 years) underwent CT angiography for the evaluation of lower extremity gunshot injuries. Imaging was conducted on the basis of standardized protocols utilizing 16-slice and 64-slice multidetector systems and images were qualitatively graded and assessed for various forms of arterial injury. CT angiography findings indicative of arterial injury were observed in 24 patients (30 %) and a total of 43 arterial injuries were noted; the most common form was focal narrowing/spasm (n = 16, 37.2 %); the most common artery involved was the superficial femoral artery (n = 12, 50 %). In qualitative assessment of images based on a 4-point grading system, both readers considered CT angiography diagnostically excellent (grade 4) in most cases. Surgical findings were consistent with CT angiography and follow-up of patients' medical records showed no arterial injuries in patients with normal findings on initial imaging. Our findings demonstrate that CT angiography is an effective imaging modality for evaluation of lower extremity gunshot wounds and could help limit more invasive procedures such as catheter angiography to a select group of patients. (orig.)

  5. How work context affects operating room processes: using data mining and computer simulation to analyze facility and process design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, André; Denz, Christof; Bender, Hans-Joachim; Schleppers, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of the operating room (OR) requires that both structural (eg, department layout) and behavioral (eg, staff interactions) patterns of work be considered when developing quality improvement strategies. In our study, we investigated how these contextual factors influence outpatient OR processes and the quality of care delivered. The study setting was a German university-affiliated hospital performing approximately 6000 outpatient surgeries annually. During the 3-year-study period, the hospital significantly changed its outpatient OR facility layout from a decentralized (ie, ORs in adjacent areas of the building) to a centralized (ie, ORs in immediate vicinity of each other) design. To study the impact of the facility change on OR processes, we used a mixed methods approach, including process analysis, process modeling, and social network analysis of staff interactions. The change in facility layout was seen to influence OR processes in ways that could substantially affect patient outcomes. For example, we found a potential for more errors during handovers in the new centralized design due to greater interdependency between tasks and staff. Utilization of the mixed methods approach in our analysis, as compared with that of a single assessment method, enabled a deeper understanding of the OR work context and its influence on outpatient OR processes.

  6. Auralization fundamentals of acoustics, modelling, simulation, algorithms and acoustic virtual reality

    CERN Document Server

    Vorlander, Michael

    2007-01-01

    "Auralization" is the technique of creation and reproduction of sound on the basis of computer data. With this tool is it possible to predict the character of sound signals which are generated at the source and modified by reinforcement, propagation and transmission in systems such as rooms, buildings, vehicles or other technical devices. This book is organized as a comprehensive collection of the basics of sound and vibration, acoustic modelling, simulation, signal processing and audio reproduction. Implementations of the auralization technique are described using examples drawn from various fields in acoustic’s research and engineering, architecture, sound design and virtual reality.

  7. Applications of a plane wave based room correction system for low frequencies using multiple loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian; Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal

    2008-01-01

    When low frequency sound is radiated inside small listening spaces by loudspeakers, large uniformities occur over the sound field. This is due to the multiple reflection and diffraction of sound on the walls and different objects in the room. A developed system named Controlled Acoustically Bass...... System (CABS) produces uniform sound field at low frequencies. This is performed by utilizing loudspeakers at the front wall and extra loudspeakers at the opposite wall, processed to remove the rear-wall reflection of a rectangular room. Effectiveness of CABS on different room scenarios has been...... evaluated by using a computer simulation program based on the Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD). CABS has been simulated in a small car cabin and in an irregular room. Non-ideal placement of loudspeakers in CABS have been evaluated. The influence of utilizing CABS with different types...

  8. Exploring the Environment/Energy Pareto Optimal Front of an Office Room Using Computational Fluid Dynamics-Based Interactive Optimization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangji Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the development of a high-resolution and control-friendly optimization framework in enclosed environments that helps improve thermal comfort, indoor air quality (IAQ, and energy costs of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC system simultaneously. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD-based optimization method which couples algorithms implemented in Matlab with CFD simulation is proposed. The key part of this method is a data interactive mechanism which efficiently passes parameters between CFD simulations and optimization functions. A two-person office room is modeled for the numerical optimization. The multi-objective evolutionary algorithm—non-dominated-and-crowding Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA-II—is realized to explore the environment/energy Pareto front of the enclosed space. Performance analysis will demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented optimization method.

  9. Sound field control in a rectangular room at low frequencies to simulate the sound radiated by a virtual source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orozco, Arturo; Uchiyama, Michiaki; Tohyama, Mikio

    1999-01-01

    The sound reproduced in a room by a conventional audio system is modified because of the acoustic response of the room. In this paper a theoreticalstudy based on computer simulations for the synthesis of a desired sound field in a room is presented. The optimal solution in a continuous region...... that covers almost the entire volume of the room has been obtained with the least-square approximation. It is shown that the synthesis of travelling waves in a certain direction is possible at frequencies up to 320 Hz in a room with dimensions 2.9x3.6x2.5 m using 32 loudspeakers. If waves travelling in any...

  10. Broadband acoustic energy confinement in hierarchical sonic crystals composed of rotated square inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakouri, Amir; Xu, Feifei; Fan, Zheng

    2017-07-01

    The propagation of acoustic waves in hierarchical sonic crystals is studied computationally and experimentally. These sonic crystals are composed of a hierarchical order of square inclusions rotated 45° with respect to the square lattice structure. It is shown that these hierarchical sonic crystals are capable of confining acoustic energy over a broad frequency range and at multiple lattice points inside the sonic crystal based on Bragg's scattering effect. Fused deposition modeling additive manufacturing is applied to prepare a finite-sized sample of the hierarchical sonic crystal. Acoustic measurements are conducted on the hierarchical sonic crystal sample in a direct and closely plane-wave field inside an anechoic room. The experimental measurements are in good agreement with the band structure calculated using the finite element method. Potential applications of the hierarchical sonic crystals for acoustic energy harvesting and noise measurements are discussed.

  11. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  12. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book chapt......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology.......Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as...

  13. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-22

    Final Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 7/1/15 to 12/22/16 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deep Water Ocean Acoustics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...shortening of the water column); 2.) Explicitly defined the geo-acoustics so that both models had the same sponge ; 3.) Output the complete computational...chosen because this VLA was spaced at /2 at 250Hz and is therefore beamforming capable, covering the conjugate depth. An ambient noise model was

  14. Acoustical Properties of Contemporary Mosques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaman Özgül Yılmaz

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Religious buildings are important for many communities because of their representation of different beliefs. In such structures, the sense of individuality or unity & togetherness are created according to variable worship activities; these different uses have also different acoustical requirements. In order to create the desired feeling in the space at the required time, rooms should be evaluated in terms of acoustical conditions.

  15. Recovery Room

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Before 1950's, patients were usually cared for in an ill-defined postoperative unit or on the hospital ward. Patients were frequently transferred from the operating room directly to the ward where they were placed close to the nursing station. In 1947 the. Anesthesia Study Commission of the Philadelphia. Country Medical ...

  16. Recovery Room

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical Journal of Zambia, Volume 36 Number 3 (2009). 132. Department of Anaesthesia, University Teaching Hospital ... nursing shortage, stimulated widespread development of recovery rooms. This article summarizes .... Singapore Med J.1997; 38(5): 200-204. 11. Feeley TW, Macario A. Chapter 71: The postanesthesia ...

  17. Computer Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Perry R.

    This chapter covers algorithms, technologies, computer languages, and systems for computer music. Computer music involves the application of computers and other digital/electronic technologies to music composition, performance, theory, history, and the study of perception. The field combines digital signal processing, computational algorithms, computer languages, hardware and software systems, acoustics, psychoacoustics (low-level perception of sounds from the raw acoustic signal), and music cognition (higher-level perception of musical style, form, emotion, etc.).

  18. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  19. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  20. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as...

  1. Acoustic design by topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    To bring down noise levels in human surroundings is an important issue and a method to reduce noise by means of topology optimization is presented here. The acoustic field is modeled by Helmholtz equation and the topology optimization method is based on continuous material interpolation functions...... in the density and bulk modulus. The objective function is the squared sound pressure amplitude. First, room acoustic problems are considered and it is shown that the sound level can be reduced in a certain part of the room by an optimized distribution of reflecting material in a design domain along the ceiling...

  2. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann P. McBride Edited by M-C. Sawley with contributions from: P. Kreuzer D. Bonacorsi S. Belforte F. Wuerthwein L. Bauerdick K. Lassila-Perini M-C. Sawley

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the comput...

  3. Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  4. In vitro assessment of the relationship between acoustic properties and bone mass density of the calcaneus by comparison of ultrasound parametric imaging and quantitative computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugier, P; Droin, P; Laval-Jeantet, A M; Berger, G

    1997-02-01

    This in vitro study aimed to add new experimental evidence to clarify the relation between acoustic properties of bone and bone mineral density (BMD) of the human calcaneus. Parametric images of normalized broadband ultrasonic attenuation (nBUA) and ultrasound bone velocity (UBV) were compared with quantitative computed tomography (QCT) images of the calcaneus. The experimental protocol was designed to control the different potential sources of error in acoustic measurements, including the shape and thickness of the samples, intervening soft tissues and cortical bone, boundary effects, and variation in location of the regions of interest (ROIs) analyzed by ultrasound and X-ray. The present study was based on bone specimens from calcaneus removed from 15 cadavers (six male and nine female donors ranging from 69 to 89 years of age). Immersion ultrasonic measurements were performed in the through-thickness direction at normal incidence using a pair of focused broad-band 0.5-MHz transducers. QCT of the specimens was performed using standard 10-mm-thick slices with the Cann-Genant calibration standard. Identical, site-matched ROIs were selected for quantitative analysis on the three images. The pattern of acoustic parameters was similar to that of BMD with QCT. The relationships between nBUA and BMD (r2 = 0.75), between UBV and BMD (r2 = 0.88) and between nBUA and UBV (r2 = 0.84) were highly significant (p < 10(-4). From this study, it appears that ultrasound parameters as measured with current transmission techniques reflect mainly bone quantity and only reflect microarchitecture to a small extent and that BUA and UBV reflect the same bone property.

  5. Experimental Acoustic Evaluation of an Auditorium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Dana Ţopa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a case history: the acoustical analysis of a rectangular auditorium. The following acoustical parameters were evaluated: early decay time, reverberation time, clarity, definition, and center time. The excitation signal was linear sweep sine and additional analysis was carried out: peak-to-noise ratio, reverberation time for empty and occupied room, standard deviation of acoustical parameters, diffusion, and just noticeable differences analysis. Conclusions about room’s destination and modeling were drawn in the end.

  6. RADIATION ACOUSTICS

    OpenAIRE

    Lyamshev, L.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a new branch of acoustics. Its' fundamentals are lying in the research of acoustical effects due to the interaction of a radiation with matter. The sound excitation in liquids and solids by modulated or pulsed particle beams (electron, proton, ion beams, γ-radiation and single high-energy elementary particles) and some practical applications are discussed.

  7. Experimental and numerical comparison of absorption optimization in small rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wincentz, Jakob Nygård; Garcia, Julian Martinez-Villalba; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2016-01-01

    A vast majority of modern music is recorded and produced in small control room environments of volumes of around 50 m3 . Several problems occur when controlling the room acoustics of such small spaces. First, the room modes will produce strong peaks and dips particularly at lower frequencies......, boundary conditions, and phase information providing accuracy at low frequencies. Good agreements are found between measurements and simulations, confirming that FEM can be used as a design tool for optimizing absorption and acoustic parameters in small rooms...

  8. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of a 1215 ft/sec Tip Speed Transonic Fan System Model for Acoustic Methods Assessment and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational Aerodynamic simulations of a 1215 ft/sec tip speed transonic fan system were performed at five different operating points on the fan operating line, in order to provide detailed internal flow field information for use with fan acoustic prediction methods presently being developed, assessed and validated. The fan system is a sub-scale, low-noise research fan/nacelle model that has undergone extensive experimental testing in the 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Details of the fan geometry, the computational fluid dynamics methods, the computational grids, and various computational parameters relevant to the numerical simulations are discussed. Flow field results for three of the five operating points simulated are presented in order to provide a representative look at the computed solutions. Each of the five fan aerodynamic simulations involved the entire fan system, which for this model did not include a split flow path with core and bypass ducts. As a result, it was only necessary to adjust fan rotational speed in order to set the fan operating point, leading to operating points that lie on a fan operating line and making mass flow rate a fully dependent parameter. The resulting mass flow rates are in good agreement with measurement values. Computed blade row flow fields at all fan operating points are, in general, aerodynamically healthy. Rotor blade and fan exit guide vane flow characteristics are good, including incidence and deviation angles, chordwise static pressure distributions, blade surface boundary layers, secondary flow structures, and blade wakes. Examination of the flow fields at all operating conditions reveals no excessive boundary layer separations or related secondary-flow problems.

  9. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the co...

  10. Air Distribution in Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    The research on air distribution in rooms is often done as full-size investigations, scale-model investigations or by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). New activities have taken place within all three areas and this paper draws comparisons between the different methods. The outcome of the l......EA sponsored research "Air Flow Pattern within Buildings" is used for comparisons in some parts of the paper because various types of experiments and many countries are involved....

  11. Influence of a Cooled Ceiling on Indoor Air Quality in a Displacement Ventilated Room Examined by Means of Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik

    The influence of a cooled ceiling on the air quality in a displacement ventilated room is examined by means of CFD. The objective of the study is to examine how the flow field in a displacement ventilated room is influenced when a cooled ceiling removes a major part of the total heat I9ad...

  12. Man and room climate. The importance of thermal comfort; Der Mensch und das Raumklima. Zur Bedeutung der thermischen Behaglichkeit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefte, Klaus [Uponor Academy, Ochtrup (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Room climate has become increasingly important during the past few decades as humans spend about 90 percent of their time inside rooms. Influencing factors are acoustics, lighting, air quality and thermal room climate. The contribution focuses on thermal room climate and room air quality which are the most important of these factors. (orig.)

  13. Enhanced sources of acoustic power surrounding AR11429

    OpenAIRE

    Donea, Alina; Hanson, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Multi-frequency power maps of the local acoustic oscillations show acoustic enhancements (\\acoustic-power halos") at high frequencies surrounding large active region. Computational seismic holography reveals a high-frequency \\acoustic-emission halo", or \\seismic glory" surrounding large active regions. In this study, we have applied computational seismic holography to map the seismic seismic source density surrounding AR 11429. Studies of HMI/SDO Doppler data, shows that the "acoustic halos" ...

  14. Experimental and numerical comparison of absorption optimization in small rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wincentz, Jakob Nygård; Garcia, Julian Martinez-Villalba; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2016-01-01

    A vast majority of modern music is recorded and produced in small control room environments of volumes of around 50 m3 . Several problems occur when controlling the room acoustics of such small spaces. First, the room modes will produce strong peaks and dips particularly at lower frequencies......, and even in the sweet spot position the listening experience can be easily deteriorated. Second, when designing or refurbishing small rooms it is hard to adequately predict the reverberation time by using Sabine’s formula due to highly non-diffuse conditions and using a statistical approach below...... the Schroeder frequency. This project investigates experimentally changes in the room acoustic parameters by altering the positioning and orientation of porous materials in a small room, which are compared with finite element method (FEM) simulations. FEM is able to take into account the exact room geometry...

  15. Fundamentals of Shallow Water Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Katsnelson, Boris; Lynch, James

    2012-01-01

    Shallow water acoustics (SWA), the study of how low and medium frequency sound propagates and scatters on the continental shelves of the world's oceans, has both technical interest and a large number of practical applications. Technically, shallow water poses an interesting medium for the study of acoustic scattering, inverse theory, and propagation physics in a complicated oceanic waveguide. Practically, shallow water acoustics has interest for geophysical exploration, marine mammal studies, and naval applications. Additionally, one notes the very interdisciplinary nature of shallow water acoustics, including acoustical physics, physical oceanography, marine geology, and marine biology. In this specialized volume, the authors, all of whom have extensive at-sea experience in U.S. and Russian research efforts, have tried to summarize the main experimental, theoretical, and computational results in shallow water acoustics, with an emphasis on providing physical insight into the topics presented.

  16. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of a 1484 ft/sec Tip Speed Quiet High-Speed Fan System Model for Acoustic Methods Assessment and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational Aerodynamic simulations of a 1484 ft/sec tip speed quiet high-speed fan system were performed at five different operating points on the fan operating line, in order to provide detailed internal flow field information for use with fan acoustic prediction methods presently being developed, assessed and validated. The fan system is a sub-scale, low-noise research fan/nacelle model that has undergone experimental testing in the 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Details of the fan geometry, the computational fluid dynamics methods, the computational grids, and various computational parameters relevant to the numerical simulations are discussed. Flow field results for three of the five operating points simulated are presented in order to provide a representative look at the computed solutions. Each of the five fan aerodynamic simulations involved the entire fan system, which includes a core duct and a bypass duct that merge upstream of the fan system nozzle. As a result, only fan rotational speed and the system bypass ratio, set by means of a translating nozzle plug, were adjusted in order to set the fan operating point, leading to operating points that lie on a fan operating line and making mass flow rate a fully dependent parameter. The resulting mass flow rates are in good agreement with measurement values. Computed blade row flow fields at all fan operating points are, in general, aerodynamically healthy. Rotor blade and fan exit guide vane flow characteristics are good, including incidence and deviation angles, chordwise static pressure distributions, blade surface boundary layers, secondary flow structures, and blade wakes. Examination of the computed flow fields reveals no excessive or critical boundary layer separations or related secondary-flow problems, with the exception of the hub boundary layer at the core duct entrance. At that location a significant flow separation is present. The region of local flow

  17. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  18. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  19. Prior listening in rooms improves speech intelligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandewie, Eugene; Zahorik, Pavel

    2010-07-01

    Although results from previous studies have demonstrated that the acoustic effects of a single reflection are perceptually suppressed after repeated exposure to a particular configuration of source and reflection, the extent to which this dynamic echo suppression might generalize to speech understanding in room environments with multiple reflections and reverberation is largely unknown. Here speech intelligibility was measured using the coordinate response measure corpus both with and without prior listening exposure to a reverberant room environment, which was simulated using virtual auditory space techniques. Prior room listening exposure was manipulated by presenting either a two-sentence carrier phrase that preceded the target speech, or no carrier phrase within the room environment. Results from 14 listeners indicate that with prior room exposure, masked speech reception thresholds were on average 2.7 dB lower than thresholds without exposure, an improvement in intelligibility of over 18 percentage points on average. This effect, which is shown to be absent in anechoic space and greatly reduced under monaural listening conditions, demonstrates that prior binaural exposure to reverberant rooms can improve speech intelligibility, perhaps due to a process of perceptual adaptation to the acoustics of the listening room.

  20. Evaluation of a Loudspeaker-Based Virtual Acoustic Environment for Investigating sound-field auditory steady-state responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zapata-Rodriguez, Valentina; Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Measuring sound-field auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) is a promising new objective clinical procedure for hearing aid fitting validation, particularly for infants who cannot respond to behavioral tests. In practice, room acoustics of non-anechoic test rooms can heavily influence the auditory...... stimulus used for eliciting the ASSR. To systematically investigate the effect of the room acoustics conditions on sound-field ASSR, a loudspeaker-based auralization system was implemented using a mixed order Ambisonics approach. The present study investigates the performance of the auralization system...... in terms of objective room acoustic measurements and sound-field ASSR measurements, both in the actual room and in the simulated and auralized room. The evaluation is conducted for a small room with well-defined acoustic properties. The room is carefully modeled using the novel room acoustic simulation...

  1. Loudspeaker-based room auralization in auditory perception research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholz, Jörg; Favrot, Sylvain Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Recently a loudspeaker-based room auralisation (LoRA) system has been developed at CAHR, which combines modern room acoustic modeling techniques with high-order Ambisonics auralisation. The environment provides: (i) a flexible research tool to study the signal processing of the normal, impaired, ...

  2. Musical Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  3. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... chapters represent review articles covering the most relevant areas of the field. They are written with the goal of providing students with comprehensive introductions. Further they offer a supply of numerous references to the relevant literature. Besides its usefulness as a textbook, this will make...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as...

  4. Rigid sphere room impulse response simulation: algorithm and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, D P; Habets, E A P; Thomas, M R P; Naylor, P A

    2012-09-01

    Simulated room impulse responses have been proven to be both useful and indispensable for comprehensive testing of acoustic signal processing algorithms while controlling parameters such as the reverberation time, room dimensions, and source-array distance. In this work, a method is proposed for simulating the room impulse responses between a sound source and the microphones positioned on a spherical array. The method takes into account specular reflections of the source by employing the well-known image method, and scattering from the rigid sphere by employing spherical harmonic decomposition. Pseudocode for the proposed method is provided, taking into account various optimizations to reduce the computational complexity. The magnitude and phase errors that result from the finite order spherical harmonic decomposition are analyzed and general guidelines for the order selection are provided. Three examples are presented: an analysis of a diffuse reverberant sound field, a study of binaural cues in the presence of reverberation, and an illustration of the algorithm's use as a mouth simulator.

  5. Sequential Organization and Room Reverberation for Speech Segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    rooms. Wechoose two acoustic rooms with the reverberation time (T^)) equal to 0.3 and 0.5 s, respectively. In each room, two RIRs corresponding to...Labeling accuracy of the proposed and comparison systems shown as a function of reverberation time for (a) two-talker and (b) three-talker mixtures...of reverberation time . This sequential organization approach was published in a 2010 paper by J. Woodruff and D.L. Wang, entitled ’’Sequential

  6. Measuring acoustic habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies.

  7. Development of a computational model for the calculation of neutron dose equivalent in laminated primary barriers of radiotherapy rooms; Desenvolvimento de um modelo computacional para calculo do equivalente de dose de neutrons em barreiras primarias laminadas de salas de radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende, Gabriel Fonseca da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Many radiotherapy centers acquire 15 and 18 MV linear accelerators to perform more effective treatments for deep tumors. However, the acquisition of these equipment must be accompanied by an additional care in shielding planning of the rooms that will house them. In cases where space is restricted, it is common to find primary barriers made of concrete and metal. The drawback of this type of barrier is the photoneutron emission when high energy photons (e.g. 15 and 18 MV spectra) interact with the metallic material of the barrier. The emission of these particles constitutes a problem of radiation protection inside and outside of radiotherapy rooms, which should be properly assessed. A recent work has shown that the current model underestimate the dose of neutrons outside the treatment rooms. In this work, a computational model for the aforementioned problem was created from Monte Carlo Simulations and Artificial Intelligence. The developed model was composed by three neural networks, each being formed of a pair of material and spectrum: Pb18, Pb15 and Fe18. In a direct comparison with the McGinley method, the Pb18 network exhibited the best responses for approximately 78% of the cases tested; the Pb15 network showed better results for 100% of the tested cases, while the Fe18 network produced better answers to 94% of the tested cases. Thus, the computational model composed by the three networks has shown more consistent results than McGinley method. (author)

  8. Reverberation Time Measurements in the NASA Langley Exterior Effects Room (EER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2006-01-01

    One-third octave band background noise and reverberation time measurements were conducted in the Exterior Effect Room (EER) at the NASA Langley Research Center. The related overall acoustic absorption of the room was calculated. The acoustic field in the room was characterized. Reverberation time measurements were performed using the integrated impulse response method. The results were compared with independent measurements using the interrupted noise reverberation time method and different instrumentation. Reasonable agreement was obtained between the reverberation times of the two methods.

  9. Time delay estimation in a reverberant environment by low rate sampling of impulsive acoustic sources

    KAUST Repository

    Omer, Muhammad

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a new method of time delay estimation (TDE) using low sample rates of an impulsive acoustic source in a room environment. The proposed method finds the time delay from the room impulse response (RIR) which makes it robust against room reverberations. The RIR is considered a sparse phenomenon and a recently proposed sparse signal reconstruction technique called orthogonal clustering (OC) is utilized for its estimation from the low rate sampled received signal. The arrival time of the direct path signal at a pair of microphones is identified from the estimated RIR and their difference yields the desired time delay. Low sampling rates reduce the hardware and computational complexity and decrease the communication between the microphones and the centralized location. The performance of the proposed technique is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experimental results. © 2012 IEEE.

  10. Sub-sampling-based 2D localization of an impulsive acoustic source in reverberant environments

    KAUST Repository

    Omer, Muhammad

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a robust method for two-dimensional (2D) impulsive acoustic source localization in a room environment using low sampling rates. The proposed method finds the time delay from the room impulse response (RIR) which makes it robust against room reverberations. We consider the RIR as a sparse phenomenon and apply a recently proposed sparse signal reconstruction technique called orthogonal clustering (OC) for its estimation from the sub-sampled received signal. The arrival time of the direct path signal at a pair of microphones is identified from the estimated RIR, and their difference yields the desired time delay estimate (TDE). Low sampling rates reduces the hardware and computational complexity and decreases the communication between the microphones and the centralized location. Simulation and experimental results of an actual hardware setup are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed technique.

  11. Comparing a phased combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method with other simulation tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2015-01-01

    A phased combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method (PARISM) has been developed in order to be able to model both specular and diffuse reflections with angle-dependent and complex-valued acoustical descriptions of the surfaces. It is of great interest to model both specular...... and diffuse reflections when simulating the acoustics of small rooms with non-diffuse sound fields, since scattering from walls add to the diffuseness in the room. This room type is often seen in class rooms and offices, as they are often small rectangular rooms with most of the absorption placed...

  12. Acoustics Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  13. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  14. Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in June 1969 at Karolinska Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. Since then, more than 10,000 acoustic neuroma ... of neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, medical physicists and a nursing staff. Specialists in neuroimaging join the team when ...

  15. Battlefield acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  16. Acoustical evaluation of preschool classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wonyoung; Hodgson, Murray

    2003-10-01

    An investigation was made of the acoustical environments in the Berwick Preschool, Vancouver, in response to complaints by the teachers. Reverberation times (RT), background noise levels (BNL), and in-class sound levels (Leq) were measured for acoustical evaluation in the classrooms. With respect to the measured RT and BNL, none of the classrooms in the preschool were acceptable according to the criteria relevant to this study. A questionnaire was administered to the teachers to assess their subjective responses to the acoustical and nonacoustical environments of the classrooms. Teachers agreed that the nonacoustical environments in the classrooms were fair, but that the acoustical environments had problems. Eight different classroom configurations were simulated to improve the acoustical environments, using the CATT room acoustical simulation program. When the surface absorption was increased, both the RT and speech levels decreased. RASTI was dependent on the volumes of the classrooms when the background noise levels were high; however, it depended on the total absorption of the classrooms when the background noise levels were low. Ceiling heights are critical as well. It is recommended that decreasing the volume of the classrooms is effective. Sound absorptive materials should be added to the walls or ceiling.

  17. Evaluation of a method for the measurement of subwoofers in usual rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melon, Manuel; Langrenne, Christophe; Herzog, Philippe; Garcia, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    This paper evaluates the potential of the field separation method (FSM) for performing subwoofer measurements in a small test room with poor absorbing properties, as is commonly available. The FSM requires the knowledge of both acoustic pressure and velocity fields on a closed surface surrounding the tested source. Pressures and velocities, measured using a p-p probe on a half-sphere mesh, are collected under various conditions: in a room with variable reverberation time (6.4-0.6 s) and with four measurement half-sphere radii. The measured data are expanded on spherical harmonics, separating outward and inward propagation. The pressure field reflected by walls of the surrounding room is then subtracted from the measured field to estimate the pressure field that would have been radiated under free-field conditions. Theoretical frequency response of the subwoofer is computed using an analytical formulation derived from an extended Thiele and Small model of the membrane motion, coupled to a boundary element model for computing the radiated pressure while taking into account the actual subwoofer geometry. Measurement and simulation results show a good agreement. The effects of the measurement distance, the measurement point number, and the room reverberation time on the separation process are then discussed.

  18. Liquid rocket combustion chamber acoustic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândido Magno de Souza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 40 years, many solid and liquid rocket motors have experienced combustion instabilities. Among other causes, there is the interaction of acoustic modes with the combustion and/or fluid dynamic processes inside the combustion chamber. Studies have been showing that, even if less than 1% of the available energy is diverted to an acoustic mode, combustion instability can be generated. On one hand, this instability can lead to ballistic pressure changes, couple with other propulsion systems such as guidance or thrust vector control, and in the worst case, cause motor structural failure. In this case, measures, applying acoustic techniques, must be taken to correct/minimize these influences on the combustion. The combustion chamber acoustic behavior in operating conditions can be estimated by considering its behavior in room conditions. In this way, acoustic tests can be easily performed, thus identifying the cavity modes. This paper describes the procedures to characterize the acoustic behavior in the inner cavity of four different configurations of a combustion chamber. Simple analytical models are used to calculate the acoustic resonance frequencies and these results are compared with acoustic natural frequencies measured at room conditions. Some comments about the measurement procedures are done, as well as the next steps for the continuity of this research. The analytical and experimental procedures results showed good agreement. However, limitations on high frequency band as well as in the identification of specific kinds of modes indicate that numerical methods able to model the real cavity geometry and an acoustic experimental modal analysis may be necessary for a more complete analysis. Future works shall also consider the presence of passive acoustic devices such as baffles and resonators capable of introducing damping and avoiding or limiting acoustic instabilities.

  19. Reliability of estimating the room volume from a single room impulse response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Martin

    2008-08-01

    The methods investigated for the room volume estimation are based on geometrical acoustics, eigenmode, and diffuse field models and no data other than the room impulse response are available. The measurements include several receiver positions in a total of 12 rooms of vastly different sizes and acoustic characteristics. The limitations in identifying the pivotal specular reflections of the geometrical acoustics model in measured room impulse responses are examined both theoretically and experimentally. The eigenmode method uses the theoretical expression for the Schroeder frequency and the difficulty of accurately estimating this frequency from the varying statistics of the room transfer function is highlighted. Reliable results are only obtained with the diffuse field model and a part of the observed variance in the experimental results is explained by theoretical expressions for the standard deviation of the reverberant sound pressure and the reverberation time. The limitations due to source and receiver directivity are discussed and a simple volume estimation method based on an approximate relationship with the reverberation time is also presented.

  20. Mobile Communication Devices, Ambient Noise, and Acoustic Voice Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryn, Youri; Ysenbaert, Femke; Zarowski, Andrzej; Vanspauwen, Robby

    2017-03-01

    The ability to move with mobile communication devices (MCDs; ie, smartphones and tablet computers) may induce differences in microphone-to-mouth positioning and use in noise-packed environments, and thus influence reliability of acoustic voice measurements. This study investigated differences in various acoustic voice measures between six recording equipments in backgrounds with low and increasing noise levels. One chain of continuous speech and sustained vowel from 50 subjects with voice disorders (all separated by silence intervals) was radiated and re-recorded in an anechoic chamber with five MCDs and one high-quality recording system. These recordings were acquired in one condition without ambient noise and in four conditions with increased ambient noise. A total of 10 acoustic voice markers were obtained in the program Praat. Differences between MCDs and noise condition were assessed with Friedman repeated-measures test and posthoc Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, both for related samples, after Bonferroni correction. (1) Except median fundamental frequency and seven nonsignificant differences, MCD samples have significantly higher acoustic markers than clinical reference samples in minimal environmental noise. (2) Except median fundamental frequency, jitter local, and jitter rap, all acoustic measures on samples recorded with the reference system experienced significant influence from room noise levels. Fundamental frequency is resistant to recording system, environmental noise, and their combination. All other measures, however, were impacted by both recording system and noise condition, and especially by their combination, often already in the reference/baseline condition without added ambient noise. Caution is therefore warranted regarding implementation of MCDs as clinical recording tools, particularly when applied for treatment outcomes assessments. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. LoRA: A Loudspeaker-Based Room Auralization System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Favrot, Sylvain Emmanuel; Buchholz, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    that the involved signal processing preserves the temporal, spectral and spatial properties of the room impulse response captured by these parameters. This flexible research platform will be useful for studying auditory processing and perception in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners in fully controlled......In order to study basic human perception in reverberant environments, a novel loudspeaker-based room auralization (LoRA) system is proposed in this paper. The LoRA system efficiently combines modern room acoustic models with high-order Ambisonic auralization. An objective evaluation has been...... carried out demonstrating the applicability of the LoRA system. Room acoustic parameters (reverberation time, clarity, speech transmission index and inter-aural cross correlation coefficients) of room impulse responses were compared at the input and the simulated output of the LoRA system. Results show...

  2. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hora P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the acoustic emission (AE source modeling by means of FEM system COMSOL Multiphysics. The following types of sources are used: the spatially concentrated force and the double forces (dipole. The pulse excitation is studied in both cases. As a material is used steel. The computed displacements are compared with the exact analytical solution of point sources under consideration.

  3. Acoustic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  4. Perception of Reverberation in Small Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplanis, Neofytos; Bech, Søren; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    Reverberation is considered as one of the fundamental perceived properties of an acoustical space. Literature is available on the topic and currently a range of sciences have contributed in understanding the properties of reverberant sound fields and the relevant auditory processes. This paper su...... attributes of reverberation and conclusive measurement data is restricted, especially for small spaces. A proposal for perceptual-based experiments is presented, aiming to further understand the links between physical properties of rooms and their effects on perception....... summarises the current literature following a top-down approach. It identifies the perceptual aspects of reverberation and attempts to establish links to physical measures, focussing on small rooms. Results indicate that the current acoustical metrics often have limited correlation to the perceptual...

  5. Auralizations with loudspeaker arrays from a phased combination of the image source method and acoustical radiosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2017-01-01

    In order to create a simulation tool that is well-suited for small rooms with low diffusion and highly absorbing ceilings, a new room acoustic simulation tool has been developed that combines a phased version of the image source with acoustical radiosity and that considers the angle dependence of...

  6. Acoustic microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Briggs, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    For many years 'Acoustic Microscopy' has been the definitive book on the subject. A key development since it was first published has been the development of ultrasonic force microscopy. This edition has a major new chapter on this technique and its applications.

  7. Holograms for acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-22

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  8. Ceiling baffles and reflectors for controlling lecture-room sound for speech intelligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wonyoung; Hodgson, Murray

    2007-06-01

    Reinforcing speech levels and controlling noise and reverberation are the ultimate acoustical goals of lecture-room design to achieve high speech intelligibility. The effects of sound absorption on these factors have opposite consequences for speech intelligibility. Here, novel ceiling baffles and reflectors were evaluated as a sound-control measure, using computer and 1/8-scale models of a lecture room with hard surfaces and excessive reverberation. Parallel ceiling baffles running front to back were investigated. They were expected to absorb reverberation incident on the ceiling from many angles, while leaving speech signals, reflecting from the ceiling to the back of the room, unaffected. Various baffle spacings and absorptions, central and side speaker positions, and receiver positions throughout the room, were considered. Reflective baffles controlled reverberation, with a minimum decrease of sound levels. Absorptive baffles reduced reverberation, but reduced speech levels significantly. Ceiling reflectors, in the form of obstacles of semicircular cross section, suspended below the ceiling, were also tested. These were either 7 m long and in parallel, front-to-back lines, or 0.8 m long and randomly distributed, with flat side up or down, and reflective or absorptive top surfaces. The long reflectors with flat side down and no absorption were somewhat effective; the other configurations were not.

  9. The influence of the directivity of musical instruments in a room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otondo, Felipe; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of the directivity of musical instruments are presented as part of the study of the influence of their representation in room acoustic simulations and auralizations. Pairs of measured and averaged directivities have been used both for room simulation comparisons and as a basis...... for listening experiments with auralizations. Room simulation results show a clear influence of the changes in the representation directivity on the distribution of acoustical parameters in the room. The results of the listening experiments with auralizations show that some changes produced by directivity...... variations can be perceived by the listener. Among these changes, loudness was perceived in the highest degree, followed by reverberance and clarity....

  10. Simulation of Acoustics for Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Gabriel; Strutzenberg, Louise L.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity acoustic measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. To take advantage of this data, a digital representation of the ASMAT test setup has been constructed and test firings of the motor have been simulated using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software. Results from ASMAT simulations with the rocket in both held down and elevated configurations, as well as with and without water suppression have been compared to acoustic data collected from similar live-fire tests. Results of acoustic comparisons have shown good correlation with the amplitude and temporal shape of pressure features and reasonable spectral accuracy up to approximately 1000 Hz. Major plume and acoustic features have been well captured including the plume shock structure, the igniter pulse transient, and the ignition overpressure.

  11. Acoustic Territoriality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzfeldt, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Under the heading of "Gang i København" a number of initiatives was presented by the Lord Mayer and the Technical and Environmental Mayer of Copenhagen in May 2006. The aim of the initiative, which roughly translates to Lively Copenhagen, was both to make Copenhagen a livelier city in terms of ci...... this article outline a few approaches to a theory of acoustic territoriality....

  12. Acoustic chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U. [Drittes Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, D-37073 Goettingen (Germany); Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Hochschule Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Akhatov, I. [Department of Continuous Media Mechanics, Bashkir State University, Ufa 450074 (Russia)

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Acoustics and Hearing

    CERN Document Server

    Damaske, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When one listens to music at home, one would like to have an acoustic impression close to that of being in the concert hall. Until recently this meant elaborate multi-channelled sound systems with 5 or more speakers. But head-related stereophony achieves the surround-sound effect in living rooms with only two loudspeakers. By virtue of their slight directivity as well as an electronic filter the limitations previously common to two-speaker systems can be overcome and this holds for any arbitrary two-channel recording. The book also investigates the question of how a wide and diffuse sound image can arise in concert halls and shows that the quality of concert halls decisively depends on diffuse sound images arising in the onset of reverberation. For this purpose a strong onset of reverberation is modified in an anechoic chamber by electroacoustic means. Acoustics and Hearing proposes ideas concerning signal processing in the auditory system that explain the measured results and the resultant sound effects plea...

  14. Acoustic buffeting by infrasound in a low vibration facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, B P; Hoffman, J E; Burke, S A; Bonn, D A

    2016-09-01

    Measurement instruments and fabrication tools with spatial resolution on the atomic scale require facilities that mitigate the impact of vibration sources in the environment. One approach to protection from vibration in a building's foundation is to place the instrument on a massive inertia block, supported on pneumatic isolators. This opens the questions of whether or not a massive floating block is susceptible to acoustic forces, and how to mitigate the effects of any such acoustic buffeting. Here this is investigated with quantitative measurements of vibrations and sound pressure, together with finite element modeling. It is shown that a particular concern, even in a facility with multiple acoustic enclosures, is the excitation of the lowest fundamental acoustic modes of the room by infrasound in the low tens of Hz range, and the efficient coupling of the fundamental room modes to a large inertia block centered in the room.

  15. Determination of acoustical transfer functions using an impulse method

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, J.

    1985-02-01

    The Transfer Function of a system may be defined as the relationship of the output response to the input of a system. Whilst recent advances in digital processing systems have enabled Impulse Transfer Functions to be determined by computation of the Fast Fourier Transform, there has been little work done in applying these techniques to room acoustics. Acoustical Transfer Functions have been determined for auditoria, using an impulse method. The technique is based on the computation of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of a non-ideal impulsive source, both at the source and at the receiver point. The Impulse Transfer Function (ITF) is obtained by dividing the FFT at the receiver position by the FFT of the source. This quantity is presented both as linear frequency scale plots and also as synthesized one-third octave band data. The technique enables a considerable quantity of data to be obtained from a small number of impulsive signals recorded in the field, thereby minimizing the time and effort required on site. As the characteristics of the source are taken into account in the calculation, the choice of impulsive source is non-critical. The digital analysis equipment required for the analysis is readily available commercially.

  16. Acoustical qualification of Teatro Nuovo in Spoleto before refurbishing works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchi, Alessandro; Cesare Consumi, Marco; Shimokura, Ryota

    2004-05-01

    To qualify the acoustical quality of an opera house two different approaches are now available: one is based on responses of qualified listeners (subjective judgments) compared with objective values of selected parameters, the other on comparison tests conducted in suited rooms and on a model of the auditory brain system (preference). In the occasion of the refurbishment of an opera house known for the Two Worlds Festival edited yearly by the Italian Composer G. C. Menotti, a large number of measurements were taken with different techniques, so it is possible to compare the different methods and also the results with some geometrical criterion, based on the most simple rules of musical harmony, now neglected as our attention is attracted to computer simulations, computer aided measurement techniques and similar modern methods. From this work some link between well known acoustical parameters (not known at the time when architects sketched the shape of ancient opera houses) and geometrical criteria (well known at the time when ancient opera houses were built) will be shown.

  17. Sound field modeling in architectural acoustics using a diffusion equation

    OpenAIRE

    Picaut, Judicaël; Valeau, Vincent; Billon, Alexis; Sakout, Anas

    2006-01-01

    A numerical approach is proposed to model the reverberated sound field in rooms. The model is based on the numerical implementation of a diffusion model enabling spatial variations of the sound energy within a room, unlike the statistical theory. The proposed method allows to take into account most of complex phenomena encountered in room acoustics, like mixed reflections on walls (diffuse and specular), low and high absorption on walls, atmospheric attenuation, fitted zones. Moreover, the mo...

  18. Sound field modeling in architectural acoustics using a diffusion equation

    OpenAIRE

    PICAUT, J; VALEAU, V; BILLON, A; SAKOUT, A

    2006-01-01

    A numerical approach is proposed to model the reverberated sound field in rooms. The model is based on the numerical implementation of a diffusion model enabling spatial variations of the sound energy within a room, unlike the statistical theory. The proposed method allows to take into account most of complex phenomena encountered in room acoustics, like mixed reflections on walls (diffuse and specular), low and high absorption on walls, atmospheric attenation, fitted zones. Moreover, the mod...

  19. Efficient Multichannel NLMS Implementation for Acoustic Echo Cancellation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schüldt Christian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An acoustic echo cancellation structure with a single loudspeaker and multiple microphones is, from a system identification perspective, generally modelled as a single-input multiple-output system. Such a system thus implies specific echo-path models (adaptive filter for every loudspeaker to microphone path. Due to the often large dimensionality of the filters, which is required to model rooms with standard reverberation time, the adaptation process can be computationally demanding. This paper presents a selective updating normalized least mean square (NLMS-based method which reduces complexity to nearly half in practical situations, while showing superior convergence speed performance as compared to conventional complexity reduction schemes. Moreover, the method concentrates the filter adaptation to the filter which is most misadjusted, which is a typically desired feature.

  20. Efficient Multichannel NLMS Implementation for Acoustic Echo Cancellation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredric Lindstrom

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available An acoustic echo cancellation structure with a single loudspeaker and multiple microphones is, from a system identification perspective, generally modelled as a single-input multiple-output system. Such a system thus implies specific echo-path models (adaptive filter for every loudspeaker to microphone path. Due to the often large dimensionality of the filters, which is required to model rooms with standard reverberation time, the adaptation process can be computationally demanding. This paper presents a selective updating normalized least mean square (NLMS-based method which reduces complexity to nearly half in practical situations, while showing superior convergence speed performance as compared to conventional complexity reduction schemes. Moreover, the method concentrates the filter adaptation to the filter which is most misadjusted, which is a typically desired feature.

  1. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... EVENTS DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts What is acoustic neuroma? Diagnosing ... Brain Freeze ? READ MORE Read More What is acoustic neuroma? Identifying an AN Learn More Get Info ...

  2. Fast wideband acoustical holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hald, Jørgen

    2016-04-01

    Patch near-field acoustical holography methods like statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography and equivalent source method are limited to relatively low frequencies, where the average array-element spacing is less than half of the acoustic wavelength, while beamforming provides useful resolution only at medium-to-high frequencies. With adequate array design, both methods can be used with the same array. But for holography to provide good low-frequency resolution, a small measurement distance is needed, whereas beamforming requires a larger distance to limit sidelobe issues. The wideband holography method of the present paper was developed to overcome that practical conflict. Only a single measurement is needed at a relatively short distance and a single result is obtained covering the full frequency range. The method uses the principles of compressed sensing: A sparse sound field representation is assumed with a chosen set of basis functions, a measurement is taken with an irregular array, and the inverse problem is solved with a method that enforces sparsity in the coefficient vector. Instead of using regularization based on the 1-norm of the coefficient vector, an iterative solution procedure is used that promotes sparsity. The iterative method is shown to provide very similar results in most cases and to be computationally much more efficient.

  3. Acoustics is a major issue in industry; L`acoustique, un enjeu majeur pour les industriels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1997-12-01

    The CETIAT laboratory (France) has several facilities for acoustic testing that may be used for industrial needs: two reverberation rooms, a double air-conditioned reverberation room, a semi-anechoic room, a range of anechoic ducts and high performance measurement devices, enabling simultaneous acoustic, thermal and aeraulic tests. Examples of applications are presented with tests of blowing fans, an air diffuser for an auditorium, an air-conditioner axial fan, a gas fired boiler for buildings, which led to significant enhancements in acoustic performances. The Intespace company`s facility include a reverberation acoustic room that is used for the qualification of structures subject to a uniform acoustic field and was designed for testing satellites launched by Ariane 4 and 5 and the space shuttle

  4. A computational simulation study on the acoustic pressure generated by a dental endosonic file: effects of intensity, file shape and volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiong, T Joyce; Price, Gareth J; Kanagasingam, Shalini

    2014-09-01

    One of the uses of ultrasound in dentistry is in the field of endodontics (i.e. root canal treatment) in order to enhance cleaning efficiency during the treatment. The acoustic pressures generated by the oscillation of files in narrow channels has been calculated using the COMSOL simulation package. Acoustic pressures in excess of the cavitation threshold can be generated and higher values were found in narrower channels. This parallels experimental observations of sonochemiluminescence. The effect of varying the channel width and length and the dimensions and shape of the file are reported. As well as explaining experimental observations, the work provides a basis for the further development and optimisation of the design of endosonic files. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. If you can't take the room out of your mix, you can't take your mix out of the room!

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, Peter

    2003-04-01

    The key issue in any recording studio is transferability-the ability of a mix to transfer to other listening environments outside the studio. For a mix to faithfully transfer to a wide range of acoustical environments, it must be created in a room with minimal acoustic distortion. The music industry is very aware of electronic distortion; however, the audible effects of acoustic distortion are only now being fully appreciated. The four forms of acoustic distortion are modal coupling, speaker boundary interference response, comb filtering and poor diffusion or a sparse spatial and temporal reflection density. These phenomena will be explained and methods to minimize them will be suggested.

  6. Evaluation of Sound Quality, Boominess and Boxiness in Small Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weisser, Adam; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2006-01-01

    ratings. The classical bass ratio definitions showed poor correlation with all subjective ratings. The overall sound quality ratings gave different results for speech and music. For speech the preferred mean RT should be as low as possible, whereas for music there was found a preferred range between 0......The acoustics of small rooms has been studied with emphasis on sound quality, boominess and boxiness when the rooms are used for speech or music. Seven rooms with very different characteristics have been used for the study. Subjective listening tests were made using binaural recordings...

  7. Influence of ultrasound power on acoustic streaming and micro-bubbles formations in a low frequency sono-reactor: mathematical and 3D computational simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, Baharak; Raman, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2015-05-01

    This paper aims at investigating the influence of ultrasound power amplitude on liquid behaviour in a low-frequency (24 kHz) sono-reactor. Three types of analysis were employed: (i) mechanical analysis of micro-bubbles formation and their activities/characteristics using mathematical modelling. (ii) Numerical analysis of acoustic streaming, fluid flow pattern, volume fraction of micro-bubbles and turbulence using 3D CFD simulation. (iii) Practical analysis of fluid flow pattern and acoustic streaming under ultrasound irradiation using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). In mathematical modelling, a lone micro bubble generated under power ultrasound irradiation was mechanistically analysed. Its characteristics were illustrated as a function of bubble radius, internal temperature and pressure (hot spot conditions) and oscillation (pulsation) velocity. The results showed that ultrasound power significantly affected the conditions of hotspots and bubbles oscillation velocity. From the CFD results, it was observed that the total volume of the micro-bubbles increased by about 4.95% with each 100 W-increase in power amplitude. Furthermore, velocity of acoustic streaming increased from 29 to 119 cm/s as power increased, which was in good agreement with the PIV analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Measurement of acoustical characteristics of mosques in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Adel A.

    2003-03-01

    The study of mosque acoustics, with regard to acoustical characteristics, sound quality for speech intelligibility, and other applicable acoustic criteria, has been largely neglected. In this study a background as to why mosques are designed as they are and how mosque design is influenced by worship considerations is given. In the study the acoustical characteristics of typically constructed contemporary mosques in Saudi Arabia have been investigated, employing a well-known impulse response. Extensive field measurements were taken in 21 representative mosques of different sizes and architectural features in order to characterize their acoustical quality and to identify the impact of air conditioning, ceiling fans, and sound reinforcement systems on their acoustics. Objective room-acoustic indicators such as reverberation time (RT) and clarity (C50) were measured. Background noise (BN) was assessed with and without the operation of air conditioning and fans. The speech transmission index (STI) was also evaluated with and without the operation of existing sound reinforcement systems. The existence of acoustical deficiencies was confirmed and quantified. The study, in addition to describing mosque acoustics, compares design goals to results obtained in practice and suggests acoustical target values for mosque design. The results show that acoustical quality in the investigated mosques deviates from optimum conditions when unoccupied, but is much better in the occupied condition.

  9. Electromagnetically generated acoustic determination of delamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaino, W.

    1991-04-01

    Previous work has demonstrated a technique for acoustically detecting localized delamination of metallized patterns on insulating substrates [W. Imaino, L. Crawforth, A. C. Munce, and A. Julaiana, in Proceedings of the IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, edited by B. R. McAvoy (IEEE, New York, 1986), p. 1065]. Employing a high-spatial-resolution permeable electromagnetic acoustic transducer to preferentially excite the metallization, the acoustic coupling between the metal foil and substrate may be probed. Scanning, then, provides a map of delaminations. To extend and generalize these results, the detailed generation mechanism and acoustic response of the substrate has been studied. A computer program developed previously [W. Imaino, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Suppl. 1 80, S7 (1986)] was used to model the acoustic source. In this investigation, a finite-element calculation is used to provide a more detailed description of the acoustic behavior of the delaminated plate. The effects of source size relative to defect dimensions and acoustic properties of the substrate have been studied. The determination of the localized coupling is complicated by structural resonances of the substrate, which make single frequency measurements unfavorable. However, the analysis shows that the spectral acoustic behavior provides an indication of metallization to substrate coupling. A signal-processing algorithm based on this analysis has been formulated and will be described.

  10. Our Urban Living Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortshøj, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Our Urban Living Room is an exhibition and a book, created by Cobe. The theme is based on Cobe’s ten years of practice, grounded in social livability and urban democracy, and our aim to create buildings and spaces that invite Copenhageners to use and define them; as an extended living room, where...... the boundaries between private and public space become fluid. Based on specific Cobe projects, Our Urban Living Room tells stories about the architectural development of Copenhagen, while exploring the progression of the Danish Capital - from an industrial city into an urban living room, known as one...

  11. Health Physics counting room

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1970-01-01

    The Health Physics counting room, where the quantity of induced radioactivity in materials is determined. This information is used to evaluate possible radiation hazards from the material investigated.

  12. Spatial Hearing with Incongruent Visual or Auditory Room Cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Carvajal, Juan C.; Cubick, Jens; Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    2016-11-01

    In day-to-day life, humans usually perceive the location of sound sources as outside their heads. This externalized auditory spatial perception can be reproduced through headphones by recreating the sound pressure generated by the source at the listener’s eardrums. This requires the acoustical features of the recording environment and listener’s anatomy to be recorded at the listener’s ear canals. Although the resulting auditory images can be indistinguishable from real-world sources, their externalization may be less robust when the playback and recording environments differ. Here we tested whether a mismatch between playback and recording room reduces perceived distance, azimuthal direction, and compactness of the auditory image, and whether this is mostly due to incongruent auditory cues or to expectations generated from the visual impression of the room. Perceived distance ratings decreased significantly when collected in a more reverberant environment than the recording room, whereas azimuthal direction and compactness remained room independent. Moreover, modifying visual room-related cues had no effect on these three attributes, while incongruent auditory room-related cues between the recording and playback room did affect distance perception. Consequently, the external perception of virtual sounds depends on the degree of congruency between the acoustical features of the environment and the stimuli.

  13. Sonochemistry and the acoustic bubble

    CERN Document Server

    Grieser, Franz; Enomoto, Naoya; Harada, Hisashi; Okitsu, Kenji; Yasui, Kyuichi

    2015-01-01

    Sonochemistry and the Acoustic Bubble provides an introduction to the way ultrasound acts on bubbles in a liquid to cause bubbles to collapse violently, leading to localized 'hot spots' in the liquid with temperatures of 5000° celcius and under pressures of several hundred atmospheres. These extreme conditions produce events such as the emission of light, sonoluminescence, with a lifetime of less than a nanosecond, and free radicals that can initiate a host of varied chemical reactions (sonochemistry) in the liquid, all at room temperature. The physics and chemistry behind the p

  14. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview In autumn the main focus was to process and handle CRAFT data and to perform the Summer08 MC production. The operational aspects were well covered by regular Computing Shifts, experts on duty and Computing Run Coordination. At the Computing Resource Board (CRB) in October a model to account for service work at Tier 2s was approved. The computing resources for 2009 were reviewed for presentation at the C-RRB. The quarterly resource monitoring is continuing. Facilities/Infrastructure operations Operations during CRAFT data taking ran fine. This proved to be a very valuable experience for T0 workflows and operations. The transfers of custodial data to most T1s went smoothly. A first round of reprocessing started at the Tier-1 centers end of November; it will take about two weeks. The Computing Shifts procedure was tested full scale during this period and proved to be very efficient: 30 Computing Shifts Persons (CSP) and 10 Computing Resources Coordinators (CRC). The shift program for the shut down w...

  15. Acoustic phonons in the hexagonal perovskite CsNiCl3 around the Gamma-point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, D.; Monteith, A.R.; Rønnow, H.M.

    2000-01-01

    The acoustic phonon dispersion curves of the hexagonal perovskite CsNiCl3 were measured at room temperature in the vicinity of the Gamma-point along the [0 0 1] and [1 1 0] directions. The derived velocity of sound values for the longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons are compared with the ......The acoustic phonon dispersion curves of the hexagonal perovskite CsNiCl3 were measured at room temperature in the vicinity of the Gamma-point along the [0 0 1] and [1 1 0] directions. The derived velocity of sound values for the longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons are compared...

  16. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview During the past three months activities were focused on data operations, testing and re-enforcing shift and operational procedures for data production and transfer, MC production and on user support. Planning of the computing resources in view of the new LHC calendar in ongoing. Two new task forces were created for supporting the integration work: Site Commissioning, which develops tools helping distributed sites to monitor job and data workflows, and Analysis Support, collecting the user experience and feedback during analysis activities and developing tools to increase efficiency. The development plan for DMWM for 2009/2011 was developed at the beginning of the year, based on the requirements from the Physics, Computing and Offline groups (see Offline section). The Computing management meeting at FermiLab on February 19th and 20th was an excellent opportunity discussing the impact and for addressing issues and solutions to the main challenges facing CMS computing. The lack of manpower is particul...

  17. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CMS distributed computing system performed well during the 2011 start-up. The events in 2011 have more pile-up and are more complex than last year; this results in longer reconstruction times and harder events to simulate. Significant increases in computing capacity were delivered in April for all computing tiers, and the utilisation and load is close to the planning predictions. All computing centre tiers performed their expected functionalities. Heavy-Ion Programme The CMS Heavy-Ion Programme had a very strong showing at the Quark Matter conference. A large number of analyses were shown. The dedicated heavy-ion reconstruction facility at the Vanderbilt Tier-2 is still involved in some commissioning activities, but is available for processing and analysis. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Facility and Infrastructure operations have been active with operations and several important deployment tasks. Facilities participated in the testing and deployment of WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request...

  18. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    The Computing Project is preparing for a busy year where the primary emphasis of the project moves towards steady operations. Following the very successful completion of Computing Software and Analysis challenge, CSA06, last fall, we have reorganized and established four groups in computing area: Commissioning, User Support, Facility/Infrastructure Operations and Data Operations. These groups work closely together with groups from the Offline Project in planning for data processing and operations. Monte Carlo production has continued since CSA06, with about 30M events produced each month to be used for HLT studies and physics validation. Monte Carlo production will continue throughout the year in the preparation of large samples for physics and detector studies ramping to 50 M events/month for CSA07. Commissioning of the full CMS computing system is a major goal for 2007. Site monitoring is an important commissioning component and work is ongoing to devise CMS specific tests to be included in Service Availa...

  19. Auralization of airborne sound insulation including the influence of source room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger

    2006-01-01

    with a frequency dependent power setting of the source in the source room. The acoustic properties in terms of volume and reverberation time as well as the area of the transmitting surface are all included in the simulation. The user only has to select the position of the source in the source room and the receiver...

  20. Acoustic transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  1. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  2. Virtual Seminar Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren Otto; Fosgerau, Anders; Hansen, Peter Søren Kirk

    1999-01-01

    The initial design considerations and research goals for an ATM network based virtual seminar room with 5 sites are presented.......The initial design considerations and research goals for an ATM network based virtual seminar room with 5 sites are presented....

  3. Operating room manager game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans, Elias W.; Nieberg, T.

    2007-01-01

    The operating room (OR) department of a hospital forms the heart of the organization, where the single largest cost is incurred. This document presents and reports on the “Operating Room Manager Game,” developed to give insight into managing a large hospital's OR department at various levels of

  4. Acoustic telemetry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  5. International Conference on Acoustics and Vibration

    CERN Document Server

    Chaari, Fakher; Walha, Lasaad; Abdennadher, Moez; Abbes, Mohamed; Haddar, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    The book provides readers with a snapshot of recent research and industrial trends in field of industrial acoustics and vibration. Each chapter, accepted after a rigorous peer-review process, reports on a selected, original piece of work presented and discussed at International Conference on Acoustics and Vibration (ICAV2016), which was organized by the Tunisian Association of Industrial Acoustics and Vibration (ATAVI) and held March 21-23, in Hammamet, Tunisia. The contributions, mainly written by north African authors, covers advances in both theory and practice in a variety of subfields, such as: smart materials and structures; fluid-structure interaction; structural acoustics as well as computational vibro-acoustics and numerical methods. Further topics include: engines control, noise identification, robust design, flow-induced vibration and many others.This book provides a valuable resource for both academics and professionals dealing with diverse issues in applied mechanics. By combining advanced theori...

  6. Dynamic tensile tests with superimposed ultrasonic oscillations for stainless steel type 321 at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schinke, B.; Malmberg, T.

    1987-03-01

    In recent years various containment codes for Fast Breeder Reactor accidents have been assessed by comparison with explosion tests in water-filled vessels (COVA experiments). Common to the various codes, a systematic underestimation of the circumferential vessel strains was found. In the COVA tests high frequency pressure oscillations in the ultrasonic range were observed and thus it has been conjectured that the phenomenon of ''acoustic softening'' might be relevant in explaining the discrepancies in the strains. To validate this conjecture a hydro-pneumatic tensile test apparatus was developed which allows dynamic tensile testing at room temperature with and without superimposed ultrasonic oscillations. The dynamic tensile tests on the COVA sheet material (stainless steel AISI 321) without ultrasonic insonation show a linear dependence of the flow stress on the logarithm of the strain rate. The results at low strain rates (10/sup -3/ s/sup -1/) agree favourably with previous measurements but at high rates (50 s/sup -1/) at 20% lower flow stress is observed. The dynamic tensile tests with continuous and intermittent insonation show the phenomenon of ''acoustic softening'': The average flow stress is reduced by an amount of about half the oscillating amplitude. At high strain rates the reduction is less. A severe ''acoustic softening'' observed by several authors for various metals at low strain rates was not observed. The experimental results were compared with the theory of the superpositon mechanism assuming a rate-independent elastic-plastic and an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive model. Although the rate-independent model is capable to predict qualitatively some of the observed effects, a better description is obtained with the viscoplastic model. The conclusion is that the ''acoustic softening'' of the COVA material is far too small to explain the discrepancies between measured

  7. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing activity had ramped down after the completion of the reprocessing of the 2012 data and parked data, but is increasing with new simulation samples for analysis and upgrade studies. Much of the Computing effort is currently involved in activities to improve the computing system in preparation for 2015. Operations Office Since the beginning of 2013, the Computing Operations team successfully re-processed the 2012 data in record time, not only by using opportunistic resources like the San Diego Supercomputer Center which was accessible, to re-process the primary datasets HTMHT and MultiJet in Run2012D much earlier than planned. The Heavy-Ion data-taking period was successfully concluded in February collecting almost 500 T. Figure 3: Number of events per month (data) In LS1, our emphasis is to increase efficiency and flexibility of the infrastructure and operation. Computing Operations is working on separating disk and tape at the Tier-1 sites and the full implementation of the xrootd federation ...

  8. [Acoustic conditions in open plan offices - Pilot test results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulski, Witold

    The main source of noise in open plan office are conversations. Office work standards in such premises are attained by applying specific acoustic adaptation. This article presents the results of pilot tests and acoustic evaluation of open space rooms. Acoustic properties of 6 open plan office rooms were the subject of the tests. Evaluation parameters, measurement methods and criterial values were adopted according to the following standards: PN-EN ISO 3382- 3:2012, PN-EN ISO 3382-2:2010, PN-B-02151-4:2015-06 and PN-B-02151-3:2015-10. The reverberation time was 0.33- 0.55 s (maximum permissible value in offices - 0.6 s; the criterion was met), sound absorption coefficient in relation to 1 m2 of the room's plan was 0.77-1.58 m2 (minimum permissible value - 1.1 m2; 2 out of 6 rooms met the criterion), distraction distance was 8.5-14 m (maximum permissible value - 5 m; none of the rooms met the criterion), A-weighted sound pressure level of speech at a distance of 4 m was 43.8-54.7 dB (maximum permissible value - 48 dB; 2 out of 6 rooms met the criterion), spatial decay rate of the speech was 1.8-6.3 dB (minimum permissible value - 7 dB; none of the rooms met the criterion). Standard acoustic treatment, containing sound absorbing suspended ceiling, sound absorbing materials on the walls, carpet flooring and sound absorbing workplace barriers, is not sufficient. These rooms require specific advanced acoustic solutions. Med Pr 2016;67(5):653-662.

  9. Influence of impedance phase angle on sound pressures and reverberation times in a rectangular room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Lee, Doheon; Santurette, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    In most room acoustic predictions, phase shift on reflection has been overlooked. This study aims to quantify the effects of the surface impedance phase angle of the boundary surfaces on room acoustic conditions. As a preliminary attempt, a medium-sized rectangular room is simulated by a phased b...... beam tracing model, after verifying it numerically against boundary element simulations. First, the absorption characteristic of the boundary surfaces varies uniformly from 0.2 to 0.8, but with various impedance phase angles. Second, typical non-uniform cases having hard walls and floor...

  10. 28th February 2011 - Turkish Minister of Foreign Affairs A. Davutoğlu signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; meeting the CERN Turkish Community at Point 1; visiting the ATLAS control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    28th February 2011 - Turkish Minister of Foreign Affairs A. Davutoğlu signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; meeting the CERN Turkish Community at Point 1; visiting the ATLAS control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  11. 23 April 2010 - Her Majesty’s Ambassador to Switzerland and Liechtenstein, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, S. Gillett CMG CVO, accompanied by Beams Department Head P. Collier, visiting the ATLAS control room with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, University of Birmingham, D. Charlton and signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    23 April 2010 - Her Majesty’s Ambassador to Switzerland and Liechtenstein, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, S. Gillett CMG CVO, accompanied by Beams Department Head P. Collier, visiting the ATLAS control room with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, University of Birmingham, D. Charlton and signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

  12. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion An activity that is still in progress is computing for the heavy-ion program. The heavy-ion events are collected without zero suppression, so the event size is much large at roughly 11 MB per event of RAW. The central collisions are more complex and...

  13. Analysis of room transfer function and reverberant signal statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georganti, Eleftheria; Mourjopoulos, John; Jacobsen, Finn

    2008-01-01

    For some time now, statistical analysis has been a valuable tool in analyzing room transfer functions (RTFs). This work examines existing statistical time-frequency models and techniques for RTF analysis (e.g., Schroeder's stochastic model and the standard deviation over frequency bands for the R...... “anechoic” and “reverberant” audio speech signals, in order to model the alterations due to room acoustics. The above results are obtained from both in-situ room response measurements and controlled acoustical response simulations.......For some time now, statistical analysis has been a valuable tool in analyzing room transfer functions (RTFs). This work examines existing statistical time-frequency models and techniques for RTF analysis (e.g., Schroeder's stochastic model and the standard deviation over frequency bands for the RTF...... magnitude and phase). RTF fractional octave smoothing, as with 1-slash 3 octave analysis, may lead to RTF simplifications that can be useful for several audio applications, like room compensation, room modeling, auralisation purposes. The aim of this work is to identify the relationship of optimal response...

  14. The Virtual Dressing Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Michael Boelstoft; Gao, Yi; Petersson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design and evaluation of a usability and user experience test of a virtual dressing room. First, we motivate and introduce our recent developed prototype of a virtual dressing room. Next, we present the research and test design grounded in related usability and user...... experience studies. We give a description of the experimental setup and the execution of the designed usability and user experience test. To this end, we report interesting results and discuss the results with respect to user-centered design and development of a virtual dressing room....

  15. RILIS laser room HD

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the RILIS laser room at ISOLDE. The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is a chemically selective ion source which relies on resonant excitation of atomic transitions using tunable laser radiation. This video shows you the laser table with the different lenses and optics as well as an overview of the RILIS laser setup. It also shows laser light with different colors and operation by the RILIS laser experts. The last part of the video shows you the laser path from the RILIS laser room into the ISOLDE GPS separator room where it enters the GPS separator magnet.

  16. RILIS laser room

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the RILIS laser room at ISOLDE. The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is a chemically selective ion source which relies on resonant excitation of atomic transitions using tunable laser radiation. This video shows you the laser table with the different lenses and optics as well as an overview of the RILIS laser setup. It also shows laser light with different colors and operation by the RILIS laser experts. The last part of the video shows you the laser path from the RILIS laser room into the ISOLDE GPS separator room where it enters the GPS separator magnet.

  17. Room for caring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Connie; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Birkelund, Regner

    2015-01-01

    rooms such as a view of nature or natural light entering the room are often neglected in caring for these patients. Method A phenomenological-hermeneutic study design was applied and data was collected through multiple qualitative interviews combined with observations at a teaching hospital in Denmark......) Experiencing inner peace and an escape from negative thoughts, (ii) Experiencing a positive mood and hope and (iii) Experiencing good memories. Conclusion Our findings highlight aesthetic sensory impressions in the form of nature sights and natural light in the patient room as a powerful source of well...

  18. Advantages of directional hearing aid microphones related to room acoustics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, A. R.; Dreschler, W. A.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, two types of hearing aids were used. Both aids had the same frequency characteristics for frontal sound, but one employed an omnidirectional microphone and the other a directional microphone. The frequency characteristics of both hearing aids were measured for five azimuths on KEMAR

  19. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design...... for the acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design...... was simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  20. Springer Handbook of Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and others. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents spanning: animal acoustics including infrasound and ultrasound, environmental noise control, music and human speech and singing, physiological and psychological acoustics, architectural acoustics, physical and engineering acoustics, signal processing, medical acoustics, and ocean acoustics. This handbook reviews the most important areas of acoustics, with emphasis on current research. The authors of the various chapters are all experts in their fields. Each chapter is richly illustrated with figures and tables. The latest rese...

  1. Interactive Acoustic Simulation in Urban and Complex Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-21

    P., Noe, N., and Gaudaire, F. Calculation of tyre noise radiation with a mixed approach. Acta Acustica united with Acustica 94, 1 (2008), 91–103. [73...radiation and scattering problems. Acta Acustica united with Acustica 81, 6 (1995), 528–543. [85] Kuttruff, H. Room acoustics. CRC Press, 2009. [86...10-12 (2010), 1296–1318. [104] Ochmann, M. The source simulation technique for acoustic radiation problems. Acta Acustica united with Acustica 81, 6

  2. Acoustic Neurinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faraji Rad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic neuromas (AN are schwann cell-derived tumors that commonly arise from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve also known as vestibular schwannoma(VS causes unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo and unsteadiness. In many cases, the tumor size may remain unchanged for many years following diagnosis, which is typically made by MRI. In the majority of cases the tumor is small, leaving the clinician and patient with the options of either serial scanning or active treatment by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR or microneurosurgery. Despite the vast number of published treatment reports, comparative studies are few. The predominant clinical endpoints of AN treatment include tumor control, facial nerve function and hearing preservation. Less focus has been put on symptom relief and health-related quality of life (QOL. It is uncertain if treating a small tumor leaves the patient with a better chance of obtaining relief from future hearing loss, vertigo or tinnitus than by observing it without treatment.   In this paper we review the literature for the natural course, the treatment alternatives and the results of AN. Finally, we present our experience with a management strategy applied for more than 30 years.

  3. Acoustic Spatiality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon LaBelle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of listening can be appreciated as intensely relational, bringing us into contact with surrounding events, bodies and things. Given that sound propagates and expands outwardly, as a set of oscillations from a particular source, listening carries with it a sensual intensity, whereby auditory phenomena deliver intrusive and disruptive as well as soothing and assuring experiences. The physicality characteristic of sound suggests a deeply impressionistic, locational "knowledge structure" – that is, the ways in which listening affords processes of exchange, of being in the world, and from which we extend ourselves. Sound, as physical energy reflecting and absorbing into the materiality around us, and even one's self, provides a rich platform for understanding place and emplacement. Sound is always already a trace of location.Such features of auditory experience give suggestion for what I may call an acoustical paradigm – how sound sets in motion not only the material world but also the flows of the imagination, lending to forces of signification and social structure, and figuring us in relation to each other. The relationality of sound brings us into a steady web of interferences, each of which announces the promise or problematic of being somewhere.

  4. PT-Symmetric Acoustics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Zhu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We introduce here the concept of acoustic parity-time (PT symmetry and demonstrate the extraordinary scattering characteristics of the acoustic PT medium. On the basis of exact calculations, we show how an acoustic PT-symmetric medium can become unidirectionally transparent at given frequencies. Combining such a PT-symmetric medium with transformation acoustics, we design two-dimensional symmetric acoustic cloaks that are unidirectionally invisible in a prescribed direction. Our results open new possibilities for designing functional acoustic devices with directional responses.

  5. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    It has been a very active year for the computing project with strong contributions from members of the global community. The project has focused on site preparation and Monte Carlo production. The operations group has begun processing data from P5 as part of the global data commissioning. Improvements in transfer rates and site availability have been seen as computing sites across the globe prepare for large scale production and analysis as part of CSA07. Preparations for the upcoming Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 are progressing. Ian Fisk and Neil Geddes have been appointed as coordinators for the challenge. CSA07 will include production tests of the Tier-0 production system, reprocessing at the Tier-1 sites and Monte Carlo production at the Tier-2 sites. At the same time there will be a large analysis exercise at the Tier-2 centres. Pre-production simulation of the Monte Carlo events for the challenge is beginning. Scale tests of the Tier-0 will begin in mid-July and the challenge it...

  6. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Computing continued with a high level of activity over the winter in preparation for conferences and the start of the 2012 run. 2012 brings new challenges with a new energy, more complex events, and the need to make the best use of the available time before the Long Shutdown. We expect to be resource constrained on all tiers of the computing system in 2012 and are working to ensure the high-priority goals of CMS are not impacted. Heavy ions After a successful 2011 heavy-ion run, the programme is moving to analysis. During the run, the CAF resources were well used for prompt analysis. Since then in 2012 on average 200 job slots have been used continuously at Vanderbilt for analysis workflows. Operations Office As of 2012, the Computing Project emphasis has moved from commissioning to operation of the various systems. This is reflected in the new organisation structure where the Facilities and Data Operations tasks have been merged into a common Operations Office, which now covers everything ...

  7. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion The Tier 0 infrastructure was able to repack and promptly reconstruct heavy-ion collision data. Two copies were made of the data at CERN using a large CASTOR disk pool, and the core physics sample was replicated ...

  8. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    CCRC’08 challenges and CSA08 During the February campaign of the Common Computing readiness challenges (CCRC’08), the CMS computing team had achieved very good results. The link between the detector site and the Tier0 was tested by gradually increasing the number of parallel transfer streams well beyond the target. Tests covered the global robustness at the Tier0, processing a massive number of very large files and with a high writing speed to tapes.  Other tests covered the links between the different Tiers of the distributed infrastructure and the pre-staging and reprocessing capacity of the Tier1’s: response time, data transfer rate and success rate for Tape to Buffer staging of files kept exclusively on Tape were measured. In all cases, coordination with the sites was efficient and no serious problem was found. These successful preparations prepared the ground for the second phase of the CCRC’08 campaign, in May. The Computing Software and Analysis challen...

  9. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The first data taking period of November produced a first scientific paper, and this is a very satisfactory step for Computing. It also gave the invaluable opportunity to learn and debrief from this first, intense period, and make the necessary adaptations. The alarm procedures between different groups (DAQ, Physics, T0 processing, Alignment/calibration, T1 and T2 communications) have been reinforced. A major effort has also been invested into remodeling and optimizing operator tasks in all activities in Computing, in parallel with the recruitment of new Cat A operators. The teams are being completed and by mid year the new tasks will have been assigned. CRB (Computing Resource Board) The Board met twice since last CMS week. In December it reviewed the experience of the November data-taking period and could measure the positive improvements made for the site readiness. It also reviewed the policy under which Tier-2 are associated with Physics Groups. Such associations are decided twice per ye...

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction During the past six months, Computing participated in the STEP09 exercise, had a major involvement in the October exercise and has been working with CMS sites on improving open issues relevant for data taking. At the same time operations for MC production, real data reconstruction and re-reconstructions and data transfers at large scales were performed. STEP09 was successfully conducted in June as a joint exercise with ATLAS and the other experiments. It gave good indication about the readiness of the WLCG infrastructure with the two major LHC experiments stressing the reading, writing and processing of physics data. The October Exercise, in contrast, was conducted as an all-CMS exercise, where Physics, Computing and Offline worked on a common plan to exercise all steps to efficiently access and analyze data. As one of the major results, the CMS Tier-2s demonstrated to be fully capable for performing data analysis. In recent weeks, efforts were devoted to CMS Computing readiness. All th...

  11. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  12. Interaction of Acoustic Waves with a Cryogenic Nitrogen Jet at Sub- and Supercritical Pressures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chehroudi, B

    2001-01-01

    To better understand the nature of the interaction between acoustic waves and liquid fuel jets in rocket engines, cryogenic liquid nitrogen is injected into a room temperature high-pressure chamber...

  13. Operating Room Telephone Microbial Flora

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Jason; Shinn, Antoinette M; Bivens, Ava

    2005-01-01

    ...) could be found on telephones in the Operating Room (OR). A total of 26 cultures were taken from telephones within 14 operating rooms and two sub-sterile rooms at a large, teaching, medical center...

  14. Acoustic conditions in open plan offices – Pilot test results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Mikulski

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main source of noise in open plan office are conversations. Office work standards in such premises are attained by applying specific acoustic adaptation. This article presents the results of pilot tests and acoustic evaluation of open space rooms. Material and Methods: Acoustic properties of 6 open plan office rooms were the subject of the tests. Evaluation parameters, measurement methods and criterial values were adopted according to the following standards: PN-EN ISO 3382- 3:2012, PN-EN ISO 3382-2:2010, PN-B-02151-4:2015-06 and PN-B-02151-3:2015-10. Results: The reverberation time was 0.33– 0.55 s (maximum permissible value in offices – 0.6 s; the criterion was met, sound absorption coefficient in relation to 1 m2 of the room’s plan was 0.77–1.58 m2 (minimum permissible value – 1.1 m2; 2 out of 6 rooms met the criterion, distraction distance was 8.5–14 m (maximum permissible value – 5 m; none of the rooms met the criterion, A-weighted sound pressure level of speech at a distance of 4 m was 43.8–54.7 dB (maximum permissible value – 48 dB; 2 out of 6 rooms met the criterion, spatial decay rate of the speech was 1.8–6.3 dB (minimum permissible value – 7 dB; none of the rooms met the criterion. Conclusions: Standard acoustic treatment, containing sound absorbing suspended ceiling, sound absorbing materials on the walls, carpet flooring and sound absorbing workplace barriers, is not sufficient. These rooms require specific advanced acoustic solutions. Med Pr 2016;67(5:653–662

  15. Acoustics in Halls for Speech and Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Anders C.

    This chapter deals specifically with concepts, tools, and architectural variables of importance when designing auditoria for speech and music. The focus will be on cultivating the useful components of the sound in the room rather than on avoiding noise from outside or from installations, which is dealt with in Chap. 11. The chapter starts by presenting the subjective aspects of the room acoustic experience according to consensus at the time of writing. Then follows a description of their objective counterparts, the objective room acoustic parameters, among which the classical reverberation time measure is only one of many, but still of fundamental value. After explanations on how these parameters can be measured and predicted during the design phase, the remainder of the chapter deals with how the acoustic properties can be controlled by the architectural design of auditoria. This is done by presenting the influence of individual design elements as well as brief descriptions of halls designed for specific purposes, such as drama, opera, and symphonic concerts. Finally, some important aspects of loudspeaker installations in auditoria are briefly touched upon.

  16. Acoustics of a Music Venue/Bar—A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramani Ramakrishnan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A vacant unit, once used by a Portuguese Deli, was converted to a bar/music room in Toronto. The unit was divided into two spaces along its north-south axis. The western portion was designed as a music room that would provide a performance space from a solo artist to a Jazz combo to a small rock band. The eastern part was designed as a regular bar/dining area. The plan also called for a microbrewery unit at the back of the unit. The bar music can be loud, while the music room can be pianissimo to forte depending on the type of performance. The acoustical design aspects are critical for the music room. In addition, the acoustical separation between the two spaces is equally important. The music room/bar is currently in use. The design results are compared to actual field measurements. The results showed that the music venue performed satisfactorily. The acoustical separation between the music venue and the bar/restaurant was better than expected other than an installation deficiency of the south side sound lock doors. The background sound along the northern portion was NC-35 or less. However, the southern portion’s background sound exceeded NC-35 due to the hissing of the return air grille. The acoustical design and the performance results of the music venue-bar/restaurant are presented in this paper.

  17. Generation and analysis of an acoustic radiation pattern database for forty-one musical instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabtai, Noam R; Behler, Gottfried; Vorländer, Michael; Weinzierl, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    A database of acoustic radiation patterns was recorded, modeled, and analyzed for 41 modern or authentic orchestral musical instruments. The generation of this database included recordings of each instrument over the entire chromatic tone range in an anechoic chamber using a surrounding spherical microphone array. Acoustic source centering was applied in order to align the acoustic center of the sound source to the physical center of the microphone array. The acoustic radiation pattern is generated in the spherical harmonics domain at each harmonic partial of each played tone. An analysis of the acoustic radiation pattern complexity has been performed in terms of the number of excitation points using the centering algorithm. The database can be used both for studying the radiation of musical instruments itself, as well as for the implementation of radiation patterns in room acoustical simulations and auralization in order to obtain a spatial excitation of the room closer to reality.

  18. Acoustic design of open plan schools and comparison of requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Petersen, Claus; Rasmussen, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    conditions at both schools are satisfactory due to both optimized acoustical conditions and teaching methods adapted to the special open environment. The results from room acoustical modelling, verification measurements and questionnaire survey are presented and evaluated in relation to the newest Danish......In the Nordic countries several new schools have open plan areas for teaching and group work. However, to optimize learning efficiency for pupils and working conditions for teachers and to reduce noise levels, such spaces require special acoustic design to obtain sufficient sound attenuation...

  19. Subjective evaluation of restaurant acoustics in a virtual sound environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nicolaj Østergaard; Marschall, Marton; Santurette, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Many restaurants have smooth rigid surfaces made of wood, steel, glass, and concrete. This often results in a lack of sound absorption. Such restaurants are notorious for high sound noise levels during service that most owners actually desire for representing vibrant eating environments, although...... surveys report that noise complaints are on par with poor service. This study investigated the relation between objective acoustic parameters and subjective evaluation of acoustic comfort at five restaurants in terms of three parameters: noise annoyance, speech intelligibility, and privacy. At each...... location, customers filled out questionnaire surveys, acoustic parameters were measured, and recordings of restaurant acoustic scenes were obtained with a 64-channel spherical array. The acoustic scenes were reproduced in a virtual sound environment (VSE) with 64 loudspeakers placed in an anechoic room...

  20. Roman Theatres; Comparison of acoustic measurements and simulation results from Aspendos Theatre, Turkey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders; Nielsen, Martin Lisa; Christensen, Claus Lynge

    2004-01-01

    Room acoustic measurements have been carried out in the best preserved of all Roman theatres, the Aspendos Theatre in Turkey. The results are compared with simulated values from a rough as well as a very detailed ODEON model of the theatre.......Room acoustic measurements have been carried out in the best preserved of all Roman theatres, the Aspendos Theatre in Turkey. The results are compared with simulated values from a rough as well as a very detailed ODEON model of the theatre....

  1. Woodwind Tone Hole Acoustics and the Spectrum Transformation Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Douglas Howard

    This report describes an investigation of woodwind musical instrument tone holes and their effect on the radiated spectrum, the total dissipation, the stability of oscillation, the psychoacoustical cues important in perception, and the tuning and response of the instrument. Varying tone hole proportions significantly affect the radiative and frictional damping near a single hole, the mutual interactions between holes, the onset of streaming and turbulence near the holes, and the perceived woodwind timbre. The interconnections between related fields are explored through a brief review of sound production in woodwinds plus more extensive reviews of room and psychological acoustics. A theoretical and experimental discussion of the spectrum transformation function from the mouthpiece into the room relates all these fields. Also, considered are differences between cylindrical and conical bore woodwinds, the systematic shifts in saxophone spectra produced by the beating of the reed, the coupling of many closely spaced tone holes to the room excitation, the role of the player, and the results pertaining to computer music synthesis. The complicated acoustical flow inside the main air column near a single tone hole has been examined using a Green function, integral equation approach. A variational formulation allows explicit calculation of the open and closed hole impedance parameters needed in the transmission line description of a woodwind, and experiments have verified the theory in detail. Major acoustical topics considered are listed below. The effective length t(,e) of an open hole, relevant for instrument design and modification, is calculated and measured in terms of the main bore diameter 2a, hole diameter 2b, and the height t of the hole chimney; the effect of a hanging pad is a semi-empirical correction on t(,e). When the fundamental plane-wave mode of the main air column oscillation is at a pressure node, both the open and closed hole series impedances are

  2. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts What is acoustic ... Stories Keywords Shop ANA Discussion Forum About Back Learn more about ANA About ANA Mission, Vision & Values ...

  3. Tethys Acoustic Metadata Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Tethys database houses the metadata associated with the acoustic data collection efforts by the Passive Acoustic Group. These metadata include dates, locations...

  4. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is acoustic neuroma? Diagnosing Symptoms Side Effects Keywords Questions to ask Choosing a healthcare provider Request a ... What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation ...

  5. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts What is acoustic neuroma? Diagnosing Symptoms Side Effects Keywords Questions to ask Choosing a healthcare provider ... Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation ...

  6. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resource Click to learn more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN ... sponsors Become a Sponsor Acoustic Neuroma Association Latest News Join / Renew Login Contact Us Become a Sponsor ...

  7. Atlantic Herring Acoustic Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC Advanced Sampling Technologies Research Group conducts annual fisheries acoustic surveys using state-of-the-art acoustic, midwater trawling, and underwater...

  8. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more Click to learn more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN ... a Sponsor Patient Events Acoustic Neuroma Association Latest News Join / Renew Login Contact Us Become a Sponsor ...

  9. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing operation has been lower as the Run 1 samples are completing and smaller samples for upgrades and preparations are ramping up. Much of the computing activity is focusing on preparations for Run 2 and improvements in data access and flexibility of using resources. Operations Office Data processing was slow in the second half of 2013 with only the legacy re-reconstruction pass of 2011 data being processed at the sites.   Figure 1: MC production and processing was more in demand with a peak of over 750 Million GEN-SIM events in a single month.   Figure 2: The transfer system worked reliably and efficiently and transferred on average close to 520 TB per week with peaks at close to 1.2 PB.   Figure 3: The volume of data moved between CMS sites in the last six months   The tape utilisation was a focus for the operation teams with frequent deletion campaigns from deprecated 7 TeV MC GEN-SIM samples to INVALID datasets, which could be cleaned up...

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

      Introduction Computing activity has been running at a sustained, high rate as we collect data at high luminosity, process simulation, and begin to process the parked data. The system is functional, though a number of improvements are planned during LS1. Many of the changes will impact users, we hope only in positive ways. We are trying to improve the distributed analysis tools as well as the ability to access more data samples more transparently.  Operations Office Figure 2: Number of events per month, for 2012 Since the June CMS Week, Computing Operations teams successfully completed data re-reconstruction passes and finished the CMSSW_53X MC campaign with over three billion events available in AOD format. Recorded data was successfully processed in parallel, exceeding 1.2 billion raw physics events per month for the first time in October 2012 due to the increase in data-parking rate. In parallel, large efforts were dedicated to WMAgent development and integrati...

  11. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Just two months after the “LHC First Physics” event of 30th March, the analysis of the O(200) million 7 TeV collision events in CMS accumulated during the first 60 days is well under way. The consistency of the CMS computing model has been confirmed during these first weeks of data taking. This model is based on a hierarchy of use-cases deployed between the different tiers and, in particular, the distribution of RECO data to T1s, who then serve data on request to T2s, along a topology known as “fat tree”. Indeed, during this period this model was further extended by almost full “mesh” commissioning, meaning that RECO data were shipped to T2s whenever possible, enabling additional physics analyses compared with the “fat tree” model. Computing activities at the CMS Analysis Facility (CAF) have been marked by a good time response for a load almost evenly shared between ALCA (Alignment and Calibration tasks - highest p...

  12. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Matthias Kasemann

    Overview The main focus during the summer was to handle data coming from the detector and to perform Monte Carlo production. The lessons learned during the CCRC and CSA08 challenges in May were addressed by dedicated PADA campaigns lead by the Integration team. Big improvements were achieved in the stability and reliability of the CMS Tier1 and Tier2 centres by regular and systematic follow-up of faults and errors with the help of the Savannah bug tracking system. In preparation for data taking the roles of a Computing Run Coordinator and regular computing shifts monitoring the services and infrastructure as well as interfacing to the data operations tasks are being defined. The shift plan until the end of 2008 is being put together. User support worked on documentation and organized several training sessions. The ECoM task force delivered the report on “Use Cases for Start-up of pp Data-Taking” with recommendations and a set of tests to be performed for trigger rates much higher than the ...

  13. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction A large fraction of the effort was focused during the last period into the preparation and monitoring of the February tests of Common VO Computing Readiness Challenge 08. CCRC08 is being run by the WLCG collaboration in two phases, between the centres and all experiments. The February test is dedicated to functionality tests, while the May challenge will consist of running at all centres and with full workflows. For this first period, a number of functionality checks of the computing power, data repositories and archives as well as network links are planned. This will help assess the reliability of the systems under a variety of loads, and identifying possible bottlenecks. Many tests are scheduled together with other VOs, allowing the full scale stress test. The data rates (writing, accessing and transfer¬ring) are being checked under a variety of loads and operating conditions, as well as the reliability and transfer rates of the links between Tier-0 and Tier-1s. In addition, the capa...

  14. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Contributions from I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The start of the 2012 run has been busy for Computing. We have reconstructed, archived, and served a larger sample of new data than in 2011, and we are in the process of producing an even larger new sample of simulations at 8 TeV. The running conditions and system performance are largely what was anticipated in the plan, thanks to the hard work and preparation of many people. Heavy ions Heavy Ions has been actively analysing data and preparing for conferences.  Operations Office Figure 6: Transfers from all sites in the last 90 days For ICHEP and the Upgrade efforts, we needed to produce and process record amounts of MC samples while supporting the very successful data-taking. This was a large burden, especially on the team members. Nevertheless the last three months were very successful and the total output was phenomenal, thanks to our dedicated site admins who keep the sites operational and the computing project members who spend countless hours nursing the...

  15. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. MacBride

    The Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 has been the main focus of the Computing Project for the past few months. Activities began over the summer with the preparation of the Monte Carlo data sets for the challenge and tests of the new production system at the Tier-0 at CERN. The pre-challenge Monte Carlo production was done in several steps: physics generation, detector simulation, digitization, conversion to RAW format and the samples were run through the High Level Trigger (HLT). The data was then merged into three "Soups": Chowder (ALPGEN), Stew (Filtered Pythia) and Gumbo (Pythia). The challenge officially started when the first Chowder events were reconstructed on the Tier-0 on October 3rd. The data operations teams were very busy during the the challenge period. The MC production teams continued with signal production and processing while the Tier-0 and Tier-1 teams worked on splitting the Soups into Primary Data Sets (PDS), reconstruction and skimming. The storage sys...

  16. Criteria of choosing building structures for rooftop boiler rooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plotnikov Artyom

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates parameters of noise and vibration distribution in the territory of residential area depending on the structural materials and power of independent heat supply systems. Rooftop boiler rooms are decentralized heat supply systems in buildings. Today, residential areas are strongly affected by noise and vibrations. Adverse effects are isolated by buildings materials, protective shields and floating floors. Rooftop boiler rooms located in Tyumen city were investigated within this research. Structures of rooftop boiler rooms were analyzed. Acoustic analysis results and the parameters of equivalent continuous sound level are presented. An option for improvement of rooftop boiler rooms structures is suggested. Comparison of capital investments in construction and installation activities is carried out. Conclusion on capital investments required for noise protection is made.

  17. A pilot study on acoustic regulations for schools – Comparison between selected countries in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit; Guigou-Carter, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    of descriptors and limit values for acoustic requirements. The paper includes examples of acoustic regulations for schools, including specific sound insulation requirements on airborne and impact sound insulation, limit values for noise from traffic and from service equipment and in addition on reverberation...... time for class rooms. Furthermore, the discrepancies between countries are being discussed and some priorities for adjusting acoustic regulations in some countries indicated....

  18. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Acoustic Neuroma Association 600 Peachtree Parkway Suite 108 Cumming, GA 30041 770-205-8211 info@ANAUSA.org The world's #1 acoustic ... Shop ANA Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Association 600 Peachtree Parkway Suite 108 Cumming, GA 30041 ...

  19. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The Computing Team successfully completed the storage, initial processing, and distribution for analysis of proton-proton data in 2011. There are still a variety of activities ongoing to support winter conference activities and preparations for 2012. Heavy ions The heavy-ion run for 2011 started in early November and has already demonstrated good machine performance and success of some of the more advanced workflows planned for 2011. Data collection will continue until early December. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Operational and deployment support for WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request Manager components, routinely used in production by Data Operations, are provided. The GlideInWMS and components installation are now deployed at CERN, which is added to the GlideInWMS factory placed in the US. There has been new operational collaboration between the CERN team and the UCSD GlideIn factory operators, covering each others time zones by monitoring/debugging pilot jobs sent from the facto...

  20. Computational study on full-wave inversion based on the acoustic wave-equation; Onkyoha hado hoteishiki full wave inversion no model keisan ni yoru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T.; Sassa, K. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Uesaka, S. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    The effect of initial models on full-wave inversion (FWI) analysis based on acoustic wave-equation was studied for elastic wave tomography of underground structures. At present, travel time inversion using initial motion travel time is generally used, and inverse analysis is conducted using the concept `ray,` assuming very high wave frequency. Although this method can derive stable solutions relatively unaffected by initial model, it uses only the data of initial motion travel time. FWI calculates theoretical waveform at each receiver using all of observed waveforms as data by wave equation modeling where 2-D underground structure is calculated by difference calculus under the assumption that wave propagation is described by wave equation of P wave. Although it is a weak point that FWI is easily affected by noises in an initial model and data, it is featured by high resolution of solutions. This method offers very excellent convergence as a proper initial model is used, resulting in sufficient performance, however, it is strongly affected by initial model. 2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Diversity of acoustic streaming in a rectangular acoustofluidic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qiang; Hu, Junhui

    2015-04-01

    Diversity of acoustic streaming field in a 2D rectangular chamber with a traveling wave and using water as the acoustic medium is numerically investigated by the finite element method. It is found that the working frequency, the vibration excitation source length, and the distance and phase difference between two separated symmetric vibration excitation sources can cause the diversity in the acoustic streaming pattern. It is also found that a small object in the acoustic field results in an additional eddy, and affects the eddy size in the acoustic streaming field. In addition, the computation results show that with an increase of the acoustic medium's temperature, the speed of the main acoustic streaming decreases first and then increases, and the angular velocity of the corner eddies increases monotonously, which can be clearly explained by the change of the acoustic dissipation factor and shearing viscosity of the acoustic medium with temperature. Commercialized FEM software COMSOL Multiphysics is used to implement the computation tasks, which makes our method very easy to use. And the computation method is partially verified by an established analytical solution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A loudspeaker-based room auralization system for auditory research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Favrot, Sylvain Emmanuel

    to systematically study the signal processing of realistic sounds by normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners, a flexible, reproducible and fully controllable auditory environment is needed. A loudspeaker-based room auralization (LoRA) system was developed in this thesis to provide virtual auditory...... environments (VAEs) with an array of loudspeakers. The LoRA system combines state-of-the-art acoustic room models with sound-field reproduction techniques. Limitations of these two techniques were taken into consideration together with the limitations of the human auditory system to localize sounds...

  3. Distance Perception in a loudspeaker-based room auralization system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Favrot, Sylvain Emmanuel; Buchholz, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    A loudspeaker-based room auralization (LoRA) system has been recently proposed that efficiently combines modern room acoustic modeling techniques with high-order Ambisonics (HOA) auralization to generate virtual auditory environments (VAEs). The reproduction of the distance of sound events...... in such VAE is very important for its fidelity. A direct-scaling distance perception experiment was conducted to evaluate the LoRA system including the use of near-field control (NFC) for HOA. Experimental results showed that (i) loudspeaker-based auralization in the LoRA system provides similar distance...

  4. QRev—Software for computation and quality assurance of acoustic doppler current profiler moving-boat streamflow measurements—Technical manual for version 2.8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, David S.

    2016-06-21

    The software program, QRev applies common and consistent computational algorithms combined with automated filtering and quality assessment of the data to improve the quality and efficiency of streamflow measurements and helps ensure that U.S. Geological Survey streamflow measurements are consistent, accurate, and independent of the manufacturer of the instrument used to make the measurement. Software from different manufacturers uses different algorithms for various aspects of the data processing and discharge computation. The algorithms used by QRev to filter data, interpolate data, and compute discharge are documented and compared to the algorithms used in the manufacturers’ software. QRev applies consistent algorithms and creates a data structure that is independent of the data source. QRev saves an extensible markup language (XML) file that can be imported into databases or electronic field notes software. This report is the technical manual for version 2.8 of QRev.

  5. Conference Room Reverberation Time Correction Using Helmholtz Resonators Lined with Absorbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Namvar Arefi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Echo and sound resonance in a conference room cause obscure speech and make listeners tired. Thus, the acoustical properties of a conference room are vitally important. The conference room 412 at Sharif University Physics Department failed to meet basic acoustical standards. The aim of this research is to improve reverberation time (RT of the conference room using Helmholtz resonators with defined dimensions, diffusers, and sound absorbers. Helmholtz resonators are widely used to absorb sound noise especially at low frequencies. They are particularly useful when noise has a narrow-frequency band. One of the advantages of using Helmholtz resonators is their capacity to be tuned on different frequencies. We enhanced acoustical properties of Helmholtz resonators using proper absorbers and diffusers. In order to decrease the RT, a large number of Helmholtz resonators have been made and installed in proper positions in the conference room. The RT was measured before and after installation. The measurements indicate that the acoustical characteristics of the conference room have been significantly improved.

  6. Analysis of Reverberation Time Field Measurement Results in Building Acoustics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mašović

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Sound level difference between two rooms depends on both sound reduction between the rooms and their acoustical properties, such as the absorption in the receiving room. In order to abstract the influence of the rooms and assess only the sound reduction between them, relevant building acoustics standards offer two ways of normalizing a measured sound level difference – according to the reverberation time and the equivalent sound absorption area in the receiving room. In both cases measurement procedure requires reverberation time measurements in the receiving room, from which the equivalent sound absorption area can be assessed using Sabine’s formula. This paper analyses more than 300 results of reverberation time field measurements and provides an insight into its typical values in buildings. The measurements are done by five teams of building acoustics engineers, mostly involved in the international EU COST Action TU0901. The results are gathered in a unique database as a part of the STSM (Short Term Scientific Mission.

  7. Acoustic Power Transmission Through a Ducted Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Envia, Ed

    2016-01-01

    For high-speed ducted fans, when the rotor flowfield is shock-free, the main contribution to the inlet radiated acoustic power comes from the portion of the rotor stator interaction sound field that is transmitted upstream through the rotor. As such, inclusion of the acoustic transmission is an essential ingredient in the prediction of the fan inlet noise when the fan tip relative speed is subsonic. This paper describes a linearized Euler based approach to computing the acoustic transmission of fan tones through the rotor. The approach is embodied in a code called LINFLUX was applied to a candidate subsonic fan called the Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP). The results from this study suggest that it is possible to make such prediction with sufficient fidelity to provide an indication of the acoustic transmission trends with the fan tip speed.

  8. Direction selective structural-acoustic coupled radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hee-Seon; Kim, Yang-Hann

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a method of designing a structural-acoustic coupled radiator that can emit sound in the desired direction. The structural-acoustic coupled system is consisted of acoustic spaces and wall. The wall composes two plates and an opening, and the wall separates one space that is highly reverberant and the other that is unbounded without any reflection. An equation is developed that predicts energy distribution and energy flow in the two spaces separated by the wall, and its computational examples are presented including near field acoustic characteristics. To design the directional coupled radiator, Pareto optimization method is adapted. An objective is selected to maximize radiation power on a main axis and minimize a side lobe level and a subjective is selected direction of the main axis and dimensions of the walls geometry. Pressure and intensity distribution of the designed radiator is also presented.

  9. Aeroelastic-Acoustics Simulation of Flight Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, kajal K.; Choi, S.; Ibrahim, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the details of a numerical finite element (FE) based analysis procedure and a resulting code for the simulation of the acoustics phenomenon arising from aeroelastic interactions. Both CFD and structural simulations are based on FE discretization employing unstructured grids. The sound pressure level (SPL) on structural surfaces is calculated from the root mean square (RMS) of the unsteady pressure and the acoustic wave frequencies are computed from a fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the unsteady pressure distribution as a function of time. The resulting tool proves to be unique as it is designed to analyze complex practical problems, involving large scale computations, in a routine fashion.

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    CMS relies on a well functioning, distributed computing infrastructure. The Site Availability Monitoring (SAM) and the Job Robot submission have been very instrumental for site commissioning in order to increase availability of more sites such that they are available to participate in CSA07 and are ready to be used for analysis. The commissioning process has been further developed, including "lessons learned" documentation via the CMS twiki. Recently the visualization, presentation and summarizing of SAM tests for sites has been redesigned, it is now developed by the central ARDA project of WLCG. Work to test the new gLite Workload Management System was performed; a 4 times increase in throughput with respect to LCG Resource Broker is observed. CMS has designed and launched a new-generation traffic load generator called "LoadTest" to commission and to keep exercised all data transfer routes in the CMS PhE-DEx topology. Since mid-February, a transfer volume of about 12 P...

  11. Teachers and Teaching: Speech Production Accommodations Due to Changes in the Acoustic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Eric J; Bottalico, Pasquale; Graetzer, Simone; Leishman, Timothy W; Berardi, Mark L; Eyring, Nathan G; Jensen, Zachary R; Rolins, Michael K; Whiting, Jennifer K

    2015-11-01

    School teachers have an elevated risk of voice problems due to the vocal demands in the workplace. This manuscript presents the results of three studies investigating teachers' voice use at work. In the first study, 57 teachers were observed for 2 weeks (waking hours) to compare how they used their voice in the school environment and in non-school environments. In a second study, 45 participants performed a short vocal task in two different rooms: a variable acoustic room and an anechoic chamber. Subjects were taken back and forth between the two rooms. Each time they entered the variable acoustics room, the reverberation time and/or the background noise condition had been modified. In this latter study, subjects responded to questions about their vocal comfort and their perception of changes in the acoustic environment. In a third study, 20 untrained vocalists performed a simple vocal task in the following conditions: with and without background babble and with and without transparent plexiglass shields to increase the first reflection. Relationships were examined between [1] the results for the room acoustic parameters; [2] the subjects' perception of the room; and [3] the recorded speech acoustic. Several differences between male and female subjects were found; some of those differences held for each room condition (at school vs. not at school, reverberation level, noise level, and early reflection).

  12. Human echolocation in different situations and rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkman, Bo N

    2017-05-01

    People, especially when blind, use echolocation to detect obstacles, orient themselves, and get an awareness of their environment. I and coworkers have, with mostly psychophysical methods, studied perceptual aspects of how people accomplish echolocation. Echolocation with long canes while walking was possible but difficult. The effects of the spectral composition of the emitted sounds had no effects. Sound recordings in anechoic and conference rooms from non-walking, static situations, later presented in a laboratory showed a better performance in an ordinary room with reflections, than in an anechoic room. We also found that there was a higher performance with longer sounding sounds than for short clicks. Among the difficulties for the blind are how to avoid masking of sounds. A few blind are exceptionally high performing. An "information-surplus principle" has been proposed. Various information sources are used, but repetition pitch seems more important than loudness for echolocation. Among other sources, timbre may also provide information. There may exist a time gap, acoustic gaze, for how blind people use clicks. It is likely also that there are at least two processes taking place in the hearing system when listening for echoes, one attuned to short sounds and one to long sounds.

  13. Modelling of a thermally activated building system (TABS) combined with free-hanging acoustic ceiling units using computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacarte, Luis Marcos Domínguez; Fan, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    . This study focuses on the influence of two types of free-hanging ceiling absorbers (horizontal and vertical) on the cooling performance of the TABS. Different scenarios are investigated for each type of sound absorber. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to illuminate the nature...

  14. Measuring Loudspeaker Distortion and Room Reverberation Time Using a Speakerphone

    OpenAIRE

    Wilhelmsson, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    This master thesis project was carried out during the spring semester of 2016 at the company Limes Audio. The company specializes in making software, electronics, industrial design and mechanics with the aim to improve audio quality in loudspeaking communication systems. The performance of audio conferencing systems may degrade if there are distortions, or if the acoustical properties of the room are unfavorable. To ensure that the system works optimally, any unwanted effects must first be id...

  15. Digital Operating Room assistant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geudon, A.C.P.

    2016-01-01

    The Operating Room (OR) is a complex environment, where a large variety of patients and diseases can be treated and many unexpected events occur (such as emergency surgeries and unexpected progress of procedures). In practice, OR assistants support OR processes as well as they can, in order to

  16. Rooms with a View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourihan, Peter; Berry, Millard, III

    2006-01-01

    When well-designed and integrated into a campus living or learning space, an atrium can function as the heart and spirit of a building, connecting interior rooms and public spaces with the outside environment. However, schools and universities should seek technological and HVAC solutions that maximize energy efficiency. This article discusses how…

  17. Operating room rescheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Essen, J. Theresia; Hurink, Johann L.; Hartholt, W.; van den Akker, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Due to surgery duration variability and arrivals of emergency surgeries, the planned Operating Room (OR) schedule is disrupted throughout the day which may lead to a change in the start time of the elective surgeries. These changes may result in undesirable situations for patients, wards or other

  18. The Virtual Dressing Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Michael Boelstoft

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a review of recent developments and future perspectives, addressing the problem of creating a virtual dressing room. First, we review the current state-of-the-art of exiting solutions and discuss their applicability and limitations. We categorize the exiting solutions into thr...

  19. PS Control Room

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1963-01-01

    The good old PS Control Room, all manual. For each parameter, a knob or a button to control it; for each, a light or meter or oscilloscope to monitor it; carefully written pages serve as the data bank; phones and intercom for communication. D.Dekkers is at the microphone, M.Valvini sits in front.

  20. Birth room images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowden, Calida; Sheehan, Athena; Foureur, Maralyn Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objective: this study examined images of birth rooms in developed countries to analyse the messages and visual discourse being communicated through images. Design: a small qualitative study using Kress and van Leeuwen's (2006) social semiotic theoretical framework for image analysis, a form of di...

  1. Low frequency sound field enhancement system for rectangular rooms, using multiple loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    to the multiple reflection of sound at the rigid walls of the room. This may cause level differences of up to 20 dB in the room. Some of these deviations are associated with the standing waves, resonances or anti resonances of the room. The understanding of the problem is accomplished by analyzing the behavior......The scope of this PhD dissertation is within the performance of loudspeakers in rooms at low frequencies. The research concentrates on the improvement of the sound level distribution in rooms produced by loudspeakers at low frequencies. The work focuses on seeing the problem acoustically...... and solving it in the time domain. Loudspeakers are the last link in the sound reproduction chain, and they are typically placed in small or medium size rooms. When low frequency sound is radiated by a loudspeaker the sound level distribution along the room presents large deviations. This is due...

  2. Experience using radio frequency laptops to access the electronic medical record in exam rooms.

    OpenAIRE

    Dworkin, L. A.; Krall, M.; Chin, H.; Robertson, N.; Harris, J.; Hughes, J.

    1999-01-01

    Kaiser Permanente, Northwest, evaluated the use of laptop computers to access our existing comprehensive Electronic Medical Record in exam rooms via a wireless radiofrequency (RF) network. Eleven of 22 clinicians who were offered the laptops successfully adopted their use in the exam room. These clinicians were able to increase their exam room time with the patient by almost 4 minutes (25%), apparently without lengthening their overall work day. Patient response to exam room computing was ove...

  3. Advances in Integrating Autonomy with Acoustic Communications for Intelligent Networks of Marine Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Sonar AUV #Environmental Sampling Environmental AUV +name : string = OEX Ocean Explorer +name : string = Hammerhead Iver2 +name : string = Unicorn ...executable» Google Earth Bluefin 21 AUV ( Unicorn ) MOOS Computer GPS «serial» Bluefin 21 AUV (Macrura) MOOS Computer «acoustic» Micro-Modem «wired...Computer Bluefin 21 AUV ( Unicorn ) MOOS Computer NURC AUV (OEX) MOOS Computer Topside MOOS Computer «wifi» 5.0GHz WiLan «acoustic» Edgetech GPS

  4. Multiple Source Localization Based on Acoustic Map De-Emphasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brutti Alessio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a novel approach for localization of multiple sources overlapping in time. The proposed algorithm relies on acoustic maps computed in multi-microphone settings, which are descriptions of the distribution of the acoustic activity in a monitored area. Through a proper processing of the acoustic maps, the positions of two or more simultaneously active acoustic sources can be estimated in a robust way. Experimental results obtained on real data collected for this specific task show the capabilities of the given method both with distributed microphone networks and with compact arrays.

  5. Informational approach to the analysis of acoustic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkevich, Yuriy; Dyuk, Vyacheslav; Mishchenko, Mikhail; Solodchuk, Alexandra

    2017-10-01

    The example of linguistic processing of acoustic signals of a seismic event would be an information approach to the processing of non-stationary signals. The method for converting an acoustic signal into an information message is described by identifying repetitive self-similar patterns. The definitions of the event selection indicators in the symbolic recording of the acoustic signal are given. The results of processing an acoustic signal by a computer program realizing the processing of linguistic data are shown. Advantages and disadvantages of using software algorithms are indicated.

  6. Auralisations with loudspeaker arrays from a phased combination of the image source method and acoustical radiosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy

    2017-01-01

    In order to create a simulation tool that is well-suited for small rooms with low diffusion and highly absorbing ceilings, a new room acoustic simulation tool has been developed that combines a phased version of the image source with acoustical radiosity and that considers the angle dependence...... with PARISM are described and compared to implementations of auralisations with another geometrical acoustic simulation tool, i.e. ODEON and the LoRA toolbox that applies Ambisonics to ODEON simulations. In opposition to the LoRA toolbox, higher order Ambisonics are also applied to the late part of the PARISM...

  7. Jean Claude Risset’s Duet for One Pianist: Challenges of a Real-Time Performance Interaction with a Computer-Controlled Acoustic Piano 16 Years Later

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Lourenço

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to discuss the work Duet for one Pianist (1989 by the French composer Jean-Claude Risset (b. 13 March 1938 by analyzing the challenges of the music performance of this Computer-Aided Composition work Disklavier and implies Human-Computer Interaction performance. Extremely honored to perform the revised version of the 8 Sketches for One Pianist and Disklavier within a research project of CITAR and a new Sketch Reflections (2012 by Jean-Claude Risset dedicated to me in a World premiere in the closing ceremony of Black&White 2012 Film Festival promoted by the Catholic University of Portugal. Several issues on the performance of this work are analysed as a case-study, from the point of view of the performer, particularly the components of expressive performance in a real-time interaction between performer and computer. These components can work as analysis criteria of a piano interpretation, in here, of a pianist and Disklavier interpretation. 

  8. Preliminary Quantification of the Acoustic Properties of Some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reverberation times of some selected lecture theatres in Federal University of Technology, Yola which are the major contributory factors to their acoustic properties have been studied. The selected halls chosen as representatives are LT I, SMIT LT I and LT III having room volumes of 1473.4, 2156.4 and 763.0 m3 ...

  9. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  10. Enhanced sources of acoustic power surrounding AR 11429

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donea, Alina; Hanson, Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Multi-frequency power maps of the local acoustic oscillations show acoustic enhancements ("acoustic-power halos") at high frequencies surrounding large active region. Computational seismic holography reveals a high-frequency "acoustic-emission halo", or "seismic glory" surrounding large active regions. In this study, we have applied computational seismic holography to map the seismic seismic source density surrounding AR 11429. Studies of HMI/SDO Doppler data, shows that the "acoustic halos" and the "seismic glories" are prominent at high frequencies 5-8 mHz. We investigate morphological properties of acoustic-power and acoustic emission halos around an active region to see if they are spatially correlated. Details about the local magnetic field from vectormagnetograms of AR 11429 are included. We identify a 15" region of seismic deficit power (dark moat) shielding the white-light boundary of the active region. The size of the seismic moat is related to region of intermediate magnetic field strength. The acoustic moat is circled by the halo of enhanced seismic amplitude as well as enhanced seismic emission. Overall, the results suggest that features are related. However, if we narrow the frequency band to 5.5 - 6.5 mHz, we find that the seismic source density dominates over the local acoustic power, suggesting the existence of sources that emit more energy downward into the solar interior than upward toward the solar surface.

  11. Room Airflows with Low Reynolds Number Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Claus; Nielsen, Peter V.; Davidson, Lars

    is limited. It has been the objective to investigate the behaviour of a plane isothermal wall jet in a full-scale ventilated room at low Reynolds numbers, i.e. when the flow is not fully turbulent. The results are significantly different from known theory for fully turbulent flows. It was found that the jet......The behaviour of room airflows under fully turbulent conditions is well known both in terms of experiments and, numerical calculations by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). For room airflows where turbulence is not fully developed though, i.e. flows at low Reynolds numbers, the existing knowledge...... constants are a strong function of the Reynolds number up to a level of Reh≈500....

  12. An acoustical survey about the Sanctuary of Altavilla Milicia (Palermo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Barbaro

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at using the science and the technique, known nowadays, at the service of the Liturgy and of the holy architecture. In addition to this, its second goal is to investigate completely, on some general acoustic aspects that can be founded inside liturgical rooms, without overlooking the historical-architectural aspects regarding the difference "kinds" of manufactures and materials in relation to the specific liturgical needs. According to this, an interesting simulation of sound diffusion inside the Sanctuario of Altavilla Milicia, defined by the Cardinal S. De Giorgi "the first and most notorious Marian place of veneration belonging to the Church of Palermo", was performed. By means of this simulation, the acoustic parameters of the ecclesial room were taken, in compliance to the standards UNI EN ISO 3382/1997 (Measurements of enclosed environments Reverberation Time with reference to other acoustic parameters.

  13. Combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutsouris, Georgios I; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    A combined model for room acoustic predictions is developed, aiming to treat both diffuse and specular reflections in a unified way. Two established methods are incorporated: acoustical radiosity, accounting for the diffuse part, and the image source method, accounting for the specular part....... The model is based on conservation of acoustical energy. Losses are taken into account by the energy absorption coefficient, and the diffuse reflections are controlled via the scattering coefficient, which defines the portion of energy that has been diffusely reflected. The way the model is formulated...... allows for a dynamic control of the image source production, so that no fixed maximum reflection order is required. The model is optimized for energy impulse response predictions in arbitrary polyhedral rooms. The predictions are validated by comparison with published measured data for a real music...

  14. Perception of music dynamics in concert hall acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pätynen, Jukka; Lokki, Tapio

    2016-11-01

    Dynamics is one of the principal means of expressivity in Western classical music. Still, preceding research on room acoustics has mostly neglected the contribution of music dynamics to the acoustic perception. This study investigates how the different concert hall acoustics influence the perception of varying music dynamics. An anechoic orchestra signal, containing a step in music dynamics, was rendered in the measured acoustics of six concert halls at three seats in each. Spatial sound was reproduced through a loudspeaker array. By paired comparison, naive subjects selected the stimuli that they considered to change more during the music. Furthermore, the subjects described their foremost perceptual criteria for each selection. The most distinct perceptual factors differentiating the rendering of music dynamics between halls include the dynamic range, and varying width of sound and reverberance. The results confirm the hypothesis that the concert halls render the performed music dynamics differently, and with various perceptual aspects. The analysis against objective room acoustic parameters suggests that the perceived dynamic contrasts are pronounced by acoustics that provide stronger sound and more binaural incoherence by a lateral sound field. Concert halls that enhance the dynamics have been found earlier to elicit high subjective preference.

  15. The role of classroom acoustics on vocal intensity regulation and speakers’ comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelegrin Garcia, David

    investigated the relationships between the classroom acoustic condition and teachers’ voice, focusing on their vocal intensity, and between the classroom acoustic condition and the sensation of acoustic comfort for a speaker. In the presence of low background noise levels, teachers were found to adjust......Teachers are one of the professional groups with the highest risk of suffering from voice disorders. Teachers point out classroom acoustics among the potential hazards affecting their vocal health, together with air dryness, background noise, and other environmental factors. The present project has...... their vocal intensity according to the room gain or voice support of the classroom, which are equivalent objective measures that quantify the amplification of one’s own voice in a room due to the reflections at the room boundaries. Most of the vocal intensity variation among classrooms was due to differences...

  16. Influence of the scattering and absorption coefficients on homogeneous room simulations that use a diffusion equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Juan M; Escolano, José; Cobos, Maximo; López, José J

    2013-03-01

    The diffusion equation model was used for room acoustic simulations to predict the sound pressure level and the reverberation time. The technical literature states that the diffusion equation method accurately models the late portion of the room impulse response if the energy is sufficiently scattered. This work provides conclusions on the validity of the diffusion equation model for rooms with homogeneous dimensions in relation to the scattering coefficients of the boundaries. A systematic evaluation was conducted out to determine the ranges of the absorption and scattering coefficient values that result in low noticeable differences between the predictions from a geometrical acoustic model and those from the diffusion equation model.

  17. Communication in Pipes Using Acoustic Modems that Provide Minimal Obstruction to Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Archer, Eric D. (Inventor); Bao, Xiaoqi (Inventor); Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A plurality of phased array acoustic communication devices are used to communicate data along a tubulation, such as a well. The phased array acoustic communication devices employ phased arrays of acoustic transducers, such as piezoelectric transducers, to direct acoustic energy in desired directions along the tubulation. The system is controlled by a computer-based controller. Information, including data and commands, is communicated using digital signaling.

  18. [Virtual room of gastroenterology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Osvaldo Mateo; Fittipaldi, Mónica Elsa; Henderson, Eduardo; Krabshuis, Justus Hendrik

    2010-12-01

    The amount of published information and its continuing growth can no longer be managed by an individual searcher. One of today's great challenges for the academic researcher and clinician is to find a relevant scientific article using bibliographic search strategies. We aimed to design and build a Virtual Room of Gastroenterology (VRG) generating real-time automated search strategies and producing bibliographic and full text search results. These results update and complement with the latest evidence the Clinical Guideline Program of the World Gastroenterology Organisation. The HTML driven interface provides a series of pre-formulated MeSH based search strategies for each Aula. For each topic between 10 and 20 specific terms, qualifiers and subheadings are identified. The functionality of the VRG is based on the PubMed's characteristic that allows a search strategy to be captured as a web address. The VRG is available in Spanish and English, and the access is free. There are 28 rooms currently available. All together these rooms provide an advanced bibliographic access using more than 900 pre-programmed MeSH driven strategies. In a further very recent development some of the topics of VRG now allow cascade based searches. These searches look at resource sensitive options and possible ethnic difference per topic. The VRG allows significant reductions in time required to design and carry out complex bibliographic searches in the areas of gastroenterology, hepatology and endoscopy. The system updates automatically in real-time thus ensuring the currency of the results.

  19. Planets in a Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomini, l.; Aloisi, F.; De Angelis, I.

    2017-09-01

    Teaching planetary science using a spherical projector to show the planets' surfaces is a very effective but usually very expensive idea. Whatsmore, it usually assumes the availability of a dedicated space and a trained user. "Planets in a room" is a prototypal low cost version of a small, spherical projector that teachers, museum, planetary scientists and other individuals can easily build and use on their own, to show and teach the planets The project of "Planets in a Room" was made by the italian non-profit association Speak Science with the collaboration of INAF-IAPS of Rome and the Roma Tre University (Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica). This proposal was funded by the Europlanet Outreach Funding Scheme in 2016. "Planets in a room" will be presented during EPSC 2017 to give birth to the second phase of the project, when the outreach and research community will be involved and schools from all over Europe will be invited to participate with the aim of bringing planetary science to a larger audience.

  20. Vibro-acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume book gives a thorough and comprehensive presentation of vibration and acoustic theories. Different from traditional textbooks which typically deal with some aspects of either acoustic or vibration problems, it is unique of this book to combine those two correlated subjects together. Moreover, it provides fundamental analysis and mathematical descriptions for several crucial phenomena of Vibro-Acoustics which are quite useful in noise reduction, including how structures are excited, energy flows from an excitation point to a sound radiating surface, and finally how a structure radiates noise to a surrounding fluid. Many measurement results included in the text make the reading interesting and informative. Problems/questions are listed at the end of each chapter and the solutions are provided. This will help the readers to understand the topics of Vibro-Acoustics more deeply. The book should be of interest to anyone interested in sound and vibration, vehicle acoustics, ship acoustics and inter...

  1. Acoustic Hygrometer Based on Reverberation Time Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motegi, Takahiro; Mizutani, Koichi; Wakatsuki, Naoto

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a hygrometer operated by acoustic means is proposed. It is important to measure spatial average humidity for environmental management in a room. In a large space, it is difficult to determine spatial average humidity because conventional sensors measure only local humidity at the measurement point. The proposed acoustic hygrometer utilizes the relationship between the sound attenuation coefficient and humidity. To measure the sound attenuation coefficient, reverberation time in a room is utilized. An acoustic hygrometer based on reverberation time achieves a noncontact measurement of spatial average humidity. As a practical examination, relative humidity (RH) was measured on the basis of reverberation time in a chamber, and compared with reference values. The humidity measurement accuracy of the hygrometer was evaluated by statistical means because the measured reverberation time showed variability. From the results, the possibility of humidity measurement with an accuracy of about 5% RH at 50% RH or more using this hygrometer was verified. Here, the unit of RH is % RH.

  2. Matrix method for acoustic levitation simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A B; Perez, Nicolas; Buiochi, Flavio; Adamowski, Julio C

    2011-08-01

    A matrix method is presented for simulating acoustic levitators. A typical acoustic levitator consists of an ultrasonic transducer and a reflector. The matrix method is used to determine the potential for acoustic radiation force that acts on a small sphere in the standing wave field produced by the levitator. The method is based on the Rayleigh integral and it takes into account the multiple reflections that occur between the transducer and the reflector. The potential for acoustic radiation force obtained by the matrix method is validated by comparing the matrix method results with those obtained by the finite element method when using an axisymmetric model of a single-axis acoustic levitator. After validation, the method is applied in the simulation of a noncontact manipulation system consisting of two 37.9-kHz Langevin-type transducers and a plane reflector. The manipulation system allows control of the horizontal position of a small levitated sphere from -6 mm to 6 mm, which is done by changing the phase difference between the two transducers. The horizontal position of the sphere predicted by the matrix method agrees with the horizontal positions measured experimentally with a charge-coupled device camera. The main advantage of the matrix method is that it allows simulation of non-symmetric acoustic levitators without requiring much computational effort.

  3. Bioeffects due to acoustic droplet vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulated micro- and nano-droplets can be vaporized via ultrasound, a process termed acoustic droplet vaporization. Our interest is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular microdroplets. Additionally, the microdroplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Early timescale vaporization events, including phase change, are directly visualized using ultra-high speed imaging, and the influence of acoustic parameters on droplet/bubble dynamics is discussed. Acoustic and fluid mechanics parameters affecting the severity of endothelial cell bioeffects are explored. These findings suggest parameter spaces for which bioeffects may be reduced or enhanced, depending on the objective of the therapy. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  4. The acoustic design of the Centro Nacional de las Artes in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Rusell

    2002-11-01

    In this paper the acoustic design of the separate buildings housing the school of music, school of drama, and school of dance that opened in 1996 will be described. Spaces that JHA designed included practice rooms, studios, rehearsal rooms, black box, and concert hall. Details of room acoustic treatments, sound isolation measures, and venturi air flow will be illustrated. An overview of the entire project will also include the 500 seat multipurpose theater (with variable absorption systems) and the Alla Magna. Differences between the American and Mexican styles of consulting, importing of materials, installation, and commissioning will also be discussed.

  5. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-03

    for including this in acoustic models . Experimental analysis is combined with model development to isolate specific physics and improve our...under- ice scattering, bathymetric diffraction and the application of the ocean acoustic Parabolic Equation to infrasound. 2. Tasks a. Task 1: Basin...of Japan received at the CTBTO HA03 station in Juan Fernandez Chile , are a treasure trove of long-range low frequency acoustic propagation. In

  6. Laboratory for Structural Acoustics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where acoustic radiation, scattering, and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures are...

  7. Localized Acoustic Surface Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-08-04

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes (ASMs). We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  8. Shallow Water Acoustic Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where high-frequency acoustic scattering and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures...

  9. Acoustic Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains an electro-magnetic worldwide data collection and field measurement capability in the area of acoustic technology. Outfitted by NASA Langley...

  10. Multipurpose council chambers ``in the round'' poses acoustical challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logsdon, Edward L.

    2003-10-01

    The City of Aurora Council Chambers is used for both municipal and public meetings. The room is configured to provide close-in seating with good sightlines from each of the 300 stadium-style seats. Presentations can be made from the central podium location to either the audience or council dais requiring multiple loudspeaker zoning and control. The cylindrical ceiling, shaped to accommodate video projection and lighting equipment, is acoustically treated to eliminate late reflections. The City Council meetings are broadcast to public TV on a regular basis from this room requiring good room acoustics and sound isolation to reduce echo and achieve acceptably low background noise levels while satisfying the aesthetic palette of the interior designers. A case history will be presented along with photographs showing how specialty wood materials, both absorptive and diffusive, were incorporated along with absorptive plaster and cloth-covered fiberglass panels into the design of the building.

  11. Experimental Validation of the Reverberation Effect in Room Electromagnetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinböck, Gerhard; Pedersen, Troels; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2015-01-01

    The delay power spectrum is widely used in both communication and localization communities for characterizing the temporal dispersion of the radio channel. Experimental investigations of in-room radio environments indicate that the delay power spectrum exhibits an exponentially decaying tail....... This tail can be characterized with Sabine's or Eyring's reverberation models, which were initially developed in acoustics. So far, these models were only fitted to data collected from radio measurements, but no thorough validation of their prediction ability in electromagnetics has been performed yet....... This paper provides a contribution to fill this gap. We follow Sabine's original experimental approach, which consists in comparing model predictions to experimental observations in a room, while varying its mean absorption coefficient and total room surface. We find that Eyring's model provides a more...

  12. Unitary and room air-conditioners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J.E.

    1977-09-01

    The scope of this technology evaluation on room and unitary air conditioners covers the initial investment and performance characteristics needed for estimating the operating cost of air conditioners installed in an ICES community. Cooling capacities of commercially available room air conditioners range from 4000 Btu/h to 36,000 Btu/h; unitary air conditioners cover a range from 6000 Btu/h to 135,000 Btu/h. The information presented is in a form useful to both the computer programmer in the construction of a computer simulation of the packaged air-conditioner's performance and to the design engineer, interested in selecting a suitably sized and designed packaged air conditioner.

  13. On The Living Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Richards

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This text discusses the work The Living Room, directed by the author, and reflects on its meanings and functions. The article confronts problems performance raises in relation to contemporary social life, bringing forward the isolation of life today and the possibilities performance offers to fight it. We problematise the crisis experienced by the author and the consequent creation of the work as a mobile performative device in relation to the staging space. Finally, the work questions the forms of interaction and type of participation possible in performance.

  14. Making room for volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    2012-01-01

    If campaigns do not accommodate this view, all but a hard core of regulars and fired-up partisans will drift away, leaving it for staffers and hired hands to do all the hard work of identifying voters, canvassing people by foot and by phone, and turning out the vote. [...] ironically, a campaign...... that is singleminded in its instrumental pursuit of victory can thus be less effective than one that is more accommodating- a campaign that makes room for volunteers by accepting that, unlike staffers, they come to politics with a different perspective and conception of what is and ought to be going on....

  15. Room Temperature Curing Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    UJ LU LU LU UJ LU W -Q U "O 26 -- - -■- — ■ ■- ■ MBti ^L. IIIIIIII.IHI.I|.UHI,IW’I»;I.!I"IT,U» mpwi«ŕ "^Wl be 190,000 psi which is consistent...was added to the mixture. After 1 hour benzene and water were added and the mixture was stirred until the salt was dissolved. The organic ...for 15 minutes and then cooled to room temperature. The mixture was extracted with two 100 ml portions of water. The organic layer was dried (MgS04

  16. Teaching acoustics courses online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroughs, Courtney B.

    2003-04-01

    Three graduate-level courses in noise control engineering have been taught by the Graduate Program in Acoustics through the Penn State World Campus for more than four years. In each course, students receive (1) a study guide which gives an overview of the course, the software, and assignments, and (2) a CD which contains the content of the course with animations embedded in the text. Because all communications are online, students have been able to take these courses asynchronously on their own schedule with minimum disruptions in their home and work schedules. Students work on group projects, known as collaborative learning activities, and conduct simulated measurements using virtual instruments. Individual learning activities include study questions, written problems, computer coding, and interactive demonstrations. The first course has been offered four times and several students have completed all three courses. Overviews of the elements of these online courses that have been successful and the elements that have presented problems, along with a discussion of adjustments that we have been able to make and those that we would like to make to improve the courses, will be presented.

  17. Acoustic power balance in lined ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eversman, W.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that the two common definitions of acoustic energy density and intensity in uniform unlined ducts carrying uniform flow are compatible to the extent that both energy densities can be used in an appropriate variational principle to derive the convected wave equation. When the duct walls are lined both energy densities must be modified to account for the wall energy density. This results in a new energy conservation equation which utilizes a modified definition of axial power and accounts for wall dissipation. Computations in specific cases demonstrate the validity of the modified acoustic energy relation.

  18. The effect of semantic context on speech intelligibility in reverberant rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Nirmal; Zahorik, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Although it is well known that semantic context affects speech intelligibility and that different reverberant rooms affect speech intelligibility differentially, these effects have seldom been studied together. Revised SPIN sentences in a background of Gaussian noise in simulated rooms with reverberation time (T60) of 1 and 0.25 s were used. The carrier phrase and the target word of the speech stimuli were manipulated to be either in the same room or in different rooms. As expected, intelligibility of predictable sentences was higher compared to unpredictable sentences-the context effect. The context effect was higher in the low-reverberant room as compared to the high-reverberant room. When the carrier phrase and target words were in different rooms, the context effect was higher when the carrier phrase was in the low-reverberant room and target word in the high-reverberant room. For predictable sentences, changing the target word from high-reverberation to low reverberation with a high reverberant carrier increased intelligibility. However, with a low-reverberant carrier and different rooms for the target word, there was no change in intelligibility. Overall, it could be concluded that there is an interaction between semantic context and room acoustics for speech intelligibility. PMID:24058720

  19. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics will compile the techniques and applications of signal processing as they are used in the many varied areas of Acoustics. The Handbook will emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Each Section of the Handbook...... will present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...... from different areas, will find the self-contained chapters accessible and will be interested in the similarities and differences between the approaches and techniques used in different areas of acoustics....

  20. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  1. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Jonas Tobias; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems...

  2. Acoustic assessment of speech privacy curtains in two nursing units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana S Pope

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hospitals have complex soundscapes that create challenges to patient care. Extraneous noise and high reverberation rates impair speech intelligibility, which leads to raised voices. In an unintended spiral, the increasing noise may result in diminished speech privacy, as people speak loudly to be heard over the din. The products available to improve hospital soundscapes include construction materials that absorb sound (acoustic ceiling tiles, carpet, wall insulation and reduce reverberation rates. Enhanced privacy curtains are now available and offer potential for a relatively simple way to improve speech privacy and speech intelligibility by absorbing sound at the hospital patient′s bedside. Acoustic assessments were performed over 2 days on two nursing units with a similar design in the same hospital. One unit was built with the 1970s′ standard hospital construction and the other was newly refurbished (2013 with sound-absorbing features. In addition, we determined the effect of an enhanced privacy curtain versus standard privacy curtains using acoustic measures of speech privacy and speech intelligibility indexes. Privacy curtains provided auditory protection for the patients. In general, that protection was increased by the use of enhanced privacy curtains. On an average, the enhanced curtain improved sound absorption from 20% to 30%; however, there was considerable variability, depending on the configuration of the rooms tested. Enhanced privacy curtains provide measureable improvement to the acoustics of patient rooms but cannot overcome larger acoustic design issues. To shorten reverberation time, additional absorption, and compact and more fragmented nursing unit floor plate shapes should be considered.

  3. Acoustic assessment of speech privacy curtains in two nursing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Diana S; Miller-Klein, Erik T

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals have complex soundscapes that create challenges to patient care. Extraneous noise and high reverberation rates impair speech intelligibility, which leads to raised voices. In an unintended spiral, the increasing noise may result in diminished speech privacy, as people speak loudly to be heard over the din. The products available to improve hospital soundscapes include construction materials that absorb sound (acoustic ceiling tiles, carpet, wall insulation) and reduce reverberation rates. Enhanced privacy curtains are now available and offer potential for a relatively simple way to improve speech privacy and speech intelligibility by absorbing sound at the hospital patient's bedside. Acoustic assessments were performed over 2 days on two nursing units with a similar design in the same hospital. One unit was built with the 1970s' standard hospital construction and the other was newly refurbished (2013) with sound-absorbing features. In addition, we determined the effect of an enhanced privacy curtain versus standard privacy curtains using acoustic measures of speech privacy and speech intelligibility indexes. Privacy curtains provided auditory protection for the patients. In general, that protection was increased by the use of enhanced privacy curtains. On an average, the enhanced curtain improved sound absorption from 20% to 30%; however, there was considerable variability, depending on the configuration of the rooms tested. Enhanced privacy curtains provide measureable improvement to the acoustics of patient rooms but cannot overcome larger acoustic design issues. To shorten reverberation time, additional absorption, and compact and more fragmented nursing unit floor plate shapes should be considered.

  4. Clinical and acoustical variability in hypokinetic dysarthria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metter, E.J.; Hanson, W.R.

    1986-10-01

    Ten male patients with parkinsonism secondary to Parkinson's disease or progressive supranuclear palsy had clinical neurological, speech, and acoustical speech evaluations. In addition, seven of the patients were evaluated by x-ray computed tomography (CT) and (F-18)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Extensive variability of speech features, both clinical and acoustical, were found and seemed to be independent of the severity of any parkinsonian sign, CT, or FDG PET. In addition, little relationship existed between the variability across each measured speech feature. What appeared to be important for the appearance of abnormal acoustic measures was the degree of overall severity of the dysarthria. These observations suggest that a better understanding of hypokinetic dysarthria may result from more extensive examination of the variability between patients. Emphasizing a specific feature such as rapid speaking rate in characterizing hypokinetic dysarthria focuses on a single and inconstant finding in a complex speech pattern.

  5. Room to Groove?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabrooke, Leonard

    . As long as they stay within the parameters of legitimate financial practice to signal institutional isomorphism, the `groove', creditors may well allow borrowers room for change in self-determined ways. This paper maps out the historical and conceptual terrain concerning civilizing ideas about...... the legitimacy of financial practices within global capital markets, and investigates relationships between Western `civilizers' and Emerging Market Economies during the last two periods of financial globalization, the late-nineteenth/ early-twentieth centuries and the late-twentieth century.......The use of a `standard of civilization', a preferred form of socio-political organization, in global capital markets presents both constraints and opportunities for creditors and borrowers. When imposed, civilizing standards may change how a borrower would prefer to conduct their affairs. Creditors...

  6. Translational illusion of acoustic sources by transformation acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Li, Shichao; He, Sailing

    2017-09-01

    An acoustic illusion of creating a translated acoustic source is designed by utilizing transformation acoustics. An acoustic source shifter (ASS) composed of layered acoustic metamaterials is designed to achieve such an illusion. A practical example where the ASS is made with naturally available materials is also given. Numerical simulations verify the performance of the proposed device. The designed ASS may have some applications in, e.g., anti-sonar detection.

  7. A loudspeaker-based room auralisation (LoRA) system for auditory perception research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholz, Jörg; Favrot, Sylvain Emmanuel

    of the LoRA processing is first presented, followed by a battery of objective and subjective tests to demonstrate the applicability of the different components of the system. In the objective evaluation, monaural and binaural room acoustic measures (e.g., reverberation time, clarity, interaural cross...... correlation coefficient) were considered. The subject evaluation included speech intelligibility and distance perception measures....

  8. Influence of impedance phase angle on sound pressures and reverberation times in a rectangular room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Lee, Doheon; Santurette, Sébastien; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2014-02-01

    In most room acoustic predictions, phase shift on reflection has been overlooked. This study aims to quantify the effects of the surface impedance phase angle of the boundary surfaces on room acoustic conditions. As a preliminary attempt, a medium-sized rectangular room is simulated by a phased beam tracing model, after verifying it numerically against boundary element simulations. First, the absorption characteristic of the boundary surfaces varies uniformly from 0.2 to 0.8, but with various impedance phase angles. Second, typical non-uniform cases having hard walls and floor, but with an absorptive ceiling are investigated. The zero phase angle, which has commonly been assumed in practice, is regarded as reference and differences in the sound pressure level and early decay time from the reference are quantified. As expected, larger differences in the room acoustic parameters are found for larger impedance phase angles. Additionally, binaural impulse responses are compared in a listening test for the uniform absorption cases, revealing that non-zero impedance phase angle cases can be perceptually different from the reference condition in terms of reverberance perception. For the non-uniform settings, the change in the impedance phase angle of the ceiling does not affect the acoustic conditions significantly.

  9. Effective acoustic modeling for robust speaker recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan Al Banna, Taufiq

    Robustness due to mismatched train/test conditions is the biggest challenge facing the speaker recognition community today, with transmission channel and environmental noise degradation being the prominent factors. Performance of state-of-the art speaker recognition methods aim at mitigating these factors by effectively modeling speech in multiple recording conditions, so that it can learn to distinguish between inter-speaker and intra-speaker variability. The increasing demand and availability of large development corpora introduces difficulties in effective data utilization and computationally efficient modeling. Traditional compensation strategies operate on higher dimensional utterance features, known as supervectors, which are obtained from the acoustic modeling of short-time features. Feature compensation is performed during front-end processing. Motivated by the covariance structure of conventional acoustic features, we envision that feature normalization and compensation can be integrated into the acoustic modeling. In this dissertation, we investigate the following fundamental research challenges: (i) analysis of data requirements for effective and efficient background model training, (ii) introducing latent factor analysis modeling of acoustic features, (iii) integration of channel compensation strategies in mixture-models, and (iv) development of noise robust background models using factor analysis. The effectiveness of the proposed solutions are demonstrated in various noisy and channel degraded conditions using the recent evaluation datasets released by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). These research accomplishments make an important step towards improving speaker recognition robustness in diverse acoustic conditions.

  10. Acoustic Gaits: Gait Analysis With Footstep Sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaf, M Umair Bin; Butko, Taras; Juang, Biing-Hwang Fred

    2015-08-01

    We describe the acoustic gaits-the natural human gait quantitative characteristics derived from the sound of footsteps as the person walks normally. We introduce the acoustic gait profile, which is obtained from temporal signal analysis of sound of footsteps collected by microphones and illustrate some of the spatio-temporal gait parameters that can be extracted from the acoustic gait profile by using three temporal signal analysis methods-the squared energy estimate, Hilbert transform and Teager-Kaiser energy operator. Based on the statistical analysis of the parameter estimates, we show that the spatio-temporal parameters and gait characteristics obtained using the acoustic gait profile can consistently and reliably estimate a subset of clinical and biometric gait parameters currently in use for standardized gait assessments. We conclude that the Teager-Kaiser energy operator provides the most consistent gait parameter estimates showing the least variation across different sessions and zones. Acoustic gaits use an inexpensive set of microphones with a computing device as an accurate and unintrusive gait analysis system. This is in contrast to the expensive and intrusive systems currently used in laboratory gait analysis such as the force plates, pressure mats and wearable sensors, some of which may change the gait parameters that are being measured.

  11. Speaker independent acoustic-to-articulatory inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, An

    Acoustic-to-articulatory inversion, the determination of articulatory parameters from acoustic signals, is a difficult but important problem for many speech processing applications, such as automatic speech recognition (ASR) and computer aided pronunciation training (CAPT). In recent years, several approaches have been successfully implemented for speaker dependent models with parallel acoustic and kinematic training data. However, in many practical applications inversion is needed for new speakers for whom no articulatory data is available. In order to address this problem, this dissertation introduces a novel speaker adaptation approach called Parallel Reference Speaker Weighting (PRSW), based on parallel acoustic and articulatory Hidden Markov Models (HMM). This approach uses a robust normalized articulatory space and palate referenced articulatory features combined with speaker-weighted adaptation to form an inversion mapping for new speakers that can accurately estimate articulatory trajectories. The proposed PRSW method is evaluated on the newly collected Marquette electromagnetic articulography -- Mandarin Accented English (EMA-MAE) corpus using 20 native English speakers. Cross-speaker inversion results show that given a good selection of reference speakers with consistent acoustic and articulatory patterns, the PRSW approach gives good speaker independent inversion performance even without kinematic training data.

  12. Optimizing acoustical treatment. [structural design criteria for theater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuran, N.; Ramboiu, S.; Farcas, I.; Halpert, E.

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical linear programming model is presented for optimizing acoustical treatment and interior decoration of concert and other public halls. This method provides the designer with a range of acoustically correct solutions at increased economical efficiency. The mathematical model uses geometrical data about the room, recommended reverberation time values, the architect's choice of given sound absorbing structures and finishing materials. The model permits inclusion of aesthetical considerations about conditioning, proportioning, or, on the contrary, reciprocal exclusion of any classes of material and/or sound absorbing structure.

  13. Acoustic streaming in microchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tribler, Peter Muller

    , the acoustic streaming flow, and the forces on suspended microparticles. The work is motivated by the application of particle focusing by acoustic radiation forces in medical, environmental and food sciences. Here acoustic streaming is most often unwanted, because it limits the focusability of particles...... oscillating plates. Furthermore, under general thermodynamic conditions, we derive the time-dependent first- and second-order equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. The coupling from fluid equations to particle motion is achieved through the expressions for the streaming-induced drag...

  14. Air Distribution in Rooms with a Fan-Driven Convector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen; Bindels, Rob H.W.; Michalak, Lukasz

    2007-01-01

    coming from the dijfuser is partly controlled by the momentum flow and partly from gravity forces, where the thermal load in the room and the temperature difference between room air and supply air affect the airflow from the convector. The convector system was tested in the same test room in which many......Experiments with a fan-driven convector used for both heating and cooling are de.scribed in this paper. Only the cooling situation is considered. The convector is positioned in the upper corner ofthe room, and from there the cold air is let out through the device along the ceiling. The airflow...... regular ventilation systems were tested earlier to be ahle to compare airflow from the convector .system with regular ventilation ,systems at a later stage of this research. The heat load in the room consists of a thermal manikin sitting at a desk, a computer, and a desk lamp producing a total heat load...

  15. Database of Multichannel In-Ear and Behind-the-Ear Head-Related and Binaural Room Impulse Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kayser

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An eight-channel database of head-related impulse responses (HRIRs and binaural room impulse responses (BRIRs is introduced. The impulse responses (IRs were measured with three-channel behind-the-ear (BTEs hearing aids and an in-ear microphone at both ears of a human head and torso simulator. The database aims at providing a tool for the evaluation of multichannel hearing aid algorithms in hearing aid research. In addition to the HRIRs derived from measurements in an anechoic chamber, sets of BRIRs for multiple, realistic head and sound-source positions in four natural environments reflecting daily-life communication situations with different reverberation times are provided. For comparison, analytically derived IRs for a rigid acoustic sphere were computed at the multichannel microphone positions of the BTEs and differences to real HRIRs were examined. The scenes' natural acoustic background was also recorded in each of the real-world environments for all eight channels. Overall, the present database allows for a realistic construction of simulated sound fields for hearing instrument research and, consequently, for a realistic evaluation of hearing instrument algorithms.

  16. An acoustical research of the undulating wooden ceiling in the Vyborg Library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Bo

    2004-01-01

    Much has been written about the Undulating Ceiling at the lecture hall of the Vyborg Library. Alvar Aalto himself claimed the ceiling to be "ninety-nine per cent acoustically perfect" and the sketches showing the acoustical considerations behind the ceiling-design is often reproduced. But how did...... it actually function? Did the wave form have the claimed acoustical avantages or could the ceiling as well have been horisontal. Comprehensive acoustical investigations have been carried out including acoustical measurements in a 1:20 scale model and calculations in a 3D computer model of the lecture hall....

  17. Modeling of Acoustic Field Statistics for Deep and Shallow Water Environments and 2015 CANAPE Pilot Study Moored Oceanographic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    of Acoustic Field Statistics for Deep ...00303 LONG-TERM GOALS The long-term goals of this research are to understand the statistics of acoustic fields in both deep and shallow water ocean...environments. OBJECTIVES The primary objective of this work is the development of accurate, and computationally efficient, reduced-physics acoustic

  18. Multi-surface Interaction in the WILD Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel; Chapuis, Olivier; Eagan, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The WILD (wall-sized interaction with large datasets) room serves as a testbed for exploring the next generation of interactive systems by distributing interaction across diverse computing devices, enabling multiple users to easily and seamlessly create, share, and manipulate digital content....... The featured Web extra is a video of Michel Beaudouin-Lafon and his colleagues demonstrating how the WILD (wall-sized interaction with large datasets) room lets users view, explore, manipulate large amounts of digital content....

  19. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Back Learn more about ANA About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Shop ANA Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Acoustic ... 205-8211 info@ANAUSA.org About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home ...

  20. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Provider List Member Portal Back Webinar Library Newsletter Library ... About Back Learn more about ANA About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Shop ANA Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Association 600 Peachtree ...

  1. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects ... To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a patient kit ...

  2. Diagnosing Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Diagnosing English English Arabic Catalan Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional) Danish French German Greek Haitian Creole Hebrew Hindi Italian Japanese Korean Portuguese Romanian Spanish Diagnosing The diagnosis of an acoustic ...

  3. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Click to learn more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts ... Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational Video Ronson and Kerri Albany Support ...

  4. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Click to learn more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts ... Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational Video Howard of NJ Gloria hiking ...

  5. Acoustic Igniter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  6. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Choosing a healthcare provider Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a ...

  7. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Mission, Vision & Values Shop ANA Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Association 600 Peachtree Parkway Suite 108 ... About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational Video English English ...

  8. Acoustic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  9. Acoustics Noise Test Cell

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Acoustic Noise Test Cell at the NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located adjacent to the large vibration system; both are located in a class 10K...

  10. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ANA About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Shop ANA Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Association 600 Peachtree ... info@ANAUSA.org About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational ...

  11. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learn more about ANA About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Shop ANA Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma ... 8211 info@ANAUSA.org About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn ...

  12. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Educational Video Scott at the Grand Canyon Proton Center load more hold SHIFT key to load all load all Stay Connected with ANA Newly Diagnosed Living with AN Healthcare Providers Acoustic Neuroma Association Donate Now Newly Diagnosed ...

  13. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Click to learn more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts ... Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational Video English English Arabic Catalan Chinese ( ...

  14. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Click to learn more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts ... Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational Video Keck Medicine of USC ANWarriors ...

  15. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Suite 108 Cumming, GA 30041 770-205-8211 info@ANAUSA.org The world's #1 acoustic neuroma resource ... List Member Portal Webinar Library Newsletter Library Patient Info Booklets Member Login Research ANA Survey/Registry AN ...

  16. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Click to learn more... LOGIN EVENTS DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts ... Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational Video Scott at the Grand Canyon ...

  17. Autonomous Acoustic Receiver System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Collects underwater acoustic data and oceanographic data. Data are recorded onboard an ocean buoy and can be telemetered to a remote ship or shore station...

  18. Acoustic ambient noise recorder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saran, A.K.; Navelkar, G.S.; Almeida, A.M.; More, S.R.; Chodankar, P.V.; Murty, C.S.

    with a robust outfit that can withstand high pressures and chemically corrosion resistant materials. Keeping these considerations in view, a CMOS micro-controller-based marine acoustic ambient noise recorder has been developed with a real time clock...

  19. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side ... Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a patient ...

  20. Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) is a progressive wave tube test facility that is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to...