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Sample records for rodent suprachiasmatic nucleus

  1. Functional network inference of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

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    Abel, John H.; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; St. John, Peter C.; Wang, Thomas J.; Bales, Benjamin B.; Doyle, Francis J.; Herzog, Erik D.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2016-04-04

    In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), noisy cellular oscillators communicate within a neuronal network to generate precise system-wide circadian rhythms. Although the intracellular genetic oscillator and intercellular biochemical coupling mechanisms have been examined previously, the network topology driving synchronization of the SCN has not been elucidated. This network has been particularly challenging to probe, due to its oscillatory components and slow coupling timescale. In this work, we investigated the SCN network at a single-cell resolution through a chemically induced desynchronization. We then inferred functional connections in the SCN by applying the maximal information coefficient statistic to bioluminescence reporter data from individual neurons while they resynchronized their circadian cycling. Our results demonstrate that the functional network of circadian cells associated with resynchronization has small-world characteristics, with a node degree distribution that is exponential. We show that hubs of this small-world network are preferentially located in the central SCN, with sparsely connected shells surrounding these cores. Finally, we used two computational models of circadian neurons to validate our predictions of network structure.

  2. Sex hormone receptors are present in the human suprachiasmatic nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijver, Frank P. M.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2002-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the clock of the brain that orchestrates circadian and circannual biological rhythms, such as the rhythms of hormones, body temperature, sleep and mood. These rhythms are frequently disturbed in menopause and even more so in dementia and can be restored in

  3. Glucocorticoids suppress vasopressin gene expression in human suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, R.-Y.; Unmehopa, U.A.; Zhou, J.-N.; Swaab, D.F.

    2006-01-01

    Sleep impairment is one of the major side effects of glucocorticoid therapy. The mechanism responsible for this circadian disorder is unknown, but alterations in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the biological clock of the human brain, are presumed to play a major role. In the present study, the

  4. Glucocorticoids suppress vasopressin gene expression in human suprachiasmatic nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Rong-Yu; Unmehopa, Unga A.; Zhou, Jiang-Ning; Swaab, Dick F.

    2006-01-01

    Sleep impairment is one of the major side effects of glucocorticoid therapy. The mechanism responsible for this circadian disorder is unknown, but alterations in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the biological clock of the human brain, are presumed to play a major role. In the present study, the

  5. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Interaction with the Arcuate Nucleus; Essential for Organizing Physiological Rhythms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, Frederik N.; Guzmán-Ruiz, Mara; León-Mercado, Luis; Basualdo, Mari Carmen; Escobar, Carolina; Kalsbeek, Andries; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2017-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is generally considered the master clock, independently driving all circadian rhythms. We recently demonstrated the SCN receives metabolic and cardiovascular feedback adeptly altering its neuronal activity. In the present study, we show that microcuts effectively

  6. Direct projection from the suprachiasmatic nucleus to hypophysiotrophic corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus demonstrated...

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrang, N.; Larsen, P.J.; Mikkelsen, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, circadian rhythms, phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, corticotropin-releasing factor, dual immunocytochemistry......Suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, circadian rhythms, phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, corticotropin-releasing factor, dual immunocytochemistry...

  7. The suprachiasmatic nucleus: age-related decline in biological rhythms.

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    Nakamura, Takahiro J; Takasu, Nana N; Nakamura, Wataru

    2016-09-01

    Aging is associated with changes in sleep duration and quality, as well as increased rates of pathologic/disordered sleep. While several factors contribute to these changes, emerging research suggests that age-related changes in the mammalian central circadian clock within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) may be a key factor. Prior work from our group suggests that circadian output from the SCN declines because of aging. Furthermore, we have previously observed age-related infertility in female mice, caused by a mismatch between environmental light-dark cycles and the intrinsic, internal biological clocks. In this review, we address regulatory mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms in mammals and summarize recent literature describing the effects of aging on the circadian system.

  8. Geniculohypothalamic GABAergic projections gate suprachiasmatic nucleus responses to retinal input.

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    Hanna, Lydia; Walmsley, Lauren; Pienaar, Abigail; Howarth, Michael; Brown, Timothy M

    2017-06-01

    Visual input to the suprachiasmatic nucleus circadian clock is critical for animals to adapt their physiology and behaviour in line with the solar day. In addition to direct retinal projections, the clock receives input from the visual thalamus, although the role of this geniculohypothalamic pathway in circadian photoreception is poorly understood. In the present study, we develop a novel brain slice preparation that preserves the geniculohypothalamic pathway to show that GABAergic thalamic neurons inhibit retinally-driven activity in the central clock in a circadian time-dependent manner. We also show that in vivo manipulation of thalamic signalling adjusts specific features of the hypothalamic light response, indicating that the geniculohypothalamic pathway is primarily activated by crossed retinal inputs. Our data provide a mechanism by which geniculohypothalamic signals can adjust the magnitude of circadian and more acute hypothalamic light responses according to time-of-day and establish an important new model for future investigations of the circadian visual system. Sensory input to the master mammalian circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), is vital in allowing animals to optimize physiology and behaviour alongside daily changes in the environment. Retinal inputs encoding changes in external illumination provide the principle source of such information. The SCN also receives input from other retinorecipient brain regions, primarily via the geniculohypothalamic tract (GHT), although the contribution of these indirect projections to circadian photoreception is currently poorly understood. To address this deficit, in the present study, we established an in vitro mouse brain slice preparation that retains connectivity across the extended circadian system. Using multi-electrode recordings, we first confirm that this preparation retains intact optic projections to the SCN, thalamus and pretectum and a functional GHT. We next show that optogenetic

  9. Sex hormone receptors are present in the human suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijver, Frank P M; Swaab, Dick F

    2002-05-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the clock of the brain that orchestrates circadian and circannual biological rhythms, such as the rhythms of hormones, body temperature, sleep and mood. These rhythms are frequently disturbed in menopause and even more so in dementia and can be restored in postmenopausal women by sex hormone replacement therapy (SHRT). Although it seems clear, both from clinical and experimental studies, that sex hormones influence circadian rhythms, it is not known whether this is by a direct or an indirect effect on the SCN. Therefore, using immunocytochemistry in the present study, we investigated whether the human SCN expresses sex hormone receptors in 5 premenopausal women and 5 young men. SCN neurons appeared to contain estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha), estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta) and progesterone receptors. Median ratings of ER immunoreactivity per individual and per gender group revealed a statistically significantly stronger nuclear ERalpha expression pattern in female SCN neurons (p sexual dimorphic tendency was observed for nuclear ERbeta (p > 0.1) and progesterone receptors (p > 0.7). These data seem to support previously reported functional and structural SCN differences in relation to sex and sexual orientation and indicate for the first time that estrogen and progesterone may act directly on neurons of the human biological clock. In addition, the present findings provide a potential neuroendocrine mechanism by which SHRT can act to improve or restore SCN-related rhythm disturbances, such as body temperature, sleep and mood. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. Rhythmic Coupling Among Cells in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

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    Colwell, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    In mammals, the part of the nervous system responsible for most circadian behavior can be localized to a pair of structures in the hypothalamus known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Previous studies suggest that the basic mechanism responsible for the generation of these rhythms is intrinsic to individual cells. There is also evidence that the cells within the SCN are coupled to one another and that this coupling is important for the normal functioning of the circadian system. One mechanism that mediates coordinated electrical activity is direct electrical connections between cells formed by gap junctions. In the present study, we used a brain slice preparation to show that developing SCN cells are dye coupled. Dye coupling was observed in both the ventrolateral and dorsomedial subdivisions of the SCN and was blocked by application of a gap junction inhibitor, halothane. Dye coupling in the SCN appears to be regulated by activity-dependent mechanisms as both tetrodotoxin and the GABAA agonist muscimol inhibited the extent of coupling. Furthermore, acute hyperpolarization of the membrane potential of the original biocytin-filled neuron decreased the extent of coupling. SCN cells were extensively dye coupled during the day when the cells exhibit synchronous neural activity but were minimally dye coupled during the night when the cells are electrically silent. Immunocytochemical analysis provides evidence that a gap-junction—forming protein, connexin32, is expressed in the SCN of postnatal animals. Together the results are consistent with a model in which gap junctions provide a means to couple SCN neurons on a circadian basis. PMID:10861563

  11. The suprachiasmatic nucleus regulates sleep timing and amount in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Easton, Amy; Meerlo, Peter; Bergmann, Bernard; Turek, Fred W.

    2004-01-01

    Context: Sleep is regulated by circadian and homeostatic processes. The circadian pacemaker, located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), regulates the timing and consolidation of the sleep-wake cycle, while a homeostatic mechanism governs the accumulation of sleep debt and sleep, recovery. Recent

  12. Circadian modulation of GABA function in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus: excitatory effects during the night phase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jeu, M.T.G.; Pennartz, C.M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp recordings were made from slices of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of adult rats to characterize the role of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) in the circadian timing system. During the day, activation of GABA(A) receptors hyperpolarized the membrane of SCN

  13. The suprachiasmatic nucleus of the human brain in relation to sex, age and senile dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaab, D. F.; Fliers, E.; Partiman, T. S.

    1985-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is considered to be the endogenous clock of the brain, essential for the ovulation cycle and the temporal organization of sleep-wake patterns, among other things. Immunocytochemical staining with anti-vasopressin as a marker permitted a morphometric study of this

  14. Increased glutamic acid decarboxylase expression in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus in depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Xueyan; Balesar, R.A.; Lu, Jing; Farajnia, Sahar; Zhu, Qiongbin; Huang, Manli; Bao, Ai-Min; Swaab, D.F.

    2017-01-01

    In depression, disrupted circadian rhythms reflect abnormalities in the central circadian pacemaker, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Although many SCN neurons are said to be GABAergic, it was not yet known whether and how SCN GABA changes occur in the SCN in depression. We,

  15. Cardiovascular control by the suprachiasmatic nucleus: neural and neuroendocrine mechanisms in human and rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheer, Frank A.; Kalsbeek, Andries; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2003-01-01

    The risk for cardiovascular incidents is highest in the early morning, which seems partially due to endogenous factors. Endogenous circadian rhythms in mammalian physiology and behavior are regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Recently, anatomical evidence has been provided that SCN

  16. Control of the Estradiol-Induced Prolactin Surge by the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palm, Inge F.; van der Beek, Eline M.; Swarts, Hans J. M.; van der Vliet, Jan; Wiegant, Victor M.; Buijs, Ruud M.; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2001-01-01

    In the present study we investigated how the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) controls the E(2)-induced PRL surge in female rats. First, the role of vasopressin (VP), a SCN transmitter present in medial preoptic area (MPO) projections and rhythmically released by SCN neurons, as a circadian signal for

  17. A role for androgens in regulating circadian behavior and the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

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    Karatsoreos, Ilia N; Wang, Alice; Sasanian, Jasmine; Silver, Rae

    2007-11-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the locus of a master circadian clock controlling behavioral and physiological rhythms, including rhythmic secretion of gonadal hormones. Gonadectomy results in marked alteration of circadian behaviors, including lengthened free-running period, decreased precision of daily onset of running, and elimination of early-evening but not late-night activity bouts. Androgen replacement restores these responses. These aspects of rhythmicity are thought to be regulated by the brain clock, although the site of androgen action remains unknown. Anatomically, the rodent SCN is composed of a ventrolateral core and a dorsomedial shell, and the present studies show that androgen receptors (AR) are localized to the ventrolateral core SCN. Using a transgenic mouse bearing dual reporter molecules driven by the AR targeted to both membrane and nucleus, we find that projections of AR-containing cells form a dense plexus in the core, with their fibers appearing to exit the SCN dorsally. In a second transgenic strain, in which the retinorecipient gastrin-releasing peptide cells express a green fluorescent protein reporter, we show that gastrin-releasing peptide cells contain AR. Through immunocytochemistry, we also show that SCN AR cells express FOS after a light pulse. Importantly, gonadectomy reduces the FOS response after a phase-shifting light pulse, whereas androgen replacement restores levels to those in intact animals. Taken together, the results support previous findings of a hypothalamic neuroendocrine feedback loop. As such, the SCN regulates circadian rhythms in gonadal hormone secretion, and in turn, androgens act on their receptors within the SCN to alter circadian function.

  18. Role of Leptin and Orexin-A Within the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus on Anxiety-Like Behaviors in Hamsters.

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    Alò, Raffaella; Avolio, Ennio; Mele, Maria; Fazzari, Gilda; Carelli, Antonio; Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Canonaco, Marcello

    2017-05-01

    It is well established that the maintenance of energy expenditure is linked to active hypothalamic neural mechanisms controlling adaptive stimuli such as food intake. Variations of glucose levels and hormonal (leptin plus orexin-A) parameters, which are involved with energy homeostasis during different behavioral states, have not yet been fully defined. In this first study, behavioral analyses of an unpredictable stress model dealing with the actions of a sub-chronic administration of orexin-A (ORX-A) and the anti-hunger neuropeptide, i.e., leptin (LEP) within the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic (SCH) nucleus, were conducted on the valuable hibernating rodent (hamster; Mesocricetus auratus) model noted for its distinct depression and anxiety states. Treatment with LEP accounted for a notable reduction (p anxiety-like behaviors with respect to that of ORX-A signaling, which may constitute useful therapeutic targets for stress-related obesity states.

  19. The Suprachiasmatic Nucleus of the Dromedary Camel (Camelus dromedarius: Cytoarchitecture and Neurochemical Anatomy

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    Khalid El Allali

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, biological rhythms are driven by a master circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the hypothalamus. Recently, we have demonstrated that in the camel, the daily cycle of environmental temperature is able to entrain the master clock. This raises several questions about the structure and function of the SCN in this species. The current work is the first neuroanatomical investigation of the camel SCN. We carried out a cartography and cytoarchitectural study of the nucleus and then studied its cell types and chemical neuroanatomy. Relevant neuropeptides involved in the circadian system were investigated, including arginine-vasopressin (AVP, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP, met-enkephalin (Met-Enk, neuropeptide Y (NPY, as well as oxytocin (OT. The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT and the enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC were also studied. The camel SCN is a large and elongated nucleus, extending rostrocaudally for 9.55 ± 0.10 mm. Based on histological and immunofluorescence findings, we subdivided the camel SCN into rostral/preoptic (rSCN, middle/main body (mSCN and caudal/retrochiasmatic (cSCN divisions. Among mammals, the rSCN is unusual and appears as an assembly of neurons that protrudes from the main mass of the hypothalamus. The mSCN exhibits the triangular shape described in rodents, while the cSCN is located in the retrochiasmatic area. As expected, VIP-immunoreactive (ir neurons were observed in the ventral part of mSCN. AVP-ir neurons were located in the rSCN and mSCN. Results also showed the presence of OT-ir and TH-ir neurons which seem to be a peculiarity of the camel SCN. OT-ir neurons were either scattered or gathered in one isolated cluster, while TH-ir neurons constituted two defined populations, dorsal parvicellular and ventral magnocellular neurons, respectively. TH colocalized with VIP in some rSCN neurons. Moreover, a high density of Met

  20. Circadian regulation of sleep in mammals: role of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

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    Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2005-11-01

    Despite significant progress in elucidating the molecular basis for circadian oscillations, the neural mechanisms by which the circadian clock organizes daily rhythms of behavioral state in mammals remain poorly understood. The objective of this review is to critically evaluate a conceptual model that views sleep expression as the outcome of opponent processes-a circadian clock-dependent alerting process that opposes sleep during the daily wake period, and a homeostatic process by which sleep drive builds during waking and is dissipated during sleep after circadian alerting declines. This model is based primarily on the evidence that in a diurnal primate, the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus), ablation of the master circadian clock (the suprachiasmatic nucleus; SCN) induces a significant expansion of total daily sleep duration and a reduction in sleep latency in the dark. According to this model, the circadian clock actively promotes wake but only passively gates sleep; thus, loss of circadian clock alerting by SCN ablation impairs the ability to sustain wakefulness and causes sleep to expand. For comparison, two additional conceptual models are described, one in which the circadian clock actively promotes sleep but not wake, and a third in which the circadian clock actively promotes both sleep and wake, at different circadian phases. Sleep in intact and SCN-damaged rodents and humans is first reviewed, to determine how well the data fit these conceptual models. Neuroanatomical and neurophysiological studies are then reviewed, to examine the evidence for direct and indirect interactions between the SCN circadian clock and sleep-wake circuits. Finally, sleep in SCN-ablated squirrel monkeys is re-examined, to consider its compatibility with alternative models of circadian regulation of sleep. In aggregate, the behavioral and neurobiological evidence suggests that in rodents and humans, the circadian clock actively promotes both wake and sleep, at different phases of

  1. Differential regulation of fos family genes in the ventrolateral and dorsomedial subdivisions of the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus.

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    Schwartz, W J; Carpino, A; de la Iglesia, H O; Baler, R; Klein, D C; Nakabeppu, Y; Aronin, N

    2000-01-01

    Extensive studies have established that light regulates c-fos gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the site of an endogenous circadian clock, but relatively little is known about the expression of genes structurally related to c-fos, including fra-1, fra-2 and fosB. We analysed the photic and temporal regulation of these genes at the messenger RNA and immunoreactive protein levels in rat suprachiasmatic nucleus, and we found different expression patterns after photic stimulation and depending on location in the ventrolateral or dorsomedial subdivisions. In the ventrolateral suprachiasmatic nucleus, c-fos, fra-2 and fosB expression was stimulated after a subjective-night (but not subjective-day) light pulse. Expression of the fra-2 gene was prolonged following photic stimulation, with elevated messenger RNA and protein levels that appeared unchanged for at least a few hours beyond the c-fos peak. Unlike c-fos and fra-2, the fosB gene appeared to be expressed constitutively in the ventrolateral suprachiasmatic nucleus throughout the circadian cycle; immunohistochemical analysis suggested that delta FosB was the protein product accounting for this constitutive expression, while FosB was induced by the subjective-night light pulse. In the dorsomedial suprachiasmatic nucleus, c-fos and fra-2 expression exhibited an endogenous circadian rhythm, with higher levels during the early subjective day, although the relative abundance was much lower than that measured after light pulses in the ventrolateral suprachiasmatic nucleus. Double-label immunohistochemistry suggested that some of the dorsomedial cells responsible for the circadian expression of c-Fos also synthesized arginine vasopressin. No evidence of suprachiasmatic nucleus fra-1 expression was found. In summary, fos family genes exhibit differences in their specific expression patterns in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, including their photic and circadian regulation in separate cell populations in the

  2. Identification of novel light-induced genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

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    Piontkivska Helen

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transmission of information about the photic environment to the circadian clock involves a complex array of neurotransmitters, receptors, and second messenger systems. Exposure of an animal to light during the subjective night initiates rapid transcription of a number of immediate-early genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Some of these genes have known roles in entraining the circadian clock, while others have unknown functions. Using laser capture microscopy, microarray analysis, and quantitative real-time PCR, we performed a comprehensive screen for changes in gene expression immediately following a 30 minute light pulse in suprachiasmatic nucleus of mice. Results The results of the microarray screen successfully identified previously known light-induced genes as well as several novel genes that may be important in the circadian clock. Newly identified light-induced genes include early growth response 2, proviral integration site 3, growth-arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45 beta, and TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose polymerase. Comparative analysis of promoter sequences revealed the presence of evolutionarily conserved CRE and associated TATA box elements in most of the light-induced genes, while other core clock genes generally lack this combination of promoter elements. Conclusion The photic signalling cascade in the suprachiasmatic nucleus activates an array of immediate-early genes, most of which have unknown functions in the circadian clock. Detected evolutionary conservation of CRE and TATA box elements in promoters of light-induced genes suggest that the functional role of these elements has likely remained the same over evolutionary time across mammalian orders.

  3. Analysis of immunohistochemical label of Fos protein in the suprachiasmatic nucleus : Comparison of different methods of quantification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieux, C; Carney, R; Lupi, D; Dkhissi-Benyahya, O; Jansen, K; Chounlamountri, N; Foster, RG; Cooper, HM

    The induction of the proto-oncogene c-fos, and its phosphoprotein product Fos, has been extensively used to study the effects of light on the circathan pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Experimental approaches to the quantification of Fos induction have mainly been based on

  4. Morphometric analysis of vasopressin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide neurons in the human suprachiasmatic nucleus: influence of microwave treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, J. N.; Hofman, M. A.; Swaab, D. F.

    1996-01-01

    The vasopressin (VP) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-expressing neurons in the human suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) were morphometrically determined with or without microwave (MW) treatment. Both an enlarged volume and an increased number of neurons were found in the VP and VIP subnucleus

  5. Distribution of AVP and Ca2+-dependent PKC-isozymes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the mouse and rabbit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, Eddy A. van der; Bult, Abel

    1995-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the circadian pacemaker in mammals and contains a network of arginine-vasopressin-immunoreactive (AVP-ir) neurons. AVP-recipient cells contain the V1a class of receptors linked to phosphoinositol turnover and protein kinase C (PKC). The present study describes

  6. Circadian Rhythm Disturbances in Mood Disorders: Insights into the Role of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythm disturbances are a common symptom among individuals with mood disorders. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), in the ventral part of the anterior hypothalamus, orchestrates physiological and behavioral circadian rhythms. The SCN consists of self-sustaining oscillators and receives photic and nonphotic cues, which entrain the SCN to the external environment. In turn, through synaptic and hormonal mechanisms, the SCN can drive and synchronize circadian rhythms in extra-SCN brain regions and peripheral tissues. Thus, genetic or environmental perturbations of SCN rhythms could disrupt brain regions more closely related to mood regulation and cause mood disturbances. Here, we review clinical and preclinical studies that provide evidence both for and against a causal role for the SCN in mood disorders. PMID:29230328

  7. Constructing the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus: A Watchmaker’s Perspective on the Central Clockworks

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    Joseph eBedont

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The circadian system constrains an organism’s palette of behaviors to portions of the solar day appropriate to its ecological niche. The central light-entrained clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the mammalian circadian system has evolved a complex network of interdependent signaling mechanisms and multiple distinct oscillators to serve this crucial function. However, studies of the mechanisms controlling SCN development have greatly lagged behind our understanding of its physiological functions. We review advances in the understanding of adult SCN function, what has been described about SCN development to date, and the potential of both current and future studies of SCN development to yield important insights into master clock function.

  8. Localization of photoperiod responsive circadian oscillators in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus.

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    Yoshikawa, Tomoko; Inagaki, Natsuko F; Takagi, Seiji; Kuroda, Shigeru; Yamasaki, Miwako; Watanabe, Masahiko; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-Ichi

    2017-08-15

    The circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) yields photoperiodic response to transfer seasonal information to physiology and behavior. To identify the precise location involved in photoperiodic response in the SCN, we analyzed circadian Period1 and PERIOD2 rhythms in horizontally sectioned SCN of mice exposed to a long or short day. Statistical analyses of bioluminescence images with respective luciferase reporters on pixel level enabled us to identify the distinct localization of three oscillating regions; a large open-ring-shape region, the region at the posterior end and a sharply demarcated oval region at the center of the SCN. The first two regions are the respective sites for the so-called evening and morning oscillators, and the third region is possibly a site for mediating photic signals to the former oscillators. In these regions, there are two classes of oscillating cells in which Per1 and Per2 could play differential roles in photoperiodic responses.

  9. The Dorsomedial Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Times Circadian Expression of Kiss1 and the Luteinizing Hormone Surge

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    Smarr, Benjamin L.; Morris, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Ovulation in mammals is gated by a master circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). GnRH neurons represent the converging pathway through which the brain triggers ovulation, but precisely how the SCN times GnRH neurons is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that neurons expressing kisspeptin, a neuropeptide coded by the Kiss1 gene and necessary for the activation of GnRH cells during ovulation, represent a relay station for circadian information that times ovulation. We first show that the circadian increase of Kiss1 expression, as well as the activation of GnRH cells, relies on intact ipsilateral neural input from the SCN. Second, by desynchronizing the dorsomedial (dm) and ventrolateral (vl) subregions of the SCN, we show that a clock residing in the dmSCN acts independently of the light-dark cycle, and the vlSCN, to time Kiss1 expression in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and that this rhythm is always in phase with the LH surge. In addition, we show that although the timing of the LH surge is governed by the dmSCN, its amplitude likely depends on the phase coherence between the vlSCN and dmSCN. Our results suggest that whereas dmSCN neuronal oscillators are sufficient to time the LH surge through input to kisspeptin cells in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, the phase coherence among dmSCN, vlSCN, and extra-SCN oscillators is critical for shaping it. They also suggest that female reproductive disorders associated with nocturnal shift work could emerge from the desynchronization between subregional oscillators within the master circadian clock. PMID:22454148

  10. Light Stimulates the Mouse Adrenal through a Retinohypothalamic Pathway Independent of an Effect on the Clock in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

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    Kiessling, Silke; Sollars, Patricia J.; Pickard, Gary E.

    2014-01-01

    The brain's master circadian pacemaker resides within the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). SCN clock neurons are entrained to the day/night cycle via the retinohypothalamic tract and the SCN provides temporal information to the central nervous system and to peripheral organs that function as secondary oscillators. The SCN clock-cell network is thought to be the hypothalamic link between the retina and descending autonomic circuits to peripheral organs such as the adrenal gland, the...

  11. A multiscale model to investigate circadian rhythmicity of pacemaker neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

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    Christina Vasalou

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the hypothalamus is a multicellular system that drives daily rhythms in mammalian behavior and physiology. Although the gene regulatory network that produces daily oscillations within individual neurons is well characterized, less is known about the electrophysiology of the SCN cells and how firing rate correlates with circadian gene expression. We developed a firing rate code model to incorporate known electrophysiological properties of SCN pacemaker cells, including circadian dependent changes in membrane voltage and ion conductances. Calcium dynamics were included in the model as the putative link between electrical firing and gene expression. Individual ion currents exhibited oscillatory patterns matching experimental data both in current levels and phase relationships. VIP and GABA neurotransmitters, which encode synaptic signals across the SCN, were found to play critical roles in daily oscillations of membrane excitability and gene expression. Blocking various mechanisms of intracellular calcium accumulation by simulated pharmacological agents (nimodipine, IP3- and ryanodine-blockers reproduced experimentally observed trends in firing rate dynamics and core-clock gene transcription. The intracellular calcium concentration was shown to regulate diverse circadian processes such as firing frequency, gene expression and system periodicity. The model predicted a direct relationship between firing frequency and gene expression amplitudes, demonstrated the importance of intracellular pathways for single cell behavior and provided a novel multiscale framework which captured characteristics of the SCN at both the electrophysiological and gene regulatory levels.

  12. Neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate induces morphological alterations in suprachiasmatic nucleus of adult rat.

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    Rojas-Castañeda, Julio César; Vigueras-Villaseñor, Rosa María; Chávez-Saldaña, Margarita; Rojas, Patricia; Gutiérrez-Pérez, Oscar; Rojas, Carolina; Arteaga-Silva, Marcela

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate (MSG) induces circadian disorders in several physiological and behavioural processes regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of neonatal exposure to MSG on locomotor activity, and on morphology, cellular density and expression of proteins, as evaluated by optical density (OD), of vasopressin (VP)-, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)- and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive cells in the SCN. Male Wistar rats were used: the MSG group was subcutaneously treated from 3 to 10 days of age with 3.5 mg/g/day. Locomotor activity was evaluated at 90 days of age using 'open-field' test, and the brains were processed for immunohistochemical studies. MSG exposure induced a significant decrease in locomotor activity. VP- and VIP-immunoreactive neuronal densities showed a significant decrease, while the somatic OD showed an increase. Major axes and somatic area were significantly increased in VIP neurons. The cellular and optical densities of GFAP-immunoreactive sections of SCN were significantly increased. These results demonstrated that newborn exposure to MSG induced morphological alterations in SCN cells, an alteration that could be the basis for behavioural disorders observed in the animals. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2016 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  13. Circadian waves of cytosolic calcium concentration and long-range network connections in rat suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jin Hee; Jeong, Byeongha; Min, Cheol Hong; Lee, Kyoung J

    2012-05-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the master clock in mammals governing the daily physiological and behavioral rhythms. It is composed of thousands of clock cells with their own intrinsic periods varying over a wide range (20-28 h). Despite this heterogeneity, an intact SCN maintains a coherent 24 h periodic rhythm through some cell-to-cell coupling mechanisms. This study examined how the clock cells are connected to each other and how their phases are organized in space by monitoring the cytosolic free calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) of clock cells using the calcium-binding fluorescent protein, cameleon. Extensive analysis of 18 different organotypic slice cultures of the SCN showed that the SCN calcium dynamics is coordinated by phase-synchronizing networks of long-range neurites as well as by diffusively propagating phase waves. The networks appear quite extensive and far-reaching, and the clock cells connected by them exhibit heterogeneous responses in their amplitudes and periods of oscillation to tetrodotoxin treatments. Taken together, our study suggests that the network of long-range cellular connectivity has an important role for the SCN in achieving its phase and period coherence. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Topological specificity and hierarchical network of the circadian calcium rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoki, Ryosuke; Kuroda, Shigeru; Ono, Daisuke; Hasan, Mazahir T; Ueda, Tetsuo; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-ichi

    2012-12-26

    The circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is a hierarchical multioscillator system in which neuronal networks play crucial roles in expressing coherent rhythms in physiology and behavior. However, our understanding of the neuronal network is still incomplete. Intracellular calcium mediates the input signals, such as phase-resetting stimuli, to the core molecular loop involving clock genes for circadian rhythm generation and the output signals from the loop to various cellular functions, including changes in neurotransmitter release. Using a unique large-scale calcium imaging method with genetically encoded calcium sensors, we visualized intracellular calcium from the entire surface of SCN slice in culture including the regions where autonomous clock gene expression was undetectable. We found circadian calcium rhythms at a single-cell level in the SCN, which were topologically specific with a larger amplitude and more delayed phase in the ventral region than the dorsal. The robustness of the rhythm was reduced but persisted even after blocking the neuronal firing with tetrodotoxin (TTX). Notably, TTX dissociated the circadian calcium rhythms between the dorsal and ventral SCN. In contrast, a blocker of gap junctions, carbenoxolone, had only a minor effect on the calcium rhythms at both the single-cell and network levels. These results reveal the topological specificity of the circadian calcium rhythm in the SCN and the presence of coupled regional pacemakers in the dorsal and ventral regions. Neuronal firings are not necessary for the persistence of the calcium rhythms but indispensable for the hierarchical organization of rhythmicity in the SCN.

  15. Persistent neuronal Ube3a expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of Angelman syndrome model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kelly A; Han, Ji Eun; DeBruyne, Jason P; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2016-06-16

    Mutations or deletions of the maternal allele of the UBE3A gene cause Angelman syndrome (AS), a severe neurodevelopmental disorder. The paternal UBE3A/Ube3a allele becomes epigenetically silenced in most neurons during postnatal development in humans and mice; hence, loss of the maternal allele largely eliminates neuronal expression of UBE3A protein. However, recent studies suggest that paternal Ube3a may escape silencing in certain neuron populations, allowing for persistent expression of paternal UBE3A protein. Here we extend evidence in AS model mice (Ube3a(m-/p+)) of paternal UBE3A expression within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian pacemaker. Paternal UBE3A-positive cells in the SCN show partial colocalization with the neuropeptide arginine vasopressin (AVP) and clock proteins (PER2 and BMAL1), supporting that paternal UBE3A expression in the SCN is often of neuronal origin. Paternal UBE3A also partially colocalizes with a marker of neural progenitors, SOX2, implying that relaxed or incomplete imprinting of paternal Ube3a reflects an overall immature molecular phenotype. Our findings highlight the complexity of Ube3a imprinting in the brain and illuminate a subpopulation of SCN neurons as a focal point for future studies aimed at understanding the mechanisms of Ube3a imprinting.

  16. Novel Rbfox2 isoforms associated with alternative exon usage in rat cortex and suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, L M M; Carter, D A

    2017-08-30

    Transcriptome diversity in adult neurons is partly mediated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs), including the RBFOX factors. RBFOX3/NeuN, a neuronal maturity marker, is strangely depleted in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons, and may be compensated by a change in Rbfox2 expression. In this study, we found no superficial changes in Rbfox2 expression in the SCN, but mRNA population analysis revealed a distinct SCN transcript profile that includes multiple novel Rbfox2 isoforms. Of eleven isoforms in SCN and cerebral cortex that exhibit exon variation across two protein domains, we found a 3-fold higher abundance of a novel ('-12-40') C-terminal domain (CTD)-variant in the SCN. This isoform embraces an alternative reading frame that imparts a 50% change in CTD protein sequence, and functional impairment of exon 7 exclusion activity in a RBFOX2-target, the L-type calcium channel gene, Cacna1c. We have also demonstrated functional correlates in SCN gene transcripts; inclusion of Cacna1c exon 7, and also exclusion of both NMDA receptor gene Grin1 exon 4, and Enah exon 12, all consistent with a change in SCN RBFOX activity. The demonstrated regional diversity of Rbfox2 in adult brain highlights the functional adaptability of this RBP, enabling neuronal specialization, and potentially responding to disease-related neuronal dysfunction.

  17. [A biological clock in the brain--the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, S I

    1994-03-01

    Rhythms of 24 hr periodicity underlie most aspects of daily life, although we are rarely aware of its presence. This circadian rhythmicity is a consequence of evolution of the living organism, which takes place on the earth for millions of years. Some of these rhythms are actually derived from an endogenous oscillating mechanism whose inherent period is not exactly 24 hrs. Therefore, it must be constantly adjusted to the solar cycle of day and night. It has been firmly established that the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the highest center of these endogenous circadian rhythms. Lesions of the SCN eliminates most behavioral and physiological rhythms and actvities of the SCN exhibited a dramatic change between day and night. Furthermore, rhythms of SCN neurons persist under in vitro conditions. The cellular or molecular mechanism for these neurons to generate a 24 hr rhythm is unclear at present. The SCN contains many neuropeptides and some of them display circadian rhythms, while others do not. We found that this distinct behavior of peptides in the SCN was due to different regulation of MRNA or gene transcription. This observation indicate the possibility that genes are involved in the generation of circadian rhythms in the SCN.

  18. Dissociation between two subgroups of the suprachiasmatic nucleus affected by the number of damped oscillated neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Changgui; Yang, Huijie; Rohling, Jos HT

    2017-03-01

    In mammals, the main clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the brain synchronizes the body rhythms to the environmental light-dark cycle. The SCN is composed of about 2 ×104 neurons which can be classified into three oscillatory phenotypes: self-sustained oscillators, damped oscillators, and arrhythmic neurons. Exposed to an artificial external light-dark cycle with a period of 22 h instead of 24 h , two subgroups of the SCN can become desynchronized (dissociated). The ventrolateral (VL) subgroup receives photic input and is entrained to the external cycle and a dorsomedial (DM) subgroup oscillates with its endogenous (i.e., free running) period and is synchronized to the external light-dark cycle through coupling from the VL. In the present study, we examined the effects of damped oscillatory neurons on the dissociation between VL and DM under an external 22 h cycle. We found that, with increasing numbers of damped oscillatory neurons located in the VL, the dissociation between the VL and DM emerges, but if these neurons are increasingly present in the DM the dissociation disappears. Hence, the damped oscillatory neurons in different subregions of the SCN play distinct roles in the dissociation between the two subregions of the SCN. This shows that synchrony between SCN subregions is affected by the number of damped oscillatory neurons and the location of these cells. We suggest that more knowledge on the number and the location of these cells may explain why some species do show a dissociation between the subregions and others do not, as the distribution of oscillatory types of neurons offers a plausible and novel candidate mechanism to explain heterogeneity.

  19. BK channels regulate spontaneous action potential rhythmicity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

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    Jack Kent

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian ( approximately 24 hr rhythms are generated by the central pacemaker localized to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the hypothalamus. Although the basis for intrinsic rhythmicity is generally understood to rely on transcription factors encoded by "clock genes", less is known about the daily regulation of SCN neuronal activity patterns that communicate a circadian time signal to downstream behaviors and physiological systems. Action potentials in the SCN are necessary for the circadian timing of behavior, and individual SCN neurons modulate their spontaneous firing rate (SFR over the daily cycle, suggesting that the circadian patterning of neuronal activity is necessary for normal behavioral rhythm expression. The BK K(+ channel plays an important role in suppressing spontaneous firing at night in SCN neurons. Deletion of the Kcnma1 gene, encoding the BK channel, causes degradation of circadian behavioral and physiological rhythms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test the hypothesis that loss of robust behavioral rhythmicity in Kcnma1(-/- mice is due to the disruption of SFR rhythms in the SCN, we used multi-electrode arrays to record extracellular action potentials from acute wild-type (WT and Kcnma1(-/- slices. Patterns of activity in the SCN were tracked simultaneously for up to 3 days, and the phase, period, and synchronization of SFR rhythms were examined. Loss of BK channels increased arrhythmicity but also altered the amplitude and period of rhythmic activity. Unexpectedly, Kcnma1(-/- SCNs showed increased variability in the timing of the daily SFR peak. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that BK channels regulate multiple aspects of the circadian patterning of neuronal activity in the SCN. In addition, these data illustrate the characteristics of a disrupted SCN rhythm downstream of clock gene-mediated timekeeping and its relationship to behavioral rhythms.

  20. Direct and specific effect of sevoflurane anesthesia on rat Per2 expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

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    Megumi Anzai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our previous studies revealed that application of the inhalation anesthetic, sevoflurane, reversibly repressed the expression of Per2 in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. We aimed to examine whether sevoflurane directly affects the SCN. METHODS: We performed in vivo and in vitro experiments to investigate rat Per2 expression under sevoflurane-treatment. The in vivo effects of sevoflurane on rPer2 expression were examined by quantitative in situ hybridization with a radioactively-labeled cRNA probe. Additionally, we examined the effect of sevoflurane anesthesia on rest/activity rhythms in the rat. In the in vitro experiments, we applied sevoflurane to SCN explant cultures from Per2-dLuc transgenic rats, and monitored luciferase bioluminescence, representing Per2 promoter activity. Bioluminescence from two peripheral organs, the kidney cortex and the anterior pituitary gland, were also analyzed. RESULTS: Application of sevoflurane in rats significantly suppressed Per2 expression in the SCN compared with untreated animals. We observed no sevoflurane-induced phase-shift in the rest/activity rhythms. In the in vitro experiments, the intermittent application of sevoflurane repressed the increase of Per2-dLuc luminescence and led to a phase delay in the Per2-dLuc luminescence rhythm. Sevoflurane treatment did not suppress bioluminescence in the kidney cortex or the anterior pituitary gland. CONCLUSION: The suppression of Per2-dLuc luminescence by sevoflurane in in vitro SCN cultures isolated from peripheral inputs and other nuclei suggest a direct action of sevoflurane on the SCN itself. That sevoflurane has no such effect on peripheral organs suggests that this action might be mediated through a neuron-specific cellular mechanism or a regulation of the signal transduction between neurons.

  1. Intracellular calcium spikes in rat suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons induced by BAPTA-based calcium dyes.

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    Jin Hee Hong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian rhythms in spontaneous action potential (AP firing frequencies and in cytosolic free calcium concentrations have been reported for mammalian circadian pacemaker neurons located within the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. Also reported is the existence of "Ca(2+ spikes" (i.e., [Ca(2+](c transients having a bandwidth of 10 approximately 100 seconds in SCN neurons, but it is unclear if these SCN Ca(2+ spikes are related to the slow circadian rhythms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We addressed this issue based on a Ca(2+ indicator dye (fluo-4 and a protein Ca(2+ sensor (yellow cameleon. Using fluo-4 AM dye, we found spontaneous Ca(2+ spikes in 18% of rat SCN cells in acute brain slices, but the Ca(2+ spiking frequencies showed no day/night variation. We repeated the same experiments with rat (and mouse SCN slice cultures that expressed yellow cameleon genes for a number of different circadian phases and, surprisingly, spontaneous Ca(2+ spike was barely observed (<3%. When fluo-4 AM or BAPTA-AM was loaded in addition to the cameleon-expressing SCN cultures, however, the number of cells exhibiting Ca(2+ spikes was increased to 13 approximately 14%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Despite our extensive set of experiments, no evidence of a circadian rhythm was found in the spontaneous Ca(2+ spiking activity of SCN. Furthermore, our study strongly suggests that the spontaneous Ca(2+ spiking activity is caused by the Ca(2+ chelating effect of the BAPTA-based fluo-4 dye. Therefore, this induced activity seems irrelevant to the intrinsic circadian rhythm of [Ca(2+](c in SCN neurons. The problems with BAPTA based dyes are widely known and our study provides a clear case for concern, in particular, for SCN Ca(2+ spikes. On the other hand, our study neither invalidates the use of these dyes as a whole, nor undermines the potential role of SCN Ca(2+ spikes in the function of SCN.

  2. Calcium Circadian Rhythmicity in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus: Cell Autonomy and Network Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Takako; Leise, Tanya L; Kingsbury, Nathaniel J; Diemer, Tanja; Wang, Lexie L; Henson, Michael A; Welsh, David K

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of mammalian physiology and behavior are coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus. Within SCN neurons, various aspects of cell physiology exhibit circadian oscillations, including circadian clock gene expression, levels of intracellular Ca 2+ ([Ca 2+ ] i ), and neuronal firing rate. [Ca 2+ ] i oscillates in SCN neurons even in the absence of neuronal firing. To determine the causal relationship between circadian clock gene expression and [Ca 2+ ] i rhythms in the SCN, as well as the SCN neuronal network dependence of [Ca 2+ ] i rhythms, we introduced GCaMP3, a genetically encoded fluorescent Ca 2+ indicator, into SCN neurons from PER2::LUC knock-in reporter mice. Then, PER2 and [Ca 2+ ] i were imaged in SCN dispersed and organotypic slice cultures. In dispersed cells, PER2 and [Ca 2+ ] i both exhibited cell autonomous circadian rhythms, but [Ca 2+ ] i rhythms were typically weaker than PER2 rhythms. This result matches the predictions of a detailed mathematical model in which clock gene rhythms drive [Ca 2+ ] i rhythms. As predicted by the model, PER2 and [Ca 2+ ] i rhythms were both stronger in SCN slices than in dispersed cells and were weakened by blocking neuronal firing in slices but not in dispersed cells. The phase relationship between [Ca 2+ ] i and PER2 rhythms was more variable in cells within slices than in dispersed cells. Both PER2 and [Ca 2+ ] i rhythms were abolished in SCN cells deficient in the essential clock gene Bmal1 . These results suggest that the circadian rhythm of [Ca 2+ ] i in SCN neurons is cell autonomous and dependent on clock gene rhythms, but reinforced and modulated by a synchronized SCN neuronal network.

  3. FosB in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the Syrian and Siberian hamster.

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    Ebling, F J; Maywood, E S; Mehta, M; Hancock, D C; McNulty, S; De Bono, J; Bray, S J; Hastings, M H

    1996-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) generates circadian rhythms of behavior and hormone secretion in mammals, and integrates responses to light and nonphotic stimuli to synchronize such rhythms with the external environment. Previous studies have demonstrated a close association between the induction of the immediate early gene (IEG) c-fos in the SCN by light and phase shifts of circadian rhythms induced by light, but nonphotic stimuli (e.g., arousal), which also cause phase shifts, do not increase c-fos expression in the SCN. Because c-fos is now known to be a member of a large family of IEGs which can regulate transcription and thus cellular function, the aim of the current study was to determine whether induction of another member of this immediate early gene family, fosB, is associated with photic and nonphotic phase shifts. An antiserum that recognizes a unique peptide sequence derived from FosB was produced so that the expression of fosB could be investigated in cells within the SCN by immunocytochemical detection of its protein product. The regional distribution of FosB-immunoreactive (ir) cells in the SCN of Syrian and Siberian hamsters was broadly similar to that for c-Fos-ir cells. However, whereas c-fos expression in the SCN was constitutively low, but could be massively induced by light at particular circadian phases, FosB-ir cells were present at all circadian phases studied, irrespective of photic stimulation, and light only produced marginal increases in the number of FosB-ir cells compared with nonstimulated controls. Moreover, blockade of glutamatergic neurotransmission by pretreatment of hamsters with the NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 significantly reduced photic induction of c-Fos-ir cells, but did not influence the number of FosB-ir cells in the SCN. Finally, an arousing nonphotic stimulus known to cause phase advances in wheel-running behavior in Syrian hamsters did not alter significantly the number of FosB-ir cells in the SCN. These

  4. Electrophysiological and morphological heterogeneity of neurons in slices of rat suprachiasmatic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennartz, C M A; De Jeu, M T G; Geurtsen, A M S; Sluiter, A A; Hermes, M L H J

    1998-01-01

    Whole cell patch clamp recordings of neurons in slices of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) were made in order to assess their electrophysiological and morphological heterogeneity. This assessment was accomplished by (i) quantification of intrinsic membrane properties recorded in current clamp mode, (ii) studying frequency distributions of these properties, (iii) grouping of cells based on visual inspection of data records, and (iv) use of cluster analysis methods. Marked heterogeneity was found in the resting membrane potential, input resistance, time constant, rate of frequency adaptation, size of rebound depolarization (low-threshold Ca2+ potential) and regularity of firing. The frequency distribution of these membrane properties deviated significantly from a normal distribution. Other parameters, including spike amplitude and width, amplitude and rising slope of the spike after-hyperpolarization (AHP) and amplitude of the spike train AHP, showed considerable variability as well but generally obeyed a normal distribution. Visual inspection of the data led to partitioning of cells into three clusters, viz. cluster I characterized by monophasic spike AHPs and irregular firing in the frequency range from 1.5 to 5.0 Hz; cluster II with biphasic spike AHPs and regular firing in the same range; and cluster III with large rebound depolarizations and biphasic spike AHPs. In a post hoc analysis, these clusters also appeared to differ in other membrane properties. This grouping was confirmed by hierarchical tree clustering and multidimensional scaling. The light microscopic properties of recorded neurons were studied by biocytin labelling. Neurons had monopolar, bipolar or multipolar branching patterns and were often varicose. Axons sometimes originated from distal dendritic segments and usually branched into multiple collaterals. Many cells with extra-SCN projections also possessed intranuclear axon collaterals. We found no morphological differences between clusters

  5. Functional Peptidomics: Combining Discovery-Based Mass Spectrometry and Neurophysiology to Explore Communication of Phase-Resetting Cues in the Rat Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Norman, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Intercellular signaling is vital to communication within neuronal circuits. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock of mammals, contains a dense collection of neurons that align their intrinsic rhythmicity with environmental stimulus and physiological state. While peptide physiology has been demonstrated as a contributor to…

  6. Habituation to a test apparatus during associative learning is sufficient to enhance muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-immunoreactivity in rat suprachiasmatic nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Zee, EA; Biemans, BAM; Gerkema, MP; Daan, S

    2004-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is engaged in modulation of memory retention after (fear) conditioning, but it is unknown which pathways and neurotransmitter system(s) play a role in this action. Here we examine immunocytochemically whether muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), mediating

  7. Cholecystokinin (CCK)-expressing neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus: innervation, light responsiveness and entrainment in CCK-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Hundahl, Christian; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the principal pacemaker driving circadian rhythms of physiology and behaviour. Neurons within the SCN express both classical and neuropeptide transmitters which regulate clock functions. Cholecyctokinin (CCK) is a potent neurotransmitter expressed in neurons......, CCK-containing processes make synaptic contacts with both groups of neurons and some CCK cell bodies were innervated by VIPergic neurons. The CCK neurons received no direct input from the three major pathways to the SCN, and the CCK neurons were not light-responsive as evaluated by induction of c......FOS, and did not express the core clock protein PER1. Accordingly, CCK-deficient mice showed normal entrainment and had similar τ, light-induced phase shift and negative masking behaviour as wild-type animals. In conclusion, CCK signalling seems not to be involved directly in light-induced resetting...

  8. Cholecystokinin (CCK)-expressing neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus: innervation, light responsiveness and entrainment in CCK-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Hundahl, Christian; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the principal pacemaker driving circadian rhythms of physiology and behaviour. Neurons within the SCN express both classical and neuropeptide transmitters which regulate clock functions. Cholecyctokinin (CCK) is a potent neurotransmitter expressed in neurons......, CCK-containing processes make synaptic contacts with both groups of neurons and some CCK cell bodies were innervated by VIPergic neurons. The CCK neurons received no direct input from the three major pathways to the SCN, and the CCK neurons were not light-responsive as evaluated by induction of c......FOS, and did not express the core clock protein PER1. Accordingly, CCK-deficient mice showed normal entrainment and had similar t, light-induced phase shift and negative masking behaviour as wild-type animals. In conclusion, CCK signalling seems not to be involved directly in light-induced resetting...

  9. The asymmetry of the entrainment range induced by the difference in intrinsic frequencies between two subgroups within the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Changgui; Yang, Huijie

    2017-06-01

    The rhythms of physiological and behavioral activities in mammals, which are regulated by the main clock suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain, can not be only synchronized to the natural 24 h light-dark cycle, but also to cycles with artificial periods. The range of the artificial periods that the animal can be synchronized to is called entrainment range. In the absence of the light-dark cycle, the animal can also maintain the circadian rhythm with an endogenous period close to 24 h. Experiments found that the entrainment range is not symmetrical with respect to the endogenous period. In the present study, an explanation is given for the asymmetry based on a Kuramoto model which describes the neuronal network of the SCN. Our numerical simulations and theoretical analysis show that the asymmetry results from the difference in the intrinsic frequencies between two subgroups of the SCN, as well as the entrainment range is affected by the difference.

  10. Projections from the raphe nuclei to the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Vrang, N.; Larsen, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    Hypothalamus, Circadian rhythm, Serotonin, Nucleus, Neuronal connections, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin (PHA-L), Cholera toxin (ChB)......Hypothalamus, Circadian rhythm, Serotonin, Nucleus, Neuronal connections, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin (PHA-L), Cholera toxin (ChB)...

  11. Cellular Neurophysiology of the Rat Suprachiasmatic Nucleus: Electrical Properties, Neurotransmission, and Mechanisms of Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-29

    available concerning the important role of the suprachi- asmatic nucleus (SCN) in the generation of circadian rhythms (Klein et al., 1991), very little is...neurons are schematicized in terms of their numbers of asmatic nucleus; SDN, sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area; primary dendrites. ac

  12. Regulation of CREB phosphorylation in the suprachiasmatic nucleus by light and a circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginty, D D; Kornhauser, J M; Thompson, M A; Bading, H; Mayo, K E; Takahashi, J S; Greenberg, M E

    1993-04-09

    Mammalian circadian rhythms are regulated by a pacemaker within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus. The molecular mechanisms controlling the synchronization of the circadian pacemaker are unknown; however, immediate early gene (IEG) expression in the SCN is tightly correlated with entrainment of SCN-regulated rhythms. Antibodies were isolated that recognize the activated, phosphorylated form of the transcription factor cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB). Within minutes after exposure of hamsters to light, CREB in the SCN became phosphorylated on the transcriptional regulatory site, Ser133. CREB phosphorylation was dependent on circadian time: CREB became phosphorylated only at times during the circadian cycle when light induced IEG expression and caused phase shifts of circadian rhythms. These results implicate CREB in neuronal signaling in the hypothalamus and suggest that circadian clock gating of light-regulated molecular responses in the SCN occurs upstream of phosphorylation of CREB.

  13. Survival value of suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in four wild sciurid rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, Patricia J

    2014-06-01

    Laboratory and field data relevant to the survival value of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) pacemaker are presented for 4 related North American squirrel species that evolved in habitats with markedly different environmental conditions. Laboratory studies used free-running activity rhythms under constant conditions as the signature of an endogenous pacemaker. Field studies documented the circadian ecology of the 4 species; survival of intact controls was compared, when possible, with an SCN-lesioned group of free-living animals or with wild-caught animals in a laboratory facility that simulated natural conditions. All 4 species were rhythmic in the laboratory as indicated by precise free-running wheel-turning rhythms under constant conditions, as well as by photo-entrainment of free-runs to a 24-hr light-dark schedule. Southern flying squirrels (Glaucomys volans) presumably minimized predation by sleeping in sheltering tree dens during daylight, with awakening by their SCN timer for nocturnal gliding. Eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) were strictly diurnal but avoided predation in elaborate dens as well as by facultative hibernation and winter food caches. Antelope squirrels (Ammospermophilus leucurus) were also diurnal with dens for minimizing predation at night. Golden-mantled ground squirrels (Spermophilus lateralis) were diurnal, fossorial species with protective dens; during the extended hibernation in winter, the SCN played a role in limiting the time spent in arousal episodes. Thus, in the evolution of the physiology and behavior of these species, the SCN has become involved in diverse functions ranging from regulation of activity to reduction of energy expenditure during arousal episodes of hibernating ground squirrels. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Mitochondrial calcium signaling mediates rhythmic extracellular ATP accumulation in suprachiasmatic nucleus astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkeen, Jeff F; Womac, Alisa D; Earnest, David J; Zoran, Mark J

    2011-06-08

    The master circadian pacemaker located within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) controls neural and neuroendocrine rhythms in the mammalian brain. Astrocytes are abundant in the SCN, and this cell type displays circadian rhythms in clock gene expression and extracellular accumulation of ATP. Still, the intracellular signaling pathways that link the SCN clockworks to circadian rhythms in extracellular ATP accumulation remain unclear. Because ATP release from astrocytes is a calcium-dependent process, we investigated the relationship between intracellular Ca(2+) and ATP accumulation and have demonstrated that intracellular Ca(2+) levels fluctuate in an antiphase relationship with rhythmic ATP accumulation in rat SCN2.2 cell cultures. Furthermore, mitochondrial Ca(2+) levels were rhythmic and maximal in precise antiphase with the peak in cytosolic Ca(2+). In contrast, our finding that peak mitochondrial Ca(2+) occurred during maximal extracellular ATP accumulation suggests a link between these cellular rhythms. Inhibition of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter disrupted the rhythmic production and extracellular accumulation of ATP. ATP, calcium, and the biological clock affect cell division and have been implicated in cell death processes. Nonetheless, rhythmic extracellular ATP accumulation was not disrupted by cell cycle arrest and was not correlated with caspase activity in SCN2.2 cell cultures. Together, these results demonstrate that mitochondrial Ca(2+) mediates SCN2.2 rhythms in extracellular ATP accumulation and suggest a role for circadian gliotransmission in SCN clock function.

  15. Combined Pharmacological and Genetic Manipulations Unlock Unprecedented Temporal Elasticity and Reveal Phase-Specific Modulation of the Molecular Circadian Clock of the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Patton, Andrew P.; Chesham, Johanna E.; Hastings, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the master circadian oscillator encoding time-of-day information. SCN timekeeping is sustained by a cell-autonomous transcriptional–translational feedback loop, whereby expression of the Period and Cryptochrome genes is negatively regulated by their protein products. This loop in turn drives circadian oscillations in gene expression that direct SCN electrical activity and thence behavior. The robustness of SCN timekeeping is further enhanced by interneuron...

  16. Synchronization-induced rhythmicity of circadian oscillators in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Bernard

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN host a robust, self-sustained circadian pacemaker that coordinates physiological rhythms with the daily changes in the environment. Neuronal clocks within the SCN form a heterogeneous network that must synchronize to maintain timekeeping activity. Coherent circadian output of the SCN tissue is established by intercellular signaling factors, such as vasointestinal polypeptide. It was recently shown that besides coordinating cells, the synchronization factors play a crucial role in the sustenance of intrinsic cellular rhythmicity. Disruption of intercellular signaling abolishes sustained rhythmicity in a majority of neurons and desynchronizes the remaining rhythmic neurons. Based on these observations, the authors propose a model for the synchronization of circadian oscillators that combines intracellular and intercellular dynamics at the single-cell level. The model is a heterogeneous network of circadian neuronal oscillators where individual oscillators are damped rather than self-sustained. The authors simulated different experimental conditions and found that: (1 in normal, constant conditions, coupled circadian oscillators quickly synchronize and produce a coherent output; (2 in large populations, such oscillators either synchronize or gradually lose rhythmicity, but do not run out of phase, demonstrating that rhythmicity and synchrony are codependent; (3 the number of oscillators and connectivity are important for these synchronization properties; (4 slow oscillators have a higher impact on the period in mixed populations; and (5 coupled circadian oscillators can be efficiently entrained by light-dark cycles. Based on these results, it is predicted that: (1 a majority of SCN neurons needs periodic synchronization signal to be rhythmic; (2 a small number of neurons or a low connectivity results in desynchrony; and (3 amplitudes and phases of neurons are negatively correlated. The authors conclude that to

  17. Effect of Mefloquine, a Gap Junction Blocker, on Circadian Period2 Gene Oscillation in the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

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    Jinmi Koo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIn mammals, the master circadian pacemaker is localized in an area of the ventral hypothalamus known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. Previous studies have shown that pacemaker neurons in the SCN are highly coupled to one another, and this coupling is crucial for intrinsic self-sustainability of the SCN central clock, which is distinguished from peripheral oscillators. One plausible mechanism underlying the intercellular communication may involve direct electrical connections mediated by gap junctions.MethodsWe examined the effect of mefloquine, a neuronal gap junction blocker, on circadian Period 2 (Per2 gene oscillation in SCN slice cultures prepared from Per2::luciferase (PER2::LUC knock-in mice using a real-time bioluminescence measurement system.ResultsAdministration of mefloquine causes instability in the pulse period and a slight reduction of amplitude in cyclic PER2::LUC expression. Blockade of gap junctions uncouples PER2::LUC-expressing cells, in terms of phase transition, which weakens synchrony among individual cellular rhythms.ConclusionThese findings suggest that neuronal gap junctions play an important role in synchronizing the central pacemaker neurons and contribute to the distinct self-sustainability of the SCN master clock.

  18. The Circadian Clock Gene Period1 Connects the Molecular Clock to Neural Activity in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Takashi; Block, Gene D; Colwell, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    The neural activity patterns of suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons are dynamically regulated throughout the circadian cycle with highest levels of spontaneous action potentials during the day. These rhythms in electrical activity are critical for the function of the circadian timing system and yet the mechanisms by which the molecular clockwork drives changes in the membrane are not well understood. In this study, we sought to examine how the clock gene Period1 (Per1) regulates the electrical activity in the mouse SCN by transiently and selectively decreasing levels of PER1 through use of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide. We found that this treatment effectively reduced SCN neural activity. Direct current injection to restore the normal membrane potential partially, but not completely, returned firing rate to normal levels. The antisense treatment also reduced baseline [Ca(2+)]i levels as measured by Fura2 imaging technique. Whole cell patch clamp recording techniques were used to examine which specific potassium currents were altered by the treatment. These recordings revealed that the large conductance [Ca(2+)]i-activated potassium currents were reduced in antisense-treated neurons and that blocking this current mimicked the effects of the anti-sense on SCN firing rate. These results indicate that the circadian clock gene Per1 alters firing rate in SCN neurons and raise the possibility that the large conductance [Ca(2+)]i-activated channel is one of the targets. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Effects of irradiation on the circadian rhythm in the release of peptides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus culture

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    Saito, Kimihiko [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-03-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythms are regulated by the circadian clock which is located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In the present study, we examined the effect of irradiation on the circadian rhythm in the release of arginine-vasopressin (AVP) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in slice cultures of the rat SCN. The effect of irradiation on the glial cell proliferation in the SCN culture was also examined by the immunohistochemical method. In SCN cultures which received irradiation, circadian rhythms in the release of AVP and VIP were detected, as observed in the SCN culture not irradiated. However, the AVP and VIP rhythms showed various phase angle differences in some cultures irradiated, which suggested that irradiation caused a looseness of coupling between AVP and VIP oscillators. On the other hand, the number of glial cells was decreased by irradiation. These results suggested that the dissociation of the two peptide rhythms after irradiation might be due to the inhibition of glial cell proliferation. Furthermore, the radiation changed the amplitude of AVP and VIP rhythms, suggesting that couplings within both AVP and VIP oscillators were influenced by irradiation. (author)

  20. Impaired sodium levels in the suprachiasmatic nucleus are associated with the formation of cardiovascular deficiency in sleep-deprived rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hung-Ming; Mai, Fu-Der; Lei, Shiou-Ling; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2010-12-01

    Biological rhythms are a ubiquitous feature of all higher organisms. The rhythmic center of mammals is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which projects to a number of brainstem centers to exert diurnal control over many physiological processes, including cardiovascular regulation. Total sleep deprivation (TSD) is a harmful condition known to impair cardiovascular activity, but the molecular mechanisms are unknown. As the inward sodium current has long been suggested as playing an important role in driving the spontaneous firing of the SCN, the present study aimed to determine if changes in sodium expression, together with its molecular machinery (Na-K ATPase) and rhythmic activity within the SCN, would occur during TSD. Adult rats subjected to different periods of TSD were processed for time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, Na-K ATPase assay, and cytochrome oxidase (COX) (an endogenous bioenergetic marker for neuronal activity) histochemistry. Cardiovascular dysfunction was determined through analysis of heart rate and changes in mean arterial pressure. Results indicated that, in normal rats, strong sodium signals were expressed throughout the entire SCN. Enzymatic data corresponded well with spectrometric findings in which high levels of Na-K ATPase and COX were observed in this nucleus. However, following TSD, all parameters including sodium imaging, sodium intensity as well as COX activities were drastically decreased. Na-K ATPase showed an increase in responsiveness following TSD. Both heart rate and mean arterial pressure measurements indicated an exaggerated pressor effect following TSD treatment. As proper sodium levels are essential for SCN activation, reduced SCN sodium levels may interrupt the oscillatory control, which could serve as the underlying mechanism for the initiation or development of TSD-related cardiovascular deficiency. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2010 Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. Bmal1 is an essential regulator for circadian cytosolic Ca²⁺ rhythms in suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons.

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    Ikeda, Masayuki; Ikeda, Masaaki

    2014-09-03

    The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) plays a pivotal role in the mammalian circadian clock system. Bmal1 is a clock gene that drives transcriptional-translational feedback loops (TTFLs) for itself and other genes, and is expressed in nearly all SCN neurons. Despite strong evidence that Bmal1-null mutant mice display arrhythmic behavior under constant darkness, the function of Bmal1 in neuronal activity is unknown. Recently, periodic changes in the levels of intracellular signaling messengers, such as cytosolic Ca(2+) and cAMP, were suggested to regulate TTFLs. However, the opposite aspect of how clock gene TTFLs regulate cytosolic signaling remains unclear. To investigate intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics under Bmal1 perturbations, we cotransfected some SCN neurons with yellow cameleon together with wild-type or dominant-negative Bmal1 using a gene-gun applied for mouse organotypic cultures. Immunofluorescence staining for a tag protein linked to BMAL1 showed nuclear expression of wild-type BMAL1 and its degradation within 1 week after transfection in SCN neurons. However, dominant-negative BMAL1 did not translocate into the nucleus and the cytosolic signals persisted beyond 1 week. Consistently, circadian Ca(2+) rhythms in SCN neurons were inhibited for longer periods by dominant-negative Bmal1 overexpression. Furthermore, SCN neurons transfected with a Bmal1 shRNA lengthened, whereas those overexpressing wild-type Bmal1 shortened, the periods of Ca(2+) rhythms, with a significant reduction in their amplitude. BMAL1 expression was intact in the majority of neighboring neurons in organotypic cultures. Therefore, we conclude that proper intrinsic Bmal1 expression, but not passive signaling via cell-to-cell interactions, is the determinant of circadian Ca(2+) rhythms in SCN neurons. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3412029-10$15.00/0.

  2. Leptin normalizes photic synchronization in male ob/ob mice, via indirect effects on the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

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    Grosbellet, Edith; Gourmelen, Sylviane; Pévet, Paul; Criscuolo, François; Challet, Etienne

    2015-03-01

    Mounting evidence indicates a strong link between metabolic diseases and circadian dysfunctions. The metabolic hormone leptin, substantially increased in dietary obesity, displays chronobiotic properties. Here we investigated whether leptin is involved in the alteration of timing associated with obesity, via direct or indirect effects on the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the site of the master clock. Photic synchronization was studied in obese ob/ob mice (deficient in leptin), either injected or not with high doses of recombinant murine leptin (5 mg/kg). This was performed first at a behavioral level, by shifting the light-dark cycle and inducing phase shifts by 30-minute light pulses and then at molecular levels (c-FOS and P-ERK1/2). Moreover, to characterize the targets mediating the chronomodulatory effects of leptin, we studied the induction of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (P-STAT3) in the SCN and in different structures projecting to the SCN, including the medial hypothalamus. Ob/ob mice showed altered photic synchronization, including augmented light-induced phase delays. Acute leptin treatment normalized the photic responses of the SCN at both the behavioral and molecular levels (decrease of light-induced c-FOS). Leptin-induced P-STAT3 was modulated by light in the arcuate nucleus and both the ventromedial and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei, whereas its expression was independent of the presence of leptin in the SCN. These results suggest an indirect action of leptin on the SCN, possibly mediated by the medial hypothalamus. Taken together, these results highlight a central role of leptin in the relationship between metabolic disturbances and circadian disruptions.

  3. Analysis of serotonin, dopamine and their metabolites in the caudate putamen, the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the median raphe nucleus of euthermic and torpid deermice, Peromyscus maniculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L H; Pivorun, E B

    1989-06-01

    Deermice, subjected to food rationing and low ambient temperature, were sacrificed in normothermia or during daily torpor. Levels of monoamines and their metabolites in the caudate putamen (CPN), the suprachiasmatic nuclear area (SCN), and the median raphe nucleus (MRN) were quantified through the use of HPLC with electrochemical detection. Significant elevations in levels (pg/mg protein) of the serotonin (5-HT) metabolite, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) were noted in torpid individuals in all nuclei examined. The dopamine (DA) metabolite, homovanillic acid (HVA) was significantly elevated in the CPN and MRN of torpid individuals. Moreover, a significant increase in the HVA to DA ratio was also noted in the CPN and the MRN. In the SCN, the concentrations of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), 5-HT, DA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were also increased significantly during torpor. These significant elevations suggest that an increase in the activity of the serotonergic and dopaminergic systems occurs in these nuclei during daily torpor in the deermouse.

  4. Genetic Disruption of Circadian Rhythms in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Causes Helplessness, Behavioral Despair, and Anxiety-like Behavior in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf, Dominic; Long, Jaimie E; Proulx, Christophe D; Barandas, Rita; Malinow, Roberto; Welsh, David K

    2016-12-01

    Major depressive disorder is associated with disturbed circadian rhythms. To investigate the causal relationship between mood disorders and circadian clock disruption, previous studies in animal models have employed light/dark manipulations, global mutations of clock genes, or brain area lesions. However, light can impact mood by noncircadian mechanisms; clock genes have pleiotropic, clock-independent functions; and brain lesions not only disrupt cellular circadian rhythms but also destroy cells and eliminate important neuronal connections, including light reception pathways. Thus, a definitive causal role for functioning circadian clocks in mood regulation has not been established. We stereotactically injected viral vectors encoding short hairpin RNA to knock down expression of the essential clock gene Bmal1 into the brain's master circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In these SCN-specific Bmal1-knockdown (SCN-Bmal1-KD) mice, circadian rhythms were greatly attenuated in the SCN, while the mice were maintained in a standard light/dark cycle, SCN neurons remained intact, and neuronal connections were undisturbed, including photic inputs. In the learned helplessness paradigm, the SCN-Bmal1-KD mice were slower to escape, even before exposure to inescapable stress. They also spent more time immobile in the tail suspension test and less time in the lighted section of a light/dark box. The SCN-Bmal1-KD mice also showed greater weight gain, an abnormal circadian pattern of corticosterone, and an attenuated increase of corticosterone in response to stress. Disrupting SCN circadian rhythms is sufficient to cause helplessness, behavioral despair, and anxiety-like behavior in mice, establishing SCN-Bmal1-KD mice as a new animal model of depression. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  5. Light stimulates the mouse adrenal through a retinohypothalamic pathway independent of an effect on the clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

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    Silke Kiessling

    Full Text Available The brain's master circadian pacemaker resides within the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. SCN clock neurons are entrained to the day/night cycle via the retinohypothalamic tract and the SCN provides temporal information to the central nervous system and to peripheral organs that function as secondary oscillators. The SCN clock-cell network is thought to be the hypothalamic link between the retina and descending autonomic circuits to peripheral organs such as the adrenal gland, thereby entraining those organs to the day/night cycle. However, there are at least three different routes or mechanisms by which retinal signals transmitted to the hypothalamus may be conveyed to peripheral organs: 1 via retinal input to SCN clock neurons; 2 via retinal input to non-clock neurons in the SCN; or 3 via retinal input to hypothalamic regions neighboring the SCN. It is very well documented that light-induced responses of the SCN clock (i.e., clock gene expression, neural activity, and behavioral phase shifts occur primarily during the subjective night. Thus to determine the role of the SCN clock in transmitting photic signals to descending autonomic circuits, we compared the phase dependency of light-evoked responses in the SCN and a peripheral oscillator, the adrenal gland. We observed light-evoked clock gene expression in the mouse adrenal throughout the subjective day and subjective night. Light also induced adrenal corticosterone secretion during both the subjective day and subjective night. The irradiance threshold for light-evoked adrenal responses was greater during the subjective day compared to the subjective night. These results suggest that retinohypothalamic signals may be relayed to the adrenal clock during the subjective day by a retinal pathway or cellular mechanism that is independent of an effect of light on the SCN neural clock network and thus may be important for the temporal integration of physiology and metabolism.

  6. Novel description of ionic currents recorded with the action potential clamp technique: application to excitatory currents in suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, John R

    2015-07-01

    The traditional method of recording ionic currents in neurons has been with voltage-clamp steps. Other waveforms such as action potentials (APs) can be used. The AP clamp method reveals contributions of ionic currents that underlie excitability during an AP (Bean BP. Nat Rev Neurosci 8: 451-465, 2007). A novel usage of the method is described in this report. An experimental recording of an AP from the literature is digitized and applied computationally to models of ionic currents. These results are compared with experimental AP-clamp recordings for model verification or, if need be, alterations to the model. The method is applied to the tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium ion current, INa, and the calcium ion current, ICa, from suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons (Jackson AC, Yao GL, Bean BP. J Neurosci 24: 7985-7998, 2004). The latter group reported voltage-step and AP-clamp results for both components. A model of INa is constructed from their voltage-step results. The AP clamp computational methodology applied to that model compares favorably with experiment, other than a modest discrepancy close to the peak of the AP that has not yet been resolved. A model of ICa was constructed from both voltage-step and AP-clamp results of this component. The model employs the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation for the current-voltage relation rather than the traditional linear dependence of this aspect of the model on the Ca(2+) driving force. The long-term goal of this work is a mathematical model of the SCN AP. The method is general. It can be applied to any excitable cell.

  7. Single unit activity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus and surrounding neurons during the wake-sleep cycle in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, K

    2014-02-28

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the mammalian hypothalamus contains a circadian clock for timing of diverse neuronal, endocrine, and behavioral rhythms, such as the cycle of sleep and wakefulness. Using extracellular single unit recordings, we have determined, for the first time, the discharge activity of individual SCN neurons during the complete wake-sleep cycle in non-anesthetized, head restrained mice. SCN neurons (n=79) were divided into three types according to their regular (type I; n=38) or irregular (type II; n=19) discharge activity throughout the wake-sleep cycle or their quiescent activity during waking and irregular discharge activity during sleep (type III; n=22). The type I and II neurons displayed a long-duration action potential, while the type III neurons displayed either a short-duration or long-duration action potential. The type I neurons discharged exclusively as single isolated spikes, whereas the type II and III neurons fired as single isolated spikes, clusters, or bursts. The type I and II neurons showed wake-active, wake/paradoxical (or rapid eye movement) sleep-active, or state-unrelated activity profiles and were, respectively, mainly located in the ventral or dorsal region of the SCN. In contrast, the type III neurons displayed sleep-active discharge profiles and were mainly located in the lateral region of the SCN. The majority of type I and II neurons tested showed an increase in discharge rate following application of light to the animal's eyes. Of the 289 extra-SCN neurons recorded, those displaying sleep-active discharge profiles were mainly located dorsal to the SCN, whereas those displaying wake-active discharge profiles were mainly located lateral or dorsolateral to the SCN. This study shows heterogeneity of mouse SCN and surrounding anterior hypothalamic neurons and suggests differences in their topographic organization and roles in mammalian circadian rhythms and the regulation of sleep and wakefulness. Copyright © 2013

  8. Melatonin administered during the fetal stage affects circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus but not in the liver

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Houdek, Pavel; Polidarová, Lenka; Nováková, Marta; Matějů, Kristýna; Kubík, Štěpán; Sumová, Alena

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 2 (2015), s. 131-144 ISSN 1932-8451 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1108 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ontogenesis * circadian system * suprachiasmatic nuclei * clock gene * melatonin Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.529, year: 2015

  9. Dispersion of the intrinsic neuronal periods affects the relationship of the entrainment range to the coupling strength in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Changgui; Yang, Huijie; Wang, Man

    2017-11-01

    Living beings on the Earth are subjected to and entrained (synchronized) to the natural 24-h light-dark cycle. Interestingly, they can also be entrained to an external artificial cycle of non-24-h periods. The range of these periods is called the entrainment range and it differs among species. In mammals, the entrainment range is regulated by a main clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) which is composed of 10 000 neurons in the brain. Previous works have found that the entrainment range depends on the cellular coupling strength in the SCN. In particular, the entrainment range decreases with the increase of the cellular coupling strength, provided that all the neuronal oscillators are identical. However, the SCN neurons differ in the intrinsic periods that follow a normal distribution in a range from 22 to 28 h. In the present study, taking the dispersion of the intrinsic neuronal periods into account, we examined the relationship between the entrainment range and the coupling strength. Results from numerical simulations and theoretical analyses both show that the relationship is altered to be paraboliclike if the intrinsic neuronal periods are nonidentical, and the maximal entrainment range is obtained with a suitable coupling strength. Our results shed light on the role of the cellular coupling in the entrainment ability of the SCN network.

  10. The Neuronal Transition Probability (NTP) Model for the Dynamic Progression of Non-REM Sleep EEG: The Role of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Merica, H

    2011-01-01

    Little attention has gone into linking to its neuronal substrates the dynamic structure of non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep, defined as the pattern of time-course power in all frequency bands across an entire episode. Using the spectral power time-courses in the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), we showed in the typical first episode, several moves towards-and-away from deep sleep, each having an identical pattern linking the major frequency bands beta, sigma and delta. The neuronal transition probability model (NTP) - in fitting the data well - successfully explained the pattern as resulting from stochastic transitions of the firing-rates of the thalamically-projecting brainstem-activating neurons, alternating between two steady dynamic-states (towards-and-away from deep sleep) each initiated by a so-far unidentified flip-flop. The aims here are to identify this flip-flop and to demonstrate that the model fits well all NREM episodes, not just the first. Using published data on suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN...

  11. Combined Pharmacological and Genetic Manipulations Unlock Unprecedented Temporal Elasticity and Reveal Phase-Specific Modulation of the Molecular Circadian Clock of the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Andrew P; Chesham, Johanna E; Hastings, Michael H

    2016-09-07

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the master circadian oscillator encoding time-of-day information. SCN timekeeping is sustained by a cell-autonomous transcriptional-translational feedback loop, whereby expression of the Period and Cryptochrome genes is negatively regulated by their protein products. This loop in turn drives circadian oscillations in gene expression that direct SCN electrical activity and thence behavior. The robustness of SCN timekeeping is further enhanced by interneuronal, circuit-level coupling. The aim of this study was to combine pharmacological and genetic manipulations to push the SCN clockwork toward its limits and, by doing so, probe cell-autonomous and emergent, circuit-level properties. Circadian oscillation of mouse SCN organotypic slice cultures was monitored as PER2::LUC bioluminescence. SCN of three genetic backgrounds-wild-type, short-period CK1ε(Tau/Tau) mutant, and long-period Fbxl3(Afh/Afh) mutant-all responded reversibly to pharmacological manipulation with period-altering compounds: picrotoxin, PF-670462 (4-[1-Cyclohexyl-4-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-imidazol-5-yl]-2-pyrimidinamine dihydrochloride), and KNK437 (N-Formyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-benzylidine-gamma-butyrolactam). This revealed a remarkably wide operating range of sustained periods extending across 25 h, from ≤17 h to >42 h. Moreover, this range was maintained at network and single-cell levels. Development of a new technique for formal analysis of circadian waveform, first derivative analysis (FDA), revealed internal phase patterning to the circadian oscillation at these extreme periods and differential phase sensitivity of the SCN to genetic and pharmacological manipulations. For example, FDA of the CK1ε(Tau/Tau) mutant SCN treated with the CK1ε-specific inhibitor PF-4800567 (3-[(3-Chlorophenoxy)methyl]-1-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4-amine hydrochloride) revealed that period acceleration in the mutant is due to inappropriately phased

  12. Time-of-day- and light-dependent expression of ubiquitin protein ligase E3 component N-recognin 4 (UBR4 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus circadian clock.

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    Harrod H Ling

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms of behavior and physiology are driven by the biological clock that operates endogenously but can also be entrained to the light-dark cycle of the environment. In mammals, the master circadian pacemaker is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, which is composed of individual cellular oscillators that are driven by a set of core clock genes interacting in transcriptional/translational feedback loops. Light signals can trigger molecular events in the SCN that ultimately impact on the phase of expression of core clock genes to reset the master pacemaker. While transcriptional regulation has received much attention in the field of circadian biology in the past, other mechanisms including targeted protein degradation likely contribute to the clock timing and entrainment process. In the present study, proteome-wide screens of the murine SCN led to the identification of ubiquitin protein ligase E3 component N-recognin 4 (UBR4, a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase component of the N-end rule pathway, as a time-of-day-dependent and light-inducible protein. The spatial and temporal expression pattern of UBR4 in the SCN was subsequently characterized by immunofluorescence microscopy. UBR4 is expressed across the entire rostrocaudal extent of the SCN in a time-of-day-dependent fashion. UBR4 is localized exclusively to arginine vasopressin (AVP-expressing neurons of the SCN shell. Upon photic stimulation in the early subjective night, the number of UBR4-expressing cells within the SCN increases. This study is the first to identify a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase component, UBR4, in the murine SCN and to implicate the N-end rule degradation pathway as a potential player in regulating core clock mechanisms and photic entrainment.

  13. Novel description of the large conductance Ca2+-modulated K+channel current, BK, during an action potential from suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, John R

    2017-11-01

    The contribution of the large conductance, Ca 2+ -modulated, voltage-gated K + channel current, I BK , to the total current during an action potential (AP) from suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons is described using a novel computational approach. An experimental recording of an SCN AP and the corresponding AP-clamp recording of I BK from the literature were both digitized. The AP data set was applied computationally to a kinetic model of I BK that was based on results from a clone of the BK channel α subunit heterologolously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The I BK model result during an AP was compared with the AP-clamp recording of I BK The comparison suggests that a change in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration does not have an immediate effect on BK channel kinetics. Rather, a delay of a few milliseconds may occur prior to the full effect of a change in Ca i 2+ As shown elsewhere, the β 2 subunit of the BK channel in the SCN, which is present in the daytime along with the α subunit, shifts the BK channel activation curve leftward on the voltage axis relative to the activation curve of BK channels comprised of the α subunit alone. That shift may underlie the diurnal changes in electrical activity that occur in the SCN and it may also enhance the delay in the effect of a change in Ca i 2+ on BK kinetics reported here. The implication of these results for models of the AP for neurons in which BK channels are present is that an additional time dependent process may be required in the models, a process that describes the time dependence of the development of a change in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration on BK channel gating. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Entrainment range of the suprachiasmatic nucleus affected by the difference in the neuronal amplitudes between the light-sensitive and light-insensitive regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Changgui; Yang, Huijie; Ruan, Zhongyuan

    2017-04-01

    Mammals not only can be synchronized to the natural 24-h light-dark cycle, but also to a cycle with a non-24-h period. The range of the period of the external cycle, for which the animals can be entrained to, is called the entrainment range, which differs among species. The entrainment range as a characteristic of the animal is determined by the main circadian clock, i.e., the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain. The SCN is composed of ˜10 000 heterogeneous neurons, which can be divided into two subgroups, i.e., the ventrolateral subgroup (VL) directly receiving the light information from the retina and relaying the information to the dorsomedial subgroup (DM). Among the SCN neurons, the amplitudes are different; however, it is unclear that the amplitude is related to the location of the neurons in experiments. In the present study, we examined the effect of the difference in the neuronal amplitude between the VL and the DM on the entrainment range of the SCN, based on a mathematical model, i.e., the Poincaré model, which is used to describe the circadian clock. We find that the maximal entrainment range is obtained when the difference is equal to a critical point. If the difference of the amplitudes of the VL neurons to the amplitudes of the DM neurons is smaller than a critical point, with the increase of the difference, the entrainment range of the SCN increases, while if the difference is larger than the critical point, the entrainment range decreases with the increase of the difference. Our finding may give a potential explanation for the diversity of the entrainment range among species.

  15. A model for the fast synchronous oscillations of firing rate in rat suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons cultured in a multielectrode array dish.

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    Andrey R Stepanyuk

    Full Text Available When dispersed and cultured in a multielectrode dish (MED, suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN neurons express fast oscillations of firing rate (FOFR; fast relative to the circadian cycle, with burst duration ∼10 min, and interburst interval varying from 20 to 60 min in different cells but remaining nevertheless rather regular in individual cells. In many cases, separate neurons in distant parts of the 1 mm recording area of a MED exhibited correlated FOFR. Neither the mechanism of FOFR nor the mechanism of their synchronization among neurons is known. Based on recent data implicating vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP as a key intercellular synchronizing agent, we built a model in which VIP acts as both a feedback regulator to generate FOFR in individual neurons, and a diffusible synchronizing agent to produce coherent electrical output of a neuronal network. In our model, VIP binding to its (VPAC2 receptors acts through Gs G-proteins to activate adenylyl cyclase (AC, increase intracellular cAMP, and open cyclic-nucleotide-gated (CNG cation channels, thus depolarizing the cell and generating neuronal firing to release VIP. In parallel, slowly developing homologous desensitization and internalization of VPAC2 receptors terminates elevation of cAMP and thereby provides an interpulse silent interval. Through mathematical modeling, we show that this VIP/VPAC2/AC/cAMP/CNG-channel mechanism is sufficient for generating reliable FOFR in single neurons. When our model for FOFR is combined with a published model of synchronization of circadian rhythms based on VIP/VPAC2 and Per gene regulation synchronization of circadian rhythms is significantly accelerated. These results suggest that (a auto/paracrine regulation by VIP/VPAC2 and intracellular AC/cAMP/CNG-channels are sufficient to provide robust FOFR and synchrony among neurons in a heterogeneous network, and (b this system may also participate in synchronization of circadian rhythms.

  16. The neuronal transition probability (NTP model for the dynamic progression of non-REM sleep EEG: the role of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helli Merica

    Full Text Available Little attention has gone into linking to its neuronal substrates the dynamic structure of non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM sleep, defined as the pattern of time-course power in all frequency bands across an entire episode. Using the spectral power time-courses in the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG, we showed in the typical first episode, several moves towards-and-away from deep sleep, each having an identical pattern linking the major frequency bands beta, sigma and delta. The neuronal transition probability model (NTP--in fitting the data well--successfully explained the pattern as resulting from stochastic transitions of the firing-rates of the thalamically-projecting brainstem-activating neurons, alternating between two steady dynamic-states (towards-and-away from deep sleep each initiated by a so-far unidentified flip-flop. The aims here are to identify this flip-flop and to demonstrate that the model fits well all NREM episodes, not just the first. Using published data on suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN activity we show that the SCN has the information required to provide a threshold-triggered flip-flop for TIMING the towards-and-away alternations, information provided by sleep-relevant feedback to the SCN. NTP then determines the PATTERN of spectral power within each dynamic-state. NTP was fitted to individual NREM episodes 1-4, using data from 30 healthy subjects aged 20-30 years, and the quality of fit for each NREM measured. We show that the model fits well all NREM episodes and the best-fit probability-set is found to be effectively the same in fitting all subject data. The significant model-data agreement, the constant probability parameter and the proposed role of the SCN add considerable strength to the model. With it we link for the first time findings at cellular level and detailed time-course data at EEG level, to give a coherent picture of NREM dynamics over the entire night and over hierarchic brain levels all the way from the SCN

  17. IA Channels Encoded by Kv1.4 and Kv4.2 Regulate Circadian Period of PER2 Expression in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; Hermanstyne, Tracey O; Carrasquillo, Yarimar; Nerbonne, Jeanne M; Herzog, Erik D

    2015-10-01

    Neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian pacemaker in mammals, display daily rhythms in electrical activity with more depolarized resting potentials and higher firing rates during the day than at night. Although these daily variations in the electrical properties of SCN neurons are required for circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior, the mechanisms linking changes in neuronal excitability to the molecular clock are not known. Recently, we reported that mice deficient for either Kcna4 (Kv1.4(-/-)) or Kcnd2 (Kv4.2(-/-); but not Kcnd3, Kv4.3(-/-)), voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channel pore-forming subunits that encode subthreshold, rapidly activating, and inactivating K(+) currents (IA), have shortened (0.5 h) circadian periods in SCN firing and in locomotor activity compared with wild-type (WT) mice. In the experiments here, we used a mouse (Per2(Luc)) line engineered with a bioluminescent reporter construct, PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC), replacing the endogenous Per2 locus, to test the hypothesis that the loss of Kv1.4- or Kv4.2-encoded IA channels also modifies circadian rhythms in the expression of the clock protein PERIOD2 (PER2). We found that SCN explants from Kv1.4(-/-)Per2(Luc) and Kv4.2(-/-) Per2(Luc), but not Kv4.3(-/-)Per2(Luc), mice have significantly shorter (by approximately 0.5 h) circadian periods in PER2 rhythms, compared with explants from Per2(Luc) mice, revealing that the membrane properties of SCN neurons feedback to regulate clock (PER2) expression. The combined loss of both Kv1.4- and Kv4.2-encoded IA channels in Kv1.4(-/-)/Kv4.2(-/-)Per2(Luc) SCN explants did not result in any further alterations in PER2 rhythms. Interestingly, however, mice lacking both Kv1.4 and Kv4.2 show a striking (approximately 1.8 h) advance in their daily activity onset in a light cycle compared with WT mice, suggesting additional roles for Kv1.4- and Kv4.2-encoded IA channels in controlling the light-dependent responses of neurons within

  18. Chronic Ethanol Consumption Disrupts the Core Molecular Clock and Diurnal Rhythms of Metabolic Genes in the Liver without Affecting the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiano, Ashley N.; Millender-Swain, Telisha; Johnson, Russell; Young, Martin E.; Gamble, Karen L.; Bailey, Shannon M.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and lipid biosynthesis, facilitating the development of alcoholic fatty liver disease. Many of these same metabolic pathways are directly regulated by cell autonomous circadian clocks, and recent studies suggest that disruption of daily rhythms in metabolism contributes to multiple common cardiometabolic diseases (including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease). However, it is not known whether ethanol disrupts the core molecular clock in the liver, nor whether this, in turn, alters rhythms in lipid metabolism. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption disrupts the molecular circadian clock in the liver and potentially changes the diurnal expression patterns of lipid metabolism genes. Consistent with previous studies, male C57BL/6J mice fed an ethanol-containing diet exhibited higher levels of liver triglycerides compared to control mice, indicating hepatic steatosis. Further, the diurnal oscillations of core clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, and Per2) and clock-controlled genes (Dbp, Hlf, Nocturnin, Npas2, Rev-erbα, and Tef) were altered in livers from ethanol-fed mice. In contrast, ethanol had only minor effects on the expression of core clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). These results were confirmed in Per2Luciferase knock-in mice, in which ethanol induced a phase advance in PER2::LUC bioluminescence oscillations in liver, but not SCN. Further, there was greater variability in the phase of PER2::LUC oscillations in livers from ethanol-fed mice. Ethanol consumption also affected the diurnal oscillations of metabolic genes, including Adh1, Cpt1a, Cyp2e1, Pck1, Pdk4, Ppargc1a, Ppargc1b and Srebp1c, in the livers of C57BL/6J mice. In summary, chronic ethanol consumption alters the function of the circadian clock in liver. Importantly, these results suggest that chronic ethanol consumption, at levels sufficient to cause steatosis

  19. Circadian and developmental regulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate-receptor 1 mRNA splice variants and N-methyl-d-aspartate-receptor 3 subunit expression within the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendová, Z; Sumová, A; Mikkelsen, Jens D.

    2009-01-01

    The circadian rhythms of mammals are generated by the circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Its intrinsic period is entrained to a 24 h cycle by external cues, mainly by light. Light impinging on the SCN at night causes either advancing or delaying phase...... shifts of the circadian clock. N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) are the main glutamate receptors mediating the effect of light on the molecular clockwork in the SCN. They are composed of multiple subunits, each with specific characteristics whose mutual interactions strongly determine properties...... of the receptor. In the brain, the distribution of NMDAR subunits depends on the region and developmental stage. Here, we report the circadian expression of the NMDAR1 subunit in the adult rat SCN and depict its splice variants that may constitute the functional receptor channel in the SCN. During ontogenesis...

  20. Melatonin adjusts the expression pattern of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and induces antidepressant-like effect in a mouse model of seasonal affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Andras David; Iwamoto, Ayaka; Kawai, Misato; Goda, Ryosei; Matsuo, Haruka; Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Nagasawa, Mao; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Yasuo, Shinobu

    2015-05-01

    Recently, we have shown that C57BL/6J mice exhibit depression-like behavior under short photoperiod and suggested them as an animal model for investigating seasonal affective disorder (SAD). In this study, we tested if manipulations of the circadian clock with melatonin treatment could effectively modify depression-like and anxiety-like behaviors and brain serotonergic system in C57BL/6J mice. Under short photoperiods (8-h light/16-h dark), daily melatonin treatments 2 h before light offset have significantly altered the 24-h patterns of mRNA expression of circadian clock genes (per1, per2, bmal1 and clock) within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) mostly by increasing amplitude in their expressional rhythms without inducing robust phase shifts in them. Melatonin treatments altered the expression of genes of serotonergic neurotransmission in the dorsal raphe (tph2, sert, vmat2 and 5ht1a) and serotonin contents in the amygdala. Importantly, melatonin treatment reduced the immobility in forced swim test, a depression-like behavior. As a key mechanism of melatonin-induced antidepressant-like effect, the previously proposed phase-advance hypothesis of the circadian clock could not be confirmed under conditions of our experiment. However, our findings of modest adjustments in both the amplitude and phase of the transcriptional oscillators in the SCN as a result of melatonin treatments may be sufficient to associate with the effects seen in the brain serotonergic system and with the improvement in depression-like behavior. Our study confirmed a predictive validity of C57BL/6J mice as a useful model for the molecular analysis of links between the clock and brain serotonergic system, which could greatly accelerate our understanding of the pathogenesis of SAD, as well as the search for new treatments.

  1. Synaptic Contributions to Receptive Field Structure and Response Properties in the Rodent Lateral Geniculate Nucleus of the Thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Vandana; Çiftçioğlu, Ulaş M; Wang, Xin; Lala, Brittany M; Ding, Kimberly R; Smith, William A; Sommer, Friedrich T; Hirsch, Judith A

    2016-10-26

    Comparative physiological and anatomical studies have greatly advanced our understanding of sensory systems. Many lines of evidence show that the murine lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) has unique attributes, compared with other species such as cat and monkey. For example, in rodent, thalamic receptive field structure is markedly diverse, and many cells are sensitive to stimulus orientation and direction. To explore shared and different strategies of synaptic integration across species, we made whole-cell recordings in vivo from the murine LGN during the presentation of visual stimuli, analyzed the results with different computational approaches, and compared our findings with those from cat. As for carnivores, murine cells with classical center-surround receptive fields had a "push-pull" structure of excitation and inhibition within a given On or Off subregion. These cells compose the largest single population in the murine LGN (∼40%), indicating that push-pull is key in the form vision pathway across species. For two cell types with overlapping On and Off responses, which recalled either W3 or suppressed-by-contrast ganglion cells in murine retina, inhibition took a different form and was most pronounced for spatially extensive stimuli. Other On-Off cells were selective for stimulus orientation and direction. In these cases, retinal inputs were tuned and, for oriented cells, the second-order subunit of the receptive field predicted the preferred angle. By contrast, suppression was not tuned and appeared to sharpen stimulus selectivity. Together, our results provide new perspectives on the role of excitation and inhibition in retinothalamic processing. We explored the murine lateral geniculate nucleus from a comparative physiological perspective. In cat, most retinal cells have center-surround receptive fields and push-pull excitation and inhibition, including neurons with the smallest (highest acuity) receptive fields. The same is true for thalamic relay cells

  2. Integration of stress and leptin signaling by CART producing neurons in the rodent midbrain centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, L.; Janssen, D.; Knaap, N.J.F. van der; Roubos, E.W.; Leshan, R.L.; Myers, M.G.; Gaszner, B.; Kozicz, L.T.

    2014-01-01

    Leptin targets the brain to regulate feeding, neuroendocrine function and metabolism. The leptin receptor is present in hypothalamic centers controlling energy metabolism as well as in the centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWcp), a region implicated in the stress response and in various

  3. Leptin activates oxytocin neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus in both control and diet-induced obese rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Perello

    Full Text Available The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin acts in the brain to reduce body weight and fat mass. Recent studies suggest that parvocellular oxytocin (OXT neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN can mediate body weight reduction through inhibition of food intake and increased energy expenditure. However, the role of OXT neurons of the PVN as a primary target of leptin has not been investigated. Here, we studied the potential role of OXT neurons of the PVN in leptin-mediated effects on body weight regulation in fasted rats. We demonstrated that intracerebroventricular (ICV leptin activates STAT3 phosphorylation in OXT neurons of the PVN, showed that this occurs in a subpopulation of OXT neurons that innervate the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, and provided further evidence suggesting a role of OXT to mediate leptin's actions on body weight. In addition, our results indicated that OXT neurons are responsive to ICV leptin and mediate leptin effects on body weight in diet induced obese (DIO rats, which are resistant to the anorectic effects of the hormone. Thus, we conclude that leptin targets a specific subpopulation of parvocellular OXT neurons of the PVN, and that this action may be important for leptin's ability to reduce body weight in both control and obese rats.

  4. Integration of stress and leptin signaling by CART producing neurons in the rodent midbrain centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu eXu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Leptin targets the brain to regulate feeding, neuroendocrine function and metabolism. The leptin receptor is present in hypothalamic centers controlling energy metabolism as well as in the centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWcp, a region implicated in the stress response and in various aspects of stress-related behaviors. We hypothesized that the stress response by cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART-producing EWcp-neurons would depend on the animal’s energy state. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of changes in energy state (mimicked by low, normal and high leptin levels, which were achieved by 24h fasting, normal chow and leptin injection, respectively on the response of CART neurons in the EWcp of rats subjected or not to acute restraint stress. Our data show that leptin treatment alone significantly increases CART mRNA expression in the rat EWcp and that in leptin receptor deficient (db/db mice, the number of CART producing neurons in this nucleus is reduced. This suggests that leptin has a stimulatory effect on the production of CART in the EWcp under non-stressed condition. Under stressed condition, however, leptin blunts stress-induced activation of EWcp neurons and decreases their CART mRNA expression. Interestingly, fasting, does not influence the stress-induced activation of EWcp-neurons, and specifically EWcp-CART neurons are not activated. These results suggest that the stress response by the EWcp depends to some degree on the animal’s energy state, a mechanism that may contribute to a better understanding of the complex interplay between obesity and stress.

  5. Integration of stress and leptin signaling by CART producing neurons in the rodent midbrain centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu; Janssen, Donny; van der Knaap, Noortje; Roubos, Eric W; Leshan, Rebecca L; Myers, Martin G; Gaszner, Balázs; Kozicz, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Leptin targets the brain to regulate feeding, neuroendocrine function and metabolism. The leptin receptor is present in hypothalamic centers controlling energy metabolism as well as in the centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWcp), a region implicated in the stress response and in various aspects of stress-related behaviors. We hypothesized that the stress response by cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART)-producing EWcp-neurons would depend on the animal's energy state. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of changes in energy state (mimicked by low, normal and high leptin levels, which were achieved by 24 h fasting, normal chow and leptin injection, respectively) on the response of CART neurons in the EWcp of rats subjected or not to acute restraint stress. Our data show that leptin treatment alone significantly increases CART mRNA expression in the rat EWcp and that in leptin receptor deficient (db/db) mice, the number of CART producing neurons in this nucleus is reduced. This suggests that leptin has a stimulatory effect on the production of CART in the EWcp under non-stressed condition. Under stressed condition, however, leptin blunts stress-induced activation of EWcp neurons and decreases their CART mRNA expression. Interestingly, fasting, does not influence the stress-induced activation of EWcp-neurons, and specifically EWcp-CART neurons are not activated. These results suggest that the stress response by the EWcp depends to some degree on the animal's energy state, a mechanism that may contribute to a better understanding of the complex interplay between obesity and stress.

  6. Lateral geniculate nucleus histopathology in the rat experimental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although trypanosomosis has a well knownaetiology, histopathological studies on brain regions involved in the control of circadian rhythms are scanty. Lateral geniculate nucleus works in conjunction with the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the master circadian rhythm pacemaker, in regulating circadian rhythms. The purpose of ...

  7. Food-reward signalling in the suprachiasmatic clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Jorge; Clesse, Daniel; Pévet, Paul; Challet, Etienne

    2010-03-01

    Under special restricted feeding conditions the mammalian circadian clock, contained in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), can be entrained by food. During food restriction, hungry animals are very motivated to obtain food. This motivational state could be a key component in altering the SCN timing by feeding. In order to comprehend how hedonic signals of food affect the SCN clock, we evaluated the effects of a daily palatable snack on the behavioural rhythm of mice fed ad libitum with regular food, and housed under constant darkness conditions. As light synchronization of the SCN is modulated by feeding/metabolic cues, the effects of a palatable meal coupled to a light pulse were tested on behavioural and molecular rhythms. A daily palatable snack entrained behavioural rhythms of mice in constant darkness conditions. Furthermore, palatable meal access at the activity onset reduced light-induced behavioural phase-delays and Period genes expression in the SCN. In addition, an increase in the dopamine content and Period genes expression in the forebrain of mice was observed, concomitant with a c-FOS activation in dopaminergic and orexinergic neurons, suggesting that the effects of a palatable snack on the SCN clock are mediated by the reward/arousal central systems. In conclusion, this study establishes an underlying sensitivity of the master circadian clock to changes in motivational states related to palatable food intake.

  8. Daily rhythms in glucose metabolism: suprachiasmatic nucleus output to peripheral tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    La Fleur, S. E.

    2003-01-01

    The body has developed several control mechanisms to maintain plasma glucose concentrations within strict boundaries. Within those physiological boundaries, a clear daily rhythm in plasma glucose concentrations is present; this rhythm depends on the biological clock, which is located in the

  9. Neuroglobin expression in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus: colocalization, innervation, and response to light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, C A; Hannibal, J; Fahrenkrug, J

    2010-01-01

    protect neurons-remains largely elusive. We have previously described the localization of Ngb in the rat brain and found it to be expressed in areas primarily involved in sleep/wake, circadian, and food regulation. The present study was undertaken, using immunohistochemistry, to characterize...... a small portion was found to co-store GRP in the ventral SCN. Furthermore, some Ngb-containing neurons were responsive to light stimulation at late night evaluated by the induction of cFOS and only a few cells were found to express the core clock gene PER1 during the 24-hour light/dark cycle. The Ngb...

  10. Intracellular Physiology of the Rat Suprachiasmatic Nucleus: Electrical Properties, Neurotransmission, and Effects of Neuromodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-24

    disease virus (BDV) causes a rare neurological disease in horses and sheep. The Olympus ultraviolet objýective (numerical aperture - virus has not been...speciflc nucleic acids and to identify the virus responsible for Borna tor-ictivated channels, and an NMDA component dieae In addition, the significance...fluorescent cells could barely be detected without digital intensification of the video image. 12. A Zeiss I.M35 inverted microscope with a x20 Borna

  11. African trypanosomiasis in the rat alters melatonin secretion and melatonin receptor binding in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensson, Krister; Claustrat, Bruno; Mhlanga, Jama D.M.

    1998-01-01

    Neurobiology, cytokines, circadian rhythm, infection, nervous system, pineal gland, trypanosoma brucei......Neurobiology, cytokines, circadian rhythm, infection, nervous system, pineal gland, trypanosoma brucei...

  12. Transcription-based oscillator model for light-induced splitting as antiphase circadian gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, Sondra; Herzog, Erik D; Kiss, István Z

    2012-02-01

    Daily locomotor patterns of a variety of organisms have been interpreted as driven by dual circadian oscillators. Yet, in mammals, cellular data have revealed many circadian oscillators in the bilateral suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). To test how large numbers of oscillators could respond to environmental cues as a pair of oscillators, the authors developed a computational model composed of 2 groups of oscillators with strong local interactions and with weaker coupling between the 2 groups. Unlike previous models that assumed that light affects the timing or polarity of coupling between a pair of oscillators, this simulation assumed that light increased the transcription rate of a clock gene and consequently altered circadian properties of individual cells. In constant dark, weak local (within each of the 2 groups) and distant (between group) coupling established in-phase oscillations and a typical single bout of daily activity. In constant light, local synchrony developed only if coupling was strong and resulted in antiphase synchrony between the 2 groups and bimodal daily activity reminiscent of split behavior. These numerical simulations thus showed that splitting behavior can develop with increased light intensity without structural changes in the coupling topology or sign. Instead, the authors propose that light changes intrinsic oscillator properties through the increase of maximal transcription rate of a clock gene, so that as light intensity increases, the output of the coupled network transitions from a single bout of activity through irregular beating to 2 bouts and, in bright constant light, arrhythmicity.

  13. Forced desynchrony reveals independent contributions of suprachiasmatic oscillators to the daily plasma corticosterone rhythm in male rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Wotus

    Full Text Available The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN is required for the daily rhythm of plasma glucocorticoids; however, the independent contributions from oscillators within the different subregions of the SCN to the glucocorticoid rhythm remain unclear. Here, we use genetically and neurologically intact, forced desynchronized rats to test the hypothesis that the daily rhythm of the glucocorticoid, corticosterone, is regulated by both light responsive and light-dissociated circadian oscillators in the ventrolateral (vl- and dorsomedial (dm- SCN, respectively. We show that when the vlSCN and dmSCN are in maximum phase misalignment, the peak of the plasma corticosterone rhythm is shifted and the amplitude reduced; whereas, the peak of the plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH rhythm is also reduced, the phase is dissociated from that of the corticosterone rhythm. These data support previous studies suggesting an ACTH-independent pathway contributes to the corticosterone rhythm. To determine if either SCN subregion independently regulates corticosterone through the sympathetic nervous system, we compared unilateral adrenalectomized, desynchronized rats that had undergone either transection of the thoracic splanchnic nerve or sham transection to the remaining adrenal. Splanchnicectomy reduced and phase advanced the peak of both the corticosterone and ACTH rhythms. These data suggest that both the vlSCN and dmSCN contribute to the corticosterone rhythm by both reducing plasma ACTH and differentially regulating plasma corticosterone through an ACTH- and sympathetic nervous system-independent pathway.

  14. Rodent Research-1 Validation of Rodent Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Ruth; Beegle, Janet

    2013-01-01

    To achieve novel science objectives, validation of a rodent habitat on ISS will enable - In-flight analyses during long duration spaceflight- Use of genetically altered animals- Application of modern analytical techniques (e.g. genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics)

  15. Biological rhythms in the human life cycle and their relationship to functional changes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaab, D. F.; van Someren, E. J.; Zhou, J. N.; Hofman, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Biological rhythms play a prominent role in the human life cycle. The endogenous rhythms are entrained by the environment and have an astronomical counterpart which is obvious for daily, monthly, and yearly rhythms, and may possibly also be present in weekly rhythms. Circadian rhythms are present

  16. Circadian and Homeostatic Control of Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep: Promotion of REM Tendency by the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wurts, Sarah W; Edgar, Dale M

    2000-01-01

    ...) and a homeostatic process that induces compensatory REM sleep in response to REM sleep loss. Whether the circadian variation in REM sleep propensity is caused by active promotion, inhibition, or passive gating of REM sleep homeostasis by the SCN is unknown...

  17. Neurogenetics of aggressive behavior: studies in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Aki; Miczek, Klaus A

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is observed in many animal species, such as insects, fish, lizards, frogs, and most mammals including humans. This wide range of conservation underscores the importance of aggressive behavior in the animals' survival and fitness, and the likely heritability of this behavior. Although typical patterns of aggressive behavior differ between species, there are several concordances in the neurobiology of aggression among rodents, primates, and humans. Studies with rodent models may eventually help us to understand the neurogenetic architecture of aggression in humans. However, it is important to recognize the difference between the ecological and ethological significance of aggressive behavior (species-typical aggression) and maladaptive violence (escalated aggression) when applying the findings of aggression research using animal models to human or veterinary medicine. Well-studied rodent models for aggressive behavior in the laboratory setting include the mouse (Mus musculus), rat (Rattus norvegicus), hamster (Mesocricetus auratus), and prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). The neural circuits of rodent aggression have been gradually elucidated by several techniques, e.g., immunohistochemistry of immediate-early gene (c-Fos) expression, intracranial drug microinjection, in vivo microdialysis, and optogenetics techniques. Also, evidence accumulated from the analysis of gene-knockout mice shows the involvement of several genes in aggression. Here, we review the brain circuits that have been implicated in aggression, such as the hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and olfactory system. We then discuss the roles of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), excitatory and inhibitory amino acids in the brain, as well as their receptors, in controlling aggressive behavior, focusing mainly on recent findings. At the end of this chapter, we discuss how genes can be identified that underlie individual

  18. Sleep Deprivation and Caffeine Treatment Potentiate Photic Resetting of the Master Circadian Clock in a Diurnal Rodent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Pawan Kumar; Bouâouda, Hanan; Gourmelen, Sylviane; Dumont, Stephanie; Fuchs, Fanny; Goumon, Yannick; Bourgin, Patrice; Kalsbeek, Andries; Challet, Etienne

    2017-04-19

    Circadian rhythms in nocturnal and diurnal mammals are primarily synchronized to local time by the light/dark cycle. However, nonphotic factors, such as behavioral arousal and metabolic cues, can also phase shift the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCNs) and/or reduce the synchronizing effects of light in nocturnal rodents. In diurnal rodents, the role of arousal or insufficient sleep in these functions is still poorly understood. In the present study, diurnal Sudanian grass rats, Arvicanthis ansorgei, were aroused at night by sleep deprivation (gentle handling) or caffeine treatment that both prevented sleep. Phase shifts of locomotor activity were analyzed in grass rats transferred from a light/dark cycle to constant darkness and aroused in early night or late night. Early night, but not late night, sleep deprivation induced a significant phase shift. Caffeine on its own induced no phase shifts. Both sleep deprivation and caffeine treatment potentiated light-induced phase delays and phase advances in response to a 30 min light pulse, respectively. Sleep deprivation in early night, but not late night, potentiated light-induced c-Fos expression in the ventral SCN. Caffeine treatment in midnight triggered c-Fos expression in dorsal SCN. Both sleep deprivation and caffeine treatment potentiated light-induced c-Fos expression in calbindin-containing cells of the ventral SCN in early and late night. These findings indicate that, in contrast to nocturnal rodents, behavioral arousal induced either by sleep deprivation or caffeine during the sleeping period potentiates light resetting of the master circadian clock in diurnal rodents, and activation of calbindin-containing suprachiasmatic cells may be involved in this effect.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Arousing stimuli have the ability to regulate circadian rhythms in mammals. Behavioral arousal in the sleeping period phase shifts the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei and/or slows down the photic

  19. Multifractal analysis of nucleus-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, K.; Cherry, M.L.; Jones, W.V.; Wefel, J.P. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)); Dabrowska, A.; Holynski, R.; Jurak, A.; Olszewski, A.; Szarska, M.; Trzupek, A.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K. (Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kawiory 26 A, 30-055, Krakow (Poland)); Freier, P.S.; Waddington, C.J. (School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)); (KLM Collaboration)

    1993-10-01

    We have performed a multifractal ([ital G]-moment) analysis of 14.6--200 GeV/nucleon nucleus-nucleus and 200--800 GeV proton-nucleus interactions from KLM and Fermilab E-90 and E-508 emulsion data, including explicit corrections for the finite statistical sample. The corrected slopes of the [ital G] moments for protons, [sup 16]O, [sup 28]Si, and [sup 32]S nuclei show only slight evidence for departures from random behavior, while the normalized entropies appear to show a more consistent departure from randomness, particularly for protons. Given the size of the uncertainties, the results of the fractal analysis are not consistent either with results of intermittency analyses for nucleus-nucleus collisions or with the nonrandom behavior previously reported for leptonic and hadronic collisions. However, because of the effects of statistical noise, the fractal analysis is not as sensitive as the intermittency analysis for detecting nonrandom fluctuations.

  20. Suprachiasmatic nuclei and Circadian rhythms. The role of suprachiasmatic nuclei on rhythmic activity of neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area, ventromedian nuclei and pineal gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, H.

    1977-01-01

    Unit activity of lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) and Ventromedian nuclei (VMN) was recorded in urethane anesthetized male rats. A 5 to 10 sec. a 3-5 min and a circadian rhythmicity were observed. In about 15% of all neurons, spontaneous activity of LHA and VMN showed reciprocal relationships. Subthreshold stimuli applied at a slow rate in the septum and the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) suppressed the rhythms without changing firing rates. On the other hand, stimulation of the optic nerve at a rate of 5 to 10/sec increased firing rates in 1/3 of neurons of SCN. Iontophoretically applied acetylcholine increased 80% of tested neurons of SCN, whereas norepinephrine, dopamine and 5 HT inhibited 64, 60 and 75% of SCN neurons respectively. These inhibitions were much stronger in neurons, the activity of which was increased by optic nerve stimulation. Stimulation of the SCN inhibited the tonic activity in cervical sympathetic nerves.

  1. Onuf's nucleus X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D

    1981-01-01

    The first, second and third sacral segments of 59 human spinal cords were examined in order to localize and describe Onuf's nucleus X. The nucleus was found to be situated in the ventral horn of the segments S2 and S3; only in very few spinal cords did it extend into S1. A significant variation...... in the length of the nucleus was observed. Based on the cytoarchitecture the nucleus could be divided in three parts, a cranial, a dorsomedial and a ventrolateral. All parts of the nucleus consisted of chromatin-rich medium-sized neurons, and apparent direct appositions between different cells bodies as well...... as between cell bodies and large dendrites were observed. Characteristic findings in the neuropil surrounding the nucleus were the sparsity of myelinated fibers and the presence of dendritic bundles. The present observations are compared to the descriptions of a morphologically similar nucleus...

  2. The largest fossil rodent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderknecht, Andrés; Blanco, R. Ernesto

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of an exceptionally well-preserved skull permits the description of the new South American fossil species of the rodent, Josephoartigasia monesi sp. nov. (family: Dinomyidae; Rodentia: Hystricognathi: Caviomorpha). This species with estimated body mass of nearly 1000 kg is the largest yet recorded. The skull sheds new light on the anatomy of the extinct giant rodents of the Dinomyidae, which are known mostly from isolated teeth and incomplete mandible remains. The fossil derives from San José Formation, Uruguay, usually assigned to the Pliocene–Pleistocene (4–2 Myr ago), and the proposed palaeoenvironment where this rodent lived was characterized as an estuarine or deltaic system with forest communities. PMID:18198140

  3. Uus Multiphonic Rodent

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    Tartus tegutsenud eksperimentaal-rock-duo Opium Flirt Eestisse jäänud liige Erki Hõbe (paarimees Ervin Trofimov tegutseb Ungaris) annab välja oma teise sooloalbumi nime all Multiphonic Rodent, heliplaadi "Astral Dance" esitluskontsert toimub 5. veebruaril Tallinnas baaris Juuksur

  4. Aging does not compromise in vitro oscillation of the suprachiasmatic nuclei but makes it more vulnerable to constant light

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polidarová, Lenka; Sládek, Martin; Novosadová, Zuzana; Sumová, Alena

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2017), s. 105-117 ISSN 0742-0528 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-07711S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : aging * circadian clock * constant light * suprachiasmatic nuclei * mPer2Luc mice Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.562, year: 2016

  5. Allergy to rodents: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeal, H; Jones, M

    2010-11-01

    Allergy to rodents in the workplace is an important occupational health problem affecting research, pharmaceutical and toxicological sectors and can have a serious impact on employees working in this area. Despite measures to reduce aeroallergen exposures to rodents in the workplace, there are few signs that this occupational health problem is declining. Rodent allergens are well characterized and exposure-response relationships have been demonstrated to be complex. More recently, the importance of rodent allergens outside of the workplace has been demonstrated in several studies of individuals with asthma. This review focuses on rodent allergy both in the workplace and in the home and examines the complex exposure-response relationships between allergen exposure and sensitization and asthma. Risk factors for rodent allergy and mechanisms of tolerance to rodent allergens are discussed. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Rodents of the Caribbean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Mouatt, Julia Thidamarth Vilstrup; Raghavan, Maanasa

    2014-01-01

    The Capromyidae (hutias) are endemic rodents of the Caribbean and represent a model of dispersal for non-flying mammals in the Greater Antilles. This family has experienced severe extinctions during the Holocene and its phylogenetic affinities with respect to other caviomorph relatives are still ...... (Bahamas, Cuba, Jamaica) hutias. Recent divergences among these western hutias suggest Plio-Pleistocene dispersal waves associated with glacial cycles....

  7. Rodent models for studying empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Sehoon; Shin, Hee-Sup

    2016-11-01

    Empathy is the important capacity to recognize and share emotions with others. Recent evidence shows that rodents possess a remarkable affective sensitivity to the emotional state of others and that primitive forms of empathy exist in social lives of rodents. However, due to the ambiguous definitional boundaries between empathy, emotional contagion and other related terms, distinct components of empathic behaviors in rodents need to be clarified. Hence, we review recent experimental studies demonstrating that rodents are able to share emotions with others. Specifically, we highlight several behavioral models that examine different aspects of rodent empathic behaviors in response to the various distress of conspecifics. Experimental approaches using rodent behavioral models will help elucidate the neural circuitry of empathy and its neurochemical association. Integrating these findings with corresponding experiments in humans will ultimately provide novel insights into therapeutic interventions for mental disorders associated with empathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Geomagnetic field detection in rodents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olcese, J.; Reuss, S.; Semm, P.

    1988-01-01

    In addition to behavioral evidence for the detection of earth-strength magnetic fields (MF) by rodents, recent investigations have revealed that electrophysiological and biochemical responses to MF occur in the pineal organ and retina of rodents. In addition, ferrimagnetic deposits have been identified in the ethmoidal regions of the rodent skull. These findings point to a new sensory phenomenon, which interfaces with many fields of biology, including neuroscience, psychophysics, behavioral ecology, chronobiology and sensory physiology.

  9. Effects of damage to the suprachiasmatic area of the anterior hypothalamus on the daily melatonin and cortisol rhythms in the rhesus monkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reppert, S.M.; Perlow, M.J.; Ungerleider, L.G.; Mishkin, M.; Tamarkin, L.; Orloff, D.G.; Hoffman, H.J.; Klein, D.C.

    1981-12-01

    The effects of lesions of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) on the circadian rhythms in melatonin and cortisol were examined in the rhesus monkey. The concentrations of the two hormones were monitored in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) withdrawn from two sham-operated animals, two animals with complete bilateral SCN lesions, and two animals with partial SCN damage at 4 and 8 months after surgery. In the sham-operated animals, as in the intact animal, the daily melatonin rhythm was entrained to the daily light-dark cycle, was suppressed in constant light, and persisted in constant darkness. In contrast, neither animal with complete SCN ablation exhibited a daily pattern of CSF melatonin in diurnal lighting at 4 months after surgery nor were their melatonin levels at constant low values. Furthermore, CSF melatonin concentrations were not suppressed in either animal by constant light. Surprisingly, at 8 months after surgery, spectral analysis revealed a 24-hr component to the melatonin patterns for each animal with complete SCN ablation in both diurnal lighting and constant darkness. The two animals with partial SCN damage exhibited a daily melatonin rhythm in diurnal lighting, but constant light did not suppress CSF melatonin concentrations consistently. Daily rhythms persisted in both for a 6 1/2-d period of study in constant darkness. In contrast to the alterations in the melatonin rhythm after SCN damage, there was no apparent effect of either partial or complete SCN ablation on the daily CSF cortisol rhythm. These data indicate that, in the rhesus monkey, the SCN is important for the generation, photic entrainment, and photic suppression of the melatonin rhythm. However, circadian oscillators located outside of the SCN region may control the normal daily cortisol rhythm and perhaps the melatonin rhythm in the absence of the SCN.

  10. Histamine 1 receptor-Gβγ-cAMP/PKA-CFTR pathway mediates the histamine-induced resetting of the suprachiasmatic circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Sik; Kim, Young-Beom; Kim, Woong Bin; Lee, Seung Won; Oh, Seog Bae; Han, Hee-Chul; Lee, C Justin; Colwell, Christopher S; Kim, Yang In

    2016-05-06

    Recent evidence indicates that histamine, acting on histamine 1 receptor (H1R), resets the circadian clock in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) by increasing intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) through the activation of CaV1.3 L-type Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release from ryanodine receptor-mediated internal stores. In the current study, we explored the underlying mechanisms with various techniques including Ca(2+)- and Cl(-)-imaging and extracellular single-unit recording. Our hypothesis was that histamine causes Cl(-) efflux through cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to elicit membrane depolarization needed for the activation of CaV1.3 Ca(2+) channels in SCN neurons. We found that histamine elicited Cl(-) efflux and increased [Ca(2+)]i in dissociated mouse SCN cells. Both of these events were suppressed by bumetanide [Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter isotype 1 (NKCC1) blocker], CFTRinh-172 (CFTR inhibitor), gallein (Gβγ protein inhibitor) and H89 [protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor]. By itself, H1R activation with 2-pyridylethylamine increased the level of cAMP in the SCN and this regulation was prevented by gallein. Finally, histamine-evoked phase shifts of the circadian neural activity rhythm in the mouse SCN slice were blocked by bumetanide, CFTRinh-172, gallein or H89 and were not observed in NKCC1 or CFTR KO mice. Taken together, these results indicate that histamine recruits the H1R-Gβγ-cAMP/PKA pathway in the SCN neurons to activate CaV1.3 channels through CFTR-mediated Cl(-) efflux and ultimately to phase-shift the circadian clock. This pathway and NKCC1 may well be potential targets for agents designed to treat problems resulting from the disturbance of the circadian system.

  11. Circadian Tick-Talking Across the Neuroendocrine System and Suprachiasmatic Nuclei Circuits: The Enigmatic Communication Between the Molecular and Electrical Membrane Clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, M D C

    2015-07-01

    As with many processes in nature, appropriate timing in biological systems is of paramount importance. In the neuroendocrine system, the efficacy of hormonal influence on major bodily functions, such as reproduction, metabolism and growth, relies on timely communication within and across many of the brain's homeostatic systems. The activity of these circuits is tightly orchestrated with the animal's internal physiological demands and external solar cycle by a master circadian clock. In mammals, this master clock is located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), where the ensemble activity of thousands of clock neurones generates and communicates circadian time cues to the rest of the brain and body. Many regions of the brain, including areas with neuroendocrine function, also contain local daily clocks that can provide feedback signals to the SCN. Although much is known about the molecular processes underpinning endogenous circadian rhythm generation in SCN neurones and, to a lesser extent, extra-SCN cells, the electrical membrane clock that acts in partnership with the molecular clockwork to communicate circadian timing across the brain is poorly understood. The present review focuses on some circadian aspects of reproductive neuroendocrinology and processes involved in circadian rhythm communication in the SCN, aiming to identify key gaps in our knowledge of cross-talk between our daily master clock and neuroendocrine function. The intention is to highlight our surprisingly limited understanding of their interaction in the hope that this will stimulate future work in these areas. © 2015 The Author. Journal of Neuroendocrinology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  12. Aquaporins in desert rodent physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannabecker, Thomas L

    2015-08-01

    Desert rodents face a sizeable challenge in maintaining salt and water homeostasis due to their life in an arid environment. A number of their organ systems exhibit functional characteristics that limit water loss above that which occurs in non-desert species under similar conditions. These systems include renal, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, nasal, and skin epithelia. The desert rodent kidney preserves body water by producing a highly concentrated urine that reaches a maximum osmolality nearly three times that of the common laboratory rat. The precise mechanism by which urine is concentrated in any mammal is unknown. Insights into the process may be more apparent in species that produce highly concentrated urine. Aquaporin water channels play a fundamental role in water transport in several desert rodent organ systems. The role of aquaporins in facilitating highly effective water preservation in desert rodents is only beginning to be explored. The organ systems of desert rodents and their associated AQPs are described. © 2015 Marine Biological Laboratory.

  13. Neurogenetics of Aggressive Behavior – Studies in Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Aki; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is observed in many animal species, such as insects, fish, lizards, frogs, and most mammals including humans. This wide range of conservation underscores the importance of aggressive behavior in the animals’ survival and fitness, and the likely heritability of this behavior. Although typical patterns of aggressive behavior differ between species, there are several concordances in the neurobiology of aggression among rodents, primates, and humans. Studies with rodent models may eventually help us to understand the neurogenetic architecture of aggression in humans. However, it is important to recognize the difference between the ecological and ethological significance of aggressive behavior (species-typical aggression) and maladaptive violence (escalated aggression) when applying the findings of aggression research using animal models to human or veterinary medicine. Well-studied rodent models for aggressive behavior in the laboratory setting include the mouse (Mus musculus), rat (Rattus norvegicus), hamster (Mesocricetus auratus), and prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). The neural circuits of rodent aggression have been gradually elucidated by several techniques e.g. immunohistochemistry of immediate-early gene (c-Fos) expression, intracranial drug microinjection, in vivo microdialysis, and optogenetics techniques. Also, evidence accumulated from the analysis of gene-knockout mice shows the involvement of several genes in aggression. Here we review the brain circuits that have been implicated in aggression, such as the hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and olfactory system. We then discuss the roles of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), major inhibitory and excitatory amino acids in the brain, as well as their receptors, in controlling aggressive behavior, focusing mainly on recent findings. At the end of this chapter, we discuss how genes can be identified that underlie

  14. Oculoscopy in Rabbits and Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jekl, Vladimir; Hauptman, Karel; Knotek, Zdenek

    2015-09-01

    Ophthalmic diseases are common in rabbits and rodents. Fast and definitive diagnosis is imperative for successful treatment of ocular diseases. Ophthalmic examination in rabbits and rodents can be challenging. Oculoscopy offers great magnification for the examination of the ocular structures in such animals, including the evaluation of cornea, anterior eye chamber, limbus, iris, lens, and retina. To date, oculoscopy has been described only sporadically and/or under experimental conditions. This article describes the oculoscopy technique, normal and abnormal ocular findings, and the most common eye disorders diagnosed with the aid of endoscopy in rabbits and rodents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. NPY and VGF Immunoreactivity Increased in the Arcuate Nucleus, but Decreased in the Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, of Type-II Diabetic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saderi, Nadia; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto; Avendaño-Pradel, Rafael; Basualdo, Maria del Carmen; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Chávez-Macías, Laura; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2012-01-01

    Ample animal studies demonstrate that neuropeptides NPY and α-MSH expressed in Arcuate Nucleus and Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, modulate glucose homeostasis and food intake. In contrast is the absence of data validating these observations for human disease. Here we compare the post mortem immunoreactivity of the metabolic neuropeptides NPY, αMSH and VGF in the infundibular nucleus, and brainstem of 11 type-2 diabetic and 11 non-diabetic individuals. α-MSH, NPY and tyrosine hydroxylase in human brain are localized in the same areas as in rodent brain. The similar distribution of NPY, α-MSH and VGF indicated that these neurons in the human brain may share similar functionality as in the rodent brain. The number of NPY and VGF immuno positive cells was increased in the infundibular nucleus of diabetic subjects in comparison to non-diabetic controls. In contrast, NPY and VGF were down regulated in the Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius of diabetic patients. These results suggest an activation of NPY producing neurons in the arcuate nucleus, which, according to animal experimental studies, is related to a catabolic state and might be the basis for increased hepatic glucose production in type-2 diabetes. PMID:22808091

  16. Study of Relativistic Nucleus - Nucleus Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the experiment is to survey the reaction mechanisms involved in the collision of 60~GeV/nucleon and 200~GeV/nucleon light ions ($^{16}$0 and $^{32}$S provided by a new GSI-LBL injector) with different nuclei, to determine the stopping power of nuclear matter and to search for evidence of the formation of quark matter by comparison to hadron-nucleus reactions at the same incident energies. \\\\ The experimental set-up consists of a 2 m Streamer Chamber in the Vertex Magnet used to detect all the charged particles emerging from the interaction as well as the neutral strange particles that decay inside the chamber. The high energy of the forward-going particles are detected by four sets of calorimeters. A highly segmented Photon Position Detector (PPD) backed up by a 240 segment Ring Calorimeter will cover one unit of rapidity around mid-rapidity. An Intermediate Calorimeter will cover the rest of the forward phase space except for the region around beam rapidity, where a Veto Calorimeter will detect be...

  17. A pomeron approach to hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus 'soft' interaction at high energy

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarenko, S; Levin, E; Maor, U

    2001-01-01

    We formulate a generalization of the Glauber formalism for hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions based on the pomeron approach to high-energy interaction. Our treatment is based on two physical assumptions (i.e. two small parameters): (i) that only sufficiently small distances contribute to the pomeron structure; and (ii) the triple-pomeron vertex G sub 3 sub P /g sub P sub N <<1 (where g sub P sub N is the pomeron-nucleon vertex) is small. A systematic method is developed for calculating the total, elastic and diffractive dissociation cross sections as well as the survival probability of large rapidity gap processes and inclusive observables, both for hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Our approach suggests saturation of the density of the produced hadrons in nucleus-nucleus collisions, the value of the saturation density turns out to be large.

  18. Regulation of circadian and acute activity levels by the murine suprachiasmatic nuclei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thijs Houben

    Full Text Available The suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN coordinate the daily sleep-wake cycle by generating a circadian rhythm in electrical impulse frequency. While period and phase of the SCN rhythm have been considered as major output parameters, we propose that the waveform of the rhythm of the SCN also has significance. Using implanted micro-electrodes, we recorded SCN impulse frequency in freely moving mice and manipulated its circadian waveform by exposing mice to light-dark (LD cycle durations ranging from 22 hours (LD 11:11 to 26 hours (LD 13:13. Adaptation to long T-cycles (>24 h resulted in a trough in electrical activity at the beginning of the night while in short T-cycles (<24 h, SCN activity reached a trough at the end of night. In all T-cycle durations, the intensity of behavioral activity was maximal during the trough of SCN electrical activity and correlated negatively with increasing levels of SCN activity. Interestingly, small changes in T-cycle duration could induce large changes in waveform and in the time of trough (about 3.5 h, and accordingly in the timing of behavioral activity. At a smaller timescale (minutes to hours, we observed a negative correlation between SCN activity and behavioral activity, and acute silencing of SCN neurons by tetrodotoxin (TTX during the inactive phase of the animal triggered behavioral activity. Thus, the SCN electrical activity levels appear crucially involved in determining the temporal profile of behavioral activity and controls behavior beyond the circadian time domain.

  19. Nucleus-Nucleus Collision as Superposition of Nucleon-Nucleus Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlova, G.I.; Adamovich, M.I.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Alexandrov, Y.A.; Andreeva, N.P.; Badyal, S.K.; Basova, E.S.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhasin, A.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bradnova, V.; Bubnov, V.I.; Cai, X.; Chasnikov, I.Y.; Chen, G.M.; Chernova, L.P.; Chernyavsky, M.M.; Dhamija, S.; Chenawi, K.El; Felea, D.; Feng, S.Q.; Gaitinov, A.S.; Ganssauge, E.R.; Garpman, S.; Gerassimov, S.G.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Grote, J.; Gulamov, K.G.; Gupta, S.K.; Gupta, V.K.; Henjes, U.; Jakobsson, B.; Kanygina, E.K.; Karabova, M.; Kharlamov, S.P.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Krasnov, S.A.; Kumar, V.; Larionova, V.G.; Li, Y.X.; Liu, L.S.; Lokanathan, S.; Lord, J.J.; Lukicheva, N.S.; Lu, Y.; Luo, S.B.; Mangotra, L.K.; Manhas, I.; Mittra, I.S.; Musaeva, A.K.; Nasyrov, S.Z.; Navotny, V.S.; Nystrand, J.; Otterlund, I.; Peresadko, N.G.; Qian, W.Y.; Qin, Y.M.; Raniwala, R.; Rao, N.K.; Roeper, M.; Rusakova, V.V.; Saidkhanov, N.; Salmanova, N.A.; Seitimbetov, A.M.; Sethi, R.; Singh, B.; Skelding, D.; Soderstrem, K.; Stenlund, E.; Svechnikova, L.N.; Svensson, T.; Tawfik, A.M.; Tothova, M.; Tretyakova, M.I.; Trofimova, T.P.; Tuleeva, U.I.; Vashisht, Vani; Vokal, S.; Vrlakova, J.; Wang, H.Q.; Wang, X.R.; Weng, Z.Q.; Wilkes, R.J.; Yang, C.B.; Yin, Z.B.; Yu, L.Z.; Zhang, D.H.; Zheng, P.Y.; Zhokhova, S.I.; Zhou, D.C

    1999-03-01

    Angular distributions of charged particles produced in {sup 16}O and {sup 32}S collisions with nuclear track emulsion were studied at momenta 4.5 and 200 A GeV/c. Comparison with the angular distributions of charged particles produced in proton-nucleus collisions at the same momentum allows to draw the conclusion, that the angular distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions can be seen as superposition of the angular distributions in nucleon-nucleus collisions taken at the same impact parameter b{sub NA}, that is mean impact parameter between the participating projectile nucleons and the center of the target nucleus.

  20. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, H.; /Tufts U.; Garvey, G.; /Los Alamos; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  1. Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  2. Photic stimulation of the suprachiasmatic nucleus via the non-visual optic system. A gene expression study in the blind Crx (-/-) mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovsing, Louise; Møller, Morten

    2014-01-01

    photoreceptors. At zeitgeber time 16, the Crx (-/-) and wild-type mice were exposed to 1 h of light. This resulted in a strong up-regulation of the immediate early genes Nr4a1, Erg, and Rrad in the SCN of both genotypes. Light stimulation during the subjective night resulted in a strong up-regulation of c...... to light during the subjective night is an immediate expression of several early response genes in the SCN. We show, by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, that the amount of melanopsin mRNA in the retinal ganglion cells is preserved in the blind Crx (-/-) mouse with degenerated classic......-fos in both genotypes with a significantly higher up-regulation in the blind Crx (-/-) mouse. Expression of Grp and Vip, the genes for two classic peptides located in the SCN, was not influenced by light stimulation. The data strongly indicate the involvement of the melanopsin-based non-visual optic system...

  3. Light-induced c-Fos expression in suprachiasmatic nuclei neurons targeting the paracentricular nucleus of the hamster hypothalamus: phase dependence and immunochemical identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Inger Christine; Møller, Morten; Larsen, Philip Just

    2002-01-01

    Neurobiology, circadian retrograde tracing, cholera toxin subunit B, vasopressin, gastrin releasing peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide......Neurobiology, circadian retrograde tracing, cholera toxin subunit B, vasopressin, gastrin releasing peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide...

  4. Direct link from the suprachiasmatic nucleus to hypothalamic neurons projecting to the spinal cord: a combined tracing study using cholera toxin subunit B and Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrang, Niels; Mikkelsen, Jens D.; Larsen, Philip J.

    1997-01-01

    Neuroanatomi, circadian rhythms, sympathetic nervous system, pineal gland, double immunocytochemistry, rat......Neuroanatomi, circadian rhythms, sympathetic nervous system, pineal gland, double immunocytochemistry, rat...

  5. Rescattering effects and intermittent exponents in nucleus-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajares, C. (Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. de Particulas Elementales)

    1991-04-11

    It is shown that the rescattering in nucleus-nucleus collisions provides a natural branching mechanism which explains the dependence of the intermittent exponents on the energy, projectile and target. The possibility of finding some new coherent phenomena by studying the dependence of the intermittent exponents on the number of collisions is discussed. (orig.).

  6. Forecasting rodent outbreaks in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leirs, Herwig; Verhagen, Ron; Verheyen, Walter

    1996-01-01

    1. Rainfall data were collated for years preceding historical outbreaks of Mastomys rats in East Africa in order to test the hypothesis that such outbreaks occur after long dry periods. 2. Rodent outbreaks were generally not preceded by long dry periods. 3. Population dynamics of Mastomys natalen...

  7. The Ethics of Rodent Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerburg, B.G.; Brom, F.W.A.; Kijlstra, A.

    2008-01-01

    Because western societies generally see animals as objects of moral concern, demands have been made on the way they are treated, e.g. during animal experimentation. In the case of rodent pests, however, inhumane control methods are often applied. This inconsistency in the human-animal relationship

  8. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control. ...

  9. The intercalatus nucleus of Staderini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Rutilio Staderini was one of the leading Italian anatomists of the twentieth century, together with some scientists, such as Giulio Chiarugi, Giovanni Vitali, and others. He was also a member of a new generation of anatomists. They had continued the tradition of the most famous Italian scientists, which started from the Renaissance up until the nineteenth century. Although he carried out important studies of neuroanatomy and comparative anatomy, as well as embryology, his name is rarely remembered by most medical historians. His name is linked to the nucleus he discovered: the Staderini nucleus or intercalated nucleus, a collection of nerve cells in the medulla oblongata located lateral to the hypoglossal nucleus. This article focuses on the biography of the neuroanatomist as well as the nucleus that carries his name and his other research, especially on comparative anatomy and embryology.

  10. Afferent projections to the hamster intergeniculate leaflet demonstrated by retrograde and anterograde tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrang, Niels; Mrosovsky, N.; Mikkelsen, Jens D.

    2003-01-01

    Circadian rhythms, Suprachiasmatic nucleus, Cholera toxin B, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, Nonphotic......Circadian rhythms, Suprachiasmatic nucleus, Cholera toxin B, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, Nonphotic...

  11. The subthalamic nucleus, Part I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marani, Enrico; Heida, Tjitske; Lakke, Egbert A.J.F.; Usunoff, Kamen G.

    2008-01-01

    Part I. Development, cytology, topography and connections. This monograph on the subthalamic nucleus accentuates in Part I the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections. The light and electron microscopical cytology

  12. Heavy flavors in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardi Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A multi-step setup for heavy-flavor studies in high-energy nucleus-nucleus (AA and proton-nucleus (pA collisions is presented. The propagation of the heavy quarks in the medium is described in a framework provided by the relativistic Langevin equation, here solved using weak-coupling transport coefficients. Successively, the heavy quarks hadronize in the medium. We compute the nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow parameter of the final Dmesons both in AA and in pA collisions and compare our results to experimental data.

  13. Mapping the co-localization of the circadian proteins PER2 and BMAL1 with enkephalin and substance P throughout the rodent forebrain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Frederick

    Full Text Available Despite rhythmic expression of clock genes being found throughout the central nervous system, very little is known about their function outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Determining the pattern of clock gene expression across neuronal subpopulations is a key step in understanding their regulation and how they may influence the functions of various brain structures. Using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, we quantified the co-expression of the clock proteins BMAL1 and PER2 with two neuropeptides, Substance P (SubP and Enkephalin (Enk, expressed in distinct neuronal populations throughout the forebrain. Regions examined included the limbic forebrain (dorsal striatum, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, stria terminalis, thalamus medial habenula of the thalamus, paraventricular nucleus and arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and the olfactory bulb. In most regions examined, BMAL1 was homogeneously expressed in nearly all neurons (~90%, and PER2 was expressed in a slightly lower proportion of cells. There was no specific correlation to SubP- or Enk- expressing subpopulations. The olfactory bulb was unique in that PER2 and BMAL1 were expressed in a much smaller percentage of cells, and Enk was rarely found in the same cells that expressed the clock proteins (SubP was undetectable. These results indicate that clock genes are not unique to specific cell types, and further studies will be required to determine the factors that contribute to the regulation of clock gene expression throughout the brain.

  14. Default-mode-like network activation in awake rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaymin Upadhyay

    Full Text Available During wakefulness and in absence of performing tasks or sensory processing, the default-mode network (DMN, an intrinsic central nervous system (CNS network, is in an active state. Non-human primate and human CNS imaging studies have identified the DMN in these two species. Clinical imaging studies have shown that the pattern of activity within the DMN is often modulated in various disease states (e.g., Alzheimer's, schizophrenia or chronic pain. However, whether the DMN exists in awake rodents has not been characterized. The current data provides evidence that awake rodents also possess 'DMN-like' functional connectivity, but only subsequent to habituation to what is initially a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI environment as well as physical restraint. Specifically, the habituation process spanned across four separate scanning sessions (Day 2, 4, 6 and 8. At Day 8, significant (p<0.05 functional connectivity was observed amongst structures such as the anterior cingulate (seed region, retrosplenial, parietal, and hippocampal cortices. Prior to habituation (Day 2, functional connectivity was only detected (p<0.05 amongst CNS structures known to mediate anxiety (i.e., anterior cingulate (seed region, posterior hypothalamic area, amygdala and parabracial nucleus. In relating functional connectivity between cingulate-default-mode and cingulate-anxiety structures across Days 2-8, a significant inverse relationship (r = -0.65, p = 0.0004 was observed between these two functional interactions such that increased cingulate-DMN connectivity corresponded to decreased cingulate anxiety network connectivity. This investigation demonstrates that the cingulate is an important component of both the rodent DMN-like and anxiety networks.

  15. Reproductive Disorders in Pet Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorell, Jaume

    2017-05-01

    Reproduction diseases are common presentations in small rodents. Some can be presented to the clinician as an emergency where a fast and effective treatment is required. This article presents an overview of reproductive disorders in these species. Diseases affecting the ovary, uterus, testicles, and mammary gland are developed in rats, mice, hamsters, and gerbils: inflammatory, infectious, and neoplasia. Clinical signs, diagnosis, and treatment information are included. Some specific indications about the surgical reproduction procedures are described. Literature regarding reproductive disorders exists for squirrels and prairie dogs. Brief information about the normal anatomy of the reproductive system is given. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evidence-Based Advances in Rodent Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jekl, Vladimir; Hauptman, Karel; Knotek, Zdenek

    2017-09-01

    The number of exotic companion pet rodents seen in veterinary practices is growing very rapidly. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association's surveys, more than 2,093,000 pet rodents were kept in US households in 2007 and in 2012 it was more than 2,349,000 animals. This article summarizes the most important evidence-based knowledge in exotic pet rodents (diagnostics of the hyperadrenocorticism in guinea pigs, pituitary tumors in rats, urolithiasis in guinea pigs, use of itopride as prokinetics, use of deslorelin acetate in rodents, cause of dental disease, and prevention of mammary gland tumors in rats). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rodent models for human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, Thierry F

    2015-07-15

    One of the factors limiting the translation of knowledge from preclinical studies to the clinic has been the limitations of in vivo diseases models. Except in the case of highly controlled and regulated clinical trials, geneticists and scientists do not use humans for their experimental investigations because of the obvious risk to life. Instead, they use various animal, fungal, bacterial, and plant species as model organisms for their studies. Amongst these model organisms, rodent models are the most used due to the easiness for the experiments and the possibility to modify genetically these model animals. Nevertheless, due to the fact that animal models typically do not contract the same genetic diseases as people, so scientists must alter their genomes to induce human disease states and to know what kind of mutation causes the disease. In this brief review, we will discuss the interests of rodent models that have been developed to simulate human pathologies, focusing in models that employ xenografts and genetic modification. Within the framework of genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models, we will review some of the current genetic strategies for modeling diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Fast mixing condensation nucleus counter

    OpenAIRE

    Flagan, Richard C.; Wang, Jian

    2003-01-01

    A fast mixing condensation nucleus counter useful for detecting particles entrained in a sample gas stream is provided. The fast mixing condensation nucleus counter comprises a detector and a mixing condensation device having a mixing chamber adapted to allow gas to flow from an inlet to an outlet, wherein the outlet directs the gas flow to the detector. The mixing chamber has an inlet for introducing vapor-laden gas into the chamber and at least one nozzle for introducing a sample gas having...

  19. Besnoitiosis in rodents from Colorado. [Parasitic infestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagle, G E; Winsor, T F; Adee, R R

    1976-01-01

    Parasitic cysts of Besnoitia jellisoni (coccidia) were found in rodents (Peromyscus maniculatus and Spermophilus tridecemlineatus) trapped in Eastern Colorado. The parasite was associated with a granulomatous inflammatory reaction in the lungs of each rodent and was disseminated in several organs from one Peromyscus. The ultrastructural appearance of the merozoites and the cyst wall formed by the host cell were studied.

  20. Thermoregulation of the subterranean rodent genus Bathyergus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The thermoregulation of the largest subterranean rodent, genus Bathyergus, comprising two species, B. suillus and B. janetta,occurring in mesic and semiarid habitats respectively, was investigated and compared with that of other subterranean rodents. Both species display low resting metabolic rates and low body ...

  1. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  2. Rodent Control: Seal Up! Trap Up! Clean Up!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... successfully trapping rodents in and around the home. Seal Up! Seal up holes inside and outside the home to ... infested areas. Before cleaning, trap the rodents and seal up any entryways to ensure that no rodents ...

  3. Rodent Models for Metabolic Syndrome Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K. Panchal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rodents are widely used to mimic human diseases to improve understanding of the causes and progression of disease symptoms and to test potential therapeutic interventions. Chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes and hypertension, together known as the metabolic syndrome, are causing increasing morbidity and mortality. To control these diseases, research in rodent models that closely mimic the changes in humans is essential. This review will examine the adequacy of the many rodent models of metabolic syndrome to mimic the causes and progression of the disease in humans. The primary criterion will be whether a rodent model initiates all of the signs, especially obesity, diabetes, hypertension and dysfunction of the heart, blood vessels, liver and kidney, primarily by diet since these are the diet-induced signs in humans with metabolic syndrome. We conclude that the model that comes closest to fulfilling this criterion is the high carbohydrate, high fat-fed male rodent.

  4. Casein kinase 1 delta (CK1delta regulates period length of the mouse suprachiasmatic circadian clock in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Etchegaray

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Casein kinase 1 delta (CK1delta plays a more prominent role in the regulation of circadian cycle length than its homologue casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1epsilon in peripheral tissues such as liver and embryonic fibroblasts. Mice lacking CK1delta die shortly after birth, so it has not been possible to assess the impact of loss of CK1delta on behavioral rhythms controlled by the master circadian oscillator in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, mPER2::LUCIFERASE bioluminescence rhythms were monitored from SCN explants collected from neonatal mice. The data demonstrate that SCN explants from neonatal CK1delta-deficient mice oscillate, but with a longer circadian period than littermate controls. The cycle length of rhythms recorded from neonatal SCN explants of CK1epsilon-deficient mice did not differ from control explants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results indicate that CK1delta plays a more prominent role than CK1epsilon in the maintenance of 24-hour rhythms in the master circadian oscillator.

  5. Casein kinase 1 delta (CK1delta) regulates period length of the mouse suprachiasmatic circadian clock in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchegaray, Jean-Pierre; Yu, Elizabeth A; Indic, Premananda; Dallmann, Robert; Weaver, David R

    2010-04-22

    Casein kinase 1 delta (CK1delta) plays a more prominent role in the regulation of circadian cycle length than its homologue casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1epsilon) in peripheral tissues such as liver and embryonic fibroblasts. Mice lacking CK1delta die shortly after birth, so it has not been possible to assess the impact of loss of CK1delta on behavioral rhythms controlled by the master circadian oscillator in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). In the present study, mPER2::LUCIFERASE bioluminescence rhythms were monitored from SCN explants collected from neonatal mice. The data demonstrate that SCN explants from neonatal CK1delta-deficient mice oscillate, but with a longer circadian period than littermate controls. The cycle length of rhythms recorded from neonatal SCN explants of CK1epsilon-deficient mice did not differ from control explants. The results indicate that CK1delta plays a more prominent role than CK1epsilon in the maintenance of 24-hour rhythms in the master circadian oscillator.

  6. Circadian control of kisspeptin and a gated GnRH response mediate the preovulatory luteinizing hormone surge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Wilbur P; Jarjisian, Stephan G; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    In spontaneously ovulating rodents, the preovulatory LH surge is initiated on the day of proestrus by a timed, stimulatory signal originating from the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The present studies explored whether kisspeptin is part of the essential neural circuit link...

  7. Dim light at night disturbs the daily sleep-wake cycle in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenvers, Dirk Jan; van Dorp, Rick; Foppen, Ewout; Mendoza, Jorge; Opperhuizen, Anne-Loes; Fliers, Eric; Bisschop, Peter H; Meijer, Johanna H; Kalsbeek, A.; Deboer, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to light at night (LAN) is associated with insomnia in humans. Light provides the main input to the master clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) that coordinates the sleep-wake cycle. We aimed to develop a rodent model for the effects of LAN on sleep. Therefore, we exposed

  8. Heavy-ion nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, M A; Haque, S

    2003-01-01

    Heavy ion-nucleus scattering is an excellent laboratory to probe high spin phenomena, exotic nuclei and for the analysis of various exit channels. The Strong Absorption Model or the generalized diffraction models, which are semi-classical in nature, have been employed in the description of various heavy ion-nucleus scattering phenomena with reasonable success. But one needs to treat the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically in the Wave Mechanical picture for the appropriate description of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering phenomena. We have brought the mathematics for the cross-section of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering to an analytic expression taking account of the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically. sup 9 Be, sup 1 sup 6 O, sup 2 sup 0 Ne and sup 3 sup 2 S heavy-ion beams elastic scattering from sup 2 sup 8 Si, sup 2 sup 4 Mg and sup 4 sup 0 Ca target nuclei at various projectile energies over the range 20-151 MeV have been analysed in terms of the 2-paramet...

  9. Photoperiodic Co-Regulation of Kisspeptin, Neurokinin B and Dynorphin in the Hypothalamus of a Seasonal Rodent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartzen-Sprauer, J; Klosen, P; Ciofi, P

    2014-01-01

    in the number of KNDy neurones under photo-inhibitory conditions. In seasonal rodents, RFamide-related peptide (RFRP) neurones of the dorsomedial hypothalamus are also critical for seasonal reproduction. Interestingly, NKB and DYN are also expressed in the dorsomedial hypothalamus but do not co...... hypothalamus. In the arcuate nucleus, NKB and DYN, together with Kp, are down-regulated under a short photoperiod, whereas, in the dorsomedial hypothalamus, NKB and DYN are up-regulated under a short photoperiod....

  10. Wild Rodent Ectoparasites Collected from Northwestern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabihollah Zarei

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rodents play an important role as reservoir of some pathogens, and the host of some ectoparasites as well. These ectoparasites can transmit rodents’ pathogens to human or animals. The aim of this study was to assess the distribution and infestation load of ectoparasites on rodents in Meshkin-Shahr District, northwestern Iran.Method: Rodents were captured using baited live traps in spring 2014 from Meshkin-Shahr District and were trans­ferred to the laboratory for identification to the species level. Their ectoparasites were collected, mounted and identi­fied.Results: Three rodent species including Meriones persicus (74%, Mus musculus (16.9% and Cricetulus migrato­rius (9% were identified. Among all rodents, 185 specimens (90.69% were infested with a total of 521 ectopara­sites. Overall, 10 arthropods species were collected, including fleas (97.6%, one mite (1.6% and one louse species (0.6% as follows: Xenopsylla nubica, X. astia, X. buxtoni, X. cheopis, Nosopsyllus fasciatus, N. iranus, Cten­ocephalides felis, Ctenophthalmus rettigismiti, Ornithonyssus sp and one species of genus Polyplax. The most prev­alent ectoparasites species was X. nubica (89%.Conclusion: Nearly all rodent species were infested with Xenopsylla species. Monitoring of ectoparasites on infested rodents is very important for awareness and early warning towards control of arthropod-borne diseases.

  11. Can rodents conceive hyperbolic spaces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio; Troiani, Francesca; Stella, Federico; Treves, Alessandro

    2015-06-06

    The grid cells discovered in the rodent medial entorhinal cortex have been proposed to provide a metric for Euclidean space, possibly even hardwired in the embryo. Yet, one class of models describing the formation of grid unit selectivity is entirely based on developmental self-organization, and as such it predicts that the metric it expresses should reflect the environment to which the animal has adapted. We show that, according to self-organizing models, if raised in a non-Euclidean hyperbolic cage rats should be able to form hyperbolic grids. For a given range of grid spacing relative to the radius of negative curvature of the hyperbolic surface, such grids are predicted to appear as multi-peaked firing maps, in which each peak has seven neighbours instead of the Euclidean six, a prediction that can be tested in experiments. We thus demonstrate that a useful universal neuronal metric, in the sense of a multi-scale ruler and compass that remain unaltered when changing environments, can be extended to other than the standard Euclidean plane. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  12. The Organization of the Suprachiasmatic Circadian Pacemaker of the Rat and Its Regulation by Neurotransmitters and Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-02

    COWAN, and E. G. JONES asmatic nucleus of rat: Intrinsic anatomy. J. Comp. (1974) An autoradiographic study of the efferent con- Neurol. 191: 661-702...Expericilt 4ý5: 696-702 Prsser RA 14nI\\ Gillette MU 198𔄃 Tlhe mnamm-ralianl circadiani clock ini tlic r(supracl asmatic iniclei is rcset ini vitro t

  13. Absence of jet quenching in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizides, Constantin; Morsch, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Medium effects on the production of high-pT particles in nucleus-nucleus (AA) collisions are generally quantified by the nuclear modification factor (RAA), defined to be unity in absence of nuclear effects. Modeling particle production including a nucleon-nucleon impact parameter dependence, we demonstrate that RAA at midrapidity in peripheral AA collisions can be significantly affected by event selection and geometry biases. Even without jet quenching and shadowing, these biases cause an apparent suppression for RAA in peripheral collisions, and are relevant for all types of hard probes and all collision energies. Our studies indicate that calculations of jet quenching in peripheral AA collisions should account for the biases, or else they will overestimate the relevance of parton energy loss. Similarly, expectations of parton energy loss in light-heavy collision systems based on comparison with apparent suppression seen in peripheral RAA should be revised. Our interpretation of the peripheral RAA data would unify observations for lighter collision systems or lower energies where significant values of elliptic flow are observed despite the absence of strong jet quenching.

  14. The fecal viral flora of wild rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung G Phan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequent interactions of rodents with humans make them a common source of zoonotic infections. To obtain an initial unbiased measure of the viral diversity in the enteric tract of wild rodents we sequenced partially purified, randomly amplified viral RNA and DNA in the feces of 105 wild rodents (mouse, vole, and rat collected in California and Virginia. We identified in decreasing frequency sequences related to the mammalian viruses families Circoviridae, Picobirnaviridae, Picornaviridae, Astroviridae, Parvoviridae, Papillomaviridae, Adenoviridae, and Coronaviridae. Seventeen small circular DNA genomes containing one or two replicase genes distantly related to the Circoviridae representing several potentially new viral families were characterized. In the Picornaviridae family two new candidate genera as well as a close genetic relative of the human pathogen Aichi virus were characterized. Fragments of the first mouse sapelovirus and picobirnaviruses were identified and the first murine astrovirus genome was characterized. A mouse papillomavirus genome and fragments of a novel adenovirus and adenovirus-associated virus were also sequenced. The next largest fraction of the rodent fecal virome was related to insect viruses of the Densoviridae, Iridoviridae, Polydnaviridae, Dicistroviriade, Bromoviridae, and Virgaviridae families followed by plant virus-related sequences in the Nanoviridae, Geminiviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Secoviridae, Partitiviridae, Tymoviridae, Alphaflexiviridae, and Tombusviridae families reflecting the largely insect and plant rodent diet. Phylogenetic analyses of full and partial viral genomes therefore revealed many previously unreported viral species, genera, and families. The close genetic similarities noted between some rodent and human viruses might reflect past zoonoses. This study increases our understanding of the viral diversity in wild rodents and highlights the large number of still uncharacterized viruses in

  15. Determination of Coil Inductances Cylindrical Iron Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azeddine Mazouz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the investigation and development of a structure and performance characteristics of a coil iron nucleus cylindrical (C.I.N.C. The coil iron nucleus cylindrical is a nonlinear electro radio in which the moving of the nucleus in a sense or in other causes change in inductance and can reach extreme values at the superposition of nucleus and coil centers. The variation of the inductance and the degree of freedom of movement of the nucleus can lead to a device with electromechanical conversion The aim of this paper is the determination and visualization of self inductance and mutual of the (C.I.N.C based on geometric dimensions and the displacement of the nucleus.  

  16. Rodent Models of Non-classical Progesterone Action Regulating Ovulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda A. Mittelman-Smith

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming clear that steroid hormones act not only by binding to nuclear receptors that associate with specific response elements in the nucleus but also by binding to receptors on the cell membrane. In this newly discovered manner, steroid hormones can initiate intracellular signaling cascades which elicit rapid effects such as release of internal calcium stores and activation of kinases. We have learned much about the translocation and signaling of steroid hormone receptors from investigations into estrogen receptor α, which can be trafficked to, and signal from, the cell membrane. It is now clear that progesterone (P4 can also elicit effects that cannot be exclusively explained by transcriptional changes. Similar to E2 and its receptors, P4 can initiate signaling at the cell membrane, both through progesterone receptor and via a host of newly discovered membrane receptors (e.g., membrane progesterone receptors, progesterone receptor membrane components. This review discusses the parallels between neurotransmitter-like E2 action and the more recently investigated non-classical P4 signaling, in the context of reproductive behaviors in the rodent.

  17. Contributions of the Paraventricular Thalamic Nucleus in the Regulation of Stress, Motivation, and Mood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Tai Hsu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to describe how the function and connections of the paraventricular thalamic nucleus (Pa may play a role in the regulation of stress and negative emotional behavior. Located in the dorsal midline thalamus, the Pa is heavily innervated by serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, corticotropin-releasing hormone, and orexins, and is the only thalamic nucleus connected to the group of structures comprising the amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, nucleus accumbens, and infralimbic/subgenual anterior cingulate cortex. These neurotransmitter systems and structures are involved in regulating motivation and mood, and display abnormal functioning in several psychiatric disorders including anxiety, substance use, and major depressive disorders. Furthermore, rodent studies show that the Pa is consistently and potently activated following a variety of stressors and has a unique role in regulating responses to chronic stressors. These observations provide a compelling rationale for investigating the Pa in the link between stress and negative emotional behavior, and for including the Pa in the neural pathways of stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  18. Hadron-nucleus bound states

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, T

    2000-01-01

    A new type of nuclear spectroscopy to study hadron-nucleus bound states is described. The first successful experiment was to search for deeply bound pi sup - states in heavy nuclei using the sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Pb(d, sup 3 He) reaction at GSI, in which a narrow peak arising from the 2p pi sup - orbital coupled with the neutron-hole states was observed at 135 MeV excitation energy. An improved experiment has just been carried out to separately identify the 1s and 2p pi sup - states. These experiments provide important information on the local potential strength, from which the effective mass of pi sup - is deduced to be 20 MeV. This method will be extended to search for eta and omega bound states as well as for K sup - bound states. The advantage of the bound-state spectroscopy versus invariant mass spectroscopy is emphasized.

  19. Action potentials: to the nucleus and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Ramendra N; Dudek, Serena M

    2008-04-01

    The neuronal nucleus is now widely accepted as playing a vital role in maintaining long-term changes in synaptic effectiveness. To act, however, the nucleus must be appropriately relayed with information regarding the latest round of synaptic plasticity. Several constraints of doing so in a neuron pertain to the often significant spatial distance of synapses from the nucleus and the number of synapses required for such a signal to reach functional levels in the nucleus. Largely based on the sensitivity of transcriptional responses to NMDA receptor antagonists, it has been postulated that the signals are physically relayed by biochemical messengers from the synapse to the nucleus. Alternatively, a second, less often considered but equally viable method of signal transduction may be initiated by action potentials generated proximal to the nucleus, wherefrom the signal can be relayed directly by calcium or indirectly by biochemical second messengers. We consider action potential-dependent signaling to the nucleus to have its own computational advantages over the synapse-to-nucleus signal for some functions. This minireview summarizes the logic and experimental support for these two modes of signaling and attempts to validate the action potential model as playing an important role in transcriptional regulation relating specifically to long-term synaptic plasticity.

  20. Object Recognition Memory and the Rodent Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Nicola J.; Gaskin, Stephane; Squire, Larry R.; Clark, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    In rodents, the novel object recognition task (NOR) has become a benchmark task for assessing recognition memory. Yet, despite its widespread use, a consensus has not developed about which brain structures are important for task performance. We assessed both the anterograde and retrograde effects of hippocampal lesions on performance in the NOR…

  1. BEHAVIOURAL STUDIES ON SOME RHODESIAN RODENTS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field studies (Lake Kariba shoreline and Salisbury) and experiments with a captive colony of 12 species of Rhodesian rodents were undertaken for a period of three years. ComparatiYll behavioural data are presented here with special reference to den and nest behaviour, group and territorial behaviour, reproductive and ...

  2. Rodent malaria parasites : genome organization & comparative genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Taco W.A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the genome organization of rodent malaria parasites (RMPs) and compare the organization and gene content of the genomes of RMPs and the human malaria parasite P. falciparum. The release of the complete genome sequence of P.

  3. Neurogenic inflammation in human and rodent skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmelz, M; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup

    2001-01-01

    The combination of vasodilation and protein extravasation following activation of nociceptors has been termed "neurogenic inflammation." In contrast to rodents, no neurogenic protein extravasation can be elicited in healthy human skin. Dermal microdialysis has considerably increased our knowledge...... about neurogenic inflammation in human skin, including the involvement of mast cells....

  4. Anaplasma phagocytophilum in livestock and small rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Lin; Cao, Wu-Chun; Jiang, Jia-Fu; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Wu, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Wen-Yi; Liu, Wei; Zuo, Shu-Qing; Cao, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Hong; Richardus, Jan H; Habbema, J Dikf

    2010-08-26

    To identify the prevalence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in both wild rodents and domestic animals and to make clear the genetic characteristics of the agents from different animals in China, a total of 105 livestock and 159 small rodents were analyzed by real-time-PCR and sequence analysis. The prevalence rate was 6.7% (7/105) and 14.5% (23/159), respectively. The nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA (rrs) from the positive livestock and rodents were identical to each other. The phylogenetic analysis based on partial A. phagocytophilum p44ESup1 gene revealed that A. phagocytophilum identified in this study was placed on a separate clade distinct from those in other continents. These findings indicated A. phagocytophilum in rodents might be able to infect livestock and intensified the threats of anaplasmosis to livestock in the area. Further studies on public health significance of the agent are worth investigation in future. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The female urine sniffing test: a novel approach for assessing reward-seeking behavior in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkesman, Oz; Scattoni, Maria Luisa; Paredes, Daniel; Tragon, Tyson; Pearson, Brandon; Shaltiel, Galit; Chen, Guang; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Manji, Husseini K

    2010-05-01

    Abnormal hedonic behavior is a key feature of many psychiatric disorders. Several paradigms measure reward-seeking behavior in rodents, but each has limitations. We describe a novel approach for monitoring reward-seeking behavior in rodents: sniffing of estrus female urine by male mice, along with number of ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) emitted during the test. The female urine sniffing test (FUST) was designed to monitor reward-seeking activity in rodents together with tests of helplessness and sweet solution preference. USVs and dopamine release from the nucleus accumbens (NAc) were recorded. Sniffing activity was measured in 1) manipulation-naive C57BL/6J and 129S1/SVImJ mice and Wistar-Kyoto rats; 2) stressed mice; 3) two groups of mice that underwent the learned helplessness paradigm-one untreated, and one treated with the SSRI citalopram; and 4) GluR6 knockout mice, known to display lithium-responsive, mania-related behaviors. Males from all three strains spent significantly longer sniffing female urine than sniffing water. Males emitted USVs and showed significantly elevated NAc dopamine levels while sniffing urine. Foot-shock stress significantly reduced female urine sniffing time. Compared with mice that did not undergo the LH paradigm, LH males spent less time sniffing female urine, and citalopram treatment alleviated this reduction. Compared with their wildtype littermates, GluR6KO males sniffed female urine longer and showed enhanced saccharin preference. In rodents, sniffing female urine is a preferred activity accompanied by biological changes previously linked to reward-seeking activities. The FUST is sensitive to behavioral and genetic manipulation and to relevant drug treatment. Copyright 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin. ...

  7. Prevalence of leptospirosis and toxoplasmosis: A study of rodents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    are rodents and cats, respectively. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of. Leptospira and Toxoplasma infections in rodents and shrews in Mikese area of Morogoro Rural District in eastern Tanzania. A total of 89 rodents and one shrew from cultivated and fallow land were tested for leptospirosis using ...

  8. Music and the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavridis, Ioannis N

    2015-03-01

    Music is a universal feature of human societies over time, mainly because it allows expression and regulation of strong emotions, thus influencing moods and evoking pleasure. The nucleus accumbens (NA), the most important pleasure center of the human brain (dominates the reward system), is the 'king of neurosciences' and dopamine (DA) can be rightfully considered as its 'crown' due to the fundamental role that this neurotransmitter plays in the brain's reward system. Purpose of this article was to review the existing literature regarding the relation between music and the NA. Studies have shown that reward value for music can be coded by activity levels in the NA, whose functional connectivity with auditory and frontal areas increases as a function of increasing musical reward. Listening to music strongly modulates activity in a network of mesolimbic structures involved in reward processing including the NA. The functional connectivity between brain regions mediating reward, autonomic and cognitive processing provides insight into understanding why listening to music is one of the most rewarding and pleasurable human experiences. Musical stimuli can significantly increase extracellular DA levels in the NA. NA DA and serotonin were found significantly higher in animals exposed to music. Finally, passive listening to unfamiliar although liked music showed activations in the NA.

  9. Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase immunoreactivity is abundantly present in human hypothalamus and posterior pituitary gland, with reduced expression in paraventricular and suprachiasmatic neurons in chronic schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Müller, Susan; Dobrowolny, Hendrik; Wolke, Carmen; Lendeckel, Uwe; Bukowska, Alicja; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Becker, Axel; Trübner, Kurt; Steiner, Johann; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2017-08-01

    The vasopressin- and oxytocin-degrading enzyme insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) is expressed in various organs including the brain. However, knowledge about its presence in human hypothalamus is fragmentary. Functionally, for a number of reasons (genetic linkage, hydrolysis of oxytocin and vasopressin, its role as angiotensin IV receptor in learning and memory and others) IRAP might play a role in schizophrenia. We studied the regional and cellular localization of IRAP in normal human brain with special emphasis on the hypothalamus and determined numerical densities of IRAP-expressing cells in the paraventricular, supraoptic and suprachiasmatic nuclei in schizophrenia patients and controls. By using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, IRAP was immunolocalized in postmortem human brains. Cell countings were performed to estimate numbers and numerical densities of IRAP immunoreactive hypothalamic neurons in schizophrenia patients and control cases. Shape, size and regional distribution of IRAP-expressing cells, as well the lack of co-localization with the glia marker glutamine synthetase, show that IRAP is expressed in neurons. IRAP immunoreactive cells were observed in the hippocampal formation, cerebral cortex, thalamus, amygdala and, abundantly, hypothalamus. Double labeling experiments (IRAP and oxytocin/neurophysin 1, IRAP with vasopressin/neurophysin 2) revealed that IRAP is present in oxytocinergic and in vasopressinergic neurons. In schizophrenia patients, the numerical density of IRAP-expressing neurons in the paraventricular and the suprachiasmatic nuclei is significantly reduced, which might be associated with the reduction in neurophysin-containing neurons in these nuclei in schizophrenia. The pathophysiological role of lowered hypothalamic IRAP expression in schizophrenia remains to be established.

  10. In Vivo Imaging of the Central and Peripheral Effects of Sleep Deprivation and Suprachiasmatic Nuclei Lesion on PERIOD-2 Protein in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curie, Thomas; Maret, Stephanie; Emmenegger, Yann; Franken, Paul

    2015-09-01

    That sleep deprivation increases the brain expression of various clock genes has been well documented. Based on these and other findings we hypothesized that clock genes not only underlie circadian rhythm generation but are also implicated in sleep homeostasis. However, long time lags have been reported between the changes in the clock gene messenger RNA levels and their encoded proteins. It is therefore crucial to establish whether also protein levels increase within the time frame known to activate a homeostatic sleep response. We report on the central and peripheral effects of sleep deprivation on PERIOD-2 (PER2) protein both in intact and suprachiasmatic nuclei-lesioned mice. In vivo and in situ PER2 imaging during baseline, sleep deprivation, and recovery. Mouse sleep-recording facility. Per2::Luciferase knock-in mice. N/A. Six-hour sleep deprivation increased PER2 not only in the brain but also in liver and kidney. Remarkably, the effects in the liver outlasted those observed in the brain. Within the brain the increase in PER2 concerned the cerebral cortex mainly, while leaving suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) levels unaffected. Against expectation, sleep deprivation did not increase PER2 in the brain of arrhythmic SCN-lesioned mice because of higher PER2 levels in baseline. In contrast, liver PER2 levels did increase in these mice similar to the sham and partially lesioned controls. Our results stress the importance of considering both sleep-wake dependent and circadian processes when quantifying clock-gene levels. Because sleep deprivation alters PERIOD-2 in the brain as well as in the periphery, it is tempting to speculate that clock genes constitute a common pathway mediating the shared and well-known adverse effects of both chronic sleep loss and disrupted circadian rhythmicity on metabolic health. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  11. Developmental switch of leptin signaling in arcuate nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquero, Arian F; de Solis, Alain J; Lindsley, Sarah R; Kirigiti, Melissa A; Smith, M Susan; Cowley, Michael A; Zeltser, Lori M; Grove, Kevin L

    2014-07-23

    Leptin is well known for its role in the regulation of energy homeostasis in adults, a mechanism that at least partially results from the inhibition of the activity of NPY/AgRP/GABA neurons (NAG) in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH). During early postnatal development in the rodent, leptin promotes axonal outgrowth from ARH neurons, and preautonomic NAG neurons are particularly responsive to leptin's trophic effects. To begin to understand how leptin could simultaneously promote axonal outgrowth from and inhibit the activity of NAG neurons, we characterized the electrochemical effects of leptin on NAG neurons in mice during early development. Here, we show that NAG neurons do indeed express a functional leptin receptor throughout the early postnatal period in the mouse; however, at postnatal days 13-15, leptin causes membrane depolarization in NAG neurons, rather than the expected hyperpolarization. Leptin action on NAG neurons transitions from stimulatory to inhibitory in the periweaning period, in parallel with the acquisition of functional ATP-sensitive potassium channels. These findings are consistent with the idea that leptin provides an orexigenic drive through the NAG system to help rapidly growing pups meet their energy requirements. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/349982-13$15.00/0.

  12. Gait Analysis Methods for Rodent Models of Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Brittany Y.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Allen, Kyle D.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) primarily seek treatment due to pain and disability, yet the primary endpoints for rodent OA models tend to be histological measures of joint destruction. The discrepancy between clinical and preclinical evaluations is problematic, given that radiographic evidence of OA in humans does not always correlate to the severity of patient-reported symptoms. Recent advances in behavioral analyses have provided new methods to evaluate disease sequelae in rodents. Of particular relevance to rodent OA models are methods to assess rodent gait. While obvious differences exist between quadrupedal and bipedal gait sequences, the gait abnormalities seen in humans and in rodent OA models reflect similar compensatory behaviors that protect an injured limb from loading. The purpose of this review is to describe these compensations and current methods used to assess rodent gait characteristics, while detailing important considerations for the selection of gait analysis methods in rodent OA models. PMID:25160712

  13. Study of Hadron Production in Hadron-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    Selyuzhenkov, I; Klochkov, V; Herve, A E; Kowalski, S; Kaptur, E A; Kowalik, K L; Dominik, W M; Matulewicz, T N; Krasnoperov, A; Feofilov, G; Vinogradov, L; Kovalenko, V; Johnson, S R; Mills, G B; Planeta, R J; Rubbia, A; Marton, K; Messerly, B A; Puzovic, J; Bogomilov, M V; Bravar, A; Renfordt, R A E; Deveaux, M; Engel, R R; Grzeszczuk, A; Davis, N; Kuich, M; Lyubushkin, V; Kondratev, V; Kadija, K; Diakonos, F; Slodkowski, M A; Rauch, W H; Pistillo, C; Laszlo, A; Nakadaira, T; Hasegawa, T; Sadovskiy, A; Morozov, S; Petukhov, O; Mathes, H; Roehrich, D; Marcinek, A J; Marino, A D; Grebieszkow, K; Wlodarczyk, Z; Rybczynski, M A; Wojtaszek-szwarc, A; Nirkko, M C; Sakashita, K; Golubeva, M; Kurepin, A; Manic, D; Kolev, D I; Kisiel, J E; Koziel, M E; Rondio, E; Larsen, D T; Czopowicz, T R; Seyboth, P; Turko, L; Guber, F; Marin, V; Busygina, O; Strikhanov, M; Taranenko, A; Cirkovic, M; Roth, M A; Pulawski, S M; Aduszkiewicz, A M; Bunyatov, S; Vechernin, V; Nagai, Y; Anticic, T; Dynowski, K M; Mackowiak-pawlowska, M K; Stefanek, G; Pavin, M; Fodor, Z P; Nishikawa, K; Tada, M; Blondel, A P P; Stroebele, H W; Posiadala, M Z; Kolesnikov, V; Andronov, E; Zimmerman, E D; Antoniou, N; Majka, Z; Di luise, S; Veberic, D; Dumarchez, J; Naskret, M; Ivashkin, A; Tsenov, R V; Koziel, M G; Schmidt, K J; Melkumov, G; Popov, B; Panagiotou, A; Richter-was, E M; Ereditato, A; Paolone, V; Damyanova, A; Gazdzicki, M; Unger, M T; Wilczek, A G; Stepaniak, J M; Seryakov, A; Susa, T; Staszel, P P; Brzychczyk, J; Maksiak, B; Tefelski, D B

    2007-01-01

    The NA61/SHINE (SHINE = SPS Heavy Ion and Neutrino Experiment) experiment is a large acceptance hadron spectrometer at the CERN SPS for the study of the hadronic final states produced in interactions of various beam particles (pions, protons, C, S and In) with a variety of fixed targets at the SPS energies. The main components of the current detector were constructed and used by the NA49 experiment. The physics program of NA61/SHINE consists of three main subjects. In the first stage of data taking (2007-2009) measurements of hadron production in hadron-nucleus interactions needed for neutrino (T2K) and cosmic-ray (Pierre Auger and KASCADE) experiments will be performed. In the second stage (2009-2011) hadron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus interactions needed as reference data for a better understanding of nucleus-nucleus reactions will be studied. In the third stage (2009-2013) energy dependence of hadron production properties will be measured in nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as in p+p a...

  14. Nucleus accumbens surgery for addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xue-lian; Chang, Chong-wang; Ge, Shun-nan; Gao, Li; Wu, He-ming; Zhao, Hai-kang; Geng, Ning; Gao, Guo-dong

    2013-01-01

    Opiate addiction remains intractable in a large percentage of patients, and relapse is the biggest hurdle to recovery because of psychological dependence. Multiple studies identify a central role of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in addiction; several studies note decreased addictive behavior after interventions in this area. Based on animal experiments, our institute started the clinical trial for the treatment of drug addicts' psychological dependence by making lesions in the bilateral NAc with stereotactic surgery from July 2000. The short-term outcomes were encouraging and triggered rapid application of this treatment in China from 2003 to 2004. However, lack of long-term outcomes and controversy eventually led to halting the surgery for addiction by the Ministry of Health of China in November 2004 and a nationwide survey about it later. Our institute had performed this surgery in 272 patients with severe heroin addiction. The follow-up study showed that the 5-year nonrelapse rate was 58% and the quality of life was significantly improved. Patients had several kinds of side effects, but the incidence rate was relatively low. The patients gradually recovered more than 5 years after the surgery. The side effects did not severely influence an individual's life or work. Nationwide surgery showed that the nonrelapse rate was 50% in the sample of 150 cases, from 1167 patients overall who underwent stereotactic surgery in China. Although sometimes accompanied by neuropsychological adverse events, stereotactic ablation of NAc may effectively treat opiate addiction. Lesion location has a significant impact on treatment efficacy and requires further study. Because ablation is irreversible, the NAc surgery for addiction should be performed with cautiousness, and deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an ideal alternative. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic detection of hantaviruses in rodents, Albania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Anna; Rogozi, Elton; Velo, Enkelejda; Papadimitriou, Evangelia; Bino, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    In order to have a first insight into the epidemiology of hantaviruses in Albania, 263 small mammals (248 rodents, 15 insectivores) were captured in 352 locations in 29 districts and tested for hantavirus infection. Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV) was detected in 10 of 148 (6.7%) Apodemus flavicollis rodents. DOBV-positive A. flavicollis were detected in six districts (Diber, Korce, Kolonje, Librazhd, Pogradec, and Vlore). The obtained nucleotide sequences were highly similar to each other and to DOBV sequences from northwestern Greece. Understanding the epidemiology of hantaviruses and identifying the endemic foci enables the public health strategies to minimize the risk of human infection. J. Med. Virol. 88:1309-1313, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-11-09

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general.

  17. Learning in the Rodent Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Andrew J; Liu, Haixin; Komiyama, Takaki

    2017-07-25

    The motor cortex is far from a stable conduit for motor commands and instead undergoes significant changes during learning. An understanding of motor cortex plasticity has been advanced greatly using rodents as experimental animals. Two major focuses of this research have been on the connectivity and activity of the motor cortex. The motor cortex exhibits structural changes in response to learning, and substantial evidence has implicated the local formation and maintenance of new synapses as crucial substrates of motor learning. This synaptic reorganization translates into changes in spiking activity, which appear to result in a modification and refinement of the relationship between motor cortical activity and movement. This review presents the progress that has been made using rodents to establish the motor cortex as an adaptive structure that supports motor learning.

  18. Homeobox Genes in the Rodent Pineal Gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian; Klein, David C

    2013-01-01

    The pineal gland is a neuroendocrine gland responsible for nocturnal synthesis of melatonin. During early development of the rodent pineal gland from the roof of the diencephalon, homeobox genes of the orthodenticle homeobox (Otx)- and paired box (Pax)-families are expressed and are essential...... for normal pineal development consistent with the well-established role that homeobox genes play in developmental processes. However, the pineal gland appears to be unusual because strong homeobox gene expression persists in the pineal gland of the adult brain. Accordingly, in addition to developmental...... functions, homeobox genes appear to be key regulators in postnatal phenotype maintenance in this tissue. In this paper, we review ontogenetic and phylogenetic aspects of pineal development and recent progress in understanding the involvement of homebox genes in rodent pineal development and adult function...

  19. Evidence for novel hepaciviruses in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Felix Drexler

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is among the most relevant causes of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Research is complicated by a lack of accessible small animal models. The systematic investigation of viruses of small mammals could guide efforts to establish such models, while providing insight into viral evolutionary biology. We have assembled the so-far largest collection of small-mammal samples from around the world, qualified to be screened for bloodborne viruses, including sera and organs from 4,770 rodents (41 species; and sera from 2,939 bats (51 species. Three highly divergent rodent hepacivirus clades were detected in 27 (1.8% of 1,465 European bank voles (Myodes glareolus and 10 (1.9% of 518 South African four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio. Bats showed anti-HCV immunoblot reactivities but no virus detection, although the genetic relatedness suggested by the serologic results should have enabled RNA detection using the broadly reactive PCR assays developed for this study. 210 horses and 858 cats and dogs were tested, yielding further horse-associated hepaciviruses but none in dogs or cats. The rodent viruses were equidistant to HCV, exceeding by far the diversity of HCV and the canine/equine hepaciviruses taken together. Five full genomes were sequenced, representing all viral lineages. Salient genome features and distance criteria supported classification of all viruses as hepaciviruses. Quantitative RT-PCR, RNA in-situ hybridisation, and histopathology suggested hepatic tropism with liver inflammation resembling hepatitis C. Recombinant serology for two distinct hepacivirus lineages in 97 bank voles identified seroprevalence rates of 8.3 and 12.4%, respectively. Antibodies in bank vole sera neither cross-reacted with HCV, nor the heterologous bank vole hepacivirus. Co-occurrence of RNA and antibodies was found in 3 of 57 PCR-positive bank vole sera (5.3%. Our data enable new hypotheses regarding HCV evolution and encourage

  20. Large philipsite crystal as ferromanganese nodule nucleus

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ghosh, A.K.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    We report here the occurrence of, to date, the largest (21 x 10 x 8 mm) phillipsite crystal forming the nucleus of a diagenetically formed ferromanganese nodule from the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB). Assuming an average rate of ferromanganese...

  1. Spontaneous Type 2 Diabetic Rodent Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-wei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus, especially type 2 diabetes (T2DM, is one of the most common chronic diseases and continues to increase in numbers with large proportion of health care budget being used. Many animal models have been established in order to investigate the mechanisms and pathophysiologic progress of T2DM and find effective treatments for its complications. On the basis of their strains, features, advantages, and disadvantages, various types of animal models of T2DM can be divided into spontaneously diabetic models, artificially induced diabetic models, and transgenic/knockout diabetic models. Among these models, the spontaneous rodent models are used more frequently because many of them can closely describe the characteristic features of T2DM, especially obesity and insulin resistance. In this paper, we aim to investigate the current available spontaneous rodent models for T2DM with regard to their characteristic features, advantages, and disadvantages, and especially to describe appropriate selection and usefulness of different spontaneous rodent models in testing of various new antidiabetic drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  2. Spontaneous type 2 diabetic rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang-Wei; Sun, Guang-Dong; Sun, Jing; Liu, Shu-Jun; Wang, Ji; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Miao, Li-Ning

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, especially type 2 diabetes (T2DM), is one of the most common chronic diseases and continues to increase in numbers with large proportion of health care budget being used. Many animal models have been established in order to investigate the mechanisms and pathophysiologic progress of T2DM and find effective treatments for its complications. On the basis of their strains, features, advantages, and disadvantages, various types of animal models of T2DM can be divided into spontaneously diabetic models, artificially induced diabetic models, and transgenic/knockout diabetic models. Among these models, the spontaneous rodent models are used more frequently because many of them can closely describe the characteristic features of T2DM, especially obesity and insulin resistance. In this paper, we aim to investigate the current available spontaneous rodent models for T2DM with regard to their characteristic features, advantages, and disadvantages, and especially to describe appropriate selection and usefulness of different spontaneous rodent models in testing of various new antidiabetic drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  3. Testing string dynamics in lepton nucleus reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyulassy, M.; Pluemer, M.

    1989-10-01

    The sensitivity of nuclear attenuation of 10-100 GeV lepton nucleus ({ell}A) reactions to space-time aspects of hadronization is investigated within the context of the Lund string model. We consider two mechanisms for attenuation in a nucleus: final state cascading and string flip excitations. Implications for the evolution of the energy density in nuclear collisions are discussed. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Advances in hard nucleus cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cui

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Security and perfect vision and fewer complications are our goals in cataract surgery, and hard-nucleus cataract surgery is always a difficulty one. Many new studies indicate that micro-incision phacoemulsification in treating hard nucleus cataract is obviously effective. This article reviews the evolution process of hard nuclear cataract surgery, the new progress in the research of artificial intraocular lens for microincision, and analyse advantages and disadvantages of various surgical methods.

  5. Improved Cloud Condensation Nucleus Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2010-01-01

    An improved thermal-gradient cloud condensation nucleus spectrometer (CCNS) has been designed to provide several enhancements over prior thermal- gradient counters, including fast response and high-sensitivity detection covering a wide range of supersaturations. CCNSs are used in laboratory research on the relationships among aerosols, supersaturation of air, and the formation of clouds. The operational characteristics of prior counters are such that it takes long times to determine aerosol critical supersaturations. Hence, there is a need for a CCNS capable of rapid scanning through a wide range of supersaturations. The present improved CCNS satisfies this need. The improved thermal-gradient CCNS (see Figure 1) incorporates the following notable features: a) The main chamber is bounded on the top and bottom by parallel thick copper plates, which are joined by a thermally conductive vertical wall on one side and a thermally nonconductive wall on the opposite side. b) To establish a temperature gradient needed to establish a supersaturation gradient, water at two different regulated temperatures is pumped through tubes along the edges of the copper plates at the thermally-nonconductive-wall side. Figure 2 presents an example of temperature and supersaturation gradients for one combination of regulated temperatures at the thermally-nonconductive-wall edges of the copper plates. c) To enable measurement of the temperature gradient, ten thermocouples are cemented to the external surfaces of the copper plates (five on the top plate and five on the bottom plate), spaced at equal intervals along the width axis of the main chamber near the outlet end. d) Pieces of filter paper or cotton felt are cemented onto the interior surfaces of the copper plates and, prior to each experimental run, are saturated with water to establish a supersaturation field inside the main chamber. e) A flow of monodisperse aerosol and a dilution flow of humid air are introduced into the main

  6. Skeletal indicators of locomotor adaptations in living and extinct rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Joshua X; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2008-11-01

    Living rodents show great diversity in their locomotor habits, including semiaquatic, arboreal, fossorial, ricochetal, and gliding species from multiple families. To assess the association between limb morphology and locomotor habits, the appendicular skeletons of 65 rodent genera from 16 families were measured. Ecomorphological analyses of various locomotor types revealed consistent differences in postcranial skeletal morphology that relate to functionally important traits. Behaviorally similar taxa showed convergent morphological characters, despite distinct evolutionary histories. Semiaquatic rodents displayed relatively robust bones, enlarged muscular attachments, short femora, and elongate hind feet. Arboreal rodents had relatively elongate humeri and digits, short olecranon processes of the ulnae, and equally proportioned fore and hind limbs. Fossorial rodents showed relatively robust bones, enlarged muscular attachments, short antebrachii and digits, elongate manual claws, and reduced hind limb elements. Ricochetal rodents displayed relatively proximal insertion of muscles, disproportionate limbs, elongate tibiae, and elongate hind feet. Gliding rodents had relatively elongate and gracile bones, short olecranon processes of the ulnae, and equally proportioned fore and hind limbs. The morphological differences observed here can readily be used to discriminate extant rodents with different locomotor strategies. This suggests that the method could be applied to extinct rodents, regardless of ancestry, to accurately infer their locomotor ecologies. When applied to an extinct group of rodents, we found two distinct ecomorphs represented in the beaver family (Castoridae), semiaquatic and semifossorial. There was also a progressive trend toward increased body size and increased aquatic specialization in the giant beaver lineage (Castoroidinae).

  7. Improved identification and quantitation of mature endogenous peptides in the rodent hypothalamus using a rapid conductive sample heating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ning; Anapindi, Krishna D B; Romanova, Elena V; Rubakhin, Stanislav S; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2017-11-03

    Measurement, identification, and quantitation of endogenous peptides in tissue samples by mass spectrometry (MS) contribute to our understanding of the complex molecular mechanisms of numerous biological phenomena. For accurate results, it is essential to arrest the postmortem degradation of ubiquitous proteins in samples prior to performing peptidomic measurements. Doing so ensures that the detection of endogenous peptides, typically present at relatively low levels of abundance, is not overwhelmed by protein degradation products. Heat stabilization has been shown to inactivate the enzymes in tissue samples and minimize the presence of protein degradation products in the subsequent peptide extracts. However, the efficacy of different heat treatments to preserve the integrity of full-length endogenous peptides has not been well documented; prior peptidomic studies of heat stabilization methods have not distinguished between the full-length (mature) and numerous truncated (possible artifacts of sampling) forms of endogenous peptides. We show that thermal sample treatment via rapid conductive heat transfer is effective for detection of mature endogenous peptides in fresh and frozen rodent brain tissues. Freshly isolated tissue processing with the commercial Stabilizor T1 heat stabilization system resulted in the confident identification of 65% more full-length mature neuropeptides compared to widely used sample treatment in a hot water bath. This finding was validated by a follow-up quantitative multiple reaction monitoring MS analysis of select neuropeptides. The rapid conductive heating in partial vacuum provided by the Stabilizor T1 effectively reduces protein degradation and decreases the chemical complexity of the sample, as assessed by determining total protein content. This system enabled the detection, identification, and quantitation of neuropeptides related to 22 prohormones expressed in individual rat hypothalami and suprachiasmatic nuclei.

  8. A-Dependence of $\\pi^0$-Meson Production in Proton-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at High Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Tokarev, M V; Dedovich, T G

    2000-01-01

    The A-dependence of pi^0-meson production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at a high transverse momentum is studied. The concept of z-scaling reflecting the general features of particle interactions is developed for the description of pi^0-meson production. Experimental data on the cross section obtained at ISR, SpS and Tevatron are usen in the analysis. The A-dependence of scale transformation z to alpha cdot z, psi to alpha^-1 cdot psi is established. An indication of the power law, psi (z) approx z^-beta, at high p_T > 4 GeV/c is found. Based on the properties of z-scaling, the dependence of the cross section of pi^0-mesons produced in pA and AA collisions on transverse momentum over the central rapidity range at RHIC energies is predicted.

  9. Open heavy-flavour production in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mischke, A.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy quarks (charm and bottom) provide sensitive penetrating probes of hot quark matter produced in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Due to their large mass, heavy quarks are believed to be predominantly produced in the initial state of the collision by gluon fusion processes. The study

  10. Observation of high energy gamma rays in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beard, K.B.; Benenson, W.; Bloch, C.; Kashy, E.; Stevenson, J.; Morrissey, D.J.; Plicht, J. van der; Sherrill, B.; Winfield, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    High energy electrons and positrons observed in medium energy nucleus-nucleus collisions are shown to be primarily due to the external conversion of high energy gamma rays. The reaction 14N+Cu was studied at E/A=40 MeV, and a magnetic spectrograph was used with a specially constructed multiwire

  11. Dietary resistant starch improves selected brain and behavioral functions in adult and aged rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, June; Keenan, Michael J; Fernandez-Kim, Sun Ok; Pistell, Paul J; Ingram, Donald K; Li, Bing; Raggio, Anne M; Shen, Li; Zhang, Hanjie; McCutcheon, Kathleen L; Tulley, Richard T; Blackman, Marc R; Keller, Jeffrey N; Martin, Roy J

    2013-11-01

    Resistant starch (RS) is a dietary fiber that exerts multiple beneficial effects. The current study explored the effects of dietary RS on selected brain and behavioral functions in adult and aged rodents. Because glucokinase (GK) expression in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and area postrema of the brainstem is important for brain glucose sensing, GK mRNA was measured by brain nuclei microdissection and PCR. Adult RS-fed rats had a higher GK mRNA than controls in both brain nuclei, an indicator of improved brain glucose sensing. Next, we tested whether dietary RS improve selected behaviors in aged mice. RS-fed aged mice exhibited (i) an increased eating responses to fasting, a behavioral indicator of improvement in aged brain glucose sensing; (ii) a longer latency to fall from an accelerating rotarod, a behavioral indicator of improved motor coordination; and (iii) a higher serum active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Then, GLP-1 receptor null (GLP-1RKO) mice were used to test the role of GLP-1 in brain glucose sensing, and they exhibited impaired eating responses to fasting. We conclude that in rodents (i) dietary RS improves two important indicators of brain function: glucose sensing and motor coordination, and (ii) GLP-1 is important in the optimal feeding response to a fast. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Susceptibility of laboratory rodents to Trichinella papuae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaow, Lakkhana; Intapan, Pewpan M; Boonmars, Thidarut; Morakote, Nimit; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-12-01

    Members of the genus Trichinella are small nematodes that can infect a wide range of animal hosts. However, their infectivity varies depending on the parasite and host species combination. In this study, we examined the susceptibility of 4 species of laboratory rodents, i.e., mice, rats, hamsters, and gerbils to Trichinella papuae, an emerging non-encapsulated Trichinella species. Trichinella spiralis and Trichinella pseudospiralis were also included in this study for comparison. Fifteen animals of each rodent species were infected orally with 100 muscle larvae of each Trichinella species. Intestinal worm burden was determined at day 6 and 10 post-inoculation (PI). The numbers of muscle larvae were examined at day 45 PI. The reproductive capacity index (RCI) of the 3 Trichinella species in different rodent hosts was determined. By day 6 PI, 33.2-69.6% of the inoculated larvae of the 3 Trichinella species became adult worms in the small intestines of the host animals. However, in rats, more than 96% of adult worms of all 3 Trichinella species were expelled from the gut by day 10 PI. In gerbils, only 4.8-18.1% of adult worms were expelled by day 10 PI. In accordance with the intestinal worm burden and the persistence of adults, the RCI was the highest in gerbils with values of 241.5±41.0 for T. papuae, 432.6±48 for T. pseudospiralis, and 528.6±20.6 for T. spiralis. Hamsters ranked second and mice ranked third in susceptibility in terms of the RCI, Rats yielded the lowest parasite RCI for all 3 Trichinella species. Gerbils may be an alternative laboratory animal for isolation and maintenance of Trichinella spp.

  13. Euthanasia using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentim, A M; Guedes, S R; Pereira, A M; Antunes, L M

    2016-08-01

    Several questions have been raised in recent years about the euthanasia of laboratory rodents. Euthanasia using inhaled agents is considered to be a suitable aesthetic method for use with a large number of animals simultaneously. Nevertheless, its aversive potential has been criticized in terms of animal welfare. The data available regarding the use of carbon dioxide (CO2), inhaled anaesthetics (such as isoflurane, sevoflurane, halothane and enflurane), as well as carbon monoxide and inert gases are discussed throughout this review. Euthanasia of fetuses and neonates is also addressed. A table listing currently available information to ease access to data regarding euthanasia techniques using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents was compiled. Regarding better animal welfare, there is currently insufficient evidence to advocate banning or replacing CO2 in the euthanasia of rodents; however, there are hints that alternative gases are more humane. The exposure to a volatile anaesthetic gas before loss of consciousness has been proposed by some scientific studies to minimize distress; however, the impact of such a measure is not clear. Areas of inconsistency within the euthanasia literature have been highlighted recently and stem from insufficient knowledge, especially regarding the advantages of the administration of isoflurane or sevoflurane over CO2, or other methods, before loss of consciousness. Alternative methods to minimize distress may include the development of techniques aimed at inducing death in the home cage of animals. Scientific outcomes have to be considered before choosing the most suitable euthanasia method to obtain the best results and accomplish the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Prenatal stressors in rodents: Effects on behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Weinstock

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The current review focuses on studies in rodents published since 2008 and explores possible reasons for any differences they report in the effects of gestational stress on various types of behavior in the offspring. An abundance of experimental data shows that different maternal stressors in rodents can replicate some of the abnormalities in offspring behavior observed in humans. These include, anxiety, in juvenile and adult rats and mice, assessed in the elevated plus maze and open field tests and depression, detected in the forced swim and sucrose-preference tests. Deficits were reported in social interaction that is suggestive of pathology associated with schizophrenia, and in spatial learning and memory in adult rats in the Morris water maze test, but in most studies only males were tested. There were too few studies on the novel object recognition test at different inter-trial intervals to enable a conclusion about the effect of prenatal stress and whether any deficits are more prevalent in males. Among hippocampal glutamate receptors, NR2B was the only subtype consistently reduced in association with learning deficits. However, like in humans with schizophrenia and depression, prenatal stress lowered hippocampal levels of BDNF, which were closely correlated with decreases in hippocampal long-term potentiation. In mice, down-regulation of BDNF appeared to occur through the action of gene-methylating enzymes that are already increased above controls in prenatally-stressed neonates. In conclusion, the data obtained so far from experiments in rodents lend support to a physiological basis for the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia and depression.

  15. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons. PMID:21738832

  16. Cell Biology of the Caenorhabditis elegans Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Fix, Orna; Askjaer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the Caenorhabditis elegans nucleus have provided fascinating insight to the organization and activities of eukaryotic cells. Being the organelle that holds the genetic blueprint of the cell, the nucleus is critical for basically every aspect of cell biology. The stereotypical development of C. elegans from a one cell-stage embryo to a fertile hermaphrodite with 959 somatic nuclei has allowed the identification of mutants with specific alterations in gene expression programs, nuclear morphology, or nuclear positioning. Moreover, the early C. elegans embryo is an excellent model to dissect the mitotic processes of nuclear disassembly and reformation with high spatiotemporal resolution. We review here several features of the C. elegans nucleus, including its composition, structure, and dynamics. We also discuss the spatial organization of chromatin and regulation of gene expression and how this depends on tight control of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Finally, the extensive connections of the nucleus with the cytoskeleton and their implications during development are described. Most processes of the C. elegans nucleus are evolutionarily conserved, highlighting the relevance of this powerful and versatile model organism to human biology. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. Dimethyl Fumarate ameliorates acute pancreatitis in rodent

    OpenAIRE

    Robles, Lourdes; Vaziri, Nostratola D.; Li, Shiri; Takasu, Chie; Masuda, Yuichi; Vo, Kelly; Farzaneh, Seyed H.; Stamos, Micheal J.; Ichii, Hirohito

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Pancreatitis is a complex inflammatory disorder, ranging from a mild attack, to severe and potentially fatal condition. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF), a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory, has been used medicinally for decades. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that treatment with DMF may ameliorate acute pancreatitis (AP) in a rodent model. Methods: Rats were treated with DMF (25 mg/kg) 24 hours prior to AP induction with L-arginine (3 g/kg). At 72 hours, the p...

  18. The Nucleus Accumbens: Mechanisms of Addiction across Drug Classes Reflect the Importance of Glutamate Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scofield, M D; Heinsbroek, J A; Gipson, C D; Kupchik, Y M; Spencer, S; Smith, A C W; Roberts-Wolfe, D; Kalivas, P W

    2016-07-01

    The nucleus accumbens is a major input structure of the basal ganglia and integrates information from cortical and limbic structures to mediate goal-directed behaviors. Chronic exposure to several classes of drugs of abuse disrupts plasticity in this region, allowing drug-associated cues to engender a pathologic motivation for drug seeking. A number of alterations in glutamatergic transmission occur within the nucleus accumbens after withdrawal from chronic drug exposure. These drug-induced neuroadaptations serve as the molecular basis for relapse vulnerability. In this review, we focus on the role that glutamate signal transduction in the nucleus accumbens plays in addiction-related behaviors. First, we explore the nucleus accumbens, including the cell types and neuronal populations present as well as afferent and efferent connections. Next we discuss rodent models of addiction and assess the viability of these models for testing candidate pharmacotherapies for the prevention of relapse. Then we provide a review of the literature describing how synaptic plasticity in the accumbens is altered after exposure to drugs of abuse and withdrawal and also how pharmacological manipulation of glutamate systems in the accumbens can inhibit drug seeking in the laboratory setting. Finally, we examine results from clinical trials in which pharmacotherapies designed to manipulate glutamate systems have been effective in treating relapse in human patients. Further elucidation of how drugs of abuse alter glutamatergic plasticity within the accumbens will be necessary for the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of addiction across all classes of addictive substances. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  19. Ecomorphological analysis of the astragalo-calcaneal complex in rodents and inferences of locomotor behaviours in extinct rodent species

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Ginot; Lionel Hautier; Laurent Marivaux; Monique Vianey-Liaud

    2016-01-01

    Studies linking postcranial morphology with locomotion in mammals are common. However, such studies are mostly restricted to caviomorphs in rodents. We present here data from various families, belonging to the three main groups of rodents (Sciuroidea, Myodonta, and Ctenohystrica). The aim of this study is to define morphological indicators for the astragalus and calcaneus, which allow for inferences to be made about the locomotor behaviours in rodents. Several specimens were dissected and des...

  20. UNCOVERING THE NUCLEUS CANDIDATE FOR NGC 253

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günthardt, G. I.; Camperi, J. A. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (Argentina); Agüero, M. P. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, and CONICET (Argentina); Díaz, R. J.; Gomez, P. L.; Schirmer, M. [Gemini Observatory, AURA (United States); Bosch, G., E-mail: gunth@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: camperi@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: mpaguero@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: rdiaz@gemini.edu, E-mail: pgomez@gemini.edu, E-mail: mschirmer@gemini.edu, E-mail: guille@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (CONICET-UNLP) (Argentina)

    2015-11-15

    NGC 253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst that becomes the best candidate for studying the relationship between starburst and active galactic nucleus activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus to the point that there is no strong evidence that the galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole co-evolving with the starburst as was supposed earlier. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, especially NIR emission line analysis, could be advantageous in shedding light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis of the central structure and through the brightest infrared source. In this work, we present evidence showing that the brightest NIR and mid-infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a large stellar supercluster, in fact presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. Mentioning some distinctive aspects, it is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.″0 of the symmetry center of the galactic bar, as measured in the K-band emission. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H{sub 2} rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate, observed at 18.3 μm (Qa) and 12.8 μm ([Ne ii]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Brγ emission line profile shows a pronounced blueshift and this emission line also has the highest equivalent width at this

  1. Decoding calcium signaling across the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, André G; Guimarães, Erika S; Andrade, Lídia M; Menezes, Gustavo B; Fatima Leite, M

    2014-09-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is an important multifaceted second messenger that regulates a wide range of cellular events. A Ca(2+)-signaling toolkit has been shown to exist in the nucleus and to be capable of generating and modulating nucleoplasmic Ca(2+) transients. Within the nucleus, Ca(2+) controls cellular events that are different from those modulated by cytosolic Ca(2+). This review focuses on nuclear Ca(2+) signals and their role in regulating physiological and pathological processes. ©2014 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  2. Restraint training for awake functional brain scanning of rodents can cause long-lasting changes in pain and stress responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Lucie A.; Bauer, Lucy C.; Pitcher, Mark H.; Bushnell, M. Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With the increased interest in longitudinal brain imaging of awake rodents, it is important to understand both the short-term and long-term effects of restraint on sensory and emotional processing in the brain. To understand the effects of repeated restraint on pain behaviors and stress responses, we modeled a restraint protocol similar to those used to habituate rodents for magnetic resonance imaging scanning, and studied sensory sensitivity and stress hormone responses over 5 days. To uncover lasting effects of training, we also looked at responses to the formalin pain test 2 weeks later. We found that while restraint causes acute increases in the stress hormone corticosterone, it can also cause lasting reductions in nociceptive behavior in the formalin test, coupled with heightened corticosterone levels and increased activation of the “nociceptive” central nucleus of the amygdala, as seen by Fos protein expression. These results suggest that short-term repeated restraint, similar to that used to habituate rats for awake functional brain scanning, could potentially cause long-lasting changes in physiological and brain responses to pain stimuli that are stress-related, and therefore could potentially confound the functional activation patterns seen in awake rodents in response to pain stimuli. PMID:27058679

  3. Hunting, Food Preparation, and Consumption of Rodents in Lao PDR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanokwan Suwannarong

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was conducted in 29 villages of Khamkeuth District in Bolikhamxay Province in the Lao PDR during March to May 2013. The study aimed to determine the characteristics associated with rodent consumption and related behaviors among different ethnic groups, ages, and genders. Five-hundred-eighty-four (584 males and females from 18-50 years of age participated in this study. Half of them were Hmong (292, 50% while 152 respondents were Lao-Tai (26% or other ethnic groups (140, 24%. Most of the respondents (79.5% had farming as their main occupation. Prevalences of the studied outcomes were high: 39.9 for hunting or capturing rodents in the previous year, 77.7% for preparing rodents as food, and 86.3% for rodent consumption. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that likelihood of these types of rodent contact was more consistently associated with behavioral factors (gathering things from the forest and elsewhere, cultivation-related activities, and taking measures to prevent rodent-borne disease than with socio-demographic, environmental, or cultural factors. The strongest associations were observed for gathering things; these associations were consistently positive and statistically significant. Although this study did not directly assess rodent-borne zoonosis risk, we believe that study findings raise concern that such risk may be substantial in the study area and other similar areas. Further epidemiological studies on the association between rodent-borne disease infection and rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption are recommended. Moreover, further studies are needed on the association between these potential exposure factors (i.e., rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption and rodent-borne infections, especially among ethnic groups like the Hmong in Lao PDR and those in neighboring countries with similar socio-demographic, environmental, behavioral and cultural contexts.

  4. TWO-PHOTON PHYSICS IN NUCLEUS-NUCLEUS COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NYSTRAND,J.

    1998-09-10

    Ultra-relativistic heavy-ions carry strong electromagnetic and nuclear fields. Interactions between these fields in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions can probe many interesting physics topics. This presentation will focus on coherent two-photon and photonuclear processes at RHIC. The rates for these interactions will be high. The coherent coupling of all the protons in the nucleus enhances the equivalent photon flux by a factor Z{sup 2} up to an energy of {approx} 3 GeV. The plans for studying coherent interactions with the STAR experiment will be discussed. Experimental techniques for separating signal from background will be presented.

  5. Two-photon physics in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystrand, J.; Klein, S.

    1998-09-01

    Ultra-relativistic heavy-ions carry strong electromagnetic and nuclear fields. Interactions between these fields in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions can probe many interesting physics topics. This presentation will focus on coherent two-photon and photonuclear processes at RHIC. The rates for these interactions will be high. The coherent coupling of all the protons in the nucleus enhances the equivalent photon flux by a factor Z{sup 2} up to an energy of {approx} 3 GeV. The plans for studying coherent interactions with the STAR experiment will be discussed. Experimental techniques for separating signal from background will be presented.

  6. Towards sustainable management of rodents in organic animal husbandry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerburg, B.G.; Bonde, M.; Brom, F.W.A.; Endepols, S.; Jensen, A.N.; Leirs, H.; Lodal, J.; Singleton, G.R.; Pelz, H.J.; Rodenburg, T.B.; Kijlstra, A.

    2004-01-01

    From 26 to 28 May 2004 an international seminar was held in Wageningen, the Netherlands, about current knowledge and advice on rodent management on organic pig and poultry farms in Western Europe. This paper summarizes the discussions. Rodent management is necessary to protect the food production

  7. Ecology of rodents at an old quarry in Zambia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ecology of rodents at an old quarry in Zambia. E.N. Chidumayo. Livingstone Museum, Zambia. An old quarry, 2,5 hain size near Livingstone in southern. Zambia was kill- and live-trapped between September 1974 and December 1976 to determine ecological relations among. rodent species inhabiting it. Seven species ...

  8. Landform and surface attributes for prediction of rodent burrows in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Landform and surface attributes for prediction of rodent burrows in the Western Usambara Mountains, Tanzania. ... Tanzania Journal of Health Research ... Therefore, this study was conducted in plague endemic area of the Western Usambara Mountains in northern, Tanzania, to explore the relationship between rodent ...

  9. Rodent-borne diseases and their risks for public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerburg, B.G.; Singleton, G.R.; Kijlstra, A.

    2009-01-01

    Rodents are the most abundant and diversified order of living mammals in the world. Already since the Middle Ages we know that they can contribute to human disease, as black rats were associated with distribution of plague. However, also in modern times rodents form a threat for public health. In

  10. Energetics and water relations ofN amib desert rodents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    desert rodents. P.C. Withers, G.N. Louw and J. Henschel. Zoology Department, University of Cape Town. All the Namib rodents investigated, except Petromus, can survive without ... Present address: Biology Department, Portland State University,. P.O. Box ...... pulmocutaneous water loss of Australian hopping mice. Compo.

  11. Rodents from the Middle Oligocene of Turkish Thrace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ünay-Bayraktar, E.

    1989-01-01

    Associations of Middle Oligocene rodent teeth are described from five localities in the Lignite-Sandstone Formation of the Ergene basin. The Muroidea are the most abundant as well as the most diverse group in these associations. In rodent faunas of Western Europe the Theridomyoidea dominate. So

  12. seasonal population dynamics of rodents of mount chilalo, arsi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Sidorowicz, 1974; George, 1984; Kotler, 1984;. Sillero-Zubiri et al., 1995). The record of highest trap success from grassland habitat was due to high abundance of rodents, capture of two individuals by single trap, and the gregarious life style of rodents in the habitat. The highest seasonal variation in the trap success was.

  13. Seed predation by nocturnal rodents in an African savanna ecosystem

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The small mammal community in Acacia savanna consists of three omnivorous nocturnal rodent species, Mastomys natalensis, Saccostomus campestris and Aethomys chrysophilus, which eat varying proportions of seed in their diet. From a seed removal experiment, it was found that rodents preferentially selected Acacia ...

  14. Diversity, relative abundance and habitat association of rodents in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diversity, relative abundance and habitat association of rodents in Aquatimo Forest patches and adjacent farmland, east Gojjam, Ethiopia. ... This study about the ecology and biology of rodents is fundamental for proper monitoring of the environment in order to control and conserve small mammals. Keywords: Insectivores ...

  15. Public Health and Rodents: A Game of Cat and Mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerburg, B.G.

    2015-01-01

    Rodents are the most abundant order of living mammals, distributed on every continent except Antarctic and represent 43 % of all mammalian species. Beside causing food losses and infrastructural damage, rodents can harbour pathogens that may cause serious problems to human and animal health.

  16. Daily and seasonal temperatures in the burrows of African rodent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1987-03-02

    Mar 2, 1987 ... burrow system of most rodent moles is essentially a sealed system. Consequently, most aspects of the microenviron- ment within the burrow can be expected to deviate greatly from conditions above ground. Although the physiology of subterranean rodents, in relation to thermoregulation and metabolism, ...

  17. ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE RAT MESENCEPHALIC TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LIEM, RSB; COPRAY, JCVM; VANWILLIGEN, JD

    The subcellular morphology of the mesencephalic trigeminal (Me5) nucleus in the rat was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Most neurons in the thin rostral as well as in the major caudal part of Me5 appeared as large (40-50-mu-m), round-to ovoid-shaped unipolar cells. A few neurons

  18. Resonances in η-light nucleus systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de los Andes, Bogota, Colombia. E-mail: kanchanp@magnum.barc.ernet.in. Abstract. We locate resonances in η-light nucleus elastic scattering using the time delay method. We solve few-body equations within the finite rank approximation in order to calculate the t-matrices and hence ...

  19. Oral alprazolam acutely increases nucleus accumbens perfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Daniel H.; Pinkham, Amy E.; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Ruparel, Kosha; Elliott, Mark A.; Valdez, Jeffrey; Smith, Mark A.; Detre, John A.; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepines treat anxiety, but can also produce euphoric effects, contributing to abuse. Using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, we provide the first direct evidence in humans that alprazolam (Xanax) acutely increases perfusion in the nucleus accumbens, a key reward-processing region linked to addiction.

  20. Resonances in η-light nucleus systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We locate resonances in -light nucleus elastic scattering using the time delay method. We solve few-body equations within the finite rank approximation in order to calculate the -matrices and hence the time delay for the - 3He and - 4He systems. We find a resonance very close to the threshold in - 3 He elastic ...

  1. The Checkerboard Model of the Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Theodore

    2015-04-01

    The Checker Board Model (CBM) of the nucleus and the associated extended standard model predicts that nature has 5 generations of quarks not 3 and that Nucleus is 2 dimensional. The CBM theory began with an insight into the structure of the He nucleus around the year 1989. Details of how this theory evolved which took many years, and is found on my web site (http://checkerboard.dnsalias.net) or in the following references One independent check of this model is that the wavelength of the ``up'' quark orbiting inside the proton at 84.8123% the speed of light (around the ``dn'' quark in the center of the proton) turns out to be exactly one de Broglie wavelength something determined after the mass and speed of the up quark were determined by other means. This theory explains the mass of the proton and neutron and their magnetic moments and this along with the beautiful symmetric 2D structure of the He nucleus led to the evolution of this theory. When this theory was first presented at Argonne in 1996, it was the first time that anyone had predicted the quarks orbited inside the proton at relativistic speeds and it was met with skepticism.

  2. Compound nucleus studies withy reverse kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto, L.G.

    1985-06-01

    Reverse kinematics reactions are used to demonstrate the compound nucleus origin of intermediate mass particles at low energies and the extension of the same mechanism at higher energies. No evidence has appeared in our energy range for liquid-vapor equilibrium or cold fragmentation mechanisms. 11 refs., 12 figs.

  3. Helminths in rodents from Wet Markets in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribas A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Only a few surveys have ever been carried out of the helminths of the commensal rodents found in the traditional wet markets that play such an important part of daily life in South-east Asia. The potential of rodents as reservoirs of zoonoses including helminths is of great interest since in these markets humans and rodents come into closer contact than in other environments and food may be indirectly contaminated via rodent faeces. Helminths in a total of 98 rats belonging to two species (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus exulans were surveyed in eight traditional wet markets in Udon Thani, Thailand. Thirteen species of helminths were recovered, seven of which are potentially zoo-notic, with an overall prevalence of 89.8 %. Our results show that rodents in wet markets could pose a threat to human health as potential reservoirs of zoonotic helminthiases.

  4. Sleep is related to neuron numbers in the ventrolateral preoptic/intermediate nucleus in older adults with and without Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Andrew S P; Ellison, Brian A; Wang, Joshua L; Yu, Lei; Schneider, Julie A; Buchman, Aron S; Bennett, David A; Saper, Clifford B

    2014-10-01

    Fragmented sleep is a common and troubling symptom in ageing and Alzheimer's disease; however, its neurobiological basis in many patients is unknown. In rodents, lesions of the hypothalamic ventrolateral preoptic nucleus cause fragmented sleep. We previously proposed that the intermediate nucleus in the human hypothalamus, which has a similar location and neurotransmitter profile, is the homologue of the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus, but physiological data in humans were lacking. We hypothesized that if the intermediate nucleus is important for human sleep, then intermediate nucleus cell loss may contribute to fragmentation and loss of sleep in ageing and Alzheimer's disease. We studied 45 older adults (mean age at death 89.2 years; 71% female; 12 with Alzheimer's disease) from the Rush Memory and Aging Project, a community-based study of ageing and dementia, who had at least 1 week of wrist actigraphy proximate to death. Upon death a median of 15.5 months later, we used immunohistochemistry and stereology to quantify the number of galanin-immunoreactive intermediate nucleus neurons in each individual, and related this to ante-mortem sleep fragmentation. Individuals with Alzheimer's disease had fewer galaninergic intermediate nucleus neurons than those without (estimate -2872, standard error = 829, P = 0.001). Individuals with more galanin-immunoreactive intermediate nucleus neurons had less fragmented sleep, after adjusting for age and sex, and this association was strongest in those for whom the lag between actigraphy and death was sleep fragmentation in older adults with and without Alzheimer's disease. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Scatter-hoarding rodents prefer slightly astringent food.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    Full Text Available The mutualistic interaction between scatter-hoarding rodents and their seed plants is highly complex yet poorly understood. Plants may benefit from the seed dispersal behavior of rodents, as long as seed consumption is minimized. In parallel, rodents may maximize foraging efficiency and cache high-quality resources for future consumption. Defensive compounds, such as tannins, are thought to be a major mechanism for plant control over rodent behavior. However, previous studies, using naturally occurring seeds, have not provided conclusive evidence supporting this hypothesis. Here, we test the importance of tannin concentrations on the scatter-hoarding behavior of rodents by using an artificial seed system. We combined feeding trials and field observations to examine the overall impact of seed tannin concentrations on rodent behavior and health. We found that rodents favored seeds with an intermediate amount of tannin (~5% in the field. Meanwhile, in rodents that were fed a diet with different tannin content, only diets with high tannin content (25%, 15%, and 10% caused a significant negative influence on rodent survival and health. Significant differences were not found among treatments with tannin levels of 0-5%. In contrast to many existing studies, our results clearly demonstrate that scatter-hoarding rodents prefer slightly 'astringent' food. In the co-evolutionary arms race between plants and animals, our results suggest that while tannins may play a significant role in reducing general predation levels by the faunal community, they have no precise control over the behavior of their mutualistic partner. Instead, the two partners appear to have reached an evolutionary point where both parties receive adequate benefits, with the year-to-year outcome being dependent on a wide range of factors beyond the control of either partner.

  6. Epidemiology of Leptospira Transmitted by Rodents in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielcarek, Mathilde; Tatard, Caroline; Chaval, Yannick; Suputtamongkol, Yupin; Buchy, Philippe; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Herbreteau, Vincent; Morand, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is the most common bacterial zoonoses and has been identified as an important emerging global public health problem in Southeast Asia. Rodents are important reservoirs for human leptospirosis, but epidemiological data is lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings We sampled rodents living in different habitats from seven localities distributed across Southeast Asia (Thailand, Lao PDR and Cambodia), between 2009 to 2010. Human isolates were also obtained from localities close to where rodents were sampled. The prevalence of Leptospira infection was assessed by real-time PCR using DNA extracted from rodent kidneys, targeting the lipL32 gene. Sequencing rrs and secY genes, and Multi Locus Variable-number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) analyses were performed on DNA extracted from rat kidneys for Leptospira isolates molecular typing. Four species were detected in rodents, L. borgpetersenii (56% of positive samples), L. interrogans (36%), L. kirschneri (3%) and L. weilli (2%), which were identical to human isolates. Mean prevalence in rodents was approximately 7%, and largely varied across localities and habitats, but not between rodent species. The two most abundant Leptospira species displayed different habitat requirements: L. interrogans was linked to humid habitats (rice fields and forests) while L. borgpetersenii was abundant in both humid and dry habitats (non-floodable lands). Conclusion/Significance L. interrogans and L. borgpetersenii species are widely distributed amongst rodent populations, and strain typing confirmed rodents as reservoirs for human leptospirosis. Differences in habitat requirements for L. interrogans and L. borgpetersenii supported differential transmission modes. In Southeast Asia, human infection risk is not only restricted to activities taking place in wetlands and rice fields as is commonly accepted, but should also include tasks such as forestry work, as well as the hunting and preparation of rodents for consumption, which

  7. Magnetic mapping of iron in rodent spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blissett, Angela R; Ollander, Brooke; Penn, Brittany; McTigue, Dana M; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2017-04-01

    Evaluation of iron distribution and density in biological tissues is important to understand the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases and the fate of exogenously administered iron-based carriers and contrast agents. Iron distribution in tissues is typically characterized via histochemical (Perl's) stains or immunohistochemistry for ferritin, the major iron storage protein. A more accurate mapping of iron can be achieved via ultrastructural transmission electron microscopy (TEM) based techniques, which involve stringent sample preparation conditions. In this study, we elucidate the capability of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) as a label-free technique to map iron at the nanoscale level in rodent spleen tissue. We complemented and compared our MFM results with those obtained using Perl's staining and TEM. Our results show how MFM mapping corresponded to sizes of iron-rich lysosomes at a resolution comparable to that of TEM. In addition MFM is compatible with tissue sections commonly prepared for routine histology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Intraoperative cerebral blood flow imaging of rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hangdao; Li, Yao; Yuan, Lu; Wu, Caihong; Lu, Hongyang; Tong, Shanbao

    2014-09-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is of interest to neuroscience researchers, which offers the assessment of hemodynamic responses throughout the process of neurosurgery and provides an early biomarker for surgical guidance. However, intraoperative CBF imaging has been challenging due to animal's motion and position change during the surgery. In this paper, we presented a design of an operation bench integrated with laser speckle contrast imager which enables monitoring of the CBF intraoperatively. With a specially designed stereotaxic frame and imager, we were able to monitor the CBF changes in both hemispheres during the rodent surgery. The rotatable design of the operation plate and implementation of online image registration allow the technician to move the animal without disturbing the CBF imaging during surgery. The performance of the system was tested by middle cerebral artery occlusion model of rats.

  9. Convergent and Divergent Adaptations of Subterranean Rodents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Xiaodong

    ) have evolved convergent and divergent traits in many of their morphological, physiological, and/or behavioral characteristics, which facilitate their adaptions to a similar underground burrowing life style. For example, all these three rodents show degenerate visual acuity and advanced sensory systems...... in the dark; they display remarkable tolerance to a living environment with an excess of carbon dioxide and ammonia, but lack of oxygen; they exhibit extraordinarily long lives, and keep a fantastic resistance to cancer and other aging-associated diseases. In this study, we reported the genomic......, coupled with the reported genetic information, will promote the utilization of subterranean animal models for biological and biomedical research in the fight against aging, cancer, stroke and other realted diseases....

  10. Nonequilibrium distribution functions of nucleons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Anchishkin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The collision smearing of the nucleon momenta about their initial values during relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is investigated. To a certain degree, our model belongs to the transport type, and we investigate the evolution of the nucleon system created at a nucleus-nucleus collision. However, we parameterize this development by the number of collisions of every particle during evolution rather than by the time variable. It is assumed that the group of nucleons which leave the system after the same number of collisions can be joined in a particular statistical ensemble. The nucleon nonequilibrium distribution functions are derived which depend on a certain number of collisions of a nucleon before a freeze-out.

  11. The production of strangeness and charmonium in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Geiss, J

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present theis is to study the space-time evolution of highly relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in a microscopic purely hadronic transport theory. Especially the production of strangeness in nucleus-nucleus collisions over a large energy range from SIS- (E sub l sub a sub b =1-2 A.GeV) up to SPS-energies (E sub l sub a sub b +200 A.GeV) for many different systems are studied, whereby for the elementary production cross sections as conservative assumptions as possible are made. The aim is to obtain an excitation function for the production of strangeness over the whole energy range. Furthermore the production of J/psi particles at SPS energies is studied for different systems, whereby a new absorption mechanism of the c anti c pairs is tested.

  12. Interacting cannabinoid and opioid receptors in the nucleus accumbens core control adolescent social play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Manduca

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Social play behavior is a highly rewarding, developmentally important form of social interaction in young mammals. However, its neurobiological underpinnings remain incompletely understood. Previous work has suggested that opioid and endocannabinoid neurotransmission interact in the modulation of social play. Therefore, we combined behavioral, pharmacological, electrophysiological and genetic approaches to elucidate the role of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG in social play, and how cannabinoid and opioid neurotransmission interact to control social behavior in adolescent rodents. Systemic administration of the 2-AG hydrolysis inhibitor JZL184 or the opioid receptor agonist morphine increased social play behavior in adolescent rats. These effects were blocked by systemic pretreatment with either CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R or mu-opioid receptor (MOR antagonists. The social play-enhancing effects of systemic morphine or JZL184 treatment were also prevented by direct infusion of the CB1R antagonist SR141716 and the MOR antagonist naloxone into the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC. Searching for synaptic correlates of these effects in adolescent NAcC excitatory synapses, we observed that CB1R antagonism blocked the effect of the MOR agonist DAMGO and, conversely, that naloxone reduced the effect of a cannabinoid agonist. These results were recapitulated in mice, and completely abolished in CB1R and MOR knockout mice, suggesting that the functional interaction between CB1R and MOR in the NAcC in the modulation of mediates social behavior is widespread in rodents. The data shed new light on the mechanism by which endocannabinoid lipids and opioid peptides interact to orchestrate rodent socioemotional behaviors.

  13. Rodent Models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Thomas; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2015-06-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a motor neuron disease affecting upper and lower motor neurons in the central nervous system. Patients with ALS develop extensive muscle wasting and atrophy leading to paralysis and death 3 to 5 years after disease onset. The condition may be familial (fALS 10%) or sporadic ALS (sALS, 90%). The large majority of fALS cases are due to genetic mutations in the Superoxide dismutase 1 gene (SOD1, 15% of fALS) and repeat nucleotide expansions in the gene encoding C9ORF72 (∼ 40% to 50% of fALS and ∼ 10% of sALS). Studies suggest that ALS is mediated through aberrant protein homeostasis (i.e., ER stress and autophagy) and/or changes in RNA processing (as in all non-SOD1-mediated ALS). In all of these cases, animal models suggest that the disorder is mediated non-cell autonomously, i.e., not only motor neurons are involved, but glial cells including microglia, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, and other neuronal subpopulations are also implicated in the pathogenesis. Provided in this unit is a review of ALS rodent models, including discussion of their relative advantages and disadvantages. Emphasis is placed on correlating the model phenotype with the human condition and the utility of the model for defining the disease process. Information is also presented on RNA processing studies in ALS research, with particular emphasis on the newest ALS rodent models. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Interactive Effects of Dorsomedial Hypothalamic Nucleus and Time-Restricted Feeding on Fractal Motor Activity Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Men-Tzung; Chiang, Wei-Yin; Hsieh, Wan-Hsin; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M; Hu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    One evolutionary adaptation in motor activity control of animals is the anticipation of food that drives foraging under natural conditions and is mimicked in laboratory with daily scheduled food availability. Food anticipation is characterized by increased activity a few hours before the feeding period. Here we report that 2-h food availability during the normal inactive phase of rats not only increases activity levels before the feeding period but also alters the temporal organization of motor activity fluctuations over a wide range of time scales from minutes up to 24 h. We demonstrate this multiscale alteration by assessing fractal patterns in motor activity fluctuations-similar fluctuation structure at different time scales-that are robust in intact animals with ad libitum food access but are disrupted under food restriction. In addition, we show that fractal activity patterns in rats with ad libitum food access are also perturbed by lesion of the dorsomedial hypothalamic (DMH)-a neural node that is involved in food anticipatory behavior. Instead of further disrupting fractal regulation, food restriction restores the disrupted fractal patterns in these animals after the DMH lesion despite the persistence of the 24-h rhythms. This compensatory effect of food restriction is more clearly pronounced in the same animals after the additional lesion of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN)-the central master clock in the circadian system that generates and orchestrates circadian rhythms in behavior and physiological functions in synchrony with day-night cycles. Moreover, all observed influences of food restriction persist even when data during the food anticipatory and feeding period are excluded. These results indicate that food restriction impacts dynamics of motor activity at different time scales across the entire circadian/daily cycle, which is likely caused by the competition between the food-induced time cue and the light-entrained circadian rhythm of the SCN. The

  15. Interactive effects of dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus and time-restricted feeding on fractal motor activity regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Men-Tzung eLo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available One evolutionary adaptation in motor activity control of animals is the anticipation of food that drives foraging under natural conditions and is mimicked in laboratory with daily scheduled food availability. Food anticipation is characterized by increased activity a few hours before the feeding period. Here we report that 2-hour food availability during the normal inactive phase of rats not only increases activity levels before the feeding period but also alters the temporal organization of motor activity fluctuations over a wide range of time scales from minutes up to 24 hours. We demonstrate this multiscale alteration by assessing fractal patterns in motor activity fluctuations – similar fluctuation structure at different time scales — that are robust in intact animals with ad libitum food access but are disrupted under food restriction. In addition, we show that fractal activity patterns in rats with ad libitum food access are also perturbed by lesion of the dorsomedial hypothalamic (DMH — a neural node that is involved in food anticipatory behavior. Instead of further disrupting fractal regulation, food restriction restores the disrupted fractal patterns in these animals after the DMH lesion despite the persistence of the 24-h rhythms. This compensatory effect of food restriction is more clearly pronounced in the same animals after the additional lesion of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN — the central master clock in the circadian system that generates and orchestrates circadian rhythms in behavior and physiological functions in synchrony with day-night cycles. Moreover, all observed influences of food restriction persist even when data during the food anticipatory and feeding period are excluded. These results indicate that food restriction impacts dynamics of motor activity at different time scales across the entire circadian/daily cycle, which is likely caused by the competition between the food-induced time cue and the light

  16. Strangeness production in antiproton-nucleus annihilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosel U.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of the microscopic transport calculations of p¯ $ar p$-nucleus interactions within a GiBUU model are presented. The dominating mechanism of hyperon production is the strangeness exchange processes K¯N $ar KN$ → γπ and K¯N $ar KN$ → ΞK. The calculated rapidity spectra of Ξ hyperons are significantly shifted to forward rapidities with respect to the spectra of S = −1 hyperons. We argue that this shift should be a sensitive test for the possible exotic mechanisms of p¯ $ar p$-nucleus annihilation. The production of the double Λ-hypernuclei by Ξ− interaction with a secondary target is calculated.

  17. Protein quality control in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofie V.; Poulsen, Esben Guldahl; Rebula, Caio A.

    2014-01-01

    to aggregate, cells have evolved several elaborate quality control systems to deal with these potentially toxic proteins. First, various molecular chaperones will seize the misfolded protein and either attempt to refold the protein or target it for degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system...... to be particularly active in protein quality control. Thus, specific ubiquitin-protein ligases located in the nucleus, target not only misfolded nuclear proteins, but also various misfolded cytosolic proteins which are transported to the nucleus prior to their degradation. In comparison, much less is known about...... these mechanisms in mammalian cells. Here we highlight recent advances in our understanding of nuclear protein quality control, in particular regarding substrate recognition and proteasomal degradation....

  18. Cell Biology of the Plant Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Iris; Richards, Eric J; Evans, David E

    2017-04-28

    The eukaryotic nucleus is enclosed by the nuclear envelope, which is perforated by the nuclear pores, the gateways of macromolecular exchange between the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. The nucleoplasm is organized in a complex three-dimensional fashion that changes over time and in response to stimuli. Within the cell, the nucleus must be viewed as an organelle (albeit a gigantic one) that is a recipient of cytoplasmic forces and capable of morphological and positional dynamics. The most dramatic reorganization of this organelle occurs during mitosis and meiosis. Although many of these aspects are less well understood for the nuclei of plants than for those of animals or fungi, several recent discoveries have begun to place our understanding of plant nuclei firmly into this broader cell-biological context.

  19. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kok, Gregory [Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States); Kulkarni, Gourihar [Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70°C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  20. Systematics of $\\alpha$--nucleus optical potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Mohr, P; Abele, H.; Atzrott, U.; Staudt, G.; Bieber, R; Grün, K.; Oberhummer, H.; Rauscher, T.; Somorjai, E.

    1994-01-01

    Double--folded optical $\\alpha$--nucleus potentials can be used to calculate elastic scattering cross sections in a wide mass-- and energy region. Because of the systematic behavior of the potential parameters we are able to obtain reliable optical potentials for astrophysically relevant reactions even without scattering data in low--energy region. As example we analyze the capture reaction ${^{144}{\\rm Sm}}(\\alpha,\\gamma){^{148}{\\Gd}}$.

  1. Improved Neuroimaging Atlas of the Dentate Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Naying; Langley, Jason; Huddleston, Daniel E; Ling, Huawei; Xu, Hongmin; Liu, Chunlei; Yan, Fuhua; Hu, Xiaoping P

    2017-07-01

    The dentate nucleus (DN) of the cerebellum is the major output nucleus of the cerebellum and is rich in iron. Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) provides better iron-sensitive MRI contrast to delineate the boundary of the DN than either T2-weighted images or susceptibility-weighted images. Prior DN atlases used T2-weighted or susceptibility-weighted images to create DN atlases. Here, we employ QSM images to develop an improved dentate nucleus atlas for use in imaging studies. The DN was segmented in QSM images from 38 healthy volunteers. The resulting DN masks were transformed to a common space and averaged to generate the DN atlas. The center of mass of the left and right sides of the QSM-based DN atlas in the Montreal Neurological Institute space was -13.8, -55.8, and -36.4 mm, and 13.8, -55.7, and -36.4 mm, respectively. The maximal probability and mean probability of the DN atlas with the individually segmented DNs in this cohort were 100 and 39.3%, respectively, in contrast to the maximum probability of approximately 75% and the mean probability of 23.4 to 33.7% with earlier DN atlases. Using QSM, which provides superior iron-sensitive MRI contrast for delineating iron-rich structures, an improved atlas for the dentate nucleus has been generated. The atlas can be applied to investigate the role of the DN in both normal cortico-cerebellar physiology and the variety of disease states in which it is implicated.

  2. Yes, there is a Medial Nucleus of the Trapezoid Body in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy J Kulesza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB is a collection of brainstem neurons that function within the ascending auditory pathway. MNTB neurons are associated with a number of anatomical and physiological specializations which make these cells especially well-equipped to provide extremely fast and precise glycinergic inhibition to its target neurons in the superior olivary complex and ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus. The inhibitory influence of MNTB neurons plays essentials roles in the localization of sound sources and encoding temporal features of complex sounds. The morphology, afferent and efferent connections and physiological response properties of MNTB neurons have been well characterized in a number of laboratory rodents and some carnivores. Furthermore, the MNTB has been positively identified in all mammals examined, ranging from opossum and mice to chimpanzees. From the early 1970’s through 2009, a number of studies denied the existence of the MNTB in humans and consequentially, the existence of this nucleus in the human brain has been debated for nearly 50 years. The absence of the MNTB from the human brain would negate current principles of sound localization and would require a number of novel adaptations, entirely unique to humans. However, a number of recent studies of human post-mortem tissue have provided evidence supporting the existence of the MNTB in humans. It therefore seems timely to review the structure and function of the MNTB, critically review the literature which led to the denial of the human MNTB and then review recent investigations supporting the existence of the MNTB in the human brain.

  3. Low P sub T hadron-nucleus interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holynski, R.; Wozniak, K.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility of describing hadron-nucleus (hA) interactions is discussed in terms of a number of independent collisions of the projectile inside the target nucleus. This multiple rescattering may occur on a particle or quark parton level. To investigate the characteristics of hA interactions as a function of antineutrinos advantage is taken of the correlation between the average number antineutrinos of collisions of the projectile inside the nucleus and the number Ng of fast protons ejected from the struck nucleus. The relation antineutrinos vs Ng obtained in antineutrinos was used. For a given target nucleus this allows the selection of interactions occurring at different impact parameters.

  4. Adrenal-dependent and -independent stress-induced Per1 mRNA in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and prefrontal cortex of male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Lauren E; Christensen, Jenny; Woodruff, Elizabeth R; Morton, Sarah J; Hinds, Laura R; Spencer, Robert L

    2018-01-01

    Oscillating clock gene expression gives rise to a molecular clock that is present not only in the body's master circadian pacemaker, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), but also in extra-SCN brain regions. These extra-SCN molecular clocks depend on the SCN for entrainment to a light:dark cycle. The SCN has limited neural efferents, so it may entrain extra-SCN molecular clocks through its well-established circadian control of glucocorticoid hormone secretion. Glucocorticoids can regulate the normal rhythmic expression of clock genes in some extra-SCN tissues. Untimely stress-induced glucocorticoid secretion may compromise extra-SCN molecular clock function. We examined whether acute restraint stress during the rat's inactive phase can rapidly (within 30 min) alter clock gene (Per1, Per2, Bmal1) and cFos mRNA (in situ hybridization) in the SCN, hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and prefrontal cortex (PFC) of male and female rats (6 rats per treatment group). Restraint stress increased Per1 and cFos mRNA in the PVN and PFC of both sexes. Stress also increased cFos mRNA in the SCN of male rats, but not when subsequently tested during their active phase. We also examined in male rats whether endogenous glucocorticoids are necessary for stress-induced Per1 mRNA (6-7 rats per treatment group). Adrenalectomy attenuated stress-induced Per1 mRNA in the PVN and ventral orbital cortex, but not in the medial PFC. These data indicate that increased Per1 mRNA may be a means by which extra-SCN molecular clocks adapt to environmental stimuli (e.g. stress), and in the PFC this effect is largely independent of glucocorticoids.

  5. Rodent models of aging bone: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Farhan A; Melim, Terry

    2011-12-01

    With an increase in the average life span especially in the Western hemisphere, there is renewed interest in treating maladies of old age including osteoporosis. Age-related bone loss and resultant osteoporosis substantially increase risk of fractures and morbidity in the geriatric population leading to both a decline in the quality of life for the elderly as well as a substantial burden on the health care system. Herein, we review recent research in murine and rodent models looking at how both extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as hormones, biochemicals, neuromodulators, inflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress, nutrition, and exercise influence the skeleton with age. Recent studies on the relationship between bone and fat in the marrow, and the fate of the marrow mesenchymal stromal cell population, which can give rise to either bone-forming osteoblasts or fat-forming adipocytic cells as a function of age, have also been highlighted. An appreciable range of studies using aging murine as well as cellular models are discussed, as these studies have broadened our understanding of the pathways and players in the aging bone. Impactful information regarding aging and the bone may then allow the application of better pharmacologic as well as nonpharmacologic regimens to alleviate bone loss due to aging.

  6. Assessing Spatial Learning and Memory in Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorhees, Charles V.; Williams, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Maneuvering safely through the environment is central to survival of almost all species. The ability to do this depends on learning and remembering locations. This capacity is encoded in the brain by two systems: one using cues outside the organism (distal cues), allocentric navigation, and one using self-movement, internal cues and nearby proximal cues, egocentric navigation. Allocentric navigation involves the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and surrounding structures; in humans this system encodes allocentric, semantic, and episodic memory. This form of memory is assessed in laboratory animals in many ways, but the dominant form of assessment is the Morris water maze (MWM). Egocentric navigation involves the dorsal striatum and connected structures; in humans this system encodes routes and integrated paths and, when overlearned, becomes procedural memory. In this article, several allocentric assessment methods for rodents are reviewed and compared with the MWM. MWM advantages (little training required, no food deprivation, ease of testing, rapid and reliable learning, insensitivity to differences in body weight and appetite, absence of nonperformers, control methods for proximal cue learning, and performance effects) and disadvantages (concern about stress, perhaps not as sensitive for working memory) are discussed. Evidence-based design improvements and testing methods are reviewed for both rats and mice. Experimental factors that apply generally to spatial navigation and to MWM specifically are considered. It is concluded that, on balance, the MWM has more advantages than disadvantages and compares favorably with other allocentric navigation tasks. PMID:25225309

  7. Detailed review of transgenic rodent mutation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Iain B; Singer, Timothy M; Boucher, Sherri E; Douglas, George R

    2005-09-01

    Induced chromosomal and gene mutations play a role in carcinogenesis and may be involved in the production of birth defects and other disease conditions. While it is widely accepted that in vivo mutation assays are more relevant to the human condition than are in vitro assays, our ability to evaluate mutagenesis in vivo in a broad range of tissues has historically been quite limited. The development of transgenic rodent (TGR) mutation models has given us the ability to detect, quantify, and sequence mutations in a range of somatic and germ cells. This document provides a comprehensive review of the TGR mutation assay literature and assesses the potential use of these assays in a regulatory context. The information is arranged as follows. (1) TGR mutagenicity models and their use for the analysis of gene and chromosomal mutation are fully described. (2) The principles underlying current OECD tests for the assessment of genotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, and also nontransgenic assays available for assessment of gene mutation, are described. (3) All available information pertaining to the conduct of TGR assays and important parameters of assay performance have been tabulated and analyzed. (4) The performance of TGR assays, both in isolation and as part of a battery of in vitro and in vivo short-term genotoxicity tests, in predicting carcinogenicity is described. (5) Recommendations are made regarding the experimental parameters for TGR assays, and the use of TGR assays in a regulatory context.

  8. Genetic backgrounds determine brown remodeling of white fat in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Ferrannini

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: Rodent genetic background determines the brown remodeling of different white fat depots. This study provides new insights into the role of genetic variation in fat remodeling in susceptibility to metabolic diseases.

  9. A glimpse on the pattern of rodent diversification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabre, Pierre-Henri Fréderic; Hautier, Lionel; Dimitrov, Dimitar Stefanov

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Development of phylogenetic methods that do not rely on fossils for the study of evolutionary processes through time have revolutionized the field of evolutionary biology and resulted in an unprecedented expansion of our knowledge about the tree of life. These methods have helped to shed...... imbalances and the time line we discuss the potential role of different diversification factors that might have shaped the rodents radiation. CONCLUSIONS:The present glimpse on the diversification pattern of rodents can be used for further comparative meta-analyses. Muroid lineages have a greater degree...... of variation in their diversification rates than any other rodent group. Different topological signatures suggest distinct diversification processes among rodent lineages. In particular, Muroidea and Sciuroidea display widespread distribution and have undergone evolutionary and adaptive radiation on most...

  10. Morphometric variation in the forest rodent Malacomys edwardsi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-08-31

    Rodentia: Muridae) from a single locality in Ghana. Journal of. Mammalogy 53: 616-619. Decher J, Kadjo B, Abedi-Lartey M, Tounkara EO,. Kante S, 2005. A rapid survey of small mammals (shrews, rodents, and bats) from the.

  11. First Isolates of Leptospira spp., from Rodents Captured in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes-Gabriel, Elsa; Carreira, Teresa; Vieira, Maria Luísa

    2016-05-04

    Rodents play an important role in the transmission of pathogenic Leptospira spp. However, in Angola, neither the natural reservoirs of these spirochetes nor leptospirosis diagnosis has been considered. Regarding this gap, we captured rodents in Luanda and Huambo provinces to identify circulating Leptospira spp. Rodent kidney tissue was cultured and DNA amplified and sequenced. Culture isolates were evaluated for pathogenic status and typing with rabbit antisera; polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing were also performed. A total of 37 rodents were captured: Rattus rattus (15, 40.5%), Rattus norvegicus (9, 24.3%), and Mus musculus (13, 35.2%). Leptospiral DNA was amplified in eight (21.6%) kidney samples. From the cultures, we obtained four (10.8%) Leptospira isolates belonging to the Icterohaemorrhagiae and Ballum serogroups of Leptospira interrogans and Leptospira borgpetersenii genospecies, respectively. This study provides information about circulating leptospires spread by rats and mice in Angola. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  12. Bone morphology of the hind limbs in two caviomorph rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, F A P; Sesoko, N F; Rahal, S C; Teixeira, C R; Müller, T R; Machado, M R F

    2013-04-01

    In order to evaluate the hind limbs of caviomorph rodents a descriptive analysis of the Cuniculus paca (Linnaeus, 1766) and Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris (Linnaeus, 1766) was performed using anatomical specimens, radiography, computed tomography (CT) and full-coloured prototype models to generate bone anatomy data. The appendicular skeleton of the two largest rodents of Neotropical America was compared with the previously reported anatomical features of Rattus norvegicus (Berkenhout, 1769) and domestic Cavia porcellus (Linnaeus, 1758). The structures were analyzed macroscopically and particular findings of each species reported. Features including the presence of articular fibular projection and lunulae were observed in the stifle joint of all rodents. Imaging aided in anatomical description and, specifically in the identification of bone structures in Cuniculus paca and Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris. The imaging findings were correlated with the anatomical structures observed. The data may be used in future studies comparing these animals to other rodents and mammalian species. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Rodent brain extraction using B-spline based deformable model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimin Huang; Chen Ling; Su Huang; Zhongkang Lu; Zhiping Lin

    2017-07-01

    Accurate rodent brain extraction is one of the basic steps for many translational study using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In this paper, we present a new approach to model the rodent brain variation using non-rigid B-spline image registration for the brain extraction in MRI images. We model the shape and appearance with the B-spline parameters together with a mean brain image. Followed by a method using multi-expert, we refine the brain extraction region. Compared with the image-based template model using cross-correlation, the performance for rodent brain extraction has shown much improvement on one data set while maintaining the similar yet more consistent performance for another. Both template based methods however outperform the voxel based method (3D PCNN) and a modified BET version for rodent brain extraction.

  14. J/$\\psi$ production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, M C; Alexa, C; Arnaldi, R; Ataian, M R; Baglin, C; Baldit, A; Bedjidian, Marc; Beolè, S; Boldea, V; Bordalo, P; Borges, G; Bussière, A; Capelli, L; Castanier, C; Castor, J I; Chaurand, B; Chevrot, I; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Cicalò, C; Claudino, T; Comets, M P; Constans, N; Constantinescu, S; Cortese, P; De Falco, A; De Marco, N; Dellacasa, G; Devaux, A; Dita, S; Drapier, O; Ducroux, L; Espagnon, B; Fargeix, J; Force, P; Gallio, M; Gavrilov, Yu K; Gerschel, C; Giubellino, P; Golubeva, M B; Gonin, M; Grigorian, A A; Grossiord, J Y; Guber, F F; Guichard, A; Gulkanian, H R; Hakobyan, R S; Haroutunian, R; Idzik, M; Jouan, D; Karavitcheva, T L; Kluberg, L; Kurepin, A B; Le Bornec, Y; Lourenço, C; Macciotta, P; MacCormick, M; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Monteno, M; Musso, A; Petiau, P; Piccotti, A; Pizzi, J R; Prado da Silva, W L; Prino, F; Puddu, G; Quintans, C; Ramello, L; Ramos, S; Rato-Mendes, P; Riccati, L; Romana, A; Santos, H; Saturnini, P; Scalas, E; Scomparin, E; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Sigaudo, F; Silva, S; Sitta, M; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Topilskaya, N S; Usai, G L; Vercellin, Ermanno; Villatte, L; Willis, N

    2002-01-01

    The NA38 and NA50 experiments at the CERN SPS have measured charmonium production in different colliding systems with the aim of observing a phase transition from ordinary hadronic matter towards a state in which quarks and gluons are deconfined (quark-gluon plasma, QGP). This experimental research is based on the prediction that the J/ psi yield should be suppressed in deconfined matter. The analysis of the data collected by the NA50 experiment with Pb-Pb collisions at 158 GeV/c per nucleon shows that the J/ psi is anomalously suppressed with respect to the pattern observed in proton-nucleus and light ion reactions. (9 refs).

  15. The anorexigenic cytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor stimulates POMC gene expression via receptors localized in the nucleus of arcuate neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvreur, Odile; Aubourg, Alain; Crépin, Delphine; Degrouard, Jéril; Gertler, Arieh; Taouis, Mohammed; Vacher, Claire-Marie

    2012-02-15

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a neural cytokine that reduces appetite and body weight when administrated to rodents or humans. We have demonstrated recently that the level of CNTF in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), a key hypothalamic region involved in food intake regulation, is positively correlated with protection against diet-induced obesity. However, the comprehension of the physiological significance of neural CNTF action was still incomplete because CNTF lacks a signal peptide and thus may not be secreted by the classical exocytosis pathways. Knowing that CNTF distribution shares similarities with that of its receptor subunits in the rat ARC, we hypothesized that CNTF could exert a direct intracrine effect in ARC cells. Here, we demonstrate that CNTF, together with its receptor subunits, translocates to the cell nucleus of anorexigenic POMC neurons in the rat ARC. Furthermore, the stimulation of hypothalamic nuclear fractions with CNTF induces the phosphorylation of several signaling proteins, including Akt, as well as the transcription of the POMC gene. These data strongly suggest that intracellular CNTF may directly modulate POMC gene expression via the activation of receptors localized in the cell nucleus, providing a novel plausible mechanism of CNTF action in regulating energy homeostasis.

  16. Placentation in Sigmodontinae: a rodent taxon native to South America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Favaron, Phelipe O; Carter, Anthony Michael; Ambrosio, Carlos E

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sigmondontinae, known as "New World rats and mice," is a large subfamily of Cricetidae for which we herein provide the first comprehensive investigation of the placenta. METHODS: Placentas of various gestational ages ranging from early pregnancy to near term were obtained fo...... subfamily of South American rodents. We note, however, that some of these rodents can be captive bred and recommend that future studies focus on the study of time dated pregnancies....

  17. Meson-nucleus potentials and the search for meson-nucleus bound states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Paryev, E. Ya.

    2017-11-01

    Recent experiments studying the meson-nucleus interaction to extract meson-nucleus potentials are reviewed. The real part of the potentials quantifies whether the interaction is attractive or repulsive while the imaginary part describes the meson absorption in nuclei. The review is focused on mesons which are sufficiently long-lived to potentially form meson-nucleus quasi-bound states. The presentation is confined to meson production off nuclei in photon-, pion-, proton-, and light-ion induced reactions and heavy-ion collisions at energies near the production threshold. Tools to extract the potential parameters are presented. In most cases, the real part of the potential is determined by comparing measured meson momentum distributions or excitation functions with collision model or transport model calculations. The imaginary part is extracted from transparency ratio measurements. Results on K+ ,K0 ,K- , η ,η‧ , ω, and ϕ mesons are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. The interaction of K+ and K0 mesons with nuclei is found to be weakly repulsive, while the K- , η ,η‧ , ω and ϕ meson-nucleus potentials are attractive, however, with widely different strengths. Because of meson absorption in the nuclear medium the imaginary parts of the meson-nucleus potentials are all negative, again with a large spread. An outlook on planned experiments in the charm sector is given. In view of the determined potential parameters, the criteria and chances for experimentally observing meson-nucleus quasi-bound states are discussed. The most promising candidates appear to be the η and η‧ mesons.

  18. Serologic survey of orthopoxvirus infection among rodents in hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldal, Miklós; Sironen, Tarja; Henttonen, Heikki; Vapalahti, Olli; Madai, Mónika; Horváth, Győző; Dallos, Bianka; Kutas, Anna; Földes, Fanni; Kemenesi, Gábor; Németh, Viktória; Bányai, Krisztián; Jakab, Ferenc

    2015-05-01

    As a result of discontinuing vaccination against smallpox after the late 1970s, different orthopoxviruses (OPVs), such as cowpox virus (CPXV), have become a re-emerging healthcare threat among zoonotic pathogens. In Hungary, data on OPV prevalence among its rodent host species have been absent. Here, rodents belonging to four species, i.e., striped field mouse (Apodemus agrarius), yellow-necked mouse (A. flavicollis), wood mouse (A. sylvaticus) and bank vole (Myodes glareolus), were live trapped at 13 sampling plots on a 149-ha area in the Mecsek Mountains, Hungary, from March to September in 2011 and 2012. Rodent sera were collected and screened for OPV-reactive antibodies with an immunfluorescence assay (IFA). Among the 1587 tested rodents, 286 (18.0%) harbored OPV-specific antibodies. Seroprevalence was the highest for the bank vole (71.4%) and the striped field mouse (66.7%). Due to a masting event in the autumn of 2011 across Central Europe, the abundance of bank voles increased drastically in the 2012 season, raising the overall OPV seroprevalence. We provide the first data on OPV occurrence and seroprevalence in rodents in Hungary. The circulation of OPV in rodents in densely populated areas warrants further studies to elucidate the zoonotic potential of OPV in humans.

  19. [Genomic analysis of Wenzhou virus in rodents from Zhejiang province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K; Lin, X D; Li, M H; Wang, M R; Sun, X Y; Zhang, Y Z

    2017-03-10

    Objective: Arenavirus is a negative single-stranded RNA virus and an important human pathogen, mainly harbored and transmitted by rodents, causing severe diseases, including hemorrhagic fever and encephalitis. Following the discovery of a novel pathogenic arenavirus (Wenzhou virus, WENV), the prevalence of WENV in local small rodents was investigated. Methods: By using RT-PCR, WENV was screened in 48 and 156 rodents sampled from Wenzhou and Longquan, respectively. Results: Consequently, WENV was detected in 5 (10.41%) rodents sampled from Wenzhou. However, no WENV was identified in all the rodents sampled from Longquan. Genetic analysis of complete genome sequences indicated that 4 of 5 virus strains were closely related to the known Wenzhou viruses with high homology. Especially, the L and S segments of Wencheng-Rn-288 strain shared homology of 87.5% and 91.6% with other viruses, respectively. They formed a distinct lineage, suggesting that this strain might be a novel variant of WENV. Conclusions: Our results indicate that WENV has a high prevalence and high genetic diversity among rodents in Wenzhou. As the respiratory disease caused by WENV has been detected in Cambodia, it is necessary to strengthen the surveillance for WENV in China.

  20. Aspects of Coulomb dissociation and interference in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystrand, Joakim; Baltz, Anthony; Klein, Spencer R.

    2001-10-21

    Coherent vector meson production in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions is discussed. These interactions may occur for impact parameters much larger than the sum of the nuclear radii. Since the vector meson production is always localized to one of the nuclei, the system acts as a two-source interferometer in the transverse plane. By tagging the outgoing nuclei for Coulomb dissociation it is possible to obtain a measure of the impact parameter and thus the source separation in the interferometer. This is of particular interest since the life-time of the vector mesons are generally much shorter than the impact parameters of the collisions.

  1. Expression of ORAII, a plasma membrane resident subunit of the CRAC channel, in rodent and non-rodent species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Roberto; Valente, Eliane G; Pretorius, Jim; Pacheco, Efrain; Qi, Meiying; Bennett, Brian D; Fong, David H; Lin, Fen-Fen; Bi, Vivian; McBride, Helen J

    2014-12-01

    We determined the expression of ORAI1 protein in rodent and non-rodent tissues using a monoclonal antibody directed against an extracellular loop of the protein. Previous reports using antibodies directed at the C-terminus of ORAI1 have not detected central nervous system (CNS) expression. Our results demonstrate broad tissue expression that includes the CNS using a unique monoclonal antibody specific to an extracellular loop of ORAI1. In addition, we present in situ hybridization (ISH) results using a probe within the middle of the mouse coding region showing CNS expression of Orai1 RNA. We contrast the patterns of rodent and human tissue expression and conclude that rodents have similar expression of ORAI1 in most tissue types when compared to primates, with an important exception being the male reproductive system, where human-specific expression is observed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. An exceptionally bright, compact starburst nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margon, Bruce; Anderson, Scott F.; Mateo, Mario; Fich, Michel; Massey, Philip

    1988-01-01

    Observations are reported of a remarkably bright (V about 13) starburst nucleus, 0833 + 652, which has been detected at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths. Despite an observed flux at each of these wavelengths which is comparable to that of NGC 7714, often considered the 'prototypical' example of the starburst phenomenon, 0833 + 652 appears to be a previously uncataloged object. Its ease of detectability throughout the electromagnetic spectrum should make it useful for a variety of problems in the study of compact emission-line galaxies.

  3. Lectures on the theory of the nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Sitenko, Aleksej Grigorevich

    1975-01-01

    Provides an advanced and up-to-date account of the theory of nuclear structure and discusses in considerable detail both the superfluid and collective models of the nucleus, in addition to earlier complementary models and theories. The book also examines other important topics such as the rotational and vibrational spectra of nuclei which have not previously been treated in such depth. To summarize, it covers a large amount of theoretical ground in one volume and attempts to fill a serious gap in the literature. Many problems are included

  4. Contemporary models of the atomic nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Nemirovskii, P E

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary Models of the Atomic Nucleus discusses nuclear structure and properties, expounding contemporary theoretical concepts of the low-energy nuclear processes underlying in nuclear models. This book focuses on subjects such as the optical nuclear model, unified or collective model, and deuteron stripping reaction. Other topics discussed include the basic nuclear properties; shell model; theoretical analysis of the shell model; and radiative transitions and alpha-decay. The deuteron theory and the liquid drop nuclear model with its application to fission theory are also mentioned, but o

  5. Distribution and seasonal variation in hypothalamic RF-amide peptides in a semi-desert rodent, the jerboa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janati, A; Talbi, R; Klosen, P

    2013-01-01

    , kisspeptin (Kp) and RF-amide-related peptide (RFRP)-3, displays seasonal variation in jerboa. Kp and/or RFRP-3 immunoreactivity was investigated in the hypothalamus of jerboas captured in the field of the Middle Atlas mountain (Morocco), either in the spring or autumn. As in other rodents, the Kp......-immunoreactive (-IR) neurones were found in the anteroventro-periventricular and arcuate nuclei. RFRP-3 neurones were noted within the dorso/ventromedial hypothalamus. A marked sexual dimorphism in the expression of Kp (but not RFRP-3) was observed. The number of Kp-IR neurones was nine-fold higher, and the density...... compared to sexually inactive autumn animals. In the arcuate nucleus, the level of Kp-IR cells and fibres was significant higher during the sexually active period in the spring than during the autumnal sexual quiescence. Similarly, the number of RFRP-3-IR neurones in the ventro/dorsomedial hypothalamus...

  6. Neurochemical organization of the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis in the human

    OpenAIRE

    Baizer, Joan S.; Baker, James F.; Haas, Kristin; Lima, Raquel

    2007-01-01

    We have characterized the neurochemical organization of a small brainstem nucleus in the human brain, the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis (PMD). PMD is located adjacent and medial to the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi (PH) in the dorsal medulla, and is distinguished by the pattern of immunoreactivity of cells and fibers to several markers including calcium-binding proteins, a synthetic enzyme for nitric oxide (neuronal nitric oxide synthase, nNOS) and a nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (a...

  7. Lassa fever or lassa hemorrhagic fever risk to humans from rodent-borne zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Megahed, Laila Abdel-Mawla; Abdalla Saleh, Hala Ahmed; Morsy, Tosson A

    2015-04-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) typically manifest as rapidly progressing acute febrile syndromes with profound hemorrhagic manifestations and very high fatality rates. Lassa fever, an acute hemorrhagic fever characterized by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and chest and abdominal pain. Rodents are important reservoirs of rodent-borne zoonosis worldwide. Transmission rodents to humans occur by aerosol spread, either from the genus Mastomys rodents' excreta (multimammate rat) or through the close contact with infected patients (nosocomial infection). Other rodents of the genera Rattus, Mus, Lemniscomys, and Praomys are incriminated rodents hosts. Now one may ask do the rodents' ectoparasites play a role in Lassa virus zoonotic transmission. This paper summarized the update knowledge on LHV; hopping it might be useful to the clinicians, nursing staff, laboratories' personals as well as those concerned zoonoses from rodents and rodent control.

  8. Toxoplasmosis seroprevalence in urban rodents: a survey in Niamey, Niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelien Mercier

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A serological survey of Toxoplasma gondii was conducted on 766 domestic and peridomestic rodents from 46 trapping sites throughout the city of Niamey, Niger. A low seroprevalence was found over the whole town with only 1.96% of the rodents found seropositive. However, differences between species were important, ranging from less than 2% in truly commensal Mastomys natalensis, Rattus rattus and Mus musculus, while garden-associated Arvicanthis niloticus displayed 9.1% of seropositive individuals. This is in line with previous studies on tropical rodents - that we reviewed here - which altogether show that Toxoplasma seroprevalence in rodent is highly variable, depending on many factors such as locality and/or species. Moreover, although we were not able to decipher statistically between habitat or species effect, such a contrast between Nile grass rats and the other rodent species points towards a potentially important role of environmental toxoplasmic infection. This would deserve to be further scrutinised since intra-city irrigated cultures are extending in Niamey, thus potentially increasing Toxoplasma circulation in this yet semi-arid region. As far as we are aware of, our study is one of the rare surveys of its kind performed in Sub-Saharan Africa and the first one ever conducted in the Sahel.

  9. Thieving rodents as substitute dispersers of megafaunal seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Patrick A.; Hirsch, Ben T.; Emsens, Willem-Jan; Zamora-Gutierrez, Veronica; Wikelski, Martin; Kays, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The Neotropics have many plant species that seem to be adapted for seed dispersal by megafauna that went extinct in the late Pleistocene. Given the crucial importance of seed dispersal for plant persistence, it remains a mystery how these plants have survived more than 10,000 y without their mutualist dispersers. Here we present support for the hypothesis that secondary seed dispersal by scatter-hoarding rodents has facilitated the persistence of these large-seeded species. We used miniature radio transmitters to track the dispersal of reputedly megafaunal seeds by Central American agoutis, which scatter-hoard seeds in shallow caches in the soil throughout the forest. We found that seeds were initially cached at mostly short distances and then quickly dug up again. However, rather than eating the recovered seeds, agoutis continued to move and recache the seeds, up to 36 times. Agoutis dispersed an estimated 35% of seeds for >100 m. An estimated 14% of the cached seeds survived to the next year, when a new fruit crop became available to the rodents. Serial video-monitoring of cached seeds revealed that the stepwise dispersal was caused by agoutis repeatedly stealing and recaching each other’s buried seeds. Although previous studies suggest that rodents are poor dispersers, we demonstrate that communities of rodents can in fact provide highly effective long-distance seed dispersal. Our findings suggest that thieving scatter-hoarding rodents could substitute for extinct megafaunal seed dispersers of tropical large-seeded trees. PMID:22802644

  10. [Parasite-host relations of fleas and rodents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosinina, E F

    1982-01-01

    Not infrequently lice can reach great abundance on rodents. The distribution of lice on animals is uneven. The infection with lice depends not only on the physiological and ecological properties of the host but also on the environmental conditions. The distribution of lice on rodents can be affected by the development of transport communications. If a population of rodents is parasitized by two species of specific lice, they belong to different genera. On single animals only one species of lice occurs as a rule; if two species occur, then one of them is dominant. In this way decreases the interspecific competition between lice. Seasonal and age changes in lice infection are associated with those in host's biology and behaviour under certain climatic conditions. It is clearly displayed in rodents breeding once a year. The infection with lice increase with the rise in rodents abundance. Along with the confirmation of the general rule of poor infection with specific parasites at the borders of the species distribution a case of high infection with lice at the border of the host's distribution was noted. In addition to specific lice, alien species are recorded on small mammals which appear due to exchange of parasites between hosts. Examples are given all conquering new hosts by lice; as a result close species of lice can parasitize phylogenetically distant hosts.

  11. Geographical distribution of rodent-associated hantaviruses in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantooth, S J; Milazzo, M L; Bradley, R D; Hice, C L; Ceballos, G; Tesh, R B; Fulhorst, C F

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to increase our knowledge of the geographic distribution and natural host range of hantaviruses in Texas, southeastern New Mexico, and Mexico. Blood samples from 3,225 wild rodents, representing 34 species, were tested for hantavirus antibody (IgG), using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hantavirus antibody was found in one or more rodents from each of 13 counties in Texas, Otero County in southeastern New Mexico, and Mexico State (central Mexico). The 133 antibody-positive rodents included seven Peromyscus species (P. attwateri, P. boylii, P. hylocetes, P. leucopus, P. maniculatis, P. melanotis, and P. pectoralis), Sigmodon hispidus, Oryzomys palustris, two Reithrodontomys species (R. fulvescens and R. megalotis), Neotoma albigula, and Perognathus merriami. This study provides further evidence that rodent-associated hantaviruses are geographically widely distributed in Texas. The discovery of antibody in P. hylocetes and P. melanotis is evidence that peromyscine rodents in Mexico are naturally associated with viruses belonging to the genus Hantavirus.

  12. Nucleus and nucleus-cytoskeleton connections in 3D cell migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lingling, E-mail: liulingling2012@163.com; Luo, Qing, E-mail: qing.luo@cqu.edu.cn; Sun, Jinghui, E-mail: sunjhemail@163.com; Song, Guanbin, E-mail: song@cqu.edu.cn

    2016-10-15

    Cell migration plays an important role in many physiological and pathological settings, ranging from embryonic development to cancer metastasis. Currently, accumulating data suggest that cells migrating in three-dimensional (3D) environments show well-defined differences compared to their well-established two-dimensional (2D) counterparts. During 3D migration, the cell body and nucleus must deform to allow cellular passage through the available spaces, and the deformability of the relatively rigid nucleus may constitute a limiting step. Here, we highlight the key evidence regarding the role of the nuclear mechanics in 3D migration, including the molecular components that govern the stiffness of the nucleus and review how the nuclear dynamics are connected to and controlled by cytoskeleton-based migration machinery. Intriguingly, nuclear movement must be coordinated with the cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading and trailing edges, which in turn impact the cytoplasmic dynamics that affect the migration efficiency. Thus, we suggest that alterations in the nuclear structure may facilitate cellular reorganizations that are necessary for efficient migration. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representations of a cell migrating on a 2D substrate and a cell migrating in a 3D extracellular matrix environment. (A) Nucleus-cytoskeleton connections are essential to 3D migration. Mechanical signals are transduced by integrins at the cell surface and channeled to cytoskeletal proteins, which generates prestress. The nucleus-cytoskeleton connections can either act as a stable skeleton to anchor the nuclei or provide active force to move the nuclei. The LINC complex is responsible for the nucleo-cytoskeletal coupling. Nesprins connect the cytoskeletal proteins to the inner nuclear membrane proteins SUN1 and SUN2. The SUN proteins connect to the lamins that form the lamina, which attaches to the chromatin. This physical connectivity transmits the mechanical signals from receptors at

  13. Set-Shifting in a Rodent Model of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chess, Amy C.; Raymond, Brittany E.; Gardner-Morse, Ira G.; Stefani, Mark R.; Green, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments compared Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHRs; a rodent model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder) and Wistars (a normoactive control strain), on the acquisition of a set-shifting strategy. In Experiment 1, SHRs and Wistars were equivalent in trials to criterion to learn a brightness or a texture discrimination but SHRs were faster than Wistars in shifting to the opposite discrimination when there was one or two days between the initial discrimination and the shift. In Experiment 2, SHRs and Wistars were equivalent in shifting when the shift between discriminations occurred immediately after a criterion had been met in the first discrimination. The results are discussed in terms of a failure of SHRs to store or retrieve an initial discrimination and/or latent inhibition over a delay, leading to faster acquisition of a set-shift. This failure in storage or retrieval may be the result of a hypoactive dopamine system in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens shell as well as abnormalities in entorhinal cortex in SHRs. PMID:21500882

  14. Set shifting in a rodent model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chess, Amy C; Raymond, Brittany E; Gardner-Morse, Ira G; Stefani, Mark R; Green, John T

    2011-06-01

    Two experiments compared spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs; a rodent model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder) and Wistar rats (a normoactive control strain), on the acquisition of a set-shifting strategy. In Experiment 1, SHRs and Wistar rats were equivalent in trials to criterion to learn a brightness or a texture discrimination but SHRs were faster than Wistar rats in shifting to the opposite discrimination when there was 1 or 2 days between the initial discrimination and the shift. In Experiment 2, SHRs and Wistar rats were equivalent in shifting when the shift between discriminations occurred immediately after a criterion had been met in the first discrimination. The results are discussed in terms of a failure of SHRs to store or retrieve an initial discrimination and/or latent inhibition over a delay, leading to faster acquisition of a set-shift. This failure in storage or retrieval may be the result of a hypoactive dopamine system in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens shell as well as abnormalities in entorhinal cortex in SHRs.

  15. Molecular analyses of mitochondrial pseudogenes within the nuclear genome of arvicoline rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triant, Deborah A; DeWoody, J Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear sequences of mitochondrial origin (numts) are common among animals and plants. The mechanism(s) by which numts transfer from the mitochondrion to the nucleus is uncertain, but their insertions may be mediated in part by chromosomal repair mechanisms. If so, then lineages where chromosomal rearrangements are common should be good models for the study of numt evolution. Arvicoline rodents are known for their karyotypic plasticity and numt pseudogenes have been discovered in this group. Here, we characterize a 4 kb numt pseudogene in the arvicoline vole Microtus rossiaemeridionalis. This sequence is among the largest numts described for a mammal lacking a completely sequenced genome. It encompasses three protein-coding and six tRNA pseudogenes that span approximately 25% of the entire mammalian mitochondrial genome. It is bordered by a dinucleotide microsatellite repeat and contains four transposable elements within its sequence and flanking regions. To determine the phylogenetic distribution of this numt among the arvicolines, we characterized one of the mitochondrial pseudogenes (cytochrome b) in 21 additional arvicoline species. Average rates of nucleotide substitution in this arvicoline pseudogene are estimated as 2.3 x 10(-8) substitutions/per site/per year. Furthermore, we performed comparative analyses among all species to estimate the age of this mitochondrial transfer at nearly 4 MYA, predating the origin of most arvicolines.

  16. NPFFR2 Activates the HPA Axis and Induces Anxiogenic Effects in Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ya-Tin; Yu, Yu-Lian; Hong, Wei-Chen; Yeh, Ting-Shiuan; Chen, Ting-Chun; Chen, Jin-Chung

    2017-08-21

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) belongs to the RFamide family and is known as a morphine-modulating peptide. NPFF regulates various hypothalamic functions through two receptors, NPFFR1 and NPFFR2. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis participates in physiological stress response by increasing circulating glucocorticoid levels and modulating emotional responses. Other RFamide peptides, including neuropeptide AF, neuropeptide SF and RFamide related peptide also target NPFFR1 or NPFFR2, and have been reported to activate the HPA axis and induce anxiety- or depression-like behaviors. However, little is known about the action of NPFF on HPA axis activity and anxiety-like behaviors, and the role of the individual receptors remains unclear. In this study, NPFFR2 agonists were used to examine the role of NPFFR2 in activating the HPA axis in rodents. Administration of NPFFR2 agonists, dNPA (intracerebroventricular, ICV) and AC-263093 (intraperitoneal, IP), time-dependently (in rats) and dose-dependently (in mice) increased serum corticosteroid levels and the effects were counteracted by the NPFF receptor antagonist, RF9 (ICV), as well as corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) antagonist, α-helical CRF(9-41) (intravenous, IV). Treatment with NPFFR2 agonist (AC-263093, IP) increased c-Fos protein expression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and induced an anxiogenic effect, which was evaluated in mice using an elevated plus maze. These findings reveal, for the first time, that the direct action of hypothalamic NPFFR2 stimulates the HPA axis and triggers anxiety-like behaviors.

  17. Modulation of Cortical Motor Evoked Potential After Stroke During Electrical Stimulation of the Lateral Cerebellar Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Joo; Furmaga, Havan; Cooperrider, Jessica; Gale, John T; Baker, Kenneth B; Machado, Andre G

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeting the dentato-thalamo-cortical (DTC) pathway at its origin in the lateral cerebellar nucleus (LCN) has been shown to enhance motor recovery in a rodent model of cortical ischemia. LCN DBS also yielded frequency-specific changes in motor cortex excitability in the normal brain, indexed by motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude. To investigate the effect of cortical stroke on cortical motor excitability in a rodent ischemia model and to measure the effects of LCN DBS on post-ischemia excitability as a function of stimulation parameters. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: naïve and stroke, with cortical ischemia induced through multiple, unilateral endothelin-1 injections. All animals were implanted with a bipolar electrode in the LCN opposite the affected hemisphere. MEPs were elicited from the affected hemisphere using intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) techniques. Multiple LCN DBS parameters were examined, including isochronal stimulation at 20, 30, 50, and 100 Hz as well as a novel burst stimulation pattern. ICMS-evoked MEPs were reduced in stroke (n = 10) relative to naïve (n = 12) animals. However, both groups showed frequency-dependent augmentation of cortical excitability in response to LCN DBS. In the naïve group, LCN DBS increased MEPs by 22-58%, while in the stroke group, MEPs were enhanced by 9-41% compared to OFF-DBS conditions. Activation of the DTC pathway increases cortical excitability in both naïve and post-stroke animals. These effects may underlie, at least partially, functional reorganization and therapeutic benefits associated with chronic LCN DBS in post-stroke animals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P. (eds.)

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

  19. Observation of the antimatter helium-4 nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    High-energy nuclear collisions create an energy density similar to that of the Universe microseconds after the Big Bang; in both cases, matter and antimatter are formed with comparable abundance. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions allows antimatter to decouple quickly from matter, and avoid annihilation. Thus, a high-energy accelerator of heavy nuclei provides an efficient means of producing and studying antimatter. The antimatter helium-4 nucleus (4He), also known as the anti-α (α), consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons (baryon number B = -4). It has not been observed previously, although the α-particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford and is present in cosmic radiation at the ten per cent level. Antimatter nuclei with B antimatter nuclei and a benchmark for possible future observations of 4He in cosmic radiation.

  20. Diet-induced obesity exacerbates metabolic and behavioral effects of polycystic ovary syndrome in a rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressler, Ilana B; Grayson, Bernadette E; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Seeley, Randy J

    2015-06-15

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy affecting women of reproductive age. Although a comorbidity of PCOS is obesity, many are lean. We hypothesized that increased saturated fat consumption and obesity would exacerbate metabolic and stress indices in a rodent model of PCOS. Female rats were implanted with the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or placebo pellets prior to puberty. Half of each group was maintained ad libitum on either a high-fat diet (HFD; 40% butter fat calories) or nutrient-matched low-fat diet (LFD). Irrespective of diet, DHT-treated animals gained more body weight, had irregular cycles, and were glucose intolerant compared with controls on both diets. HFD/DHT animals had the highest levels of fat mass and insulin resistance. DHT animals demonstrated increased anxiety-related behavior in the elevated plus maze by decreased distance traveled and time in the open arms. HFD consumption increased immobility during the forced-swim test. DHT treatment suppressed diurnal corticosterone measurements in both diet groups. In parallel, DHT treatment significantly dampened stress responsivity to a mild stressor. Brains of DHT animals showed attenuated c-Fos activation in the ventromedial hypothalamus and arcuate nucleus; irrespective of DHT-treatment, however, all HFD animals had elevated hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus c-Fos activation. Whereas hyperandrogenism drives overall body weight gain, glucose intolerance, anxiety behaviors, and stress responsivity, HFD consumption exacerbates the effect of androgens on adiposity, insulin resistance, and depressive behaviors. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Calcium microdomains in mitochondria and nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, María Teresa; Villalobos, Carlos; Chamero, Pablo; Alvarez, Javier; García-Sancho, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Endomembranes modify the progression of the cytosolic Ca(2+) wave and contribute to generate Ca(2+) microdomains, both in the cytosol and inside the own organella. The concentration of Ca(2+) in the cytosol ([Ca(2+)](C)), the mitochondria ([Ca(2+)](M)) and the nucleus ([Ca(2+)](N)) are similar at rest, but may become very different during cell activation. Mitochondria avidly take up Ca(2+) from the high [Ca(2+)](C) microdomains generated during cell activation near Ca(2+) channels of the plasma membrane and/or the endomembranes and prevent propagation of the high Ca(2+) signal to the bulk cytosol. This shaping of [Ca(2+)](C) signaling is essential for independent regulation of compartmentalized cell functions. On the other hand, a high [Ca(2+)](M) signal is generated selectively in the mitochondria close to the active areas, which tunes up respiration to the increased local needs. The progression of the [Ca(2+)](C) signal to the nucleus may be dampened by mitochondria, the nuclear envelope or higher buffering power inside the nucleoplasm. On the other hand, selective [Ca(2+)](N) signals could be generated by direct release of stored Ca(2+) into the nucleoplasm. Ca(2+) release could even be restricted to subnuclear domains. Putative Ca(2+) stores include the nuclear envelope, their invaginations inside the nucleoplasm (nucleoplasmic reticulum) and nuclear microvesicles. Inositol trisphosphate, cyclic ADP-ribose and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate have all been reported to produce release of Ca(2+) into the nucleoplasm, but contribution of these mechanisms under physiological conditions is still uncertain.

  2. Antenatal Maternal Hypoxia: Criterion for Fetal Growth Restriction in Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E Jang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rodents are a useful model for life science research. Accumulating evidence suggests that the offspring of mice and rats suffer from similar disorders as humans when exposed to hypoxia during pregnancy. Importantly, with antenatal hypoxic exposure, human neonates demonstrate low birth weight or growth restriction. Similarly, with antenatal hypoxic exposure rodents also demonstrate the fetal growth restriction (FGR. Surprisingly, there is no consensus on the minimum duration or degree of hypoxic exposure required to cause FGR in rodents. Thus, we have reviewed the available literature in an attempt to answer these questions. Based on studies in rats, birth weight reduction of 31% corresponded to 10th percentile reduction in birth weight curve. With the similar criterion (10th percentile, in mice 3 days or more and in rats 7 days or more of 14% or lower hypoxia administration was required to produce statistically significant FGR.

  3. Imaging conditioned fear circuitry using awake rodent fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichola M Brydges

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a powerful method for exploring emotional and cognitive brain responses in humans. However rodent fMRI has not previously been applied to the analysis of learned behaviour in awake animals, limiting its use as a translational tool. Here we have developed a novel paradigm for studying brain activation in awake rats responding to conditioned stimuli using fMRI. Using this method we show activation of the amygdala and related fear circuitry in response to a fear-conditioned stimulus and demonstrate that the magnitude of fear circuitry activation is increased following early life stress, a rodent model of affective disorders. This technique provides a new translatable method for testing environmental, genetic and pharmacological manipulations on emotional and cognitive processes in awake rodent models.

  4. Anatomy and Histology of Rodent and Human Major Salivary Glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Osamu; Mizobe, Kenichi; Bando, Yasuhiko; Sakiyama, Koji

    2012-01-01

    Major salivary glands of both humans and rodents consist of three pairs of macroscopic glands: parotid, submandibular, and sublingual. These glands secrete serous, mucous or mixed saliva via the proper main excretory ducts connecting the glandular bodies with the oral cavity. A series of discoveries about the salivary ducts in the 17th century by Niels Stensen (1638–1686), Thomas Wharton (1614–1673), and Caspar Bartholin (1655–1738) established the concept of exocrine secretion as well as salivary glands. Recent investigations have revealed the endocrine functions of parotin and a variety of cell growth factors produced by salivary glands. The present review aims to describe macroscopic findings on the major salivary glands of rodents and the microscopic differences between those of humans and rodents, which review should be of interest to those researchers studying salivary glands. PMID:23209333

  5. Rodent-Pika Parasite Spillover in Western North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Patrick; Roth, Tara; Foley, Janet; Ray, Chris

    2017-09-01

    Competition during the Cenozoic expansion of the Rodentia may have contributed to ecological niche reduction of pikas, which are now increasingly under threat as their habitat degrades under global climate change, while some rodents expand their ranges and overlap with pikas. Range overlap carries the possibility of disease spillover. Contemporary North American pikas are cold-adapted and relegated primarily to alpine environments where they subsist on relatively low-quality herbaceous diet. Yet their evolutionary ancestors were distributed geographically even into the subtropics. Here we examine historical and contemporary records of fleas on pikas (Ochotona princeps) from sites at different elevations in the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Northwest. We calculated indices of diversity from each site and spillover fraction, i.e., the proportion of fleas on pikas that have a preference for rodents. Across this range there are four pika specialist flea species, with no more than two of these per site, and 18 characteristically rodent flea species. Diversity is greatest in the Pacific Northwest and lowest in Montana. Rodent flea spillover onto pikas declines with elevation in the Rocky Mountains. These data provide evidence that rodents and pikas interact enough to allow considerable parasite spillover, and which could be exacerbated as pikas are increasingly stressed by climate change at lower elevations some rodent species expand up-elevation in the face of increasing global warming. With global climate change, both biotic and abiotic niche shrinkage demand our attention. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Experimental and phenomenological investigations of QCD matter in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronic, Anton

    2014-07-15

    This thesis is heterogeneous, comprising experimental papers at low energies (SIS-18 at GSI) and at the LHC, papers on phenomenology of high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions, and papers on detectors. The overview covers the experimental papers and those on phenomenology. I have chosen to write it in a general manner, intended to be accessible to non-experts. It emphasizes recent measurements and their understanding at the LHC. The detector papers, which address many principle aspects of gaseous detectors, are summarized and placed in context in the review I co-wrote and which closes the stack. The detector papers included here are the outcome of an R and D program for the Transition Radiation Detector of ALICE.

  7. Dynamical and statistical aspects in nucleus-nucleus collisions around the Fermi energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamain, B.; Bocage, F.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire; Assenard, M. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees; Auger, G.; Benlliure, J. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Bacri, C.O.; Borderie, B. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Bisquer, E. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire] [and others

    1997-12-31

    Nucleus-nucleus collisions at low incident energy are mainly governed by statistical dissipative processes, fusion and deep inelastic reactions being the most important ones. Conversely, in the relativistic energy regime, dynamical effects play a dominant role and one should apply a participant-spectator picture in order to understand the data. In between, the intermediate energy region is a transition one in which it is necessary to disentangle dynamics from statistical effects. Moreover, the Fermi energy region corresponds to available energies comparable with nuclear binding energies and one may except to observe phase transition effects. Experiments performed recently with 4{pi} devices have given quite new data and a much better insight into involved mechanisms and hot nuclear matter properties. INDRA data related to reaction mechanisms and multifragmentation are presented. (author) 53 refs.

  8. A versatile dielectron trigger for nucleon-nucleon and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Schicker, R; Tsertos, H

    1998-01-01

    A novel approach for a versatile first level dielectron trigger is presented. This trigger operates in the low multiplicity environment of nucleon-nucleon reactions as well as in the high multiplicity situation of nucleus-nucleus collisions. For optimal trigger performance, time of flight conditions for the two fastest particles of the event are combined with event multiplicity requirements. The dielectron trigger efficiency is given. The event reduction factor of such a trigger approach is studied for a low, a medium and a high multiplicity environment. The impact parameter dependence of the event reduction is given. The timing properties of the trigger signal are described. The losses due to deadtime are specified. Finally, the first level trigger rate is reported.

  9. The bioeconomics of controlling an African rodent pest species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skonhoft, Anders; Leirs, Herwig; Andreassen, Harry P

    2006-01-01

    The paper treats the economy of controlling an African pest rodent, the multimammate rat, causing major damage in maize production. An ecological population model is presented and used as a basis for the economic analyses carried out at the village level using data from Tanzania. This model...... of the dry season/beginning of rainy season. The paper demonstrates that changing from today's practice of symptomatic treatment when heavy rodent damage is noticed to a practice where the calendar is emphasized, may substantially improve the economic conditions for the maize producing farmers. This main...... conclusion is highly robust and not much affected by changing prices of maize production....

  10. Discovery of Novel Alphacoronaviruses in European Rodents and Shrews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theocharis Tsoleridis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Eight hundred and thirteen European rodents and shrews encompassing seven different species were screened for alphacoronaviruses using PCR detection. Novel alphacoronaviruses were detected in the species Rattus norvegicus, Microtus agrestis, Sorex araneus and Myodes glareolus. These, together with the recently described Lucheng virus found in China, form a distinct rodent/shrew-specific clade within the coronavirus phylogeny. Across a highly conserved region of the viral polymerase gene, the new members of this clade were up to 22% dissimilar at the nucleotide level to the previously described Lucheng virus. As such they might represent distinct species of alphacoronaviruses. These data greatly extend our knowledge of wildlife reservoirs of alphacoronaviruses.

  11. Of mice and women: rodent models of placental malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars; Marinho, Claudio R F; Staalsoe, Trine

    2010-01-01

    expressed in placental malaria (PM) and specific for chondroitin sulfate A (CSA). In Plasmodium falciparum, these VSA(PM) appear largely synonymous with the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family variant VAR2CSA. As rodent malaria parasites do not possess PfEMP1 homologs......, the usefulness of experimental mouse PM models remains controversial. However, many features of murine and human PM are similar, including involvement of VSAs analogous to PfEMP1. It thus appears that rodent model studies can further the understanding of VSA-dependent malaria pathogenesis and immunity....

  12. Stress, social behavior, and resilience: insights from rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beery, Annaliese K; Kaufer, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The neurobiology of stress and the neurobiology of social behavior are deeply intertwined. The social environment interacts with stress on almost every front: social interactions can be potent stressors; they can buffer the response to an external stressor; and social behavior often changes in response to stressful life experience. This review explores mechanistic and behavioral links between stress, anxiety, resilience, and social behavior in rodents, with particular attention to different social contexts. We consider variation between several different rodent species and make connections to research on humans and non-human primates.

  13. Museum specimen data predict crop damage by tropical rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Cordero, V; Martínez-Meyer, E

    2000-06-20

    Museum collections constitute a massive store of information on biological diversity. We used museum specimen data to generate ecological niche models that provide predictions of geographic distributions of native rodent pest species and agricultural census data that summarize the geographic distribution of nine crops in the state of Veracruz, Mexico, as well as crop losses between planting and harvest. Herein, we show that crop damage is related significantly to the predicted presence of rodent species for seven of nine crops. Museum collections may thus provide important baseline information for designing land-use and agricultural pest-management programs.

  14. New quasibound states of the compound nucleus in α -particle capture by the nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydanyuk, Sergei P.; Zhang, Peng-Ming; Zou, Li-Ping

    2017-07-01

    We generalize the theory of nuclear decay and capture of Gamow that is based on tunneling through the barrier and internal oscillations inside the nucleus. In our formalism an additional factor is obtained, which describes distribution of the wave function of the the α particle inside the nuclear region. We discover new most stable states (called quasibound states) of the compound nucleus (CN) formed during the capture of α particle by the nucleus. With a simple example, we explain why these states cannot appear in traditional calculations of the α capture cross sections based on monotonic penetrabilities of a barrier, but they appear in a complete description of the evolution of the CN. Our result is obtained by a complete description of the CN evolution, which has the advantages of (1) a clear picture of the formation of the CN and its disintegration, (2) a detailed quantum description of the CN, (3) tests of the calculated amplitudes based on quantum mechanics (not realized in other approaches), and (4) high accuracy of calculations (not achieved in other approaches). These peculiarities are shown with the capture reaction of α +44Ca . We predict quasibound energy levels and determine fusion probabilities for this reaction. The difference between our approach and theory of quasistationary states with complex energies applied for the α capture is also discussed. We show (1) that theory does not provide calculations for the cross section of α capture (according to modern models of the α capture), in contrast with our formalism, and (2) these two approaches describe different states of the α capture (for the same α -nucleus potential).

  15. The Confined Hydrogen Atom with a Moving Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom confined to a spherical box with impenetrable walls but, unlike earlier pedagogical articles on the subject, we assume that the nucleus also moves. We obtain the ground-state energy approximately by means of first-order perturbation theory and show that it is greater than that for the case in which the nucleus is clamped…

  16. Farmer survey in the hinterland of Kisangani (Democratic Republic of Congo) on rodent crop damage and rodent control techniques used

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drazo, Nicaise Amundala; Kennis, Jan; Leirs, Herwig

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a survey on rodent crop damage among farmers in the hinterland of Kisangani (Democratic Republic of Congo). We studied the amount of crop damage, the rodent groups causing crop damage, the growth stages affected and the control techniques used. We conducted this survey in three...... municipalities using a standard questionnaire form translated into local languages, between November 2005 and June 2006 and during July 2007. We used the Quotas method and interviewed 70 households per municipality. Farmers indicated rodent groups implicated in crop damage on color photographs. Two types...... of survey techniques were used: individual and focus-group surveys. The sugar cane rat, Thryonomys sp. and Lemniscomys striatus caused most damage to crops, but inside granaries, Rattus rattus was the primary pest species eating stored food supplies and causing damage to stored goods. Cassava and maize were...

  17. Genetic characterization of commensal Escherichia coli isolated from laboratory rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loong, Shih Keng; Mahfodz, Nur Hidayana; Che Mat Seri, Nurul Asma Anati; Mohamad Wali, Haryanti Azura; Abd Gani, Syahar Amir; Wong, Pooi-Fong; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli, a commensal in the intestines of vertebrates, is capable of colonizing many different hosts and the environment. Commensal E. coli strains are believed to be the precursor of pathogenic strains by means of acquisition of antimicrobial resistant and virulence genes. Laboratory rodents are inherently susceptible to numerous known infectious agents, which could transfer virulence determinants to commensal E. coli. Hence, in this study, the genetic structure of commensal E. coli found in laboratory rodents and their antimicrobial resistance profiles were investigated. E. coli strains belonging to phylogroup A were the predominant strain obtained from the animals used in the study. Four novel sequence types (ST746, ST747, ST748 and ST749) were discovered using the multi locus sequence typing, together with one common ST357 in the gastrointestinal tract, liver and, the trachea and lung. Serotyping demonstrated that these commensal E. coli strains were non-Shiga toxin-producers. Phenotypic and genotypic analyses of extended spectrum beta lactamases were also negative. These findings implied that the E. coli strains recovered from the laboratory rodents were truly commensal in nature. Further study is required to investigate the possible influence of gender on the susceptibility of hosts to E. coli colonization in laboratory rodents.

  18. Tick-borne agents in rodents, China, 2004-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Zhan (Lin); W.C. Cao (Wu Chun); C.Y. Chu (Chen); B.G. Jiang; F. Zhang (Fang); L.J. Liu (Wei); J.S. Dumler (Stephen); X-M. Wu (Xiao-Ming); S-Q. Zuo (Shu-Qing); H.N. Huang; Q.M. Zhao; N. Jia (Na); H. Yang (Hong); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractA total of 705 rodents from 6 provinces and autonomous regions of mainland People's Republic of China were tested by PCRs for tick-borne agents (Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, spotted fever group rickettsiae, and Francisella tularensis). Infection rates were

  19. Foraging behaviour of two rodent species inhabiting a kopje (rocky ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We employed patch use theory to evaluate how several environmental factors influence the foraging behaviour of two rodent species: Grammomys dolichurus and Acomys cahirinus. Foraging efficiency was determined by measuring the remaining food in artificial food patches (giving-up densities: GUDs) from two ...

  20. Activity Patterns in a Subterranean Social Rodent, Spalacopus cyanus (Octodontidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Begall, Sabine; Daan, S.; Burda, H.; Overkamp, G.J.F.; Tomasi, Thomas E.

    Daily patterns of activity were studied under laboratory conditions in 12 coruros, Spalacopus cyanus, subterranean social rodents originally from Chile. When able to burrow, coruros spent 90% of the total time underground, and surface activity occurred during the 1st hours of darkness. When

  1. The biology of arboreal rodents in Douglas-fir forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew B. Carey

    1991-01-01

    Arboreal rodents in Douglas-fir forests west of the Cascade crest in Oregon and Washington include (listed in decreasing order of dependence on trees) red tree vole (Phenacomys longicaucfus), northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus), Douglas' squirrel (Tamiasciurus douglasii), dusky-footed woodrat...

  2. Behavioural studies on some Rhodesian Rodents | Choate | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field studies (Lake Kariba shoreline and Salisbury) and experiments with a captive colony of 12 species of Rhodesian rodents were undertaken for a period of three years. Comparative behavioural data are presented here with special reference to den and nest behaviour, group and territorial behaviour, reproductive and ...

  3. Ectoparasite diversity on rodents at De Hoop Nature Reserve ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fleas, lice, mites and ticks were collected from 41 Rhabdomys pumilio and seven Otomys irroratus at De Hoop Nature Reserve in theWestern Cape Province of South Africa. The aims of the study were firstly to quantify parasite abundance and to record the species richness on the rodents. Secondly to record the parasite ...

  4. Helminthes parasites of rodents caught around human habitats in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four groups of helminthes, a trematode species, two species of cestodes, four species of nematodes and one species of an acanthocephalan were encountered in the rodents. The prevalence rates for the respective groups of helminthes were 11.61%, 25.00%, 33.93%, and 8.93%. The worm burdens per infected host were ...

  5. Prevalence of leptospirosis and toxoplasmosis: a study of rodents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leptospirosis and toxoplasmosis are among understudied zoonotic diseases that are also not diagnosed routinely in Tanzania. Humans get leptospirosis and toxoplasmosis through contact with an environment contaminated with Leptospira bacteria and Toxoplasma protozoa from reservoir hosts, which are rodents and ...

  6. Seasonal Population Dynamics of Rodents of Mount Chilalo, Arsi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study on seasonal population dynamics of rodents was carried out on Mount Chilalo from August, 2007 to April, 2008. Six habitats, namely grassland, bush land, montane forest, Erica forest, Afroalpine forest and moor land were identified to carry out live and snap trapping during wet and dry seasons in randomly selected ...

  7. Rodent damage to natural and replanted mountain forest regeneration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heroldová, Marta; Bryja, Josef; Jánová, Eva; Suchomel, J.; Homolka, Miloslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 872536 (2012), s. 872536 ISSN 1537-744X R&D Projects: GA MZe QH72075 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : small rodents * forest regeneration Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2012

  8. Rodents and Shrews as Vectors of Zoonotic Spirochetes and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood samples were collected from the captured animals and screened for infectious agents of public health importance, including; Trypanosoma spp., Plasmodium spp., Borrelia spp. and Bacillus spp. Out of 4,963 blood smears examined, 424 (8.5%) were from shrews and 4,539 (91.5%) were from rodents. Trypanosoma ...

  9. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Genetic Toxicity § 798.5450 Rodent dominant... methanesulfonate. (d) Test method—(1) Principle. Generally, male animals are exposed to the test substance and... determine the total number of implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal selection—(i...

  10. 40 CFR 798.5460 - Rodent heritable translocation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Genetic Toxicity § 798.5460 Rodent... fertile animals for cytological confirmation as translocation heterozygotes. (3) Animal selection—(i... animals shall be used. (iii) Number. (A) The number of male animals necessary is determined by the...

  11. Food deprivation and drinking in two African rodents, Mastomys ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1986-02-12

    Feb 12, 1986 ... Food deprivation and drinking in two African rodents, Mastomys natalensis and ... therefore able to survive for longer on a given energy in- ... drinking). No adaptive explanation was advanced re- garding these trends, but a hypothesis was proposed which predicted similar responses in other mesophilic.

  12. Blood protozoan parasites of rodents in Jos, Plateau State, Nigerai ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and thirty rodents, comprising nine different species caught from seven different locations in Jos, Nigeria, were examined for blood protozoan parasites, and 82(63.08%) were positive, with Plasmodium 63(48.46%), Trypanosoma 4(3.08%), Toxoplasma 6(4.62%), Babesia 7(5.38%) and Anaplasma 2(1.54%).

  13. Access to the tracheal pulmonary pathway in small rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto S. A. Ribeiro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The tracheal pulmonary route is used in diverse experimental models for the study of drugs, infectious agents, and diseases. In view of its importance and associated difficulties, the present article proposes to give research groups up-to-date information on techniques to access the tracheal pulmonary pathway of small rodents.

  14. Lassa serology in natural populations of rodents and horizontal transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Koivogui, Lamine; Günther, Stephan

    2014-09-01

    Lassa virus causes hemorrhagic fever in West Africa. Previously, we demonstrated by PCR screening that only the multimammate mouse, Mastomys natalensis, hosts Lassa virus in Guinea. In the present study, we used the same specimen collection from 17 villages in Coastal, Upper, and Forest Guinea to investigate the Lassa virus serology in the rodent population. The aim was to determine the dynamics of antibody development in M. natalensis and to detect potential spillover infections in other rodent species. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody screening was performed using the indirect immunofluorescence assay with the Guinean Lassa virus strain Bantou 289 as antigen. The overall seroprevalence was 8% (129/1551) with the following rodents testing positive: 109 M. natalensis, seven Mastomys erythroleucus, four Lemniscomys striatus, four Praomys daltoni, three Mus minutoides, and two Praomys rostratus. Nearly all of them (122/129) originated from Bantou, Tanganya, and Gbetaya, where Lassa virus is highly endemic in M. natalensis. The antibody seroprevalence in M. natalensis from this high-endemic area (27%; 108/396) depended on the village, habitat, host age, and host abundance. A main positive factor was age; the maximum seroprevalence reached 50% in older animals. Our data fit with a model implicating that most M. natalensis rodents become horizontally infected, clear the virus within a period significantly shorter than their life span, and develop antibodies. In addition, the detection of antibodies in other species trapped in the habitats of M. natalensis suggests spillover infections.

  15. Factors associated with flea infestation among the different rodent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flea infection with the bacterium, Yersinia pestis is acquired from reservoirs which include several rodents and other small mammals. In areas that are endemic of plague, reservoirs of Y. pestis and various flea vectors are responsible for perpetuating existence of the disease. The objective of this cross sectional study was to ...

  16. Preliminary report of shrews and rodents in and around Lake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surveys during October 2004 and July 2005, in and around Lake Bogoria National Reserve, Kenya, collected evidence of nine rodent species, and one species of shrew. The diversity of small mammals live-trapped within a single habitat type was low compared to similar studies in Africa. The low diversity may be due to the ...

  17. home range and reproduction of rodents in maynugus irrigation field

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    observations were outside irrigated fields. Population dynamics of small mammals in irrigated fields is unique due to the continuous supply of food. Hence this investigation was carried out in agricultural fields at Maynugus, in northern Ethiopia, to understand the home range and reproductive patterns of rodents, and to.

  18. Defensive burying in rodents : ethology, neurobiology and psychopharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, S.F.; Koolhaas, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Defensive burying refers to the typical rodent behavior of displacing bedding material with vigorous treading-like movements of their forepaws and shoveling movements of their heads directed towards a variety of noxious stimuli that pose a near and immediate threat, such as a wall-mounted

  19. A rodent malarial model of Plasmodium berghei for the development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the development of pyrimethamine (pyr) and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (S/P) resistance in Plasmodium berghei, a rodent parasite in mice using a serial technique (3.50 – 10mg/kg pyrimethamine) and a single treatment course approach with 125/6.25mg/kg S/P. The stability of resistance ...

  20. Sleep EEG spectral analysis in a diurnal rodent : Eutamias sibiricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJK, DJ; DAAN, S

    1989-01-01

    1. Sleep was studied in the diurnal rodent Eutamias sibiricus, chronically implanted with EEG and EMG electrodes. Analysis of the distribution of wakefulness, nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep over the 24 h period (LD 12:12) showed that total sleep time was 27.5%

  1. Early Eocene rodents (Mammalia) from the Subathu Formation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    known whether ailuravines could ever spread to the sub-Himalayan region and lived alongside the chapattimyids and yuomyids at any point of time. In otherwise very rich and quite diverse. Vastan vertebrate fauna with plenty of preda- tors, especially snakes, the presence of just one rodent species is rather surprising and ...

  2. Rodent Research on the International Space Station - A Look Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapusta, A. B.; Smithwick, M.; Wigley, C. L.

    2014-01-01

    Rodent Research on the International Space Station (ISS) is one of the highest priority science activities being supported by NASA and is planned for up to two flights per year. The first Rodent Research flight, Rodent Research-1 (RR-1) validates the hardware and basic science operations (dissections and tissue preservation). Subsequent flights will add new capabilities to support rodent research on the ISS. RR-1 will validate the following capabilities: animal husbandry for up to 30 days, video downlink to support animal health checks and scientific analysis, on-orbit dissections, sample preservation in RNA. Later and formalin, sample transfer from formalin to ethanol (hindlimbs), rapid cool-down and subsequent freezing at -80 of tissues and carcasses, sample return and recovery. RR-2, scheduled for SpX-6 (Winter 20142015) will add the following capabilities: animal husbandry for up to 60 days, RFID chip reader for individual animal identification, water refill and food replenishment, anesthesia and recovery, bone densitometry, blood collection (via cardiac puncture), blood separation via centrifugation, soft tissue fixation in formalin with transfer to ethanol, and delivery of injectable drugs that require frozen storage prior to use. Additional capabilities are also planned for future flights and these include but are not limited to male mice, live animal return, and the development of experiment unique equipment to support science requirements for principal investigators that are selected for flight. In addition to the hardware capabilities to support rodent research the Crew Office has implemented a training program in generic rodent skills for all USOS crew members during their pre-assignment training rotation. This class includes training in general animal handling, euthanasia, injections, and dissections. The dissection portion of this training focuses on the dissection of the spleen, liver, kidney with adrenals, brain, eyes, and hindlimbs. By achieving and

  3. Role of nucleus accumbens glutamatergic plasticity in drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Gabriel C

    2013-01-01

    Substance dependence is characterized by a group of symptoms, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR). These symptoms include tolerance, withdrawal, drug consumption for alleviating withdrawal, exaggerated consumption beyond original intention, failure to reduce drug consumption, expending a considerable amount of time obtaining or recovering from the substance's effects, disregard of basic aspects of life (for example, family), and maintenance of drug consumption, despite facing adverse consequences. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is a brain structure located in the basal forebrain of vertebrates, and it has been the target of addictive drugs. Different neurotransmitter systems at the level of the NAc circuitry have been linked to the different problems of drug addiction, like compulsive use and relapse. The glutamate system has been linked mainly to relapse after drug-seeking extinction. The dopamine system has been linked mainly to compulsive drug use. The glutamate homeostasis hypothesis centers around the dynamics of synaptic and extrasynaptic levels of glutamate, and their impact on circuitry from the prefrontal cortex (PFC) to the NAc. After repetitive drug use, deregulation of this homeostasis increases the release of glutamate from the PFC to the NAc during drug relapse. Glial cells also play a fundamental role in this hypothesis; glial cells shape the interactions between the PFC and the NAc by means of altering glutamate levels in synaptic and extrasynaptic spaces. On the other hand, cocaine self-administration and withdrawal increases the surface expression of subunit glutamate receptor 1 (GluA1) of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors at the level of the NAc. Also, cocaine self-administration and withdrawal induce the formation of subunit glutamate receptor 2 (GluA2), lacking the Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) at the level of the NAc

  4. Subthalamic nucleus detects unnatural android movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Takashi; Hirata, Masayuki; Kasaki, Masashi; Alimardani, Maryam; Matsushita, Kojiro; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Nishio, Shuichi; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2017-12-19

    An android, i.e., a realistic humanoid robot with human-like capabilities, may induce an uncanny feeling in human observers. The uncanny feeling about an android has two main causes: its appearance and movement. The uncanny feeling about an android increases when its appearance is almost human-like but its movement is not fully natural or comparable to human movement. Even if an android has human-like flexible joints, its slightly jerky movements cause a human observer to detect subtle unnaturalness in them. However, the neural mechanism underlying the detection of unnatural movements remains unclear. We conducted an fMRI experiment to compare the observation of an android and the observation of a human on which the android is modelled, and we found differences in the activation pattern of the brain regions that are responsible for the production of smooth and natural movement. More specifically, we found that the visual observation of the android, compared with that of the human model, caused greater activation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). When the android's slightly jerky movements are visually observed, the STN detects their subtle unnaturalness. This finding suggests that the detection of unnatural movements is attributed to an error signal resulting from a mismatch between a visual input and an internal model for smooth movement.

  5. Control of nucleus accumbens activity with neurofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Stephanie M; Trujillo, Andrew J; Glover, Gary H; Knutson, Brian

    2014-08-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) plays critical roles in healthy motivation and learning, as well as in psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Thus, techniques that confer control of NAcc activity might inspire new therapeutic interventions. By providing second-to-second temporal resolution of activity in small subcortical regions, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can resolve online changes in NAcc activity, which can then be presented as "neurofeedback." In an fMRI-based neurofeedback experiment designed to elicit NAcc activity, we found that subjects could increase their own NAcc activity, and that display of neurofeedback significantly enhanced their ability to do so. Subjects were not as capable of decreasing their NAcc activity, however, and enhanced control did not persist after subsequent removal of neurofeedback. Further analyses suggested that individuals who recruited positive aroused affect were better able to increase NAcc activity in response to neurofeedback, and that NAcc neurofeedback also elicited functionally correlated activity in the medial prefrontal cortex. Together, these findings suggest that humans can modulate their own NAcc activity and that fMRI-based neurofeedback may augment their efforts. The observed association between positive arousal and effective NAcc control further supports an anticipatory affect account of NAcc function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparing Realistic Subthalamic Nucleus Neuron Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njap, Felix; Claussen, Jens C.; Moser, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2011-06-01

    The mechanism of action of clinically effective electrical high frequency stimulation is still under debate. However, recent evidence points at the specific activation of GABA-ergic ion channels. Using a computational approach, we analyze temporal properties of the spike trains emitted by biologically realistic neurons of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) as a function of GABA-ergic synaptic input conductances. Our contribution is based on a model proposed by Rubin and Terman and exhibits a wide variety of different firing patterns, silent, low spiking, moderate spiking and intense spiking activity. We observed that most of the cells in our network turn to silent mode when we increase the GABAA input conductance above the threshold of 3.75 mS/cm2. On the other hand, insignificant changes in firing activity are observed when the input conductance is low or close to zero. We thus reproduce Rubin's model with vanishing synaptic conductances. To quantitatively compare spike trains from the original model with the modified model at different conductance levels, we apply four different (dis)similarity measures between them. We observe that Mahalanobis distance, Victor-Purpura metric, and Interspike Interval distribution are sensitive to different firing regimes, whereas Mutual Information seems undiscriminative for these functional changes.

  7. Parity Measurements in the 70Ga Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas Vargas, D. C.; Haring-Kaye, R. A.; Jones, K. D.; Le, K. Q.; Harbin, B. L.; Döring, J.; Abromeit, B.; Dungan, R.; Lubna, R.; Tabor, S. L.; Tai, P.-L.; Tripati, Vandana; Vonmoss, J. M.; Morrow, S. I.

    2017-09-01

    The odd-odd 70Ga nucleus was studied at high spin after being produced at Florida State University using the 62Ni(14C,αpn) fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 50 MeV. The resulting γ rays were detected in coincidence using an array of Compton-suppressed Ge detectors consisting of three Clover detectors and seven single-crystal detectors. The linear polarizations of eight γ-ray transitions in 70Ga were measured by comparing their scattering yields within a Clover detector in the parallel and perpendicular directions relative to the beam axis, under the requirement that at least one other γ ray in 70Ga was recorded by a single-crystal detector in the array. As a result of these measurements, the parities of six states were confirmed and those of two other states were established for the first time based on a comparison of the experimental polarizations with the predicted ones determined from known spin assignments. The resulting level spectrum of 70Ga shows both similarities and differences with the predictions of previous shell-model calculations. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the Ohio Wesleyan University Summer Science Research Program.

  8. Survey of Hymenolepis spp. in pet rodents in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ovidio, D; Noviello, Emilio; Pepe, P; Del Prete, L; Cringoli, G; Rinaldi, L

    2015-12-01

    We carried out the first survey of Hymenolepis spp. infection in pet rodents in Italy. Fresh fecal samples were collected from 172 pet rodents as follows: guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus; n = 60), squirrels (Callosciurus finlaysonii, Callosciurus prevosti, Tamias striatus, Tamias sibiricus, Sciurus calorinensis; n = 52), hamsters (Phodopus campbelli, Mesocricetus auratus; n = 30), chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera; n = 13), rats (Rattus norvegicus; n = 10), and mice (Mus minutoides; n = 7). These animals were housed either in pet shops or in private houses. All fecal samples were processed using the FLOTAC pellet technique to assess the number of eggs per gram (EPG) of feces. Eggs of Hymenolepis nana were found in 24 out of 172 (13.9 %; 95 % confidence interval = 9.3-20.2 %) pet rodents. Of those rodents, 41.6 % (10/24) were rats (mean EPG = 55.7; range = 2-200), 29.2 % (7/24) mice (mean EPG = 64.5; range = 32-120), 25.0 % (6/24) were chinchillas (mean EPG = 25.5; range = 10-50), and 4.2 % (1/24) hamsters (P. campbelli) (EPG = 86.0). In addition, Hymenolepis diminuta eggs were found in 2 out of 172 (1.2 %; 95 % confidence interval = 0.2-4.6 %) rodents examined, both of which (100 %; 2/2) were pet squirrels (C. prevosti) (mean EPG = 10; range = 4-16). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a natural infection of H. diminuta in pet squirrels.

  9. The role of wild rodents in spread and transmission of Coxiella burnetii needs further elucidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerburg, B.G.; Reusken, C.B.E.M.

    2011-01-01

    Rodents are known to cause massive food losses, but are also implicated as reservoirs for a wide variety of zoonotic pathogens. This review discusses the contribution of rodents in the spread and transmission of Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q-fever. We found that rodents have been

  10. Can small terrestrial rodents affect the natural regeneration of tropical forest?

    OpenAIRE

    ELEXHAUSEROVÁ, Anna

    2011-01-01

    In my bachelor thesis, I focused on the question if small terrestrial rodents can affect natural regeneration of tropical forest. In this work, I summarize knowledge about rodents acting as dispersers of tree seeds and I mention the factors affecting rodents in treating with seeds.

  11. Restoring Segmental Biomechanics Through Nucleus Augmentation: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Matthew H; Cohen, Charles S; Ducheyne, Paul; Walsh, William R

    2016-12-01

    In vitro biomechanical laboratory study. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a mechanical treatment to create a degenerative motion segment and the ability of nucleus augmentation to restore biomechanics. In cases with an intact annulus fibrosus, the replacement or augmentation of the nucleus pulposus alone may provide a less invasive option to restore normal biomechanics and disk height when compared with spinal fusion or total disk replacement. Laboratory testing allows these changes to be fully characterized. However, without preexisting pathology, nucleus augmentation therapies are difficult to evaluate in vitro. The present study evaluated pure moment bending and compressive biomechanics in 3 states (n=6): (1) intact, (2) after creep loading and nucleus disruption to induce degenerative biomechanical changes, and (3) after nucleus augmentation through an injectable polymer (DiscCell). Neutral zone and ROM were increased in all modes of bending after the degenerative treatment. The most sensitive mode of bending was lateral bending, with intact ROM (20.0±2.9 degrees) increased to 22.3±2.6 degrees after degenerative treatment and reduced to 18.4±1.6 degrees after injection of the polymer. All bending ROM and NZ changes induced by the degenerative treatment were reversed by nucleus augmentation. This material was shown to be effective at altering motion segment biomechanics and restoring disk height during time zero tests. This technique may provide a model to examine the time zero performance of a nucleus augmentation device/material.

  12. Evidence that urocortin is absent from neurons of the Edinger-Westphal nucleus in pigeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavani J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWN is a central preganglionic parasympathetic cell group that gives rise to cholinergic input to the ciliary ganglion, thereby regulating several neurovegetative ocular functions. Recently, the supposed presence of the neuropeptide urocortin (UCN has been reported in EWN neurons in rodent brain. The purpose of the present study was to examine the distribution of UCN in avian brain and to investigate by immunohistochemical analysis the possible use of this substance as an EWN marker in a non-mammalian class of vertebrates. Brain tissue of pigeons was incubated with a specific antibody against UCN and the results showed labeling of many small neurons, forming a double wing in the dorsal mesodiencephalic transition area. Their size and shape, however, differed from those of EWN neurons, and they were preferentially located rostral to the EWN. Double-label experiments employing an antibody against the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT showed that UCN is not localized to the cholinergic cells of the EWN and confirmed the rostral distributionof UCN never overlapping the ChAT+ EWN cells. Taken together, these results suggest that, at least in pigeons, the UCN+ population does not belong to the traditionally defined EWN.

  13. [Eradication of swine dysentery as modified partial depopulation in a nucleus sow breeding farm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figi; Goldinger; Fuschini; Hartnack; Sidler

    2014-08-01

    On a Swiss nucleus sow breeding farm with 170 sows and 600 gilts/fatteners, an eradication of swine dysentery as modified partial depopulation was conducted in stages over a period of 12 weeks in 2011 after Brachyspira (B.) hyodysenteriae was detected in the herd. In addition to administering oral medication (8.1 mg tiamulin per kg body weight) for 4 weeks to the pigs remaining on the farm, all stables were cleaned thoroughly and the residual slurry was disinfected with Alzogur(®) (3 l/m(3)) while the surfaces were disinfected with Venno Vet 1 Super(®) (1.5 %). At the same time rodent and fly control was intensified. Upon completion of the eradication programme, the farm was monitored for 6 months by carrying out fecal swab analyses of pigs with diarrhea. All fecal samples were negative for B. hyodysenteriae. The costs of the eradication amounted to approximately CHF 104'500. The eradication yielded significantly higher live daily weight gain (+ 23.8 g, ± 10.1 g, P per year.

  14. Major vault protein is expressed along the nucleus-neurite axis and associates with mRNAs in cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paspalas, Constantinos D; Perley, Casey C; Venkitaramani, Deepa V; Goebel-Goody, Susan M; Zhang, YongFang; Kurup, Pradeep; Mattis, Joanna H; Lombroso, Paul J

    2009-07-01

    Major Vault Protein (MVP), the main constituent of the vault ribonucleoprotein particle, is highly conserved in eukaryotic cells and upregulated in a variety of tumors. Vaults have been speculated to function as cargo transporters in several cell lines, yet no work to date has characterized the protein in neurons. Here we first describe the cellular and subcellular expression of MVP in primate and rodent cerebral cortex, and in cortical neurons in vitro. In prefrontal, somatosensory and hippocampal cortices, MVP was predominantly expressed in pyramidal neurons. Immunogold labeled free and attached ribosomes, and structures reminiscent of vaults on the rough endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. The nucleus was immunoreactive in association with nucleopores. Axons and particularly principal dendrites expressed MVP along individual microtubules, and in pre- and postsynaptic structures. Synapses were not labeled. Colocalization with microtubule-associated protein-2, tubulin, tau, and phalloidin was observed in neurites and growth cones in culture. Immunoprecipitation coupled with reverse transcription PCR showed that MVP associates with mRNAs that are known to be translated in response to synaptic activity. Taken together, our findings provide the first characterization of neuronal MVP along the nucleus-neurite axis and may offer new insights into its possible function(s) in the brain.

  15. Quarkonium-nucleus bound states from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beane, S.  R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chang, E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Cohen, S.  D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Detmold, W. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lin, H. -W. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Orginos, K. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Parreño, A. [Univ., de Barcelona, Marti Franques (Spain); Savage, M.  J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-11

    Quarkonium-nucleus systems are composed of two interacting hadronic states without common valence quarks, which interact primarily through multi-gluon exchanges, realizing a color van der Waals force. We present lattice QCD calculations of the interactions of strange and charm quarkonia with light nuclei. Both the strangeonium-nucleus and charmonium-nucleus systems are found to be relatively deeply bound when the masses of the three light quarks are set equal to that of the physical strange quark. Extrapolation of these results to the physical light-quark masses suggests that the binding energy of charmonium to nuclear matter is B < 40 MeV.

  16. Sleep deprivation and caffeine treatment potentiate photic resetting of the master circadian clock in a diurnal rodent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar Jha, Pawan; Bouâouda, Hanan; Gourmelen, Sylviane; Dumont, Stephanie; Fuchs, Fanny; Goumon, Yannick; Bourgin, Patrice; Kalsbeek, A.; Challet, Etienne

    Circadian rhythms in nocturnal and diurnal mammals are primarily synchronized to local time by the light-dark cycle. However, non-photic factors, such as behavioural arousal and metabolic cues, can also phase-shift the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) and/or reduce the synchronizing

  17. Colonisation and shedding of Lawsonia intracellularis in experimentally inoculated rodents and in wild rodents on pig farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A M; Fell, S; Pearson, H; Toribio, J-A

    2011-06-02

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an intracellular bacterium causing proliferative enteropathy in various animal species, and is considered an economically important pathogen of pigs. Rats and mice have been implicated as external vectors for a wide range of pig pathogens, including L. intracellularis. Previous studies have demonstrated L. intracellularis infection and proliferative enteropathy in rodents, but did not show the duration of shedding or the number of L. intracellularis shed by infected rodents, and therefore the infection risk that rodents pose to pigs. In this study, the number of L. intracellularis shed in the faeces and intestinal mucosa of wild rats trapped on pig farms was determined by a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction assay. The prevalence of L. intracellularis in wild rats trapped on pig farms with endemic proliferative enteropathy (PE) was very high (≥ 70.6%), and large numbers of L. intracellularis were shed (10(10)/g of faeces) in a small proportion of wild rats. The duration of colonisation in laboratory rats and mice challenged with porcine isolates of L. intracellularis was also shown. Faecal shedding of L. intracellularis persisted for 14-21 days in rats and mice that were mildly affected with histological lesions of PE. The humoral immune response to L. intracellularis persisted for 40 days in both species. This study demonstrates that rodents may be an important reservoir of L. intracellularis on piggeries, and hence rodent control is important in disease eradication programs on pig farms. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of nucleus accumbens glutamatergic plasticity in drug addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintero GC

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel C Quintero1–31Florida State University – Panama, Clayton, Panama; 2Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA; 3Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Ancon, Republic of PanamaAbstract: Substance dependence is characterized by a group of symptoms, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR. These symptoms include tolerance, withdrawal, drug consumption for alleviating withdrawal, exaggerated consumption beyond original intention, failure to reduce drug consumption, expending a considerable amount of time obtaining or recovering from the substance’s effects, disregard of basic aspects of life (for example, family, and maintenance of drug consumption, despite facing adverse consequences. The nucleus accumbens (NAc is a brain structure located in the basal forebrain of vertebrates, and it has been the target of addictive drugs. Different neurotransmitter systems at the level of the NAc circuitry have been linked to the different problems of drug addiction, like compulsive use and relapse. The glutamate system has been linked mainly to relapse after drug-seeking extinction. The dopamine system has been linked mainly to compulsive drug use. The glutamate homeostasis hypothesis centers around the dynamics of synaptic and extrasynaptic levels of glutamate, and their impact on circuitry from the prefrontal cortex (PFC to the NAc. After repetitive drug use, deregulation of this homeostasis increases the release of glutamate from the PFC to the NAc during drug relapse. Glial cells also play a fundamental role in this hypothesis; glial cells shape the interactions between the PFC and the NAc by means of altering glutamate levels in synaptic and extrasynaptic spaces. On the other hand, cocaine self-administration and withdrawal increases the surface expression of subunit glutamate receptor 1 (GluA1 of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4

  19. The nucleus retroambiguus control of respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Hari H; Holstege, Gert

    2009-03-25

    The role of the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) in the context of respiration control has been subject of debate for considerable time. To solve this problem, we chemically (using d, l-homocysteic acid) stimulated the NRA in unanesthetized precollicularly decerebrated cats and studied the respiratory effect via simultaneous measurement of tracheal pressure and electromyograms of diaphragm, internal intercostal (IIC), cricothyroid (CT), and external oblique abdominal (EO) muscles. NRA-stimulation 0-1 mm caudal to the obex resulted in recruitment of IIC muscle and reduction in respiratory frequency. NRA-stimulation 1-3 mm caudal to the obex produced vocalization along with CT activation and slight increase in tracheal pressure, but no change in respiratory frequency. NRA-stimulation 3-5 mm caudal to the obex produced CT muscle activation and an increase in respiratory frequency, but no vocalization. NRA-stimulation 5-8 mm caudal to the obex produced EO muscle activation and reduction in respiratory frequency. A change to the inspiratory effort was never observed, regardless of which NRA part was stimulated. The results demonstrate that NRA does not control eupneic inspiration but consists of topographically separate groups of premotor interneurons each producing detailed motor actions. These motor activities have in common that they require changes to eupneic breathing. Different combination of activation of these premotor neurons determines the final outcome, e.g., vocalization, vomiting, coughing, sneezing, mating posture, or child delivery. Higher brainstem regions such as the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) decides which combination of NRA neurons are excited. In simple terms, the NRA is the piano, the PAG one of the piano players.

  20. Quantitative analysis of the fusion cross sections using different microscopic nucleus-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adel, A. [Cairo University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Giza (Egypt); Majmaah University, Physics Department, College of Science, Al-Zulfi (Saudi Arabia); Alharbi, T. [Majmaah University, Physics Department, College of Science, Al-Zulfi (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-01-15

    The fusion cross sections for reactions involving medium and heavy nucleus-nucleus systems are investigated near and above the Coulomb barrier using the one-dimensional barrier penetration model. The microscopic nuclear interaction potential is computed by four methods, namely: the double-folding model based on a realistic density-dependent M3Y NN interaction with a finite-range exchange part, the Skyrme energy density functional in the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi approximation, the generalized Proximity potential, and the Akyuez-Winther interaction. The comparison between the calculated and the measured values of the fusion excitation functions indicates that the calculations of the DFM give quite satisfactory agreement with the experimental data, being much better than the other methods. New parameterized forms for the fusion barrier heights and positions are presented. Furthermore, the effects of deformation and orientation degrees of freedom on the distribution of the Coulomb barrier characteristics as well as the fusion cross sections are studied for the reactions {sup 16}O + {sup 70}Ge and {sup 28}Si + {sup 100}Mo. The calculated values of the total fusion cross sections are compared with coupled channel calculations using the code CCFULL and compared with the experimental data. Our results reveal that the inclusion of deformations and orientation degrees of freedom improves the comparison with the experimental data. (orig.)

  1. Formation and identification of Centauro and Strangelets in nucleus- nucleus collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bogolyubsky, M Yu; Filippov, S N; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Maevskaya, A I; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Stefanski, P; Wlodarczyk, Z

    1999-01-01

    We present a phenomenological model for the formation and decay of a cosmic ray Centauro fireball in the baryon-rich projectile fragmentation rapidity region in nucleus-nucleus interactions. Our model naturally incorporates the $9 possibility of strangelet formation, Strangelets being conjectured to be the "strongly penetrating component" observed in hadron-rich cosmic ray events. Based on this model we have performed Monte-Carlo simulations to study the $9 Centauro and strangelet dynamic and kinematic characteristics in central Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energies, as well as their identification by the detector system CASTOR. CASTOR is being developed for the ALICE heavy ion experiment at $9 the LHC and will probe the very forward pseudorapidity region 5.6

  2. EOS: A time projection chamber for the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Bevalac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, H.G.; Odyniec, G.; Rai, G.; Seidl, P.

    1986-12-01

    The conceptual design is presented for a detector to identify and measure (..delta..p/p approx. = 1%) most of the 200 or so mid-rapidity charged particles (p, d, t, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He, ..pi../sup + -/, K/sup + -/) produced in each central nucleus-nucleus collision (Au + Au) at Bevalac energies, as well as K/sub 3//sup 0/ and ..lambda../sup 0/. The beam particles and heavy spectator fragments are excluded from the detection volume by means of a central vacuum pipe. Particle identification is achieved by a combination of dE/dx measurements in the TPC, and of time-of-flight measurements in a scintillator array. The TPC is single-ended and its end cap is entirely covered with cathode pads (about 25,000 pads and about 1000 anode wires). A non-uniform pad distribution is proposed to accommodate the high multiplicity of particles emitted at forward angles. The performance of the detector is assessed with regard to multihit capability, tracking, momentum resolution, particle identification, ..lambda../sup 0/ reconstruction, space charge effects, field non-uniformity, dynamic range, data acquisition rate, and data analysis rate. 72 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs.

  3. Pro-opiomelanocortin gene transfer to the nucleus of the solitary track but not arcuate nucleus ameliorates chronic diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Rodrigues, E; Gao, Y X; King, M; Cheng, K Y; Erdös, B; Tümer, N; Carter, C; Scarpace, P J

    2010-09-15

    Short-term pharmacological melanocortin activation deters diet-induced obesity (DIO) effectively in rodents. However, whether central pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene transfer targeted to the hypothalamus or hindbrain nucleus of the solitary track (NTS) can combat chronic dietary obesity has not been investigated. Four-weeks-old Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high fat diet for 5 months, and then injected with either the POMC or control vector into the hypothalamus or NTS, and body weight and food intake recorded for 68 days. Insulin sensitivity, glucose metabolism and adrenal indicators of central sympathetic activation were measured, and voluntary wheel running (WR) assessed. Whereas the NTS POMC-treatment decreased cumulative food consumption and caused a sustained weight reduction over 68 days, the hypothalamic POMC-treatment did not alter cumulative food intake and produced weight loss only in the first 25 days. At death, only the NTS-POMC rats had a significant decrease in fat mass. They also displayed enhanced glucose tolerance, lowered fasting insulin and increased QUICK value, and elevated adrenal indicators of central sympathetic activation. Moreover, the NTS-POMC animals exhibited a near 20% increase in distance ran relative to the respective controls, but the ARC-POMC rats did not. In conclusion, POMC gene transfer to the NTS caused modest anorexia, persistent weight loss, improved insulin sensitivity, and increased propensity for WR in DIO rats. These metabolic improvements may involve stimulation of energy expenditure via centrally regulated sympathetic outflow. The similar POMC treatment in the hypothalamus had minimal long-term physiological or metabolic impact. Thus, melanocortin activation in the brainstem NTS region effectively ameliorates chronic dietary obesity whilst that in the hypothalamus fails to do so. (c) 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nucleus management in manual small incision cataract surgery by phacosection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleus management is critical in manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS, as the integrity of the tunnel, endothelium and posterior capsule needs to be respected. Several techniques of nucleus management are in vogue, depending upon the specific technique of MSICS. Nucleus can be removed in toto or bisected or trisected into smaller segments. The pressure in the eye can be maintained at the desired level with the use of an anterior chamber maintainer or kept at atmospheric levels. In MSICS, unlike phacoemulsification, there is no need to limit the size of the tunnel or restrain the size of capsulorrhexis. Large well-structured tunnels and larger capsulorrhexis provide better control on the surgical maneuvers. Safety and simplicity of MSICS has made it extremely popular. The purpose of this article is to describe nucleus management by phacosection in MSICS.

  5. Colour, albedo and nucleus size of Halley's comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Tholen, D. J.; Hartmann, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    Photometry of Halley's comet in the B, J, V, and K broadband filters during a time when the coma was very weak and presumed to contribute negligibly to the broadband photometry is reported. The V-J and J-K colors suggest that the color of the nucleus of Halley's comet is similar to that of the D-type asteroids, which in turn suggests that the surface of the nucleus has an albedo less than 0.1.

  6. The TLC: A Novel Auditory Nucleus of the Mammalian Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Saldaña Fernández, Enrique; Viñuela, Antonio; Marshall, Allen F.; Fitzpatrick, Douglas C.; Aparicio Vaquero, María Auxiliadora

    2007-01-01

    [EN]We have identified a novel nucleus of the mammalian brain and termed it the tectal longitudinal column (TLC). Basic histologic stains, tract-tracing techniques and three-dimensional reconstructions reveal that the rat TLC is a narrow, elongated structure spanning themidbrain tectum longitudinally. This paired nucleus is located close to the midline, immediately dorsal to the periaqueductal gray matter.It occupies what has traditionally been considered the most medial region of the deep su...

  7. Social modulation of and by pain in humans and rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogil, Jeffrey S

    2015-04-01

    The social domain of the biopsychosocial model of pain has been greatly understudied compared with the biological and psychological domains but holds great promise for furthering our understanding, and better treatment, of pain. Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in social neuroscience and have revealed the ability of pain stimuli to alter social interactions. These experiments suggest that rodents are capable of producing simplified versions of any number of social phenomena involving empathy, previously thought to be the sole province of human beings. This review describes the state of science in both humans and nonhuman animals, and notes intriguing parallels in observations from both species. Indeed, my laboratory is starting to demonstrate perfectly translatable findings regarding social modulation of pain in rodents and humans.

  8. Anatomy and Histology of Rodent and Human Major Salivary Glands

    OpenAIRE

    Amano, Osamu; Mizobe, Kenichi; Bando, Yasuhiko; Sakiyama, Koji

    2012-01-01

    Major salivary glands of both humans and rodents consist of three pairs of macroscopic glands: parotid, submandibular, and sublingual. These glands secrete serous, mucous or mixed saliva via the proper main excretory ducts connecting the glandular bodies with the oral cavity. A series of discoveries about the salivary ducts in the 17th century by Niels Stensen (1638–1686), Thomas Wharton (1614–1673), and Caspar Bartholin (1655–1738) established the concept of exocrine secretion as well as sal...

  9. Seasonal variation in telomere length of a hibernating rodent

    OpenAIRE

    Turbill, Christopher; Ruf, Thomas; Smith, Steve; Bieber, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Small hibernating rodents have greater maximum lifespans and hence appear to age more slowly than similar-sized non-hibernators. We tested for a direct effect of hibernation on somatic maintenance and ageing by measuring seasonal changes in relative telomere length (RTL) in the edible dormouse Glis glis. Average RTL in our population did not change significantly over the hibernation season, and a regression model explaining individual variation in post-hibernation RTL suggested a significant ...

  10. Nest Predation by Commensal Rodents in Urban Bushland Remnants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen M Smith

    Full Text Available Exotic predators are a major threat to native wildlife in many parts of the world. Developing and implementing effective strategies to mitigate their effects requires robust quantitative data so that management can be evidence-based, yet in many ecosystems this is missing. Birds in particular have been severely impacted by exotic mammalian predators, and a plethora of studies on islands record predation of bird eggs, fledglings and adults by exotic species such as rodents, stoats and cats. By comparison, few studies have examined nest predation around mainland urban centres which often act as dispersal hubs, especially for commensal species such as rodents. Here, we experimentally examine nest predation rates in habitat patches with varying black rat (Rattus rattus densities in Sydney, Australia and test whether these exotic rats have the effects expected of exotic predators using effect size benchmarks. In the case where black rats have replaced native Rattus spp., we expected that black rats, being more arboreal than native Rattus spp., would be a significant source of predation on birds because they can readily access the arboreal niche where many birds nest. We tested this idea using above-ground artificial nests to represent those of typical small bird species such as the New Holland honeyeater (Phylidonyris novaehollandiae. We found that fewer eggs were depredated by rodents on sites where we removed black rats compared to unmanipulated sites, and that the effect size calculated from the total number of eggs surviving beyond the typical incubation period was similar to that expected for an exotic predator. Our results suggest that, although Australian birds have co-evolved with native Rattus species, in the case where black rats have replaced native Rattus species, exotic black rats appear to pose an additive source of predation on birds in remnant habitats, most likely due to their ability to climb more efficiently than their native

  11. Nest Predation by Commensal Rodents in Urban Bushland Remnants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Helen M; Dickman, Chris R; Banks, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Exotic predators are a major threat to native wildlife in many parts of the world. Developing and implementing effective strategies to mitigate their effects requires robust quantitative data so that management can be evidence-based, yet in many ecosystems this is missing. Birds in particular have been severely impacted by exotic mammalian predators, and a plethora of studies on islands record predation of bird eggs, fledglings and adults by exotic species such as rodents, stoats and cats. By comparison, few studies have examined nest predation around mainland urban centres which often act as dispersal hubs, especially for commensal species such as rodents. Here, we experimentally examine nest predation rates in habitat patches with varying black rat (Rattus rattus) densities in Sydney, Australia and test whether these exotic rats have the effects expected of exotic predators using effect size benchmarks. In the case where black rats have replaced native Rattus spp., we expected that black rats, being more arboreal than native Rattus spp., would be a significant source of predation on birds because they can readily access the arboreal niche where many birds nest. We tested this idea using above-ground artificial nests to represent those of typical small bird species such as the New Holland honeyeater (Phylidonyris novaehollandiae). We found that fewer eggs were depredated by rodents on sites where we removed black rats compared to unmanipulated sites, and that the effect size calculated from the total number of eggs surviving beyond the typical incubation period was similar to that expected for an exotic predator. Our results suggest that, although Australian birds have co-evolved with native Rattus species, in the case where black rats have replaced native Rattus species, exotic black rats appear to pose an additive source of predation on birds in remnant habitats, most likely due to their ability to climb more efficiently than their native counterparts

  12. Miniature wireless recording and stimulation system for rodent behavioural testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnell, R. C.; Dempster, J.; Pratt, J.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Elucidation of neural activity underpinning rodent behaviour has traditionally been hampered by the use of tethered systems and human involvement. Furthermore the combination of deep-brain stimulation (DBS) and various neural recording modalities can lead to complex and time-consuming laboratory setups. For studies of this type, novel tools are required to drive forward this research. Approach. A miniature wireless system weighing 8.5 g (including battery) was developed for rodent use that combined multichannel DBS and local-field potential (LFP) recordings. Its performance was verified in a working memory task that involved 4-channel fronto-hippocampal LFP recording and bilateral constant-current fimbria-fornix DBS. The system was synchronised with video-tracking for extraction of LFP at discrete task phases, and DBS was activated intermittently at discrete phases of the task. Main results. In addition to having a fast set-up time, the system could reliably transmit continuous LFP at over 8 hours across 3-5 m distances. During the working memory task, LFP pertaining to discrete task phases was extracted and compared with well-known neural correlates of active exploratory behaviour in rodents. DBS could be wirelessly activated/deactivated at any part of the experiment during EEG recording and transmission, allowing for a seamless integration of this modality. Significance. The wireless system combines a small size with a level of robustness and versatility that can greatly simplify rodent behavioural experiments involving EEG recording and DBS. Designed for versatility and simplicity, the small size and low-cost of the system and its receiver allow for enhanced portability, fast experimental setup times, and pave the way for integration with more complex behaviour.

  13. Population response of rodents to control with rodenticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. TCHABOVSKY

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We summarize theoretical approaches and practice of rodent pest control in Russia and former USSR during last 50 years. We review literature as well as original data to understand mechanisms of rodent populations recovery after chemical control campaigns in urban areas, agricultural lands and natural foci of plague. Laboratory and field experiments indicate that inherent individual variation in behavioural, physiological and life-history traits provides survival of heterogeneous mix of individuals in residual population with increased resistance to poisonous baits and high reproductive potential that leads to fast recovery of a population. In a series of field experiments with various rodent and lagomorph species (Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Meriones unguiculatus, M.meridianus, M.tamariscinus, Ochotona pallasii we have shown that patterns of recolonization of depopulated area and mechanisms of population recovery vary among species and depend on species-specific social organization. After control territorial and group-living species demonstrated an increase in mobility and affiliative and marking behaviour and a decrease in intraspecific aggression. The rate of recolonization of treated areas was high due to redistribution of survived individuals and immigration by neighbors. Population recovered to original level due to increased breeding performance and fecundity of both survived residents and immigrants. In contrast, socially-independent species exhibited minor changes in behaviour. Recolonization was mainly due to better survival and recruitment of youngs, so the rate of recolonization was low. Species-specificity of behavioural compensation mechanisms to control should be considered when developing ecologically based rodent management strategies.

  14. Stress impact on learning in rodents {--} ethological & fysiological approach

    OpenAIRE

    HAVLOVÁ, Jitka

    2009-01-01

    The review compares two methodological approaches of studying stress impact on learning in rodents. Particular forms of stress that can harm or facilitace memory and learning process are distinguished. Permanent exposure to hormone treatments results in space memory damage, whereas short-term exposure enforces the learning processes. Ethological methods have predominantly a negative effect on learning, particularly on space learning and reference memory. On the contrary, some methods can faci...

  15. Trying to make sense of rodents' drug choice behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Serge H

    2017-09-28

    Since the first experimental hint for the existence of "an actual desire or striving for the drug" in nonhuman animals by Sidney Spragg in the late 1930s, much effort has been expended by lab researchers to try to model in a valid manner the key behavioral aspects and signs of addiction in animals, typically in rodents (i.e., mainly rats and, to a lesser extent, mice). Despite much advances, there still remains a lingering doubt about the disordered status of drug use in rodents. This is mainly because drug use occurs in a particular setting where animals have access to a drug for self-administration but without access to other valuable behavioral options that could compete with and divert from drug use. Here I review evidence showing that enriching the drug setting with other behavioral options can dramatically influence the pattern of drug choices in rodents. Overall, access to other options during drug access can divert the vast majority of rats from continued drug use. Only few individuals continue to engage in drug use despite access to and at the expense of other options. However, there exist certain high-risk settings in which virtually all animals are vulnerable to develop a harmful pattern of exclusive drug use that can even become fatal in the long run if not discontinued by an outside intervention. Paradoxically, it appears that the behavioral trait that is hypothesized to uniquely render rodents vulnerable to the latter settings (i.e., a narrow focus on the local, current choice, with no consideration of the global pattern of choice) would also protect most of them from using drugs in other choice settings. I conclude with an attempt to make sense of this peculiar setting-specific behavior and with some general propositions for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 in rodent digestive system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutaka; Oomura

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To observe the regional distributions and morphological features of nesfatin-1/nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2) immunoreactive (IR) cells in the rodent digestive system. METHODS: Paraffin-embedded sections of seven organs (pancreas, stomach, duodenum, esophagus, liver, small intestine and colon) dissected from sprague-dawley (SD) rats and institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice were prepared. The regional distributions of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 IR cells were observed by immunohistochemical staining. The morphological ...

  17. New rodent models for studies of chemopreventive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkin, M

    1997-01-01

    Some recent studies of the effects of chemopreventive agents have begun to use new rodent models to improve the analysis of stages of colonic preneoplasia, and how chemopreventive agents modify progressive abnormal cell development. In one of the models of inherited predisposition to colon cancer, mice carrying a truncated Apc allele with a nonsense mutation in exon 15 have been generated by gene targeting and embryonic stem cell technology (Apc1638 mice). These mice develop multiple gastrointestinal lesions, including adenomas and carcinomas, focal areas of high-grade dysplasia (FAD), and polypoid hyperplasias with FADS. The incidence of inherited colonic neoplasms has now been modulated by a chemopreventive regimen. Colonic lesions significantly increased in Apc1638 mice on a Western-style diet, which has higher fat content and lower calcium and vitamin D compared to the same mice on AIN-76A diet. In another rodent model, Min mice were treated with sulindac, which markedly reduced the incidence of intestinal tumors. A third new rodent model containing a targeted mutation in the gene Mcc (mutated in colorectal cancer) recently became available for chemoprevention studies. These mice develop multiple types of neoplasms including adenocarcinomas, focal areas of gastrointestinal dysplasia, papillomas of the forestomach, and tumors in other organs including lung, liver, and lymphoid tissue. Feeding a Western-style diet to the Mcc mutant mice also resulted in significantly increased gastrointestinal lesions. These nutrient modifications also have been given to normal mice, demonstrating without any chemical carcinogen that a Western-style diet induced colonic tumorigenesis. Western-style diets also have now induced modulation of cell proliferation in other organs including mammary gland, pancreas, and prostate. These findings help develop new preclinical rodent models to aid the analysis of genetic and environmental factors leading to neoplasia, as well as new methods

  18. Stress, social behavior, and resilience: Insights from rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Beery, Annaliese K.; Kaufer, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The neurobiology of stress and the neurobiology of social behavior are deeply intertwined. The social environment interacts with stress on almost every front: social interactions can be potent stressors; they can buffer the response to an external stressor; and social behavior often changes in response to stressful life experience. This review explores mechanistic and behavioral links between stress, anxiety, resilience, and social behavior in rodents, with particular attention to different s...

  19. Museum specimen data predict crop damage by tropical rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Cordero, Víctor; Martínez-Meyer, Enrique

    2000-01-01

    Museum collections constitute a massive store of information on biological diversity. We used museum specimen data to generate ecological niche models that provide predictions of geographic distributions of native rodent pest species and agricultural census data that summarize the geographic distribution of nine crops in the state of Veracruz, Mexico, as well as crop losses between planting and harvest. Herein, we show that crop damage is related significantly to the predicted presence of rod...

  20. A rodent version of the Iowa Gambling Task: 7 years of progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruud eVan Den Bos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT subjects need to find a way to earn money in a context of variable wins and losses, conflicting short-term and long-term pay-off, and uncertainty of outcomes. In 2006, we published the first rodent version of the IGT (r-IGT; Behavior Research Methods 38, 470-478. Here, we discuss emerging ideas on the involvement of different prefrontal-striatal networks in task-progression in the r-IGT, as revealed by our studies thus far. The emotional system, encompassing, among others, the orbitofrontal cortex, infralimbic cortex and nucleus accumbens (shell and core area, may be involved in assessing and anticipating the value of different options in the early stages of the task, i.e. as animals explore and learn task contingencies. The cognitive control system, encompassing, among others, the prelimbic cortex and dorsomedial striatum, may be involved in instrumental goal-directed behaviour in later stages of the task, i.e. as behaviour towards long-term options is strengthened (reinforced and behaviour towards long-term poor options is weakened (punished. In addition, we suggest two directions for future research: (1 the role of the internal state of the subject in decision-making, and (2 studying differences in task-related costs. Overall, our studies have contributed to understanding the interaction between the emotional system and cognitive control system as crucial to navigating human and non-human animals alike through a world of variable wins and losses, conflicting short-term and long-term pay-offs, and uncertainty of outcomes.

  1. Affective communication in rodents: ultrasonic vocalizations as a tool for research on emotion and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöhr, Markus; Schwarting, Rainer K W

    2013-10-01

    Mice and rats emit and perceive calls in the ultrasonic range, i.e., above the human hearing threshold of about 20 kHz: so-called ultrasonic vocalizations (USV). Juvenile and adult rats emit 22-kHz USV in aversive situations, such as predator exposure and fighting or during drug withdrawal, whereas 50-kHz USV occur in appetitive situations, such as rough-and-tumble play and mating or in response to drugs of abuse, e.g., amphetamine. Aversive 22-kHz USV and appetitive 50-kHz USV serve distinct communicative functions. Whereas 22-kHz USV induce freezing behavior in the receiver, 50-kHz USV lead to social approach behavior. These opposite behavioral responses are paralleled by distinct patterns of brain activation. Freezing behavior in response to 22-kHz USV is paralleled by increased neuronal activity in brain areas regulating fear and anxiety, such as the amygdala and periaqueductal gray, whereas social approach behavior elicited by 50-kHz USV is accompanied by reduced activity levels in the amygdala but enhanced activity in the nucleus accumbens, a brain area implicated in reward processing. These opposing behavioral responses, together with distinct patterns of brain activation, particularly the bidirectional tonic activation or deactivation of the amygdala elicited by 22-kHz and 50-kHz USV, respectively, concur with a wealth of behavioral and neuroimaging studies in humans involving emotionally salient stimuli, such as fearful and happy facial expressions. Affective ultrasonic communication therefore offers a translational tool for studying the neurobiology underlying socio-affective communication. This is particularly relevant for rodent models of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by social and communication deficits, such as autism and schizophrenia.

  2. NPFFR2 Activates the HPA Axis and Induces Anxiogenic Effects in Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Tin Lin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide FF (NPFF belongs to the RFamide family and is known as a morphine-modulating peptide. NPFF regulates various hypothalamic functions through two receptors, NPFFR1 and NPFFR2. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis participates in physiological stress response by increasing circulating glucocorticoid levels and modulating emotional responses. Other RFamide peptides, including neuropeptide AF, neuropeptide SF and RFamide related peptide also target NPFFR1 or NPFFR2, and have been reported to activate the HPA axis and induce anxiety- or depression-like behaviors. However, little is known about the action of NPFF on HPA axis activity and anxiety-like behaviors, and the role of the individual receptors remains unclear. In this study, NPFFR2 agonists were used to examine the role of NPFFR2 in activating the HPA axis in rodents. Administration of NPFFR2 agonists, dNPA (intracerebroventricular, ICV and AC-263093 (intraperitoneal, IP, time-dependently (in rats and dose-dependently (in mice increased serum corticosteroid levels and the effects were counteracted by the NPFF receptor antagonist, RF9 (ICV, as well as corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF antagonist, α-helical CRF(9-41 (intravenous, IV. Treatment with NPFFR2 agonist (AC-263093, IP increased c-Fos protein expression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and induced an anxiogenic effect, which was evaluated in mice using an elevated plus maze. These findings reveal, for the first time, that the direct action of hypothalamic NPFFR2 stimulates the HPA axis and triggers anxiety-like behaviors.

  3. Rodent models for resolving extremes of exercise and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garton, Fleur C; North, Kathryn N; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Nogales-Gadea, Gisela; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-02-01

    The extremes of exercise capacity and health are considered a complex interplay between genes and the environment. In general, the study of animal models has proven critical for deep mechanistic exploration that provides guidance for focused and hypothesis-driven discovery in humans. Hypotheses underlying molecular mechanisms of disease and gene/tissue function can be tested in rodents to generate sufficient evidence to resolve and progress our understanding of human biology. Here we provide examples of three alternative uses of rodent models that have been applied successfully to advance knowledge that bridges our understanding of the connection between exercise capacity and health status. First we review the strong association between exercise capacity and all-cause morbidity and mortality in humans through artificial selection on low and high exercise performance in the rat and the consequent generation of the "energy transfer hypothesis." Second we review specific transgenic and knockout mouse models that replicate the human disease condition and performance. This includes human glycogen storage diseases (McArdle and Pompe) and α-actinin-3 deficiency. Together these rodent models provide an overview of the advancements of molecular knowledge required for clinical translation. Continued study of these models in conjunction with human association studies will be critical to resolving the complex gene-environment interplay linking exercise capacity, health, and disease. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Genotypes of pathogenic Leptospira spp isolated from rodents in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Grune Loffler

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonosis in the world and significant efforts have been made to determine and classify pathogenic Leptospira strains. This zoonosis is maintained in nature through chronic renal infections of carrier animals, with rodents and other small mammals serving as the most important reservoirs. Additionally, domestic animals, such as livestock and dogs, are significant sources of human infection. In this study, a multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA was applied to genotype 22 pathogenic Leptospira strains isolated from urban and periurban rodent populations from different regions of Argentina. Three MLVA profiles were identified in strains belonging to the species Leptospira interrogans (serovars Icterohaemorrhagiae and Canicola; one profile was observed in serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae and two MLVA profiles were observed in isolates of serovars Canicola and Portlandvere. All strains belonging to Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Castellonis exhibited the same MLVA profile. Four different genotypes were isolated from urban populations of rodents, including both mice and rats and two different genotypes were isolated from periurban populations.

  5. Allometric relations of neotropical small rodents (Sigmodontinae) in anthropogenic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosalino, Luís M; Martin, Paula S; Gheler-Costa, Carla; Lopes, Paula C; Verdade, Luciano M

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims at assessing allometric relationships in the Sigmodontinae rodents (Calomys tener, Akodon cf. montensis, Necromys lasiurus, Oligoryzomys flavescens, and Oligoryzomys nigripes), and morphological variation among different habitats in human-dominated environments in Southeastern Brazil. We captured rodents using pitfall traps placed in Eucalyptus plantations, abandoned pastures, and remnants of secondary native vegetation, and took the following measurements: body mass, total length, body length, left hind foot length, and left ear length. Males were usually larger than females, except in N. lasiurus. There was no intraspecific difference in body condition among habitats, suggesting that Eucalyptus may not have a deleterious effect upon its residents. However, A. cf montensis from Eucalyptus plantations had longer feet than those from other vegetation associations, suggesting a possible adaptive response to the lower cover in the plantation environment, and its consequent higher predation risk, or alternatively that only individuals with greater dispersal ability are found in Eucalyptus plantations. Future studies should investigate a possible co-evolutionary predator-prey relationship, including rapid evolution by Sigmodontinae rodents in anthropogenic landscapes.

  6. Rodent Damage to Natural and Replanted Mountain Forest Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Heroldová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact of small rodents on mountain forest regeneration was studied in National Nature Reserve in the Beskydy Mountains (Czech Republic. A considerable amount of bark damage was found on young trees (20% in spring after the peak abundance of field voles (Microtus agrestis in combination with long winter with heavy snowfall. In contrast, little damage to young trees was noted under high densities of bank voles (Myodes glareolus with a lower snow cover the following winter. The bark of deciduous trees was more attractive to voles (22% damaged than conifers (8%. Young trees growing in open and grassy localities suffered more damage from voles than those under canopy of forest stands (2=44.04, <0.001. Natural regeneration in Nature Reserve was less damaged compared to planted trees (2=55.89, <0.001. The main factors influencing the impact of rodent species on tree regeneration were open, grassy habitat conditions, higher abundance of vole species, tree species preferences- and snow-cover condition. Under these conditions, the impact of rodents on forest regeneration can be predicted. Foresters should prefer natural regeneration to the artificial plantings.

  7. Rodent damage to natural and replanted mountain forest regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroldová, Marta; Bryja, Josef; Jánová, Eva; Suchomel, Josef; Homolka, Miloslav

    2012-01-01

    Impact of small rodents on mountain forest regeneration was studied in National Nature Reserve in the Beskydy Mountains (Czech Republic). A considerable amount of bark damage was found on young trees (20%) in spring after the peak abundance of field voles (Microtus agrestis) in combination with long winter with heavy snowfall. In contrast, little damage to young trees was noted under high densities of bank voles (Myodes glareolus) with a lower snow cover the following winter. The bark of deciduous trees was more attractive to voles (22% damaged) than conifers (8%). Young trees growing in open and grassy localities suffered more damage from voles than those under canopy of forest stands (χ² = 44.04, P Natural regeneration in Nature Reserve was less damaged compared to planted trees (χ² = 55.89, P impact of rodent species on tree regeneration were open, grassy habitat conditions, higher abundance of vole species, tree species preferences- and snow-cover condition. Under these conditions, the impact of rodents on forest regeneration can be predicted. Foresters should prefer natural regeneration to the artificial plantings.

  8. Genotypes of pathogenic Leptospira spp isolated from rodents in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffler, Sylvia Grune; Pavan, Maria Elisa; Vanasco, Bibiana; Samartino, Luis; Suarez, Olga; Auteri, Carmelo; Romero, Graciela; Brihuega, Bibiana

    2014-04-01

    Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonosis in the world and significant efforts have been made to determine and classify pathogenic Leptospira strains. This zoonosis is maintained in nature through chronic renal infections of carrier animals, with rodents and other small mammals serving as the most important reservoirs. Additionally, domestic animals, such as livestock and dogs, are significant sources of human infection. In this study, a multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) was applied to genotype 22 pathogenic Leptospira strains isolated from urban and periurban rodent populations from different regions of Argentina. Three MLVA profiles were identified in strains belonging to the species Leptospira interrogans (serovars Icterohaemorrhagiae and Canicola); one profile was observed in serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae and two MLVA profiles were observed in isolates of serovars Canicola and Portlandvere. All strains belonging to Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Castellonis exhibited the same MLVA profile. Four different genotypes were isolated from urban populations of rodents, including both mice and rats and two different genotypes were isolated from periurban populations.

  9. Karyotype and reproduction mode of the rodent parasite Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Akina; Tanaka, Teruhisa; Takaishi, Maho; Fujii, Yumiko; Palomares-Rius, Juan E; Hasegawa, Koichi; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Kikuchi, Taisei

    2014-11-01

    SUMMARY Strongyloides venezuelensis is a parasitic nematode that infects rodents. Although Strongyloides species described to date are known to exhibit parthenogenetic reproduction in the parasitic stage of their life cycle and sexual reproduction in the free-living stage, we did not observe any free-living males in S. venezuelensis in our strain, suggesting that the nematode is likely to depend on parthenogenetic reproduction. We confirmed by cytological analysis that S. venezuelensis produces eggs by parthenogenesis during the parasitic stage of its life cycle. Phylogenetic analysis using nearly the full length of 18S and D3 region of 28S ribosomal RNA gene suggested that S. venezuelensis is distantly related to another rodent parasite, namely Strongyloides ratti, but more closely related to a ruminant parasite, Strongyloides papillosus. Karyotype analysis revealed S. venezuelensis reproduces with mitotic parthenogenesis, and has the same number of chromosomes as S. papillosus (2n = 4), but differs from S. ratti (2n = 6) in this regard. These results, taken together, suggest that S. venezuelensis evolved its parasitism for rodents independently from S. ratti and, therefore, is likely to have a different reproductive strategy.

  10. Performance analysis of exam gloves used for aseptic rodent surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMoine, Dana M; Bergdall, Valerie K; Freed, Carrie

    2015-05-01

    Aseptic technique includes the use of sterile surgical gloves for survival surgeries in rodents to minimize the incidence of infections. Exam gloves are much less expensive than are surgical gloves and may represent a cost-effective, readily available option for use in rodent surgery. This study examined the effectiveness of surface disinfection of exam gloves with 70% isopropyl alcohol or a solution of hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid (HP-PA) in reducing bacterial contamination. Performance levels for asepsis were met when gloves were negative for bacterial contamination after surface disinfection and sham 'exertion' activity. According to these criteria, 94% of HP-PA-disinfected gloves passed, compared with 47% of alcohol-disinfected gloves. In addition, the effect of autoclaving on the integrity of exam gloves was examined, given that autoclaving is another readily available option for aseptic preparation. Performance criteria for glove integrity after autoclaving consisted of: the ability to don the gloves followed by successful simulation of wound closure and completion of stretch tests without tearing or observable defects. Using this criteria, 98% of autoclaved nitrile exam gloves and 76% of autoclaved latex exam gloves met performance expectations compared with the performance of standard surgical gloves (88% nitrile, 100% latex). The results of this study support the use of HP-PA-disinfected latex and nitrile exam gloves or autoclaved nitrile exam gloves as viable cost-effective alternatives to sterile surgical gloves for rodent surgeries.

  11. The valproic acid-induced rodent model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Chiara; Fahnestock, Margaret

    2017-05-02

    Autism is a lifelong neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in social communication and interaction and by repetitive patterns of behavior, interests and activities. While autism has a strong genetic component, environmental factors including toxins, pesticides, infection and drugs are known to confer autism susceptibility, likely by inducing epigenetic changes. In particular, exposure to valproic acid (VPA) during pregnancy has been demonstrated to increase the risk of autism in children. Furthermore, rodents prenatally exposed to this drug display behavioral phenotypes characteristics of the human condition. Indeed, in utero exposure of rodents to VPA represents a robust model of autism exhibiting face, construct and predictive validity. This model might better represent the many cases of idiopathic autism which are of environmental/epigenetic origins than do transgenic models carrying mutations in single autism-associated genes. The VPA model provides a valuable tool to investigate the neurobiology underlying autistic behavior and to screen for novel therapeutics. Here we review the VPA-induced rodent model of autism, highlighting its importance and reliability as an environmentally-induced animal model of autism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Rodent Models of Depression: Neurotrophic and Neuroinflammatory Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Stepanichev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rodent models are an indispensable tool for studying etiology and progress of depression. Since interrelated systems of neurotrophic factors and cytokines comprise major regulatory mechanisms controlling normal brain plasticity, impairments of these systems form the basis for development of cerebral pathologies, including mental diseases. The present review focuses on the numerous experimental rodent models of depression induced by different stress factors (exteroceptive and interoceptive during early life (including prenatal period or adulthood, giving emphasis to the data on the changes of neurotrophic factors and neuroinflammatory indices in the brain. These parameters are closely related to behavioral depression-like symptoms and impairments of neuronal plasticity and are both gender- and genotype-dependent. Stress-related changes in expression of neurotrophins and cytokines in rodent brain are region-specific. Some contradictory data reported by different groups may be a consequence of differences of stress paradigms or their realization in different laboratories. Like all experimental models, stress-induced depression-like conditions are experimental simplification of clinical depression states; however, they are suitable for understanding the involvement of neurotrophic factors and cytokines in the pathogenesis of the disease—a goal unachievable in the clinical reality. These major regulatory systems may be important targets for therapeutic measures as well as for development of drugs for treatment of depression states.

  13. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Sexual selection halts the relaxation of protamine 2 among rodents.

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    Lena Lüke

    Full Text Available Sexual selection has been proposed as the driving force promoting the rapid evolutionary changes observed in some reproductive genes including protamines. We test this hypothesis in a group of rodents which show marked differences in the intensity of sexual selection. Levels of sperm competition were not associated with the evolutionary rates of protamine 1 but, contrary to expectations, were negatively related to the evolutionary rate of cleaved- and mature-protamine 2. Since both domains were found to be under relaxation, our findings reveal an unforeseen role of sexual selection: to halt the degree of degeneration that proteins within families may experience due to functional redundancy. The degree of relaxation of protamine 2 in this group of rodents is such that in some species it has become dysfunctional and it is not expressed in mature spermatozoa. In contrast, protamine 1 is functionally conserved but shows directed positive selection on specific sites which are functionally relevant such as DNA-anchoring domains and phosphorylation sites. We conclude that in rodents protamine 2 is under relaxation and that sexual selection removes deleterious mutations among species with high levels of sperm competition to maintain the protein functional and the spermatozoa competitive.

  15. Rodent facial nerve recovery after selected lesions and repair techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadlock, Tessa A; Kowaleski, Jeffrey; Lo, David; Mackinnon, Susan E; Heaton, James T

    2010-01-01

    Measuring rodent facial movements is a reliable method for studying recovery from facial nerve manipulation and for examining the behavioral correlates of aberrant regeneration. The authors quantitatively compared recovery of vibrissal and ocular function following three types of clinically relevant nerve injury. One hundred seventy-eight adult rats underwent facial nerve manipulation and testing. In the experimental groups, the left facial nerve was either crushed, transected, and repaired epineurially, or transected and the stumps suture-secured into a tube with a 2-mm gap between them. Facial recovery was measured for the ensuing 1 to 4 months. Data were analyzed for whisking recovery. Previously developed markers of co-contraction of the upper and midfacial zones (possible synkinesis markers) were also examined. Animals in the crush groups recovered nearly normal whisking parameters within 25 days. The distal branch crush group showed improved recovery over the main trunk crush group for several days during early recovery. By week 9, the transection/repair groups showed evidence of recovery that trended further upward throughout the study period. The entubulation groups followed a similar recovery pattern, although they did not maintain significant recovery levels by the study conclusion. Markers of potential synkinesis increased in selected groups following facial nerve injury. Rodent vibrissal function recovers in a predictable fashion following manipulation. Generalized co-contraction of the upper and midfacial zones emerges following facial nerve manipulation, possibly related to aberrant regeneration, polyterminal axons, or hypersensitivity of the rodent to sensory stimuli following nerve manipulation.

  16. Two New Mylagaulid Rodents from the Early Miocene of China.

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    Xiaoyu Lu

    Full Text Available Mylagaulid fossorial rodents are a common component of North American Miocene fossil faunas. However outside of North America, only three species are known from Asia. Here we report two new mylagaulids, Irtyshogaulus minor gen. et sp. nov. and Irtyshogaulus major gen. et sp. nov., recovered from early Miocene sediments in the Junggar Basin in northwestern China. The two new taxa are small-sized, high-crowned promylagauline rodents. Their lower molars possess high metastylid crests, small mesostylids, broad and posterolingually expanded labial inflections, and transversely extending metalophid IIs. The mesoconid is absent in both species. The anterior and posterior fossettids are large and equally developed. Their upper M1-2s possess a square occlusal surface with five deep fossettes. The two new taxa are distinguished from each other mainly by their size, the morphology of fossettes and fossettids, development of mesial and distal lophs, posterior reduction of M3, and the orientation of m2 hypolophid. Our phylogenetic analysis indicates that Irtyshogaulus and Lamugaulus (another early Miocene Asian mylagaulid are sister taxa. The two genera are nested among the North American promylagaulines, and share a common ancestor from North America, indicating early Miocene intercontinental dispersal within this clade of rodents.

  17. Leptin and the adaptations of lactation in rodents and ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, R G; Denis, R G P; Sorensen, A; Williams, G

    2002-01-01

    Lactation markedly increases nutrient requirements in both rodents and ruminants. This is met mostly by increased food intake, but there are also adaptations to increase metabolic efficiency. Despite such changes, lactating animals usually experience periods of negative energy balance. This is not due to a physical constraint on food intake, at least in the rat. Leptin, a hormone secreted by adipocytes, plays an important role in the regulation of appetite and energy balance. During lactation, serum leptin concentration is decreased in both rodents and ruminants, and the nocturnal rise in concentration is lost in rats. Hypoleptinaemia in lactation is primarily a result of negative energy balance. There is also increased clearance of serum leptin, and the attenuation of the nocturnal rise in leptin in rats is at least partly due to the suckling stimulus. Hypoleptinaemia is not the major factor driving hyperphagia in lactating rats, but it probably facilitates the increased food intake. Leptin may play a more important role in this respect in lactating ruminants. Leptin is probably involved in other adaptations that increase metabolic efficiency during lactation. The ability of hypothalamic neuropeptides to respond to leptin does not appear to be altered by lactation in either rodents or ruminants. The reason why lactating animals do not respond to hypoleptinaemia with a further increase in appetite, thereby achieving energy balance, appears to be due to a failure to respond to changes in neuropeptides which mediate the effects of leptin.

  18. Central melanopsin projections in the diurnal rodent, Arvicanthis niloticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langel, Jennifer L; Smale, Laura; Esquiva, Gema

    2015-01-01

    with injections of cholera toxin subunit β coupled with Alexa Fluor 488 in one eye and Alexa Fluor 594 in the other, combined with IHC staining of PACAP. These studies also revealed that the ventral and dorsal LGN and the caudal olivary pretectal nucleus receive less innervation from ipRGCs than that reported...

  19. Study of high energy densities over extended nuclear volumes via nucleus-nucleus collisions at the SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment examines in detail the characteristics of ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions using $^{16}$O beams of 200 GeV/A from the SPS. The experiment combines 4$\\pi$ calorimeter coverage with measurements of inclusive particle spectra, two-particle correlations, low and high-mass lepton pairs and photons. A multiwire active target allows maximum interaction rates with a minimum of secondary interactions. Additional data are taken with an emulsion target.

  20. Fluctuations and correlations in nucleus-nucleus collisions within transport approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konchakovski, Volodymyr P.

    2009-10-01

    The current thesis is devoted to a systematic study of fluctuations and correlations in heavy-ion collisions, which might be considered as probes for the phase transition and the critical point in the phase diagram, within the Hadron-String- Dynamics (HSD) microscopic transport approach. This is a powerful tool to study nucleus-nucleus collisions and allows to completely simulate experimental collisions on an event-by-event basis. Thus, the transport model has been used to study fluctuations and correlations including the influence of experimental acceptance as well as centrality, system size and collision energy. The comparison to experimental data can separate the effects induced by a phase transition since there is no phase transition in the HSD version used here. Firstly the centrality dependence of multiplicity fluctuations has been studied. Different centrality selections have been performed in the analysis in correspondence to the experimental situation. For the fixed target experiment NA49 events with fixed numbers of the projectile participants have been studied while in the collider experiment PHENIX centrality classes of events have been defined by the multiplicity in certain phase space region. A decrease of participant number fluctuations (and thus volume fluctuations) in more central collisions for both experiments has been obtained. Another area of this work addresses to transport model calculations of multiplicity fluctuations in nucleus-nucleus collisions as a function of colliding energy and system size. This study is in full correspondence to the experimental program of the NA61 Collaboration at the SPS. Central C+C, S+S, In+In, and Pb+Pb nuclear collisions at Elab = 10, 20, 30, 40, 80, 158 AGeV have been investigated. The expected enhanced fluctuations - attributed to the critical point and phase transition - can be observed experimentally on top of a monotonic and smooth 'hadronic background'. These findings should be helpful for the

  1. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-An; Natowitz, Joseph B.

    2013-03-01

    The 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012) was held from 27 May to 1 June 2012, in San Antonio, Texas, USA. It was jointly organized and hosted by The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University, College Station and The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Among the approximately 300 participants were a large number of graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. The Keynote Talk of the conference, 'The State of Affairs of Present and Future Nucleus-Nucleus Collision Science', was given by Dr Robert Tribble, University Distinguished Professor and Director of the TAMU Cyclotron Institute. During the conference a very well-received public lecture on neutrino astronomy, 'The ICEcube project', was given by Dr Francis Halzen, Hilldale and Gregory Breit Distinguished Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Scientific program continued in the general spirit and intention of this conference series. As is typical of this conference a broad range of topics including fundamental areas of nuclear dynamics, structure, and applications were addressed in 42 plenary session talks, 150 parallel session talks, and 21 posters. The high quality of the work presented emphasized the vitality and relevance of the subject matter of this conference. Following the tradition, the NN2012 International Advisory Committee selected the host and site of the next conference in this series. The 12th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2015) will be held 21-26 June 2015 in Catania, Italy. It will be hosted by The INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania and the Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia of the University of Catania. The NN2012 Proceedings contains the conference program and 165 articles organized into the following 10 sections 1. Heavy and Superheavy Elements 2. QCD and Hadron Physics 3. Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 4. Nuclear Structure 5. Nuclear Energy and Applications of

  2. Ecomorphological analysis of the astragalo-calcaneal complex in rodents and inferences of locomotor behaviours in extinct rodent species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautier, Lionel; Marivaux, Laurent; Vianey-Liaud, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Studies linking postcranial morphology with locomotion in mammals are common. However, such studies are mostly restricted to caviomorphs in rodents. We present here data from various families, belonging to the three main groups of rodents (Sciuroidea, Myodonta, and Ctenohystrica). The aim of this study is to define morphological indicators for the astragalus and calcaneus, which allow for inferences to be made about the locomotor behaviours in rodents. Several specimens were dissected and described to bridge the myology of the leg with the morphology of the bones of interest. Osteological characters were described, compared, mechanically interpreted, and correlated with a “functional sequence” comprising six categories linked to the lifestyle and locomotion (jumping, cursorial, generalist, fossorial, climber and semi-aquatic). Some character states are typical of some of these categories, especially arboreal climbers, fossorial and “cursorial-jumping” taxa. Such reliable characters might be used to infer locomotor behaviours in extinct species. Linear discriminant analyses (LDAs) were used on a wider sample of species and show that astragalar and calcaneal characters can be used to discriminate the categories among extant species whereas a posteriori inferences on extinct species should be examined with caution. PMID:27761303

  3. Ecomorphological analysis of the astragalo-calcaneal complex in rodents and inferences of locomotor behaviours in extinct rodent species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Ginot

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies linking postcranial morphology with locomotion in mammals are common. However, such studies are mostly restricted to caviomorphs in rodents. We present here data from various families, belonging to the three main groups of rodents (Sciuroidea, Myodonta, and Ctenohystrica. The aim of this study is to define morphological indicators for the astragalus and calcaneus, which allow for inferences to be made about the locomotor behaviours in rodents. Several specimens were dissected and described to bridge the myology of the leg with the morphology of the bones of interest. Osteological characters were described, compared, mechanically interpreted, and correlated with a “functional sequence” comprising six categories linked to the lifestyle and locomotion (jumping, cursorial, generalist, fossorial, climber and semi-aquatic. Some character states are typical of some of these categories, especially arboreal climbers, fossorial and “cursorial-jumping” taxa. Such reliable characters might be used to infer locomotor behaviours in extinct species. Linear discriminant analyses (LDAs were used on a wider sample of species and show that astragalar and calcaneal characters can be used to discriminate the categories among extant species whereas a posteriori inferences on extinct species should be examined with caution.

  4. Heterogeneous calretinin expression in the avian cochlear nucleus angularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, S; Williams, A; MacLeod, K M

    2014-08-01

    Multiple calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) are expressed at high levels and in complementary patterns in the auditory pathways of birds, mammals, and other vertebrates, but whether specific members of the CaBP family can be used to identify neuronal subpopulations is unclear. We used double immunofluorescence labeling of calretinin (CR) in combination with neuronal markers to investigate the distribution of CR-expressing neurons in brainstem sections of the cochlear nucleus in the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). While CR was homogeneously expressed in cochlear nucleus magnocellularis, CR expression was highly heterogeneous in cochlear nucleus angularis (NA), a nucleus with diverse cell types analogous in function to neurons in the mammalian ventral cochlear nucleus. To quantify the distribution of CR in the total NA cell population, we used antibodies against neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN), a postmitotic neuron-specific nuclear marker. In NA neurons, NeuN label was variably localized to the cell nucleus and the cytoplasm, and the intensity of NeuN immunoreactivity was inversely correlated with the intensity of CR immunoreactivity. The percentage of CR + neurons in NA increased from 31 % in embryonic (E)17/18 chicks, to 44 % around hatching (E21), to 51 % in postnatal day (P) 8 chicks. By P8, the distribution of CR + neurons was uniform, both rostrocaudal and in the tonotopic (dorsoventral) axis. Immunoreactivity for the voltage-gated potassium ion channel Kv1.1, used as a marker for physiological type, showed broad and heterogeneous postsynaptic expression in NA, but did not correlate with CR expression. These results suggest that CR may define a subpopulation of neurons within nucleus angularis.

  5. A Field Study of Plague and Tularemia in Rodents, Western Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Ehsan; Shahraki, Abdolrazagh Hashemi; Japoni-Nejad, Alireza; Esmaeili, Saber; Darvish, Jamshid; Sedaghat, Mohammad Mehdi; Mohammadi, Ali; Mohammadi, Zeinolabedin; Mahmoudi, Ahmad; Pourhossein, Behzad; Ghasemi, Ahmad; Gyuranecz, Miklós; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2017-04-01

    Kurdistan Province in Iran is a historical focus for plague and tularemia. This study aimed at assessing the current status of these two foci by studying their rodent reservoirs. Rodents were trapped and their ectoparasites were collected. The genus and species of both rodents and ectoparasites were determined. Serological analyses of rodent blood samples were done by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for plague and by standard tube agglutination assay for tularemia. Rodent spleen samples were subjected to bacterial culture, microscopic examination, and real-time PCR to search for active plague or tularemia infection. During this study, 245 rodents were trapped, of which the most abundant genera were Apodemus (40%), Mus (24.49%), and Meriones (12.65%). One hundred fifty-three fleas, 37 mites, and 54 ticks were collected on these rodents. The results of all direct and indirect tests were negative for plague. Serological tests were positive for tularemia in 4.8% of trapped rodents. This study is the first report on the presence of tularemia infection in rodents in Western Iran. Since Meriones persicus is a known reservoir for plague and tularemia, and this rodent carried plague and tularemia vectors in Marivan and Sanandaj districts, there is a real potential for the occurrence of these two diseases in this region.

  6. Recognition and management of rodent-borne infectious disease outbreaks after heavy rainfall and flooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, James H

    2014-01-01

    Climatic events, especially heavy rains and flooding following periods of relative drought, have precipitated both arthropod-borne and rodent-borne infectious disease outbreaks. Heavy rainfall encourages excessive wild grass seed production that supports increased outdoor rodent populations, and flooding forces rodents from their burrows near water sources into the built environment and closer to humans. The objectives of this review are to alert clinicians to the climatic conditions common to hurricane-prone regions, such as Louisiana, that can precipitate outbreaks of the two rodent-borne diseases most often associated with periods of heavy rainfall and flooding, leptospirosis (LS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). It will also describe the epidemiology, presenting clinical manifestations and outcomes of these rodent-borne infectious diseases, and recommend both prophylactic therapies and effective control and prevention strategies for rodent-borne infectious disease outbreaks. Healthcare providers should maintain high levels of suspicion for LS in patients developing febrile illnesses after contaminated freshwater exposures during flooding or recreational events, and for HPS in patients with febrile illnesses that progress rapidly to respiratory failure following rodent exposures in enclosed spaces. Public health educational strategies should encourage limiting human contact with all wild and peridomestic rats and mice, avoiding all contact with rodent excreta, safely disposing of all rodent excreta, and modifying the built environment to deter rodents from colonizing households and workplaces.

  7. Calculated dynamical evolution of the nucleus of comet Hartley 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksanfomality, Leonid

    2013-04-01

    The nucleus of comet Hartley 2 has a relatively regular dumbbell shape with unequal heads. The narrow part of elongated shape contains a relatively smooth region whose covering material is highly different in its shallow structure compared to other parts of this celestial body. The surface of crudely spherical parts of the nucleus is different from the surface of the "neck", which implies a hypothesis that the shape of the nucleus of Hartley 2 is indicative of destruction of this celestial body occurring in our days. The nucleus rotates around its axis passing through the center of mass, and centrifugal forces arise. This process is hindered by gravitation between parts of the nucleus and gradual slowing of rotation due to body lengthening because of the increase in the moment of inertia (proportional to R2) and due to friction losses in the neck material. We posed the task to determine centrifugal and gravitational forces in the neck (and, respectively, the strains of stretching and compression), the moment of inertia of the body and supply of its rotational energy E, the volume of the nucleus and its average density, and the position of the barycenter and center of rotation. It can be assumed that these forces cause slow but progressive lengthening of the neck which should eventually result in fragmentation of the nucleus. Centrifugal forces can be found as a result of summation of forces produced by parts of the body. According to the calculation model, the total stretching forces in the section passing through the narrowest cut of the neck are 1.21E6 N. The corresponding compression forces in the section passing through the narrow section are 1.04E6 N. The comparison of these values indicates a paradoxical result: stretching strains dominate in the neck, while compressions are dominant in the section passing through the common center of mass. The excess of stretching strains in the neck is 11%. The inference is as follows: the right part of the neck and the

  8. Qualitative analysis neurons in the adult human dentate nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Dušica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although many relevant findings regarding to the morphology and cytoarchitectural development of the dentate nucleus have been presented so far, very little qualitative information has been collected on neuronal morphology in the adult human dentate nucleus. The neurons were labelled by Golgi staining from thirty human cerebella, obtained from medico-legal forensic autopsies of adult human bodies and free of significant brain pathology. The human dentate neurons were qualitatively analyzed and these cells were classified into two main classes: the small and the large multipolar neurons. Considering the shape of the cell body, number of the primary dendrites, shape of the dendritic tree and their position within the dentate nucleus, three subclasses of the large multipolar neurons have been recognized. The classification of neurons from the human dentate nucleus has been qualitatively confirmed in fetuses and premature infants. This study represents the first qualitative analysis and classification of the large multipolar neurons in the dentate nucleus of the adult human.

  9. Classical cadherins control nucleus and centrosome position and cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupin, Isabelle; Camand, Emeline; Etienne-Manneville, Sandrine

    2009-06-01

    Control of cell polarity is crucial during tissue morphogenesis and renewal, and depends on spatial cues provided by the extracellular environment. Using micropatterned substrates to impose reproducible cell-cell interactions, we show that in the absence of other polarizing cues, cell-cell contacts are the main regulator of nucleus and centrosome positioning, and intracellular polarized organization. In a variety of cell types, including astrocytes, epithelial cells, and endothelial cells, calcium-dependent cadherin-mediated cell-cell interactions induce nucleus and centrosome off-centering toward cell-cell contacts, and promote orientation of the nucleus-centrosome axis toward free cell edges. Nucleus and centrosome off-centering is controlled by N-cadherin through the regulation of cell interactions with the extracellular matrix, whereas the orientation of the nucleus-centrosome axis is determined by the geometry of N-cadherin-mediated contacts. Our results demonstrate that in addition to the specific function of E-cadherin in regulating baso-apical epithelial polarity, classical cadherins control cell polarization in otherwise nonpolarized cells.

  10. Cochlear nucleus whole mount explants promote the differentiation of neuronal stem cells from the cochlear nucleus in co-culture experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Kristen; Völker, Johannes; Jürgens, Lukas; Völker, Christine; Frenz, Silke; Scherzad, Agmal; Schendzielorz, Philipp; Jablonka, Sibylle; Mlynski, Robert; Radeloff, Andreas; Hagen, Rudolf

    2015-08-07

    The cochlear nucleus is the first brainstem nucleus to receive sensory input from the cochlea. Depriving this nucleus of auditory input leads to cellular and molecular disorganization which may potentially be counteracted by the activation or application of stem cells. Neuronal stem cells (NSCs) have recently been identified in the neonatal cochlear nucleus and a persistent neurogenic niche was demonstrated in this brainstem nucleus until adulthood. The present work investigates whether the neurogenic environment of the cochlear nucleus can promote the survival of engrafted NSCs and whether cochlear nucleus-derived NSCs can differentiate into neurons and glia in brain tissue. Therefore, cochlear nucleus whole-mount explants were co-cultured with NSCs extracted from either the cochlear nucleus or the hippocampus and compared to a second environment using whole-mount explants from the hippocampus. Factors that are known to induce neuronal differentiation were also investigated in these NSC-explant experiments. NSCs derived from the cochlear nucleus engrafted in the brain tissue and differentiated into all cells of the neuronal lineage. Hippocampal NSCs also immigrated in cochlear nucleus explants and differentiated into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Laminin expression was up-regulated in the cochlear nucleus whole-mounts and regulated the in vitro differentiation of NSCs from the cochlear nucleus. These experiments confirm a neurogenic environment in the cochlear nucleus and the capacity of cochlear nucleus-derived NSCs to differentiate into neurons and glia. Consequently, the presented results provide a first step for the possible application of stem cells to repair the disorganization of the cochlear nucleus, which occurs after hearing loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on the cochlear nucleus in cats deafened as neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandathil, Cherian K; Stakhovskaya, Olga; Leake, Patricia A

    2016-12-01

    Many previous studies have shown significant neurotrophic effects of intracochlear delivery of BDNF in preventing degeneration of cochlear spiral ganglion (SG) neurons after deafness in rodents and our laboratory has shown similar results in developing cats deafened prior to hearing onset. This study examined the morphology of the cochlear nucleus (CN) in a group of neonatally deafened cats from a previous study in which infusion of BDNF elicited a significant improvement in survival of the SG neurons. Five cats were deafened by systemic injections of neomycin sulfate (60 mg/kg, SQ, SID) starting one day after birth, and continuing for 16-18 days until auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing demonstrated profound bilateral hearing loss. The animals were implanted unilaterally at about 1 month of age using custom-designed electrodes with a drug-delivery cannula connected to an osmotic pump. BDNF (94 μg/ml; 0.25 μl/hr) was delivered for 10 weeks. The animals were euthanized and studied at 14-23 weeks of age. Consistent with the neurotrophic effects of BDNF on SG survival, the total CN volume in these animals was significantly larger on the BDNF-treated side than on the contralateral side. However, total CN volume, both ipsi- and contralateral to the implants in these deafened juvenile animals, was markedly smaller than the CN in normal adult animals, reflecting the severe effects of deafness on the central auditory system during development. Data from the individual major CN subdivisions (DCN, Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus; PVCN, Posteroventral Cochlear Nucleus; AVCN, Anteroventral Cochlear Nucleus) also were analyzed. A significant difference was observed between the BDNF-treated and control sides only in the AVCN. Measurements of the cross-sectional areas of spherical cells showed that cells were significantly larger in the AVCN ipsilateral to the implant than on the contralateral side. Further, the numerical density of spherical cells was significantly lower in

  12. Effect of woodland patch size on rodent seed predation in a fragmented landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Loman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Predation on large woody plant seeds; chestnuts, acorns and sloe kernels, was studied in deciduous forests of two size classes: small woodlots (<1 ha and large woods (at least 25 ha in southern Sweden. Seeds used for the study were artificially distributed on the forest ground and seed predation measured as seed removal. Predation rate was similar in both types of woods. However, rodent density was higher in small woodlots and a correction for differences in rodent density showed that predation rate per individual rodent was higher in the large woods. This suggests that the small woodlots (including the border zone and their adjacent fields have more rodent food per area unit. A small woodlot cannot be considered a representative sample of a large continuous forest, even if the habitats appear similar. There was a strong effect of rodent density on seed predation rate. This suggests that rodents are major seed predators in this habitat.

  13. Insulin induces calcium signals in the nucleus of rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Michele A; Gomes, Dawidson A; Andrade, Viviane A; Leite, M Fatima; Nathanson, Michael H

    2008-11-01

    Insulin is an hepatic mitogen that promotes liver regeneration. Actions of insulin are mediated by the insulin receptor, which is a receptor tyrosine kinase. It is currently thought that signaling via the insulin receptor occurs at the plasma membrane, where it binds to insulin. Here we report that insulin induces calcium oscillations in isolated rat hepatocytes, and that these calcium signals depend upon activation of phospholipase C and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, but not upon extracellular calcium. Furthermore, insulin-induced calcium signals occur in the nucleus, and are temporally associated with selective depletion of nuclear phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate and translocation of the insulin receptor to the nucleus. These findings suggest that the insulin receptor translocates to the nucleus to initiate nuclear, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated calcium signals in rat hepatocytes. This novel signaling mechanism may be responsible for insulin's effects on liver growth and regeneration.

  14. Gastrointestinal helminth fauna of rodents from Cambodia: emphasizing the community ecology of host-parasite associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisiri, K; Chou, M; Siew, C C; Morand, S; Ribas, A

    2017-11-01

    Extensive field surveys of rodents were conducted in Cambodia from 2008 to 2014 to study the diversity and ecology of helminth infection in wild rodent populations. Gastrointestinal helminths were isolated from 14 species of rodents (569 individuals) trapped from different habitats (forest, dry land, rain-fed land and human settlements) in four provinces of Cambodia (Krong Preah Sihanouk, Mondolkiri, Pursat and Steung Treng). The average prevalence of parasitic infection was 58.5% (range, 16.0-64.7%), and 19 helminth taxa were identified in total. Trichostrongylid nematodes were the most prevalent (25.8%), followed by Raillietina sp. (14.1%), Gongylonema neoplasticum (10.7%), Syphacia muris (9.8%) and Hymenolepis diminuta (9.6%). Potential rodent-borne zoonotic helminths were also identified, and the risks of helminthiasis were discussed. The status of helminth infection and species diversity in rodents from settlements were significantly lower than in rodents from forest and peri-domesticated habitats, which indicates that habitat alteration might affect helminth infection and diversity in rodent hosts. Generalized linear models revealed that host attributes (host species and maturity) and environmental factors (habitat and geographical location) were explanatory variables for helminth infection in these rodents. Using network analyses, we showed that the oriental house rat, Rattus tanezumi, was the most central host in the rodent-helminth assemblage, based on the number of helminth taxa it shared with other rodent species. Therefore, R. tanezumi could play an important role in rodent-helminth interactions and helminth transmission to other rodent hosts.

  15. Fossil and molecular evidence constrain scenarios for the early evolutionary and biogeographic history of hystricognathous rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Sallam, Hesham M.; Seiffert, Erik R.; Steiper, Michael E.; Simons, Elwyn L.

    2009-01-01

    The early evolutionary and paleobiogeographic history of the diverse rodent clade Hystricognathi, which contains Hystricidae (Old World porcupines), Caviomorpha (the endemic South American rodents), and African Phiomorpha (cane rats, dassie rats, and blesmols) is of great interest to students of mammalian evolution, but remains poorly understood because of a poor early fossil record. Here we describe the oldest well-dated hystricognathous rodents from an earliest late Eocene (≈37 Ma) fossil l...

  16. Arthropod Parasites of Rodents in Khorram Abbad district, Lorestan Provincen of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    A Shayan; J Rafinejad

    2006-01-01

    Ectoparasites are considered as the main vectors of zoonotic diseases. They play an important role for transmission of wide variety of diseases such as CCHF, leishmaniosis and plague to human and vertebrates. Mammals, especially rodents, are the most important reservoirs of zoonotic diseases. The aim of this study was to identify the ectoparasites of rodents captured in Korram-Abad, Lurestan Province, Iran during year 2002-2003. Rodents were live trapped from 24 localities in six major land-r...

  17. Unintentional wildlife poisoning and proposals for sustainable management of rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coeurdassier, Michael; Riols, Romain; Decors, Anouk; Mionnet, Aymeric; David, Fabienne; Quintaine, Thomas; Truchetet, Denis; Scheifler, Renaud; Giraudoux, Patrick

    2014-04-01

    In Europe, bromadiolone, an anticoagulant rodenticide authorized for plant protection, may be applied intensively in fields to control rodents. The high level of poisoning of wildlife that follows such treatments over large areas has been frequently reported. In France, bromadiolone has been used to control water voles (Arvicola terrestris) since the 1980s. Both regulation and practices of rodent control have evolved during the last 15 years to restrict the quantity of poisoned bait used by farmers. This has led to a drastic reduction of the number of cases of poisoned wildlife reported by the French surveillance network SAGIR. During the autumn and winter 2011, favorable weather conditions and high vole densities led to the staging of several hundreds of Red Kites (Milvus milvus) in the Puy-de-Dôme department (central France). At the same time, intensive treatments with bromadiolone were performed in this area. Although no misuse has been mentioned by the authorities following controls, 28 Red Kites and 16 Common Buzzards (Buteo buteo) were found dead during surveys in November and December 2011. For all these birds, poisoning by bromadiolone as the main cause of death was either confirmed or highly suspected. Other observations suggest a possible impact of bromadiolone on the breeding population of Red Kites in this area during the spring 2011. French regulation of vole control for plant protection is currently under revision, and we believe this event calls for more sustainable management of rodent outbreaks. Based on large-scale experiments undertaken in eastern France, we propose that direct control of voles at low density (with trapping or limited chemical treatments) and mechanical destruction of vole tunnels, mole control, landscape management, and predator fostering be included in future regulation because such practices could help resolve conservation and agricultural issues. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  18. Protection of Stored Plant Products Using Chlorophacinone Against Rodent Pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Vukša

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Apart from some preventive measures advisably taken during construction of storage facilities or at the time of product storage, treatments with chemical rodenticides are the most widely practiced method of controlling commensal rodents. Their control in storage facilities is normally carried out after animal presence has been observed, and treatments from early autumn onwards throughout the season provide the best effect. The aim of this paper is to present the effects of rodent control using baits with less content am chlorofacinon than recommended, to the protection of stored plant products. The experiments were set up using the relevant OEPP/EPPO method. A ready for use (RB paste bait formulation was used with different contents (0.005% and 0.0075% of the active ingredient chlorophacinone.Baits were laid in boxes along rodent routes, underneath pallets with sacs and in places where major damage had been observed. Baits for house mouse were placed at a rate of 10-20 g per 1-3 m, while 30-50 g of bait for brown rats were laid at specific points. Daily bait intake was monitored over a period of ten days and the portions were replaced with new ones as needed. Placebo baits were laid in identical boxes for four days before the experiment began. The abundance of house mouse was estimated based on the highest and lowest daily intake of bait divided by the species’ daily requirement. Mice presence was monitored over the next 20 days. Rodenticide efficacy was calculated using Abbott’s formula. The data in this experiment show that chorophacinone contents of 0.005% and 0.0075% in RB baits had no effect on the palatability and bait efficacy in controlling house mouse and brown rat indoors. The average efficacy of chorophacinone was 87-93% against house mouse and 90-100% against brown rat.

  19. The Immunology of Wild Rodents: Current Status and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Viney

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Wild animals’ immune responses contribute to their evolutionary fitness. These responses are moulded by selection to be appropriate to the actual antigenic environment in which the animals live, but without imposing an excessive energetic demand which compromises other component of fitness. But, exactly what these responses are, and how they compare with those of laboratory animals, has been little studied. Here, we review the very small number of published studies of immune responses of wild rodents, finding general agreement that their humoral (antibody responses are highly elevated when compared with those of laboratory animals, and that wild rodents’ cellular immune system reveals extensive antigenic exposure. In contrast, proliferative and cytokine responses of ex vivo-stimulated immune cells of wild rodents are typically depressed compared with those of laboratory animals. Collectively, these responses are appropriate to wild animals’ lives, because the elevated responses reflect the cumulative exposure to infection, while the depressed proliferative and cytokine responses are indicative of effective immune homeostasis that minimizes immunopathology. A more comprehensive understanding of the immune ecology of wild animals requires (i understanding the antigenic load to which wild animals are exposed, and identification of any key antigens that mould the immune repertoire, (ii identifying immunoregulatory processes of wild animals and the events that induce them, and (iii understanding the actual resource state of wild animals, and the immunological consequences that flow from this. Together, by extending studies of wild rodents, particularly addressing these questions (while drawing on our immunological understanding of laboratory animals, we will be better able to understand how rodents’ immune responses contribute to their fitness in the wild.

  20. Sex differences in chronic stress effects on cognition in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luine, Victoria; Gomez, Juan; Beck, Kevin; Bowman, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Chronic stress causes deleterious changes in physiological function in systems ranging from neural cells in culture to laboratory rodents, sub-human primates and humans. It is notable, however, that the vast majority of research in this area has been conducted in males. In this review, we provide information about chronic stress effects on cognition in female rodents and contrast it with responses in male rodents. In general, females show cognitive resilience to chronic stressors which impair male cognitive function using spatial tasks including the radial arm maze, radial arm water maze, Morris water maze, Y-maze and object placement. Moreover, stress often enhances female performance in some of these cognitive tasks. Memory in females is not affected by stress in non-spatial memory tasks like recognition memory and temporal order recognition memory while males show impaired memory following stress. We discuss possible bases for these sex-dependent differences including the use of different strategies by the sexes to solve cognitive tasks. Whether the sex differences result from changes in non-mnemonic factors is also considered. Sex-dependent differences in alcohol and drug influences on stress responses are also described. Finally, the role of neurally derived estradiol in driving sex differences and providing resilience to stress in females is shown. The importance of determining the nature and extent of sex differences in stress responses is that such differences may provide vital information for understanding why some stress related diseases have different incidence rates between the sexes and for developing novel therapeutic treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evidence for rectus extraocular muscle pulleys in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, S; Porter, J D

    2001-08-01

    Extraocular rectus muscle (EOM) pulleys are important determinants of orbital biomechanics in humans. In this study, the authors evaluated orbital connective tissue morphology, specifically characterizing rectus muscle pulleys, in the rat, a species with laterally placed eyes, afoveate vision, and a less complex visuomotor repertoire than primates. Adult rat orbits were paraffin processed and serially sectioned for histochemical and immunohistochemical staining. Frozen sections of enucleated globes with intact EOMs and associated connective tissue were also studied with myosin immunohistochemistry and histochemistry for the mitochondrial enzyme, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-tetrazolium reductase, to delineate the orbital layer relationship with the pulley tissue. Focal condensations of collagenous connective tissue were found in relationship to the rectus muscles in the equatorial Tenon's fascia, similar to those described as human recti muscle pulleys. The fibroelastic pulley rings were coupled to adjacent EOM pulleys by bands containing collagen and elastin. The coupling of pulleys to the orbital walls was significantly less than that previously described in humans. As in humans, there was a dual insertion of rodent rectus muscles, with the orbital layer inserting on the muscle pulley and the global layer attaching to the sclera. The data support the presence of structures in the rat orbit that are the morphologic equivalent of the human rectus pulley system. Although rodent and human pulleys were similar in many respects, there were species-specific properties that may relate to established differences in orbital anatomy and/or visuomotor behavior. These data extend the rectus muscle pulley concept to rodents and may provide insight into pulley structure-function relationships.

  2. Evidence for involvement of the subcoeruleus nucleus and nucleus raphe magnus in urine storage and penile erection in decerebrate rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, K; Ogawa, Y; Hatano, T; Koyama, Y; Miyazato, T; Oda, M

    1998-06-01

    Micturition and male sexual activity require the lower urinary tract to function. During the sexual act, micturition must be inhibited and urine stored in the bladder. We studied the role of the brainstem in relation to both micturition/urine storage and penile erection in rats. Wire electrodes were placed on the dorsal nerve of the penis and microelectrodes for stimulation were introduced into the brainstem in decerebrate male rats. Electrical stimulation was used to locate optimally responding sites by monitoring the isovolumetric intravesical pressure and intracavernous pressure. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal nerve of the penis, the subcoeruleus nucleus in the rostral pons, and the nucleus raphe magnus in the caudal pons increased intracavernous pressure, but inhibited rhythmic bladder contractions. Electrical stimulation of Barrington's nucleus (the pontine micturition center in the rat) in the rostral pons induced bladder contraction. Stimulation of the pontine reticular formation did not increase intracavernous pressure. Acute transection of the thoracic spinal cord eliminated rhythmic bladder contractions, but gave rise to sporadic increments of intracavernous pressure. This electrophysiological study demonstrated that the subcoeruleus nucleus and nucleus raphe magnus are involved in both urine storage and penile erection, and that their physiological functions are reciprocally controlled; so that erection leads to inhibition of micturition.

  3. Silk fibroin porous scaffolds for nucleus pulposus tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Chao; Yang, Qiang [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhu, Meifeng [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Du, Lilong [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhang, Jiamin [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Ma, Xinlong [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Xu, Baoshan, E-mail: xubaoshan99@126.com [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Wang, Lianyong, E-mail: wly@nankai.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are structurally complex tissue that hold the vertebrae together and provide mobility to spine. The nucleus pulposus (NP) degeneration often results in degenerative IVD disease that is one of the most common causes of back and neck pain. Tissue engineered nucleus pulposus offers an alternative approach to regain the function of the degenerative IVD. The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility of porous silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds fabricated by paraffin-sphere-leaching methods with freeze-drying in the application of nucleus pulposus regeneration. The prepared scaffold possessed high porosity of 92.38 ± 5.12% and pore size of 165.00 ± 8.25 μm as well as high pore interconnectivity and appropriate mechanical properties. Rabbit NP cells were seeded and cultured on the SF scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy, histology, biochemical assays and mechanical tests revealed that the porous scaffolds could provide an appropriate microstructure and environment to support adhesion, proliferation and infiltration of NP cells in vitro as well as the generation of extracellular matrix. The NP cell–scaffold construction could be preliminarily formed after subcutaneously implanted in a nude mice model. In conclusion, The SF porous scaffold offers a potential candidate for tissue engineered NP tissue. - Highlights: • Paraffin microsphere-leaching method is used to fabricate silk fibroin scaffold. • The scaffold has appropriate mechanical property, porosity and pore size • The scaffold supports growth and infiltration of nucleus pulposus cells. • Nucleus pulposus cells can secrete extracellular matrix in the scaffolds. • The scaffold is a potential candidate for tissue engineered nucleus pulposus.

  4. Brain networks modulated by subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accolla, Ettore A; Herrojo Ruiz, Maria; Horn, Andreas; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Draganski, Bogdan; Kühn, Andrea A

    2016-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an established treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Given the frequent occurrence of stimulation-induced affective and cognitive adverse effects, a better understanding about the role of the subthalamic nucleus in non-motor functions is needed. The main goal of this study is to characterize anatomical circuits modulated by subthalamic deep brain stimulation, and infer about the inner organization of the nucleus in terms of motor and non-motor areas. Given its small size and anatomical intersubject variability, functional organization of the subthalamic nucleus is difficult to investigate in vivo with current methods. Here, we used local field potential recordings obtained from 10 patients with Parkinson's disease to identify a subthalamic area with an analogous electrophysiological signature, namely a predominant beta oscillatory activity. The spatial accuracy was improved by identifying a single contact per macroelectrode for its vicinity to the electrophysiological source of the beta oscillation. We then conducted whole brain probabilistic tractography seeding from the previously identified contacts, and further described connectivity modifications along the macroelectrode's main axis. The designated subthalamic 'beta' area projected predominantly to motor and premotor cortical regions additional to connections to limbic and associative areas. More ventral subthalamic areas showed predominant connectivity to medial temporal regions including amygdala and hippocampus. We interpret our findings as evidence for the convergence of different functional circuits within subthalamic nucleus' portions deemed to be appropriate as deep brain stimulation target to treat motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Potential clinical implications of our study are illustrated by an index case where deep brain stimulation of estimated predominant non-motor subthalamic nucleus induced hypomanic behaviour. © The

  5. Do farming practices influence population dynamics of rodents?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Massawe, A W; Rwamugira, W; Leirs, Herwig

    2007-01-01

    A capture-mark-recapture study was conducted in crop fields in Morogoro, Tanzania, to investigate how the population dynamics of multimammate field rats, Mastomys natalensis, was influenced by the commonly practised land preparation methods and cropping systems. Two land preparation methods (trac...... practices. In maize fields in Tanzania, the crop is most susceptible to damage by M. natalensis in the first 2 weeks after planting, and therefore, lower densities of rodents will result into lower crop damage in tractor ploughed fields....

  6. Diagnostic Imaging of Dental Disease in Pet Rabbits and Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capello, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques are of paramount importance for dentistry and oral disorders of rabbits, rodents, and other exotic companion mammals. Aside from standard radiography, stomatoscopy is a complementary tool allowing a thorough and detailed inspection of the oral cavity. Computed tomography (CT) generates multiple 2-dimensional views and 3-dimensional reconstructions providing superior diagnostic accuracy also useful for prognosis and treatment of advanced dental disease and its related complications. MRI is a diagnostic imaging technique additional to CT used primarily to enhance soft tissues, including complex odontogenic abscesses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Rodent Habitat On ISS: Spaceflight Effects On Mouse Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronca, A. E.; Moyer, E. L.; Talyansky, Y.; Padmanabhan, S.; Choi, S.; Gong, C.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Decadal Survey (2011), Recapturing a Future for Space Exploration: Life and Physical Sciences Research for a New Era, emphasized the importance of expanding NASA life sciences research to long duration, rodent experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). To accomplish this objective, flight hardware, operations, and science capabilities supporting mouse studies in space were developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The first flight experiment carrying mice, Rodent Research Hardware and Operations Validation (Rodent Research-1), was launched on Sept 21, 2014 in an unmanned Dragon Capsule, SpaceX4, exposing the mice to a total of 37 days in space. Ground control groups were maintained in environmental chambers at Kennedy Space Center. Mouse health and behavior were monitored for the duration of the experiment via video streaming. Here we present behavioral analysis of two groups of five C57BL/6 female adult mice viewed via fixed camera views compared with identically housed Ground Controls. Flight (Flt) and Ground Control (GC) mice exhibited the same range of behaviors, including eating, drinking, exploratory behavior, self- and allo-grooming, and social interactions at similar or greater levels of occurrence. Mice propelled themselves freely and actively throughout the Habitat using their forelimbs to push off or by floating from one cage area to another, and they quickly learned to anchor themselves using tails and/or paws. Overall activity was greater in Flt as compared to GC mice, with spontaneous ambulatory behavior including the development of organized ‘circling’ or ‘race-tracking’ behavior that emerged within the first few days of flight and encompassed the primary dark cycle activity for the remainder of the experiment. We quantified the bout frequency, duration and rate of circling with respect to characteristic behaviors observed in the varying stages of the progressive development of circling: flipping utilizing two sides of the

  8. The water economy of South American desert rodents: from integrative to molecular physiological ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozinovic, Francisco; Gallardo, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Rodents from arid and semi-arid habitats live under conditions where the spatial and temporal availability of free water is limited, or scarce, thus forcing these rodents to deal with the problem of water conservation. The response of rodents to unproductive desert environments and water deficits has been intensively investigated in many deserts of the world. However, current understanding of the cellular, systemic and organismal physiology of water economy relies heavily on short-term, laboratory-oriented experiments, which usually focus on responses at isolated levels of biological organization. In addition, studies in small South American mammals are scarce. Indeed xeric habitats have existed in South America for a long time and it is intriguing why present day South American desert rodents do not show the wide array of adaptive traits to desert life observed for rodents on other continents. Several authors have pointed out that South American desert rodents lack physiological and energetic specialization for energy and water conservation, hypothesizing that their success is based more on behavioral and ecological strategies. We review phenotypic flexibility and physiological diversity in water flux rate, urine osmolality, and expression of water channels in South American desert-dwelling rodents. As far as we know, this is the first review of integrative studies at cellular, systemic and organismal levels. Our main conclusion is that South American desert rodents possess structural as well as physiological systems for water conservation, which are as remarkable as those found in "classical" rodents inhabiting other desert areas of the world.

  9. A new form of rodent placentation in the relict species, Laonastes aenigmamus (Rodentia Diatomyidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Anthony Michael; Enders, A C; Jones, C J P

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Laotian rock rat is a relict species in a sister group relationship to hystricognath rodents (Hystricognathi). We asked whether there were similarities in placentation that might reflect this relationship or differences that might cast light on the evolution of Hystricognathi...... was the plesiomorphic condition for rodents. A hemomonochorial interhemal region was plesiomorphic for rodents and Hystricognathi, and the hemodichorial condition found in Laonastes, and possibly in Ctenodactylus, was unlike that of any rodent studied to date. CONCLUSION: Similar to Hystricognathi, Laonastes bears...

  10. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Tomasz [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Juszczak, Cezary [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Sobczyk, Jan T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  11. Intrinsically disordered proteins in the nucleus of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frege, Telma; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-05-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are known to perform a variety of important functions such as macromolecular recognition, promiscuous binding, and signaling. They are crucial players in various cellular pathway and processes, where they often have key regulatory roles. Among vital cellular processes intimately linked to the intrinsically disordered proteins is transcription, an intricate biological performance predominantly developing inside the cell nucleus. With this work, we gathered information about proteins that exist in various compartments and sub-nuclear bodies of the nucleus of the human cells, with the goal of identifying which ones are highly disordered and which functions are ascribed to the disordered nuclear proteins.

  12. Formation and decay of a hot compound nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, B.V.; Dalmolin, F.T.; Dutra, M.; Santos, T.J., E-mail: brett@ita.br [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos SP (Brazil); Souza, S.R. [Universidade Federal de Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre RS, (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Donangelo, R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de la Republica de Uruguay, Montevideo (Uruguay); Universidade Federal de Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre RS, (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The compound nucleus plays an important role in nuclear reactions over a wide range of projectile-target combinations and energies. The limits that angular momentum places on its formation and existence are, for the most part, well understood. The limits on its excitation energy are not as clear. Here we first analyze general geometrical and thermodynamical features of a hot compound nucleus. We then discuss the manners by which it can decay and close by speculating on the high energy limit to its formation and existence. (author)

  13. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge G. Morfín

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  14. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morfín, Jorge G.; Nieves, Juan; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  15. Comparative analysis of the oral mucosae from rodents and non-rodents: Application to the nonclinical evaluation of sublingual immunotherapy products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Thirion-Delalande

    Full Text Available A comparative characterization of the oral mucosa in various animals is needed to identify the best animal model(s for nonclinical evaluation of sublingual immunotherapy products. With this aim, we studied the histological characteristics and immune cell infiltrates of oral mucosae from common animal species.Three oral regions (i.e. ventral surface of the tongue, mouth floor and cheek obtained from eight animal species, including rodents (i.e. mice, rats, hamsters, guinea pigs and non-rodents (i.e. rabbits, dogs, minipigs and monkeys were characterized by histology and immunohistology in comparison with a human tongue.Rodents exhibit a thin keratinized epithelium with low epithelial extensions, whereas non-rodents, most particularly minipigs and monkeys, display a non-keratinized epithelium with larger rete ridges, similarly to humans. Glycogen-rich cells in the superficial epithelial layers are observed in samples from both minipigs, monkeys and humans. Comparable immune subpopulations detected in the 3 oral regions from rodent and non-rodent species include MHC-II+ antigen presenting cells, mostly CD163+ macrophages, located in the lamina propria (LP and muscle tissue in the vicinity of resident CD3+CD4+ T cells. Limited numbers of mast cells are also detected in the LP and muscle tissue from all species.The oral mucosae of minipigs and monkeys are closest to that of humans, and the immune networks are quite similar between all rodents and non-rodents. Taking into account the ethical and logistical difficulties of performing research in the latter species, rodents and especially mice, should preferentially be used for pharmacodynamics/efficacy studies. Our data also support the use of minipigs to perform biodistribution and safety studies of sublingual immunotherapy products.

  16. The retrograde connections and anatomical segregation of the Göttingen minipig nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Christian Meidahl

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nucleus accumbens (NAcc has been implicated in several psychiatric disorders such as treatment resistant depression (TRD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, and has been an ongoing experimental target for deep brain stimulation (DBS in both rats and humans. In order to translate basic scientific results from rodents to the human setting a large animal model is needed to thoroughly study the effect of such therapeutic interventions. The aim of the study was, accordingly, to describe the basic anatomy of the Göttingen minipig NAcc and its retrograde connections.Tracing was carried out by MRI-guided stereotactic unilateral fluorogold injections in the NAcc of Göttingen minipigs. After two weeks the brains were sectioned and subsequently stained with Nissl-, autometallographic (AMG development of myelin, and DARPP-32 and calbindin immunohistochemistry.The minipig NAcc was divided in a central core and an outer medial, ventral and lateral shell. We confirmed the NAcc to be a large and well-segregated structure towards its medial, ventral and lateral borders. The fluorogold tracing revealed inputs to NAcc from the medial parts of the prefrontal cortex, BA 25 (subgenual cortex, insula bilaterally, amygdala, the CA1-region of hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, subiculum, paraventricular and anterior parts of thalamus, dorsomedial parts of hypothalamus, substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, the retrorubral field and the dorsal and median raphe nuclei.In conclusion the Göttingen minipig NAcc is a large ventral striatal structure that can be divided into a core and shell with prominent afferent connections from several subrhinal and infra-/prelimbic brain areas.

  17. Social isolation rearing increases nucleus accumbens dopamine and norepinephrine responses to acute ethanol in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkhanis, Anushree N; Locke, Jason L; McCool, Brian A; Weiner, Jeffrey L; Jones, Sara R

    2014-11-01

    Early-life stress is associated with increased vulnerability to alcohol addiction. However, the neural substrates linking chronic childhood/adolescent stress and increased risk of alcohol addiction are not well understood. In the nucleus accumbens (NAc), dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) signaling can be profoundly influenced by stress, anxiety, and drugs of abuse, including ethanol (EtOH). Here, we employed a rodent model of early-life stress that results in enduring increases in behavioral risk factors of alcoholism to gain a better understanding of how chronic adolescent stress may impact the EtOH sensitivity of DA and NE release in the NAc. Male Long-Evans rats were either group housed (GH; 4 rats/cage) or socially isolated (SI; 1 rat/cage) for 6 weeks beginning on postnatal day 28. SI and GH rats were tested in adulthood for anxiety-like behaviors (elevated plus maze), and the effects of EtOH (1 and 2 g/kg; intraperitoneally.) on NAc DA and NE were assessed by microdialysis. SI animals showed increased anxiety-like behavior compared to GH animals. Although SI had no effect on baseline levels of DA or NE, baseline DA levels were positively correlated with anxiety measures. In addition, while no significant differences were observed with 1 g/kg EtOH, the 2 g/kg dose induced significantly greater DA release in SI animals. Moreover, EtOH (2 g/kg) only elevated NAc NE levels in SI rats. These results suggest that chronic early-life stress sensitizes accumbal DA and NE release in response to an acute EtOH challenge. A greater EtOH sensitivity of DA and NE release dynamics in the NAc may contribute to increases in behavioral risk factors of alcoholism, like greater EtOH self-administration, that are observed in SI rats. Copyright © 2014 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  18. Regulation of nucleus accumbens transcript levels in mice by early-life social stress and cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Iacono, Luisa; Valzania, Alessandro; Visco-Comandini, Federica; Viscomi, Maria Teresa; Felsani, Armando; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Carola, Valeria

    2016-04-01

    Much interest has been piqued regarding the quality of one's environment at early ages in modulating the susceptibility to drug addiction in adulthood. However, the molecular mechanisms that are engaged during early trauma and mediate the risk for drug addiction are poorly understood. In rodents, exposure to early-life stress alters the rewarding effects of cocaine, amphetamine, and morphine in adulthood. Recently, we demonstrated that the exposure of juvenile mice to social threat (Social Stress, S-S) promoted cocaine-seeking behavior and relapse of cocaine-seeking after periods of withdrawal, compared with unhandled controls (UN) and with juvenile mice that experienced only daily isolation in a novel environment (no social stress, NS-S). Interestingly, while the exposure to NS-S slightly increased cocaine-seeking behavior compared with UN, the same was not sufficient to promote cocaine reinstatement. In this study, we examined the long-term transcriptional changes that are induced by S-S compared to NS-S and linked the increased susceptibility of S-S mice to cocaine reinstatement. To this end, we performed genome-wide RNA sequencing analysis in the nucleus accumbens (NAC), which revealed that 89 transcripts were differentially expressed between S-S and NS-S mice. By Gene Ontology classification, these hits were enriched in genes that mediate cell proliferation, neuronal differentiation, and neuron/forebrain development. Eleven of these genes have been reported to be involved in substance use disorders, and the remaining genes are novel candidates in this area. We characterized 4 candidates with regard to their significant neurobiological relevance (ZIC1, ZIC2, FABP7, and PRDM12) and measured their expression in the NAC by immunohistochemistry. These findings provide insights into novel molecular mechanisms in NAC that might be associated with the risk of relapse in cocaine-dependent individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Habitual action video game playing is associated with caudate nucleus-dependent navigational strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Greg L; Drisdelle, Brandi Lee; Konishi, Kyoko; Jackson, Jonathan; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Bohbot, Veronique D

    2015-06-07

    The habitual playing of video games is associated with increased grey matter and activity in the striatum. Studies in humans and rodents have shown an inverse relationship between grey matter in the striatum and hippocampus. We investigated whether action video game playing is also associated with increased use of response learning strategies during navigation, known to be dependent on the caudate nucleus of the striatum, when presented in a dual solution task. We tested 26 action video game players (actionVGPs) and 33 non-action video game players (nonVGPs) on the 4-on-8 virtual maze and a visual attention event-related potential (ERP) task, which elicits a robust N-2-posterior-controlateral (N2pc) component. We found that actionVGPs had a significantly higher likelihood of using a response learning strategy (80.76%) compared to nonVGPs (42.42%). Consistent with previous evidence, actionVGPs and nonVGPs differed in the way they deployed visual attention to central and peripheral targets as observed in the elicited N2pc component during an ERP visual attention task. Increased use of the response strategy in actionVGPs is consistent with previously observed increases in striatal volume in video game players (VGPs). Using response strategies is associated with decreased grey matter in the hippocampus. Previous studies have shown that decreased volume in the hippocampus precedes the onset of many neurological and psychiatric disorders. If actionVGPs have lower grey matter in the hippocampus, as response learners normally do, then these individuals could be at increased risk of developing neurological and psychiatric disorders during their lifetime. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. The extent of intrauterine growth restriction determines the severity of cerebral injury and neurobehavioural deficits in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal A Ruff

    Full Text Available Cerebral Palsy (CP is the most common physical pediatric neurodevelopmental disorder and spastic diplegic injury is its most frequent subtype. CP results in substantial neuromotor and cognitive impairments that have significant socioeconomic impact. Despite this, its underlying pathophysiological mechanisms and etiology remain incompletely understood. Furthermore, there is a need for clinically relevant injury models, which a reflect the heterogeneity of the condition and b can be used to evaluate new translational therapies. To address these key knowledge gaps, we characterized a chronic placental insufficiency (PI model, using bilateral uterine artery ligation (BUAL of dams. This injury model results in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR in pups, and animals recapitulate the human phenotype both in terms of neurobehavioural and anatomical deficits.Effects of BUAL were studied using luxol fast blue (LFB/hematoxylin & eosin (H&E staining, immunohistochemistry, quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, and Catwalk neurobehavioural tests.Neuroanatomical analysis revealed regional ventricular enlargement and corpus callosum thinning in IUGR animals, which was correlated with the extent of growth restriction. Olig2 staining revealed reductions in oligodendrocyte density in white and grey matter structures, including the corpus callosum, optic chiasm, and nucleus accumbens. The caudate nucleus, along with other brain structures such as the optic chiasm, internal capsule, septofimbrial and lateral septal nuclei, exhibited reduced size in animals with IUGR. The size of the pretectal nucleus was reduced only in moderately injured animals. MAG/NF200 staining demonstrated reduced myelination and axonal counts in the corpus callosum of IUGR animals. NeuN staining revealed changes in neuronal density in the hippocampus and in the thickness of hippocampal CA2 and CA3 regions. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI revealed regional white and grey matter

  1. Causal evidence between monsoon and evolution of rhizomyine rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Antoñanzas, Raquel; Knoll, Fabien; Wan, Shiming; Flynn, Lawrence J

    2015-03-11

    The modern Asian monsoonal systems are currently believed to have originated around the end of the Oligocene following a crucial step of uplift of the Tibetan-Himalayan highlands. Although monsoon possibly drove the evolution of many mammal lineages during the Neogene, no evidence thereof has been provided so far. We examined the evolutionary history of a clade of rodents, the Rhizomyinae, in conjunction with our current knowledge of monsoon fluctuations over time. The macroevolutionary dynamics of rhizomyines were analyzed within a well-constrained phylogenetic framework coupled with biogeographic and evolutionary rate studies. The evolutionary novelties developed by these rodents were surveyed in parallel with the fluctuations of the Indian monsoon so as to evaluate synchroneity and postulate causal relationships. We showed the existence of three drops in biodiversity during the evolution of rhizomyines, all of which reflected elevated extinction rates. Our results demonstrated linkage of monsoon variations with the evolution and biogeography of rhizomyines. Paradoxically, the evolution of rhizomyines was accelerated during the phases of weakening of the monsoons, not of strengthening, most probably because at those intervals forest habitats declined, which triggered extinction and progressive specialization toward a burrowing existence.

  2. Digestive and Nondigestive Functions of Rodents' Salivary Glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, V V; Milto, I V; Sukhodolo, I V; Serebryakova, O N; Buzenkova, A V

    2017-01-01

    Major salivary glands play a role not only in digestion, but also in regulation of other functions in rodents. In this review, we analyzed and summarized the data about the rodents' parotid, submandibular and sublingual salivary glands functions, which is not limited to the production of saliva and action of its hydrolytic enzymes on food in the oral cavity. In recent decades significantly expanded understanding of major salivary glands nondigestive functions. They are involved in excretion of metabolic products, maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance. Special attention has been paid to the characteristics of specific (parotin, sialorphin, etc.) and nonspecific (epidermal growth factor, nerve growth factor, kallikrein, etc.) active substances of the major salivary glands and their involvement in wound healing, mineral metabolism, regulation of hematopoiesis and immunity system. Summarized and analyzed major salivary glands endocrine function in the organs and systems. Available literature data suggest: the structure of the major salivary glands, as well as the synthesis and secretion of a number of biologically active substances are controlled by sex hormones. In turn, these biologically active factors of the salivary glands, as epidermal growth factor, and parotin, sialorphin, whose expression is regulated by androgens, have an impact on the morphological and functional state of the gonads. Thus, major salivary glands operate a wide range of functions and involved in the regulation of sexual behavior of reproductive function and maintaining homeostasis in the body.

  3. Studying autism in rodent models: reconciling endophenotypes with comorbidities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eArgyropoulos

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD patients commonly exhibit a variety of comorbid traits including seizures, anxiety, aggressive behavior, gastrointestinal problems, motor deficits, abnormal sensory processing and sleep disturbances for which the cause is unknown. These features impact negatively on daily life and can exaggerate the effects of the core diagnostic traits (social communication deficits and repetitive behaviors. Studying endophenotypes relevant to both core and comorbid features of ASD in rodent models can provide insight into biological mechanisms underlying these disorders. Here we review the characterization of endophenotypes in a selection of environmental, genetic and behavioural rodent models of ASD. In addition to exhibiting core ASD-like behaviours, each of these animal models display one or more endophenotypes relevant to comorbid features including altered sensory processing, seizure susceptibility, anxiety-like behaviour and disturbed motor functions, suggesting that these traits are indicators of altered biological pathways in ASD. However, the study of behaviours paralleling comorbid traits in animal models of ASD is an emerging field and further research is needed to assess altered gastrointestinal function, aggression and disorders of sleep onset across models. Future studies should include investigation of these endophenotypes in order to advance our understanding of the etiology of this complex disorder.

  4. Seasonal variation in telomere length of a hibernating rodent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbill, Christopher; Ruf, Thomas; Smith, Steve; Bieber, Claudia

    2013-04-23

    Small hibernating rodents have greater maximum lifespans and hence appear to age more slowly than similar-sized non-hibernators. We tested for a direct effect of hibernation on somatic maintenance and ageing by measuring seasonal changes in relative telomere length (RTL) in the edible dormouse Glis glis. Average RTL in our population did not change significantly over the hibernation season, and a regression model explaining individual variation in post-hibernation RTL suggested a significant negative effect of the reduction in body mass over the inactive hibernation period (an index of time spent euthermic), supporting the idea that torpor slows ageing. Over the active season, RTL on average decreased in sub-adults but increased in adults, supporting previous findings of greater telomere shortening at younger ages. Telomere length increase might also have been associated with reproduction, which occurred only in adults. Our study reveals how seasonal changes in physiological state influence the progress of life-history traits, such as somatic maintenance and ageing, in a small hibernating rodent.

  5. Population Ecology of Hantavirus Rodent Hosts in Southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Bernardo R.; Loureiro, Nathalie; Strecht, Liana; Gentile, Rosana; Oliveira, Renata C.; Guterres, Alexandro; Fernandes, Jorlan; Mattos, Luciana H. B. V.; Raboni, Sonia M.; Rubio, Giselia; Bonvicino, Cibele R.; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N.; Lemos, Elba R. S.; D'Andrea, Paulo S.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we analyze population dynamics of hantavirus rodent hosts and prevalence of infection over a 2-year period in Southern Brazil, a region with a high incidence of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. The 14 small mammal species captured were composed of 10 rodents and four marsupials, the six most abundant species being Akodon serrensis, Oxymycterus judex, Akodon montensis, Akodon paranaensis, Oligoryzomys nigripes, and Thaptomys nigrita. These species displayed a similar pattern with increasing population sizes in fall/winter caused by recruitment and both, increase in reproductive activity and higher hantavirus prevalence in spring/summer. Specific associations between A. montensis/Jaborá Virus (JABV) and O. nigripes/Juquitiba-like Virus (JUQV-like) and spillover infections between A. paranaensis/JABV, A. serrensis/JABV, and A. paranaensis/JUQV-like were observed. Spillover infection in secondary hosts seems to play an important role in maintaining JABV and JUQV-like in the hantavirus sylvatic cycle mainly during periods of low prevalence in primary hosts. PMID:24935954

  6. Animal models of excessive alcohol consumption in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Howard C

    2013-01-01

    Numerous animal models have been developed to study excessive alcohol consumption in rodents. Use of such models has played a valuable role in elucidating biological underpinnings and environmental factors that mediate/promote excessive levels of alcohol drinking. A major obstacle in this work has been the need to overcome the natural tendency of rodents to either avoid alcohol or consume it in limited amounts that typically do not produce overt signs of intoxication. A variety of experimental approaches that entail modifying genetic and/or environmental factors have been employed to address this general problem and demonstrate excessive levels of alcohol consumption. Five different approaches that characterize animal models of excessive alcohol consumption are described: models that involve (a) scheduled access to alcohol; (b) scheduled periods of alcohol deprivation; (c) scheduled intermittent access to alcohol; (d) scheduled-induced polydipsia; and (e) dependence and withdrawal experience. Each of the models possesses unique experimental features that engender excessive levels of alcohol consumption. Both advantages and disadvantages for each model are described along with discussion of future challenges to be considered in developing more optimal models. Ultimately, the validity and usefulness of these models will lie in their ability to serve as a platform for studying biological underpinnings and environmental influences that drive increased motivation for alcohol seeking and consumption, as well as evaluation of treatment strategies that effectively reduce excessive levels of alcohol consumption.

  7. Identifying genes for neurobehavioural traits in rodents: progress and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie Baud

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Identifying genes and pathways that contribute to differences in neurobehavioural traits is a key goal in psychiatric research. Despite considerable success in identifying quantitative trait loci (QTLs associated with behaviour in laboratory rodents, pinpointing the causal variants and genes is more challenging. For a long time, the main obstacle was the size of QTLs, which could encompass tens if not hundreds of genes. However, recent studies have exploited mouse and rat resources that allow mapping of phenotypes to narrow intervals, encompassing only a few genes. Here, we review these studies, showcase the rodent resources they have used and highlight the insights into neurobehavioural traits provided to date. We discuss what we see as the biggest challenge in the field – translating QTLs into biological knowledge by experimentally validating and functionally characterizing candidate genes – and propose that the CRISPR/Cas genome-editing system holds the key to overcoming this obstacle. Finally, we challenge traditional views on inbred versus outbred resources in the light of recent resource and technology developments.

  8. Relapsing fever group Borrelia in Southern California rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Nathan C; Teglas, Mike B

    2014-09-01

    Wild rodent reservoir host species were surveyed prospectively for infection with Borrelia hermsii, the causative agent of tick-borne relapsing fever in the western United States. Trapping occurred during the summer of 2009-2012 at field sites surrounding Big Bear Lake, CA, a region where human infection has been reported for many years. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), we tested 207 rodents from 11 species and found chipmunks (Tamias spp.) and a woodrat (Neotoma macrotis) infected. Chipmunks represented the majority of captures at these sites. Sixteen of the 207 (7.7%; CI = 4.6-12.4) animals were qPCR-positive for Borrelia spp. associated with relapsing fever, and of those, we obtained bacterial DNA sequences from eight. The phylogram made from these sequences depict a clear association with B. hermsii genomic group I. In addition, we identified an infection with Borrelia coriaceae in a Tamias merriami, a potentially nonpathogenic member of the tick-borne relapsing fever group. Our findings support the hypothesis that chipmunk species play an important role in the maintenance of Borrelia species that cause tick-borne relapsing fever in the western United States, and therefore the risk of infection to people.

  9. A Practical Guide to Rodent Islet Isolation and Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Jeffrey D

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pancreatic islets of Langerhans secrete hormones that are vital to the regulation of blood glucose and are, therefore, a key focus of diabetes research. Purifying viable and functional islets from the pancreas for study is an intricate process. This review highlights the key elements involved with mouse and rat islet isolation, including choices of collagenase, the collagenase digestion process, purification of islets using a density gradient, and islet culture conditions. In addition, this paper reviews commonly used techniques for assessing islet viability and function, including visual assessment, fluorescent markers of cell death, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and intracellular calcium measurements. A detailed protocol is also included that describes a common method for rodent islet isolation that our laboratory uses to obtain viable and functional mouse islets for in vitro study of islet function, beta-cell physiology, and in vivo rodent islet transplantation. The purpose of this review is to serve as a resource and foundation for successfully procuring and purifying high-quality islets for research purposes.

  10. Intrinsic membrane properties of central vestibular neurons in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugène, Daniel; Idoux, Erwin; Beraneck, Mathieu; Moore, L E; Vidal, Pierre-Paul

    2011-05-01

    Numerous studies in rodents have shown that the functional efficacy of several neurotransmitter receptors and the intrinsic membrane excitability of central vestibular neurons, as well as the organization of synaptic connections within and between vestibular nuclei can be modified during postnatal development, after a lesion of peripheral vestibular organs or in vestibular-deficient mutant animals. This review mainly focuses on the intrinsic membrane properties of neurons of the medial vestibular nuclei of rodents, their postnatal maturation, and changes following experimental or congenital alterations in vestibular inputs. It also presents the concomitant modifications in the distribution of these neurons into different neuron types, which has been based on their membrane properties in relation to their anatomical, biochemical, or functional properties. The main points discussed in this review are that (1) the intrinsic membrane properties can be used to distinguish between two dominant types of neurons, (2) the system remains plastic throughout the whole life of the animal, and finally, (3) the intracellular calcium concentration has a major effect on the intrinsic membrane properties of central vestibular neurons.

  11. Functional assessments of the rodent facial nerve: a synkinesis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadlock, Tessa; Kowaleski, Jeffrey; Lo, David; Bermejo, Roberto; Zeigler, H Philip; Mackinnon, Susan; Heaton, James T

    2008-10-01

    Rodent whisker movement has been used as a tool, after facial nerve manipulation, to quantify functional recovery. We have recently established a method to study functional correlates of aberrant regeneration of the facial nerve. Our objective was to establish normative parameters for both spontaneous and induced whisking and blinking behavior in a large group of normal rats. Prospective animal study. Eighty animals underwent quantitative facial movement testing to measure simultaneous vibrissal movement and ocular closure for each side independently. Right and left C-1 whisker positions were continuously recorded for 5-minute sessions, and changes in infrared detection corresponding to eye closure were continuously recorded. Whisking and blinking were elicited by delivery of olfactory stimuli (10 s scented airflows) and corneal air puffs. Whisks were counted and analyzed, and eye closures were counted. Whisking amplitude, velocity, and acceleration were consistent with literature values. Air puff delivery elicited an ipsilateral blink 99% of the time, a contralateral blink 18% of the time, and changes in or initiation of bilateral whisking 70% of the time. Olfactory stimulus delivery prompted a change in whisking behavior 83% of the time, and eye closure 20% of the time. This study establishes normative data for assessing cranial nerve VII-controlled facial movement in four separate facial regions. We demonstrate the capability and tendency of animals to move their orbicularis oculi muscles independently of and simultaneously with their midfacial muscles. This model provides an excellent tool for the study of aberrant regeneration after facial nerve injury in the rodent.

  12. Cranial MRI of small rodents using a clinical MR scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Jennifer; Schwarz, Friederike; Schichor, Christian; Wiesmann, Martin

    2007-09-01

    Increasing numbers of small animal models are in use in the field of neuroscience research. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an excellent method for non-invasive imaging of the brain. Using three-dimensional (3D) MR sequences allows lesion volumetry, e.g. for the quantification of tumor size. Specialized small-bore animal MRI scanners are available for high-resolution MRI of small rodents' brain, but major drawbacks of this dedicated equipment are its high costs and thus its limited availability. Therefore, more and more research groups use clinical MR scanners for imaging small animal models. But to achieve a reasonable spatial resolution at an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio with these scanners, some requirements concerning sequence parameters have to be matched. Thus, the aim of this paper was to present in detail a method how to perform MRI of small rodents brain using a standard clinical 1.5 T scanner and clinically available radio frequency coils to keep material costs low and to circumvent the development of custom-made coils.

  13. Management of rodent exposure and allergy in the pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Elizabeth C

    2013-12-01

    Although rodent allergy has long been recognized as an occupational disease, it has only been in the past decade that it has been recognized as a community-based disease that affects children. Most homes in the US have detectable mouse allergen, but the concentrations in inner-city homes are orders of magnitude higher than those found in suburban homes. Home mouse allergen exposure has been linked to sensitization to mouse, and children with asthma who are both sensitized and exposed to high mouse allergen concentrations at home are at greater risk for symptoms, exacerbations and reduced lung function. Rat allergen is found primarily in inner-city homes and has also been linked to asthma morbidity among sensitized children. The objective of this review is to summarize the scientific literature on rodents and their allergens, the effects of exposure to these allergens on allergic respiratory disease, and to make recommendations, based on this evidence base, for the evaluation and management of mouse allergy in the pediatric population.

  14. Late Pleistocene echimyid rodents (Rodentia, Hystricognathi from northern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THAIS M.F. FERREIRA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Echimyidae (spiny rats, tree rats and the coypu is the most diverse family of extant South American hystricognath rodents (caviomorphs. Today, they live in tropical forests (Amazonian, coastal and Andean forests, occasionally in more open xeric habitats in the Cerrado and Caatinga of northern South America, and open areas across the southern portion of the continent (Myocastor. The Quaternary fossil record of this family remains poorly studied. Here, we describe the fossil echimyids found in karst deposits from southern Tocantins, northern Brazil. The analyzed specimens are assigned to Thrichomys sp., Makalata cf. didelphoides and Proechimys sp. This is the first time that a fossil of Makalata is reported. The Pleistocene record of echimyids from this area is represented by fragmentary remains, which hinders their determination at specific levels. The data reported here contributes to the understanding of the ancient diversity of rodents of this region, evidenced until now in other groups, such as the artiodactyls, cingulates, carnivores, marsupials, and squamate reptiles.

  15. Advances in Rodent Research Missions on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S. Y.; Ronca, A.; Leveson-Gower, D.; Gong, C.; Stube, K.; Pletcher, D.; Wigley, C.; Beegle, J.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    A research platform for rodent experiment on the ISS is a valuable tool for advancing biomedical research in space. Capabilities offered by the Rodent Research project developed at NASA Ames Research Center can support experiments of much longer duration on the ISS than previous experiments performed on the Space Shuttle. NASAs Rodent Research (RR)-1 mission was completed successfully and achieved a number of objectives, including validation of flight hardware, on-orbit operations, and science capabilities as well as support of a CASIS-sponsored experiment (Novartis) on muscle atrophy. Twenty C57BL6J adult female mice were launched on the Space-X (SpX) 4 Dragon vehicle, and thrived for up to 37 days in microgravity. Daily health checks of the mice were performed during the mission via downlinked video; all flight animals were healthy and displayed normal behavior, and higher levels of physical activity compared to ground controls. Behavioral analysis demonstrated that Flight and Ground Control mice exhibited the same range of behaviors, including eating, drinking, exploratory behavior, self- and allo-grooming, and social interactions indicative of healthy animals. The animals were euthanized on-orbit and select tissues were collected from some of the mice on orbit to assess the long-term sample storage capabilities of the ISS. In general, the data obtained from the flight mice were comparable to those from the three groups of control mice (baseline, vivarium and ground controls, which were housed in flight hardware), showing that the ISS has adequate capability to support long-duration rodent experiments. The team recovered 35 tissues from 40 RR-1 frozen carcasses, yielding 3300 aliquots of tissues to distribute to the scientific community in the U.S., including NASAs GeneLab project and scientists via Space Biology's Biospecimen Sharing Program Ames Life Science Data Archive. Tissues also were distributed to Russian research colleagues at the Institute for

  16. Nucleus geometry and mechanical properties of resistance spot ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    show that nugget diameter, indentation depth and tensile load-bearing capacity are affected by weld parameters. Coating prevents full joining at low parameters. Microhardness increased in heat-affected zone and weld metal. Keywords. Automotive steels; resistance spot welding; mechanical properties; nucleus geometry.

  17. Study of the variability of the nucleus of Centaurus A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes de Mello Rabaca, D.; Abraham, Z.

    1990-11-01

    ABSTRACT. This work consists in the study of the variability of the nucleus of the peculiar galaxy NGC 5128 (Centaurus A) at the radio continuum frequency of 43 GHz. The data were obtained with the 13.7 m itapetinga Radiotelescope. The radio source presents a pair of inner radio lobes and a compact variable nucleus. The observational technique used was scans through the inner radio lobes and the nucleus. The quasi- simultaneous measurements of the flux density of each source allowed us to derive accurately the relative flux between them, and to obtain the real variability of the nucleus. RESUMO. Este trabalho consiste no estudo da variabilidade do nucleo da galaxia peculiar NGC 5128 (Centaurus A) no de radio na de 43 GHz. Os dados foram obtidos com 0 Radiotelescopio do Itapetinga. A radio fonte apresenta um par de lobulos internos e um nucleo compacto variavel. A tetnica observacional utilizada foi a de varreduras passando pelos lobulos e pelo nucleo. As medidas quase simultaneas da densidade de fluxo de cada fonte permitiu obter precisa- mente 0 fluxo relativo entre elas e a variabilidade real do nucleo. Keq woit : GALAXIES-RADIO

  18. Deexcitation of superdeformed bands in the nucleus Tb-151

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finck, C; Appelbe, D; Beck, FA; Byrski, T; Cullen, D; Curien, D; deFrance, G; Duchene, G; Erturk, S; Haas, B; Khadiri, N; Kharraja, B; Prevost, D; Rigollet, C; Stezowski, O; Twin, P; Vivien, JP; Zuber, K

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is to get more informations about the decay-out of superdeformed bands. One of the best candidates in the mass A similar or equal to 150 region for that kind of research is the nucleus Tb-151. From previous works, it has been established that the first excited band goes lower in

  19. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation reverses mediofrontal influence over decision threshold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavanagh, J.F.; Wiecki, T.V.; Cohen, M.X.; Figueroa, C.M.; Samanta, J.; Sherman, S.J.; Frank, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    It takes effort and time to tame one's impulses. Although medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is broadly implicated in effortful control over behavior, the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is specifically thought to contribute by acting as a brake on cortico-striatal function during decision conflict, buying

  20. Inelastic magnetic electron scattering form factors of the Mg nucleus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    states of the 26Mg nucleus have been studied using shell model calculations. The universal sd of the Wildenthal interaction, universal sd-shell interaction A, universal sd-shell interaction B, are used for the sd-shell orbits. Core polarization effects accord- ing to microscopic theory are taken into account by the excitations of ...

  1. Nuclear structure in odd-odd nucleus [sup 138]Pr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzutto, M.A.; Cybulska, E.W.; Vanin, V.R.; Oliveira, J.R.B.; Emediato, L.G.R.; Ribas, R.V.; Seale, W.A.; Rao, M.N.; Medina, N.H.; Botelho, S.; Acquadro, J.C.; Lima, C.L. (Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Lab. Pelletron)

    1992-12-01

    With the view of extending the systematics of odd-odd Pr nuclei toward the N=82 closed shell, high-spin states in [sup 138]Pr nucleus have been investigated with the [sup 128]Te([sup 14]N, 4n[gamma]) reaction. Configurations and spin assignments are suggested for three of the observed band-structures. (orig.).

  2. KINEMATIC DETECTION OF THE DOUBLE NUCLEUS IN M31

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GERSSEN, J; KUIJKEN, K; MERRIFIELD, MR

    1995-01-01

    Using a spectrum obtained under moderate (similar to 1 arcsec) seeing, we show that the double nucleus in M31 produces a strong kinematic signature even though the individual components are not spatially resolved. The signature consists of a significant asymmetric wing in the stellar velocity

  3. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Ke-Mian [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Chang, Chia-Chun [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shen, Qing-Ji [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); Sung, Li-Ying, E-mail: liyingsung@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Ji-Long, E-mail: jilong.liu@dpag.ox.ac.uk [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  4. Calcium-regulated import of myosin IC into the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Ivan V; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2016-06-01

    Myosin IC is a molecular motor involved in intracellular transport, cell motility, and transcription. Its mechanical properties are regulated by calcium via calmodulin binding, and its functions in the nucleus depend on import from the cytoplasm. The import has recently been shown to be mediated by the nuclear localization signal located within the calmodulin-binding domain. In the present paper, it is demonstrated that mutations in the calmodulin-binding sequence shift the intracellular distribution of myosin IC to the nucleus. The redistribution is displayed by isoform B, described originally as the "nuclear myosin," but is particularly pronounced with isoform C, the normally cytoplasmic isoform. Furthermore, experimental elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration induces a rapid import of myosin into the nucleus. The import is blocked by the importin β inhibitor importazole. These findings are consistent with a mechanism whereby calmodulin binding prevents recognition of the nuclear localization sequence by importin β, and the steric inhibition of import is released by cell signaling leading to the intracellular calcium elevation. The results establish a mechanistic connection between the calcium regulation of the motor function of myosin IC in the cytoplasm and the induction of its import into the nucleus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in the nucleus revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, Chantale; Choufani, Faten; Avedanian, Levon; Bkaily, Ghassan; Gobeil, Fernand; Jacques, Danielle

    2010-03-01

    Recent work from our group showed that the nuclear envelope membranes contain several G protein-coupled receptors, including prostaglandin E2 (EP3R) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) receptors. Activation of EP3R increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) RNA expression in nuclei. eNOS and inducible NOS (iNOS) are reported to also be present at the nuclear level. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also localized at the nuclear level. In this review, we show that stimulation with NO donor sodium nitroprusside results in an increase of intranuclear calcium that was dependent on guanylate cyclase activation, but independent of MAPK. This increase in nuclear calcium correlated with an increase in nuclear transcription of iNOS. H2O2 and ET-1 increase both cytosolic and nuclear ROS in human endocardial endothelial cells and in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. This increase in ROS levels by H2O2 and ET-1 was reversed by the antioxidant glutathione. In addition, our results strongly suggest that cytosolic signalization is not only transmitted to the nucleus but is also generated by the nucleus. Furthermore, we demonstrate that oxidative stress can be sensed by the nucleus. These results highly suggest that ROS formation is also generated directly by the nucleus and that free radicals may contribute to ET-1 regulation of nuclear Ca2+ homeostasis.

  6. Inclusive jet production in ultrarelativistic proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Perepelitsa, Dennis

    High-$p_\\mathrm{T}$ processes in proton- and deuteron-nucleus collisions at TeV energies are the best presently available way to study the partonic structure of the nucleus in a high-density regime. Jet production over a wide range of phase space can significantly constrain the current knowledge of nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs), which are substantially less well understood than the corresponding PDFs in protons and which have only recently begun to be treated in a spatially-dependent way. An accurate knowledge of nPDFs is crucial for a definitive control of perturbative processes in a cold nuclear environment, since high-$p_\\mathrm{T}$ probes are used to quantitatively investigate the hot QCD matter created in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. Furthermore, jets from low Bjorken-$x$ partons can probe the transition from the dilute to saturated nuclear regimes. Jet production is investigated in $d$+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 200$ GeV with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Hea...

  7. The human granulocyte nucleus: Unusual nuclear envelope and heterochromatin composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olins, Ada L; Zwerger, Monika; Herrmann, Harald; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Simon, Amos J; Monestier, Marc; Olins, Donald E

    2008-05-01

    The human blood granulocyte (neutrophil) is adapted to find and destroy infectious agents. The nucleus of the human neutrophil has a segmented appearance, consisting of a linear or branched array of three or four lobes. Adequate levels of lamin B receptor (LBR) are necessary for differentiation of the lobulated nucleus. The levels of other components of the nuclear envelope may also be important for nuclear shape determination. In the present study, immunostaining and immunoblotting procedures explored the levels of various components of the nuclear envelope and heterochromatin, comparing freshly isolated human neutrophils with granulocytic forms of HL-60 cells, a tissue culture model system. In comparison to granulocytic HL-60 cells, blood neutrophil nuclear envelopes contain low-to-negligible amounts of LBR, lamins A/C, B1 and B2, LAP2beta and emerin. Surprisingly, a "mitotic" chromosome marker, H3(S10)phos, is elevated in neutrophil nuclei, compared to granulocytic HL-60 cells. Furthermore, neutrophil nuclei appear to be more fragile to methanol fixation, than observed with granulocytic HL-60 cells. Thus, the human neutrophil nucleus appears to be highly specialized, possessing a paucity of nuclear envelope-stabilizing proteins. In consequence, the neutrophil nucleus appears to be very malleable, supporting rapid migration through tight tissue spaces.

  8. Cortically evoked potentials in the human subthalamic nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwartjes - de Klerk, D.G.M; Janssen, M.L.F; Heida, Tjitske; van Kranen-Mastenbroek, V.; Bour, L.; Temel, Y.; Visser-Vandewalle, V.; Martens, H.C.F.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) alleviates motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. However, in a substantial number of patients the beneficial effects of STN DBS are overshadowed by psychiatric side effects. We hypothesize that stimulation of the STN motor

  9. Saturating Cronin effect in ultrarelativistic proton-nucleus collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Papp, Gabor; Levai, Peter; Fai, George

    1999-01-01

    Pion and photon production cross sections are analyzed in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions at energies 20 GeV < s^1/2 < 60 GeV. We separate the proton-proton and nuclear contributions to transverse-momentum broadening and suggest a new mechanism for the nuclear enhancement in the high transverse-momentum region.

  10. Red nucleus connectivity as revealed by constrained spherical deconvolution tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milardi, Demetrio; Cacciola, Alberto; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Marino, Silvia; Irrera, Mariangela; Cacciola, Giorgio; Santoro, Giuseppe; Ciolli, Pietro; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-07-28

    Previous Diffusion Tensor Imaging studies have demonstrated that the human red nucleus is widely interconnected with sensory-motor and prefrontal cortices. In this study, we assessed red nucleus connectivity by using a multi-tensor model called non- negative Constrained Spherical Deconvolution (CSD), which is able to resolve more than one fiber orientation per voxel. Connections of the red nuclei of fifteen volunteers were studied at 3T using CSD axonal tracking. We found significant connectivity between RN and the following cortical and subcortical areas: cerebellar cortex, thalamus, paracentral lobule, postcentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, superior frontal gyrus and dentate nucleus. We confirmed that red nucleus is tightly linked with the cerebral cortex and has dense subcortical connections with thalamus and cerebellar cortex. These findings may be useful in a clinical context considering that RN is involved in motor control and it is known to have potential to compensate for injury of the corticospinal tract. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pro-TRH and pro-CRF expression in paraventricular nucleus of small litter-reared fasted adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aréchiga-Ceballos, F; Alvarez-Salas, E; Matamoros-Trejo, G; Amaya, M I; García-Luna, C; de Gortari, P

    2014-04-01

    Neuroendocrine axes adapt to nutrient availability. During fasting, the function of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis (HPT) is reduced, whereas that of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) is increased. Overfeeding-induced hyperleptinemia during lactation may alter the regulatory set point of neuroendocrine axes and their adaptability to fasting in adulthood. Hyperleptinemia is developed in rodents by litter size reduction during lactation; adult rats from small litters become overweight, but their paraventricular nucleus (PVN) TRH synthesis is unchanged. It is unclear whether peptide expression still responds to nutrient availability. PVN corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) expression has not been evaluated in this model. We analyzed adaptability of HPT and HPA axes to fasting-induced low leptin levels of reduced-litter adult rats. Offspring litters were reduced to 2-3/dam (early-overfed) or maintained at 8/dam (controls, C). At 10 weeks old, a subset of animals from each group was fasted for 48 h and leptin, corticosterone, and thyroid hormones serum levels were analyzed. In brain, expressions of leptin receptor, NPY and SOCS3, were evaluated in arcuate nucleus, and those of proTRH and proCRF in PVN by real-time PCR. ProTRH expression in anterior and medial PVN subcompartments was assayed by in situ hybridization. Early-overfed adults developed hyperphagia and excessive weight, together with decreased proTRH expression in anterior PVN, supporting the anorexigenic effects of TRH. Early-overfed rats presented low PVN proTRH synthesis, whereas fasting did not induce a further reduction. Fasting-induced stress was unable to increase corticosterone levels, contributing to reduced body weight loss in early-overfed rats. We concluded that early overfeeding impaired the adaptability of HPT and HPA axes to excess weight and fasting in adults.

  12. Kv7 channels in the nucleus accumbens are altered by chronic drinking and are targets for reducing alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuier, Natalie S; Griffin, William C; Gass, Justin T; Padula, Audrey E; Chesler, Elissa J; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2016-11-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are a major public health issue and produce enormous societal and economic burdens. Current Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmacotherapies for treating AUDs suffer from deleterious side effects and are only effective in a subset of individuals. It is therefore essential to find improved medications for the management of AUDs. Emerging evidence suggests that anticonvulsants are a promising class of drugs for treating individuals with AUDs. In these studies, we used integrative functional genomics to demonstrate that genes that encode Kv7 channels (i.e. Kcnq2/3) are related to alcohol (ethanol) consumption, preference and acceptance in rodents. We then tested the ability of the FDA-approved anticonvulsant retigabine, a Kv7 channel opener, to reduce voluntary ethanol consumption of Wistar rats in a two-bottle choice intermittent alcohol access paradigm. Systemic administration and microinjections of retigabine into the nucleus accumbens significantly reduced alcohol drinking, and retigabine was more effective at reducing intake in high- versus low-drinking populations of Wistar rats. Prolonged voluntary drinking increased the sensitivity to the proconvulsant effects of pharmacological blockade of Kv7 channels and altered surface trafficking and SUMOylation patterns of Kv7.2 channels in the nucleus accumbens. These data implicate Kcnq2/3 in the regulation of ethanol drinking and demonstrate that long-term drinking produces neuroadaptations in Kv7 channels. In addition, these results have identified retigabine as a potential pharmacotherapy for treating AUDs and Kv7 channels as a novel therapeutic target for reducing heavy drinking. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  13. Physical interrelation of volatile and refractories in a cometary nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulle, Marco; Alice Team; Stern, Alan; CONSTERT Team; Kofman, Wlodek; COSIMA Team; Hilchenbach, Martin; GIADA Team; Rotundi, Alessandra; MIDAS Team; Bentley, Mark; MIRO Team; Hofstadter, Mark; OSIRIS Team; Sierks, Holger; ROSINA Team; Altwegg, Kathrin; RPC Team; Nilsson, Hans; Burch, James; Eriksson, Anders; Heinz-Glassmeier, Karl; Henri, Pierre; Carr, Christopher; RSI Team; Paetzold, Martin; , VIRTIS Team; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Lander Team; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; IDS Team; Gruen, Eberhard; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Weissman, Paul; Project Scientist Team; Taylor, Matt; Buratti, Bonnie; Altobelli, Nicolas; Choukroun, Mathieu; Ground-Based Observations Team; Snodgrass, Colin

    2016-10-01

    The Rosetta mission has been taking measurements of its target comet Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since early 2014 and will complete operations at the end of September 2016. The mission Science Management Plan, in 1994, laid out the the prime goals and themes of the mission. These five themes were: 1) To study the global characterisation of the Nuclues, the determination of the dynamics properties , surface morpholy and composition of the comet. 2) Examination of the Chemical, Mineralogical and isotopic compositions of volatiles and refractories in a cometary nucleus.3) Physical interrelation of volatile and refractories in a cometary nucleus4) Study the development of cometary activity and the process in the surface layer of the nucleus and in the inner coma5) The origins of comets, the relationship between cometary and interstellar material and the implications for the origin of the solar system,To cover all aspects of the Rosetta mission in this special Show case session, this abstracts is one of 5, with this particular presentation focusing on theme 3, in particular on a) The dust-to-gas ratio; b) distributed sources of volatiles; c) seasonal evolution of the dust size distribution.a) The dust-to-gas ratio has been provided by coma observations measuring the gas and dust loss rates from the nucleus surface. The ratio of these two loss rates provides a lower limit of the dust-to-gas ratio at the nucleus surface, since it does not take into account the largest chunks unable to leave the nucleus, or falling back due to the dominant gravity. We review the value inferred so far, its time evolution, and new techniques to directly measure it in the nucleus.b) Evidences offered by Rosetta observations of gas sublimating from dust particles are up to now faint. We report the few available observations and an estimate of the probable average water content in dust particles inferred by 3D gas-dynamical codes of 67P coma.c) The dust-size distribution tunes the sizes

  14. Structures and functions in the crowded nucleus: new biophysical insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald eHancock

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Concepts and methods from the physical sciences have catalysed remarkable progress in understanding the cell nucleus in recent years. To share this excitement with physicists and encourage their interest in this field, this review offers an overview of how the physics which underlies structures and functions in the nucleus is becoming more clear thanks to methods which have been developed to simulate and study macromolecules, polymers, and colloids. The environment in the nucleus is very crowded with macromolecules, making entropic (depletion forces major determinants of interactions. Simulation and experiments are consistent with their key role in forming membraneless compartments such as nucleoli, PML and Cajal bodies, and discrete territories for chromosomes. The chromosomes, giant linear polyelectrolyte polymers, exist in vivo in a state like a polymer melt. Looped conformations are predicted in crowded conditions, and have been confirmed experimentally and are central to the regulation of gene expression. Polymer theory has revealed how the chromosomes are so highly compacted in the nucleus, forming a crumpled globule with fractal properties which avoids knots and entanglements in DNA while allowing facile accessibility for its replication and transcription. Entropic repulsion between looped polymers can explain the confinement of each chromosome to a discrete region of the nucleus. Crowding and looping are predicted to facilitate finding the specific targets of factors which modulate activities of DNA. Simulation shows that entropic effects contribute to finding and repairing potentially lethal double-strand breaks in DNA by increasing the mobility of the broken ends, favouring their juxtaposition for repair. Signaling pathways are strongly influenced by crowding, which favours a processive mode of response (consecutive reactions without releasing substrates. This new information contributes to understanding the sometimes counter

  15. Cochlear nucleus neuron analysis in individuals with presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Raul; Nelson, Erik G

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the cochlear nucleus neuron population in individuals with normal hearing and presbycusis. Retrospective study of archival human temporal bone and brain stem tissues. Using strict inclusion criteria, the temporal bones and cochlear nuclei from six normal hearing individuals and four individuals with presbycusis were selected for analysis. The spiral ganglion cell population, the cochlear nucleus neuron population, and the cell body size of the neurons were quantified in these cases. A relationship was not observed between age and the spiral ganglion cell population in the normal hearing group. Presbycusis subjects exhibited a reduced spiral ganglion cell population. The mean cochlear nucleus neuron population was observed to be significantly higher in the presbycusis group (mean ± standard deviation: 114,170 ± 10,570) compared to the normal hearing group (91,470 ± 9,510) (P = .019). This difference was predominantly the result of greater multipolar and granule cell neuron populations. Only the fusiform neuron type exhibited a significantly different mean cell body cross-sectional area between the normal hearing group (242 ± 27) and the presbycusis group (300 ± 37) (P = .033). This investigation is the first time, to our knowledge, that the populations of the eight neuron types in the cochlear nucleus have been quantified in both normal hearing individuals and individuals with presbycusis. The data support the concept that presbycusis is not an effect of aging alone but instead may be a condition that predisposes one to hearing loss with advancing age and is characterized by a congenitally elevated cochlear nucleus neuron population. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Polyandry and polygyny in an African rodent pest species, Mastomys natalensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kennis, J.; Sluydts, V.; Leirs, H.; Hooft, van W.F.

    2008-01-01

    Males and females use different mating strategies and seldom have these strategies been studied on the field for cryptic rodent species. We studied the breeding strategies of both males and females of the sub-Sahara African rodent pest species, Mastomys natalensis, in the field using capture removal

  17. Long-term population patterns of rodents and associated damage in German forestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imholt, Christian; Reil, Daniela; Plašil, Pavel; Rödiger, Kerstin; Jacob, Jens

    2017-02-01

    Several rodent species can damage forest trees, especially at young tree age in afforestation. Population outbreaks of field voles (Microtus agrestis L.) and bank voles (Myodes glareolus Schreber) in particular can cause losses. Analyses of long-term time series indicate good synchrony of population abundance in rodent species associated with damage in forestry. This synchrony could be related to the effect of beech (Fagus spec.) mast in the previous year on population growth rates of both species. In shorter time series from Eastern Germany, damage in forestry was mostly associated with autumn abundances of rodents. Environmental factors such as beech mast and snow cover did not explain additional variation in rodent damage to trees. Beech mast is a good indicator of long-term rodent abundance in Northern German afforestation areas. However, rodent damage to forestry in Central Germany did not seem to depend on environmental parameters other than rodent abundance at large scale. As a result, there is still uncertainty about the link between environmental predictors and rodent damage to forestry, and further experimental work is required to identify suitable environmental drivers and their interplay with other potential factors such as the local predator community. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. The role of rodents and shrews in the transmission of Toxoplasma gondii to pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijlstra, A.; Meerburg, B.G.; Cornelissen, J.B.W.J.; Craeye, de S.; Vereijken, P.F.G.; Jongert, E.

    2008-01-01

    Inadequate rodent control is considered to play a role in Toxoplasma gondii infection of pigs. This issue was addressed in the current study by combining a 4-month rodent control campaign and a 7-month longitudinal analysis of T. gondii seroprevalence in slaughter pigs. Three organic pig farms with

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the Rodent Opportunistic Pathogen Pasteurella pneumotropica ATCC 35149T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hiraku; Ishikawa, Hiroki; Asano, Ryoki; Ueshiba, Hidehiro; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Boot, Ron; Kawamoto, Eiichi

    2014-08-07

    Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunistic pathogen in rodents that is commonly isolated from upper respiratory tracts in laboratory rodents. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the P. pneumotropica type strain ATCC 35149, which was first isolated and characterized as biotype Jawetz. Copyright © 2014 Sasaki et al.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Rodent Opportunistic Pathogen Pasteurella pneumotropica ATCC 35149T

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Hiraku; Ishikawa, Hiroki; Asano, Ryoki; Ueshiba, Hidehiro; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Boot, Ron; Kawamoto, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunistic pathogen in rodents that is commonly isolated from upper respiratory tracts in laboratory rodents. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the P. pneumotropica type strain ATCC 35149, which was first isolated and characterized as biotype Jawetz.

  1. Rodent-borne infectious disease outbreaks after flooding disasters: Epidemiology, management, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, James H

    2015-01-01

    To alert clinicians to the climatic conditions that can precipitate outbreaks of the rodent-borne infectious diseases most often associated with flooding disasters, leptospirosis (LS), and the Hantavirus-caused diseases, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS); to describe the epidemiology and presenting clinical manifestations and outcomes of these rodent-borne infectious diseases; and to recommend both prophylactic therapies and effective control and prevention strategies for rodent-borne infectious diseases. Internet search engines, including Google®, Google Scholar®, Pub Med, Medline, and Ovid, were queried with the key words as search terms to examine the latest scientific articles on rodent-borne infectious disease outbreaks in the United States and worldwide to describe the epidemiology and presenting clinical manifestations and outcomes of LS and Hantavirus outbreaks. Not applicable. Not applicable. Not applicable. Rodent-borne infectious disease outbreaks following heavy rainfall and flooding disasters. Heavy rainfall encourages excessive wild grass seed production that supports increased outdoor rodent population densities; and flooding forces rodents from their burrows near water sources into the built environment and closer to humans. Healthcare providers should maintain high levels of suspicion for LS in patients developing febrile illnesses after contaminated freshwater exposures following heavy rainfall, flooding, and even freshwater recreational events; and for Hantavirus-caused infectious diseases in patients with hemorrhagic fevers that progress rapidly to respiratory or renal failure following rodent exposures.

  2. Rough-legged buzzards, Arctic foxes and red foxes in a tundra ecosystem without rodents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pokrovsky, Ivan; Ehrich, Dorothée; Ims, Rolf A; Kondratyev, Alexander V; Kruckenberg, Helmut; Kulikova, Olga; Mihnevich, Julia; Pokrovskaya, Liya; Shienok, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    ... to collapse in a warming Arctic. Here we document for the first time how three normally rodent-dependent predator species-rough-legged buzzard, arctic fox and red fox - perform in a low-arctic ecosystem with no rodents. During six years...

  3. Prevalence of SFTSV among Asian house shrews and rodents, China, January-August 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Wei; Wen, Hong-Ling; Fang, Li-Zhu; Zhang, Zhen-Tang; He, Shu-Ting; Xue, Zai-Feng; Ma, Dong-Qiang; Zhang, Xiao-Shuang; Wang, Tao; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Li; Yu, Xue-jie

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the role of small mammals as hosts of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), we tested serum samples from rodents and shrews in China, collected in 2013. SFTSV antibodies and RNA were detected, suggesting that rodents and shrews might be hosts for SFTSV.

  4. [Helminth fauna in small rodents (Mammalia: Rodentia) of canal banks in meliorated territories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimalov, V V

    2002-01-01

    A helminth fauna of small rodents inhabiting channel banks have been investigated in soil improvement territories (Belorussian Polesie) in the period 1996-1999. 41 helminth species have been found in animals. Generally, there are specific helminths of rodents of the Cricetidae and Muridae families. These animals also participate in life cycles of bird's and carnivore's helminths.

  5. Molecular Survey of Zoonotic Agents in Rodents and Other Small Mammals in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadin, Ante; Tokarz, Rafal; Markotić, Alemka; Margaletić, Josip; Turk, Nenad; Habuš, Josipa; Svoboda, Petra; Vucelja, Marko; Desai, Aaloki; Jain, Komal; Lipkin, W Ian

    2016-02-01

    Croatia is a focus for many rodent-borne zoonosis. Here, we report a survey of 242 rodents and small mammals, including 43 Myodes glareolus, 131 Apodemus flavicollis, 53 Apodemus agrarius, three Apodemus sylvaticus, six Sorex araneus, four Microtus arvalis, one Microtus agrestis, and one Muscardinus avellanarius, collected at eight sites in Croatia over an 8-year period. Multiplex MassTag polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for detection of Borrelia, Rickettsia, Bartonella, Babesia, Ehrlichia, Anaplasma, Francisella tularensis, and Coxiella burnetii. Individual PCR assays were used for detection of Leptospira, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, orthopoxviruses, flaviviruses, hantaviruses, and Toxoplasma gondii. Of the rodents, 52 (21.5%) were infected with Leptospira, 9 (3.7%) with Borrelia miyamotoi, 5 (2%) with Borrelia afzelii, 29 (12.0%) with Bartonella, 8 (3.3%) with Babesia microti, 2 (0.8%) with Ehrlichia, 4 (1.7%) with Anaplasma, 2 (0.8%) with F. tularensis, 43 (17.8%) with hantaviruses, and 1 (0.4%) with an orthopoxvirus. Other agents were not detected. Multiple infections were found in 32 rodents (13.2%): dual infections in 26 rodents (10.7%), triple infections in four rodents (2.9%), and quadruple infections in two rodents (0.8%). Our findings indicate that rodents in Croatia harbor a wide range of bacteria and viruses that are pathogenic to humans. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  6. Polyandry and polygyny in an African rodent pest species, Mastomys natalensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennis, Jan; Sluydts, Vincent; Leirs, Herwig

    2008-01-01

    Males and females use different mating strategies and seldom have these strategies been studied on the field for cryptic rodent species. We studied the breeding strategies of both males and females of the sub-Sahara African rodent pest species, Mastomys natalensis, in the field using capture remo...... as a pest management technique due to the promiscuous mating and high frequency of sexual contacts....

  7. Prevalence of rodent and mongoose leptospirosis on the Island of Oahu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, H H; Fujinaka, I T

    1976-01-01

    Sporadic occurrences of human leptospirosis in recent years throughout the State of Hawaii have resulted in at least one death. Because of the apparent association of rodents and possibly mongooses with human leptospiral infections, a survey for leptospirosis was conducted among rodents as well as mongooses on Oahu. No such work had been recorded since a survey of rodents and mongooses for leptospirosis 31 years ago. In the current work, the prevalence of rodent and mongoose leptospirosis in the districts of Oahu was determined by the kidney-culture method. A serologic study of the rodents and mongooses subjected to kidney culturing was also conducted by use of the microscopic slide agglutination test. There were 1.2 times as many kidney culture results that were positive as serologic results. High prevalence of rodent leptospirosis were found where there was considerable rainfall or fresh surface water such as from streams. The overall leptospirosis prevalence for rodents was 23.4 percent, and for mongooses it was 23.0 percent. The Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) had the highest infection rate, 33.3 percent, and the predominant (72.2 percent) organism in these infections was Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae, which causes Weil's disease in man. Observations of rodent leptospirosis recorded 31 years ago were compared with results of the current study. The mongoose (Herpestes auropunctatus) is the preeminent carrier of Leptospira sejroe, a serotype that generally causes a mild form of leptospirosis in man.

  8. Rodents on pig and chicken farms – a potential threat to human and animal health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Backhans

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Rodents can cause major problems through spreading various diseases to animals and humans. The two main species of rodents most commonly found on farms around the world are the house mouse (Mus musculus and the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus. Both species are omnivorous and can breed year-round under favourable conditions. This review describes the occurrence of pathogens in rodents on specialist pig and chicken farms, which are usually closed units with a high level of bio-security. However, wild rodents may be difficult to exclude completely, even from these sites, and can pose a risk of introducing and spreading pathogens. This article reviews current knowledge regarding rodents as a hazard for spreading disease on farms. Most literature available regards zoonotic pathogens, while the literature regarding pathogens that cause disease in farm animals is more limited.

  9. Comparing strategies for controlling an African pest rodent: an empirically based theoretical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Leirs, Herwig; Mercelis, Saskia

    2001-01-01

    1. Small rodents in general and the multimammate rat Mastomys natalensis in particular cause major economic losses in Africa through damage to crops. Attempts to develop dynamic population models for this and other pest rodents are ongoing. Small rodents in general and the multimammate rat...... in particular cause major economic losses in Africa through damage to crops. Attempts to develop dynamic population models for this and other pest rodents are ongoing. 2. Demographic estimates from a capture-mark-recapture (CMR) study in Tanzania were used to parameterize a population model for this species....... This model incorporated three functional age categories (juveniles, subadults and adults) of both sexes and used density-dependent and density-independent factors, the latter represented by rainfall.3. The model was used to analyse the effect of rodent control on the population dynamics and resulting number...

  10. Neurobiology of rodent self-grooming and its value for translational neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalueff, Allan V; Stewart, Adam Michael; Song, Cai; Berridge, Kent C; Graybiel, Ann M; Fentress, John C

    2016-01-01

    Self-grooming is a complex innate behaviour with an evolutionarily conserved sequencing pattern and is one of the most frequently performed behavioural activities in rodents. In this Review, we discuss the neurobiology of rodent self-grooming, and we highlight studies of rodent models of neuropsychiatric disorders--including models of autism spectrum disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder--that have assessed self-grooming phenotypes. We suggest that rodent self-grooming may be a useful measure of repetitive behaviour in such models, and therefore of value to translational psychiatry. Assessment of rodent self-grooming may also be useful for understanding the neural circuits that are involved in complex sequential patterns of action.

  11. DMPD: TGF-beta signaling from receptors to the nucleus. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10611754 TGF-beta signaling from receptors to the nucleus. Roberts AB. Microbes Inf...leus. PubmedID 10611754 Title TGF-beta signaling from receptors to the nucleus. Authors Roberts AB. Publicat

  12. IHW COMET HALLEY NEAR NUCLEUS IMAGE DATA, V2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set presents images of the nucleus of comet 1P/Halley obtained by the various contributing observers of the International Halley Watch (IHW) Near-Nucleus...

  13. Anatomical evidence for direct connections between the shell and core subregions of the rat nucleus accumbens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, Y.C.; Deniau, J.M.; Pennartz, C.M.A.; Galis-de Graaf, Y.; Voorn, P.; Thierry, A.M.; Groenewegen, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens is thought to subserve different aspects of adaptive and emotional behaviors. The anatomical substrates for such actions are multiple, parallel ventral striatopallidal output circuits originating in the nucleus accumbens shell and core subregions. Several indirect ways of

  14. Next-generation sequencing for rodent barcoding: species identification from fresh, degraded and environmental samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Galan

    Full Text Available Rodentia is the most diverse order among mammals, with more than 2,000 species currently described. Most of the time, species assignation is so difficult based on morphological data solely that identifying rodents at the specific level corresponds to a real challenge. In this study, we compared the applicability of 100 bp mini-barcodes from cytochrome b and cytochrome c oxidase 1 genes to enable rodent species identification. Based on GenBank sequence datasets of 115 rodent species, a 136 bp fragment of cytochrome b was selected as the most discriminatory mini-barcode, and rodent universal primers surrounding this fragment were designed. The efficacy of this new molecular tool was assessed on 946 samples including rodent tissues, feces, museum samples and feces/pellets from predators known to ingest rodents. Utilizing next-generation sequencing technologies able to sequence mixes of DNA, 1,140 amplicons were tagged, multiplexed and sequenced together in one single 454 GS-FLX run. Our method was initially validated on a reference sample set including 265 clearly identified rodent tissues, corresponding to 103 different species. Following validation, 85.6% of 555 rodent samples from Europe, Asia and Africa whose species identity was unknown were able to be identified using the BLASTN program and GenBank reference sequences. In addition, our method proved effective even on degraded rodent DNA samples: 91.8% and 75.9% of samples from feces and museum specimens respectively were correctly identified. Finally, we succeeded in determining the diet of 66.7% of the investigated carnivores from their feces and 81.8% of owls from their pellets. Non-rodent species were also identified, suggesting that our method is sensitive enough to investigate complete predator diets. This study demonstrates how this molecular identification method combined with high-throughput sequencing can open new realms of possibilities in achieving fast, accurate and inexpensive

  15. Effects of Fat and Protein Levels on Foraging Preferences of Tannin in Scatter-Hoarding Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Both as consumers and dispersers of seeds, scatter-hoarding rodents often play an important role in the reproductive ecology of many plant species. However, the seeds of many plant species contain tannins, which are a diverse group of water-soluble phenolic compounds that have a high affinity for proteins. The amount of tannins in seeds is expected to affect rodent foraging preferences because of their major impact on rodent physiology and survival. However, variable results have been obtained in studies that evaluated the effects of tannin on rodent foraging behavior. Hence, in this study, we aimed to explain these inconsistent results and proposed that a combination of seed traits might be important in rodent foraging behavior, because it is difficult to distinguish between the effects of individual traits on rodent foraging behavior and the interactions among them. By using a novel artificial seed system, we manipulated seed tannin and fat/protein levels to examine directly the univariate effects of each component on the seed preferences of free-ranging forest rats (Apodemus latronum and Apodemus chevrieri) during the behavioral process of scatter hoarding. Our results showed that both tannin and fat/protein had significant effects on rodent foraging behavior. Although only a few interactive effects of tannin and fat/protein were recorded, higher concentrations of both fat and protein could attenuate the exclusion of seeds with higher tannin concentrations by rodents, thus influencing seed fate. Furthermore, aside from the concentrations of tannin, fat, and protein, numerous other traits of plant seeds may also influence rodent foraging behavior. We suggest that by clarifying rodent foraging preferences, a better understanding of the evolution of plant seed traits may be obtained because of their strong potential for selective pressure. PMID:22808217

  16. Rodent and flea abundance fail to predict a plague epizootic in black-tailed prairie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkerhoff, Robert Jory; Collinge, Sharon K; Ray, Chris; Gage, Ken L

    2010-01-01

    Small rodents are purported to be enzootic hosts of Yersinia pestis and may serve as sources of infection to prairie dogs or other epizootic hosts by direct or flea-mediated transmission. Recent research has shown that small rodent species composition and small rodent flea assemblages are influenced by the presence of prairie dogs, with higher relative abundance of both small rodents and fleas at prairie dog colony sites compared to grasslands without prairie dogs. However, it is unclear if increased rodent or flea abundance predisposes prairie dogs to infection with Y. pestis. We tracked rodent and flea occurrence for 3 years at a number of prairie dog colony sites in Boulder County, Colorado, before, during, and after a local plague epizootic to see if high rodent or flea abundance was associated with plague-affected colonies when compared to colonies that escaped infection. We found no difference in preepizootic rodent abundance or flea prevalence or abundance between plague-positive and plague-negative colonies. Further, we saw no significant before-plague/after-plague change in these metrics at either plague-positive or plague-negative sites. We did, however, find that small rodent species assemblages changed in the year following prairie dog die-offs at plague-affected colonies when compared to unaffected colonies. In light of previous research from this system that has shown that landscape features and proximity to recently plagued colonies are significant predictors of plague occurrence in prairie dogs, we suggest that landscape context is more important to local plague occurrence than are characteristics of rodent or flea species assemblages.

  17. Ground-based rodent control in a remote Hawaiian rainforest on Maui

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, T.R.; Swinnerton, K.J.; Groombridge, J.J.; Sparklin, B.D.; Brosius, C.N.; Vetter, J.P.; Foster, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    Effective control of introduced mammalian predators is essential to the recovery of native bird species in Hawai'i. Between August 1996 and December 2004, introduced rodents were controlled within three home ranges of the Po'ouli Melamprosops phaeosoma, a critically endangered Hawaiian honeycreeper. Rats were controlled using a combination of ground-based rodenticide (0.005% diphacinone) application and snap traps. Beginning in August 2001, we monitored the effectiveness of these rodent control efforts. Relative abundances of Black Rats Rattus rattus and Polynesian Rats R. exulans were measured in each of five snap-trapping grids seven times over a 35-month period. Rat populations decreased inside of the rodent control areas, but control effectiveness differed between rat species. During the first year of monitoring, target control levels for R. rattus were consistently achieved in only one of the rodent control areas. Control techniques were refined in areas failing to meet targets. Subsequently, we achieved target control levels for R. rattus more consistently in all three rodent control areas. However, relative abundances of R. exulans did not differ between rodent control and reference areas, indicating that our rodent control techniques were insufficient to reduce population levels of this species. These findings signify a need for further improvement of rodent control methods in Hawai'i, especially for Polynesian Rats, and demonstrate the critical importance of periodic monitoring of the response of rodent populations to management. In the future, managers may need to design rodent control operations targeting R. rattus and R. exulans independently to achieve best results.

  18. Responses of primate caudal parabrachial nucleus and Kolliker-fuse nucleus neurons to whole body rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Carey D.; McGee, David M.; Zhou, Jianxun; Scudder, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    The caudal aspect of the parabrachial (PBN) and Kolliker-Fuse (KF) nuclei receive vestibular nuclear and visceral afferent information and are connected reciprocally with the spinal cord, hypothalamus, amygdala, and limbic cortex. Hence, they may be important sites of vestibulo-visceral integration, particularly for the development of affective responses to gravitoinertial challenges. Extracellular recordings were made from caudal PBN cells in three alert, adult female Macaca nemestrina through an implanted chamber. Sinusoidal and position trapezoid angular whole body rotation was delivered in yaw, roll, pitch, and vertical semicircular canal planes. Sites were confirmed histologically. Units that responded during rotation were located in lateral and medial PBN and KF caudal to the trochlear nerve at sites that were confirmed anatomically to receive superior vestibular nucleus afferents. Responses to whole-body angular rotation were modeled as a sum of three signals: angular velocity, a leaky integration of angular velocity, and vertical position. All neurons displayed angular velocity and integrated angular velocity sensitivity, but only 60% of the neurons were position-sensitive. These responses to vertical rotation could display symmetric, asymmetric, or fully rectified cosinusoidal spatial tuning about a best orientation in different cells. The spatial properties of velocity and integrated velocity and position responses were independent for all position-sensitive neurons; the angular velocity and integrated angular velocity signals showed independent spatial tuning in the position-insensitive neurons. Individual units showed one of three different orientations of their excitatory axis of velocity rotation sensitivity: vertical-plane-only responses, positive elevation responses (vertical plane plus ipsilateral yaw), and negative elevation axis responses (vertical plane plus negative yaw). The interactions between the velocity and integrated velocity components

  19. Melanocortin Control of Energy Balance: Evidence from Rodent Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jonghe, Bart C.; Hayes, Matthew R.; Bence, Kendra K.

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of energy balance is extremely complex, and involves multiple systems of hormones, neurotransmitters, receptors, and intracellular signals. As data have accumulated over the last two decades, the CNS melanocortin system is now identified as a prominent integrative network of energy balance controls in the mammalian brain. Here, we will review findings from rat and mouse models, which have provided an important framework in which to study melanocortin function. Perhaps most importantly, this review attempts for the first time to summarize recent advances in our understanding of the intracellular signaling pathways thought to mediate the action of melanocortin neurons and peptides in control of long term energy balance. Special attention will be paid to the roles of MC4R/MC3R, as well as downstream neurotransmitters within forebrain and hindbrain structures that illustrate the distributed control of melanocortin signaling in energy balance. In addition, distinctions and controversy between rodent species will be discussed. PMID:21553232

  20. Reclassification of 30 Pasteurellaceae strains isolated from rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, R; Bisgaard, M

    1995-07-01

    Thirty Pasteurellaceae strains isolated from gerbil, guineapig, hamster, mouse, muskrat and rat were reinvestigated and reclassified after comparison with reference strains. Strains originally described as Pasteurella pneumotropica were reclassified as [Pasteurella] pneumotropica Heyl biotype (7), [P.] pneumotropica Jawetz biotype (1), Pasteurella dagmatis (1) or Taxon 22 (2). Strains previously reported as Actinobacillus sp. were reclassified as [P.] pneumotropica biotype Jawetz (3), P. dagmatis (3) or Taxon 6 (7). Strains earlier described as Pasteurella gallinarum were renamed as SP group pasteurella (4) or Taxon 25 (2). Some of these reclassified Pasteurellaceae have not been reported previously in rodents. The present findings underline the importance of extended characterization of isolates and comparison with references strains to avoid misclassification within the family Pasteurellaceae Pohl 1981.

  1. Hepatoprotective effect of aged black garlic extract in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung Hyu; Lee, Chang Woo; Oh, Soo Jin; Yun, Jieun; Kang, Moo Rim; Han, Sang-Bae; Park, Heungsik; Jung, Jae Chul; Chung, Yoon Hoo; Kang, Jong Soon

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the hepatoprotective effects of aged black garlic (ABG) in rodent models of liver injury. ABG inhibited carbon tetrachloride-induced elevation of aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT), which are markers of hepatocellular damage, in SD rats. D-galactosamineinduced hepatocellular damage was also suppressed by ABG treatment. However, ABG does not affect the elevation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a marker of hepatobilliary damage, in rats treated with carbon tetrachloride or D-galactosamine. We also examined the effect of ABG on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced fatty liver and subsequent liver damage. ABG had no significant effect on body weight increase and plasma lipid profile in HFD-fed mice. However, HFD-induced increase in AST and ALT, but not ALP, was significantly suppressed by ABG treatment. These results demonstrate that ABG has hepatoprotective effects and suggest that ABG supplementation might be a good adjuvant therapy for the management of liver injury.

  2. Identification of rodent homologs of hepatitis C virus and pegiviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapoor, Amit; Simmonds, Peter; Scheel, Troels K H

    2013-01-01

    Flaviviridae. The genetic diversity of the rodent hepaciviruses exceeded that observed for hepaciviruses infecting either humans or non-primates, leading to new insights into the origin, evolution, and host range of hepaciviruses. The presence of genes, encoded proteins, and translation elements homologous......UNLABELLED: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human pegivirus (HPgV or GB virus C) are globally distributed and infect 2 to 5% of the human population. The lack of tractable-animal models for these viruses, in particular for HCV, has hampered the study of infection, transmission, virulence, immunity...... to those found in human hepaciviruses and pegiviruses suggests the potential for the development of new animal systems with which to model HCV pathogenesis, vaccine design, and treatment. IMPORTANCE: The genetic and biological characterization of animal homologs of human viruses provides insights...

  3. Modelling the emergence of rodent filial huddling from physiological huddling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stuart P.

    2017-11-01

    Huddling behaviour in neonatal rodents reduces the metabolic costs of physiological thermoregulation. However, animals continue to huddle into adulthood, at ambient temperatures where they are able to sustain a basal metabolism in isolation from the huddle. This `filial huddling' in older animals is known to be guided by olfactory rather than thermal cues. The present study aimed to test whether thermally rewarding contacts between young mice, experienced when thermogenesis in brown adipose fat tissue (BAT) is highest, could give rise to olfactory preferences that persist as filial huddling interactions in adults. To this end, a simple model was constructed to fit existing data on the development of mouse thermal physiology and behaviour. The form of the model that emerged yields a remarkable explanation for filial huddling; associative learning maintains huddling into adulthood via processes that reduce thermodynamic entropy from BAT metabolism and increase information about social ordering among littermates.

  4. Amorphous intergranular phases control the properties of rodent tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lyle M.; Cohen, Michael J.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Pasteris, Jill D.; Seda, Takele; Joester, Derk

    2015-02-01

    Dental enamel, a hierarchical material composed primarily of hydroxylapatite nanowires, is susceptible to degradation by plaque biofilm-derived acids. The solubility of enamel strongly depends on the presence of Mg2+, F-, and CO32-. However, determining the distribution of these minor ions is challenging. We show—using atom probe tomography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlative techniques—that in unpigmented rodent enamel, Mg2+ is predominantly present at grain boundaries as an intergranular phase of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP). In the pigmented enamel, a mixture of ferrihydrite and amorphous iron-calcium phosphate replaces the more soluble Mg-ACP, rendering it both harder and more resistant to acid attack. These results demonstrate the presence of enduring amorphous phases with a dramatic influence on the physical and chemical properties of the mature mineralized tissue.

  5. Social stress models in rodents: Towards enhanced validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolhaas, J M; de Boer, S F; Buwalda, B; Meerlo, P

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the role of the social environment in the development of stress related diseases requires a more fundamental understanding of stress. Stress includes not only the stimulus and the response but also the individual appraisal of the situation. The social environment is not only essential for survival it is at the same time an important source of stressors. This review discusses the social stress concept, how it has been studied in rodents in the course of time and some more recent insights into the appraisal process. In addition to the factors controllability and predictability, outcome expectancy and feedback of the victim's own actions during the social stress are suggested to be important factors in the development of stress related disease. It is hypothesized that individual differences in the way in which these factors are used in the appraisal of everyday life situations may explain individual vulnerability.

  6. Transmission of Guanarito and Pirital Viruses among Wild Rodents, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Mary L.; Cajimat, Maria N.B.; Duno, Gloria; Duno, Freddy; Utrera, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Samples from rodents captured on a farm in Venezuela in February 1997 were tested for arenavirus, antibody against Guanarito virus (GTOV), and antibody against Pirital virus (PIRV). Thirty-one (48.4%) of 64 short-tailed cane mice (Zygodontomys brevicauda) were infected with GTOV, 1 Alston’s cotton rat (Sigmodon alstoni) was infected with GTOV, and 36 (64.3%) of 56 other Alston’s cotton rats were infected with PIRV. The results of analyses of field and laboratory data suggested that horizontal transmission is the dominant mode of GTOV transmission in Z. brevicauda mice and that vertical transmission is an important mode of PIRV transmission in S. alstoni rats. The results also suggested that bodily secretions and excretions from most GTOV-infected short-tailed cane mice and most PIRV-infected Alston’s cotton rats may transmit the viruses to humans. PMID:22172205

  7. Behavioral effects of developmental methylmercury drinking water exposure in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisen-Hersh, Emily B; Farina, Marcelo; Barbosa, Fernando; Rocha, Joao B T; Aschner, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Early methylmercury (MeHg) exposure can have long-lasting consequences likely arising from impaired developmental processes, the outcome of which has been exposed in several longitudinal studies of affected populations. Given the large number of newborns at an increased risk of learning disabilities associated with in utero MeHg exposure, it is important to study neurobehavioral alterations using ecologically valid and physiologically relevant models. This review highlights the benefits of using the MeHg drinking water exposure paradigm and outlines behavioral outcomes arising from this procedure in rodents. Combination treatments that exacerbate or ameliorate MeHg-induced effects, and possible molecular mechanisms underlying behavioral impairment are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Rodent communities in the sub-polar Ural mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berdyugin, K. I.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of the rodent communities in the Sub-polar Urals is analysed. This part of the range, between 64° and 66°N, includes the highest peaks, is very scarcely settled and has been rarely studied. However, the area is interesting for biogeography, being a border zone separating European and Siberian lowland faunas. Comparison of results with those from expeditions undertaken in 1927 and in 1972, allows to evaluate changing trends in the local rodent communities, and to relate these trends to changes in the environmental conditions. The results help to emphasize the barrier role played by Sub-polar Urals for the species of rodents inhabiting both sides of the range, and also show the shifting of southern rodent forms northwards, or the moving upwards of other lowland species. This could be seen as an additional evidence of current climate warming trends.

    [fr]
    On analyse la répartition des communautés de rongeurs dans les Durais Subpolaires, une section de la chaîne comprise entre les 64° et les 66° de latitude N. Cette partie est très peu peuplée, elle possède les pics les plus hauts de la chaîne et a été rarement étudiée. Il s'agit d'une région intéressante, car c'est la frontière entre les plaines européennes et les plaines orientales de la Sibérie. En comparant les observations effectuées en 1927 et en 1972 avec celles des dernières années, on peut voir les tendances de changement des groupements de rongeurs de la région, et les interpréter en fonction des changements dans l'environnement. Les résultats permettent de mieux comprendre le rôle de barrière qui jouent les Durais Subpolaires pour les espèces de rongeurs situées d'un coté et d'autre de la chaîne. Aussi, ils permettent de verifier le déplacement vers le nord deformes méridionales et l'élévation en altitude d'autres, ce qui pourrait être vu comme une preuve additionnelle de la tendance au réchauffement global.
    [es]
    Se

  9. Tunable somatosensory stimulation for selective sleep restriction studies in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Dillon M; Staggs, Kendra E; Yaghouby, Farid; Agarwal, Anuj; O'Hara, Bruce F; Donohue, Kevin D; Blalock, Eric M; Sunderam, Sridhar

    2016-08-01

    Many methods for sleep restriction in rodents have emerged, but most are intrusive, lack fine control, and induce stress. Therefore, a versatile, non-intrusive means of sleep restriction that can alter sleep in a controlled manner could be of great value in sleep research. In previous work, we proposed a novel system for closed-loop somatosensory stimulation based on mechanical vibration and applied it to the task of restricting Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep in mice [1]. While this system was effective, it was a crude prototype and did not allow precise control over the amplitude and frequency of stimulation applied to the animal. This paper details the progression of this system from a binary, "all-or-none" version to one that allows dynamic control over perturbation to accomplish graded, state-dependent sleep restriction. Its preliminary use is described in two applications: deep sleep restriction in rats, and REM sleep restriction in mice.

  10. Morphological evolution, ecological diversification and climate change in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Sabrina; Michaux, Jacques; Schmidt, Daniela N; Aguilar, Jean-Pierre; Mein, Pierre; Auffray, Jean-Christophe

    2005-03-22

    Among rodents, the lineage from Progonomys hispanicus to Stephanomys documents a case of increasing size and dental specialization during an approximately 9 Myr time-interval. On the contrary, some contemporaneous generalist lineages like Apodemus show a limited morphological evolution. Dental shape can be related to diet and can be used to assess the ecological changes along the lineages. Consequently, size and shape of the first upper molar were measured in order to quantify the patterns of morphological evolution along both lineages and compare them to environmental trends. Climatic changes do not have a direct influence on evolution, but they open new ecological opportunities by changing vegetation and allow the evolution of a specialist like Stephanomys. On the other hand, environmental changes are not dramatic enough to destroy the habitat of a long-term generalist like Apodemus. Hence, our results exemplify a case of an influence of climate on the evolution of specialist species, although a generalist species may persist without change.

  11. Building for the future: essential infrastructure for rodent ageing studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Sara E; Bellantuono, Ilaria

    2016-08-01

    When planning ageing research using rodent models, the logistics of supply, long term housing and infrastructure provision are important factors to take into consideration. These issues need to be prioritised to ensure they meet the requirements of experiments which potentially will not be completed for several years. Although these issues are not unique to this discipline, the longevity of experiments and indeed the animals, requires a high level of consistency and sustainability to be maintained throughout lengthy periods of time. Moreover, the need to access aged stock or material for more immediate experiments poses many issues for the completion of pilot studies and/or short term intervention studies on older models. In this article, we highlight the increasing demand for ageing research, the resources and infrastructure involved, and the need for large-scale collaborative programmes to advance studies in both a timely and a cost-effective way.

  12. Nonhuman gamblers: lessons from rodents, primates, and robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio ePaglieri

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The search for neuronal and psychological underpinnings of pathological gambling in humans would benefit from investigating related phenomena also outside of our species. In this paper, we present a survey of studies in three widely different populations of agents, namely rodents, non-human primates, and robots. Each of these populations offer valuable and complementary insights on the topic, as the literature demonstrates. In addition, we highlight the deep and complex connections between relevant results across these different areas of research (i.e., cognitive and computational neuroscience, neuroethology, cognitive primatology, neuropsychiatry, evolutionary robotics, to make the case for a greater degree of methodological integration in future studies on pathological gambling.

  13. Fellow travellers: Working memory and mental time travel in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dere, Ekrem; Dere, Dorothea; de Souza Silva, Maria Angelica; Huston, Joseph P; Zlomuzica, Armin

    2017-03-19

    The impairment of mental time travel is a severe cognitive symptom in patients with brain lesions and a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Whether animals are also able to mentally travel in time both forward and backward is still a matter of debate. In this regard, we have proposed a continuum of mental time travel abilities across different animal species, with humans being the species with the ability to perform most sophisticated forms of mental time travel. In this review and perspective article, we delineate a novel approach to understand the evolution, characteristics and function of human and animal mental time travel. Furthermore, we propose a novel approach to measure mental time travel in rodents in a comprehensive manner using a test battery composed of well-validated and easy applicable tests. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Regional Difference in Sex Steroid Action on Formation of Morphological Sex Differences in the Anteroventral Periventricular Nucleus and Principal Nucleus of the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Moeko; Tsuda, Mumeko C.; Sagoshi, Shoko; Nagata, Kazuyo; Morimoto, Chihiro; Tha Thu, Chaw Kyi; Toda, Katsumi; Kato, Shigeaki; Ogawa, Sonoko; Tsukahara, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Sex steroid action is critical to form sexually dimorphic nuclei, although it is not fully understood. We previously reported that masculinization of the principal nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTp), which is larger and has more neurons in males than in females, involves aromatized testosterone that acts via estrogen receptor-α (ERα), but not estrogen receptor-β (ERβ). Here, we examined sex steroid action on the formation of the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) that is larger and has more neurons in females. Morphometrical analysis of transgenic mice lacking aromatase, ERα, or ERβ genes revealed that the volume and neuron number of the male AVPV were significantly increased by deletion of aromatase and ERα genes, but not the ERβ gene. We further examined the AVPV and BNSTp of androgen receptor knockout (ARKO) mice. The volume and neuron number of the male BNSTp were smaller in ARKO mice than those in wild-type mice, while no significant effect of ARKO was found on the AVPV and female BNSTp. We also examined aromatase, ERα, and AR mRNA levels in the AVPV and BNSTp of wild-type and ARKO mice on embryonic day (ED) 18 and postnatal day (PD) 4. AR mRNA in the BNSTp and AVPV of wild-type mice was not expressed on ED18 and emerged on PD4. In the AVPV, the aromatase mRNA level was higher on ED18, although the ERα mRNA level was higher on PD4 without any effect of AR gene deletion. Aromatase and ERα mRNA levels in the male BNSTp were significantly increased on PD4 by AR gene deletion. These results suggest that estradiol signaling via ERα during the perinatal period and testosterone signaling via AR during the postnatal period are required for masculinization of the BNSTp, whereas the former is sufficient to defeminize the AVPV. PMID:25398007

  15. Natural infection of wild rodents by Schistosoma mansoni parasitological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosângela Rodrigues e Silva

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of the role of rodents as natural hosts of Schistosoma mansoni was studied at the Pamparrão Valley, Sumidouro, RJ, with monthly captures and examination of the animals. Twenty-three Nectomys squamipes and 9 Akodom arviculoides with a shistosomal infection rate of 56.5% and 22.2% respectively eliminated a great majority of viable eggs. With a strain isolated from one of the naturally infected N. squamipes, we infected 75% of simpatric Biomphalaria glabrata and 100% of albino Mus musculus mice. The adult worms, isolated from N. squamipes after perfusion were located mainly in the liver (91.5% and the mesenteric veins (8.5%. The male/female proportion was 2:1. The eggs were distributed on small intestine segments (proximal, medial and distal portions and the large intestine without any significant differences in egg concentration of these segments. In A. arviculoides, the few eggs eliminated by the stools were viable and there was litlle egg retention on intestinal segments. Considering the ease to complete S. mansoni biological cycle in the Nectomys/Biomphalaria/Nectomys system under laboratory conditions, probably the same is likely to occur in natural conditions. In support to this hypotesis there are also the facts that human mansonic shistosomiasis has a very low prevalence in Sumidouro and endemicity among the rodents has not changed even after repetead treatments of the local patients. Based on our experiments, we conclude that N. squamipes has become a natural host of S. mansoni and possibly may participate in keeping the cycle of schistosomiasis transmission at Pamparrão Valley.

  16. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the lunar surface for long-duration human habitation and research. The surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust, and the living quarters in the lunar outpost are expected to be contaminated by lunar dust. Because the toxicity of lunar dust is not known, NASA has tasked its toxicology laboratory to evaluate the risk of exposure to the dust and to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in the lunar habitat. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally done first in rodents by intratracheal/intrapharyngeal instillation. This toxicity screening test is then followed by an inhalation study, which requires much more of the test dust and is labor intensive. Preliminary results obtained by examining lung lavage fluid from dust-treated mice show that lunar dust was somewhat toxic (more toxic than TiO2, but less than quartz dust). More extensive studies are in progress to further examine lung lavage fluid for biomarkers of toxicity and lung tissues for histopathological lesions in rodents exposed to aged and activated (ground) lunar dust samples. In these studies, reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) of known toxicities and have industrial exposure limits will be studied in parallel so the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. The results from the instillation studies will be useful for choosing exposure concentrations for the animal inhalation study. The animal inhalation exposure will be conducted with lunar dust simulant prior to the study with the lunar dust. The experiment with the simulate will ensure that the study techniques used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of instillation and inhalation studies will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and are essential for setting exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  17. DNA Barcoding of Sigmodontine Rodents: Identifying Wildlife Reservoirs of Zoonoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Lívia; Gonçalves, Gislene L.; Cordeiro-Estrela, Pedro; Marinho, Jorge R.; Althoff, Sérgio L.; Testoni, André. F.; González, Enrique M.; Freitas, Thales R. O.

    2013-01-01

    Species identification through DNA barcoding is a tool to be added to taxonomic procedures, once it has been validated. Applying barcoding techniques in public health would aid in the identification and correct delimitation of the distribution of rodents from the subfamily Sigmodontinae. These rodents are reservoirs of etiological agents of zoonoses including arenaviruses, hantaviruses, Chagas disease and leishmaniasis. In this study we compared distance-based and probabilistic phylogenetic inference methods to evaluate the performance of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) in sigmodontine identification. A total of 130 sequences from 21 field-trapped species (13 genera), mainly from southern Brazil, were generated and analyzed, together with 58 GenBank sequences (24 species; 10 genera). Preliminary analysis revealed a 9.5% rate of misidentifications in the field, mainly of juveniles, which were reclassified after examination of external morphological characters and chromosome numbers. Distance and model-based methods of tree reconstruction retrieved similar topologies and monophyly for most species. Kernel density estimation of the distance distribution showed a clear barcoding gap with overlapping of intraspecific and interspecific densities < 1% and 21 species with mean intraspecific distance < 2%. Five species that are reservoirs of hantaviruses could be identified through DNA barcodes. Additionally, we provide information for the description of a putative new species, as well as the first COI sequence of the recently described genus Drymoreomys. The data also indicated an expansion of the distribution of Calomys tener. We emphasize that DNA barcoding should be used in combination with other taxonomic and systematic procedures in an integrative framework and based on properly identified museum collections, to improve identification procedures, especially in epidemiological surveillance and ecological assessments. PMID:24244670

  18. Arctic Small Rodents Have Diverse Diets and Flexible Food Selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeva M Soininen

    Full Text Available The ecology of small rodent food selection is poorly understood, as mammalian herbivore food selection theory has mainly been developed by studying ungulates. Especially, the effect of food availability on food selection in natural habitats where a range of food items are available is unknown. We studied diets and selectivity of grey-sided voles (Myodes rufocanus and tundra voles (Microtus oeconomus, key herbivores in European tundra ecosystems, using DNA metabarcoding, a novel method enabling taxonomically detailed diet studies. In order to cover the range of food availabilities present in the wild, we employed a large-scale study design for sampling data on food availability and vole diets. Both vole species had ingested a range of plant species and selected particularly forbs and grasses. Grey-sided voles also selected ericoid shrubs and tundra voles willows. Availability of a food item rarely affected its utilization directly, although seasonal changes of diets and selection suggest that these are positively correlated with availability. Moreover, diets and selectivity were affected by availability of alternative food items. These results show that the focal sub-arctic voles have diverse diets and flexible food preferences and rarely compensate low availability of a food item with increased searching effort. Diet diversity itself is likely to be an important trait and has previously been underrated owing to methodological constraints. We suggest that the roles of alternative food item availability and search time limitations for small rodent feeding ecology should be investigated.Annotated Checklist of the Panarctic Flora (PAF, Vascular plants. Available at: http://nhm2.uio.no/paf/, accessed 15.6.2012.

  19. Mutation Analysis in Cultured Cells of Transgenic Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Besaratinia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To comply with guiding principles for the ethical use of animals for experimental research, the field of mutation research has witnessed a shift of interest from large-scale in vivo animal experiments to small-sized in vitro studies. Mutation assays in cultured cells of transgenic rodents constitute, in many ways, viable alternatives to in vivo mutagenicity experiments in the corresponding animals. A variety of transgenic rodent cell culture models and mutation detection systems have been developed for mutagenicity testing of carcinogens. Of these, transgenic Big Blue® (Stratagene Corp., La Jolla, CA, USA, acquired by Agilent Technologies Inc., Santa Clara, CA, USA, BioReliance/Sigma-Aldrich Corp., Darmstadt, Germany mouse embryonic fibroblasts and the λ Select cII Mutation Detection System have been used by many research groups to investigate the mutagenic effects of a wide range of chemical and/or physical carcinogens. Here, we review techniques and principles involved in preparation and culturing of Big Blue® mouse embryonic fibroblasts, treatment in vitro with chemical/physical agent(s of interest, determination of the cII mutant frequency by the λ Select cII assay and establishment of the mutation spectrum by DNA sequencing. We describe various approaches for data analysis and interpretation of the results. Furthermore, we highlight representative studies in which the Big Blue® mouse cell culture model and the λ Select cII assay have been used for mutagenicity testing of diverse carcinogens. We delineate the advantages of this approach and discuss its limitations, while underscoring auxiliary methods, where applicable.

  20. DNA barcoding of sigmodontine rodents: identifying wildlife reservoirs of zoonoses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Müller

    Full Text Available Species identification through DNA barcoding is a tool to be added to taxonomic procedures, once it has been validated. Applying barcoding techniques in public health would aid in the identification and correct delimitation of the distribution of rodents from the subfamily Sigmodontinae. These rodents are reservoirs of etiological agents of zoonoses including arenaviruses, hantaviruses, Chagas disease and leishmaniasis. In this study we compared distance-based and probabilistic phylogenetic inference methods to evaluate the performance of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI in sigmodontine identification. A total of 130 sequences from 21 field-trapped species (13 genera, mainly from southern Brazil, were generated and analyzed, together with 58 GenBank sequences (24 species; 10 genera. Preliminary analysis revealed a 9.5% rate of misidentifications in the field, mainly of juveniles, which were reclassified after examination of external morphological characters and chromosome numbers. Distance and model-based methods of tree reconstruction retrieved similar topologies and monophyly for most species. Kernel density estimation of the distance distribution showed a clear barcoding gap with overlapping of intraspecific and interspecific densities < 1% and 21 species with mean intraspecific distance < 2%. Five species that are reservoirs of hantaviruses could be identified through DNA barcodes. Additionally, we provide information for the description of a putative new species, as well as the first COI sequence of the recently described genus Drymoreomys. The data also indicated an expansion of the distribution of Calomys tener. We emphasize that DNA barcoding should be used in combination with other taxonomic and systematic procedures in an integrative framework and based on properly identified museum collections, to improve identification procedures, especially in epidemiological surveillance and ecological assessments.