WorldWideScience

Sample records for rod cladding temperatures

  1. Mechanical and temperature contact in fuel rod cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredriksson, B.E.; Rydholm, S.G.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents results for the effect of different types of slip rules on the contact stress distribution. It is shown that the contact shear stress is smaller for the hardening model than for the ideal model. It is also shown that a crack in the fuel increases the contact stresses and that at temperature decrease high tensile stresses arise after eventual welding. It is also shown how particles between fuel and cladding influence the stresses. Also here the effect of eventual welding is studied. The present method is well suited to study cracks and crack propagation. The surfaces of the existing cracks are defined as contact surfaces and the crack extension work is calculated by releasing the nodes at the crack tip. As the crack surfaces are defined as contact surfaces eventual crack closure is automatically taken into account. Crack extension work is calculated for existing cracks in the cladding. It is shown that cracks in the fuel and particles between fuel and cladding will increase the crack extension work

  2. Models for the Configuration and Integrity of Partially Oxidized Fuel Rod Cladding at High Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefken, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    Models were designed to resolve deficiencies in the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.2 calculations of the configuration and integrity of hot, partially oxidized cladding. These models are expected to improve the calculations of several important aspects of fuel rod behavior. First, an improved mapping was established from a compilation of PIE results from severe fuel damage tests of the configuration of melted metallic cladding that is retained by an oxide layer. The improved mapping accounts for the relocation of melted cladding in the circumferential direction. Then, rules based on PIE results were established for calculating the effect of cladding that has relocated from above on the oxidation and integrity of the lower intact cladding upon which it solidifies. Next, three different methods were identified for calculating the extent of dissolution of the oxidic part of the cladding due to its contact with the metallic part. The extent of dissolution effects the stress and thus the integrity of the oxidic part of the cladding. Then, an empirical equation was presented for calculating the stress in the oxidic part of the cladding and evaluating its integrity based on this calculated stress. This empirical equation replaces the current criterion for loss of integrity which is based on temperature and extent of oxidation. Finally, a new rule based on theoretical and experimental results was established for identifying the regions of a fuel rod with oxidation of both the inside and outside surfaces of the cladding. The implementation of these models is expected to eliminate the tendency of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to overpredict the extent of oxidation of the upper part of fuel rods and to underpredict the extent of oxidation of the lower part of fuel rods and the part with a high concentration of relocated material. This report is a revision and reissue of the report entitled, Improvements in Modeling of Cladding Oxidation and Meltdown

  3. Cladding temperature measurement by thermocouples at preirradiated LWR fuel rod samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiling, W.

    1981-12-01

    This report describes the technique to measure cladding temperatures of test fuel rod samples, applied during the in-pile tests on fuel rod failure in the steam loop of the FR2 reactor. NiCr/Ni thermocouples with stainless steel and Inconel sheaths, respectively,of 1 mm diameter were resistance spot weld to the outside of the fuel rod cladding. For the pre-irradiated test specimens, welding had to be done under hot-cell conditions, i.e. under remote handling. In order to prevent the formation of eutectics between zirconium and the chemical elements of the thermocouple sheath at elevated temperatures, the thermocouples were covered with a platinum jacket of 1.4 mm outside diameter swaged onto the sheath in the area of the measuring junction. This thermocouple design has worked satisfactorily in the in-pile experiments performed in a steam atmosphere. Even in the heatup phase, in which cladding temperatures up to 1050 0 C were reached, only very few failures occured. This good performance is to a great part due to a careful control and a thorough inspection of the thermocouples. (orig.) [de

  4. Out-of-pile experiments on the high-temperature behavior of Zircaloy-4 clad fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.

    1984-01-01

    Out-of-pile experiments have been performed to investigate the escalation in temperature of Zircaloy-clad fuel rods during heatup in steam due to the exothermal Zircaloy steam reaction. In these tests single Zircaloy/uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) fuel rod simulators surrounded with a Zircaloy shroud--simulating the Zircaloy of neighboring rods--were heated inside a fiber ceramic insulation. The initial heating rates were varied from 0.3 to 2.5 K/s. In every test an escalation of the temperature rise rate was observed. The maximum measured surface temperature was about 2200 0 C. The temperature decreased after the maximum had been reached without decreasing the input electric power. The temperature decreases were due to inherent processes including the runoff of molten Zircaloy. The escalation process was influenced by the temperature behavior of the shroud, which was itself affected by the insulation and steam cooling. Damage to the fuel rods increased with increasing heatup rate. Fro slow heatup rates nearly no interaction between the oxidized cladding and UO 2 was observed, while for fast heatup rates the entire annular pellet was dissolved by molten Zircaloy

  5. Clad buffer rod sensors for liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen, C.-K.; Ihara, I.

    1999-01-01

    Clad buffer rods, consisting of a core and a cladding, have been developed for ultrasonic monitoring of liquid metal processing. The cores of these rods are made of low ultrasonic-loss materials and the claddings are fabricated by thermal spray techniques. The clad geometry ensures proper ultrasonic guidance. The lengths of these rods ranges from tens of centimeters to 1m. On-line ultrasonic level measurements in liquid metals such as magnesium at 700 deg C and aluminum at 960 deg C are presented to demonstrate their operation at high temperature and their high ultrasonic performance. A spherical concave lens is machined at the rod end for improving the spatial resolution. High quality ultrasonic images have been obtained in the liquid zinc at 600 deg C. High spatial resolution is needed for the detection of inclusions in liquid metals during processing. We also show that the elastic properties such as density, longitudinal and shear wave velocities of liquid metals can be measured using a transducer which generates and receives both longitudinal and shear waves and is mounted at the end of a clad buffer rod. (author)

  6. Inspection system for Zircaloy clad fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yancey, M.E.; Porter, E.H.; Hansen, H.R.

    1975-10-01

    A description is presented of the design, development, and performance of a remote scanning system for nondestructive examination of fuel rods. Characteristics that are examined include microcracking of fuel rod cladding, fuel-cladding interaction, cladding thickness, fuel rod diameter variation, and fuel rod bowing. Microcracking of both the inner and outer fuel rod surfaces and variations in wall thickness are detected by using a pulsed eddy current technique developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Fuel rod diameter variation and fuel rod bowing are detected by using two linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs) and a signal conditioning system. The system's mechanical features include variable scanning speeds, a precision indexing system, and a servomechanism to maintain proper probe alignment. Initial results indicate that the system is a very useful mechanism for characterizing irradiated fuel rods

  7. Experimental determination of local temperature field variations due to spacer grids in the cladding tubes of a rod cluster flowed through by sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, R.; Tschoeke, H.

    1978-01-01

    If spacer grids are used to keep the fuel rods in their places - as in the fuel elements of the SNR series, exact tests are necessary to find out whether and to what extent temperature peaks near the supporting points affect cladding tube design. To clarify this special problem, experimental investigations have been carried out for the first time in a rod cluster model of the SNR-300 fuel element cross-flowed with sodium. The investigations and findings so far are reported on. (orig./RW) [de

  8. Hydraulic burst tests at elevated temperatures on Zircaloy cladding from fuel rods irradiated in the Winfrith SGHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garlick, A.; Hindmarch, P.

    1980-09-01

    Closed-end hydraulic burst tests have been carried out at 613K on lengths of cladding cut from fuel rods that had been irradiated in the SGHWR to 25 n/m 2 . The effects of reactor exposure on the mechanical properties of the Zircaloy cladding, initially in the stress-relieved and fully recrystallised conditions, have been evaluated from measurements of the 0.2% proof stress, the ultimate burst stress, the total circumferential elongation and the reduction in wall thickness at fracture. It is shown that after irradiation, the measured strength properties of stress-relieved cladding remained higher than for that in the fully recrystallised condition, although the large differences observed before irradiation were considerably reduced. The irradiation-induced increase in proof stress measured during these tests was compared with US results from uniaxial tensile tests and, after correcting for the effect of stress-ratio, it is concluded that close agreement exists between the two sets of data for Zircaloy in the fully recrystallised condition. In contrast, the agreement for stress-relieved Zircaloy is less good, although the maximum increase in proof stress after high neutron doses for this material is similar for data from the two sources. After irradiation, the ductility of fully recrystallised Zircaloy remained higher than that of stress-relieved material and there was no evidence to suggest that a serious loss of ductility had occurred for Zircaloy in either condition of heat-treatment as a result of reactor exposure. (author)

  9. Embedded cladding surface thermocouples on Zircaloy-sheathed heater rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, S.C.

    1977-06-01

    Titanium-sheathed Type K thermocouples embedded in the cladding wall of zircaloy-sheathed heater rods are described. These thermocouples constitute part of a program intended to characterize the uncertainty of measurements made by surface-mounted cladding thermocouples on nuclear fuel rods. Fabrication and installation detail, and laboratory testing of sample thermocouple installations are included

  10. Behavior of high burnup fuel rod cladding during long-term dry storage in CASTOR casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaberg, A.; Spilker, H.; Goll, W.

    2000-01-01

    Short-time creep and rupture tests were performed to assess the strain potential of cladding of high burnt rods under conditions of dry storage. The tests comprised optimized Zr y-4 cladding samples from fuel rods irradiated to burnups of up to 64 MWd/kg U and were carried out at temperatures of 573 and 643 K at cladding stresses of about 400 and 600 MPa. The stresses, much higher than those occurring in a fuel rod, were chosen to reach circumferential elongations of about 2% within an envisaged testing time of 3-4 days. The creep tests were followed by a low temperature test at 423 K and 100 MPa to assess the long-term behavior of the cladding ductility especially with regard to the effect of a higher hydrogen content in the cladding due to the high burnup. The creep tests showed considerable uniform plastic elongations at these high burnups. It was demonstrated that around 600 K a uniform plastic strain of a least 2% is reached without cladding failure. The low temperature tests at 423 K for up to 5 days revealed no cladding failure under these conditions of reduced cladding ductility. It can be concluded that the increased hydrogen content has no adverse effect on cladding performance. (Authors)

  11. The M5 Fuel Rod Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardon, J.P.; Charquet, D.; Senevat, J.

    1998-01-01

    The large-scale program for the development and irradiation of new Zr alloys started by FRAMATOME and its industrial partners CEZUS and ZIRCOTUBE more than 10 years ago is now enabling FRAGEMA to offer the ternary M5 (ZrNbO) as the cladding material for PWR advanced fuel rods. Compared with the former product (low-tin-Zircaloy-4), this alloy exhibits impressive gains under irradiation at extended burnup (55 GWd/t) relatively to corrosion (factor 3 to 4), hydriding (factor 5 to 6), growth and creep (factor 2 to 3). In this paper, we shall successively address: - the industrial development and manufacturing experience - the corrosion, hydriding, creep and growth performances obtained over a wide range of PWR normal irradiation conditions (France and other countries) up to burnups of 55 GWd/t - The interpretation of these results by means of analytical experiments conducted in test reactors (free growth, creep) and microstructural observations on the irradiated material - and the behaviour under accident (LOCA) and severe environment and irradiation (Li, boiling) conditions. (Author)

  12. Elastic plastic analysis of fuel element assemblies - hexagonal claddings and fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamoun, M.M.; Wu, T.S.; Chopra, P.S.; Rardin, D.C.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical studies have been conducted to investigate the structural, thermal, and mechanical behavior of fuel rods, claddings and fuel element assemblies of several designs for a conceptual Safety Test Facility (STF). One of the design objectives was to seek a geometrical configuration for a clad by maximizing the volume fraction of fuel and minimizing the resultant stresses set-up in the clad. The results of studies conducted on various geometrical configurations showed that the latter design objective can be achieved by selecting a clad of an hexagonal geometry. The analytical studies necessitated developing solutions for determining the stresses, strains, and displacements experienced by fuel rods and an hexagonal cladding subjected to thermal fuel-bowing loads acting on its internal surface, the external pressure of the coolant, and elevated temperatures. This paper presents some of the initially formulated analytical methods and results. It should be emphasized that the geometrical configuration considered in this paper may not necessarily be similar to that of the final design. Several variables have been taken into consideration including cladding thickness, the dimensions of the fuel rod, the temperature of the fuel and cladding, the external pressure of the cooling fluid, and the mechanical strength properties of fuel and cladding. A finite-element computer program, STRAW Code, has also been employed to generate several numerical results which have been compared with those predicted by employing the initially formulated solutions. The theoretically predicted results are in good agreement with those of the STRAW Code. (orig.)

  13. Computer analysis of elongation of the WWER fuel rod claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheglov, A.; Proselkov, V.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper description of mechanisms influencing changes of the WWER fuel cladding length and axial forces influencing fuel and cladding are presented. It is shown that shortening of the fuel claddings in case of high burnup can be explained by the change of the fuel and cladding reference state caused by reduction of the fuel rod power level - during reactor outages. It is noted that the presented calculated data are to be reviewed and interpreted as the preliminary results; further work is needed for their confirmation. (authors)

  14. Gap conductance in Zircaloy-clad LWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainscough, J.B.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes the procedures currently used to calculate fuel-cladding gap conductance in light water reactor fuel rods containing pelleted UO 2 in Zircaloy cladding, under both steady-state and transient conditions. The relevant theory is discussed together with some of the approximations usually made in performance modelling codes. The state of the physical property data which are needed for heat transfer calculations is examined and some of the relevant in- and out-of-reactor experimental work on fuel rod conductance is reviewed

  15. Cladding For Transversely-Pumped Laser Rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byer, Robert L.; Fan, Tso Yee

    1989-01-01

    Combination of suitable dimensioning and cladding of neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet of similar solid-state laser provides for more efficient utilization of transversely-incident pump light from diode lasers. New design overcomes some of limitations of longitudinal- and older transverse-pumping concepts and promotes operation at higher output powers in TEM00 mode.

  16. Method for the protection of the cladding tubes of fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, E.

    1978-01-01

    To present stress crack corrosion and to protect the cladding tubes of the fuel rods made of a circonium alloy from attack by iodine, the inward surfaces are provided with protective coatings. Therefore the casting tubes already filled with fuel element pellets are put under over-pressure at a temperature range between 300 and 500 0 C, until almost yield-point is reached. A small amount of H 2 O or H 2 O 2 , filled in, reacts with the cladding tube material to form the Zr-O 2 protective coating. Afterwards comes a pressure relief, and the cladding tube reaches its original dimensions. (DG) [de

  17. Pellet clad interaction analysis of AFA 3G fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tong; Shen Caifen; Jiao Yongjun; Lu Huaquan; Zhou Zhou

    2002-01-01

    The author described Pellet Clad Interaction (PCI) analysis of AFA 3G fuel rod during condition II transients for GNPS 18-months alternating equilibrium cycles. It provided PCI technical limit, analytical methods and computer code used in the analyses of condition II transients and thermal-mechanical. Finally, given main calculation results and the conclusion for GNPS 18-months cycles

  18. Cladding tube of fuel rod for a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Hitoshi; Fujie, Kunio; Kuwahara, Heikichi; Hirai, Tadamasa; Kakizaki, Kimio.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To form a cladding tube wall with tunnels in communication with the exterior through a number of small-diameter openings to rapidly disperse a large quantity of heat thereby providing high density of the fuel rod. Structure: Tunnels adjacent to each other are provided under the skin in contact with cooling liquid of a cladding tube, and a number of openings through which said tunnels and the periphery of the cladding tube are placed in communication are formed, said openings each having its section smaller than that of said tunnel. With this arrangement, the cooling water entered the tunnel through some of small diameter openings absorbs heat of the fuel rod to be vaporized, which is flown out into the cooling water through the other small diameter openings and formed into vapor bubbles which move up for release of heat. (Taniai, N.)

  19. Calculation of thermoelastic stresses in the rewetting region of the fuel rod cladding during a loss of coolant accident (loca)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberty, N.C.; Carmo, E.G.D. do; Tanajura, C.A.S.

    1982-01-01

    A one-dimensional model for axial distribution calculation of temperature and thermal stresses in the fuel rod cladding for a Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) is developed. The effect of the coolant inlet temperaure, the Leidenfrost and the nucleate boiling in the stress distribution are evaluated. A perturbation in the cladding stress state is obtained. (E.G.) [pt

  20. Out-pile Test of Double Cladding Fuel Rod Mockups for a Nuclear Fuel Irradiation Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Jaemin; Park, Sungjae; Kang, Younghwan; Kim, Harkrho; Kim, Bonggoo; Kim, Youngki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    An instrumented capsule for a nuclear fuel irradiation test has been developed to measure fuel characteristics, such as a fuel temperature, internal pressure of a fuel rod, a fuel pellet elongation and a neutron flux during an irradiation test at HANARO. In the future, nuclear fuel irradiation tests under a high temperature condition are expected from users. To prepare for this request, we have continued developing the technology for a high temperature nuclear fuel irradiation test at HANARO. The purpose of this paper is to verify the possibility that the temperature of a nuclear fuel can be controlled at a high temperature during an irradiation test. Therefore we designed and fabricated double cladding fuel rod mockups. And we performed out-pile tests using these mockups. The purposes of a out-pile test is to analyze an effect of a gap size, which is between an outer cladding and an inner cladding, on the temperature and the effect of a mixture ratio of helium gas and neon gas on the temperature. This paper presents the design and fabrication of double cladding fuel rod mockups and the results of the out-pile test.

  1. Secondary hydriding of defected zircaloy-clad fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, D.R.; Vaknin, S.

    1993-01-01

    The phenomenon of secondary hydriding in LWR fuel rods is critically reviewed. The current understanding of the process is summarized with emphasis on the sources of hydrogen in the rod provided by chemical reaction of water (steam) introduced via a primary defect in the cladding. As often noted in the literature, the role of hydrogen peroxide produced by steam radiolysis is to provide sources of hydrogen by cladding and fuel oxidation that are absent without fission-fragment irradiation of the gas. Quantitative description of the evolution of the chemical state inside the fuel rod is achieved by combining the chemical kinetics of the reactions between the gas and the fuel and cladding with the transport by diffusion of components of the gas in the gap. The chemistry-gas transport model provides the framework into which therate constants of the reactions between the gases in the gap and the fuel and cladding are incorporated. The output of the model calculation is the H 2 0/H 2 ratio in the gas and the degree of claddingand fuel oxidation as functions of distance from the primary defect. This output, when combined with a criterion for the onset of massive hydriding of the cladding, can provide a prediction of the time and location of a potential secondary hydriding failure. The chemistry-gas transport model is the starting point for mechanical and H-in-Zr migration analyses intended to determine the nature of the cladding failure caused by the development of the massive hydride on the inner wall

  2. The Testing of Fuel Rod Models with Zr1Nb Alloy Cladding in Water Vapor at Temperature of Hypothetical Accident Situation in WWER-1000 Type Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnorutsky, V.S.; Petel'guzov, I.A.; Gritsina, V.M.; Rodak, A.G.; Belash, N.N.; Yakovlev, V.K.

    2006-01-01

    In the article happen to results of testing the fuel rod models, their welded joints, changing the mechanical characteristics of shells of models from experimental parties of pipes from Zr1Nb alloy (Zr+1 mass%Nb) at heating of models, pervaded helium before pressures, using in earned one's living fuel rods (2,2 MPa), before the temperature 770 degree C and above occurs an overblown fuels, but at temperature 820...830 degree C shells can be broken at the expense of pressure of warming gas. Swept away reduction plasticity and embrittlement shells after the heating under temperature of 900...1200 degree C and cooling before room temperature pipes-shells from Zr1Nb alloy and from the staff alloy E110

  3. LOFT fuel rod surface temperature measurement testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, A.M.; Tolman, E.L.; Solbrig, C.W.

    1978-01-01

    Testing of the LOFT fuel rod cladding surface thermocouples has been performed to evaluate how accurately the LOFT thermocouples measure the cladding surface temperature during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) sequence and what effect, if any, the thermocouple would have on core performance. Extensive testing has been done to characterize the thermocouple design. Thermal cycling and corrosion testing of the thermocouple weld design have provided an expected lifetime of 6000 hours when exposed to reactor coolant conditions of 620 K and 15.9 MPa and to sixteen thermal cycles with an initial temperature of 480 K and peak temperatures ranging from 870 to 1200K. Departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) tests have indicated a DNB penalty (5 to 28% lower) during steady state operation and negligible effects during LOCA blowdown caused by the LOFT fuel rod surface thermocouple arrangement. Experience with the thermocouple design in Power Burst Facility (PBF) and LOFT nonnuclear blowdown testing has been quite satisfactory. Tests discussed here were conducted using both stainless steel and zircaloy-clad electrically heated rod in the LOFT Test Support Facility (LTSF) blowdown simulation loop

  4. Experimental determination of temperature fields in sodium-cooled rod bundles with hexagonal rod arrangement and grid spacers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, R.; Tschoeke, H.; Kolodziej, M.

    1977-01-01

    Three-dimensional temperature fields in the claddings of sodium cooled rods were determined experimentally under representative nominal operating conditions for a SNR typical 19-rod bundle model provided with spark-eroded spacers. These experiments are required to verify thermohydraulic computer programs which will provide the output data for strength calculations of the high loaded cladding tubes. In this work the essentials are reported of the measured circumferential distributions of wall temperatures of peripheral rods. In addition the sub-channel temperatures measured over the bundle cross section are indicated, they are required to sustain codes for the global thermohydraulic design of core elements. The most important results are: 1) The whole fuel element is located within the thermal entrance length. 2) High azimuthal temperature differences were measured in the claddings of peripheral rods, which are strongly influenced by the distance between the rod and the shroud, especially for the corner rod. 3) With decreasing Pe-number ( [de

  5. Fuel-clad heat transfer coefficient of a defected fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruet, M.; Stora, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    A special rod has been built with a stack of UO 2 pellets inside a thick zircaloy clad. The atmosphere inside the fuel rod can be changed and particularly the introduction of water is possible. The capsule was inserted in the Siloe pool reactor in a special device equipped with a neutron flux monitor. The fuel centerline temperature and the temperature at a certain radius of the clad were recorded by two thermocouples. The temperature profiles in the fuel and in the cladding have been calculated and then the heat transfer coefficient. In order to check the proper functioning of the device, two runs were successively achieved with a helium atmosphere. Then the helium atmosphere inside the fuel rod was removed and replaced by water. The heat transfer coefficients derived from the measurements at low power level are in agreement with the values given by the model based on thermal conductivity. However, for higher power levels, the heat transfer coefficients become higher than those based on the calculated gap

  6. Method and apparatus for sizing nuclear fuel rod cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, L.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear fuel rod cladding tubes are sized internally to diameters precisely fitting nuclear fuel pellets with which the tubes are charged by externally applying hydraulic pressure to short lengths of each tube. The pressure is applied while the tube is stationary. The tube is then moved to bring a new length within the hydraulic pressure zone. The volume of the hydraulic liquid used and the pressure applied to this liquid is such that the liquid is compressed slightly so that the length being sized yields, the expansion of the liquid then completing the sizing. The lengths being sized step-by-step are internally supported by either the fuel pellets or a mandrel having the same diameter as the pellets

  7. Corrosion of Zircaloy-clad fuel rods in high-temperature PWRs: Measurement of waterside corrosion in North Anna Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balfour, M.G.; Kilp, G.R.; Comstock, R.J.; McAtee, K.R.; Thornburg, D.R.

    1992-03-01

    Twenty-four peripheral rods and two interior rods from North Anna Unit 1, End-of-Cycle 7, were measured at poolside for waterside corrosion on four-cycle Region 6 assemblies F35 and F66, with rod average burnups of 60 GWD/MTU. Similar measurements were obtained on 24 two-cycle fuel rods from Region 8A assemblies H02 and H10 with average burnups of about 40 GWD/MTU. The Region 6 peripheral rods had been corrosion measured previously after three cycles, at 45 GWD/MTU average burnup. The four-cycle Region 6 fuel rods showed high corrosion, compared to only intermediate corrosion level after three cycles. The accelerated corrosion rate in the fourth cycle was accompanied by extensive laminar cracking and spalling of the oxide film in the thickest regions. The peak corrosion of the two-cycle region 8A rods was 32 μm to 53 μm, with some isolated incipient oxide spalling. In conjunction with the in-reactor corrosion measurements, extensive characterization tests plus long-term autoclave corrosion tests were performed on archive samples of the three major tubing lots represented in the North Anna measurements. The autoclave tests generally showed the same ordering of corrosion by tubing lot as in the reactor; the chief difference between the archive tubing samples was a lower tin content (1.38 percent) for the lot with the lowest corrosion rate compared with a higher tin content (1.58) for the lot with the highest corrosion rate. There was no indication in the autoclave tests of an accelerated rate of corrosion as observed in the reactor

  8. Study of pellet clad interaction defects in Dresden-3 fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasupathi, V.; Perrin, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    During Cycle-3 operation of Dresden-3, fuel rod failures occurred following a transient power increase. Ten fuel rods from five of the leaking fuel assemblies were examined at Battelle's Columbus Laboratory and General Electric-Vallecitos Nuclear Center. Examinations consisted of nondestructive and destructive methods including metallography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed the cause of fuel rod failure to be pellet clad interaction involving stress corrosion cracking. Results of SEM studies of the cladding crack surfaces and deposits on clad inner surfaces were in agreement with those reported by other investigators

  9. Modelling of pellet-cladding interaction for PWRs reactors fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The pellet-cladding interaction that can occur in a PWR fuel rod design is modelled with the computer codes FRAPCON-1 and ANSYS. The fuel performance code FRAPCON-1 analyzes the fuel rod irradiation behavior and generates the initial conditions for the localized fuel rod thermal and mechanical modelling in two and three-dimensional finite elements with ANSYS. In the mechanical modelling, a pellet fragment is placed in the fuel rod gap. Two types of fuel rod cladding materials are considered: Zircaloy and austenitic stainless steel. Linear and non-linear material behaviors are allowed. Elastic, plastic and creep behaviors are considered for the cladding materials. The modelling is applied to Angra-II fuel rod design. The results are analyzed and compared. (author)

  10. Zircaloy sheathed thermocouples for PWR fuel rod temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.V.; Wesley, R.D.; Wilkins, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    Small diameter zircaloy sheathed thermocouples have been developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Surface mounted thermocouples were developed to measure the temperature of zircaloy clad fuel rods used in the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program (TFBP), and embedded thermocouples were developed for use by the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Program for support tests using zircaloy clad electrically heated nuclear fuel rod simulators. The first objective of this developmental effort was to produce zircaloy sheathed thermocouples to replace titanium sheathed thermocouples and thereby eliminate the long-term corrosion of the titanium-to-zircaloy attachment weld. The second objective was to reduce the sheath diameter to obtain faster thermal response and minimize cladding temperature disturbance due to thermocouple attachment

  11. Influence of pellet-clad-gap-size on LWR fuel rod performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzoska, B.; Fuchs, H.P.; Garzarolli, F.; Manzel, R.

    1979-01-01

    The as-fabricated pellet-clad-gap size varies due to fabricational tolerances of the cladding inner diameter and the pellet outer diameter. The consequences of these variations on the fuel rod behaviour are analyzed using the KWU fuel rod code CARO. The code predictions are compared with experimental results of special pathfinder test fuel rods irradiated in the OBRIGHEIM nuclear power plant. These test fuel rods include gap sizer in the range of 140 μm to 270 μm, prepressurization between 13 bar to 36 bar and Helium and Argon fill gases irradiated up to a local burnup of 35 MWd/kg(U). Post irradiation examination were performed at different burnups. CARC calculations have been performed with special emphasis in cladding creep down, fission gas release and pellet clad gap closure. (orig.)

  12. The pellet-cladding contact in a fuel rod and its simulation by finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanajura, C.A.S.

    1988-01-01

    A model to analyse the mechanical behavior of a fuel rod of a PWR is presented. We drew our attention to the phenomenon of pellet-pellet and pellet-cladding contact by taking advantage of a model which assumes the hypotheses of axisymmetry, elastic behavior with infinitesimal deformations and changes of the material properties with temperature. It also includes the effects of swelling and initial relocation. The problem of contact gives rise to a variational formulation which employs Lagrangian multipliers. With this approach an iterative scheme is constructed to obtain the solution. The finite element method is applied to space discretization. The model sensibility to some parameters and its performance concerning fuel rod behavior is discussed by means of numerical simulations. (author) [pt

  13. Temperature distribution determination of JPSR power reactor fuel element and cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudarmono

    1996-01-01

    In order to utilize of fuel rod efficiency, a concept of JAERI passive Safety Reactor (JPSR) has been developed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. In the JPSR design, UO 2 . are adopted as a fuel rod. The temperature distribution in the fuel rod and cladding in the hottest channel is a potential limiting design constraint of the JPSR. In the present determination, temperature distribution of the fuel rod and cladding for JPSR were PET:formed using COBRA-IV-I to evaluate the safety margin of the present JPSR design. In this method, the whole core was represented by the 1/4 sector and divided into 50 subchannels and 40 axial nodes. The temperature become maximum at the elevation of 1.922 and 2.196 m in the typical cell under operating condition. The maximum temperature in the center of the fuel rod surface of the fuel rod and cladding were 1620,4 o C, 722,8 o C, and 348,6 o C. The maximum results of temperature in the center of the fuel rod and cladding; were 2015,28 o C and 550 o C which were observed at 3.1 second in the typical cell

  14. Parametric Evaluation of SiC/SiC Composite Cladding with UO2 Fuel for LWR Applications: Fuel Rod Interactions and Impact of Nonuniform Power Profile in Fuel Rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G.; Sweet, R.; Brown, N. R.; Wirth, B. D.; Katoh, Y.; Terrani, K.

    2018-02-01

    SiC/SiC composites are candidates for accident tolerant fuel cladding in light water reactors. In the extreme nuclear reactor environment, SiC-based fuel cladding will be exposed to neutron damage, significant heat flux, and a corrosive environment. To ensure reliable and safe operation of accident tolerant fuel cladding concepts such as SiC-based materials, it is important to assess thermo-mechanical performance under in-reactor conditions including irradiation and realistic temperature distributions. The effect of non-uniform dimensional changes caused by neutron irradiation with spatially varying temperatures, along with the closing of the fuel-cladding gap, on the stress development in the cladding over the course of irradiation were evaluated. The effect of non-uniform circumferential power profile in the fuel rod on the mechanical performance of the cladding is also evaluated. These analyses have been performed using the BISON fuel performance modeling code and the commercial finite element analysis code Abaqus. A constitutive model is constructed and solved numerically to predict the stress distribution in the cladding under normal operating conditions. The dependence of dimensions and thermophysical properties on irradiation dose and temperature has been incorporated into the models. Initial scoping results from parametric analyses provide time varying stress distributions in the cladding as well as the interaction of fuel rod with the cladding under different conditions of initial fuel rod-cladding gap and linear heat rate. It is found that a non-uniform circumferential power profile in the fuel rod may cause significant lateral bowing in the cladding, and motivates further analysis and evaluation.

  15. Method for automatic filling of nuclear fuel rod cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezold, H.

    1979-01-01

    Prior to welding the zirconium alloy cladding tubes with end caps, they are automatically filled with nuclear fuel tablets and ceramic insulating tablets. The tablets are introduced into magazine drums and led through a drying oven to a discharging station. The empty cladding tubes are removed from this discharging station and filled with tablets. A filling stamp pushes out the columns of tablets in the magazine tubes of the magazine drum into the cladding tube. Weight and measurement of length determine the filled state of the cladding tube. The cladding tubes are then led to the welding station via a conveyor belt. (DG) [de

  16. Corrosion behaviour of zircaloy 4 fuel rod cladding in EDF power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romary, H; Deydier, D [EDF, Direction de l` Equipment SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-02-01

    Since the beginning of the French nuclear program, a surveillance of fuel has been carried out in order to evaluate the fuel behaviour under irradiation. Until now, nuclear fuels provided by suppliers have met EDF requirements concerning fuel behaviour and reliability. But, the need to minimize the costs and to increase the flexibility of the power plants led EDF to the definition of new targets: optimization of the core management and fuel cycle economy. The fuel behaviour experience shows that some of these new requirements cannot be fully fulfilled by the present standard fuel due to some technological limits. Particularly, burnup enhancement is limited by the oxidation and the hydriding of the Zircaloy 4 fuel rod cladding. Also, fuel suppliers and EDF need to have a better knowledge of the Zy-4 cladding behaviour in order to define the existing margins and the limiting factors. For this reason, in-reactor fuel characterization programs have been set up by fuel suppliers and EDF for a few years. This paper presents the main results and conclusions of EDF experience on Zy-4 in-reactor corrosion behaviour. Data obtained from oxide layer or zirconia thickness measurements show that corrosion performance of Zy-4 fuel rod cladding, as irradiated until now in EDF reactors, is satisfactory but not sufficient to meet the future needs. The fuel suppliers propose in order to improve the corrosion resistance of fuel rod cladding, low tin Zy-4 cladding and then optimized Zy-4 cladding. Irradiation of these claddings are ongoing. The available corrosion data show the better in-reactor corrosion resistance of optimized Zy-4 fuel rod cladding compared to the standard Zy-4 cladding. The scheduled fuel surveillance program will confirm if the optimized Zy-4 fuel rod cladding will meet the requirements for the future high burnup and high flexibility fuel. (author). 10 refs, 19 figs, 4 tabs.

  17. Adaptation of fuel code for light water reactor with austenitic steel rod cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira; Giovedi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Light water reactors were used with steel as nuclear fuel cladding from 1960 to 1980. The high performance proved that the use of low-carbon alloys could substitute the current zirconium alloys. Stainless steel is an alternative that can be used as cladding. The zirconium alloys replaced the steel. However, significant experiences in-pile occurred, in commercial units such as Haddam Neck, Indian Point, and Yankee experiences. Stainless Steel Types 347 and 348 can be used as cladding. An advantage of using Stainless Steel was evident in Fukushima when a large number of hydrogens was produced at high temperatures. The steel cladding does not eliminate the problem of accumulating free hydrogen, which can lead to a risk of explosion. In a boiling water reactor, environments easily exist for the attack of intergranular corrosion. The Stainless Steel alloys, Types 321, 347, and 348, are stabilized against attack by the addition of titanium, niobium, or tantalum. The steel Type 348 is composed of niobium, tantalum, and cobalt. Titanium preserves type 321, and niobium additions stabilize type 347. In recent years, research has increased on studying the effects of irradiation by fast neutrons. The impact of radiation includes changes in flow rate limits, deformation, and ductility. The irradiation can convert crystalline lattices into an amorphous structure. New proposals are emerging that suggest using a silicon carbide-based fuel rod cladding or iron-chromium-aluminum alloys. These materials can substitute the classic zirconium alloys. Once the steel Type 348 was chosen, the thermal and mechanical properties were coded in a library of functions. The fuel performance codes contain all features. A comparative analysis of the steel and zirconium alloys was made. The results demonstrate that the austenitic steel alloys are the viable candidates for substituting the zirconium alloys. (author)

  18. Adaptation of fuel code for light water reactor with austenitic steel rod cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.br, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (POLI/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise, Avaliacao e Gerenciamento de Risco

    2015-07-01

    Light water reactors were used with steel as nuclear fuel cladding from 1960 to 1980. The high performance proved that the use of low-carbon alloys could substitute the current zirconium alloys. Stainless steel is an alternative that can be used as cladding. The zirconium alloys replaced the steel. However, significant experiences in-pile occurred, in commercial units such as Haddam Neck, Indian Point, and Yankee experiences. Stainless Steel Types 347 and 348 can be used as cladding. An advantage of using Stainless Steel was evident in Fukushima when a large number of hydrogens was produced at high temperatures. The steel cladding does not eliminate the problem of accumulating free hydrogen, which can lead to a risk of explosion. In a boiling water reactor, environments easily exist for the attack of intergranular corrosion. The Stainless Steel alloys, Types 321, 347, and 348, are stabilized against attack by the addition of titanium, niobium, or tantalum. The steel Type 348 is composed of niobium, tantalum, and cobalt. Titanium preserves type 321, and niobium additions stabilize type 347. In recent years, research has increased on studying the effects of irradiation by fast neutrons. The impact of radiation includes changes in flow rate limits, deformation, and ductility. The irradiation can convert crystalline lattices into an amorphous structure. New proposals are emerging that suggest using a silicon carbide-based fuel rod cladding or iron-chromium-aluminum alloys. These materials can substitute the classic zirconium alloys. Once the steel Type 348 was chosen, the thermal and mechanical properties were coded in a library of functions. The fuel performance codes contain all features. A comparative analysis of the steel and zirconium alloys was made. The results demonstrate that the austenitic steel alloys are the viable candidates for substituting the zirconium alloys. (author)

  19. Welding of stainless steel clad fuel rods for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, Mauricio David Martins das

    1986-01-01

    This work describes the obtainment of austenitic stainless steel clad fuel rods for nuclear reactors. Two aspects have been emphasized: (a) obtainment and qualification of AISI 304 and 304 L stainless steel tubes; b) the circumferential welding of pipe ends to end plugs of the same alloy followed by qualification of the welds. Tubes with special and characteristic dimensions were obtained by set mandrel drawing. Both, seamed and seamless tubes of 304 and 304 L were obtained.The dimensional accuracy, surface roughness, mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of the tubes were found to be adequate. The differences in the properties of the tubes with and without seams were found to be insignificant. The TIG process of welding was used. The influence of various welding parameters were studied: shielding gas (argon and helium), welding current, tube rotation speed, arc length, electrode position and gas flow. An inert gas welding chamber was developed and constructed with the aim of reducing surface oxidation and the heat affected zone. The welds were evaluated with the aid of destructive tests (burst-test, microhardness profile determination and metallographic analysis) and non destructive tests (visual inspection, dimensional examination, radiography and helium leak detection). As a function of the results obtained, two different welding cycles have been suggested; one for argon and another for helium. The changes in the microstructure caused by welding have been studied in greater detail. The utilization of work hardened tubes, permitted the identification by optical microscopy and microhardness measurements, of the different zones: weld zone; heat affected zone (region of grain growth, region of total and partial recrystallization) and finally, the zone not affected by heat. Some correlations between the welding parameters and metallurgical phenomena such as: solidification, recovery, recrystallization, grain growth and precipitation that occurred

  20. Reduction in degree of absorber-cladding mechanical interaction by shroud tube in control rods for the fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donomae, Takako; Katsuyama, Kozo; Tachi, Yoshiaki; Maeda, Koji; Yamamoto, Masaya; Soga, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Research and development of a long-life control rod for fast reactors is being conducted at Joyo. One of the challenges in developing a long-life control rod is the restraint of absorber-cladding mechanical interaction (ACMI). First, a helium-bonding rod was selected as a control rod for the experimental fast reactor Joyo, which is the first liquid metal fast reactor in Japan. Its lifetime was limited by ACMI, which is induced by the swelling and relocation of B 4 C pellets. To restrain ACMI, a shroud tube was inserted into the gap between the B 4 C pellets and the cladding tube. However, once B 4 C pellets cracked and broke into small fragments, relocation occurred. After this, the narrow gap closed immediately as the degree of B 4 C pellet swelling increased. To solve this problem, the gap was widened during design, and sodium was selected as the bonding material instead of helium to restrain the increase in pellet temperature. Irradiation testing of the modified sodium-bonding control rod confirmed that ACMI would be restrained by the shroud tube regardless of the occurrence of B 4 C pellet relocation. As a result of these improvements, the estimated lifetime of the control rod at Joyo was doubled. In this paper, the results of postirradiation examination are reported. (author)

  1. Investigation of typicality of non-nuclear rod and fuel-clad gap effect during reflood phase, and development of a FEM thermal transient analysis code HETFEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudoh, Takashi

    1981-06-01

    The objective of this study are: 1) Evaluate the capability of the electrical heater for simulating the fuel rod during the reflood phase, and 2) To investigate the effect of the clad-fuel gap in the fuel rod on the clad thermal response during the reflood phase. A computer code HETFEM which is the two dimensional transient thermal conductivity analysis code utilized a finite element method is developed for analysing thermal responses of heater and fuel rod. The two kinds of electrical heaters and a fuel rod are calculated with simple boundary conditions. 1) direct heater (former JAERI reflood test heater), 2) indirect heater (FLECHT test heater), 3) fuel rod (15 x 15 type in Westinghouse PWR). The comparison of the clad temperature responses shows the quench time is influenced by the thermal diffusivity and gap conductance. In the conclusion, the ELECHT heater shows atypicality in the clad temperature response and heat releasing rate. But the direct heater responses are similar to those of the fuel rod. For the gap effect on the fuel rod behavior, the lower gap conductance causes sooner quench and less heat releasing rate. This calculation is not considered the precursory cooling which is affected by heat releasing rate at near and below the quench front. Therefore two dimensional calculation with heat transfer related to the local fluid conditions will be needed. (author)

  2. Modelling of pellet cladding interaction during power ramps in PWR rods by means of Transuranus fuel rod analysis code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Marcello, V.; Luzzi, L.

    2008-01-01

    Pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) in PWR type rods subjected to power ramps was analysed by means of TRANSURANUS (TU) fuel rod performance code. PCI phenomena depend on the fuel power history - i.e. by several irradiation and thermal induced phenomena occurring in the fuel rod and mutually interacting during its life in reactor - and may become critical for cladding integrity under accidental conditions. Ten test fuel rods, whose power histories and post irradiation experiment (PIE) data were available from the OECD/NEA-IAEA International Fuel Performance Experiment (UTE) database through the Studsvik SUPER-RAMP Project, were simulated by TRANSURANUS. During a power ramp pellet gaseous swelling can be inhibited by cladding pressure and can be over-predicted by a normal operation swelling model. This phenomenon was simulated by a new formulation of a fuel swelling model already available in the code, in order to consider hot pressing of inter-granular -fuel porosity due to the high hydrostatic stress resulting from PCI: it was found that TRANSURANUS, as a result of the proposed swelling formulation as well as of the accurate modelling of the other phenomena occurring during irradiation, gives correct predictions on PCI induced fuel rod failures. In addition, PCI failure threshold identified by TRANSURANUS was compared with the technological limits known in literature: the possibility of relaxing these limits for low burn-up values and the preponderance of the European fuel rod design in front of PCI emerged from TU analyses. Finally, a good agreement was found between TU evaluations and PIE data, with regard to fission gas release, fuel grain growth, and creep, corrosion and elongation of the cladding. (authors)

  3. Axial distribution of deformation in the cladding of pressurized water reactor fuel rods in a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, K.M.; Mann, C.A.; Hindle, E.D.

    1979-01-01

    In the event of a loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor, the cladding of the fuel rods would undergo a temperature excursion while being subject to tensile hoop stress. The deformation behavior of 470-mm lengths of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding has been studied experimentally; under a range of stress levels in the high-alpha range of zirconium (600 to 850 0 C), diametral strains of up to 70% were observed over the greater part of their length. A negative-feedback mechanism is suggested, based on the reduction of secondary creep rate following cooling by enhanced heat loss at swelling areas. An approximate analysis based on this mechanism was found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. A computer modeling code is being developed to predict cladding deformation under realistic conditions

  4. Axial distribution of deformation in the cladding of pressurized water reactor fuel rods in a loss-of-coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K.M.; Mann, C.A.; Hindle, E.D.

    1979-12-01

    In the event of a loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor, the cladding of the fuel rods would undergo a temperature excursion while being subject to tensile hoop stress. The deformation behavior of 470-mm lengths of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding has been studied experimentally; under a range of stress levels in the high-alpha range of zirconium (600 to 850/sup 0/C), diametral strains of up to 70% were observed over the greater part of their length. A negative-feedback mechanism is suggested, based on the reduction of secondary creep rate following cooling by enhanced heat loss at swelling areas. An approximate analysis based on this mechanism was found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. A computer modeling code is being developed to predict cladding deformation under realistic conditions.

  5. Corrosion performance of optimised and advanced fuel rod cladding in PWRs at high burnups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jourdain, P.; Hallstadius, L.; Pati, S.R.; Smith, G.P.; Garde, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour both in-pile and out-of-pile for a number of cladding alloys developed by ABB to meet the current and future needs for fuel rod cladding with improved corrosion resistance is presented. The cladding materials include: 1) Zircaloy-4 (OPTIN) with optimised composition and processing and Zircaloy-2 optimised for Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR), (Zircaloy-2P), and 2) several alternative zirconium-based alloys with compositions outside the composition range for Zircaloys. The data presented originate from fuel rods irradiated in six PWRs to burnups up to about 66 MWd/kgU and from tests conducted in 360 o water autoclave. Also included are in-pile fuel rod growth measurements on some of the alloys. (UK)

  6. Experimental study of the deformation of Zircaloy PWR fuel rod cladding under mainly convective cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.; Mann, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 cladding specimens 450 mm long were filled with alumina pellets and tested at temperatures between 630 and 915 degree C in flowing steam at atmospheric pressure. Internal test pressures were in the range 0.69 to 11.0 MPa. The length of cladding strained 33 percent or more was greatest (about 20 times the original diameter) when the initial pressure was 1.38/plus or minus/0.17MPa. This results from oxidation strengthening of the surface layers acting as an additional mechanism for stabilizing the deformation or partial superplastic deformation, or both. For adjacent rods in a fuel assembly not to touch at any temperature, the pressure would have to be less than about 1 MPa. These results are compared with those form multirod tests elsewhere, and it is suggested that heat transfer has a dominant effect in determining deformation. The implications for the behavior of fuel elements in a loss-of-coolant accident are outlined. 37 refs

  7. Experimental study of the deformation of Zircaloy PWR fuel rod cladding under mainly convective cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindle, E.D.; Mann, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 cladding specimens 450 mm long were filled with alumina pellets and tested at temperatures between 630 and 915 degree C in flowing steam at atmospheric pressure. Internal test pressures were in the range 0.69 to 11.0 MPa. The length of cladding strained 33 percent or more was greatest (about 20 times the original diameter) when the initial pressure was 1.38/plus or minus/0.17MPa. This results from oxidation strengthening of the surface layers acting as an additional mechanism for stabilizing the deformation or partial superplastic deformation, or both. For adjacent rods in a fuel assembly not to touch at any temperature, the pressure would have to be less than about 1 MPa. These results are compared with those form multirod tests elsewhere, and it is suggested that heat transfer has a dominant effect in determining deformation. The implications for the behavior of fuel elements in a loss-of-coolant accident are outlined. 37 refs.

  8. The use of eddy current testing for nuclear fuel rods cladding evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Junior, Silverio F. da; Alencar, Donizete A.; Brito, Mucio Jose D. de

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear fuel rods cladding must be tested after their manufacture and during their operational life. This paper describes a study about the use of eddy current test method as a nondestructive tool for nuclear fuel rods cladding evaluation. The experiments were carried out using two different probes: an external probe and an internal probe. The main goal was to verify the sensitivity of the eddy current test system, to develop calibration and reference standards and to establish the main capabilities and limitations presented by this test method for this application. (author)

  9. Fuel cladding tube and fuel rod for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu; Mitani, Shinji.

    1995-01-01

    A fuel cladding tube has grooves fabricated, on the surface thereof, with a predetermined difference between crest and bottom (depth of the groove) in the circumferential direction. The cross sectional shape thereof is sinusoidal. The distribution of the grain size of iron crud particles in coolants is within a range about from 2μm to 12μm. If the surface roughness of the fuel cladding tube (depth of the groove) is determined greater than 1.6μm and less than 12.5, iron cruds in coolants can be positively deposited on the surface of the fuel cladding tube. In addition, once deposited iron cruds can be prevented from peeling from the surface of the fuel cladding tube. With such procedures, iron cruds deposited and radioactivated on the fuel cladding tube can be prevented from peeling, to prevent and reduce the increase of radiation dose on the surface of the pipelines without providing any additional device. (I.N.)

  10. Some aspects of the utilization of zicaloy and austenitic steel as cladding material for PWR reactor fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira e Silva, A.; Perrotta, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The behaviour under irradiation of fuel rods for light water reactors was simulated by using fuel performance codes. Two types of cladding were analyzed: zircaloy and austenitic stainless steel. The fuel performance codes, originally made for zircaloy cladding, were adapted for austenitic stainless steel. The simulation results for the two types of cladding are presented, compared and discussed. (F.E.) [pt

  11. PWR clad ballooning: The effect of circumferential clad temperature variations on the burst strain/burst temperature relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, P.

    1983-01-01

    By experiment, it has been shown by other workers that there is a reduction in the creep ductility of Zircaloy 4 in the α+β phase transition region. Results from single rod burst tests also show a reduction in burst strain in the α+β phase region. In this report it is shown theoretically that for single rod burst tests in the presence of circumferential temperature gradients, the temperature dependence of the mean burst strain is not determined by temperature variations in creep ductility, but is governed by the temperature sensitivity of the creep strain rate, which is shown to be a maximum in the α+β phase transition region. To demonstrate this effect, the mean clad strain at burst was calculated for creep straining at different temperature levels in the α, α+β and β phase regions. Cross-pin temperature gradients were applied which produced strain variations around the clad which were greatest in the α+β phase region. The mean strain at burst was determined using a maximum local burst strain (i.e. a creep ductility) which is independent of temperature. By assuming cross-pin temperature gradients which are typical of those observed during burst tests, then the calculated mean burst strain/burst temperature relationship gave good agreement with experiment. The calculations also show that when circumferential temperature differences are present, the calculated mean strain at burst is not sensitive to variations in the magnitude of the assumed creep ductility. This reduces the importance of the assumed burst criterion in the calculations. Hence a temperature independent creep ductility (e.g. 100% local strain) is adequate as a burst criterion for calculations under PWR LOCA conditions. (author)

  12. Temperature measurement on Zircaloy-clad fuel pins during high temperature excursions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meservey, R.H.

    1976-04-01

    The development of a sheathed thermocouple suitable for attachment to zircaloy-clad fuel rods and for use during high temperature (2,800 0 F) excursions under loss-of-coolant accident conditions is described. Development, fabrication, and testing of the thermocouples is covered in detail. In addition, the development of a process for laser welding the thermocouples to fuel rods is discussed. The thermocouples and attachment welds have been tested for resistance to corrosion and nuclear radiation and have been subjected to fast thermal cycle, risetime, and blowdown accident tests

  13. Deformation and collapse of zircaloy fuel rod cladding into plenum axial gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfennigwerth, P.L.; Gorscak, D.A.; Selsley, I.A.

    1983-01-01

    To minimize support structure, blanket and reflector fuel rods of the thoria urania-fueled Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) were designed with non-freestanding Zircaloy-4 cladding. An analytical model was developed to predict deformation of unirradiated cladding into axial gaps of fuel rod plenum regions where it is unsupported. This model uses the ACCEPT finite element computer program to calculate elastic-plastic deformation of cladding due to external pressure. The finite element is 20-node, triquadratic, isoparametric, and 3-dimensional. Its curved surface permits accurate modeling of the tube geometry, including geometric nonuniformities such as circumferential wall thickness variation and initial tube out-of-roundness. Progressive increases in axial gap length due to cladding elongation and fuel stack shrinkage are modeled, as are deformations of fuel pellets and stainless steel support sleeves which bound plenum axial gaps in LWBR type blanket fuel rods. Zircaloy-4 primary and secondary thermal creep representations were developed from uniaxial creep testing of fuel rod tubing. Creep response to multi-axial loading is modeled with a variation of Hill's formulation for anisotropic materials. Coefficients accounting for anisotropic thermal creep in Zircaloy-4 tubes were developed from creep testing of externally pressurized tubes having fixed axial gaps in the range 2.5 cm to 5.7 cm and radial clearances over simulated fuel pellets ranging from zero to 0.089 mm. (orig./RW)

  14. Correlation of waterside corrosion and cladding microstructure in high-burnup fuel and gadolinia rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.

    1989-09-01

    Waterside corrosion of the Zircaloy cladding has been examined in high-burnup fuel rods from several BWRs and PWRs, as well as in 3 wt % gadolinia burnable poison rods obtained from a BWR. The corrosion behavior of the high-burnup rods was then correlated with results from a microstructural characterization of the cladding by optical, scanning-electron, and transmission-electron microscopy (OM, SEM, and TEM). OM and SEM examination of the BWR fuel cladding showed both uniform and nodular oxide layers 2 to 45 μm in thickness after burnups of 11 to 30 MWd/kgU. For one of the BWRs, which was operated at 307 degree C rather than the normal 288 degree C, a relatively thick (50 to 70 μm) uniform oxide, rather than nodular oxides, was observed after a burnup of 27 to 30 MWd/kgU. TEM characterization revealed a number of microstructural features that occurred in association with the intermetallic precipitates in the cladding metal, apparently as a result of irradiation-induced or -enhanced processes. The BWR rods that exhibited white nodular oxides contained large precipitates (300 to 700 nm in size) that were partially amorphized during service, indicating that a distribution of the large intermetallic precipitates is conductive to nodular oxidation. 23 refs., 9 figs

  15. Experimental study of effect of initial clad temperature on reflood phenomena during PWR-LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Jun; Murao, Yoshio

    1983-01-01

    Integral system tests with the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) were performed to investigate the effect of the initial clad temperature on the reflood phenomena in a PWR-LOCA. The initial peak clad temperatures in these three tests were 871, 968 and 1,047K, respectively. The feedback of the system on the core inlet mass flow rate was estimated to be little influenced by the variation of the initial clad temperature except for the first 20s in the transient. The observed temperature rise from the reflood initiation was lower with the higher initial clad temperature. This qualitatively agreed with the results of the small scale forced feed reflood experiments. However, the magnitude of the temperature rise in CCTF was significantly low due to the high initial core inlet mass flow rate. Also observed were the multi-dimensional thermal behaviors for the three cases in the CCTF wide core. The analysis codes REFLA and TRAC reasonably predicted the effect of the initial clad temperature on the core thermo-hydraulics under the simulated core inlet flow conditions. However, the calculated temperature rise of the maximum powered rod based on the one-dimensional core analysis was higher than that of the average powered rod, which contradicts the tendency observed in CCTF tests. (author)

  16. The fuel-cladding interfacial friction coefficient in water-cooled reactor fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1979-01-01

    A central problem in the development of cladding failure criteria and of effective operational, design or material remedies is to know whether the cladding stress is enhanced significantly near cladding ridges, pellet chips or fuel pellet cracks; the latter may also be coincident with cladding ridges at pellet-pellet interfaces. As regards the fuel pellet crack source of cladding stress concentration, the magnitude of the uranium dioxide-Zircaloy interfacial friction coefficient μ governs the magnitude and distribution of the enhanced cladding stress. Considerable discussion, particularly at a Post-Conference Seminar associated with the SMIRT 4 Conference, has focussed on the value of μ, the author taking the view that it is unlikely to be large (< 0.5). The reasoning behind this view is as follows. A fuel pellet should fracture during a power ramp when the tensile hoop stress within the pellet exceeds the fuel's fracture stress. Since the preferred position for a fuel pellet crack to form is at the fuel-cladding interface midway between existing fuel cracks, where the interfacial shear stress changes sign, the pellet segment size after a power ramp provides a limit to the magnitude of the interfacial shear stresses and consequently to the value of μ. With this argument as a basis, the author's early work used the Gittus fuel rod model, in which there is a symmetric distribution of fuel pellet cracks and symmetric interfacial slippage, to show that μ < 0.5 if it is assumed that the average hoop stress within the cladding attains yield levels. It was therefore suggested that a high interfacial friction coefficient is unlikely to be operative during a power ramp; this result was used to support the view that interfacial friction effects do not play a dominant role in stress corrosion crack formation within the cladding. (orig.)

  17. Effects of Lower Drying-Storage Temperature on the Ductility of High-Burnup PWR Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Burtseva, T. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-08-30

    The purpose of this research effort is to determine the effects of canister and/or cask drying and storage on radial hydride precipitation in, and potential embrittlement of, high-burnup (HBU) pressurized water reactor (PWR) cladding alloys during cooling for a range of peak drying-storage temperatures (PCT) and hoop stresses. Extensive precipitation of radial hydrides could lower the failure hoop stresses and strains, relative to limits established for as-irradiated cladding from discharged fuel rods stored in pools, at temperatures below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT).

  18. Nuclear fuel rod with burnable plate and pellet-clad interaction fix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear fuel rod comprising a metallic tubular cladding containing nuclear fuel pellets, the pellets containing enriched uranium-235. The improvement described here comprises: ceramic wafers, each wafter comprising a sintered mixture of gadolinium oxide and uranium dioxide, the uranium oxide having no more uranium-235 than is present in natural uranium dioxide. Each of the wafers is axially disposed between a major portion of adjacent the nuclear fuel pellets, whereby the wafers freeze out volatile fission products produced by the nuclear fuel and prevent interaction of the fission products with the metallic tubing cladding

  19. Effect of annealing temperature on the mechanical properties of Zircaloy-4 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauregard, R.J.; Clevinger, G.S.; Murty, K.L.

    1977-01-01

    The mechanical properties of Zircaloy cladding materials are sensitive to those fabrication variables which have an effect on the preferred crystallographic orientation or texture of the finished tube. The effect of one such variable, the final annealing temperature, on various mechanical properties is examined using tube reduced Zircaloy-4 fuel rod cladding annealed at temperatures from 905F to 1060F. This temperature range provides cladding with varying degrees of recrystallization including full recrystallization. The burst strength of the cladding at 650F decreased with the annealing temperature reaching a saturation value at approximately 1000F. The total circumferential elongation increased with the annealing temperature reaching a maximum at approximately 1000F and decreasing at higher temperatures. Hoop creep characteristics of Zircaloy cladding were studied as a function of the annealing temperature using closed-end internal pressurization tests at 750F and hoop stresses of 10, 15, 20 and 25 ksi. The effect of annealing temperature on the room temperature mechanical anisotropy parameters, R and P, was studied. The R-parameter was essentially independent of the annealing temperature while the P-parameter increased with annealing temperature. The mechanical anisotropy parameters were also studied as a function of the test temperature from ambient to approximately 800F using continuously monitored high precision extensometry. (Auth.)

  20. Heat transfer in rod bundles with severe clad deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihle, P.

    1984-04-01

    The content of the paper is focused on heat transfer conditions during the reflood phase of a LOCA in slightly to severely deformed PWR fuel rod bundle geometries. The status of analytical and, especially, of experimental work is described as far as it is possible within this frame. Emphasis is placed on the presentation of the results of ''Flooding Experiments with Blocked Arrays'' (FEBA), a program performed at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe in the frame of the Project Nuclear Safety (PNS). (orig./WL) [de

  1. IFPE/IFA-508 and 515, PCMI Behaviour of Thin Cladding Rods, JAERI and HRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Description: To measure the integrated response of UO 2 and its cladding to conditions associated with PCI, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute carried out a series of experiments in the Halden BWR. The experiment involved two major objectives. The first was to study the influence of rod design parameters on PCI. Diametral gap, wall cladding thickness, SiO 2 additive, and pellet grain size were used as design parameters. The second objective was to study the influence of pre-irradiation (i.e. burnup) on PCI. The maximum burnup attained in the experiment was 23 MWd/kgU. These research results can be applied to current BWR-type fuel rods. The tests were performed between April 1977 and March 1981

  2. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, E.; Pardini, J.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1984-03-13

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  3. Effects of pellet-to-cladding gap design parameters on the reliability of high burnup PWR fuel rods under steady state and transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tas, Fatma Burcu; Ergun, Sule

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Fuel performance of a typical Pressurized Water Reactor rod is analyzed. • Steady state fuel rod behavior is examined to see the effects of pellet to cladding gap thickness and gap gas pressure. • Transient fuel rod behavior is examined to see the effects of pellet to cladding gap thickness and gap gas pressure. • The optimum pellet to cladding gap thickness and gap gas pressure values of the simulated fuel are determined. • The effects of pellet to cladding gap design parameters on nuclear fuel reliability are examined. - Abstract: As an important improvement in the light water nuclear reactor operations, the nuclear fuel burnup rate is increased in recent decades and this increase causes heavier duty for the nuclear fuel. Since the high burnup fuel is exposed to very high thermal and mechanical stresses and since it operates in an environment with high radiation for about 18 month cycles, it carries the risk of losing its integrity. In this study; it is aimed to determine the effects of pellet–cladding gap thickness and gap pressure on reliability of high burnup nuclear fuel in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) under steady state operation conditions and suggest optimum values for the examined parameters only and validate these suggestions for a transient condition. In the presented study, fuel performance was analyzed by examining the effects of pellet–cladding gap thickness and gap pressure on the integrity of high burnup fuels. This work is carried out for a typical Westinghouse type PWR fuel. The steady state conditions were modeled and simulated with FRAPCON-3.4a steady state fuel performance code and the FRAPTRAN-1.4 fuel transient code was used to calculate transient fuel behavior. The analysis included the changes in the important nuclear fuel design limitations such as the centerline temperature, cladding stress, strain and oxidation with the change in pellet–cladding gap thickness and initial pellet–cladding gap gas

  4. Strengthening effect of reduced graphene oxide in steel clad copper rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haitao; Liu, Xianghua; Ai, Zhengrong; Zhang, Shilong; Liu, Lizhong

    2016-11-01

    Reduced graphene oxide has been extensively used as reinforcing agent owing to their high mechanical properties. In this work, an attempt is made to synthesize steel clad copper rod reinforced with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) by the combination of powder-in-tube and intermediate annealing (IA). Experiments show that the Fe/RGO/Cu composites manifest better mechanical properties than Fe/Cu composites. In the process of groove rolling, RGO acts as effective binder, which can greatly improve the adhesive strength of copper scrap and two metals. Moreover, the strengthening effect of RGO is tightly related to its dispersion state. The RGO diffuses much more uniformly on the metallic substrate under the IA temperature of 1100 °C than 800 °C, which can be characterized by less deformation twins appearing at the interface of core copper and the formation of Fe-RGO-Cu transition belt at the bonding interface. In this case, the peak hardness, tensile strength and shear strength of Fe/RGO/Cu composites are 52 HV, 125 and 41 MPa higher than those of the Fe/Cu composites, respectively. The difference of strengthening effect and mechanisms of RGO under 800 and 1100 °C of IA are systematically discussed by referring to experimental results.

  5. Evaluation of thermocouple fin effect in cladding surface temperature measurement during film boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, Takaharu; Fujishiro, Toshio

    1984-01-01

    Thermocouple fin effect on surface temperature measurement of a fuel rod has been studied at elevated wall temperatures under film boiling condition in a reactivity initiated accident (RIA) situation. This paper presents an analytical equation to evaluate temperature drops caused by the thermocouple wires attached to cladding surface. The equation yielded the local temperature drop at measuring point depending on thermocouple diameter, cladding temperature, coolant flow condition and vapor film thickness. The temperature drops by the evaluating equation were shown in cases of free and forced convection conditions. The analytical results were compared with the measured data for various thermocouple sizes, and also with the estimated maximum cladding temperature based on the oxidation layer thickness in the cladding outer surface. It was concluded that the temperature drops at above 1,000 0 C in cladding temperature were around 120 and 150 0 C for 0.2 and 0.3 mm diameter Pt-Pt.Rh thermocouples, respectively, under a stagnant coolant condition. The fin effect increases with the decrease of vapor film thickness such as under forced flow cooling or at near the quenching point. (author)

  6. Investigating mechanical behavior and radiation resistant of fuel rods clad in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedgh Kerdar, A.

    1999-01-01

    interstitials in metal lattice under irradiation causes increased strength and hardness but decreases ductility in metals.The increase in strength and hardness depends on obstacles that prevent the motion of dislocations. The clustering of point defects are responsible for these changes. Irradiation also induces instabilities in phases due to enhancement of diffusion, solute segregation, precipitate formation, order- disorder transformation and resolution of small precipitates. From the microscopic point of view accumulation of vacancies accompanied by formation of He and H 2 gases under irradiation cause an increase in volume which results in swelling and eventually ends up with embrittlement of metals. This subject was described in chapter three Zirconium and its alloys are the best structural materials for fuel cladding of BWR and PWR reactors core. The working condition in the core of nuclear reactor are very serve, respect temperature and radiation dose. It should be realized that, if fuel cladding receive damage and get cracked, the first cooling cycle and the maine equipment will be contaminated with active materials which cause additional environmental problems. Furthermore, replacement of fuel rods are very costly. Therefore, for increasing life time of fuel cladding and minimizing damage, the effect of radiation and heat on Zirconium and its alloys must be investigated. This subject was described in chapter four.The mechanical behavior and radiation resistant of fuel cladding in PWR reactor (specifically WWER ) have been investigated which is described in chapter five. Result, discussion and final conclusion are summarized in last chapter and also several points for improvement have been offered

  7. Effects of thermocouple installation and location on fuel rod temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the results of analyses of nuclear fuel rod cladding temperature data obtained during in-reactor experiments under steady state and transient (simulated loss-of-coolant accident) operating conditions. The objective of the analyses was to determine the effect of thermocouple attachment method and location on measured thermal response. The use of external thermocouples increased the time to critical heat flux (CHF), reduced the blowdown peak temperature, and enhanced rod quench. A comparison of laser welded and resistance welded external thermocouple responses showed that the laser welding technique reduced the indicated cladding steady state temperatures and provided shorter time-to-CHF. A comparison of internal welded and embedded thermocouples indicated that the welded technique gave generally unsatisfactory cladding temperature measurements. The embedded thermocouple gave good, consistent results, but was possibly more fragile than the welded thermocouples. Detailed descriptions of the thermocouple designs, attachment methods and locations, and test conditions are provided

  8. Characteristics and properties of cladding tubes for VVER-1000 higher Uranium content fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peregud, M.; Markelov, A.; Novikov, V.; Gusev, A.; Konkov, V.; Pimenov, Y.; Agapitov, V.; Shtutsa, M.

    2009-01-01

    To improve the fuel cycle economics and to further increase the VVER fuel usability the work programme is under way to design novel improved fuel, fuel rods and fuel assemblies. Longer FA operation time that is needed to increase the fuel burnup and the related design developments of novel fuel assemblies resulted not only in changing types and sizes of Zirconium items and fuel assembly components but also altered the requirements placed on their technical characteristics. To use fuel rods having a larger charge of fuel, to improve their behaviour in LOCA, to reduce fuel rod damage ability during assembling the work was carried out to perfect the characteristics of both the cladding (reduced wall thickness and more rigid tolerances for geometry) and its material. To meet the more rigid requirements for the geometry dimensions of cladding tubes an improved process flow sheet has been designed and employed for their fabrication and also the finishing treatment of tube surfaces has been improved. The higher and stable properties of the cladding materials were managed through using the special purity in terms of Hafnium Zirconium (not higher than 100 ppm Hf) as a base of the E110 alloy and maintaining within the valid specifications for the alloy the optimized contents of Oxygen and Iron at the levels of (600 - 990) ppm and (250 - 700) ppm, respectively. The work was under way in 2004 - 2008 years; during this period the technology and materials science solutions were mastered that were phased-in introduced into the production of the cladding tubes for the fuels loaded into the of the Kalinin NPP Unit 1

  9. In-core failure of the instrumented BWR rod by locally induced high coolant temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki

    1985-12-01

    In the BWR type light water loop instrumented in HBWR, a current BWR type fuel rod pre-irradiated up to 5.6 MWd/kgU was power ramped to 50 kW/m. During the ramp, the diameter of the rod was expanded significantly at the bottom end. The behaviour was different from which caused by pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). In the post-irradiation examination, the rod was found to be failed. In this paper, the cause of the failure was studied and obtained the followings. (1) The significant expansion of the rod diameter was attributed to marked oxidation of cladding outer diameter, appeared in the direction of 0 0 -180 0 degree with a shape of nodular. (2) The cladding in the place was softened by high coolant temperature. Coolant pressure, 7MPa intruded the cladding into inside chamfer void at pellet interface. (3) At the place of the significant oxidation, an instrumented transformer was existed and the coolant flow area was very little. The reduction of the coolant flow was enhanced by the bending of the cladding which was caused in pre-irradiation stage. They are considered to be a principal cause of local closure of coolant flow and resultant high temperature in the place. (author)

  10. Specific features of the determination of the pellet-cladding gap of the fuel rods by non-destructive method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amosov, S.V.; Pavlov, S.V.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the specific features of determining the pellet-cladding gap of the irradiated WWER-1000 fuel rods by nondestructive method. The method is based on the elastic radial deformation of the cladding up to its contact with the fuel. The value of deformation of cladding till its contacting fuel when radial force changes from F max to 0 is proposed as a measuring parameter for determination of the diametrical gap. Because of the features of compression method, the obtained gap value is not analog of the gap measured on micrograph of the fuel rod cross-section. Results of metallography can provide only qualitative evaluation of its method efficiency. Comparison of the values determined by non-destructive method and metallography for WWER-1000 fuel rods with burnup from 25 to 55 MWd/kg U testified that the results of compression method can be used as a low estimate of the pellet-cladding gap value. (author)

  11. Use of a commercial heat transfer code to predict horizontally oriented spent fuel rod temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wix, S.D.; Koski, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Radioactive spent fuel assemblies are a source of hazardous waste that will have to be dealt with in the near future. It is anticipated that the spent fuel assemblies will be transported to disposal sites in spent fuel transportation casks. In order to design a reliable and safe transportation cask, the maximum cladding temperature of the spent fuel rod arrays must be calculated. The maximum rod temperature is a limiting factor in the amount of spent fuel that can be loaded in a transportation cask. The scope of this work is to demonstrate that reasonable and conservative spent fuel rod temperature predictions can be made using commercially available thermal analysis codes. The demonstration is accomplished by a comparison between numerical temperature predictions, with a commercially available thermal analysis code, and experimental temperature data for electrical rod heaters simulating a horizontally oriented spent fuel rod bundle

  12. Contribution to numerical and mechanical modelling of pellet-cladding interaction in nuclear reactor fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retel, V.

    2002-12-01

    Pressurised water reactor fuel rods (PWR) are the place of nuclear fission, resulting in unstable and radioactive elements. Today, the mechanical loading on the cladding is harder and harder and is partly due to the fuel pellet movement. Then, the mechanical behaviour of the cladding needs to be simulated with models allowing to assess realistic stress and strain fields for all the running conditions. Besides, the mechanical treatment of the fuel pellet needs to be improved. The study is part of a global way of improving the treatment of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) in the 1D finite elements EDF code named CYRANO3. Non-axisymmetrical multidirectional effects have to be accounted for in a context of unidirectional axisymmetrical finite elements. The aim of this work is double. Firstly a model simulating the effect of stress concentration on the cladding, due to the opening of the radial cracks of fuel, had been added in the code. Then, the fragmented state of fuel material has been taken into account in the thermomechanical calculation, through a model which led the strain and stress relaxation in the pellet due to the fragmentation, be simulated. This model has been implemented in the code for two types of fuel behaviour: elastic and viscoplastic. (author)

  13. Development of new zirconium alloys for PWR fuel rod claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wenjin; Zhou Bangxin; Miao Zhi; Li Cong; Jiang Hongman; Yu Xiaowei; Jiang Yourong; Huang Qiang; Gou Yuan; Huang Decheng

    2001-01-01

    An advanced zirconium alloys containing Sn, Nb, Fe and Cr have been developed. The relationships between manufacturing, microstructure and corrosion performance for the new alloys have been studied. The effects of both heat treatment and chemistry on corrosion behavior were assessed by autoclave tests in lithia water at 633 K and high-temperature steam at 773 K. Analytical electron microscopy demonstrated that the best out-of-pile corrosion performance was obtained for microstructure containing a fine and uniform distribution of β-Nb and Zr(Fe, Nb) 2 particles. Autoclave testing in LiOH solution indicated that two kinds of alloys (N18, N36) showed the lower corrosion rate than the reference Zr-4 tested, and especially, the corrosion resistance in superheated steam at 773 K was much better. Moreover, the mechanical properties were superior to Zr-4. And the hydrogen absorption data for all of alloys from corrosion reactions under various corrosion conditions showed a linear increase with the oxide thickness

  14. Effect of annealing temperature on the mechanical properties of zircaloy-4 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauregard, R.J.; Clevinger, G.S.; Murty, K.L.

    1977-01-01

    The mechanical properties of zircaloy cladding materials are sensitive to those fabrication variables which have an effect on the preferred crystallographic orientation or texture of the finished tube. The effect of one such variable, the final annealing temperature, on various mechanical properties is examined using tube reduced zircaloy-4 fuel rod cladding annealed at temperatures from 905F to 1060F. This temperature range provides cladding with varying degrees of recrystallization including full recrystallization. Hoop creep characteristics of zircaloy cladding were studied as a function of the annealing temperature using closed-end internal pressurization tests at 750F and hoop stresses of 10, 15, 20 and 25 ksi. The critical annealing temperature at which a minimum creep strain occurs decreases as the applied stress increases. An additional test at 700F and 30 ksi hoop stress was conducted to demonstrate that the critical annealing temperature is essentially independent of the test temperature. Plausible explanations based on differing substructures developed in cold-worked stress-relieved material are forwarded. The effect of annealing temperature on the room temperature mechanical anisotropy parameters, R and P, was studied. R-parameters were determined from in situ transverse strain gage measurements in uniaxial tensile tests. P-parameters were calculated from uniaxial test data (R and yield stress) and hoop yield stress determined in biaxial, closed-end internal pressurization tests

  15. Temperature escalation in PWR fuel rod simulators due to the zircaloy/steam reaction ESSI-4 ESSI-11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Kapulla, H.; Malauscheck, H.; Wallenfels, K.P.; Buescher, B.J.

    1985-03-01

    The tests had the initial heatup rate as main parameter. The experimental arrangement consisted of a fuel rod simulator (central tungsten heater, UO 2 ring pellets and zircaloy cladding), a zircaloy shroud and the fiber ceramic insulation. A steam flow of ca. 20 g/min was introduced at the lower end of the bundle. A temperature escalation was observed in every test. The maximum cladding surface temperature in the single rod tests never exceeded 2200 0 C. The escalation began in the upper region of the rods and moved down the rods, opposite to the direction of steam flow. For fast initial heatup rates, the runoff of molten zircaloy was a limiting process for the escalation. For slow heatup rates, the formation of a protective oxide layer reduced the reaction rate. The test with less insulation thickness showed a reduction of the escalation. A stronger influence was found for the gap between shroud and insulation. This is caused by convection heat losses to the steam circulating in this gap by natural convection. Removal of the gap between shroud and insulation in essentially the same experimental arrangement produced a faster escalation. The posttest appearance of the fuel rod simulators showed that, at slow heatup rates oxidation of the cladding was complete, and the fuel rod was relatively intact. Conversely, at fast heatup rates, relatively little cladding oxidation with extensive dissolution of the UO 2 pellets and runoff of molten cladding was observed. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Investigation of in-pile formed corrosion films on zircaloy fuel-rod claddings by impedance spectroscopy and galvanostatic anodization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebhardt, O.

    1993-01-01

    Hot-cell investigations have been executed to study the corrosion behaviour of irradiated Zircaloy fuel-rod claddings by impedance spectroscopy and galvanostatic anodization. The thickness of the compact oxide at the metal/oxide interface and the thickness of the minimum barrier oxide have been determined at different positions along the claddings. As shown by analysis, both quantities first increase and then decrease with increasing thickness of the total oxide. (author) 6 figs., 33 refs

  17. Flow-Induced Vibration Measurement of an Inner Cladding Tube in a Simulated Dual-Cooled Fuel Rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Hee; Kim, Hyung Kyu; Yoon, Kyung Ho; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Jae Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    To create an internal coolant flow passage in a dual cooled fuel rod, an inner cladding tube cannot have intermediate supports enough to relieve its vibration. Thus it can be suffered from a flow-induced vibration (FIV) more severely than an outer cladding tube which will be supported by series of spacer grids. It may cause a fatigue failure at welding joints on the cladding's end plug or fluid elastic instability of long, slender inner cladding due to decrease of a critical flow velocity. This is one of the challenging technical issues when a dual cooled fuel assembly is to be realized into a conventional reactor core To study an actual vibration phenomenon of a dual cooled fuel rod, FIV tests using a small-scale test bundle are being carried out. Measurement results of inner cladding tube of two typically simulated rods are presented. Causes of the differences in the vibration amplitude and response spectrum of the inner cladding tube in terms of intermediate support condition and pellet stacking are discussed.

  18. Modeling of the PWR fuel mechanical behaviour and particularly study of the pellet-cladding interaction in a fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourdequin, N.

    1995-05-01

    In Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) power plants, fuel cladding constitutes the first containment barrier against radioactive contamination. Computer codes, developed with the help of a large experimental knowledge, try to predict cladding failures which must be limited in order to maintain a maximal safety level. Until now, fuel rod design calculus with unidimensional codes were adequate to prevent cladding failures in standard PWR's operating conditions. But now, the need of nuclear power plant availability increases. That leads to more constraining operating condition in which cladding failures are strongly influenced by the fuel rod mechanical behaviour, mainly at high power level. Then, the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) becomes important, and is characterized by local effects which description expects a multidimensional modelization. This is the aim of the TOUTATIS 2D-3D code, that this thesis contributes to develop. This code allows to predict non-axisymmetric behaviour too, as rod buckling which has been observed in some irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS. By another way, PCI is influenced by under irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS which includes a densification model and a swelling model. The latter can only be used in standard operating conditions. However, the processing structure of this modulus provides the possibility to include any type of model corresponding with other operating conditions. In last, we show the result of these fuel volume variations on the cladding mechanical conditions. (author). 25 refs., 89 figs., 2 tabs., 12 photos., 5 appends

  19. Development and fabrication of seamless Aluminium finned clad tubes for metallic uranium fuel rods for research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.K.; Hussain, M.M.; Jayachandran, N.K.; Abdulla, K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Natural uranium metal or its alloy is used as fuel in nuclear reactors. Usually fuel is clad with compatible material to prevent its direct contact with coolant which prevents spread of activity. One of the methods of producing fuel for nuclear reactor is by co-drawing finished uranium rods with aluminum clad tube to develop intimate contact for effective heat removal during reactor operation. Presently seam welded Aluminium tubes are used as clad for Research Reactor fuel. The paper will highlight entire fabrication process followed for the fabrication of seamless Aluminium finned tubes along with relevant characterisation results

  20. Fracture of Zircaloy cladding by interactions with uranium dioxide pellets in LWR fuel rods. Technical report 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.; Ranjan, G.V.; Cipolla, R.C.

    1976-11-01

    Power reactor fuel rod failures can be caused by uranium dioxide fuel pellet-Zircaloy cladding interactions. The report summarizes the current position attained in a detailed theoretical study of Zircaloy cladding fracture caused by the growth of stress corrosion cracks which form near fuel pellet cracks as a consequence of a power increase after a sufficiently high burn-up. It is shown that stress corrosion crack growth in irradiated Zircaloy must be able to proceed at very low stress intensifications if uniform friction effects are operative at the fuel-cladding interface, when the interfacial friction coefficient is less than unity, when a symmetric distribution of fuel cracks exists, and when symmetric interfacial slippage occurs (i.e., ''uniform'' conditions). Otherwise, the observed fuel rod failures must be due to departures from ''uniform'' conditions, and a very high interfacial friction coefficient and particularly fuel-cladding bonding, are means of providing sufficient stess intensification at a cladding crack tip to explain the occurrence of cladding fractures. The results of the investigation focus attention on the necessity for reliable experimental data on the stress corrosion crack growth behavior of irradiated Zircaloy, and for further investigations on the correlation between local fuel-cladding bonding and stress corrosion cracking

  1. Numerical solution of the elastic non-axial contact between pellet and cladding of fuel rod in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zymak, J.

    1987-08-01

    Elastic non-axial contacts between the pellet and the cladding of a fuel rod in a pressurized water reactor were calculated. The existence and the uniqueness of the solution were proved. The problem was approximated by the finite element method and quadratic programming was used for the solution. The results will be used in the solution of the probabilistic model of a fuel rod with non-axial pellets in a PWR. (author). 10 figs., 4 tabs., 10 refs

  2. Temperature analysis of the control rods at the scram shutdown of the HTTR. Evaluation by using measurement data at scram test of HTTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, Eiji; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Nakagawa, Shigeaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Matsuda, Atsuko [Toshiba Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    In the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), since the primary coolant temperature become 950 degrees centigrade at the high temperature test operation, the special alloy Alloy800H is used for cladding tubes and spines of the control rods to endure the high temperature. The temperature limitation of control rod is 900 degrees centigrade according to the strength data of Alloy800H. The scram shutdown by loss of off-site electric power at the high temperature test operation was assumed as an transient of the temperature of the control rods cladding might exceed 900 degrees centigrade. In this report, the temperature of the control rods is analyzed by using the measurement data of the rise-to-power test. From the result of this analysis, it was confirmed that the control rod temperature does not exceed the limit even at the transient of the loss of off-site electric power from the high temperature test operation. (author)

  3. A model for predicting pellet-cladding interaction induced fuel rod failure, based on nonlinear fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernkvist, L.O.

    1993-01-01

    A model for predicting pellet-cladding mechanical interaction induced fuel rod failure, suitable for implementation in finite element fuel-performance codes, is presented. Cladding failure is predicted by explicitly modelling the propagation of radial cracks under varying load conditions. Propagation is assumed to be due to either iodine induced stress corrosion cracking or ductile fracture. Nonlinear fracture mechanics concepts are utilized in modelling these two mechanisms of crack growth. The novelty of this approach is that the development of cracks, which may ultimately lead to fuel rod failure, can be treated as a dynamic and time-dependent process. The influence of cyclic loading, ramp rates and material creep on the failure mechanism can thereby be investigated. Results of numerical calculations, in which the failure model has been used to study the dependence of cladding creep rate on crack propagation velocity, are presented. (author)

  4. Performance of HT9 clad metallic fuel at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Hayes, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    Steady-state testing of HT9 clad metallic fuel at high temperatures was initiated in EBR-II in November of 1987. At that time U-10 wt. % Zr fuel clad with the low-swelling ferritic/martensitic alloy HT9 was being considered as driver fuel options for both EBR-II and FFTF. The objective of the X447 test described here was to determine the lifetime of HT9 cladding when operated with metallic fuel at beginning of life inside wall temperatures approaching ∼660 degree C. Though stress-temperature design limits for HT9 preclude its use for high burnup applications under these conditions due to excessive thermal creep, the X447 test was carried out to obtain data on high temperature breach phenomena involving metallic fuel since little data existed in that area

  5. Ultrahigh temperature-sensitive silicon MZI with titania cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Moo eLee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a possibility of intensifying temperature sensitivity of a silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI by using a highly negative thermo-optic property of titania (TiO2. Temperature sensitivity of an asymmetric silicon MZI with a titania cladding is experimentally measured from +18pm/C to -340 pm/C depending on design parameters of MZI.

  6. Laboratory simulation of rod-to-rod mechanical interactions during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents in a PWR involving cladding oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.; Haste, T.J.; Harrison, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    Creep deformation of Zircaloy cladding in postulated PWR loss-of-coolant accidents may lead to rod-to-rod mechanical interactions. Tests have been performed in the electrically heated FOURSQUARE rig at 750 0 C and 850 0 C in steam to investigate this effect. Conservatisms inherent in a simple 'square with rounded corners' coolant channel blockage model have been quantified; about 5-10% flow area may remain even at strains which in ideal circumstances would give total blockage. Reduction of average burst strains produced by an oxide layer (up to 13 μm) has been demonstrated, resulting from strain concentration at oxide cracks. (author)

  7. Study on microstructure and high temperature wear resistance of laser cladded nuclear valve clack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunliang; Chen Zichen

    2002-01-01

    Laser cladding of Co-base alloy on the nuclear valve-sealing surface are performed with a 5 kW CO 2 transverse flowing laser. The microstructure and the high temperature impact-slide wear resistance of the laser cladded coating and the plasma cladded coating are studied. The results show that the microstructure, the dilution rate and the high temperature impact-slide wear resistance of the laser cladded coating have obvious advantages over the spurt cladding processing

  8. 3D finite element analysis of a nuclear fuel rod with gap elements between the pellet and the cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Chang-Hak; Lee, Sung-Uk; Yang, Dong-Yol; Kim, Hyo-Chan; Yang, Yong-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear fuel rods which comprises an important component of a nuclear power plant are composed of nuclear fuel and cladding. Simulating the nuclear fuel rod using a computer program is the universal method to verify its safety. The computer program used for this is called the fuel performance code. The main objective of this study is to simulate the nuclear fuel rod behavior considering the gap conductance using three-dimensional gap elements. Gap elements are used because, unlike other methods, this approach does not require special methods or other variables such as the Lagrange multiplier. In this work, a nuclear fuel rod has been simulated and the results are compared with the experimental results. (author)

  9. Design of cladding rods-assisted depressed-core few-mode fibers with improved modal spacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiawei; Zhang, Jie

    2018-03-01

    This paper investigates the design details of cladding rods-assisted (CRA) depressed-core (DC) few-mode fibers (FMFs) that feature more equally spaced linearly polarized (LP) modal effective indices, suitable for high-spatial-density weakly-coupled mode-division multiplexing systems. The influences of the index profile of cladding rods on LP mode-resolved effective index, bending sensitivity, and effective area Aeff, are numerically described. Based on the design considerations of LP modal Aeff-dependent spatial efficiency and LP modal bending loss-dependent robustness, the small LP21-LP02 and LP22-LP03 modal spacing limitations, encountered in state-of-the-art weakly-coupled step-index FMFs, have been substantially improved by at least 25%. In addition, the proposed CRA DC FMFs also show sufficiently large effective areas (in excess of 110 μm2) for all guided LP modes, which are expected to exhibit good nonlinear performance.

  10. Mechanical modelling of transient- to- failure SFR fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feria, F.; Herranz, L. E.

    2014-07-01

    The response of Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) fuel rods to transient accident conditions is an important safety concern. During transients the cladding strain caused by the stress due to pellet cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) can lead to failure. Due to the fact that SFR fuel rods are commonly clad with strengthened material made of stainless steel (SS), cladding is usually treated as an elastic-perfectly-plastic material. However, viscoplastic behaviour can contribute to mechanical strain at high temperature (> 1000 K). (Author)

  11. Measurements of local temperature distributions in rod bundles with sodium flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, R.; Tschoeke, H.; Kolodziej, M.

    1984-12-01

    In an electrically heated 19-rod bundle (P/D = 1.30, W/R = 1.40) with sodium flow the three-dimensional temperature fields in the rod clads were measured. The main characteristics of the test section are three adjacent heater rods in the duct wall zone instrumented on four measuring planes and rotatable by 360 0 under full power conditions; furthermore spacer grids which are axially movable, and a system allowing to bow one heater rod over the last third of its heated length. The results of measurements of the azimuthal temperature variations of the rotatable rods are presented for different operating conditions (80 2 ), different spacer grid positions relative to the measuring planes and different bowing positions of one rod. For better understanding of the experimental results cross sections of the 19-rod bundle were prepared. It became evident, that a well-known bundle geometry is very important for the interpretation of the experimental results. (orig.) [de

  12. Characteristics of copper-clad aluminum rods prepared by horizontal continuous casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yubo; Fu, Ying; Jie, Jinchuan; Wu, Li; Svynarenko, Kateryna; Guo, Qingtao; Li, Tingju; Wang, Tongmin

    2017-11-01

    An innovative horizontal continuous casting method was developed and successfully used to prepare copper-clad aluminum (CCA) rods with a diameter of 85 mm and a sheath thickness of 16 mm. The solidification structure and element distribution near the interface of the CCA ingots were investigated by means of a scanning electron microscope, an energy dispersive spectrometer, and an electron probe X-ray microanalyzer. The results showed that the proposed process can lead to a good metallurgical bond between Cu and Al. The interface between Cu and Al was a multilayered structure with a thickness of 200 μm, consisting of Cu9Al4, CuAl2, α-Al/CuAl2 eutectic, and α-Al + α-Al/CuAl2 eutectic layers from the Cu side to the Al side. The mean tensile-shear strength of the CCA sample was 45 MPa, which fulfills the requirements for the further extrusion process. The bonding and diffusion mechanisms are also discussed in this paper.

  13. An evaluation of the influence of fuel design parameters and burnup on pellet/cladding interaction for boiling water reactor fuel rod through in-core diameter measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, K.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of design parameters and burning on pellet/cladding interaction (PCI) of current boiling water reactor fuel rods was studied through in-core diameter measurement. Thinner cladding and a smaller diametral gap enhanced the PCI during startup. At constant power, fuel with SiO 2 added greatly reduced PCI due to relaxation. The fuel with a small grain size greatly reduced PCI due to densification. Preirradiation of rods up to 23 MWd/kgU caused a large PCI not only in a small gap but also in a large gap rod. Relaxation and permanent deformation was small. In the power increase experiment, one rod experienced PCI failure. The spurt times of coolant radioactivity coincided well with the sudden drop of cladding axial strain and marked crack opening at the rod surface. The estimated hoop stress predicted by FEMAXI-III was 350 MPa at the failure

  14. The Effect of Peak Temperatures and Hoop Stresses on Hydride Reorientations of Zirconium Alloy Cladding Tubes under Interim Dry Storage Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Hyun Jin; Jang, Ki Nam; Kim, Kyu Tae

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of peak temperatures and hoop tensile stresses on hydride reorientation in cladding was investigated. It was shown that the 250ppm-H specimens generated larger radial hydride fractions and longer radial hydrides than the 500ppm-H ones. The precipitated hydride in radial direction severely degrades mechanical properties of spent fuel rod. Hydride reorientation is related to cladding material, cladding temperature, hydrogen contents, thermal cycling, hoop stress and cooling rate. US NRC established the regulation on cladding temperature during the dry storage, which is the maximum fuel cladding temperature should not exceed 400 .deg. C for all fuel burnups under normal conditions of storage. However, if it is proved that the best estimate cladding hoop stress is equal to or less than 90MPa for the temperature limit proposed, a higher short-term temperature limit is allowed for low burnup fuel. In this study, 250ppm and 500ppm hydrogen-charged Zr-Nb alloy cladding tubes were selected to evaluate the effect of peak temperatures and hoop tensile stresses on the hydride reorientation during the dry storage. In order to evaluate threshold stresses in relation to various peak temperatures, four peak temperatures of 250, 300, 350, and 400 .deg. C and three tensile hoop stresses of 80, 100, 120MPa were selected.

  15. Calculation of hydrogen and oxygen uptake in fuel rod cladding during severe accidents using the integral diffusion method -- Preliminary design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefken, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    Preliminary designs are described for models of hydrogen and oxygen uptake in fuel rod cladding during severe accidents. Calculation of the uptake involves the modeling of seven processes: (1) diffusion of oxygen from the bulk gas into the boundary layer at the external cladding surface, (2) diffusion from the boundary layer into the oxide layer, (3) diffusion from the inner surface of the oxide layer into the metallic part of the cladding, (4) uptake of hydrogen in the event that the cladding oxide layer is dissolved in a steam-starved region, (5) embrittlement of cladding due to hydrogen uptake, (6) cracking of cladding during quenching due to its embrittlement and (7) release of hydrogen from the cladding after cracking of the cladding. An integral diffusion method is described for calculating the diffusion processes in the cladding. Experimental results are presented that show a rapid uptake of hydrogen in the event of dissolution of the oxide layer and a rapid release of hydrogen in the event of cracking of the oxide layer. These experimental results are used as a basis for calculating the rate of hydrogen uptake and the rate of hydrogen release. The uptake of hydrogen is limited to the equilibrium solubility calculated by applying Sievert's law. The uptake of hydrogen is an exothermic reaction that accelerates the heatup of a fuel rod. An embrittlement criteria is described that accounts for hydrogen and oxygen concentration and the extent of oxidation. A design is described for implementing the models for hydrogen and oxygen uptake and cladding embrittlement into the programming framework of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code. A test matrix is described for assessing the impact of the proposed models on the calculated behavior of fuel rods in severe accident conditions. This report is a revision and reissue of the report entitled; ''Preliminary Design Report for Modeling of Hydrogen Uptake in Fuel Rod Cladding During Severe Accidents.''

  16. A novel contra propagating ultrasonic flowmeter using glad buffer rods for high temperature measurement. Application to the oil and gas industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franca, Demartonne R. [Brasilia Univ., DF (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Eletrica; Cheng-Kuei Jen; Yuu Ono [National Research Council (NRC), Quebec (Canada). Industrial Materials Institute

    2005-07-01

    Ultrasonic techniques are attractive for process monitoring and control because they are non-intrusive, robust and inexpensive. Two common concerns limiting the high temperature performance of conventional ultrasonic systems for flow measurement are related to transducers and couplants. A suitable approach to overcoming this drawback is to insert a thermal isolating buffer rod with good ultrasonic performance (e.g., high signal-to-noise ratio). This requirement is important because, a priori, the noises generated in the buffer rod may bury the desired signals, so that no meaningful information is extracted. Besides protecting the ultrasonic transducers from overheating in applications such as high temperature flow measurements, buffer rods are also a solution for the couplant between the probe and tested sample, since their probing end can be directly wetted by fluids. Here, we propose clad buffer rods driven by shear transducers as the main building block of contra propagating ultrasonic flowmeters for high temperature application. It is demonstrated that the superior signal-to-noise ratio exhibit by clad buffer rods compared to the reported non-clad counterparts improve precision in transit-time measurement, leading to more accurate flow speed determination. In addition, it is shown that clad buffer rods generate specific ultrasonic signals for temperature calibration of flowmeters, allowing temperature variation while still measuring accurately the flow speed. These results are of interest for the oil and gas industries. (author)

  17. BWR stability: analysis of cladding temperature for high amplitude oscillations - 146

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, P.; Wehle, F.

    2010-01-01

    Power oscillations associated with density waves in boiling water reactors (BWRs) have been studied widely. Industrial research in this area is active since the invention of the first BWR. Stability measurements have been performed in various plants during commissioning phase but especially the magnitude and divergent nature of the oscillations during the LaSalle Unit 2 nuclear power plant event on March 9, 1988, renewed concern about the state of knowledge on BWR instabilities and possible consequences to fuel rod integrity. The objective of this paper is to present a simplified stability tool, applicable for stability analysis in the non-linear regime, which extends to high amplitude oscillations where inlet reverse flow occurs. In case of high amplitude oscillations a cyclical dryout and rewetting process at the fuel rod may take place, which leads in turn to rapid changes of the heat transfer from the fuel rod to the coolant. The application of this stability tool allows for a conservative determination of the fuel rod cladding temperature in case of high amplitude oscillations during the dryout / re-wet phase. Moreover, it reveals in good agreement to experimental findings the stabilizing effect of the reverse bundle inlet flow, which might be obtained for large oscillation amplitudes. (authors)

  18. Hydrogenation and high temperature oxidation of Zirconium claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, T.; Perez-Feró, E.; Horváth, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years a new series of experiments started for supporting the new LOCA criteria, considering the proposals of US NRC. The effects which can cause the embrittlement of VVER fuel claddings were reviewed and evaluated in the framework of the project. The purpose of the work was to determine how the fuel cladding’s hydrogen uptake under normal operating conditions, effect the behavior of the cladding under LOCA conditions. As a first step a gas system equipment with gas valves and pressure gauge was built, in which the zirconium alloy can absorb hydrogen under controlled conditions. In this apparatus E110 (produced by electrolytic method, currently used at Paks NPP) and E110G (produced by a new technology) alloys were hydrogenated to predetermined hydrogen contents. According the results of ring compression tests the E110G alloys lose their ductility above 3200 ppm hydrogen content. This limit can be applied to determine the ductile-brittle transition of the nuclear fuel claddings. After the hydrogenation, high temperature oxidation experiments were carried out on the E110G and E110 samples at 1000 °C and 1200 °C. 16 pieces of E110G and 8 samples of E110 with 300 ppm and 600 ppm hydrogen content were tested. The oxidation of the specimens was performed in steam, under isothermal conditions. Based on the ring compression tests load-displacement curves were recorded. The main objective of the compression tests was to determine the ductile-brittle transition. These results were compared to the results of our previous experiments where the samples did not contain hydrogen. The original claddings showed more ductile behavior than the samples with hydrogen content. The higher hydrogen content resulted in a more brittle mechanical behavior. However no significant difference was observed in the oxidation kinetics of the same cladding types with different hydrogen content. The experiments showed that the normal operating hydrogen uptake of the fuel claddings

  19. Post test investigation of the single rod tests ESSI 1-11 on temperature escalation in PWR fuel rod simulators due to the Zircaloy/steam reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Kapulla, H.; Malauschek, H.; Katanishi, S.

    1987-03-01

    This KfK-report describes the posttest investigation of the single rod tests ESSI-1 to ESSI-11. The objective of these tests was to investigate the temperature escalation behaviour of Zircaloy clad PWR-fuel rods in steam. The investigation of the temperature escalation is part of the program of out-of-pile experiments (CORA) performed within the frame work of the PNS Severe Fuel Damage Program. The experimental arrangement consisted of fuel rod simulator (central tungsten heater, UO 2 ring pellets and Zircaloy cladding), Zircaloy shroud and fiber ceramic insulation. The introductory test ESSI-1 to ESSI-3 were scoping tests designed to obtain information on the temperature escalation of zircaloy in steam. ESSI-4 to ESSI-8 were run with increasing heating rates to investigate the influence of the oxide layer thickness at the start of the escalation. ESSI-9 to ESSI-11 were performed to investigate the influence of the insulation thickness on the escalation behaviour. In these tests we also learned that the gap between removed shroud and insulation has a remarkable influence due to heat removal by convection in the gap. After the test the fuel rod simulator was embedded into epoxy and cut by a diamond saw. The cross sections were photographed and investigated by metalograph microscope, SEM and EMP examinations. (orig./GL) [de

  20. Long-term strength of claddings made of E110 in the temperature range of 400-570 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobylyansky, G.; Shamardin, V.; Eremin, S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the data on the initial stage of the in-sight into the mechanism of long-term strength of spent fuel rod claddings in the temperature range 400-570 0 C and also their comparison with corresponding mechanism of irradiated in the inert environment specimens and unirradiated ones. A set of test results in the temperature range 400-570 0 C of non-irradiated and irradiated in BOR-60 specimens and also of the WWER-1000 fuel element claddings irradiated up to a burnup of 29-47 MWd/kgU is approximated by Larson-Miller parametric dependence in the first approximation that allows the long-term strength data to be extrapolated and interpolated onto the unknown value regions of stress, temperature and time. The time before damage of the fuel element claddings irradiated up to ∼ 29MWd/kgU in the temperature range 540-570 0 C is higher than that of non-irradiated tubular specimens and irradiated ones up to fast neutron fluence (1-2)x10 22 cm -2 (E >0.1 MeV). With temperature decreasing to 673 K, the long-term strength of the claddings irradiated up to ∼ 47 MWd/kgU is lower than it can be expected from the extrapolation of high-temperature data obtained with the irradiated specimens. Now, the bulk of experimental data on the long-term strength of the claddings made of E110 alloy makes it possible to provide only preliminary estimation for the validation of parameters typical of the deviation from the normal operation conditions; emergencies and accidental situations; dry and wet storage and also transportation. The experiments should be continued to accumulate missing data, in particular, tests of fuel element claddings irradiated up to high burnup at temperatures ranging 300-400 0 C and stresses, which are significantly lower than the yield stress

  1. Influence of fuel pin bowing on the temperature distribution in fuel pin cladding tubes in case of sodium cooling; experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, R.; Tschoeke, H.; Kolodziej, M.

    1978-09-01

    The influence of rod bowing on the local temperature distribution was measured with turbulent sodium flow in the cladding tubes of a 19-rod bundle mock-up of the SNR 300 Mark Ia fuel element. Such measurements have been carried out for the first time. The results presented in this report are part 1 of the experimental evaluation not yet completed. The major results are: 1. When a rod on the first ring gets deformed towards a neighbour on the second ring with a gap reduction from the nominal value of 100 % down to 20 %, the maximum azimuthal temperature difference of the outer rod increases by about 60 %. 2. The maximum azimuthal temperature difference of a rod on the first ring increases by a factor of 2, if it is approached by a neighbour on the same ring. 3. The reduction in cross section of a subchannel by rod bowing results only locally in distinct temperature rises, i.e. in the adjacent cladding tubes. Rods of the next but one row are no more subject to noticeable changes in temperature [de

  2. Eutectic reaction analysis between TRU-50%Zr alloy fuel and HT-9 cladding, and temperature prediction of eutectic reaction under steady-state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Bong Sang; Park, Won Seok

    2001-02-01

    Blanket fuel assembly for HYPER contains a bundle of pins arrayed in triangular pitch, which has hexagonal bundle structure. The reference blanket fuel pin consists of the fuel slug of TRU-50wt%Zr alloy and the cladding material of ferritic martensite steel, HT-9. Chemical interaction between fuel slug and cladding is one of the major concerns in metallic fuel rod design. The contact of metallic fuel slug and stainless steel cladding in a fuel rod forms a complex multi-component diffusion couple at elevated temperatures. The potential problem of inter-diffusion of fuel and cladding components is essentially two-fold weakening of cladding mechanical strength due to the formation of diffusion zones in the cladding, and the formation of comparatively low melting point phases in the fuel/cladding interface to develop eutectic reaction. The main components of fuel slug are composed of zirconium alloying element in plutonium matrix, including neptunium, americium and uranium additionally. Therefore basic eutectic reaction change of Pu-Fe binary system can be assessed, while it is estimated how much other elements zirconium, uranium, americium and neptunium influence on plutonium phase stability. Afterwards it is needed that eutectic reaction is verified through experimental necessarily.

  3. Eutectic reaction analysis between TRU-50%Zr alloy fuel and HT-9 cladding, and temperature prediction of eutectic reaction under steady-state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Bong Sang; Park, Won Seok

    2001-02-01

    Blanket fuel assembly for HYPER contains a bundle of pins arrayed in triangular pitch, which has hexagonal bundle structure. The reference blanket fuel pin consists of the fuel slug of TRU-50wt%Zr alloy and the cladding material of ferritic martensite steel, HT-9. Chemical interaction between fuel slug and cladding is one of the major concerns in metallic fuel rod design. The contact of metallic fuel slug and stainless steel cladding in a fuel rod forms a complex multi-component diffusion couple at elevated temperatures. The potential problem of inter-diffusion of fuel and cladding components is essentially two-fold weakening of cladding mechanical strength due to the formation of diffusion zones in the cladding, and the formation of comparatively low melting point phases in the fuel/cladding interface to develop eutectic reaction. The main components of fuel slug are composed of zirconium alloying element in plutonium matrix, including neptunium, americium and uranium additionally. Therefore basic eutectic reaction change of Pu-Fe binary system can be assessed, while it is estimated how much other elements zirconium, uranium, americium and neptunium influence on plutonium phase stability. Afterwards it is needed that eutectic reaction is verified through experimental necessarily

  4. An allowable cladding peak temperature for spent nuclear fuels in interim dry storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyun-Jin; Jang, Ki-Nam; Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2018-01-01

    Allowable cladding peak temperatures for spent fuel cladding integrity in interim dry storage were investigated, considering hydride reorientation and mechanical property degradation behaviors of unirradiated and neutron irradiated Zr-Nb cladding tubes. Cladding tube specimens were heated up to various temperatures and then cooled down under tensile hoop stresses. Cool-down specimens indicate that higher heat-up temperature and larger tensile hoop stress generated larger radial hydride precipitation and smaller tensile strength and plastic hoop strain. Unirradiated specimens generated relatively larger radial hydride precipitation and plastic strain than did neutron irradiated specimens. Assuming a minimum plastic strain requirement of 5% for cladding integrity maintenance in interim dry storage, it is proposed that a cladding peak temperature during the interim dry storage is to keep below 250 °C if cladding tubes are cooled down to room temperature.

  5. Potential for cladding thermal failure in LWRs during high temperature transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Genk, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    The temperature increase in the fuel and the cladding during a PCM accident produces film boiling at the cladding surface which may induce zircaloy cladding failure, due to embrittlement, and fuel melting at the centerline of the fuel pellets. Molten fuel may extrude through radial cracks in the fuel and relocate in the fuel-cladding gap. Contact of extruded molten fuel with the cladding, which is at high temperature during film boiling, may induce cladding thermal failure due to melting. An assessment of central fuel melting and molten fuel extrusion into the fuel-cladding gap during a PCM accident is presented. The potential for thermal failure of the zircaloy cladding upon being contacted by molten fuel during such an accident is also analyzed and compared with the applicable experimental evidence

  6. Temperature measurements of the aluminium claddings of fuel elements in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daolong

    1986-01-01

    A method for embedding the sheathed thermocouples in the aluminium claddings of some fuel elements of experimental reactors by ultrasonic welding technique is described. The measurement results of the cladding temperature of fuel elements in reactors are given. By means of this method, the joint between the sheathed thermocouples and the cladding of fuel elements can be made very tight, there are no bulges on the cladding surfaces, and the sheathed thermocouples are embedded strongly and reliably. Therefore an essential means is provided for acquiring the stable and dynamic state data of the cladding temperature of in-core fuel elements

  7. Investigation of likely causes of white patch formation on irradiated WWER fuel rod claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibilashvili, Yu.K.; Velioukhanov, V.P.; Ioltoukhovski, A.Y.; Pogodin, V.P.

    1999-01-01

    The information concerning white patches observed on fuel cladding surfaces has been analytically treated. The analysis shows at least three kinds of the white patch appearance: bright white spots which appear to be loose corrosion product deposits disclosing corrosion pits upon spalling; indistinct streaks with separate pronounced spots 1-2 in dia. The spots seem to be thin superficial deposits; light-coloured dense uniform crud distributed over the surface of fuel claddings and fuel assembly jackets. (author)

  8. Reflood behavior at low initial clad temperature in Slab Core Test Facility Core-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Hajime; Sobajima, Makoto; Abe, Yutaka; Iwamura, Takamichi; Ohnuki, Akira; Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio; Okabe, Kazuharu; Adachi, Hiromichi.

    1990-07-01

    In order to study the reflood behavior with low initial clad temperature, a reflood test was performed using the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) with initial clad temperature of 573 K. The test conditions of the test are identical with those of SCTF base case test S2-SH1 (initial clad temperature 1073 K) except the initial clad temperature. Through the comparison of results from these two tests, the following conclusions were obtained. (1) The low initial clad temperature resulted in the low differential pressures through the primary loops due to smaller steam generation in the core. (2) The low initial clad temperature caused the accumulated mass in the core to be increased and the accumulated mass in the downcomer to be decreased in the period of the lower plenum injection with accumulator (before 50s). In the later period of the cold leg injection with LPCI (after 100s), the water accumulation rates in the core and the downcomer were almost the same between both tests. (3) The low initial clad temperature resulted in the increase of the core inlet mass flow rate in the lower plenum injection period. However, the core inlet mass flow rate was almost the same regardless of the initial clad temperature in the later period of the cold leg injection period. (4) The low initial clad temperature resulted in the low turnaround temperature, high temperature rise and fast bottom quench front propagation. (5) In the region apart from the quench front, low initial clad temperature resulted in the lower heat transfer. In the region near the quench front, almost the same heat transfer coefficient was observed between both tests. (6) No flow oscillation with a long period was observed in the SCTF test with low initial clad temperature of 573 K, while it was remarkable in the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) test which was performed with the same initial clad temperature. (J.P.N.)

  9. Hydride precipitation crack propagation in zircaloy cladding during a decreasing temperature history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    An assessment of safety, design, and cost tradeoff issues for short (ten to fifty years) and longer (fifty to hundreds of years) interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel in Zircaloy rods shall address potential failures of the Zircaloy cladding caused by the precipitation response of zirconium hydride platelets. To perform such assessment analyses rigorously and conservatively will be necessarily complex and difficult. For Zircaloy cladding, a model for zirconium hydride induced crack propagation velocity was developed for a decreasing temperature field and for hydrogen, temperature, and stress dependent diffusive transport of hydrogen to a generic hydride platelet at a crack tip. The development of the quasi-steady model is based on extensions of existing models for hydride precipitation kinetics for an isolated hydride platelet at a crack tip. An instability analysis model of hydride-crack growth was developed using existing concepts in a kinematic equation for crack propagation at a constant thermodynamic crack potential subject to brittle fracture conditions. At the time an instability is initiated, the crack propagation is no longer limited by hydride growth rate kinetics, but is then limited by stress rates. The model for slow hydride-crack growth will be further evaluated using existing available data. (authors)

  10. Hydride precipitation crack propagation in zircaloy cladding during a decreasing temperature history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, R.B. [California Univ., Livermore, CA (United States). Lawrence Livermore National Lab

    2001-07-01

    An assessment of safety, design, and cost tradeoff issues for short (ten to fifty years) and longer (fifty to hundreds of years) interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel in Zircaloy rods shall address potential failures of the Zircaloy cladding caused by the precipitation response of zirconium hydride platelets. To perform such assessment analyses rigorously and conservatively will be necessarily complex and difficult. For Zircaloy cladding, a model for zirconium hydride induced crack propagation velocity was developed for a decreasing temperature field and for hydrogen, temperature, and stress dependent diffusive transport of hydrogen to a generic hydride platelet at a crack tip. The development of the quasi-steady model is based on extensions of existing models for hydride precipitation kinetics for an isolated hydride platelet at a crack tip. An instability analysis model of hydride-crack growth was developed using existing concepts in a kinematic equation for crack propagation at a constant thermodynamic crack potential subject to brittle fracture conditions. At the time an instability is initiated, the crack propagation is no longer limited by hydride growth rate kinetics, but is then limited by stress rates. The model for slow hydride-crack growth will be further evaluated using existing available data. (authors)

  11. Expandable device for a nuclear fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesinski, L.T.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear fuel rod and a device for use within the rod cladding to maintain the axial position of the fuel pellets stacked one atop another within the cladding are described. The device is initially of a smaller external cross-section than the fuel rod cladding internal cross-section so as to accommodate loading into the rod at preselected locations. During power operation the device responds to a rise in temperature, so as to permanently maintain its position and restrain any axial motion of the fuel pellets

  12. Procedure and apparatus for measuring the radial gap between fuel and surrounding cladding in a fuel rod for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olshausen, K.D.

    1976-01-01

    A device is described for measuring non-destructively the annular fuel-cladding gap in an irradiated or fresh fuel rod. The principle applied is that a force is applied to an arm which presses the cladding diametrically, thus deforming it until it touches the fuel pellet. By presenting the values of the force applied and the deformation produced on an XY recorder, the width of the gap is obtained. Alternatively the gap width may be obtained digitally. Since the gap is so small that the deformation is within the elastic range, the fuel rod may be reloaded in the reactor for further irradiation. (JIW)

  13. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutter, E.; Pardini, J.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor having a core, a safety rod for downward insertion into and upward withdrawal from the core, a drive shaft for supporting and operating the safety rod, and drive means connected to the drive shaft for operating the shaft. An apparatus is described for releasably supporting the safety rod, the apparatus comprising an upper adapter adapted to be affixed to the upper end of the safety rod, the upper adapter having a retention means, a lower portion on the drive shaft and having a hollow interior for housing the upper adapter, a bimetallic means supported within the hollow interior of the lower portion and having at least one ledge which engages the retention means to support the upper adapter, the bimetallic means being a substantially cylindrical bimetallic member for receiving the upper adapter in a generally coaxial relation, the substantially cylindrical bimetallic member comprising an inner layer and an outer layer, and the inner layer having a greater coefficient of thermal expansion than the outer layer

  14. Temperature measurement in cans of fuel rods and fuel rod simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschoeke, H.; Moeller, R.

    1977-01-01

    On the sodium-cooled 19-rod cluster model for the SNR 300 the can wall temperature distributions of the non-uniformly cooled rods were measured with thermocouples mounted in outer grooves in the peripheral zone, permitting, in connection with Ni solder, a practically undisturbed measurement. For a more exact determination of the local surface temperature a calibration method, the so-called double-wall method, was developed and applied. The description of this calibration method and the experimental results achieved until now are presented. (orig./RW) [de

  15. Temperature escalation in PWR fuel rod simulator bundles due to the zircaloy/steam reaction: Test ESBU-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Malauschek, H.; Peck, S.O.; Wallenfels, K.P.

    1983-12-01

    This report describes the test conduct and results of the bundle test ESBU-1. The test objective was the investigation of temperature escalation of zircaloy clad fuel rods. The investigation of the temperature escalation is part of a program of out-of-pile experiments, performed within the framework of the PNS Several Fuel Damage Program. The bundle was composed of a 3x3 array of fuel rod simulators surrounded by a zircaloy shroud which was insulated with a ZrO 2 fiber ceramic wrap. The fuel rod simulators comprised a tungsten heater, UO 2 annular pellets, and zircaloy cladding over a 0.4 m heated length. A steam flow of 1 g/s was inlet to the bundle. The most pronounced temperature escalation was found on the central rod. The initial heatup rate of 2 0 C/s at 1100 0 C increased to approximately 6 0 C/s. The maximum temperature reached was 2250 0 C. The following fast temperature decrease was caused by runoff of molten zircaloy. Molten zircaloy swept down the thin cladding oxide layer formed during heatup. The melt dissolved the surface of the UO 2 pellets and refroze as a coherent lump in the lower part of the bundle. The remaining pellets fragmented during cooldown and formed a powdery layer on the refrozen lump. The lump was sectioned posttest at several elevations: Dissolution of UO 2 by the molten zircaloy, interaction between the melt and previously oxidized zircaloy, and oxidation of the melt had occurred. (orig.) [de

  16. Analytical functions used for description of the plastic deformation process in Zirconium alloys WWER type fuel rod cladding under designed accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedotov, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to improve the RAPTA-5 code as applied to the analysis of the thermomechanical behavior of the fuel rod cladding under designed accident conditions. The irreversible process thermodynamics methods were proposed to be used for the description of the plastic deformation process in zirconium alloys under accident conditions. Functions, which describe yielding stress dependence on plastic strain, strain rate and temperature may be successfully used in calculations. On the basis of the experiments made and the existent experimental data the dependence of yielding stress on plastic strain, strain rate, temperature and heating rate for E110 alloy was determined. In future the following research work shall be made: research of dynamic strain ageing in E635 alloy under different strain rates; research of strain rate influence on plastic strain in E635 alloy under test temperature higher than 873 K; research of deformation strengthening of E635 alloy under high temperatures; research of heating rate influence n phase transformation in E110 and E635 alloys

  17. Temperature escalation in PWR fuel rod simulator bundles due to the zircaloy/steam reaction: Post test investigations of bundle test ESBU-2A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Kapulla, H.; Malauschek, H.; Wallenfels, K.P.; Buescher, B.

    1986-11-01

    This KfK report describes the post test investigation of bundle experiment ESBU-2a. ESBU-2a was the second of two bundle tests on the temperature escalation of zircaloy clad fuel rods. The investigation of the temperature escalation is part of the program of out-of-pile experiments performed within the frame work of the PNS-Severe Fuel Damage program. The bundle was composed of a 3x3 fuel rod array of our fuel rod simulators (central tungsten heater, UO 2 -ring pellet and zircaloy cladding). The length was 0.4 meter. The bundle was heated to a maximum temperature of 2175 0 C. Molten cladding which dissolved part of the UO 2 pellets and slumped away from the already oxidized cladding formed a lump in the lower part of the bundle. After the test the bundle was embedded in epoxy and sectioned with a diamand saw, in the region of the refrozen melt. The cross sections were investigated by metallographic examination. The refrozen (U,Zr,O) melt consists variously of three phases with increasing oxygen content (metallic α-Zry, metallic (U,Zr) alloy and a (U,Zr)O 2 mixed oxide), two phases (α-Zry, (U,Zr)O 2 mixed oxide), or one phase ((U,Zr)O 2 mixed oxide). The cross sections show the increasing oxidation of the cladding with increasing elevation (temperature). A strong azimuthal dependency of the oxidation is found. In regions where the initial oxidized cladding is contacted by the melt one can recognize the interaction between the metallic melt and ZrO 2 of the cladding. Oxygen is taken away from the ZrO 2 . If the melt is in direct contact with steam a relatively well defined oxide layer is formed. (orig.) [de

  18. Development and application of an asymmetric deformation model to describe the fuel rod behaviour during LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, A.K.; Schubert, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    For calculation of clad ballooning from single rod and rod bundle experiments a model considering the influences of azimuthal temperature gradients due to the existing eccentricity of the pellets has been developed. This model is based on the secondary creep model of Norton and on the concentric deformation model ending in cladding burst as proposed by F. Erbacher. The new model considers the azimuthal temperature differences along the cladding and the resulting differences in deformations. With this model, calculations of cladding burst deformations from single rod and rod bundle experiments are performed with good agreement

  19. PHEBUS/test-218, Behaviour of a Fuel Rod Bundle during a Large Break LOCA Transient with a two Peaks Temperature History

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    1 - Description of test facility: PHEBUS test facility operated at CEA Research Center Cadarache consists of a pressurized circuit involving pumps, heat exchangers and a blowdown tank - 25 nuclear fuel rod bundle, coupled to a separate driver core; - active length 0.8 m, cosine axial power profile; - pressurized and un-pressurized fuel rods; - controlled cooling conditions at the bundle inlet (blowdown, refill and reflood period); - de-pressurized test rig volume 0.22 m 3 . The following 'as measured' boundary conditions (B.C.) were offered to participants as options with decreasing challenge to their analytical approach: Boundary conditions B.C.0: - full thermal-hydraulic analysis of PHEBUS test rig (was not recommended). Boundary conditions B.C.1: - thermal power level of fuel bundle; - fluid inlet conditions to bundle section. Boundary conditions B.C.2: - local cladding temperatures of rods; - heat transfer coefficients. Boundary conditions B.C.3: - cladding temperatures of rods; - internal pressure of rods. 2 - Description of test: Post-test investigation into the response of a nuclear fuel bundle to a large break loss of coolant accident with respect to - local fuel temperatures, - cladding strain at the time of burst, - time to burst and under given thermal-hydraulic boundary conditions of PHEBUS-test 218

  20. Use of a commercial heat transfer code to predict horizontally oriented spent fuel rod surface temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wix, S.D.; Koski, J.A.

    1993-03-01

    Radioactive spent fuel assemblies are a source of hazardous waste that will have to be dealt with in the near future. It is anticipated that the spent fuel assemblies will be transported to disposal sites in spent fuel transportation casks. In order to design a reliable and safe transportation cask, the maximum cladding temperature of the spent fuel rod arrays must be calculated. A comparison between numerical calculations using commercial thermal analysis software packages and experimental data simulating a horizontally oriented spent fuel rod array was performed. Twelve cases were analyzed using air and helium for the fill gas, with three different heat dissipation levels. The numerically predicted temperatures are higher than the experimental data for all levels of heat dissipation with air as the fill gas. The temperature differences are 4 degree C and 23 degree C for the low heat dissipation and high heat dissipation, respectively. The temperature predictions using helium as a fill gas are lower for the low and medium heat dissipation levels, but higher at the high heat dissipation. The temperature differences are 1 degree C and 6 degree C for the low and medium heat dissipation, respectively. For the high heat dissipation level, the temperature predictions are 16 degree C higher than the experimental data. Differences between the predicted and experimental temperatures can be attributed to several factors. These factors include experimental uncertainty in the temperature and heat dissipation measurements, actual convection effects not included in the model, and axial heat flow in the experimental data. This work demonstrates that horizontally oriented spent fuel rod surface temperature predictions can be made using existing commercial software packages. This work also shows that end effects will be increasingly important as the amount of dissipated heat increases

  1. Study and development of a pyrometric in-core measurement technique to follow the temperature of the fuel rod cladding; applied to the study of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) during trial simulations in the Jules Horowitz Reactor (Material Testing Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramiandrisoa, Liana

    2014-01-01

    In both research and industry, temperature is a key parameter for understanding and characterizing the behavior of materials. To study the thermomechanical behavior of a fuel rod, a test device is designed for the Jules Horowitz Material Testing Reactor (currently under construction in the CEA Cadarache). The device will be placed under accidental conditions (Loss Of Coolant Accident, LOCA) causing rapid overheating. The temperature tracking, between 700 and 1200 C, will be measured by a fiber optic sensor. The aim of the project is to optimize temperature measurement by comparing different pyrometry techniques. This study covers the management of the main difficulties inherent to the design of the sensor.The first challenge consists of predicting optical fiber behavior in such complex environments where irradiation and high temperature are combined. The fiber will be exposed to a neutron dose rate about 10 12 nfast/cm 2 /s and a dose rate of about 1 kGy/s. Moreover its extremity is heated to approximately 800 C. It is shown that under these conditions, light interferences, absorption bands and fluctuating attenuation are obstacles to overcome or to mitigate.The second challenge, concerning pyrometric measurement, comes from spectral variations expected for the rod emissivity. The material of study is chosen for its widespread use in France: Zircaloy-4. Under oxidizing conditions the spectral emissivity of this Zirconium alloy evolves. This thesis proves that between 700 and 800 C pyrometric measurement is possible from experimental point of view in laboratory without irradiation.In conclusion rod temperature tracking in JHR conditions may be possible providing that interferences are mastered and wavelengths are chosen. This work makes the use of optical pyrometry under civil nuclear extreme conditions more promising. (author) [fr

  2. Core temperature in super-Gaussian pumped air-clad photonic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we investigate the core temperature of air-clad photonic crystal fiber (PCF) lasers pumped by a super-Gaussian (SG) source of order four. The results are compared with conventional double-clad fiber (DCF) lasers pumped by the same super-Gaussian and by top-hat pump profiles.

  3. Fuel Rod Melt Progression Simulation Using Low-Temperature Melting Metal Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seung Dong Lee; Suh, Kune Y.; GoonCherl Park; Un Chul Lee

    2002-01-01

    The TMI-2 accident and various severe fuel damage experiments have shown that core damage is likely to proceed through various states before the core slumps into the lower head. Numerous experiments were conducted to address when and how the core can lose its original geometry, what geometries are formed, and in what processes the core materials are transported to the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel. Core degradation progresses along the line of clad ballooning, clad oxidation, material interaction, metallic blockage, molten pool formation, melt progression, and relocation to the lower head. Relocation into the lower plenum may occur from the lateral periphery or from the bottom of the core depending upon the thermal and physical states of the pool. Determining the quantities and rate of molten material transfer to the lower head is important since significant amounts of molten material relocated to the lower head can threaten the vessel integrity by steam explosion and thermal and mechanical attack of the melt. In this paper the focus is placed on the melt flow regime on a cylindrical fuel rod utilizing the LAMDA (Lumped Analysis of Melting in Degrading Assemblies) facility at the Seoul National University. The downward relocation of the molten material is a combination of the external film flow and the internal pipe flow. The heater rods are 0.8 m long and are coated by a low-temperature melting metal alloy. The electrical internal heating method is employed during the test. External heating is adopted to simulate the exothermic Zircaloy-steam reaction. Tests are conducted in several quasi-steady-state conditions. Given the variable boundary conditions including the heat flux and the water level, observation is made for the melting location, progression, and the mass of molten material. Finally, the core melt progression model is developed from the visual inspection and quantitative analysis of the experimental data. As the core material relocates

  4. Temperature escalation in PWR fuel rod simulators due to the zircaloy/steam reaction: Tests ESSI-1,2,3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Malauschek, H.; Wallenfels, K.P.; Peck, S.O.

    1983-08-01

    This report discusses the test conduct, results, and posttest appearance of three scoping tests (ESSI-1,2,3) investigating temperature escalation in zircaloy clad fuel rods. The experiments are part of an out-of-pile program using electrically heated fuel rod simulators to investigate PWR fuel element behavior up to temperatures of 2000 0 C. These experiments are part of the PNS Severe Fuel Damage Program. The temperature escalation is caused by the exothermal zircaloy/steam reaction, whose reaction rate increases exponentially with the temperature. The tests were performed using different initial oxide layers as a major parameter, obtained by varying the heatup rates and steam exposure times. (orig./RW) [de

  5. Allowable peak heat-up cladding temperature for spent fuel integrity during interim-dry storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Nam Jang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate allowable peak cladding temperature and hoop stress for maintenance of cladding integrity during interim-dry storage and subsequent transport, zirconium alloy cladding tubes were hydrogen-charged to generate 250 ppm and 500 ppm hydrogen contents, simulating spent nuclear fuel degradation. The hydrogen-charged specimens were heated to four peak temperatures of 250°C, 300°C, 350°C, and 400°C, and then cooled to room temperature at cooling rates of 0.3 °C/min under three tensile hoop stresses of 80 MPa, 100 MPa, and 120 MPa. The cool-down specimens showed that high peak heat-up temperature led to lower hydrogen content and that larger tensile hoop stress generated larger radial hydride fraction and consequently lower plastic elongation. Based on these out-of-pile cladding tube test results only, it may be said that peak cladding temperature should be limited to a level < 250°C, regardless of the cladding hoop stress, to ensure cladding integrity during interim-dry storage and subsequent transport.

  6. IFPE/NFIR-1, Clad creep-down, power history effect on fission product distribution (6 PWR rods 40-64 MWd/kg in BR-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Description: The NFIR-1 programme was designed to investigate factors likely to affect the fission gas release behaviour of fuel rods operating under normal commercial conditions. The factors which were investigated were: - the effect of fuel/rod design parameters, e.g., wet versus dry route pellet manufacture, fuel-clad gap size and rod pressurization; - the effect of power history i.e., In/Out fuel management strategy; - the effect of burn-up extension. This was accomplished by an extensive PIE campaign on 6 fuel rods irradiated to 40-64 MWd/kg under different prescribed conditions in the BR3 PWR. The examination involved non destructive mensuration and destructive examination using optical, SEM, TEM and EPMA techniques. The dataset is unique in demonstrating the effect of these variables on fuel performance

  7. IFPE/IFA-597.3, centre-line temperature, fission gas release and clad elongation at high burn-up (60-62 MWd/kg)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    grain boundary porosity in the central regions of the pellet. The back scattered electron image of the pellet periphery showed an area of high porosity as would be associated with re-structuring caused by formation of the Hobs. The depth of this region was typically 200 microns with traces of Hobs at greater depths. After transfer to Kjeller hot laboratories in Norway, three segments were cut from rod D5 33-25065. All were from regions of uniform burn-up as measured by axial gamma scanning. The sections were identified as D5:1, rod 7, D5:2, rod 8 and D5:3, rod 9. Whilst drilling rod 7 to insert a thermocouple, the drill broke and thermocouple insertion was abandoned. The rod was finally sealed with a clad elongation detector (EC). Rods 8 and 9 were successfully drilled and thermocouples inserted. They were then sealed with pressure transducers (PF). Rods 8 and 9 were loaded into positions 2 and 5 in IFA-597.2 (second loading) and irradiated in Halden for some 20 days in July 1995. After a small number of power ramps, rod 9 failed and the assembly withdrawn. During this time, useful data were generated on centreline temperature as a function of power. Rod 9 was removed and replaced by rod 7. The assembly was returned to the reactor as IFA-597.3 (third loading); the irradiation started in January 1997 and continued to May of that year having accrued a further ∼2 MWd/kg UO 2 . Data obtained included, centreline temperature as a function of power and burn-up, (rod 8), FGR from the increase in rod internal pressure (rod 8) and clad elongation (rod 7). The assembly was discharged and transported to Kjeller for PIE. FGR of 12.6% and 15.8% were measured from puncturing and gas extraction from rods 7 and 8 respectively. Further PIE was carried out on rod 8 after it had been transported to Studsvik. Here, additional ceramography was performed, axial gamma scans, radial scans of selected fission products and the radial porosity distribution. On account of the high burn-up of

  8. Heater rod temperature change at boiling transition under flow oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Shigeru; Toba, Akio; Takigawa, Yukio; Ebata, Shigeo; Morooka, Shin-ichi; Shirakawa, Ken-etsu; Utsuno, Hideaki.

    1986-01-01

    The experiments were performed to investigate the boiling transition phenomenon under flow oscillation (OSBT) during thermal hydraulic instability. It was found, from the experimental results, that the thermal hydraulic instability did not immediately lead to the boiling transition (BT) and, even when the BT occurred due to a power increase, the change in the heater rod temperature was periodically up and down with a saw-toothed shape and no excursion occurred. To investigate the temperature change characteristics, an analysis was also performed using the transient thermal hydraulics code. The analytical results showed that the shape of the heater rod temperature change was well simulated by presuming a repeat of alternate BT and rewetting. Based on these results, further analysis has been performed with the lumped parameter model to investigate the temperature profile characteristics as well as the effects of the post-BT heat transfer coefficient and the flow oscillation period on the maximum temperature. (author)

  9. Numerically predicting horizontally oriented spent fuel rod surface temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wix, S.D.; Koski, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison between numerical calculations with use of commercial thermal analysis software packages and experimental data simulating a horizontally oriented spent fuel rod array was performed. Twelve cases were analyzed using air and helium for the fill gas, with three different heat dissipation levels. The numerically predicted temperatures are higher than the experimental data for all levels of heat dissipation with air as the fill gas. The temperature differences are 4 degrees C and 23 degrees C for the low heat dissipation and high dissipation, respectively. The temperature predictions using helium as a fill gas are lower than the experimental data for the low and medium heat dissipation levels. The temperature predictions are 1 degrees C and 6 degrees C lower than the experimental data for the low and medium heat dissipation, respectively. For the high heat dissipation level, the temperature predictions are 16 degrees C higher than the experimental data. Differences between the predicted and experimental temperatures can be attributed to several factors. These factors include a experimental uncertainity in the temperature and heat dissipation measurements, actual convection effects not included in the model, and axial heat flow in the experimental data. This works demonstrates that horizontally oriented spent fuel rod surface temperature predictions can be made using existing commercial software packages. This work also shows that end effects, such as axial heat transfer through the spent fuel rods, will be increasingly important as the amount of dissipated heat increases

  10. Numerically predicting horizontally oriented spent fuel rod surface temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wix, S.D.; Koski, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    A comparison between numerical calculations with use of commercial thermal analysis software packages and experimental data simulating a horizontally oriented spent fuel rod array was performed. Twelve cases were analyzed using air and helium for the fill gas, with three different heat dissipation levels. The numerically predicted temperatures are higher than the experimental data for all levels of heat dissipation with air as the fill gas. The temperature differences are 4 degree C and 23 degree C for the low heat dissipation and high heat dissipation, respectively. The temperature predictions using helium as a fill gas are lower than the experimental data for the low and medium heat dissipation levels. The temperature predictions are 1 degree C and 6 degree C lower than the experimental data for the low and medium heat dissipation, respectively. For the high heat dissipation level, the temperature predictions are 16 degree C higher than the experimental data. Differences between the predicted and experimental temperatures can be attributed to several factors. These factors include experimental uncertainty in the temperature and heat dissipation measurements, actual convection effects not included in the model, and axial heat flow in the experimental data. This work demonstrates that horizontally oriented spent fuel rod surface temperature predictions can be made using existing commercial software packages. This work also shows that end effects, such as axial heat transfer through the spent fuel rods, will be increasingly important as the amount of dissipated heat increases

  11. An integrated approach to selecting materials for fuel cladding in advanced high-temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangacharyulu, C., E-mail: chary.r@usask.ca [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Guzonas, D.A.; Pencer, J.; Nava-Dominguez, A.; Leung, L.K.H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    An integrated approach has been developed for selection of fuel cladding materials for advanced high-temperature reactors. Reactor physics, thermalhydraulic and material analyses are being integrated in a systematic study comparing various candidate fuel-cladding alloys. The analyses established the axial and radial neutron fluxes, power distributions, axial and radial temperature distributions, rates of defect formation and helium production using AECL analytical toolsets and experimentally measured corrosion rates to optimize the material composition for fuel cladding. The project has just been initiated at University of Saskatchewan. Some preliminary results of the analyses are presented together with the path forward for the project. (author)

  12. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Y., E-mail: yano.yasuhide@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Ukai, S.; Oono, N. [Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8628 (Japan); Kimura, A. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hayashi, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Torimaru, T. [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1313 (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900–1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  13. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Y.; Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T.; Ukai, S.; Oono, N.; Kimura, A.; Hayashi, S.; Torimaru, T.

    2017-04-01

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900-1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  14. Temperature escalation in PWR fuel rod simulator bundles due to the Zircaloy/steam reaction: Test ESBU-2A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Kapulla, H.; Malauschek, H.; Wallenfels, K.P.; Peck, S.O.

    1984-07-01

    This report describes the test conduct and results of the bundle test ESBU-2A, which was run to investigate the temperature escalation of zircaloy clad fuel rods. This investigation of temperature escalation is part of a series of out-of-pile experiments, performed within the framework of the PNS Severe Fuel Damage Program. The test bundle was of a 3 x 3 array of fuel rod simulators with a 0.4 m heated length. The fuel rod simulators were electrically heated and consisted of tungsten heaters, UO 2 annular pellets, and zircaloy cladding. A nominal steam flow of 0.7 g/s was inlet to the bundle. The bundle was surrounded by a zircaloy shroud which was insulated with ZrO 2 fiber ceramic wrap. The initial heatup rate of the bundle was 0.4 0 C/s. The temperature escalation began at the 255 mm elevation after 1200 0 C had been reached. At this elevation, the measured peak temperature was limited to 1500 0 C. It was concluded from different thermocouple results, that induced by this first escalation melt was formed in the lower part of the bundle. Consequently, the escalation in the lower part must be much higher, at least up to the melting temperature of zircaloy. Due to the failure in the steam production system, steam starvation in the upper region may explain the beginning of the escalation at the 255 mm elevation. The maximum temperature reached was 2175 0 C on the center rod at the end of the test. The unregularities in the steam supply may be the reason for less oxidation than expected. (orig./GL) [de

  15. Effect of Temperature and Sheet Temper on Isothermal Solidification Kinetics in Clad Aluminum Brazing Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Michael J.; Whitney, Mark A.; Wells, Mary A.; Winkler, Sooky

    2016-09-01

    Isothermal solidification (IS) is a phenomenon observed in clad aluminum brazing sheets, wherein the amount of liquid clad metal is reduced by penetration of the liquid clad into the core. The objective of the current investigation is to quantify the rate of IS through the use of a previously derived parameter, the Interface Rate Constant (IRC). The effect of peak temperature and initial sheet temper on IS kinetics were investigated. The results demonstrated that IS is due to the diffusion of silicon (Si) from the liquid clad layer into the solid core. Reduced amounts of liquid clad at long liquid duration times, a roughened sheet surface, and differences in resolidified clad layer morphology between sheet tempers were observed. Increased IS kinetics were predicted at higher temperatures by an IRC model as well as by experimentally determined IRC values; however, the magnitudes of these values are not in good agreement due to deficiencies in the model when applied to alloys. IS kinetics were found to be higher for sheets in the fully annealed condition when compared with work-hardened sheets, due to the influence of core grain boundaries providing high diffusivity pathways for Si diffusion, resulting in more rapid liquid clad penetration.

  16. Steam oxidation of Zr 1% Nb clads of VVER fuels in high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solyanyj, V.I.; Bibilashvili, Yu.K.; Dranenko, V.V.; Levin, A.Ya.; Izrajlevskij, L.B.; Morozov, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    In a wide range of accident conditions processes of clad corrosion effected by steam are rather intensive and in many respects influence the safety of NPP and the after-accident dismantling of a reactor core. This paper discusses the results of comprehensive studies into corrosion behaviour of Zr 1%Nb clads of VVER-type fuels at high temperatures. These studies are a continuation of previous work and the base for the design modelling of corrosion processes

  17. Irradiation of pressurized water reactor fuel rods in the Forschungsreaktor Juelich 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaertner, M.

    1978-10-01

    Test fuel rods have been irradiated in FRJ-2 to study the interaction between fuel and cladding as well as hydride orientation stability in the prehydrided cladding. The fuel rods achieved burn-ups of 3.500 to 10.000 MWd/tU at surface temperatures of 333 0 C and power levels up to 620 W/cm. (orig.) [de

  18. Cladding creepdown model for FRAPCON-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Tolli, J.E.

    1985-02-01

    This report presents a cladding deformation model developed to analyze cladding creepdown during steady state operation in both a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and a boiling water reactor (BWR). This model accounts for variations in zircaloy cladding heat treatment; cold worked and stress relieved material, typically used in a PWR, and fully recrystallized material, typically used in a BWR. The model calculates cladding creepdown as a function of hoop stress, fast neutron flux, exposure time, and temperature. This report also presents a comparison between cladding creep calculations by this model and corresponding measurements from the KWU/CE program, ORNL HOBBIE experiments, and EPRI/Westinghouse Engineering cooperative project. The comparisons show that the model calculates cladding creep strains well. The analyses of non-fueled rods by FRAPCON-2 show that the cladding creepdown model was correctly incorporated. Also, analysis of a PWR rod test case shows that the FRAPCON-2 code can analyze pellet-cladding mechanical interaction caused by cladding creepdown and fuel swelling

  19. Development of high performance cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Yong; Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.

    2010-04-01

    The irradiation test for HANA claddings conducted and a series of evaluation for next-HANA claddings as well as their in-pile and out-of pile performances tests were also carried out at Halden research reactor. The 6th irradiation test have been completed successfully in Halden research reactor. As a result, HANA claddings showed high performance, such as corrosion resistance increased by 40% compared to Zircaloy-4. The high performance of HANA claddings in Halden test has enabled lead test rod program as the first step of the commercialization of HANA claddings. DB has been established for thermal and LOCA-related properties. It was confirmed from the thermal shock test that the integrity of HANA claddings was maintained in more expanded region than the criteria regulated by NRC. The manufacturing process of strips was established in order to apply HANA alloys, which were originally developed for the claddings, to the spacer grids. 250 kinds of model alloys for the next-generation claddings were designed and manufactured over 4 times and used to select the preliminary candidate alloys for the next-generation claddings. The selected candidate alloys showed 50% better corrosion resistance and 20% improved high temperature oxidation resistance compared to the foreign advanced claddings. We established the manufacturing condition controlling the performance of the dual-cooled claddings by changing the reduction rate in the cold working steps

  20. Temperature distributions in cladded configurations of complicated boundary shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laura, P.A.A.; Gutierrez, R.H.; Sarmiento, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    This pape deals with an approximate analytical solution of certain cladded shapes of basic interest in nuclear engineering technology. In one case a solution of Laplace's equation is obtained. In the other, a solution to a system of partial differential equations (Poisson's and Laplace's) is attained. A approximate conformal mapping approach is also used in both situation, and it is shown that the analytical predictions are in good agreement with the values obtained by means of a finite element code. (orig.)

  1. Influence of the temperature in the measurement of the {sup 235}U content in fuel rods in the passive scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Carlos A. da S.; Junqueira, Fabio da S., E-mail: carlossilva@inb.gov.br, E-mail: fabiojunqueira@ing.gov.br [Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Superintendência de Engenharia do Combustível

    2017-07-01

    The fuel rod, composed of a cladding responsible for storing UO{sub 2} pellets, is an indispensable component for the composition of the mentioned fuel assembly, a metallic structure that is installed inside nuclear reactors for the purpose of generating energy. With the change of the technology of fuel elements of the Angra-1 plant, it was necessary to install a new equipment in the Nuclear Fuel Plant of INB in Resende / RJ. This new equipment, called Rod Scanner, is responsible for inspecting, through non-destructive tests, the internal structure of the fuel rod. Such inspection is the measurement of enrichment of the pellets ({sup 235}U content) inside of the rod by detection of gamma radiation by bismuth germanate (BGO) detectors using the scintillation principle. However, throughout the operation of the equipment, it was found that this measurement was not happening on a regular basis. After an intense investigation, it was verified that one of the factors that affects such measurement is the temperature at which the BGO detectors are submitted. In this way, the objective of this paper is to show the experiments and tests performed to reach the conclusion described previously, as well as to show the relation obtained between the signals collected in the detectors versus the internal temperature of the block where they are located. (author)

  2. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm 2 , 1000 0 C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm 2 , 1200 0 C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370 0 C

  3. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

  4. Characteristics of WWER-1000 fuel rod claddings and FA components from E635 alloy at burnups up to 72 MWd/kgU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikulin, A.; Novikov, A.; Peregud, M.; Shishov, V.; Shevyakov, A.; Volkova, I.; Novoselov, A.; Kobylyansky, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper operation experience, results of investigated E365 alloy components of Balakovo NPP Unit 1 and Kalinin NPP unit 1 fuel assemblies are presented. Appearance, shape changes and geometric size, corrosion state of guide thimbles, angles and fuel rods, corrosion of fuel claddings are studied. At the end authors concluded that: I) E635 alloy corroborated its high operation reliability as fuel claddings and WWER-1000 FA components during 6 year service to the fuel burnup of 72MWd/kgU; II) Based on the results from the post-irradiation investigations of the fuel rods and other structural elements of WWER-1000 FAA, fabricated from E635 alloy, in terms of the basic operational characteristics, their resources after the 6 year operation cycle have not been exhausted; III) The geometrical parameters, corrosion states, tensile properties of items fabricated from fuel alloy did not attain the values that would prevent their further operation: 1) the elongations of the fuel rods at the mean burnups up to 66.2 MWd/kgU do not exceed 15 mm or 4.9%; 8) the amount of the oxide coat at surface of GT and CT does not exceed 45 μm, the hydrogen content is <0.03% mass; 9) the oxide coat at the surfaces of the frame angles does not exceed 50 μm, the hydrogen content is <0.04% mass

  5. High Temperature Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions Between TRIGA Fuels and 304 Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Emmanuel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Keiser, Jr., Dennis D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Forsmann, Bryan [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Janney, Dawn E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Henley, Jody [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Woolstenhulme, Eric C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    High-temperature fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) between TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) fuel elements and the 304 stainless steel (304SS) are of interest to develop an understanding of the fuel behavior during transient reactor scenarios. TRIGA fuels are composed of uranium (U) particles dispersed in a zirconium-hydride (Zr-H) matrix. In reactor, the fuel is encased in 304-stainless-steel (304SS) or Incoloy 800 clad tubes. At high temperatures, the fuel can readily interact with the cladding, resulting in FCCI. A number of FCCI can take place in this system. Interactions can be expected between the cladding and the Zr-H matrix, and/or between the cladding and the U-particles. Other interactions may be expected between the Zr-H matrix and the U-particles. Furthermore, the fuel contains erbium-oxide (Er-O) additions. Interactions can also be expected between the Er-O, the cladding, the Zr-H and the U-particles. The overall result is that very complex interactions may take place as a result of fuel and cladding exposures to high temperatures. This report discusses the characterization of the baseline fuel microstructure in the as-received state (prior to exposure to high temperature), characterization of the fuel after annealing at 950C for 24 hours and the results from diffusion couple experiments carries out at 1000C for 5 and 24 hours. Characterization was carried out via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with sample preparation via focused ion beam in situ-liftout-technique.

  6. High Temperature Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions Between TRIGA Fuels and 304 Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Emmanuel; Keiser Jr, Dennis D.; Forsmann, Bryan; Janney, Dawn E.; Henley, Jody; Woolstenhulme, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) between TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) fuel elements and the 304 stainless steel (304SS) are of interest to develop an understanding of the fuel behavior during transient reactor scenarios. TRIGA fuels are composed of uranium (U) particles dispersed in a zirconium-hydride (Zr-H) matrix. In reactor, the fuel is encased in 304-stainless-steel (304SS) or Incoloy 800 clad tubes. At high temperatures, the fuel can readily interact with the cladding, resulting in FCCI. A number of FCCI can take place in this system. Interactions can be expected between the cladding and the Zr-H matrix, and/or between the cladding and the U-particles. Other interactions may be expected between the Zr-H matrix and the U-particles. Furthermore, the fuel contains erbium-oxide (Er-O) additions. Interactions can also be expected between the Er-O, the cladding, the Zr-H and the U-particles. The overall result is that very complex interactions may take place as a result of fuel and cladding exposures to high temperatures. This report discusses the characterization of the baseline fuel microstructure in the as-received state (prior to exposure to high temperature), characterization of the fuel after annealing at 950C for 24 hours and the results from diffusion couple experiments carries out at 1000C for 5 and 24 hours. Characterization was carried out via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with sample preparation via focused ion beam in situ-liftout-technique.

  7. Influence of texture on fracture toughness of zircaloy cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, V.; Andersson, Stefan

    1997-06-01

    The correlation between texture and fracture toughness of Zircaloy 2 cladding has been investigated in connection with axial cracks in fuel rods. The texture of the cladding determines the anisotropy of plasticity of the cladding which, in turn, should influence the strain conditions at the crack-tip. Plastic strains in the cladding under uniaxial tension were characterised by means of the anisotropy constants F, G and H calculated according to Hill's theory. Test temperatures between 20 and 300 deg C do not influence the F, G and H values. Any significant effect of hydrogen (about 500 wtppm) on the anisotropy constants F, G and H has not been revealed at a test temperature of 300 deg C. The results, obtained for stress-relieved and recrystallized cladding with different texture, show an obvious influence of texture on the fracture toughness of Zircaloy cladding. A higher fracture toughness has been found for cladding with more radial texture

  8. Effects of non-uniform core flow on peak cladding temperature: MOXY/SCORE sensitivity calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.C.

    1979-08-15

    The MOXY/SCORE computer program is used to evaluate the potential effect on peak cladding temperature of selective cooling that may result from a nonuniform mass flux at the core boundaries during the blowdown phase of the LOFT L2-4 test. The results of this study indicate that the effect of the flow nonuniformity at the core boundaries will be neutralized by a strong radial flow redistribution in the neighborhood of core boundaries. The implication is that the flow nonuniformity at the core boundaries has no significant effect on the thermal-hydraulic behavior and cladding temperature at the hot plane.

  9. Effects of non-uniform core flow on peak cladding temperature: MOXY/SCORE sensitivity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    The MOXY/SCORE computer program is used to evaluate the potential effect on peak cladding temperature of selective cooling that may result from a nonuniform mass flux at the core boundaries during the blowdown phase of the LOFT L2-4 test. The results of this study indicate that the effect of the flow nonuniformity at the core boundaries will be neutralized by a strong radial flow redistribution in the neighborhood of core boundaries. The implication is that the flow nonuniformity at the core boundaries has no significant effect on the thermal-hydraulic behavior and cladding temperature at the hot plane

  10. Numerical Simulation of Temperature Field and Residual Stress Distribution for Laser Cladding Remanufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Hua

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional finite element model was employed to simulate the cladding process of Ni-Cr-B-Si coatings on 16MnR steel under different parameters of laser power, scanning speed, and spot diameter. The temperature and residual stress distribution, the depth of the heat affected zone (HAZ, and the optimized parameters for laser cladding remanufacturing technology were obtained. The orthogonal experiment and intuitive analysis on the depth of the HAZ were performed to study the influence of different cladding parameters. A new criterion based on the ratio of the maximum tensile residual stress and fracture strength of the substrate was proposed for optimization of the remanufacturing parameters. The result showed well agreement with that of the HAZ analysis.

  11. Comparison between temperature distributions of an annular fuel rod of circular cross-section and of a hemoglobin shaped cross-section rod for PWR reactors in steady state conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Maria Vitória A. de; Alvim, Antônio Carlos Marques, E-mail: moliveira@con.ufrj.br, E-mail: alvim@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this work is to make a comparison between the temperature distributions of an annular fuel rod of circular cross-section and a hemoglobin shaped cross-section for PWR reactors in steady state conditions. The motivation for this article is due to the fact that the symmetric form of the red globules particles allows the O{sub 2} gases to penetrate the center of the cell homogeneously and quickly. The diffusion equation of gases in any environment is very similar to the heat diffusion equation: Diffusion - Fick's Law; Heat Flow - Fourier; where, the temperature (T) replaces the concentration (c). In previous works the comparison between the shape of solid fuel rods with circular section, and a with hemoglobin-shaped cross-section has proved that this new format optimizes the heat transfer, decreasing the thermal resistance between the center of the UO{sub 2} pellets and the clad. With this, a significant increase in the specific power of the reactor was made possible (more precisely a 23% increase). Currently, the advantages of annular fuel rods are being studied and recent works have shown that 12 x 12 arrays of annular fuel rods perform better, increasing the specific power of the reactor by at least 20% in relation to solid fuel rods, without affecting the safety of the reactor. Our proposal is analyzing the temperature distribution in annular fuel rods with cross sections with red blood cell shape and compare with the theoretical results of the annular fuel rods of circular cross section, initially in steady state. (author)

  12. Comparison between temperature distributions of an annular fuel rod of circular cross-section and of a hemoglobin shaped cross-section rod for PWR reactors in steady state conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Maria Vitória A. de; Alvim, Antônio Carlos Marques

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this work is to make a comparison between the temperature distributions of an annular fuel rod of circular cross-section and a hemoglobin shaped cross-section for PWR reactors in steady state conditions. The motivation for this article is due to the fact that the symmetric form of the red globules particles allows the O 2 gases to penetrate the center of the cell homogeneously and quickly. The diffusion equation of gases in any environment is very similar to the heat diffusion equation: Diffusion - Fick's Law; Heat Flow - Fourier; where, the temperature (T) replaces the concentration (c). In previous works the comparison between the shape of solid fuel rods with circular section, and a with hemoglobin-shaped cross-section has proved that this new format optimizes the heat transfer, decreasing the thermal resistance between the center of the UO 2 pellets and the clad. With this, a significant increase in the specific power of the reactor was made possible (more precisely a 23% increase). Currently, the advantages of annular fuel rods are being studied and recent works have shown that 12 x 12 arrays of annular fuel rods perform better, increasing the specific power of the reactor by at least 20% in relation to solid fuel rods, without affecting the safety of the reactor. Our proposal is analyzing the temperature distribution in annular fuel rods with cross sections with red blood cell shape and compare with the theoretical results of the annular fuel rods of circular cross section, initially in steady state. (author)

  13. High Temperature Dry Sliding Friction and Wear Performance of Laser Cladding WC/Ni Composite Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Jiao-xi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Two different types of agglomerate and angular WC/Ni matrix composite coatings were deposited by laser cladding. The high temperature wear resistance of these composite coatings was tested with a ring-on-disc MMG-10 apparatus. The morphologies of the worn surfaces were observed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS for elemental composition. The results show that the high temperature wear resistance of the laser clad WC/Ni-based composite coatings is improved significantly with WC mass fraction increasing. The 60% agglomerate WC/Ni composite coating has optimal high temperature wear resistance. High temperature wear mechanism of 60% WC/Ni composite coating is from abrasive wear of low temperature into composite function of the oxidation wear and abrasive wear.

  14. SEFLEX - fuel rod simulator effects in flooding experiments. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihle, P.; Rust, K.

    1986-03-01

    This report presents typical data and a limited heat transfer analysis from unblocked bundle reflood tests of an experimental thermal-hydraulic program. Full-length bundles of 5 x 5 fuel rod simulators having a gas-filled gap between the Zy cladding and the alumina pellets were tested in the test rig designed for the earlier Flooding Experiments with Blocked Arrays (FEBA-program). The 5 x 5 FEBA rod bundle tests were performed with gapless heater rods. These rods have a close thermal contact between the stainless steel cladding and the electric insulation material. A comparison of the SEFLEX data with the reference data of FEBA obtained under identical initial and reflood conditions shows the influence of different fuel rod simulators on the thermal-hydraulic behavior during forced feed bottom reflooding of unblocked and blocked arrays. Compared to bundles of gapless rods, bundles of rods with Zy claddings and a gas filled gap between claddings and pellets, which more closely represent the features that exist in an actual fuel rod geometry, produced higher quench front velocities, enhanced removal of stored heat in the rods, reduced peak cladding temperatures, increased grid spacer effects and absolutely unproblematic coolability of 90 percent blockages with bypass. The data offer the opportunity for further validation of computer codes to make realistic predictions of safety margins during a LOCA in a PWR. (orig./HP) [de

  15. SEFLEX fuel rod simulator effects in flooding experiments. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihle, P.; Rust, K.

    1986-03-01

    This report presents typical data and a limited heat transfer analysis from blocked bundle reflood tests of an experimental thermal-hydraulic program. Full-length bundles of 5x5 fuel rod simulators having a gas-filled gap between the Zy cladding and the alumina pellets were tested in the test rig designed for the earlier Flooding Experiments with Blocked Arrays (FEBA-program). The 5x5 FEBA rod bundle tests were performed with gapless heater rods. These rods have a close thermal contact between the stainless steel cladding and the electric insulation material. A comparison of the SEFLEX data with the reference data of FEBA obtained under identical initial and reflood conditions shows the influence of different fuel rod simulators on the thermal-hydraulic behavior during forced feed bottom reflooding of unblocked and blocked arrays. Compared to bundles of gapless rods, bundles of rods with Zy claddings and a gas filled gap between claddings and pellets, which more closely represent the features that exist in an actual fuel rod geometry, produced higher quench front velocities, enhanced removal of stored heat in the rods, reduced peak cladding temperatures, increased grid spacer effects and absolutely unproblematic coolability of 90 percent blockages with bypass. The data offer the opportunity for further validation of computer codes to make realistic predictions of safety margins during a LOCA in a PWR. (orig./HP) [de

  16. A new high temperature deformation model for zircaloy clad ballooning under hypothetical LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzoska, B.; Cheliotis, G.; Kunick, A.; Senski, G.

    1977-01-01

    Assuming Zircaloy clad ballooning occurs predominantly by thermal activated secondary creep, generally a power law is applied to describe the creep rate analytically. According to Norton the creep rate is taken as a power function of the cladding hoop stress multiplied by a numerical constant which is determined by the cladding structural properties and a Boltzmann factor including the creep activation energy, the gas constant and the cladding temperature respectively. As is well known, the stress exponent is not a constant value in the total range of LOCA stresses, but increases steadily with stress. This difficulty is avoided by introducing into the Norton law a plastic flow-factor including a limiting stress, which was derived by G. Senski using plastic crack models from Dugdale and Irwin. For LOCA applications the limiting stress is identified with the burst stress, which is experimentally determined. A total number of about 280 directly heated KWU burst tests including two types of experiments: (i) controlled temperature transient tests, (ii) creep rupture tests, are used to fit the burst stress of KWU zircaloy tubes simulating the whole range of LOCA temperatur

  17. Status of rod consolidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1985-04-01

    Two of the factors that need to be taken into account with rod consolidation are (1) the effects on rods from their removal from the fuel assembly and (2) the effects on rods as a result of the consolidation process. Potential components of both factors are described in the report. Discussed under (1) are scratches on the fuel rod surfaces, rod breakage, crud, extended burnup, and possible cladding embrittlement due to hydrogen injection at BWRs. Discussed under (2) are the increased water temperature (less than 10 0 C) because of closer packing of the rods, formation of crevices between rods in the close-packed mode, contact with dissimilar metals, and the potential for rapid heating of fuel rods following the loss of water from a spent fuel storage pool. Another factor that plays an important role in rod consolidation is the cost of disposal of the nonfuel-bearing components of the fuel assembly. Also, the dose rate from the components - especially Inconel spacer grids - can affect the handling procedures. Several licensing issues that exist are described. A list of recommendations is provided. 98 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  18. Oxidation during reflood of reactor core with melting cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siefken, L.J.; Allison, C.M.; Davis, K.L. [and others

    1995-09-01

    Models were recently developed and incorporated into the SCDAP/RELAP5 code for calculating the oxidation of fuel rods during cladding meltdown and reflood. Experiments have shown that a period of intense oxidation may occur when a hot partially oxidized reactor core is reflooded. This paper offers an explanation of the cladding meltdown and oxidation processes that cause this intense period of oxidation. Models for the cladding meltdown and oxidation processes are developed. The models are assessed by simulating a severe fuel damage experiment that involved reflood. The models for cladding meltdown and oxidation were found to improve calculation of the temperature and oxidation of fuel rods during the period in which hot fuel rods are reflooded.

  19. Low temperature chemical processing of graphite-clad nuclear fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-10-17

    A reduced-temperature method for treatment of a fuel element is described. The method includes molten salt treatment of a fuel element with a nitrate salt. The nitrate salt can oxidize the outer graphite matrix of a fuel element. The method can also include reduced temperature degradation of the carbide layer of a fuel element and low temperature solubilization of the fuel in a kernel of a fuel element.

  20. Thermal performance of the nuclear fuel rods submitted to angular variation of the heat exchanger coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, A.M.M. de.

    1984-01-01

    Generally, LMFBR fuel rods consist of fuel pellets encapsulated in cladding tubes. These tubes are wrapped by a helical wire, working as a spacer. Distortions in the rod temperature distribution and in the external heat flux can be generated by angular variations in the local heat transfer coefficients due to the wire, by excentricity between pellet and clad or by ovalization of the cladding tube. Also, the temperature distributions can be affected by fuel densification, reestructuring and swelling. The present work consists of the development of a computer code in order to analyse the fuel rod performance as function of geometrical and operational effects, in steady state regime. (Author) [pt

  1. Temperature estimates from the zircaloy oxidation kinetics in the α plus β phase region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Oxidation rates of zircaloy in steam were measured at temperatures between 961 and 1264 K and for duration times between 25 and 1900 seconds in order to calculate, in conjunction with measurements from postirradiation metallographic examination, the prior peak temperatures of zircaloy fuel rod cladding. These temperature estimates will be used in light water reactor research programs to assess (a) the accuracy of temperature measurements of fuel rod cladding peak temperatures from thermocouples attached to the surface during loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCEs), (b) the perturbation of the fuel rod cladding LOCE temperature history caused by the presence of thermocouples, and (c) the measurements of cladding azimuthal temperature gradients near thermocouple locations

  2. Peaking cladding temperature and break equivalent size of intermediate break loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Bangqi

    2012-01-01

    The analysis results of intermediate break loss of coolant accident for the nuclear power plant of million kw level showed to be as following: (1) At the begin of life, the break occur simultaneity reactor shutdown with L(X)P. it's equivalent break size and peaking cladding temperature is respectively 20 cm and 849℃. (2) At the begin of life, the break occur simultaneity reactor shutdown without loop. the reactor coolant pumps will be stop after reactor shutdown 10 minutes, it's equivalent break size and peaking cladding temperature is respectively 10.5 cm and 921℃. (3) At the bur up of 31 GWd/t(EOC1). the break occur simultaneity reactor shutdown without loop, the reactor coolant pumps will be stop after reactor shutdown 20 minutes, it's equivalent break size and peaking cladding temperature is respectively 8 cm and 1145℃. The above analysis results showed that the peaking cladding temperature of intermediate break loss of coolant accident is not only related with the break equivalent size and core bur up, and is closely related with the stop time of coolant pumps because the coolant pumps would drive the coolant from safety system to produce the seal loop in break loop and affect the core coolant flow, results in the fuel cladding temperature increasing or damaging. Therefore, the break spectrum, burn up spectrum, the stop time of coolant pumps and operator action time will need to detail analysis and provide appropriate operating procedure, otherwise the peaking cladding temperature will exceed 1204℃ and threaten the safety of the reactor core when the intermediate break loss of coolant accident occur in some break equivalent size, burn up, stop pumps time and operator action not appropriate. The pressurizer pressure low signal simultaneity containment pressure higher signal were used as the operator manual close the signal of reactor coolant pumps after reactor shutdown of 20 minutes. have successful solved the operator intervention time from 10 minutes

  3. Fuel rod failure detection method and system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assmann, H.; Janson, W.; Stehle, H.; Wahode, P.

    1975-01-01

    The inventor claims a method for the detection of a defective fuel rod cladding tube or of inleaked water in the cladding tube of a fuel rod in the fuel assembly of a pressurized-water reactor. The fuel assembly is not disassembled but examined as a whole. In the examination, the cladding tube is heated near one of its two end plugs, e.g. with an attached high-frequency inductor. The water contained in the cladding tube evaporates, and steam bubbles or a condensate are detected by the ultrasonic impulse-echo method. It is also possible to measure the delay of the temperature rise at the end plug or to determine the cooling energy required to keep the end plug temperature stable and thus to detect water ingression. (DG/AK) [de

  4. Creep behavior under internal pressure of zirconium alloy cladding oxidized in steam at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chosson, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    During hypothetical Loss-Of-Coolant-Accident (LOCA) scenarios, zirconium alloy fuel cladding tubes creep under internal pressure and are oxidized on their outer surface at high temperature (HT). Claddings become stratified materials: zirconia and oxygen-stabilized α phase, called α(O), are formed on the outer surface of the cladding whereas the inner part remains in the β domain. The strengthening effect of oxidation on the cladding creep behavior under internal pressure has been highlighted at HT. In order to model this effect, the creep behavior of each layer had to be determined. This study focused on the characterization of the creep behavior of the α(O) phase at HT, through axial creep tests performed under vacuum on model materials, containing from 2 to 7 wt.% of oxygen and representative of the α(O) phase. For the first time, two creep flow regimes have been observed in this phase. Underlying physical mechanisms and relevant microstructural parameters have been discussed for each regime. The strengthening effect due to oxygen on the α(O) phase creep behavior at HT has been quantified and creep flow equations have been identified. A ductile to brittle transition criterion has been also suggested as a function of temperature and oxygen content. Relevance of the creep flow equations for each layer, identified in this study or from the literature, has been discussed. Then, a finite element model, describing the oxidized cladding as a stratified material, has been built. Based on this model, a fraction of the experimental strengthening during creep is predicted. (author) [fr

  5. Release of fission products from a fuel rod with an artificial hole through cladding irradiated in an in-pile water loop, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Nasumi

    1978-11-01

    To make clear the iodine spiking phenomenon from a defective fuel rod into the primary coolant, the fuel rod (UO 2 pellets, with stainless steel sheath) with an artificial pin hole was irradiated in the inpile test section of water loop JMTR.OWL-1. Experimental conditions were depressurization and temperature drop of the primary loop coolant and diameter and position of the pin hole. Iodine 131 and cesium 137 in loop coolant were measured under various coolant conditions. The inventory and translation rate of iodine 131 in fuel rod related to irradiation histories were calculated. The levels of I-131 and Cs-137 released to loop coolant from fuel rod were compared. Comparison of the results with LWRs was made by way of the spiked amount and release rate of iodine 131. (author)

  6. Creep and creep rupture properties of cladding tube (type 316) in high temperature sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atsumo, H.

    1977-01-01

    The thin walled small sized seamless AISI 316 steel tubes, which are designated to be domestically used as the fuel cladding tube for sodium cooled fast breeder reactors in Japan, are irradiated in the following sodium of high temperature in the range of 370 deg. C to 700 deg. C, and receive gradually increased internal pressure caused by the fission produced gas generating from the nuclear fuel burn-up inside the cladding tube. Consequently, the creep behavior of fuel cladding tubes under a high temperature sodium environment is an important problem which must be determined and clarified together with their characteristic features under irradiation and in air. In relation to the creep performance of fuel cladding tubes made of AISI 316 steel and other comparable austenitic stainless steels, hardly any studies are found that are made systematically to examine the effect of sodium with sodium purity as parameter or any comparative studies with in-air data at various different temperatures. The present research work was aimed to obtain certain basic design data relating to in-sodium creep performance of the domestic made fuel cladding tubes for fast breeder reactors, and also to gain further date as considered necessary under several sodium conditions. That is, together with establishment of the technology for tensile creep test and internal pressure creep rupture test in flowing sodium of high temperature, a series of tests and studies were performed on the trial made cladding tubes of AISI Type-316 steel. In the first place, two kinds of purity conditions of sodium, close to the actual reactor-operating condition, (oxygen concentration of 10 ppm and 5 ppm respectively) were established, and then uniaxial tensile creep test and rupture test under various temperatures were performed and the resulting data were compared and evaluated against the in-air data. Then, secondly, an internal pressure creep rupture test was conducted under a single purity sodium environment

  7. Technical basis for storage of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel in inert gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Gilbert, E.R.

    1983-09-01

    The technical bases to establish safe conditions for dry storage of Zircaloy-clad fuel are summarized. Dry storage of fuel with zirconium alloy cladding has been licensed in Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, and Switzerland. Dry storage demonstrations, hot cell tests, and modeling have been conducted using Zircaloy-clad fuel. The demonstrations have included irradiated boiling water reactor, pressurized heavy-water reactor, and pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies. Irradiated fuel has been emplaced in and retrieved from metal casks, dry wells, silos, and a vault. Dry storage tests and demonstrations have involved about 15,000 fuel rods, and about 5600 rods have been monitored during dry storage in inert gases with maximum cladding temperatures ranging from 50 to 570 0 C. Although some tests and demonstrations are still in progress, there is currently no evidence that any rods exposed to inert gases have failed (one PWR rod exposed to an air cover gas failed at about 270 0 C). Based on this favorable experience, it is concluded that there is sufficient information on fuel rod behavior, storage conditions, and potential cladding failure mechanisms to support licensing of dry storage in the US. This licensing position includes a requirement for inert cover gases and a maximum cladding temperature guideline of 380 0 C for Zircaloy-clad fuel. Using an inert cover gas assures that even if fuel with cladding defects were placed in dry storage, or if defects develop during storage, the defects would not propagate. Tests and demonstrations involving Zircaloy-clad rods and assemblies with maximum cladding temperatures above 400 0 C are in progress. When the results from these tests have been evaluated, the viability of higher temperature limits should be examined. Acceptable conditions for storage in air and dry storage of consolidated fuel are issues yet to be resolved

  8. High-temperature deformation and rupture behavior of internally-pressurized Zircaloy-4 cladding in vacuum and steam enivronments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Garde, A.M.; Kassner, T.F.

    1977-01-01

    The high-temperature diametral expansion and rupture behavior of Zircaloy-4 fuel-cladding tubes have been investigated in vacuum and steam environments under transient-heating conditions that are of interest in hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident situations in light-water reactors. The effects of internal pressure, heating rate, axial constraint, and localized temperature nonuniformities in the cladding on the maximum circumferential strain have been determined for burst temperatures between approximately 650 and 1350 0 C

  9. Peak cladding temperature in a spent fuel storage or transportation cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Murakami, H.; Liu, Y.; Gomez, P.E.A.; Gudipati, M.; Greiner, M.

    2007-01-01

    From reactor discharge to eventual disposition, spent nuclear fuel assemblies from a commercial light water reactor are typically exposed to a variety of environments under which the peak cladding temperature (PCT) is an important parameter that can affect the characteristics and behavior of the cladding and, thus, the functions of the spent fuel during storage, transportation, and disposal. Three models have been identified to calculate the peak cladding temperature of spent fuel assemblies in a storage or transportation cask: a coupled effective thermal conductivity and edge conductance model developed by Manteufel and Todreas, an effective thermal conductivity model developed by Bahney and Lotz, and a computational fluid dynamics model. These models were used to estimate the PCT for spent fuel assemblies for light water reactors under helium, nitrogen, and vacuum environments with varying decay heat loads and temperature boundary conditions. The results show that the vacuum environment is more challening than the other gas environments in that the PCT limit is exceeded at a lower boundary temperature for a given decay heat load of the spent fuel assembly. This paper will highlight the PCT calculations, including a comparison of the PCTs obtained by different models.

  10. User's guide for FREG-3: a computer program to analyze pellet-cladding gap conductance in accordance with fuel-rod irradiation history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harayama, Yasuo; Izumi, Fumio; Fujita, Misao; Ishibashi, Akihiro; Otsubo, Naoaki.

    1976-10-01

    The present report describes user's manual for program FREG-3, and provides a general description of the program and instructions of input/output. FREG-3 estimates the temperature distribution in a fuel rod and the stored energy based on the distribution. The temperature distribution is calculated in accordance with fuel-rod irradiation history. Mechanical properties and models in handling specific problems, such as densification and relocation, are optional in the program. The options are to be given by key word. If appropriate options are selected, the program is used not only as a safety evaluation code, but also as a best evaluation code. (auth.)

  11. PATE - a computer code for the calculation of temperature distribution in cylindrical fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Neto, A.J. da; Roberty, N.C.; Carmo, E.G.D. do.

    1983-08-01

    An analytical solution for the temperature profile in the fuel cladding is presented, having the coolant temperature as boundary conditions and using a first-order polynomial for the zircalloy thermal conductivity. The temperature profile in the fuel pellet is determined solving an algebraic equation by iterative methods. (E.G.) [pt

  12. Analysis of irradiation temperature in fuel rods of OGL-1 fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Kousaku; Kobayashi, Fumiaki; Minato, Kazuo; Ikawa, Katsuichi; Iwamoto, Kazumi

    1984-10-01

    Irradiation temperature in the fuel rods of 5th OGL-1 fuel assembly was analysed by the system composed by STPDSP2 and TRUMP codes. As the measured input-data, following parameters were allowed for; circumferential heating distribution around the fuel rod, which was measured in the JMTR critical assembly, axial heating distribution through the fuel rod, ratio of peak heatings of three fuel rods, and pre- and post-irradiation outer radii of the fuel compacts and inner radii of the graphite sleeves, which had been measured in PIE of the 5th OGL-1 fuel assembly. In computation the axial distributions of helium coolant temperature through the fuel rod and the heating value of each fuel rod were, firstly, calculated as input data for TRUMP. The TRUMP calculation yielded the temperatures which were fitted in those measured by all of the thermo-couples installed in the fuel rods, by adjusting only the value of the surface heat transfer coefficient, and consequently, the temperatures in all portions of the fuel rod were obtained. The apparent heat transfer coefficient changed to 60% of the initial values in the middle period of irradiation. For this reduction it was deduced that shoot had covered the surface of the fuel rod during irradiation, which was confirmed in PIE. Beside it, several things were found in this analysis. (author)

  13. BISON Investigation of the Effect of the Fuel- Cladding Contact Irregularities on the Peak Cladding Temperature and FCCI Observed in AFC-3A Rodlet 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medvedev, Pavel G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The primary objective of this report is to document results of BISON analyses supporting Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) activities. Specifically, the present report seeks to provide explanation for the microstructural features observed during post irradiation examination of the helium-bonded annular U-10Zr fuel irradiated during the AFC-3A experiment. Post irradiation examination of the AFC-3A rodlet revealed microstructural features indicative of the fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) at the fuel-cladding interface. Presence of large voids was also observed in the same locations. BISON analyses were performed to examine stress and temperature profiles and to investigate possible correlation between the voids and FCCI. It was found that presence of the large voids lead to a formation of circumferential temperature gradients in the fuel that may have redirected migrating lanthanides to the locations where fuel and cladding are in contact. Resulting localized increase of lanthanide concentration is expected to accelerate FCCI. The results of this work provide important guidance to the post irradiation examination studies. Specifically, the hypothesis of lanthanides being redirected from the voids to the locations where the fuel and the cladding are in contact should be verified by conducting quantitative electron microscopy or Electron Probe Micro-Analyzer (EPMA). The results also highlight the need for computer models capable of simulating lanthanide diffusion in metallic fuel and establish a basis for validation of such models.

  14. Air oxidation of Zircaloy-4, M5 (registered) and ZIRLOTM cladding alloys at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrueck, M.; Boettcher, M.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the results of isothermal and transient oxidation experiments of the advanced cladding alloys M5 (registered) and ZIRLO TM in comparison to Zircaloy-4 in air at temperatures from 973 to 1853 K. Generally, oxidation in air leads to a strong degradation of the cladding material. The main mechanism of this process is the formation of zirconium nitride and its re-oxidation. From the point of view of safety, the barrier effect of the fuel cladding is lost much earlier than during accident transients with a steam atmosphere only. Comparison of the three alloys investigated reveals a qualitatively similar, but quantitatively varying oxidation behavior in air. The mainly parabolic oxidation kinetics, where applicable, is comparable for the three alloys. Strong differences of up to 500% in oxidation rates were observed after transition to linear kinetics at temperatures below 1300 K. The paper presents kinetic rate constants as well as critical times and oxide scale thicknesses at the point of transition from parabolic to linear kinetics.

  15. FRACAS: a subcode for the analysis of fuel pellet-cladding mechanical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, M.P.

    1977-04-01

    This report describes FRACAS (Fuel Rod and Cladding Analysis Subcode), a computer code which performs the mechanical analysis in the FRAP fuel rod codes. At each loadstep, FRACAS obtains a complete elastic-plastic-creep solution for the stresses, strains, and displacements in the fuel rod cladding. The cladding is modeled as a thin cylindrical shell with prescribed temperature, pressures, and radial displacement of the inside surface. The displacement of the fuel pellets is assumed to be due to thermal gradients only. Three different regimes of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction are considered: (a) open gap, (b) closed gap, and (c) trapped stack. Both transient and steady state creep calculations are performed. The capabilities of the code are illustrated by an example problem, and comparisons are made with data obtained from two experimental fuel rods

  16. IFPE/IFA-432, Fission Gas Release, Mechanical Interaction BWR Fuel Rods, Halden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Description: It contains data from experiments that have been performed at the IFE/OECD Halden Reactor Project, available for use in fuel performance studies. It covers experiments on thermal performance, fission product release, clad properties and pellet clad mechanical interaction. It includes also experimental data relevant to high burn-up behaviour. IFA-432: Measurements of fuel temperature response, fission gas release and mechanical interaction on BWR-type fuel rods up to high burn-ups. The assembly featured several variations in rod design parameters, including fuel type, fuel/cladding gap size, fill gas composition (He and Xe) and fuel stability. It contained 6 BWR-type fuel rods with fuel centre thermocouples at two horizontal planes, rods were also equipped with pressure transducers and cladding extensometers. Only data from 6 rods are compiled here

  17. Mechanisms of damage to the oxide layer of cladding of fuel rods under accident conditions like RI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busser, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    During reactivity initiated accident, the importance of cladding tube oxidation on its thermomechanical behavior has been investigated. After RIA tests in experimental reactors oxide damage including radial cracking and spallation of the outer oxide layer has been evidenced. This work aims at better understanding the key mechanisms controlling these phenomena. Laboratory air-oxidation of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes has been performed at 470 C. SEM micrographs show that radial cracks are initiated from the outer surface of the oxide layer and propagated radially towards the oxide-metal interface. A model predicting the stress evolution within the oxide and the depth of crack has been developed and validated on literature tests and tests of this study. Ring compression tests were used for the experimental study of the oxide degradation under mechanical loading. Experimental data revealed three mechanisms: densification of the radial crack network, propagation of these radial cracks, branching and spallation of oxide fragments. The influence of the circumferential cracks, periodically distributed in the oxide layer, on the stress distribution in oxide fragments has been analysed using finite element modelling. The determining influence of these cracks on the maximum stress oxide fragments has been demonstrated. (author)

  18. The maximum allowable temperature of zircaloy-2 fuel cladding under dry storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, M.; Yoshiki, S.; Yasuda, T.; Nakatsuka, M.

    1990-09-01

    Japan plans to reprocess and reutilise the spent nuclear fuel from nuclear power generation. However, the temporary storage of spent fuel is assuming increasing importance as a means of ensuring flexibility in the nuclear fuel cycle. Our investigations of various methods of storage have shown that casks are the most suitable means of storing small quantities of spent fuel of around 500 t, and research and development are in progress to establish dry storage technology for such casks. The soundness of fuel cladding is being investigated. The most important factor in evaluating soundness in storage under inert gas as currently envisaged is creep deformation and rupture, and a number of investigations have been made of the creep behaviour of cladding. The present study was conducted on the basis of existing in-house results in collaboration with Nippon Kakunenryo Kaihatsu KK (Nippon Nuclear Fuel Department Co.), which has hot lab facilities. Tests were run on the creep deformation behaviour of irradiated cladding, and the maximum allowable temperature during dry storage was investigated. (author)

  19. Change in geometrical parameters of WWER high burnup fuel rods under operational conditions and transient testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanashov, B.; Amosov, S.; Lyadov, G.; Markov, D.; Ovchinnikov, V; Polenok, V.; Smirnov, A.; Sukhikh, A.; Bek, E.; Yenin, A.; Novikov, V.

    2001-01-01

    The paper discusses changes in fuel rods geometric parameters as result of operation conditions and burnups. The degree of geometry variability of fuel rods, cladding and column is one of the most important characteristics affecting fuel serviceability. On the other hand, changes in fuel rod geometric parameters influence fuel temperature, fission gas release, fuel-to-cladding stress strained state as well as the degree of interaction with FA skeleton elements and skeleton rigidity. Change in fuel-to-cladding gap is measured using compression technique. The axial distribution of fuel-to-cladding gap demonstrates the largest decrease of the gap in the region 500 to 2000 mm from the bottom of the fuel rod (WWER-440) and in the region of 500 to 3000 mm for WWER-1000. The cladding material creep in WWER fuel rods together with the radiation growth results in fuel rod cladding elongation. A set of transient tests for spent WWER-440 and WWER-1000 fuel rods carried out in SSC RIAR during a period 1995-1999, with the aim to estimate the changes in geometric parameters of FRs. The estimation of changes in outer diameter of cladding and fuel column and fuel-to-cladding gap are performed in transient conditions (changes in linear power range of 180 to 400 W/cm) for both WWER-440 and WWER-1000. WWER-440 fuel rods having the same burnup and close fuel-cladding contact before testing are subjected to considerable hoop cladding strain in testing up to 300 W/cm. But the hoop strain does not grow due to the structural changes in fuel column and decrease in central hole diameter occurred when the power is higher

  20. Characterization of hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon and sulfur in nuclear fuel (UO2) and cladding nuclear rod materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crewe, Maria Teresa I.; Lopes, Paula Corain; Moura, Sergio C.; Sampaio, Jessica A.G.; Bustillos, Oscar V.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Oxygen, Carbon and Sulfur gases analysis in nuclear fuels such as UO 2 , U 3 O 8 , U 3 Si 2 and in the fuel cladding such as Zircaloy, is a well known as a quality control in nuclear industry. In UO 2 pellets, the Hydrogen molecule fragilizes the metal lattice causing the material cracking. In Zircaloy material the H2 molecules cause the boiling of the cladding. Other gases like Nitrogen, Oxygen, Carbon and Sulfur affect in the lattice structure change. In this way these chemical compounds have to be measure within specify parameters, these measurement are part of the quality control of the nuclear industry. The analytical procedure has to be well established by a convention of the quality assurance. Therefore, the Oxygen, Carbon, Sulfur and Hydrogen are measured by infrared absorption (IR) and the nitrogen will be measured by thermal conductivity (TC). The gas/metal analyzer made by LECO Co. model TCHEN-600 is Hydrogen, Oxygen and Nitrogen analyzer in a variety of metals, refractory and other inorganic materials, using the principle of fusion by inert gas, infrared and thermo-coupled detector. The Carbon and Sulfur compounds are measure by LECO Co. model CS-400. A sample is first weighed and placed in a high purity graphite crucible and is casted on a stream of helium gas, enough to release the oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen. During the fusion, the oxygen present in the sample combines with the carbon crucible to form carbon monoxide. Then, the nitrogen present in the sample is analyzed and released as molecular nitrogen and the hydrogen is released as gas. The hydrogen gas is measured by infrared absorption, and the sample gases pass through a trap of copper oxide which converts CO to CO 2 and hydrogen into water. The gases enter the cell where infrared water content is then converted making the measurement of total hydrogen present in the sample. The Hydrogen detection limits for the nuclear fuel is 1 μg/g for the Nitrogen

  1. Fuel enrichment and temperature distribution in nuclear fuel rod in (D-T) driven hybrid reactor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, Ypek [Suleyman Demirel Universitesi Muhendislik-Mimarlyk Fakultesi, Isparta (Turkey)

    2001-07-01

    In this study, melting point of the fuel rod and temperature distribution in nuclear fuel rod are investigated for different coolants under various first wall loads (P{sub w}, =5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 MWm{sup -2}) in Fusion-Fission reactor fueled with 50%LWR +50%CANDU. The fusion source of neutrons of 14.1 MeV is simulated by a movable target along the main axis of cylindrical geometry as a line source. In addition, the fusion chamber was thought as a cylindrical cavity with a diameter of 300 cm that is comparatively small value. The fissile fuel zone is considered to be cooled with four different coolants, gas, flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}), natural lithium (Li), and eutectic lithium (Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83}). Investigations are observed during 4 years for discrete time intervals of{delta}t= 0.5 month and by a plant factor (PF) of 75%. Volumetric ratio of coolant-to fuel is 1:1, 45.515% coolant, 45.515% fuel, 8.971% clad, in fuel zone. (author)

  2. Fuel cladding behavior under rapid loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, K.; Karlsson, J.; Stjärnsäter, J.; Schrire, D.; Ledergerber, G.; Munoz-Reja, C.; Hallstadius, L.

    2016-02-01

    A modified burst test (MBT) was used in an extensive test program to characterize fuel cladding failure behavior under rapid loading conditions. The MBT differs from a normal burst test with the use of a driver tube to simulate the expansion of a fuel pellet, thereby producing a partial strain driven deformation condition similar to that of a fuel pellet expansion in a reactivity insertion accident (RIA). A piston/cylinder assembly was used to pressurize the driver tube. By controlling the speed and distance the piston travels the loading rate and degree of sample deformation could be controlled. The use of a driver tube with a machined gauge section localizes deformation and allows for continuous monitoring of the test sample diameter change at the location of maximum hoop strain, during each test. Cladding samples from five irradiated fuel rods were tested between 296 and 553 K and loading rates from 1.5 to 3.5/s. The test rods included variations of Zircaloy-2 with different liners and ZIRLO, ranging in burn-up from 41 to 74 GWd/MTU. The test results show cladding ductility is strongly temperature and loading rate dependent. Zircaloy-2 cladding ductility degradation due to operational hydrogen pickup started to recover at approximately 358 K for test condition used in the study. This recovery temperature is strongly loading rate dependent. At 373 K, ductility recovery was small for loading rates less than 8 ms equivalent RIA pulse width, but longer than 8 ms the ductility recovery increased exponentially with increasing pulse width, consistent with literature observations of loading rate dependent brittle-to-ductile (BTD) transition temperature. The cladding ductility was also observed to be strongly loading rate/pulse width dependent for BWR cladding below the BTD temperature and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) cladding at both 296 and 553 K.

  3. Corrosion behavior of duplex and reference cladding in NPP Grohnde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besch, O.A.; Yagnik, S.K.; Eucken, C.M.; Bradley, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Industry Research (NFIR) Group undertook a lead test assembly (LTA) program in NPP Grohnde PWR in Germany to assess the corrosion performance of duplex and reference cladding. Two identical 16 by 16 LTAs, each containing 32 peripheral test rods, completed four reactor cycles, reaching a peak rod burnup of 46 MWd/kgU. The results from poolside examinations performed at the end of each cycle, together with power histories and coolant chemistry, are reported. Five different cladding materials were characterized during fabrication. The corrosion performance of the cladding materials was tracked in long-term tests in high-pressure, high-temperature autoclaves. The relative ranking of corrosion behavior in such tests corresponded well with the in-reactor corrosion performance. The extent and distribution of hydriding in duplex and reference specimens during the autoclave testing has been characterized. The in-reactor corrosion data indicate that the low-tin Zircaloy-4 reference cladding, R2, had an improved corrosion resistance compared to high-tin Zircaloy-4 reference cladding, R1. Two types of duplex cladding, D1 (Zr-2.5% Nb) and D2 (Zr-0.4% Fe-0.5% Sn), showed an even further improvement in corrosion resistance compared to R2 cladding. The third duplex cladding, D3 (Zr-4 + 1.0% Nb), had significantly less corrosion resistance, which was inferior to R1. The in-reactor and out-reactor corrosion performances have been ranked

  4. Consequences of metallic fuel-cladding liquid phase attack during over-temperature transient on fuel element lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Seidel, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    Metallic fuel elements irradiated in EBR-II at temperatures significantly higher than design, causing liquid phase attack of the cladding, were subsequently irradiated at normal operating temperatures to first breach. The fuel element lifetime was compared to that for elements not subjected to the over-temperature transient and found to be equivalent. 1 ref., 3 figs

  5. Zircaloy cladding degradation under repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santanam, L.; Raghavan, S.; Chin, B.A.

    1990-12-01

    Creep, a potential degradation mechanism of Zircaloy cladding after repository disposal of spent nuclear fuel, has been investigated. The deformation and fracture map methodology has been used to predict maximum allowable initial storage temperatures to achieve a thousand year life without rupture as a function of spent-fuel history. Maximum allowable temperatures are 340 degree C (613 K) for typically stressed rods (70--100 MPa) and 300 degree C (573 K) for highly stressed rods (140--160 MPa). 10 refs., 2 figs

  6. Behavior of four PWR rods subjected to a simulated loss-of-coolant accient in the power burst facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, T.F.; Hagrman, D.L.; Sepold, L.K.

    1978-01-01

    Cladding deformation characteristics resulting from the first nuclear blowdown tests (LOC-11) conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) are emphasized in this paper. The objective of the LOC-11 tests was to obtain data on the thermal, mechanical, and materials behavior of pressurized and unpressurized fuel rods when exposed to a blowdown similiar to that expected in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) during a hypothesized double-ended cold-leg break. The test hardware consisted of four separately shrouded fresh fuel rods of PWR 15 x 15 design. Initial plenum pressures ranged from atmospheric to 4.8 MPa (representative of end-of-life). During LOC-11C, the four fuel rods were subjected to 6.5 hours of nuclear operation at approximately 67 kW/m average rod power to cause decay heat build-up. Just before the start of blowdown, cladding surface temperatures were about 620 K and fuel centerline temperatures were in the 2500 to 2600 K range. During the 30-second blowdown transient, CHF occurred 2 seconds after initiation. Fuel centerline temperature dropped continuously, while cladding surface temperatures increased. Maximum cladding temperatures of 1030 to 1050 K occurred 15 seconds into the transient. Posttest destructive examination revealed cladding microstructures and oxide thicknesses consistent with the measured cladding temperatures. The cladding surface thermocouples did not appreciably affect cladding temperature distributuion (fin cooling effect) in the vicinity of the thermocouples

  7. Development of Cr Electroplated Cladding Tube for preventing Fuel-Cladding Chemical Interaction (FCCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Hwan; Woo, Je Woong; Kim, Sung Ho; Cheon, Jin Sik; Lee, Byung Oon; Lee, Chan Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Metal fuel has been selected as a candidate fuel in the SFR because of its superior thermal conductivity as well as enhanced proliferation resistance in connection with the pyroprocessing. However, metal fuel suffers eutectic reaction (Fuel Cladding Chemical Interaction, FCCI) with the fuel cladding made of stainless steel at reactor operating temperature so that cladding thickness gradually reduces to endanger reactor safety. In order to mitigate FCCI, barrier concept has been proposed between the fuel and the cladding in designing fuel rod. Regarding this, KAERI has initiated barrier cladding development to prevent interdiffusion process as well as enhance the SFR fuel performance. Previous study revealed that Cr electroplating has been selected as one of the most promising options because of its technical and economic viability. This paper describes the development status of the Cr electroplating technology for the usage of fuel rod in SFR. This paper summarizes the status of Cr electroplating technology to prevent FCCI in metal fuel rod. It has been selected for the ease of practical application at the tube inner surface. Technical scoping, performance evaluation and optimization have been carried out. Application to the tube inner surface and in-pile test were conducted which revealed as effective.

  8. Review of experimental data for modelling LWR fuel cladding behaviour under loss of coolant accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massih, Ali R. [Quantum Technologies AB, Uppsala Science Park (Sweden)

    2007-02-15

    Extensive range of experiments has been conducted in the past to quantitatively identify and understand the behaviour of fuel rod under loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions in light water reactors (LWRs). The obtained experimental data provide the basis for the current emergency core cooling system acceptance criteria under LOCA conditions for LWRs. The results of recent experiments indicate that the cladding alloy composition and high burnup effects influence LOCA acceptance criteria margins. In this report, we review some past important and recent experimental results. We first discuss the background to acceptance criteria for LOCA, namely, clad embrittlement phenomenology, clad embrittlement criteria (limitations on maximum clad oxidation and peak clad temperature) and the experimental bases for the criteria. Two broad kinds of test have been carried out under LOCA conditions: (i) Separate effect tests to study clad oxidation, clad deformation and rupture, and zirconium alloy allotropic phase transition during LOCA. (ii) Integral LOCA tests, in which the entire LOCA sequence is simulated on a single rod or a multi-rod array in a fuel bundle, in laboratory or in a tests and results are discussed and empirical correlations deduced from these tests and quantitative models are conferred. In particular, the impact of niobium in zirconium base clad and hydrogen content of the clad on allotropic phase transformation during LOCA and also the burst stress are discussed. We review some recent LOCA integral test results with emphasis on thermal shock tests. Finally, suggestions for modelling and further evaluation of certain experimental results are made.

  9. High-Temperature Tolerance in Multi-Scale Cermet Solar-Selective Absorbing Coatings Prepared by Laser Cladding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xuming; Wei, Qian; Zhou, Jianxin; Ma, Huiyang

    2018-06-19

    In order to achieve cermet-based solar absorber coatings with long-term thermal stability at high temperatures, a novel single-layer, multi-scale TiC-Ni/Mo cermet coating was first prepared using laser cladding technology in atmosphere. The results show that the optical properties of the cermet coatings using laser cladding were much better than the preplaced coating. In addition, the thermal stability of the optical properties for the laser cladding coating were excellent after annealing at 650 °C for 200 h. The solar absorptance and thermal emittance of multi-scale cermet coating were 85% and 4.7% at 650 °C. The results show that multi-scale cermet materials are more suitable for solar-selective absorbing coating. In addition, laser cladding is a new technology that can be used for the preparation of spectrally-selective coatings.

  10. High-Temperature Tolerance in Multi-Scale Cermet Solar-Selective Absorbing Coatings Prepared by Laser Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuming Pang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve cermet-based solar absorber coatings with long-term thermal stability at high temperatures, a novel single-layer, multi-scale TiC-Ni/Mo cermet coating was first prepared using laser cladding technology in atmosphere. The results show that the optical properties of the cermet coatings using laser cladding were much better than the preplaced coating. In addition, the thermal stability of the optical properties for the laser cladding coating were excellent after annealing at 650 °C for 200 h. The solar absorptance and thermal emittance of multi-scale cermet coating were 85% and 4.7% at 650 °C. The results show that multi-scale cermet materials are more suitable for solar-selective absorbing coating. In addition, laser cladding is a new technology that can be used for the preparation of spectrally-selective coatings.

  11. Western and WWER materials investigations - past lessons, present achievements and future trends for fuel rod cladding and fuel assembly structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidinger, H.

    2001-01-01

    The paper gives a detailed overview of Western and WWER materials used in nuclear fuel manufacturing industry. The status of technical experience with regard to design, fabrication and particular in-pile behavior is described and compared for material of major importance for PWR and WWER fuel. In particular Zr-base alloys for cladding tubes, spacer grids and guide thimbles are considered. In addition spacer spring materials are also discussed. The paper shows that during the last decade a considerable diversification of different Zr materials occurred in Western PWR fuel, while for WWER fuel the focus is still on the classical Zr1%Nb material. Corrosion and hydrogen uptake as well as the dimensional behavior (creep and growth) of all presently relevant Zr-based materials is described in detail. For spacer springs Zr-based and Ni-based materials are considered. For this application spring force relaxation is the most important issue. The paper shows that the focus of consideration is typically different for PWR and WWER fuel materials. While for PWR fuel mainly corrosion and hydrogen uptake is most important and design limiting, for WWER fuel the focus of interests is with mechanical strength. The main reason for this significant difference is that the corrosive environment is typically different for PWR and WWER cores

  12. Simulation and Measurement of Through-the-Earth, Extremely Low-Frequency Signals Using Copper-Clad Steel Ground Rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Nicholas William; Yan, Lincan; Whisner, Bruce; Zhou, Chenming

    2017-01-01

    The underground mining environment can greatly affect radio signal propagation. Understanding how the earth affects signal propagation is a key to evaluating communications systems used during a mine emergency. One type of communication system is through-the-earth, which can utilize extremely low frequencies (ELF). This paper presents the simulation and measurement results of recent National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) research aimed at investigating current injection at ELF, and in particular, ground contact impedance. Measurements were taken at an outside surface testing location. The results obtained from modeling and measurement are characterized by electrode impedance, and the voltage received between two distant electrodes. This paper concludes with a discussion of design considerations found to affect low-frequency communication systems utilizing ground rods to inject a current into the earth.

  13. Dynamics of a BWR with inclusion of boiling nonlinearity, clad temperature and void-dependent core power removal: Stability and bifurcation characteristics of advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Dinkar, E-mail: dinkar@iitk.ac.in [Nuclear Engineering and Technology Program, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India); Kalra, Manjeet Singh, E-mail: drmanjeet.singh@dituniversity.edu.in [DIT University, Dehradun 248 009 (India); Wahi, Pankaj, E-mail: wahi@iitk.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2016-11-15

    the models. We find that boiling nonlinearity and void-dependent power removal from the primary loop increases the supercritical region while inclusion of clad temperature to include fuel rod heat transfer increases the subcritical regime.

  14. Temperature and humidity effects on the corrosion of aluminium-base reactor fuel cladding materials during dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, H.B.; Sindelar, R.L.; Lam, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on the high temperature (up to 200 deg. C) corrosion of aluminum cladding alloys was investigated for dry storage of spent nuclear fuels. A dependency on alloy type and temperature was determined for saturated water vapor conditions. Models were developed to allow prediction of cladding behaviour of 1100, 5052, and 6061 aluminum alloys for up to 50+ years at 100% relative humidity. Calculations show that for a closed system, corrosion stops after all moisture and oxygen is used up during corrosion reactions with aluminum alloys. (author)

  15. Analysis of fuel rod behaviour within a rod bundle of a pressurized water reactor under the conditions of a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) using probabilistic methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengpiel, W.

    1980-12-01

    The assessment of fuel rod behaviour under PWR LOCA conditions aims at the evaluation of the peak cladding temperatures and the (final) maximum circumferential cladding strains. Moreover, the estimation of the amount of possible coolant channel blockages within a rod bundle is of special interest, as large coplanar clad strains of adjacent rods may result in strong local reductions of coolant channel areas. Coolant channel blockages of large radial extent may impair the long-term coolability of the corresponding rods. A model has been developed to describe these accident consequences using probabilistic methodology. This model is applied to study the behaviour of fuel rods under accident conditions following the double-ended pipe rupture between collant pump and pressure vessel in the primary system of a 1300 MW(el)-PWR. Specifically a rod bundle is considered consisting of 236 fuel rods, that is subjected to severe thermal and mechanical loading. The results obtained indicate that plastic clad deformations with circumferential clad strains of more than 30% cannot be excluded for hot rods of the reference bundle. However, coplanar coolant channel blockages of significant extent seem to be probable within that bundle only under certain boundary conditions which are assumed to be pessimistic. (orig./RW) [de

  16. Temperature and composition profile during double-track laser cladding of H13 tool steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X.; Yu, G.; Mazumder, J.

    2010-01-01

    Multi-track laser cladding is now applied commercially in a range of industries such as automotive, mining and aerospace due to its diversified potential for material processing. The knowledge of temperature, velocity and composition distribution history is essential for a better understanding of the process and subsequent microstructure evolution and properties. Numerical simulation not only helps to understand the complex physical phenomena and underlying principles involved in this process, but it can also be used in the process prediction and system control. The double-track coaxial laser cladding with H13 tool steel powder injection is simulated using a comprehensive three-dimensional model, based on the mass, momentum, energy conservation and solute transport equation. Some important physical phenomena, such as heat transfer, phase changes, mass addition and fluid flow, are taken into account in the calculation. The physical properties for a mixture of solid and liquid phase are defined by treating it as a continuum media. The velocity of the laser beam during the transition between two tracks is considered. The evolution of temperature and composition of different monitoring locations is simulated.

  17. Simulation of a pellet-clad mechanical interaction with ABAQUS and its verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheon, J.-S.; Lee, B.-H.; Koo, Y.-H.; Sohn, D.-S.; Oh, J.-Y.

    2003-01-01

    Pellet-clad mechanical interaction (PCMI) during power transients for MOX fuel is modelled by a FE method. The PCMI model predicts well clad elongation during power ramp and relaxation during power hold except the fuel behaviour during a power decrease. Higher fiction factor results in the earlier occurrence of PCMI and more enhanced clad elongation. The relaxation is dependent on the irradiation creep rate of the pellet and axial compressive force. Verification of the PCMI model was done using recent MOX experimental data. Temperature and clad elongation for the fuel rod can be evaluated in a reasonable way

  18. Influence on rewetting temperature and wetting delay during rewetting rod bundle by various radial jet models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debbarma, Ajoy; Pandey, Krishna Murari [National Institute of Technology, Assam (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2016-03-15

    Numerical investigation of the rewetting of single sector fuel assembly of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been carried out to exhibit the effect of coolant jet diameters (2, 3 and 4 mm) and jet directions (Model: M, X and X2). The rewetting phenomena with various jet models are compared on the basis of rewetting temperature and wetting delay. Temperature-time curve have been evaluated from rods surfaces at different circumference, radial and axial locations of rod bundle. The cooling curve indicated the presence of vapor in respected location, where it prevents the contact between the firm and fluid phases. The peak wall temperature represents as rewetting temperature. The time period observed between initial to rewetting temperature point is wetting delay. It was noted that as improved in various jet models, rewetting temperature and wetting delay reduced, which referred the coolant stipulation in the rod bundle dominant vapor formation.

  19. Influence on rewetting temperature and wetting delay during rewetting rod bundle by various radial jet models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debbarma, Ajoy; Pandey, Krishna Murari

    2016-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the rewetting of single sector fuel assembly of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been carried out to exhibit the effect of coolant jet diameters (2, 3 and 4 mm) and jet directions (Model: M, X and X2). The rewetting phenomena with various jet models are compared on the basis of rewetting temperature and wetting delay. Temperature-time curve have been evaluated from rods surfaces at different circumference, radial and axial locations of rod bundle. The cooling curve indicated the presence of vapor in respected location, where it prevents the contact between the firm and fluid phases. The peak wall temperature represents as rewetting temperature. The time period observed between initial to rewetting temperature point is wetting delay. It was noted that as improved in various jet models, rewetting temperature and wetting delay reduced, which referred the coolant stipulation in the rod bundle dominant vapor formation.

  20. Fission reactor control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Tomoo.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a control rod in a PWR type reactor. A control rod has an inner cladding tube and an outer cladding tube disposed coaxially, and a water draining hole is formed at the inside of the inner cladding tube. Neutron absorbers are filled in an annular gap between the outer cladding tube and the inner cladding tube. The water draining hole opens at the lower end thereof to the top end of the control rod and at the upper end thereof to the side of the upper end plug of the control rod. If the control rod is dropped to a control rod guide thimble for reactor scram, coolants from the control rod guide thimble are flown from the lower end of the water draining hole and discharged from the upper end passing through the water draining hole. In this way, water from the control rod guide thimble is removed easily when the control rod is dropped. Further, the discharging amount of water itself is reduced by the provision of the water draining hole. Accordingly, sufficient control rod dropping speed can be attained. (I.N.)

  1. Development of a program for evaluating the temperature of SMART-P fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Jin Sik; Lee, Byung Ho; Koo, Yang Hyun; Oh, Je Yong; Yim, Jeong Sik; Sohn, Dong Seong

    2003-11-01

    A code for evaluating the temperature of SMART-P fuel rod has been developed. Finite Element (FE) method is adopted for the developed code sharing the user subroutines which has been prepared for the ABAQUS commercial FE code. The developed program for SMART-P fuel rod corresponds to a nonlinear transient heat transfer problem, and uses a sparse matrix solver for FE equations during iterations at every time step. The verifications of the developed program were conducted using the ABAQUS code. Steady state and transient problems were analyzed for 1/8 rod model due to the symmetry of the fuel rod and full model. From the evaluation of temperature for the 1/8 rod model at steady state, maximal error of 0.18 % was present relative to the ABAQUS result. Analysis for the transient problem using the fuel rod model resulted in the same as the variation of centerline temperature from the ABAQUS code during a hypothetical power transient. Also, given a power depression in fuel meat as a function of burnup, its effect on the centerline temperature was more precisely evaluated by the developed program compared to the ABAQUS code. The distribution of heat flux for the entire cross section and surface was almost identical for the two codes.

  2. Influence of partial blockage of a BWR bundle on heat transfer, cladding temperature, and quenching during bottom flooding or top spraying under simulated LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brand, B.; Gaul, H.P.; Sarkar, J.

    1982-01-01

    In a test facility with two parallel boiling water reactor fuel assemblies, experiments were carried out with top spray and bottom flooding, simulating loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. The flow area restriction, caused by the ballooning of fuel rod cladding within one of the bundles, was provided by blockage plates, which had reductions of 37% in one case and in a second series 70% of the flow area. Test parameters were system pressure (1, 5, and 10 bars), spray (0.68 and 1.02 m 3 /h) and flooding rates (1.5,2, and 3.3 cm/s), power input (520 and 614 kW), and the initial cladding temperature (600 and 800 0 C at midplane) of the heaters. The test results showed no significant variations from those without blockage, except in the blocked region. An enhancement of heat transfer was observed in a close region downstream from the blockage in cases such as bottom flooding and top spray tests. The results will serve the purpose of code verification for reactor LOCA analysis

  3. Investigation of the high temperature steam oxidation of Zircaloy 4 cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leistikow, S.; Berg, H. v.; Kraft, R.; Pott, E.; Schanz, G.

    1979-01-01

    Also for the ORNL Zircaloy 4 cladding material, an intermediate decrease of the proportion of the ZrO 2 /α-phase layer was found, followed by an drastic increase when the breakaway of the ZrO 2 -scale occurred. Other reasons for small divergencies were evaluated, for instance temperature and time measurements, metallographic evaluation of layer thicknesses, consequences of one-sided (ORNL) and double-sided (KfK) oxidation. The so-called anomalous effect of steam oxidation during temperature transients was reproduced qualitatively and-in case that a reduced gain of oxygen was observed-explained by the predominant existence of the monoclinic oxide phase. The creep-rupture tests below 800 0 C showed a moderate prolongation of time-to-rupture when the tests were performed in steam (or after preoxidation in steam) instead of argon. Also slightly reduced maximum circumferential strain could be measured. (orig./RW) [de

  4. Definition of the local fields of velocity, temperature and turbulent characteristics for axial stabilized fluid in arbitrary formed rod bundle assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedov, A.A.; Gagin, V.L.

    1995-01-01

    For the temperature fields in rod clads of experimental assemblies a good agreement have been got with use of prior calculations by subchannel code COBRA-IV-I, from results of which an additional information about δt/δX 3 distribution was taken. The method of definition the local fields of velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, temperature and eddy diffusivities for one-phase axial stabilized fluids in arbitrary formed rod bundle assemblies with invariable upward geometry was developed. According to this model the AGURA code was worked out to calculate local thermal hydraulic problems in combination with temperature fields in fuel rods and constructive elements of fuel assemblies. The method does not use any prior geometric scales and is based only on invariant local flow parameters: turbulent kinetic energy, velocity field deformation tensor and specific work of inner friction. Verification of this method by available experimental data showed a good agreement of calculation data and findings of velocity and t.k.e. fields, when the secondary flows have not a substantial influence to a balance of axial momentum and turbulent kinetic energy. (author)

  5. Thermal and irradiation effects on high-temperature mechanical properties of materials for SCWR fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, F.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Oka, K.

    2009-01-01

    The thermal and irradiation effects on high-temperature mechanical properties are examined for candidate alloys for fuel cladding of supercritical water-cooled reactors (SCRWs). JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) and Experimental Fast Reactor JOYO were utilized for neutron irradiation tests, considering their fluence and temperature. Irradiation was performed with JMTR at 600degC up to 4x10 24 n/m 2 and with JOYO at 600degC and 700degC up to 6x10 25 n/m 2 . Tensile test, creep test and hardness measurement were carried out for high-temperature mechanical properties. Based on the uniaxial creep test, the extrapolation curves were drawn with time-temperature relationships utilizing the Larson and Miller Parameter. Several candidate alloys are expected to satisfy the design requirement from the estimation of the creep rupture stress for 50000 hours. Comparing the creep strengths under irradiated and unirradiated conditions, it was inferred that creep deformation was dominated by the thermal effect rather than the irradiation at SCWR core condition. The microstructure was examined using transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis, focusing on void swelling and helium (He) bubble formation. Void formation was observed in the materials irradiated with JOYO at 600degC but not at 700degC. However, its effect on the deformation of components was estimated to be tolerable since their size and density were negligibly small. The manufacturability of the thin-wall, small-diameter tube was confirmed for the potential candidate alloys through the trial tests in the factory where the fuel cladding tube is manufactured. (author)

  6. High-temperature oxidation kinetics of sponge-based E110 cladding alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong; Garrison, Benton E.; Howell, Mike; Bell, Gary L.

    2018-02-01

    Two-sided oxidation experiments were recently conducted at 900°C-1200 °C in flowing steam with samples of sponge-based Zr-1Nb alloy E110. Although the old electrolytic E110 tubing exhibited a high degree of susceptibility to nodular corrosion and experienced breakaway oxidation rates in a relatively short time, the new sponge-based E110 demonstrated steam oxidation behavior comparable to Zircaloy-4. Sample weight gain and oxide layer thickness measurements were performed on oxidized E110 specimens and compared to oxygen pickup and oxide layer thickness calculations using the Cathcart-Pawel correlation. Our study shows that the sponge-based E110 follows the parabolic law at temperatures above 1015 °C. At or below 1015 °C, the oxidation rate was very low when compared to Zircaloy-4 and can be represented by a cubic expression. No breakaway oxidation was observed at 1000 °C for oxidation times up to 10,000 s. Arrhenius expressions are given to describe the parabolic rate constants at temperatures above 1015 °C and cubic rate constants are provided for temperatures below 1015 °C. The weight gains calculated by our equations are in excellent agreement with the measured sample weight gains at all test temperatures. In addition to the as-fabricated E110 cladding sample, prehydrided E110 cladding with hydrogen concentrations in the 100-150 wppm range was also investigated. The effect of hydrogen content on sponge-based E110 oxidation kinetics was minimal. No significant difference was found between as-fabricated and hydrided samples with regard to oxygen pickup and oxide layer thickness for hydrogen contents below 150 wppm.

  7. Development of program for evaluating the temperature of Zr-U metallic fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, J. S.; Lee, B. H.; Ku, Y. H.; Oh, J. Y.; Im, J. S.; Sohn, D. S.

    2003-01-01

    A code for evaluating the temperature of Zr-U metallic rod has been developed. Finite element (FE) method is adopted for the developed code sharing the user subroutines which has been prepared for the ABAQUS commercial FE code. The developed program for the Zr-U metallic fuel rod corresponds to a nonlinear transient heat transfer problem, and uses a sparse matrix solver for FE equations during iterations at every time step. The verifications of the developed program were conducted using the ABAQUS code. Steady state and transient problems were analyzed for 1/8 rod model due to the symmetry of the fuel rod and full model. From the evaluation of temperature for the 1/8 rod model at steady state, maximal error of 0.18 % was present relative to the ABAQUS result. Analysis for the transient problem using the fuel rod model resulted in the same as the variation of centerline temperature from the ABAQUS code during a hypothetical power transient. The distribution of heat flux for the entire cross section and surface was almost identical for the two codes

  8. Recycling temperature elevation device and temperature control method for control rod driving system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Hajime.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention concerns a device for and a method of controlling a recycling temperature control device for control rod drives (CRD) of a nuclear power plant, which can prevent occurrence of cavitation and keep the amount of cooling water to be transferred to a water source transfer pipeline thereby improving maintenanciability, operationability and reliability. Namely, a supply pipeline supplies cooling water required for the control rod drives from a water source. A CRD pump elevates the pressure of the cooling water. A recycling pipeline is branched from the downstream of the CRD pump of the supply pipeline and connected to the supply pipeline at the upstream of the CRD pump. A first pressure element and a restricting valve disposed at the upstream thereof are connected to the upstream of the CRD pump and the water source transfer pipeline. The water source transfer pipeline is branched from the recycling pipeline and connected to the water source. A second pressure element is disposed to a recycling pipeline at the downstream of the branched point from the water source transfer pipeline. (I.S.)

  9. Refractive index and temperature-sensing characteristics of a cladding-etched thin core fiber interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiying; Dong, Xinran; Chu, Dongkai; Hu, Youwang; Sun, Xiaoyan; Duan, Ji-An

    2018-05-01

    A high refractive index (RI) sensor based on an in-line Mach-Zehnder mode interferometer (MZI) is proposed. The sensor was realized by splicing a 2-cm length of cladding-etched thin core fiber (TCF) between two single mode fibers (SMFs). The TCF-structured MZI exhibited good fringe visibility as high as 15 dB in air and the high RI sensitivity attained a value of 1143.89 nm/RIU at a RI of 1.447. The experimental data revealed that the MZI has high RI sensitivity after HF etching realizing 2599.66 nm/RIU. Studies were performed on the temperature characteristics of the device. It is anticipated that this high RI sensor will be deployed in new and diverse applications in the chemical and biological fields.

  10. High-temperature steam oxidation kinetics of the E110G cladding alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Király, Márton; Kulacsy, Katalin; Hózer, Zoltán; Perez-Feró, Erzsébet; Novotny, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    In the course of recent years, several experiments were performed at MTA EK (Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences) on the isothermal high-temperature oxidation of the improved Russian cladding alloy E110G in steam/argon atmosphere. Using these data and designing additional supporting experiments, the oxidation kinetics of the E110G alloy was investigated in a wide temperature range, between 600 °C and 1200 °C. For short durations (below 500 s) or high temperatures (above 1065 °C) the oxidation kinetics was found to follow a square-root-of-time dependence, while for longer durations and in the intermediate temperature range (800–1000 °C) it was found to approach a cube-root-of-time dependence rather than a square-root one. Based on the results a new best-estimate and a conservative oxidation kinetics model were created. - Highlights: • Steam oxidation kinetics of E110G was studied at MTA EK based on old and new data. • New best-estimate and conservative steam oxidation kinetics were proposed for E110G. • The exponent of oxidation time changed depending on oxidation temperature. • A simple exponential curve was used instead of Arrhenius-type curve for the factor.

  11. Analysis of Double-encapsulated Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Medvedev, Pavel G [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Perez, Danielle Marie [Idaho National Laboratory; Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory

    2014-09-01

    In an LWR fuel rod, the cladding encapsulates the fuel, contains fission products, and transfers heat directly to the water coolant. In some situations, it may be advantageous to separate the cladding from the coolant through use of a secondary cladding or capsule. This may be done to increase confidence that the fuel or fission products will not mix with the coolant, to provide a mechanism for controlling the rod temperature, or to place multiple experimental rodlets within a single housing. With an axisymmetric assumption, it is possible to derive closed-form expressions for the temperature profile in a fuel rod using radially-constant thermal conductivity in the fuel. This is true for both a traditional fuel-cladding rod and a double-encapsulated fuel (fuel, cladding, capsule) configuration. Likewise, it is possible to employ a fuel performance code to analyse both a traditional and a double-encapsulated fuel. In the case of the latter, two sets of gap heat transfer conditions must be imposed. In this work, we review the equations associated with radial heat transfer in a cylindrical system, present analytic and computational results for a postulated power and gas mixture history for IFA-744, and describe the analysis of the AFC-2A, 2B metallic fuel alloy experiments at the Advanced Test Reactor, including the effect of a release of fission products into the cladding-capsule gap. The computational results for these two cases were obtained using BISON, a fuel performance code under development at Idaho National Laboratory.

  12. Lumped-parameter fuel rod model for rapid thermal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, K.R.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1975-07-01

    The thermal behavior of fuel rods during simulated accident conditions is extremely sensitive to the heat transfer coefficient which is, in turn, very sensitive to the cladding surface temperature and the fluid conditions. The development of a semianalytical, lumped-parameter fuel rod model which is intended to provide accurate calculations, in a minimum amount of computer time, of the thermal response of fuel rods during a simulated loss-of-coolant accident is described. The results show good agreement with calculations from a comprehensive fuel-rod code (FRAP-T) currently in use at Aerojet Nuclear Company

  13. Biaxial creep deformation of Zircaloy-4 PWR fuel cladding in the alpha,(alpha + beta) and beta phase temperature ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, A.T.; Healey, T.; Horwood, R.A.L.

    1985-01-01

    The biaxial creep behaviour of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding has been determined at temperatures between 973 - 1073 K in the alpha phase range, in the duplex (alpha + beta) region between 1098 - 1223 K and in the beta phase range between 1323 - 1473 K. This paper presents the creep data together with empirical equations which describe the creep deformation response within each phase region. (author)

  14. Effect of ultra high temperature ceramics as fuel cladding materials on the nuclear reactor performance by SERPENT Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkut, Turgay; Kara, Ayhan; Korkut, Hatun [Sinop Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Energy Engineering

    2016-12-15

    Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) have low density and high melting point. So they are useful materials in the nuclear industry especially reactor core design. Three UHTCs (silicon carbide, vanadium carbide, and zirconium carbide) were evaluated as the nuclear fuel cladding materials. The SERPENT Monte Carlo code was used to model CANDU, PWR, and VVER type reactor core and to calculate burnup parameters. Some changes were observed at the same burnup and neutronic parameters (keff, neutron flux, absorption rate, and fission rate, depletion of U-238, U-238, Xe-135, Sm-149) with the use of these UHTCs. Results were compared to conventional cladding material zircalloy.

  15. High temperature oxidation test of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Takeshi; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Matsuda, Yasushi

    2006-07-01

    In a feasibility study of ODS steel cladding, its high temperature oxidation resistance was evaluated. Although addition of Cr is effective for preventing high temperature oxidation, excessively higher amount of Cr leads to embrittlement due to the Cr-rich α' precipitate formation. In the ODS steel developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), the Cr content is controlled in 9Cr-ODS martensite and 12Cr-ODS ferrite. In this study, high temperature oxidation test was conducted for ODS steels, and their results were compared with that of conventional austenitic stainless steel and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. Following results were obtained in this study. (1) 9Cr-ODS martensitic and 12Cr-ODS ferritic steel have superior high temperature oxidation resistance compared to 11mass%Cr PNC-FMS and even 17mass% SUS430 and equivalent to austenitic PNC316. (2) The superior oxidation resistance of ODS steel was attributed to earlier formation of the protective alpha-Cr 2 O 3 layer at the matrix and inner oxide scale interface. The grain size of ODS steel is finer than that of PNC-FMS, so the superior oxidation resistance of ODS steel can be attributed to the enhanced Cr-supplying rate throughout the accelerated grain boundary diffusion. Finely dispersed Y 2 O 3 oxide particles in the ODS steel matrix may also stabilized the adherence between the protective alpha-Cr 2 O 3 layer and the matrix. (author)

  16. Progress In Developing an Impermeable, High Temperature Ceramic Composite for Advanced Reactor Clad And Structural Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, Herbert; Hao, Bernard; Fehrenbacher, Larry; Patterson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Most Advanced Reactors for Energy and Space Applications require higher temperature materials for fuel cladding and core internal structures. For temperatures above 500 deg. C, metal alloys do not retain sufficient strength or long term corrosion resistance for use in either water, liquid metal or gas cooled systems. In the case of water cooled systems, such metals react exo-thermically with water during core overheating accidents, thus requiring extensive and expensive emergency systems to protect against major releases. Past efforts to apply ceramic composites (oxide, carbide or nitride based) having passive safety characteristics, good strength properties at high temperatures, and reasonable resistance to crack growth, have not been successful, either because of irradiation induced effects, or lack of impermeability to fission gases. Under a Phase 1 SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) project sponsored by DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, the authors have developed a new material system that may solve these problems. A hybrid tubular structure (0.6 inches in outside diameter) consisting of an inner layer of monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) and outer layers of SiC-SiC composite, bonded to the inner layer, has been fabricated in small lengths. Room temperature permeability tests demonstrate zero gas leakage at pressures up to 120 psig internal pressure. Four point flexural bending tests on these hybrid tubular specimens demonstrate a 'graceful' failure mode: i.e. - the outer composite structure sustains a failure mode under stress that is similar to the yield vs. stress characteristics of metal structures. (authors)

  17. Fuel Retention Improvement at High Temperatures in Tungsten-Uranium Dioxide Dispersion Fuel Elements by Plasma-Spray Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.; Caves, Robert M.

    1964-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the feasibility of depositing integrally bonded plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings onto 80-volume-percent tungsten - 20-volume-percent uranium dioxide composites. These composites were face clad with thin tungsten foil to inhibit uranium dioxide loss at elevated temperatures, but loss at the unclad edges was still significant. By preheating the composite substrates to approximately 3700 degrees F in a nitrogen environment, metallurgically bonded tungsten coatings could be obtained directly by plasma spraying. Furthermore, even though these coatings were thin and somewhat porous, they greatly inhibited the loss of uranium dioxide. For example, a specimen that was face clad but had no edge cladding lost 5.8 percent uranium dioxide after 2 hours at 4750 dgrees F in flowing hydrogen. A similar specimen with plasma-spray-coated edges, however, lost only 0.75 percent uranium dioxide under the same testing conditions.

  18. Anisotropic Azimuthal Power and Temperature distribution on FuelRod. Impact on Hydride Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Ivanov, Kostadin [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Arramova, Maria [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Hales, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-29

    The degradation of the zirconium cladding may limit nuclear fuel performance. In the high temperature environment of a reactor, the zirconium in the cladding corrodes, releasing hydrogen in the process. Some of this hydrogen is absorbed by the cladding in a highly inhomogeneous manner. The distribution of the absorbed hydrogen is extremely sensitive to temperature and stress concentration gradients. The absorbed hydrogen tends to concentrate near lower temperatures. This hydrogen absorption and hydride formation can cause cladding failure. This project set out to improve the hydrogen distribution prediction capabilities of the BISON fuel performance code. The project was split into two primary sections, first was the use of a high fidelity multi-physics coupling to accurately predict temperature gradients as a function of r, θ , and z, and the second was to use experimental data to create an analytical hydrogen precipitation model. The Penn State version of thermal hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF) was successfully coupled to the DeCART neutronics code. This coupled system was verified by testing and validated by comparison to FRAPCON data. The hydrogen diffusion and precipitation experiments successfully calculated the heat of transport and precipitation rate constant values to be used within the hydrogen model in BISON. These values can only be determined experimentally. These values were successfully implemented in precipitation, diffusion and dissolution kernels that were implemented in the BISON code. The coupled output was fed into BISON models and the hydrogen and hydride distributions behaved as expected. Simulations were conducted in the radial, axial and azimuthal directions to showcase the full capabilities of the hydrogen model.

  19. Mechanical behaviour of PWR fuel rods during intermediate storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouffioux, P.; Dalmas, R.; Bernaudat, C.

    2000-01-01

    EDF, which owns the irradiated fuel coming from its NPPs, has initiated studies regarding the mechanical behaviour of a fuel rod and the integrity of its cladding, in the case where the spent fuel is stored for a significant duration. During the phases following in-reactor irradiation (ageing in a water-pool, transport and intermediate storage), many phenomena, which are strongly coupled, may influence the cladding integrity: - residual power and temperature decay; - helium production and release in the free volume of the rod (especially for MOX fuel); - fuel column swelling; - cladding creep-out under the inner gas pressure of the fuel rod; - metallurgical changes due to high temperatures during transportation. In parallel, the quantification of the radiological risk is based on the definition of a cladding integrity criterion. Up to now, this criterion requires that the clad hoop strain due to creep-out does not exceed 1%. A more accurate criterion is being investigated. The study and modelling of all the phenomena mentioned above are included in a R and D programme. This programme also aims at redefining the cladding integrity criterion, which is assumed to be too conservative. The R and D programme will be presented. In order to predict the overall behaviour of the rod during the intermediate storage phases, the AVACYC code has been developed. It includes the models developed in the R and D programme. The input data of the AVACYC code are provided by the results of in-reactor rod behaviour simulations, using the thermal-mechanical CYRANO3 code. Its main results are the evolution vs. time of hoop stresses in the cladding, rod internal pressure and cladding hoop strains. Chained CYRANO-AVACYC calculations have been used to simulate the behaviour of MOX fuel rods irradiated up to 40 GWd/t and stored under air during 100 years, or under water during 50 years. For such fuels, where the residual power remains high, we show that a large part of the cladding strain

  20. Experimental study on the temperature conditions for rod and plane irradiators with 60Co source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, G.D.; Osipov, V.B.; Sarapkin, I.I.; Chizhikov, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    The formation of a temperature field of rod and flat 60 Co irradiators has been studied. The experiments are carried out on a gamma installation. It has been shown that for a stationary operating mode the maximum cassette temperature (when the cassette contains a 60 Co source) is 148 deg C at maximum permissible temperature of 250 deg C. When ampoules containing the sources with maximum activity (640 Ci) are loaded into cassettes they have the temperature of 184 deg C. The reciprocal screening influence of rod irradiators gives the temperature rise of 8-10 deg in each element. The irradiators under study reach a stationary thermal operating mode in 150 min after the sources are elevated to the operating position

  1. Metallurgical and mechanical behaviours of PWR fuel cladding tube oxidised at high temperature; Comportements metallurqigue et mecanique des materiaux de gainage du combustible REP oxydes a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, A

    2007-12-15

    Zirconium alloys are used as cladding materials in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). As they are submitted to very extreme conditions, it is necessary to check their behaviour and especially to make sure they meet the safety criteria. They are therefore studied under typical in service-loadings but also under accidental loadings. In one of these accidental scenarios, called Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) the cladding temperature may increase above 800 C, in a steam environment, and decrease before a final quench of the cladding. During this temperature transient, the cladding is heavily oxidised, and the metallurgical changes lead to a decrease of the post quench mechanical properties. It is then necessary to correlate this drop in residual ductility to the metallurgical evolutions. This is the problem we want to address in this study: the oxidation of PWR cladding materials at high temperature in a steam environment and its consequences on post quench mechanical properties. As oxygen goes massively into the metallic part - a zirconia layer grows at the same time - during the high temperature oxidation, the claddings tubes microstructure shows three different phases that are the outer oxide layer (zirconia) and the inner metallic phases ({alpha}(O) and 'ex {beta}') - with various mechanical properties. In order to reproduce the behaviour of this multilayered material, the first part of this study consisted in creating samples with different - but homogeneous in thickness - oxygen contents, similar to those observed in the different phases of the real cladding. The study was especially focused on the {beta}-->{alpha} phase transformation upon cooling and on the resulting microstructures. A mechanism was proposed to describe this phase transformation. For instance, we conclude that for our oxygen enriched samples, the phase transformation kinetics upon cooling are ruled by the oxygen partitioning between the two allotropic phases. Then, these materials

  2. High-temperature air oxidation of E110 and Zr-1%Nb alloys claddings with coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuprin, A.S.; Belous, V.A.; Voyevodin, V.N.; Bryk, V.V.; Vasilenko, R.L.; Ovcharenko, V.D.; Tolmachova, G.N.; V'yugov, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    Results of experimental study of the influence of protective vacuum-arc claddings on the base of compounds zirconium-chromium and of its nitrides on air oxidation resistance at temperatures 660, 770, 900, 1020, 1100 deg C during 3600 s. of tubes produced of zirconium alloys E110 and Zr-1%Nb (calcium-thermal alloy of Ukrainian production) are presented. Change of hardness, the width of oxide layer and depth of oxygen penetration into alloys from the side of coating and without coating are investigated by the methods of nanoindentation and by scanning electron microscopy. It is shown that the thickness of oxide layer in zirconium alloys at temperatures 1020 and 1100 deg C from the side of the coating doesn't exceed 5 μm, and from the unprotected side reaches the value of ≥ 120 μm with porous and rough structure. Tubes with coatings save their shape completely independently of the type of alloy; tubes without coatings deform with the production of through cracks

  3. Evaluation of LWR fuel rod behavior under operational transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, M.; Hiramoto, K.; Maru, A.

    1984-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of fission gas flow and diffusion in the fuel-cladding gap on fuel rod thermal and mechanical behaviors in light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods under operational transient conditions, computer sub-programs which can calculate the gas flow and diffusion have been developed and integrated into the LWR fuel rod performance code BEAF. This integrated code also calculates transient temperature distribution in the fuel-pellet and cladding. The integrated code was applied to an analysis of Inter Ramp Project data, which showed that by taking into account the gas flow and diffusion effects, the calculated cladding damage indices predicted for the failed rods in the ramp test were consistent with iodine-SCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking) failure conditions which were obtained from out-of-reactor pressurized tube experiments with irradiated Zircaloy claddings. This consistency was not seen if the gas flow and diffusion effects were neglected. Evaluation were also made for the BWR 8x8 RJ fuel rod temperatures under power ramp conditions. (orig.)

  4. Analysis of the Behavior of CAREM-25 Fuel Rods Using Computer Code BACO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estevez, Esteban; Markiewicz, Mario; Marino, Armando

    2000-01-01

    The thermo-mechanical behavior of a fuel rod subjected to irradiation is a complex process, on which a great quantity of interrelated physical-chemical phenomena are coupled.The code BACO simulates the thermo-mechanical behavior and the evolution of fission gases of a cylindrical rod in operation.The power history of fuel rods, arising from neutronic calculations, is the program input.The code calculates, among others, the temperature distribution and the principal stresses in the pellet and cladding, changes in the porosity and restructuring of pellet, the fission gases release, evolution of the internal gas pressure.In this work some of design limits of CAREM-25's fuel rods are analyzed by means of the computer code BACO.The main variables directly related with the integrity of the fuel rod are: Maximum temperature of pellet; Cladding hoop stresses; Gases pressure in the fuel rod; Cladding axial and radial strains, etc.The analysis of results indicates that, under normal operation conditions, the maximum fuel pellet temperature, cladding stresses, pressure of gases at end of life, etc, are below the design limits considered for the fuel rod of CAREM-25 reactor

  5. Deformation behavior of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes under inert gas conditions in the temperature range from 600 to 12000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.; Raff, S.; Gausmann, G.

    1981-07-01

    Within the temperature range from 600 0 to 1200 0 isothermal, isobaric creep rupture experiments were performed under inert gas with short Zircaloy-4 tube specimens in order to obtain experimental data supporting the development of the NORA cladding tube deformation model. The values of the tube inner pressure were so selected that the time-to-failure values varied between 2 and 2000 s. The corresponding creep rupture curves are indicated. Besides the temperature and the burst pressure the development of deformation over time of the tube specimens was measured. This allowed to draw diagrams of stress, strain rate and strain. On account of the type of specimen heating applied (radiation heating) the temperature difference at the cladding tube circumference is very small ( [de

  6. Control rod position and temperature coefficients in HTTR power-rise tests. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Nojiri, Naoki; Takada, Eiji; Saito, Kenji; Kobayashi, Shoichi; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Kokusen, Sigeru

    2001-03-01

    Power-rise tests of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) have been carried out aiming to achieve 100% power. So far, 50% of power operation and many tests have been carried out. In the HTTR, temperature change in core is so large to achieve the outlet coolant temperature of 950degC. To improve the calculation accuracy of the HTTR reactor physics characteristics, control rod positions at criticality and temperature coefficients were measured at each step to achieve 50% power level. The calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo code and diffusion theory with temperature distributions in the core obtained by reciprocal calculation of thermo-hydraulic code and diffusion theory. Control rod positions and temperature coefficients were calculated by diffusion theory and Monte Carlo method. The test results were compared to calculation results. The control rod positions at criticality showed good agreement with calculation results by Monte Carlo method with error of 50 mm. The control position at criticality at 100% was predicted around 2900mm. Temperature coefficients showed good agreement with calculation results by diffusion theory. The improvement of calculation will be carried out comparing the measured results up to 100% power level. (author)

  7. Influence of texture on fracture toughness of zircaloy cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, V. [Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Andersson, Stefan [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-06-01

    The correlation between texture and fracture toughness of Zircaloy 2 cladding has been investigated in connection with axial cracks in fuel rods. The texture of the cladding determines the anisotropy of plasticity of the cladding which, in turn, should influence the strain conditions at the crack-tip. Plastic strains in the cladding under uniaxial tension were characterised by means of the anisotropy constants F, G and H calculated according to Hill`s theory. Test temperatures between 20 and 300 deg C do not influence the F, G and H values. Any significant effect of hydrogen (about 500 wtppm) on the anisotropy constants F, G and H has not been revealed at a test temperature of 300 deg C. The results, obtained for stress-relieved and recrystallized cladding with different texture, show an obvious influence of texture on the fracture toughness of Zircaloy cladding. A higher fracture toughness has been found for cladding with more radial texture. With a 2 page summary in Swedish. 32 refs, 18 figs.

  8. The effect of non-uniform fuel rod temperatures on effective resonance integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichel, A.

    1961-06-01

    The effective resonance integral for heterogeneous lattices can be reduced to the effective resonance integral for an equivalent homogeneous system with a fairly well defined error depending on lump size and geometry. This report investigates the effect of a radial parabolic temperature variation in cylindrical lumps on the equivalent homogeneous effective resonance integral. Also determined is the equivalent uniform temperature to be taken in the usual formulae to allow for non-uniform fuel rod temperature. This effective temperature is found to be T eff. = T s + 4/9 (T c - T s ) where T s and T c are the surface and central temperatures of the lump. (author)

  9. Characteristics of turbulent velocity and temperature in a wall channel of a heated rod bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, T.; Meyer, L. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    Turbulent air flow in a wall sub-channel of a heated 37-rod bundle (P/D = 1.12, W/D = 1.06) was investigated. measurements were performed with hot-wire probe with X-wires and a temperature wire. The mean velocity, the mean fluid temperature, the wall shear stress and wall temperature, the turbulent quantities such as the turbulent kinetic energy, the Reynolds-stresses and the turbulent heat fluxes were measured and are discussed with respect to data from isothermal flow in a wall channel and heated flow in a central channel of the same rod bundle. Also, data on the power spectral densities of the velocity and temperature fluctuations are presented. These data show the existence of large scale periodic fluctuations are responsible for the high intersubchannel heat and momentum exchange.

  10. RODSWELL: a computer code for the thermomechanical analysis of fuel rods under LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casadei, F.; Laval, H.; Donea, J.; Jones, P.M.; Colombo, A.

    1984-01-01

    The code calculates the variation in space and time of all significant fuel rod variables, including fuel, gap and cladding temperature, fuel and cladding deformation, cladding oxidation and rod internal pressure. The code combines a transient 2-dimensional heat conduction code and a 1-dimensional mechanical model for the cladding deformation. The first sections of this report deal with the heat conduction model and the finite element discretization used for the thermal analysis. The mechanical deformation model is presented next: modelling of creep, phase change and oxidation of the zircaloy cladding is discussed in detail. A model describing the effect of oxidation and oxide cracking on the mechanical strength of the cladding is presented too. Next a mechanical restraint model, which allows the simulation of the presence of the neighbouring rods and is particularly important in assessing the amount of channel blockage during a transient, is presented. A description of the models used for the coolant conditions and for the power generation follows. The heat source can be placed either in the fuel or in the cladding, and direct or indirect clad heating by electrical power can be simulated. Then a section follows, dealing with the steady-state and transient types of calculation and with the automatic variable time step selection during the transient. The last sections deal with presentation of results, graphical output, test problems and an example of general application of the code

  11. The improvement of control rod in experimental fast reactor JOYO. The development of a sodium bonded type control rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soga, T.; Miyakawa, S.; Mitsugi, T. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai Engineering Center, Irradiation Center, Irradiation and Administration Section, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Currently, the lifetime of control rods in JOYO is limited by Absorber-Cladding Mechanical Interaction (ACMI) due to swelling of B{sub 4}C(boron carbide) pellets accelerated by relocation of pellet fragments. A sodium bonded type control rod was developed which improves the thermal conductivity by means of charging sodium into the gap between B{sub 4}C and cladding and by utilizing a shroud which wraps the pellet fragments in a thin tube. This new design will be able to enlarge the gap between B{sub 4}C and cladding, without heating B{sub 4}C or fragment relocation, thus extending the life of the control rod. The sodium bonded type will be fabricated as the ninth reload control rods in JOYO. (1) The specification of a sodium bonded type control rod was determined with the wide gap between B{sub 4}C and cladding. In the design simulation, main component temperature were below the maximum limit. And the local heating by helium bubble generated from B{sub 4}C in the sodium gap, was not a serious problem in the analysis which was considered. (2) A structural design for the sodium entrance into the pin was determined. A formula was developed which the limit for sodium charging given physical dimension of the structure and sodium property. Result from sodium out-pile experiments validated the theoretical formula. (3) The analysis of ACMI indicated a lifetime extension of the sodium bonded type by 4.6% in comparison with lifetime of the helium bonded type of 1.6%. This is due to the boron10 burn-up rate being three times higher in the sodium bonded type than in the helium bonded type. To achieve a target burn-up 10% in the future, it will be necessary to modify design based on irradiation data which will be obtained by practical use of the sodium bonded control rods in JOYO. (4) The effects due to Absorber-Cladding Chemical Interaction (ACCI) were reduced by controlling the cladding temperature and chromium coating to the cladding's inner surface. It was confirmed

  12. FRAPCON-3: A computer code for the calculation of steady-state, thermal-mechanical behavior of oxide fuel rods for high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berna, G.A.; Beyer, G.A.; Davis, K.L.; Lanning, D.D.

    1997-12-01

    FRAPCON-3 is a FORTRAN IV computer code that calculates the steady-state response of light water reactor fuel rods during long-term burnup. The code calculates the temperature, pressure, and deformation of a fuel rod as functions of time-dependent fuel rod power and coolant boundary conditions. The phenomena modeled by the code include (1) heat conduction through the fuel and cladding, (2) cladding elastic and plastic deformation, (3) fuel-cladding mechanical interaction, (4) fission gas release, (5) fuel rod internal gas pressure, (6) heat transfer between fuel and cladding, (7) cladding oxidation, and (8) heat transfer from cladding to coolant. The code contains necessary material properties, water properties, and heat-transfer correlations. The codes' integral predictions of mechanical behavior have not been assessed against a data base, e.g., cladding strain or failure data. Therefore, it is recommended that the code not be used for analyses of cladding stress or strain. FRAPCON-3 is programmed for use on both mainframe computers and UNIX-based workstations such as DEC 5000 or SUN Sparcstation 10. It is also programmed for personal computers with FORTRAN compiler software and at least 8 to 10 megabytes of random access memory (RAM). The FRAPCON-3 code is designed to generate initial conditions for transient fuel rod analysis by the FRAPTRAN computer code (formerly named FRAP-T6)

  13. Comparison of the cladding deformation measured during the Power Burst Facility loss-of-coolant accident in-pile experiments with recent Oak Ridge National Laboratory out-of-pile results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broughton, J.M.; McCardell, R.K.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    A series of four large break loss-of-coolant accident fuel behavior experiments have been performed in the Power Burst Facility. The results of these experiments are briefly reviewed and compared with results from the ORNL multirod burst test program. The effect of cladding burst temperature and prior irradiation were investigated. The cladding strain of the previously irradiated test rods was more uniformly distributed around the cladding circumference and larger than for similar unirradiated test rods. The ORNL out-of-pile single rod test results are in good agreement with the Power Burst Facility (PBF) test results with unirradiated test rods, and the ORNL out-of-pile, single-rod test results with heated shrouds and the PBF test results with previously irradiated test rods are comparable

  14. In-cell facility for performing mechanical-property tests on irradiated cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaggee, F.L.; Haglund, R.C.; Mattas, R.F.

    1978-11-01

    A new facility was developed for testing cladding sections of LWR fuel rods. This facility and the accompanying test procedures have improved the level of in-cell mechanical-testing capabilities, making them comparable to existing capabilities for unirradiated cladding. The new facility is currently being used to study the susceptibility of irradiated Zircaloy cladding from LWR fuel rods to iodine stress-corrosion cracking. Preliminary testing results indicate a systematic effect of temperature, stress and irradiation on the susceptibility of annealed and stress-relieved Zircaloy-2. Experimental data obtained to date are being used to develop a stress-corrosion cracking model for LWR fuel rod failure. SEM examination of the undisturbed fracture surface of specimens that failed by pinhole leakage provides useful information on crack propagation and morphology

  15. High-temperature irradiation of niobium-1 w/o zirconium-clad UO/sub 2/. [Compatibility with lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kangilaski, M.; Fromm, E.O.; Lozier, D.H.; Storhok, V.W.; Gates, J.E.

    1965-06-28

    Twenty-four 0.225-in.-diameter and six 0.290-in.-diameter UO/sub 2/ specimens clad with 80 mils of niobium-1 w/o zirconium were irradiated to burnups of 1.4 to 6.0 at. % of uranium at surface temperatures of 900 to 1400/sup 0/C. UO/sub 2/ and lithium were found to be incompatible at these temperatures, and the thick cladding was used primarily to minimize the chances of contact of UO/sub 2/ and the lithium coolant. The thickly clad specimens did not undergo any dimensional changes as a result of irradiation, although it was found that movement of UO/sub 2/ took place in the axial direction by a vaporization-redeposition mechanism. It was found that 32 to 87% of the fission gases was released from the fuel, depending on the temperature of the specimen. Metallographic examination of longitudinal and transverse sections of the specimens indicated the usual UO/sub 2/ microstructure with columnar grains. Grain-boundary thickening was observed in the UO/sub 2/ at higher burnups. The oxygen/uranium ratio of UO/sub 2/ increased with increasing burnup.

  16. Development and Experimental Benchmark of Simulations to Predict Used Nuclear Fuel Cladding Temperatures during Drying and Transfer Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiner, Miles [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2017-03-31

    Radial hydride formation in high-burnup used fuel cladding has the potential to radically reduce its ductility and suitability for long-term storage and eventual transport. To avoid this formation, the maximum post-reactor temperature must remain sufficiently low to limit the cladding hoop stress, and so that hydrogen from the existing circumferential hydrides will not dissolve and become available to re-precipitate into radial hydrides under the slow cooling conditions during drying, transfer and early dry-cask storage. The objective of this research is to develop and experimentallybenchmark computational fluid dynamics simulations of heat transfer in post-pool-storage drying operations, when high-burnup fuel cladding is likely to experience its highest temperature. These benchmarked tools can play a key role in evaluating dry cask storage systems for extended storage of high-burnup fuels and post-storage transportation, including fuel retrievability. The benchmarked tools will be used to aid the design of efficient drying processes, as well as estimate variations of surface temperatures as a means of inferring helium integrity inside the canister or cask. This work will be conducted effectively because the principal investigator has experience developing these types of simulations, and has constructed a test facility that can be used to benchmark them.

  17. Modeling of the PWR fuel mechanical behaviour and particularly study of the pellet-cladding interaction in a fuel rod; Contribution a la modelisation du comportement mecanique des combustibles REP sous irradiation, avec en particulier le traitement de l`interaction pastille-gaine dans un crayon combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hourdequin, N.

    1995-05-01

    In Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) power plants, fuel cladding constitutes the first containment barrier against radioactive contamination. Computer codes, developed with the help of a large experimental knowledge, try to predict cladding failures which must be limited in order to maintain a maximal safety level. Until now, fuel rod design calculus with unidimensional codes were adequate to prevent cladding failures in standard PWR`s operating conditions. But now, the need of nuclear power plant availability increases. That leads to more constraining operating condition in which cladding failures are strongly influenced by the fuel rod mechanical behaviour, mainly at high power level. Then, the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) becomes important, and is characterized by local effects which description expects a multidimensional modelization. This is the aim of the TOUTATIS 2D-3D code, that this thesis contributes to develop. This code allows to predict non-axisymmetric behaviour too, as rod buckling which has been observed in some irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS. By another way, PCI is influenced by under irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS which includes a densification model and a swelling model. The latter can only be used in standard operating conditions. However, the processing structure of this modulus provides the possibility to include any type of model corresponding with other operating conditions. In last, we show the result of these fuel volume variations on the cladding mechanical conditions. (author). 25 refs., 89 figs., 2 tabs., 12 photos., 5 appends.

  18. Modeling of mechanical behavior of quenched zirconium-based nuclear fuel claddings after a high temperature oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera-Salcedo, A.

    2012-01-01

    During the second stage of Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) zirconium-based fuel claddings undergo a high temperature oxidation (up to 1200 C), then a water quench. After a single-side steam oxidation followed by a direct quench, the cladding is composed of three layers: an oxide (Zirconia) outer layer (formed at HT), always brittle at Room Temperature (RT), an intermediate oxygen stabilized alpha layer, always brittle at RT, called alpha(O), and an inner 'prior-beta' layer, which is the only layer able to keep some significant Post Quench (PQ) ductility at RT. However, hydrogen absorbed because of service exposure or during the LOCA transient, concentrates in this layer and may leads to its embrittlement. To estimate the PQ mechanical properties of these materials, Ring Compression Tests (RCT) are widely used because of their simplicity. Small sample size makes RCTs advantageous when a comparison with irradiated samples is required. Despite their good reproducibility, these tests are difficult to interpret as they often present two or more load drops on the engineering load-displacement curve. Laboratories disagree about their interpretation. This study proposes an original fracture scenario for a stratified PQ cladding tested by RCT, and its associated FE model. Strong oxygen content gradient effect on layers mechanical properties is taken into account in the model. PQ thermal stresses resulting from water quench of HT oxidized cladding are investigated, as well as progressive damage of three layers during an RCT. The proposed scenario is based on interrupted RCT analysis, post- RCT sample's outer layers observation for damage evaluation, RCTs of prior-beta single-layer rings, and mechanical behavior of especially chemically adjusted samples. The force displacement curves appearance is correctly reproduced using the obtained FE model. The proposed fracture scenario elucidates RCTs of quenched zirconium-based nuclear fuel

  19. CFD analyses of the rod bowing effect on the subchannel outlet temperature distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekstroem, Karoliina; Toppila, Timo [Fortum Power and Heat, Fortum (Finland)

    2017-09-15

    In the Loviisa 1 and 2 nuclear power plants the subcooling margin of the hottest subchannel of the fuel assembly is monitored. The temperature of the coolant in the hottest subchannel is limited to the constant saturation temperature. Bending of the fuel rods occurs during normal operation due to the differences in the heat profiles of the rods. The coolant temperature will rise more in the subchannel with smaller flow area due to the bending and this has to be taken into account in the safety margin of subchannel enthalpy rise. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to estimate how much the estimated maximum bow of a rod affects the temperature rise of the subchannel. The quantitative uncertainty of the predicted enthalpy rise in fuel bundle subchannel is estimated based on the uncertainty of modelling of mixing between subchannels. The measured turbulence quantities from LDA measurements of cold test assembly made in 1990s in Fortum are compared with CFD results to give uncertainty estimation for turbulence, which is further used for uncertainty estimation of mixing and simulated subchannel enthalpy rise.

  20. International symposium on fuel rod simulators: development and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, R.W. (comp.)

    1981-05-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning fuel rod simulator operation and performance; simulator design and evaluation; clad heated fuel rod simulators and fuel rod simulators for cladding investigations; fuel rod simulator components and inspection; and simulator analytical modeling. Ten papers have previously been input to the Energy Data Base.

  1. Cladding embrittlement during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.; Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Daum, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-31

    The effect of fuel burnup on the embrittlement of various cladding alloys was examined with laboratory tests conducted under conditions relevant to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The cladding materials tested were Zircaloy-4, Zircaloy-2, ZIRLO, M5, and E110. Tests were performed with specimens sectioned from as-fabricated cladding, from prehydrided (surrogate for high-burnup) cladding, and from high-burnup fuel rods which had been irradiated in commercial reactors. The tests were designed to determine for each cladding material the ductile-to-brittle transition as a function of steam oxidation temperature, weight gain due to oxidation, hydrogen content, pre-transient cladding thickness, and pre-transient corrosion-layer thickness. For short, defueled cladding specimens oxidized at 1000-1200 C, ring compression tests were performed to determine post-quench ductility at {le} 135 C. The effect of breakaway oxidation on embrittlement was also examined for short specimens oxidized at 800-1000 C. Among other findings, embrittlement was found to be sensitive to fabrication processes--especially surface finish--but insensitive to alloy constituents for these dilute zirconium alloys used as cladding materials. It was also demonstrated that burnup effects on embrittlement are largely due to hydrogen that is absorbed in the cladding during normal operation. Some tests were also performed with longer, fueled-and-pressurized cladding segments subjected to LOCA-relevant heating and cooling rates. Recommendations are given for types of tests that would identify LOCA conditions under which embrittlement would occur.

  2. Calculation of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity considering non-uniform radial temperature distribution in the fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazirandeh, Ali [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Science and Research Branch; Hooshyar Mobaraki, Almas

    2017-07-15

    The safe operation of a reactor is based on feedback models. In this paper we attempted to discuss the influence of a non-uniform radial temperature distribution on the fuel rod temperature coefficient of reactivity. The paper demonstrates that the neutron properties of a reactor core is based on effective temperature of the fuel to obtain the correct fuel temperature feedback. The value of volume-averaged temperature being used in the calculations of neutron physics with feedbacks would result in underestimating the probable event. In the calculation it is necessary to use the effective temperature of the fuel in order to provide correct accounting of the fuel temperature feedback. Fuel temperature changes in different zones of the core and consequently reactivity coefficient change are an important parameter for analysis of transient conditions. The restricting factor that compensates the inserted reactivity is the temperature reactivity coefficient and effective delayed neutron fraction.

  3. Study of the response of Zircaloy- 4 cladding to thermal shock during water quenching after double sided steam oxidation at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawarn, Tapan K., E-mail: sawarn@barc.gov.in; Banerjee, Suparna; Kumar, Sunil

    2016-05-15

    This study investigates the failure of embrittled Zircaloy-4 cladding in a simulated loss of coolant accident condition and correlates it with the evolved stratified microstructure. Isothermal steam oxidation of Zircaloy-4 cladding at high temperatures (900–1200 °C) with soaking periods in the range 60–900 s followed by water quenching was carried out. The combined oxide + oxygen stabilized α-Zr layer thickness and the fraction of the load bearing phase (recrystallised α-Zr grains + prior β-Zr or only prior β-Zr) of clad tube specimens were correlated with the %ECR calculated using Baker-Just equation. Average oxygen concentration of the load bearing phase corresponding to different oxidation conditions was calculated from the average microhardness using an empirical correlation. The results of these experiments are presented in this paper. Thermal shock sustainability of the clad was correlated with the %ECR, combined oxide+α-Zr(O) layer thickness, fraction of the load bearing phase and its average oxygen concentration. - Highlights: • Response of the embrittled Zircaloy-4 clad towards thermal shock, simulated under LOCA condition was investigated. • Thermal shock sustainability of the clad was correlated with its evolved stratified microstructure. • Cladding fails at %ECR value ≥ 29. • To resist the thermal shock, clad should have load bearing phase fraction > 0.44 and average oxygen concentration < 0.69 wt%.

  4. Temperature distribution, porosity migration and formation of the central void in cylindrical fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotta, R.M.; Roberty, N.C.

    1982-01-01

    The porosity - and temperature distribution in cylindrical fuels rods, were studied by numerical resolution of mass-and energy equation, as well as determining the evolution of the central void radii. The finite difference method with implicit formulation for heat conduction equation and explicit formulation for continuity equation, was used. The Nichols model was used in the determination of the constitutive equation of the porous migration velocity. (E.G.) [pt

  5. Fuel rod pressure in nuclear power reactors: Statistical evaluation of the fuel rod internal pressure in LWRs with application to lift-off probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelinek, Tomas

    2001-02-01

    In this thesis, a methodology for quantifying the risk of exceeding the Lift-off limit in nuclear light water power reactors is outlined. Due to fission gas release, the pressure in the gap between the fuel pellets and the cladding increases with burnup of the fuel. An increase in the fuel-clad gap due to clad creep would be expected to result in positive feedback, in the form of higher fuel temperatures, leading to more fission gas release, higher rod pressure, etc, until the cladding breaks. An increase in the fuel-clad gap that leads to this positive feedback is a phenomenon called Lift-off and is a limitation that must be considered in the fuel core management. Lift-off is a consequence of very high internal fuel rod pressure. The internal fuel rod pressure is therefore used as a Lift-off indicator. The internal fuel rod pressure is closely connected to the fission gas release into the fuel rod plenum and is thus used to increase the database. It is concluded that the dominating error source in the prediction of the pressure in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR), is the power history. There is a bias in the fuel pressure prediction that is dependent on the fuel rod position in the fuel assembly for BWRs. A methodology to quantify the risk of the fuel rod internal pressure exceeding a certain limit is developed; the risk is dependent of the pressure prediction and the fuel rod position. The methodology is based on statistical treatment of the discrepancies between predicted and measured fuel rod internal pressures. Finally, a methodology to estimate the Lift-off probability of the whole core is outlined.

  6. Annealing studies of Zircaloy-2 cladding at 580-850 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    For fuel rod cladding it is important to determine if prior metallurgical condition combined with irradiation damage can influence high temperature deformation, because studies of such deformation are required to produce data for the cladding ballooning models which are used in analysing loss-of-coolant (LOCA). If the behaviour of all cladding conditions during a LOCA can be represented by, say, the annealed condition, then a great deal of experimental work on a multiplicity of cladding conditions can be avoided. By examining the metallographic structure and hardness, the present study determines the time required in the range 580 to 850 deg C for returning Zircaloy cladding to the annealed condition, so that for any transient a point can be specified where the material should have annealed. An equation has been derived to give this information. (author)

  7. Laser cladding with powder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, M.F.; Schneider, Marcel Fredrik

    1998-01-01

    This thesis is directed to laser cladding with powder and a CO2 laser as heat source. The laser beam intensity profile turned out to be an important pa6 Summary rameter in laser cladding. A numerical model was developed that allows the prediction of the surface temperature distribution that is

  8. Fabrication of Tungsten-Rhenium Cladding materials via Spark Plasma Sintering for Ultra High Temperature Reactor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charit, Indrajit; Butt, Darryl; Frary, Megan; Carroll, Mark

    2012-11-05

    This research will develop an optimized, cost-effective method for producing high-purity tungsten-rhenium alloyed fuel clad forms that are crucial for the development of a very high-temperature nuclear reactor. The study will provide critical insight into the fundamental behavior (processing-microstructure- property correlations) of W-Re alloys made using this new fabrication process comprising high-energy ball milling (HEBM) and spark plasma sintering (SPS). A broader goal is to re-establish the U.S. lead in the research field of refractory alloys, such as W-Re systems, with potential applications in very high-temperature nuclear reactors. An essential long-term goal for nuclear power is to develop the capability of operating nuclear reactors at temperatures in excess of 1,000K. This capability has applications in space exploration and some special terrestrial uses where high temperatures are needed in certain chemical or reforming processes. Refractory alloys have been identified as being capable of withstanding temperatures in excess of 1,000K and are considered critical for the development of ultra hightemperature reactors. Tungsten alloys are known to possess extraordinary properties, such as excellent high-temperature capability, including the ability to resist leakage of fissile materials when used as a fuel clad. However, there are difficulties with the development of refractory alloys: 1) lack of basic experimental data on thermodynamics and mechanical and physical properties, and 2) challenges associated with processing these alloys.

  9. Structural cladding /clad structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Structural Cladding /Clad Structures: Studies in Tectonic Building Practice A. Beim CINARK – Centre for Industrialized Architecture, Institute of Architectural Technology, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark ABSTRACT: With point of departure in the pr......Structural Cladding /Clad Structures: Studies in Tectonic Building Practice A. Beim CINARK – Centre for Industrialized Architecture, Institute of Architectural Technology, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark ABSTRACT: With point of departure...... to analyze, compare, and discuss how these various construction solutions point out strategies for development based on fundamentally different mindsets. The research questions address the following issues: How to learn from traditional construction principles: When do we see limitations of tectonic maneuver......, to ask for more restrictive building codes. As an example, in Denmark there are series of increasing demands in the current building legislations that are focused at enhancing the energy performance of buildings, which consequently foster rigid insulation standards and ask for improvement of air...

  10. Fabrication and use of zircaloy/tantalum-sheathed cladding thermocouples and molybdenum/rhenium-sheathed fuel centerline thermocouples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, S.C.; Sepold, L.K.

    1985-01-01

    The thermocouples described in this report are zircaloy/tantalum-sheathed and molybdenum/rhenium alloy-sheathed instruments intended for fuel rod cladding and fuel centerline temperature measurements, respectively. Both types incorporate beryllium oxide insulation and tungsten/rhenium alloy thermoelements. These thermocouples, operated at temperatures of 2000 0 C and above, were developed for use in the internationally sponsored Severe Fuel Damage test series in the Power Burst Facility. The fabrication steps for both thermocouple types are described in detail. A laser-welding attachment technique for the cladding-type thermocouple is presented, and experience with alternate materials for cladding and fuel therocouples is discussed

  11. High Temperature Steam Oxidation Testing of Candidate Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nelson, Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parker, Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parkison, Adam [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2013-12-23

    > formation, which reacted with the specimen to form a liquid reaction product. This behavior was not observed at lower temperatures where gas velocity and H2O content showed typical effects on the reaction rate. For LANL, the capabilities for oxidation testing as well as exploration of a methodology for measurement of hydrogen production of samples during oxidation under water vapor atmospheres is discussed. Results obtained for available commercial alloys are summarized, and data highlighting the performance of molybdenum, a recently proposed cladding material, are presented. Finally, leveraging of these techniques in conjunction with current and companion FCRD programs is discussed with respect to work in FY14.

  12. The development of the fuel rod transient performance analysis code FTPAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Zhijie; Ji Songtao

    2014-01-01

    Fuel rod behavior, especially the integrity of cladding, played an important role in fuel safety research during reactor transient and hypothetical accidents conditions. In order to study fuel rod performance under transient accidents, FTPAC (Fuel Transient Performance Analysis Code) has been developed for simulating light water reactor fuel rod transient behavior when power or coolant boundary conditions are rapidly changing. It is composed of temperature, mechanical deformation, cladding oxidation and gas pressure model. The assessment was performed by comparing FTPAC code analysis result to experiments data and FRAPTRAN code calculations. Comparison shows that, the FTPAC gives reasonable agreement in temperature, deformation and gas pressure prediction. And the application of slip coefficient is more suitable for simulating the sliding between pellet and cladding when the gap is closed. (authors)

  13. Gate-last TiN/HfO2 band edge effective work functions using low-temperature anneals and selective cladding to control interface composition

    KAUST Repository

    Hinkle, C. L.

    2012-04-09

    Silicon N-metal-oxide-semiconductor (NMOS) and P-metal-oxide-semiconductor (PMOS) band edge effective work functions and the correspondingly low threshold voltages (Vt) are demonstrated using standard fab materials and processes in a gate-last scheme employing low-temperature anneals and selective cladding layers. Al diffusion from the cladding to the TiN/HfO2interface during forming gas anneal together with low O concentration in the TiN enables low NMOS Vt. The use of non-migrating W cladding along with experimentally detected N-induced dipoles, produced by increased oxygen in the TiN, facilitates low PMOS Vt.

  14. Gate-last TiN/HfO2 band edge effective work functions using low-temperature anneals and selective cladding to control interface composition

    KAUST Repository

    Hinkle, C. L.; Galatage, R. V.; Chapman, R. A.; Vogel, E. M.; Alshareef, Husam N.; Freeman, C.; Christensen, M.; Wimmer, E.; Niimi, H.; Li-Fatou, A.; Shaw, J. B.; Chambers, J. J.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon N-metal-oxide-semiconductor (NMOS) and P-metal-oxide-semiconductor (PMOS) band edge effective work functions and the correspondingly low threshold voltages (Vt) are demonstrated using standard fab materials and processes in a gate-last scheme employing low-temperature anneals and selective cladding layers. Al diffusion from the cladding to the TiN/HfO2interface during forming gas anneal together with low O concentration in the TiN enables low NMOS Vt. The use of non-migrating W cladding along with experimentally detected N-induced dipoles, produced by increased oxygen in the TiN, facilitates low PMOS Vt.

  15. Distribution of temperature and deformations during resistance butt welding of uranium rods with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatarinov, V.R.; Krasnorutskij, V.S.

    1977-01-01

    Results are described on studying time-temperature and deformation parameters for resistance welding of uranium rods with titanium. It is shown that in the first period of welding (approximately 2/3 tsub(wel.)) the maxima of weld temperature and weld deformation deviate to titanium, and in the final period uranium deformation reaches the level of maximum lateral deformation of titanium. For faying surfaces with minimum weld deformation the joint cleaning of contaminants and oxides is insufficient, which results in lower weld quality

  16. End plug for fuel rod and welding method therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Hiroshi; Murakami, Kazuo; Oyama, Jun-ichi.

    1996-01-01

    An end plug of a fuel rod comprises a pressure-insertion portion having a diameter somewhat greater than the inner diameter of a fuel cladding tube and a welding portion having a diameter substantially the same as the outer diameter of the cladding tube. A V-shaped recess having an outer diameter smaller than the greatest outer diameter of the pressure-insertion portion is formed over the entire circumferential surface of the outer circumference of the connection portion of the pressure-insertion portion and the welding portion. The pressure-insertion portion of the end plug is inserted to the end of the cladding tube till the end of the cladding tube abuts against the inclined surface of the V-shaped recess. The abutting surfaces of the end plug and the cladding tube are subjected to resistance welding in this state. The inner portion bulged from the inclined surface of the V-shaped recess is filled in the recess in a molten state. Lowering of temperature of the cladding tube in the vicinity of the welded portion is decreased by γ heat during reactor operation. Accordingly, lowering of ductility of the cladding tube and degradation of material of the welded region due to segregation of hydrogen in the cladding tube can be suppressed. (I.N.)

  17. BISON Fuel Performance Analysis of FeCrAl cladding with updated properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, Nathan M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-30

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys due to much slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and allow the cladding to remain integral longer in the presence of high temperature steam, making accident mitigation more likely. As a continuation of the development for these alloys, suitability for normal operation must also be demonstrated. This research is focused on modeling the integral thermo-mechanical performance of FeCrAl-cladded fuel during normal reactor operation. Preliminary analysis has been performed to assess FeCrAl alloys (namely Alkrothal 720 and APMT) as a suitable fuel cladding replacement for Zr-alloys, using the MOOSE-based, finite-element fuel performance code BISON and the best available thermal-mechanical and irradiation-induced constitutive properties. These simulations identify the effects of the mechanical-stress and irradiation response of FeCrAl, and provide a comparison with Zr-alloys. In comparing these clad materials, fuel rods have been simulated for normal reactor operation and simple steady-state operation. Normal reactor operating conditions target the cladding performance over the rod lifetime (~4 cycles) for the highest-power rod in the highest-power fuel assembly under reactor power maneuvering. The power histories and axial temperature profiles input into BISON were generated from a neutronics study on full-core reactivity equivalence for FeCrAl using the 3D full core simulator NESTLE. Evolution of the FeCrAl cladding behavior over time is evaluated by using steady-state operating conditions such as a simple axial power profile, a constant cladding surface temperature, and a constant fuel power history. The fuel rod designs and

  18. Rod-Shaped Magnetite Nano/Microparticles Synthesis at Ambient Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaprasad Ankamwar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we reported room temperature synthesis of Fe3O4 rod-shaped nano/microparticles by chemical reduction method from FeCl3 precursor and NaBH4 as the reducing agent in the presence of the pyrrole as a capping agent. The magnetic Fe3O4 particles were characterized by several methods, such as SEM, XRD, FTIR, and TGA. The average aspect ratio of Fe3O4 rod-shaped particles was ~2.8. These particles were redispersed in deionised water to form a colloidal solution and showed magnetic properties. This economical synthesis route is scalable, and Fe3O4 particles can be exploited for various applications such as MRI contrast enhancement, biodiseperations, Ni-Fe batteries, and as a catalyst.

  19. Experimental determination of the local temperature distribution in the cladding tubes of a sodium-cooled pin bundle caused by grid spacers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, R.; Tschoeke, H.

    1980-01-01

    The cladding tubes of reactor core elements are highly stressed structural elements. Their careful design includes the following: (a) the mathematical determination of the maximum cladding tube temperatures; (b) the determination of the maximum permissible fatigue strengths and creep strains of the materials; and (c) the safety distance between the nominal cladding tube hot spots and the permissible extreme cladding tube temperature. The maximum cladding tube temperatures occur on the top edge of the core and, due to radial power gradients, in the wrapper-wall region of a pin bundle. If grid spacers are now used for fixing the pins as in the SNR fuel elements, a careful check must be made of whether and to what degree temperature peaks in the region of the supports have an influence on the cladding tube design. Initial experimental investigations on a sodium-cooled pin bundle model of the SNR-300 fuel element were carried out to throw light on these special problems. This is reported in the following together with the results so far obtained. (U.K.)

  20. Deformation of PWR cladding following a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.; Mann, C.A.

    1979-07-01

    A review is presented of recent experiments to investigate the deformation behaviour of Zircaloy cladding in simulated loss-of-coolant accidents. The behaviour of Zircaloy cladding is shown to be controlled by a complex interaction of metallurgical and heat transfer variables, with the latter having a major influence. There is a significant increase in both diametral strain and the axial extent of deformation in multi-rod compared with single-rod tests. The extent to which this will occur in nuclear-heated tests is not yet known; however, it is expected that the 'smearing' of the gamma-radiation portion of decay heat in such tests will tend to reduce circumferential temperature variations. Opposing this is the influence of the colder control rods in an assembly. The resolution of this dichotomy will require a series of in-reactor multi-rod tests and attendant code development. (author)

  1. Fuel rod-grid interaction wear: in-reactor tests (LWBR development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stackhouse, R.M.

    1979-11-01

    Wear of the Zircaloy cladding of LWBR irradiation test fuel rods, resulting from relative motion between rod and rod support contacts, is reported. Measured wear depths were small, 0.0 to 2.7 mils, but are important in fuel element behavior assessment because of the local loss of cladding thickness, as well as the effect on grid spring forces that laterally restrain the rods. An empirical wear analysis model, based on out-of-pile tests, is presented. The model was used to calculate the wear on the irradiation test fuel rods attributed to a combination of up-and-down motions resulting from power and pressure/temperature cycling of the test reactor, flow-induced vibrations, and assembly handling scratches. The calculated depths are generally deeper than the measured depths

  2. Fuel-rod response during the large-break LOCA Test LOC-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.; Cook, B.A.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    The large break Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) Test LOC-6 was conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory by EG and G Idaho, Inc. The objectives of the PBF LOCA tests are to obtain in-pile cladding ballooning data under blowdown and reflood conditions and assess how well out-of-pile ballooning data represent in-pile fuel rod behavior. The primary objective of the LOC-6 test was to determine the effects of internal rod pressures and prior irradiation on the deformation behavior of fuel rods that reached cladding temperatures high in the alpha phase of zircaloy. Test LOC-6 was conducted with four rods of PWR 15 x 15 design with the exception of fuel stack length (89 cm) and enrichment (12.5 W% 235 U). Each rod was surrounded by an individual flow shroud

  3. Irradiation temperature memorization by retention of krypton-85. Application to the temperature determination for the internal cladding surface of fuel elements in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fremiot, Claude

    1977-01-01

    The temperature of the inner surface of the cladding fuel elements, which can not be measured directly, can be determined after irradiation. During its stage within the reactor, the cladding is bombarded by krypton-85 fission product, which is trapped in the metallic lattice defects. The experience shows that the krypton release during postirradiation heating takes place at the irradiation temperature. This method was applied for PWR fuel element. A very simple model for retention and release of the krypton is proposed. The krypton trap-energy in zircaloy partakes in this model. This technique can be ordered amongst the Hot'Lab' control methods and expert appraisements. It is pointed out that the principal interest in that method is the fact that it does not need any fuel element instrumentation. At the present, this method is being used by CEA for routine-control. [fr

  4. FRAPCON-2: A Computer Code for the Calculation of Steady State Thermal-Mechanical Behavior of Oxide Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna, G. A; Bohn, M. P.; Rausch, W. N.; Williford, R. E.; Lanning, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    FRAPCON-2 is a FORTRAN IV computer code that calculates the steady state response of light Mater reactor fuel rods during long-term burnup. The code calculates the temperature, pressure, deformation, and tai lure histories of a fuel rod as functions of time-dependent fuel rod power and coolant boundary conditions. The phenomena modeled by the code include (a) heat conduction through the fuel and cladding, (b) cladding elastic and plastic deformation, (c) fuel-cladding mechanical interaction, (d) fission gas release, (e} fuel rod internal gas pressure, (f) heat transfer between fuel and cladding, (g) cladding oxidation, and (h) heat transfer from cladding to coolant. The code contains necessary material properties, water properties, and heat transfer correlations. FRAPCON-2 is programmed for use on the CDC Cyber 175 and 176 computers. The FRAPCON-2 code Is designed to generate initial conditions for transient fuel rod analysis by either the FRAP-T6 computer code or the thermal-hydraulic code, RELAP4/MOD7 Version 2.

  5. End-of-life destructive examination of light water breeder reactor fuel rods (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, K.D.

    1987-10-01

    Destructive examination of 12 representative Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods was performed following successful operation in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station for 29,047 effective full power hours, about five years. Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods were unique in that the thorium oxide and uranium-233 oxide fuel was contained within Zircaloy-4 cladding. Destructive examinations included analysis of released fission gas; chemical analysis of the fuel to determine depletion, iodine, and cesium levels; chemical analysis of the cladding to determine hydrogen, iodine, and cesium levels; metallographic examination of the cladding, fuel, and other rod components to determine microstructural features and cladding corrosion features; and tensile testing of the irradiated cladding to determine mechanical strength. The examinations confirmed that Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rod performance was excellent. No evidence of fuel rod failure was observed, and the fuel operating temperature was low (below 2580 0 F at which an increased percentage of fission gas is released). 21 refs., 80 figs., 20 tabs

  6. Model for incorporating fuel swelling and clad shrinkage effects in diffusion theory calculations (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schick, W.C. Jr.; Milani, S.; Duncombe, E.

    1980-03-01

    A model has been devised for incorporating into the thermal feedback procedure of the PDQ few-group diffusion theory computer program the explicit calculation of depletion and temperature dependent fuel-rod shrinkage and swelling at each mesh point. The model determines the effect on reactivity of the change in hydrogen concentration caused by the variation in coolant channel area as the rods contract and expand. The calculation of fuel temperature, and hence of Doppler-broadened cross sections, is improved by correcting the heat transfer coefficient of the fuel-clad gap for the effects of clad creep, fuel densification and swelling, and release of fission-product gases into the gap. An approximate calculation of clad stress is also included in the model

  7. Simulation of fuel rod behaviour during various break LOCAs in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadalla, A.A.; El-Fawal, M.M.

    1996-01-01

    During loss of coolant accident (LOCAs) course of events, attention focuses on fuel rod cladding temperature behaviour. In this study, the DRUFAN analytical model and LOBI-MOD2 experimental modeling scheme for fuel rod temperature behaviour during C L-Break LOCA in PWRs, are described and discussed. These models are applied for the investigation of fuel rod cladding temperature behaviour during LOCA blowdown phase. A spectrum of selected values representing small, intermediate and large CL- Break sizes are considered in the predictions. The results of the predictions demonstrated that calculated heater rod temperature at steady state as well as the transient period up to 1000 sec are going in good agreement with the measured values. However above 1000 sec the calculated temperatures are higher than the measured values. This indicates that code predictions in this period are conservative. The results indicated also that, in case of small CL-break LOCA (0.01 A and 0.01 and 0.03 A), the heater rod cladding temperature don't rise above saturation temperature. However, on the top of the heater rod, DNB is occurred in case of 0.03 A CL break, while for 0.01 A break, DNB didn't occur. In case of intermediate and large CL-break; (0.05 A, 0.10 A and 1 A), the results showed that, the heater rod cladding temperature exceeded the saturation temperature and DNB prevailed in upper and intermediate sections of the core. 15 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Review of Current Criteria of Spent Fuel Rod Integrity during Dry Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Sun Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Song, Kun Woo

    2006-01-01

    A PWR spent fuel has been stored in a wet storage pool in Korea. However, the amount of spent fuel is expected to exceed the capacity of a wet storage pool within 10∼15 years. From the early 1970's, a research on the PWR spent fuel dry storage started because the dry storage system has been economical compared with the wet storage system. The dry storage technology for Zircaloy-clad fuel was assessed and licensed in many countries such as USA, Canada, FRG and Switzerland. In the dry storage system, a clad temperature may be higher than in the wet storage system and can reach up to 400 .deg.. A higher clad temperature can cause cladding failures during the period of dry storage, and thus a dry storage related research has essentially dealt with the prevention of clad degradation. It is temperature and rod internal pressure that cause cladding failures through the mechanisms such as clad creep rupture, hydride re-orientation, and stress-corrosion cracking etc.. In this paper, the current licensing criteria are summarized for the PWR spent fuel dry storage system, especially on spent fuel rod integrity. And it is investigated that an application propriety of existing criteria to Korea spent fuel dry storage system

  9. Failure probabilities of SiC clad fuel during a LOCA in public acceptable simple SMR (PASS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youho, E-mail: euo@kaist.ac.kr; Kim, Ho Sik, E-mail: hskim25@kaist.ac.kr; NO, Hee Cheon, E-mail: hcno@kaist.ac.kr

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Graceful operating conditions of SMRs markedly lower SiC cladding stress. • Steady-state fracture probabilities of SiC cladding is below 10{sup −7} in SMRs. • PASS demonstrates fuel coolability (T < 1300 °C) with sole radiation in LOCA. • SiC cladding failure probabilities of PASS are ∼10{sup −2} in LOCA. • Cold gas gap pressure controls SiC cladding tensile stress level in LOCA. - Abstract: Structural integrity of SiC clad fuels in reference Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) (NuScale, SMART, IRIS) and a commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) are assessed with a multi-layered SiC cladding structural analysis code. Featured with low fuel pin power and temperature, SMRs demonstrate markedly reduced incore-residence fracture probabilities below ∼10{sup −7}, compared to those of commercial PWRs ∼10{sup −6}–10{sup −1}. This demonstrates that SMRs can serve as a near-term deployment fit to SiC cladding with a sound management of its statistical brittle fracture. We proposed a novel SMR named Public Acceptable Simple SMR (PASS), which is featured with 14 × 14 assemblies of SiC clad fuels arranged in a square ring layout. PASS aims to rely on radiative cooling of fuel rods during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) by fully leveraging high temperature tolerance of SiC cladding. An overarching assessment of SiC clad fuel performance in PASS was conducted with a combined methodology—(1) FRAPCON-SiC for steady-state performance analysis of PASS fuel rods, (2) computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT for radiative cooling rate of fuel rods during a LOCA, and (3) multi-layered SiC cladding structural analysis code with previously developed SiC recession correlations under steam environments for both steady-state and LOCA. The results show that PASS simultaneously maintains desirable fuel cooling rate with the sole radiation and sound structural integrity of fuel rods for over 36 days of a LOCA without water supply. The stress level of

  10. A model for asymmetric ballooning and analyses of ballooning behaviour of single rods with probabilistic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keusenhoff, J.G.; Schubert, J.D.; Chakraborty, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    Plastic deformation behaviour of Zircaloy cladding has been extensively examined in the past and can be described best by a model for asymmetric deformation. Slight displacement between the pellet and cladding will always exist and this will lead to the formation of azimuthal temperature differences. The ballooning process is strongly temperature dependent and, as a result of the built up temperature differences, differing deformation behaviours along the circumference of the cladding result. The calculated ballooning of cladding is mainly influenced by its temperature, the applied burst criterion and the parameters used in the deformation model. All these influencing parameters possess uncertainties. In order to quantify these uncertainties and to estimate distribution functions of important parameters such as temperature and deformation the response surface method was applied. For a hot rod the calculated standard deviation of cladding temperature amounts to 50 K. From this high value the large influence of the external cooling conditions on the deformation and burst behaviour of cladding can be estimated. In an additional statistical examination the parameters of deformation and burst models have been included and their influence on the deformation of the rod has been studied. (author)

  11. CANSWEL-2: a computer model of the creep deformation of Zircaloy cladding under loss-of-coolant accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haste, T.J.

    1982-07-01

    The CANSWEL-2 code models cladding creep deformation under conditions relevant to a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurised water reactor (PWR). It considers in detail the centre rod of a 3 x 3 nominally square array, taking into account azimuthal non-uniformities in cladding thickness and temperature, and the mechanical restraint imposed on contact with neighbouring rods. Any of the rods in the array may assume a non-circular shape. Models are included for primary and secondary creep, dynamic phase change and superplasticity when both alpha- and beta-phase Zircaloy are present. A simple treatment of oxidation strengthening is incorporated. Account is taken of the anisotropic creep behaviour of alpha-phase Zircaloy which leads to cladding bowing. The CANSWEL-2 model is used both as a stand-alone code and also as part of the LOCA analysis code MABEL-2. (author)

  12. Silver-indium-cadmium control rod behaviour during a severe reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowsher, B.R.; Jenkins, R.A.; Nichols, A.L.; Rowe, N.A.; Simpson, J.A.H.

    1986-04-01

    An alloy of silver, indium and cadmium is commonly used as control rod material in pressurised water reactors (PWRs). The behaviour of this alloy has been studied in a series of experiments using an induction furnace to achieve temperatures up to 1900K. The aerosols released from overheated clad and unclad control rod samples have been characterised in both steam and inert atmospheres. Mass balance experiments have been undertaken to determine the distribution of the control rod alloy constituents following rupture of the cladding, and this work has been supported by thermogravimetric studies of silver-indium mixtures. Metallographic studies were also undertaken to assess the failure mode of the stainless steel cladding and the interaction of the molten alloy with Zircaloy. The results of this work are discussed in terms of aerosol/vapour behaviour during severe reactor accidents. (author)

  13. FREC-4A: a computer program to predict fuel rod performance under normal reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harayama, Yasuo; Izumi, Fumio

    1981-10-01

    The program FREC-4A (Fuel Reliability Evaluation Code-version 4A) is used for predicting fuel rod performance in normal reactor operation. The performance is calculated in accordance with the irradiation history of fuel rods. Emphasis is placed on the prediction of the axial elongation of claddings induced by pellet-cladding mechanical interaction, including the influence of initially preloaded springs inserted in fuel rod lower plenums. In the FREC-4A, an fuel rod is divided into axial segments. In each segment, it is assumed that the temperature, stress and strain are axi-symmetrical, and the axial strain in constant in fuel pellets and in a cladding, though the values in the pellets and in the cladding are different. The calculation of the contact load and the clearance along the length of a fuel rod and the stress and strain in each segment is explained. The method adopted in the FREC-4A is simple, and suitable to predict the deformation of fuel rods over their full length. This report is described on the outline of the program, the method of solving the stiffness equations, the calculation models, the input data such as irradiation history, output distribution, material properties and pores, the printing-out of input data and calculated results. (Kako, I.)

  14. Experimental study and modeling of high-temperature oxidation and phase transformation of cladding-tubes made in zirconium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeres, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    One of the hypothetical accident studied in the field of the safety studies of Pressurized light Water Reactor (PWR) is the Loss-Of-Coolant-Accident (LOCA). In this scenario, zirconium alloy fuel claddings could undergo an important oxidation at high temperature (T≅ 1200 C) in a steam environment. Cladding tubes constitute the first confinement barrier of radioelements and then it is essential that they keep a certain level of ductility after quenching to ensure their integrity. These properties are directly related to the growth kinetics of both the oxide and the αZr(O) phase and also to the oxygen diffusion profile in the cladding tube after the transient. In this context, this work was dedicated to the understanding and the modeling of the both oxidation phenomenon and oxygen diffusion in zirconium based alloys at high temperature. The numerical tool (EKINOX-Zr) used in this thesis is based on a numerical resolution of a diffusion/reaction problem with equilibrium-conditions on three moving boundaries: gas/oxide, oxide/αZr(O), αZr(O)/βZr. EKINOX-Zr kinetics model is coupled with ThermoCalc software and the Zircobase database to take into account the influence of the alloying elements (Sn, Fe, Cr, Nb) but also the influence of hydrogen on the solubility of oxygen. This study focused on two parts of the LOCA scenario: the influence of a pre-oxide layer (formed in-service) and the effects of hydrogen. Thanks to the link between EKINOX-Zr and the thermodynamic database Zircobase, the hydrogen effects on oxygen solubility limit could be considered in the numerical simulations. Thus, simulations could reproduce the oxygen diffusion profiles measured in pre-hydrided samples. The existence of a thick pre-oxide layer on cladding tubes can induce a reduction of this pre-oxide layer before the growth of a high-temperature one during the high temperature dwell under steam. The first simulations performed using the numerical tool EKINOX-Zr showed that this particular

  15. High-temperature steam-oxidation behavior of Zr-1Nb-1Sn-0.1Fe cladding tube at temperatures of 800-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Cheol Min; Cho, Tae Won; Jeong, Gwan Yoon; Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Hee Jae; Sohn, Dong Seong; Mok, Yong Kyoon

    2016-01-01

    To prevent cladding failure, NRC issued a regulation Title 10 § 50.46, which specifies cladding temperature of 1204 .deg. C and 17% ECR should not be exceeded. The fundamental reason of the mechanical degradation of cladding is the formation of the oxide which is brittle. Theoretically, the oxide layer is formed following parabolic rate. However, from many experiments, sub-parabolic rates are often observed. There have been many suggestions so far; chemical and stress gradient across the oxide layer could initiate the sub-parabolic rate, the phase transformation of Zirconium dioxide from tetragonal to monoclinic could be the reason, change of the grain size of Zirconium dioxide could cause the cubic oxidation rate, and there is a suggestion that if electron migration is the major mechanism of the oxide growth, then the subparabolic rate can show up. However, the reason why the sub-parabolic rate appears is still not certain. Another important degradation mechanism is breakaway oxidation. A clear explanation that why the breakaway oxidation appears is still not clear. Most of the people believe the phase transformation of Zirconium dioxide cause instability within the oxide, which causes breakaway oxidation to appear. However, how much effect is caused from the phase transformation is not so sure. In this study, detailed analysis about the oxidation kinetics and the breakaway oxidation of Zr-1Nb-1Sn- 0.1Fe were carried out at temperatures between 800 - 1000 .deg. C.

  16. Eddy-current inspection of high flux isotope reactor nuclear control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.H.; Chitwood, L.D.

    1981-07-01

    Inner control rods for the High Flux Isotope Reactor were nondestructively inspected for defects by eddy-current techniques. During these examinations aluminum cladding thickness and oxide thickness on the cladding were also measured. Special application techniques were required because of the high-radiation levels (approx. 10 5 R/h at 30 cm) present and the relatively large temperature gradients that occurred on the surface of the control rods. The techniques used to perform the eddy-current inspections and the methods used to reduce the associated data are described

  17. RODSWELL: a computer code for the thermomechanical analysis of fuel rods under LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casadei, F.; Laval, H.; Donea, J.; Jones, P.M.; Colombo, A.

    1984-01-01

    The present report is the user's manual for the computer code RODSWELL developed at the JRC-Ispra for the thermomechanical analysis of LWR fuel rods under simulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. The code calculates the variation in space and time of all significant fuel rod variables, including fuel, gap and cladding temperature, fuel and cladding deformation, cladding oxidation and rod internal pressure. The essential characteristics of the code are briefly outlined here. The model is particularly designed to perform a full thermal and mechanical analysis in both the azimuthal and radial directions. Thus, azimuthal temperature gradients arising from pellet eccentricity, flux tilt, arbitrary distribution of heat sources in the fuel and the cladding and azimuthal variation of coolant conditions can be treated. The code combines a transient 2-dimensional heat conduction code and a 1-dimentional mechanical model for the cladding deformation. The fuel rod is divided into a number of axial sections and a detailed thermomechanical analysis is performed within each section in radial and azimuthal directions. In the following sections, instructions are given for the definition of the data files and the semi-variable dimensions. Then follows a complete description of the input data. Finally, the restart option is described

  18. Fuel rod simulator effects in flooding experiments single rod tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, M.

    1984-09-01

    The influence of a gas filled gap between cladding and pellet on the quenching behavior of a PWR fuel rod during the reflood phase of a LOCA has been investigated. Flooding experiments were conducted with a short length electrically heated single fuel rod simulator surrounded by glass housing. The gap of 0.05 mm width between the Zircaloy cladding and the internal Al 2 O 3 pellets of the rod was filled either wit helium or with argon to vary the radial heat resistance across the gap. This report presents some typical data and an evaluation of the reflood behavior of the fuel rod simulator used. The results show that the quench front propagates faster for increasing heat resistance in the gap between cladding and heat source of the rod. (orig.) [de

  19. Temperature estimates from the Zircaloy oxidation kinetics in the α plus β phase region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Oxidation rates of Zircaloy in steam were measured at temperatures between 961 and 1264 K and for duration times between 25 and 1900 seconds in order to calculate, in conjunction with measurements from postirradiation metallographic examination, the prior peak temperatures of Zircaloy fuel rod cladding. These temperature estimates will be used in light water reactor research programs to assess (a) the accuracy of temperature measurements of fuel rod cladding peak temperatures from thermocouples attached to the surface during loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCEs), (b) the perturbation of the fuel rod cladding LOCE temperature history caused by the presence of thermocouples, and (c) the measurements of cladding azimuthal temperature gradients near the thermocouple locations

  20. The effect of mechanical restraint on the deformation of Zircaloy cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.; Haste, T.J.

    1980-10-01

    Zircaloy cladding, deformed at temperatures postulated for loss-of-coolant accidents, can exhibit considerable ductility. The actual circumferential strain is governed by the temperature uniformity around the rod during the time at which the major part of the deformation occurs. If the bulges in neighbouring rods in a multi-rod array touch before rupture, and the array is large enough for the outer rods to restrain bulges rather than be pushed away by them, then the stress in such bulges drops. However the stress in adjacent axial regions of the cladding which have not contacted remains high and these continue to strain until they also interact, thus propagating the bulging axially. Meanwhile the non-contacted portions of the interacting bulges continue to strain slowly into the remaining sub-channels. Illustrative calculations suggest that the mechanical restraint of bulging cladding will only be effective in increasing sub-channel blockage when the failure strains are greater than 60-70%. This may occur with temperature differences between neighbouring rods of 10-25 0 C if the deformation process is thermally stabilised. (author)

  1. Sensitivity Study of the Peak Cladding Temperature for the Pipe Break Accidents of the 3-Pin Fuel Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. K.; Chi, D. Y.; Sim, B. S.; Park, K. N.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, J. M.; Lee, C. Y.; Kim, H. R.

    2005-12-01

    The effect of the thermal hydraulic operation parameters, the stroke times of safety-related valves, the node number of test fuel for MARS modeling, and the axial power distribution on the peak cladding temperature (PCT) has been investigated for the loss of coolant accident of the 3-pin fuel test loop. The thermal hydraulic operation parameters investigated are the thermal power of the fuel test loop and the flow rate, temperature, and pressure of the main cooling water. The effect of the thermal power and the coolant temperature on the peak cladding temperature is dominant as compared with that of the coolant flow rate and pressure. The maximum PCT increases up to about 34.3K for the room 1 LOCA when the thermal power increase by 5% of the normal operation power and decreases up to about 38.9K for the room 1 LOCA when the coolant temperature decrease by 2% of the normal operation temperature. The effect of the stroke time of the loop isolation valves on the PCT is also dominant. However the effect of the stroke time of the safety injection valves and depressurization vent valves are negligible. Especially the maximum PCT increases up to 25.7K with the increase of the design stroke time of the cold leg loop isolation valve by 13% and decreases up to 25.1K with the decrease of the design stroke time by 13%. The maximum PCT increases by 3.3K as the number of nodes increases from 7 to 14 for the MARS model of test fuel. Three different axial power distributions are also investigated. The maximum PCT occurs for the room 1 LOCA in case the peak power is shifted to the downstream by 20cm

  2. Review and evaluation of cladding attack of LMFBR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, M.; Nagai, S.; Furuya, H.; Muto, T.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of cladding inner wall corrosion during irradiation was evaluated in terms of fuel density, fuel form, O/M ratio, plutonium concentration, cladding composition, cladding pretreatment, cladding inner diameter, burnup and cladding inner wall temperature. Factors which influence the corrosion are O/M ratio (oxygen to metal ratio), burn up, cladding inner diameter and cladding inner wall temperature. Maximum cladding inner wall corrosion depth was formulated as a function of O/M ratio, burn up and cladding inner wall temperature

  3. Multidimensional simulations of hydrides during fuel rod lifecycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stafford, D.S.

    2015-01-01

    In light water reactor fuel rods, waterside corrosion of zirconium-alloy cladding introduces hydrogen into the cladding, where it is slightly soluble. When the solubility limit is reached, the hydrogen precipitates into crystals of zirconium hydride which decrease the ductility of the cladding and may lead to cladding failure during dry storage or transportation events. The distribution of the hydride phase and the orientation of the crystals depend on the history of the spatial temperature and stress profiles in the cladding. In this work, we have expanded the existing hydride modeling capability in the BISON fuel performance code with the goal of predicting both global and local effects on the radial, azimuthal and axial distribution of the hydride phase. We compare results from 1D simulations to published experimental data. We demonstrate the new capability by simulating in 2D a fuel rod throughout a lifecycle that includes irradiation, short-term storage in the spent fuel pool, drying, and interim storage in a dry cask. Using the 2D simulations, we present qualitative predictions of the effects of the inter-pellet gap and the drying conditions on the growth of a hydride rim. - Highlights: • We extend BISON fuel performance code to simulate lifecycle of fuel rods. • We model hydrogen evolution in cladding from reactor through dry storage. • We validate 1D simulations of hydrogen evolution against experiments. • We show results of 2D axisymmetric simulations predicting hydride formation. • We show how our model predicts formation of a hydride rim in the cladding.

  4. Full-fluence tests of experimental thermosetting fuel rods for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The irradiation performance of injected thermosetting fuel rods is compared to that of standard pitch-temperature gas-cooled reactor requirements. The primary objective of the experiments reported here was to obtain additional irradiation data at higher fluences for resin-based rods with intermediate binder char contents within the 15 to 30 wt% ''window of acceptability'' that had been previously established. 12 refs

  5. Initial Cladding Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegmann, E.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the condition of commercial Zircaloy clad fuel as it is received at the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site. Most commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. This analysis is developed to describe cladding degradation from the expected failure modes. This includes reactor operation impacts including incipient failures, potential degradation after reactor operation during spent fuel storage in pool and dry storage and impacts due to transportation. Degradation modes include cladding creep, and delayed hydride cracking during dry storage and transportation. Mechanical stresses from fuel handling and transportation vibrations are also included. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) does not address any potential damage to assemblies that might occur at the YMP surface facilities. Ranges and uncertainties have been defined. This analysis will be the initial boundary condition for the analysis of cladding degradation inside the repository. In accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning'', a work plan (CRWMS M andO 2000c) was developed, issued, and utilized in the preparation of this document. There are constraints, caveats and limitations to this analysis. This cladding degradation analysis is based on commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel with Zircaloy cladding but is applicable to Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel. Reactor operating experience for both PWRs and BWRs is used to establish fuel reliability from reactor operation. It is limited to fuel exposed to normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences (i.e. events which are anticipated to occur within a reactor lifetime), and not to fuel that has been exposed to severe accidents. Fuel burnup projections have been limited to the current commercial reactor licensing environment with restrictions on fuel enrichment, oxide coating thickness and rod plenum pressures. The information provided in this analysis will be used in

  6. Temperature distribution on fuel rods: a study on the effect of eccentricity in the position of UO2 pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar Junior, Joao Carlos Aguiar

    2010-01-01

    This work proposes the development of a method of solving equations of heat transfer applied in fuel rods using the finite element method, in order to evaluate the performance and safety of the nuclear system. Was prepared in a Fortran program to evaluate the equations governing the problem, the boundary conditions and apply the properties of materials on a steady state. This program uses the mesh generation input and graphical output generated by the program GID. The method was validated against the analytical solution found in the book Todreas and Kazimi with error less than 0.2% and with respect to the improved analytical solution of Nijsing for axisymmetry rod and eccentricity rod with error less than a 3.6%. Applications have been developed with the use of correlations for properties with the temperature dependence of resolution axisymmetry rod and the resolution of a rod with eccentricity. The method developed, should it be implemented, would allow the assessment of fuel rods in the given situations and other scenarios, as well as adding a tool of substantial value in the analysis of rods. (author)

  7. Mathematical formulation of temperature fluctuation and control rod vibration in PARR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, S.A.; Ayazuddin, S.K.

    This report describes the mathematical interpretation of experimental neutron noise spectra obtained for PARR core. A one dimensional thermal-hydraulic model of PARR core was developed to calculate the magnitude of neutron noise as a result of fluctuation in the core inlet coolant temperature. The sink structure of the neutron power spectral density as well as the dependence of observed neutron spectra on coolant velocity is also explained by the thermal hydraulic model. An attempt is made to explain the phenomena of control rod vibration by a simple eigen frequency vibration model. The calculated neutron power spectral density due to vibration and temperature noise were added and compared with the experimental power spectra obtained for PARR. (orig./A.B.)

  8. Numerical simulation on temperature field of TIG welding for 0Cr18Ni10Ti steel cladding and experimental verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Hongyi; Tang Xian; Luo Zhifu

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at tungsten inert gas (TIG) for 0Cr18Ni10Ti stainless steel cladding for radioactive source, the numerical calculation of welding pool temperature field was carried out through adopting ANSYS software. The numerical model of non-steady TIG welding pool shape was established, the heat enthalpy and Gaussian electric arc heat source model of surface distribution were introduced, and the effects of welding current and welding speed to temperature field distribution were calculated. Comparing the experimental data and the calculation results under different welding currents and speeds, the reliability and correctness of the model were proved. The welding technological parameters of 0Cr18Ni10Ti stainless steel were optimized based on the calculation results and the welding procedure was established. (authors)

  9. Temperature studies of the TileCal ROD G-Links for the validation of the air-cooling system

    CERN Document Server

    Valero, A; Abdallah, J; Castillo, V; Cuenca, C; Ferrer, A; Fullana, E; González, V; Higón, E; Munar, A; Poveda, J; Salvachúa, B; Sanchis, E; Solans, C; Torres, J; Valls, J A

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we show the results of the temperature studies performed on the TileCal ROD G-Links in order to validate the air-cooling system. In the first part of the note we present results on the characterization tests of the temperature monitor system for the G-Link chips of the TileCal ROD motherboard, performed at IFIC-Valencia. We report on the performance of the temperature behavior system and some cooling studies of a single ROD motherboard. We conclude that the present system can be successfully used to online monitor the temperature of the ROD G-Links. In the second part we show the results of the studies performed with multiple RODs in a standard 9U VME crate in the laboratory at IFIC, and in their final location in the ATLAS cavern. We conclude that the air-cooling provided by the standard VME crate fans is enough to keep the temperature of the G-Links well within specifications.

  10. Transient Temperature Distribution in a Reactor Core with Cylindrical Fuel Rods and Compressible Coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, H

    1968-04-15

    Applying linearization and Laplace transformation the transient temperature distribution and weighted temperatures in fuel, canning and coolant are calculated analytically in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry for constant material properties in fuel and canning. The model to be presented includes previous models as special cases and has the following novel features: compressibility of the coolant is accounted for. The material properties of the coolant are variable. All quantities determining the temperature field are taken into account. It is shown that the solution for fuel and canning temperature may be given by the aid of 4 basic transfer functions depending on only two variables. These functions are calculated for all relevant rod geometries and material constants. The integrals involved in transfer functions determining coolant temperatures are solved for the most part generally by application of coordinate and Laplace transformation. The model was originally developed for use in steam cooled fast reactor analysis where the coolant temperature rise and compressibility are considerable. It may be applied to other fast or thermal systems after suitable simplifications.

  11. High temperature behaviour of E110G and E110 fuel claddings in various mixtures of steam and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Feró, Erzsébet; Novotny, Tamás; Horváth, Márta; Kunstár, Mihály; Vér, Nóra; Hózer, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Experiments with sponge base E110G and the traditional E110 were carried out to compare the oxidation kinetics of these alloys in steam, in hydrogen rich steam, in steam-air and in air atmosphere and to study the effect of hydrogen- and nitrogen-containing environment on the oxidation. The effect of oxidizing atmosphere on the mechanical behaviour of the claddings was also investigated. The new and the traditional types of cladding rings were oxidised at high temperature (600°C – 1200°C). Oxidation of both alloys in steam-air mixture and in air atmosphere resulted in faster oxidation kinetics compared to steam. In many cases bumpy, porous oxide layer have been found. The presence of hydrogen in the steam atmosphere had no significant effect on the oxidation kinetics. Comparing the two alloys, more favourable behaviour of oxidised E110G was observed regarding the oxidation kinetics, breakaway oxidation and load bearing capability in all cases. (author)

  12. FARST: A computer code for the evaluation of FBR fuel rod behavior under steady-state/transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, M.; Sakagami, M.

    1984-01-01

    FARST, a computer code for the evaluation of fuel rod thermal and mechanical behavior under steady-state/transient conditions has been developed. The code characteristics are summarized as follows: (I) FARST evaluates the fuel rod behavior under the transient conditions. The code analyzes thermal and mechanical phenomena within a fuel rod, taking into account the temperature change in coolant surrounding the fuel rod. (II) Permanent strains such as plastic, creep and swelling strains as well as thermoelastic deformations can be analyzed by using the strain increment method. (III) Axial force and contact pressure which act on the fuel stack and cladding are analyzed based on the stick/slip conditions. (IV) FARST used a pellet swelling model which depends on the contact pressure between pellet and cladding, and an empirical pellet relocation model, designated as 'jump relocation model'. The code was successfully applied to analyses of the fuel rod irradiation data from pulse reactor for nuclear safety research in Cadarache (CABRI) and pulse reactor for nuclear safety research in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (NSRR). The code was further applied to stress analysis of a 1000 MW class large FBR plant fuel rod during transient conditions. The steady-state model which was used so far gave the conservative results for cladding stress during overpower transient, but underestimated the results for cladding stress during a rapid temperature decrease of coolant. (orig.)

  13. Post-test examination of the VVER-1000 fuel rod bundle CORA-W2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Burbach, J.; Metzger, H.; Schanz, G.; Hagen, S.; Sepold, L.

    1995-01-01

    The upper half of the bundle is completely oxidized, the lower half has kept the fuel rods relatively intact. The post-test examination results show the strong impact of the B 4 C absorber rod and the stainless steel grid spacers on the 'low-temperature' bundle damage initiation and progression. The B 4 C absorber rod completely disappeared in the upper half of the bundle. The multicomponent melts relocated and formed coolant channel blockages on solidification with a maximum extent of about 30% in the lower part of the bundle. At temperatures above the melting point of the ZrNb1 cladding extensive fuel dissolution occured. (orig./HP)

  14. Drying of encapsulated parts (nuclear fuel rods) in applying vacuum, by introducing dehydratings, vacuum, and filling with an inert gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.R.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns a decontamination technique, in particular a process and equipment for extracting the water contained in fuel rods and other similar components of a nuclear reactor. The extraction of the contaminants contained in the fuel rods is carried out by a standard method by drilling a small hole in the surface of the cladding and applying a vacuum to bleed the rod of its impurities (moisture and gas). The invention consists for example in applying a vacuum at the hole drilled in the cladding to extract the contaminants and introducing spirit into the rod through the same orifice. The spirit absorbs the remaining liquid and other impurities. The spirit charged with the impurities is then pumped out by the same aperture by means of a regulated atmosphere inside a closed receptacle. This receptacle is then filled with an inert gas cooled to ambient temperature. The rods are then pressurised and the small orifice is sealed [fr

  15. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Hiroyasu; Kawamura, Atsuo.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce pellet-clad mechanical interactions, as well as improve the fuel safety. Constitution: In the rod drive of a bwr type reactor, an electric motor operated upon intermittent input such as of pulse signals is connected to a control rod. A resolver for converting the rotational angle of the motor to electric signals is connected to the rotational shaft of the motor and the phase difference between the output signal from the resolver and a reference signal is adapted to detect by a comparator. Based on the detection result, the controller is actuated to control a motor for control rod drive so that fine control for the movement of the control rod is made possible. This can reduce the moving distance of the control rod, decrease the thermal stress applied to the control rod and decrease the pellet clad mechanical interaction failures due to thermal expansion between the cladding tube and the pellets caused by abrupt changes in the generated power. (Furukawa, Y.)

  16. Semi-empirical corrosion model for Zircaloy-4 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeem Elahi, Waseem; Atif Rana, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The Zircaloy-4 cladding tube in Pressurize Water Reactors (PWRs) bears corrosion due to fast neutron flux, coolant temperature, and water chemistry. The thickness of Zircaloy-4 cladding tube may be decreased due to the increase in corrosion penetration which may affect the integrity of the fuel rod. The tin content and inter-metallic particles sizes has been found significantly in the magnitude of oxide thickness. In present study we have developed a Semiempirical corrosion model by modifying the Arrhenius equation for corrosion as a function of acceleration factor for tin content and accumulative annealing. This developed model has been incorporated into fuel performance computer code. The cladding oxide thickness data obtained from the Semi-empirical corrosion model has been compared with the experimental results i.e., numerous cases of measured cladding oxide thickness from UO 2 fuel rods, irradiated in various PWRs. The results of the both studies lie within the error band of 20μm, which confirms the validity of the developed Semi-empirical corrosion model. Key words: Corrosion, Zircaloy-4, tin content, accumulative annealing factor, Semi-empirical, PWR. (author)

  17. Low temperature synthesis of hydroxyapatite nano-rods by a modified sol-gel technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadalannagari, Sushma; More, Sandeep; Kowshik, Meenal; Ramanan, Sutapa Roy

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) nano-rods were successfully synthesized by a modified sol-gel method using a solution of CaCl 2 .2H 2 O in water, along with a solution of H 3 PO 4 in triethylamine and NH 4 OH as starting materials. The Ca/P molar ratio was maintained at 1.67. The sol obtained was dried in an oven for 2 days at 100 deg. C after being dialyzed for 12 h. Pellets were made from the crystalline powders and immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) to check its biocompatibility after 15, 45 and 180 days of immersion. The HAp powders and pellets were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction crystallography (XRD), Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The HAp nano-rods had an average diameter of 25 nm and length 110-120 nm. Immersion of the HAp pellets in SBF led to the formation of a highly porous interconnecting HAp layer on the surface. The porosity increased with increase in immersion time. Highlights: → Low temperature synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanorods using Ca and P sources and triethylamine. → The synthesis time was only 0.5 hours. → Crystalline material was obtained after drying at 100oC only in air. → SBF studies showed the HAP bodies to be biocompatible.

  18. Temperature sensitivity study of eddy current and digital gauge probes for nuclear fuel rod oxide measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Faith R.; Lind, R. Paul; Smith, James A.

    2018-04-01

    Novel fuels are part of the nationwide effort to reduce the enrichment of Uranium for energy production. Performance of such fuels is determined by irradiating their surfaces. To test irradiated samples, the instrumentation must operate remotely. The plate checker used in this experiment at Idaho National Lab (INL) performs non-destructive testing on fuel rod and plate geometries with two different types of sensors: eddy current and digital thickness gauges. The sensors measure oxide growth and total sample thickness on research fuels, respectively. Sensor measurement accuracy is crucial because even 10 microns of error is significant when determining the viability of an experimental fuel. One parameter known to affect the eddy current and thickness gauge sensors is temperature. Since both sensor accuracies depend on the ambient temperature of the system, the plate checker has been characterized for these sensitivities. The manufacturer of the digital gauge probes has noted a rather large coefficient of thermal expansion for their linear scale. It should also be noted that the accuracy of the digital gauge probes are specified at 20°C, which is approximately 7°C cooler than the average hot-cell temperature. In this work, the effect of temperature on the eddy current and digital gauge probes is studied, and thickness measurements are given as empirical functions of temperature.

  19. Microstructural examination of fuel rods subjected to a simulated large-break loss of coolant accident in reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garlick, A.

    1985-01-01

    A series of tests has been conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Canada, to investigate the behaviour of full-length 32-rod PWR fuel bundles during a simulated large-break loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In one of these tests (MT-3), 12 central rods were pre-pressurized in order to evaluate the ballooning and rupture of cladding in the Zircaloy high-α/α+β temperature region. All 12 rods ruptured after experiencing < 90% diametral strain but there was no suggestion of coplanar blockage. Post-irradiation examination was carried out on cross-sections of cladding from selected rods to determine the aximuthal distribution of wall thinning along the ballooned regions. These data are assessed to check whether they are consistent with a mechanism in which fuel stack eccentricity generates temperature gradients around the ballooning cladding and leads to premature rupture during a LOCA. After anodizing, the cladding microstructures were examined for the presence of prior-beta phase that would indicate the α/α+β transformation temperature (1078K) had been exceeded. These results were compared with isothermal annealing test data on unirradiated cladding from the same manufacturing batch

  20. Control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Toshikazu; Inoue, Kotaro.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To flatten the power distribution in the reactor core without impairing neutron economy by disposing pins containing elements of lower atomic number in the central region of a shroud and loading pins containing depleted uranium in the periphery region thereof. Constitution: The shroud has a layer of pins containing depleted uranium in the peripheral region and a layer of pins containing elements of lower atomic number such as beryllium in the central region. Heat removal from those pins containing depleted uranium and elements of lower atomic number (neutron moderator) is effected by sodium flow outside of the cladding material. The control rod operation is conducted by inserting or extracting the central portion (pins containing elements of lower atomic number such as beryllium) inside of the stainless pipe. Upon extraction of the control rod, the moderator in the central region is removed whereby high speed neutrons are no more deccelerated and the absorption rate to the depleted uranium is decreased. This can flatten the power distribution in the reactore core with the disposition of a plurality of control rods at a better neutron economy as compared with the use of neutron absorber such as boron. (Seki, T.)

  1. Pellet-clad interaction in water reactor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this seminar is was to draw up a comprehensive picture of the pellet clad interaction and its impact on the fuel rod. This document is a detailed abstract of the papers presented during the following five sessions: industrial goals, fuel material behaviour in PCI situation, cladding behaviour relevant to PCI, in pile rod behaviour and modelling of the mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding. (A.L.B.)

  2. Pellet-clad interaction in water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this seminar is was to draw up a comprehensive picture of the pellet clad interaction and its impact on the fuel rod. This document is a detailed abstract of the papers presented during the following five sessions: industrial goals, fuel material behaviour in PCI situation, cladding behaviour relevant to PCI, in pile rod behaviour and modelling of the mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding. (A.L.B.)

  3. Analysis of steady state temperature distribution in rod arrays exposed to stagnant gaseous environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, G.; MaarKandeya, S.G.; Raj, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    This paper deals with the calculation of radiative heat exchange in a rod array exposed to stagnant gaseous environment. a computer code has been developed for this purpose and has been used for predicting the steady state temperature distribution in a nuclear fuel sub-assembly. Nuclear fuels continue to generate heat even after their removal from the core. During the transfer of the nuclear fuel sub-assemblies from the core to the storage bay, they pass through stagnant gaseous environment and may remain there for extended periods under abnormal conditions. Radiative heat exchange will be the dominant mode within the sub-assembly involved, since axial heat conduction through the fuel pins needs to be accounted for. a computer code RHEINA-3D (Radiative Heat Exchange In Nuclear Assemblies -3D) has been developed based on a simplified numerical model which considers both the above-mentioned phenomena. The analytical model and the results obtained are briefly discussed in this paper

  4. Mechanical stress analysis for a fuel rod under normal operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pino, Eddy S.; Giovedi, Claudia; Serra, Andre da Silva; Abe, Alfredo Y.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear reactor fuel elements consist mainly in a system of a nuclear fuel encapsulated by a cladding material subject to high fluxes of energetic neutrons, high operating temperatures, pressure systems, thermal gradients, heat fluxes and with chemical compatibility with the reactor coolant. The design of a nuclear reactor requires, among a set of activities, the evaluation of the structural integrity of the fuel rod submitted to different loads acting on the fuel rod and the specific properties (dimensions and mechanical and thermal properties) of the cladding material and coolant, including thermal and pressure gradients produced inside the rod due to the fuel burnup. In this work were evaluated the structural mechanical stresses of a fuel rod using stainless steel as cladding material and UO 2 with a low degree of enrichment as fuel pellet on a PWR (pressurized water reactor) under normal operating conditions. In this sense, tangential, radial and axial stress on internal and external cladding surfaces considering the orientations of 0 deg, 90 deg and 180 deg were considered. The obtained values were compared with the limit values for stress to the studied material. From the obtained results, it was possible to conclude that, under the expected normal reactor operation conditions, the integrity of the fuel rod can be maintained. (author)

  5. A two-dimensional finite element method for analysis of solid body contact problems in fuel rod mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nissen, K.L.

    1988-06-01

    Two computer codes for the analysis of fuel rod behavior have been developed. Fuel rod mechanics is treated by a two-dimensional, axisymmetric finite element method. The program KONTAKT is used for detailed examinations on fuel rod sections, whereas the second program METHOD2D allows instationary calculations of whole fuel rods. The mechanical contact of fuel and cladding during heating of the fuel rod is very important for it's integrity. Both computer codes use a Newton-Raphson iteration for the solution of the nonlinear solid body contact problem. A constitutive equation is applied for the dependency of contact pressure on normal approach of the surfaces which are assumed to be rough. If friction is present on the contacting surfaces, Coulomb's friction law is used. Code validation is done by comparison with known analytical solutions for special problems. Results of the contact algorithm for an elastic ball pressing against a rigid surface are confronted with Hertzian theory. Influences of fuel-pellet geometry as well as influences of discretisation of displacements and stresses of a single fuel pellet are studied. Contact of fuel and cladding is calculated for a fuel rod section with two fuel pellets. The influence of friction forces between fuel and cladding on their axial expansion is demonstrated. By calculation of deformations and temperatures during an instationary fuel rod experiment of the CABRI-series the feasibility of two-dimensional finite element analysis of whole fuel rods is shown. (orig.) [de

  6. Experimental investigation of cooling by top spray and bottom flooding of a simulated 64 rod bundle for a BWR. Pt. 2. Main experiment with modified test section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, L.; Gustafson, L.; Harju, R.

    1978-06-01

    The cooling of an electrically heated, full scale 64-rod bundle has been investigated under simulated emergency core cooling conditions. Emphasis was laid on measurements of rod cladding and canister temperatures. By means of difference pressure measurements the levels in bundle, by-pass and downcomer could be estimated and thus the effective reflooding velocity. The test section was modified compared to the pre-tests, in order to improve system effects simulation. A new rod bundle was installed including a hollow, water, rod and 63 indirectly heated rods. Parameter effects of coolant mass flow rate and distribution, initial cladding temperature, pressure and power were studied. The effect of the way the test section was vented was also investigated and turned out to be very significant. (author)

  7. Modelling of pellet-clad interaction during power ramps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, G.; Lindback, J.E.; Schutte, H.C.; Jernkvist, L.O.; Massih, A.R.; Massih, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    A computational method to describe the pellet-clad interaction phenomenon is presented. The method accounts for the mechanical contact between fragmented pellets and the zircaloy clad, as well as for chemical reaction of fission products with zircaloy during power ramps. Possible pellet-clad contact states, soft, hard and friction, are taken into account in the computational algorithm. The clad is treated as an elastic-plastic-viscoplastic material with irradiation hardening. Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking is described by using a fracture mechanics-based model for crack propagation. This integrated approach is used to evaluate two power ramp experiments made on boiling water reactor fuel rods in test reactors. The influence of the pellet-clad coefficient of friction on clad deformation is evaluated and discussed. Also, clad deformations, pellet-clad gap size and fission product gas release for one of the ramped rods are calculated and compared with measured data. (authors)

  8. Cladding creepdown under compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, D.O.

    1977-01-01

    Light-water power reactors use Zircaloy tubing as cladding to contain the UO 2 fuel pellets. In-service operating conditions impose an external hydrostatic force on the cladding, causing it to creep down into eventual contact with the fuel. Knowledge of the rate of such creepdown is of great importance to modelers of fuel element performance. An experimental system was devised for studying creepdown that meets several severe requirements by providing (1) correct stress state, (2) multiple positions for measuring radial displacement of the cladding surface, (3) high-precision data, and (4) an experimental configuration compact enough to fit in-reactor. A microcomputer-controlled, eddy-current monitoring system was developed for this study and has proven highly successful in measuring cladding deformation with time at temperatures of 371 0 C (700 0 F) and higher, and at pressures as high as 21 MPa

  9. Conceptual design report of the SMART fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Chan Bock; Bang, Je Gun; Jung, Yeon Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    The SMART fuel rod is based on 17 x 17 KOFA(Korea Fuel Assembly) fuel rod of the 950MWe pressurize water reactor. The fuel stack length of the KOFA is 3658mm, otherwise SMART fuel rod stack length is 2000mm. The fuel rod contains UO{sub 2} pellets with the enrichment of 4.95%. All the fuel in core will be replaced every 35 months. The average LHGR of the fuel rod is 120 W/cm, commercial PWR is 178 W/cm, SMART LHGR is lower about 31% than commercial PWR. The core inlet and outlet temperature of coolant are respectively 270 deg C and 310 deg C, commercial PWR are respectively 291.6 deg C and 326.8 deg C, SMART inlet and outlet temperature is lower averaged 19.2 deg C than commercial PWR. The coolant use mixed soluble ammonia in high purity water and boron is not in. The general performance of the fuel rod UO{sub 2} pellet has been already verified through the sufficient burnup (60,000 MWd/MTU-rod avg.) experience as the rods of same design in commercial PWR's. But cladding corrosion is required the further verification. (author). 13 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. A thermodynamic model for the attack behaviour in stainless steel clad oxide fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetzmann, O.

    1979-01-01

    So far, post irradiation examination of burnt fuel pins has not revealed a clear cut picture of the cladding attack situation. For seemingly same conditions sometimes attack occurs, sometimes not. This model tries to depict the reaction possibilities along the inner cladding wall on the basis of thermodynamic facts in the fuel pin. It shows how the thermodynamic driving force for attack changes along the fuel column, and with different initial and operational conditions. Two criteria for attack are postulated: attack as a result of the direct reaction of reactive elements with cladding components; and attack as a result of the action of a special agent (CsOH). In defining a reaction potenial the oxygen potential, the temperature conditions (cladding temperature and fuel surface temperature), and the fission products are involved. For the determination of the oxygen potential at the cladding, three models for the redistribution of oxygen across the fuel/clad gap are offered. The effect of various parameters, like rod power, gap conductance, oxygen potential, inner wall temperature, on the thermodynamic potential for attack is analysed. (Auth.)

  11. Fuel rod failure due to marked diametral expansion and fuel rod collapse occurred in the HBWR power ramp experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki

    1985-12-01

    In the power ramp experiment with the BWR type light water loop at the HBWR, the two pre-irradiated fuel rods caused an unexpected pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). One occurred in the fuel rod with small gap of 0.10 mm, which was pre-irradiated up to the burn-up of 14 MWd/kgU. At high power, the diameter of the rod was increased markedly without accompanying significant axial elongation. The other occurred in the rod with a large gap of 0.23 mm, which was pre-irradiated up to the burn-up of 8 MWd/kgU. The diameter of the rod collapsed during a diameter measurement at the maximum power level. The causes of those were investigated in the present study by evaluating in-core data obtained from equipped instruments in the experiment. It was revealed from the investigation that these behaviours were attributed to the local reduction of the coolant flow occurred in the region of a transformer in the ramp rig. The fuel cladding material is seemed to become softened due to temperature increase caused by the local reduction of the coolant flow, and collapsed by the coolant pressure, either locally or wholly depending on the rod diametral gap existed. (author)

  12. Microstructure and high temperature oxidation resistance of Ti-Ni gradient coating on TA2 titanium alloy fabricated by laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fencheng; Mao, Yuqing; Lin, Xin; Zhou, Baosheng; Qian, Tao

    2016-09-01

    To improve the high temperature oxidation resistance of TA2 titanium alloy, a gradient Ni-Ti coating was laser cladded on the surface of the TA2 titanium alloy substrate, and the microstructure and oxidation behavior of the laser cladded coating were investigated experimentally. The gradient coating with a thickness of about 420-490 μm contains two different layers, e.g. a bright layer with coarse equiaxed grain and a dark layer with fine and columnar dendrites, and a transition layer with a thickness of about 10 μm exists between the substrate and the cladded coating. NiTi, NiTi2 and Ni3Ti intermetallic compounds are the main constructive phases of the laser cladded coating. The appearance of these phases enhances the microhardness, and the dense structure of the coating improves its oxidation resistance. The solidification procedure of the gradient coating is analyzed and different kinds of solidification processes occur due to the heat dissipation during the laser cladding process.

  13. Benchmark Tests to Develop Analytical Time-Temperature Limit for HANA-6 Cladding for Compliance with New LOCA Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Yong; Jang, Hun; Lim, Jea Young; Kim, Dae Il; Kim, Yoon Ho; Mok, Yong Kyoon [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    According to 10CFR50.46c, two analytical time and temperature limits for breakaway oxidation and postquench ductility (PQD) should be determined by approved experimental procedure as described in NRC Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.222 and 1.223. According to RG 1.222 and 1.223, rigorous qualification requirements for test system are required, such as thermal and weight gain benchmarks. In order to meet these requirements, KEPCO NF has developed the new special facility to evaluate LOCA performance of zirconium alloy cladding. In this paper, qualification results for test facility and HT oxidation model for HANA-6 are summarized. The results of thermal benchmark tests of LOCA HT oxidation tester is summarized as follows. 1. The best estimate HT oxidation model of HANA- 6 was developed for the vender proprietary HT oxidation model. 2. In accordance with the RG 1.222 and 1.223, Benchmark tests were performed by using LOCA HT oxidation tester 3. The maximum axial and circumferential temperature difference are ± 9 .deg. C and ± 2 .deg. C at 1200 .deg. C, respectively. At the other temperature conditions, temperature difference is less than 1200 .deg. C result. Thermal benchmark test results meet the requirements of NRC RG 1.222 and 1.223.

  14. Properties of ZnO Nano rods Arrays Growth via Low Temperature Hydrothermal Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Syafinaz Ridhuan; Zainovia Lockman; Azlan Abdul Aziz; Azlan Abdul Aziz; Khairunisak Abdul Razak; Khairunisak Abdul Razak

    2011-01-01

    This work describes properties of 1- D ZnO nano rods (NRs) arrays growth using low temperature hydrothermal method on seeded substrate. The properties of ZnO seed were studied by varying annealed temperature from 250-450 degree Celsius. The optimum oxidation temperature to produce seeded ZnO template was 400 degree Celsius. The formations of ZnO NRs were further studied by varying hydrothermal reaction growth time from 1 to 24 hours. I-V characteristic of ZnO NRs photodetector in dark, ambient light and UV light were also studied. The change in the photoconductivity under UV illumination was found to be 1 order higher in magnitude compared to dark current and ambient light. With an incident wavelength of 370 nm and applied bias of 3V, the responsivity of photodetector was 5.0 mA/ W, which was higher compared to other reported works. The increase of photosensitivity indicated that the produced ZnO NRs were suitable for UV photodetector applications.(author)

  15. Thermal gradient effects on the oxidation of Zircaloy fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.C.; Reyes, J.N. Jr.; Maguire, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    A Thermal Gradient Test Facility (TGTF) has been designed and constructed to measure the thermal gradient effect on pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rod cladding. The TGTF includes a heat flux simulator assembly capable of producing a wide range of PWR operating conditions including water flow velocities and temperatures, water chemistry conditions, cladding temperatures, and heat fluxes ranging to 160 W/cm 2 . It is fully instrumented including a large number of thermocouples both inside the water flow channel and inside the cladding. Two test programs are in progress. First, cladding specimens are pre-oxidized in air at 500 deg. C and in 400 deg. C steam for various lengths of time to develop a range of uniform oxide thicknesses from 1 to 60 micrometers. The pre-oxidized specimens are placed in the TGTF to characterize the oxide thermal conductivity under a variety of water flow and heat flux conditions. Second, to overcome the long exposure times required under typical PWR conditions a series of tests with the addition of high concentrations of lithium hydroxide to the water are being considered. Static autoclave tests have been conducted with lithium hydroxide concentrations ranging from 0 to 2 moles per liter at 300, 330, and 360 deg. C for up to 36 hours. Results for zircaloy-4 show a considerable increase in the weight gain for the exposed samples with oxidation rate enhancement factors as high as 70 times that of pure water. Operation of the TGTF with elevated lithium hydroxide levels will yield real-time information concerning the effects of a heat flux on the oxidation kinetics of zircaloy fuel rod cladding. (author). 5 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  16. Determination of transient temperature and heat flux on the surface of a reactor control rod based on temperature measurements at the interior points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebula, Artur; Taler, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents heat transfer calculation results concerning a control rod of nuclear power plant. Apart from numerical calculation results, experimental heat transfer measurements of the control rod model are also presented. The control rod that is the object of interest is surrounded by a mixing region of hot and cold streams and, as a consequence, is subjected to thermal fluctuations. The paper describes a method based on the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP) for determining heat flux on the outer surface of the rod. Numerical tests were conducted to validate the method by comparison of the results with the time changes of surface temperature and heat flux which were obtained from the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the mixing process. A measuring instrument was designed to measure the heat flux at the outer surface of the control rod model. In addition, the principle of operation and construction of heat flux meter is presented in detail. -- Highlights: • Temperature and heat flux estimation during cooling of control rod are presented. • The inverse technique is based on the space marching method. • The instrument for surface heat flux measurement was manufactured and tested. • CFD simulations were used to validate the developed inverse technique. • Actual data were used to demonstrate practical applicability of the method

  17. BISON Fuel Performance Analysis of IFA-796 Rod 3 & 4 and Investigation of the Impact of Fuel Creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sweet, Ryan T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace the currently used zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromiumaluminum (FeCrAl) alloys because they exhibit slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and slow cladding consumption in the presence of high temperature steam. These alloys should also exhibit increased “coping time” in the event of an accident scenario by improving the mechanical performance at high temperatures, allowing greater flexibility to achieve core cooling. As a continuation of the development of these alloys, in-reactor irradiation testing of FeCrAl cladded fuel rods has started. In order to provide insight on the possible behavior of these fuel rods as they undergo irradiation in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor, engineering analysis has been performed using FeCrAl material models implemented into the BISON fuel performance code. This milestone report provides an update on the ongoing development of modeling capability to predict FeCrAl cladding fuel performance and to provide an early look at the possible behavior of planned in-reactor FeCrAl cladding experiments. In particular, this report consists of two separate analyses. The first analysis consists of fuel performance simulations of IFA-796 rod 4 and two segments of rod 3. These simulations utilize previously implemented material models for the C35M FeCrAl alloy and UO2 to provide a bounding behavior analysis corresponding to variation of the initial fuel cladding gap thickness within the fuel rod. The second analysis is an assessment of the fuel and cladding stress states after modification of the fuel creep model that is currently implemented in the BISON fuel performance code. Effects from modifying the fuel creep model were identified for the BISON simulations

  18. Thermal performance of a buried nuclear waste storage container storing a hybrid mix of PWR and BWR spent fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.L.

    1991-11-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will design, model, and test nuclear waste packages for use at the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. On such package would store tightly packed spent fuel rods from both pressurized and boiling water reactors. The storage container provides the primary containment of the nuclear waste and the spent fuel rod cladding provides secondary containment. A series of transient conduction and radiation heat transfer analyses was run to determine for the first 1000 yr of storage if the temperature of the tuff at the borehole wall ever falls below 97 degrees C and whether the cladding of the stored spent fuel ever exceeds 350 degrees C. Limiting the borehole to temperatures of 97 degrees C or greater helps minimize corrosion by assuring that no condensed water collects on the container. The 350 degrees C cladding limit minimizes the possibility of creep- related failure in the spent fuel rod cladding. For a series of packages stored in a 8 x 30 m borehole grid where each package contains 10-yr-old spent fuel rods generating 4.74 kW or more, the borehole wall stays above 97 degrees C for the full 10000-yr analysis period. For the 4.74-kW load, the peak cladding temperature rises to just below the 350 degrees C limit about 4 years after emplacement. If the packages are stored using the spacing specified in the Site Characterization Plan (15 ft x 126 ft), a maximum of 4.1 kW per container may be stored. If the 0.05-m-thick void between the container and the borehole wall is filled with loosely packed bentonite, the peak cladding temperature rises more than 40 degrees C above the allowed cladding limit. In all cases the dominant heat transfer mode between container components is thermal radiation

  19. Model investigation of fuel rod behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girgis, M.M.; Wiesenack, W.; Stegemann, D.

    1985-06-01

    Thermal and mechanical behaviour of fuel rods can be explained but unsatisfactorily by models based of an axial symmetry concept. Recently developed models include, with respect to their thermal components, a simple method for the computation of the temperature distribution within the fuel, and they also take into account the influence of excentrically placed pellets for the computation of heat transfer in the cold gap. Additionally, a finite-element model is used to evaluate the effects of cracking and fragmentation on the thermal behaviour of pellets. The reaction of fuel and fuel cladding to external and internal loadings and the axial interaction between fuel and cladding are described in the mechanical portion of the model. A special case of axial coupling is the so-called random stacking interaction caused by fuel pellets placed excentrically at the cladding and sliding radially and axially. In the comparison of measurement results, both thermal and mechanical behaviour of different rods from the OECD Halden Reactor Project are subject to investigations. (RF) [de

  20. Sensitivity Analysis of Gap Conductance for Heat Split in an Annular Fuel Rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Kun Ho; Chun, Tae Hyun; In, Wang Kee; Song, Keun Woo

    2006-01-01

    To increase of the core power density in the current PWR cores, an annular fuel rod was proposed by MIT. This annular fuel rod has two coolant channels and two cladding-pellet gaps unlike the current solid fuel rod. It's important to predict the heat split reasonably because it affects coolant enthalpy rise in each channel and Departure from Nuclear Boiling Ratio (DNBR) in each channel. Conversely, coolant conditions affect fuel temperature and heat split. In particular if the heat rate leans to either inner or outer channel, it is out of a thermal equilibrium. To control a thermal imbalance, placing another gap in the pellet is introduced. The heat flow distribution between internal and external channels as well as fuel and cladding temperature profiles is calculated with and without the fuel gap between the inner and outer pellets

  1. FLECHT-SEASET 21-rod bundle flow blockage heat transfer during reflood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loftus, M.; Hochreiter, L.; Lee, N.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of various flow blockage shapes and distributions during a PWR reflood was investigated using six 21-rod bundles with full length, internally heated, cosine power-shaped electrical rods. The flow blockage shapes, simulating the fuel rod clad ballooning, were made of thin-wall stainless steel tubes hydroformed into a short, concentric shape and along, nonconcentric shape. The blockage sleeves were distributed both coplanar, with all sleeves located at the same elevation, and non-coplanar. The initial and boundary conditions were varied to include parametric effects of pressure, inlet water temperature, and primarily, flooding rate. The initial mid-plane rod temperature was 871 0 C (1600 0 F) in all tests. Rod and vapor temperature measurements were made throughout the rod bundle with emphasis on the blockage region. The rod heat transfer downstream of the blockage was found to be greater for rods in a blocked bundle than for similar rods in an unblocked bundle. The heat transfer improvement decreases both with time after flood initiation and as the distance increased downstream of the blockage. The improvement in the heat transfer is attributed primarily to the breakup of the water droplets entrained in the steam flow. The smaller droplets subsequently evaporate and desuperheat the steam, which then improves the heat transfer between the rods and the steam in and downstream of the blockage zone

  2. Interactions in Zircaloy/UO2 fuel rod bundles with Inconel spacers at temperatures above 1200deg C (posttest results of severe fuel damage experiments CORA-2 and CORA-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Schanz, G.; Sepold, L.

    1990-09-01

    In the CORA experiments test bundles of usually 16 electrically heated fuel rod simulators and nine unheated rods are subjected to temperature transients of a slow heatup rate in a steam environment. Thus, an accident sequence is simulated, which may develop from a small-break loss-of-coolant accident of an LWR. An aim of CORA-2, as a first test of its kind, was also to gain experience in the test conduct and posttest handling of UO 2 specimens. CORA-3 was performed as a high-temperature test. The transient phases of CORA-2 and CORA-3 were initiated with a temperature ramp rate of 1 K/s. The temperature escalation due to the exothermal zircaloy(Zry)-steam reaction started at about 1000deg C, leading the bundles to maximum temperatures of 2000deg C and 2400deg C for tests CORA-2 and CORA-3, respectively. The test bundles resulted in severe oxidation and partial melting of the cladding, fuel dissolution by Zry/UO 2 interaction, complete Inconel spacer destruction, and relocation of melts and fragments to lower elevations in the bundle, where extended blockages have formed. In both tests the fuel rod destruction set in together with the formation of initial melts from the Inconel/Zry interaction. The lower Zry spacer acted as a catcher for relocated material. In test CORA-2 the UO 2 pellets partially disintegrated into fine particles. This powdering occurred during cooldown. There was no physical disintegration of fuel in test CORA-3. (orig./MM) [de

  3. Influence of fuel-cladding system deviations from the model of continuous cylinders on the parameters of WWER fuel element working ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheglov, A.

    1994-01-01

    In the programs of fuel rod computation, fuel and cladding are usually presented in the form of coaxial cylinders, which can change their sizes, mechanical and thermal-physical properties. The real fuel element has some typical deviations from this continuous coaxial cylinders (CCC) model as: axial asymmetry of fuel-cladding system (due to the oval form of the cladding, cracking and other type of fuel pallet damage, axial asymmetry of the volumetric heat release), gaps between the pallets (and heat release peaking in fuel near the gap), chambers in the pallets. As a result of these deviations actual fuel rod parameters of working ability - temperature, stresses, thermal fluxes relieved from the cladding, geometry changes - in some locations can greatly vary from the ones calculated according to CCC model. The influence of these deviations is extremely important while calculating the fuel rod, because they are a part of the mechanical excess coefficient. The author reviews the influence of these factors using specific examples. He applies his own two-dimensional codes based on the Finite Elements Method for calculations of temperature fields, stresses and deformation in the fuel rod elements. It is shown that consideration of these deviations, as a rule, leads to the increase of the maximum fuel temperature in the WWER pellets (characterized by a large central hole), temperature of the cladding, thermal flux, relieved by the coolant from the cladding, and stresses in the cladding. It is necessary to consider these factors for both validation of the fuel element working ability and interpretation of the experimental results. 4 tabs., 3 figs., 5 refs

  4. Influence of fuel-cladding system deviations from the model of continuous cylinders on the parameters of WWER fuel element working ability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheglov, A [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    In the programs of fuel rod computation, fuel and cladding are usually presented in the form of coaxial cylinders, which can change their sizes, mechanical and thermal-physical properties. The real fuel element has some typical deviations from this continuous coaxial cylinders (CCC) model as: axial asymmetry of fuel-cladding system (due to the oval form of the cladding, cracking and other type of fuel pallet damage, axial asymmetry of the volumetric heat release), gaps between the pallets (and heat release peaking in fuel near the gap), chambers in the pallets. As a result of these deviations actual fuel rod parameters of working ability - temperature, stresses, thermal fluxes relieved from the cladding, geometry changes - in some locations can greatly vary from the ones calculated according to CCC model. The influence of these deviations is extremely important while calculating the fuel rod, because they are a part of the mechanical excess coefficient. The author reviews the influence of these factors using specific examples. He applies his own two-dimensional codes based on the Finite Elements Method for calculations of temperature fields, stresses and deformation in the fuel rod elements. It is shown that consideration of these deviations, as a rule, leads to the increase of the maximum fuel temperature in the WWER pellets (characterized by a large central hole), temperature of the cladding, thermal flux, relieved by the coolant from the cladding, and stresses in the cladding. It is necessary to consider these factors for both validation of the fuel element working ability and interpretation of the experimental results. 4 tabs., 3 figs., 5 refs.

  5. Modeling and preliminary analysis on the temperature profile of the (TRU-Zr)-Zr dispersion fuel rod for HYPER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. W.; Hwang, W.; Lee, B. S.; Park, W. S.

    2000-01-01

    Either TRU-Zr metal alloy or (TRU-Zr)-Zr dispersion fuel is considered as a blanket fuel for HYPER(Hybrid Power Extraction Reactor). In order to develop the code for dispersion fuel rod performance analysis under steady state condition, the fuel temperature distribution model which is the one of the most important factors in a fuel performance code has been developed in this paper,. This developed model computes the one dimensional radial temperature distribution of a cylindrical fuel rod. The temperature profile results by this model are compared with the temperature distributions of U 3 Si-A1 dispersion fuel and TRU-Zr metal alloy fuel. This model will be installed in performance analysis code for dispersion fuel

  6. Influence of Crucible Support Rod on the Growth Rate and Temperature Gradient in a Bridgman Growth of Tin Crystal

    OpenAIRE

    IMASHIMIZU, Yuji; MIURA, Koji; KAMATA, Masaki; WATANABE, Jiro

    2003-01-01

    Bridgman growth of tincrystal was carried out in a graphite crucible that was fixed on a quartz support rod or a copper one. The growth rate and axial temperature distribution were examined by recording the temperature variation with time at each of four prescribed positions in the solid-liquidsystem during solidification, l) Actual growth rate of crystal increased with progress of solidification while the furnace elevated at a constant rate, but the tendency was different depending on the ty...

  7. Modelling of pellet-cladding interaction in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, A.M.; Silva, A.T. e.

    1992-01-01

    The pellet-cladding interaction that can occur in a PWR fuel rod design is modelled with the computer codes FRAPCON-1 and ANSYS. The fuel performance code FRAPCON-1 analyses the fuel rod irradiation behavior and generates the initial conditions for the localized fuel rod thermal and mechanical modelling in two and three-dimensional finite elements with ANSYS. In the mechanical modelling, a pellet fragment is placed in the fuel rod gap. Two types of fuel rod cladding materials are considered: Zircaloy and austenitic stainless steel. (author)

  8. Influence of temperature and hydrogen content on stress-induced radial hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desquines, J., E-mail: jean.desquines@irsn.fr; Drouan, D.; Billone, M.; Puls, M.P.; March, P.; Fourgeaud, S.; Getrey, C.; Elbaz, V.; Philippe, M.

    2014-10-15

    Radial hydride precipitation in stress relieved Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings is studied using a new thermal–mechanical test. Two maximum temperatures for radial hydride precipitation heat treatment are studied, 350 and 450 °C with hydrogen contents ranging between 50 and 600 wppm. The new test provides two main results of interest: the minimum hoop stress required to precipitate radial hydrides and a maximum stress above which, all hydrides precipitate in the radial direction. Based on these two extreme stress conditions, a model is derived to determine the stress level required to obtain a given fraction of radial hydrides after high temperature thermal–mechanical heat treatment. The proposed model is validated using metallographic observation data on pressurized tubes cooled down under constant pressure. Most of the samples with reoriented hydrides are further subjected to a ductility test. Using finite element modeling, the test results are analyzed in terms of crack nucleation within radial hydrides at the outer diameter and crack growth through the thickness of the tubular samples. The combination of test results shows that samples with hydrogen contents of about 100 wppm had the lowest ductility.

  9. Mechanical Performance of Polyurethane and Epoxy Adhesives in Connections with Glued-in Rods at Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Verdet

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Glued-in rods have successfully been used for connections or reinforcement of timber structures due to their high strength and stiffness. However, their performance is potentially sensitive to temperature. This paper deals with an experimental investigation of the connections and adhesives in elevated temperatures. First, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA tests were performed to characterize an epoxy (EPX and a polyurethane (PUR adhesive. The evolution of the stiffness and the glass transition temperature, Tg, were measured in the range of 30 °C to 120 °C. Then, a total of 66 specimens with glued-in rods and the same adhesives were tested under a static tensile load at 20 °C, 40 °C, 50 °C, 60 °C, and 70 °C. In both types of tests, the EPX outperformed PUR due to its higher stiffness at temperatures of up to 40 °C; however, it showed a more rapid degradation of the stiffness and strength than the PUR at higher temperatures. No direct correlation was established between the Tg and the performance of the connections. The test results suggest that timber structures with glued-in rods may be vulnerable in service at temperatures above 40 °C.

  10. Fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hajime; Ueda, Makoto

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a structure capable of measuring, in a non-destructive manner, the releasing amount of nuclear gaseous fission products from spent fuels easily and at a high accuracy. Constitution: In order to confirm the integrity and the design feasibility of a nuclear fuel rod, it is important to accurately determine the amount of gaseous nuclear fission products released from nuclear pellets. In a structure where a plurality of fuel pellets are charged in a fuel cladding tube and retained by an inconel spring, a hollow and no-sealed type spacer tube made of zirconium or the alloy thereof, for example, not containing iron, cobalt, nickel or manganese is formed between the spring and the upper end plug. In the fuel rod of such a structure, by disposing a gamma ray collimator and a gamma ray detector on the extension of the spacer pipe, the gamma rays from the gaseous nuclear fission products accumulated in the spacer pipe can be detected while avoiding the interference with the induction radioactivity from inconel. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. The irradiation performance of austenitic stainless steel clade PWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira e Silva, A.; Esteves, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    The steady state irradiation performance of austenitic stainless steel clad pressurized water reactor fuel rods is modeled with fuel performance codes of the FRAP series. These codes, originally developed to model the thermal-mechanical behavior of zircaloy clad fuel rods, are modified to model stainless steel clad fuel rods. The irradiation thermal-mechanical behavior of type 348 stainless steel and zircaloy fuel rods is compared. (author) [pt

  12. 3D Finite Element Simulation of Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Sang Kyu; Lee, Sung Uk; Lee, Eun Ho; Yang, Dong Yol; Kim, Hyo Chan; Yang, Dong Yol

    2016-01-01

    In a nuclear power plant, the fuel assembly, which is composed of fuel rods, burns, and the high temperature can generate power. The fuel rod consists of pellets and a cladding that covers the pellets. It is important to understand the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction with regard to nuclear safety. This paper proposes simulation of the PCMI. The gap between the pellets and the cladding, and the contact pressure are very important for conducting thermal analysis. Since the gap conductance is not known, it has to be determined by a suitable method. This paper suggests a solution. In this study, finite element (FE) contact analysis is conducted considering thermal expansion of the pellets. As the contact causes plastic deformation, this aspect is considered in the analysis. A 3D FE module is developed to analyze the PCMI using FORTRAN 90. The plastic deformation due to the contact between the pellets and the cladding is the major physical phenomenon. The simple analytical solution of a cylinder is proposed and compared with the fuel rod performance code results

  13. Tensile and burst tests in support of the cadmium safety rod failure evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.K.

    1992-02-01

    The reactor safety rods may be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level has dropped during the ECS phase of hypothetical LOCA event. Accordingly, an experimental safety rod testing subtask was established as part of a task to address the response of reactor core components to this accident. This report discusses confirmatory separate effects tests conducted to support the evaluation of failures observed in the safety rod thermal tests. As part of the failure evaluation, the potential for liquid metal embrittlement (LME) of the safety rod cladding by cadmium (Cd) -- aluminum (Al) solutions was examined. Based on the test conditions, literature data, and U-Bend tests, its was concluded that the SS304 safety rod cladding would not be subject to LME by liquid Cd-Al solutions under conditions relevant to the safety rod thermal tests or gamma heating accident. To confirm this conclusion, tensile tests on SS304 specimens were performed in both air and liquid Cd-Al solutions with the range of strain rates, temperatures, and loading conditions spanning the range relevant to the safety rod thermal tests and gamma heating accident

  14. Duke Power Company's control rod wear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culp, D.C.; Kitlan, M.S. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Recent examinations performed at several foreign and domestic pressurized water reactors have identified significant control rod cladding wear, leading to the conclusion that previously believed control rod lifetimes are not attainable. To monitor control rod performance and reduce safety concerns associated with wear, Duke Power Company has developed a comprehensive control rod wear program for Ag-In-Cd and boron carbide (B 4 C) rods at the McGuire and Catawba nuclear stations. Duke Power currently uses the Westinghouse 17 x 17 Ag-In-Cd control rod design at McGuire Unit 1 and the Westinghouse 17 x 17 hybrid B 4 C control rod design with a Ag-In-Cd tip at McGuire Unit 2 and Catawba Units 1 and 2. The designs are similar, with the exception of the absorber material and clad thickness. There are 53 control rods per unit

  15. Development of high temperature metallic melting processes related to detritiation of exhausted control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dworschak, H.; Mannone, F.; Modica, G.

    1994-01-01

    A rather critical problem to be faced in developing a safe strategy for the management of tritiated solid wastes is dealing with the outgassing property of tritium. Releases of tritium under elemental or oxide form may occur from waste items at different temperatures and rates depending upon the nature of tritium bonds into the waste matrix as well as on its 'contamination history'. Apart from the commercial value of tritium, its release from waste packages anyhow represents a risk of tritium exposure that cannot be accepted by skippers, by store and disposal site operators as well as by the general public. Consequently it is mandatory to carry out the detritiation of such wastes before their packaging and storage or disposal. In the boron carbide control rods from the Lingen BWR after about three years of operation, tritium generated by neutron reaction was essentially retained in the B 4 C matrix. The objectives of the study are to demonstrate the feasibility of two processes aimed at reducing to the maximum practicable extent the level of tritium contamination in such waste management are facilitated

  16. Effect of cladding defect size on the oxidation of irradiated spent LWR [light-water reactor] fuel below 3690C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einziger, R.E.; Strain, R.V.

    1984-01-01

    Tests on spent fuel fragments and rod segments were conducted between 250 and 360 0 C to relate temperature, defect size, and fuel oxidation rate with time-to-cladding-splitting. Defect sizes from 760 μm diameter down to 8 μm, the size of an SCC type breach, were used. Above 283 0 C, the time-to-cladding-splitting was longer for the smaller defects. The enhancement of the incubation time by smaller defects steadily decreased with temperature and was not detected at 250 0 C. 18 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Numerical prediction on turbulent heat transfer of a spacer ribbed fuel rod for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Kazuyuki

    1994-11-01

    The turbulent heat transfer of a fuel rod with three-dimensional trapezoidal spacer ribs for high temperature gas-cooled reactors was analyzed numerically using the k-ε turbulence model, and investigated experimentally using a simulated fuel rod under the helium gas condition of a maximum outlet temperature of 1000degC and pressure of 4MPa. From the experimental results, it found that the turbulent heat transfer coefficients of the fuel rod were 18 to 80% higher than those of a concentric smooth annulus at a region of Reynolds number exceeding 2000. On the other hand, the predicted average Nusselt number of the fuel rod agreed well with the heat transfer correlation obtained from the experimental data within a relative error of 10% with Reynolds number of more than 5000. It was verified that the numerical analysis results had sufficient accuracy. Furthermore, the numerical prediction could clarify quantitatively the effects of the heat transfer augmentation by the spacer rib and the axial velocity increase due to a reduction in the annular channel cross-section. (author)

  18. Temperature and Stresses Estimation in Reactivity Control Rods for CAREM-25 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markiewicz, Mario; Estevez, Esteban

    2000-01-01

    The reactivity control rods are a critical component regarding safety.Its correct operation when required must be ensured.For this purpose, this component must maintain its operating capacity during all its residence time and under any foreseen operation condition.To evaluate the behaviour of reactivity control rods, it is necessary to analyse the demands they are exposed to, determining from the mechanical point of view, the residence time in the reactor core.In this report, using analytical calculations, the parameters affecting the performance of the reactivity control rods are analysed, with the objective of determine from the mechanical point of view, its behaviour and residence time

  19. Super ODS steels R and D for fuel cladding of next generation nuclear systems. 4) Mechanical properties at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Tomohiro; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Inoue, Masaki; Okuda, Takanari; Abe, Fujio; Ohnuki, Somei; Fujisawa, Toshiharu; Kimura, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    As fuel cladding material for lead bismuth-cooled fast reactors and supercritical pressurized water-cooled fast reactors, our research group has been developing highly corrosion-resistant oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels with superior high-temperature strength. In this study, the mechanical properties of super ODS steel candidates at elevated temperature have been evaluated. Tensile tests, creep tests and low cycle fatigue tests were carried out for a total of 21 types of super ODS steel candidates which have a basic chemical composition of Fe-16Cr-4Al-0.1Ti- 0.35Y 2 O 3 , with small variations. The testing temperatures were 700degC (for tensile, creep and low cycle fatigue tests) and 450degC (for tensile test). The major alloying parameters of the candidate materials were the compositions of Cr, Al, W and the minor elements such as Hf, Zr and Ce etc. The addition of the minor elements is considered effective in the control of the formation of the Y-Al complex oxides, which improves high-temperature strength. The addition of Al was very effective for the improvement of corrosion resistance. However, the addition also caused a reduction in high-temperature tensile strength. Among the efforts aimed at increasing high-temperature strength, such as the low-temperature hot-extrusion process, solution strengthening by W and the addition of minor elements, a remarkable improvement of strength was observed in ODS steel with a basic chemical composition of 2W-0.6Hf steel (SOC-14) or 2W-0.6Zr steel (SOC-16). The same behavior was also observed in creep tests, and the creep rupture times of SOC-14 and SOC-16 at 700degC - 100MPa were greater than 10,000 h. The strength was similar to that of no-Al ODS steels. No detrimental effect by the additional elements on low-cycle fatigue strength was observed in this study. These results showed that the addition of Hf/Zr to ODS-Al steels was effective in improving high-temperature strength. (author)

  20. Stainless steel clad for light water reactor fuels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, J.E.; Meyer, J.E.

    1980-07-01

    Proper reactor operation and design guidelines are necessary to assure fuel integrity. The occurrence of fuel rod failures for operation in compliance with existing guidelines suggests the need for more adequate or applicable operation/design criteria. The intent of this study is to develop such criteria for light water reactor fuel rods with stainless steel clad and to indicate the nature of uncertainties in its development. The performance areas investigated herein are: long term creepdown and fuel swelling effects on clad dimensional changes and on proximity to clad failure; and short term clad failure possibilities during up-power ramps

  1. The effects of off-center pellets on the temperature distribution and the heat flux distribution of fuel rods in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Muzhang; Xing Jianhua

    1986-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of off-center pellets on the steady state temperature distribution and heat flux distribution of fuel rods in the nuclear reactors, and derives the dimensionless temperature distribution relationships and the dimensionless heat flux distribution relationship from the fuel rods with off-center pellets. The calculated results show that the effects of off-center will result in not only deviations of the highest temperature placement in the fuel pellets, but also the circumferentially nonuniform distributions of the temperatures and heat fluxes of the fuel rod surfaces

  2. Study of the response of Zircaloy cladding to thermal shock during water quenching after double sided steam oxidation at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Suparna; Sawarn, Tapan K.; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the failure of embrittled Zircaloy-4 cladding used in the present generation of Indian pressurized heavy water reactors (IPHWRs) in a simulated LOCA condition and its correlation with the evolved stratified microstructure. Isothermal steam oxidation of Zircaloy-4 cladding at high temperatures (900-1200°C) with soaking periods in the range 60-900 seconds followed by water quenching was carried out. None of the pieces broke during quenching except for those heated at 1100, 1150 and 1200°C for longer durations. The combined oxide + oxygen stabilized α-Zr(O) layer thickness and the fraction of the load bearing phase of clad tube specimens were correlated with the %ECR values calculated using Baker-Just equation. Average oxygen concentration of the load bearing prior β-Zr phase corresponding to different oxidation conditions was calculated from the average microhardness values in Vickers scale using an empirical correlation developed by Leistikow. The results of these experiments are presented in this paper. Thermal shock sustainability of the clad was correlated with the %ECR, combined oxide+α-Zr(O) layer thickness, fraction of the prior β-Zr phase and its average oxygen concentration. The thermal shock boundary was observed to be 29% ECR, 0.29 mm combined thickness of ZrO_2+α-Zr(O), 0.16 mm of β-Zr thickness with an average β phase oxygen content of 0.69 wt%. (author)

  3. Microstructure and wear behaviors of laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2-WS2 high temperature self-lubricating wear-resistant composite coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mao-Sheng; Liu, Xiu-Bo; Fan, Ji-Wei; He, Xiang-Ming; Shi, Shi-Hong; Fu, Ge-Yan; Wang, Ming-Di; Chen, Shu-Fa

    2012-02-01

    The high temperature self-lubricating wear-resistant NiCr/Cr3C2-30%WS2 coating and wear-resistant NiCr/Cr3C2 coating were fabricated on 0Cr18Ni9 austenitic stainless steel by laser cladding. Phase constitutions and microstructures were investigated, and the tribological properties were evaluated using a ball-on-disc wear tester under dry sliding condition at room-temperature (17 °C), 300 °C and 600 °C, respectively. Results indicated that the laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2 coating consisted of Cr7C3 primary phase and γ-(Fe,Ni)/Cr7C3 eutectic colony, while the coating added with WS2 was mainly composed of Cr7C3 and (Cr,W)C carbides, with the lubricating WS2 and CrS sulfides as the minor phases. The wear tests showed that the friction coefficients of two coatings both decrease with the increasing temperature, while the both wear rates increase. The friction coefficient of laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2-30%WS2 is lower than the coating without WS2 whatever at room-temperature, 300 °C, 600 °C, but its wear rate is only lower at 300 °C. It is considered that the laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2-30%WS2 composite coating has good combination of anti-wear and friction-reducing capabilities at room-temperature up to 300 °C.

  4. Analysis of corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Kim, Ki Hang; Seo, Keum Seok; Chung, Jin Gon

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding was analyzed using the oxide measurement data of KOFA fuel irradiated up to the fuel rod burnup of 35,000 MWD/MTU for two cycles in Kori-2. Even though KOFA cladding is a standard Zircaloy-4 manufactured by Westinghouse according to the Siemens/KWU's HCW (Highly Cold Worked) standard Zircaloy-4 specification, it was expected that in-pile corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding would not be equivalent to that of Siemens/KWU's cladding due to the differences in such manufacturing processes as cold work and heat treatment. The analysis of measured KOFA cladding oxidation showed that oxidation of KOFA cladding is at least 19 % lower than the design analysis based upon Siemens/KWU's HCW standard Zircaloy-4 cladding. Lower corrosion of KOFA cladding seems to result from the differences in the manufacturing processes and chemical composition although the burnup and oxide layer thickness of the measured fuel rods is relatively low and the amount of the oxidation data base is small

  5. Zirconium-barrier cladding attributes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.; Rand, R.A.; Tucker, R.P.; Cheng, B.; Adamson, R.B.; Davies, J.H.; Armijo, J.S.; Wisner, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    This metallurgical study of Zr-barrier fuel cladding evaluates the importance of three salient attributes: (1) metallurgical bond between the zirconium liner and the Zircaloy substrate, (2) liner thickness (roughly 10% of the total cladding wall), and (3) softness (purity). The effect that each of these attributes has on the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) resistance of the Zr-barrier fuel was studied by a combination of analytical model calculations and laboratory experiments using an expanding mandrel technique. Each of the attributes is shown to contribute to PCI resistance. The effect of the zirconium liner on fuel behavior during off-normal events in which steam comes in contact with the zirconium surface was studied experimentally. Simulations of loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) showed that the behavior of Zr-barrier cladding is virtually indistinguishable from that of conventional Zircaloy cladding. If steam contacts the zirconium liner surface through a cladding perforation and the fuel rod is operated under normal power conditions, the zirconium liner is oxidized more rapidly than is Zircaloy, but the oxidation rate returns to the rate of Zircaloy oxidation when the oxide phase reaches the zirconium-Zircaloy metallurgical bond

  6. The high temperature out-of-pile test of LVDT for internal pressure measurement of nuclear fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, J. M.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, D. S.; Yoon, K. B.; Sin, Y. T.; Park, S. J.; Kang, Y. H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    As a part of the development of instrumentation technologies for the nuclear fuel irradiation test in HANARO(High-flux Advanced Nuclear Application Reactor), the internal pressure measurement technique of the nuclear fuel rod is being developed using LVDT(Linear Variable Differential Transformer). As the results of out-of-pile test at room temperature, it was concluded that the well qualified out-of-pile tests were needed to understand the LVDT's detail characteristics at high temperature for the detail design of the fuel irradiation capsule, because LVDT is very sensitive to variation of temperature. Therefore, the high temperature out-of-pile test system for pressure measurement was developed, and this test was performed under the temperature condition between room temperature and 300 .deg. C increasing the pressure from 0 bar to 30 bar. The LVDT's high temperature characteristics and temperature sensitivity of LVDT were analyzed through this experiment. Based on the result of this test, the method for the application of LVDT at high temperature was introduced. It is known that the results will be used to predict accurately the internal pressure of fuel rod during irradiation test.

  7. Elevated temperature creep behavior of Inconel alloy 625

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, A.; Burke, W.F.

    1984-07-01

    Inconel 625 in the solution-annealed condition has been selected as the clad material for the fuel and control rod housing assemblies of the Upgraded Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT Upgrade or TU). The clad is expected to be subjected to temperatures up to about 1100 0 C. Creep behavior for the temperature range of 800 0 C to 1100 0 C of Inconel alloy 625, in four distinct heat treated conditions, was experimentally evaluated

  8. Code Package to Analyze Parameters of the WWER Fuel Rod. TOPRA-2 Code - Verification Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheglov, A.; Proselkov, V.; Passage, G.; Stefanova, S.

    2009-01-01

    Presented are the data for computer codes to analyze WWER fuel rods, used in the WWER department of RRC 'Kurchatov Institute'. Presented is the description of TOPRA-2 code intended for the engineering analysis of thermophysical and strength parameters of the WWER fuel rod - temperature distributions along the fuel radius, gas pressures under the cladding, stresses in the cladding, etc. for the reactor operation in normal conditions. Presented are some results of the code verification against test problems and the data obtained in the experimental programs. Presented are comparison results of the calculations with TOPRA-2 and TRANSURANUS (V1M1J06) codes. Results obtained in the course of verification demonstrate possibility of application of the methodology and TOPRA-2 code for the engineering analysis of the WWER fuel rods

  9. A survey of blockage measurement methods used in PWR multi-rod experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindle, E.D.; Jones, C.; Whitty, S. (AEA Reactor Services, Springfield (UK))

    1986-05-01

    The deformation characteristics of Zircaloy multi-rod arrays are being investigated in laboratory and in-reactor tests, and heat transfer experiments are being carried out on pre-deformed arrays. The primary objective is to demonstrate that cladding distension occurring under hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions will not impede the PWR emergency coolant flow during the reflood stage to the extent that unacceptably high cladding temperatures are reached, i.e. that a coolable geometry is maintained. This Report critically reviews the current methods for measuring blockage in multi-rod arrays and discusses their application. A new definition which overcomes the deficiencies of the previous methods is proposed even though it still has drawbacks in the case of overall blockage measurement. A method for automatically measuring the individual rod strain, general cluster blockage sub-channel blockage and sub-channel perimeter changes is described and the results from a deformed array presented. (author).

  10. A survey of blockage measurement methods used in PWR multi-rod experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.; Jones, C.; Whitty, S.

    1986-05-01

    The deformation characteristics of Zircaloy multi-rod arrays are being investigated in laboratory and in-reactor tests, and heat transfer experiments are being carried out on pre-deformed arrays. The primary objective is to demonstrate that cladding distension occurring under hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions will not impede the PWR emergency coolant flow during the reflood stage to the extent that unacceptably high cladding temperatures are reached, i.e. that a coolable geometry is maintained. This Report critically reviews the current methods for measuring blockage in multi-rod arrays and discusses their application. A new definition which overcomes the deficiencies of the previous methods is proposed even though it still has drawbacks in the case of overall blockage measurement. A method for automatically measuring the individual rod strain, general cluster blockage sub-channel blockage and sub-channel perimeter changes is described and the results from a deformed array presented. (author)

  11. Modeling of Zircaloy cladding degradation under repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santanam, L.; Raghavan, S.; Chin, B.A.

    1989-07-01

    Two potential degradation mechanisms, creep and stress corrosion cracking, of Zircaloy cladding during repository storage of spent nuclear fuel have been investigated. The deformation and fracture map methodology has been used to predict maximum allowable initial storage temperatures to achieve a thousand year life without rupture as a function of spent-fuel history. A stress analysis of fuel rods has been performed. Stresses in the outer zirconium oxide layer and the inner Zircaloy tube have been predicted for typical internal pressurization, oxide layer thickness, volume expansion from formation of the oxide layer and thermal expansion coefficients of the cladding and oxide. Stress relaxation occurring in-reactor has also been taken into account. The calculations indicate that for the anticipated storage conditions investigated, the outer zirconium oxide layer is in a state of compression thus making it unlikely that stress corrosion cracking of the exterior surface will occur. 20 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs

  12. Diffusion in cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, M.S.; Pande, B.M.; Agarwala, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Aluminium has been used as a cladding material in most research reactors because its low neutron absorption cross section and ease of fabrication. However, it is not suitable for cladding in power reactors and as such zircaloy-2 is normally used as a clad because it can withstand high temperature. It has low neutron absorption cross section, good oxidation, corrosion, creep properties and possesses good mechanical strength. With the passage of time, further development in this branch of science took place and designers started looking for better neutron economy and less hydrogen pickup in PHW reactors. The motion of fission products in the cladding material could pose a problem after long operation. In order to understand their behaviour under reactor environment, it is essential to study first the diffusion under normal conditions. These studies will throw light on the interaction of defects with impurities which would in turn help in understanding the mechanism of diffusion. In this article, it is intended to discuss the diffusion behaviour of impurities in cladding materials.(i.e. aluminium, zircaloy-2, zirconium-niobium alloy etc.). (author). 94 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Structural analysis and modeling of water reactor fuel rod behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roshan Zamir, M.

    2000-01-01

    An important aspect of the design and analysis of nuclear reactor is the ability to predict the behavior of fuel elements in the adverse environment of a reactor system under normal and emergency operating conditions. To achieve these objectives and in order to provide a suitable computer code based on fundamental material properties for design and study of the thermal-mechanical behavior of water reactor fuel rods during their irradiation life and also to demonstrate the fuel rod design and modeling for students, The KIANA-1 computer program has been developed by the writer at Amir-Kabir university of technology with support of Atomic Energy Organization of Iran. KIANA-1 is an integral one-dimensional computer program for the thermal and mechanical analysis in order to predict fuel rods performance and also parameter study of Zircaloy-clad UO 2 fuel rod during steady state conditions. The code has been designed for the following main objectives: To give a solution for the steady state heat conduction equation for fuel as a heat source and clad by using finite difference, control volume and semi-analytical methods in order to predict the temperature profile in the fuel and cladding. To predict the inner gas pressures due to the filling gases and released gaseous fission products. To predict the fission gas production and release by using a simple diffusion model based on the Booth models and an empirical model. To calculate the fuel-clad gap conductance for cracked fuel with partial contact zones to a closed gap with strong contact. To predict the distribution of stress in three principal directions in the fuel and sheet by assuming one-dimensional plane strain and asymmetric idealization. To calculate the strain distribution in three principal directions and the corresponding deformation in the fuel and cladding. For this purpose the permanent strain such as creep or plasticity as well as the thermoelastic deformation and also the swelling, densification, cracking

  14. Steady-state, local temperature fields with turbulent liquid sodium flow in nominal and disturbed bundle geometries with spacer grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, R.; Tschoeke, H.

    1980-01-01

    The operating reliability of nuclear reactors calls for a reliable strength analysis of the highly loaded core elements, one of its prerequisites being the reliable determination of the three-dimensional velocity and temperature fields. To verify thermohydraulics computer programs, extensive local temperature measurements in the rod claddings of the critical bundle zone were performed on a heated 19-rod bundle model with sodium flow and provided with spacer grids (P/D = 1.30; W/D = 1.19). The essential results are: - Outside the spacer grids, the azimuthal temperature variations of the side and corner rods are approximately 10-fold those of rods in the central bundle zone. - The spacer grids investigated give rise to great local temperature peaks and correspondingly great temperature gradients in the axial and azimuthal directions immediately around the support points. - Continuous reduction of a subchannel by rod bowing results in substantial rises of temperature which, however, are limited to adjacent cladding tubes. (orig.)

  15. Power ramp tests of MOX fuel rods. HBWR irradiation with the instrument rig, IFA-591

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Takayuki; Abe, Tomoyuki

    2006-03-01

    Plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel rods of instrumental rig IFA-591 were ramped in HBWR to study the Advanced Thermal Reactor (ATR) MOX fuel behavior during transient operation and to determine a failure threshold of the MOX fuel rods. Eleven segments were base-irradiated in ATR 'FUGEN' up to 18.4 GWd/t. Zirconium liner claddings were adopted for four segments of them. As the results of non-destructive post irradiation examinations (PIEs) after the base-irradiation and before the ramp tests, no remarkable behavior affecting the integrity of fuel assembly and fuel rod was confirmed. All segments to be used for the ramp tests, which consisted of the multi-step ramp tests and the single-step ramp tests, had instrumentations for in-pile measurements of cladding elongation or plenum pressure, and heated up to the maximum linear power of 58.3-68.4 kW/m without failure. The major results of ramp tests are as follows: There is no difference in PCMI behaviors between two type rods of Zry-2 and Zirconium liner claddings from the in-pile measurements of cladding elongation and plenum pressure. The computations of cladding elongation and inner pressure gave slightly lower elongation and pressure than the in-pile measurements during the ramp-test. However, the cladding relaxation during the power hold was in good agreement, and the fission gas release behavior during cooling down could be evaluated by taking into account the relaxation of contact pressure between pellet and cladding. Although the final power during IFA-591 ramp tests reached the higher linear power than the failure threshold power of UO 2 fuel rods, no indication of fuel failure was observed during the ramp tests. The cladding relaxation due to the creep deformation of the MOX pellets at high temperature could be confirmed at the power steps during the multi-ramp test. The fission gas release due to the emancipation from PCMI stress was observed during the power decreasing. The burn-up dependence could be

  16. Equilibrium moisture content of wood at different temperature/moisture conditions in the cladding of wooden constructions and in the relation to their reliability and service life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeňka Havířová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the natural properties of wood and wood-based materials is their soaking capacity (hy­gro­sco­pi­ci­ty. The moisture content of wood and building constructions of wood and wood based materials significantly influences the service life and reliability of these constructions and buildings. The equilibrium weight moisture content of built-in wood corresponding to temperature/moisture conditions inside the cladding has therefore a decisive influence on the basic requirements placed on building constructions. The wood in wooden frame cladding changes its moisture content depending on temperature and moisture conditions of the environment it is built into. The water vapor condensation doesn’t necessarily have to occur right in the wooden framework of the cladding for the equilibrium moisture content to rise over the level permissible for the reliable function of a given construction. In spite of the fact that the common heat-technical assessment cannot be considered fully capable of detecting the effects of these factors on the functional reliability of wood-based constructions and buildings, an extension has been proposed of the present method of design an assessment of building constructions according to the ČSN 73 0540 standard regarding the interpretation of equilibrium moisture content in relation to the temperature/moisture conditions and their time behavior inside a construction.

  17. Control rod assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Akio.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable reliable insertion and drops of control rods, as well as insure a sufficient flow rate of coolants flowing through the control rods for attaining satisfactory cooling thereof to enable relexation of thermal stress resulted to rectifying mechanisms or the likes. Constitution: To the outer circumference of a control rod contained vertically movably within a control rod guide tube, resistive members are retractably provided in such a way as to project to close the gap between outer circumference of the control rod and the inner surface of the control rod guide tube upon engagement of a gripper of control rod drives, and retract upon release of the engagement of the gripper. Thus, since the resistive members project to provide a greater resistance to the coolants flowing between them and the control rod guide tube in the normal operation where the gripper is engaged to drive the control rod by the control rod drives, a major part of the coolant flowing into the control rod guide tube flows into the control rod. This enables to cool the control rod effectively and make the temperature distribution uniform for the coolant flowing from the upper end of the control rod guide tube to thereby attain the relaxation of the thermal stress resulted in the rectifying mechanisms or the likes. (Moriyama, K.)

  18. Modeling the UO2 ex-AUC pellet process and predicting the fuel rod temperature distribution under steady-state operating condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Nguyen Trong; Thuan, Le Ba; Thanh, Tran Chi; Nhuan, Hoang; Khoai, Do Van; Tung, Nguyen Van; Lee, Jin-Young; Jyothi, Rajesh Kumar

    2018-06-01

    Modeling uranium dioxide pellet process from ammonium uranyl carbonate - derived uranium dioxide powder (UO2 ex-AUC powder) and predicting fuel rod temperature distribution were reported in the paper. Response surface methodology (RSM) and FRAPCON-4.0 code were used to model the process and to predict the fuel rod temperature under steady-state operating condition. Fuel rod design of AP-1000 designed by Westinghouse Electric Corporation, in these the pellet fabrication parameters are from the study, were input data for the code. The predictive data were suggested the relationship between the fabrication parameters of UO2 pellets and their temperature image in nuclear reactor.

  19. Control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Isao; Masuoka, Ryuzo.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent fuel element failures during power conditioning by removing liquid absorbents in poison tubes of control rods in a fast power up step and extracting control rods to slightly increase power in a medium power up step. Constitution: A plurality of poison tubes are disposed in a coaxial or plate-like arrangement and divided into a region capable of compensating the reactivity from the initial state at low temperature to 40% power operation and a region capable of compensating the reactivity in the power up above 40% power operation. Soluble poisons are used as absorbers in the poison tubes corresponding to above 40% power operation and they are adapted to be removed independently from the driving of control rods. The poison tubes filled with the soluble absorbers are responsible for the changes in the reactivity from the initial state at low temperature to the medium power region and the reactivity control is conducted by the elimination of liquid absorbers from the poison tubes. In the succeeding slight power up region above the medium power, power up is proceeding by extracting the control rods having remaining poison tubes filled with solid or liquid absorbers. (Seki, T.)

  20. FRAPCON analysis of cladding performance during dry storage operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, David J.; Geelhood, Kenneth J.

    2018-03-01

    There is an increasing need in the U.S. and around the world to move used nuclear fuel from wet storage in fuel pools to dry storage in casks stored at independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSI) or interim storage sites. The NRC limits cladding temperature to 400°C while maintaining cladding hoop stress below 90 MPa in an effort to avoid radial hydride reorientation. An analysis was conducted with FRAPCON-4.0 on three modern fuel designs with three representative used nuclear fuel storage temperature profiles that peaked at 400 °C. Results were representative of the majority of U.S. LWR fuel. They conservatively showed that hoop stress remains below 90 MPa at the licensing temperature limit. Results also show that the limiting case for hoop stress may not be at the highest rod internal pressure in all cases but will be related to the axial temperature and oxidation profiles of the rods at the end of life and in storage.

  1. Thermal performance of a buried nuclear waste storage container storing a hybrid mix of PWR and BWR spent fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.L.

    1988-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will design, model, and test nuclear waste packages for use at the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. One such package would store lightly packed spent fuel rods from both pressurized and boiling water reactors. The storage container provides the primary containment of the nuclear waste and the spent fuel rod cladding provides secondary containment. A series of transient conduction and radiation heat transfer analyses was run to determine for the first 1000 yr of storage if the temperature of the tuff at the borehole wall ever falls below 97/degree/C and whether the cladding of the stored spent fuel ever exceeds 350/degree/C. Limiting the borehole to temperatures of 97/degree/C or greater helps minimize corrosion by assuring that no condensed water collects on the container. The 350/degree/C cladding limit minimizes the possibility of creep-related failure in the spent fuel rod cladding. For a series of packages stored in a 8 x 30 m borehole grid where each package contains 10-yr-old spent fuel rods generating 4.74 kW or more, the borehole wall stays above 97/degree/C for the full 1000-yr analysis period

  2. URANUS - a computer programme for the thermal and mechanical analysis of the fuel rods in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassmann, K.

    1978-01-01

    The URANUS code, a digital computer programme for the thermal and mechanical analysis of integral fuel rods, is described. With this code the fuel rods found in the majority of power reactors can be analyzed. URANUS is built around a quasi two-dimensional analysis of fuel and cladding. The mechanical analysis can accommodate seven components of strain: elastic, time-independent plastic, creep and thermal strains, as well as strains due to swelling, cracking and densification. The heat generation and temperature distribution, cladding/fuel gap closure, pellet cracking and crack healing, fission-gas release, corrosion, O/M-distribution and plutonium redistribution are modelled. Geometric non-linearities (large displacements) are included; steady state or transient loading (pressure, temperature) is possible. In this paper special attention is paid to a theory for determining crack structures. The present status of the URANUS computer programme and a critical comparison with other fuel rod codes as well as sample analyses are given. (Auth.)

  3. Pre-test prediction and post-test analysis of PWR fuel rod ballooning in the MT-3 in-pile LOCA simulation experiment in the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, A.T.; Horwood, R.A.; Healey, T.

    1983-01-01

    The USNRC and the UKAEA have jointly funded a series of in-pile LOCA simulation experiments in the Canadian NRU reactor in order to secure further information on the thermal hydraulic and clad deformation response of PWR fuel rod bundles. Test MT-3 in the series was performed using reflood rate and rod internal pressure conditions specified by the UK nuclear industry. The parameters were selected to ensure the development of a near-isothermal clad temperature history during which zircaloy was required to balloon and rupture near the alpha-alpha/beta phase transition. Specification of the reflood rate conditions was assisted by the performance of a precursor test on an unpressurised rod bundle and by complementary application of appropriate thermal hydraulic analyses. Identification of the rod internal pressure needed to cause ballooning and rupture was achieved using a creep deformation model, BALLOON, in conjunction with the clad thermal history defined by the prior thermal hydraulic test. This paper presents the basis of the BALLOON analysis and describes its application in calculating the fill gas pressure for rods MT-3, their axial ballooning profile and the clad temperature at peak radial strain elevations. (author)

  4. Detailed analysis for a control rod worth of the gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Tetsuo; Katanishi, Shoji; Takada, Shoji; Yan, Xing; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    GTHTR300 is composed of a simplified and economical power plant based on an inherent safe 600 MWt reactor and a nearly 50% high efficiency gas turbine power conversion cycle. GTHTR300 core consist of annular fuel region, center and outer side reflectors because of cooling it effectively in depressurized accident conditions, and all control rods are located in both side reflectors of annular core. As a thermal neutron spectrum is strongly distorted in reflector regions, an accurate calculation is especially required for the control rod worth evaluation. In this study, we applied the detailed Monte Carlo calculations of a full core model, and confirmed that our design method has enough accuracy. (author)

  5. Heat flux and temperature determination on the control rod outer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taler, J.; Cebula, A.; Marcinkiewicz, J.; Tinoco, H.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents heat transfer calculation results concerning a control rod of Unit 3 of Forsmark Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The part of the control rod, which is the object of interest, is surrounded by a mixing region of hot and cold flows and, as a consequence, is subjected to thermal fluctuations. The paper describes a numerical test which validates the method based on the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP). The comparison of the results achieved by two methods, CFD and IHCP, including a description of the IHCP method used in the calculation process, shows a very good agreement between the methods. (author)

  6. Verification of heat flux and temperature calculation on the control rod outer surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taler, Jan; Cebula, Artur

    2011-12-01

    The paper presents heat transfer calculation results concerning a control rod of Forsmark Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The part of the control rod, which is the object of interest, is surrounded by a mixing region of hot and cold flows and, as a consequence, is subjected to thermal fluctuations. The paper describes a numerical test which validates the method based on the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP). The comparison of the results achieved by two methods, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and IHCP, including a description of the IHCP method used in the calculation process, shows a very good agreement between the methods.

  7. Fuel Performance Calculations for FeCrAl Cladding in BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Nathan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Sweet, Ryan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Maldonado, G. Ivan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Wirth, Brian D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This study expands upon previous neutronics analyses of the reactivity impact of alternate cladding concepts in boiling water reactor (BWR) cores and directs focus toward contrasting fuel performance characteristics of FeCrAl cladding against those of traditional Zircaloy. Using neutronics results from a modern version of the 3D nodal simulator NESTLE, linear power histories were generated and supplied to the BISON-CASL code for fuel performance evaluations. BISON-CASL (formerly Peregrine) expands on material libraries implemented in the BISON fuel performance code and the MOOSE framework by providing proprietary material data. By creating material libraries for Zircaloy and FeCrAl cladding, the thermomechanical behavior of the fuel rod (e.g., strains, centerline fuel temperature, and time to gap closure) were investigated and contrasted.

  8. Method of manufacturing nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Masao; Oyama, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Takanobu.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To discriminate the properties of light white deposits on a clad tube during the process of manufacturing nuclear fuel rods and then remove this to reproduce a good clad tube, thereby enhancing a yield of the clad tube. Structure: When a light white deposits is found to be appeared on outer or inner surface of coating during the process of appearance inspection, this is then permitted to subject to treatment of hot water immersion and discrimination. Requirements for removal of adhered matter in the process of treatment of hot water immersion are that deioned water of specific resistance 5 x 10 5 ohms or more is used with water temperature maintained at 60 to 100 0 C for immersion treatment for 10 to 30 minutes. In this case, however, if the water temperature is more than 80 0 C, the immersion time can be set less than 10 minutes. With the addition of such process described above, about 2.5% of total receiving number can be reproduced. (Yoshihara, H.)

  9. The modeling of fuel rod behaviour under RIA conditions in the code DYN3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, U.

    2001-01-01

    A description of the fuel rod behaviour and heat transfer model used in the code DYN3D for nuclear reactor core dynamic simulations is given. Besides the solution of heat conduction equations in fuel and cladding, the model comprises a detailed description of heat transfer in the gas gap by conduction, radiation and fuel-cladding contact. The gas gap behaviour is modeled in a mechanistic way taking into account transient changes of the gas gap parameters based on given conditions for the initial state. Thermal, elastic and plastic deformations of fuel and cladding are taken into account within 1D approximation. A creeping law for time-dependent estimation of plastic deformations is implemented. Metal-water reaction of the cladding material in the high temperature region is considered. The cladding-coolant heat transfer regime map covers the region from one-phase liquid convection to dispersed flow with superheated steam. Special emphasis is put on taking into account the impact of thermodynamic non-equilibrium conditions on heat transfer. For the validation of the model, experiments on fuel rod behaviour during RIAs carried out in Russian and Japanese pulsed research reactors with shortened probes of fresh fuel rods are calculated. Comparisons between calculated and measured results are shown and discussed. It is shown, that the fuel rod behaviour is significantly influenced by plastic deformation of the cladding, post crisis heat transfer with sub-cooled liquid conditions and heat release from the metal-water reaction. Numerical studies concerning the fuel rod behaviour under RIA conditions in power reactors are reported on. It is demonstrated, that the fuel rod behaviour at high pressures and flow rates in power reactors is different from the behaviour under atmospheric pressure and stagnant flow conditions in the experiments. The mechanisms of fuel rod failure for fresh and burned fuel reported from the literature can be qualitatively reproduced by the DYN3D

  10. Effect of high hydrogen content on metallurgical and mechanical properties of zirconium alloy claddings after heat-treatment at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turque, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Under hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident conditions, fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys can be exposed to steam at high temperature (HT, up 1200 C) before being cooled and then quenched in water. In some conditions, after burst occurrence the cladding can rapidly absorb a significant amount of hydrogen (secondary hydriding), up to 3000 wt.ppm locally, during steam exposition at HT. The study deals with the effect, poorly studied up to date, of high contents of hydrogen on the metallurgical and mechanical properties of two zirconium alloys, Zircaloy-4 and M5, during and after cooling from high temperatures, at which zirconium is in its β phase. A specific facility was developed to homogeneously charge in hydrogen up to ∼ 3000 wt.ppm cladding tube samples of several centimeters in length. Phase transformations, chemical element partitioning and hydrogen precipitation during cooling from the β temperature domain of zirconium were studied by using several techniques, for the materials containing up to ∼ 3000 wt.ppm of hydrogen in average: in-situ neutron diffraction upon cooling from 700 C, X-ray diffraction, μ-ERDA, EPMA and electron microscopy in particular. The results were compared to thermodynamic predictions. In order to study the effect of high hydrogen contents on the mechanical behavior of the (prior-)μ phase of zirconium, axial tensile tests were performed at various temperatures between 20 and 700 C upon cooling from the β temperature domain, on samples with mean hydrogen contents up to ∼ 3000 wt.ppm. The results show that metallurgical and mechanical properties of the (prior-)β phase of zirconium alloys strongly depend on temperature and hydrogen content. (author) [fr

  11. PWR control rods wear by vibrations induced by coolant fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynier, R.

    1997-01-01

    Flow induced vibrations in pressurised water reactors generate the wear of control rods against their guidance systems. Alternate sliding (at 320 deg. C in water) and impact-sliding tests (at room temperature in air) were carried out on 304 L austenitic stainless steel control rods' claddings. Microstructural analysis were made on the wear scars of the tube specimen using Scanning ELectron Microscopy, microhardness measurements and X-ray diffractometry. The alternate sliding leads to an important mass loss, a strong plastic deformation due to the strain hardening of the surface layers and generates strong compressive residual stresses. These results are specific to a severe wear case. Therefore, the impact-sliding mode induces martensitic phase, a cracked oxide layer and a compressive residual stresses weaker than those created in the alternate sliding case. This type of motion leads to a milder wear of the control rods

  12. Core design and fuel rod analyses of a super fast reactor with high power density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Haitao; Cao, Liangzhi; Lu, Haoliang; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ikejiri, Satoshi; Ishiwatari, Yuki

    2009-01-01

    A Super Fast Reactor is a pressure-vessel type, fast spectrum SuperCritical Water Reactor (SCWR) that is presently researched in a Japanese project. One of the most important advantages of the Super Fast Reactor is the higher power density compared to the thermal spectrum SCWR, which reduces the capital cost. A preliminary core has an average power density of 158.8W/cc. In this paper, the principle of improving the average power density is studied and the core design is improved. After the sensitivity analyses on the fuel rod configurations, the fuel assembly configurations and the core configurations, an improved core with an average power density of 294.8W/cc is designed by 3-D neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled calculations. This power density is competitive with that of typical Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR). In order to ensure the fuel rod integrity of this core design, the fuel rod behaviors on the normal operating condition are analyzed using FEMAXI-6 code. The power histories of each fuel rod are taken from the neutronics calculation results in the core design. The cladding surface temperature histories are taken from the thermal-hydraulic calculation results in the core design. Four types of the limiting fuel rods, with the Maximum Cladding Surface Temperature (MCST), Maximum Power Peak(MPP), Maximum Discharge Burnup(MDB) and Different Coolant Flow Pattern (DCFP), are chosen to cover all the fuel rods in the core. The available design range of the fuel rod design parameters, such as initial gas plenum pressure, gas plenum position, gas plenum length, grain size and gap size, are found out in order to satisfy the following design criteria: (1) Maximum fuel centerline temperature should be less than 1900degC. (2) Maximum cladding stress in circumstance direction should be less than 100MPa. (3) Pressure difference on the cladding should be less than 1/3 of buckling collapse pressure. (4) Cumulative damage faction (CDF) of the cladding should be

  13. Effects of fuel relocation on reflood in a partially-blocked rod bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Jae [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongrok; Kim, Kihwan; Bae, Sung Won [Thermal-Hydraulic Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Division, 111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Sang-Ki, E-mail: skmoon@kaeri.re.kr [Thermal-Hydraulic Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Division, 111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Ballooning of the fuel rods has been an important issue, since it can influence the coolability of the rod bundle in a large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA). Numerous past studies have investigated the effect of blockage geometry on the heat transfer in a partially blocked rod bundle. However, they did not consider the occurrence of fuel relocation and the corresponding effect on two-phase heat transfer. Some fragmented fuel particles located above the ballooned region may drop into the enlarged volume of the balloon. Accordingly, the fuel relocation brings in a local power increase in the ballooned region. The present study’s objective is to investigate the effect of the fuel relocation on the reflood under a LBLOCA condition. Toward this end, experiments were performed in a 5 × 5 partially-blocked rod bundle. Two power profiles were tested: one is a typical cosine shape and the other is the modified shape considering the effect of the fuel relocation. For a typical power shape, the peak temperature in the ballooned rods was lower than that in the intact rods. On the other hand, for the modified power shape, the peak temperature in the ballooned rods was higher than that in the intact rods. Numerical simulations were also performed using the MARS code. The tendencies of the peak clad temperatures were well predicted.

  14. Modification of tribology and high-temperature behavior of Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb intermetallic alloy by laser cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiubo; Wang Huaming

    2006-01-01

    In order to improve the tribology and high-temperature oxidation properties of the Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb intermetallic alloy simultaneously, mixed NiCr-Cr 3 C 2 precursor powders had been investigated for laser cladding treatment to modify wear and high-temperature oxidation resistance of the material. The alloy samples were pre-placed with NiCr-80, 50 and 20%Cr 3 C 2 (wt.%), respectively, and laser treated at the same parameters, i.e., laser output power 2.8 kW, beam scanning speed 2.0 mm/s, beam dimension 1 mm x 18 mm. The treated samples underwent tests of microhardness, wear and high-temperature oxidation. The results showed that laser cladding with different constitution of mixed precursor NiCr-Cr 3 C 2 powders improved surface hardness in all cases. Laser cladding with NiCr-50%Cr 3 C 2 resulted in the best modification of tribology and high-temperature oxidation behavior. X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) analyses indicated that the formation of reinforced Cr 7 C 3 , TiC and both continuous and dense Al 2 O 3 , Cr 2 O 3 oxide scales were supposed to be responsible for the modification of the relevant properties. As a result, the present work had laid beneficial surface engineering foundation for TiAl alloy applied as future light weight and high-temperature structural candidate materials

  15. Fuel and control rod failure behavior during degraded core accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, K.S.

    1984-01-01

    As a part of the pretest and posttest analyses of Light Water Reactor Source Term Experiments (STEP) which are conducted in the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility, this paper investigates the thermodynamic and material behaviors of nuclear fuel pins and control rods during severe core degradation accidents. A series of four STEP tests are being performed to simulate the characteristics of the power reactor accidents and investigate the behavior of fission product release during these accidents. To determine the release rate of the fission products from the fuel pins and the control rod materials, information concerning the timing of the clad failure and the thermodynamic conditions of the fuel pins and control rods are needed to be evaluated. Because the phase change involves a large latent heat and volume expansion, and the phase change is a direct cause of the clad failure, the understanding of the phase change phenomena, particularly information regarding how much of the fuel pin and control rod materials are melted are very important. A simple energy balance model is developed to calculate the temperature profile and melt front in various heat transfer media considering the effects of natural convection phenomena on the melting and freezing front behavior

  16. TEGENA: Detailed experimental investigations of temperature and velocity distributions in rod bundle geometries with turbulent sodium flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, R.

    1989-02-01

    Precise knowledge of the velocity and temperature distributions is necessary in fuel element design (rod bundles with longitudinal flow). The detail codes required in the fine analysis of non-uniformly cooled bundle zones are presently at the stage of development. In order to verify these computer codes, the mean fluid temperatures and the related RMS values of the temperature fluctuations were measured in a heated bundle TEGENA, containing 4 rods arranged in one row (P/D = W/D = 1.147) with sodium cooling (Pr ≅ 0.005). The temperature distribution in the structures was determined as the necessary boundary condition for the temperature profiles in the fluid. The experiments were carried out with different types of heating (uniform load and load tilting) and the flow conditions were varied in the range from 4000 ≤ Re ≤ 76.000, 20 ≤ Pe ≤ 400. The essential process of thermal development took place under uniform load within a heated bundle length of about 100 hydraulic diameters. In the main measuring plane at the end of the heated zone, after 200 hydraulic diameters, the flow can be termed largely developed thermally. There, the temperature profiles measured in the fluid exhibit pronounced maxima in the narrowest gaps of the subchannels as well as pronounced minima in the centers of the subchannels at the unheated wall. In the zones of maximum temperature gradients the temperature fluctuations attain maximum and minimum values, respectively, at the points of disappearance of the temperature gradients. In all cases of load tilting investigated the flow at the end of the heated zone had not yet developed thermally. By inspection of all thermocouples in isothermal experiments performed at regular intervals, by redundant arrangement of the mobile probe thermocouples and by demonstration of the reproducibility of results of measurement the experiments have been validated satisfactorily. (orig./GL) [de

  17. TEGENA: Detailed experimental investigations of temperature and velocity distributions in rod bundle geometries with turbulent sodium flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, R.

    1989-12-01

    Precise knowlege of the velocity and temperature distributions is necessary in fuel element design (rod bundles with longitudinal flow). The detail codes required in the fine analysis of non-uniformly cooled bundle zones are presently at the stage of development. In order to verify these computer codes, the mean fluid temperatures and the related RMS values of the temperature fluctuations were measured in a heated bundle, TEGENA, containing four rods arranged in one row (P/D = W/D = 1.147) with sodium cooling (Pr≅0.005). The temperature distribution in the structures was determined as the necessary boundary condition for the temperature profiles in the fluid. The experiments were carried out with different types of heating (uniform load and flux tilting) and the flow conditions were varied in the ranges 4000≤Re≤76,000; 20≤Pe≤400. The essential processes of thermal development took place under uniform load within a heated bundle length of about 100 hydraulic diameters. In the main measuring plane at the end of the heated zone, after 200 hydraulic diameters, the flow can be termed largely developed thermally. There, the temperature profiles measured in the fluid exhibit pronounced maxima in the narrowest gaps of the subchannels as well as pronounced minima in the centers of the subchannels at the unheated wall. In the zones of maximum temperature gradients the temperature fluctuations attain maximum and minimum values, respectively, at the points of disappearance of the temperature gradients. In all cases of flux tilting investigated the flow at the end of the heated zone had not yet developed thermally. (orig.) [de

  18. On the effect of temperature on the threshold stress intensity factor of delayed hydride cracking in light water reactor fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holston, Anna-MariaAlvarez; Stjarnsater, Johan [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoping (Sweden)

    2017-06-15

    Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) was first observed in pressure tubes in Canadian CANDU reactors. In light water reactors, DHC was not observed until the late 1990s in high-burnup boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel cladding. In recent years, the focus on DHC has resurfaced in light of the increased interest in the cladding integrity during interim conditions. In principle, all spent fuel in the wet pools has sufficient hydrogen content for DHC to operate below 300°C. It is therefore of importance to establish the critical parameters for DHC to operate. This work studies the threshold stress intensity factor (K{sub IH}) to initiate DHC as a function of temperature in Zry-4 for temperatures between 227°C and 315°C. The experimental technique used in this study was the pin-loading testing technique. To determine the K{sub IH}, an unloading method was used where the load was successively reduced in a stepwise manner until no cracking was observed during 24 hours. The results showed that there was moderate temperature behavior at lower temperatures. Around 300°C, there was a sharp increase in K{sub IH} indicating the upper temperature limit for DHC. The value for K{sub IH} at 227°C was determined to be 2.6 ± 0.3 MPa √m.

  19. On the effect of temperature on the threshold stress intensity factor of delayed hydride cracking in light water reactor fuel cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Maria Alvarez Holston

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Delayed hydride cracking (DHC was first observed in pressure tubes in Canadian CANDU reactors. In light water reactors, DHC was not observed until the late 1990s in high-burnup boiling water reactor (BWR fuel cladding. In recent years, the focus on DHC has resurfaced in light of the increased interest in the cladding integrity during interim conditions. In principle, all spent fuel in the wet pools has sufficient hydrogen content for DHC to operate below 300°C. It is therefore of importance to establish the critical parameters for DHC to operate. This work studies the threshold stress intensity factor (KIH to initiate DHC as a function of temperature in Zry-4 for temperatures between 227°C and 315°C. The experimental technique used in this study was the pin-loading testing technique. To determine the KIH, an unloading method was used where the load was successively reduced in a stepwise manner until no cracking was observed during 24 hours. The results showed that there was moderate temperature behavior at lower temperatures. Around 300°C, there was a sharp increase in KIH indicating the upper temperature limit for DHC. The value for KIH at 227°C was determined to be 2.6 ± 0.3 MPa √m.

  20. Post-irradiation examination of Al-61 wt% U3Si fuel rods from the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Wang, N.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the post-irradiation examination of 4 intact low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel rods from the national research universal (NRU) reactor at the Chalk River Laboratories of AECL. The rods were irradiated during the period 1993 through 1995, under typical driver fuel operating conditions in NRU, i.e., nominal D 2 O coolant inlet temperature 37E C, inlet pressure 654 kPa and mass flow 12.4 L/s. Irradiation exposures ranged from 147 to 251 full-power days, corresponding to 40 to 84 atom % 235 U burnup. The maximum rod power was ∼2 MW, with element linear power ratings up to 68 kW/m. Post-irradiation examinations, conducted in 1997, focused on optical metallography to measure cladding oxide thickness and fuel core and cladding microstructural examinations. The cladding oxide was approximately 24 : m thick at the mid-plane of fuel rods irradiated to 251 full-power days, with small areas up to 34 : m thick on the fins. The cladding retained significant ductility after irradiation, and its microstructure appeared unchanged. Fuel core diametral increases were small (up to 4%) and within the range previously observed on Al-61 wt% U 3 Si fuel irradiated in the NRU reactor. (author)

  1. Post-irradiation examination of A1-61 wt % U3Si fuel rods from the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Wang, N.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the post-irradiation examination of 4 intact low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel rods from the national research universal (NRU) reactor at the Chalk River Laboratories of AECL. The rods were irradiated during the period 1993 through 1995, under typical driver fuel operating conditions in NRU, i.e., nominal D 2 0 coolant inlet temperature 37 degrees C, inlet pressure 654 kPa and mass flow 12.4 L/s. Irradiation exposures ranged from 147 to 251 full-power days, corresponding to 40 to 84 atom % 235 U burnup. The maximum rod power was ∼2 MW, with element linear power ratings up to 68 kW/m. Post-irradiation examinations, conducted in 1997, focused on optical metallography to measure cladding oxide thickness and fuel core and cladding microstructural examinations. The cladding oxide was approximately 24 μm thick at the mid-plane of fuel rods irradiated to 251 full-power days, with small areas up to 34 μm thick on the fins. The cladding retained significant ductility after irradiation, and its microstructure appeared unchanged. Fuel core diametral increases were small (up to 4%) and within the range previously observed on A1-61 wt % U 3 Si fuel irradiated in the NRU reactor. (author)

  2. A model for hydrogen pickup for BWR cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hede, G.; Kaiser, U.

    2001-01-01

    It has been observed that rod elongation is driven by the hydrogen pickup but not by corrosion as such. Based on this a non-destructive method to determine clad hydrogen concentration has been developed. The method is based on the observation that there are three different mechanisms behind the rod growth: the effect of neutron irradiation on the Zircaloy microstructure, the volume increase of the cladding as an effect of hydride precipitation and axial pellet-cladding-mechanical-interaction (PCMI). The derived correlation is based on the experience of older cladding materials, inspected at hot-cell laboratories, that obtained high hydrogen levels (above 500 ppm) at lower burnup (assembly burnup below 50 MWd/kgU). Now this experience can be applied, by interpolation, on more modern cladding materials with a burnup beyond 50 MWd/kgU by analysis of the rod growth database of the respective cladding materials. Hence, the method enables an interpolation rather than an extrapolation of present day hydrogen pickup database, which improves the reliability and accuracy. Further, one can get a good estimate of the hydrogen pickup during an ongoing outage based on a non-destructive method. Finally, rod growth measurements are normally performed for a large population of rods, hence giving a good statistics compared to examination of a few rods at a hot cell. (author)

  3. Development of electrically heated rods with resistive element of graphite or carbon/carbon composites for simulating transients in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polidoro, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    Thermo-hydraulic problems, in nuclear plants are normally analysed by the use of electrically heated rods. The direct or indirect heater rods are limited in their use because, for high temperatures and high heat flux, the heating element temperature approach its melting point. The use of platinum or tantalum is not economically viable. Graphite and carbon/carbon composites are alternative materials because they are good electrical conductors and have good mechanical properties at high temperatures. Graphite and carbon/carbon composites were used to make heating elements for testing by indirect heating. The swaging process used to reduce the cladding diameter prevented the fabrication of graphite heater rods. Carbon/carbon composite used to make heating elements gave good results up to a heat flux of 100 W/cm 2 . It is easy to verify that this value can be exceeded if the choice of the complementary materials for insulator and cladding improved. (author) [pt

  4. High burnup fuel onset conditions in dry storage. Prediction of EOL rod internal pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feria, F.; Herranz, L.E.

    2015-07-01

    During dry storage, cladding resistance to failure can be affected by several degrading mechanisms like creep or hydrides radial reorientation. The driving force of these effects is the stress at which the cladding is submitted. The maximum stress in the cladding is determined by the end-of-reactor-life (EOL) rod internal pressure, PEOL, at the maximum temperature attained during dry storage. Thus, PEOL sets the initial conditions of storage for potential time-dependent changes in the cladding. Based on FRAPCON-3.5 calculations, the aim of this work is to analyse the PEOL of a PWR fuel rod irradiated to burnups greater than 60 GWd/tU, where limited information is available. In order to be conservative, demanding irradiation histories have been used with a peak linear power of 44 kW/m. FRAPCON-3.5 results show an increasing exponential trend of PEOL with burnup, from which a simple correlation has been derived. The comparison with experimental data found in the literature confirms the enveloping nature of the predicted curve. Based on that, a conservative prediction of cladding stress in dry storage has been obtained. The comparison with a critical stress threshold related to hydrides embrittlement seems to point out that this issue should not be a concern at burnups below 65 GWd/tU. (Author)

  5. PIN99W, Modelling of VVER and PWR Fuel Rod Thermomechanical Behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valach, M.; Strizhov, P.; Svoboda, R.

    2000-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The Code is developed to describe fuel rod thermomechanical behaviour in operational conditions. The main goal of this code is to calculate fuel temperature, gap conductivity, fission gas release and inner gas pressure. 2 - Methods: - fuel rod temperature response is solved by using one-dimensional finite element method combined with weighted residuals method; - the code involves models describing physical phenomena typical for the fuel irradiated in Light Water Power Reactors (densification, restructuring, fission gas release, swelling and relocation) ; - this code is updated and improves PIN-micro code. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: - simplified mechanistic solution; - only steady-state solution; - no cladding failure criterion; - no model for axial fuel-cladding interaction

  6. The physical and chemical degradation of PWR fuel rods in severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, P.D.; Mowat, J.A.S.; Dewhurst, D.W.F.; Hughes, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental study of the interaction between Zircaloy-4 cladding and UO 2 in PWR fuel rods heated to high temperatures with a negligible differential pressure across the cladding wall is described. The fuel rods were of dimensions appropriate to the 17x17 PWR fuel sub-assembly and were heated in a non-oxidising environment (vacuum) up to approx. 1850 deg. C either isothermally or through heating ramps. Observations were made concerning the extent and nature of the reaction zone between Zircaloy-4 and UO 2 over the temperature range 1500-1850 deg. C for times ranging from 1 min to 125 min. The location, morphology and the chemical composition of the phases formed are described along with the kinetics of their formation. (author)

  7. Effect of PWR Re-start ramp rate on pellet-cladding interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagnik, S.K.; Chang, B.C.; Sunderland, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    To mitigate pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) leading to fuel rod failures, fuel suppliers specify reactor power ramp rate limitations during reactor start-up after an outage. Typical re-start ramp rates are restricted and range between 3-4% per hour of full reactor power above a threshold power level. Relaxation of threshold power and ramp rate restrictions has the potential to improve plant economics. The paper will compare known re-start power ascension procedures employed in the US, German, French and Korean PWRs after a refuelling outage. A technical basis for optimising power ascension procedures during reactor start-up can be developed using analytical modelling. The main objective of the modelling is to determine the potential for PCI failure for various combinations of threshold power levels and ramp rate levels. A key element of our analysis is to estimate the decrease in margin to cladding failure by ISCC based on a time-temperature-stress failure criterion fashioned Act a cumulative cladding damage index. The analysis approach and the cladding damage model will be described and the results from three case studies based on the FALCON fuel rod behaviour code will be reported. We conclude that the PCI behaviour is more affected by ramp rate and threshold power than by the fuel design and that the fuel power history is the most important parameter. (authors)

  8. A deformation and thermodynamic model for hydride precipitation kinetics in spent fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.

    1989-10-01

    Hydrogen is contained in the Zircaloy cladding of spent fuel rods from nuclear reactors. All the spent fuel rods placed in a nuclear waste repository will have a temperature history that decreases toward ambient; and as a result, most all of the hydrogen in the Zircaloy will eventually precipitate as zirconium hydride platelets. A model for the density of hydride platelets is a necessary sub-part for predicting Zircaloy cladding failure rate in a nuclear waste repository. A model is developed to describe statistically the hydride platelet density, and the density function includes the orientation as a physical attribute. The model applies concepts from statistical mechanics to derive probable deformation and thermodynamic functionals for cladding material response that depend explicitly on the hydride platelet density function. From this model, hydride precipitation kinetics depend on a thermodynamic potential for hydride density change and on the inner product of a stress tensor and a tensor measure for the incremental volume change due to hydride platelets. The development of a failure response model for Zircaloy cladding exposed to the expected conditions in a nuclear waste repository is supported by the US DOE Yucca Mountain Project. 19 refs., 3 figs

  9. Micro-Structures and High-Temperature Friction-Wear Performances of Laser Cladded Cr–Ni Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jiahong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cr–Ni coatings with the mass ratios of 17% Cr–83% Ni, 20% Cr–80% Ni and 24% Cr–76% Ni were fabricated on H13 hot work mould steel using a laser cladding (LC. The surface–interface morphologies, chemical elements, surface roughness and phase composition of the obtained Cr–Ni coatings were analysed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS, atomic force microscope (AFM and X–ray diffractometer (XRD, respectively. The friction–wear properties and wear rates of Cr–Ni coatings with the different mass ratios of Cr and Ni at 600 °C were investigated, and the worn morphologies and wear mechanism of Cr–Ni coatings were analysed. The results show that the phases of Cr–Ni coatings with mass ratios of 17% Cr–83% Ni, 20% Cr–80% Ni and 24% Cr–76% Ni are composed of Cr + Ni single-phases and their compounds at the different stoichiometry, the porosities on the Cr–Ni coatings increase with the Cr content increasing. The average coefficient of friction (COF of 17% Cr–83% Ni, 20% Cr–80% Ni and 24% Cr–76% coatings are 1.10, 0.33 and 0.87, respectively, in which the average COF of 20% Cr–80% Ni coating is the lowest, exhibiting the better anti-friction performance. The wear rate of 17% Cr–83% Ni, 20% Cr–80% Ni and 24% Cr–76% Ni coatings is 4.533 × 10−6, 5.433 × 10−6, and 1.761 × 10−6 N−1·s−1, respectively, showing the wear resistance of Cr–Ni coatings at a high temperature increases with the Cr content, in which the wear rate is 24% Cr–76% Ni coating with the better reducing wear. The wear mechanism of 17% Cr–83% Ni and 20% Cr–80% Ni and 24% Cr–76% coatings at 600 °C is primarily adhesive wear, and that of 24% Cr–76% coating is also accompanied by oxidative wear.

  10. Multi-rod burst test under a loss-of coolant accident condition, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otomo, Takashi; Hashimoto, Masao; Kawasaki, Satoru; Furuta, Teruo; Uetsuka, Hiroshi

    1983-06-01

    Multi-rod burst test of No.7808 bundle was performed in steam to estimate quantitative coolant flow channel restriction caused by the ballooning of zircaloy claddings in a fuel assembly during a LOCA transient in LWRs. The test was conducted under the condition that the initial internal pressure in each rod was 35kg/cm 2 (RT) and the heating rate was 9 0 C/s in steam with flow rate of 0.4g/cm 2 .min. The following results were obtained; (1) Maximum and burst pressures in rods were in the range 45 to 48kg/cm 2 and 41 to 45kg/cm 2 , respectively. The burst temperature of cladding were estimated to be 850 to 880 0 C. (2) Axial portions of tubes with greater than 34% strain were observed in the range 0 to 40mm in most rod. The mean length was 19mm in the bundle. (3) The degree of maximum increase in cross-sectional area is 54.2% in the bundle(7 x 7) and 66.9% in the internal rods(5 x 5). (4) Maximum channel area restriction was 40.5% in the bundle(7 x 7) and 51.4% in the internal rods(5 x 5). (author)

  11. Development of advanced zirconium fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Young Hwan; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.

    2007-04-01

    This report includes the manufacturing technology developed for HANA TM claddings, a series of their characterization results as well as the results of their in-pile and out-of pile performances tests which were carried out to develop some fuel claddings for a high burn-up (70,000MWd/mtU) which are competitive in the world market. Some of the HANA TM claddings, which had been manufactured based on the results from the 1st and 2nd phases of the project, have been tested in a research reactor in Halden of Norway for an in-pile performance qualification. The results of the in-pile test showed that the performance of the HANA TM claddings for corrosion and creep was better than 50% compared to that of Zircaloy-4 or A cladding. It was also found that the out-of pile performance of the HANA TM claddings for such as LOCA and RIA in some accident conditions corrosion creep, tensile, burst and fatigue was superior or equivalent to that of the Zircaloy-4 or A cladding. The project also produced the other many data which were required to get a license for an in-pile test of HANA TM claddings in a commercial reactor. The data for the qualification or characterization were provided for KNFC to assist their activities to get the license for the in-pile test of HANA TM Lead Test Rods(LTR) in a commercial reactor

  12. Unirradiated cladding rip-propagation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.; Hunter, C.W.

    1981-04-01

    The size of cladding rips which develop when a fuel pin fails can affect the subassembly cooling and determine how rapidly fuel escapes from the pin. The object of the Cladding Rip Propagation Test (CRPT) was to quantify the failure development of cladding so that a more realistic fuel pin failure modeling may be performed. The test results for unirradiated 20% CS 316 stainless steel cladding show significantly different rip propagation behavior at different temperatures. At room temperature, the rip growth is stable as the rip extension increases monotonically with the applied deformation. At 500 0 C, the rip propagation becomes unstable after a short period of stable rip propagation. The rapid propagation rate is approximately 200 m/s, and the critical rip length is 9 mm. At test temperatures above 850 0 C, the cladding exhibits very high failure resistances, and failure occurs by multiple cracking at high cladding deformation. 13 figures

  13. Experimental and calculation results of the integral reflood test QUENCH-14 with M5 (registered) cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuckert, J.; Birchley, J.; Grosse, M.; Jaeckel, B.; Steinbrueck, M.

    2010-01-01

    The QUENCH-14 experiment investigated the effect of M5 (registered) cladding material on bundle oxidation and core reflood, in comparison with tests QUENCH-06 (ISP-45) that used standard Zircaloy-4 and QUENCH-12 that used VVER E110-claddings. The PWR bundle configuration of QUENCH-14 with a single unheated rod, 20 heated rods, and four corner rods was otherwise identical to QUENCH-06. The test was conducted in principle with the same protocol as QUENCH-06, so that the effects of the change of cladding material could be observed more easily. Pre-test calculations were performed by the Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland) using the SCDAPSIM, SCDAP/RELAP5 and MELCOR codes. Follow-on post-test analyses were performed using SCDAP/RELAP5 and MELCOR as part of an ongoing programme of model validation and code assessment. Alternative oxidation correlations were used to examine the possible influence of the M5 (registered) cladding material on hydrogen generation, in comparison with Zircaloy-4. The experiment started with a pre-oxidation phase in steam, lasting ∼3000 s at ∼1500 K peak bundle temperature. After a further temperature increase to maximum bundle temperature of 2073 K the bundle was flooded with 2 g/s/rod water from the bottom. The peak temperature of ∼2300 K was measured on the bundle shroud, shortly after quench initiation. The electrical power was reduced to average value of 2 W/cm during the reflood phase to simulate effective decay heat level. Complete bundle cooling was reached in 300 s after reflood initiation. The development of the oxide layer growth during the test was essentially defined by measurements performed on the three Zircaloy-4 corner rods withdrawn successively from the bundle. The withdrawal of Zircaloy-4 and E110 corner rods after the test allowed a comparison of the different alloys in one test. One heated rod with M5 cladding was withdrawn after the test for a detailed analysis of oxidation degree and measurement of absorbed

  14. Equilibrium moisture content of wood at different temperature/moisture conditions in the cladding of wooden constructions and in the relation to their reliability and service life

    OpenAIRE

    Zdeňka Havířová; Pavel Kubů

    2010-01-01

    One of the natural properties of wood and wood-based materials is their soaking capacity (hy­gro­sco­pi­ci­ty). The moisture content of wood and building constructions of wood and wood based materials significantly influences the service life and reliability of these constructions and buildings. The equilibrium weight moisture content of built-in wood corresponding to temperature/moisture conditions inside the cladding has therefore a decisive influence on the basic requirements placed on bui...

  15. Fabrication of the instrumented fuel rods for the 3-Pin Fuel Test Loop at HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Jae Min; Park, Sung Jae; Shin, Yoon Tag; Lee, Jong Min; Ahn, Sung Ho; Kim, Soo Sung; Kim, Bong Goo; Kim, Young Ki; Lee, Ki Hong; Kim, Kwan Hyun

    2008-09-01

    The 3-Pin Fuel Test Loop(hereinafter referred to as the '3-Pin FTL') facility has been installed at HANARO(High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor) and the 3-Pin FTL is under a test operation. The purpose of this report is to fabricate the instrumented fuel rods for the 3-Pin FTL. The fabrication of these fuel rods was based on experiences and technologies of the instrumented fuel rods for an irradiation fuel capsule. The three instrumented fuel rods of the 3-Pin FTL have been designed. The one fuel rod(180 .deg. ) was designed to measure the centerline temperature of the nuclear fuels and the internal pressure of the fuel rod, and others(60 .deg. and 300 .deg. ) were designed to measure the centerline temperature of the fuel pellets. The claddings were made of the reference material 1 and 2 and new material 1 and 2. And nuclear fuel was used UO 2 (2.0w/o) pellet type with large grain and standard grain. The major procedures of fabrication are followings: (1) the assembling and weld of fuel rods with the pellet mockups and the sensor mockups for the qualification tests, (2) the qualification tests(dimension measurements, tensile tests, metallography examinations and helium leak tests) of weld, (3) the assembling and weld of instrumented fuel rods with the nuclear pellets and the sensors for the irradiation test, and (4) the qualification tests(the helium leak test, the dimensional measurement, electric resistance measurements of sensors) of test fuel rods. Satisfactory results were obtained for all the qualification tests of the instrumented fuel rods for the 3-Pin FTL. Therefore the three instrumented fuel rods for the 3-Pin FTL have been fabricated successfully. These will be installed in the In-Pile Section of 3-Pin FTL. And the irradiation test of these fuel rods is planned from the early next year for about 3 years at HANARO

  16. Critical cladding radius for hybrid cladding modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyard, Romain; Leduc, Dominique; Lupi, Cyril; Lecieux, Yann

    2018-05-01

    In this article we explore some properties of the cladding modes guided by a step-index optical fiber. We show that the hybrid modes can be grouped by pairs and that it exists a critical cladding radius for which the modes of a pair share the same electromagnetic structure. We propose a robust method to determine the critical cladding radius and use it to perform a statistical study on the influence of the characteristics of the fiber on the critical cladding radius. Finally we show the importance of the critical cladding radius with respect to the coupling coefficient between the core mode and the cladding modes inside a long period grating.

  17. Analysis of pellet cladding mechanical interaction using computational simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berretta, José R.; Suman, Ricardo B.; Faria, Danilo P.; Rodi, Paulo A., E-mail: jose.berretta@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (LabRisco/USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Laboratório de Análise, Avaliação e Gerenciamento de Riscos

    2017-07-01

    During the operation of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), specifically under power transients, the fuel pellet experiences many phenomena, such as swelling and thermal expansion. These dimensional changes in the fuel pellet can enable occurrence of contact it and the cladding along the fuel rod. Thus, pellet cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI), due this contact, induces stress increase at the contact points during a period, until the accommodation of the cladding to the stress increases. This accommodation occurs by means of the cladding strain, which can produce failure, if the fuel rod deformation is permanent or the burst limit of the cladding is reached. Therefore, the mechanical behavior of the cladding during the occurrence of PCMI under power transients shall be investigated during the fuel rod design. Considering the Accident Tolerant Fuel program which aims to develop new materials to be used as cladding in PWR, one important design condition to be evaluated is the cladding behavior under PCMI. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of the PCMI on a typical PWR fuel rod geometry with stainless steel cladding under normal power transients using computational simulation (ANSYS code). The PCMI was analyzed considering four geometric situations at the region of interaction between pellet and cladding. The first case, called “perfect fuel model” was used as reference for comparison. In the second case, it was considered the occurrence of a pellet crack with the loss of a chip. The goal for the next two cases was that a pellet chip was positioned into the gap of pellet-cladding, in the situations described in the first two cases. (author)

  18. Inspecting method for fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Masaaki; Kogure, Sumio.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To precisely detect the response of flaw in clad tube and submerged fuel pellets from a relationship between the surface of fuel rod and internal signal. Constitution: Ultrasonic reflected waves from the surface of fuel rods and the interior are detected and either one of fuel rod or ultrasonic flaw detecting contact is rotated to thereby precisely detect the response of the flaw of clad tube and submerged fuel pellets from a relationship between said surface and the interior. It will be noted that the ultrasonic flaw detecting contact used is of the line-focus type, the incident angle of ultrasonic wave from the ultrasonic flaw detecting contact relative to the fuel rod is the angle of skew, that is, the ultrasonic flaw detecting contact is not perpendicular to a center axis of the fuel rod but is slightly displace. That is, the use of the aforesaid contact may facilitate discrimination between the surface flaw of the fuel rod and the response of submergence, and in addition, the employment of the aforesaid incident angle makes it hard to receive reflected waves from the surface of the fuel rod which is great in terms of energy to facilitate discrimination of waves responsive to submergence. (Kawakami, Y.)

  19. Prevention of nuclear fuel cladding materials corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, K.R.; Yang, J.C.; Lee, I.C.; Kang, H.D.; Cho, S.W.; Whang, C.K.

    1983-01-01

    The only way which could be performed by the operator of nuclear power plant to minimizing the degradation of nuclear fuel cladding material is to control the water quality of primary coolant as specified standard conditions which dose not attack the cladding material. If the water quality of reactor coolant does not meet far from the specification, the failure will occure not only cladding material itself but construction material of primary system which contact with the coolant. The corrosion product of system material are circulate through the whole primary system with the coolant and activated by the neutron near the reactor core. The activated corrosion products and fission products which released from fuel rod to the coolant, so called crud, will repeate deposition and redeposition continuously on the fuel rod and construction material surface. As a result we should consider heat transfer problem. In this study following activities were performed; 1. The crud sample was taken from the spent fuel rod surface of Kori unit one and analized for radioactive element and non radioactive chemical species. 2. The failure mode of nuclear fuel cladding material was estimated by the investigation of releasing type of fission products from the fuel rod to the reactor coolant using the iodine isotopes concentration of reactor coolants. 3. A study was carried out on the sipping test results of spent fuel and a discussion was made on the water quality control records through the past three cycle operation period of Kori unit one plant. (Author)

  20. History of Resistance Welding Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Cladding and other High Temperature Materials at Center for Advanced Energy Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Zirker; Nathan Jerred; Dr. Indrajit Charit; James Cole

    2012-03-01

    Research proposal 08-1079, 'A Comparative Study of Welded ODS Cladding Materials for AFCI/GNEP,' was funded in 2008 under an Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Research and Development Funding Opportunity, number DE-PS07-08ID14906. Th proposal sought to conduct research on joining oxide dispersion strengthen (ODS) tubing material to a solid end plug. This document summarizes the scientific and technical progress achieved during the project, which ran from 2008 to 2011.

  1. History of Resistance Welding Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Cladding and other High Temperature Materials at Center for Advanced Energy Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirker, Larry; Jerred, Nathan; Charit, Indrajit; Cole, James

    2012-01-01

    Research proposal 08-1079, 'A Comparative Study of Welded ODS Cladding Materials for AFCI/GNEP,' was funded in 2008 under an Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Research and Development Funding Opportunity, number DE-PS07-08ID14906. Th proposal sought to conduct research on joining oxide dispersion strengthen (ODS) tubing material to a solid end plug. This document summarizes the scientific and technical progress achieved during the project, which ran from 2008 to 2011.

  2. Estimation of penetration depth of fission products in cladding Hull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Moon; Jung, Yang Hong; Yoo, Byong Ok; Choo, Yong Sun; Hong, Kwon Pyo

    2005-01-01

    A disposal and a reprocessing for spent fuel rod with high burnup need de-cladding procedure. Pellet in this rod has been separated from a cladding hull to reduce a radioactivity of hull by chemical and mechanical methods. But fission products and actinides(U,Pu) still remain inside of cladding hull by chemical bonding and fission spike, which is called as 'contamination'. More specific removal of this contamination would have been considered. In this study, the sorts of fission products and penetration depth in hull were observed by EPMA test. To analyze this behavior, SRIM 2000 code was also used as energies of fission products and an oxide thickness of hull

  3. Stress corrosion testing of irradiated cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunde, L.; Olshausen, K.D.

    1980-01-01

    Samples from two fuel rods with different cladding have been stress corrosion tested by closed-end argon-iodine pressurization at 320 0 C. The fuel rods with stress relieved and recrystallized Zircaloy-2 had received burnups of 10.000 and 20.000 MWd/ton UO 2 , respectively. It was found that the SCC failure stress was unchanged or slightly higher for the irradiated than for the unirradiated control tubes. The tubes failed consistently in the end with the lowest irradiation dose. The diameter increase of the irradiated cladding during the test was 1.1% for the stress-relieved samples and 0.24% for the recrystallized samples. SEM examination revealed no major differences between irradiated and unirradiated cladding. A ''semi-ductile'' fracture zone in recrystallized material is described in some detail. (author)

  4. Control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Kazuo; Shimoshige, Takanori; Nishimura, Akira

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: A control rod has been developed, which provided a plurality of through-holes in the vicinity of the sheath fitting position, in order to flatten burn-up, of fuel rods in positions confronting a control rod. Thereby to facilitate the manufacture of the control rods and prevent fuel rod failures. Constitution: A plurality of through-holes are formed in the vicinity of the sheath fitting position of a central support rod to which a sheath for the control rod is fitted. These through-holes are arranged in the axial direction of the central support rod. Accordingly, burn-up of fuel rods confronting the control rods can be reduced by through-holes and fuel rod failures can be prevented. (Yoshino, Y.)

  5. Accident-tolerant control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Hirokazu; Sawabe, Takashi; Ogata, Takanari

    2013-01-01

    Boron carbide (B 4 C) and hafnium (Hf) metal are used for the neutron absorber materials of control rods in BWRs, and silver-indium-cadmium (Ag-In-Cd) alloy is used in PWRs. These materials are clad with stainless steel. The eutectic point of B 4 C and iron (Fe) is about 1150 deg. C and the melting point of Ag-In-Cd alloy is about 800 deg. C, which are lower than the temperature of zircaloy - steam reaction increases rapidly (∼1200 deg. C). Accordingly, it is possible that the control rods melt and collapse before the reactor core is significantly damaged in the case of severe accidents. Since the neutron absorber would be separated from the fuels, there is a risk of re-criticality, when pure water or seawater is injected for emergency cooling. In order to ensure sub-criticality and extend options of emergency cooling in the course of severe accidents, a concept of accident-tolerant control rod (ACT) has been derived. ACT utilises a new absorber material having the following properties: - higher neutron absorption than current control rod; - higher melting or eutectic temperature than 1200 deg. C where rapid zircaloy oxidation occurs; - high miscibility with molten fuel materials. The candidate of a new absorber material for ATC includes gadolinia (Gd 2 O 3 ), samaria (Sm 2 O 3 ), europia (Eu 2 O 3 ), dysprosia (Dy 2 O 3 ), hafnia (HfO 2 ). The melting point of these materials and the liquefaction temperature with Fe are higher than the rapid zircaloy oxidation temperature. ACT will not collapse before the core melt-down. After the core melt-down, the absorber material will be mixed with molten fuel material. The current absorber materials, such as B 4 C, Hf and Ag-In-Cd, are charged at the tip of ATC in which the neutron flux is high, and a new absorber material is charged in the low-flux region. This design could minimise the degradation of a new absorber material by the neutron absorption and the influence of ATC deployment on reactor control procedure. As a

  6. Assessment of oxygen diffusion coefficients by studying high-temperature oxidation behaviour of Zr1Nb fuel cladding in the temperature range of 1100–1300 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Négyesi, M., E-mail: negy@seznam.cz [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); UJP PRAHA a.s., Nad Kamínkou 1345, 156 10 Praha – Zbraslav (Czech Republic); Chmela, T. [UJP PRAHA a.s., Nad Kamínkou 1345, 156 10 Praha – Zbraslav (Czech Republic); Veselský, T. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Krejčí, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); CHEMCOMEX Praha a.s., Elišky Přemyslovny 379, 156 10 Praha – Zbraslav (Czech Republic); Novotný, L.; Přibyl, A. [UJP PRAHA a.s., Nad Kamínkou 1345, 156 10 Praha – Zbraslav (Czech Republic); Bláhová, O. [New Technologies Research Centre, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitní 8, 306 14 Plzeň (Czech Republic); Burda, J. [NRI Rez plc, Husinec-Řež 130, 250 68 Řež (Czech Republic); Siegl, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Vrtílková, V. [UJP PRAHA a.s., Nad Kamínkou 1345, 156 10 Praha – Zbraslav (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-15

    The paper deals with high-temperature steam oxidation behaviour of Zr1Nb fuel cladding. First of all, comprehensive experimental program was conducted to provide sufficient experimental data, such as the thicknesses of evolved phase layers and the overall weight gain kinetics, as well as the oxygen concentration and nanohardness values at phase boundaries. Afterwards, oxygen diffusion coefficients in the oxide, in the α-Zr(O) layer, in the double-phase (α + β)-Zr region, and in the β-phase region have been estimated based on the experimental data employing analytical solution of the multiphase moving boundary problem, assuming the equilibrium conditions being fulfilled at the interface boundaries. Eventually, the determined oxygen diffusion coefficients served as input into the in-house numerical code, which was designed to predict the high-temperature oxidation behaviour of Zr1Nb fuel cladding. Very good agreement has been achieved between the numerical calculations and the experimental data.

  7. Thermal and mechanical behavior of APWR-claddings under critical heat flux conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diegele, E.; Rust, K.

    1986-10-01

    Helical grid spacers, such as three or six helical fins as integral part of the claddings, are regarded as a more convenient design for the very tight lattice of an advanced pressurized water reactor (APWR) than grid spacers usually used. Furthermore, it is expected that this spacer design allows an increased safety margin against the critical heat flux (CHF), the knowledge of which is important for design, licensing, and operation of water cooled reactors. To address the distribution of the heat flux density at the outer circumference of the cladding geometry under investigation, the temperature fields in claddings without as well with fins were calculated taking into consideration nuclear and electrically heated rods. Besides the thermal behavior of the claddings, the magnitude and distribution of thermal stresses were determined additionally. A locally increased surface heat flux up to about 40 percent was calculated for the fin bases of nuclear as well as indirect electrically heated claddings with six such helical fins. For all investigated cases, the VON MISES stresses are clearly lower than 200 MPa, implying that no plastic deformations are to be expected. The aim of this theoretical analysis is to allow a qualitative assessment of the finned tube conception and to support experimental investigations concerning the critical heat flux. (orig.) [de

  8. Simulation of the thermomechanical interaction between pellet and cladding and fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, Alicia C.; Soba, Alejandro

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the present status of a computer code that simulates some of the main phenomena occurring in a fuel element of a nuclear power reactor throughout its life. Temperature distribution, thermal expansion, elastic and plastic strains, creep, mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding, fission gas release, swelling and densification are modeled. Thermal expansion gives origin to elastic or plastic strains, which adequately describe the bamboo effect. The code assumes an axial symmetric rod and hence, cylindrical finite elements are employed for the discretization. The fission gas inventory is calculated by means of a diffusion model, which assumes spherical grains and uses also a finite element scheme. Once the temperature distribution in the pellet and the cladding is obtained and in order to reduce the calculation time, the rod is divided into five cylindrical rings where the temperature is averaged. In each ring the gas diffusion problem is solved in one representative grain and the results are then extended to the whole ring. The pressure, increased by the released gas, interacts with the stress field. Densification and swelling due to solid and gaseous fission products are also considered. Experiments, particularly those of the FUMEX series, are simulated with this code. A good agreement is obtained for the fuel center line temperature, the inside rod pressure and the fractional gas release. (author)

  9. The deformation of Zircaloy PWR cladding with low internal pressures, under mainly convective cooling by steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.; Mann, C.A.; Reynolds, A.E.

    1981-08-01

    Simulated PWR fuel rods clad with Zircaloy-4 were tested under convective steam cooling conditions, by pressurising to 0.69-2.07MPa (100-300lb/in 2 ), then ramping at 10 0 C/s to various temperatures in the region 800-955 0 C and holding until either 600 s elapsed or rupture occurred. The length of cladding strained 33% or more was greatest (about 20 times the original diameter) when the initial internal pressure was 1.38+-0.17 PMa (200+-25lb/in 2 ), and the temperature 885 0 C. It is thought that this results from oxidation strengthening of the surface layers acting as an additional mechanism for stabilising the deformation and/or partial superplastic deformation. To avoid adjacent rods in a fuel assembly touching at any temperature, the pressure would have to be less than about 1MPa (145 1b/in 2 ). If the pressure was 1.38MPa (200lb/in 2 ) then the rods would not swell sufficiently to touch if the temperature did not exceed about 840 0 C. (author)

  10. A statistical analysis of pellet-clad interaction failures in water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, S.G.; Fardo, R.D.; Sipush, P.J.; Kaiser, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    The primary objective of the statistical analysis was to develop a mathematical function that would predict PCI fuel rod failures as a function of the imposed operating conditions. Linear discriminant analysis of data from both test and commercial reactors was performed. The initial data base used encompassed 713 data points (117 failures and 596 non-failures) representing a wide variety of water cooled reactor fuel (PWR, BWR, CANDU, and SGHWR). When applied on a best-estimate basis, the resulting function simultaneously predicts approximately 80 percent of both the failure and non-failure data correctly. One of the most significant predictions of the analysis is that relatively large changes in power can be tolerated when the pre-ramp irradiation power is low, but that only small changes in power can be tolerated when the pre-ramp irradiation power is high. However, it is also predicted that fuel rods irradiated at low power will fail at lower final powers than those irradiated at high powers. Other results of the analysis are that fuel rods with high clad operating temperatures can withstand larger power increases that fuel rods with low clad operating temperatures, and that burnup has only a minimal effect on PCI performance after levels of approximately 10000 MWD/MTU have been exceeded. These trends in PCI performance and the operating parameters selected are believed to be consistent with mechanistic considerations. Published PCI data indicate that BWR fuel usually operates at higher local powers and changes in power, lower clad temperatures, and higher local ramp rates than PWR fuel

  11. Growth temperature dependence of flux pinning properties in ErBa2Cu3Oy thin films with nano-rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haruta, M.; Sueyoshi, T.; Fujiyoshi, T.; Mukaida, M.; Kai, H.; Matsumoto, K.; Mele, P.; Maeda, T.; Horii, S.

    2011-01-01

    Nano-rods were introduced into ErBa 2 Cu 3 O y thin films to improve J c . Pinning properties depended on the growth temperature of the films. Morphology of nano-rods was affected by the growth temperature. The growth temperature is important to achieve high in-field J c 's. Irreversibility lines and distributions of local critical current density (J cl ) based on the percolation transition model were affected by the growth temperature (T s ) in 3.5 wt.%-BaNb 2 O 6 -doped ErBa 2 Cu 3 O y thin films. The vortex-Bose-glass-like state appeared by the introduction of nano-rods, and this vortex state was affected by T s . The shape and width of the J cl distribution strongly depended on T s . These results are probably caused by variations of the density and the growth direction for nano-rods reflecting T s . The growth temperature is an important factor to achieve higher critical current properties under magnetic fields for coated conductors of rare-earth-based cuprates with nano-rods.

  12. Solution to a fuel-and-cladding rewetting model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olek, S.

    1989-06-01

    A solution by the Wiener-Hopf technique is derived for a model for the rewetting of a nuclear fuel rod. The gap between the fuel and the cladding is modelled by an imperfect contact between the two. A constant heat transfer coefficient is assumed on the wet side, whereas the dry side is assumed to be adiabatic. The solution for the rewetting temperature is in the form of an integral whose integrand contains the model parameters, including the rewetting velocity. Numerical results are presented for a large number of these parameters. It is shown that there are such large values of the rewetting temperature and the gap resistance, or such low values of the initial wall temperature, for which the rewetting velocity is unaffected by the fuel properties. (author) l fig., 7 tabs., 17 refs

  13. The effect of hot spots upon swelling of Zircaloy cladding as modelled by the code CANSWEL-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haste, T.J.; Gittus, J.H.

    1980-12-01

    The code CANSWEL-2 models cladding creep deformation under conditions relevant to a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurised-water reactor (PWR). It can treat azimuthal non-uniformities in cladding thickness and temperature, and model the mechanical restraint imposed by the nearest neighbouring rods, including situations where cladding is forced into non-circular shapes. The physical and mechanical models used in the code are presented. Applications of the code are described, both as a stand-alone version and as part of the PWR LOCA code MABEL-2. Comparison with a limited number of relevant out-of-reactor creep strain experiments has generally shown encouraging agreement with the data. (author)

  14. Three-dimensional FE analysis of the thermal-mechanical behaviors in the nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yijie; Cui Yi; Huo Yongzhong; Ding Shurong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We establish three-dimensional finite element models for nuclear fuel rods. → The thermal-mechanical behaviors at the initial stage of burnup are obtained. → Several parameters on the in-pile performances are investigated. → The parameters have remarkable effects on the in-pile behaviors. → This study lays a foundation for optimal design and irradiation safety. - Abstract: In order to implement numerical simulation of the thermal-mechanical behaviors in the nuclear fuel rods, a three-dimensional finite element model is established. The thermal-mechanical behaviors at the initial stage of burnup in both the pellet and the cladding are obtained. Comparison of the obtained numerical results with those from experiments validates the developed finite element model. The effects of the constraint conditions, several operation and structural parameters on the thermal-mechanical performances of the fuel rod are investigated. The research results indicate that: (1) with increasing the heat generation rates from 0.15 to 0.6 W/mm 3 , the maximum temperature within the pellet increases by 99.3% and the maximum radial displacement at the outer surface of the pellet increases by 94.3%. And the maximum Mises stresses in the cladding all increase; while the maximum values of the first principal stresses within the pellet decrease as a whole; (2) with increasing the heat transfer coefficients between the cladding and the coolant, the internal temperatures reduce and the temperature gradient remains similar; when the heat transfer coefficient is lower than a critical value, the temperature change is sensitive to the heat transfer coefficient. The maximum temperature increases only 7.13% when h changes from 0.5 W/mm 2 K to 0.01 W/mm 2 K, while increases up to 54.7% when h decreases from 0.01 W/mm 2 K to 0.005 W/mm 2 K; (3) the initial gap sizes between the pellet and the cladding significantly affect the thermal-mechanical behaviors in the fuel rod; when the

  15. Models for fuel rod behaviour at high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jernkvist, Lars O.; Massih, Ali R. [Quantum Technologies AB, Uppsala Science Park, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    This report deals with release of fission product gases and irradiation-induced restructuring in uranium dioxide nuclear fuel. Waterside corrosion of zirconium alloy clad tubes to light water reactor fuel rods is also discussed. Computational models, suitable for implementation in the FRAPCON-3.2 computer code, are proposed for these potentially life-limiting phenomena. Hence, an integrated model for the calculation or thermal fission gas release by intragranular diffusion, gas trapping in grain boundaries, irradiation-induced re-solution, grain boundary saturation, and grain boundary sweeping in UO{sub 2} fuel, under time varying temperature loads, is formulated. After a brief review of the status of thermal fission gas release modelling, we delineate the governing equations for the aforementioned processes. Grain growth kinetic modelling is briefly reviewed and pertinent data on grain growth of high burnup fuel obtained during power ramps in the Third Risoe Fission Gas Release Project are evaluated. Sample computations are performed, which clearly show the connection between fission gas release and gram growth as a function of time at different isotherms. Models are also proposed for the restructuring of uranium dioxide fuel at high burnup, the so-called rim formation, and its effect on fuel porosity build-up, fuel thermal conductivity and fission gas release. These models are assessed by use of recent experimental data from the High Burnup Rim Project, as well as from post irradiation examinations of high-burnup fuel, irradiated in power reactors. Moreover, models for clad oxide growth and hydrogen pickup in PWRs, applicable to Zircaloy-4, ZIRLO or M5 cladding, are formulated, based on recent in-reactor corrosion data for high-burnup fuel rods. Our evaluation of these data indicates that the oxidation rate of ZIRLO-type materials is about 20% lower than for standard Zircaloy-4 cladding under typical PWR conditions. Likewise, the oxidation rate of M5 seems to be

  16. Uncontrolled withdrawal of a control rod without scram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-EL-Maaty, Talal

    2008-01-01

    In the present work the thermal-hydraulics of reactivity-induced transients in low enriched uranium (LEU) core of a typical material test research reactor (MTR) are analyzed using the previous program developed by Khater et al. The analysis was done for uncontrolled withdrawal of a control rod with scram-disabled conditions. Initiating reactivity events with and without the influence of reactivity efficiency curve ('S' curve) were considered. The results of the proposed transients are analyzed and compared with each other. In transient without the 'S' curve influence, a high primary peak power of 406.18 MW is attained and a clad melt down takes place after 1.85 s. In the transient with the 'S' curve influence, a high super prompt-critical situation is produced (1.762$ at 0.895 s) with a very high primary peak power of 801.05 MW at 0.912 s. Also, a fast clad melt down is resulted in the hot channel at 1.088 s and a stable film boiling is established. This study indicates that, compared to the application of linear reactivity curve, the application of the reactivity efficiency curve results in the prediction of higher peaks in power and temperatures (fuel, clad and coolant) with a fast clad melt down

  17. Uncontrolled withdrawal of a control rod without SCRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-El-Maaty, T.

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, the thermal-hydraulic analysis of reactivity-induced transients in a Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) core of a typical material test research reactor is conducted using the previous program developed Khater et al. The analysis was done for the uncontrolled withdrawal of a control rod under scram-disabled conditions. The initiating event reactivity was considered with and without influence of the reactivity efficiency curve (''S'' curve). The results of the transient calculations are analyzed and compared with each other. In the transient without the ''S'' curve influence, a high primary peak power of 406.18 MW is attained and a clad melt down is occurring after 1.85 s. In the transient with the ''S'' curve influence, a super prompt highly critical situation is produced (1.762 $ at 0.895 s) with a very high primary peak power of 801.05 MW at 0.912 s. A fast clad melt down is resulting in the hot channel at 1.088 s and a stable film boiling is occurring. This study shows that the influence of the reactivity efficiency curve results in higher peaks in power and temperatures (fuel, clad and coolant) with a fast clad melt down than that of a linear assumption. (orig.)

  18. High temperature mechanisms and kinetics of SiC oxidation under low partial pressures of oxygen: application to the fuel cladding of gas fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hun, N.

    2011-01-01

    Gas Fast Reactor (GFR) is one of the different Generation IV concepts under investigation for energy production. SiC/SiC composites are candidates of primary interest for a GFR fuel cladding use, thanks to good corrosion resistance among other properties. The mechanisms and kinetics of SiC oxidation under operating conditions have to be identified and quantified as the corrosion can decrease the mechanical properties of the composite. An experimental device has been developed to study the oxidation of silicon carbide under high temperature and low oxygen partial pressure. The results pointed out that not only parabolic oxidation, but also interfacial reactions and volatilization occur under such conditions. After determining the kinetics of each mechanism, as functions of oxygen partial pressure and temperature, the data are used for the modeling of the composites oxidation. The model will be used to predict the lifetime of the composite in operating conditions. (author) [fr

  19. Cladding using a 15 kW CO2 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesely, E.J.; Verma, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    Laser alloying or cladding differs little in principle from the traditional forms of weld overlays, but lasers as a heat source offer some distinct advantages. With the selective heating attainable using high power lasers, good metallurgical bond of the clad layer, minimal dilution and typically, a very fine homogeneous microstructure can be obtained in the clad layer. This is a review of work in laser cladding using the 15 kW CO 2 laser. The authors discuss the ability of the laser clad surface to increase the high temperature oxidation resistance of a low-alloy carbon steel (4140). Examples of clads subjected to high- temperature thermal cycling of nickel-20% aluminum and TaC + 4140 clad low-alloy steel and straight high-temperature oxidation of Stellite 6-304L cladding on a 4140 substrate are given

  20. Control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Hiromi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To realize effective utilization, cost reduction and weight reduction in neutron absorbing materials. Constitution: Residual amount of neutron absorbing material is averaged between the top end region and other regions of a control rod upon reaching to the control rod working life, by using a single kind of neutron absorbing material and increasing the amount of the neutron absorber material at the top end region of the control rod as compared with that in the other regions. Further, in a case of a control rod having control rod blades such as in a cross-like control rod, the amount of the neutron absorbing material is decreased in the middle portion than in the both end portions of the control rod blade along the transversal direction of the rod, so that the residual amount of the neutron absorbing material is balanced between the central region and both end regions upon reaching the working life of the control rod. (Yoshihara, H.)

  1. Modelling cladding response to changing conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tulkki, Ville; Ikonen, Timo [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland ltd (Finland)

    2016-11-15

    The cladding of the nuclear fuel is subjected to varying conditions during fuel reactor life. Load drops and reversals can be modelled by taking cladding viscoelastic behaviour into account. Viscoelastic contribution to the deformation of metals is usually considered small enough to be ignored, and in many applications it merely contributes to the primary part of the creep curve. With nuclear fuel cladding the high temperature and irradiation as well as the need to analyse the variable load all emphasise the need to also inspect the viscoelasticity of the cladding.

  2. Results of calculation of WWER-440 fuel rods (Kol`skaya-3 NPP) at high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheglov, A; Proselkov, V [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Panin, M; Pitkin, Yu [Kol` skaya NPP, (Russian Federation); Tzibulya, V [AO Mashinostroitelnij Zavod Electrostal (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    Thermal-physical characteristics of fuel rods of two fuel assemblies which were operated within 5 - 8 and 5 - 9 core fuel loadings of the Unit 3 of the Kol`skaya NPP are calculated. They have achieved deep burnup during 4-year (> 46 Mwd/kg U) and 5-year (> 48 Mwd/kg U) fuel cycle. Fuel assemblies have been unloaded off the reactor and subjected to a post-irradiation testing. PIN-mod2 code originally designed for modelling of WWER fuel rod behaviour in a quasi-steady-state operation is used. The average fuel rod in the fuel assembly and the fuel rod with maximum burnup are selected. The preliminary comparison of the calculation results with those of the post-irradiation examination shows a satisfactory agreement. On the basis of the results obtained in the post-irradiation experiments an improvement of the model for calculation of fission gas release and creep of the cladding is planned. The results of the analysis performed indicate that the fuel rod completely preserves its working ability; fuel temperature does not exceed 1300{sup o} C; fission gas release does not exceed 4%; maximum gas pressure inside the cladding at the end of campaign does not exceed 2 MPa. 2 tabs., 11 figs., 5 refs.

  3. Influences of Cr content and PWHT on microstructure and oxidation behavior of stainless steel weld overlay cladding materials in high temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, X.Y.; Ding, X.F. [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Lu, Y.H., E-mail: lu_yonghao@mater.ustb.edu.cn [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Zhu, P. [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute Co. Ltd., 1788 Xihuan Road, 215004 Suzhou (China); Shoji, T. [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aramaki Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai City 980-8579 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Influences of Cr content and post weld heat treatment (PWHT) on microstructure and oxidation behavior of stainless steel cladding materials in high temperature water were investigated. The amounts of metal oxidized and dissolved were estimated to compare the oxidation behaviors of cladding materials with different Cr contents and PWHT. The results indicated that higher Cr content led to formation of more ferrite content, and carbides were found along δ/γ phase interface after PWHT. Higher Cr content enhanced the pitting resistance and compactness of the oxide film to reduce metal amount oxidized and dissolved, which mitigated the weight changes and the formation of Fe-rich oxides. PWHT promoted more and deeper pitting holes along the δ/γ phase interface due to formation of carbides, which resulted in an increase in metal amount oxidized and dissolved, and were also responsible for more Fe-rich oxides and higher weight changes. - Highlights: • The amounts of metal oxidized and metal dissolved were estimated. • Higher Cr content increased ferrite content and PWHT led to formation of carbides. • PWHT promoted more and deeper pitting holes along the δ/γ phase interface. • Lower Cr content and PWHT promoted the metal amounts oxidized and dissolved. • Lower Cr content and PWHT increased weight changes and Fe-rich film formation.

  4. Modelling of Rod No 8 in IFA-597:3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malen, K.

    2002-06-01

    A Westinghouse Atom 8x8 fuel rod irradiated in the Ringhals 1 BWR for 12 years to a local burnup of about 67 MWd/kgU was refabricated, instrumented with centreline thermocouple and pressure transducer, and irradiated in IFA-597.2 for about 20 days and in IFA-597.3 for about four months. The rod was then sent to Kjeller for puncturing and then to the Studsvik hot cells for detailed post-irradiation examinations. The peak centreline, temperature was close to 1350 deg C. The total fission gas release (FGR) determined from the puncturing was approximately 20 %. Electron probe microanalysis on a fuel section from the central part of the rod showed that virtually 100 % Xe release had occurred in the central part of the pellet out to about half the pellet radius, and this thermal release from the central part of the fuel accounted for the measured total FGR. Optical and scanning electron microscopy of the fuel cross-section showed complete pellet-clad bonding as well as an extensive high burnup 'rim' structure extending at least 0,15 mm in from the fuel surface. The fuel microstructure was characterised at different radial positions in the pellet. This report describes modelling of the rod behaviour using the code SKIROD, in particular fuel temperature and fission gas release. The transient response of the fuel centre line temperature after a scram is also modelled using the code TOODEE2. The modelling results are compared to the experimental results

  5. LOCA scenario tests of irradiated fuel rod specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Harold

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The NRC's cladding performance program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is testing fueled high-burnup segments subjected to LOCA integral phenomena. The data are provided to NRC and the nuclear industry for their independent assessment of the adequacy of licensing criteria for LOCA events. The tests are being conducted with high-burnup 30 cm segments from Limerick (9x9 Zry-2) and H.B. Robinson (15x15 Zry-4) reactors. Prior to testing, sibling samples are characterized with respect to fuel morphology, fuel-cladding bond, cladding oxide layer thickness, hydrogen content and high-temperature steam oxidation kinetics. Specimens that survive quench are subjected to four-point bend tests, followed by local diametral compression tests. The retention of post-quench ductility is a more limiting requirement than surviving thermal stresses during quench. Companion tests are conducted with unirradiated cladding to generate baseline data for comparison with the high-burnup fuel results. LOCA integral tests have the following sequential steps: stabilization of temperature, internal pressure and steam flow at 300 C, ramping of temperature (∼5C/s) through ballooning and burst to 1204 C, hold at 1204 C for 1-5 minutes, slow-cooling (∼3C/s) to 800 C, and water quenching at ∼800C. Two high-burnup tests were completed in 2002 with Limerick BWR rod segments: ramp to burst in argon followed by slow cooling; and the LOCA test with 5-minute hold time at 1204 C, followed by slow cooling. With the exception of burst-opening shape, results for burst temperature, burst pressure, burst length, and ballooning strain profile are more similar to, than different from, results for unirradiated Zry-2 cladding exposed to the same time-temperature history. The 3rd Limerick test with quench was performed in December 2003, and a 4th Limerick test was performed in March 2004. Tests on high-burnup Robinson PWR fuel segments are scheduled to begin in June 2004. The presentation points

  6. Core design of super LWR with double tube water rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianhui; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Supercritical light water cooled and moderated reactor with double tube water rods is developed. • Double-row fuel rod assembly and out-in fuel loading pattern are applied. • Separation plates in peripheral assemblies increase average outlet temperature. • Neutronic and thermal design criteria are satisfied during the cycle. - Abstract: Double tube water rods are employed in core design of super LWR to simplify the upper core structure and refueling procedure. The light water moderator flows up in the inner tube from the bottom of the core, then, changes the flow direction at the top of the core into the outer tube and flows out at the bottom of the core. It eliminates the moderator guide/distribution tubes into the single tube water rods from the top dome of the reactor pressure vessel of the previous super LWR design. Two rows of fuel rods are filled between the water rods in the fuel assembly. Out-in refueling pattern is adopted to flatten radial power distribution. The peripheral fuel assemblies of the core are divided into four flow zones by separation plates for increasing the average core outlet temperature. Three enrichment zones are used for axial power flattening. The equilibrium core is analyzed based on neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled model. The results show that, by applying the separation plates in peripheral fuel assemblies and low gadolinia enrichment, the maximum cladding surface temperature (MCST) is limited to 653 °C with the average outlet temperature of 500 °C. The inherent safety is satisfied by the negative void reactivity effects and sufficient shutdown margin

  7. Power ramp performance of some 15 x 15 PWR test fuel rods tested in the STUDSVIK SUPER-RAMP and SUPER-RAMP extension projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djurle, S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents results obtained from the STUDSVIK SUPER-RAMP (SR) and SUPER-RAMP EXTENSION (SRX) projects. As parts of these projects test fuel rods of the same PWR type were base irradiated in the Obrigheim power reactor and power ramp tested in the STUDSVIK R2 reactor. Some of the rods were ramped using an inlet coolant water temperature 50 deg. C below the normal one. Fabricated data on the test fuel rods are presented as well as data on the base irradiation, interim examination, conditioning irradiation, power ramp irradiation and results of the post irradiation examination. The data on the change of diameter at ridges due to power ramping have shown that a lower clad temperature during ramping leads to smaller deformations. Most likely this may be explained as due to a smaller creep rate in the cladding at the lower temperature, resulting in a more severe stress situation. The combination of low cladding temperature, high ramp terminal level and the presence of a stress corrosion agent may have caused the failure of one of the test rods. (author)

  8. Cladding properties under simulated fuel pin transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, C.W.; Johnson, G.D.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the HEDL fuel pin testing program utilizing a recently developed Fuel Cladding Transient Tester (FCTT) to generate the requisite mechanical property information on irradiated and unirradiated fast reactor fuel cladding under temperature ramp conditions. The test procedure is described, and data are presented

  9. Effects of cold worked and fully annealed claddings on fuel failure behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shinzo; Hoshino, Hiroaki; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Yanagihara, Satoshi

    1979-12-01

    Described are the results of six differently heat-treated Zircaloy clad fuel rod tests in NSRR experiments. The purpose of the test is to examine the extent of simulating irradiated claddings in mechanical properties by as-cold worked ones and also the effect of fully annealing on the fuel failure bahaviour in a reactivity initiated accident (RIA) condition. As-cold worked cladding does not properly simulated the embrittlement of the irradiated one in a RIA condition, because the cladding is fully annealed before the fuel failure even in the short transient. Therefore, the fuel behaviour such as fuel failure threshold energy, failure mechanism, cladding deformation and cladding oxidation of the fully annealed cladding fuel, as well as that of the as-cold worked cladding fuel, are not much different from that of the standard stress-relieved cladding fuel. (author)

  10. Post-test examination of the VVER-1000 fuel rod bundle CORA-W2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Burbach, J.; Metzger, H.; Schanz, G.; Hagen, S.; Sepold, L.

    1995-08-01

    The upper half of the bundle is completely oxidized, the lower half has kept the fuel rods relatively intact. The post-test examination results show the strong impact of the B{sub 4}C absorber rod and the stainless steel grid spacers on the `low-temperature` bundle damage initiation and progression. The B{sub 4}C absorber rod completely disappeared in the upper half of the bundle. The multicomponent melts relocated and formed coolant channel blockages on solidification with a maximum extent of about 30% in the lower part of the bundle. At temperatures above the melting point of the ZrNb1 cladding extensive fuel dissolution occured. (orig./HP)

  11. A systematic approach for development of a PWR cladding corrosion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quecedo, M.; Serna, J.J.; Weiner, R.A.; Kersting, P.J.

    2001-01-01

    A new model for the in-reactor corrosion of Improved (low-tin) Zircaloy-4 cladding irradiated in commercial pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is described. The model is based on an extensive database of PWR fuel cladding corrosion data from fuel irradiated in commercial reactors, with a range of fuel duty and coolant chemistry control strategies which bracket current PWR fuel management practices. The fuel thermal duty with these current fuel management practices is characterized by a significant amount of sub-cooled nucleate boiling (SNB) during the fuel's residence in-core, and the cladding corrosion model is very sensitive to the coolant heat transfer models used to calculate the coolant temperature at the oxide surface. The systematic approach to developing the new corrosion model therefore began with a review and evaluation of several alternative models for the forced convection and SNB coolant heat transfer. The heat transfer literature is not sufficient to determine which of these heat transfer models is most appropriate for PWR fuel rod operating conditions, and the selection of the coolant heat transfer model used in the new cladding corrosion model has been coupled with a statistical analysis of the in-reactor corrosion enhancement factors and their impact on obtaining the best fit to the cladding corrosion data. The in-reactor corrosion enhancement factors considered in this statistical analysis are based on a review of the current literature for PWR cladding corrosion phenomenology and models. Fuel operating condition factors which this literature review indicated could have a significant effect on the cladding corrosion performance were also evaluated in detail in developing the corrosion model. An iterative least squares fitting procedure was used to obtain the model coefficients and select the coolant heat transfer models and in-reactor corrosion enhancement factors. This statistical procedure was completed with an exhaustive analysis of the model

  12. Fuel-cladding chemical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueneau, C.; Piron, J.P.; Dumas, J.C.; Bouineau, V.; Iglesias, F.C.; Lewis, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    The chemistry of the nuclear fuel is very complex. Its chemical composition changes with time due to the formation of fission products and depends on the temperature level history within the fuel pellet and the clad during operation. Firstly, in thermal reactors, zircaloy oxidation from reaction with UO 2 fuel under high-temperature conditions will be addressed. Then other fuel-cladding interaction phenomena occurring in fast reactors will be described. Large thermal gradients existing between the centre and the periphery of the pellet induce the radial redistribution of the fuel constituents. The fuel pellet can react with the clad by different corrosion processes which can involve actinide and/or fission product transport via gas, liquid or/and solid phases. All these phenomena are briefly described in the case of different kinds of fuels (oxide, carbide, nitride, metallic) to be used in fast reactors. The way these phenomena are taken into account in fuel performance codes is presented. (authors)

  13. Electrically heated ex-reactor pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) simulations utilizing irradiated Zircaloy cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barner, J.O.; Fitzsimmons, D.E.

    1985-02-01

    In a program sponsored by the Fuel Systems Research Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a series of six electrically heated fuel rod simulation tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The primary objective of these tests was to determine the susceptibility of irradiated pressurized-water reactor (PWR) Zircaloy-4 cladding to failures caused by pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). A secondary objective was to acquire kinetic data (e.g., ridge growth or relaxation rates) that might be helpful in the interpretation of in-reactor performance results and/or the modeling of PCMI. No cladding failures attributable to PCMI occurred during the six tests. This report describes the testing methods, testing apparatus, fuel rod diametral strain-measuring device, and test matrix. Test results are presented and discussed

  14. FRAPCON analysis of cladding performance during dry storage operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Richmond

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing need in the United States and around the world to move used nuclear fuel from wet storage in fuel pools to dry storage in casks stored at independent spent fuel storage installations or interim storage sites. Under normal conditions, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission limits cladding temperature to 400°C for high-burnup (>45 GWd/mtU fuel, with higher temperatures allowed for low-burnup fuel. An analysis was conducted with FRAPCON-4.0 on three modern fuel designs with three representative used nuclear fuel storage temperature profiles that peaked at 400°C. Results were representative of the majority of US light water reactor fuel. They conservatively showed that hoop stress remains below 90 MPa at the licensing temperature limit. Results also show that the limiting case for hoop stress may not be at the highest rod internal pressure in all cases but will be related to the axial temperature and oxidation profiles of the rods at the end of life and in storage. Keywords: Dry Storage, FRAPCON, Fuel Performance, Radial Hydride Reorientation, Vacuum Drying

  15. Control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Takao; Sugawara, Satoshi; Yoshimoto, Yuichiro; Saito, Shozo; Fukumoto, Takashi.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the weight and thereby obtain satisfactory operationability of control rods by combining absorbing nuclear chain type neutron absorbers and conventional type neutron absorbers in the axial direction of blades. Constitution: Neutron absorber rods and long life type neutron absorber rods are disposed in a tie rod and a sheath. The neutron absorber rod comprises a poison tube made of stainless steels and packed with B 4 C powder. The long life type neutron absorber rod is prepared by packing B-10 enriched boron carbide powder into a hafnium metal rod, hafnium pipe, europium and stainless made poison tube. Since the long life type absorber rod uses HF as the absorbing nuclear chain type neutron absorber, it absorbs neutrons to form new neutron absorbers to increase the nuclear life. (Yoshino, Y.)

  16. Thermoelastic analysis for the fuel claddings of the nuclear power reactor at Atucha in the skid's region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Sarmiento, Gustavo; Basombrio, F.G.

    1979-01-01

    For the fuel elements of the Nuclear Power Reactor at Atucha, a two-dimensional thermoelastic analysis has been made in the region of the skids of the fuel cladding, when the gap between them and the fuel rod separator's support becomes zero. In such a case the latter forces exert on the skids an elastic reaction opposite to the cladding's expansion. The internal pressure reaching the yield stress for the cladding material has been calculated, as a function of the initial gap; for several possible fuel rod locations within the separator; for the actual dimensions and also for reduced thickness of the cladding; with a given external pressure and, with a known temperature spatial distribution. The latter has been calculated by solving the heat conduction equation along the fuel element for a certain power level in the reactor. The calculations are made with two FORTRAN IV computer codes developed at C.A.B., using the finite-element method: the NOLICUARM, to solve the nonlinear quasi-harmonic equation, and the ELASTEF 3, for the solution of thermoelastic problems with plane symmetry. (author) [es

  17. The corrosion of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Swam, L.F.P.; Shann, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the effects of thermo-mechanical processing of cladding on the corrosion of Zircaloy-4 in commercial PWRs that have been investigated. Visual observations and nondestructive measurements at poolside, augmented by observations in the hot cell, indicate that the initial black oxide transforms into a grey or tan later white oxide layer at a thickness of 10 to 15 μm independent of the thermal processing history of the tubing. At an oxide layer thickness of 60 to 80 μm, the oxide may spall depending somewhat on the particular oxide morphology formed and possibly on the frequency of power and temperature changes of the fuel rods. Because spalling of oxide lowers the metal-to-oxide interface temperature of fuel rods, it reduces the corrosion rate and is beneficial from that point of view. To determine the effect of thermo-mechanical processing on in-reactor corrosion of Zircaloy-4, oxide thickness measurements at poolside and in the hot cell have been analyzed with the MATPRO corrosion model. A calibrated corrosion parameter in this model provides a measure of the corrosion susceptibility of the Zircaloy-4 cladding. It was found necessary to modify the MATPRO equations with a burnup dependent term to obtain a near constant value of the corrosion parameter over a burnup range of approximately 10 to 45 MWd/kgU. Different calculational tests were performed to confirm that the modified model accurately predicts the corrosion behavior of fuel rods

  18. Transient fuel rod behavior prediction with RODEX-3/SIERRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billaux, M R; Shann, S H; Swam, L.F. Van [Siemens Power Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This paper discusses some aspects of the fuel performance code SIERRA (SIEmens Rod Response Analysis). SIERRA, the latest version of the code RODEX-3, has been developed to improve the fuel performance prediction capabilities of the code, both at high burnup and during transient reactor conditions. The paper emphasizes the importance of the mechanical models of the cracked pellet and of the cladding, in the prediction of the transient response of the fuel rod to power changes. These models are discussed in detail. Other aspects of the modelling of high burnup effects are also presented, in particular the modelling of the rim effect and the way it affects the fuel temperature. (author). 12 refs, 5 figs.

  19. Transient fuel rod behavior prediction with RODEX-3/SIERRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billaux, M.R.; Shann, S.H.; Swam, L.F. Van

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses some aspects of the fuel performance code SIERRA (SIEmens Rod Response Analysis). SIERRA, the latest version of the code RODEX-3, has been developed to improve the fuel performance prediction capabilities of the code, both at high burnup and during transient reactor conditions. The paper emphasizes the importance of the mechanical models of the cracked pellet and of the cladding, in the prediction of the transient response of the fuel rod to power changes. These models are discussed in detail. Other aspects of the modelling of high burnup effects are also presented, in particular the modelling of the rim effect and the way it affects the fuel temperature. (author). 12 refs, 5 figs

  20. Status and development of RBMK fuel rods and reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibilashvili, Yu.K.; Reshetnikov, F.G.; Ioltukhovsky, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents current status and development of RBMK fuel rods and reactor materials. With regard to fuel rod cladding the following issues have been discussed: corrosion, tensile properties, welding technology and testing of an alternative cladding alloy with a composition of Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe. Erbium doped fuel has been suggested for safety improvement. Also analysis of fuel reliability is presented in the paper. (author)

  1. Fuel rod behavior of a PWR during load following

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotta, J.A.; Andrade, G.G. de

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of a PWR fuel rod when operating in normal power cycles, excluding in case of accidents, is analysed. A computer code, that makes the mechanical analysis of the cladding using the finite element method was developed. The ramps and power cycles were simulated suposing the existence of cracks in pellets when the cladding-pellet interaction are done. As a result, an operation procedure of the fuel rod in power cycle is recommended. (E.G.) [pt

  2. BWR fuel clad behaviour following LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, S.M.; Vyas, K.N.; Dinesh Babu, R.

    1996-01-01

    Flow and pressure through the fuel coolant channel reduce rapidly following a loss of coolant accident. Due to stored energy and decay heat, fuel and cladding temperatures rise rapidly. Increase in clad temperature causes deterioration of mechanical properties of clad material. This coupled with increase of pressure inside the cladding due to accumulation of fission gases and de-pressurization of coolant causes the cladding to balloon. This phenomenon is important as it can reduce or completely block the flow passages in a fuel assembly causing reduction of emergency coolant flow. Behaviour of a BWR clad is analyzed in a design basis LOCA. Fuel and clad temperatures following a LOCA are calculated. Fission gas release and pressure is estimated using well established models. An elasto-plastic analysis of clad tube is carried out to determine plastic strains and corresponding deformations using finite-element technique. Analysis of neighbouring pins gives an estimate of flow areas available for emergency coolant flow. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  3. Adhesion property and high-temperature oxidation behavior of Cr-coated Zircaloy-4 cladding tube prepared by 3D laser coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Gil, E-mail: hgkim@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, Il-Hyun; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun

    2015-10-15

    A 3D laser coating technology using Cr powder was developed for Zr-based alloys considering parameters such as: the laser beam power, inert gas flow, cooling of Zr-based alloys, and Cr powder control. This technology was then applied to Zr cladding tube samples to study the effect of Cr coating on the high-temperature oxidation of Zr-based alloys in a steam environment of 1200 °C for 2000s. It was revealed that the oxide layer thickness formed on the Cr-coated tube surface was about 25-times lower than that formed on a Zircaloy-4 tube surface. In addition, both the ring compression and the tensile tests were performed to evaluate the adhesion properties of the Cr-coated sample. Although some cracks were formed on the Cr-coated layer, the Cr-coated layer had not peeled off after the two tests.

  4. FEMAXI-III: a computer code for the analysis of thermal and mechanical behavior of fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Tetsuo; Ichikawa, Michio; Iwano, Yoshihiko; Ito, Kenichi; Saito, Hiroaki; Kashima, Koichi; Kinoshita, Motoyasu; Okubo, Tadatsune.

    1985-12-01

    FEMAXI-III is a computer code to predict the thermal and mechanical behavior of a light water fuel rod during its irradiation life. It can analyze the integral behavior of a whole fuel rod throughout its life, as well as the localized behavior of a small part of fuel rod. The localized mechanical behavior such as the cladding ridge deformation is analyzed by the two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method. FEMAXI-III calculates, in particular, the temperature distribution, the radial deformation, the fission gas release, and the inner gas pressure as a function of irradiation time and axial position, and the stresses and strains in the fuel and cladding at a small part of fuel rod as a function of irradiation time. For this purpose, Elasto-plasticity, creep, thermal expansion, fuel cracking and crack healing, relocation, densification, swelling, hot pressing, heat generation distribution, fission gas release, and fuel-cladding mechanical interaction are modelled and their interconnected effects are considered in the code. Efforts have been made to improve the accuracy and stability of finite element solution and to minimize the computer memory and running time. This report describes the outline of the code and the basic models involved, and also includes the application of the code and its input manual. (author)

  5. Models of multi-rod code FRETA-B for transient fuel behavior analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Masaaki; Otsubo, Naoaki.

    1984-11-01

    This paper is a final report of the development of FRETA-B code, which analyzes the LWR fuel behavior during accidents, particularly the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA). The very high temperature induced by a LOCA causes oxidation of the cladding by steam and, as a combined effect with low external pressure, extensive swelling of the cladding. The latter may reach a level that the rods block the coolant channel. To analyze these phenomena, single-rod model is insufficient; FRETA-B has a capability to handle multiple fuel rods in a bundle simultaneously, including the interaction between them. In the development work, therefore, efforts were made for avoiding the excessive increase of calculation time and core memory requirement. Because of the strong dependency of the in-LOCA fuel behavior on the coolant state, FRETA-B has emphasis on heat transfer to the coolant as well as the cladding deformation. In the final version, a capability was added to analyze the fuel behavior under reflooding using empirical models. The present report describes the basic models of FRETA-B, and also gives its input manual in the appendix. (author)

  6. Development of thermocouple re-instrumentation technique for irradiated fuel rod. Techniques for making center hole into UO2 pellets and thermocouple re-instrumentation to fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Michio; Saito, Junichi; Oshima, Kunio

    1995-07-01

    The information on FP gas pressure and centerline temperature of fuel pellets during power transient is important to study the pellet clad interaction (PCI) mechanism of high burnup LWR fuel rods. At the Department of JMTR, a re-instrumentation technique of FP gas pressure gage for an irradiated fuel rod was developed in 1990. Furthermore, a thermocouple re-instrumentation technique was successfully developed in 1994. Two steps were taken to carry out the development program of the thermocouple re-instrumentation technique. In the first step, a drilling technique was developed for making a center hole of the irradiated fuel pellets. Various drilling tests were carried out using dummy of fuel rods consisted of Ba 2 FeO 3 pellets and Zry-2 cladding. On this work it is important to keep the pellets just the state cracked at a power reactor. In these tests, the technique to fix the pellets by frozen CO 2 was used during the drilling work. Also, diamond drills were used to make the center hole. These tests were completed successfully. A center hole, 54mm depth and 2.5mm diameter, was realized by these methods. The second step of this program is the in-pile demonstration test on an irradiated fuel rod instrumented dually a thermocouple and FP gas pressure gage. The demonstration test was carried out at the JMTR in 1995. (author)

  7. Defect-induced room temperature ferromagnetic properties of the Al-doped and undoped ZnO rod-like nanostructure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jule, L

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available : 151-155 Defect-induced room temperature ferromagnetic properties of the Al-doped and undoped ZnO rod-like nanostructure Jule L Dejene F Ali AG Roro KT Mwakikunga BW ABSTRACT: In this work, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR...

  8. A rod-packing microporous hydrogen-bonded organic framework for highly selective separation of C2H2/CO2at room temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng

    2014-11-13

    Self-assembly of a trigonal building subunit with diaminotriazines (DAT) functional groups leads to a unique rod-packing 3D microporous hydrogen-bonded organic framework (HOF-3). This material shows permanent porosity and demonstrates highly selective separation of C2H2/CO2 at ambient temperature and pressure.

  9. A rod-packing microporous hydrogen-bonded organic framework for highly selective separation of C2H2/CO2at room temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng; He, Yabing; Zhao, Yunfeng; Weng, Linhong; Wang, Hailong; Krishna, Rajamani A A; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Wei; O'Keeffe, Michael A.; Han, Yu; Chen, Banglin

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of a trigonal building subunit with diaminotriazines (DAT) functional groups leads to a unique rod-packing 3D microporous hydrogen-bonded organic framework (HOF-3). This material shows permanent porosity and demonstrates highly selective separation of C2H2/CO2 at ambient temperature and pressure.

  10. Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term and Elevated Temperature Irradiation: Modeling and Experimental Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Brian; Morgan, Dane; Kaoumi, Djamel; Motta, Arthur

    2013-12-01

    The in-service degradation of reactor core materials is related to underlying changes in the irradiated microstructure. During reactor operation, structural components and cladding experience displacement of atoms by collisions with neutrons at temperatures at which the radiation-induced defects are mobile, leading to microstructure evolution under irradiation that can degrade material properties. At the doses and temperatures relevant to fast reactor operation, the microstructure evolves by dislocation loop formation and growth, microchemistry changes due to radiation-induced segregation, radiation-induced precipitation, destabilization of the existing precipitate structure, and in some cases, void formation and growth. These processes do not occur independently; rather, their evolution is highly interlinked. Radiationinduced segregation of Cr and existing chromium carbide coverage in irradiated alloy T91 track each other closely. The radiation-induced precipitation of Ni-Si precipitates and RIS of Ni and Si in alloys T91 and HCM12A are likely related. Neither the evolution of these processes nor their coupling is understood under the conditions required for materials performance in fast reactors (temperature range 300-600°C and doses beyond 200 dpa). Further, predictive modeling is not yet possible as models for microstructure evolution must be developed along with experiments to characterize these key processes and provide tools for extrapolation. To extend the range of operation of nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials in advanced nuclear energy and transmutation systems to that required for the fast reactor, the irradiation-induced evolution of the microstructure, microchemistry, and the associated mechanical properties at relevant temperatures and doses must be understood. Predictive modeling relies on an understanding of the physical processes and also on the development of microstructure and microchemical models to describe their evolution under

  11. Evaluation of the thermal-mechanical performance of fuel rods of a BWR during a power ramp using the FUELSIM code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantoja C, R.

    2010-01-01

    , and the other one from 10 x 10 fuel assembly design, and a comparison of the thermal-mechanical performance between the two different rod designs is performed. Results about diverse parameters related to BWR thermal limits are presented, as maximum temperatures in the center of the fuel and results of cladding axial deformation. The performance simulations were performed by the code FUELSIM. The benefit that can be obtained from the thermal-mechanical analysis in relation to safety and economy, among others, is to design and optimize fuel rods, as well as to perform independent evaluations of the information provided by different fuel vendors. (Author)

  12. Nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Toyoji.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To remove failures caused from combination of fuel-cladding interactions, hydrogen absorptions, stress corrosions or the likes by setting the quantity ratio of uranium or uranium and plutonium relative to oxygen to a specific range in fuel pellets and forming a specific size of a through hole at the center of the pellets. Constitution: In a fuel rods of a structure wherein fuel pellets prepared by compacting and sintering uranium dioxide, or oxide mixture consisting of oxides of plutonium and uranium are sealed with a zirconium metal can, the ratio of uranium or uranium and plutonium to oxygen is specified as 1 : 2.01 - 1 : 2.05 in the can and a passing hole of a size in the range of 15 - 30% of the outer diameter of the fuel pellet is formed at the center of the pellet. This increases the oxygen partial pressure in the fuel rod, oxidizes and forms a protection layer on the inner surface of the can to control the hydrogen absorption and stress corrosion. Locallized stress due to fuel cladding interaction (PCMI) can also be moderated. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. Room-temperature ferromagnetic properties of Cu-doped ZnO rod ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    logical applications in optoelectronics, magnetoelectronics, and microwave devices (Kin et al 2004; Bouloudenine et al. 2005). Recently, theoretical investigations have suggested that wide bandgap semiconductors are the most promising candidates for achieving high Curie temperatures (Dietl et al. 2000), which have ...

  14. Clad-coolant chemical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, F.C.; Lewis, B.J.; Desgranges, C.; Toffolon, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the kinetics for zircaloy clad oxidation behaviour in steam and air during reactor accident conditions. The generation of chemical heat from metal/water reaction is considered. Low-temperature oxidation of zircaloy due to water-side corrosion is further described. (authors)

  15. Damage and failure of unirradiated and irradiated fuel rods tested under film boiling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehner, A.S.; Hobbins, R.R.; Seiffert, S.L.; MacDonald, P.E.; McCardell, R.K.

    1979-01-01

    Power-cooling-mismatch experiments are being conducted as part of the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program in the Power Burst Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to evaluate the behavior of unirradiated and previously irradiated light water reactor fuel rods tested under stable film boiling conditions. The observed damage that occurs to the fuel rod cladding and the fuel as a result of film boiling operation is reported. Analyses performed as a part of the study on the effects of operating failed fuel rods in film boiling, and rod failure mechanisms due to cladding embrittlement and cladding melting upon being contacted by molten fuel are summarized

  16. Power ramp tests of high burnup BWR segment rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, H.; Etoh, Y.; Tsukuda, Y.; Shimada, S.; Sakurai, H.

    2002-01-01

    Lead use assemblies (LUAs) of high burnup 8x8 fuel design for Japanese BWRs were irradiated up to 5 cycles in Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station No. 2 Unit. Segment rods were installed in LUAs and used for power ramp tests in Japanese Material Test Reactor (JMTR). Post irradiation examinations (PIEs) of segment rods were carried out at Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd. before and after ramp tests. Maximum linear heat rates of LUAs were kept above 300 W/cm in the first cycle, above 250 W/cm in the second and third cycles and decreased to 200 W/cm in the fourth cycle and 80 W/cm in the fifth cycle. The integrity of high burnup 8x8 fuel was confirmed up to the bundle burnup of 48 GWd/t after 5 cycles of irradiation. Systematic and high quality data were collected through detailed PIEs. The main results are as follows. The oxide on the outer surface of cladding tubes was uniform and its thickness was less than 20 micro-meter after 5 cycles of irradiation and was almost independent of burnup. Hydrogen contents in cladding tubes were less than 150 ppm after 5 cycles of irradiation, although hydrogen contents increased during the fourth and fifth irradiation cycles. Mechanical properties of cladding tubes were on the extrapolated line of previous data up to 5 cycles of irradiation. Fission gas release rates were in the low level (mainly less than 6%) up to 5 cycles of irradiation due to the design to decrease pellet temperature. Pellet-cladding bonding layers were observed after the third cycle and almost full bonding was observed after the fifth cycle. Pellet volume increased with burnup in proportion to solid swelling rate up to the forth cycle. After the fifth cycle, slightly higher pellet swelling was confirmed. Power ramp tests were carried out and satisfactory performance of Zr-lined cladding tube was confirmed up to 60 GWd/t (segment average burnup). One segment rod irradiated for 3 cycles failed by a single step ramp test at terminal ramp power of 614 W

  17. Deformation behavior of laser welds in high temperature oxidation resistant Fe–Cr–Al alloys for fuel cladding applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G., E-mail: fieldkg@ornl.gov; Gussev, Maxim N., E-mail: gussevmn@ornl.gov; Yamamoto, Yukinori, E-mail: yamamotoy@ornl.gov; Snead, Lance L., E-mail: sneadll@ornl.gov

    2014-11-15

    Ferritic-structured Fe–Cr–Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability and post-weld mechanical behavior of three model alloys in a range of Fe–(13–17.5)Cr–(3–4.4)Al (wt.%) with a minor addition of yttrium using modern laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds using sub-sized, flat dog-bone tensile specimens and digital image correlation (DIC) has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. For all proposed alloys, laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions.

  18. Deformation behavior of laser welds in high temperature oxidation resistant Fe-Cr-Al alloys for fuel cladding applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance L.

    2014-11-01

    Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability and post-weld mechanical behavior of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al (wt.%) with a minor addition of yttrium using modern laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds using sub-sized, flat dog-bone tensile specimens and digital image correlation (DIC) has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. For all proposed alloys, laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions.

  19. Cladding axial elongation models for FRAP-T6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Carlson, E.R.; Berna, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the cladding axial elongation models developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for use by the FRAP-T6 computer code in analyzing the response of fuel rods during reactor transients in light water reactors (LWR). The FRAP-T6 code contains models (FRACAS-II subcode) that analyze the structural response of a fuel rod including pellet-cladding-mechanical-interaction (PCMI). Recently, four models were incorporated into FRACAS-II to calculate cladding axial deformation: (a) axial PCMI, (b) trapped fuel stack, (c) fuel relocation, and (d) effective fuel thermal expansion. Comparisons of cladding axial elongation measurements from two experiments with the corresponding FRAP-T6 calculations are presented

  20. Pin clad strains in Phenix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Languille, A.

    1979-07-01

    The Phenix reactor has operated for 4 years in a satisfactory manner. The first 2 sub-assembly loadings contained pins clad in solution treated 316. The principal pin strains are: diametral strain (swelling and irradiation creep), ovality and spiral bending of the pin (interaction of wire and pin cluster and wrapper). A pin cluster irradiated to a dose of 80 dpa F reached a pin diameter strain of 5%. This strain is principally due to swelling (low fission gas pressure). The principal parameters governing the swelling are instantaneous dose, time and temperature for a given type of pin cladding. Other types of steel are or will be irradiated in Phenix. In particular, cold-worked titanium stabilised 316 steel should contribute towards a reduction in the pin clad strains and increase the target burn-up in this reactor. (author)

  1. Development and testing of improved polyimide actuator rod seals at higher temperatures for use in advanced aircraft hydraulic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, E. D.; Waterman, A. W.; Nelson, W. G.

    1972-01-01

    Polyimide second stage rod seals were evaluated to determine their suitability for application in advanced aircraft systems. The configurations of the seals are described. The conditions of the life cycle tests are provided. It was determined that external rod seal leakage was within prescribed limits and that the seals showed no signs of structural degradation.

  2. Internal hydriding in irradiated defected Zircaloy fuel rods: A review (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, J.C.

    1987-10-01

    Although not a problem in recent commercial power reactors, including the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor, internal hydriding of Zircaloy cladding was a persistent cause of gross cladding failures during the 1960s. It occurred in the fuel rods of water-cooled nuclear power reactors that had a small cladding defect. This report summarizes the experimental findings, causes, mechanisms, and methods of minimizing internal hydriding in defected Zircaloy-clad fuel rods. Irradiation test data on the different types of defected fuel rods, intentionally fabricated defected and in-pile operationally defected rods, are compared. Significant factors affecting internal hydriding in defected Zircaloy-clad fuel rods (defect hole size, internal and external sources of hydrogen, Zircaloy cladding surface properties, nickel alloy contamination of Zircaloy, the effect of heat flux and fluence) are discussed. Pertinent in-pile and out-of-pile test results from Bettis and other laboratories are used as a data base in constructing a qualitative model which explains hydrogen generation and distribution in Zircaloy cladding of defected water-cooled reactor fuel rods. Techniques for minimizing internal hydride failures in Zircaloy-clad fuel rods are evaluated

  3. Zircaloy PWR fuel cladding deformation tests under mainly convective cooling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.; Mann, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    In a loss-of-coolant accident the temperature of the cladding of the fuel rods may rise to levels (650-810 0 C) where the ductility of Zircaloy is high (approximately 80%). The net outward pressure which will obtain if the coolant pressure falls to a small fraction of its normal working value produces stresses in the cladding which can result in large strain through secondary creep. An earlier study of the deformation of specimens of PWR Zircaloy cladding tubing 450 mm long under internal pressure had shown that strains of over 50% could be produced over considerable lengths (greater than twenty tube diameters). Extended deformation of this sort might be unacceptable if it occurred in a fuel element. The previous tests had been carried out under conditions of uniform radiative heat loss, and the work reported here extends the study to conditions of mainly convective heat loss believed to be more representative of a fuel element following a loss of coolant. Zircaloy-4 cladding specimens 450 mm long were filled with alumina pellets and tested at temperatures between 630 and 845 0 C in flowing steam at atmospheric pressure. Internal test pressures were in the range 2.9-11.0 MPa (400-1600 1b/in 2 ). Maximum strains were observed of the same magnitude as those seen in the previous tests, but the shape of the deformation differed; in these tests the deformation progressively increased in the direction of the steam flow. These results are compared with those from multi-rod tests elsewhere, and it is suggested that heat transfer has a dominant effect in determining deformation. The implications for the behaviour of fuel elements in a loss-of-coolant accident are outlined. (author)

  4. Description of turbulent velocity and temperature fields of single phase flow through tight rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monir, C.

    1991-02-01

    A two-dimensional procedure, VANTACY-II, describing the turbulent velocity and temperature fields for single phase flow in tight lattices is presented and validated. The flow is assumed to be steady, incrompressible and hydraulic and thermal fully developed. First, the state of art of turbulent momentum and heat transport in tight lattices is documented. It is shown that there is a necessity for experimental investigations in the field of turbulent heat transport. The presented new procedure is based on the turbulence model VELASCO-TUBS by NEELEN. The numerical solution of the balance equations is done by the finite element method code VANTACY by KAISER. The validation of the new procedure VANTACY-II is done by comparing the numerically calculated data for the velocity and temperature fields and for natural mixing with the experimental data of SEALE. The comparison shows a good agreement of experimental and numerically computed data. The observed differences can be mainly attributed to the model of the turbulent PRANDTL number used in the new procedure. (orig.) [de

  5. Design characteristics of metallic fuel rod on its in-LMR performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Woan; Kang Hee Young; Nam, Cheol; Kim, Jong Oh

    1997-01-01

    Fuel design is a key feature to assure LMR safety goals. To date, a large effort had been devoted to develop metallic fuels at ANL's experimental breeder reactor (EBR-II). The major design and performance parameters investigated include; thermal conductivity and temperature profile; smear density; axial plenum; FCMI and cladding deformation including creep, and fission gas release. In order to evaluate the sensitivity of each parameter, in-LMR performances of metallic fuels are not only reviewed by the experiment results in literatures, but also key design characteristics according to the variation of metallic fuel rod design parameters are analyzed by using the MACSIS code which simulates in-reactor behaviors of metal fuel rod. In this study, key design characteristics and the criteria which must be considered to design fuel rod in LMR, are proposed and discussed. (author). 14 refs., 4 figs

  6. An Evaluation on the Fluid Elastic Instability of the Fuel Rod for OPR1000 Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeong Koo; Jeon, Sang Yoon; Lee, Kyu Seok; Kim, Jeong Ha; Lee, Sang Jong [Reactor Core Technology Department, Korea Nuclear Fuel, 493, Deogjin, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    The fuel assembly for a typical PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) plant suffers severe operating conditions during its lifetime such as high temperature, high pressure and massive coolant passing through the fuel assembly with high speed. Moreover, recently nuclear fuel is requested not only to operate under more severe operation conditions for example high burnup, longer cycle and power up-rate, but also to maintain its integrity in spite of the operation severity. Lots of vendors, therefore, have poured their endeavor to develop an advanced fuel in order to meet these requirements. However, the fuel failures are still reported from time to time. In general, fuel failure mechanisms known as significant causes of PWR fuel failure are grid to rod fretting, corrosion of the cladding, pellet cladding interaction and debris induced fretting. Especially, since the fuel assembly is very tall and flexible structure and the flow velocity of reactor coolant is pretty high, flow induced vibration (FIV) of fuel rod is an inevitable phenomenon in PWR fuel and the energy vibrating fuel rod continually provided by coolant flow can become a root cause of the fuel failure like grid to rod fretting. Moreover, the cross flow of the coolant is highly susceptible to cause the fluid elastic instability (FEI) which produces extraordinarily big amplitudes of the fuel rod suddenly and is eventually ended up fuel failure within very short-term. The FIV problem, therefore, has to be evaluated carefully to avoid unexpected fuel failure. At present, the susceptibility to vibration damage of the fuel rod for OPR1000 plants has been estimated by the comparison of natural frequencies of every fuel rod span with recognized external excitation frequencies like coolant pump blade passing frequencies, vortex shedding frequencies and lower support structure vibration frequencies. That is, in order to prevent fuel failure due to the external excitation, the natural frequencies of unsupported lengths of

  7. Development of Mechanical Improvement of the Cladding by Ion Implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, J G; Lee, S B [Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S H [Kangwon University, Chunchon (Korea, Republic of); Song, G [Suwon College, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    In this research we analyzed the state of art related to the surface treatment method of nuclear fuel cladding for the development of the surface treatment technique of nuclear fuel cladding by ion beam while investigating major causes of the leakage of fuel rods. Ion implantation simulation code called TRIM-95 was used to decide basic parameters ion beams and wetup an appropriate process for ion implantation. For the mechanical properties measurements, a high temperature wear resistance tester, a fretting wear tester, and a fretting fatigue resistance tester were constructed. Using these testers, some mechanical properties as micro hardness, wear resistance against AISI52100 and AI{sub 2}O{sub 3} balls, and fretting properties were measured and analyzed for the implanted materials as a function of ion dose and processing temperature. Effect of the oxygen atmosphere was measured in the nitrogen implantation. Auger electron spectroscopy(AES) was applied for the depth profile, and X-ray diffraction was used for the nitrogen and oxide measurements. 48 refs., 7 tabs., 46 figs. (author)

  8. Detection of defective fuel rods in water reactors - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartog, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Consideration of the fundamental processes of fission product release within fuel pellets and at the pellet surface, and its transport in the fuel/cladding interspace and from fuel rod to coolant, indicates what radio-nuclides will be detectable in the coolant from small and large cladding failures. A better understanding of the aggregate fission product transport is required to allow reactor operators to interpret signals from detection systems in terms of quantitative cladding deterioration. This needs experimental investigation in a specially instrumented loop, as well as development of a technique to cause a rod to defect deliberately during steady power operation. (author)

  9. Degradation resistant fuel cladding materials and manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlowe, M.O. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Montes, J. [ENUSA, Madrid (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    GE has been producing the degradation resistant cladding (zirconium liner and zircaloy-2 surface larger) described here with the cooperation of its primary zirconium vendors since the beginning of 1994. Approximately 24 fuel reloads, or in excess of 250,000 fuel rods, have been produced using this material by GE. GE has also produced tubing for one reload of fuel that is currently being produced by its technology affiliate ENUSA. (orig./HP)

  10. Simulation of pellet-cladding thermomechanical interaction and fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, Alicia; Soba, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the present status of a computer code that describes some of the main phenomena occurring in a nuclear fuel rod throughout its life. Temperature distribution, thermal expansion, elastic and plastic strains, creep, mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding, fission gas release, gas mixing, swelling, and densification are modeled. The modular structure of the code allows for the incorporation of models to simulate different phenomena and material properties. Collapsible rods can be also simulated. The code is bidimensional, assumes cylindrical symmetry for the rod and uses the finite element method to integrate the differential equations. The stress-strain and heat conduction problems are nonlinear due to plasticity and to the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity. The fission gas inventory is calculated with a diffusion model, assuming spherical grains and using a one-dimensional finite element scheme. Pressure increase, swelling and densification are coupled with the stress field. Good results are obtained for the simulation of the irradiation tests of the first argentine prototypes of MOX fuels, where the bamboo effect is clearly observed, and of the FUMEX series for the fuel centerline temperature, the inside rod pressure and the fractional gas release.

  11. Thermalhydraulic phenomena governing the quenching of hot rods, and existing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bestion, D.

    2001-01-01

    After a core dry-out and a period of rod clad overheating, which might occur in some postulated accidental sequences in a PWR, the actuation of safety injections allows to quench the hot rods. Both thermal and mechanical processes control the phenomenon of quenching. Quenching first requires that liquid water is present to release the heat stored in the rod. When water is present, a pre-cooling of the clad is also required before quenching. (author)

  12. Thermalhydraulic phenomena governing the quenching of hot rods, and existing models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bestion, D. [CEA-Grenoble, DEN/DTP/SMTH (France)

    2001-07-01

    After a core dry-out and a period of rod clad overheating, which might occur in some postulated accidental sequences in a PWR, the actuation of safety injections allows to quench the hot rods. Both thermal and mechanical processes control the phenomenon of quenching. Quenching first requires that liquid water is present to release the heat stored in the rod. When water is present, a pre-cooling of the clad is also required before quenching. (author)

  13. Engineered zircaloy cladding modifications for improved accident tolerance of LWR fuel: US DOE NEUP Integrated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuser, Brent

    2013-01-01

    cladding composition to promote precipitation of minor phase(s) during fabrication. These precipitates will be stable under normal operation, but dissolve during the temperature excursions; the migration of solute elements to the free surface will then shift the reaction away from oxide formation. This pathway is referred to as the 'bulk self-healing' solution. A synergistic response of the fuel rod is anticipated in which the combined mitigation of brittle exothermic oxide formation and associated reduction in cladding temperature lead to accident tolerance with respect to cladding failure. The proposed cladding modifications potentially may influence neutronics and thermal hydraulics, both under normal operation and off-normal scenarios; a favourable reactor system response must therefore be demonstrated for both solution pathways. The objectives of the proposed IRP is four-fold: 1) demonstration of the performance of modified cladding material under normal BWR and PWR operation with respect to corrosion, in particular, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC); 2) the mitigation of accelerated cladding oxidation during off-normal scenarios that fall below unchecked LOCA events, as well as uncovering scenarios that involve used fuel in on-site storage pools; 3) the benchmarking of the fuel performance code against the databases developed in 1 and 2; 4) demonstration of overall reactor system performance with the proposed modifications to the pellet and cladding

  14. Replacement rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatfield, S.C.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes in an elongated replacement rod for use with fuel assemblies of the type having two end fittings connected by guide tubes with a plurality of rod and guide tube cell defining spacer grids containing rod support features and mixing vanes. The grids secured to the guide tubes in register between the end fittings at spaced intervals. The fuel rod comprising: an asymmetrically beveled tip; a shank portion having a straight centerline; and a permanently diverging portion between the tip and the shank portion

  15. Corrosion characteristics of K-claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. Y.; Choi, B. K.; Jung, Y. H.; Jung, Y. H.

    2004-01-01

    The Improvement of the corrosion resistance of nuclear fuel claddings is the critical issue for the successful development of the high burn-up fuel. KAERI have developed the K-claddings having a superior corrosion resistance by controlling the alloying element addition and optimizing the manufacturing process. The comparative evaluation of the corrosion resistance for K-claddings and the foreign claddings was performed and the effect of the heat treatment on the corrosion behavior of K-claddings was also examined. Corrosion tests were carried out in the conditions of 360 .deg. C pure water, PWR-simulating loop and 400 .deg. C steam, From the results of the corrosion tests, it was found that the corrosion resistance of K-claddings is superior to those of Zry4 and A claddings and K6 showed a better corrosion resistance than K3. The corrosion behavior of K-cladding was strongly influenced by the final annealing rather than the intermediate annealing, and the corrosion resistance increased with decreasing the final annealing temperature

  16. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    This report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for cladding large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high-power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for cladding inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. An initial evaluation for performed on the quality of nickel claddings processed using the two selected cladding techniques.

  17. Effective thermal conductivity of a heat generating rod bundle dissipating heat by natural convection and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senve, Vinay; Narasimham, G.S.V.L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Transport processes in isothermal hexagonal sheath with 19 heat generating rods is studied. → Correlation is given to predict the maximum temperature considering all transport processes. → Effective thermal conductivity of rod bundle can be obtained using max temperature. → Data on the critical Rayleigh numbers for p/d ratios of 1.1-2.0 is presented. → Radiative heat transfer contributes to heat dissipation of 38-65% of total heat. - Abstract: A numerical study of conjugate natural convection and surface radiation in a horizontal hexagonal sheath housing 19 solid heat generating rods with cladding and argon as the fill gas, is performed. The natural convection in the sheath is driven by the volumetric heat generation in the solid rods. The problem is solved using the FLUENT CFD code. A correlation is obtained to predict the maximum temperature in the rod bundle for different pitch-to-diameter ratios and heat generating rates. The effective thermal conductivity is related to the heat generation rate, maximum temperature and the sheath temperature. Results are presented for the dimensionless maximum temperature, Rayleigh number and the contribution of radiation with changing emissivity, total wattage and the pitch-to-diameter ratio. In the simulation of a larger system that contains a rod bundle, the effective thermal conductivity facilitates simplified modelling of the rod bundle by treating it as a solid of effective thermal conductivity. The parametric studies revealed that the contribution of radiation can be 38-65% of the total heat generation, for the parameter ranges chosen. Data for critical Rayleigh number above which natural convection comes into effect is also presented.

  18. Measurement of reactivity worths of burnable poison rods in enriched uranium graphite-moderated core simulated to high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Fujiyoshi; Takeuchi, Motoyoshi; Kitadate, Kenji; Yoshifuji, Hisashi; Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1980-11-01

    As the core design for the Experimental Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor progresses, evaluation of design precision has become increasingly important. For a high precision design, it is required to have adequate group constants based on accurate nuclear data, as well as calculation methods properly describing the physical behavior of neutrons. We, therefore, assembled a simulation core for VHTR, SHE-14, using a graphite-moderated 20%-enriched uranium Semi-Homogeneous Experimental Critical Facility (SHE), and obtained useful experimental data in evaluating the design precision. The VHTR is designed to accommodate burnable poison and control rods for reactivity compensation. Accordingly, the experimental burnable poison rods which are similar to those to be used in the experimental reactor were prepared, and their reactivity values were measured in the SHE-14 core. One to three rods of the above experimental burnable poison rods were inserted into the central column of the SHE-14 core, and the reactivity values were measured by the period and fuel rod substitution method. The results of the measurements have clearly shown that due to the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles the reactivity value decreases with increasing particle diameter. For the particle diameter, the reactivity value is found to increase linearly with the logarithm of boron content. The measured values and those calculated are found to agree with each other within 5%. These results indicate that the reactivity of the burnable poison rod can be estimated fairly accurately by taking into account the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles and the heterogeneity of the lattice cell. (author)

  19. Control rod driving mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooshima, Yoshio.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To perform reliable scram operation, even if abnormality should occur in a system instructing scram operation in FBR type reactors. Constitution: An aluminum alloy member to be melt at a predetermined temperature (about 600sup(o)C) is disposed to a connection part between a control rod and a driving mechanism, whereby the control rod is detached from the driving mechanism and gravitationally fallen to the reactor core. (Ikeda, J.)

  20. Results of VVER fuel rods tests in the MIR.M1 reactor under power cycling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burukin, A.; Izhutov, A.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Kalygin, V.; Markov, D.; Pimenov, Y.; Novikov, V.; Medvedev, A.; Nesterov, B.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the main results of the 50 ... 60 MWd/kgU burnup VVER fuel rods tests performed in the MIR.M1 reactor loop facilities under power cycling. The non-destructive PIE results are presented as well. A series of experiments was performed, including overall measurement of fuel rod parameters test, in one of which 300 cycles were done. Irradiation under power cycling conditions and PIE of high-burnup VVER fuel rods showed the following: 1) all fuel rods claddings preserved their integrity under irradiation at linear heat rate (LHR) higher than the NPP operating one; 2) experimental data were obtained on the axial and radial cladding strain and fission gas release (FGR) from 50 ... 60 MWd/kgU burnup VVER-440 and VVER-1000 fuel rods as well as on the kinetics of the change in these parameters and fuel temperature under the power cycling; 3) non-destructive PIE results are in a satisfactory correlation with the data obtained by means of in-pile measurement gages during irradiation. (authors)

  1. The behaviour of water-cooled reactor fuel rods in steady state and transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strupczewski, A.; Marks, P.

    1997-01-01

    In this report, the results of temperature field and filling gas pressure calculations by means of contemporary calculational models for a WWER-440 and WWER-1000 type fuel rod at low and high burnup operating under steady-state conditions are presented. A review of in-core temperature and pressure measurements for various types of LWR fuel is also included. Basing on calculational and collected measured data, the behaviour of fuel cladding during large and small break LOCA, is estimated with special emphasis on their oxidation and failure resistance. (author)

  2. Analysis of transient heat conduction in a PWR fuel rod by an improved lumped parameter approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dourado, Eneida Regina G. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cotta, Renato M. [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Mecanica; Jian, Su, E-mail: eneidadourado@gmail.com, E-mail: sujian@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: cotta@mecanica.ufrj.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    This paper aims to analyze transient heat conduction in a nuclear fuel rod by an improved lumped parameter approach. One-dimensional transient heat conduction is considered, with the circumferential symmetry assumed and the axial conduction neglected. The thermal conductivity and specific heat in the fuel pellet are considered temperature dependent, while the thermophysical properties of the cladding are considered constant. Hermite approximation for integration is used to obtain the average temperature and heat flux in the radial direction. Significant improvement over the classical lumped parameter formulation has been achieved. The proposed model can be also used in dynamic analysis of PWR and nuclear power plant simulators. (author)

  3. Analysis of transient heat conduction in a PWR fuel rod by an improved lumped parameter approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dourado, Eneida Regina G.; Cotta, Renato M.; Jian, Su

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to analyze transient heat conduction in a nuclear fuel rod by an improved lumped parameter approach. One-dimensional transient heat conduction is considered, with the circumferential symmetry assumed and the axial conduction neglected. The thermal conductivity and specific heat in the fuel pellet are considered temperature dependent, while the thermophysical properties of the cladding are considered constant. Hermite approximation for integration is used to obtain the average temperature and heat flux in the radial direction. Significant improvement over the classical lumped parameter formulation has been achieved. The proposed model can be also used in dynamic analysis of PWR and nuclear power plant simulators. (author)

  4. A high-throughput investigation of Fe-Cr-Al as a novel high-temperature coating for nuclear cladding materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, Jonathan Kenneth; Fang, Randy L; Albing, Mark R; Mehta, Apurva; Kramer, Matthew J; Besser, Matthew F; Hattrick-Simpers, Jason R

    2015-07-10

    High-temperature alloy coatings that can resist oxidation are urgently needed as nuclear cladding materials to mitigate the danger of hydrogen explosions during meltdown. Here we apply a combination of computationally guided materials synthesis, high-throughput structural characterization and data analysis tools to investigate the feasibility of coatings from the Fe–Cr–Al alloy system. Composition-spread samples were synthesized to cover the region of the phase diagram previous bulk studies have identified as forming protective oxides. The metallurgical and oxide phase evolution were studied via in situ synchrotron glancing incidence x-ray diffraction at temperatures up to 690 K. A composition region with an Al concentration greater than 3.08 at%, and between 20.0 at% and 32.9 at% Cr showed the least overall oxide growth. Subsequently, a series of samples were deposited on stubs and their oxidation behavior at 1373 K was observed. The continued presence of a passivating oxide was confirmed in this region over a period of 6 h.

  5. Rod consolidation at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1986-12-01

    A rod consolidation demonstration with irradiated pressurized water reactor fuel was recently conducted by personnel from Nuclear Assurance Corporation and West Valley Nuclear Services Company at the West Valley Demonstration Project in West Valley, New York. The rod consolidation demonstration involved pulling all of the fuel rods from six fuel Assemblies. In general, the rod pulling proceeded smoothly. The highest compaction ratio attained was 1:8:1. Among the total of 1074 fuel rods were some known degraded rods (they had collapsed cladding, a result of in-reactor fuel densification), but no rods were broken or dropped during the demonstration. One aim was to gather information on the effect of rod consolidation operations on the integrity of the fuel rods during subsequent handling and storage. Another goal was to collect information on the condition and handling of intact, damaged, and failed fuel that has been in storage for an extended period. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  6. Calculation of the linear heat generation rates which violate the thermomechanical limit of plastic deformation of the fuel cladding in function of the burn up of a BWR fuel rod type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucatero, M.A.; Hernandez L, H.

    2003-01-01

    The linear heat generation rates (LHGR) for a BWR type generic fuel rod, as function of the burnup that violate the thermomechanical limit of circumferential plastic deformation of the can (canning) in nominal operation in stationary state of the fuel rod are calculated. The evaluation of the LHGR in function of the burnt of the fuel, is carried out under the condition that the deformation values of the circumferential plastic deformation of the can exceeds in 0.1 the thermomechanical value operation limit of 1%. The results of the calculations are compared with the generation rates of linear operation heat in function of the burnt for this fuel rod type. The calculations are carried out with the FEMAXI-V and RODBURN codes. The results show that for exhibitions or burnt between 0 and 16,000 M Wd/tU a minimum margin of 160.8 W/cm exists among LHGR (439.6 W/cm) operation peak for the given fuel and maximum LHGR of the fuel (calculated) to reach 1.1% of circumferential plastic deformation of the can, for the peak factor of power of 1.40. For burnt of 20,000 MWd/tU and 60,000 MWd/tU exist a margin of 150.3 and 298.6 W/cm, respectively. (Author)

  7. Enhancing the ABAQUS Thermomechanics Code to Simulate Multidimensional Steady and Transient Fuel Rod Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, R.L.; Knoll, D.A. [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3855 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Important aspects of fuel rod behavior, for example pellet-clad interaction (PCI), fuel fracture, and non-axisymmetric cooling and oxide formation, are inherently 3-D. Current fuel rod simulation codes typically approximate such behavior using a quasi 2D (or 1.5D) approach and, often, separate codes must be used for steady and transient (or accident) conditions. Notable exceptions are the EPRI propriety code FALCON which is 2D and can be applied to steady or transient operation, and TOUTATIS which is 3D. Recent studies have indicated the need for multidimensional fuel rod simulation capability, particularly for accurate predictions of PCI. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is currently developing next-generation capability to model nuclear fuel performance. The goal is to develop a 2D/3D computer code (BISON) which solves the fully coupled thermomechanics equations, includes multi-physics constitutive behavior for both fuel and cladding materials, and is designed for efficient use on highly parallel computers. To provide guidance and a proto-typing environment for this effort, plus provide the INL with near-term fuel modeling capability, the commercially available ABAQUS thermomechanics software has been enhanced to include the fuel behavior phenomena necessary to afford a practical fuel performance simulation capability. This paper details the enhancements which have been implemented in ABAQUS to date, and provides results of a multi-pellet fuel problem which demonstrates the new capability. ABAQUS employs modern finite element methods to solve the nonlinear thermomechanics equations in 1, 2, or 3-D, using linear or quadratic elements. The temperature and displacement fields are solved in a fully-coupled fashion, using sophisticated iteration and time integration error control. The code includes robust contact algorithms, essential for computing multidimensional pellet-pellet or pellet-clad interaction. Extensive constitutive models are available, including

  8. Water rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwai, Shin-ichi; Yokomizo, Osamu; Orii, Akihito.

    1992-01-01

    In a reactor core of a BWR type reactor, the area of a flow channel in a lower portion of a downcoming pipe for downwardly releasing steams present at the top portion in a water rod is increased. Further, a third coolant flow channel (an inner water rod) is disposed in an uprising having an exit opened near the inlet of the water rod and an inlet opened at the outside near the top portion of the water and having an increase flow channel area in the upper portion. The downcoming pipe in the water rod is filled with steams, and the void ratio is increased by so much as the flow channel area of the downcoming pipe is increased. Since the pressure difference between the inlet and the exit of the inner water rod is greater than the pressure difference between the inlet and the exit of the water rod, most of water flown into the inner water rod is discharged out of the exit in the form of water as it is. Since the area of the flow channel is increased in the portion of the inner water rod, void efficiency in the upper portion of the reactor core is decreased by so much. Since the void ratio is thus increased in the lower portion and the void efficiency is decreased in the upper portion of the reactor core, axial void distribution can be flattened. (N.H.)

  9. Application of analytical capability to predict rapid cladding cooling and quench during the blowdown phase of a large break loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksan, S.N.; Tolman, E.L.; Nelson, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Large-break Experiments L2-2 and L2-3 conducted in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility experienced core-wide rapid quenches early in the blowdown transients. To further investigate rapid cladding quenches, separate effects experiments using Semiscale solid-type electric heater rods were conducted in the LOFT Test Support Facility (LTSF) over a wide range of inlet coolant conditions. The analytical capability to predict the cladding temperature response from selected LTSF experiments estimated to bound the hydraulic conditions causing the LOFT early blowdown quenches was investigated using the RELAP4 computer code and was shown to be acceptable over the film boiling cooldown phase. This analytical capability was then used to investigate the behavior of nuclear fuel rods under the same hydraulic conditions. The calculations show that, under rapid cooling conditions, the behaviors of nuclear and electrical heater rods are significantly different because the nuclear rods are conduction limited, while the electrical rods are convection limited

  10. A pellet-clad interaction failure criterion

    International Nuclear Informat