WorldWideScience

Sample records for rock mass classification

  1. Tunnel Design by Rock Mass Classifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Engineering," revised second edition, Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, London, 1977, pp 113-115 and 150-192. 42. Selmer - Olsen , R., and Broch, E...to wall when a)/03 > 10, re- stability) ................ 10-5 0.66-0.33 0.5-2.0 duce oc and ot to L. Mild rock burst (massive 0.6 cc and 0.6 on rock ...5-2.5 0.33-0.16 5-10 where: 0 c = uncon-fined compression M. Heavy rock burst (massive strength, at = rock

  2. Improved RMR Rock Mass Classification Using Artificial Intelligence Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Raoof; Rasouli, Vamegh; Alimoradi, Andisheh

    2013-09-01

    Rock mass classification systems such as rock mass rating (RMR) are very reliable means to provide information about the quality of rocks surrounding a structure as well as to propose suitable support systems for unstable regions. Many correlations have been proposed to relate measured quantities such as wave velocity to rock mass classification systems to limit the associated time and cost of conducting the sampling and mechanical tests conventionally used to calculate RMR values. However, these empirical correlations have been found to be unreliable, as they usually overestimate or underestimate the RMR value. The aim of this paper is to compare the results of RMR classification obtained from the use of empirical correlations versus machine-learning methodologies based on artificial intelligence algorithms. The proposed methods were verified based on two case studies located in northern Iran. Relevance vector regression (RVR) and support vector regression (SVR), as two robust machine-learning methodologies, were used to predict the RMR for tunnel host rocks. RMR values already obtained by sampling and site investigation at one tunnel were taken into account as the output of the artificial networks during training and testing phases. The results reveal that use of empirical correlations overestimates the predicted RMR values. RVR and SVR, however, showed more reliable results, and are therefore suggested for use in RMR classification for design purposes of rock structures.

  3. Engineering rock mass classification of the Olkiluoto investigation site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeikaes, K. [ed.; Hagros, A.; Johansson, E. [Saanio and Riekkola Consulting Engineers, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    2000-06-01

    Olkiluoto in Eurajoki is being investigated as a possible site for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel from the Finnish nuclear power plants. The selection of the depth, placement and layout of the repository is affected by the constructability of the bedrock. The constructability, in turn, is influenced by several properties of the host rock, such as its Ethology, the extent of fracturing, its hydrogeological properties and rock engineering characteristics and also by the magnitude and orientation of the in situ stresses and the chemistry of the groundwater. The constructability can be evaluated by the application of a rock classification system in which the properties of the host rock are assessed against common rock engineering judgements associated with underground construction. These judgements are based partly on measurements of in situ stresses and the properties of the bedrock determined from rock samples, but an important aspect is also the practical experience which has been gained during underground excavation in similar conditions and rock types. The aim of the engineering rock mass classification was to determine suitable bedrock volumes for the construction of the repository and has used data from the site characterisation programme carried out at Olkiluoto, which consisted of both surface studies and borehole investigations. The classification specifies three categories of constructability - normal, demanding and very demanding. In addition, rock mass quality has also been classified according to the empirical Q-system to enable a comparison to be made. The rock mass parameters that determine the constructability of the bedrock at Olkiluoto depend primarily on the depth and the Ethology, as well as on whether construction takes place in intact or in fractured rock. The differences in the characteristics of intact rock within a single rock type have been shown to be small. The major lithological unit at Olkiluoto, the mica gneiss, lies in the

  4. Rock mass classification system : transition from RMR to GSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications is expected to replace the rock mass rating : (RMR) system with the Geological Strength Index (GSI) system for classifying and estimating : engineering properties of rock masses. This transition is motivat...

  5. Applicability of geomechanical classifications for estimation of strength properties in Brazilian rock masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Tatiana B; Lana, Milene S; Santos, Allan E M; Silveira, Larissa R C

    2017-01-01

    Many authors have been proposed several correlation equations between geomechanical classifications and strength parameters. However, these correlation equations have been based in rock masses with different characteristics when compared to Brazilian rock masses. This paper aims to study the applicability of the geomechanical classifications to obtain strength parameters of three Brazilian rock masses. Four classification systems have been used; the Rock Mass Rating (RMR), the Rock Mass Quality (Q), the Geological Strength Index (GSI) and the Rock Mass Index (RMi). A strong rock mass and two soft rock masses with different degrees of weathering located in the cities of Ouro Preto and Mariana, Brazil; were selected for the study. Correlation equations were used to estimate the strength properties of these rock masses. However, such correlations do not always provide compatible results with the rock mass behavior. For the calibration of the strength values obtained through the use of classification systems, ​​stability analyses of failures in these rock masses have been done. After calibration of these parameters, the applicability of the various correlation equations found in the literature have been discussed. According to the results presented in this paper, some of these equations are not suitable for the studied rock masses.

  6. Proposal of rock mass behavior classification based on convergence measurement in shaft sinking through sedimentary soft rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsusaka, Kimikazu

    2010-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been excavating deep shafts through sedimentary soft rocks in Horonobe, Hokkaido. From the viewpoint of the observational construction, site engineers need a practical guide to evaluate the field measurements conducted with shaft sinking. The author analyzed the relationship among initial deformation rate, observed deformation, the ratio of the modulus of elasticity of rock mass to the initial stress, and the magnitude of inelastic behavior of rock based on convergence measurements and investigation of rock mass properties on shaft walls. As a result, the rock mass behavior classification for shaft sinking which consists of three classes was proposed. (author)

  7. Correlation of the Rock Mass Rating (RMR) System with the Unified Soil Classification System (USCS): Introduction of the Weak Rock Mass Rating System (W-RMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sean N.; Kallu, Raj R.; Barnard, Chase K.

    2016-11-01

    Underground gold mines in Nevada are exploiting increasingly deeper ore bodies comprised of weak to very weak rock masses. The Rock Mass Rating (RMR) classification system is widely used at underground gold mines in Nevada and is applicable in fair to good-quality rock masses, but is difficult to apply and loses reliability in very weak rock mass to soil-like material. Because very weak rock masses are transition materials that border engineering rock mass and soil classification systems, soil classification may sometimes be easier and more appropriate to provide insight into material behavior and properties. The Unified Soil Classification System (USCS) is the most likely choice for the classification of very weak rock mass to soil-like material because of its accepted use in tunnel engineering projects and its ability to predict soil-like material behavior underground. A correlation between the RMR and USCS systems was developed by comparing underground geotechnical RMR mapping to laboratory testing of bulk samples from the same locations, thereby assigning a numeric RMR value to the USCS classification that can be used in spreadsheet calculations and geostatistical analyses. The geotechnical classification system presented in this paper including a USCS-RMR correlation, RMR rating equations, and the Geo-Pick Strike Index is collectively introduced as the Weak Rock Mass Rating System (W-RMR). It is the authors' hope that this system will aid in the classification of weak rock masses and more usable design tools based on the RMR system. More broadly, the RMR-USCS correlation and the W-RMR system help define the transition between engineering soil and rock mass classification systems and may provide insight for geotechnical design in very weak rock masses.

  8. Rock Mass Classification of Karstic Terrain in the Reservoir Slopes of Tekeze Hydropower Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailemariam Gugsa, Trufat; Schneider, Jean Friedrich

    2010-05-01

    Hydropower reservoirs in deep gorges usually experience slope failures and mass movements. History also showed that some of these projects suffered severe landslides, which left lots of victims and enormous economic loss. Thus, it became vital to make substantial slope stability studies in such reservoirs to ensure safe project development. This study also presents a regional scale instability assessment of the Tekeze Hydropower reservoir slopes. Tekeze hydropower project is a newly constructed double arch dam that completed in August 2009. It is developed on Tekeze River, tributary of Blue Nile River that runs across the northern highlands of Ethiopia. It cuts a savage gorge 2000m deep, the deepest canyon in Africa. The dam is the highest dam in Ethiopia at 188m, 10 m higher than China's Three Gorges Dam. It is being developed by Chinese company at a cost of US350M. The reservoir is designed at 1140 m elevation, as retention level to store more than 9000 million m3 volume of water that covers an area of 150 km2, mainly in channel filling form. In this study, generation of digital elevation model from ASTER satellite imagery and surface field investigation is initially considered for further image processing and terrain parameters' analyses. Digitally processed multi spectral ASTER ortho-images drape over the DEM are used to have different three dimensional perspective views in interpreting lithological, structural and geomorphological features, which are later verified by field mapping. Terrain slopes are also delineated from the relief scene. A GIS database is ultimately developed to facilitate the delineation of geotechnical units for slope rock mass classification. Accordingly, 83 geotechnical units are delineated and, within them, 240 measurement points are established to quantify in-situ geotechnical parameters. Due to geotechnical uncertainties, four classification systems; namely geomorphic rock mass strength classification (RMS), slope mass rating (SMR

  9. Rock suitability classification RSC 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, T. (ed.) [McEwen Consulting, Leicester (United Kingdom); Kapyaho, A. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Hella, P. [Saanio and Riekkola, Helsinki (Finland); Aro, S.; Kosunen, P.; Mattila, J.; Pere, T.

    2012-12-15

    This report presents Posiva's Rock Suitability Classification (RSC) system, developed for locating suitable rock volumes for repository design and construction. The RSC system comprises both the revised rock suitability criteria and the procedure for the suitability classification during the construction of the repository. The aim of the classification is to avoid such features of the host rock that may be detrimental to the favourable conditions within the repository, either initially or in the long term. This report also discusses the implications of applying the RSC system for the fulfilment of the regulatory requirements concerning the host rock as a natural barrier and the site's overall suitability for hosting a final repository of spent nuclear fuel.

  10. Rock suitability classification RSC 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwen, T.; Kapyaho, A.; Hella, P.; Aro, S.; Kosunen, P.; Mattila, J.; Pere, T.

    2012-12-01

    This report presents Posiva's Rock Suitability Classification (RSC) system, developed for locating suitable rock volumes for repository design and construction. The RSC system comprises both the revised rock suitability criteria and the procedure for the suitability classification during the construction of the repository. The aim of the classification is to avoid such features of the host rock that may be detrimental to the favourable conditions within the repository, either initially or in the long term. This report also discusses the implications of applying the RSC system for the fulfilment of the regulatory requirements concerning the host rock as a natural barrier and the site's overall suitability for hosting a final repository of spent nuclear fuel

  11. The Application of Spectral Analysis of Surface Wave (SASW) Method as a New Rock Mass Classification Technique in Engineering Geology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Rahim Samsuddin; Abdul Ghani Rafek; Umar Hamzah; Suharsono; Khairul Anuar Mohd Nayan

    2008-01-01

    Spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) is a seismic method that uses the dispersive characteristics of Rayleigh waves propagating through layered material to evaluate S-wave velocity profile. The SASW is an in situ non intrusive method for geotechnical site characterization which is cost effective as compared to the conventional drilling method. In this study, a total of 20 stations from 13 sites were selected. A software (WINSASW 2.0) was used for the inversion process to produce S-wave velocity versus depth profiles. These profiles were then separately analyzed in relation to several engineering rock mass geological parameters such as stiffness, rock quality designation (RQD), anisotropy and the excavability properties. The analysis of the SASW data was based on the assumption that the rock mass is an isotropic homogeneous material with various intensity of discontinuity which influenced the velocity of surface wave propagation within the rock mass. Measurement of dynamic soil properties was carried out employing the shear wave velocities and the N values of the Standard Penetration Test (N SPT ) from borehole data. A new linear equation V s = 4.44 N SPT + 213.84 which relates S-wave and N SPT was deduced. An empirical equation is also proposed to calculate Rock Quality Designation (RQD) values based on S-wave velocity derived from SASW and that of ultrasonic tests. The result of this equation was found to be less than 10% in comparison to the RQD obtained from actual borehole data. An isotropic analysis of the rock mass was carried out using S-wave velocities derived from SASW measurements in four directions. The plots of S-wave - ultrasonic velocity ratio versus ultrasonic velocity were used to evaluate the excavability properties of rock mass. Five classes of rock mass excavability curves were finally proposed in relation to easy digging, easy ripping, hard ripping, hydraulic breaking and blasting. (author)

  12. Relative scale and the strength and deformability of rock masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Richard A.

    1996-09-01

    The strength and deformation of rocks depend strongly on the degree of fracturing, which can be assessed in the field and related systematically to these properties. Appropriate Mohr envelopes obtained from the Rock Mass Rating (RMR) classification system and the Hoek-Brown criterion for outcrops and other large-scale exposures of fractured rocks show that rock-mass cohesive strength, tensile strength, and unconfined compressive strength can be reduced by as much as a factor often relative to values for the unfractured material. The rock-mass deformation modulus is also reduced relative to Young's modulus. A "cook-book" example illustrates the use of RMR in field applications. The smaller values of rock-mass strength and deformability imply that there is a particular scale of observation whose identification is critical to applying laboratory measurements and associated failure criteria to geologic structures.

  13. Unsupervised feature learning for autonomous rock image classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Lei; McIsaac, Kenneth; Osinski, Gordon R.; Francis, Raymond

    2017-09-01

    Autonomous rock image classification can enhance the capability of robots for geological detection and enlarge the scientific returns, both in investigation on Earth and planetary surface exploration on Mars. Since rock textural images are usually inhomogeneous and manually hand-crafting features is not always reliable, we propose an unsupervised feature learning method to autonomously learn the feature representation for rock images. In our tests, rock image classification using the learned features shows that the learned features can outperform manually selected features. Self-taught learning is also proposed to learn the feature representation from a large database of unlabelled rock images of mixed class. The learned features can then be used repeatedly for classification of any subclass. This takes advantage of the large dataset of unlabelled rock images and learns a general feature representation for many kinds of rocks. We show experimental results supporting the feasibility of self-taught learning on rock images.

  14. Rock slope instabilities in Norway: First systematic hazard and risk classification of 22 unstable rock slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhme, Martina; Hermanns, Reginald L.; Oppikofer, Thierry; Penna, Ivanna

    2016-04-01

    Unstable rock slopes that can cause large failures of the rock-avalanche type have been mapped in Norway for almost two decades. Four sites have earlier been characterized as high-risk objects based on expertise of few researchers. This resulted in installing continuous monitoring systems and set-up of an early-warning system for those four sites. Other unstable rock slopes have not been ranked related to their hazard or risk. There are ca. 300 other sites known of which 70 sites were installed for periodic deformation measurements using multiple techniques (Global Navigation Satellite Systems, extensometers, measurement bolts, and others). In 2012 a systematic hazard and risk classification system for unstable rock slopes was established in Norway and the mapping approach adapted to that in 2013. Now, the first 22 sites were classified for hazard, consequences and risk using this classification system. The selection of the first group of sites to be classified was based on an assumed high hazard or risk and importance given to the sites by Norwegian media and the public. Nine of the classified 22 unstable rock slopes are large sites that deform inhomogeneously or are strongly broken up in individual blocks. This suggests that different failure scenarios are possible that need to be analyzed individually. A total of 35 failure scenarios for those nine unstable rock slopes were considered. The hazard analyses were based on 9 geological parameters defined in the classification system. The classification system will be presented based on the Gamanjunni unstable rock slope. This slope has a well developed back scarp that exposes 150 m preceding displacement. The lateral limits of the unstable slope are clearly visible in the morphology and InSAR displacement data. There have been no single structures observed that allow sliding kinematically. The lower extend of the displacing rock mass is clearly defined in InSAR data and by a zone of higher rock fall activity. Yearly

  15. Towards a comprehensive classification of igneous rocks and magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlemost, Eric A. K.

    1991-08-01

    The IUGS Subcommission on the Systematics of Igneous Rocks has recently published an excellent book on the classification of these rocks. This event has shifted the vexed question of classification towards the top of the agenda in igneous petrology. Over the years the Subcommission has used many different criteria to establish the positions of the boundaries between the various common igneous rocks. It now has to adopt a holistic approach and develop a comprehensive, coherent classification that is purged of all the minor anomalies that arise between the various classifications that it has approved. It is appreciated that the Subcommission's classification was never intended to have any genetic implications; however, it is suggested that an ideal classification should he presented in such a way that it is able to group rocks into an order that directs attention to petrogenetic relationships between individual rocks and larger groups of rocks. Unfortunately, many of the Subcommission's definitions are Earth chauvinistic; for example, igneous rocks are defined as being those rocks that solidified from a molten state either within or on the surface of the Earth. Nowhere in the book is it acknowledged that during the past 20 years, while the Subcommission has been framing its many recommendations, a whole new science of planetary petrology has subsumed classical petrology. In any new edition of the book, the Subcommission should acknowledge that rocks are essentially the solid materials of which planets, natural satellites and other broadly similar cosmic bodies are made. The Subcommission should also explicitly recognise that igneous rocks can be divided into either a main sequence of essentially common rocks or a number of supplementary clans of special rocks that evolved outside the main sequence. It is hoped that in the near future the Subcommission will rescind its recommendation that the TAS classification should be regarded as an adjunct to its more traditional

  16. Landslide susceptibility assessment using logistic regression and its comparison with a rock mass classification system, along a road section in the northern Himalayas (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Iswar; Sahoo, Sashikant; van Westen, Cees; Stein, Alfred; Hack, Robert

    2010-02-01

    Landslide studies are commonly guided by ground knowledge and field measurements of rock strength and slope failure criteria. With increasing sophistication of GIS-based statistical methods, however, landslide susceptibility studies benefit from the integration of data collected from various sources and methods at different scales. This study presents a logistic regression method for landslide susceptibility mapping and verifies the result by comparing it with the geotechnical-based slope stability probability classification (SSPC) methodology. The study was carried out in a landslide-prone national highway road section in the northern Himalayas, India. Logistic regression model performance was assessed by the receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve, showing an area under the curve equal to 0.83. Field validation of the SSPC results showed a correspondence of 72% between the high and very high susceptibility classes with present landslide occurrences. A spatial comparison of the two susceptibility maps revealed the significance of the geotechnical-based SSPC method as 90% of the area classified as high and very high susceptible zones by the logistic regression method corresponds to the high and very high class in the SSPC method. On the other hand, only 34% of the area classified as high and very high by the SSPC method falls in the high and very high classes of the logistic regression method. The underestimation by the logistic regression method can be attributed to the generalisation made by the statistical methods, so that a number of slopes existing in critical equilibrium condition might not be classified as high or very high susceptible zones.

  17. Fragment Size Distribution of Blasted Rock Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jug, Jasmin; Strelec, Stjepan; Gazdek, Mario; Kavur, Boris

    2017-12-01

    Rock mass is a heterogeneous material, and the heterogeneity of rock causes sizes distribution of fragmented rocks in blasting. Prediction of blasted rock mass fragmentation has a significant role in the overall economics of opencast mines. Blasting as primary fragmentation can significantly decrease the cost of loading, transport, crushing and milling operations. Blast fragmentation chiefly depends on the specific blast design (geometry of blast holes drilling, the quantity and class of explosive, the blasting form, the timing and partition, etc.) and on the properties of the rock mass (including the uniaxial compressive strength, the rock mass elastic Young modulus, the rock discontinuity characteristics and the rock density). Prediction and processing of blasting results researchers can accomplish by a variety of existing software’s and models, one of them is the Kuz-Ram model, which is possibly the most widely used approach to estimating fragmentation from blasting. This paper shows the estimation of fragmentation using the "SB" program, which was created by the authors. Mentioned program includes the Kuz-Ram model. Models of fragmentation are confirmed and calibrated by comparing the estimated fragmentation with actual post-blast fragmentation from image processing techniques. In this study, the Kuz-Ram fragmentation model has been used for an open-pit limestone quarry in Dalmatia, southern Croatia. The resulting calibrated value of the rock factor enables the quality prognosis of fragmentation in further blasting works, with changed drilling geometry and blast design parameters. It also facilitates simulation in the program to optimize blasting works and get the desired fragmentations of the blasted rock mass.

  18. Host Rock Classification (HRC) system for nuclear waste disposal in crystalline bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagros, A.

    2006-01-01

    A new rock mass classification scheme, the Host Rock Classification system (HRC-system) has been developed for evaluating the suitability of volumes of rock mass for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in Precambrian crystalline bedrock. To support the development of the system, the requirements of host rock to be used for disposal have been studied in detail and the significance of the various rock mass properties have been examined. The HRC-system considers both the long-term safety of the repository and the constructability in the rock mass. The system is specific to the KBS-3V disposal concept and can be used only at sites that have been evaluated to be suitable at the site scale. By using the HRC-system, it is possible to identify potentially suitable volumes within the site at several different scales (repository, tunnel and canister scales). The selection of the classification parameters to be included in the HRC-system is based on an extensive study on the rock mass properties and their various influences on the long-term safety, the constructability and the layout and location of the repository. The parameters proposed for the classification at the repository scale include fracture zones, strength/stress ratio, hydraulic conductivity and the Groundwater Chemistry Index. The parameters proposed for the classification at the tunnel scale include hydraulic conductivity, Q' and fracture zones and the parameters proposed for the classification at the canister scale include hydraulic conductivity, Q', fracture zones, fracture width (aperture + filling) and fracture trace length. The parameter values will be used to determine the suitability classes for the volumes of rock to be classified. The HRC-system includes four suitability classes at the repository and tunnel scales and three suitability classes at the canister scale and the classification process is linked to several important decisions regarding the location and acceptability of many components of

  19. Seismic response of rock joints and jointed rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, A.; Hsiung, S.M.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1996-06-01

    Long-term stability of emplacement drifts and potential near-field fluid flow resulting from coupled effects are among the concerns for safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). A number of factors can induce drift instability or change the near-field flow patterns. Repetitive seismic loads from earthquakes and thermal loads generated by the decay of emplaced waste are two significant factors. One of two key technical uncertainties (KTU) that can potentially pose a high risk of noncompliance with the performance objectives of 10 CFR Part 60 is the prediction of thermal-mechanical (including repetitive seismic load) effects on stability of emplacement drifts and the engineered barrier system. The second KTU of concern is the prediction of thermal-mechanical-hydrological (including repetitive seismic load) effects on the host rock surrounding the engineered barrier system. The Rock Mechanics research project being conducted at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) is intended to address certain specific technical issues associated with these two KTUs. This research project has two major components: (i) seismic response of rock joints and a jointed rock mass and (ii) coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological (TMH) response of a jointed rock mass surrounding the engineered barrier system (EBS). This final report summarizes the research activities concerned with the repetitive seismic load aspect of both these KTUs

  20. Examining the relation between rock mass cuttability index and rock drilling properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetkin, Mustafa E.; Özfırat, M. Kemal; Yenice, Hayati; Şimşir, Ferhan; Kahraman, Bayram

    2016-12-01

    Drilling rate is a substantial index value in drilling and excavation operations at mining. It is not only a help in determining physical and mechanical features of rocks, but also delivers strong estimations about instantaneous cutting rates. By this way, work durations to be finished on time, proper machine/equipment selection and efficient excavation works can be achieved. In this study, physical and mechanical properties of surrounding rocks and ore zones are determined by investigations carried out on specimens taken from an underground ore mine. Later, relationships among rock mass classifications, drillability rates, cuttability, and abrasivity have been investigated using multi regression analysis. As a result, equations having high regression rates have been found out among instantaneous cutting rates and geomechanical properties of rocks. Moreover, excavation machine selection for the study area has been made at the best possible interval.

  1. Effects of confinement on rock mass modulus: A synthetic rock mass modelling (SRM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Vazaios

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to examine the influence of the applied confining stress on the rock mass modulus of moderately jointed rocks (well interlocked undisturbed rock mass with blocks formed by three or less intersecting joints. A synthetic rock mass modelling (SRM approach is employed to determine the mechanical properties of the rock mass. In this approach, the intact body of rock is represented by the discrete element method (DEM-Voronoi grains with the ability of simulating the initiation and propagation of microcracks within the intact part of the model. The geometry of the pre-existing joints is generated by employing discrete fracture network (DFN modelling based on field joint data collected from the Brockville Tunnel using LiDAR scanning. The geometrical characteristics of the simulated joints at a representative sample size are first validated against the field data, and then used to measure the rock quality designation (RQD, joint spacing, areal fracture intensity (P21, and block volumes. These geometrical quantities are used to quantitatively determine a representative range of the geological strength index (GSI. The results show that estimating the GSI using the RQD tends to make a closer estimate of the degree of blockiness that leads to GSI values corresponding to those obtained from direct visual observations of the rock mass conditions in the field. The use of joint spacing and block volume in order to quantify the GSI value range for the studied rock mass suggests a lower range compared to that evaluated in situ. Based on numerical modelling results and laboratory data of rock testing reported in the literature, a semi-empirical equation is proposed that relates the rock mass modulus to confinement as a function of the areal fracture intensity and joint stiffness. Keywords: Synthetic rock mass modelling (SRM, Discrete fracture network (DFN, Rock mass modulus, Geological strength index (GSI, Confinement

  2. Assessment of rock mass quality based on rock quality designation and rock block index. Taking the Borehole BS01 in Beishan HLW disposal repository as example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jian; Wang Ju

    2006-01-01

    Rock mass quality assessment plays an important role in the security for all kinds of large-scale buildings, especially for the underground buildings. In this paper, based on two parameters of RQD and RBI, taking the Borehole BS01 as example, lots of measured data prove that the rock block index can reflect the integrity and corresponding variation of mechanical properties of core from Borehole BS01 to some extent. Meanwhile, the rock mass classification around the Borehole BS01 is given in this paper. Finally, comparison of the results for rock mass assessment between RBI and RQD is made. The research result shows that the rock block index has remarkable significance in engineering and advantages in rock mass quality assessment. (authors)

  3. Evaluation of tunnel seismic prediction (TSP) result using the Japanese highway rock mass classification system for Pahang-Selangor Raw Water Transfer Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von, W. C.; Ismail, M. A. M.

    2017-10-01

    The knowing of geological profile ahead of tunnel face is significant to minimize the risk in tunnel excavation work and cost control in preventative measure. Due to mountainous area, site investigation with vertical boring is not recommended to obtain the geological profile for Pahang-Selangor Raw Water Transfer project. Hence, tunnel seismic prediction (TSP) method is adopted to predict the geological profile ahead of tunnel face. In order to evaluate the TSP results, IBM SPSS Statistic 22 is used to run artificial neural network (ANN) analysis to back calculate the predicted Rock Grade Points (JH) from actual Rock Grade Points (JH) using Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs from TSP. The results show good correlation between predicted Rock Grade points and actual Rock Grade Points (JH). In other words, TSP can provide geological profile prediction ahead of tunnel face significantly while allowing continuously TBM excavation works. Identifying weak zones or faults ahead of tunnel face is crucial for preventative measures to be carried out in advance for a safer tunnel excavation works.

  4. Deep fracturation of granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bles, J.L.; Blanchin, R.; Bonijoly, D.; Dutartre, P.; Feybesse, J.L.; Gros, Y.; Landry, J.; Martin, P.

    1986-01-01

    This documentary study realized with the financial support of the European Communities and the CEA aims at the utilization of available data for the understanding of the evolution of natural fractures in granitic rocks from the surface to deep underground, in various feasibility studies dealing with radioactive wastes disposal. The Mont Blanc road tunnel, the EDF Arc-Isere gallerie, the Auriat deep borehole and the Pyrenean rock mass of Bassies are studied. In this study are more particularly analyzed the relationship between small fractures and large faults, evolution with depth of fracture density and direction, consequences of rock decompression and relationship between fracturation and groundwater [fr

  5. Theoretical study of rock mass investigation efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmen, Johan G.; Outters, Nils

    2002-05-01

    The study concerns a mathematical modelling of a fractured rock mass and its investigations by use of theoretical boreholes and rock surfaces, with the purpose of analysing the efficiency (precision) of such investigations and determine the amount of investigations necessary to obtain reliable estimations of the structural-geological parameters of the studied rock mass. The study is not about estimating suitable sample sizes to be used in site investigations.The purpose of the study is to analyse the amount of information necessary for deriving estimates of the geological parameters studied, within defined confidence intervals and confidence level In other words, how the confidence in models of the rock mass (considering a selected number of parameters) will change with amount of information collected form boreholes and surfaces. The study is limited to a selected number of geometrical structural-geological parameters: Fracture orientation: mean direction and dispersion (Fisher Kappa and SRI). Different measures of fracture density (P10, P21 and P32). Fracture trace-length and strike distributions as seen on horizontal windows. A numerical Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) was used for representation of a fractured rock mass. The DFN-model was primarily based on the properties of an actual fracture network investigated at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The rock mass studied (DFN-model) contained three different fracture sets with different orientations and fracture densities. The rock unit studied was statistically homogeneous. The study includes a limited sensitivity analysis of the properties of the DFN-model. The study is a theoretical and computer-based comparison between samples of fracture properties of a theoretical rock unit and the known true properties of the same unit. The samples are derived from numerically generated boreholes and surfaces that intersect the DFN-network. Two different boreholes are analysed; a vertical borehole and a borehole that is

  6. Evaluation of rock classifications at B. C. Rail tumbler ridge tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Peter K.; Mackay, C.; Gale, A. D.

    1986-10-01

    Construction of four single track railway tunnels through sedimentary rocks in central British Columbia, Canada, provided an excellent opportunity to compare various rock mass classification systems and to evaluate their applicability to the local geology. The tunnels were excavated by conventional drilling and blasting techniques and supported primarily with rock bolts and shotcrete, and with steel sets in some sections. After a brief project description including tunnel construction techniques, local geology and groundwater conditions, the data collection and filed mapping procedure is reviewed. Four rock mass classification systems ( RQD, RSR, RMR, Q) for empirical tunnel design are reviewed and relevant factors for the data interpretation are discussed. In comparing and evaluating the performance of these classification systems three aspects received special attention. The tunnel support predicted by the various systems was compared to the support installed, a unique correlation between the two most useful and most frequently applied classifications, the RMR and Q systems, was established and assessed, and finally, the non-support limit and size effect were evaluated. It is concluded that the Q-system best predicted the required tunnel support and that the RMR was only adequate after adjustment for the influence of opening size. Correction equations for opening size effects are presented for the RMR system. The RSR and RQD systems are not recommended for empirical tunnel design.

  7. Assessment of rock mass decay in artificial slopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, M.

    2006-01-01

    This research investigates the decay of rock masses underlying slopes, and seeks to quantify the relations of such decay with time and geotechnical parameters of the slope and rock mass. Decay can greatly affect the geotechnical properties of rocks within engineering timescales, and may induce a

  8. Guidelines to classification and nomenclature of Arabian felsic plutonic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, C.R.; Stoeser, D.B.; Drysdall, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    Well-defined procedures for classifying the felsic plutonic rocks of the Arabian Shield on the basis of petrographic, chemical and lithostratigraphic criteria and mineral-resource potential have been adopted and developed in the Saudi Arabian Deputy Ministry for Mineral Resources over the past decade. A number of problems with conventional classification schemes have been identified and resolved; others, notably those arising from difficulties in identifying precise mineral compositions, continue to present difficulties. The petrographic nomenclature used is essentially that recommended by the International Union of Geological Sciences. Problems that have arisen include the definition of: (1) rocks with sodic, zoned or perthitic feldspar, (2) trondhjemites, and (3) alkali granites. Chemical classification has been largely based on relative molar amounts of alumina, lime and alkalis, and the use of conventional variation diagrams, but pilot studies utilizing univariate and multivariate statistical techniques have been made. The classification used in Saudi Arabia for stratigraphic purposes is a hierarchy of formation-rank units, suites and super-suites as defined in the Saudi Arabian stratigraphic code. For genetic and petrological studies, a grouping as 'associations' of similar and genetically related lithologies is commonly used. In order to indicate mineral-resource potential, the felsic plutons are classed as common, precursor, specialized or mineralized, in order of increasing exploration significance. ?? 1986.

  9. Establishment of land model at the Shika Nuclear Power Plant. Mainly, on rock board classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagawa, Hideki; Hashimoto, Toru; Hirano, Shuji

    1999-01-01

    In order to grasp engineering properties of basic land of constructions, there is rock board classification as a method to classify whole of rock board to some groups considerable to be nearly equal on its properties. Among the method, various methods in response to its aim and characteristics are devised, and for a classification to hard rock board, the Denken type rock board classification considering degree of weathering to its main element and so forth are well known. The basic rock board of the Shika Nuclear Power Plant is composed of middle and hard types of rock, and its weathering is limited to its shallow portion, most of which are held at fresh condition. For such land, a new classification standard in response to characteristics of land was established. Here were introduced on a progress to establish a new classification standard, its application results and rock board properties. (G.K.)

  10. Hydrogeomechanics for rock engineering: coupling subsurface hydrogeomechanical assessement and hydrogeotechnical mapping on fracturated rock masses

    OpenAIRE

    Meirinhos, João Miguel de Freitas

    2015-01-01

    The present work aims to achieve and further develop a hydrogeomechanical approach in Caldas da Cavaca hydromineral system rock mass (Aguiar da Beira, NW Portugal), and contribute to a better understanding of the hydrogeological conceptual site model. A collection of several data, namely geology, hydrogeology, rock and soil geotechnics, borehole hydraulics and hydrogeomechanics, was retrieved from three rock slopes (Lagoa, Amores and Cancela). To accomplish a comprehensive analysis and rock e...

  11. Comparison of four approaches to a rock facies classification problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, M.K.; Bohling, Geoffrey C.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, seven classifiers based on four different approaches were tested in a rock facies classification problem: classical parametric methods using Bayes' rule, and non-parametric methods using fuzzy logic, k-nearest neighbor, and feed forward-back propagating artificial neural network. Determining the most effective classifier for geologic facies prediction in wells without cores in the Panoma gas field, in Southwest Kansas, was the objective. Study data include 3600 samples with known rock facies class (from core) with each sample having either four or five measured properties (wire-line log curves), and two derived geologic properties (geologic constraining variables). The sample set was divided into two subsets, one for training and one for testing the ability of the trained classifier to correctly assign classes. Artificial neural networks clearly outperformed all other classifiers and are effective tools for this particular classification problem. Classical parametric models were inadequate due to the nature of the predictor variables (high dimensional and not linearly correlated), and feature space of the classes (overlapping). The other non-parametric methods tested, k-nearest neighbor and fuzzy logic, would need considerable improvement to match the neural network effectiveness, but further work, possibly combining certain aspects of the three non-parametric methods, may be justified. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Comparison of underground opening support design methods in jointed rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharavi, M.; Shafiezadeh, N.

    2008-01-01

    It is of great importance to consider long-term stability of rock mass around the openings of underground structure. during design, construction and operation of the said structures in rock. In this context. three methods namely. empirical. analytical and numerical have been applied to design and analyze the stability of underground infrastructure at the Siah Bisheh Pumping Storage Hydro-Electric Power Project in Iran. The geological and geotechnical data utilized in this article were selected and based on the preliminary studies of this project. In the initial stages of design. it was recommended that, two methods of rock mass classification Q and rock mass rating should be utilized for the support system of the underground cavern. Next, based on the structural instability, the support system was adjusted by the analytical method. The performance of the recommended support system was reviewed by the comparison of the ground response curve and rock support interactions with surrounding rock mass, using FEST03 software. Moreover, for further assessment of the realistic rock mass behavior and support system, the numerical modeling was performed utilizing FEST03 software. Finally both the analytical and numerical methods were compared, to obtain satisfactory results complimenting each other

  13. Effect of excavation method on rock mass displacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Toshinori; Kikuchi, Tadashi; Sugihara, Kozo

    1998-01-01

    Rock mass displacement measurements have been performed to understand rock mass behavior and its dependence on excavation method during drift excavation at the Tono mine. Rock mass displacements of 1.46 mm and 0.67 mm have been measured at one meter (0.33D: blasting, 0.42D: machine, D: width of drift) from the walls of drifts excavated by the drill and blasting method and machine, respectively. Numerical analysis of rock mass displacements with Finite Element Method has been performed assuming an excavation disturbed zone. Measured and analysed rock mass displacements are consistent with each other for the drift excavation by the drill and blasting method. The excavation disturbed zone was narrower for the drift excavated by machine than for the drift excavated by the drill and blasting method. (author)

  14. Estimation of hydrologic properties of an unsaturated, fractured rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klavetter, E.A.; Peters, R.R.

    1986-07-01

    In this document, two distinctly different approaches are used to develop continuum models to evaluate water movement in a fractured rock mass. Both models provide methods for estimating rock-mass hydrologic properties. Comparisons made over a range of different tuff properties show good qualitative and quantitative agreement between estimates of rock-mass hydrologic properties made by the two models. This document presents a general discussion of: (1) the hydrology of Yucca Mountain, and the conceptual hydrological model currently being used for the Yucca Mountain site, (2) the development of two models that may be used to estimate the hydrologic properties of a fractured, porous rock mass, and (3) a comparison of the hydrologic properties estimated by these two models. Although the models were developed in response to hydrologic characterization requirements at Yucca Mountain, they can be applied to water movement in any fractured rock mass that satisfies the given assumptions

  15. A hazard and risk classification system for catastrophic rock slope failures in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns, R.; Oppikofer, T.; Anda, E.; Blikra, L. H.; Böhme, M.; Bunkholt, H.; Dahle, H.; Devoli, G.; Eikenæs, O.; Fischer, L.; Harbitz, C. B.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Loew, S.; Yugsi Molina, F. X.

    2012-04-01

    The Geological Survey of Norway carries out systematic geologic mapping of potentially unstable rock slopes in Norway that can cause a catastrophic failure. As catastrophic failure we describe failures that involve substantial fragmentation of the rock mass during run-out and that impact an area larger than that of a rock fall (shadow angle of ca. 28-32° for rock falls). This includes therefore rock slope failures that lead to secondary effects, such as a displacement wave when impacting a water body or damming of a narrow valley. Our systematic mapping revealed more than 280 rock slopes with significant postglacial deformation, which might represent localities of large future rock slope failures. This large number necessitates prioritization of follow-up activities, such as more detailed investigations, periodic monitoring and permanent monitoring and early-warning. In the past hazard and risk were assessed qualitatively for some sites, however, in order to compare sites so that political and financial decisions can be taken, it was necessary to develop a quantitative hazard and risk classification system. A preliminary classification system was presented and discussed with an expert group of Norwegian and international experts and afterwards adapted following their recommendations. This contribution presents the concept of this final hazard and risk classification that should be used in Norway in the upcoming years. Historical experience and possible future rockslide scenarios in Norway indicate that hazard assessment of large rock slope failures must be scenario-based, because intensity of deformation and present displacement rates, as well as the geological structures activated by the sliding rock mass can vary significantly on a given slope. In addition, for each scenario the run-out of the rock mass has to be evaluated. This includes the secondary effects such as generation of displacement waves or landslide damming of valleys with the potential of later

  16. Correlation between Rock mass rating, Q-system and Rock mass index based on field data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soufi Amine

    2018-01-01

    The proposed regression models reveal strong correlations between RMR, Q and RMi indexes with high values of accuracy coefficients so that they can be used to estimate the “CPB3” underground rock mass quality for the range of RMR between 30% and 80%. The developed mathematical formulations of the geomechanicalindexes will certainly offer an effective tool to geologist and geotechnical professionals in the decision-making process, preliminary design phase, stability problems and suggestions of the required supporting system and techniques without the expense of more resources or time.

  17. Thermo-mechanical ratcheting in jointed rock masses

    KAUST Repository

    Pasten, C.; Garcí a, M.; Santamarina, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Thermo-mechanical coupling takes place in jointed rock masses subjected to large thermal oscillations. Examples range from exposed surfaces under daily and seasonal thermal fluctuations to subsurface rock masses affected by engineered systems such as geothermal operations. Experimental, numerical and analytical results show that thermo-mechanical coupling can lead to wedging and ratcheting mechanisms that result in deformation accumulation when the rock mass is subjected to a biased static-force condition. Analytical and numerical models help in identifying the parameter domain where thermo-mechanical ratcheting can take place.

  18. Thermo-mechanical ratcheting in jointed rock masses

    KAUST Repository

    Pasten, C.

    2015-09-01

    Thermo-mechanical coupling takes place in jointed rock masses subjected to large thermal oscillations. Examples range from exposed surfaces under daily and seasonal thermal fluctuations to subsurface rock masses affected by engineered systems such as geothermal operations. Experimental, numerical and analytical results show that thermo-mechanical coupling can lead to wedging and ratcheting mechanisms that result in deformation accumulation when the rock mass is subjected to a biased static-force condition. Analytical and numerical models help in identifying the parameter domain where thermo-mechanical ratcheting can take place.

  19. Research of compression strength of fissured rock mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. Г. Протосеня

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article examines a method of forecasting strength properties and their scale effect in fissured rock mass using computational modelling with final elements method in ABAQUS software. It shows advantages of this approach for solving tasks of determining mechanical properties of fissured rock mass, main stages of creating computational geomechanic model of rock mass and conducting a numerical experiment. The article presents connections between deformation during loading of numerical model, inclination angle of main fracture system from uniaxial and biaxial compression strength value, size of the sample of fissured rock mass and biaxial compression strength value under conditions of apatite-nepheline rock deposit at Plateau Rasvumchorr OAO «Apatit» in Kirovsky region of Murmanskaya oblast. We have conducted computational modelling of rock mass blocks testing in discontinuities based on real experiment using non-linear shear strength criterion of Barton – Bandis and compared results of computational experiments with data from field studies and laboratory tests. The calculation results have a high-quality match to laboratory results when testing fissured rock mass samples.

  20. Conducting Rock Mass Rating for tunnel construction on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beemer, Heidi D.; Worrells, D. Scott

    2017-10-01

    Mars analogue missions provide researchers, scientists, and engineers the opportunity to establish protocols prior to sending human explorers to another planet. This paper investigated the complexity of a team of simulation astronauts conducting a Rock Mass Rating task during Analogue Mars missions. This study was conducted at the Mars Desert Research Station in Hanksville, UT, during field season 2015/2016 and with crews 167,168, and 169. During the experiment, three-person teams completed a Rock Mass Rating task during a three hour Extra Vehicular Activity on day six of their two-week simulation mission. This geological test is used during design and construction of excavations in rock on Earth. On Mars, this test could be conducted by astronauts to determine suitable rock layers for tunnel construction which would provide explorers a permanent habitat and radiation shielding while living for long periods of time on the surface. The Rock Mass Rating system derives quantitative data for engineering designs that can easily be communicated between engineers and geologists. Conclusions from this research demonstrated that it is feasible for astronauts to conduct the Rock Mass Rating task in a Mars simulated environment. However, it was also concluded that Rock Mass Rating task orientation and training will be required to ensure that accurate results are obtained.

  1. Determining the REV for Fracture Rock Mass Based on Seepage Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Seepage problems of the fractured rock mass have always been a heated topic within hydrogeology and engineering geology. The equivalent porous medium model method is the main method in the study of the seepage of the fractured rock mass and its engineering application. The key to the method is to determine a representative elementary volume (REV. The FractureToKarst software, that is, discrete element software, is a main analysis tool in this paper and developed by a number of authors. According to the standard of rock classification established by ISRM, this paper aims to discuss the existence and the size of REV of fractured rock masses with medium tractility and provide a general method to determine the existence of REV. It can be gleaned from the study that the existence condition of fractured rock mass with medium tractility features average fracture spacing smaller than 0.6 m. If average fracture spacing is larger than 0.6 m, there is no existence of REV. The rationality of the model is verified by a case study. The present research provides a method for the simulation of seepage field in fissured rocks.

  2. Thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of fractured rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coste, F.

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to model Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical behavior of fractured rock mass regarding a nuclear waste re-depository. For this, a methodology of modeling was proposed and was applied to a real underground site (EDF site at Nouvelle Romanche). This methodology consists, in a first step, to determine hydraulic and mechanical REV. Beyond the greatest of these REV, development of a finite element code allows to model all the fractures in an explicit manner. The homogenized mechanical properties are determined in drained and undrained boundary conditions by simulating triaxial tests that represent rock mass subject to loading. These simulations allow to study the evolution of hydraulic and mechanical properties as a function of stress state. Drained and undrained boundary conditions enable to discuss the validity of assimilation of a fractured rock mass to a porous medium. The simulations lead to a better understanding of the behavior of the fractured rock masses and allow to show the dominant role of the shear behavior of the fractures on the hydraulic and mechanical homogenized properties. From a thermal point of view, as long as conduction is dominant, thermal properties of the rock mass are almost the same as those the intact rock. (author)

  3. Effects of Weathering on TIR Spectra and Rock Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, M. L.; Hamilton, V. E.; Riley, D.

    2006-03-01

    Changes in mineralogy due to weathering are detectable in the TIR and cause misclassification of rock types. We survey samples over a range of lithologies and attempt to provide a method of correction for rock identification from weathered spectra.

  4. Tensile rock mass strength estimated using InSAR

    KAUST Repository

    Jonsson, Sigurjon

    2012-11-01

    The large-scale strength of rock is known to be lower than the strength determined from small-scale samples in the laboratory. However, it is not well known how strength scales with sample size. I estimate kilometer-scale tensional rock mass strength by measuring offsets across new tensional fractures (joints), formed above a shallow magmatic dike intrusion in western Arabia in 2009. I use satellite radar observations to derive 3D ground displacements and by quantifying the extension accommodated by the joints and the maximum extension that did not result in a fracture, I put bounds on the joint initiation threshold of the surface rocks. The results indicate that the kilometer-scale tensile strength of the granitic rock mass is 1–3 MPa, almost an order of magnitude lower than typical laboratory values.

  5. Tensile rock mass strength estimated using InSAR

    KAUST Repository

    Jonsson, Sigurjon

    2012-01-01

    The large-scale strength of rock is known to be lower than the strength determined from small-scale samples in the laboratory. However, it is not well known how strength scales with sample size. I estimate kilometer-scale tensional rock mass strength by measuring offsets across new tensional fractures (joints), formed above a shallow magmatic dike intrusion in western Arabia in 2009. I use satellite radar observations to derive 3D ground displacements and by quantifying the extension accommodated by the joints and the maximum extension that did not result in a fracture, I put bounds on the joint initiation threshold of the surface rocks. The results indicate that the kilometer-scale tensile strength of the granitic rock mass is 1–3 MPa, almost an order of magnitude lower than typical laboratory values.

  6. Study of deep fracturation of granitic rock mass. Documentary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bles, J.L.; Landry, J.

    1984-01-01

    This documentary study realized with the financial support of the European Communities and the CEA aims at the utilization of available data for the understanding of the evolution of natural fractures in granitic rocks from the surface to deep underground. The Mt Blanc road tunnel, the EDF's Arc-Isere gallerie, the Auriat deep borehole and the Pyrenean rock mass of Bassies are studied because detailed structural and geological studies have been realized these last 20 years. In this study are more particularly analyzed the relationship between small fractures and large faults, evolution with depth of fracture density and direction, consequences of rock decompression and relationship between fracturation and groundwater

  7. Integrated analysis of rock mass deformation within shaft protective pillar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Warchala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of the rock mass deformation resulting from mining in the vicinity of the shaft protection pillar. A methodology of deformation prediction is based on a deterministic method using Finite Element Method (FEM. The FEM solution is based on the knowledge of the geomechanical properties of the various geological formations, tectonic faults, types of mining systems, and the complexity of the behaviour of the rock mass. The analysis gave the stress and displacement fields in the rock mass. Results of the analysis will allow for design of an optimal mining system. The analysis is illustrated by an example of the shaft R-VIII Rudna Mine KGHM Polish Copper SA.

  8. ROCK MASS DAMAGED ZONE CAUSED BY BLASTING DURING TUNNEL EXCAVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Antičević

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Design of underground spaces, including tunnels, and repositories for radioactive waste include the application of the same or similar technologies. Tunnel excavation by blasting inevitably results in the damage in the rock mass around the excavation profile. The damage in the rock mass immediately next to the tunnel profile emerges as the expanding of the existing cracks and the appearance of new cracks, i.e. as the change of the physical and-mechanical properties of the rock mass. Concerning the design of deep geological repositories, requirements in terms of damaged rock are the same or more rigorous than for the design of tunnel. The aforementioned research is directed towards determining the depth of damage zone caused by blasting. The depth of the damage zone is determined by measuring the changes of physical and-mechanical properties of the rock mass around the tunnel excavation profile. By this research the drilling and blasting parameters were correlated with the depth and size of the damage zone (the paper is published in Croatian.

  9. A spatial estimation model for continuous rock mass characterization from the specific energy of a TBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exadaktylos, G.; Stavropoulou, M.; Xiroudakis, G.; de Broissia, M.; Schwarz, H.

    2008-12-01

    Basic principles of the theory of rock cutting with rolling disc cutters are used to appropriately reduce tunnel boring machine (TBM) logged data and compute the specific energy (SE) of rock cutting as a function of geometry of the cutterhead and operational parameters. A computational code written in Fortran 77 is used to perform Kriging predictions in a regular or irregular grid in 1D, 2D or 3D space based on sampled data referring to rock mass classification indices or TBM related parameters. This code is used here for three purposes, namely: (1) to filter raw data in order to establish a good correlation between SE and rock mass rating (RMR) (or tunnelling quality index Q) along the chainage of the tunnel, (2) to make prediction of RMR, Q or SE along the chainage of the tunnel from boreholes at the exploration phase and design stage of the tunnel, and (3) to make predictions of SE and RMR or Q ahead of the tunnel’s face during excavation of the tunnel based on SE estimations during excavation. The above tools are the basic constituents of an algorithm to continuously update the geotechnical model of the rock mass based on logged TBM data. Several cases were considered to illustrate the proposed methodology, namely: (a) data from a system of twin tunnels in Hong Kong, (b) data from three tunnels excavated in Northern Italy, and (c) data from the section Singuerlin-Esglesias of the Metro L9 tunnel in Barcelona.

  10. Study on the constitutive model for jointed rock mass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Xu

    Full Text Available A new elasto-plastic constitutive model for jointed rock mass, which can consider the persistence ratio in different visual angle and anisotropic increase of plastic strain, is proposed. The proposed the yield strength criterion, which is anisotropic, is not only related to friction angle and cohesion of jointed rock masses at the visual angle but also related to the intersection angle between the visual angle and the directions of the principal stresses. Some numerical examples are given to analyze and verify the proposed constitutive model. The results show the proposed constitutive model has high precision to calculate displacement, stress and plastic strain and can be applied in engineering analysis.

  11. Interim rock mass properties and conditions for analyses of a repository in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tammemagi, H.Y.; Chieslar, J.D.

    1985-03-01

    A summary of rock properties for generic crystalline rock is compiled from literature sources to provide the input data for analyses of a conceptual repository in crystalline rock. Frequency histograms, mean values and ranges of physical, mechanical, thermal, and thermomechanical properties, and the dependence of these properties on temperature are described. A description of the hydrogeologic properties of a crystalline rock mass and their dependence on depth is provided. In addition, the temperature gradients, mean annual surface temperature, and in situ stress conditions are summarized for the three regions of the United States currently under consideration to host a crystalline repository; i.e., the North Central, Northeastern, and Southeastern. Brief descriptions of the regional geology are also presented. Large-scale underground experiments in crystalline rock at Stripa, Sweden, and in Climax Stock in Nevada, are reviewed to assess whether the rock properties presented in this report are representative of in situ conditions. The suitability of each rock property and the sufficiency of its data base are described. 110 refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Forensic Excavation of Rock Masses: A Technique to Investigate Discontinuity Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, J.; Hencher, S. R.; West, L. J.; Handley, K.

    2017-11-01

    True persistence of rock discontinuities (areas with insignificant tensile strength) is an important factor controlling the engineering behaviour of fractured rock masses, but is extremely difficult to quantify using current geological survey methodologies, even where there is good rock exposure. Trace length as measured in the field or using remote measurement devices is actually only broadly indicative of persistence for rock engineering practice and numerical modelling. Visible traces of discontinuities are treated as if they were open fractures within rock mass classifications, despite many such traces being non-persistent and actually retaining considerable strength. The common assumption of 100% persistence, based on trace length, is generally extremely conservative in terms of strength and stiffness, but not always so and may lead to a wrong prediction of failure mechanism or of excavatability. Assuming full persistence would give hopelessly incorrect predictions of hydraulic conductivity. A new technique termed forensic excavation of rock masses is introduced, as a procedure for directly investigating discontinuity persistence. This technique involves non-explosive excavation of rock masses by injecting an expansive chemical splitter along incipient discontinuities. On expansion, the splitter causes the incipient traces to open as true joints. Experiments are described in which near-planar rock discontinuities, through siltstone and sandstone, were opened up by injecting the splitter into holes drilled along the lines of visible traces of the discontinuities in the laboratory and in the field. Once exposed the surfaces were examined to investigate the pre-existing persistence characteristics of the incipient discontinuities. One conclusion from this study is that visible trace length of a discontinuity can be a poor indicator of true persistence (defined for a fracture area with negligible tensile strength). An observation from this series of experiments

  13. Overview of geotechnical methods to characterize rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-12-01

    The methods that are used to characterize discontinuous rock masses from a geotechnical point of view are summarized. Emphasis is put on providing key references on each subject. The topics of exploration, in-situ stresses, mechanical properties, thermal properties, and hydraulic properties are addressed

  14. Estimating RMR Values for Underground Excavations in a Rock Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítor Santos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available During underground excavations for civil or mining engineering purposes, the variations in rock mass quality are important, especially for the design of the most suitable support to be applied to ensure stability. The aim of this investigation is to model the expected behavior of the ground, and thus to predict the scenarios indicating potential variations in the quality of the rock mass during underground excavation. When considering the rock mass rating (RMR values observed at the excavation face in six study cases, which together total more than 27 km in length of underground excavation by drilling and blasting (D&B, and based on the observed RMR values at the face, the most probable value (1–100 is estimate for the RMR index at the five subsequent front advances. It is concluded that, up to about 20 m ahead of the current face, the quality of the rock mass for the next advances is close to the quality observed at the present face, and that, with increasing distance, there is a greater deviation of RMR values with respect to the quality observed at the current face.

  15. Image resolution influence on determination of resin injection rock mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weixing; Hakami, Eva

    2006-01-01

    In the context of nuclear waste repositories, an important approach to understanding brittle rock mass behavior to integrate new and powerful observational and numerical methods with multi-functional 3-D imaging and visualization techniques. Since 1994, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) have identified the need for a better understanding of radionuclide transport and retention processes in fractured rock. As a cooperation project between Sweden and China, we sampled a number of rock specimens for analyze rock fracture network by optical image technique. The samples are resin injected, in which way; opened fractures can be seen clearly by means of UV (Ultraviolet) light illumination. In the study period, we used different optical focuses to obtain the images from the same samples; we found that Image resolution influences on porosity determination of resin injected rock mass. This paper presents and discusses the six issues based on our research results: (1) Fracture porosity increases as camera focus distance decreases; (2) Porosity increases as illumination increases in resin injected fracture images; (3) To roughly estimate the porosity, the low resolution image can be used; (4) To collect more details of fracture information, the high resolution image is needed; (5) The resolution of image should be determined based on the aim of fracture analysis; (6) To acquire high resolution image, constructing a special illumination (standard) box maybe helpful to avoid light reflection and diffusion.

  16. Characterization of the fracturation of rock masses for determining flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derlich, S.

    1984-02-01

    Flow in a rock mass is the consequence of the permeability of the rock, which can be roughly separated into matrix permeability and fissure permeability. In crystalline rocks fissure permeability is dominant, especially where the rocks are extensively fractured. It is thus essential, by means of studies either at the surface or underground, to characterize the volume fracturation in the mass considered. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the methodology for analysing fracturation at a site by the studies performed on the granite mass of Auriat in the French Massif Central. A number of geology laboratories have participated in this study and a broad spectrum of observations has been made which can be used for determining the various stages of a study with a view to selection of a site, the advantages and limitations of each method or study plan and additional methods which need to be used for gaining as complete a picture as possible of the fracturation. A brief examination of the results obtained at Auriat enables the relative advantages of using these various methods at a particular site to be compared

  17. The development of rock suitability classification strategies in the Finnish spent nuclear fuel disposal program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellae, Pirjo; Hagros, Annika [Saanio and Riekkola Oy (Finland); Aaltonen, Ismo; Kosunen, Paula; Mattila, Jussi [Posiva Oy (Finland)

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development of the rock suitability classification strategies applied to locate the spent fuel repository in crystalline rock in Finland. Development of the classification procedure is motivated not only by the regulatory requirements, but also by the need to more closely integrate site characterization, repository design and long-term safety assessment. The classification procedure has been developed along with the increasing level of detail of the available site data and knowledge on the performance of the engineered barrier system (EBS). The classification system has also been adapted to the changes in the regulations. The present form of the classification system and experiences from testing the system at the site are described. Demonstration activities have shown that the criteria and the stepwise research, construction and decision making protocol can be applied successfully.

  18. The development of rock suitability classification strategies in the Finnish spent nuclear fuel disposal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellae, Pirjo; Hagros, Annika; Aaltonen, Ismo; Kosunen, Paula; Mattila, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the rock suitability classification strategies applied to locate the spent fuel repository in crystalline rock in Finland. Development of the classification procedure is motivated not only by the regulatory requirements, but also by the need to more closely integrate site characterization, repository design and long-term safety assessment. The classification procedure has been developed along with the increasing level of detail of the available site data and knowledge on the performance of the engineered barrier system (EBS). The classification system has also been adapted to the changes in the regulations. The present form of the classification system and experiences from testing the system at the site are described. Demonstration activities have shown that the criteria and the stepwise research, construction and decision making protocol can be applied successfully.

  19. Analysis on one underground nuclear waste repository rock mass in USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha Qiuling; Zhang Tiantian

    2012-01-01

    When analyzing the rock mass of a underground nuclear waste repository, the current studies are all based on the loading mechanical condition, and the unloading damage of rock mass is unconsidered. According to the different mechanical condition of actual engineering rock mass of loading and unloading, this paper implements a comprehensive analysis on the rock mass deformation of underground nuclear waste repository through the combination of present loading and unloading rock mass mechanics. It is found that the results of comprehensive analysis and actual measured data on the rock mass deformation of underground nuclear waste repository are basically the same, which provide supporting data for the underground nuclear waste repository. (authors)

  20. Effect of blasting on the strength of a rock mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, L

    1964-01-01

    Although the fact that blasting concussions tend to loosen a rock mass has always been known, the enormous reduction in strength associated with such loosening is not generally recognized. Recent investigations of the effect of blasting on a rock mass have shown that even slight loosening may markedly reduce the strength. This factor introduces a new slant on modern blasting methods, some of which will have to be considered more critically. The sensitivity of the mass to impacts depends on stress concentrations at the end of joints (Kerbspannungen) and on tensile stresses developed in the immediate vicinity of a joint, even in regions where the field stresses are not tensile. Thus, the sensitivity depends on the shape and orientation of the joints and particularly on the degree of separation of the individual joint families. The orientation of the joint families to the strains produced by blasting is just as important as the reduction in overall strength arising from the drop in friction due to the effects of the ''knocking out'' process (Foppl) on the joint body complex. Concussions may critically increase the degree of separation of the joint network thus reducing the tensile and shear strengths of the rock mass. (19 refs.)

  1. Effect of blasting on the strength of a rock mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, L.

    1964-01-01

    Although the fact that blasting concussions tend to loosen a rock mass has always been known, the enormous reduction in strength associated with such loosening is not generally recognized. Recent investigations of the effect of blasting on a rock mass have shown that even slight loosening may markedly reduce the strength. This factor introduces a new slant on modern blasting methods, some of which will have to be considered more critically. The sensitivity of the mass to impacts depends on stress concentrations at the end of joints (Kerbspannungen) and on tensile stresses developed in the immediate vicinity of a joint, even in regions where the field stresses are not tensile. Thus, the sensitivity depends on the shape and orientation of the joints and particularly on the degree of separation of the individual joint families. The orientation of the joint families to the strains produced by blasting is just as important as the reduction in overall strength arising from the drop in friction due to the effects of the ''knocking out'' process (Foppl) on the joint body complex. Concussions may critically increase the degree of separation of the joint network thus reducing the tensile and shear strengths of the rock mass. (19 refs.)

  2. Rock mass mechanical property estimations for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M.; Hardy, M.P.; Bauer, S.J.

    1993-06-01

    Rock mass mechanical properties are important in the design of drifts and ramps. These properties are used in evaluations of the impacts of thermomechanical loading of potential host rock within the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Representative intact rock and joint mechanical properties were selected for welded and nonwelded tuffs from the currently available data sources. Rock mass qualities were then estimated using both the Norwegian Geotechnical Institute (Q) and Geomechanics Rating (RMR) systems. Rock mass mechanical properties were developed based on estimates of rock mass quality, the current knowledge of intact properties, and fracture/joint characteristics. Empirical relationships developed to correlate the rock mass quality indices and the rock mass mechanical properties were then used to estimate the range of rock mass mechanical properties

  3. Classification Scheme for Diverse Sedimentary and Igneous Rocks Encountered by MSL in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Mangold, N.; Fisk, M.; Forni, O.; McLennan, S.; Ming, D. W.; Sumner, D.; Sautter, V.; Williams, A. J.; Gellert, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Curiosity Rover landed in a lithologically and geochemically diverse region of Mars. We present a recommended rock classification framework based on terrestrial schemes, and adapted for the imaging and analytical capabilities of MSL as well as for rock types distinctive to Mars (e.g., high Fe sediments). After interpreting rock origin from textures, i.e., sedimentary (clastic, bedded), igneous (porphyritic, glassy), or unknown, the overall classification procedure (Fig 1) involves: (1) the characterization of rock type according to grain size and texture; (2) the assignment of geochemical modifiers according to Figs 3 and 4; and if applicable, in depth study of (3) mineralogy and (4) geologic/stratigraphic context. Sedimentary rock types are assigned by measuring grains in the best available resolution image (Table 1) and classifying according to the coarsest resolvable grains as conglomerate/breccia, (coarse, medium, or fine) sandstone, silt-stone, or mudstone. If grains are not resolvable in MAHLI images, grains in the rock are assumed to be silt sized or smaller than surface dust particles. Rocks with low color contrast contrast between grains (e.g., Dismal Lakes, sol 304) are classified according to minimum size of apparent grains from surface roughness or shadows outlining apparent grains. Igneous rocks are described as intrusive or extrusive depending on crystal size and fabric. Igneous textures may be described as granular, porphyritic, phaneritic, aphyric, or glassy depending on crystal size. Further descriptors may include terms such as vesicular or cumulate textures.

  4. Rock mass characterization for Copenhagen Metro using face logs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sanne Louise; Galsgaard, Jens; Foged, Niels Nielsen

    2015-01-01

    An extension of the existing Metro in central Copenhagen is currently under construction. We present a comparison of the different field logging techniques available from a large number of borehole logs and face logs carried out during the construction in cooperation with the constructor and client......, describing rock mass characteristics using detailed face logging with geological description and recording of induration and fracturing, giving a field RQD value during excavation, combined with televiewer logs, when available, has shown to be a valuable tool for rock mass characterization compared......’s representatives, which illustrate and approve the applied methods. The new ‘Cityringen’ Metro will consist of two 16 km single track tunnels, with 17 stations and 3 construction and ventilation shafts. The geological ground conditions are dominated by glacial and postglacial deposits overlying Paleocene Greensand...

  5. Rock mass characterization for tunnels in the Copenhagen limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels Nielsen; Jakobsen, Lisa; Jackson, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Tunnels in Copenhagen are drilled through highly anisotropic limestone comprising alternating strongly lithified and less lithified parts. The mass quality of the limestone is usually defined from fracture spacing registered in core samples. The deposit is, however, affected destructively by dril...... by drilling activity yielding a low Rock Quality Designation RQD. In-situ observations of the limestone in excavations or televiewer logs reveal only few natural discontinuities compared to core logging, indicating a very good suitability for tunneling....

  6. Finite element model for heat conduction in jointed rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gartling, D.K.; Thomas, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    A computatonal procedure for simulating heat conduction in a fractured rock mass is proposed and illustrated in the present paper. The method makes use of a simple local model for conduction in the vicinity of a single open fracture. The distributions of fractures and fracture properties within the finite element model are based on a statistical representation of geologic field data. Fracture behavior is included in the finite element computation by locating local, discrete fractures at the element integration points

  7. Automated classification of Acid Rock Drainage potential from Corescan drill core imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cracknell, M. J.; Jackson, L.; Parbhakar-Fox, A.; Savinova, K.

    2017-12-01

    Classification of the acid forming potential of waste rock is important for managing environmental hazards associated with mining operations. Current methods for the classification of acid rock drainage (ARD) potential usually involve labour intensive and subjective assessment of drill core and/or hand specimens. Manual methods are subject to operator bias, human error and the amount of material that can be assessed within a given time frame is limited. The automated classification of ARD potential documented here is based on the ARD Index developed by Parbhakar-Fox et al. (2011). This ARD Index involves the combination of five indicators: A - sulphide content; B - sulphide alteration; C - sulphide morphology; D - primary neutraliser content; and E - sulphide mineral association. Several components of the ARD Index require accurate identification of sulphide minerals. This is achieved by classifying Corescan Red-Green-Blue true colour images into the presence or absence of sulphide minerals using supervised classification. Subsequently, sulphide classification images are processed and combined with Corescan SWIR-based mineral classifications to obtain information on sulphide content, indices representing sulphide textures (disseminated versus massive and degree of veining), and spatially associated minerals. This information is combined to calculate ARD Index indicator values that feed into the classification of ARD potential. Automated ARD potential classifications of drill core samples associated with a porphyry Cu-Au deposit are compared to manually derived classifications and those obtained by standard static geochemical testing and X-ray diffractometry analyses. Results indicate a high degree of similarity between automated and manual ARD potential classifications. Major differences between approaches are observed in sulphide and neutraliser mineral percentages, likely due to the subjective nature of manual estimates of mineral content. The automated approach

  8. Numerical Simulation on Zonal Disintegration in Deep Surrounding Rock Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuguang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Zonal disintegration have been discovered in many underground tunnels with the increasing of embedded depth. The formation mechanism of such phenomenon is difficult to explain under the framework of traditional rock mechanics, and the fractured shape and forming conditions are unclear. The numerical simulation was carried out to research the generating condition and forming process of zonal disintegration. Via comparing the results with the geomechanical model test, the zonal disintegration phenomenon was confirmed and its mechanism is revealed. It is found to be the result of circular fracture which develops within surrounding rock mass under the high geostress. The fractured shape of zonal disintegration was determined, and the radii of the fractured zones were found to fulfill the relationship of geometric progression. The numerical results were in accordance with the model test findings. The mechanism of the zonal disintegration was revealed by theoretical analysis based on fracture mechanics. The fractured zones are reportedly circular and concentric to the cavern. Each fracture zone ruptured at the elastic-plastic boundary of the surrounding rocks and then coalesced into the circular form. The geometric progression ratio was found to be related to the mechanical parameters and the ground stress of the surrounding rocks.

  9. Numerical simulation on zonal disintegration in deep surrounding rock mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuguang; Wang, Yuan; Mei, Yu; Zhang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Zonal disintegration have been discovered in many underground tunnels with the increasing of embedded depth. The formation mechanism of such phenomenon is difficult to explain under the framework of traditional rock mechanics, and the fractured shape and forming conditions are unclear. The numerical simulation was carried out to research the generating condition and forming process of zonal disintegration. Via comparing the results with the geomechanical model test, the zonal disintegration phenomenon was confirmed and its mechanism is revealed. It is found to be the result of circular fracture which develops within surrounding rock mass under the high geostress. The fractured shape of zonal disintegration was determined, and the radii of the fractured zones were found to fulfill the relationship of geometric progression. The numerical results were in accordance with the model test findings. The mechanism of the zonal disintegration was revealed by theoretical analysis based on fracture mechanics. The fractured zones are reportedly circular and concentric to the cavern. Each fracture zone ruptured at the elastic-plastic boundary of the surrounding rocks and then coalesced into the circular form. The geometric progression ratio was found to be related to the mechanical parameters and the ground stress of the surrounding rocks.

  10. Creep in jointed rock masses. State of knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glamheden, Rune; Hoekmark, Harald

    2010-06-01

    To describe creep behaviour in hard rock masses in a physically realistic way, elaborate models including various combinations of dash pots, spring elements and sliders would be needed. According to our knowledge, there are at present no numerical tools available that can handle such a creep model. In addition, there are no records over sufficient long time periods of tunnel convergence in crystalline rock that could be used to determine or calibrate values for the model parameters. A possible method to perform bounding estimates of creep movements around openings in a repository may be to use distinct element codes with standard built-in elasto-plastic models. By locally reducing the fracture shear strength near the underground openings a relaxation of fracture shear loads is reached. The accumulated displacements may then represent the maximum possible effects of creep that can take place in a jointed rock mass without reference to the actual time it takes to reach the displacements. Estimates based on results from analyses where all shear stresses are allowed to disappear completely will, however, be over-conservative. To be able to set up and analyse reasonably realistic numerical models with the proposed method, further assumptions regarding the creep movements and the creep region around the opening have to be made. The purpose of this report is to present support for such assumptions as found in the literature

  11. Creep in jointed rock masses. State of knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glamheden, Rune (Golder Associates AB (Sweden)); Hoekmark, Harald (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2010-06-15

    To describe creep behaviour in hard rock masses in a physically realistic way, elaborate models including various combinations of dash pots, spring elements and sliders would be needed. According to our knowledge, there are at present no numerical tools available that can handle such a creep model. In addition, there are no records over sufficient long time periods of tunnel convergence in crystalline rock that could be used to determine or calibrate values for the model parameters. A possible method to perform bounding estimates of creep movements around openings in a repository may be to use distinct element codes with standard built-in elasto-plastic models. By locally reducing the fracture shear strength near the underground openings a relaxation of fracture shear loads is reached. The accumulated displacements may then represent the maximum possible effects of creep that can take place in a jointed rock mass without reference to the actual time it takes to reach the displacements. Estimates based on results from analyses where all shear stresses are allowed to disappear completely will, however, be over-conservative. To be able to set up and analyse reasonably realistic numerical models with the proposed method, further assumptions regarding the creep movements and the creep region around the opening have to be made. The purpose of this report is to present support for such assumptions as found in the literature.

  12. Material constitutive model for jointed rock mass behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.K.

    1980-11-01

    A material constitutive model is presented for jointed rock masses which exhibit preferred planes of weakness. This model is intended for use in finite element computations. The immediate application is the thermomechanical modelling of a nuclear waste repository in hard rock, but the model seems appropriate for a variety of other static and dynamic geotechnical problems as well. Starting with the finite element representations of a two-dimensional elastic body, joint planes are introduced in an explicit manner by direct modification of the material stiffness matrix. A novel feature of this approach is that joint set orientations, lengths and spacings are readily assigned through the sampling of a population distribution statistically determined from field measurement data. The result is that the fracture characteristics of the formations have the same statistical distribution in the model as is observed in the field. As a demonstration of the jointed rock mass model, numerical results are presented for the example problem of stress concentration at an underground opening

  13. Rock mass characterization for storage of nuclear waste in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witherspoon, P.A.; Nelson, P.; Doe, T.; Thorpe, R.; Paulsson, B.; Gale, J.; Forster, C.

    1979-02-01

    The rock mass characterization in granite adjacent to an iron mine at Stripa, Sweden is being carried out by four different methods. The mechanical characterization includes monitoring the responses to thermal loading of jointed rock in situ, and mechanical tests on cores from 25 mm to 1 m in diameter. Geological characterization includes detailed surface mapping, subsurface mapping, and core mapping. Geophysical characterization uses a variety of borehole techniques, with emphasis on sonic methods. The hydrologic characterization is done through injection tests, pump tests, water pressure measurements, and controlled inflow tests to tunnels. Since the data are not yet complete, only tentative conclusions can be drawn regarding the best combinations of techniques for rock-mass characterization. Mapping studies are useful in defining continuity and fracture-system geometry. They do not give aperture, a factor significant in terms of both water flow and the displacements due to heating. Of the geophysical techniques, sonic methods appear most effective in fracture definition; other methods, gamma and neutron particularly, give data on radionuclide and water content and need further analysis with geologic and hydrologic data to determine their significance. Hydrologic work yields primarily aperture data, which with fracture geometry can be used to calculate directional permeabilities. Pressure measurements may provide one means of assessing fracture continuity. Finally, laboratory tests on large cores suggest considerable refinement in testing techniques may be needed before stress-aperture data can be extrapolated from laboratory to field

  14. Formulations and algorithms for problems on rock mass and support deformation during mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryakov, VM

    2018-03-01

    The analysis of problem formulations to calculate stress-strain state of mine support and surrounding rocks mass in rock mechanics shows that such formulations incompletely describe the mechanical features of joint deformation in the rock mass–support system. The present paper proposes an algorithm to take into account the actual conditions of rock mass and support interaction and the algorithm implementation method to ensure efficient calculation of stresses in rocks and support.

  15. Lithophysal Rock Mass Mechanical Properties of the Repository Host Horizon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Rigby

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop estimates of key mechanical properties for the lithophysal rock masses of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) within the repository host horizon, including their uncertainties and spatial variability. The mechanical properties to be characterized include an elastic parameter, Young's modulus, and a strength parameter, uniaxial compressive strength. Since lithophysal porosity is used as a surrogate property to develop the distributions of the mechanical properties, an estimate of the distribution of lithophysal porosity is also developed. The resulting characterizations of rock parameters are important for supporting the subsurface design, developing the preclosure safety analysis, and assessing the postclosure performance of the repository (e.g., drift degradation and modeling of rockfall impacts on engineered barrier system components)

  16. Buffer mass test - Rock drilling and civil engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1982-09-01

    The buffer mass test (BMT) is being run in the former 'ventilation drift' in which a number of rock investigations were previously conducted. A number of vertical pilot holes were drilled from the tunnel floor to get information of the water inflow in possible heater hole position. The final decision of the location of the heater holes was then made, the main principle being that much water should be available in each hole with the possible exception of one of the holes. Thereafter, the diameter 0.76 m heater holes were drilled to a depth of 3-3.3 m. Additional holes were then drilled for rock anchoring of the lids of the four outer heater holes, for the rock mechanical investigation, as well as for a number of water pressure gauges. The inner, about 12 m long part of the tunnel, was separated from the outer by bulwark. The purpose of this construction was to confine a backfill, the requirements of the bulwark being to withstand the swelling pressure as well as the water pressure. Outside the bulwark an approximately 1.5-1.7 m thick concrete slab was cast on the tunnel floor, extending about 24.7 m from the bulwark. Boxing-outs with the same height as the slab and with the horizontal dimensions 1.8 x 1.8 m, were made and rock-anchored concrete lids were cast on top of them after backfilling. The slab which thus represents 'rock', also forms a basal support of the bulwark. The lids permits access to the backfill as well as to the underlying, highly compacted bentonite for rapid direct determination of the water distributin at the intended successive test stops. The construction of the slab and lids will be described in this report. (Author)

  17. Classification of mammographic masses using geometric symmetry and fractal analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Qi; Ruiz, V.F. [Cybernetics, School of Systems Engineering, Univ. of Reading (United Kingdom); Shao Jiaqing [Dept. of Electronics, Univ. of Kent (United Kingdom); Guo Falei [WanDe Industrial Engineering Co. (China)

    2007-06-15

    In this paper, we propose a fuzzy symmetry measure based on geometrical operations to characterise shape irregularity of mammographic mass lesion. Group theory, a powerful tool in the investigation of geometric transformation, is employed in our work to define and describe the underlying mathematical relations. We investigate the usefulness of fuzzy symmetry measure in combination with fractal analysis for classification of masses. Comparative studies show that fuzzy symmetry measure is useful for shape characterisation of mass lesions and is a good complementary feature for benign-versus-malignant classification of masses. (orig.)

  18. Rock images classification by using deep convolution neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guojian; Guo, Wenhui

    2017-08-01

    Granularity analysis is one of the most essential issues in authenticate under microscope. To improve the efficiency and accuracy of traditional manual work, an convolutional neural network based method is proposed for granularity analysis from thin section image, which chooses and extracts features from image samples while build classifier to recognize granularity of input image samples. 4800 samples from Ordos basin are used for experiments under colour spaces of HSV, YCbCr and RGB respectively. On the test dataset, the correct rate in RGB colour space is 98.5%, and it is believable in HSV and YCbCr colour space. The results show that the convolution neural network can classify the rock images with high reliability.

  19. Classification Identification of Acoustic Emission Signals from Underground Metal Mine Rock by ICIMF Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Zuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the drawback that fuzzy classifier was sensitive to noises and outliers, Mamdani fuzzy classifier based on improved chaos immune algorithm was developed, in which bilateral Gaussian membership function parameters were set as constraint conditions and the indexes of fuzzy classification effectiveness and number of correct samples of fuzzy classification as the subgoal of fitness function. Moreover, Iris database was used for simulation experiment, classification, and recognition of acoustic emission signals and interference signals from stope wall rock of underground metal mines. The results showed that Mamdani fuzzy classifier based on improved chaos immune algorithm could effectively improve the prediction accuracy of classification of data sets with noises and outliers and the classification accuracy of acoustic emission signal and interference signal from stope wall rock of underground metal mines was 90.00%. It was obvious that the improved chaos immune Mamdani fuzzy (ICIMF classifier was useful for accurate diagnosis of acoustic emission signal and interference signal from stope wall rock of underground metal mines.

  20. Macroscopic Rock Texture Image Classification Using a Hierarchical Neuro-Fuzzy Class Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laercio B. Gonçalves

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We used a Hierarchical Neuro-Fuzzy Class Method based on binary space partitioning (NFHB-Class Method for macroscopic rock texture classification. The relevance of this study is in helping Geologists in the diagnosis and planning of oil reservoir exploration. The proposed method is capable of generating its own decision structure, with automatic extraction of fuzzy rules. These rules are linguistically interpretable, thus explaining the obtained data structure. The presented image classification for macroscopic rocks is based on texture descriptors, such as spatial variation coefficient, Hurst coefficient, entropy, and cooccurrence matrix. Four rock classes have been evaluated by the NFHB-Class Method: gneiss (two subclasses, basalt (four subclasses, diabase (five subclasses, and rhyolite (five subclasses. These four rock classes are of great interest in the evaluation of oil boreholes, which is considered a complex task by geologists. We present a computer method to solve this problem. In order to evaluate system performance, we used 50 RGB images for each rock classes and subclasses, thus producing a total of 800 images. For all rock classes, the NFHB-Class Method achieved a percentage of correct hits over 73%. The proposed method converged for all tests presented in the case study.

  1. Normal dynamic deformation characteristics of non-consecutive jointed rock masses under impact loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Sheng; Jiang, Bowei; Sun, Bing

    2017-08-01

    In order to study deformation characteristics of non-consecutive single jointed rock masses under impact loads, we used the cement mortar materials to make simulative jointed rock mass samples, and tested the samples under impact loads by the drop hammer. Through analyzing the time-history signal of the force and the displacement, first we find that the dynamic compression displacement of the jointed rock mass is significantly larger than that of the intact jointless rock mass, the compression displacement is positively correlated with the joint length and the impact height. Secondly, the vertical compressive displacement of the jointed rock mass is mainly due to the closure of opening joints under small impact loads. Finally, the peak intensity of the intact rock mass is larger than that of the non-consecutive jointed rock mass and negatively correlated with the joint length under the same impact energy.

  2. Gravity-induced rock mass damage related to large en masse rockslides: Evidence from Vajont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paronuzzi, Paolo; Bolla, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    The Vajont landslide is a well-known, reservoir-induced slope failure that occurred on 9 October 1963 and was characterized by an 'en masse' sliding motion that triggered various large waves, determining catastrophic consequences for the nearby territory and adjacent villages. During the Vajont dam construction, and especially after the disaster, some researchers identified widespread field evidence of heavy rock mass damage involving the presumed prehistoric rockslide and/or the 1963 failed mass. This paper describes evidence of heavy gravitational damage, including (i) folding, (ii) fracturing, (iii) faulting, and (iv) intact rock disintegration. The gravity-induced rock mass damage (GRMD) characterizes the remnants of the basal shear zone, still resting on the large detachment surface, and the 1963 failed rock mass. The comprehensive geological study of the 1963 Vajont landslide, based on the recently performed geomechanical survey (2006-present) and on the critical analysis of the past photographic documentation (1959-1964), allows us to recognize that most GRMD evidence is related to the prehistoric multistage Mt. Toc rockslide. The 1963 catastrophic en masse remobilization induced an increase to the prehistoric damage, reworking preexisting structures and creating additional gravity-driven features (folds, fractures, faults, and rock fragmentation). The gravity-induced damage was formed during the slope instability phases that preceded the collapse (static or quasi-static GRMD) and also as a consequence of the sliding motion and of the devastating impact between the failed blocks (dynamic GRMD). Gravitational damage originated various types of small drag folds such as flexures, concentric folds, chevron, and kink-box folds, all having a radius of 1-5 m. Large buckle folds (radius of 10-50 m) are related to the dynamic damage and were formed during the en masse motion as a consequence of deceleration and impact processes that involved the sliding mass. Prior

  3. Deep learning for tumor classification in imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrmann, Jens; Etmann, Christian; Boskamp, Tobias; Casadonte, Rita; Kriegsmann, Jörg; Maaß, Peter

    2018-04-01

    Tumor classification using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) data has a high potential for future applications in pathology. Due to the complexity and size of the data, automated feature extraction and classification steps are required to fully process the data. Since mass spectra exhibit certain structural similarities to image data, deep learning may offer a promising strategy for classification of IMS data as it has been successfully applied to image classification. Methodologically, we propose an adapted architecture based on deep convolutional networks to handle the characteristics of mass spectrometry data, as well as a strategy to interpret the learned model in the spectral domain based on a sensitivity analysis. The proposed methods are evaluated on two algorithmically challenging tumor classification tasks and compared to a baseline approach. Competitiveness of the proposed methods is shown on both tasks by studying the performance via cross-validation. Moreover, the learned models are analyzed by the proposed sensitivity analysis revealing biologically plausible effects as well as confounding factors of the considered tasks. Thus, this study may serve as a starting point for further development of deep learning approaches in IMS classification tasks. https://gitlab.informatik.uni-bremen.de/digipath/Deep_Learning_for_Tumor_Classification_in_IMS. jbehrmann@uni-bremen.de or christianetmann@uni-bremen.de. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  4. Rock mass deformation properties of closely jointed basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.; Cramer, M.L.

    1982-12-01

    The deformational behavior of the Columbia River basalt is being investigated as part of a comprehensive site characterization program intended to determine the feasibility of constructing a nuclear waste repository in basalt at Hanford, Washington. Direct field measurements were conducted in a 2-m cube of basalt to obtain truly representative rock mass deformation properties. Load was applied to the test block in three orthogonal directions through the use of flat jacks in two perpendicular planes and a cable anchor system in the third. This configuration allowed the block to be placed in a simulated triaxial stress state at stress levels up to 12.5 MPa. The deformation at the center of the test block was monitored through the use of an optical measurement system developed for this project. The results indicate that the vertically oriented columnar joints have a significant influence on the deformation behavior of the basalt. The modulus in the direction parallel to the column axis was approx. 30 GPa, while the modulus value perpendicular to the columns was approx. 20 GPa. Laboratory measurements of intact specimens taken from this area yielded a value of 80 GPa with no indication of anisotropy. Hysteresis was observed in all loading cycles, but was distinctly more pronounced perpendicular to the column axis, indicative of significant joint displacement in this direction. The results of this test represent the first true rock mass modulus data obtained in closely jointed rock on a large scale. These measurement methods have eliminated many of the ambiguities associated with borehole jacking and surface measurement techniques

  5. Mass transport in low permeability rocks under the influence of coupled thermomechanical and hydrochemical effects - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, C.F.

    1984-10-01

    The present paper gives a general overview of mass transport in low permeability rocks under the coupled thermomechanical and hydrochemical effects associated with a nuclear waste repository. A classification of coupled processes is given. Then an ess is presented. example of a coupled process is presented. Discussions of coupled processes based on a recent LBL Panel meeting are summarized. 5 references, 3 figures, 4 tables

  6. Structural Analysis: Folds Classification of metasedimentary rock in the Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsuddin, A.

    2017-10-01

    Understanding shear zone characteristics of deformation are a crucial part in the oil and gas industry as it might increase the knowledge of the fracture characteristics and lead to the prediction of the location of fracture zones or fracture swarms. This zone might give high influence on reservoir performance. There are four general types of shear zones which are brittle, ductile, semibrittle and brittle-ductile transition zones. The objective of this study is to study and observe the structural geometry of the shear zones and its implication as there is a lack of understanding, especially in the subsurface area because of the limitation of seismic resolution. A field study was conducted on the metasedimentary rocks (shear zone) which are exposed along the coastal part of the Peninsular Malaysia as this type of rock resembles the types of rock in the subsurface. The analysis in this area shows three main types of rock which are non-foliated metaquartzite and foliated rock which can be divided into slate and phyllite. Two different fold classification can be determined in this study. Layer 1 with phyllite as the main type of rock can be classified in class 1C and layer 2 with slate as the main type of rock can be classified in class 1A. This study will benefit in predicting the characteristics of the fracture and fracture zones.

  7. Use of border information in the classification of mammographic masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varela, C; Timp, S; Karssemeijer, N

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a new method to characterize the margin of a mammographic mass lesion to improve the classification of benign and malignant masses. Towards this goal, we designed features that measure the degree of sharpness and microlobulation of mass margins. We calculated these features in a border region of the mass defined as a thin band along the mass contour. The importance of these features in the classification of benign and malignant masses was studied in relation to existing features used for mammographic mass detection. Features were divided into three groups, each representing a different mass segment: the interior region of a mass, the border and the outer area. The interior and the outer area of a mass were characterized using contrast and spiculation measures. Classification was done in two steps. First, features representing each of the three mass segments were merged into a neural network classifier resulting in a single regional classification score for each segment. Secondly, a classifier combined the three single scores into a final output to discriminate between benign and malignant lesions. We compared the classification performance of each regional classifier and the combined classifier on a data set of 1076 biopsy proved masses (590 malignant and 486 benign) from 481 women included in the Digital Database for Screening Mammography. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the classifiers. The area under the ROC curve (A z ) was 0.69 for the interior mass segment, 0.76 for the border segment and 0.75 for the outer mass segment. The performance of the combined classifier was 0.81 for image-based and 0.83 for case-based evaluation. These results show that the combination of information from different mass segments is an effective approach for computer-aided characterization of mammographic masses. An advantage of this approach is that it allows the assessment of the contribution of regions rather

  8. The Possibilities of Using the Terrestrial Scanning Data for Classification of Rocks in Limestone Mine “Czatkowice”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toś Cezary

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of a research of potential utilisation of the intensity of laser beam reflection recorded by ground-based lasers, for an initial classification of rock formations within the Czatkowice Limestone Quarry. As part of the research, spectrometric analysis in visible (VIS, near-infrared (NIR and Short-wavelength infrared (SWIR bands was carried out for rock samples typical for the Czatkowice Quarry. Moreover, the rock samples were scanned using equipment working within different wavelengths. The reflected intensity of the laser beam recorded for each rock sample with several different scanners were analysed to assess their potential use for rock classification. The results of this analysis were then compared with spectral curves of each sample. The relationship between the intensity of the laser beam reflection and the spectral curves can be used for selection of most suitable scanner for rock classification.

  9. Analysis of steranes and triterpanes in geolipid extracts by automatic classification of mass spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardroper, A. M. K.; Brooks, P. W.; Humberston, M. J.; Maxwell, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A computer method is described for the automatic classification of triterpanes and steranes into gross structural type from their mass spectral characteristics. The method has been applied to the spectra obtained by gas-chromatographic/mass-spectroscopic analysis of two mixtures of standards and of hydrocarbon fractions isolated from Green River and Messel oil shales. Almost all of the steranes and triterpanes identified previously in both shales were classified, in addition to a number of new components. The results indicate that classification of such alkanes is possible with a laboratory computer system. The method has application to diagenesis and maturation studies as well as to oil/oil and oil/source rock correlations in which rapid screening of large numbers of samples is required.

  10. Rock mass seismic imaging around the ONKALO tunnel, Olkiluoto 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosma, C.; Cozma, M.; Balu, L.; Enescu, N.

    2008-11-01

    Posiva Oy prepares for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in bedrock focusing in Olkiluoto, Eurajoki. This is in accordance of the application filed in 1999, the Decision-in-Principle of the State Council in 2000, and ratification by the Parliament in 2001. Vibrometric Oy has performed a tunnel seismic survey in ONKALO access tunnel on a 100 m line in December 2007. Tunnel length (chainage) was 1720 - 1820 m (vertical depth 170 - 180 m). Measurement applied 120 source positions at 1 m spacing, and on the both ends at 4 m spacing. Electromechanical Vibsist-20 tool was used as the source. Hammer produced 15.36 s sweeps. Signal was recorded with 2-component geophone assemblies, installed in 400 mm long, 45 mm drillholes in the tunnel wall. Sweeps were recorded with Summit II seismograph and decoded to seismic traces. Also percussion drill rig, which is used in drilling the blasting holes in tunnel excavation, was tested from a 100-m distance as a seismic source. Signal is equally good as from actual seismic source, and may be applied later on for production. Obtained seismic results were processed with tomographic reconstruction of the first arrivals to P and S wave refraction tomograms, and to tomograms of Young's modulus and Shear Modulus. The obtained values correspond the typical levels known from Olkiluoto. There are indications of lower velocity near tunnel wall, but resolution is not adequate for further interpretation. Some variation of velocity is detected in the rock mass. Seismic data was also processed with normal reflection profile interpretation and migrated. As a result there was obtained reflection images to a 100-m distance from the tunnel. Several reflecting events were observed in the rock mass. Features making an angle of 30 deg or more with tunnel axis can be imaged from distances of tens of metres. Vertical fractures perpendicular to tunnel can be imaged only near the tunnel. Gently dipping features can be imaged below and above. Images are 2D, i

  11. In silico prediction of ROCK II inhibitors by different classification approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chuipu; Wu, Qihui; Luo, Yunxia; Ma, Huili; Shen, Jiangang; Zhang, Yongbin; Yang, Lei; Chen, Yunbo; Wen, Zehuai; Wang, Qi

    2017-11-01

    ROCK II is an important pharmacological target linked to central nervous system disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this research is to generate ROCK II inhibitor prediction models by machine learning approaches. Firstly, four sets of descriptors were calculated with MOE 2010 and PaDEL-Descriptor, and optimized by F-score and linear forward selection methods. In addition, four classification algorithms were used to initially build 16 classifiers with k-nearest neighbors [Formula: see text], naïve Bayes, Random forest, and support vector machine. Furthermore, three sets of structural fingerprint descriptors were introduced to enhance the predictive capacity of classifiers, which were assessed with fivefold cross-validation, test set validation and external test set validation. The best two models, MFK + MACCS and MLR + SubFP, have both MCC values of 0.925 for external test set. After that, a privileged substructure analysis was performed to reveal common chemical features of ROCK II inhibitors. Finally, binding modes were analyzed to identify relationships between molecular descriptors and activity, while main interactions were revealed by comparing the docking interaction of the most potent and the weakest ROCK II inhibitors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on ROCK II inhibitors utilizing machine learning approaches that provides a new method for discovering novel ROCK II inhibitors.

  12. Stability evaluation considering the scattering of the physical properties of rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Shin, Koichi

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this research is to establish the rational design method which could be evaluated the influence of the scattering of mechanical properties on the stability of the foundation ground of Nuclear Power Plant and surrounding slope. For this purpose, investigation on the actual scattering state of mechanical properties of rock and rock masses, and the stability estimations by the probabilistic method are conducted in this report, and following results are obtained. (1) The actual distribution of scattering of mechanical properties could describe in the probabilistic models of Weibull and Gamma distribution most accurately. The Normal distribution model could also do almostly. The coefficients of variation are so large in the range of 0.4 - 0.8, the remarkable tendency of them among the kinds of mechanical Properties and among the rock classification are not recognized. (2) It is found that the stability estimation considering the scattering of mechanical properties can be sufficiently conducted by using the conventional deterministic method, and the results of deterministic method using the average value of scattering need not be reduce in proportional to the degree of scattering of mechanical properties. (3) Based on these results, new rational design method and procedure, which could be evaluated the scattering of mechanical properties of ground material, is proposed. (author)

  13. Computerized classification of mass lesions in digital mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giger, M.L.; Doi, K.; Yin, F.F.; Schmidt, R.A.; Vyborny, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    Subjective classification of masses on mammograms is a difficult task. On average, about 25% of masses referred for surgical biopsy are actually malignant. The authors are developing, as an aid to radiologists, a computerized scheme for the classification of lesions in mammograms to reduce the false-negative and false-positive diagnoses of malignancies. The classification scheme involves the extraction of border information from the mammographic lesion in order to quantify the degree of spiculation, which is related to the possibility of malignancy. Clinical film mammograms are digitized with an optical drum scanner (0.1-mm pixel size) for analysis on a Micro VAX 3500 computer. Border information (fluctuations) is obtained from the difference between the lesion border and its smoothed border. Using the rms variation of the frequency content of these fluctuations, approximately 85% of the cancerous lesions were correctly classified as malignant, while 15% of benign lesions were misclassified, in a preliminary study

  14. Classification of debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers in the Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Jason R.; Bellisario, Antonio C.; Ferrando, Francisco A.

    2015-07-01

    In the Dry Andes of Chile (17 to 35° S), debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers are differentiated from true glaciers based on the percentage of surface debris cover, thickness of surface debris, and ice content. Internal ice is preserved by an insulating cover of thick debris, which acts as a storage reservoir to release water during the summer and early fall. These landforms are more numerous than glaciers in the central Andes; however, the existing legislation only recognizes uncovered or semicovered glaciers as a water resource. Glaciers, debris-covered glaciers, and rock glaciers are being altered or removed by mining operations to extract valuable minerals from the mountains. In addition, agricultural expansion and population growth in this region have placed additional demands on water resources. In a warmer climate, as glaciers recede and seasonal water availability becomes condensed over the course of a snowmelt season, rock glaciers and debris-covered glaciers contribute a larger component of base flow to rivers and streams. As a result, identifying and locating these features to implement sustainable regional planning for water resources is important. The objective of this study is to develop a classification system to identify debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers based on the interpretation of satellite imagery and aerial photographs. The classification system is linked to field observations and measurements of ice content. Debris-covered glaciers have three subclasses: surface coverage of semi (class 1) and fully covered (class 2) glaciers differentiates the first two forms, whereas debris thickness is critical for class 3 when glaciers become buried with more than 3 m of surface debris. Based on field observations, the amount of ice decreases from more than 85%, to 65-85%, to 45-65% for semi, fully, and buried debris-covered glaciers, respectively. Rock glaciers are characterized by three stages. Class 4 rock glaciers have pronounced

  15. Experimental Characterization of Stress- and Strain-Dependent Stiffness in Grouted Rock Masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Won; Chong, Song-Hun; Cho, Gye-Chun

    2018-03-29

    Grouting of fractured rock mass prior to excavation results in grout-filled discontinuities that govern the deformation characteristics of a site. The influence of joint characteristics on the properties of grouted rocks is important in assessing the effects of grouting on jointed rock mass. However, grouting remains a predominantly empirical practice and the effects of grouting on rock joint behavior and material properties have yet to be accurately assessed. Granular materials, including jointed rocks, typically display nonlinear strain-dependent responses that can be characterized by the shear modulus degradation curve. In this study, the effects of grouting on the strain-dependent shear stiffness of jointed rock mass were investigated at the small-strain (below 10 -5 ) and mid-strain (10 -5 to 10 -3 ) ranges using the quasi-static resonant column test and rock mass dynamic test devices. The effects of curing time, axial stress, initial joint roughness, and grouted joint thickness were examined. The results show that (1) grouting of rock joints leads to decreased stress sensitivity and increased small-strain shear stiffness for all tested samples; (2) the grouted rock samples display similar modulus degradation characteristics as the applied grout material; (3) the initial joint roughness determines the stress-dependent behaviors and general stiffness range of the jointed and grouted rocks, but the strain-dependent behaviors are dependent on the properties of the grout material; (4) increased grouted joint thickness results in larger contribution of the grout properties in the overall grouted rock mass.

  16. Dynamic stability and failure modes of slopes in discontinuous rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Aydan, O.; Ichikawa, Yasuaki; Kawamoto, Toshikazu.

    1988-01-01

    The stability of rock slopes during earthquakes are of great concern in rock engineering works such as highway, dam, and nuclear power station constructions. As rock mass in nature is usually discontinuous, the stability of rock slopes will be geverned by the spatial distribution of discontinuities in relation with the geometry of slope and their mechanical properties rather than the rock element. The authors have carried out some model tests on discontinuous rock slopes using three different model tests techniques in order to investigate the dynamic behaviour and failure modes of the slopes in discontinuous rock mass. This paper describes the findings and observations made on model rock slopes with various discontinuity patterns and slope geometry. In addition some stability criterions are developed and the calculated results are compared with those of experiments. (author)

  17. Classification of masses on mammograms using support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yong; Li, Lihua; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Qui, Yan; Clark, Robert A.

    2003-05-01

    Mammography is the most effective method for early detection of breast cancer. However, the positive predictive value for classification of malignant and benign lesion from mammographic images is not very high. Clinical studies have shown that most biopsies for cancer are very low, between 15% and 30%. It is important to increase the diagnostic accuracy by improving the positive predictive value to reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies. In this paper, a new classification method was proposed to distinguish malignant from benign masses in mammography by Support Vector Machine (SVM) method. Thirteen features were selected based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of classification using individual feature. These features include four shape features, two gradient features and seven Laws features. With these features, SVM was used to classify the masses into two categories, benign and malignant, in which a Gaussian kernel and sequential minimal optimization learning technique are performed. The data set used in this study consists of 193 cases, in which there are 96 benign cases and 97 malignant cases. The leave-one-out evaluation of SVM classifier was taken. The results show that the positive predict value of the presented method is 81.6% with the sensitivity of 83.7% and the false-positive rate of 30.2%. It demonstrated that the SVM-based classifier is effective in mass classification.

  18. Rock mass mechanical property estimation strategy for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M.; Brechtel, C.E.; Hardy, M.P.; Bauer, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a method of estimating the rock mass properties for the welded and nonwelded tuffs based on currently available information on intact rock and joint characteristics at the Yucca Mountain site. Variability of the expected ground conditions at the potential repository horizon (the TSw2 thermomechanical unit) and in the Calico Hills nonwelded tuffs is accommodated by defining five rock mass quality categories in each unit based upon assumed and observed distributions of the data

  19. THE EFFECT OF FISSURES IN DOLOMITE ROCK MASS ON BLASTING PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Božić

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Rock fractures in the form of fissures are one of more important geological features of a tectonic system. They have an effect on mechanical behaviour of rook masses exposed to the actions of surface forces. For exploitation in dolomite quarries carried out by blasting of deep shot holes it is important to know the system of fissures within a rock mass for the rock brakes along already weakened planes (the paper is published in Croatian.

  20. Stress–strain state of adjacent rock mass under slice mining of steeply dipping ore bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshnikov, VD; Gakhova, LN

    2018-03-01

    Under analysis is the stress state of rock mass surrounding stopes in the initial cutting layer displaced in plan relative to the above-lying extracted layer in the overcut rock mass. The authors determine the boundaries of the post-limiting deformation zones during stoping advance using the Mohr–Coulomb criterion. The sequence of stoping to ensure better support conditions is proposed.

  1. Time-Dependent Damage Investigation of Rock Mass in an In Situ Experimental Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Quan; Cui, Jie; Chen, Jing

    2012-01-01

    In underground tunnels or caverns, time-dependent deformation or failure of rock mass, such as extending cracks, gradual rock falls, etc., are a costly irritant and a major safety concern if the time-dependent damage of surrounding rock is serious. To understand the damage evolution of rock mass in underground engineering, an in situ experimental testing was carried out in a large belowground tunnel with a scale of 28.5 m in width, 21 m in height and 352 m in length. The time-dependent damage of rock mass was detected in succession by an ultrasonic wave test after excavation. The testing results showed that the time-dependent damage of rock mass could last a long time, i.e., nearly 30 days. Regression analysis of damage factors defined by wave velocity, resulted in the time-dependent evolutional damage equation of rock mass, which corresponded with logarithmic format. A damage viscoelastic-plastic model was developed to describe the exposed time-dependent deterioration of rock mass by field test, such as convergence of time-dependent damage, deterioration of elastic modules and logarithmic format of damage factor. Furthermore, the remedial measures for damaged surrounding rock were discussed based on the measured results and the conception of damage compensation, which provides new clues for underground engineering design.

  2. The effective stress concept in a jointed rock mass. A literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Roger

    1997-04-01

    The effective stress concept was defined by Terzaghi in 1923 and was introduced 1936 in a conference at Harvard University. The concept has under a long time been used in soil mechanics to analyse deformations and strength in soils. The effective stress σ' is equal to the total stress σ minus the pore pressure u (σ'=σ-u). The concepts's validity in a jointed rock mass has been investigated by few authors. A literature review of the area has examined many areas to create an overview of the use of the concept. Many rock mechanics and rock engineering books recommend that the expression introduced by Terzaghi is suitable for practical purpose in rock. Nevertheless, it is not really clear if they mean rock or rock mass. Within other areas such as porous rocks, mechanical compressive tests on rock joints and determination of the permeability, a slightly changed expression is used, which reduces the acting pore pressure (σ'=σ-α·u). The α factor can vary between 0 and 1 and is defined differently for different areas. Under assumption that the pore system of the rock mass is sufficiently interconnected, the most relevant expression for a jointed rock mass, that for low effective stresses should the Terzagi's original expression with α=1 be used. But for high normal stresses should α=0.9 be used

  3. I. Some results from a field investigation of thermo-mechanical loading of a rock mass when heaters are emplaced in the rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hood, M.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented of a field experiment to monitor the response of a rock mass to thermomechanical loading from electrically heated canisters emplaced in the rock at a depth of 340 m. Measurements made to date of temperature, displacement, and stress fields indicate that heat is transferred through the rock mainly by conduction; discontinuities within the rock mass have a minimal effect on the heat flow. Displacements within the rock from thermal expansion are shown to be much less than those predicted by linear thermoelastic theory. A plausible, though not complete, reason for these reduced displacements is the absorption of the initial rock expansions into discontinuities within the rock mass. Difficulties have been experienced in obtaining reliable stress measurement data using borehole deformation gauges to monitor changes in rock stress. Some data have been obtained and are being analyzed. Rock decrepitation in the heater boreholes is discussed

  4. Empirical Assessment of the Mean Block Volume of Rock Masses Intersected by Four Joint Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Gian Luca

    2016-05-01

    The estimation of a representative value for the rock block volume ( V b) is of huge interest in rock engineering in regards to rock mass characterization purposes. However, while mathematical relationships to precisely estimate this parameter from the spacing of joints can be found in literature for rock masses intersected by three dominant joint sets, corresponding relationships do not actually exist when more than three sets occur. In these cases, a consistent assessment of V b can only be achieved by directly measuring the dimensions of several representative natural rock blocks in the field or by means of more sophisticated 3D numerical modeling approaches. However, Palmström's empirical relationship based on the volumetric joint count J v and on a block shape factor β is commonly used in the practice, although strictly valid only for rock masses intersected by three joint sets. Starting from these considerations, the present paper is primarily intended to investigate the reliability of a set of empirical relationships linking the block volume with the indexes most commonly used to characterize the degree of jointing in a rock mass (i.e. the J v and the mean value of the joint set spacings) specifically applicable to rock masses intersected by four sets of persistent discontinuities. Based on the analysis of artificial 3D block assemblies generated using the software AutoCAD, the most accurate best-fit regression has been found between the mean block volume (V_{{{{b}}_{{m}} }}) of tested rock mass samples and the geometric mean value of the spacings of the joint sets delimiting blocks; thus, indicating this mean value as a promising parameter for the preliminary characterization of the block size. Tests on field outcrops have demonstrated that the proposed empirical methodology has the potential of predicting the mean block volume of multiple-set jointed rock masses with an acceptable accuracy for common uses in most practical rock engineering applications.

  5. Study on flow and mass transport through fractured soft sedimentary rocks (Contact research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimo, Michito; Kumamoto, Sou; Maekawa, Keisuke

    2007-03-01

    It is important for safety assessment of HLW geological disposal to evaluate groundwater flow and mass transport in deep underground accurately. Though it is considered that the mass transport in sedimentary rock occurs in pores between grains mainly, fractures of sedimentary rock can be main paths. The objective of this study is to establish a conceptual model for flow and mass transport in fractured soft sedimentary rock. In previous study, a series of laboratory hydraulic and tracer tests and numerical analyses were carried out using sedimentary rock specimens obtained from Koetoi and Wakkanai formation. Single natural fractured cores and rock block specimen were used for the tests and analyses. The results indicated that the matrix diffusion played an important role for mass transport in the fractured soft sedimentary rocks. In this study, the following two tasks were carried out: (1) laboratory hydraulic and tracer experiments of rock cores of Koetoi and Wakkanai formation obtained at HDB-9, HDB-10 and HDB-11 boreholes and a rock block specimen, Wakkanai formation, obtained at an outcrop in the Horonobe area, (2) a numerical study on the conceptual model of flow and mass transport through fractured soft sedimentary rocks. Non-sorbing tracer experiments using naturally fractured cores and rock block specimens were carried out. Pottasium iodide was used as a tracer. The obtained breakthrough curves were interpreted and fitted by using a numerical simulator, and mass transport parameters, such as longitudinal dispersivity, matrix diffusion coefficient, transport aperture, were obtained. Mass transport simulations using a fracture network model, a continuum model and a double porosity model were performed to study the applicability of continuum model and double porosity model for transport in fractured sedimentary rock. (author)

  6. Study of the method to estimate the hydraulic characteristics in rock masses by using elastic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsu, Kenta; Ohnishi, Yuzo; Nishiyama, Satoshi; Yano, Takao; Ando, Kenichi; Yoshimura, Kimitaka

    2008-01-01

    In the area of radioactive waste repository, estimating radionuclide migration through the rock mass is an important factor for assessment of the repository. The purpose of this study is to develop a method to estimate hydraulic characteristics of rock masses by using elastic wave velocity dispersion. This method is based on dynamics poroelastic relations such as Biot and BISQ theories. These theories indicate relations between velocity dispersion and hydraulic characteristics. In order to verify the validity of these theories in crystalline rocks, we performed laboratory experiments. The results of experiments show the dependency of elastic wave velocity on its frequency. To test the applicability of this method to real rock masses, we performed in-situ experiment for tuff rock masses. The results of in-situ experiment show the possibility as a practical method to estimate the hydraulic characteristics by using elastic wave velocity dispersion. (author)

  7. Comparison of laboratory, in situ, and rock mass measurements of the hydraulic conductivity of metamorphic rock at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine, I.W.

    1980-01-01

    In situ testing of exploratory wells in metamorphic rock indicates that two types of fracturing occur in the rock mass. Rock containing small openings that permit only extremely slow movement of water is termed virtually impermeable rock. Rock containing openings of sufficient size to permit transmission of water at a significantly faster rate is termed hydraulically transmissive rock. Laboratory methods are unsuitable for measuring hydraulic conductivity in hydraulically transmissive rock; however, for the virtually impermeable rock, values comparable to the in situ tests are obtained. The hydraulic conductivity of the rock mass over a large region is calculated by using the hydraulic gradient, porosity, and regional velocity. This velocity is determined by dividing the inferred travel distance by the age of water which is determined by the helium content of the water. This rock mass hydraulic conductivity value is between the values measured for the two types of fractures, but is closer to the measured value for the virtually impermeable rock. This relationship is attributed to the control of the regional flow rate by the virtually impermeable rock where the discrete fractures do not form a continuous open connection through the entire rock mass. Thus, laboratory methods of measuring permeability in metamorphic rock are of value if they are properly applied

  8. Impact of weathering on slope stability in soft rock mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Miščević

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Weathering of soft rocks is usually considered as an important factor in various fields such as geology, engineering geology, mineralogy, soil and rock mechanics, and geomorphology. The problem of stability over time should be considered for slopes excavated in soft rocks, in case they are not protected against weathering processes. In addition to disintegration of material on slope surface, the weathering also results in shear strength reduction in the interior of the slope. Principal processes in association with weathering are discussed with the examples of marl hosted on flysch formations near Split, Croatia.

  9. Study of the Rock Mass Failure Process and Mechanisms During the Transformation from Open-Pit to Underground Mining Based on Microseismic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Yang, Tianhong; Bohnhoff, Marco; Zhang, Penghai; Yu, Qinglei; Zhou, Jingren; Liu, Feiyue

    2018-05-01

    To quantitatively understand the failure process and failure mechanism of a rock mass during the transformation from open-pit mining to underground mining, the Shirengou Iron Mine was selected as an engineering project case study. The study area was determined using the rock mass basic quality classification method and the kinematic analysis method. Based on the analysis of the variations in apparent stress and apparent volume over time, the rock mass failure process was analyzed. According to the recent research on the temporal and spatial change of microseismic events in location, energy, apparent stress, and displacement, the migration characteristics of rock mass damage were studied. A hybrid moment tensor inversion method was used to determine the rock mass fracture source mechanisms, the fracture orientations, and fracture scales. The fracture area can be divided into three zones: Zone A, Zone B, and Zone C. A statistical analysis of the orientation information of the fracture planes orientations was carried out, and four dominant fracture planes were obtained. Finally, the slip tendency analysis method was employed, and the unstable fracture planes were obtained. The results show: (1) The microseismic monitoring and hybrid moment tensor analysis can effectively analyze the failure process and failure mechanism of rock mass, (2) during the transformation from open-pit to underground mining, the failure type of rock mass is mainly shear failure and the tensile failure is mostly concentrated in the roof of goafs, and (3) the rock mass of the pit bottom and the upper of goaf No. 18 have the possibility of further damage.

  10. Modelling Geomechanical Heterogeneity of Rock Masses Using Direct and Indirect Geostatistical Conditional Simulation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eivazy, Hesameddin; Esmaieli, Kamran; Jean, Raynald

    2017-12-01

    An accurate characterization and modelling of rock mass geomechanical heterogeneity can lead to more efficient mine planning and design. Using deterministic approaches and random field methods for modelling rock mass heterogeneity is known to be limited in simulating the spatial variation and spatial pattern of the geomechanical properties. Although the applications of geostatistical techniques have demonstrated improvements in modelling the heterogeneity of geomechanical properties, geostatistical estimation methods such as Kriging result in estimates of geomechanical variables that are not fully representative of field observations. This paper reports on the development of 3D models for spatial variability of rock mass geomechanical properties using geostatistical conditional simulation method based on sequential Gaussian simulation. A methodology to simulate the heterogeneity of rock mass quality based on the rock mass rating is proposed and applied to a large open-pit mine in Canada. Using geomechanical core logging data collected from the mine site, a direct and an indirect approach were used to model the spatial variability of rock mass quality. The results of the two modelling approaches were validated against collected field data. The study aims to quantify the risks of pit slope failure and provides a measure of uncertainties in spatial variability of rock mass properties in different areas of the pit.

  11. The influence of normal fault on initial state of stress in rock mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajduś Antoni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of original state of stress in rock mass is a very difficult task for rock mechanics. Yet, original state of stress in rock mass has fundamental influence on secondary state of stress, which occurs in the vicinity of mining headings. This, in turn, is the cause of the occurrence of a number of mining hazards, i.e., seismic events, rock bursts, gas and rock outbursts, falls of roof. From experience, it is known that original state of stress depends a lot on tectonic disturbances, i.e., faults and folds. In the area of faults, a great number of seismic events occur, often of high energies. These seismic events, in many cases, are the cause of rock bursts and damage to the constructions located inside the rock mass and on the surface of the ground. To estimate the influence of fault existence on the disturbance of original state of stress in rock mass, numerical calculations were done by means of Finite Element Method. In the calculations, it was tried to determine the influence of different factors on state of stress, which occurs in the vicinity of a normal fault, i.e., the influence of normal fault inclination, deformability of rock mass, values of friction coefficient on the fault contact. Critical value of friction coefficient was also determined, when mutual dislocation of rock mass part separated by a fault is impossible. The obtained results enabled formulation of a number of conclusions, which are important in the context of seismic events and rock bursts in the area of faults.

  12. The influence of normal fault on initial state of stress in rock mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajduś, Antoni; Cała, Marek; Tajduś, Krzysztof

    2016-03-01

    Determination of original state of stress in rock mass is a very difficult task for rock mechanics. Yet, original state of stress in rock mass has fundamental influence on secondary state of stress, which occurs in the vicinity of mining headings. This, in turn, is the cause of the occurrence of a number of mining hazards, i.e., seismic events, rock bursts, gas and rock outbursts, falls of roof. From experience, it is known that original state of stress depends a lot on tectonic disturbances, i.e., faults and folds. In the area of faults, a great number of seismic events occur, often of high energies. These seismic events, in many cases, are the cause of rock bursts and damage to the constructions located inside the rock mass and on the surface of the ground. To estimate the influence of fault existence on the disturbance of original state of stress in rock mass, numerical calculations were done by means of Finite Element Method. In the calculations, it was tried to determine the influence of different factors on state of stress, which occurs in the vicinity of a normal fault, i.e., the influence of normal fault inclination, deformability of rock mass, values of friction coefficient on the fault contact. Critical value of friction coefficient was also determined, when mutual dislocation of rock mass part separated by a fault is impossible. The obtained results enabled formulation of a number of conclusions, which are important in the context of seismic events and rock bursts in the area of faults.

  13. Prediction of tunnel boring machine performance using machine and rock mass data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dastgir, G.

    2012-01-01

    Performance of the tunnel boring machine and its prediction by different methods has been a hot issue since the first TBM came into being. For the sake of safe and sound transport, improvement of hydro-power, mining, civil and many other tunneling projects that cannot be driven efficiently and economically by conventional drill and blast, TBMs are quite frequently used. TBM parameters and rock mass properties, which heavily influence machine performance, should be estimated or known before choice of TBM-type and start of excavation. By applying linear regression analysis (SPSS19), fuzzy logic tools and a special Math-Lab code on actual field data collected from seven TBM driven tunnels (Hieflau expansion, Queen water tunnel, Vereina, Hemerwald, Maen, Pieve and Varzo tunnel), an attempt was made to provide prediction of rock mass class (RMC), rock fracture class (RFC), penetration rate (PR) and advance rate (AR). For detailed analysis of TBM performance, machine parameters (thrust, machine rpm, torque, power etc.), machine types and specification and rock mass properties (UCS, discontinuity in rock mass, RMC, RFC, RMR, etc.) were analyzed by 3-D surface plotting using statistical software R. Correlations between machine parameters and rock mass properties which effectively influence prediction models, are presented as well. In Hieflau expansion tunnel AR linearly decreases with increase of thrust due to high dependence of machine advance rate upon rock strength. For Hieflau expansion tunnel three types of data (TBM, rock mass and seismic data e.g. amplitude, pseudo velocity etc.) were coupled and simultaneously analyzed by plotting 3-D surfaces. No appreciable correlation between seismic data (Amplitude and Pseudo velocity) and rock mass properties and machine parameters could be found. Tool wear as a function of TBM operational parameters was analyzed which revealed that tool wear is minimum if applied thrust is moderate and that tool wear is high when thrust is

  14. Rock mass evaluation for predicting tunnel constructability in the preliminary investigation stage. Phenomena causing difficult tunneling and rockburst prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Koichi; Sawada, Masataka; Inohara, Yoshiki; Shidahara, Takumi; Hatano, Teruyoshi

    2011-01-01

    For the selection of the Detailed Investigation Areas for HLW disposal, predicting the tunnel constructability is one of the requirements together with assessing long-term safety. This report is the 1st of the three papers dealing with the evaluation of tunnel constructability. This paper deals with the geological factors relating to difficult tunneling such as squeezing, rockburst, and others. Also it deals with the prediction of rockburst. The 2nd paper will deal with the prediction of squeezing. The 3rd paper deals with the engineering characteristics of rock mass through rock mass classification. This paper about difficult tunneling has been based upon analysis of more than 500 tunneling reports about 280 tunnel constructions. The causes of difficult tunneling are related to (1) underground water, (2) mechanical properties of the rock, or (3) others such as gas. The geological factors for excessive water inflow are porous volcanic product of Quarternary, fault crush zone and hydrothermally altered zone of Green Tuff area, and degenerated mixed rock in accretionary complex. The geological factors for squeezing are solfataric clay at Quarternary volcanic zone, fault crush zone and hydrothermally altered zone of Green Tuff area, mudstone and fault crush zone of sedimentary rock of Neogene and later. Information useful for predicting rockburst has been gathered from previous reports. In the preliminary investigation stage, geological survey, geophysical survey and borehole survey from the surface are the source of information. Therefore rock type, P-wave velocity from seismic exploration and in-situ rock stress from hydrofracturing have been considered. Majority of rockburst events occurred at granitic rock, excluding coal mine where different kind of rockburst occurred at pillars. And P-wave velocity was around 5 km/s at the rock of rockburst events. Horizontal maximum and minimum stresses SH and Sh have been tested as a criterion for rockburst. It has been

  15. Experimental Characterization of Stress- and Strain-Dependent Stiffness in Grouted Rock Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Won Kim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Grouting of fractured rock mass prior to excavation results in grout-filled discontinuities that govern the deformation characteristics of a site. The influence of joint characteristics on the properties of grouted rocks is important in assessing the effects of grouting on jointed rock mass. However, grouting remains a predominantly empirical practice and the effects of grouting on rock joint behavior and material properties have yet to be accurately assessed. Granular materials, including jointed rocks, typically display nonlinear strain-dependent responses that can be characterized by the shear modulus degradation curve. In this study, the effects of grouting on the strain-dependent shear stiffness of jointed rock mass were investigated at the small-strain (below 10−5 and mid-strain (10−5 to 10−3 ranges using the quasi-static resonant column test and rock mass dynamic test devices. The effects of curing time, axial stress, initial joint roughness, and grouted joint thickness were examined. The results show that (1 grouting of rock joints leads to decreased stress sensitivity and increased small-strain shear stiffness for all tested samples; (2 the grouted rock samples display similar modulus degradation characteristics as the applied grout material; (3 the initial joint roughness determines the stress-dependent behaviors and general stiffness range of the jointed and grouted rocks, but the strain-dependent behaviors are dependent on the properties of the grout material; (4 increased grouted joint thickness results in larger contribution of the grout properties in the overall grouted rock mass.

  16. An experimental investigation of transient heat transfer in surrounding rock mass of high geothermal roadway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A self-designed experimental installation for transient heat transfer in the modelling surrounding rock mass of high geothermal roadways was elaborated in this paper. By utilizing the new installation, the temperature variation rules in surrounding rock mass of the high geothermal roadway during mechanical ventilation were studied. The results show that the roadway wall temperature decreases dramatically at the early stage of ventilation, and the temperature at every position of the surrounding rock mass is decreasing constantly with time passing by. From roadway wall to deep area, the temperature gradually increases until reaching original rock temperature. The relationship between dimensionless temperature and dimensionless radius demonstrates approximately exponential function. Meanwhile, the temperature disturbance range in the simulated surrounding rock mass extends gradually from the roadway wall to deep area in the surrounding rock mass. Besides, as the air velocity increases, heat loss in the surrounding rock mass rises and the ratio of temperature reduction becomes larger, the speed of disturbance range expansion also gets faster.

  17. Geo-Engineering Evaluation of Rock Masses for Crushed Rock and Cut Stones in Khartoum State, Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirelseed, E. E.; Ming, T. H.; Abdalla, S. B.

    The purpose of this study is to find artificial coarse aggregates and cut stones around Khartoum. To meat the objectives of the study, data from both field and laboratory are collected. The field data includes geological investigations based on different methods and samples collection, whereas the laboratory tests consists of specific gravity, water absorption, impact value, crushing value, Los Angeles abrasion, soundness tests. The field and laboratory results were weighed and compiled together to reveal the engineering performance of the different rock masses in term of cut stone and crushed aggregates. The results show that most of the examined rock masses are suitable for crushing, building and dressed stones. For decorative slabs only foliated granite and syenite masses can be used.

  18. Relative Dating and Classification of Minerals and Rocks Based on Statistical Calculations Related to Their Potential Energy Index

    OpenAIRE

    Labushev, Mikhail M.; Khokhlov, Alexander N.

    2012-01-01

    Index of proportionality of atomic weights of chemical elements is proposed for determining the relative age of minerals and rocks. Their chemical analysis results serve to be initial data for calculations. For rocks of different composition the index is considered to be classification value as well. Crystal lattice energy change in minerals and their associations can be measured by the index value change, thus contributing to the solution of important practical problems. There was determined...

  19. Rock mass modification around a nuclear waste repository in welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, M.G.; Brandshaug, T.; Brady, B.H.

    1989-08-01

    This report presents the results of numerical analyses to estimate the extent of rock mass modification resulting from the presence of a High Level Waste (HLW) repository. Changes in rock mass considered are stresses and joint deformations resulting from disposal room excavation and thermal efffects induced by the heat generated by nuclear waste. rock properties and site conditions are taken from the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design Report for the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Analyses were conducted using boundary element and distinct element methods. Room-scale models and repository-scale models were investigated for up to 500 years after waste emplacement. Results of room-scale analyses based on the thermoelastic boundary element model indicate that a zone of modified rock develops around the disposal rooms for both vertical and horizontal waste emplacement. This zone is estimated to extend a distance of roughly two room diameters from the room surface. Results from the repository-scale model, which are based on the thermoelastic boundary element model and the distinct element model, indicate a zone with modified rock mass properties starting approximately 100 m above and below the repository, with a thickness of approximately 200 m above and 150 m below the repository. Slip-prone subhorizontal features are shown to have a substantial effect on rock mass response. The estimates of rock mass modification reflect uncertainties and simplifying assumptions in the models. 32 refs., 57 figs., 1 tab

  20. Quantitative determination of minor and trace elements in rocks and soils by spark source mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ure, A.M.; Bacon, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental details are given of the quantitative determination of minor and trace elements in rocks and soils by spark source mass spectrometry. The effects of interfering species, and corrections that can be applied, are discussed. (U.K.)

  1. Study on structural plane characteristics of deep rock mass based on acoustic borehole TV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiyong; Su Rui; Chen Liang; Tian Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Deep rock mass structural plane characteristics are one of the basic data for evaluating the quality of rock mass. Based on acoustic borehole TV, the structural plane quantity, density, attitude, dominant set, structural plane aperture of deep rock mass in boreholes BS15 # and BS16 # located in Beishan granite rock mass of Gansu Province have been calculated and compared with the results of geological documentation of drill core. The results indicate that acoustic borehole TV has the effect in study on characteristics of structural plane. But as a kind of technique of geophysical logging, the acoustic borehole TV has certain defect, and need to combine with the analysis of the other geological materials in applications. (authors)

  2. Characterization of deep-seated rock masses by means of borehole investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    Swedish State Power Board. The main objective of the programme was to test a method of measuring in-situ rock stresses in the deep, water-filled boreholes and to correlate measured rock stresses with the hydraulic and geological properties of the rock mass. The investigations consist of the following activities: - Coredrillin of two main boreholes with a depth of 500 m and 250 m respectively. - Rock stress measurements at 11 and 9 main levels in the boreholes respectively. At each level at least 3 complete measurements were made. - Logging of the cores with respect to rock type, fractures and fracture characteristics. - Water injection tests in the boreholes. The rock mass investigated is composed of a gneiss granite of Svecocarelian age (1500 Ma), with inclusions of younger pegmatites and greenstones of variable ages. The fracture density is as a mean 2 fractures per meter with a marked decrease in frequency with increased depth. The fractures are generally coated with calcite and chlorite as the dominating coating minerals. For the rock stress measurements, the method of Leeman and Hayes was chosen. The result show that there is a very high stress level in the rock mass, recordings of about 70 MPa were taken below a horizontal fracture zone at 320 m depth. In this lower rock masses the high stresses were also illustrated by intense disking of the hollow core which made measurements impossible in large sections of the boreholes. Water injection tests were performed, mainly as double-packer tests alon the entire boreholes. For the evaluation, both stationary and transient calculation theories were used and the results show a good agreement. The hyddraulic conductivities of the rock mass vary from below 10 -10 m/s up to 10 -7 m/s. The conductivity decreases with depth, though there are zones even at great depth with high conductivity. (Author)

  3. Study on flow and mass transport through fractured sedimentary rocks (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimo, Michito; Kumamoto, Sou; Karasaki, Kenzi; Sato, Hisashi; Sawada, Atsushi

    2009-03-01

    It is important for safety assessment of HLW geological disposal to understand hydro-geological conditions at the investigation area, and to evaluate groundwater flow and mass transport model and parameters, at each investigation phase. Traditionally, for Neogene sedimentary rock, the grain spacing of sediments has been considered as the dominant migration path. However, fractures of sedimentary rock could act as dominant paths, although they were soft sedimentary rocks. In this study, as part of developing groundwater flow and mass transport evaluation methodologies of such a fractured sedimentary rock' distributed area, we conducted two different scale of studies; 1) core rock sample scale and 2) several kilometer scale. For the core rock sample scale, some of laboratory hydraulic and tracer experiments have conducted using the rock cores with tailored parallel fracture, obtained at pilot borehole drilled in the vicinity of ventilation shaft. From the test results, hydraulic conductivity, diffusion coefficient, transport aperture, dispersion length and etc. was evaluated. Based on these test results, the influence of these parameters onto mass transport behavior of fractures sedimentary rocks was examined. For larger scale, such as several kilometer scale, the regional scale groundwater flow was examined using temperature data observed along the boreholes at Horonobe site. The results show that the low permeable zone between the boreholes might be estimated. (author)

  4. Pore Type Classification on Carbonate Reservoir in Offshore Sarawak using Rock Physics Model and Rock Digital Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubis, L A; Harith, Z Z T

    2014-01-01

    It has been recognized that carbonate reservoirs are one of the biggest sources of hydrocarbon. Clearly, the evaluation of these reservoirs is important and critical. For rigorous reservoir characterization and performance prediction from geophysical measurements, the exact interpretation of geophysical response of different carbonate pore types is crucial. Yet, the characterization of carbonate reservoir rocks is difficult due to their complex pore systems. The significant diagenesis process and complex depositional environment makes pore systems in carbonates far more complicated than in clastics. Therefore, it is difficult to establish rock physics model for carbonate rock type. In this paper, we evaluate the possible rock physics model of 20 core plugs of a Miocene carbonate platform in Central Luconia, Sarawak. The published laboratory data of this area were used as an input to create the carbonate rock physics models. The elastic properties were analyzed to examine the validity of an existing analytical carbonate rock physics model. We integrate the Xu-Payne Differential Effective Medium (DEM) Model and the elastic modulus which was simulated from a digital carbonate rock image using Finite Element Modeling. The results of this integration matched well for the separation of carbonate pore types and sonic P-wave velocity obtained from laboratory measurement. Thus, the results of this study show that the integration of rock digital image and theoretical rock physics might improve the elastic properties prediction and useful for more advance geophysical techniques (e.g. Seismic Inversion) of carbonate reservoir in Sarawak

  5. Study on dynamic behavior of a shaft excavation through a faulted crystalline rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Shigeru; Matsui, Hiroya; Horiuchi, Yasuharu; Hata, Koji; Akiyoshi, Kenji; Sato, Shin; Shibata, Chihoko; Niunoya, Sumio; Noda, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    The 'Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory' has been studying and developing engineering technology for deep underground applications. These applications are multifaceted and are categorized as development of design and construction planning technology, development construction technology, development of countermeasure technology, and development of technology for construction and operation security. In this report, the dynamic behavior of shaft and the surrounding rock mass has been studied with respect to rock mass displacement and stress, the effect of using a concrete liner and excavating through faulted crystalline rock. (author)

  6. Fuzzy cluster quantitative computations of component mass transfer in rocks or minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dezheng

    2000-01-01

    The author advances a new component mass transfer quantitative computation method on the basis of closure nature of mass percentage of components in rocks or minerals. Using fuzzy dynamic cluster analysis, and calculating restore closure difference, and determining type of difference, and assisted by relevant diagnostic parameters, the method gradually screens out the true constant component. Then, true mass percentage and mass transfer quantity of components of metabolic rocks or minerals are calculated by applying the true constant component fixed coefficient. This method is called true constant component fixed method (TCF method)

  7. Numerical Simulation on Zonal Disintegration in Deep Surrounding Rock Mass

    OpenAIRE

    Xuguang Chen; Yuan Wang; Yu Mei; Xin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Zonal disintegration have been discovered in many underground tunnels with the increasing of embedded depth. The formation mechanism of such phenomenon is difficult to explain under the framework of traditional rock mechanics, and the fractured shape and forming conditions are unclear. The numerical simulation was carried out to research the generating condition and forming process of zonal disintegration. Via comparing the results with the geomechanical model test, the zonal disintegration p...

  8. Depth optimization for the Korean HLW repository System within a discontinuous and saturated granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Bae, Dae Seok; Choi, Jong Won

    2005-12-01

    The present study is to evaluate the material properties of the compacted bentonite, backfill material, canister cast iron insert, and the rock mass for the Korean HLW repository system. These material properties are either measured, or taken from other countries, through the evaluation of the thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical interaction behavior of a repository. After the evaluation of the material properties, the most appropriate and economical depth as well as the layout of a single layer repository is to be recommended. Material properties used for the granitic rock mass, rock joints, PWR spent fuel, disposal canister, compacted bentonite, backfill material, and ground water are the data collected domestically, and foreign data are used for some of the data not available domestically. The repository model includes a saturated granitic rock mass with joints, PWR spent fuel in a disposal canister surrounded by compacted bentonite inside a deposition hole, and backfill material in the rest of the space within a repository cavern

  9. A Model of Anisotropic Property of Seepage and Stress for Jointed Rock Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-tao Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Joints often have important effects on seepage and elastic properties of jointed rock mass and therefore on the rock slope stability. In the present paper, a model for discrete jointed network is established using contact-free measurement technique and geometrical statistic method. A coupled mathematical model for characterizing anisotropic permeability tensor and stress tensor was presented and finally introduced to a finite element model. A case study of roadway stability at the Heishan Metal Mine in Hebei Province, China, was performed to investigate the influence of joints orientation on the anisotropic properties of seepage and elasticity of the surrounding rock mass around roadways in underground mining. In this work, the influence of the principal direction of the mechanical properties of the rock mass on associated stress field, seepage field, and damage zone of the surrounding rock mass was numerically studied. The numerical simulations indicate that flow velocity, water pressure, and stress field are greatly dependent on the principal direction of joint planes. It is found that the principal direction of joints is the most important factor controlling the failure mode of the surrounding rock mass around roadways.

  10. A new energy-absorbing bolt for rock support in high stress rock masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlie Chunlin Li [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway)

    2010-04-15

    An energy-absorbing rock support device, called a D bolt, has been recently developed to counteract both burst-prone and squeezing rock conditions that occur during underground excavation. The bolt is a smooth steel bar with a number of anchors along its length. The anchors are firmly fixed within a borehole using either cement grout or resin, while the smooth sections of the bolt between the anchors may freely deform in response to rock dilation. Failure of one section does not affect the reinforcement performance of the other sections. The bolt is designed to fully use both the strength and the deformation capacity of the bolt material along the entire length. The bolt has large load-bearing and deformation capacities. Static pull tests and dynamic drop tests show that the bolt length elongates by 14-20% at a load level equal to the strength of the bolt material, thereby absorbing a large amount of energy. The impact average load of a 20 mm D bolt is 200-230 kN, with only a small portion of the load transferred to the bolt plate. The cumulative dynamic energy absorption of the bolt is measured to be 47 kJ/m. D bolts were tested in three deep mines. Filed measurements show that D bolts are loaded less than rebar bolts. This paper presents the layout and principle of the D bolt, and corresponding results from static, dynamic, and field tests.

  11. Revision of Scheumann’s classification of melilitic lamprophyres and related melilitic rocks in light of new analytical data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ulrych, Jaromír; Adamovič, Jiří; Krmíček, L.; Ackerman, Lukáš; Balogh, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 1 (2014), s. 3-22 ISSN 1802-6222 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300130902 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : melilitic rocks * lamprophyres * polzenites * classification * geochemistry * Bohemian Massif Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.405, year: 2014

  12. Classification of mammographic masses using generalized dynamic fuzzy neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Wei Keat; Er, Meng Joo

    2004-01-01

    In this article, computer-aided classification of mammographic masses using generalized dynamic fuzzy neural networks (GDFNN) is presented. The texture parameters, derived from first-order gradient distribution and gray-level co-occurrence matrices, were computed from the regions of interest. A total of 343 images containing 180 benign masses and 163 malignant masses from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography were analyzed. A fast approach of automatically generating fuzzy rules from training samples was implemented to classify tumors. This work is novel in that it alleviates the problem of requiring a designer to examine all the input-output relationships of a training database in order to obtain the most appropriate structure for the classifier in a conventional computer-aided diagnosis. In this approach, not only the connection weights can be adjusted, but also the structure can be self-adaptive during the learning process. By virtue of the automatic generation of the classifier by the GDFNN learning algorithm, the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve, A z , attains 0.868±0.020, which corresponds to a true-positive fraction of 95.0% at a false positive fraction of 52.8%. The corresponding accuracy is 70.0%, the positive predictive value is 62.0%, and the negative predictive value is 91.4%

  13. Hydromechanical coupling in fractured rock masses: mechanisms and processes of selected case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangerl, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Hydromechanical (HM) coupling in fractured rock play an important role when events including dam failures, landslides, surface subsidences due to water withdrawal or drainage, injection-induced earthquakes and others are analysed. Generally, hydromechanical coupling occurs when a rock mass contain interconnected pores and fractures which are filled with water and pore/fracture pressures evolves. In the on hand changes in the fluid pressure can lead to stress changes, deformations and failures of the rock mass. In the other hand rock mass stress changes and deformations can alter the hydraulic properties and fluid pressures of the rock mass. Herein well documented case studies focussing on surface subsidence due to water withdrawal, reversible deformations of large-scale valley flanks and failure as well as deformation processes of deep-seated rock slides in fractured rock masses are presented. Due to pore pressure variations HM coupling can lead to predominantly reversible rock mass deformations. Such processes can be considered by the theory of poroelasticity. Surface subsidence reaching magnitudes of few centimetres and are caused by water drainage into deep tunnels are phenomenas which can be assigned to processes of poroelasticity. Recently, particular focus was given on large tunnelling projects to monitor and predict surface subsidence in fractured rock mass in oder to avoid damage of surface structures such as dams of large reservoirs. It was found that surface subsidence due to tunnel drainage can adversely effect infrastructure when pore pressure drawdown is sufficiently large and spatially extended and differential displacements which can be amplified due to topographical effects e.g. valley closure are occurring. Reversible surface deformations were also ascertained on large mountain slopes and summits with the help of precise deformation measurements i.e. permanent GPS or episodic levelling/tacheometric methods. These reversible deformations are often

  14. Inclined indentation of smooth wedge in rock mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanyshev, AI; Podyminogin, GM; Lukyashko, OA

    2018-03-01

    The article focuses on the inclined rigid wedge indentation into a rigid-plastic half-plane of rocks with the Mohr–Coulomb-Mohr plasticity. The limiting loads on different sides of the wedge are determined versus the internal friction angle, cohesion and wedge angle. It is shown that when the force is applied along the symmetry axis of the wedge, the zone of plasticity is formed only on one wedge side. In order to form the plasticity zone on both sides of the wedge, it is necessary to apply the force asymmetrically relative to the wedge symmetry axis. An engineering solution for the asymmetrical case implementation is suggested.

  15. Carbonate rock classification applied to brazilian sedimentary basins; Classificacao de rochas carbonaticas aplicavel as bacias sedimentares brasileiras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terra, Gerson Jose Salamoni [Universidade Petrobras, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Ciencias e Tecnologias de Exploracao e Producao], E-mail: gersonterra@petrobras.com.br; Spadini, Adali Ricardo [Petrobras E e P, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Exploracao], E-mail: spadini@petrobras.com.br; Franca, Almerio Barros [Centro de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento Leopoldo A. Miguez de Mello (CENPES), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Sedimentologia e Petrologia] (and others)

    2009-11-15

    A new classification of carbonate rocks is proposed seeking to cover the entire spectrum of their occurrence in Brazilian basins. Emphasis is given to those in oil exploration and production locations, especially since the discovery of giant oil fields in the so called Pre-Salt section. This classification is a synergy between the various existing classifications adapting or modifying some terms and introducing new names. The carbonate rocks were divided into four groups according to their depositional texture: 1) elements not bound during deposition (mudstone, wackestone, packstone, grainstone, floatstone, rudstone, bioaccumulated, breccia), 2) elements bound during deposition, or in situ (boundstone, stromatolite, arborescent stromatolite, arbustiform stromatolite, dendriform stromatolite, thrombolite, dendrolite, leiolite, spherulitite, travertine and tufa), 3) elements bound or not bound during deposition (laminite, smooth laminite, crenulated laminite); 4) unrecognized depositional texture (crystalline limestone, dolomite). (author)

  16. Seismic bearing capacity of strip footings on rock masses using the Hoek–Brown failure criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Keshavarz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the bearing capacity of strip footings on rock masses has been studied in the seismic case. The stress characteristics or slip line method was used for analysis. The problem was analyzed in the plane strain condition using the Hoek–Brown failure criterion. First, the equilibrium equations along the stress characteristics were obtained and the rock failure criterion was applied. Then, the equations were solved using the finite difference method. A computer code has been provided for analysis. Given the footing and rock parameters, the code can calculate the stress characteristics network and obtain the stress distribution under the footing. The seismic effects have been applied as the horizontal and vertical pseudo-static coefficients. The results of this paper are very close to those of the other studies. The seismic bearing capacity of weightless rock masses can be obtained using the proposed equations and graphs without calculating the whole stress characteristics network.

  17. Calculation of stresses in a rock mass and lining in stagewise face drivage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryakov, VM; Zhamalova, BR

    2018-03-01

    Using the method of calculating mechanical state of a rock mass for the conditions of stagewise drivage of a production face in large cross-section excavations, the specific features of stress redistribution in lining of excavations are found. The zones of tensile stresses in the lining are detected. The authors discuss the influence of the initial stress state of rocks on the tension stress zones induced in the lining in course of the heading advance

  18. Deep fracturation of granitic rock mass. Fracturation profonde des massifs rocheux granitiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bles, J L; Blanchin, R; Bonijoly, D; Dutartre, P; Feybesse, J L; Gros, Y; Landry, J; Martin, P

    1986-01-01

    This documentary study realized with the financial support of the European Communities and the CEA aims at the utilization of available data for the understanding of the evolution of natural fractures in granitic rocks from the surface to deep underground, in various feasibility studies dealing with radioactive wastes disposal. The Mont Blanc road tunnel, the EDF Arc-Isere gallerie, the Auriat deep borehole and the Pyrenean rock mass of Bassies are studied. In this study are more particularly analyzed the relationship between small fractures and large faults, evolution with depth of fracture density and direction, consequences of rock decompression and relationship between fracturation and groundwater.

  19. Feature selection and nearest centroid classification for protein mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levner Ilya

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of mass spectrometry as a proteomics tool is poised to revolutionize early disease diagnosis and biomarker identification. Unfortunately, before standard supervised classification algorithms can be employed, the "curse of dimensionality" needs to be solved. Due to the sheer amount of information contained within the mass spectra, most standard machine learning techniques cannot be directly applied. Instead, feature selection techniques are used to first reduce the dimensionality of the input space and thus enable the subsequent use of classification algorithms. This paper examines feature selection techniques for proteomic mass spectrometry. Results This study examines the performance of the nearest centroid classifier coupled with the following feature selection algorithms. Student-t test, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, and the P-test are univariate statistics used for filter-based feature ranking. From the wrapper approaches we tested sequential forward selection and a modified version of sequential backward selection. Embedded approaches included shrunken nearest centroid and a novel version of boosting based feature selection we developed. In addition, we tested several dimensionality reduction approaches, namely principal component analysis and principal component analysis coupled with linear discriminant analysis. To fairly assess each algorithm, evaluation was done using stratified cross validation with an internal leave-one-out cross-validation loop for automated feature selection. Comprehensive experiments, conducted on five popular cancer data sets, revealed that the less advocated sequential forward selection and boosted feature selection algorithms produce the most consistent results across all data sets. In contrast, the state-of-the-art performance reported on isolated data sets for several of the studied algorithms, does not hold across all data sets. Conclusion This study tested a number of popular feature

  20. Introduction to numerical modeling of thermohydrologic flow in fractured rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    1980-01-01

    More attention is being given to the possibility of nuclear waste isolation in hard rock formations. The waste will generate heat which raises the temperature of the surrounding fractured rock masses and induces buoyancy flow and pressure change in the fluid. These effects introduce the potential hazard of radionuclides being carried to the biosphere, and affect the structure of a repository by stress changes in the rock formation. The thermohydrological and thermomechanical responses are determined by the fractures as well as the intact rock blocks. The capability of modeling fractured rock masses is essential to site characterization and repository evaluation. The fractures can be modeled either as a discrete system, taking into account the detailed fracture distributions, or as a continuum representing the spatial average of the fractures. A numerical model is characterized by the governing equations, the numerical methods, the computer codes, the validations, and the applications. These elements of the thermohydrological models are discussed. Along with the general review, some of the considerations in modeling fractures are also discussed. Some remarks on the research needs in modeling fractured rock mass conclude the paper

  1. Effects of fracture distribution and length scale on the equivalent continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marte Gutierrez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fracture systems have strong influence on the overall mechanical behavior of fractured rock masses due to their relatively lower stiffness and shear strength than those of the rock matrix. Understanding the effects of fracture geometrical distribution, such as length, spacing, persistence and orientation, is important for quantifying the mechanical behavior of fractured rock masses. The relation between fracture geometry and the mechanical characteristics of the fractured rock mass is complicated due to the fact that the fracture geometry and mechanical behaviors of fractured rock mass are strongly dependent on the length scale. In this paper, a comprehensive study was conducted to determine the effects of fracture distribution on the equivalent continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses over a wide range of fracture lengths. To account for the stochastic nature of fracture distributions, three different simulation techniques involving Oda's elastic compliance tensor, Monte Carlo simulation (MCS, and suitable probability density functions (PDFs were employed to represent the elastic compliance of fractured rock masses. To yield geologically realistic results, parameters for defining fracture distributions were obtained from different geological fields. The influence of the key fracture parameters and their relations to the overall elastic behavior of the fractured rock mass were studied and discussed. A detailed study was also carried out to investigate the validity of the use of a representative element volume (REV in the equivalent continuum representation of fractured rock masses. A criterion was also proposed to determine the appropriate REV given the fracture distribution of the rock mass.

  2. Model test study on propagation law of plane stress wave in jointed rock mass under different in-situ stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qian

    2017-12-01

    The study of propagation law of plane stress wave in jointed rock mass under in-situ stress has important significance for safety excavation of underground rock mass engineering. A model test of the blasting stress waves propagating in the intact rock and jointed rock mass under different in-situ stresses was carried out, and the influencing factors on the propagation law, such as the scale of static loads and the number of joints were studied respectively. The results show that the transmission coefficient of intact rock is larger than that of jointed rock mass under the same loading condition. With the increase of confining pressure, the transmission coefficients of intact rock and jointed rock mass both show an trend of increasing first and then decreasing, and the variation of transmission coefficients in intact rock is smaller than that of jointed rock mass. Transmission coefficient of jointed rock mass decreases with the increase of the number of joints under the same loading condition, when the confining pressure is relatively small, the reduction of transmission coefficients decreases with the increasing of the number of joints, and the variation law of the reduction of transmission coefficients is contrary when the confining pressure is large.

  3. Characterization and classification of two soils derived from basic rocks in Pernambuco State Coast, Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Lindomário Barros de

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Geomorphic surfaces that present soils derived from basic rocks under warm and humid climate are unique scenarios for studying tropical soils. This paper aimed to characterize and classify two pedons derived from basalt at the Atlantic Forest Zone, Pernambuco State, Northeastern coast of Brazil. Two representative pedons (P1 and P2 were selected on a hillslope at the Cabo de Santo Agostinho municipality. Field macromorphological descriptions were carried out and soil horizon were sampled for physical, chemical, mineralogical and micromorphological characterization. The soils were classified, according to the Brazilian System of Soil Classification (and US Soil Taxonomy as: "Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo distroférrico argissólico" (Typic Hapludox (P1 and "Nitossolo Vermelho distroférrico típico" (Rhodic Paleudult (P2. Pedon 1 differs from Pedon 2 in some aspects. For instance, P1 presents more yellowish colors, absence of clay illuviation, more friable consistence and the prismatic structure undergoes transformation to angular and subangular blocks. Pedon 2 presents ferri-argilans and leptocutans which indicate that vertical and lateral illuviation of clay is an active process in their formation. These chemically poor and mineralogically uniform soils are a result of the high temperature and rainfall of the studied area.

  4. Impact of bearing plates dimensions on interaction of mine workings support and rock mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Rotkegel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research presented in this article is to assess the impact of bearing plates dimensions on the interaction of steel arch support and rock mass. The analysis of the bearing plates was based on laboratory tests and numerical calculations using the FLAC3D program (a finite difference method and the strain-hardening/softening model based on prescribed variations of Mohr–Coulomb properties. The article presents the results of laboratory tests on selected bearing plates and the results of numerical analysis of the interaction between the bearing plates and rock mass with coal, clay stone and sandstone properties.

  5. Back-analysing rock mass modulus from monitoring data of two tunnels in Sydney, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bertuzzi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two case studies where the rock mass modulus and in situ stress are estimated from the monitoring data obtained during the construction of underground excavations in Sydney, Australia. The case studies comprise the widening of existing twin road tunnels within Hawkesbury sandstone and the excavation of a large cavern within Ashfield shale. While back-analysis from detailed systematic monitoring has been previously published, this paper presents a relatively simple methodology to derive rock mass modulus and in situ stress from the relatively simple displacement data routinely recorded during tunnelling.

  6. Geotechnical core and rock mass characterization for the UK radioactive waste repository design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlings, C.G.; Barton, N.; Loset, F.; Vik, G.; Bhasin, R.K.; Smallwood, A.; Davies, N.

    1996-01-01

    The NGI method of characterizing joints (using JRC, JCS and φ r ) and characterizing rock masses (using the Q-system) have been and are currently being used extensively in geotechnical consultancy projects. One such project recently completed for UK Nirex Ltd included the logging of 8 km of 100-mm-diameter drill core from boreholes up to 2km in depth. Preliminary rock reinforcement designs were derived from the Q-system statistics, which were logged in parallel with JRC, JCS and φ r . The data from the NGI method of characterizing joints and the Q-system for characterizing rock masses have also been used as the basis for UDEC-BB numerical modelling of the proposed cavern excavations for the disposal of solid, low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The purpose of this numerical modelling was to investigate the stability of rock caverns and in particular the rock reinforcement requirements (giving predicted bolt loads and rock deformations), the extent of the disturbed zone (joint shearing and hydraulic aperture) with respect to cavern orientation, the effect of various pillar widths, and the effect of the cavern excavation sequence. (Author)

  7. Phenomenological study on crystalline rock aiming at evaluation of long-term behaviour of rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Seisuke

    2005-02-01

    This study was started on the basis of the outcomes of the research project conducted between 1994 and 2003. In the fiscal year of 1994 when this project was started, a pneumatic creep testing machine was modified. At the end of the fiscal year of 1994, Inada granite was purchased, and the preliminary tests such as P-wave velocity measurement and Schmidt hammer testing were carried out. Through the fiscal year of 1995, a specimen of Tage tuff under water-saturated condition had been loaded in uniaxial condition in the pneumatic creep testing machine. In the fiscal year of 1995, the uniaxial compression and tension tests, and the short-term creep test of Inada granite were also carried out in the servo-controlled testing machines to obtain the complete stress-strain curves. A hydraulic creep testing machine which was planned to use in the next year was modified for long-term creep testing. Finally, a constitutive equation of variable compliance type was examined based on the experimental results. In the fiscal year of 1996, creep, compression and tension tests were carried out. Two types of pressure maintenance equipment (hydraulic and pneumatic types) were developed and examined. In the fiscal year of 1997, creep, compression and tension tests etc. were again carried out on the basis of the results heretofore. The experimental results of long-term creep testing of Tage tuff, middle-term creep testing of Inada granite were described. In both creep tests, samples were submerged in water. In the fiscal year of 1998, creep testing of Tage tuff was conducted. Results of relatively short-term (middle-term) creep conducted on a servo-controlled testing machine were also described. Sample rock was Sirahama sandstone that showed a considerably large creep strain in low stress level such as 17 % of the uniaxial compression strength. Results of triaxial compression test and uniaxial tension test including unloading-reloading tests were described. In the fiscal years of 1999

  8. Solid-Gas Coupling Model for Coal-Rock Mass Deformation and Pressure Relief Gas Flow in Protection Layer Mining

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Zhuohui; Feng, Tao; Yuan, Zhigang; Xie, Donghai; Chen, Wei

    2018-01-01

    The solid-gas coupling model for mining coal-rock mass deformation and pressure relief gas flow in protection layer mining is the key to determine deformation of coal-rock mass and migration law of pressure relief gas of protection layer mining in outburst coal seams. Based on the physical coupling process between coal-rock mass deformation and pressure-relief gas migration, the coupling variable of mining coal-rock mass, a part of governing equations of gas seepage field and deformation fiel...

  9. Relationship between the rock mass deformation and places of occurrence of seismological events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janusz Makowka; Jozef Kabiesz; Lin-ming Ddou [Central Mining Institute, Katowice (Poland)

    2009-09-15

    Static effort of rock mass very rarely causes of rock burst in Polish coal mines. Rock bursts with source in the seismic tremor within the roof rock layers are prevailing. A seismic tremor is an effect of rupture or sliding in roof layers above the exploited panel in coal seam, sometime in a distance from actual exploitation. Sliding, as a rule occurs in fault zone and tremors in it are expected, but monolithic layer rupture is very hard to predict. In a past few years a practice of analyzing state of deformation in high energy seismic tremors zones has been employed. It let gathering experience thanks to witch determination of dangerous shape of reformatted roof is possible. In the paper some typical forms of roof rocks deformations leading to seismic tremor occurrence will be presented. In general these are various types of multidirectional rock layers bending. Real examples of seismic events and rock bursts in the Czech Republic will be shown. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Study on crystalline rock aiming at evaluation method of long-term behavior of rock mass (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Katsunori; Hashiba, Kimihiro; Matsui, Hiroya

    2017-11-01

    It is important to evaluate the stability of a repository for high-level radioactive waste not only during the design, construction and operation phases, but also during the post-closure period, for time frames likely exceeding several millennia or longer. The rock mass around the tunnels could be deformed through time in response to time dependent behavior such as creep and stress relaxation. Therefore, development of methodology to evaluate the past long-term behavior of rock mass is considered to be an issue. In view of above points, this study has been started as a collaboration study with the University of Tokyo from Fiscal Year 2016. In FY 2016, creep testing on Tage tuff was continuously conducted. Existing theory of rate process and stochastic process was modified to be applied to evaluate effects of water, and then the modified theory was validated based on the results of strength and creep tests performed under dry and wet conditions. Furthermore, effects of water contents on stress-strain curves were examined by uniaxial compression testing under various water content conditions. (author)

  11. Geo-Mechanical Characterization of Carbonate Rock Masses by Means of Laser Scanner Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Biagio; Parise, Mario; Ruocco, Anna

    2017-12-01

    Knowledge of the geometrical and structural setting of rock masses is crucial to evaluate the stability and to design the most suitable stabilization works. In this work we use the Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) at the site of the Grave of the Castellana Caves, a famous show cave in southern Italy. The Grave is the natural access to the cave system, produced by collapse of the vault, due to upward progression of instabilities in the carbonate rock masses. It is about 55-m high, bell-shaped, with maximum width of 120 m. Aim of the work is the characterization of carbonate rock masses from the structural and geo-mechanical standpoints through the use of innovative survey techniques. TLS survey provides a product consisting of millions of geo-referenced points, to be managed in space, to become a suitable database for the morphological and geological-structural analysis. Studying by means of TLS a rock face, partly inaccessible or located in very complex environments, allows to investigate slopes in their overall areal extent, thus offering advantages both as regards safety of the workers and time needed for the survey. In addition to TLS, the traditional approach was also followed by performing scanlines surveys along the rims of the Grave, following the ISRM recommendations for characterization of discontinuity in rock masses. A quantitative comparison among the data obtained by TLS technique and those deriving from the classical geo-mechanical survey is eventually presented, to discuss potentiality of drawbacks of the different techniques used for surveying the rock masses.

  12. A new method for automatic discontinuity traces sampling on rock mass 3D model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umili, G.; Ferrero, A.; Einstein, H. H.

    2013-02-01

    A new automatic method for discontinuity traces mapping and sampling on a rock mass digital model is described in this work. The implemented procedure allows one to automatically identify discontinuity traces on a Digital Surface Model: traces are detected directly as surface breaklines, by means of maximum and minimum principal curvature values of the vertices that constitute the model surface. Color influence and user errors, that usually characterize the trace mapping on images, are eliminated. Also trace sampling procedures based on circular windows and circular scanlines have been implemented: they are used to infer trace data and to calculate values of mean trace length, expected discontinuity diameter and intensity of rock discontinuities. The method is tested on a case study: results obtained applying the automatic procedure on the DSM of a rock face are compared to those obtained performing a manual sampling on the orthophotograph of the same rock face.

  13. Computer programs for the numerical modelling of water flow in rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croney, P.; Richards, L.R.

    1985-08-01

    Water flow in rock joints provides a very important possible route for the migration of radio-nuclides from radio-active waste within a repository back to the biosphere. Two computer programs DAPHNE and FPM have been developed to model two dimensional fluid flow in jointed rock masses. They have been developed to run on microcomputer systems suitable for field locations. The fluid flows in a number of jointed rock systems have been examined and certain controlling functions identified. A methodology has been developed for assessing the anisotropic permeability of jointed rock. A number of examples of unconfined flow into surface and underground openings have been analysed and ground water lowering, pore water pressures and flow quantities predicted. (author)

  14. Theoretical Investigations on the Influence of Artificially Altered Rock Mass Properties on Mechanical Excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlieb, Philipp; Bock, Stefan

    2018-03-01

    This study presents a theoretical analysis of the influence of the rock mass rating on the cutting performance of roadheaders. Existing performance prediction models are assessed for their suitability for forecasting the influence of pre-damaging the rock mass with alternative methods like lasers or microwaves, prior to the mechanical excavation process. Finally, the RMCR model was chosen because it is the only reported model incorporating a range of rock mass properties into its calculations. The results show that even very tough rocks could be mechanically excavated if the occurrence, orientation and condition of joints are favourable for the cutting process. The calculated improvements in the cutting rate (m3/h) are up to 350% for the most favourable cases. In case of microwave irradiation of hard rocks with an UCS of 200 MPa, a reasonable improvement in the performance by 120% can be achieved with as little as an extra 0.7 kWh/m3 (= 1% more energy) compared to cutting only.

  15. A Copula-Based Method for Estimating Shear Strength Parameters of Rock Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The shear strength parameters (i.e., the internal friction coefficient f and cohesion c are very important in rock engineering, especially for the stability analysis and reinforcement design of slopes and underground caverns. In this paper, a probabilistic method, Copula-based method, is proposed for estimating the shear strength parameters of rock mass. The optimal Copula functions between rock mass quality Q and f, Q and c for the marbles are established based on the correlation analyses of the results of 12 sets of in situ tests in the exploration adits of Jinping I-Stage Hydropower Station. Although the Copula functions are derived from the in situ tests for the marbles, they can be extended to be applied to other types of rock mass with similar geological and mechanical properties. For another 9 sets of in situ tests as an extensional application, by comparison with the results from Hoek-Brown criterion, the estimated values of f and c from the Copula-based method achieve better accuracy. Therefore, the proposed Copula-based method is an effective tool in estimating rock strength parameters.

  16. Mass transport of soluble species through backfill into surrounding rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Chul Hyung; Park, Hun Hwee

    1992-01-01

    Some soluble species may not be solubility-limited or congruent-released with the matrix species. For example, during the operation of the nuclear reactor, the fission products can be accumulated in the fuel-cladding gap, void, and grain boundaries of the fuel rods. In the waste package for spent-fuel placed in a geologic repository, the high solubility species of these fission products accumulated in the 'gap', e.g. cesium or iodine are expected to dissolve rapidly when ground water penetrates fuel rods. The time and space dependent mass transport for high solubility nuclides in the gap is analyzed, and its numerical illustrations are demonstrated. The approximate solution that is valid for all times is developed, and validated by comparison with an asymptotic solution and the solution obtained by the numerical inversion of Laplace transform covering the entire time span. (Author)

  17. In situ measurement of the thermal conductivity in propylite rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimooka, Kenji; Araki, Kunio; Suda, Shintaro.

    1982-11-01

    The safety evaluation for the geological disposal of the high level waste becomes an urgent problem to establish the backend of nuclear fuel cycle. The stability of the original host rock and the flow of groundwater will be perturbed by the thermal disturbances from the waste. So the heater experiment at a depth of 90 m below the surface was carried out to study the conduction of decay heat. For measuring the thermal conductivity of propylite rock mass, a cylindrical heater and 13 thermocouples were inserted in 6 boreholes. The power output of the heater was kept at 880 W constant during the experimental periods of 61 days. From the observed temperature rise around the heater, the thermal conductivity 2.1 W/m 0 C was calculated by steady-state calculation. The value of the rock mass was found to be slightly bigger compared with 1.5 - 1.6 W/m 0 C of core samples. (author)

  18. In situ determination of a rock mass modulus using a high resolution tiltmeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, B.; Husein Malkawi, A.I. [University of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Blum, P.A. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-04-01

    A very sensitive, compact tiltmeter made of melted silica, developed for the measurement of small deformations of various civil engineering structures, was described. The instrument is capable of giving a continuous record and was used to establish a new approach to directly evaluating the in situ average elastic rock mass modulus. Such information is important in decision making during the design stages of large civil engineering works, such as dams, nuclear plant facilities, and underground structures. Five tiltmeters were installed on the facades of the Louvre in Paris to study the deformation induced by internal structural work and by the impact of the Paris metro traffic movement. The data was used to determine displacement using the Boussinesq equation. Results were consistent with typical elastic rock-mass modulus for the rock found in the museum`s foundations. 13 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  19. Experimental research data on stress state of salt rock mass around an underground excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshnikov, VD; Baryshnikov, DV

    2018-03-01

    The paper presents the experimental stress state data obtained in surrounding salt rock mass around an excavation in Mir Mine, ALROSA. The deformation characteristics and the values of stresses in the adjacent rock mass are determined. Using the method of drilling a pair of parallel holes in a stressed area, the authors construct linear relationship for the radial displacements of the stress measurement hole boundaries under the short-term loading of the perturbing hole. The resultant elasticity moduli of rocks are comparable with the laboratory core test data. Pre-estimates of actual stresses point at the presence of a plasticity zone in the vicinity of the underground excavation. The stress state behavior at a distance from the excavation boundary disagrees with the Dinnik–Geim hypothesis.

  20. Layout Optimization for the Repository within a discontinuous and saturated granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Choi, Jong Won; Bae, Dae Seok

    2005-12-01

    The objective of the present study is a layout optimization of a single and double layer repositories within a repository site with special joint set arrangements. Single and double layer repository models, subjected to the variation of repository depth, cavern spacing, pitch, and layer spacing, are analyzed for the thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical interaction behavior during the period of 2000 years from waste emplacement. Material properties used for the granitic rock mass, rock joints, PWR spent fuel, disposal canister, compacted bentonite, backfill material, and groundwater are the data collected domestically, and foreign data are used for some of the data not available domestically. The repository model includes a saturated granitic rock mass with joints, PWR spent fuel in a disposal canister surrounded by compacted bentonite inside a deposition hole, and backfill material in the rest of the space within a repository cavern

  1. Using pattern classification and nuclear forensic signatures to link UOC to source rocks and purification processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, N.; Robel, M.; Borg, M.; Hutcheon, I.; Kristo, M.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear forensics is a scientific discipline interfacing law enforcement, nuclear science and nonproliferation. Information on the history and on the potential origin of unknown nuclear material can be obtained through nuclear forensic analysis. Using commonly available techniques of mass spectrometry, microscopy and x-ray diffraction, we have gained insight into the processing and origin of a suite of uranium ore concentrate (UOC) samples. We have applied chemometric techniques to investigate the relationships between uranium ore deposits and UOC samples in order to identify chemical and isotopic signatures of nuclear forensic importance. We developed multivariate signatures based on elemental concentrations and isotope ratios using a database of characteristics of UOC originating throughout the world. By introducing detailed and specific information about the source rock geology for each sample, we improved our understanding of the preservation of forensic signatures in UOC. Improved characterization of sample processing and provenance allows us to begin to assess the statistical significance of different groupings of samples and identify underlying patterns. Initial results indicate the concentration of uranium in the ore body, the geochemical conditions associated with uranium emplacement, and host rock petrogenesis exert controlling influences on the impurities preserved in UOC. Specific ore processing techniques, particularly those related to In-Situ Recovery, are also reflected in UOC impurity signatures. Stable and radiogenic isotope geochemistry can be used in conjunction with rare earth element patterns and other characteristics to link UOCs to specific geologic deposits of origin. We will present a number of case studies illustrating the ways in which nuclear forensic analysis can provide insight into the ore geology and production and purification processes used to produce UOC. (author)

  2. Investigation of Rock Mass Stability Around the Tunnels in an Underground Mine in USA Using Three-Dimensional Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yan; Kulatilake, P. H. S. W.; Sandbak, L. A.

    2018-02-01

    The stability of the rock mass around the tunnels in an underground mine was investigated using the distinct element method. A three-dimensional model was developed based on the available geological, geotechnical, and mine construction information. It incorporates a complex lithological system, persistent and non-persistent faults, and a complex tunnel system including backfilled tunnels. The strain-softening constitutive model was applied for the rock masses. The rock mass properties were estimated using the Hoek-Brown equations based on the intact rock properties and the RMR values. The fault material behavior was modeled using the continuously yielding joint model. Sequential construction and rock supporting procedures were simulated based on the way they progressed in the mine. Stress analyses were performed to study the effect of the horizontal in situ stresses and the variability of rock mass properties on tunnel stability, and to evaluate the effectiveness of rock supports. The rock mass behavior was assessed using the stresses, failure zones, deformations around the tunnels, and the fault shear displacement vectors. The safety of rock supports was quantified using the bond shear and bolt tensile failures. Results show that the major fault and weak interlayer have distinct influences on the displacements and stresses around the tunnels. Comparison between the numerical modeling results and the field measurements indicated the cases with the average rock mass properties, and the K 0 values between 0.5 and 1.25 provide satisfactory agreement with the field measurements.

  3. Outline and results of study on excavation response of rock mass around shaft in shaft excavation effects project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, Kozo; Matsui, Hiroya; Sato, Toshinori

    1993-01-01

    A shaft, with a diameter of 6 m and a depth of 150 m, has been newly excavated in sedimentary rock and excavation response of rock mass around the shaft has been measured and analyzed. Excavation response has been evaluated based on the results of measurement of rock mass movement, such as displacement and strain, and change of rock property, such as deformability and permeability. This study indicates that rock property has been changed with in about 1 m from the shaft wall, and rock mass movement and property change has been influenced by rock facies, fracture and re-distributed stress. The relation between property change and these factors is remained to be evaluated in future study. (author)

  4. Dataset of the relationship between unconfined compressive strength and tensile strength of rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, Yutaka; Yui, Mikazu

    2002-02-01

    This report summary the dataset of the relationship between unconfined compressive strength and tensile strength of the rock mass described in supporting report 2; repository design and engineering technology of second progress report (H12 report) on research and development for the geological disposal of HLW in Japan. (author)

  5. Microseismicity of an Unstable Rock Mass: From Field Monitoring to Laboratory Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombero, C.; Comina, C.; Vinciguerra, S.; Benson, P. M.

    2018-02-01

    The field-scale microseismic (MS) activity of an unstable rock mass is known to be an important tool to assess damage and cracking processes eventually leading to macroscopic failures. However, MS-event rates alone may not be enough for a complete understanding of the trigger mechanisms of mechanical instabilities. Acoustic Emission (AE) techniques at the laboratory scale can be used to provide complementary information. In this study, we report a MS/AE comparison to assess the stability of a granitic rock mass in the northwestern Italian Alps (Madonna del Sasso). An attempt to bridge the gap between the two different scales of observation, and the different site and laboratory conditions, is undertaken to gain insights on the rock mass behavior as a function of external governing factors. Time- and frequency-domain parameters of the MS/AE waveforms are compared and discussed with this aim. At the field scale, special attention is devoted to the correlation of the MS-event rate with meteorological parameters (air temperature and rainfalls). At the laboratory scale, AE rates, waveforms, and spectral content, recorded under controlled temperature and fluid conditions, are analyzed in order to better constrain the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed field patterns. The factors potentially governing the mechanical instability at the site were retrieved from the integration of the results. Abrupt thermal variations were identified as the main cause of the site microsesimicity, without highlighting irreversible acceleration in the MS-event rate potentially anticipating the rock mass collapse.

  6. Guided elastic waves produced by a periodically joined interface in a rock mass

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Yenwong Fai

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available on Computational and Applied Mechanics SACAM2012 Johannesburg, South Africa, 3−5 September 2012 c©SACAM Guided Elastic Waves Produced by a Periodically Joined Interface in a Rock Mass A.S. Yenwong Fai School of Physics University of the Witwatersrand Johannesburg...

  7. Rock mass condition, behaviour and seismicity in mines of the Bushveld igneous complex.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Haile, AT

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available This project report gives an overall view of the rock mass environment of the Bushveld complex and influence on the mine design practices. The main focus of the project was to survey the currently available data and conduct further analysis in order...

  8. Determination of the mechanical parameters of rock mass based on a GSI system and displacement back analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kwang-Song; Hu, Nai-Lian; Sin, Chung-Sik; Rim, Song-Ho; Han, Eun-Cheol; Kim, Chol-Nam

    2017-08-01

    It is very important to obtain the mechanical paramerters of rock mass for excavation design, support design, slope design and stability analysis of the underground structure. In order to estimate the mechanical parameters of rock mass exactly, a new method of combining a geological strength index (GSI) system with intelligent displacment back analysis is proposed in this paper. Firstly, average spacing of joints (d) and rock mass block rating (RBR, a new quantitative factor), surface condition rating (SCR) and joint condition factor (J c) are obtained on in situ rock masses using the scanline method, and the GSI values of rock masses are obtained from a new quantitative GSI chart. A correction method of GSI value is newly introduced by considering the influence of joint orientation and groundwater on rock mass mechanical properties, and then value ranges of rock mass mechanical parameters are chosen by the Hoek-Brown failure criterion. Secondly, on the basis of the measurement result of vault settlements and horizontal convergence displacements of an in situ tunnel, optimal parameters are estimated by combination of genetic algorithm (GA) and numerical simulation analysis using FLAC3D. This method has been applied in a lead-zinc mine. By utilizing the improved GSI quantization, correction method and displacement back analysis, the mechanical parameters of the ore body, hanging wall and footwall rock mass were determined, so that reliable foundations were provided for mining design and stability analysis.

  9. ESTIMATION OF THE SPECIFIC ENERGY OF TUNNEL BORING MACHINE USING POST-FAILURE BEHAVIOUR OF ROCK MASS.CASE STUDY: KARAJ-TEHRAN WATER CONVEYANCE TUNNEL IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAJID MIRAHMADI

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Performance prediction of tunnel boring machines (TBM is the most important factor for successful tunnel excavation projects. The specific energy (SE of TBM, defined as the amount of energy required to excavate a unit volume of rock, is one of the critical parameters used for performance prediction of these machines. Estimation of SE is very useful to design the drilling project because it is a function of many parameters such as rock mass behaviour, machine properties and project parameters. Several methods are used to estimate this parameter, such as experimental, empirical and numerical. The aim of this study is to estimate the SE considering the postfailure behaviour of rock mass. For this reason, based on the actual data from Karaj-Tehran water conveyance tunnel, a new empirical method is proposed to estimate the SE using the drop-to-deformation modulus ratio (λ. Based on the statistical analysis, the relation between the SE and λ is estimated. It is clear that the amplitude of λ, is high and to increase the correlation between mentioned parameters, the classification of data is performed. All data is classified in three classes as very weak (GSI75. Also a statistical analysis is performed to estimate the SE using the mentioned parameter (λ in any class. The result shows that there is a direct relation between both parameters and the best correlation is achieved. So, the best equations are proposed to estimate SE using λ, considering the post failure behaviour of rock mass.

  10. Between-hole acoustic surveying and monitoring of a granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulsson, B.N.P.; King, M.S.

    1980-02-01

    The purpose of this technical note is to present preliminary results of an acoustic monitoring study performed as part of a comprehensive rock mechanic and geophysics research program (Ref.20) associated with large-scale heater tests in an abandoned iron-ore mine in central Sweden. The investigation was performed in a fractured granitic rock mass at a sub-surface depth of 340 m, in a drift adjacent to the original iron-ore mine workings. Acoustic monitoring took place between four empty, dry, vertical boreholes of 10 m depth spaced in the vicinity of a vertical heater borehole in the floor of a drift

  11. The application of positron emission tomography to the study of mass transfer in fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilling, D.; Jefferies, N.L.; Fowles, P.; Hawkesworth, M.R.; Parker, D.J.

    1991-06-01

    Water flow in hard rocks takes place dominantly in fractures. In order to predict the transport of dissolved radioelements through a fractured rock it is necessary to determine both the geometry of the fracture network and the hydraulic properties of the individual fractures. This paper describes a technique for studying mass transfer in a single fracture. The technique is positron emission tomography (PET) and it offers the potential for visualising quantitatively the migration of dissolved tracers. Preliminary experiments have been undertaken involving the flow of Na-22 and F-18 labelled solutions through artificial fractures. The results demonstrate that PET is well suited to this application. (author)

  12. Modelling of rock mass response to glaciation in the Dounreay area, Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errington, M.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results of a modelling study undertaken to investigate the potential response of a faulted rock mass to glacial loading. The modelled rock mass was a 10X10X10 km region around Dounreay. This site was selected as one of the two locations under consideration by UK Nirex Ltd for a deep repository for the disposal of low and intermediate radioactive waste. The model selected for the study was 3DEC, a distinct element code which has been used in similar modelling studies in Sweden. A set of seven regional fractures and five rock types were identified in the region to be modelled. Properties for these discontinuities and media were derived from published information where possible or from data for similar regimes. A number of parameters were selected for sensitivity studies. The results of the study form a useful basis for assessing the extent of fracture movement which might be expected in the region modelled. Site-specific results cannot be extended to other areas but the results of the sensitivity study indicate those parameters which have a significant effect on the modelled behaviour of the rock mass and which would thus require site-specific determination. (Author)

  13. Classification and Distribution of Mars Pathfinder Rocks Using Quantitative Morphologic Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingst, R. A.; Biederman, K. L.; Monhead, A. M.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Kowalczyk, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder (MPF) landing site was predicted to contain a broad sampling of rock types varying in mineralogical, physical, mechanical and geochemical characteristics. Although rocks have been divided into several spectral categories based on Imager for Mars Pathfinder visible/near-infrared spectra, it has not been fully determined which of these stem from intrinsic mineralogical differences between rocks or rock surfaces, and which result from factors such as physical or chemical weathering. This has made isolation of unique mineralogy's difficult. Efforts in isolating and classifying spectral units among MPF rocks and soils have met with varying degrees of success, and the current understanding is such that many factors influencing spectral signatures cannot be quantified to a sufficient level so they may be removed. The result is that fundamental questions regarding information needed to reveal the present and past interactions between the rocks and rock surfaces and the Martian environment remain unanswered. But it is possible to approach the issue of identifying distinct rock and rock surface types from a different angle.

  14. Microseism Induced by Transient Release of In Situ Stress During Deep Rock Mass Excavation by Blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhua; Lu, Wenbo; Chen, Ming; Yan, Peng; Zhou, Chuangbing

    2013-07-01

    During deep rock mass excavation with the method of drill and blast, accompanying the secession of rock fragments and the formation of a new free surface, in situ stress on this boundary is suddenly released within several milliseconds, which is termed the transient release of in situ stress. In this process, enormous strain energy around the excavation face is instantly released in the form of kinetic energy and it inevitably induces microseismic events in surrounding rock masses. Thus, blasting excavation-induced microseismic vibrations in high-stress rock masses are attributed to the combined action of explosion and the transient release of in situ stress. The intensity of stress release-induced microseisms, which depends mainly on the magnitude of the in situ stress and the dimension of the excavation face, is comparable to that of explosion-induced vibrations. With the methods of time-energy density analysis, amplitude spectrum analysis, and finite impulse response (FIR) digital filter, microseismic vibrations induced by the transient release of in situ stress were identified and separated from recorded microseismic signals during a blast of deep rock masses in the Pubugou Hydropower Station. The results show that the low-frequency component in the microseismic records results mainly from the transient release of in situ stress, while the high-frequency component originates primarily from explosion. In addition, a numerical simulation was conducted to demonstrate the occurrence of microseismic events by the transient release of in situ stress, and the results seem to have confirmed fairly well the separated vibrations from microseismic records.

  15. Automatic extraction of discontinuity orientation from rock mass surface 3D point cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianqin; Zhu, Hehua; Li, Xiaojun

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a new method for extracting discontinuity orientation automatically from rock mass surface 3D point cloud. The proposed method consists of four steps: (1) automatic grouping of discontinuity sets using an improved K-means clustering method, (2) discontinuity segmentation and optimization, (3) discontinuity plane fitting using Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC) method, and (4) coordinate transformation of discontinuity plane. The method is first validated by the point cloud of a small piece of a rock slope acquired by photogrammetry. The extracted discontinuity orientations are compared with measured ones in the field. Then it is applied to a publicly available LiDAR data of a road cut rock slope at Rockbench repository. The extracted discontinuity orientations are compared with the method proposed by Riquelme et al. (2014). The results show that the presented method is reliable and of high accuracy, and can meet the engineering needs.

  16. MCCREEP - a model to estimate creep produced by microcracking around a cavity in an intact rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, B.J.S.; Rigby, G.L.

    1991-11-01

    AECL Research is examining the disposal of nuclear fuel waste in a vault in plutonic rock. Models (MCDIRC and MCROC) have been developed to predict the mechanical behaviour of the rock in response to excavation and heat from the waste. The dominant mechanism of deformation at temperatures below 150 degrees C is microcracking, which results in rock creep and a decrease in rock strength. MCDIRC has been constructed to consider the perturbation of the stress state of intact rock by long cylindrical cavities. Slow crack-growth data are used to estimate time-dependent changes in rock strength, from which possible movements (creep strain) in the rock mass are estimated. MCDIRC depends on analytical solutions for stress-state perturbations. MCCREEP has been developed from MCDIRC and relies on the use of finite-element methods to solve for stress states. It is more flexible than MCDIRC and can deal with non-homogeneous rock properties and non-symmetrical cavities

  17. Long-term monitoring of rock mass properties in the underground excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Jirků, Jaroslav; Slavík, Lubomír; Bárta, Jaroslav

    2015-04-01

    It is generally agreed today that hazardous waste should be placed in repositories hundreds of meters below the Earth's surface. In our research we deal with the long-term monitoring of the underground excavation by seismic and electrical resistivity measurements. Permanent measuring system was developed and installed at the Bedřichov gallery test site (northern Bohemia). The gallery was excavated using TBM (Tunnel Boring Machine) in granitic rocks. Realized repeated measurements include ultrasonic time of flight measurement and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). The seismic measurements are performed by pulse-transmission technique directly on the rock wall using one seismic source and three receivers in the distances of 1, 2 and 3 m. The main emphasis is devoted to P-waves; however, recording of full waveform enables analyzing of S- waves and other types of waves as well. The comparison of repeated measurements is used for an assessment of changes in seismic velocities with very high-accuracy. The repetition rate of measurements can be selected from seconds; however such fast changes in the rock mass are unexpected. The ERT measurement is performed on the same rock wall using 48 electrodes. The spacing between electrodes is 20 centimeters. The conductivity of undisturbed granitic rocks is extremely low. Therefore the observed local increase of conductivity can be associated with joints and fractures saturated with water, resulting in their ionic conductivity. Repeated ERT measurement can reveal some changes in the rock mass. Due to time requirements of ERT measurement the repetition rate can be about three hours. The data collected by measuring system is transferred by means of computer network and can be accessed via internet. This contribution deals with preliminary results gained so far during the testing of developed monitoring system. Acknowledgments: This work was partially supported by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic, project No. TA

  18. Precursors predicted by artificial neural networks for mass balance calculations: Quantifying hydrothermal alteration in volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trépanier, Sylvain; Mathieu, Lucie; Daigneault, Réal; Faure, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    This study proposes an artificial neural networks-based method for predicting the unaltered (precursor) chemical compositions of hydrothermally altered volcanic rock. The method aims at predicting precursor's major components contents (SiO2, FeOT, MgO, CaO, Na2O, and K2O). The prediction is based on ratios of elements generally immobile during alteration processes; i.e. Zr, TiO2, Al2O3, Y, Nb, Th, and Cr, which are provided as inputs to the neural networks. Multi-layer perceptron neural networks were trained on a large dataset of least-altered volcanic rock samples that document a wide range of volcanic rock types, tectonic settings and ages. The precursors thus predicted are then used to perform mass balance calculations. Various statistics were calculated to validate the predictions of precursors' major components, which indicate that, overall, the predictions are precise and accurate. For example, rank-based correlation coefficients were calculated to compare predicted and analysed values from a least-altered test dataset that had not been used to train the networks. Coefficients over 0.87 were obtained for all components, except for Na2O (0.77), indicating that predictions for alkali might be less performant. Also, predictions are performant for most volcanic rock compositions, except for ultra-K rocks. The proposed method provides an easy and rapid solution to the often difficult task of determining appropriate volcanic precursor compositions to rocks modified by hydrothermal alteration. It is intended for large volcanic rock databases and is most useful, for example, to mineral exploration performed in complex or poorly known volcanic settings. The method is implemented as a simple C++ console program.

  19. A study on rock mass behaviour induced by shaft sinking in the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsusaka, Kimikazu; Tokiwa, Tetsuya; Inagaki, Daisuke; Hatsuyama, Yoshihiro; Koike, Masashi; Ijiri, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been excavating three deep shafts through soft sedimentary rock in the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory. In this paper, the authors discussed rock mass behaviour induced by a 6.5 m diameter shaft sinking. They conducted geological mapping in an excavation face and boreholes digged around the shaft wall, field measurements such as convergence measurements and monitoring of rock displacements using multi-interval borehole extensometers around a shaft at around 160 m and 220 m in depths, and three-dimensional numerical analysis which models the shaft excavation procedure such as timing of installation of support elements and setting and removal of a concrete form. As a result, it was clarified that remarkably large compressive strains occurred within about 1 m into the shaft wall in a radial direction since the rock mass behaviour was controlled by the concrete lining and that the behaviour would predominantly be induced by the fractures closing which opened significantly and propagated during excavation steps before the installation of a concrete lining and the directions where the strains occurred heavily depended on the fracture orientation around the shaft. (author)

  20. The classification of ambiguity in polarimetric reconstruction of coronal mass ejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Xinghua; Wang, Huaning; Huang, Xin; Du, Zhanle; He, Han

    2014-01-01

    The Thomson scattering theory indicates that there exist explicit and implicit ambiguities in polarimetric analyses of coronal mass ejection (CME) observations. We suggest a classification for these ambiguities in CME reconstruction. Three samples, including double explicit, mixed, and double implicit ambiguity, are shown with the polarimetric analyses of STEREO CME observations. These samples demonstrate that this classification is helpful for improving polarimetric reconstruction.

  1. State of the art of numerical modeling of thermohydrologic flow in fractured rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Tsang, C.F.; Sterbentz, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art of numerical modeling of thermohydrologic flow in fractured rock masses is reviewed and a comparative study is made of several models which have been developed in nuclear waste isolation, geothermal energy, ground-water hydrology, petroleum engineering, and other geologic fields. The general review is followed by separate summaries of the main characteristics of the governing equations, numerical solutions, computer codes, validations, and applications for each model

  2. Determination of Rock Mass Modulus Using the Plate Loading Method at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finley, R.E.; George, J.T.; Riggins, M.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of plate loading tests has recently been conducted by Sandia National Laboratories at the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Fielding of these in situ tests as well as other approaches undertaken for the determination of rock mass modulus are described. The various methodologies are evaluated and their data compared. Calculation by existing empirical methods and numerical modeling are compared to each other as well as to field data

  3. Influence of structural parameter included in nonlocal rock mass model on stress concentration around circular tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrikov, SV; Mikenina, OA; Revuzhenko, AF

    2018-03-01

    A model of elastic body, including local curvature of elementary volume, is matched with a nonlocal model with a linear structural parameter in the differential approximation. The problem on deformation of rock mass around a circular cross section tunnel is solved numerically. The contours of the calculated stresses are plotted. It is shown that inclusion of local bends in the model results in expansion of influence zone of the tunnel and reduces stress concentration factor at the tunnel boundary.

  4. The state of the art of numerical modeling of thermohydrologic flow in fractured rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Sterbentz, R.A.; Tsang, C.F.

    1982-01-01

    The state of the art of numerical modeling of thermohydrologic flow in fractured rock masses is reviewed and a comparative study is made of several models which have been developed in nuclear waste isolation, geothermal energy, ground water hydrology, petroleum engineering, and other geologic fields. The general review is followed by individual summaries of each model and the main characteristics of its governing equations, numerical solutions, computer codes, validations, and applications

  5. Modeling stress–strain state of rock mass under mining of complex-shape extraction pillar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryanov, VN; Pavlova, LD

    2018-03-01

    Based on the results of numerical modeling of stresses and strains in rock mass, geomechanical parameters of development workings adjacent to coal face operation area are provided for multi-entry preparation and extraction of flat seams with production faces of variable length. The negative effects on the geomechanical situation during the transition from the longwall to shortwall mining in a fully mechanized extraction face are found.

  6. Influence of different geological structures on stress–strain state of hard rock mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetzov, NN; Fedotova, YuV

    2018-03-01

    The results of numerical simulation of stress–strain state in a hard rock mass area with the complex geological structures are presented. The variants of the stress value change are considered depending on the boundary conditions and physical properties of the model blocks. Furthermore, the possibility of in-situ stress formation under the influence of energy coming from the deeper Earth’s layers is demonstrated in terms of the Khibiny Massif.

  7. Analysis of EDZ Development of Columnar Jointed Rock Mass in the Baihetan Diversion Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xian-Jie; Feng, Xia-Ting; Yang, Cheng-Xiang; Jiang, Quan; Li, Shao-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Due to the time dependency of the crack propagation, columnar jointed rock masses exhibit marked time-dependent behaviour. In this study, in situ measurements, scanning electron microscope (SEM), back-analysis method and numerical simulations are presented to study the time-dependent development of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) around underground diversion tunnels in a columnar jointed rock mass. Through in situ measurements of crack propagation and EDZ development, their extent is seen to have increased over time, despite the fact that the advancing face has passed. Similar to creep behaviour, the time-dependent EDZ development curve also consists of three stages: a deceleration stage, a stabilization stage, and an acceleration stage. A corresponding constitutive model of columnar jointed rock mass considering time-dependent behaviour is proposed. The time-dependent degradation coefficient of the roughness coefficient and residual friction angle in the Barton-Bandis strength criterion are taken into account. An intelligent back-analysis method is adopted to obtain the unknown time-dependent degradation coefficients for the proposed constitutive model. The numerical modelling results are in good agreement with the measured EDZ. Not only that, the failure pattern simulated by this time-dependent constitutive model is consistent with that observed in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and in situ observation, indicating that this model could accurately simulate the failure pattern and time-dependent EDZ development of columnar joints. Moreover, the effects of the support system provided and the in situ stress on the time-dependent coefficients are studied. Finally, the long-term stability analysis of diversion tunnels excavated in columnar jointed rock masses is performed.

  8. Continuum model for water movement in an unsaturated fractured rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.R.; Klavetter, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    The movement of fluids in a fractured, porous medium has been the subject of considerable study. This paper presents a continuum model that may be used to evaluate the isothermal movement of water in an unsaturated, fractured, porous medium under slowly changing conditions. This continuum model was developed for use in evaluating the unsaturated zone at the Yucca Mountain site as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. Thus its development has been influenced by the conditions thought to be present at Yucca Mountain. A macroscopic approach and a microscopic approach are used to develop a continuum model to evaluate water movement in a fractured rock mass. Both approaches assume that the pressure head in the fractures and the matrix are identical in a plane perpendicular to flow. Both approaches lead to a single-flow equation for a fractured rock mass. The two approaches are used to calculate unsaturated hydrologic properties, i.e., relative permeability and saturation as a function of pressure head, for several types of tuff underlying Yucca Mountain, using the best available hydrologic data for the matrix and the fractures. Rock mass properties calculated by both approaches are similar

  9. Potential increases in natural radon emissions due to heating of the Yucca Mountain rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, C.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    Heating of the rock mass by the spent fuel in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain will cause extra amounts of natural radon to diffuse into the fracture system and to migrate faster to the accessible environment. Indeed, free-convection currents due to heating will act to shorten the radon travel times and will cause larger releases than would be possible under undistributed conditions. To estimate the amount of additional radon released due to heating of the Yucca Mountain rock mass, we obtain an expression for the release enhancement factor, E. This factor is defined as the ratio between the total flux of radon at the surface of the mountain before and after closure of the repository assuming the only cause of disturbance to be the heating of the rock mass. With appropriate approximations and using a heat load representative of that expected at Yucca Mountain, the present calculations indicate that the average enhancement factor over the first 10,000 years will be 4.5 as a minimum. These calculations are based on the assumption that barometric pumping does not significantly influence radon release. The latter assumption will need to be substantiated

  10. Geostatistical methods for rock mass quality prediction using borehole and geophysical survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Rubin, Y.; Sege, J. E.; Li, X.; Hehua, Z.

    2015-12-01

    For long, deep tunnels, the number of geotechnical borehole investigations during the preconstruction stage is generally limited. Yet tunnels are often constructed in geological structures with complex geometries, and in which the rock mass is fragmented from past structural deformations. Tunnel Geology Prediction (TGP) is a geophysical technique widely used during tunnel construction in China to ensure safety during construction and to prevent geological disasters. In this paper, geostatistical techniques were applied in order to integrate seismic velocity from TGP and borehole information into spatial predictions of RMR (Rock Mass Rating) in unexcavated areas. This approach is intended to apply conditional probability methods to transform seismic velocities to directly observed RMR values. The initial spatial distribution of RMR, inferred from the boreholes, was updated by including geophysical survey data in a co-kriging approach. The method applied to a real tunnel project shows significant improvements in rock mass quality predictions after including geophysical survey data, leading to better decision-making for construction safety design.

  11. Determination of trace quantities of uranium in rocks mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakazu, Mauricio Hiromitu

    1980-01-01

    A detailed experimental investigation on the thermionic emission of uranium deposited on a single flat type rhenium filament has been carried out. The study was aimed at determining the influence of various forms of deposition on the emission sensitivity and thermal stability of U + , UO + and UO 2 + ions. Based on these investigations, a technique, involving an addition of a small quantity of colloidal suspension of graphite on top of the uranyl nitrate sample deposited, was chosen because of its higher, emission sensitivity for uranium metal ions. The experimental parameters of the technique were optimised and the technique was employed in the determination of trace quantities of uranium in rock samples using mass spectrometric isotope dilution method. For the mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis National Bureau of Standards uranium isotopic standard NBS-U 970 was employed as a tracer, where as the mass discrimination effect in the uranium isotope analysis was corrected using the uranium isotopic standard NBS-U500. Uranium was determined in each of the seven granite samples from Wyoming, USA and two USGS standard rocks. The precision of the analysis was found to be ±1% . The uranium values obtained on the rock samples were compared with the analyses of other investigators. Influence of the sample splitting on the uranium analysis was discussed in the light of the analytical results obtained.(author)

  12. Steady-state flow in a rock mass intersected by permeable fracture zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindbom, B.

    1986-12-01

    Level 1 of HYDROCOIN consists of seven well-defined test problems. This paper is concerned with Case 2, which is formulated as a generic groundwater flow situation often found in crystalline rock with highly permeable fracture zones in a less permeable rock mass. The case is two-dimensional and modelled with 8-noded, isoparametric, rectangular elements. According to the case definition, calculations of hydraulic head and particle tracking are performed. The computations are carried out with varying degree of discretisation in order to analyse possible impact on the result with respect to nodal density. Further calculations have been performed mainly devoted to mass balance deviations and how these are affected by permeability contrasts, varying degree of spatial discretisation and distortion of finite elements. The distribution of hydraulic head in the domain is less sensitive to differences in nodal density than the trajectories. The hydraulic heads show similar behaviour for three meshes with varying degrees of discretisation. The particle tracking seems to be more sensitive to the level of discretisation. The results obtained with a coarse and medium mesh indicate completely different solutions for one of the pathlines. The coarse mesh is too sparsely discretised for the specified problem. The local mass balance is evaluated for seven runs. The mass balance deviation seems to be considerably more sensitive to the level of discretisation than to both permeability contrasts and deformation of elements. The permeability contrasts between the rock mass and fracture zones vary from a factor of 1000 to 1 (homogeneous properties) with increments of a factor of 10. These calculations in fact give better mass balance with increasing permeability contrasts, contrary to what could be expected. (orig./HP)

  13. SITE-94. Natural elemental mass movement in the vicinity of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.M.; Smith, G.M.; Towler, P.A.; Savage, D.

    1997-05-01

    The primary objective of this study is to quantify natural elemental fluxes at a location exhibiting typical characteristics of a site for a spent fuel repository in Sweden. The relevant pathways are considered to be: Groundwater transport; Glacial erosion; Non-glacial weathering; River transport. Calculations are made of elemental mass fluxes from a volume of rock equivalent to that which would hold a KBS-3 style repository. In addition, the radioactive flux associated with the natural series radionuclide mass fluxes from the repository are also calculated. These can be compared directly to performance assessment predictions of the releases from a repository. 88 refs, 13 figs, 24 tabs

  14. SITE-94. Natural elemental mass movement in the vicinity of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.M.; Smith, G.M.; Towler, P.A.; Savage, D. [QuantiSci, Melton Mowbray (United Kingdom)

    1997-05-01

    The primary objective of this study is to quantify natural elemental fluxes at a location exhibiting typical characteristics of a site for a spent fuel repository in Sweden. The relevant pathways are considered to be: Groundwater transport; Glacial erosion; Non-glacial weathering; River transport. Calculations are made of elemental mass fluxes from a volume of rock equivalent to that which would hold a KBS-3 style repository. In addition, the radioactive flux associated with the natural series radionuclide mass fluxes from the repository are also calculated. These can be compared directly to performance assessment predictions of the releases from a repository. 88 refs, 13 figs, 24 tabs.

  15. Stress state of rock mass under open pit mining in the influence zone of tectonic disturbances (in terms of the Oktorkoi Fault, North Tien Shan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhogulov, KCh; Nikolskaya, OV; Rybin, AK; Kuzikov, SI

    2018-03-01

    The qualitative connection between the crack growth direction and the orientation of the main axes of horizontal deformations in rocks mass in the area of the Boordin gold ore province is revealed. The effect of the rock mass quality (RQD) and contact conditions of crack surfaces on the stability index of pit wall rock mass is evaluated, and the influence of the rock mass quality index on the pit wall stability is determined.

  16. Hydromechanical Rock Mass Fatigue in Deep-Seated Landslides Accompanying Seasonal Variations in Pore Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisig, Giona; Eberhardt, Erik; Smithyman, Megan; Preh, Alexander; Bonzanigo, Luca

    2016-06-01

    The episodic movement of deep-seated landslides is often governed by the presence of high pore pressures and reduced effective stresses along active shear surfaces. Pore pressures are subject to cyclic fluctuation under seasonal variations of groundwater recharge, resulting in an intermittent movement characterized by acceleration-deceleration phases. However, it is not always clear why certain acceleration phases reach alarming levels without a clear trigger (i.e., in the absence of an exceptional pore pressure event). This paper presents a conceptual framework linking hydromechanical cycling, progressive failure and fatigue to investigate and explain the episodic behavior of deep-seated landslides using the Campo Vallemaggia landslide in Switzerland as a case study. A combination of monitoring data and advanced numerical modeling is used. The principal processes forcing the slope into a critical disequilibrium state are analyzed as a function of rock mass damage and fatigue. Modeling results suggest that during periods of slope acceleration, the rock slope experiences localized fatigue and gradual weakening through slip along pre-existing natural fractures and yield of critically stressed intact rock bridges. At certain intervals, pockets of critically weakened rock may produce a period of enhanced slope movement in response to a small pore pressure increase similar to those routinely experienced each year. Accordingly, the distribution and connectivity of pre-existing permeable planes of weakness play a central role. These structures are often related to the rock mass's tectonic history or initiate (and dilate) in response to stress changes that disturb the entire slope, such as glacial unloading or seismic loading via large earthquakes. The latter is discussed in detail in a companion paper to this (Gischig et al., Rock Mech Rock Eng, 2015). The results and framework presented further demonstrate that episodic movement and progressive failure of deep

  17. Application of large strain analysis for estimation of behavior and stability of rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Mitsuo; Jiang, Yujing; Esaki, Tetsuro.

    1997-01-01

    It is difficult to simulate a large deformation phenomena with plastic flow after failure by using a general numerical approach, such as the FEM (finite element method), based on the infinitesimal strain theory. In order to investigate the behavior of tunnels excavated in soft rock mass, a new simulation technique which can represent large strain accurately is desired, and the code FLAC (Fast Lagragian Analysis of Continua) adopted in this study is being thought a best mean for this propose. In this paper, the basic principles and the application of the large strain analysis method to stability analysis and prediction of the deformational behavior of tunnels in soft rock are presented. First, the features of the large strain theory and some different points from the infinitesimal strain theory are made up. Next, as the examples, the reproduction of uniaxial compression test for soft rock material and the stability analysis of tunnel in soft rock are tried so as to determine the capability of presenting the large deformational behavior. (author)

  18. Model test of anchoring effect on zonal disintegration in deep surrounding rock masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu-Guang; Zhang, Qiang-Yong; Wang, Yuan; Liu, De-Jun; Zhang, Ning

    2013-01-01

    The deep rock masses show a different mechanical behavior compared with the shallow rock masses. They are classified into alternating fractured and intact zones during the excavation, which is known as zonal disintegration. Such phenomenon is a great disaster and will induce the different excavation and anchoring methodology. In this study, a 3D geomechanics model test was conducted to research the anchoring effect of zonal disintegration. The model was constructed with anchoring in a half and nonanchoring in the other half, to compare with each other. The optical extensometer and optical sensor were adopted to measure the displacement and strain changing law in the model test. The displacement laws of the deep surrounding rocks were obtained and found to be nonmonotonic versus the distance to the periphery. Zonal disintegration occurs in the area without anchoring and did not occur in the model under anchoring condition. By contrasting the phenomenon, the anchor effect of restraining zonal disintegration was revealed. And the formation condition of zonal disintegration was decided. In the procedure of tunnel excavation, the anchor strain was found to be alternation in tension and compression. It indicates that anchor will show the nonmonotonic law during suppressing the zonal disintegration.

  19. STRESSES AND DEFORMABILITY OF ROCK MASS UPON OPEN PIT EXPLOITATION OF DIMENSION STONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Dunda

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of increased stresses and deformability of rock mass in the quarry of Zečevo (exploitation field of Selca – island of Brač has caused a considerable decrease of usability of mineral raw materials, which put into question the survival of the pit. Therefore the research and measurements of the state of stresses and deformability of rock mass within the pit were carried out. Besides detailed laboratory testings (testings on small samples performed were trial in-situ testings on large samples including the corresponding numerical analyses. The exploitation of dimension stone by sowing regularly shaped rectangular blocks has been proved to be appropriate for in-situ testing of bending strength. The paper presents the results of carried out laboratory testings, in-situ testings of bending strength including measuring of deformations after sowing cuts and numerical analyses by which the possible range of horizontal stresses was determined. Since for the case of massive rocks, for which the continuum concept is applied, there are no specifically defined methods of corrections, presented is a possible relation for correction of input size values based on the carried out laboratory and in-situ testings.

  20. Model Test of Anchoring Effect on Zonal Disintegration in Deep Surrounding Rock Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Guang Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The deep rock masses show a different mechanical behavior compared with the shallow rock masses. They are classified into alternating fractured and intact zones during the excavation, which is known as zonal disintegration. Such phenomenon is a great disaster and will induce the different excavation and anchoring methodology. In this study, a 3D geomechanics model test was conducted to research the anchoring effect of zonal disintegration. The model was constructed with anchoring in a half and nonanchoring in the other half, to compare with each other. The optical extensometer and optical sensor were adopted to measure the displacement and strain changing law in the model test. The displacement laws of the deep surrounding rocks were obtained and found to be nonmonotonic versus the distance to the periphery. Zonal disintegration occurs in the area without anchoring and did not occur in the model under anchoring condition. By contrasting the phenomenon, the anchor effect of restraining zonal disintegration was revealed. And the formation condition of zonal disintegration was decided. In the procedure of tunnel excavation, the anchor strain was found to be alternation in tension and compression. It indicates that anchor will show the nonmonotonic law during suppressing the zonal disintegration.

  1. Shear Creep Simulation of Structural Plane of Rock Mass Based on Discontinuous Deformation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxin Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations of the creep characteristics of the structural plane of rock mass are very useful. However, most existing simulation methods are based on continuum mechanics and hence are unsuitable in the case of large displacements and deformations. The discontinuous deformation analysis method proposed by Genhua is a discrete one and has a significant advantage when simulating the contacting problem of blocks. In this study, we combined the viscoelastic rheological model of Burgers with the discontinuous deformation analysis (DDA method. We also derived the recurrence formula for the creep deformation increment with the time step during numerical simulations. Based on the minimum potential energy principle, the general equilibrium equation was derived, and the shear creep deformation in the structural plane was considered. A numerical program was also developed and its effectiveness was confirmed based on the curves obtained by the creep test of the structural plane of a rock mass under different stress levels. Finally, the program was used to analyze the mechanism responsible for the creep features of the structural plane in the case of the toppling deformation of the rock slope. The results showed that the extended DDA method is an effective one.

  2. Mathematical modeling of seismic explosion waves impact on rock mass with a working

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. П. Господариков

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the article, within the framework of the dynamic theory of elasticity, a mathematical model of the impact of seismic blast waves on rock mass is presented, including a working. The increase in the volume of mining operations in complex mining and geological conditions, taking into account the influence of the explosion energy, is closely connected with the analysis of the main parameters of the stress-strain state of the rock massif including a working. The latter leads to the need to determine the safe parameters of drilling and blasting operations that ensure the operational state of mining. The main danger in detonation of an explosive charge near an active working is a seismic explosive wave which characteristics are determined by the properties of soil and parameters of drilling and blasting operations. The determination of stress fields and displacement velocities in rock mass requires the use of a modern mathematical apparatus for its solution. For numerical solution of the given boundary value problem by the method of finite differences, an original calculation-difference scheme is constructed. The application of the splitting method for solving a two-dimensional boundary value problem is reduced to the solution of spatially one-dimensional differential equations. For the obtained numerical algorithm, an effective computational software has been developed. Numerical solutions of the model problem are given for the case when the shape of the working has a form of an ellipse.

  3. An Illustration of Determining Quantitatively the Rock Mass Quality Parameters of the Hoek-Brown Failure Criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Adoko, Amoussou Coffi; Li, Bo

    2018-04-01

    In tunneling, determining quantitatively the rock mass strength parameters of the Hoek-Brown (HB) failure criterion is useful since it can improve the reliability of the design of tunnel support systems. In this study, a quantitative method is proposed to determine the rock mass quality parameters of the HB failure criterion, namely the Geological Strength Index (GSI) and the disturbance factor ( D) based on the structure of drilling core and weathering condition of rock mass combined with acoustic wave test to calculate the strength of rock mass. The Rock Mass Structure Index and the Rock Mass Weathering Index are used to quantify the GSI while the longitudinal wave velocity ( V p) is employed to derive the value of D. The DK383+338 tunnel face of Yaojia tunnel of Shanghai-Kunming passenger dedicated line served as illustration of how the methodology is implemented. The values of the GSI and D are obtained using the HB criterion and then using the proposed method. The measured in situ stress is used to evaluate their accuracy. To this end, the major and minor principal stresses are calculated based on the GSI and D given by HB criterion and the proposed method. The results indicated that both methods were close to the field observation which suggests that the proposed method can be used for determining quantitatively the rock quality parameters, as well. However, these results remain valid only for rock mass quality and rock type similar to those of the DK383+338 tunnel face of Yaojia tunnel.

  4. Multielement determination of rare earth elements in rock sample by liquid chromatography / inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamanaka, Tadashi; Itoh, Akihide; Itoh, Shinya; Sawatari, Hideyuki; Haraguchi, Hiroki.

    1995-01-01

    Rare earth elements in geological standard rock sample JG-1 (granodiolite)issued from the Geological Survey of Japan have been determined by a combined system of liquid chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. (author)

  5. The impact of the structural features of the rock mass on seismicity in Polish coal mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patyńska, Renata

    2017-11-01

    The article presents seismic activity induced in the coal mines of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (GZW) in relation to the locations of the occurrence of rockbursts. The comparison of these measurements with the structural features of the rock mass of coal mines indicates the possibility of estimating the so-called Unitary Energy Expenditure (UEE) in a specific time. The obtained values of UEE were compared with the distribution of seismic activity in GZW mines. The level of seismic activity in the analysed period changed and depended on the intensity of mining works and diverse mining and geological conditions. Five regions, where tremors occurred (Bytom Trough, Main Saddle, Main Trough, Kazimierz Trough, and Jejkowice and Chwałowice Trough) which belong to various structural units of the Upper Silesia were analyzed. It was found out that rock bursts were recorded only in three regions: Main Saddle, Bytom Trough, and Jejkowice and Chwałowice Trough.

  6. Geomechanical analysis of excavation-induced rock mass behavior of faulted Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoeny, R.

    2014-01-01

    Clay rock formations are potential host rocks for deep geological disposal of nuclear waste. However, they exhibit relatively low strength and brittle failure behaviour. Construction of underground openings in clay rocks may lead to the formation of an excavation damage zone (EDZ) in the near-field area of the tunnel. This has to be taken into account during risk assessment for waste-disposal facilities. To investigate the geomechanical processes associated with the rock mass response of faulted Opalinus Clay during tunnelling, a full-scale ‘mine-by’ experiment was carried out at the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory (URL) in Switzerland. In the ‘mine-by’ experiment, fracture network characteristics within the experimental section were characterized prior to and after excavation by integrating structural data from geological mapping of the excavation surfaces and from four pre- and post-excavation boreholes.The displacements and deformations in the surrounding rock mass were measured using geo-technical instrumentation including borehole inclinometers, extensometers and deflectometers, together with high-resolution geodetic displacement measurements and laser scanning measurements on the excavation surfaces. Complementary data was gathered from structural and geophysical characterization of the surrounding rock mass. Geological and geophysical techniques were used to analyse the structural and kinematic relationships between the natural and excavation-induced fracture network surrounding the ‘mine-by’ experiment. Integrating the results from seismic refraction tomography, borehole logging, and tunnel surface mapping revealed that spatial variations in fault frequency along the tunnel axis alter the rock mass deformability and strength. Failure mechanisms, orientation and frequency of excavation-induced fractures are significantly influenced by tectonic faults. On the side walls, extensional fracturing tangential to the tunnel circumference was the

  7. Geomechanical analysis of excavation-induced rock mass behavior of faulted Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoeny, R.

    2014-07-01

    Clay rock formations are potential host rocks for deep geological disposal of nuclear waste. However, they exhibit relatively low strength and brittle failure behaviour. Construction of underground openings in clay rocks may lead to the formation of an excavation damage zone (EDZ) in the near-field area of the tunnel. This has to be taken into account during risk assessment for waste-disposal facilities. To investigate the geomechanical processes associated with the rock mass response of faulted Opalinus Clay during tunnelling, a full-scale ‘mine-by’ experiment was carried out at the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory (URL) in Switzerland. In the ‘mine-by’ experiment, fracture network characteristics within the experimental section were characterized prior to and after excavation by integrating structural data from geological mapping of the excavation surfaces and from four pre- and post-excavation boreholes.The displacements and deformations in the surrounding rock mass were measured using geo-technical instrumentation including borehole inclinometers, extensometers and deflectometers, together with high-resolution geodetic displacement measurements and laser scanning measurements on the excavation surfaces. Complementary data was gathered from structural and geophysical characterization of the surrounding rock mass. Geological and geophysical techniques were used to analyse the structural and kinematic relationships between the natural and excavation-induced fracture network surrounding the ‘mine-by’ experiment. Integrating the results from seismic refraction tomography, borehole logging, and tunnel surface mapping revealed that spatial variations in fault frequency along the tunnel axis alter the rock mass deformability and strength. Failure mechanisms, orientation and frequency of excavation-induced fractures are significantly influenced by tectonic faults. On the side walls, extensional fracturing tangential to the tunnel circumference was the

  8. A new qualitative pattern classification of shear wave elastograghy for solid breast mass evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Rui; Li, Jing; Guo, Song

    2017-02-01

    To examine the efficacy of qualitative shear wave elastography (SWE) in the classification and evaluation of solid breast masses, and to compare this method with conventional ultrasonograghy (US), quantitative SWE parameters and qualitative SWE classification proposed before. From April 2015 to March 2016, 314 consecutive females with 325 breast masses who decided to undergo core needle biopsy and/or surgical biopsy were enrolled. Conventional US and SWE were previously performed in all enrolled subjects. Each mass was classified by two different qualitative classifications. One was established in our study, herein named the Qual1. Qual1 could classify the SWE images into five color patterns by the visual evaluations: Color pattern 1 (homogeneous pattern); Color pattern 2 (comparative homogeneous pattern); Color pattern 3 (irregularly heterogeneous pattern); Color pattern 4 (intralesional echo pattern); and Color pattern 5 (the stiff rim sign pattern). The second qualitative classification was named Qual2 here, and included a four-color overlay pattern classification (Tozaki and Fukuma, Acta Radiologica, 2011). The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) assessment and quantitative SWE parameters were recorded. Diagnostic performances of conventional US, SWE parameters, and combinations of US and SWE parameters were compared. With pathological results as the gold standard, of the 325 examined breast masses, 139 (42.77%) samples were malignant and 186 (57.23%) were benign. The Qual1 showed a higher Az value than the Qual2 and quantitative SWE parameters (all Pbreast mass diagnoses. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Yucca Mountain Project thermal and mechanical codes first benchmark exercise: Part 3, Jointed rock mass analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costin, L.S.; Bauer, S.J.

    1991-10-01

    Thermal and mechanical models for intact and jointed rock mass behavior are being developed, verified, and validated at Sandia National Laboratories for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Benchmarking is an essential part of this effort and is one of the tools used to demonstrate verification of engineering software used to solve thermomechanical problems. This report presents the results of the third (and final) phase of the first thermomechanical benchmark exercise. In the first phase of this exercise, nonlinear heat conduction code were used to solve the thermal portion of the benchmark problem. The results from the thermal analysis were then used as input to the second and third phases of the exercise, which consisted of solving the structural portion of the benchmark problem. In the second phase of the exercise, a linear elastic rock mass model was used. In the third phase of the exercise, two different nonlinear jointed rock mass models were used to solve the thermostructural problem. Both models, the Sandia compliant joint model and the RE/SPEC joint empirical model, explicitly incorporate the effect of the joints on the response of the continuum. Three different structural codes, JAC, SANCHO, and SPECTROM-31, were used with the above models in the third phase of the study. Each model was implemented in two different codes so that direct comparisons of results from each model could be made. The results submitted by the participants showed that the finite element solutions using each model were in reasonable agreement. Some consistent differences between the solutions using the two different models were noted but are not considered important to verification of the codes. 9 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs

  10. Hydrogeology of the rock mass encountered at the 240 level of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, E.T.; Davison, C.C.

    1992-09-01

    The rock mass surrounding the 240 level of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory (URL) has been hydrogeologically characterized through observations made in the tunnel and room excavations and from a network of radiating low-dipping boreholes. The 240 level complex sits in a wedge of grey-to-pink granite between two important, low-dipping, hydraulically active fracture zones, known as Fracture Zone 2 (FZ2) and Fracture Zone 2.5 (FZ2.5), a splay of FZ2. There is no apparent seepage into the 240 level room and tunnel network from the surrounding rock mass except from a vertical fracture intersected by the Room 209 tunnel. Extensive hydraulic and geomechanical tests have been conducted in boreholes intersecting the Room 209 vertical fracture, and transmissivities were found to range from 10 -10 to 10 -6 m 2 /s. FZ2 and FZ2.5 occur at the 240 m depth approximately 10 m to the west and 100 m to the south respectively of the 240 level tunnel network. Hydraulic testing within packer-isolated boreholes intersecting these fracture zones showed that transmissivities ranged from 10 -7 to 10 -5 m 2 /s in FZ2, and 10 -9 to 10 -7 m 2 /s in FZ2.5. No naturally-occurring fractures were encountered east of the 240 level complex up to 300 m away. The rock mass to the north of the 240 level is dominated by the Room 209 vertical fracture, which tends to splay with distance and has been intersected 95 m from the Room 209 tunnel. (Author) (50 figs., 5 tabs., 10 refs.)

  11. A High Throughput Ambient Mass Spectrometric Approach to Species Identification and Classification from Chemical Fingerprint Signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Musah, Rabi A.; Espinoza, Edgard O.; Cody, Robert B.; Lesiak, Ashton D.; Christensen, Earl D.; Moore, Hannah E.; Maleknia, Simin; Drijfhout, Falko P.

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput method for species identification and classification through chemometric processing of direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry-derived fingerprint signatures has been developed. The method entails introduction of samples to the open air space between the DART ion source and the mass spectrometer inlet, with the entire observed mass spectral fingerprint subjected to unsupervised hierarchical clustering processing. A range of both polar and non-polar chemotypes a...

  12. Determination of stress state in rock mass using strain gauge probes CCBO

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Waclawik, Petr; Staš, Lubomír; Němčík, J.; Koníček, Petr; Kaláb, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 149, č. 149 (2016), s. 544-552 E-ISSN 1877-7058 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Compact Conical ended Borehole Overcoring method (CCBO) * overcoring * rock mass * stress Subject RIV: DH - Mining , incl. Coal Mining http://ac.els-cdn.com/S1877705816312206/1-s2.0-S1877705816312206-main.pdf?_tid=c951eea6-768c-11e6-bf0e-00000aab0f01&acdnat=1473425952_96caea37ce97896f79050c5dce211b57

  13. The application of positron emission tomography to the study of mass transfer in fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilling, D.; Jefferies, N.L.; Fowles, P.; Hawkesworth, M.R.; Parker, D.J.

    1991-06-01

    In order to predict the transport of dissolved radioelements through a fractured rock it is necessary to determine both the geometry of the fracture network and the hydraulic properties of the individual fractures. This paper describes a technique for studying mass transfer in a single fracture. The technique is positron emission tomography (PET) and it offers the potential for visualising quantitatively the migration of dissolved tracers. Preliminary experiments have been undertaken involving the flow of Na-22 and F-18 labelled solutions through artificial fractures. The results demonstrate that PET is well suited to this application. (author)

  14. Bolt-Grout Interactions in Elastoplastic Rock Mass Using Coupled FEM-FDM Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Deb

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical procedure based on finite element method (FEM and finite difference method (FDM for the analysis of bolt-grout interactions are introduced in this paper. The finite element procedure incorporates elasto-plastic concepts with Hoek and Brown yield criterion and has been applied for rock mass. Bolt-grout interactions are evaluated based on finite difference method and are embedded in the elasto-plastic procedures of FEM. The experimental validation of the proposed FEM-FDM procedures and numerical examples of a bolted tunnel are provided to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method for practical applications.

  15. Mass Spectrometry Imaging for the Classification of Tumor Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mascini, N.E.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can detect and identify many different molecules without the need for labeling. In addition, it can provide their spatial distributions as ‘molecular maps’. These features make MSI well suited for studying the molecular makeup of tumor tissue. Currently, there is an

  16. Classification of terverticillate Penicillia by electrospray mass spectrometric profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedsgaard, Jørn; Hansen, Michael Edberg; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2004-01-01

    429 isolates of 58 species belonging to Penicillium subgenus Penicillium are classified from direct infusion electrospray mass spectrometry (diMS) analysis of crude extracts by automated data processing. The study shows that about 70% of the species can be classified correctly into species using...

  17. Rock Mass Behavior Under Hydropower Embankment Dams: A Two-Dimensional Numerical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarchuk, A.; Ask, M. V. S.; Dahlström, L.-O.; Nordlund, E.

    2012-09-01

    Sweden has more than 190 large hydropower dams, of which about 50 are pure embankment dams and over 100 are concrete/embankment dams. This paper presents results from conceptual analyses of the response of typical Swedish rock mass to the construction of a hydropower embankment dam and its first stages of operation. The aim is to identify locations and magnitudes of displacements that are occurring in the rock foundation and grout curtain after construction of the dam, the first filling of its water reservoir, and after one seasonal variation of the water table. Coupled hydro-mechanical analysis was conducted using the two-dimensional distinct element program UDEC. Series of the simulations have been performed and the results show that the first filling of the reservoir and variation of water table induce largest magnitudes of displacement, with the greatest values obtained from the two models with high differential horizontal stresses and smallest spacing of sub-vertical fractures. These results may help identifying the condition of the dam foundation and contribute to the development of proper maintenance measures, which guarantee the safety and functionality of the dam. Additionally, newly developed dams may use these results for the estimation of the possible response of the rock foundation to the construction.

  18. Volcanic instability: the effects of internal pressurisation and consideration of rock mass properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M.; Petford, N.; Bromhead, E. N.

    2003-04-01

    Since the events at mount St Helens during May 1980, there has been considerable attention focused on the mechanisms and consequences of volcanic edifice collapse. As a result catastrophic edifice failure is now recognised as perhaps the most socially devastating natural disaster associated with volcanic activity. The tendency of volcanic edifices to fail appears ubiquitous behaviour, and a number of failure precursors and more importantly triggers have been suggested, of which magmagenic (e.g. thermal and mechanical pore pressure increases) and seismogenic (e.g. tectonic or volcanic earthquakes) are common. Despite the increased interest in this field, large-scale, deep seated catastrophic edifice failure has still only be successfully modelled in the most extreme of cases, which does not account for the volume of field evidence of edifice collapse. One possible reason for this is the way that pore pressures are considered. For pore fluids that are entering the system from the surface (e.g. rain water) there is a set volume and therefore a set pressure that the system can accommodate, as once the edifice becomes saturated, any new fluids to fall on the surface of the edifice simply run off. If we consider internal pore fluid pressurisation from magmatic gasses, then the pressurising fluid is already in the system and the only limit to how much pressure can be accommodated is the strength of the edifice itself. The failure to fully consider the strength and deformability of a rock mass compared to an intact laboratory sample of a volcanic rock may result in a misleading assessment of edifice strength. An intact laboratory sample of basalt may yield a strength of 100--350 MPa (from uniaxial compression tests), a volcanic edifice however is not an intact rock, and is cut through by many discontinuities, including; faults, fractures and layering from discrete lava flows. A better approximation of the true strength can be determined from the rock mass rating (RMR

  19. Lithology and Bedrock Geotechnical Properties in Controlling Rock and Ice Mass Movements in Mountain Cryosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, A.; Kargel, J. S.

    2017-12-01

    Landslides and ice avalanches kill >5000 people annually (D. Petley, 2012, Geology http://dx.doi.org/10.1130/G33217.1); destroy or damage homes and infrastructure; and create secondary hazards, such as flooding due to blocked rivers. Critical roles of surface slope, earthquake shaking, soil characteristics and saturation, river erosional undercutting, rainfall intensity, snow loading, permafrost thaw, freeze-thaw and frost shattering, debuttressing of unstable masses due to glacier thinning, and vegetation burn or removal are well-known factors affecting landslides and avalanches. Lithology-dependent bedrock physicochemical-mechanical properties—especially brittle elastic and shear strength, and chemical weathering properties that affect rock strength, are also recognized controls on landsliding and avalanching, but are not commonly considered in detail in landslide susceptibility assessment. Lithology controls the formation of weakened, weathered bedrock; the formation and accumulation of soils; soil saturation-related properties of grain size distribution, porosity, and permeability; and soil creep related to soil wetting-drying and freeze-thaw. Lithology controls bedrock abrasion and glacial erosion and debris production rates, the formation of rough or smoothed bedrock surface by glaciation, fluvial, and freeze-thaw processes. Lithologic variability (e.g., bedding; fault and joint structure) affects contrasts in chemical weathering rates, porosity, and susceptibility to frost shattering and chemical weathering, hence formation of overhanging outcrops and weakened slip planes. The sudden failure of bedrock or sudden slip of ice on bedrock, and many other processes depend on rock lithology, microstructure (porosity and permeability), and macrostructure (bedding; faults). These properties are sometimes considered in gross terms for landslide susceptibility assessment, but in detailed applications to specific development projects, and in detailed mapping over

  20. The new classification of elementary particle resonance mass spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareev, F.A.; Barabanov, M.Yu.; Kazacha, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    Elementary particle resonances have been systematically analyzed from the first principles: the conservation laws of energy-momentum and Ehrenfest adiabatic invariant. As a result, resonance decay product momenta and masses of resonances were established to be quantized. Radial excited states of resonances were revealed. These observations give us a possibility to formulate the strategy of experimental searches for new resonances and to systematize already known ones. (author)

  1. District element modelling of the rock mass response to glaciation at Finnsjoen, central Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosengren, L.; Stephansson, O.

    1990-12-01

    Six rock mechanics models of a cross section of the Finnsjoen test site have been simulated by means of distinct element analysis and the computer code UDEC. The rock mass response to glaciation, deglaciation, isostatic movements and water pressure from an ice lake have been simulated. Four of the models use a boundary condition with boundary elements at the bottom and sides of the model. This gives a state of stress inside the model which agrees well with the analytical solution where the horizontal and vertical stresses are almost similar. Roller boundaries were applied to two models. This boundary condition cause zero lateral displacement at the model boundaries and the horizontal stress are always less than the vertical stress. Isostatic movements were simulated in one model. Two different geometries of fracture Zone 2 were simulated. Results from modelling the two different geometries show minor changes in stresses, displacements and failure of fracture zones. Under normal pore pressure conditions in the rock mass the weight of the ice load increases the vertical stresses in the models differ depending on the boundary condition. An ice thickness of 3 km and 1 km and an ice wedge of 1 km thickness covering half the top surface of the model have been simulated. For each loading sequence of the six models a complete set of data about normal stress, stress profiles along selected sections, displacements and failure of fracture zones are presented. Based on the results of this study a protection zone of about 100 m width from the outer boundary of stress discontinuity to the repository location is suggested. This value is based on the result that the stress disturbance diminishes at this distance from the outer boundary of the discontinuity. (25 refs.) (authors)

  2. Study on Dynamic Disaster in Steeply Deep Rock Mass Condition in Urumchi Coalfield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Ping Lai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The possible mining seismicity (MS and its prediction are important for safety and recovery optimization of mining in steep-heavy-thick rock mass condition. The stress-lever-rotation-effect (SLRE model of fault-like mobilization was proposed preliminarily. Some innovation monitoring technique approaches for mining seismicity assessment were successfully fulfilled at Wudong Mine of Urumchi Coalfield, China. The characteristics on acoustic-seismic-wave index indicated the spatial-temporal-strength and stress redistribution of steeply deeper-heavy thick coal and rock masses. Applications in field investigations showed that the innovation monitoring (in time and space of these instruments could provide important information about the performance of mining disturbed structures (heading and steep pillar during caving of competent overlying roof strata. The prediction and evaluation for mining seismicity were applicable and valid. Operating practice showed that mining efficiency was raised and conspicuous economic benefit was obtained. This approach provides essential data for assessing mining seismicity, coal burst, dynamic hazard prevention, and deep mining potential.

  3. A new qualitative pattern classification of shear wave elastograghy for solid breast mass evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cong, Rui, E-mail: congrui2684@163.com; Li, Jing, E-mail: lijing@sj-hospital.org; Guo, Song, E-mail: 21751735@qq.com

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Qualitative SWE classification proposed here was significantly better than quantitative SWE parameters. • Qualitative classification proposed here was better than the classification proposed before. • Qualitative classification proposed here could obtain higher specificity without a loss of sensitivity. - Abstract: Objectives: To examine the efficacy of qualitative shear wave elastography (SWE) in the classification and evaluation of solid breast masses, and to compare this method with conventional ultrasonograghy (US), quantitative SWE parameters and qualitative SWE classification proposed before. Methods: From April 2015 to March 2016, 314 consecutive females with 325 breast masses who decided to undergo core needle biopsy and/or surgical biopsy were enrolled. Conventional US and SWE were previously performed in all enrolled subjects. Each mass was classified by two different qualitative classifications. One was established in our study, herein named the Qual1. Qual1 could classify the SWE images into five color patterns by the visual evaluations: Color pattern 1 (homogeneous pattern); Color pattern 2 (comparative homogeneous pattern); Color pattern 3 (irregularly heterogeneous pattern); Color pattern 4 (intralesional echo pattern); and Color pattern 5 (the stiff rim sign pattern). The second qualitative classification was named Qual2 here, and included a four-color overlay pattern classification (Tozaki and Fukuma, Acta Radiologica, 2011). The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) assessment and quantitative SWE parameters were recorded. Diagnostic performances of conventional US, SWE parameters, and combinations of US and SWE parameters were compared. Results: With pathological results as the gold standard, of the 325 examined breast masses, 139 (42.77%) samples were malignant and 186 (57.23%) were benign. The Qual1 showed a higher Az value than the Qual2 and quantitative SWE parameters (all P < 0.05). When applying Qual1

  4. A new qualitative pattern classification of shear wave elastograghy for solid breast mass evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong, Rui; Li, Jing; Guo, Song

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Qualitative SWE classification proposed here was significantly better than quantitative SWE parameters. • Qualitative classification proposed here was better than the classification proposed before. • Qualitative classification proposed here could obtain higher specificity without a loss of sensitivity. - Abstract: Objectives: To examine the efficacy of qualitative shear wave elastography (SWE) in the classification and evaluation of solid breast masses, and to compare this method with conventional ultrasonograghy (US), quantitative SWE parameters and qualitative SWE classification proposed before. Methods: From April 2015 to March 2016, 314 consecutive females with 325 breast masses who decided to undergo core needle biopsy and/or surgical biopsy were enrolled. Conventional US and SWE were previously performed in all enrolled subjects. Each mass was classified by two different qualitative classifications. One was established in our study, herein named the Qual1. Qual1 could classify the SWE images into five color patterns by the visual evaluations: Color pattern 1 (homogeneous pattern); Color pattern 2 (comparative homogeneous pattern); Color pattern 3 (irregularly heterogeneous pattern); Color pattern 4 (intralesional echo pattern); and Color pattern 5 (the stiff rim sign pattern). The second qualitative classification was named Qual2 here, and included a four-color overlay pattern classification (Tozaki and Fukuma, Acta Radiologica, 2011). The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) assessment and quantitative SWE parameters were recorded. Diagnostic performances of conventional US, SWE parameters, and combinations of US and SWE parameters were compared. Results: With pathological results as the gold standard, of the 325 examined breast masses, 139 (42.77%) samples were malignant and 186 (57.23%) were benign. The Qual1 showed a higher Az value than the Qual2 and quantitative SWE parameters (all P < 0.05). When applying Qual1

  5. A Model of Equilibrium Conditions of Roof Rock Mass Giving Consideration to the Yielding Capacity of Powered Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszczuk, Marek; Pawlikowski, Arkadiusz

    2017-12-01

    The work presents the model of interactions between the powered roof support units and the rock mass, while giving consideration to the yielding capacity of the supports - a value used for the analysis of equilibrium conditions of roof rock mass strata in geological and mining conditions of a given longwall. In the model, the roof rock mass is kept in equilibrium by: support units, the seam, goafs, and caving rocks (Fig. 1). In the assumed model of external load on the powered roof support units it is a new development - in relation to the model applied in selection of supports based on the allowable deflection of roof theory - that the load bearing capacity is dependent on the increment of the inclination of the roof rock mass and on the properties of the working medium, while giving consideration to the air pockets in the hydraulic systems, the load of the caving rocks on the caving shield, introducing the RA support value of the roof rock mass by the coal seam as a closed-form expression and while giving consideration to the additional support provided by the rocks of the goaf as a horizontal component R01H of the goaf reaction. To determine the roof maintenance conditions it is necessary to know the characteristics linking the yielding capacity of the support units with the heading convergence, which may be measured as the inclination angle of the roof rock mass. In worldwide mining, Ground Reaction Curves are used, which allow to determine the required yielding capacity of support units based on the relation between the load exerted on the unit and the convergence of the heading ensuring the equilibrium of the roof rock mass. (Figs. 4 and 8). The equilibrium of the roof rock mass in given conditions is determined at the displacement of the rock mass by the α angle, which impacts the following values: yielding capacity of units FN, vertical component of goaf reaction R01V and the horizontal component of goaf reaction R01H. In the model of load on the support

  6. Classification of breast masses in ultrasonic B scans using Nakagami and K distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, P M; Dumane, Vishruta A; George, Thomas; Piccoli, Catherine W; Reid, John M; Forsberg, Flemming; Goldberg, Barry B

    2003-01-01

    Classification of breast masses in greyscale ultrasound images is undertaken using a multiparameter approach. Five parameters reflecting the non-Rayleigh nature of the backscattered echo were used. These parameters, based mostly on the Nakagami and K distributions, were extracted from the envelope of the echoes at the site, boundary, spiculated region and shadow of the mass. They were combined to create a linear discriminant. The performance of this discriminant for the classification of breast masses was studied using a data set consisting of 70 benign and 29 malignant cases. The A z value for the discriminant was 0.96 ± 0.02, showing great promise in the classification of masses into benign and malignant ones. The discriminant was combined with the level of suspicion values of the radiologist leading to an A z value of 0.97 ± 0.014. The parameters used here can be calculated with minimal clinical intervention, so the method proposed here may therefore be easily implemented in an automated fashion. These results also support the recent reports suggesting that ultrasound may help as an adjunct to mammography in breast cancer diagnostics to enhance the classification of breast masses

  7. Selection of basic data for numerical modeling of rock mass stress state at Mirny Mining and Processing Works, Alrosa Group of Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokiy, IB; Zoteev, OV; Pul, VV; Pul, EK

    2018-03-01

    The influence of structural features on the strength and elasticity modulus is studied in rock mass in the area of Mirny Mining and Processing Works. The authors make recommendations on the values of physical properties of rocks.

  8. The Practical Application of Aqueous Geochemistry in Mapping Groundwater Flow Systems in Fractured Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursey, G.; Seok, E.; Gale, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    Flow to underground mines and open pits takes place through an interconnected network of regular joints/fractures and intermediate to large scale structural features such as faults and fracture zones. Large scale features can serve either as high permeability pathways or as barriers to flow, depending on the internal characteristics of the structure. Predicting long term water quality in barrier-well systems and long-term mine water inflows over a mine life, as a mine expands, requires the use of a 3D numerical flow and transport code. The code is used to integrate the physical geometry of the fractured-rock mass with porosity, permeability, hydraulic heads, storativity and recharge data and construct a model of the flow system. Once that model has been calibrated using hydraulic head and permeability/inflow data, aqueous geochemical and isotopic data provide useful tools for validating flow-system properties, when one is able to recognize and account for the non-ideal or imperfect aspects of the sampling methods used in different mining environments. If groundwater samples are collected from discrete depths within open boreholes, water in those boreholes have the opportunity to move up or down in response to the forces that drive groundwater flow, whether they be hydraulic gradients, gas pressures, or density differences associated with variations in salinity. The use of Br/Cl ratios, for example, can be used to determine if there is active flow into, or out of, the boreholes through open discontinuities in the rock mass (i.e., short-circuiting). Natural groundwater quality can also be affected to varying degrees by mixing with drilling fluids. The combined use of inorganic chemistry and stable isotopes can be used effectively to identify dilution signals and map the dilution patterns through a range of fresh, brackish and saline water types. The stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen are nearly ideal natural tracers of water, but situations occur when deep

  9. Evaluating heat-related mortality in Korea by objective classifications of 'air masses'

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyselý, Jan; Huth, Radan; Kim, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 10 (2010), s. 1484-1501 ISSN 0899-8418 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC205/07/J044 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : weather type classifications * air masses * biometeorology * human mortality * South Korea Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.479, year: 2010

  10. 76 FR 22322 - Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of Ovarian Adnexal Mass...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0026] Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of Ovarian Adnexal Mass Assessment Score Test System; Correction AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION...

  11. Heat Conductivity Model in the Rock Masses of the Kochani Depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakashev, Deljo; Delipetrov, Todor

    2006-01-01

    The numerous regional geologic and hydrogeological explorations carried out in the Kochani depression by the end of the last century and those carried out lately indicate that the area possesses large thermal potentiality. The physical analysis presents one physical model which explain the thermal flow and heat conductivity who fluidity yielding in the rock masses of the Kochani depression. The models offer a clear picture on the geothermal energy, which becomes important for the economics in developing and developed countries. The results obtained and the calculations carried out on the heat flow in individual geothermal zones in the Kochani depression made it possible to conclude that the central zone possesses the highest heat flow. This points out to the higher heat circulation in the central part than in the periphery. Based on this it can be said that the major source and the main heat supply in the valley comes from the central part. The north-eastern part of the depression distinguished as a geothermal source is of high capacity in which large amounts of geothermal energy can be exploited. On the other hand, the south-west of the depression is the poorest with regard to thermal energy and heat flow in the rocks compared with the other two zones in the depression. (Author)

  12. Observations of borehole deformation modulus values before and after extensive heating of a granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick, W.C.; Yow, J.L.; Caxelrod, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    An extensive campaign of in situ deformation modulus measurements was recently completed using a standard NX borehole jack. These results were obtained in a granite intrusive where spent nuclear-fuel assemblies and electrical heaters had raised the rock temperatures 10 0 C to 40 0 C above ambient. We present an analysis of temperature effects based on 41 preheat and 63 post-heat measurements in three boreholes. Using analysis of covariance statistical techniques, we found that the deformation modulus is affected by heat, loading direction, and position within the borehole. The analysis also uncovered a significant interaction between the effects of heating and loading direction. We used 123 measurements from the same boreholes to evaluate the ''Draft Standard Guide for Estimating the In Situ Modulus of Rock Masses Using the NX-Borehole Jack'' which was recently proposed by Heuze. In particular, we examined the criterion for screening measurements in those cases where contact between the jack platen and the borehole wall was incomplete. We found that the proposed screen appears to operate randomly on the data and is therefore ineffective

  13. Catastrophe theory—one of the basic components in the analysis of the seismic response of rock mass to explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachay, OA; Khachay, OYu

    2018-03-01

    It is shown that the dynamic process of mining can be controlled using the catastrophe theory. The control parameters can be values of blasting energy and locations of explosions relative to an area under study or operation. The kinematic and dynamic parameters of the deformation waves, as well as the structural features of rock mass through which these waves pass act as internal parameters. The use of the analysis methods for short-term and medium-term forecast of rock mass condition with the control parameters only is insufficient in the presence of sharp heterogeneity. However, the joint use of qualitative recommendations of the catastrophe theory and spatial–temporal data of changes in the internal parameters of rock mass will allow accident prevention in the course of mining.

  14. Analysis of displacement and strain data for the determination of the in-situ deformability of rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de la Cruz, R.V.; Karfakis, M.; Kim, K.

    1981-01-01

    The in-situ deformability of a highly jointed basalt rock mass was determined by two distinctly different methods: one, by the NX-borehole jack method where the displacements of opposing curved platens were related to the applied hydraulic pressures, and; two, by the modified Goodman jack method where the tangential strains on the borehole walls were related to the induced tangential stresses. The modulus obtained by the modified Goodman jack method were much higher than those obtained by the NX-borehole jack method. To explain the discrepancy, the influence of fractures and test variables such as depth, orientation, hole number and applied pressure on the calculated modulus of the rock mass were analyzed by factorial analysis and it was found that the orientations and depths of measurement has statistically significant effects. The in-situ deformability values obtained by non-linear regression analysis were also found comparable with other measurements and empirically predicted values for the basalt rock mass

  15. Collaborative Research: failure of RockMasses from Nucleation and Growth of Microscopic Defects and Disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, William [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2016-09-12

    Over the 21 years of funding we have pursued several projects related to earthquakes, damage and nucleation. We developed simple models of earthquake faults which we studied to understand Gutenburg-Richter scaling, foreshocks and aftershocks, the effect of spatial structure of the faults and its interaction with underlying self organization and phase transitions. In addition we studied the formation of amorphous solids via the glass transition. We have also studied nucleation with a particular concentration on transitions in systems with a spatial symmetry change. In addition we investigated the nucleation process in models that mimic rock masses. We obtained the structure of the droplet in both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. We also investigated the effect of defects or asperities on the nucleation of failure in simple models of earthquake faults.

  16. Porous media fluid flow, heat, and mass transport model with rock stress coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runchal, A.K.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the physical and mathematical basis of a general purpose porous media flow model, GWTHERM. The mathematical basis of the model is obtained from the coupled set of the classical governing equations for the mass, momentum and energy balance. These equations are embodied in a computational model which is then coupled externally to a linearly elastic rock-stress model. This coupling is rather exploratory and based upon empirical correlations. The coupled model is able to take account of time-dependent, inhomogeneous and anisotropic features of the hydrogeologic, thermal and transport phenomena. A number of applications of the model have been made. Illustrations from the application of the model to nuclear waste repositories are included

  17. Use of prior mammograms in the classification of benign and malignant masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varela, Celia; Karssemeijer, Nico; Hendriks, Jan H.C.L.; Holland, Roland

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of using prior mammograms for classification of benign and malignant masses. Five radiologists and one resident classified mass lesions in 198 mammograms obtained from a population-based screening program. Cases were interpreted twice, once without and once with comparison of previous mammograms, in a sequential reading order using soft copy image display. The radiologists' performances in classifying benign and malignant masses without and with previous mammograms were evaluated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The statistical significance of the difference in performances was calculated using analysis of variance. The use of prior mammograms improved the classification performance of all participants in the study. The mean area under the ROC curve of the readers increased from 0.763 to 0.796. This difference in performance was statistically significant (P = 0.008)

  18. False-positive reduction in CAD mass detection using a competitive classification strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lihua; Zheng Yang; Zhang Lei; Clark, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    High false-positive (FP) rate remains to be one of the major problems to be solved in CAD study because too many false-positively cued signals will potentially degrade the performance of detecting true-positive regions and increase the call-back rate in CAD environment. In this paper, we proposed a novel classification method for FP reduction, where the conventional 'hard' decision classifier is cascaded with a 'soft' decision classification with the objective to reduce false-positives in the cases with multiple FPs retained after the 'hard' decision classification. The 'soft' classification takes a competitive classification strategy in which only the 'best' ones are selected from the pre-classified suspicious regions as the true mass in each case. A neural network structure is designed to implement the proposed competitive classification. Comparative studies of FP reduction on a database of 79 images by a 'hard' decision classification and a combined 'hard'-'soft' classification method demonstrated the efficiency of the proposed classification strategy. For example, for the high FP sub-database which has only 31.7% of total images but accounts for 63.5% of whole FPs generated in single 'hard' classification, the FPs can be reduced for 56% (from 8.36 to 3.72 per image) by using the proposed method at the cost of 1% TP loss (from 69% to 68%) in whole database, while it can only be reduced for 27% (from 8.36 to 6.08 per image) by simply increasing the threshold of 'hard' classifier with a cost of TP loss as high as 14% (from 69% to 55%). On the average in whole database, the FP reduction by hybrid 'hard'-'soft' classification is 1.58 per image as compared to 1.11 by 'hard' classification at the TP costs described above. Because the cases with high dense tissue are of higher risk of cancer incidence and false-negative detection in mammogram screening, and usually generate more FPs in CAD detection, the method proposed in this paper will be very helpful in improving

  19. Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Renee Clary and James Wandersee describe the beginnings of "Classification," which lies at the very heart of science and depends upon pattern recognition. Clary and Wandersee approach patterns by first telling the story of the "Linnaean classification system," introduced by Carl Linnacus (1707-1778), who is…

  20. A study on excavation of rock mass by lasers. Researching the possibility of utilizing low-power lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Fumio [Taisei Corporation, Technology Research Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    The object of this research is to develop the techniques of rock-mass excavation by laser irradiation. This rock-mass excavation technique by lasers has a characteristic of extremely little effect to the surroundings of an excavation site no matter how the target rock mass is with regard to geological aspects and given physical property. Moreover, it could be utilized in excavation of waste dump facilities, which need to be re-buried, and applied to excavation of long piles and tunnels, which are drilled through different kinds of strata, and to improvement of rock mass and ground. Lasers have a characteristic of concentrating the energy into a limited point and not only discontinue or cut a large area with a small output like sharp scissors but also block up the cracks deep inside the rock mass by fusing vitrification for its improvement. It leads to restrain the loss of energy, minimization of the effected environment, effective utilization of resources and energy, environmental restoration, and improvement of the working environment. In the field of nuclear fuel, which includes excavating dump pits, dismantling a furnace, and taking appropriate steps of mine remains, excavating, cutting, and fusing could be required to do within a limited space of rock mass or concrete. Up to the present, those things have been done mainly by large machines, but it is too scarce in possibility for them to improve their large size, heavy weight, difficulty in unmanned operation, limited shapes of cutting, and stabilization of waste. In this research the concrete system images have been examined, doing the fundamental researches about higher-power lasers, smaller sizing, transmitting by fibers to find our the breakthrough to realization of laser excavation, This year, as the summary of examining the laser excavation techniques, utilizing a low-power laser, which is thought to be highly effective in rock-mass improvement, will be examined, considering application of the technique

  1. Influence of the Elastic Dilatation of Mining-Induced Unloading Rock Mass on the Development of Bed Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weibing Zhu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how mining-induced strata movement, fractures, bed separation, and ground subsidence evolve is an area of great importance for the underground coal mining industry, particularly for disaster control and sustainable mining. Based on the rules of mining-induced strata movement and stress evolution, accumulative dilatation of mining-induced unloading rock mass is first proposed in this paper. Triaxial unloading tests and theoretical calculation were used to investigate the influence of elastic dilatation of mining-induced unloading rock mass on the development of bed separation in the context of district No. 102 where a layer of super-thick igneous sill exists in the Haizi colliery. It is shown that the elastic dilatation coefficient of mining-induced unloading hard rocks and coal were 0.9~1.0‰ and 2.63‰ respectively under the axial load of 16 MPa, which increased to 1.30~1.59‰ and 4.88‰ when the axial load was 32 MPa. After successively excavating working faces No. 1022 and No. 1024, the elastic dilatation of unloading rock mass was 157.9 mm, which represented approximately 6.3% of the mining height, indicating the elastic dilatation of mining-induced unloading rock mass has a moderate influence on the development of bed separation. Drill hole detection results after grouting, showed that only 0.33 m of the total grouting filling thickness (1.67 m was located in the fracture zone and bending zone, which verified the result from previous drill hole detection that only small bed separation developed beneath the igneous sill. Therefore, it was concluded that the influences of elastic dilatation of mining-induced unloading rock mass and bulking of caved rock mass jointly contributed to the small bed separation space beneath the igneous sill. Since the accurate calculation of the unloading dilatation of rock mass is the fundamental basis for quantitative calculation of bed separation and surface subsidence, this paper is expected

  2. Effects of statistical distribution of joint trace length on the stability of tunnel excavated in jointed rock mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayvan Ghorbani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The rock masses in a construction site of underground cavern are generally not continuous, due to the presence of discontinuities, such as bedding, joints, faults, and fractures. The performance of an underground cavern is principally ruled by the mechanical behaviors of the discontinuities in the vicinity of the cavern. During underground excavation, many surrounding rock failures have close relationship with joints. The stability study on tunnel in jointed rock mass is of importance to rock engineering, especially tunneling and underground space development. In this study, using the probability density distribution functions of negative exponential, log-normal and normal, we investigated the effect of joint trace length on the stability parameters such as stress and displacement of tunnel constructed in rock mass using UDEC (Universal Distinct Element Code. It was obtained that normal distribution function of joint trace length is more critical on the stability of tunnel, and exponential distribution function has less effect on the tunnel stability compared to the two other distribution functions.

  3. Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2017-01-01

    This article presents and discusses definitions of the term “classification” and the related concepts “Concept/conceptualization,”“categorization,” “ordering,” “taxonomy” and “typology.” It further presents and discusses theories of classification including the influences of Aristotle...... and Wittgenstein. It presents different views on forming classes, including logical division, numerical taxonomy, historical classification, hermeneutical and pragmatic/critical views. Finally, issues related to artificial versus natural classification and taxonomic monism versus taxonomic pluralism are briefly...

  4. Numerical probabilistic analysis for slope stability in fractured rock masses using DFN-DEM approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Baghbanan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to existence of uncertainties in input geometrical properties of fractures, there is not any unique solution for assessing the stability of slopes in jointed rock masses. Therefore, the necessity of applying probabilistic analysis in these cases is inevitable. In this study a probabilistic analysis procedure together with relevant algorithms are developed using Discrete Fracture Network-Distinct Element Method (DFN-DEM approach. In the right abutment of Karun 4 dam and downstream of the dam body, five joint sets and one major joint have been identified. According to the geometrical properties of fractures in Karun river valley, instability situations are probable in this abutment. In order to evaluate the stability of the rock slope, different combinations of joint set geometrical parameters are selected, and a series of numerical DEM simulations are performed on generated and validated DFN models in DFN-DEM approach to measure minimum required support patterns in dry and saturated conditions. Results indicate that the distribution of required bolt length is well fitted with a lognormal distribution in both circumstances. In dry conditions, the calculated mean value is 1125.3 m, and more than 80 percent of models need only 1614.99 m of bolts which is a bolt pattern with 2 m spacing and 12 m length. However, as for the slopes with saturated condition, the calculated mean value is 1821.8 m, and more than 80 percent of models need only 2653.49 m of bolts which is equivalent to a bolt pattern with 15 m length and 1.5 m spacing. Comparison between obtained results with numerical and empirical method show that investigation of a slope stability with different DFN realizations which conducted in different block patterns is more efficient than the empirical methods.

  5. Qualitative pattern classification of shear wave elastography for breast masses: how it correlates to quantitative measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung Hyun; Ko, Kyung Hee; Jung, Hae Kyoung; Lee, Jong Tae

    2013-12-01

    To determine the correlation of qualitative shear wave elastography (SWE) pattern classification to quantitative SWE measurements and whether it is representative of quantitative SWE values with similar performances. From October 2012 to January 2013, 267 breast masses of 236 women (mean age: 45.12 ± 10.54 years, range: 21-88 years) who had undergone ultrasonography (US), SWE, and subsequent biopsy were included. US BI-RADS final assessment and qualitative and quantitative SWE measurements were recorded. Correlation between pattern classification and mean elasticity, maximum elasticity, elasticity ratio and standard deviation were evaluated. Diagnostic performances of grayscale US, SWE parameters, and US combined to SWE values were calculated and compared. Of the 267 breast masses, 208 (77.9%) were benign and 59 (22.1%) were malignant. Pattern classifications significantly correlated with all quantitative SWE measurements, showing highest correlation with maximum elasticity, r = 0.721 (P0.05). Pattern classification shows high correlation to maximum stiffness and may be representative of quantitative SWE values. When combined to grayscale US, SWE improves specificity of US. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Qualitative pattern classification of shear wave elastography for breast masses: How it correlates to quantitative measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jung Hyun; Ko, Kyung Hee; Jung, Hae Kyoung; Lee, Jong Tae

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the correlation of qualitative shear wave elastography (SWE) pattern classification to quantitative SWE measurements and whether it is representative of quantitative SWE values with similar performances. Methods: From October 2012 to January 2013, 267 breast masses of 236 women (mean age: 45.12 ± 10.54 years, range: 21–88 years) who had undergone ultrasonography (US), SWE, and subsequent biopsy were included. US BI-RADS final assessment and qualitative and quantitative SWE measurements were recorded. Correlation between pattern classification and mean elasticity, maximum elasticity, elasticity ratio and standard deviation were evaluated. Diagnostic performances of grayscale US, SWE parameters, and US combined to SWE values were calculated and compared. Results: Of the 267 breast masses, 208 (77.9%) were benign and 59 (22.1%) were malignant. Pattern classifications significantly correlated with all quantitative SWE measurements, showing highest correlation with maximum elasticity, r = 0.721 (P < 0.001). Sensitivity was significantly decreased in US combined to SWE measurements to grayscale US: 69.5–89.8% to 100.0%, while specificity was significantly improved: 62.5–81.7% to 13.9% (P < 0.001). Area under the ROC curve (A z ) did not show significant differences between grayscale US to US combined to SWE (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Pattern classification shows high correlation to maximum stiffness and may be representative of quantitative SWE values. When combined to grayscale US, SWE improves specificity of US

  7. Qualitative pattern classification of shear wave elastography for breast masses: How it correlates to quantitative measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jung Hyun, E-mail: lvjenny0417@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Kyung Hee, E-mail: yourheeya@cha.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hae Kyoung, E-mail: AA40501@cha.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Tae, E-mail: jtlee@cha.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Objective: To determine the correlation of qualitative shear wave elastography (SWE) pattern classification to quantitative SWE measurements and whether it is representative of quantitative SWE values with similar performances. Methods: From October 2012 to January 2013, 267 breast masses of 236 women (mean age: 45.12 ± 10.54 years, range: 21–88 years) who had undergone ultrasonography (US), SWE, and subsequent biopsy were included. US BI-RADS final assessment and qualitative and quantitative SWE measurements were recorded. Correlation between pattern classification and mean elasticity, maximum elasticity, elasticity ratio and standard deviation were evaluated. Diagnostic performances of grayscale US, SWE parameters, and US combined to SWE values were calculated and compared. Results: Of the 267 breast masses, 208 (77.9%) were benign and 59 (22.1%) were malignant. Pattern classifications significantly correlated with all quantitative SWE measurements, showing highest correlation with maximum elasticity, r = 0.721 (P < 0.001). Sensitivity was significantly decreased in US combined to SWE measurements to grayscale US: 69.5–89.8% to 100.0%, while specificity was significantly improved: 62.5–81.7% to 13.9% (P < 0.001). Area under the ROC curve (A{sub z}) did not show significant differences between grayscale US to US combined to SWE (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Pattern classification shows high correlation to maximum stiffness and may be representative of quantitative SWE values. When combined to grayscale US, SWE improves specificity of US.

  8. An experimental scale-model study of seismic response of an underground opening in jointed rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kana, D.D.; Fox, D.J.; Hsiung, S.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes an experimental investigation conducted by the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) to (i) obtain a better understanding of the seismic response of an underground opening in a highly-fractured and jointed rock mass and (ii) generate a data set that can be used to evaluate the capabilities (analytical methods) to calculate such response. This report describes the design and implementation of simulated seismic experiments and results for a 1/15 scale model of a jointed rock mass with a circular tunnel in the middle. The discussion on the design of the scale model includes a description of the associated similitude theory, physical design rationale, model material development, preliminary analytical evaluation, instrumentation design and calibration, and model assembly and pretest procedures. The thrust of this discussion is intended to provide the information necessary to understand the experimental setup and to provide the background necessary to understand the experimental results. The discussion on the experimental procedures and results includes the seismic input test procedures, test runs, and measured excitation and response time histories. The closure of the tunnel due to various levels of seismic activity is presented. A threshold level of seismic input amplitude was required before significant rock mass motion occurred. The experiment, though designed as a two-dimensional representation of a rock mass, behaved in a somewhat three-dimensional manner, which will have an effect on subsequent analytical model comparison

  9. Scale effect experiment in a fractured rock mass. Pilot study in the certified Fanay-Augeres mine (F)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, E.; Peaudecerf, P.; Ledoux, E.; De Marsily, G.

    1985-01-01

    This report (in two volumes) presents the results of a first phase of research about ''scale effect'' on permeability and solute transport in a fractured rock mass, to assess its suitability for future disposal of radioactive wastes. The gallery which was ''certified'' is located in the Fanay-Augeres mine(F), at a depth of about 175 m, in a granite mass. The portion selected for the subsequent experimental work is about 100 m long

  10. Relationships between summer air masses and mortality in Seoul: Comparison of weather-type classifications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyselý, Jan; Huth, Radan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 35, 9-12 (2010), s. 536-543 ISSN 1474-7065 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC205/07/J044 Grant - others: Korea Research Foundation(KR) KRF-2006-C00005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Classification of weather types * Air masses * Biometeorology * Human mortality * East Asia Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 0.917, year: 2010

  11. Hydrogeological and geochemical monitoring system for deep disposal in rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Ohi, Y.

    1996-01-01

    For investigation and construction of deep underground disposal site, it is very important to monitor three dimensional hydrogeological and geochemical condition for long term in all stages of investigation, construction and management. In deep geological disposal site, permeability of rock mass should be extremely lower than conventional civil engineering field, and natural piezometric pressure should be much higher than conventional groundwater monitoring in civil engineering. So, pressure measuring device should have wide measuring range and high precision especially for interference hydraulic test in investigation stage. And, simultaneous pressure measurement in plural points would be required for cost minimization. Recently, some kinds of multi-point pressure monitoring system has been presented. However, most of all system requires borehole with large diameter, and for utilization in plural boreholes, centralized sensor control is very difficult. And, in groundwater sampling for geochemical investigation, it is important to keep original chemical condition through sampling and transportation from sampling depth to surface. For these purposes, the authors have developed multi well multi point piezometric pressure measuring device, and groundwater sampling system for 1,000m depth. (author)

  12. Excavatability Assessment of Weathered Sedimentary Rock Mass Using Seismic Velocity Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bin Mohamad, Edy Tonnizam; Noor, Muhazian Md; Isa, Mohamed Fauzi Bin Md.; Mazlan, Ain Naadia; Saad, Rosli

    2010-01-01

    Seismic refraction method is one of the most popular methods in assessing surface excavation. The main objective of the seismic data acquisition is to delineate the subsurface into velocity profiles as different velocity can be correlated to identify different materials. The physical principal used for the determination of excavatability is that seismic waves travel faster through denser material as compared to less consolidated material. In general, a lower velocity indicates material that is soft and a higher velocity indicates more difficult to be excavated. However, a few researchers have noted that seismic velocity method alone does not correlate well with the excavatability of the material. In this study, a seismic velocity method was used in Nusajaya, Johor to assess the accuracy of this seismic velocity method with excavatability of the weathered sedimentary rock mass. A direct ripping run by monitoring the actual production of ripping has been employed at later stage and compared to the ripper manufacturer's recommendation. This paper presents the findings of the seismic velocity tests in weathered sedimentary area. The reliability of using this method with the actual rippability trials is also presented.

  13. Excavatability Assessment of Weathered Sedimentary Rock Mass Using Seismic Velocity Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Mohamad, Edy Tonnizam; Saad, Rosli; Noor, Muhazian Md; Isa, Mohamed Fauzi Bin Md.; Mazlan, Ain Naadia

    2010-12-01

    Seismic refraction method is one of the most popular methods in assessing surface excavation. The main objective of the seismic data acquisition is to delineate the subsurface into velocity profiles as different velocity can be correlated to identify different materials. The physical principal used for the determination of excavatability is that seismic waves travel faster through denser material as compared to less consolidated material. In general, a lower velocity indicates material that is soft and a higher velocity indicates more difficult to be excavated. However, a few researchers have noted that seismic velocity method alone does not correlate well with the excavatability of the material. In this study, a seismic velocity method was used in Nusajaya, Johor to assess the accuracy of this seismic velocity method with excavatability of the weathered sedimentary rock mass. A direct ripping run by monitoring the actual production of ripping has been employed at later stage and compared to the ripper manufacturer's recommendation. This paper presents the findings of the seismic velocity tests in weathered sedimentary area. The reliability of using this method with the actual rippability trials is also presented.

  14. A new method for automated discontinuity trace mapping on rock mass 3D surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojun; Chen, Jianqin; Zhu, Hehua

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an automated discontinuity trace mapping method on a 3D surface model of rock mass. Feature points of discontinuity traces are first detected using the Normal Tensor Voting Theory, which is robust to noisy point cloud data. Discontinuity traces are then extracted from feature points in four steps: (1) trace feature point grouping, (2) trace segment growth, (3) trace segment connection, and (4) redundant trace segment removal. A sensitivity analysis is conducted to identify optimal values for the parameters used in the proposed method. The optimal triangular mesh element size is between 5 cm and 6 cm; the angle threshold in the trace segment growth step is between 70° and 90°; the angle threshold in the trace segment connection step is between 50° and 70°, and the distance threshold should be at least 15 times the mean triangular mesh element size. The method is applied to the excavation face trace mapping of a drill-and-blast tunnel. The results show that the proposed discontinuity trace mapping method is fast and effective and could be used as a supplement to traditional direct measurement of discontinuity traces.

  15. Rock mass joint treated by jet grouting at Diavik A418 dike south abutment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baisre, C.A. [SNC-Lavalin, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Hatch Energy, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    In order to exploit the diamond pipes at the Diavik mines, located in the Northwest Territories, two dikes were built into the Lac de Gras, dikes A154 and A418. However, during the construction of the curtain grouting of the A418 Dike, the pressure grouting technique did not achieve the desired closure of a subhorizontal joint located at variable depth beneath the dike foundation into the granite rock mass at the south abutment. The joint was filled mainly with silt, sand and gravel. This paper reviewed the problems with the pressure grouting treatment methodology, and the final decision of the designers and construction manager to treat the joint by jet grouting. The paper outlined pressure grouting, with particular reference to technical specifications; curtain grouting analysis; and joint grouting investigation. The joint treatment by jet grouting was described and the most important features of the core drilling after jetting were outlined. The permeability of the joint was reduced significantly in the treated area, according to observations made during jetting and in the recovered cores and the permeability tests. 1 tab., 7 figs.

  16. Rock mass and shaft concrete lining temperature measurement procedure: Final draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    This procedure document describes the equipment and procedures which will be used to obtain temperature data from within rock-mass and shaft linings at the Deaf Smith Exploratory Shaft Facility. Temperature measurement methods for instrument temperature correction, fluid temperature correction, heated surface monitoring and air temperature monitoring are outside the scope of this procedure, and are covered in the appropriate individual test procedures. Calibration, acceptance testing and the assignment of transducer reference numbers are outside the scope of this procedure. Section 2.0 provides a summary of the temperature measurement methods which will be employed, together with the measurement locations, environmental considerations and measurement requirements. Test layouts, including detailed descriptions of instruments, support requirements and detailed installation procedures are also presented. Section 3.0 describes the requirements for data recording, ADAS monitoring, and data reporting. Section 4.0 defines personnel responsibilities and qualifications. In addition a measurement and installation schedule is provided, and safety and contingency plans are described. Section 5.0 discusses management and quality assurance requirements. Cited references are listed in Section 6.0. 7 refs., 9 figs

  17. Sensitivity study of rock mass response to glaciation at Finnsjoen, central Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israelsson, J.; Rosengren, L.; Stephansson, O.

    1992-11-01

    The safety analysis SKB-91 of the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) paid specific attention to the glaciation scenario and related phenomena. In the first phase, Rosengren and Stephansson (1990), used the distinct element computer code UDEC to examine the response of the rock mass in the Finnsjoen area to the processes of glaciation and deglaciation. This report describes the second phase, in which the sensitivity of the results to different in situ stresses and fault zone strength properties have been analyzed. A statistical approach was used to extrapolate the range of in-situ stresses at depth from measured in-situ stresses at shallower depths. Three different linear in-situ stress variations with depth were defined using a 99% confidence interval. For each in-situ stress case, three fault zone strength assumptions were analyzed for an ice loading sequence, involving 3 km, 1 km, 0-1 km (ice wedge) and 0 km of ice thickness. Each combination of in-situ stress and fault zone strength was analyzed with and without an ice lake, situated on top of the ice sheet. Consequently, a total of 18 models were studied. The results indicated significant differences in stress distribution, failure (reactivation) of fault zones, and shear displacement on fault zones for some combinations of in-situ stress, fault zone strength, and ice lake pressure. Based on the results, several preliminary recommendations for repository siting are made, as well as recommendations for further study. (authors)

  18. Calculation of craters resulting from impact rupture of rock mass using pulse hydrodynamic problem formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodilov, LV; Rasputina, TB

    2018-03-01

    A liquid–solid hydrodynamic model is used to determine shapes and sizes of craters generated by impact rupture of rocks. Near the impact location, rock is modeled by an ideal incompressible liquid, in the distance—by an absolute solid. The calculated data are compared with the experimental results obtained under impact treatment of marble by a wedge-shaped tool.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Rock Mass Damage Evolution During Deep-Buried Tunnel Excavation by Drill and Blast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhua; Lu, Wenbo; Hu, Yingguo; Chen, Ming; Yan, Peng

    2015-09-01

    Presence of an excavation damage zone (EDZ) around a tunnel perimeter is of significant concern with regard to safety, stability, costs and overall performance of the tunnel. For deep-buried tunnel excavation by drill and blast, it is generally accepted that a combination of effects of stress redistribution and blasting is mainly responsible for development of the EDZ. However, few open literatures can be found to use numerical methods to investigate the behavior of rock damage induced by the combined effects, and it is still far from full understanding how, when and to what degree the blasting affects the behavior of the EDZ during excavation. By implementing a statistical damage evolution law based on stress criterion into the commercial software LS-DYNA through its user-subroutines, this paper presents a 3D numerical simulation of the rock damage evolution of a deep-buried tunnel excavation, with a special emphasis on the combined effects of the stress redistribution of surrounding rock masses and the blasting-induced damage. Influence of repeated blast loadings on the damage extension for practical millisecond delay blasting is investigated in the present analysis. Accompanying explosive detonation and secession of rock fragments from their initial locations, in situ stress in the immediate vicinity of the excavation face is suddenly released. The transient characteristics of the in situ stress release and induced dynamic responses in the surrounding rock masses are also highlighted. From the simulation results, some instructive conclusions are drawn with respect to the rock damage mechanism and evolution during deep-buried tunnel excavation by drill and blast.

  20. Galaxy And Mass Assembly: automatic morphological classification of galaxies using statistical learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, Sreevarsha; Pereverzyev, Sergiy, Jr.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Marleau, Francine R.; Haltmeier, Markus; Ebner, Judith; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Driver, Simon P.; Graham, Alister W.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Liske, Jochen; Loveday, Jon; Moffett, Amanda J.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Taylor, Edward N.; Wang, Lingyu; Wright, Angus H.

    2018-03-01

    We apply four statistical learning methods to a sample of 7941 galaxies (z test the feasibility of using automated algorithms to classify galaxies. Using 10 features measured for each galaxy (sizes, colours, shape parameters, and stellar mass), we apply the techniques of Support Vector Machines, Classification Trees, Classification Trees with Random Forest (CTRF) and Neural Networks, and returning True Prediction Ratios (TPRs) of 75.8 per cent, 69.0 per cent, 76.2 per cent, and 76.0 per cent, respectively. Those occasions whereby all four algorithms agree with each other yet disagree with the visual classification (`unanimous disagreement') serves as a potential indicator of human error in classification, occurring in ˜ 9 per cent of ellipticals, ˜ 9 per cent of little blue spheroids, ˜ 14 per cent of early-type spirals, ˜ 21 per cent of intermediate-type spirals, and ˜ 4 per cent of late-type spirals and irregulars. We observe that the choice of parameters rather than that of algorithms is more crucial in determining classification accuracy. Due to its simplicity in formulation and implementation, we recommend the CTRF algorithm for classifying future galaxy data sets. Adopting the CTRF algorithm, the TPRs of the five galaxy types are : E, 70.1 per cent; LBS, 75.6 per cent; S0-Sa, 63.6 per cent; Sab-Scd, 56.4 per cent, and Sd-Irr, 88.9 per cent. Further, we train a binary classifier using this CTRF algorithm that divides galaxies into spheroid-dominated (E, LBS, and S0-Sa) and disc-dominated (Sab-Scd and Sd-Irr), achieving an overall accuracy of 89.8 per cent. This translates into an accuracy of 84.9 per cent for spheroid-dominated systems and 92.5 per cent for disc-dominated systems.

  1. A High Throughput Ambient Mass Spectrometric Approach to Species Identification and Classification from Chemical Fingerprint Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musah, Rabi A.; Espinoza, Edgard O.; Cody, Robert B.; Lesiak, Ashton D.; Christensen, Earl D.; Moore, Hannah E.; Maleknia, Simin; Drijfhout, Falko P.

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput method for species identification and classification through chemometric processing of direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry-derived fingerprint signatures has been developed. The method entails introduction of samples to the open air space between the DART ion source and the mass spectrometer inlet, with the entire observed mass spectral fingerprint subjected to unsupervised hierarchical clustering processing. A range of both polar and non-polar chemotypes are instantaneously detected. The result is identification and species level classification based on the entire DART-MS spectrum. Here, we illustrate how the method can be used to: (1) distinguish between endangered woods regulated by the Convention for the International Trade of Endangered Flora and Fauna (CITES) treaty; (2) assess the origin and by extension the properties of biodiesel feedstocks; (3) determine insect species from analysis of puparial casings; (4) distinguish between psychoactive plants products; and (5) differentiate between Eucalyptus species. An advantage of the hierarchical clustering approach to processing of the DART-MS derived fingerprint is that it shows both similarities and differences between species based on their chemotypes. Furthermore, full knowledge of the identities of the constituents contained within the small molecule profile of analyzed samples is not required. PMID:26156000

  2. Can a Modified Bosniak Classification System Risk Stratify Pediatric Cystic Renal Masses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, Amanda F; Carrasco, Alonso; Colvin, Alexandra N; Meyers, Mariana L; Cost, Nicholas G

    2018-03-20

    We characterize and apply the modified Bosniak classification system to a cohort of children with cystic renal lesions and known surgical pathology. We identified all patients at our institution with cystic renal masses who also underwent surgery for these lesions. Patients without available preoperative imaging or pathology were excluded. All radiological imaging was independently reviewed by a pediatric radiologist blinded to pathological findings. Imaging characteristics (size, border, septations, calcifications, solid components, vascularity) were recorded from the most recent preoperative ultrasounds and computerized tomograms. The modified Bosniak classification system was applied to these scans and then correlated with final pathology. A total of 22 patients met study criteria. Median age at surgery was 6.1 years (range 11 months to 16.8 years). Of the patients 12 (54.5%) underwent open nephrectomy, 6 (27.3%) open partial nephrectomy, 2 (9.1%) laparoscopic cyst decortication, 1 (4.5%) open renal biopsy and 1 (4.5%) laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. Final pathology was benign in 9 cases (41%), intermediate in 6 (27%) and malignant in 7 (32%). All malignant lesions were modified Bosniak class 4, all intermediate lesions were modified class 3 or 4 and 8 of 9 benign lesions (89%) were modified class 1 or 2. Cystic renal lesions in children with a modified Bosniak class of 1 or 2 were most often benign, while class 3 or 4 lesions warranted surgical excision since more than 90% of masses harbored intermediate or malignant pathology. The modified Bosniak classification system appears to allow for a reasonable clinical risk stratification of pediatric cystic renal masses. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Rational Design of Tunnel Supports: An Interactive Graphics Based Analysis of the Support Requirements of Excavations in Jointed Rock Masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    joint orientetion and joint slippage than to failure of the intact rock mass. Dixon (1971) noted the importance of including the confining influence of...dedicated computer. The area of research not covered by this investigation which holds promise for a future study is a detailed comparison of the results of...block data, type key "W". The program writes this data on Linc tapes for future retripval. This feature can be used to store the consolidated block

  4. Effects of non-linearity of material properties on the coupled mechanical-hydraulic-thermal behavior in rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Akira; Ohnishi, Yuzo

    1986-01-01

    The nonlinearity of material properties used in the coupled mechanical-hydraulic-thermal analysis is investigated from the past literatures. Some nonlinearity that is respectively effective for the system is introduced into our computer code for analysis such a coupling problem by using finite element method. And the effects of nonlinearity of each material property on the coupled behavior in rock mass are examined for simple model and Stripa project model with the computer code. (author)

  5. A classification tree for the prediction of benign versus malignant disease in patients with small renal masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendon, Ricardo A; Mason, Ross J; Kirkland, Susan; Lawen, Joseph G; Abdolell, Mohamed

    2014-08-01

    To develop a classification tree for the preoperative prediction of benign versus malignant disease in patients with small renal masses. This is a retrospective study including 395 consecutive patients who underwent surgical treatment for a renal mass classification tree to predict the risk of having a benign renal mass preoperatively was developed using recursive partitioning analysis for repeated measures outcomes. Age, sex, volume on preoperative imaging, tumor location (central/peripheral), degree of endophytic component (1%-100%), and tumor axis position were used as potential predictors to develop the model. Forty-five patients (11.4%) were found to have a benign mass postoperatively. A classification tree has been developed which can predict the risk of benign disease with an accuracy of 88.9% (95% CI: 85.3 to 91.8). The significant prognostic factors in the classification tree are tumor volume, degree of endophytic component and symptoms at diagnosis. As an example of its utilization, a renal mass with a volume of classification tree to predict the risk of benign disease in small renal masses has been developed to aid the clinician when deciding on treatment strategies for small renal masses.

  6. Analysis of rock mass dynamic impact influence on the operation of a powered roof support control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szurgacz, Dawid; Brodny, Jaroław

    2018-01-01

    A powered roof support is a machine responsible for protection of an underground excavation against deformation generated by rock mass. In the case of dynamic impact of rock mass, the proper level of protection is hard to achieve. Therefore, the units of the roof support and its components are subject to detailed tests aimed at acquiring greater reliability, efficiency and efficacy. In the course of such test, however, it is not always possible to foresee values of load that may occur in actual conditions. The article presents a case of a dynamic load impacting the powered roof support during a high-energy tremor in an underground hard coal mine. The authors discuss the method for selecting powered roof support units proper for specific forecasted load conditions. The method takes into account the construction of the support and mining and geological conditions of an excavation. Moreover, the paper includes tests carried out on hydraulic legs and yield valves which were responsible for additional yielding of the support. Real loads impacting the support unit during tremors are analysed. The results indicated that the real registered values of the load were significantly greater than the forecasted values. The analysis results of roof support operation during dynamic impact generated by the rock mass (real life conditions) prompted the authors to develop a set of recommendations for manufacturers and users of powered roof supports. These include, inter alia, the need for innovative solutions for testing hydraulic section systems.

  7. Sensitivity analysis of efficiency thermal energy storage on selected rock mass and grout parameters using design of experiment method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wołoszyn, Jerzy; Gołaś, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Paper propose a new methodology to sensitivity study of underground thermal storage. • Using MDF model and DOE technique significantly shorter of calculations time. • Calculation of one time step was equal to approximately 57 s. • Sensitivity study cover five thermo-physical parameters. • Conductivity of rock mass and grout material have a significant impact on efficiency. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of selected parameters on the efficiency of underground thermal energy storage. In this paper, besides thermal conductivity, the effect of such parameters as specific heat, density of the rock mass, thermal conductivity and specific heat of grout material was investigated. Implementation of this objective requires the use of an efficient computational method. The aim of the research was achieved by using a new numerical model, Multi Degree of Freedom (MDF), as developed by the authors and Design of Experiment (DoE) techniques with a response surface. The presented methodology can significantly reduce the time that is needed for research and to determine the effect of various parameters on the efficiency of underground thermal energy storage. Preliminary results of the research confirmed that thermal conductivity of the rock mass has the greatest impact on the efficiency of underground thermal energy storage, and that other parameters also play quite significant role

  8. TextureCam Field Test Results from the Mojave Desert, California: Autonomous Instrument Classification of Sediment and Rock Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, R.; Abbey, W. J.; Bekker, D. L.; Cabrol, N. A.; Francis, R.; Manatt, K.; Ortega, K.; Thompson, D. R.; Wagstaff, K.

    2013-12-01

    TextureCam is an intelligent camera that uses integrated image analysis to classify sediment and rock surfaces into basic visual categories. This onboard image understanding can improve the autonomy of exploration spacecraft during the long periods when they are out of contact with operators. This could increase the number of science activities performed in each command cycle by, for example, autonomously targeting science features of opportunity with narrow field of view remote sensing, identifying clean surfaces for autonomous placement of arm-mounted instruments, or by detecting high value images for prioritized downlink. TextureCam incorporates image understanding directly into embedded hardware with a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). This allows the instrument to perform the classification in real time without taxing the primary spacecraft computing resources. We use a machine learning approach in which operators train a statistical model of surface appearance using examples from previously acquired images. A random forest model extrapolates from these training cases, using the statistics of small image patches to characterize the texture of each pixel independently. Applying this model to each pixel in a new image yields a map of surface units. We deployed a prototype instrument in the Cima Volcanic Fields during a series of experiments in May 2013. We imaged each environment with a tripod-mounted RGB camera connected directly to the FPGA board for real time processing. Our first scenario assessed ground surface cover on open terrain atop a weathered volcanic flow. We performed a transect consisting of 16 forward-facing images collected at 1m intervals. We trained the system to categorize terrain into four classes: sediment, basalt cobbles, basalt pebbles, and basalt with iron oxide weathering. Accuracy rates with regards to the fraction of the actual feature that was labeled correctly by the automated system were calculated. Lower accuracy rates were

  9. Neighborhood Structural Similarity Mapping for the Classification of Masses in Mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabidas, Rinku; Midya, Abhishek; Chakraborty, Jayasree

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, two novel feature extraction methods, using neighborhood structural similarity (NSS), are proposed for the characterization of mammographic masses as benign or malignant. Since gray-level distribution of pixels is different in benign and malignant masses, more regular and homogeneous patterns are visible in benign masses compared to malignant masses; the proposed method exploits the similarity between neighboring regions of masses by designing two new features, namely, NSS-I and NSS-II, which capture global similarity at different scales. Complementary to these global features, uniform local binary patterns are computed to enhance the classification efficiency by combining with the proposed features. The performance of the features are evaluated using the images from the mini-mammographic image analysis society (mini-MIAS) and digital database for screening mammography (DDSM) databases, where a tenfold cross-validation technique is incorporated with Fisher linear discriminant analysis, after selecting the optimal set of features using stepwise logistic regression method. The best area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.98 with an accuracy of is achieved with the mini-MIAS database, while the same for the DDSM database is 0.93 with accuracy .

  10. Comparison of World Health Organization and Asia-Pacific body mass index classifications in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim JU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Jeong Uk Lim,1 Jae Ha Lee,2 Ju Sang Kim,3 Yong Il Hwang,4 Tae-Hyung Kim,5 Seong Yong Lim,6 Kwang Ha Yoo,7 Ki-Suck Jung,4 Young Kyoon Kim,8 Chin Kook Rhee8 1Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, St Paul’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 2Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Inje University College of Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan, 3Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Incheon St Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Incheon, 4Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, 5Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Hanyang University Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri, 6Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 7Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, 8Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea Introduction: A low body mass index (BMI is associated with increased mortality and low health-related quality of life in patients with COPD. The Asia-Pacific classification of BMI has a lower cutoff for overweight and obese categories compared to the World Health Organization (WHO classification. The present study assessed patients with COPD among different BMI categories according to two BMI classification systems: WHO and Asia-Pacific. Patients and methods: Patients with COPD aged 40 years or older from the Korean COPD Subtype Study cohort were selected for evaluation

  11. Geomechanical characterization of volcanic rocks using empirical systems and data mining techniques

    OpenAIRE

    T. Miranda; L.R. Sousa; A.T. Gomes; J. Tinoco; C. Ferreira

    2018-01-01

    This paper tries to characterize volcanic rocks through the development and application of an empirical geomechanical system. Geotechnical information was collected from the samples from several Atlantic Ocean islands including Madeira, Azores and Canarias archipelagos. An empirical rock classification system termed as the volcanic rock system (VRS) is developed and presented in detail. Results using the VRS are compared with those obtained using the traditional rock mass rating (RMR) system....

  12. Semiquantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for accurate classification of complex adnexal masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazerooni, Anahita Fathi; Malek, Mahrooz; Haghighatkhah, Hamidreza; Parviz, Sara; Nabil, Mahnaz; Torbati, Leila; Assili, Sanam; Saligheh Rad, Hamidreza; Gity, Masoumeh

    2017-02-01

    To identify the best dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) descriptive parameters in predicting malignancy of complex ovarian masses, and develop an optimal decision tree for accurate classification of benign and malignant complex ovarian masses. Preoperative DCE-MR images of 55 sonographically indeterminate ovarian masses (27 benign and 28 malignant) were analyzed prospectively. Four descriptive parameters of the dynamic curve, namely, time-to-peak (TTP), wash-in-rate (WIR), relative signal intensity (SI rel ), and the initial area under the curve (IAUC 60 ) were calculated on the normalized curves of specified regions-of-interest (ROIs). A two-tailed Student's t-test and two automated classifiers, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and support vector machines (SVMs), were used to compare the performance of the mentioned parameters individually and in combination with each other. TTP (P = 6.15E-8) and WIR (P = 5.65E-5) parameters induced the highest sensitivity (89% for LDA, and 97% for SVM) and specificity (93% for LDA, and 100% for SVM), respectively. Regarding the high sensitivity of TTP and high specificity of WIR and through their combination, an accurate and simple decision-tree classifier was designed using the line equation obtained by LDA classification model. The proposed classifier achieved an accuracy of 89% and area under the ROC curve of 93%. In this study an accurate decision-tree classifier based on a combination of TTP and WIR parameters was proposed, which provides a clinically flexible framework to aid radiologists/clinicians to reach a conclusive preoperative diagnosis and patient-specific therapy plan for distinguishing malignant from benign complex ovarian masses. 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:418-427. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Spectral analysis and classification of igneous and metamorphic rocks of Hamedan region for remote sensing studies; using laboratory reflectance spectra (350-2500 nm)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangzan, K.; Saki, A.; Hassanshahi, H.; Mojaradi, B.

    2012-01-01

    Reflectance spectrometry techniques with the integration of remote sensing data help us in identifying and mapping the phenomena on the earth. Using these techniques to discriminate the petrologic units independently and without knowing the spectral behavior of rocks along the electromagnetic wavelengths can not be so much useful. For the purposes of this study, 65 samples of igneous and metamorphic rocks from Hamedan region were collected and their spectra were measured using Fieldspec3 device in laboratory. The spectra were analyzed on the basis of absorption, position and shape. Petrographic analyses were used to interpret the absorption patterns as well. Then the spectra were classified according to spectral patterns. This measurement was done on both freshly cut and exposed surfaces of the samples and except a few samples, the two sets of spectra did not differ significantly. Finally, to evaluate the possibility of recognition of these targets, the responses of two hyper spectral and multispectral sensors were simulated from spectra representative of the spectral classes, showing that significant identification and classification of well exposed rocks are potentially possible using remote instruments providing high quality spectra. Also Aster simulation showed that a preliminary gross discrimination of rocks was however possible.

  14. Mass transfer between waste canister and water seeping in rock fractures. Revisiting the Q-equivalent model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neretnieks, Ivars; Liu Longcheng; Moreno, Luis

    2010-03-01

    Models are presented for solute transport between seeping water in fractured rock and a copper canister embedded in a clay buffer. The migration through an undamaged buffer is by molecular diffusion only as the clay has so low hydraulic conductivity that water flow can be neglected. In the fractures and in any damaged zone seeping water carries the solutes to or from the vicinity of the buffer in the deposition hole. During the time the water passes the deposition hole molecular diffusion aids in the mass transfer of solutes between the water/buffer interface and the water at some distance from the interface. The residence time of the water and the contact area between the water and the buffer determine the rate of mass transfer between water and buffer. Simple analytical solutions are presented for the mass transfer in the seeping water. For complex migration geometries simplifying assumptions are made that allow analytical solutions to be obtained. The influence of variable apertures on the mass transfer is discussed and is shown to be moderate. The impact of damage to the rock around the deposition hole by spalling and by the presence of a cemented and fractured buffer is also explored. These phenomena lead to an increase of mass transfer between water and buffer. The overall rate of mass transfer between the bulk of the water and the canister is proportional to the overall concentration difference and inversely proportional to the sum of the mass transfer resistances. For visualization purposes the concept of equivalent flowrate is introduced. This entity can be thought as of the flowrate of water that will be depleted of its solute during the water passage past the deposition hole. The equivalent flowrate is also used to assess the release rate of radionuclides from a damaged canister. Examples are presented to illustrate how various factors influence the rate of mass transfer

  15. Simultaneous detection and classification of breast masses in digital mammograms via a deep learning YOLO-based CAD system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Masni, Mohammed A; Al-Antari, Mugahed A; Park, Jeong-Min; Gi, Geon; Kim, Tae-Yeon; Rivera, Patricio; Valarezo, Edwin; Choi, Mun-Taek; Han, Seung-Moo; Kim, Tae-Seong

    2018-04-01

    Automatic detection and classification of the masses in mammograms are still a big challenge and play a crucial role to assist radiologists for accurate diagnosis. In this paper, we propose a novel Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system based on one of the regional deep learning techniques, a ROI-based Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) which is called You Only Look Once (YOLO). Although most previous studies only deal with classification of masses, our proposed YOLO-based CAD system can handle detection and classification simultaneously in one framework. The proposed CAD system contains four main stages: preprocessing of mammograms, feature extraction utilizing deep convolutional networks, mass detection with confidence, and finally mass classification using Fully Connected Neural Networks (FC-NNs). In this study, we utilized original 600 mammograms from Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM) and their augmented mammograms of 2,400 with the information of the masses and their types in training and testing our CAD. The trained YOLO-based CAD system detects the masses and then classifies their types into benign or malignant. Our results with five-fold cross validation tests show that the proposed CAD system detects the mass location with an overall accuracy of 99.7%. The system also distinguishes between benign and malignant lesions with an overall accuracy of 97%. Our proposed system even works on some challenging breast cancer cases where the masses exist over the pectoral muscles or dense regions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Rippability Assessment of Weathered Sedimentary Rock Mass using Seismic Refraction Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, M. A. M.; Kumar, N. S.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Madun, A.

    2018-04-01

    Rippability or ease of excavation in sedimentary rocks is a significant aspect of the preliminary work of any civil engineering project. Rippability assessment was performed in this study to select an available ripping machine to rip off earth materials using the seismic velocity chart provided by Caterpillar. The research area is located at the proposed construction site for the development of a water reservoir and related infrastructure in Kampus Pauh Putra, Universiti Malaysia Perlis. The research was aimed at obtaining seismic velocity, P-wave (Vp) using a seismic refraction method to produce a 2D tomography model. A 2D seismic model was used to delineate the layers into the velocity profile. The conventional geotechnical method of using a borehole was integrated with the seismic velocity method to provide appropriate correlation. The correlated data can be used to categorize machineries for excavation activities based on the available systematic analysis procedure to predict rock rippability. The seismic velocity profile obtained was used to interpret rock layers within the ranges labelled as rippable, marginal, and non-rippable. Based on the seismic velocity method the site can be classified into loose sand stone to moderately weathered rock. Laboratory test results shows that the site’s rock material falls between low strength and high strength. Results suggest that Caterpillar’s smallest ripper, namely, D8R, can successfully excavate materials based on the test results integration from seismic velocity method and laboratory test.

  17. Using Spores for Fusarium spp. Classification by MALDI-Based Intact Cell/Spore Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Winkler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium is a widespread genus of filamentous fungi and a member of the soil microbial community. Certain subspecies are health threatening because of their mycotoxin production that affects the human and animal food chain. Thus, for early and effective pest control, species identification is of particular interest; however, differentiation on the subspecies level is challenging and time-consuming for this fungus. In the present study, we show the possibilities of intact cell mass spectrometry for spore analysis of 22 different Fusarium strains belonging to six Fusarium subspecies. We found that species differentiation is possible if mass spectrometric analyses are performed under well-defined conditions with fixed parameters. A critical point for analysis is a proper sample preparation of spores, which increases the quality of mass spectra with respect to signal intensity and m/z value variations. It was concluded that data acquistion has to be performed automatically; otherwise, user-specific variations are introduced generating data which cannot fit the existing datasets. Data that show clearly that matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-based intact cell/intact spore mass spectrometry (IC/ISMS can be applied to differentiate closely related Fusarium spp. are presented. Results show a potential to build a database on Fusarium species for accurate species identification, for fast response in the case of infections in the cornfield. We furthermore demonstrate the high precision of our approach in classification of intact Fusarium species according to the location of their collection.

  18. Application of the mass spectrometry-isotope dilution technique for the determination of uranium contents in rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakazu, M.H.; Iyer, S.S.

    1980-01-01

    Application of the spectrometric isotope dilution technique for the accurate determination of parts per million range of uranium in rock samples is described. The various aspects of the method like sample dissolution, ion exchange separation, mass spectrometric procedures are discussed. A single filament ionization source was employed for the isotope analysis. A carbon reduction method was used to reduce uranium oxide ions to uranium metal ions. The tracer solution for isotope dilution was prepared from National Bureau of Standards uranium isotopic Standard NBS U-970. Uranium contents are meassured for nine rock samples and the values obtained are compared with the uranium values measured by others workers. Errors caused in the uranium determination due to sample splitting problems as well as the incomplete acid digestion of the samples are discussed. (Author) [pt

  19. A theoretical and numerical consideration of rock mass behaviour under thermal loading of radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reivinen, M.; Freund, J.; Eloranta, E.

    1996-08-01

    The aim of the study is to model the geodynamic response of a ground rock block under horizontal stresses and also consider the thermal fields and deformations, especially on the ground surface, caused by the heat produced by nuclear waste. (12 refs.)

  20. Overweight and obesity prevalence among Cree youth of Eeyou Istchee according to three body mass index classification systems

    OpenAIRE

    St-Jean, Audray; Meziou, Salma; Ayotte, Pierre; Lucas, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Background Little is known about the suitability of three commonly used body mass index (BMI) classification systems for Indigenous youth. We estimated overweight and obesity prevalence among Cree youth of Eeyou Istchee according to three BMI classification systems, assessed the level of agreement between them, and evaluated their accuracy through body fat and cardiometabolic risk factors. Methods Data on 288 youth (aged 8–17 years) were collected. Overweight and obesity prevalence were estim...

  1. Computer-aided classification of breast masses using contrast-enhanced digital mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danala, Gopichandh; Aghaei, Faranak; Heidari, Morteza; Wu, Teresa; Patel, Bhavika; Zheng, Bin

    2018-02-01

    By taking advantages of both mammography and breast MRI, contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) has emerged as a new promising imaging modality to improve efficacy of breast cancer screening and diagnosis. The primary objective of study is to develop and evaluate a new computer-aided detection and diagnosis (CAD) scheme of CEDM images to classify between malignant and benign breast masses. A CEDM dataset consisting of 111 patients (33 benign and 78 malignant) was retrospectively assembled. Each case includes two types of images namely, low-energy (LE) and dual-energy subtracted (DES) images. First, CAD scheme applied a hybrid segmentation method to automatically segment masses depicting on LE and DES images separately. Optimal segmentation results from DES images were also mapped to LE images and vice versa. Next, a set of 109 quantitative image features related to mass shape and density heterogeneity was initially computed. Last, four multilayer perceptron-based machine learning classifiers integrated with correlationbased feature subset evaluator and leave-one-case-out cross-validation method was built to classify mass regions depicting on LE and DES images, respectively. Initially, when CAD scheme was applied to original segmentation of DES and LE images, the areas under ROC curves were 0.7585+/-0.0526 and 0.7534+/-0.0470, respectively. After optimal segmentation mapping from DES to LE images, AUC value of CAD scheme significantly increased to 0.8477+/-0.0376 (pbreast tissue on lesions, segmentation accuracy was significantly improved as compared to regular mammograms, the study demonstrated that computer-aided classification of breast masses using CEDM images yielded higher performance.

  2. The role of post-failure brittleness of soft rocks in the assessment of stability of intact masses: FDEM technique applications to ideal problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lollino, Piernicola; Andriani, Gioacchino Francesco; Fazio, Nunzio Luciano; Perrotti, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Strain-softening under low confinement stress, i.e. the drop of strength that occurs in the post-failure stage, represents a key factor of the stress-strain behavior of rocks. However, this feature of the rock behavior is generally underestimated or even neglected in the assessment of boundary value problems of intact soft rock masses. This is typically the case when the stability of intact rock masses is treated by means of limit equilibrium or finite element analyses, for which rigid-plastic or elastic perfectly-plastic constitutive models, generally implementing peak strength conditions of the rock, are respectively used. In fact, the aforementioned numerical techniques are characterized by intrinsic limitations that do not allow to account for material brittleness, either for the method assumptions or due to numerical stability problems, as for the case of the finite element method, unless sophisticated regularization techniques are implemented. However, for those problems that concern the stability of intact soft rock masses at low stress levels, as for example the stability of shallow underground caves or that of rock slopes, the brittle stress-strain response of rock in the post-failure stage cannot be disregarded due to the risk of overestimation of the stability factor. This work is aimed at highlighting the role of post-peak brittleness of soft rocks in the analysis of specific ideal problems by means of the use of a hybrid finite-discrete element technique (FDEM) that allows for the simulation of the rock stress-strain brittle behavior in a proper way. In particular, the stability of two ideal cases, represented by a shallow underground rectangular cave and a vertical cliff, has been analyzed by implementing a post-peak brittle behavior of the rock and the comparison with a non-brittle response of the rock mass is also explored. To this purpose, the mechanical behavior of a soft calcarenite belonging to the Calcarenite di Gravina formation, extensively

  3. Semi-analytical treatment of fracture/matrix flow in a dual-porosity simulator for unsaturated fractured rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.W.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1992-04-01

    A semi-analytical dual-porosity simulator for unsaturated flow in fractured rock masses has been developed. Fluid flow between the fracture network and the matrix blocks is described by analytical expressions that have been derived from approximate solutions to the imbibition equation. These expressions have been programmed into the unsaturated flow simulator, TOUGH, as a source/sink term. Flow processes are then simulated using only fracture elements in the computational grid. The modified code is used to simulate flow along single fractures, and infiltration into pervasively fractured formations

  4. Some Open Issues on Rockfall Hazard Analysis in Fractured Rock Mass: Problems and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Anna Maria; Migliazza, Maria Rita; Pirulli, Marina; Umili, Gessica

    2016-09-01

    Risk is part of every sector of engineering design. It is a consequence of the uncertainties connected with the cognitive boundaries and with the natural variability of the relevant variables. In soil and rock engineering, in particular, uncertainties are linked to geometrical and mechanical aspects and the model used for the problem schematization. While the uncertainties due to the cognitive gaps could be filled by improving the quality of numerical codes and measuring instruments, nothing can be done to remove the randomness of natural variables, except defining their variability with stochastic approaches. Probabilistic analyses represent a useful tool to run parametric analyses and to identify the more significant aspects of a given phenomenon: They can be used for a rational quantification and mitigation of risk. The connection between the cognitive level and the probability of failure is at the base of the determination of hazard, which is often quantified through the assignment of safety factors. But these factors suffer from conceptual limits, which can be only overcome by adopting mathematical techniques with sound bases, not so used up to now (Einstein et al. in rock mechanics in civil and environmental engineering, CRC Press, London, 3-13, 2010; Brown in J Rock Mech Geotech Eng 4(3):193-204, 2012). The present paper describes the problems and the more reliable techniques used to quantify the uncertainties that characterize the large number of parameters that are involved in rock slope hazard assessment through a real case specifically related to rockfall. Limits of the existing approaches and future developments of the research are also provided.

  5. The Interplay of In Situ Stress Ratio and Transverse Isotropy in the Rock Mass on Prestressed Concrete-Lined Pressure Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanjuntak, T. D. Y. F.; Marence, M.; Schleiss, A. J.; Mynett, A. E.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the mechanical and hydraulic behaviour of passively prestressed concrete-lined pressure tunnels embedded in elastic transversely isotropic rocks subjected to non-uniform in situ stresses. Two cases are distinguished based on whether the in situ vertical stress in the rock mass is higher, or lower than the in situ horizontal stress. A two-dimensional finite element model was used to study the influence of dip angle, α, and horizontal-to-vertical stress ratio, k, on the bearing capacity of prestressed concrete-lined pressure tunnels. The study reveals that the in situ stress ratio and the orientation of stratifications in the rock mass significantly affect the load sharing between the rock mass and the lining. The distribution of stresses and deformations as a result of tunnel construction processes exhibits a symmetrical pattern for tunnels embedded in a rock mass with either horizontal or vertical stratification planes, whereas it demonstrates an unsymmetrical pattern for tunnels embedded in a rock mass with inclined stratification planes. The results obtained for a specific value α with coefficient k are identical to that for α + 90° with coefficient 1/ k by rotating the tunnel axis by 90°. The maximum internal water pressure was determined by offsetting the prestress-induced hoop strains at the final lining intrados against the seepage-induced hoop strains. As well as assessing the internal water pressure, this approach is capable of identifying potential locations where longitudinal cracks may occur in the final lining.

  6. Field assessment of the use of borehole pressure transients to measure the permeability of fractured rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, C.B.; Gale, J.E.

    1981-06-01

    A field experiment to evaluate the transient pressure pulse technique as a method of determining the in-situ hydraulic conductivity of low permeability fractured rock was made. The experiment attempted to define: the radius of influence of a pressure pulse-test in fractured rock and the correlation between pressure-pulse tests and steady-state flow tests performed in five boreholes drilled in fractured granite. Twenty-five test intervals, 2 to 3 m in length, were isolated in the boreholes, using air-inflated packers. During pressure pulse and steady-state tests, pressures were monitored in both the test and observation cavities. Rock-mass conductivities were calculated from steady-state test results and were found to range from less than 10 - 11 to 10 - 7 cm/sec. However, there was no consistent correlation between the steady-state conductivity and the pressure pulse decay characteristics of individual intervals. These conflicting test results can be attributed to the following factors: differences in volumes of rock affected by the test techniques; effects of equipment configuration and compliance; and complexity of the fracture network. Although the steady-state flow tests indicate that hydraulic connections exist between most of the test cavities, no pressure responses were noted in the observation cavities (located at least 0.3 m from the test cavities) during the pulse tests. This does not mean, however, that the pressure-pulse radius of influence is <0.3 m, because the observation cavities were too large (about 7 liters). The lack of correlation between steady-state conductivities and the corresponding pressure pulse decay times does not permit use of existing single-fracture type curves to analyze pulse tests performed in multiple-fracture intervals. Subsequent work should focus on the detailed interpretation of field results with particular reference to the effects of the fracture system at the test site

  7. Analysis of the effect of spatial resolution on texture features in the classification of breast masses in mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangayyan, R.M.; Nguyen, T.M.; Ayres, F.J.; Nandi, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of spatial resolution on co-occurrence matrix-based texture features in discriminating breast lesions as benign masses or malignant tumors. The highest classification result, in terms of the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve, of A z 0.74, was obtained at the spatial resolution of 800 μm using all 14 of Haralick's texture features computed using the margins, or ribbons, of the breast masses as seen on mammograms. Furthermore, our study indicates that texture features computed using the ribbons resulted in higher classification accuracy than the same texture features computed using the corresponding regions of interest within the mass boundaries drawn by an expert radiologist. Classification experiments using each single texture feature showed that the texture F 8 , sum entropy, gives consistently high classification results with an average A z of 0.64 across all levels of resolution. At certain levels of resolution, the textures F 5 , F 9 , and F 11 individually gave the highest classification result with A z = 0.70. (orig.)

  8. The Impact of the Rock Mass Deformation on Geometric Changes of a Historical Chimney in the Salt Mine of Bochnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szafarczyk, Anna; Gawałkiewicz, Rafał

    2018-03-01

    There are many ways of the geometry measurement of slim objects, with the application of geodetic and photogrammetric methods. A modern solution in the diagnostics of slim objects is the application of laser scanning, with the use of a scanner of a scanning total station. The point cloud, obtained from the surface of the scanned object gives the possibility of generating not only information on structural surface deformations, but also facilitates obtaining the data on the geometry of the axis of the building, as a basic indicator of the characteristics of its deformation. The cause of the change in the geometry of slim objects is the impact of many external and internal factors. These objects are located in the areas of working or closed underground mines. They can be impacted by the ground and they can face the results of the convergence of cavities. A specific structure of the salt rock mass causes subsequent convergence of the post-exploitation cavities, which has the influence on the behaviour of the terrain surface and the related objects. The authors analysed the impact of the changes in the rock mass and the surface on the changes of the industrial chimney in the Bochnia Salt Mine.

  9. A study on the ground water flow and hydrogeochemical interaction in fractured rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Jong Sung; Kim, Chun Soo; Yoon, Si Tae; Kim, Sun Joon; Chung, Chan Ho; Kim, Gye Nam

    1991-01-01

    A study site, the Precambrian gneiss complex in the vincinity of Chungyang has been investigated by geologic surface mapping, tunnel mapping and core drilling with chemical analysis and microscopic observation of rock samples and fracture filling materials. Four boreholes at depths between 50 and 200m were drilled. They are located in a potential fracture zone, which was selected based on the topographic characterisitcs and the fracture survey data. The hydraulic characteristics are described based on the results of constant pressure injection test and cross hole test. In the single hole test, the test sections varied between 1 and 5 m. The hydraulic conductivity of local fracture zones ranges from 1xlO -5 to lxlO -7 m/sec whereas that of the intact rock within the depth of 50 m is in the range of 7xlO -8 to 8xlO -9 m/sec. The field dispersivity values obtained from an injection phase range from 0.15 to 4.5 m at varying depths. The whole thickness dispersivity on the 18 m section obtained from a withdrawal phase is 0.4 m. The dispersion test in two well non-circulation mode was carried out along a single fracture set at depth between 11.5-14.5m. The longitudinal dispersivity obtained from the two well test is 8.14 m. The identified minerals of host rocks are quartz, K-feldspar,plagioclase, biotite, muscovite, sericite, chlorite, calcite, pyrite, zircon and opaque minerals. The primary minerals such as feldspar and biotite are highly altered into sericite and chlorite respectively. The fracture-filling materials from core samples identified by as calcite, kaolinite, smectite, chlorite, illitite, quartz, pyrite with fe- and Mn-oxides. (Author)

  10. Discrete fracture modelling of the Finnsjoen rock mass. Phase 1: Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, J.E.; Axelsson, C.L.

    1991-03-01

    The geometry and properties of discrete fractures are expected to control local heterogeneity in flow and solute transport within crystalline rock in the Finnsjoen area. The present report describes the first phase of a discrete-fracture modelling study, the goal of which is to develop stochastic-continuum and hydrologic properties. In the first phase of this study, the FracMan discrete fracture modelling package was used to analyse discrete fracture geometrical and hyrological data. Constant-pressure packer tests were analysed using fractional dimensional methods to estimate effective transmissivities and flow dimension for the packer test intervals. Discrete fracture data on orientation, size, shape, and location were combined with hydrologic data to develop a preliminary conceptual model for the conductive fractures at the site. The variability of fracture properties was expressed in the model by probability distributions. The preliminary conceptual model was used to simulate three-dimensional populations of conductive fractures in 25 m and 50 m cubes of rock. Transient packer tests were simulated in these fracture populations, and the simulated results were used to validate the preliminary conceptual model. The calibrated model was used to estimate the components of effective conductivity tensors for the rock by simulating steady-state groundwater flow through the cubes in three orthogonal directions. Monte Carlo stochastic simulations were performed for alternative realizations of the conceptual model. The number of simulations was insufficient to give a quantitative prediction of the effective conductivity heterogeneity and anisotropy on the scales of the cubes. However, the results give preliminary, rough estimates of these properties, and provide a demonstration of how the discrete-fracture network concept can be applied to derive data that is necessary for stochastic continuum and channel network modelling. (authors)

  11. EFFICIENT SELECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF INFRARED EXCESS EMISSION STARS BASED ON AKARI AND 2MASS DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yafang; Li Jinzeng [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Rector, Travis A. [University of Alaska, 3211 Providence Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508 (United States); Mallamaci, Carlos C., E-mail: ljz@nao.cas.cn [Observatorio Astronomico Felix Aguilar, Universidad Nacional de San Juan (Argentina)

    2013-05-15

    The selection of young stellar objects (YSOs) based on excess emission in the infrared is easily contaminated by post-main-sequence stars and various types of emission line stars with similar properties. We define in this paper stringent criteria for an efficient selection and classification of stellar sources with infrared excess emission based on combined Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and AKARI colors. First of all, bright dwarfs and giants with known spectral types were selected from the Hipparcos Catalogue and cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI Point Source Catalogues to produce the main-sequence and the post-main-sequence tracks, which appear as expected as tight tracks with very small dispersion. However, several of the main-sequence stars indicate excess emission in the color space. Further investigations based on the SIMBAD data help to clarify their nature as classical Be stars, which are found to be located in a well isolated region on each of the color-color (C-C) diagrams. Several kinds of contaminants were then removed based on their distribution in the C-C diagrams. A test sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars and classical T Tauri stars were cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI catalogs to define the loci of YSOs with different masses on the C-C diagrams. Well classified Class I and Class II sources were taken as a second test sample to discriminate between various types of YSOs at possibly different evolutionary stages. This helped to define the loci of different types of YSOs and a set of criteria for selecting YSOs based on their colors in the near- and mid-infrared. Candidate YSOs toward IC 1396 indicating excess emission in the near-infrared were employed to verify the validity of the new source selection criteria defined based on C-C diagrams compiled with the 2MASS and AKARI data. Optical spectroscopy and spectral energy distributions of the IC 1396 sample yield a clear identification of the YSOs and further confirm the criteria defined

  12. EFFICIENT SELECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF INFRARED EXCESS EMISSION STARS BASED ON AKARI AND 2MASS DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yafang; Li Jinzeng; Rector, Travis A.; Mallamaci, Carlos C.

    2013-01-01

    The selection of young stellar objects (YSOs) based on excess emission in the infrared is easily contaminated by post-main-sequence stars and various types of emission line stars with similar properties. We define in this paper stringent criteria for an efficient selection and classification of stellar sources with infrared excess emission based on combined Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and AKARI colors. First of all, bright dwarfs and giants with known spectral types were selected from the Hipparcos Catalogue and cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI Point Source Catalogues to produce the main-sequence and the post-main-sequence tracks, which appear as expected as tight tracks with very small dispersion. However, several of the main-sequence stars indicate excess emission in the color space. Further investigations based on the SIMBAD data help to clarify their nature as classical Be stars, which are found to be located in a well isolated region on each of the color-color (C-C) diagrams. Several kinds of contaminants were then removed based on their distribution in the C-C diagrams. A test sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars and classical T Tauri stars were cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI catalogs to define the loci of YSOs with different masses on the C-C diagrams. Well classified Class I and Class II sources were taken as a second test sample to discriminate between various types of YSOs at possibly different evolutionary stages. This helped to define the loci of different types of YSOs and a set of criteria for selecting YSOs based on their colors in the near- and mid-infrared. Candidate YSOs toward IC 1396 indicating excess emission in the near-infrared were employed to verify the validity of the new source selection criteria defined based on C-C diagrams compiled with the 2MASS and AKARI data. Optical spectroscopy and spectral energy distributions of the IC 1396 sample yield a clear identification of the YSOs and further confirm the criteria defined

  13. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry analysis linked with chemometrics for food classification - a case study: geographical provenance and cultivar classification of monovarietal clarified apple juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Heng-Hui; Soukoulis, Christos; Fisk, Ian

    2014-03-01

    In the present work, we have evaluated for first time the feasibility of APCI-MS volatile compound fingerprinting in conjunction with chemometrics (PLS-DA) as a new strategy for rapid and non-destructive food classification. For this purpose 202 clarified monovarietal juices extracted from apples differing in their botanical and geographical origin were used for evaluation of the performance of APCI-MS as a classification tool. For an independent test set PLS-DA analyses of pre-treated spectral data gave 100% and 94.2% correct classification rate for the classification by cultivar and geographical origin, respectively. Moreover, PLS-DA analysis of APCI-MS in conjunction with GC-MS data revealed that masses within the spectral ACPI-MS data set were related with parent ions or fragments of alkyesters, carbonyl compounds (hexanal, trans-2-hexenal) and alcohols (1-hexanol, 1-butanol, cis-3-hexenol) and had significant discriminating power both in terms of cultivar and geographical origin. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural characterization of the rock mass of the underground mine Oro Descanso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeoluwa Olajesu Oluwaseyi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the rocky massif where the Oro Descanso underground mine is located, an assessment was made of the physical-mechanical properties of rocks, cracking and blocking, in order to propose safe tillage measures for underground mining excavations using appropriate empirical methods. From the evaluation made it was concluded that the massif is composed of areas of rocks of different quality: good, fair and poor. It is proposed for the area of good quality to work excavations with complete advance, of free length 1.0-1.5 m, using in the crown the support of cemented anchors of diameter 20 mm, length 3 m and spaced 2.5 m and apply concrete released 50 mm thick. For the zone of bad and regular quality, it is suggested to work in stepwise progression, of free length of 1-3 m and after each blasting, to install in the crown, cemented anchors of diameter 20 mm, length 4-5 m and spacing 1-2 m, placing on the sides metallic mesh, with concrete cast 50-150 mm thick.

  15. An engineering geological appraisal of the Chamshir dam foundation using DMR classification and kinematic analysis, southwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torabi Kaveh Mehdi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results of engineering geological  investigations and rock mechanics studies carried out at the proposed Chamshir dam site. It is proposed that a 155 m high solid concrete gravity-arc dam be built across the Zuhreh River to the southeast of the city of Gachsaran in south-western Iran. The dam and its associated structures are mainly located on the Mishan formation. Analysis consisted of rock mass classification and a kinematic
    analysis of the dam foundation's rock masses. The studies were carried out in the field and the laboratory. The field studies included geological mapping, intensive discontinuity surveying, core drilling and sampling for laboratory testing. Rock mass classifications were made in line with RMR and DMR classification for the dam foundation. Dam foundation analysis regarding stability using DMR classification and kinematic analysis indicated that the left abutment's rock foundation (area 2 was unstable for planar, wedge and toppling failure modes.

  16. Classification-based comparison of pre-processing methods for interpretation of mass spectrometry generated clinical datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoefsloot Huub CJ

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mass spectrometry is increasingly being used to discover proteins or protein profiles associated with disease. Experimental design of mass-spectrometry studies has come under close scrutiny and the importance of strict protocols for sample collection is now understood. However, the question of how best to process the large quantities of data generated is still unanswered. Main challenges for the analysis are the choice of proper pre-processing and classification methods. While these two issues have been investigated in isolation, we propose to use the classification of patient samples as a clinically relevant benchmark for the evaluation of pre-processing methods. Results Two in-house generated clinical SELDI-TOF MS datasets are used in this study as an example of high throughput mass-spectrometry data. We perform a systematic comparison of two commonly used pre-processing methods as implemented in Ciphergen ProteinChip Software and in the Cromwell package. With respect to reproducibility, Ciphergen and Cromwell pre-processing are largely comparable. We find that the overlap between peaks detected by either Ciphergen ProteinChip Software or Cromwell is large. This is especially the case for the more stringent peak detection settings. Moreover, similarity of the estimated intensities between matched peaks is high. We evaluate the pre-processing methods using five different classification methods. Classification is done in a double cross-validation protocol using repeated random sampling to obtain an unbiased estimate of classification accuracy. No pre-processing method significantly outperforms the other for all peak detection settings evaluated. Conclusion We use classification of patient samples as a clinically relevant benchmark for the evaluation of pre-processing methods. Both pre-processing methods lead to similar classification results on an ovarian cancer and a Gaucher disease dataset. However, the settings for pre

  17. Numerical modeling of the geomechanical response of a rock mass to a radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, M.P.; St John, C.M.; Hocking, G.

    1979-06-01

    Geotechnical numerical models capable of predicting the thermomechanical response and groundwater movements around an underground radioactive waste repository are vital to the success of the nuclear waste disposal program. In the absence of directly related engineering experience, the design, risk assessment, and licensing procedures of a repository will be reliant on predictions made using such models. This paper reviews models being used to assist in repository design and summarizes the results of a recent parametric study of underground disposal in basaltic rocks. On the basis of preliminary site data, it is concluded that the allowable areal density of heat-generating waste will be controlled by the stability of placement rooms and the boreholes in which waste canisters are placed. Regional effects including thermally induced upward groundwater flow, appear to present less severe problems

  18. In situ stresses in rock masses: methodology for its study in tunnel projects in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madirolas Perez, G.; Perucho Martinez, A.

    2014-01-01

    In situ stress is one of the main factors to be taken into account in the design of tunnels, as it can cause inadmissible stresses and strains leading to high deviations in the budgets. For that reason, the stress state is directly introduced into the numerical models used for the design of tunnels. In Spain, although several tunnels have been carried out with an important overburden in tectonically relevant zones, a quantitative determination of the stresses has not been usually included in civil work projects. Therefore, it is considered necessary to implement a routine procedure of study of civil work projects involving tunnels excavated in rock, and a new detailed methodology is proposed. The challenge is that project managers, who face works in which stresses may play a determinant role, may have a practical reference enabling them to optimize available resources and to include the real stress information in the design of underground works. (Author)

  19. Identification of aerosol types over an urban site based on air-mass trajectory classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, G. V.; Devara, P. C. S.; Aher, G. R.

    2015-10-01

    Columnar aerosol properties retrieved from MICROTOPS II Sun Photometer measurements during 2010-2013 over Pune (18°32‧N; 73°49‧E, 559 m amsl), a tropical urban station in India, are analyzed to identify aerosol types in the atmospheric column. Identification/classification is carried out on the basis of dominant airflow patterns, and the method of discrimination of aerosol types on the basis of relation between aerosol optical depth (AOD500 nm) and Ångström exponent (AE, α). Five potential advection pathways viz., NW/N, SW/S, N, SE/E and L have been identified over the observing site by employing the NOAA-HYSPLIT air mass back trajectory analysis. Based on AE against AOD500 nm scatter plot and advection pathways followed five major aerosol types viz., continental average (CA), marine continental average (MCA), urban/industrial and biomass burning (UB), desert dust (DD) and indeterminate or mixed type (MT) have been identified. In winter, sector SE/E, a representative of air masses traversed over Bay of Bengal and Eastern continental Indian region has relatively small AOD (τpλ = 0.43 ± 0.13) and high AE (α = 1.19 ± 0.15). These values imply the presence of accumulation/sub-micron size anthropogenic aerosols. During pre-monsoon, aerosols from the NW/N sector have high AOD (τpλ = 0.61 ± 0.21), and low AE (α = 0.54 ± 0.14) indicating an increase in the loading of coarse-mode particles over Pune. Dominance of UB type in winter season for all the years (i.e. 2010-2013) may be attributed to both local/transported aerosols. During pre-monsoon seasons, MT is the dominant aerosol type followed by UB and DD, while the background aerosols are insignificant.

  20. Rock formation characterization for carbon dioxide geosequestration: 3D seismic amplitude and coherency anomalies, and seismic petrophysical facies classification, Wellington and Anson-Bates Fields, Kansas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Derek; Raef, Abdelmoneam

    2014-04-01

    Higher resolution rock formation characterization is of paramount priority, amid growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide, CO2, into subsurface rock formations of depeleting/depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs or saline aquifers in order to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. In this paper, we present a case study for a Mississippian carbonate characterization integrating post-stack seismic attributes, well log porosities, and seismic petrophysical facies classification. We evaluated changes in petrophysical lithofacies and reveal structural facies-controls in the study area. Three cross-plot clusters in a plot of well log porosity and acoustic impedance corroborated a Neural Network petrophysical facies classification, which was based on training and validation utilizing three petrophysically-different wells and three volume seismic attributes, extracted from a time window including the wavelet of the reservoir-top reflection. Reworked lithofacies along small-throw faults has been revealed based on comparing coherency and seismic petrophysical facies. The main objective of this study is to put an emphasis on reservoir characterization that is both optimized for and subsequently benefiting from pilot tertiary CO2 carbon geosequestration in a depleting reservoir and also in the deeper saline aquifer of the Arbuckle Group, south central Kansas. The 3D seismic coherency attribute, we calculated from a window embracing the Mississippian top reflection event, indicated anomalous features that can be interpreted as a change in lithofacies or faulting effect. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) lithofacies modeling has been used to better understand these subtle features, and also provide petrophysical classes, which will benefit flow-simulation modeling and/or time-lapse seismic monitoring feasibility analysis. This paper emphasizes the need of paying greater attention to small-scale features when embarking upon characterization of a reservoir or saline-aquifer for CO2

  1. A scale space approach for unsupervised feature selection in mass spectra classification for ovarian cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Michele; d'Acierno, Antonio; Facchiano, Angelo

    2009-10-15

    Mass spectrometry spectra, widely used in proteomics studies as a screening tool for protein profiling and to detect discriminatory signals, are high dimensional data. A large number of local maxima (a.k.a. peaks) have to be analyzed as part of computational pipelines aimed at the realization of efficient predictive and screening protocols. With this kind of data dimensions and samples size the risk of over-fitting and selection bias is pervasive. Therefore the development of bio-informatics methods based on unsupervised feature extraction can lead to general tools which can be applied to several fields of predictive proteomics. We propose a method for feature selection and extraction grounded on the theory of multi-scale spaces for high resolution spectra derived from analysis of serum. Then we use support vector machines for classification. In particular we use a database containing 216 samples spectra divided in 115 cancer and 91 control samples. The overall accuracy averaged over a large cross validation study is 98.18. The area under the ROC curve of the best selected model is 0.9962. We improved previous known results on the problem on the same data, with the advantage that the proposed method has an unsupervised feature selection phase. All the developed code, as MATLAB scripts, can be downloaded from http://medeaserver.isa.cnr.it/dacierno/spectracode.htm.

  2. Model Test Research on the End Bearing Behavior of the Large-Diameter Cast-in-Place Concrete Pile for Jointed Rock Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Cai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For large-diameter, cast-in-place concrete piles, the end bearing capacity of a single pile is affected by discontinuous surfaces that exist in natural rock masses when the bearing layer of the pile end is located in the rock layer. In order to study the influence of the jointed dip angle on the bearing characteristics of the pile end, the discrete element models are adopted to simulate the mechanical characteristics of the jointed rock masses, and the model tests of the failure mode of the jointed rock masses were also designed. The results of the numerical calculations and modeling tests show that the joints, which have a filtering effect on the internal stress of the bedrock located at the pile end, change the load transferring paths. And the failure mode of the jointed rock foundation also changes as jointed dip angle changes. The rock located at the pile end generally presents a wedge failure mode. In addition, the Q-S curves obtained by model tests show that the ultimate end bearing capacity of a single pile is influenced by the jointed dip angle. The above results provide an important theoretical basis for how to correctly calculate end resistance for a cast-in-place concrete pile.

  3. Geomechanical characterization of volcanic rocks using empirical systems and data mining techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Miranda

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper tries to characterize volcanic rocks through the development and application of an empirical geomechanical system. Geotechnical information was collected from the samples from several Atlantic Ocean islands including Madeira, Azores and Canarias archipelagos. An empirical rock classification system termed as the volcanic rock system (VRS is developed and presented in detail. Results using the VRS are compared with those obtained using the traditional rock mass rating (RMR system. Data mining (DM techniques are applied to a database of volcanic rock geomechanical information from the islands. Different algorithms were developed and consequently approaches were followed for predicting rock mass classes using the VRS and RMR classification systems. Finally, some conclusions are drawn with emphasis on the fact that a better performance was achieved using attributes from VRS.

  4. Classification of mass and normal breast tissue: A convolution neural network classifier with spatial domain and texture images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahiner, B.; Chan, H.P.; Petrick, N.; Helvie, M.A.; Adler, D.D.; Goodsitt, M.M.; Wei, D.

    1996-01-01

    The authors investigated the classification of regions of interest (ROI's) on mammograms as either mass or normal tissue using a convolution neural network (CNN). A CNN is a back-propagation neural network with two-dimensional (2-D) weight kernels that operate on images. A generalized, fast and stable implementation of the CNN was developed. The input images to the CNN were obtained form the ROI's using two techniques. The first technique employed averaging and subsampling. The second technique employed texture feature extraction methods applied to small subregions inside the ROI. Features computed over different subregions were arranged as texture images, which were subsequently used as CNN inputs. The effects of CNN architecture and texture feature parameters on classification accuracy were studied. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methodology was used to evaluate the classification accuracy. A data set consisting of 168 ROI's containing biopsy-proven masses and 504 ROI's containing normal breast tissue was extracted from 168 mammograms by radiologists experienced in mammography. This data set was used for training and testing the CNN. With the best combination of CNN architecture and texture feature parameters, the area under the test ROC curve reached 0.87, which corresponded to a true-positive fraction of 90% at a false positive fraction of 31%. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using a CNN for classification of masses and normal tissue on mammograms

  5. Rocks Can Wow? Yes, Rocks Can Wow!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Sally; Luke, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Rocks and fossils appear in the National Curriculum of England science programmes of study for children in year 3 (ages 7-8). A frequently asked question is "How do you make the classification of rocks engaging?" In response to this request from a school, a set of interactive activities was designed and organised by tutors and students…

  6. Selected elements of rock burst state assessment in case studies from the Silesian hard coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozef Kabiesz; Janusz Makowka [Central Mining Institute, Katowice (Poland)

    2009-09-15

    Exploitation of coal seams in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin is conducted in complex and difficult conditions. These difficulties are connected with the occurrence of many natural mining hazards and limitations resulting from the existing in this area surface infrastructure. One of the most important problems of Polish mining is the rock burst hazard and reliable evaluation of its condition. During long-years' mining practice in Poland a comprehensive system of evaluation and control of this hazard was developed. In the paper the main aspects of rock burst hazard state evaluation will be presented, comprising: 1) rock mass inclination for rock bursts, i.e., rock strength properties investigation, comprehensive parametric evaluation of rock mass inclination for rock bursts, prognosis of seismic events induced by mining operations, methods of computer-aided modelling of stress and rock mass deformation parameters distribution, strategic rock mass classification under rock burst degrees; 2) immediate seismic and rock burst hazard state evaluation, i.e., low diameter test drilling method, seismologic and seismoacoustic method, comprehensive method of rock burst hazard state evaluation, non-standard methods of evaluation; 3) legal aspects of rock burst hazard state evaluation. Selected elements of the hazard state evaluation system are illustrated with specific practical examples of their application. 11 refs., 14 figs.

  7. Comparison of Computational Algorithms for the Classification of Liver Cancer using SELDI Mass Spectrometry: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Hickey

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As an alternative to DNA microarrays, mass spectrometry based analysis of proteomic patterns has shown great potential in cancer diagnosis. The ultimate application of this technique in clinical settings relies on the advancement of the technology itself and the maturity of the computational tools used to analyze the data. A number of computational algorithms constructed on different principles are available for the classification of disease status based on proteomic patterns. Nevertheless, few studies have addressed the difference in the performance of these approaches. In this report, we describe a comparative case study on the classification accuracy of hepatocellular carcinoma based on the serum proteomic pattern generated from a Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization (SELDI mass spectrometer.Methods: Nine supervised classifi cation algorithms are implemented in R software and compared for the classification accuracy.Results: We found that the support vector machine with radial function is preferable as a tool for classification of hepatocellular carcinoma using features in SELDI mass spectra. Among the rest of the methods, random forest and prediction analysis of microarrays have better performance. A permutation-based technique reveals that the support vector machine with a radial function seems intrinsically superior in learning from the training data since it has a lower prediction error than others when there is essentially no differential signal. On the other hand, the performance of the random forest and prediction analysis of microarrays rely on their capability of capturing the signals with substantial differentiation between groups.Conclusions: Our finding is similar to a previous study, where classification methods based on the Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI mass spectrometry are compared for the prediction accuracy of ovarian cancer. The support vector machine, random forest and prediction

  8. Hydrogeological evidence of low rock mass permeabilities in ordovician strata: Bruce nuclear site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauheim, R.L.; Roberts, R.M.; Avis, J.D.; Heagle, D.

    2011-01-01

    One of the key attributes contributing to the suitability of the Bruce nuclear site to host a Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for Low and Intermediate Level Waste (L&ILW) is the low permeability of the Ordovician host rock and of the overlying and underlying strata. The permeability of these rocks is so low that diffusion is a much more significant transport mechanism than advection. Hydrogeological evidence for the low permeability of the Ordovician strata comes from two principal sources, direct and indirect. Direct evidence of low permeability is provided by the hydraulic testing performed in deep boreholes, DGR-2 through DGR-6. Straddle-packer hydraulic testing was performed in 57 Ordovician intervals in these five holes. The testing provided continuous coverage using ~30-m straddle intervals of the Ordovician strata exposed in boreholes DGR-2, DGR-3, DGR-4, and DGR-5, while testing was targeted on discontinuous 10.2-m intervals in DGR-6. The average horizontal hydraulic conductivities of these intervals determined from the tests ranged from 2E-16 to 2E-10 m/s. The Lower Member of the Cobourg Formation, which is the proposed host formation for the DGR, was found to have a horizontal hydraulic conductivity of 4E-15 to 3E-14 m/s. The only horizontal hydraulic conductivity values measured that were greater than 2E-12 m/s are from the Black River Group, located at the base of the Ordovician sedimentary sequence. Indirect evidence of low permeability is provided by the observed distribution of hydraulic heads through the Ordovician sequence. Hydraulic head profiles, defined by hydraulic testing and confirmed by Westbay multilevel monitoring systems, show significant underpressures relative to a density-compensated hydrostatic condition throughout most of the Ordovician strata above the Black River Group, whereas the Black River Group is overpressured. Pressure differences of 1 MPa or more are observed between adjacent intervals in the boreholes. The observed

  9. Evaluation of the Impact of Hydrostatic Pressure and Lode Angle on the Strength of the Rock Mass Based on the Hoek–Brown Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marczak Halina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the global uniaxial compressive strength of rock mass on the basis of the Hoek-Brown failure criterion requires knowledge of the strength parameters: cohesion and the angle of internal friction. In the conventional method for the determination of these parameters given by Balmer, they are expressed by the minimum principal stress. Thus, this method does not allow for the assessment of an impact of hydrostatic pressure and stress path on the value of cohesion, friction angle and global uniaxial compression of rock mass. This problem can be eliminated by using the Hoek-Brown criterion expressed by the invariants of the stress state. The influence of hydrostatic pressure and the Lode angle on the strength parameters of the rock mass was analysed.

  10. FROMS3D: New Software for 3-D Visualization of Fracture Network System in Fractured Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Y. H.; Um, J. G.; Choi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A new software (FROMS3D) is presented to visualize fracture network system in 3-D. The software consists of several modules that play roles in management of borehole and field fracture data, fracture network modelling, visualization of fracture geometry in 3-D and calculation and visualization of intersections and equivalent pipes between fractures. Intel Parallel Studio XE 2013, Visual Studio.NET 2010 and the open source VTK library were utilized as development tools to efficiently implement the modules and the graphical user interface of the software. The results have suggested that the developed software is effective in visualizing 3-D fracture network system, and can provide useful information to tackle the engineering geological problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviors of the fractured rock masses.

  11. Estimation of groundwater recharge from the subsurface to the rock mass. A case study of Tono Mine Area, Gifu Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Nakano, Katushi; Koide, Kaoru

    1996-01-01

    The groundwater flow analysis involve the groundwater recharge from the subsurface to the rock mass. According to water balance method, annual groundwater recharge is calculated by the remainder of annual evapotranspirator and river flow from annual precipitation. In this estimation, hydrological and meteorological data observed for 5 years on the watershed in Tono mine area is used. Annual precipitation ranges from 1,000 to 1,900 mm and annual river flow ranges from 400 to 1,300 mm, then river flow depends critically on precipitation. Annual evapotranspiration calculated by Penman method ranges from 400 to 500 mm. It is less fluctuant than annual precipitation. As the result of examination of water balance in subsurface zone estimated, annual ground water recharge ranges from 10 to 200 mm in this watershed. (author)

  12. Conceptual characterization of the system of fractures of the rock mass known as Sierra del Medio (Chubut)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    This work characterizes conceptually the system of fractures of the rock mass known as Sierra del Medio and its surroundings. The purpose of this characterization is to define the spectra of flow regimes which must be covered in computational models to be used in the prediction of the thermohydraulic effects of the eventual emplacement of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The analysis of the available data from previous studies was performed in order to determine qualitative data to be used in the stage of feasibility studied. The flow of water roughly N-S is defined by two systems of vertical, almost orthogonal fractures and surrounded by large faults. A set of hypotheses were considered which allow, supposing a given distribution of surface fractures, to establish the variations according to depth. The usual ways of obtaining the permeability and the hydraulic conductivity in fractured porous media are summarized in an appendix. (Author) [es

  13. Hydraulic tests for the Excavation Disturbed Zone in deep rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Eiken

    1998-03-01

    Investigation for characterization of rock properties of the Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) were carried out in 250 m level drift of KAMAISHI Mine. As a part of this investigation, hydraulic tests in the two different sections which were excavated by normal and smooth blasting method respectively, were performed in the vicinity of a drift wall and floor. The test results are as follows, 1) The distribution of pore water pressure in two sections was different. 2) In this investigation, hydraulic test was performed at the different depth in the horizontal and vertical down hole. The variation of measured permeability with depth from the drift wall and floor showed different character. 3) The measured permeability in horizontal hole has no change with depth from drift wall, but in vertical down hole, the measured permeability in nearest part from the floor indicated the higher value compared to the permeability in deeper part. 4) In horizontal holes in two sections there was no difference of the measured permeabilities dependent on the excavation method. The higher permeability was obtained in the vertical hole in smooth blasting section compared to normal blasting section. (author)

  14. Delineating Groundwater Vulnerability and Protection Zone Mapping in Fractured Rock Masses: Focus on the DISCO Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Meerkhan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hard-rock catchments are considered to be source of valuable water resources for water supply to inhabitants and ecosystems. The present work aims to develop a groundwater vulnerability approach in the Caldas da Cavaca hydromineral system (Aguiar da Beira, Central Portugal in order to improve the hydrogeological conceptual site model. Different types of information were overlaid, generating several thematic maps to achieve an integrated framework of key sectors in the study site. Thus, a multi-technical approach was used, encompassing field and laboratory techniques, whereby different types of data were collected from fields such as geology, hydrogeology, applied geomorphology and geophysics and hydrogeomechanics, with the fundamental aim of applying the so-called DISCO index method. All of these techniques were successfully performed and an intrinsic groundwater vulnerability to contamination assessment, based on the multicriteria methodology of GOD-S, DRASTIC-Fm, SINTACS, SI and DISCO indexes, was delineated. Geographic Information Systems (GIS provided the basis on which to organize and integrate the databases and to produce all the thematic maps. This multi-technical approach highlights the importance of groundwater vulnerability to contamination mapping as a tool to support hydrogeological conceptualization, contributing to improving the decision-making process regarding water resources management and sustainability.

  15. Animal urine as painting materials in African rock art revealed by cluster ToF-SIMS mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazel, Vincent; Richardin, Pascale; Touboul, David; Brunelle, Alain; Richard, Caroline; Laval, Eric; Walter, Philippe; Laprévote, Olivier

    2010-08-01

    The rock art site at the village of Songo in Mali is a very important Dogon ritual place where, since the end of the nineteenth century until today, takes place the ceremony of circumcision. During these ceremonies, paintings are performed on the walls of the shelter with mainly three colors: red, black and white. Ethnological literature mentions the use of animal urine of different species such as birds, lizards or snakes as a white pigment. Urine of these animals is mainly composed of uric acid or urate salts. In this article, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is used to compare uric acid, snake urine and a sample of a white pigment of a Dogon painting coming from the rock art site of Songo. ToF-SIMS measurements in both positive and negative ion modes on reference compounds and snake urine proved useful for the study of uric acid and urate salts. This method enables to identify unambiguously these compounds owing to the detection in negative ion mode of the ion corresponding to the deprotonated molecule ([M-H](-) at m/z 167.01) and its fragment ions. Moreover, the mass spectra obtained in positive ion mode permit to differentiate uric acid and urate salts on the basis of specific ions. Applying this method to the Dogon white pigments sample, we show that the sample is entirely composed of uric acid. This proves for the first time, that animal urine was used as a pigment by the Dogon. The presence of uric acid instead of urate salts as normally expected in animal urine could be explained by the preparation of the pigment for its application on the stone. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Slope Stability Problems and Back Analysis in Heavily Jointed Rock Mass: A Case Study from Manisa, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Mutluhan

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a case study regarding slope stability problems and the remedial slope stabilization work executed during the construction of two reinforced concrete water storage tanks on a steep hill in Manisa, Turkey. Water storage tanks of different capacities were planned to be constructed, one under the other, on closely jointed and deformed shale and sandstone units. The tank on the upper elevation was constructed first and an approximately 20-m cut slope with two benches was excavated in front of this upper tank before the construction of the lower tank. The cut slope failed after a week and the failure threatened the stability of the upper water tank. In addition to re-sloping, a 15.6-m deep contiguous retaining pile wall without anchoring was built to support both the cut slope and the upper tank. Despite the construction of a retaining pile wall, a maximum of 10 mm of displacement was observed by inclinometer measurements due to the re-failure of the slope on the existing slip surface. Permanent stability was achieved after the placement of a granular fill buttress on the slope. Back analysis based on the non-linear (Hoek-Brown) failure criterion indicated that the geological strength index (GSI) value of the slope-forming material is around 21 and is compatible with the in situ-determined GSI value (24). The calculated normal-shear stress plots are also consistent with the Hoek-Brown failure envelope of the rock mass, indicating that the location of the sliding surface, GSI value estimated by back analysis, and the rock mass parameters are well defined. The long-term stability analysis illustrates a safe slope design after the placement of a permanent toe buttress.

  17. Proceedings of the workshop on numerical modeling of thermohydrological flow in fractured rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    Nineteen papers were presented at the workshop on modeling thermohydrologic flow in fractured masses. This workshop was a result of the interest currently being given to the isolation of nuclear wastes in geologic formations. Included in these proceedings are eighteen of the presentations, one abstract and summaries of the panel discussions. The papers are listed under the following categories: introduction; overviews; fracture modelings; repository studies; geothermal models; and recent developments. Eighteen of the papers have been abstracted and indexed

  18. Thermo-hydro-mechanical modelling of fractured rock masses application to radioactive wastes storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuillod, E.

    1995-01-01

    This work belongs to the Decovalex project (international cooperative project for the development of coupled models and their validation against experiments in nuclear waste isolation) of thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) modeling of fractured rock massifs inside which high level radioactive waste disposal sites are simulated. The mathematical laws controlling the behaviour of the environment are resolved analytically in the case of a continuous environment (definition of an equivalent environment) and numerically if the environment is discontinuous (modeling of joints behaviour). The coupled THM models strongly influence the behaviour of a model. Modeling performed with the UDEC code shows the importance of HM couplings depending on whether the calculations are made in permanent or transient regime, and the influence of the loading path in the case of TM modeling. The geometry of fractures also influences the behaviour of the model. Studying the connexity of a fractures network allows to determine its degree of homogeneity. The comparison between two methods, continuous environment and discontinuous environment, has been carried out by determining the permeability tensor and the stress-deformation relations on fractured test-samples. It shows the differences in behaviour between an homogenized environment and a discrete environment. Finally two exercises of THM modeling of radioactive waste disposal sites illustrate the researches carried out. A far field model has permitted to compare the results obtained with calculation codes using different logics. The second model, a near field one, focusses more on the importance played by fracturing on the behaviour of the massif. The high density of the reference network has required some mathematical developments, in order to determine the representative equivalent volume (continuous approaches), and some mathematical analyses, to correctly simplify the environment (discontinuous approaches). These methods and analyses are

  19. Early Holocene (8.6 ka) rock avalanche deposits, Obernberg valley (Eastern Alps): Landform interpretation and kinematics of rapid mass movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Marc; Sanders, Diethard; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Alfimov, Vasily; Rockenschaub, Manfred; Römer, Alexander

    2012-10-15

    In the Obernberg valley, the Eastern Alps, landforms recently interpreted as moraines are re-interpreted as rock avalanche deposits. The catastrophic slope failure involved an initial rock volume of about 45 million m³, with a runout of 7.2 km over a total vertical distance of 1330 m (fahrböschung 10°). 36 Cl surface-exposure dating of boulders of the avalanche mass indicates an event age of 8.6 ± 0.6 ka. A 14 C age of 7785 ± 190 cal yr BP of a palaeosoil within an alluvial fan downlapping the rock avalanche is consistent with the event age. The distal 2 km of the rock-avalanche deposit is characterized by a highly regular array of transverse ridges that were previously interpreted as terminal moraines of Late-Glacial. 'Jigsaw-puzzle structure' of gravel to boulder-size clasts in the ridges and a matrix of cataclastic gouge indicate a rock avalanche origin. For a wide altitude range the avalanche deposit is preserved, and the event age of mass-wasting precludes both runout over glacial ice and subsequent glacial overprint. The regularly arrayed transverse ridges thus were formed during freezing of the rock avalanche deposits.

  20. Rock Physical Interpretation of the Relationship between Dynamic and Static Young's Moduli of Sedimentary Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T.

    2017-12-01

    The static Young's modulus (deformability) of a rock is indispensable for designing and constructing tunnels, dams and underground caverns in civil engineering. Static Young's modulus which is an elastic modulus at large strain level is usually obtained with the laboratory tests of rock cores sampled in boreholes drilled in a rock mass. A deformability model of the entire rock mass is then built by extrapolating the measurements based on a rock mass classification obtained in geological site characterization. However, model-building using data obtained from a limited number of boreholes in the rock mass, especially a complex rock mass, may cause problems in the accuracy and reliability of the model. On the other hand, dynamic Young's modulus which is the modulus at small strain level can be obtained from seismic velocity. If dynamic Young's modulus can be rationally converted to static one, a seismic velocity model by the seismic method can be effectively used to build a deformability model of the rock mass. In this study, we have, therefore, developed a rock physics model (Mavko et al., 2009) to estimate static Young's modulus from dynamic one for sedimentary rocks. The rock physics model has been generally applied to seismic properties at small strain level. In the proposed model, however, the sandy shale model, one of rock physics models, is extended for modeling the static Young's modulus at large strain level by incorporating the mixture of frictional and frictionless grain contacts into the Hertz-Mindlin model. The proposed model is verified through its application to the dynamic Young's moduli derived from well log velocities and static Young's moduli measured in the tri-axial compression tests of rock cores sampled in the same borehole as the logs were acquired. This application proves that the proposed rock physics model can be possibly used to estimate static Young's modulus (deformability) which is required in many types of civil engineering applications

  1. Assessment of respiratory muscle strength in children according to the classification of body mass index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Jung da Rosa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess and compare the respiratory muscle strength among eutrophic, overweight and obese school children, as well as to identify anthropometric and respiratory variables related to the results.METHODS: Cross-sectional survey with healthy schoolchildren aged 7-9 years old, divided into three groups: Normal weight, Overweight and Obese. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC questionnaire was applied. The body mass index (BMI was evaluated, as well as the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 with a portable digital device. The maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures (MIP and MEP were measured by a digital manometer. Comparisons between the groups were made by Kruskal-Wallis test. Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to analyze the correlations among the variables.RESULTS: MIP of eutrophic school children was higher than MIP found in overweight (p=0.043 and obese (p=0.013 children. MIP was correlated with BMI percentile and weight classification (r=-0.214 and r=-0.256 and MEP was correlated with height (r=0.328. Both pressures showed strong correlation with each other in all analyses (r≥0.773, and less correlation with FEV1 (MIP - r=0.362 and MEP - r=0.494. FEV1 correlated with MEP in all groups (r: 0.429 - 0.569 and with MIP in Obese Group (r=0.565. Age was correlated with FEV1 (r=0.578, MIP (r=0.281 and MEP (r=0.328.CONCLUSIONS: Overweight and obese children showed lower MIP values, compared to eutrophic ones. The findings point to the influence of anthropometric variables on respiratory muscle strength in children.

  2. Bosniak classification system: a prospective comparison of CT, contrast-enhanced US, and MR for categorizing complex renal cystic masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graumann, Ole; Osther, Susanne Sloth; Karstoft, Jens; Hørlyck, Arne; Osther, Palle Jörn Sloth

    2016-11-01

    Background The Bosniak classification was originally based on computed tomographic (CT) findings. Magnetic resonance (MR) and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) imaging may demonstrate findings that are not depicted at CT, and there may not always be a clear correlation between the findings at MR and CEUS imaging and those at CT. Purpose To compare diagnostic accuracy of MR, CEUS, and CT when categorizing complex renal cystic masses according to the Bosniak classification. Material and Methods From February 2011 to June 2012, 46 complex renal cysts were prospectively evaluated by three readers. Each mass was categorized according to the Bosniak classification and CT was chosen as gold standard. Kappa was calculated for diagnostic accuracy and data was compared with pathological results. Results CT images found 27 BII, six BIIF, seven BIII, and six BIV. Forty-three cysts could be characterized by CEUS, 79% were in agreement with CT (κ = 0.86). Five BII lesions were upgraded to BIIF and four lesions were categorized lower with CEUS. Forty-one lesions were examined with MR; 78% were in agreement with CT (κ = 0.91). Three BII lesions were upgraded to BIIF and six lesions were categorized one category lower. Pathologic correlation in six lesions revealed four malignant and two benign lesions. Conclusion CEUS and MR both up- and downgraded renal cysts compared to CT, and until these non-radiation modalities have been refined and adjusted, CT should remain the gold standard of the Bosniak classification.

  3. Body mass index: different nutritional status according to WHO, OPAS and Lipschitz classifications in gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barao, Katia; Forones, Nora Manoukian

    2012-01-01

    The body mass index (BMI) is the most common marker used on diagnoses of the nutritional status. The great advantage of this index is the easy way to measure, the low cost, the good correlation with the fat mass and the association to morbidity and mortality. To compare the BMI differences according to the WHO, OPAS and Lipschitz classification. A prospective study on 352 patients with esophageal, gastric or colorectal cancer was done. The BMI was calculated and analyzed by the classification of WHO, Lipschitz and OPAS. The mean age was 62.1 ± 12.4 years and 59% of them had more than 59 years. The BMI had not difference between the genders in patients cancer had more than 65 years. A different cut off must be used for this patients, because undernourished patients may be wrongly considered well nourished.

  4. Studies on the reconstruction of the concept of rock mass around the tunnel. Japanese fiscal year, 2013 (Contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Keiji [Geospace Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan); Ohnishi, Yuzo [Kansai Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan); Aoki, Kenji [Geosystem Research Inst., Kyoto (Japan); Tochiyama, Osamu [Nuclear Safety Research Association, Radioactive Waste Disposal Safety Center, Tokyo (Japan); Nishigaki, Makoto [Okayama Univ., Okayama (Japan); Tosaka, Hiroyuki [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Yoshida, Hidekazu [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Ogata, Nobuhisa [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sector of Decommissioning and Radioactive Waste Management, Tono Geoscience Center, Mizunami, Gifu (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    This report is concerned with research to reconstruct more realistic near-field (NF) concept for the geological disposal. In previous year, we examined the realistic concept for near-field, including rock mass around the tunnel, particularly based on the nuclide migration scenario. The time-series change of the field was divided into five stages of 0 to IV through the process of geological disposal (Excavation, Operation and Post-closure). Then, at each respective stage, post-closure stage in particular; we examined interaction between environmental factors and exhaustive extraction of those factors affecting the near-field, focusing on each scale-time cross-section. Subsequently, we committee, presented tasks for the next fiscal year. This year, to reflect/develop the results obtained from above study, we tried to establish a realistic conceptual model of near-field focusing on, which is among the factors that have been extracted. In addition, Japan Atomic Energy Agency is planning to re-flood studies at the -500m Research Gallery, which leads to the verification of the matters as part of reconstructing practical near-field concept. The committee has conducted this plan and exchanging of views was held among the committee members. Comments on the chapter I from respective members are compiled in Appendix. In chapter II, we discussed and then summarized the 'Realistic conceptual model description of near field focusing on fault and fractures in crystalline rock' described in chapter I. In addition, since the 'Great East Japan Earthquake 2011', a paradigm shift for safety has dramatically changed. In the reconstruction of realistic near-field concept, it is necessary to analyze security matters are unacceptable by society, regarding geological disposal. In the committee, we also exchanged views on those matters and presented the future direction of research and development for geological disposal. (author)

  5. An Improved Computing Method for 3D Mechanical Connectivity Rates Based on a Polyhedral Simulation Model of Discrete Fracture Network in Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingchao; Han, Shuai; Zhou, Sibao; Zhang, Ye

    2018-06-01

    Based on a 3D model of a discrete fracture network (DFN) in a rock mass, an improved projective method for computing the 3D mechanical connectivity rate was proposed. The Monte Carlo simulation method, 2D Poisson process and 3D geological modeling technique were integrated into a polyhedral DFN modeling approach, and the simulation results were verified by numerical tests and graphical inspection. Next, the traditional projective approach for calculating the rock mass connectivity rate was improved using the 3D DFN models by (1) using the polyhedral model to replace the Baecher disk model; (2) taking the real cross section of the rock mass, rather than a part of the cross section, as the test plane; and (3) dynamically searching the joint connectivity rates using different dip directions and dip angles at different elevations to calculate the maximum, minimum and average values of the joint connectivity at each elevation. In a case study, the improved method and traditional method were used to compute the mechanical connectivity rate of the slope of a dam abutment. The results of the two methods were further used to compute the cohesive force of the rock masses. Finally, a comparison showed that the cohesive force derived from the traditional method had a higher error, whereas the cohesive force derived from the improved method was consistent with the suggested values. According to the comparison, the effectivity and validity of the improved method were verified indirectly.

  6. Detection of regularities in variation in geomechanical behavior of rock mass during multi-roadway preparation and mining of an extraction panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, AB; Pavlova, LD; Fryanov, VN

    2018-03-01

    The results of numerical simulation of the stress–strain state in a rock block and surrounding mass mass under multi-roadway preparation to mining are presented. The numerical solutions obtained by the nonlinear modeling and using the constitutive relations of the theory of elasticity are compared. The regularities of the stress distribution in the vicinity of the pillars located in the zone of the abutment pressure of are found.

  7. Using Local Event Tomography to Image Changes in the Rock Mass in the Kiirunavaara Iron Ore Mine, Northern Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, B.; Berglund, K.; Tryggvason, A.; Dineva, S.; Jonsson, L.

    2017-12-01

    Although induced seismic events in a mining environment are a potential hazard, they can be used to gain information about the rock mass in the mine which otherwise would be very difficult to obtain. In this study we use approximately 1.2 million mining induced seismic events in the Kiirunavaara iron ore mine in northernmost Sweden to image the rock mass using local event travel-time tomography. The Kiirunavaara mine is the largest underground iron ore mine in the world. The ore body is a magnetite sheet of 4 km length, with an average thickness of 80 m, which dips approximately 55° to the east. The events are of various origins such as shear slip on fractures, non-shear events and blasts, with magnitudes of up to 2.5. We use manually picked P- and S-wave arrival times from the routine processing in the tomography and we require that both phases are present at at least five geophones. For the tomography we use the 3D local earthquake tomography code PStomo_eq (Tryggvason et al., 2002), which we adjusted to the mining scale. The tomographic images show clearly defined regions of high and low velocities. Prominent low S-velocity zones are associated with mapped clay zones. Regions of ore where mining is ongoing and the near-ore tunnel infrastructure in the foot-wall also show generally low P- and S-velocities. The ore at depths below the current mining levels is imaged both as a low S-velocity zone but even more pronounced as a high Vp/Vs ratio zone. The tomography shows higher P- and S-velocities in the foot-wall away from the areas of mine infrastructure. We relocate all 1.2 million events in the new 3D velocity model. The relocation significantly enhances the clarity of the event distribution in space and we can much more easily identify seismically active structures, such as e.g. the deformation of the ore passes. The large number of events makes it possible to do detailed studies of the temporal evolution of stability in the mine. We present preliminary results

  8. Multi-resolution analysis using integrated microscopic configuration with local patterns for benign-malignant mass classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabidas, Rinku; Midya, Abhishek; Chakraborty, Jayasree; Sadhu, Anup; Arif, Wasim

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, Curvelet based local attributes, Curvelet-Local configuration pattern (C-LCP), is introduced for the characterization of mammographic masses as benign or malignant. Amid different anomalies such as micro- calcification, bilateral asymmetry, architectural distortion, and masses, the reason for targeting the mass lesions is due to their variation in shape, size, and margin which makes the diagnosis a challenging task. Being efficient in classification, multi-resolution property of the Curvelet transform is exploited and local information is extracted from the coefficients of each subband using Local configuration pattern (LCP). The microscopic measures in concatenation with the local textural information provide more discriminating capability than individual. The measures embody the magnitude information along with the pixel-wise relationships among the neighboring pixels. The performance analysis is conducted with 200 mammograms of the DDSM database containing 100 mass cases of each benign and malignant. The optimal set of features is acquired via stepwise logistic regression method and the classification is carried out with Fisher linear discriminant analysis. The best area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and accuracy of 0.95 and 87.55% are achieved with the proposed method, which is further compared with some of the state-of-the-art competing methods.

  9. A new classification method for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry data acquired on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskamp, Tobias; Lachmund, Delf; Oetjen, Janina; Cordero Hernandez, Yovany; Trede, Dennis; Maass, Peter; Casadonte, Rita; Kriegsmann, Jörg; Warth, Arne; Dienemann, Hendrik; Weichert, Wilko; Kriegsmann, Mark

    2017-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) shows a high potential for applications in histopathological diagnosis, and in particular for supporting tumor typing and subtyping. The development of such applications requires the extraction of spectral fingerprints that are relevant for the given tissue and the identification of biomarkers associated with these spectral patterns. We propose a novel data analysis method based on the extraction of characteristic spectral patterns (CSPs) that allow automated generation of classification models for spectral data. Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from N=445 patients assembled on 12 tissue microarrays were analyzed. The method was applied to discriminate primary lung and pancreatic cancer, as well as adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. A classification accuracy of 100% and 82.8%, resp., could be achieved on core level, assessed by cross-validation. The method outperformed the more conventional classification method based on the extraction of individual m/z values in the first application, while achieving a comparable accuracy in the second. LC-MS/MS peptide identification demonstrated that the spectral features present in selected CSPs correspond to peptides relevant for the respective classification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MALDI Imaging, edited by Dr. Corinna Henkel and Prof. Peter Hoffmann. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Classification of Obesity Varies between Body Mass Index and Direct Measures of Body Fat in Boys and Girls of Asian and European Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell-Nzunga, J.; Naylor, P. J.; Macdonald, H.; Rhodes, R. E.; Hofer, S. M.; McKay, H.

    2018-01-01

    Body mass index is a common proxy for proportion of body fat. However, body mass index may not classify youth similarly across ages and ethnicities. We used sex- and ethnic-specific receiver operating characteristic curves to determine how obesity classifications compared between body mass index and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry-based body fat…

  11. Quiet tunneling method in hard rock mass by cutting grooves and fracturing rock; Mizo wo hori, iwa wo wari, katai tonneru wo shizukani kussaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noma, T. [Fujita Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-08-15

    Where blasting cannot be applied due to large vibration and noise, adoption of mechanical tunneling is essential to tunneling of hard rock. In tunneling of hard rock, the existing of free surface is important. The free surface means a surface which does not restrict destruction on fracturing and it is important to form a continuous free surface efficiently and economically. The development of a new free surface forming engineering method is described. It requires no exclusive machines and all drilling works can be operated with general drill jumbo machine. In this new engineering method, the free surface is formed by continuous drilling of a single hole. Spinning anti-bend (SAB) rod is inserted into the existing drilled hole and a drill bit generates the free surface by contact with and blow the SAB rod. The procedure of the continuous drilling, an application example and the features of the procedure are described. This method has an ability to form a free surface more than 3.5m{sup 2}h even for rock bed wit compression strength more than 200MPa. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Determining the Particle Size of Debris from a Tunnel Boring Machine Through Photographic Analysis and Comparison Between Excavation Performance and Rock Mass Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispoli, A.; Ferrero, A. M.; Cardu, M.; Farinetti, A.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the results of a study carried out on a 6.3-m-diameter exploratory tunnel excavated in hard rock by an open tunnel boring machine (TBM). The study provides a methodology, based on photographic analysis, for the evaluation of the particle size distribution of debris produced by the TBM. A number of tests were carried out on the debris collected during the TBM advancement. In order to produce a parameter indicative of the particle size of the debris, the coarseness index (CI) was defined and compared with some parameters representative of the TBM performance [i.e. the excavation specific energy (SE) and field penetration index (FPI)] and rock mass features, such as RMR, GSI, uniaxial compression strength and joint spacing. The results obtained showed a clear trend between the CI and some TBM performance parameters, such as SE and FPI. On the contrary, due to the rock mass fracturing, a clear relationship between the CI and rock mass characteristics was not found.

  13. Maternal thyroid hormones enhance hatching success but decrease nestling body mass in the rock pigeon (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Bin-Yan; Dijkstra, Cor; Darras, Veerle M; de Vries, Bonnie; Groothuis, Ton G G

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) - triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) - are essential for embryonic development in vertebrates. All vertebrate embryos are exposed to THs from maternal origin. As maternal TH levels are known to be essential to embryonic development, the natural variation of maternal THs probably represents a pathway of maternal effects that can modify offspring phenotype. However, potential fitness consequences of variation of maternal TH exposure within the normal physiological range and without confounding effects of the mother have never been experimentally investigated. We experimentally manipulated the levels of yolk T3 and T4 within the physiological range in a species in which the embryo develops outside the mother's body, the Rock Pigeon (Columba livia) eggs. Making use of the natural difference of yolk testosterone between the two eggs of pigeon clutches, we were also able to investigate the potential interaction between THs and testosterone. Elevated yolk TH levels enhanced embryonic development and hatching success, and reduced body mass but not tarsus length between day 14 and fledging. The yolk hormones increased plasma T4 concentrations in females but reduced it in males, in line with the effect on metabolic rate at hatching. Plasma concentrations of T3 and testosterone were not significantly affected. The effects of treatment did not differ between eggs with high or low testosterone levels. Our data indicate that natural variation in maternal yolk TH levels affects offspring phenotype and embryonic survival, potentially influencing maternal and chick fitness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 76 FR 16292 - Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of Ovarian Adnexal Mass...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0026] Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of Ovarian... of Food and Drugs, 21 CFR part 866 is amended as follows: PART 866--IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY...

  15. A case study on the application of isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in determining the provenance of a rock used in an alleged nickel switching incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofse, F; Horstmann, U E

    2008-01-15

    The application of isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in forensic science to establish the provenance of a range of questioned substances including soils, drugs, explosives, currency, ivory and rhino horn has been widely documented. The present study wishes to highlight the applicability of IRMS and specifically stable carbon IRMS in determining the provenance of a carbonate rock that was switched for nickel metal exported from South Africa to Israel. The technique employed effectively argued against a South African origin for the rock whilst simultaneously supporting an Israeli origin, enabling investigators to focus their attention accordingly. The study represents the first documented instance known to the authors where IRMS has been employed in the forensic geo-location of a rock.

  16. Meet interesting abbreviations in clinical mass spectrometry: from compound classification by REIMS to multimodal and mass spectrometry imaging (MSI)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luptáková, Dominika; Pluháček, Tomáš; Palyzová, Andrea; Přichystal, Jakub; Balogh, J.; Lemr, Karel; Juránek, I.; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2017), s. 353-360 ISSN 0001-723X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20229S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : REIMS * multimodal * mass spectrometry imaging Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 0.673, year: 2016

  17. Quantitative analysis of major and trace elements in NH4HF2-modified silicate rock powders by laser ablation - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Hu, Zhaochu; Liu, Yongsheng; Yang, Wenwu; Chen, Haihong; Hu, Shenghong; Xiao, Hongyan

    2017-08-29

    In this paper, we described a NH 4 HF 2 digestion method as sample preparation for the rapid determination of major and trace elements in silicate rocks using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Sample powders digested by NH 4 HF 2 at 230 °C for 3 h form ultrafine powders with a typical grain size d 80  rocks have a consistent grain morphology and size, allowing us to produce pressed powder pellets that have excellent cohesion and homogeneity suitable for laser ablation micro-analysis without the addition of binder. The influences of the digestion parameters were investigated and optimized, including the evaporation stage of removing residual NH 4 HF 2 , sample homogenization, selection of the digestion vessel and calibration strategy of quantitative analysis. The optimized NH 4 HF 2 digestion method was applied to dissolve six silicate rock reference materials (BCR-2, BHVO-2, AGV-2, RGM-2, GSP-2, GSR-1) covering a wide range of rock types. Ten major elements and thirty-five trace elements were simultaneously analyzed by LA-ICP-MS. The analytical results of the six reference materials generally agreed with the recommended values, with discrepancies of less than 10% for most elements. The analytical precision is within 5% for most major elements and within 10% for most trace elements. Compared with previous methods of LA-ICP-MS bulk analysis, our method enables the complete dissolution of refractory minerals, such as zircon, in intermediate-acidic intrusive rocks and limits contamination as well as the loss of volatile elements. Moreover, there are many advantages for the new technique, including reducing matrix effects between reference materials and samples, spiking the internal standard simply and feasibly and sample batch processing. The applicability filed of the new technique in this study was focused on the whole-rock analysis of igneous rock samples, which are from basic rocks to acid rocks (45% rock analysis

  18. Recursive SVM feature selection and sample classification for mass-spectrometry and microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Lyndsay N

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Like microarray-based investigations, high-throughput proteomics techniques require machine learning algorithms to identify biomarkers that are informative for biological classification problems. Feature selection and classification algorithms need to be robust to noise and outliers in the data. Results We developed a recursive support vector machine (R-SVM algorithm to select important genes/biomarkers for the classification of noisy data. We compared its performance to a similar, state-of-the-art method (SVM recursive feature elimination or SVM-RFE, paying special attention to the ability of recovering the true informative genes/biomarkers and the robustness to outliers in the data. Simulation experiments show that a 5 %-~20 % improvement over SVM-RFE can be achieved regard to these properties. The SVM-based methods are also compared with a conventional univariate method and their respective strengths and weaknesses are discussed. R-SVM was applied to two sets of SELDI-TOF-MS proteomics data, one from a human breast cancer study and the other from a study on rat liver cirrhosis. Important biomarkers found by the algorithm were validated by follow-up biological experiments. Conclusion The proposed R-SVM method is suitable for analyzing noisy high-throughput proteomics and microarray data and it outperforms SVM-RFE in the robustness to noise and in the ability to recover informative features. The multivariate SVM-based method outperforms the univariate method in the classification performance, but univariate methods can reveal more of the differentially expressed features especially when there are correlations between the features.

  19. The influence of rock movement on the stress/strain situation in tunnels or bore holes with radioactive canisters embedded in a bentonite/quartz buffer mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1977-08-01

    The report presents the author's main ideas concerning the possible recurence of large unexpected movements in Swedish pre-Cambrian rock and gives the theoretical basis for the calculation of stress and strain in the canisters and the buffer mass. A rough calculation shows that a sudden and large shear strain at actual depths will only occur along already existing continous weak zones in the bedrock. In situ rock investigations to find and locate weak zones are essential. Shear tests with a model shear apparatus were run with the canister embedded in 10 percent bentonite 90 percent quarz buffer mass. The least favourable theory (Meyerhof) gave high contact pressures which cause high bending momentum on the canister. The stresses can be reduced by changing the geometry of the canister. (L.B.)

  20. Water Mass Classification on a Highly Variable Arctic Shelf Region: Origin of Laptev Sea Water Masses and Implications for the Nutrient Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, D.; Cherniavskaia, E.

    2018-03-01

    Large gradients and inter annual variations on the Laptev Sea shelf prevent the use of uniform property ranges for a classification of major water masses. The central Laptev Sea is dominated by predominantly marine waters, locally formed polynya waters and riverine summer surface waters. Marine waters enter the central Laptev Sea from the northwestern Laptev Sea shelf and originate from the Kara Sea or the Arctic Ocean halocline. Local polynya waters are formed in the Laptev Sea coastal polynyas. Riverine summer surface waters are formed from Lena river discharge and local melt. We use a principal component analysis (PCA) in order to assess the distribution and importance of water masses within the Laptev Sea. This mathematical method is applied to hydro-chemical summer data sets from the Laptev Sea from five years and allows to define water types based on objective and statistically significant criteria. We argue that the PCA-derived water types are consistent with the Laptev Sea hydrography and indeed represent the major water masses on the central Laptev Sea shelf. Budgets estimated for the thus defined major Laptev Sea water masses indicate that freshwater inflow from the western Laptev Sea is about half or in the same order of magnitude as freshwater stored in locally formed polynya waters. Imported water dominates the nutrient budget in the central Laptev Sea; and only in years with enhanced local polynya activity is the nutrient budget of the locally formed water in the same order as imported nutrients.

  1. Mass Dependent Fractionation of Hg Isotopes in Source Rocks, Mineral Deposits and Spring Waters of the California Coast Ranges, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. N.; Kesler, S. E.; Blum, J. D.; Rytuba, J. J.

    2007-12-01

    We present here the first study of the isotopic composition of Hg in rocks, ore deposits, and active hydrothermal systems from the California Coast Ranges, one of Earth's largest Hg-depositing systems. The Franciscan Complex and Great Valley Sequence, which form the bedrock in the California Coast Ranges, are intruded and overlain by Tertiary volcanic rocks including the Clear Lake Volcanic Sequence. These rocks contain two types of Hg deposits, hot-spring deposits that form at shallow depths (<300 m) and silica-carbonate deposits that extend to greater depths (200 to 1000 m), as well as active springs and geothermal systems that release Hg to the present surface. The Franciscan Complex and Great Valley Sequence contain clastic sedimentary rocks with higher concentrations of Hg than volcanic rocks of the Clear Lake Volcanic Field. Mean Hg isotope compositions for all three rock units are similar, although the range of values in Franciscan Complex rocks is greater than in either Great Valley or Clear Lake rocks. Hot spring and silica-carbonate Hg deposits have similar average isotopic compositions that are indistinguishable from averages for the three rock units, although δ202Hg values for the Hg deposits have a greater variance than the country rocks. Precipitates from dilute spring and saline thermal waters in the area have similarly large variance and a mean δ202Hg value that is significantly lower than the ore deposits and rocks. These observations indicate there is little or no isotopic fractionation during release of Hg from its source rocks into hydrothermal solutions. Isotopic fractionation does appear to take place during transport and concentration of Hg in deposits, especially in their uppermost parts. Boiling of hydrothermal fluids is likely the most important process causing of the observed Hg isotope fractionation. This should result in the release of Hg with low δ202Hg values into the atmosphere from the top of these hydrothermal systems and a

  2. Classification of mass matrices and the calculability of the Cabibbo angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    We have analyzed all possible 2 x 2 mass matrices with two nonzero elements in an attempt to find which matrices yield a reasonable value of the Cabibbo angle upon diagonalization. We do not concern ourselves with the origin of these mass matrices (spontaneous symmetry breaking, bare-mass term, etc.). We find that, in the limit m/sub u//m/sub c/→0, only four possible relationships exist between sin 2 theta/sub C/ and the quark mass ratio m/sub d//m/sub s/, only one of which is reasonable for the usual value of m/sub d//m/sub s/ (approx.1/20). This limits the possible forms of the quark mass matrix to be two in number, both of which have been discussed previously in the literature

  3. VISCOT: a two-dimensional and axisymmetric nonlinear transient thermoviscoelastic and thermoviscoplastic finite-element code for modeling time-dependent viscous mechanical behavior of a rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    VISCOT is a non-linear, transient, thermal-stress finite-element code designed to determine the viscoelastic, fiscoplastic, or elastoplastic deformation of a rock mass due to mechanical and thermal loading. The numerical solution of the nonlinear incremental equilibrium equations within VISCOT is performed by using an explicit Euler time-stepping scheme. The rock mass may be modeled as a viscoplastic or viscoelastic material. The viscoplastic material model can be described by a Tresca, von Mises, Drucker-Prager or Mohr-Coulomb yield criteria (with or without strain hardening) with an associated flow rule which can be a power or an exponential law. The viscoelastic material model within VISCOT is a temperature- and stress-dependent law which has been developed specifically for salt rock masses by Pfeifle, Mellegard and Senseny in ONWI-314 topical report (1981). Site specific parameters for this creep law at the Richton, Permian, Paradox and Vacherie salt sites have been calculated and are given in ONWI-314 topical report (1981). A major application of VISCOT (in conjunction with a SCEPTER heat transfer code such as DOT) is the thermomechanical analysis of a rock mass such as salt in which significant time-dependent nonlinear deformations are expected to occur. Such problems include room- and canister-scale studies during the excavation, operation, and long-term post-closure stages in a salt repository. In Section 1.5 of this document the code custodianship and control is described along with the status of verification, validation and peer review of this report

  4. Measurement of cosmogenic 36Cl/Cl in young volcanic rocks: An application of accelerator mass spectrometry in geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leavy, B.D.; Phillips, F.M.; Elmore, D.; Kubik, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    We have measured 36 Cl/Cl ratios in a number of young volcanic rocks in order to test the feasibility of using 36 Cl buildup as a geochronometer for materials less than about 700,000 years old. All of the analyzed rocks have been dated independently using K-Ar or other radiometric dating methods and have exposure histories that are known or can be reasonably assumed. Measured 36 Cl/Cl ratios in these rocks are in good agreement with the calculated in-situ 36 Cl buildup curve. These analyses indicate that AMS measurement of 36 Cl buildup in young rocks is a potentially powerful new method for dating materials that had previously been undatable, and as such will have broad applications in volcanology, tectonics, geophysics, and Quaternary research

  5. Impact of In Situ Stress Distribution Characteristics on Jointed Surrounding Rock Mass Stability of an Underground Cavern near a Hillslope Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangxiang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a series of numerical simulations are performed to analyze the in situ stress distribution characteristics of the rock mass near different slope angles hillslope surfaces, which are subjected to the vertical gravity stress and different horizontal lateral stresses and the influence which the in situ stress distribution characteristics of 45° hillslope to the integral stability of surrounding rock mass when an underground cavern is excavated considering three different horizontal distances from the underground cavern to the slope surface. It can be concluded from the numerical results that different slope angles and horizontal lateral stresses have a strong impact on the in situ stress distribution and the integral surrounding rock mass stability of the underground cavern when the horizontal distance from the underground cavern to the slope surface is approximately 100 m to 200 m. The relevant results would provide some important constructive suggestions to the engineering site selection and optimization of large-scale underground caverns in hydropower stations.

  6. The Relationship between Mechanical Properties and Gradual Deterioration of Microstructures of Rock Mass Subject to Freeze-thaw Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Jiang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Under freeze-thaw cycles, the relationship between rock microstructure deterioration and its macroscopic mechanical characteristics has drawn extensive attention from engineers. With the objective to incorporate freeze-thaw cycle experiment into headrace tunnel engineering, in the present study two groups of andesite rock samples in different states are tested under the conditions of the lowest freezing temperature of –40 ℃ and the thawing temperature of 20 ℃. Damage detection was performed by magnetic resonance imaging for the interior microstructure of rock samples subject to different freeze-thaw cycles, and the relationship between the sample mechanical properties and gradual deterioration of rock microstructures was discussed. The results demonstrate evident influence of freeze-thaw cycle on the damage and deterioration of internal pore structure in andesite, and the rock uniaxial compressive strength and elasticity modulus exhibit a decreasing trend with the increase of freeze-thaw cycles. After 40 cycles, the strength of naturally saturated rock samples decreases by 39.4% (equivalent to 69.4 MPa and the elasticity modulus drops by 47.46% (equivalent to 3.27 GPa. For rock samples saturated by vacuum, 40 freeze-thaw cycles lead to a decrease of 36.86% (equivalent to 58.2 MPa in rock strength and a drop of 44.85% (equivalent to 2.83 GPa in elasticity modulus. Therefore, the test results quantitatively elucidate the substantial influence of freeze-thaw cycle on the damage and deterioration of internal structure in andesite.

  7. Numerical simulation of the time-dependent deformation behaviour of clay-stone rock mass at the Tournemire site with 2D and 3D models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutenberg, M.; Lux, K. H.

    2011-01-01

    Clay-stone rock masses are a reasonable alternative to e.g. salt rock masses as a host rock for underground radioactive waste repositories because of their very low permeability as well as their radionuclide retention capacity. Though clay-stone has been explored for many years, there is still a need for further research on its hydro-mechanical behaviour. Convergence measurements over a 4-year period in the tunnel system of the argillaceous Tournemire site in France yielded the presence of a time-dependent deformation behaviour in indurated clay. Moreover, a mine-by test was carried out with extensometer measurements capturing the rock mass deformation during the excavation process of a new gallery in 2003.This work focuses on the validation of a constitutive model by means of a three-dimensional (3D) simulation of the mine-by test. The utilised constitutive model Hou/Lux-T is based on the viscous constitutive model Lubby2 with which time-dependent deformation behaviour of salt rock can appropriately be simulated. It has been adapted to clay-stone by considering anisotropy effects, and in addition it features a strain-dependent fracture and failure criterion. The results of the mine-by-test simulation show that the calculated stresses and deformations in the rock mass seem to behave reasonably under this constitutive model with respect to time-dependency. A comparison of the 3D results to the results of a simplified two-dimensional (2D) simulation confirms the adequacy of using a 2D model with the constitutive model Hou/Lux-T for the setting at hand, described in the text (material parameters, time scale), in order to assess load-bearing capacity and deformability of the gallery near field away from heading face and tunnel crossing. Finally, a comparison of the 3D simulation results to the extensometer measurement results yields the principal ability of the used constitutive model to describe time-dependent evolutions of stresses and deformations during a three

  8. Effluents from a waste rock deposit of a former uranium mine in Saxony/Germany - Mass flow balance of water and dissolved solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biehler, D.

    2002-01-01

    Soon after uranium mining had ceased in eastern Germany in 1990, work for remediation of several mining sites began. The Wismut GmbH, owner of the Mine of Dresden-Gittersee's waste rock dump, introduced the concept of reducing the impact to the environment via water and air paths by implementing a multi-layer soil cover. The deposit consists mainly of waste rock (clastic sediments of Doehlener Becken, deep metamorphic rocks) but also of low-grade ore (U-rich coal) and tailing materials. At the time when remediation started, the effluents completely infiltrated the underground. Because of previous surface exfiltration activities, they were already known to be very rich in dissolved solids, especially in sulphate and uranium. As demanded by the state authorities, the owner funded a vast hydrogeological study of the site. In testing the efficiency of surface sealing, the study indicated a mass flow balance of water and dissolved solids for the current situation, and predicted emissions into the water path which would occur after realisation of the proposed soil cover. The field investigation program consisted of: measurements of flow, of concentrations of dissolved solids (esp. U and Ra-226) and of contents of environmental isotopes in precipitation, surface runoff, seepage water and groundwater in the current condition of the dump; the study of waste rock material (geochemistry, mineralogy); waste rock material elution tests; underground investigation by drilling boreholes up to 270 m in depth. The resulting data allowed for: a hydrogeological conceptual model of the site; a consistent mass flow balance for the current condition of the dump; a prediction of concentrations in groundwater resulting after the realisation of a soil cover. The predictions show that the concentrations of dissolved solids in the contaminated groundwater would be significantly decreased. Furthermore it would be possible to reach the standards for drinking water with respect to uranium

  9. Development of evaluation methods for impact of earthquake-induced slope failure on nearby critical structures. Analysis of behavior of collapsed rock masses using 3-D distinct element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Makoto; Tochigi, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Masato; Shirai, Koji

    2012-01-01

    Recently, importance of evaluation for impact of earthquake-induced slope failure on nearby critical structures is increasing in order to evaluate seismic stability of the slope, in addition to evaluating the possibilities of slope failure. In this study, we presented an examination flow chart to evaluate the impact on structures after slope failure. In the examination flow chart, we assumed the following four considerations; (1) evaluation of the collapse region of the slope, (2) evaluation of behavior of the collapsed rock masses, (3) evaluation of the impact on the structures, (4) examination of the countermeasures. And, for the purpose of using three dimensional distinct element method (DEM) for evaluation of behavior of the collapsed rock masses, we firstly confirmed applicability of DEM to behavior of a mass hurtling down the slope by means of comparing with the model test results. Moreover, we clarified influence of initial position or restitution coefficient of rock masses on final traveling distance of collapsed rock masses. (author)

  10. Critical issues in soft rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Milton Assis Kanji

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses several efforts made to study and investigate soft rocks, as well as their physico-mechanical characteristics recognized up to now, the problems in their sampling and testing, and the possibility of its reproduction through artificially made soft rocks. The problems in utilizing current and widespread classification systems to some types of weak rocks are also discussed, as well as other problems related to them. Some examples of engineering works in soft rock or in soft ...

  11. Shale characterization in mass transport complex as a potential source rock: An example from onshore West Java Basin, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, A. M. S.; Widiarti, R.; Kusumah, E. P.

    2017-12-01

    This study describes a deep-water slump facies shale of the Early Miocene Jatiluhur/Cibulakan Formation to understand its potential as a source rock in an active tectonic region, the onshore West Java. The formation is equivalent with the Gumai Formation, which has been well-known as another prolific source rock besides the Oligocene Talang Akar Formation in North West Java Basin, Indonesia. The equivalent shale formation is expected to have same potential source rock towards the onshore of Central Java. The shale samples were taken onshore, 150 km away from the basin. The shale must be rich of organic matter, have good quality of kerogen, and thermally matured to be categorized as a potential source rock. Investigations from petrography, X-Ray diffractions (XRD), and backscattered electron show heterogeneous mineralogy in the shales. The mineralogy consists of clay minerals, minor quartz, muscovite, calcite, chlorite, clinopyroxene, and other weathered minerals. This composition makes the shale more brittle. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis indicate secondary porosities and microstructures. Total Organic Carbon (TOC) shows 0.8-1.1 wt%, compared to the basinal shale 1.5-8 wt%. The shale properties from this outcropped formation indicate a good potential source rock that can be found in the subsurface area with better quality and maturity.

  12. Numerical simulation of the time-dependent deformation behaviour of clay-stone rock mass at the Tournemire site with 2D and 3D models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutenberg, M.; Lux, K.H.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Modern repository research foregrounds physico-chemical processes (mechanical, hydraulic, thermal, chemical) and their interactions taking place in the near field and the far field of the geological system being explored. With regard to load bearing behaviour and preservation of barrier integrity, and with the general objective of complete confinement of the waste in the isolating rock zone, the focus is especially on geomechanical processes induced by excavation - including the influences on and by hydraulic, thermal, and chemical processes - as well as on thermal processes induced by heat generation of the deposited radioactive waste and their effects on mechanical and hydraulic processes. In order to improve assessments of the mechanical stability and, in case of a water saturated rock formation, of the hydraulic effects on the host rock of the repository, suitable physical models for numerical simulations of rock and rock mass behaviour have to be found and to be validated. Because of their radionuclide retention capacity, their low water permeability, and their resistance to water, clay-stone rock masses form a reasonable alternative to e.g. salt rock masses as a host rock for deep geological repositories. In past decades, various working groups at an international level have elaborated a broad experimental and theoretical understanding of the geomechanical and geo-hydraulic behaviour of clay-stones and applied this know-how to geologic repository components, e.g. in the context of engineering studies, or in the back-analysis of field tests. In this context, measurement results revealed a continuing convergence of drift walls lasting for a few years after completion of excavation. Possible reasons for this time-dependent deformation behaviour of the clay-stone rock mass might be: - viscous properties of the material from a phenomenological point of view, meaning a constant stress state leading to increasing

  13. Long term thermo-hydro-mechanical interaction behavior study of the saturated, discontinuous granitic rock mass around the radwaste repository using a steady state flow algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Bae, Dae Suk; Kang, Chul Hyung; Choi, Jong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-02-01

    The objective of the present study is to understand the long term (500 years) thermo-hydro-mechanical interaction behavior of the 500 m depth underground radwaste repository in the saturated, discontinuous granitic rock mass using a steady state flow algorithm. The numerical model includes a saturated granitic rock mass with joints around the repository and a 45 .deg. C fault passing through the tunnel roof-wall intersection, and a canister with PWR spent fuels surrounded by the compacted bentonite and mixed-bentonite. Barton-Bandis joint constitutive model from the UDEC code is used for the joints. For the hydraulic analysis, a steady state flow algorithm is used for the groundwater flow through the rock joints. For the thermal analysis, heat transfer is modeled as isotropic conduction and heat decays exponentially with time. The results show that the variations of the hydraulic aperture, hydraulic conductivity, normal stress, normal displacements, and shear displacements of the joints are high in the vicinity of the repository and stay fairly constant on the region away from the repository. 14 refs., 15 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  14. A study on the strength properties of the rock mass based on triaxial tests conducted at the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Kazuhei; Ishii, Eiichi; Fujita, Tomoo; Kondo, Keiji; Tsusaka, Kimikazu

    2015-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been conducting R and D activities at the off-site URL at Horonobe, Hokkaido, Japan in order to enhance reliability of technology related to deep geological disposal of HLW in sedimentary rocks. In this report, strength properties (cohesion and frictional angle) of rock masses in the Koetoi and Wakkanai formations are investigated on the basis of triaxial tests conducted in the Horonobe URL considering the relative depths to the formation. Strength properties investigated in this report are compared with the properties obtained in the designing phase. The cohesion in the Koetoi Formation increased with increasing depth. On the other hand, in the transition zone of the Wakkanai Formation, the cohesion increased significantly in the shallow Wakkanai formation (transition zone). Below the transition zone, the cohesion does not significantly depend on the depth. Thus the strength properties between two formations were found to be different. Comparing the cohesions and frictional angles determined from triaxial tests with the values determined in the designing phase, there was no agreement between these values in almost all the depth. Thus it is essential to determine cohesion and frictional angle considering the relative depths to the formation for detailed understanding of strength properties of rock mass. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (J.P.N.)

  15. Rapid Classification and Identification of Multiple Microorganisms with Accurate Statistical Significance via High-Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Gelio; Wang, Guanghui; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y; Drake, Steven K; Gucek, Marjan; Sacks, David B; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2018-06-05

    Rapid and accurate identification and classification of microorganisms is of paramount importance to public health and safety. With the advance of mass spectrometry (MS) technology, the speed of identification can be greatly improved. However, the increasing number of microbes sequenced is complicating correct microbial identification even in a simple sample due to the large number of candidates present. To properly untwine candidate microbes in samples containing one or more microbes, one needs to go beyond apparent morphology or simple "fingerprinting"; to correctly prioritize the candidate microbes, one needs to have accurate statistical significance in microbial identification. We meet these challenges by using peptide-centric representations of microbes to better separate them and by augmenting our earlier analysis method that yields accurate statistical significance. Here, we present an updated analysis workflow that uses tandem MS (MS/MS) spectra for microbial identification or classification. We have demonstrated, using 226 MS/MS publicly available data files (each containing from 2500 to nearly 100,000 MS/MS spectra) and 4000 additional MS/MS data files, that the updated workflow can correctly identify multiple microbes at the genus and often the species level for samples containing more than one microbe. We have also shown that the proposed workflow computes accurate statistical significances, i.e., E values for identified peptides and unified E values for identified microbes. Our updated analysis workflow MiCId, a freely available software for Microorganism Classification and Identification, is available for download at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads.html . Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  16. Binary classification of dyslipidemia from the waist-to-hip ratio and body mass index: a comparison of linear, logistic, and CART models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paccaud Fred

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We sought to improve upon previously published statistical modeling strategies for binary classification of dyslipidemia for general population screening purposes based on the waist-to-hip circumference ratio and body mass index anthropometric measurements. Methods Study subjects were participants in WHO-MONICA population-based surveys conducted in two Swiss regions. Outcome variables were based on the total serum cholesterol to high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio. The other potential predictor variables were gender, age, current cigarette smoking, and hypertension. The models investigated were: (i linear regression; (ii logistic classification; (iii regression trees; (iv classification trees (iii and iv are collectively known as "CART". Binary classification performance of the region-specific models was externally validated by classifying the subjects from the other region. Results Waist-to-hip circumference ratio and body mass index remained modest predictors of dyslipidemia. Correct classification rates for all models were 60–80%, with marked gender differences. Gender-specific models provided only small gains in classification. The external validations provided assurance about the stability of the models. Conclusions There were no striking differences between either the algebraic (i, ii vs. non-algebraic (iii, iv, or the regression (i, iii vs. classification (ii, iv modeling approaches. Anticipated advantages of the CART vs. simple additive linear and logistic models were less than expected in this particular application with a relatively small set of predictor variables. CART models may be more useful when considering main effects and interactions between larger sets of predictor variables.

  17. Automated correlation and classification of secondary ion mass spectrometry images using a k-means cluster method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konicek, Andrew R; Lefman, Jonathan; Szakal, Christopher

    2012-08-07

    We present a novel method for correlating and classifying ion-specific time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) images within a multispectral dataset by grouping images with similar pixel intensity distributions. Binary centroid images are created by employing a k-means-based custom algorithm. Centroid images are compared to grayscale SIMS images using a newly developed correlation method that assigns the SIMS images to classes that have similar spatial (rather than spectral) patterns. Image features of both large and small spatial extent are identified without the need for image pre-processing, such as normalization or fixed-range mass-binning. A subsequent classification step tracks the class assignment of SIMS images over multiple iterations of increasing n classes per iteration, providing information about groups of images that have similar chemistry. Details are discussed while presenting data acquired with ToF-SIMS on a model sample of laser-printed inks. This approach can lead to the identification of distinct ion-specific chemistries for mass spectral imaging by ToF-SIMS, as well as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI).

  18. Overweight and obesity prevalence among Cree youth of Eeyou Istchee according to three body mass index classification systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Jean, Audray; Meziou, Salma; Ayotte, Pierre; Lucas, Michel

    2017-11-22

    Little is known about the suitability of three commonly used body mass index (BMI) classification systems for Indigenous youth. We estimated overweight and obesity prevalence among Cree youth of Eeyou Istchee according to three BMI classification systems, assessed the level of agreement between them, and evaluated their accuracy through body fat and cardiometabolic risk factors. Data on 288 youth (aged 8-17 years) were collected. Overweight and obesity prevalence were estimated with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) and World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Agreement was measured with weighted kappa (κw). Associations with body fat and cardiometabolic risk factors were evaluated by analysis of variance. Obesity prevalence was 42.7% with IOTF, 47.2% with CDC, and 49.3% with WHO criteria. Agreement was almost perfect between IOTF and CDC (κw = 0.93), IOTF and WHO (κw = 0.91), and WHO and CDC (κw = 0.94). Means of body fat and cardiometabolic risk factors were significantly higher (P trend  obesity, regardless of the system used. Youth considered overweight by IOTF but obese by CDC or WHO exhibited less severe clinical obesity. IOTF seems to be more accurate in identifying obesity in Cree youth.

  19. Classification of wine by determination of bioactive phenolic compounds using high resolution mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanova, Violeta; Dimovska, Violeta; Mitrev, Sasa; Gulaboski, Rubin; Bogeva, Elena; Petruseva, Dragana; Causon, Tim; Hann, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    In this project proposal, metabolomic fingerprinting of wine samples will be examined using high performance liquid chromatography combined with ion mobility quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC–IMS-QTOF-MS) for the first time. Bioactive compounds in wines from various red and white varieties produced in Macedonia and Austria from different wine regions and different vintages will be determined for the first time using a non-targeted fingerprinting approach on this analytical plat...

  20. Strategy for a Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Model. Development and testing of the empirical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeshoff, Kennert; Lanaro, Flavio; Lanru Jing

    2002-05-01

    application of different classification systems, advantages and disadvantages of each method could be highlighted. Moreover, a comparison of the results of the methods could be made, so that the differences in the output parameters were studied and explained. This comparison also allowed establishing a range of possible values of the output parameters. Through this process, a suitable determination method was chosen for each rock mechanics property required as outcome of the Project. Based on the critical analysis and comparison of the different rock mass classification systems, a series of recommendations was provided concerning: i) the quality/quantity of the geological/rock mechanics input data; ii) the technique for partitioning of the rock mass in homogeneous domains; iii) the sensitivity and subjectivity of the empirical methods; iv) some limits of the methods; v) some warnings about difficulties, misleading techniques, and; vi) about the need of more studies for the validation of the empirical methods against results from case histories

  1. Strategy for a Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Model. Development and testing of the empirical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeshoff, Kennert; Lanaro, Flavio [Berg Bygg Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Lanru Jing [Royal Inst. of Techn., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Engineering Geology

    2002-05-01

    by the application of different classification systems, advantages and disadvantages of each method could be highlighted. Moreover, a comparison of the results of the methods could be made, so that the differences in the output parameters were studied and explained. This comparison also allowed establishing a range of possible values of the output parameters. Through this process, a suitable determination method was chosen for each rock mechanics property required as outcome of the Project. Based on the critical analysis and comparison of the different rock mass classification systems, a series of recommendations was provided concerning: i) the quality/quantity of the geological/rock mechanics input data; ii) the technique for partitioning of the rock mass in homogeneous domains; iii) the sensitivity and subjectivity of the empirical methods; iv) some limits of the methods; v) some warnings about difficulties, misleading techniques, and; vi) about the need of more studies for the validation of the empirical methods against results from case histories.

  2. Classification of breast masses by ultrasonic Nakagami imaging: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Chang, Chien-Cheng; Liao, Yin-Yin

    2008-11-01

    Ultrasound is an important clinical tool in noninvasive diagnoses of breast cancer. The Nakagami statistical parameter estimated from the ultrasonic backscattered envelope has been demonstrated to be useful in complementing conventional B-mode scans when classifying breast masses. However, the shadowing effect caused by certain high-attenuation tumors in the B-mode image makes the tumor contour unclear, and thus it is more difficult to choose an appropriate region of interest from which to collect tumor data for estimating the Nakagami parameter. This study explored the feasibility of using the Nakagami parametric image to overcome the shadowing effect for visualizing the properties of breast masses. Experiments were performed on a breast-mimicking phantom and on some typical clinical cases for cysts, fat and tumors (fibroadenoma) (n = 18) in order to explore the performance of the Nakagami image under ideal and practical conditions. The experimental results showed that the Nakagami image pixels (i.e. the local Nakagami parameter) in the cyst, tumor and fat are 0.21 ± 0.01, 0.65 ± 0.05 and 0.98 ± 0.07, respectively, for six independent phantom measurements, and 0.14 ± 0.03, 0.67 ± 0.11 and 0.89 ± 0.08, respectively, for clinical experiments. This suggests that the Nakagami image is able to classify various breast masses (p < 0.005) although the clinical results from tumors of different cases have a larger variance that may be caused by the complexity of real breast tissues. In particular, unlike the B-mode image, the Nakagami image is not subject to significant shadowing effects, making it useful to complement the B-mode image to describe the tumor contour for identifying the tumor-related region when the shadowing effect is stronger or a low system gain is used.

  3. Classification of breast masses by ultrasonic Nakagami imaging: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsui, P-H; Chang, C-C [Division of Mechanics, Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, 128, Section 2, Academia Road, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Yeh, C-K; Liao, Y-Y [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: mechang@gate.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: ckyeh@mx.nthu.edu.tw

    2008-11-07

    Ultrasound is an important clinical tool in noninvasive diagnoses of breast cancer. The Nakagami statistical parameter estimated from the ultrasonic backscattered envelope has been demonstrated to be useful in complementing conventional B-mode scans when classifying breast masses. However, the shadowing effect caused by certain high-attenuation tumors in the B-mode image makes the tumor contour unclear, and thus it is more difficult to choose an appropriate region of interest from which to collect tumor data for estimating the Nakagami parameter. This study explored the feasibility of using the Nakagami parametric image to overcome the shadowing effect for visualizing the properties of breast masses. Experiments were performed on a breast-mimicking phantom and on some typical clinical cases for cysts, fat and tumors (fibroadenoma) (n = 18) in order to explore the performance of the Nakagami image under ideal and practical conditions. The experimental results showed that the Nakagami image pixels (i.e. the local Nakagami parameter) in the cyst, tumor and fat are 0.21 {+-} 0.01, 0.65 {+-} 0.05 and 0.98 {+-} 0.07, respectively, for six independent phantom measurements, and 0.14 {+-} 0.03, 0.67 {+-} 0.11 and 0.89 {+-} 0.08, respectively, for clinical experiments. This suggests that the Nakagami image is able to classify various breast masses (p < 0.005) although the clinical results from tumors of different cases have a larger variance that may be caused by the complexity of real breast tissues. In particular, unlike the B-mode image, the Nakagami image is not subject to significant shadowing effects, making it useful to complement the B-mode image to describe the tumor contour for identifying the tumor-related region when the shadowing effect is stronger or a low system gain is used.

  4. Classification of premalignant pancreatic cancer mass-spectrometry data using decision tree ensembles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong G William

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Consequently, identification of clinically relevant biomarkers for the early detection of this cancer type is urgently needed. In recent years, proteomics profiling techniques combined with various data analysis methods have been successfully used to gain critical insights into processes and mechanisms underlying pathologic conditions, particularly as they relate to cancer. However, the high dimensionality of proteomics data combined with their relatively small sample sizes poses a significant challenge to current data mining methodology where many of the standard methods cannot be applied directly. Here, we propose a novel methodological framework using machine learning method, in which decision tree based classifier ensembles coupled with feature selection methods, is applied to proteomics data generated from premalignant pancreatic cancer. Results This study explores the utility of three different feature selection schemas (Student t test, Wilcoxon rank sum test and genetic algorithm to reduce the high dimensionality of a pancreatic cancer proteomic dataset. Using the top features selected from each method, we compared the prediction performances of a single decision tree algorithm C4.5 with six different decision-tree based classifier ensembles (Random forest, Stacked generalization, Bagging, Adaboost, Logitboost and Multiboost. We show that ensemble classifiers always outperform single decision tree classifier in having greater accuracies and smaller prediction errors when applied to a pancreatic cancer proteomics dataset. Conclusion In our cross validation framework, classifier ensembles generally have better classification accuracies compared to that of a single decision tree when applied to a pancreatic cancer proteomic dataset, thus suggesting its utility in future proteomics data analysis. Additionally, the use of feature selection

  5. Mass defect filtering-oriented classification and precursor ions list-triggered high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis for the discovery of indole alkaloids from Uncaria sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huiqin; Yang, Wenzhi; Yao, Changliang; Shen, Yao; Zhang, Yibei; Shi, Xiaojian; Yao, Shuai; Wu, Wanying; Guo, Dean

    2017-09-22

    Discovery of new natural compounds is becoming increasingly challenging because of the interference from those known and abundant components. The aim of this study is to report a dereplication strategy, by integrating mass defect filtering (MDF)-oriented novelty classification and precursor ions list (PIL)-triggered high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis, and to validate it by discovering new indole alkaloids from the medicinal herb Uncaria sinensis. Rapid chromatographic separation was achieved on a Kinetex ® EVO C18 column (<16min). An in-house MDF algorithm, developed based on the informed phytochemistry information and molecular design, could more exactly screen the target alkaloids and divide them into three novelty levels: Known (KN), Unknown-but-Predicted (UP), and Unexpected (UN). A hybrid data acquisition method, namely PIL-triggered collision-induced dissociation-MS 2 and high-energy C-trap dissociation-MS 3 with dynamic exclusion on a linear ion trap/Orbitrap mass spectrometer, facilitated the acquisition of diverse product ions sufficient for the structural elucidation of both indole alkaloids and the N-oxides. Ultimately, 158 potentially new alkaloids, including 10 UP and 108 UN, were rapidly characterized from the stem, leaf, and flower of U. sinensis. Two new alkaloid compounds thereof were successfully isolated and identified by 1D and 2D NMR analyses. The varied ring E and novel alkaloid-acylquinic acid conjugates were first reported from the whole Uncaria genus. Conclusively, it is a practical chemical dereplication strategy that can enhance the efficiency and has the potential to be a routine approach for the discovery of new natural compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid fingerprinting and classification of extra virgin olive oil by microjet sampling and extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Wai Siang; Chen, Huan Wen; Balabin, Roman; Berchtold, Christian; Meier, Lukas; Zenobi, Renato

    2010-04-01

    Microjet sampling in combination with extractive electrospray ionization (EESI) mass spectrometry (MS) was applied to the rapid characterization and classification of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) without any sample pretreatment. When modifying the composition of the primary ESI spray solvent, mass spectra of an identical EVOO sample showed differences. This demonstrates the capability of this technique to extract molecules with varying polarities, hence generating rich molecular information of the EVOO. Moreover, with the aid of microjet sampling, compounds of different volatilities (e.g.E-2-hexenal, trans-trans-2,4-heptadienal, tyrosol and caffeic acid) could be sampled simultaneously. EVOO data was also compared with that of other edible oils. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed to discriminate EVOO and EVOO adulterated with edible oils. Microjet sampling EESI-MS was found to be a simple, rapid (less than 2 min analysis time per sample) and powerful method to obtain MS fingerprints of EVOO without requiring any complicated sample pretreatment steps.

  7. Overweight and Obesity Prevalence Among School-Aged Nunavik Inuit Children According to Three Body Mass Index Classification Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medehouenou, Thierry Comlan Marc; Ayotte, Pierre; St-Jean, Audray; Meziou, Salma; Roy, Cynthia; Muckle, Gina; Lucas, Michel

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about the suitability of three commonly used body mass index (BMI) classification system for Indigenous children. This study aims to estimate overweight and obesity prevalence among school-aged Nunavik Inuit children according to International Obesity Task Force (IOTF), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and World Health Organization (WHO) BMI classification systems, to measure agreement between those classification systems, and to investigate whether BMI status as defined by these classification systems is associated with levels of metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers. Data were collected on 290 school-aged children (aged 8-14 years; 50.7% girls) from the Nunavik Child Development Study with data collected in 2005-2010. Anthropometric parameters were measured and blood sampled. Participants were classified as normal weight, overweight, and obese according to BMI classification systems. Weighted kappa (κw) statistics assessed agreement between different BMI classification systems, and multivariate analysis of variance ascertained their relationship with metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers. The combined prevalence rate of overweight/obesity was 26.9% (with 6.6% obesity) with IOTF, 24.1% (11.0%) with CDC, and 40.4% (12.8%) with WHO classification systems. Agreement was the highest between IOTF and CDC (κw = .87) classifications, and substantial for IOTF and WHO (κw = .69) and for CDC and WHO (κw = .73). Insulin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein plasma levels were significantly higher from normal weight to obesity, regardless of classification system. Among obese subjects, higher insulin level was observed with IOTF. Compared with other systems, IOTF classification appears to be more specific to identify overweight and obesity in Inuit children. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Classification of photobacteria associated with spoilage of fish products by numerical taxanomy and pyrolysis mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Paw; Manfio, G.P.; Goodfellow, M.

    1997-01-01

    , from spoiled products and by using a specific detection method. The data were analysed using the similarity coefficient and the unweighted pair-group with arithmetic averages algorithm. In addition twenty-six of the fish isolates and five reference strains were analysed by Curie-point pyrolysis mass...... sub-groups. One sub-group of psychrotolerant P. phosphoreum strains, which was selected in modified atmosphere packed fish stored at low temperature, was also highlighted using each of the methods. The importance of classifying food spoilage bacteria has been shown and a simple key generated......Forty strains of luminous and non-luminous Photobacterium phosphoreum isolates from cod (Gadus morhua) and seven reference strains of psychrotolerant and mesophilic photobacteria were examined for 156 unit characters in a numerical taxonomic study. The fish strains were isolated from the intestines...

  9. Study on heat and mass transfer between a greenhouse considered as a solar air heater and a rock packed bed as ambient control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajona Maeztu, J.I.

    1990-01-01

    A general study on heat transfer in dry packed beds is made, with special emphasis in comparing different transient models and in identifying the required conditions by which the attained results are equivalent. The differences in thermal behaviour on packed beds, when simultaneous heat mass transfer occurs as wet air is used as heat transfer fluid and exchanges heat and water with the solid in the bed, is analyzed. We modelize wet packed beds considering them as one dimension adsorbents beds, with dispersive and non-dispersive models, where adsorption, condensation-evaporation and liquid water downward flow from condensate phenomena are present. Models were solved numerically and experiments with a rock bed with dry and wet air through it, were made to test assumptions and to further understand the behavior of the system, obtaining a pretty good agreement between expected and measured profiles of the temperature evolution within the packed bed. As a possible application of the wet rock bed for storage purposes, a forced ventilation greenhouse was characterized as a wet air solar heater and analyzed the energetic potential of storing the heat that has to be rejected during daytime to control the crop ambient conditions, in a rock bed for later use at night for heating. (author)

  10. Theoretical and numerical studies of crack initiation and propagation in rock masses under freezing pressure and far-field stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongshui Kang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Water-bearing rocks exposed to freezing temperature can be subjected to freeze–thaw cycles leading to crack initiation and propagation, which are the main causes of frost damage to rocks. Based on the Griffith theory of brittle fracture mechanics, the crack initiation criterion, propagation direction, and crack length under freezing pressure and far-field stress are analyzed. Furthermore, a calculation method is proposed for the stress intensity factor (SIF of the crack tip under non-uniformly distributed freezing pressure. The formulae for the crack/fracture propagation direction and length of the wing crack under freezing pressure are obtained, and the mechanism for coalescence of adjacent cracks is investigated. In addition, the necessary conditions for different coalescence modes of cracks are studied. Using the topology theory, a new algorithm for frost crack propagation is proposed, which has the capability to define the crack growth path and identify and update the cracked elements. A model that incorporates multiple cracks is built by ANSYS and then imported into FLAC3D. The SIFs are then calculated using a FISH procedure, and the growth path of the freezing cracks after several calculation steps is demonstrated using the new algorithm. The proposed method can be applied to rocks containing fillings such as detritus and slurry.

  11. A new approach to develop computer-aided diagnosis scheme of breast mass classification using deep learning technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Yan, Shiju; Gundreddy, Rohith Reddy; Wang, Yunzhi; Cheng, Samuel; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2017-01-01

    To develop and test a deep learning based computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme of mammograms for classifying between malignant and benign masses. An image dataset involving 560 regions of interest (ROIs) extracted from digital mammograms was used. After down-sampling each ROI from 512×512 to 64×64 pixel size, we applied an 8 layer deep learning network that involves 3 pairs of convolution-max-pooling layers for automatic feature extraction and a multiple layer perceptron (MLP) classifier for feature categorization to process ROIs. The 3 pairs of convolution layers contain 20, 10, and 5 feature maps, respectively. Each convolution layer is connected with a max-pooling layer to improve the feature robustness. The output of the sixth layer is fully connected with a MLP classifier, which is composed of one hidden layer and one logistic regression layer. The network then generates a classification score to predict the likelihood of ROI depicting a malignant mass. A four-fold cross validation method was applied to train and test this deep learning network. The results revealed that this CAD scheme yields an area under the receiver operation characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.696±0.044, 0.802±0.037, 0.836±0.036, and 0.822±0.035 for fold 1 to 4 testing datasets, respectively. The overall AUC of the entire dataset is 0.790±0.019. This study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a deep learning based CAD scheme to classify between malignant and benign breast masses without a lesion segmentation, image feature computation and selection process.

  12. A New Approach to Develop Computer-aided Diagnosis Scheme of Breast Mass Classification Using Deep Learning Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Yan, Shiju; Gundreddy, Rohith Reddy; Wang, Yunzhi; Cheng, Samuel; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To develop and test a deep learning based computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme of mammograms for classifying between malignant and benign masses. METHODS An image dataset involving 560 regions of interest (ROIs) extracted from digital mammograms was used. After down-sampling each ROI from 512×512 to 64×64 pixel size, we applied an 8 layer deep learning network that involves 3 pairs of convolution-max-pooling layers for automatic feature extraction and a multiple layer perceptron (MLP) classifier for feature categorization to process ROIs. The 3 pairs of convolution layers contain 20, 10, and 5 feature maps, respectively. Each convolution layer is connected with a max-pooling layer to improve the feature robustness. The output of the sixth layer is fully connected with a MLP classifier, which is composed of one hidden layer and one logistic regression layer. The network then generates a classification score to predict the likelihood of ROI depicting a malignant mass. A four-fold cross validation method was applied to train and test this deep learning network. RESULTS The results revealed that this CAD scheme yields an area under the receiver operation characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.696±0.044, 0.802±0.037, 0.836±0.036, and 0.822±0.035 for fold 1 to 4 testing datasets, respectively. The overall AUC of the entire dataset is 0.790±0.019. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a deep learning based CAD scheme to classify between malignant and benign breast masses without a lesion segmentation, image feature computation and selection process. PMID:28436410

  13. Top-quark mass coupling and classification of weakly coupled heterotic superstring vacua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizos, J.

    2014-01-01

    The quest for the Standard Model among the huge number of string vacua is usually based on a set of phenomenological criteria related to the massless spectrum of string models. In this work we study criteria associated with interactions in the effective low energy theory and in particular with the presence of the coupling that provides mass to the top quark. Working in the context of the free-fermionic formulation of the heterotic superstring, we demonstrate that, in a big class of phenomenologically promising Z 2 x Z 2 compactifications, these criteria can be expressed entirely in terms of the generalised GSO projection coefficients entering the definition of the models. They are shown to be very efficient in identifying phenomenologically viable vacua, especially in the framework of computer-based search, as they are met by approximately one every 10 4 models. We apply our results in the investigation of a class of supersymmetric Pati-Salam vacua, comprising 10 16 configurations, and we show that when combined with other phenomenological requirements they lead to a relatively small set of about 10 7 Standard Model compatible models that can be fully classified. (orig.)

  14. Top-quark mass coupling and classification of weakly coupled heterotic superstring vacua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizos, J.

    2014-06-01

    The quest for the Standard Model among the huge number of string vacua is usually based on a set of phenomenological criteria related to the massless spectrum of string models. In this work we study criteria associated with interactions in the effective low energy theory and in particular with the presence of the coupling that provides mass to the top quark. Working in the context of the free-fermionic formulation of the heterotic superstring, we demonstrate that, in a big class of phenomenologically promising compactifications, these criteria can be expressed entirely in terms of the generalised GSO projection coefficients entering the definition of the models. They are shown to be very efficient in identifying phenomenologically viable vacua, especially in the framework of computer-based search, as they are met by approximately one every models. We apply our results in the investigation of a class of supersymmetric Pati-Salam vacua, comprising configurations, and we show that when combined with other phenomenological requirements they lead to a relatively small set of about Standard Model compatible models that can be fully classified.

  15. Classification of cultivation locations of Panax quinquefolius L samples using high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and chemometric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panax quinquefolius L (P. quinquefolius L) samples grown in the United States and China were analyzed with high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC—MS). Prior to classification, the two-way datasets were subjected to pretreatment including baseline correction and retention tim...

  16. Evaluation of water content in rock mass by electromagnetic and resistivity tomography. Denjiha, hiteiko tomography ni yoru ganban no gansui jotai hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaba, T; Inoue, M; Matsumoto, K [Kajima Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1993-10-31

    As a method to evaluate the rock mass, electromagnetic tomography and resistivity tomography were tested on the original site. The electromagnetic tomography can tomographically analyze the propagation velocity and initial amplitude damping. The resistivity tomography uses a finite element method from the initial resistivity distribution model and finally gives a model which is nearly equal to the actual resistivity distribution. Both the above tomographic analyses can detect the crushed spot as a low velocity, high damping and low resistivity spot. However, the electromagnetic tomography could detect finer structure than the resistivity tomography. The water content of rock mass was evaluated from the damping coefficient which was given by the amplitude damping tomography of electromagnetic wave. If it is compared with the water content which is given by the dielectric constant of velocity tomography, there partially exists discrepancy between both, because the damping coefficient contains information on cracks which disperse and reflect the electromagnetic wave. Between the resistivity and porosity, there exists a known experimental formula, which was satisfied by the presently given resistivity. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  17. FEM Analyses for T-H-M-M Coupling Processes in Dual-Porosity Rock Mass under Stress Corrosion and Pressure Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jun Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The models of stress corrosion and pressure solution established by Yasuhara et al. were introduced into the 2D FEM code of thermo-hydro-mechanical-migratory coupling analysis for dual-porosity medium developed by the authors. Aiming at a hypothetical model for geological disposal of nuclear waste in an unsaturated rock mass from which there is a nuclide leak, two computation conditions were designed. Then the corresponding two-dimensional numerical simulation for the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-migratory processes were carried out, and the states of temperatures, rates and magnitudes of aperture closure, pore and fracture pressures, flow velocities, nuclide concentrations and stresses in the rock mass were investigated. The results show: the aperture closure rates caused by stress corrosion are almost six orders higher than those caused by pressure solution, and the two kinds of closure rates climb up and then decline, furthermore tend towards stability; when the effects of stress corrosion and pressure solution are considered, the negative fracture pressures in near field rise very highly; the fracture aperture and porosity are decreases in the case 1, so the relative permeability coefficients reduce, therefore the nuclide concentrations in pore and fracture in this case are higher than those in case 2.

  18. A comparison study of single and double layer repositories for high level radioactive wastes within a saturated and discontinuous granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Choi, Jong Won; Bae, Dae Suk

    2004-02-01

    The present study is to analyze and compare a long term thermohydro mechanical interaction behavior of a single layer and a double layer repository for high level radioactive wastes within a saturated and discontinuous granitic rock mass, and then to contribute this understanding to the development of a Korean disposal concept. The model includes a saturated and discontinuous granitic rock mass, PWR spent nuclear fuel in a disposal canister surrounded by compacted bentonite inside a deposition hole, and mixed bentonite backfilled in the rest of the space within a repository cavern. It is assumed that two joint sets exist within the model. Joint set 1 includes joints of 56 .deg. dip angle, spaced at 20 m, and joint set 2 is in the perpendicular direction to joint set 1 and includes joints of .deg. dip angle, spaced at 20 m. The two dimensional distinct element code, UDEC is used for the analysis. To understand the joint behavior adjacent to the repository cavern, Barton-Bandis joint model is used. Effect of the decay heat from PWR spent fuels on the repository model has been analyzed, and a steady state flow algorithm is used for the hydraulic analysis

  19. Piezo-electric automatic vehicle classification system : Oregon Department of Transportation with Castle Rock Consultants for a SHRP Long Term Pavement Performance Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    Oregon has twelve sites that are part of the Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP), Long Term Pavement Performance (LTPP) studies. Part of the data gathering on these sites involves vehicle weight and classification. This pilot project was to hel...

  20. Piezo-electric automatic vehicle classification system : Oregon Department of Transportation with Castle Rock Consultants for a SHRP Long Term Pavement Performance Site : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    Oregon has twelve pavement test sites that are part of the Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP), Long Term Pavement Performance (LTPP) studies. Part of the data gathering on these sites involves vehicle weight and classification. This pilot proj...

  1. Role of HHM coupling mechanisms on the evolution of rock masses around nuclear waste disposals in the context of gas generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoxha, D.; Do, D.-P.; Wendling, J.; Poutrel, A.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. This paper aims at modelling of long term evolution of hydro-mechanical state of rock masses around sealing nuclear waste disposals. In the principles of nuclear waste disposals the geological barrier must play a long term confining role in respect with nuclide transport. In terms of hydro-mechanical properties this calls for managing the damage around the underground workings of the waste disposals. In particular the seal buffers and barrier rock will support the generation of hydrogen of different origins, mainly from the corrosion of steals used in various elements of a nuclear waste disposal. This generation would generate gas pressures sufficiently high to partially dry seal or barrier rock leading to a redistribution of stress around underground openings, to a reactivation of the rock damage and finally could put in question the concept of geological barrier itself. The object of this paper is to shed light in the mechanisms of HHM coupling in rocks around a repository by comparative numerical analyses. Basically, we chose two configurations to proceed with analyses: one in plan strain conditions and the other an axial symmetric configuration. The goal of the first configuration is the assessment of gas pressure evolution in the openings of a repository. The principal input of the problem is the kinetics of gas generation (H 2 generation) given by a step-wise function of time describing the gas generation of one single nuclear waste coli. Then known the repository architecture one could easily calculate the mass of gas generated on one access gallery. Since extreme scenario is studied, we suppose that the gas generated by the set of alveoli is fully located in the access gallery and only a radial gas flux is possible.The hydro mechanical properties of rocks up to the surface were taken into account. For the callovo-Oxfordian clay that constitutes barrier rock in immediate neighbouring of the gallery a model

  2. Correlation between Bieniawski’s RMR index and Barton’s Q index in fine-grained sedimentary rock formations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Fernández-Gutiérrez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available From the XX century, various rock mass classification systems have been proposed. Among them, the Bieniawski’s RMR system and Barton’s Q system have emerged as the most used rock mass classification worldwide. Correlations between both indices have been proposed, usually with a wide scattering of the data used in deriving the equations. However, it has been observed that correlations established for a specific geological unit fit better. The aim of this paper is to propose a correlation between RMR and Q indices for fine-grained sedimentary rock formations, normally found in the area of Bilbao (Spain, by means of the collected data during the excavation of the tunnel Etxebarri-Casco Viejo of the line 3 of the Metropolitan Railway of Bilbao. Obtained equation shows a high correlation coefficient and a unique relationship between the two classification systems has been proposed, not depending on the choice of the independent variable.

  3. Laser ablation aerosol particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LAAPTOF): performance, reference spectra and classification of atmospheric samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoli; Ramisetty, Ramakrishna; Mohr, Claudia; Huang, Wei; Leisner, Thomas; Saathoff, Harald

    2018-04-01

    The laser ablation aerosol particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LAAPTOF, AeroMegt GmbH) is able to identify the chemical composition and mixing state of individual aerosol particles, and thus is a tool for elucidating their impacts on human health, visibility, ecosystem, and climate. The overall detection efficiency (ODE) of the instrument we use was determined to range from ˜ (0.01 ± 0.01) to ˜ (4.23 ± 2.36) % for polystyrene latex (PSL) in the size range of 200 to 2000 nm, ˜ (0.44 ± 0.19) to ˜ (6.57 ± 2.38) % for ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3), and ˜ (0.14 ± 0.02) to ˜ (1.46 ± 0.08) % for sodium chloride (NaCl) particles in the size range of 300 to 1000 nm. Reference mass spectra of 32 different particle types relevant for atmospheric aerosol (e.g. pure compounds NH4NO3, K2SO4, NaCl, oxalic acid, pinic acid, and pinonic acid; internal mixtures of e.g. salts, secondary organic aerosol, and metallic core-organic shell particles; more complex particles such as soot and dust particles) were determined. Our results show that internally mixed aerosol particles can result in spectra with new clusters of ions, rather than simply a combination of the spectra from the single components. An exemplary 1-day ambient data set was analysed by both classical fuzzy clustering and a reference-spectra-based classification method. Resulting identified particle types were generally well correlated. We show how a combination of both methods can greatly improve the interpretation of single-particle data in field measurements.

  4. Orbit classification in an equal-mass non-spinning binary black hole pseudo-Newtonian system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotos, Euaggelos E.; Dubeibe, F. L.; González, Guillermo A.

    2018-04-01

    The dynamics of a test particle in a non-spinning binary black hole system of equal masses is numerically investigated. The binary system is modeled in the context of the pseudo-Newtonian circular restricted three-body problem, such that the primaries are separated by a fixed distance and move in a circular orbit around each other. In particular, the Paczyński-Wiita potential is used for describing the gravitational field of the two non-Newtonian primaries. The orbital properties of the test particle are determined through the classification of the initial conditions of the orbits, using several values of the Jacobi constant, in the Hill's regions of possible motion. The initial conditions are classified into three main categories: (i) bounded, (ii) escaping and (iii) displaying close encounters. Using the smaller alignment index (SALI) chaos indicator, we further classify bounded orbits into regular, sticky or chaotic. To gain a complete view of the dynamics of the system, we define grids of initial conditions on different types of two-dimensional planes. The orbital structure of the configuration plane, along with the corresponding distributions of the escape and collision/close encounter times, allow us to observe the transition from the classical Newtonian to the pseudo-Newtonian regime. Our numerical results reveal a strong dependence of the properties of the considered basins with the Jacobi constant as well as with the Schwarzschild radius of the black holes.

  5. Analysis of the stability of underground high-level nuclear waste repository in discontinuous rock mass using 3DEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Sang Ki; Park, Jeong Hwa; Choi, Jong Won; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2001-03-01

    For the safe design of a high-level nuclear waste repository in deep location, it is necessary to confirm the stability of the underground excavations under the high overburden pressure and also to investigate the influence of discontinuities such as fault, fracture zone, and joints. In this study, computer simulations using 3DEC, which is a Distince Element (DEM) code, were carried out for determining important parameters on the stability of the disposal tunnel and deposition holes excavated in 500 m deep granite body. The development of plastic zone and stress and strain distributions were analyzed with various modelling conditions with variation on the parameters including joint numbers, tunnel size, joint properties, rock properties, and stress ratio. Furthermore, the influence of fracture zone, which is located around the underground excavations, on the stability of the excavation was investigated. In this study, the variation of stress and strain distribution due to the variation of fracture zone location, dip, and width was analyzed

  6. Unsupervised classification of petroleum Certified Reference Materials and other fuels by chemometric analysis of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho Rocha, Werickson Fortunato; Schantz, Michele M; Sheen, David A; Chu, Pamela M; Lippa, Katrice A

    2017-06-01

    As feedstocks transition from conventional oil to unconventional petroleum sources and biomass, it will be necessary to determine whether a particular fuel or fuel blend is suitable for use in engines. Certifying a fuel as safe for use is time-consuming and expensive and must be performed for each new fuel. In principle, suitability of a fuel should be completely determined by its chemical composition. This composition can be probed through use of detailed analytical techniques such as gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). In traditional analysis, chromatograms would be used to determine the details of the composition. In the approach taken in this paper, the chromatogram is assumed to be entirely representative of the composition of a fuel, and is used directly as the input to an algorithm in order to develop a model that is predictive of a fuel's suitability. When a new fuel is proposed for service, its suitability for any application could then be ascertained by using this model to compare its chromatogram with those of the fuels already known to be suitable for that application. In this paper, we lay the mathematical and informatics groundwork for a predictive model of hydrocarbon properties. The objective of this work was to develop a reliable model for unsupervised classification of the hydrocarbons as a prelude to developing a predictive model of their engine-relevant physical and chemical properties. A set of hydrocarbons including biodiesel fuels, gasoline, highway and marine diesel fuels, and crude oils was collected and GC-MS profiles obtained. These profiles were then analyzed using multi-way principal components analysis (MPCA), principal factors analysis (PARAFAC), and a self-organizing map (SOM), which is a kind of artificial neural network. It was found that, while MPCA and PARAFAC were able to recover descriptive models of the fuels, their linear nature obscured some of the finer physical details due to the widely varying composition of the

  7. Rock fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.S.; Green, S.J.; Hakala, W.W.; Hustrulid, W.A.; Maurer, W.C. (eds.)

    1976-01-01

    Experts in rock mechanics, mining, excavation, drilling, tunneling and use of underground space met to discuss the relative merits of a wide variety of rock fragmentation schemes. Information is presented on novel rock fracturing techniques; tunneling using electron beams, thermocorer, electric spark drills, water jets, and diamond drills; and rock fracturing research needs for mining and underground construction. (LCL)

  8. Review on the prevailing methods for the prediction of potential rock burst / rock spalling in tunnels

    OpenAIRE

    Panthi, Krishna Kanta

    2017-01-01

    Rock burst / rock spalling is among the prevailing stability challenges, which can be met while tunneling through hard rock mass. Especially, this is very relevant for the mountainous country like Norway where hard rock is dominating and many road, railway and hydropower tunnels have to be aligned deep into the mountain with steep valley slope topography. Tunnels passing beneath deep rock cover (overburden), in general, are subjected to high in-situ stresses. If the rock mass is relatively un...

  9. Stable Chlorine Isotopes and Elemental Chlorine by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Ion Chromatography; Martian Meteorites, Carbonaceous Chondrites and Standard Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C.-Y.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2011-01-01

    Recently significantly large mass fractionation of stable chlorine isotopes has been reported for terrestrial and lunar samples [1,2]. In addition, in view of possible early solar system processes [3] and also potential perchlorate-related fluid/microbial activities on the Martian surface [4,5], a large chlorine isotopic fractionation might be expected for some types of planetary materials. Due to analytical difficulties of isotopic and elemental analyses, however, current chlorine analyses for planetary materials are controversial among different laboratories, particularly between IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1,6,7] for isotopic analyses, as well as between those doing pyrohydrolysis and other groups [i.e. 6,8]. Additional careful investigations of Cl isotope and elemental abundances are required to confirm real chlorine isotope and elemental variations for planetary materials. We have developed a TIMS technique combined with HF-leaching/ion chromatography at NASA JSC that is applicable to analysis of small amounts of meteoritic and planetary materials. We present here results for several standard rocks and meteorites, including Martian meteorites.

  10. Laser ablation aerosol particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LAAPTOF: performance, reference spectra and classification of atmospheric samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Shen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The laser ablation aerosol particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LAAPTOF, AeroMegt GmbH is able to identify the chemical composition and mixing state of individual aerosol particles, and thus is a tool for elucidating their impacts on human health, visibility, ecosystem, and climate. The overall detection efficiency (ODE of the instrument we use was determined to range from  ∼  (0.01 ± 0.01 to  ∼  (4.23 ± 2.36 % for polystyrene latex (PSL in the size range of 200 to 2000 nm,  ∼  (0.44 ± 0.19 to  ∼  (6.57 ± 2.38 % for ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3, and  ∼  (0.14 ± 0.02 to  ∼  (1.46 ± 0.08 % for sodium chloride (NaCl particles in the size range of 300 to 1000 nm. Reference mass spectra of 32 different particle types relevant for atmospheric aerosol (e.g. pure compounds NH4NO3, K2SO4, NaCl, oxalic acid, pinic acid, and pinonic acid; internal mixtures of e.g. salts, secondary organic aerosol, and metallic core–organic shell particles; more complex particles such as soot and dust particles were determined. Our results show that internally mixed aerosol particles can result in spectra with new clusters of ions, rather than simply a combination of the spectra from the single components. An exemplary 1-day ambient data set was analysed by both classical fuzzy clustering and a reference-spectra-based classification method. Resulting identified particle types were generally well correlated. We show how a combination of both methods can greatly improve the interpretation of single-particle data in field measurements.

  11. IAEA Classification of Uranium Deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruneton, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Classifications of uranium deposits follow two general approaches, focusing on: • descriptive features such as the geotectonic position, the host rock type, the orebody morphology, …… : « geologic classification »; • or on genetic aspects: « genetic classification »

  12. Characterization on the Fracture system in jurassic granitic rocks: Kosung and Yusung areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Su; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Chun Soo; Park, Byung Yoon; Koh, Yong Kweon

    2001-03-01

    The safety of waste disposal can be achieved by a complete isolation of radioactive wastes from biosphere or by a retardation of nuclide migration to reach an acceptable dose level. For the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, the potential pathways of nuclide primarily depend on the spatial distribution characteristics of conductive fractures in rock mass. Major key issues in the quantification of fracture system for a disposal site are involved in classification criteria, hydraulic parameters, geometry, field investigation methods etc. This research aims to characterize the spatial distribution characteristics of regional lineaments and background fractures in eastern and western-type granite rock mass.

  13. Characterization on the Fracture system in jurassic granitic rocks: Kosung and Yusung areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Su; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Chun Soo; Park, Byung Yoon; Koh, Yong Kweon

    2001-03-01

    The safety of waste disposal can be achieved by a complete isolation of radioactive wastes from biosphere or by a retardation of nuclide migration to reach an acceptable dose level. For the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, the potential pathways of nuclide primarily depend on the spatial distribution characteristics of conductive fractures in rock mass. Major key issues in the quantification of fracture system for a disposal site are involved in classification criteria, hydraulic parameters, geometry, field investigation methods etc. This research aims to characterize the spatial distribution characteristics of regional lineaments and background fractures in eastern and western-type granite rock mass

  14. Influence of a thermal gradient on water-rock interactions and mass transport in geologic media (marine pelagic clay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyfried, W.E. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A brief outline of the role of thermodiffusional processes in mass transport and sediment alteration for a sediment/seawater system that is subjected to a thermal gradient and maximum temperature and pressure condition, such as in a subseabed repository is presented. The author underscores the need to investigate the effect of basic physical and chemical parameters on Soret coefficients for various electrolyte fluids. Such experiments will require the design and development of unique hydrothermal apparatus

  15. Rock engineering in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    Contains a large collection of short articles concerned with tunnels and underground caverns and their construction and use. The articles are grouped under the following headings: use of the subsurface space; water supply; waste water services; energy management (includes articles on power stations, district heating and oil storage and an article on coal storage); multipurpose tunnels; waste disposal; transport; shelters; sporting and recreational amenities located in rock caverns; storage facilities; industrial, laboratory, and service facilities; rock foundations; tourism and culture; utilization of rock masses; research on the disposal of nuclear waste; training and research in the field of rock engineering; site investigation techniques; design of structures in rock; construction; the environment and occupational safety; modern equipment technology; underground space in Helsinki.

  16. Slope stability probability classification, Waikato Coal Measures, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, P.; Gillard, G.R.; Moore, T.A. [CRL Energy, PO Box 29-415, Christchurch (New Zealand); Campbell, R.N.; Fergusson, D.A. [Solid Energy North, Private Bag 502, Huntly (New Zealand)

    2001-01-01

    Ferm classified lithological units have been identified and described in the Waikato Coal Measures in open pits in the Waikato coal region. These lithological units have been classified geotechnically by mechanical tests and discontinuity measurements. Using these measurements slope stability probability classifications (SSPC) have been quantified based on an adaptation of Hack's [Slope Stability Probability Classification, ITC Delft Publication, Enschede, Netherlands, vol. 43, 1998, 273 pp.] SSPC system, which places less influence on rock quality designation and unconfined compressive strength than previous slope/rock mass rating systems. The Hack weathering susceptibility rating has been modified by using chemical index of alteration values determined from XRF major element analyses. Slaking is an important parameter in slope stability in the Waikato Coal Measures lithologies and hence, a non-subjective method of assessing slaking in relation to the chemical index of alteration has been introduced. Another major component of this adapted SSPC system is the inclusion of rock moisture content effects on slope stability. The main modifications of Hack's SSPC system are the introduction of rock intact strength derived from the modified Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion, which has been adapted for varying moisture content, weathering state and confining pressure. It is suggested that the subjectivity in assessing intact rock strength within broad bands in the initial SSPC system is a major weakness of the initial system. Initial results indicate a close relationship between rock mass strength values, calculated from rock mass friction angles and rock mass cohesion values derived from two established rock mass classification methods (modified Hoek-Brown failure criteria and MRMR) and the adapted SSPC system. The advantage of the modified SSPC system is that slope stability probabilities based on discontinuity-independent and discontinuity-dependent data and a

  17. Determination of major, minor and trace elements in rock samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Progress in the utilization of borate glasses as targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Tacito Dantas F.; Escalfoni, Rainerio; Fonseca, Teresa Cristina O. da; Miekeley, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    The present work is a continuation of a research study performed at our laboratory aiming at the multielement analysis of rock samples (basalts and shale) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in combination with laser ablation using borate glasses as analytical targets. Argon, nitrogen-argon mixtures and helium were evaluated as cell gases, the latter confirming its better performance. Different operational parameters of the laser, such as gas flow, energy, focus, scanning speed and sampling frequency were optimized. External calibration was made with standards prepared by fusion of geological reference materials (basalts 688 and BCR-2, obsidian SRM 278, and shale SGR-1) of different mass fractions in the meta-tetra borate matrix. Coefficients of determination (R 2 ) were > 0.99 for 30 elements from o total of 40 determined. Method validation was then performed using additional certified reference materials (BHVO-2, BIR-1, SCo-1) produced as borate targets in a similar way. Accuracies were better than 10% for most of the elements studied and analytical precisions, calculated from the residual standard deviations of calibration curves were, typically, between 6% and 10%. Additionally, the semiquantitative TotalQuant (registered) technique was applied, which gave, within the expected uncertainty for this calibration technique, concordant results when compared to the quantitative external calibration procedure. Both methods were then used for the analysis of marine shale samples, which are of great geological interest in petroleum prospecting.

  18. Rock Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  19. Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-01-01

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  20. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the characterization of pigments in prehistoric rock art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resano, Martin; García-Ruiz, Esperanza; Alloza, Ramiro; Marzo, Maria P; Vandenabeele, Peter; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2007-12-01

    In this work, several red-colored paintings of post-Paleolithic schematic style found in 10 different shelters in the vicinity of the Vero River (Huesca) were sampled and subjected to analysis by means of scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX), Raman spectroscopy, and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). The goal of this research was to obtain meaningful information on the samples composition, in order to establish differences or similarities among them. The combined use of these techniques proved beneficial, as Raman data permitted structural information on the compounds present (hematite was identified as the main pigment, whereas calcite and gypsum are the main components of the substrate layer, as well as of the accretions that covered the pigments) to be obtained, while the quantitative values obtained by SEM were suitable for the use of Ca as internal reference during LA-ICPMS analysis. However, it was this latter technique that provided the most relevant data for fingerprinting purposes. The potential of this technique for obtaining spatially resolved information allowed the multielement quantitative analysis of the pigment layer, in spite of the presence of superficial accretions. The sensitivity of the technique permitted the determination of more than 40 elements present in a wide concentration range (from microgram per gram to 10% level) with minimum sample consumption (approximately 900 ng for each sample, corresponding to five replicates). Finally, in order to establish significant differences, only those elements showing a high correlation with Fe (As, Co, Mo, Sb, Tl, and Zr, in this case) were selected, as it is expected that these were truly present in the original pigment, while others could have migrated into the pigment layer throughout time. By using this information, it seems feasible to discriminate between various paint pots, as demonstrated for the samples under

  1. Water/rock interactions and mass transport within a thermal gradient Application to the confinement of high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, Ch.; Ecole Normale Superieure, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses

    1998-01-01

    The initial stage of a high level nuclear waste disposal will be characterised by a large heat release within the near-field environment of the canisters. This heat flux caused by radioactive decay will lead to an increase of temperature and a subsequent thermal gradient between the 'hot' canisters and the 'cold'geological medium. In addition, this thermal gradient will decrease with time due to the heat decay although it could last hundred years. What will be the consequences of such a thermal field varying both on space and time for the alteration of the different constituents of the near field environment. In particular, what could be the effects on the radionuclides migration in the accidental case of an early breach of a canister during the thermal stage? This study brings significant answers to these questions in the light of a performance assessment study. This work is supported by a triple methodological approach involving experimental studies, modelling calculations and a natural analogues study. This complete work demonstrates that a thermal gradient leads to a large re-distribution of elements within the system: some elements are incorporated in the solid phases of the hot end (Si, Zr, Ca) whereas some others are in those of the cold end (Fe, Al, Zn). The confrontation of the results of very simple experiments with the results of a model built on equilibrium thermodynamics allow us to evidence the probable mechanisms causing this mass transport: out-of-equilibrium thermodiffusion processes coupled to irreversible precipitation. Moreover, the effects of the variation of temperatures with time is studied by the way of a natural system which underwent a similar temperature evolution as a disposal and which was initially rich in uranium: the Jurassic Alpine bauxites. In addition, part of the initial bauxite escaped this temperature transformations due to their incorporation in outer thrusting nappes. They are used as a reference. (author)

  2. 'Escher' Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Chemical Changes in 'Endurance' Rocks [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock dubbed 'Escher' on the southwestern slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' Scientists believe the rock's fractures, which divide the surface into polygons, may have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Opportunity has spent the last 14 sols investigating Escher, specifically the target dubbed 'Kirchner,' and other similar rocks with its scientific instruments. This image was taken on sol 208 (Aug. 24, 2004) by the rover's panoramic camera, using the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters. The graph above shows that rocks located deeper into 'Endurance Crater' are chemically altered to a greater degree than rocks located higher up. This chemical alteration is believed to result from exposure to water. Specifically, the graph compares ratios of chemicals between the deep rock dubbed 'Escher,' and the more shallow rock called 'Virginia,' before (red and blue lines) and after (green line) the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drilled into the rocks. As the red and blue lines indicate, Escher's levels of chlorine relative to Virginia's went up, and sulfur down, before the rover dug a hole into the rocks. This implies that the surface of Escher has been chemically altered to a greater extent than the surface of Virginia. Scientists are still investigating the role water played in influencing this trend. These data were taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

  3. Hydrological characteristics of Japanese rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, Yuji; Sawada, Atsushi; Akahori, Kuniaki

    1999-11-01

    It is crucial to evaluate the hydrogeological characteristics of rock in Japan in order to assess the performance of geosphere. This report summarizes the hydrogeological characteristics of various rock types obtained from broad literature surveys and the fields experiments at the Kamaishi mine in northern Japan and at the Tono mine in central Japan. It is found that the hydraulic conductivity of rock mass ranges from 10 -9 m/s to 10 -8 m/s, whereas the hydraulic conductivity of fault zone ranges from 10 -9 m/s to 10 -3 m/s. It is also found that the hydraulic conductivity tends to decrease with depth. Therefore, the hydraulic conductivity of rock mass at the depth of a repository will be smaller than above values. From the investigations at outcrops and galleries throughout the country, fractures are observed as potential pathways in all rock types. All kinds of crystalline rocks and pre-Neogene sedimentary rocks are classified as fractured media where fracture flow is dominant. Among these rocks, granitic rock is considered the archetype fractured media. On the other hand, andesite, tuff and Neogene sedimentary rocks are considered as intermediate between fractured media and porous media where flow in fractures as well as in rock matrix are significant. (author)

  4. Simultaneous determination of platinum group elements and rhenium in rock samples using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after cation exchange separation followed by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinotsuka, Kazunori; Suzuki, Katsuhiko

    2007-01-01

    A simple and precise determination method for platinum group elements (PGEs) and Re in rock samples was developed using isotope dilution coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS). Cation exchange separation was employed for simplicity, because it is applicable to group separation and simultaneous isotopic measurement in contrast with the widely used anion exchange separation which entails separate elution. However, its application to ID-ICP-MS has been limited due to spectral interferences from impurities retained in the PGE fraction even after ion chromatography. To overcome this limitation, solvent extraction using N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine (BPHA) in chloroform was successfully applied for further purification. After the examination of optimum experimental parameters in cation exchange separation and solvent extraction using synthetic PGE solution, the established procedure was applied to the determination of PGEs and Re in some geochemical reference materials. The obtained results agreed well with the literature data determined using the different digestion methods (NiS fire assay and the use of a high-pressure asher) within the analytical uncertainties of each other. Significant difference in reproducibility between Ru, Ir, Pt and Os group, and Pd and Re group was observed in the results for BHVO-2 and JA-2. By considering the error factors affecting analytical reproducibility, we concluded that the difference is ascribed to the sample heterogeneity of minor minerals enriched in Ru, Ir, Pt and Os

  5. Strength Reduction Method for Stability Analysis of Local Discontinuous Rock Mass with Iterative Method of Partitioned Finite Element and Interface Boundary Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongchun Li

    2015-01-01

    element is proposed to solve the safety factor of local discontinuous rock mass. Slope system is divided into several continuous bodies and local discontinuous interface boundaries. Each block is treated as a partition of the system and contacted by discontinuous joints. The displacements of blocks are chosen as basic variables and the rigid displacements in the centroid of blocks are chosen as motion variables. The contact forces on interface boundaries and the rigid displacements to the centroid of each body are chosen as mixed variables and solved iteratively using the interface boundary equations. Flexibility matrix is formed through PFE according to the contact states of nodal pairs and spring flexibility is used to reflect the influence of weak structural plane so that nonlinear iteration is only limited to the possible contact region. With cohesion and friction coefficient reduced gradually, the states of all nodal pairs at the open or slip state for the first time are regarded as failure criterion, which can decrease the effect of subjectivity in determining safety factor. Examples are used to verify the validity of the proposed method.

  6. Solid as a rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pincus, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    Recent technologic developments have required a more comprehensive approach to the behavior of rock mass or rock substance plus discontinuities than was adequate previously. This work considers the inherent problems in such operations as the storage of hot or cold fluids in caverns and aquifers, underground storage of nuclear waste, underground recovery of heat from hydrocarbon fuels, tertiary recovery of oil by thermal methods, rapid excavation of large openings at shallow to great depths and in hostile environments, and retrofitting of large structures built on or in rock. The standardization of methods for determining rock properties is essential to all of the activities described, for use not only in design and construction but also in site selection and post-construction monitoring. Development of such standards is seen as a multidisciplinary effort

  7. Application of Rqd-Number and Rqd-Volume Multifractal Modelling to Delineate Rock Mass Characterisation in Kahang Cu-Mo Porphyry Deposit, Central Iran / Zastosowanie Metod Modelowania Numerycznego Oraz Modelowania Fraktalnego do Analizy JAKOŚCI SKAŁ W Celu OKREŚLENIA Charakterystyki GÓROTWORU W Obszarze ZŁOŻA Cu-Mo W Kahang, ŚRODKOWY Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasrebi, Amir Bijan; Wetherelt, Andrew; Foster, Patrick J.; Afzal, Peyman; Coggan, John; Ahangaran, Dariush Kaveh

    2013-12-01

    Identification of rock mass properties in terms of Rock Quality Designation (RQD) plays a significant role in mine planning and design. This study aims to separate the rock mass characterisation based on RQD data analysed from 48 boreholes in Kahang Cu-Mo porphyry deposit situated in the central Iran utilising RQD-Volume (RQD-V) and RQD-Number (RQD-N) fractal models. The log-log plots for RQD-V and RQD-N models show four rock mass populations defined by RQD thresholds of 3.55, 25.12 and 89.12% and 10.47, 41.68 and 83.17% respectively which represent very poor, poor, good and excellent rocks based on Deere and Miller rock classification. The RQD-V and RQD-N models indicate that the excellent rocks are situated in the NW and central parts of this deposit however, the good rocks are located in the most parts of the deposit. The results of validation of the fractal models with the RQD block model show that the RQD-N fractal model of excellent rock quality is better than the RQD-V fractal model of the same rock quality. Correlation between results of the fractal and the geological models illustrates that the excellent rocks are associated with porphyric quartz diorite (PQD) units. The results reveal that there is a multifractal nature in rock characterisation with respect to RQD for the Kahang deposit. The proposed fractal model can be intended for the better understanding of the rock quality for purpose of determination of the final pit slope. Identyfikacja właściwości górotworu odgrywa zasadniczą rolę w planowaniu wydobycia i projektowaniu kopalni. Praca niniejsza ma na celu określenie charakterystyki górotworu w oparciu o dane o jakości skał zebrane na podstawie próbek uzyskanych z 48 odwiertów wykonanych w złożu porfiru Cu-Mo w Kahang, zalegającym w środkowym Iranie przy użyciu modeli fraktalnych RQD-V - Rock Quality Determination-Volume [Określenie jakości skał-objętość]) i RQD-N (Rock Quality Determination-Number [Określenie jakości ska

  8. Mineral and rock chemistry of Mata da Corda Kamafugitic Rocks (Minas Gerais State, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque Sgarbi, Patricia B. de; Valenca, Joel G.

    1995-01-01

    The volcanic rocks of the Mata da Corda Formation (Upper Cretaceous) in Minas Gerais, Brazil, are mafic potassic to ultra potassic rocks of kamafugitic affinity containing essentially clinopyroxenes, perovskite, magnetite and occasionally olivine, phlogopite, melilite pseudomorphs and apatite. The felsic phases are kalsilite and/or leucite pseudomorphs. The rocks are classified as mafitites, leucitites and kalsilitites. The analysis of the available data of the rocks studied, based on the relevant aspects of the main proposals for the classification of alkaline mafic to ultramafic potassic rocks leads to the conclusion that Sahama's (1974) proposal to divide potassium rich alkaline rocks in two large families is the one to which the Mata da Corda rocks adapt best. According to this and the data in the literature on the mineralogy and mineral and rock chemistries of the other similar occurrences, these rocks may be interpreted as alkaline potassic to ultra potassic rocks of hamafugitic affinity. 11 figs., 5 tabs

  9. Classification of species in the genus Penicillium by Curie point pyrolysis/mass spectrometry followed by multivariate analysis and artificial neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Torben; Bassani, Maria R.; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    1996-01-01

    different agar media, replicates of the same species grouped together. Likewise, a satisfactory classification was achieved by multivariate analysis of the data for various isolates of the cheese-associated fungi Aspergillus versicolor, P. discolor, P. roqueforti, P. solitum, P. verrucosum, P. commune and P......Curie point pyrolysis/mass spectrometry of Penicillium species was performed with 530 degrees C Curie point foils. The mass spectra were submitted to principal component analysis, canonical variates analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis, producing a final dendrogram by the use of average....... palitans. However, some difficulties appeared in distinguishing the closely related species P. commune and P. palitans. Such difficulties became greater on including more isolates and limiting the analysis to five of the species. The use of back-propagation artificial neural networks, in contrast, resulted...

  10. Recreating Rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole R

    2008-01-01

    Nicole Posth and colleagues spent a month touring South African rock formations in their quest to understand the origin of ancient iron and silicate layers.......Nicole Posth and colleagues spent a month touring South African rock formations in their quest to understand the origin of ancient iron and silicate layers....

  11. Geostatistical investigations of rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matar, J.A.; Sarquis, M.A.; Girardi, J.P.; Tabbia, G.H.

    1987-01-01

    The geostatistical tehniques applied for the selection of a minimun fracturation volume in Sierra del Medio allow to quantify and qualify the variability of mechanic characteristics and density of fracture and also the level of reliability in estimations. The role of geostatistics is discussed in this work so as to select minimun fracturation blocks as a very important site selection step. The only variable used is the 'jointing density' so as to detect the principal fracture systems affecting the rocky massif. It was used on the semivariograms corresponding to the previously mentioned regionalized variables. The different results of fracturation are compared with the deep and shallow geological survey to obtain two and three dimensional models. The range of the geostatistical techniques to detect local geological phenomena such as faults is discussed. The variability model obtained from the borehole data computations is investigated taking as basis the vertical Columnar Model of Discontinuity (fractures) hypothesis derived from geological studies about spatial behaviour of the joint systems and from geostatistical interpretation. (Author) [es

  12. THE STUDY OF GAS MIGRATION IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK USING INJECTION TESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Svoboda

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of gas migration in crystalline rock using injection tests is being carried out in the frame of the FORGE (Fate of Repository Gases project. The Czech Technical University in Prague (CTU, Centre of Experimental Geotechnics (CEG is participating in WP4 which is focused on disturbed host rock formations with respect to radioactive waste deep repositories. A series of in-situ tests is being conducted at the Josef Underground Laboratory. The aim of the testing is to simulate and study phenomena that might lead to gas-driven radionuclide transport in fractured crystalline rock. The in-situ tests combine migration and large-scale gas injection measurements; gas injection tests are being employed for the study of gas transport. For the purposes of comparison of the behaviour of the rock mass with regard to air and water a series of water pressure tests are also being carried out. The quality of the rock mass is assessed using rock mass classification systems.

  13. Bayesian Integration and Classification of Composition C-4 Plastic Explosives Based on Time-of-Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Christine M; Kelly, Ryan T; Alexander, Liz; Newburn, Matt; Bader, Sydney; Ewing, Robert G; Fahey, Albert J; Atkinson, David A; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2016-04-05

    Time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) were used for characterization and identification of unique signatures from a series of 18 Composition C-4 plastic explosives. The samples were obtained from various commercial and military sources around the country. Positive and negative ion TOF-SIMS data were acquired directly from the C-4 residue on Si surfaces, where the positive ion mass spectra obtained were consistent with the major composition of organic additives, and the negative ion mass spectra were more consistent with explosive content in the C-4 samples. Each series of mass spectra was subjected to partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), a multivariate statistical analysis approach which serves to first find the areas of maximum variance within different classes of C-4 and subsequently to classify unknown samples based on correlations between the unknown data set and the original data set (often referred to as a training data set). This method was able to successfully classify test samples of C-4, though with a limited degree of certainty. The classification accuracy of the method was further improved by integrating the positive and negative ion data using a Bayesian approach. The TOF-SIMS data was combined with a second analytical method, LA-ICPMS, which was used to analyze elemental signatures in the C-4. The integrated data were able to classify test samples with a high degree of certainty. Results indicate that this Bayesian integrated approach constitutes a robust classification method that should be employable even in dirty samples collected in the field.

  14. Statistical analysis of determining the filtration heterogeneity of foundation rock mass of hydraulic structures on the example of the boguchanskaya hpp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshev Sergey Nikolaevich

    2016-01-01

    intervals with identical key values in the second position of the code. The boundaries between the drilled wells are held on a Pro forma basis for geological reasons. For example, if the set of values with the largest number lgq, which corresponds to the species with a visually perceptible change when exposed to weathering, has a number 4, the boundaries between the drilled wells will naturally stretch along the roof of the bedrock. If according to the proposed methodology, within the limited element number 4, the interval is flagged with number 3, it can be interpreted as the appearance of the outcrop of other rocks. In this case we need to show the boundary of engineering-geological element with a smaller value of lgq around the 3, than it is inside the engineering-geological element number 4. For each of the obtained groups of values, calculated using known statistical formulas, we calculated the mean value and other statistical estimates that are useful in practice. For example, the geometric mean is an effective in a hydraulic sense evaluation of the specific absorption coefficient of the filter. So the authors proposed a formalized approach to defining the structural elements of the filtration field inhomogeneity of a rock mass of hydraulic structures foundation on the basis of statistical analysis. The article shows how to highlight the engineering-geological elements with the filtration inhomogeneity of rocky soils on the example of the Boguchanskaya HPP on the Angara River.

  15. Effect of Electrode Geometry on the Classification Performance of Rapid Evaporative Ionization Mass Spectrometric (REIMS) Bacterial Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodai, Zsolt; Cameron, Simon; Bolt, Frances; Simon, Daniel; Schaffer, Richard; Karancsi, Tamas; Balog, Julia; Rickards, Tony; Burke, Adam; Hardiman, Kate; Abda, Julia; Rebec, Monica; Takats, Zoltan

    2018-01-01

    The recently developed automated, high-throughput monopolar REIMS platform is suited for the identification of clinically important microorganisms. Although already comparable to the previously reported bipolar forceps method, optimization of the geometry of monopolar electrodes, at the heart of the system, holds the most scope for further improvements to be made. For this, sharp tip and round shaped electrodes were optimized to maximize species-level classification accuracy. Following optimization of the distance between the sample contact point and tube inlet with the sharp tip electrodes, the overall cross-validation accuracy improved from 77% to 93% in negative and from 33% to 63% in positive ion detection modes, compared with the original 4 mm distance electrode. As an alternative geometry, round tube shaped electrodes were developed. Geometry optimization of these included hole size, number, and position, which were also required to prevent plate pick-up due to vacuum formation. Additional features, namely a metal "X"-shaped insert and a pin in the middle were included to increase the contact surface with a microbial biomass to maximize aerosol production. Following optimization, cross-validation scores showed improvement in classification accuracy from 77% to 93% in negative and from 33% to 91% in positive ion detection modes. Supervised models were also built, and after the leave 20% out cross-validation, the overall classification accuracy was 98.5% in negative and 99% in positive ion detection modes. This suggests that the new generation of monopolar REIMS electrodes could provide substantially improved species level identification accuracies in both polarity detection modes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  17. Rock Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Rock physics is the discipline linking petrophysical properties as derived from borehole data to surface based geophysical exploration data. It can involve interpretation of both elastic wave propagation and electrical conductivity, but in this chapter focus is on elasticity. Rock physics is based...... on continuum mechanics, and the theory of elasticity developed for statics becomes the key to petrophysical interpretation of velocity of elastic waves. In practice, rock physics involves interpretation of well logs including vertical seismic profiling (VSP) and analysis of core samples. The results...

  18. Analysis of microseismic signals and temperature recordings for rock slope stability investigations in high mountain areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Occhiena

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The permafrost degradation is a probable cause for the increase of rock instabilities and rock falls observed in recent years in high mountain areas, particularly in the Alpine region. The phenomenon causes the thaw of the ice filling rock discontinuities; the water deriving from it subsequently freezes again inducing stresses in the rock mass that may lead, in the long term, to rock falls. To investigate these processes, a monitoring system composed by geophones and thermometers was installed in 2007 at the Carrel hut (3829 m a.s.l., Matterhorn, NW Alps. In 2010, in the framework of the Interreg 2007–2013 Alcotra project no. 56 MASSA, the monitoring system has been empowered and renovated in order to meet project needs.

    In this paper, the data recorded by this renewed system between 6 October 2010 and 5 October 2011 are presented and 329 selected microseismic events are analysed. The data processing has concerned the classification of the recorded signals, the analysis of their distribution in time and the identification of the most important trace characteristics in time and frequency domain. The interpretation of the results has evidenced a possible correlation between the temperature trend and the event occurrence.

    The research is still in progress and the data recording and interpretation are planned for a longer period to better investigate the spatial-temporal distribution of microseismic activity in the rock mass, with specific attention to the relation of microseismic activity with temperatures. The overall goal is to verify the possibility to set up an effective monitoring system for investigating the stability of a rock mass under permafrost conditions, in order to supply the researchers with useful data to better understand the relationship between temperature and rock mass stability and, possibly, the technicians with a valid tool for decision-making.

  19. MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-IMS―Application of Spatial Proteomics for Ovarian Cancer Classification and Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan O. R. Gustafsson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS allows acquisition of mass data for metabolites, lipids, peptides and proteins directly from tissue sections. IMS is typically performed either as a multiple spot profiling experiment to generate tissue specific mass profiles, or a high resolution imaging experiment where relative spatial abundance for potentially hundreds of analytes across virtually any tissue section can be measured. Crucially, imaging can be achieved without prior knowledge of tissue composition and without the use of antibodies. In effect MALDI-IMS allows generation of molecular data which complement and expand upon the information provided by histology including immuno-histochemistry, making its application valuable to both cancer biomarker research and diagnostics. The current state of MALDI-IMS, key biological applications to ovarian cancer research and practical considerations for analysis of peptides and proteins on ovarian tissue are presented in this review.

  20. Rock pushing and sampling under rocks on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, H.J.; Liebes, S.; Crouch, D.S.; Clark, L.V.

    1978-01-01

    Viking Lander 2 acquired samples on Mars from beneath two rocks, where living organisms and organic molecules would be protected from ultraviolet radiation. Selection of rocks to be moved was based on scientific and engineering considerations, including rock size, rock shape, burial depth, and location in a sample field. Rock locations and topography were established using the computerized interactive video-stereophotogrammetric system and plotted on vertical profiles and in plan view. Sampler commands were developed and tested on Earth using a full-size lander and surface mock-up. The use of power by the sampler motor correlates with rock movements, which were by plowing, skidding, and rolling. Provenance of the samples was determined by measurements and interpretation of pictures and positions of the sampler arm. Analytical results demonstrate that the samples were, in fact, from beneath the rocks. Results from the Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer of the Molecular Analysis experiment and the Gas Exchange instrument of the Biology experiment indicate that more adsorbed(?) water occurs in samples under rocks than in samples exposed to the sun. This is consistent with terrestrial arid environments, where more moisture occurs in near-surface soil un- der rocks than in surrounding soil because the net heat flow is toward the soil beneath the rock and the rock cap inhibits evaporation. Inorganic analyses show that samples of soil from under the rocks have significantly less iron than soil exposed to the sun. The scientific significance of analyses of samples under the rocks is only partly evaluated, but some facts are clear. Detectable quantities of martian organic molecules were not found in the sample from under a rock by the Molecular Analysis experiment. The Biology experiments did not find definitive evidence for Earth-like living organisms in their sample. Significant amounts of adsorbed water may be present in the martian regolith. The response of the soil

  1. Rocking pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Rijkers, Ger T.; Rodriguez Gomez, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Ever since Chuck Berry coined the term “rocking pneumonia” in his 1956 song “Roll over Beethoven”, pneumonia has been mentioned frequently in modern blues and rock songs. We analyzed the lyrics of these songs to examine how various elements of pneumonia have been represented in popular music, specifically the cause of pneumonia, the risk groups, comorbidity (such as the boogie woogie flu), the clinical symptoms, and treatment and outcome. Up to this day, songwriters suggest that pneumonia is ...

  2. Strategy for a Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Model. A test case based on data from the Aespoe HRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, John A

    2002-06-01

    In anticipation of the SKB Site Investigations for radioactive waste disposal, an approach has been developed for the Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Model. This approach was tested by predicting the rock mechanics properties of a 600 m x 180 m x 120 m rock volume at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) using limited borehole data of the type typically obtained during a site investigation. These predicted properties were then compared with 'best estimate' properties obtained from a study of the test rock volume using additional information, mainly tunnel data. The exercise was known as the Test Case, and is the subject of this Report. Three modelling techniques were used to predict the rock properties: the 'empirical approach' - the rock properties were estimated using rock mass classification schemes and empirical correlation formulae; the 'theoretical approach' - the rock properties were estimated using numerical modelling techniques; and the 'stress approach' - the rock stress state was estimated using primary data and numerical modelling. These approaches are described separately and respectively. Following an explanation of the context for the Test Case within the strategy for developing the Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Model, conditions at the Aespoe HRL are described in Chapter 2. The Test Case organization and the suite of nine Protocols used to ensure that the work was appropriately guided and co-ordinated are described in Chapter 3. The methods for predicting the rock properties and the rock stress, and comparisons with the 'best estimate' properties of the actual conditions, are presented in Chapters 4 and 5. Finally, the conclusions from this Test Case exercise are given in Chapter 6. General recommendations for the management of this type of Test Case are also included

  3. Strategy for a Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Model. A test case based on data from the Aespoe HRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, John A (ed.) [Rock Engineering Consultants, Welwyn Garden City (United Kingdom)

    2002-06-01

    In anticipation of the SKB Site Investigations for radioactive waste disposal, an approach has been developed for the Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Model. This approach was tested by predicting the rock mechanics properties of a 600 m x 180 m x 120 m rock volume at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) using limited borehole data of the type typically obtained during a site investigation. These predicted properties were then compared with 'best estimate' properties obtained from a study of the test rock volume using additional information, mainly tunnel data. The exercise was known as the Test Case, and is the subject of this Report. Three modelling techniques were used to predict the rock properties: the 'empirical approach' - the rock properties were estimated using rock mass classification schemes and empirical correlation formulae; the 'theoretical approach' - the rock properties were estimated using numerical modelling techniques; and the 'stress approach' - the rock stress state was estimated using primary data and numerical modelling. These approaches are described separately and respectively. Following an explanation of the context for the Test Case within the strategy for developing the Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Model, conditions at the Aespoe HRL are described in Chapter 2. The Test Case organization and the suite of nine Protocols used to ensure that the work was appropriately guided and co-ordinated are described in Chapter 3. The methods for predicting the rock properties and the rock stress, and comparisons with the 'best estimate' properties of the actual conditions, are presented in Chapters 4 and 5. Finally, the conclusions from this Test Case exercise are given in Chapter 6. General recommendations for the management of this type of Test Case are also included.

  4. Classification of bacteria by simultaneous methylation-solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of fatty acid methyl esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao; Harrington, Peter B

    2010-08-01

    Direct methylation and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) were used as a sample preparation technique for classification of bacteria based on fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles. Methanolic tetramethylammonium hydroxide was applied as a dual-function reagent to saponify and derivatize whole-cell bacterial fatty acids into FAMEs in one step, and SPME was used to extract the bacterial FAMEs from the headspace. Compared with traditional alkaline saponification and sample preparation using liquid-liquid extraction, the method presented in this work avoids using comparatively large amounts of inorganic and organic solvents and greatly decreases the sample preparation time as well. Characteristic gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) of FAME profiles was achieved for six bacterial species. The difference between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was clearly visualized with the application of principal component analysis of the GC/MS data of bacterial FAMEs. A cross-validation study using ten bootstrap Latin partitions and the fuzzy rule building expert system demonstrated 87 +/- 3% correct classification efficiency.

  5. Effects of explosions in hard rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuze, F.E.; Walton, O.R.; Maddix, D.M.; Shaffer, R.J.; Butkovich, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    This work relates to explosions in hard rocks (ex: basalt, granite, limestone...). Hard rock masses typically have a blocky structure created by the existence of geologic discontinuities such as bedding contacts, faults, and joints. At very high pressure - hundreds of kilobars and above - these discontinuities do not act separately, and the rock appears to be an equivalent continuous medium. At stress of a few tens of kilobars and below, the geologic discontinuities control the kinematics of the rock masses. Hence, the simulation of rock dynamics, anywhere but in the very-near source region, should account for those kinematics

  6. MBC model analysis for predicting the rock behavior in excavating the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Takayuki; Iwano, Keita; Nakajima, Makoto; Morikawa, Seiji; Tabei, Kazuto

    2005-03-01

    As a Phase 1 of MIU project (Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory project), through the laboratory and borehole in-situ tests, JNC Tono Geoscience Center plans to constitute the comprehensive geological model and predicts the rock behaviors in excavating the shaft and gallery. These model and results leads to be reflected by the next step research projects. So far, the Phase 1 of MIU project is coming to final stage, and the Phase 2 will start at next year in which the in-situ researches are planned through the excavation. In this study, the comprehensive geometrical model was drawn out through the Phase 1 data, and MBC model analysis was carried out to predict the rock mass behavior around the shaft and gallery. The following results are obtained. 1. With MIZ-1 borehole core, artificial joints, which are assumed to be produced by rock blasting, were formed through the Brazilian test. And through the rock shear test for these joints, these mechanical properties were obtained. 2. By examining the MIZ-1 borehole research data, Mizunami site was classified by mechanical and joint properties and the Geomechanical model were made up. 3. Through the MBC model, the shaft and gallery cases were analyzed which depend on the rock mass classification, Excavation Damaged Zone, and the direction of the galleries. These results showed that in most cases, the joint opening were little because of the rock stiffness, but by the existence of high inclined joints, the side wall of the galleries were damaged by the excavation. (author)

  7. Combining information from headspace mass spectrometry and visible spectroscopy in the classification of the Ligurian olive oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casale, Monica [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie Farmaceutiche ed Alimentari, Universita di Genova, Via Brigata Salerno (ponte), I-16147 Genova (Italy)]. E-mail: monica@dictfa.unige.it; Armanino, Carla [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie Farmaceutiche ed Alimentari, Universita di Genova, Via Brigata Salerno (ponte), I-16147 Genova (Italy); Casolino, Chiara [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie Farmaceutiche ed Alimentari, Universita di Genova, Via Brigata Salerno (ponte), I-16147 Genova (Italy); Forina, Michele [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie Farmaceutiche ed Alimentari, Universita di Genova, Via Brigata Salerno (ponte), I-16147 Genova (Italy)

    2007-04-18

    An electronic nose and an UV-Vis spectrophotometer, in combination with multivariate analysis, have been used to verify the geographical origin of extra virgin olive oils. Forty-six oil samples from three different areas of Liguria were included in this analysis. Initially, the data obtained from the two instruments were analysed separately. Then, the potential of the synergy between these two technologies for testing food authenticity and quality was investigated. Application of Linear Discriminant Analysis, after feature selection, was sufficient to differentiate the three geographical denominations of Liguria ('Riviera dei Fiori', 'Riviera del Ponente Savonese' and 'Riviera di Levante'), obtaining 100% success in classification and close to 100% in prediction. The models built using SIMCA as a class-modelling tool, were not so effective, but confirmed that the results improve using the synergy between different analytical techniques. This paper shows that objective instrumental data related to two important organoleptic features such as oil colour and aroma, supply complementary information.

  8. Microarea dating of mineral and rock. The application of technique by combining 40Ar/39Ar mass spectrometer with laser probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Shiling; Dai Tongmo; Pu Zhiping

    1998-01-01

    The 40 Ar/ 39 Ar dating of probe technique by the continuous laser is successfully applied to determine the ages of microarea samples for mineral and whole rock, including the standard samples from internal and abroad, volcanical rock from westsouthern Antarctica and Green Pissolites of Guizhou. Isochron ages for volcanical rock to be excess or lost argon are accomplished by the whole fused, and for 'green Pisolites' not only by the whole fused, but also by the steps heat. All of which shows the significant geological ages. It would be exhibited the obvious advantage for dating some special samples to make the microarea 40 Ar/ 39 Ar dating technique by laser probe as compare with conventional K-Ar and 40 Ar/ 39 Ar methods

  9. Source rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakr F. Makky

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available West Beni Suef Concession is located at the western part of Beni Suef Basin which is a relatively under-explored basin and lies about 150 km south of Cairo. The major goal of this study is to evaluate the source rock by using different techniques as Rock-Eval pyrolysis, Vitrinite reflectance (%Ro, and well log data of some Cretaceous sequences including Abu Roash (E, F and G members, Kharita and Betty formations. The BasinMod 1D program is used in this study to construct the burial history and calculate the levels of thermal maturity of the Fayoum-1X well based on calibration of measured %Ro and Tmax against calculated %Ro model. The calculated Total Organic Carbon (TOC content from well log data compared with the measured TOC from the Rock-Eval pyrolysis in Fayoum-1X well is shown to match against the shale source rock but gives high values against the limestone source rock. For that, a new model is derived from well log data to calculate accurately the TOC content against the limestone source rock in the study area. The organic matter existing in Abu Roash (F member is fair to excellent and capable of generating a significant amount of hydrocarbons (oil prone produced from (mixed type I/II kerogen. The generation potential of kerogen in Abu Roash (E and G members and Betty formations is ranging from poor to fair, and generating hydrocarbons of oil and gas prone (mixed type II/III kerogen. Eventually, kerogen (type III of Kharita Formation has poor to very good generation potential and mainly produces gas. Thermal maturation of the measured %Ro, calculated %Ro model, Tmax and Production index (PI indicates that Abu Roash (F member exciting in the onset of oil generation, whereas Abu Roash (E and G members, Kharita and Betty formations entered the peak of oil generation.

  10. Geological and geotechnical properties of the medieval rock hewn churches of Lalibela, Northern Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrat, Asfawossen; Ayallew, Yodit

    2011-01-01

    Lalibela is a medieval settlement in Northern Ethiopia famous for its 11 beautifully carved rock hewn churches, registered as World Heritage Site in 1978. The rock hewn churches are grouped into three based on their proximity: the Bete Medhane Alem (Church of the Holy Saviour), Bete Gabriel-Rufael (Church of St. Gabriel-Rafael) and Bete Giorgis (Church of St. George) groups. The churches are carved out of a single, massive scoriaceous basalt hill which was deposited along an East-West extending palaeovalley in the Oligo-Miocene Trap basalt of the northwestern Ethiopian plateau. The Rock Mass Rating (RMR) classification scheme was used to classify the rock mass (assuming each church as a separate rock mass) based on their uniaxial compressive strength and the spacing and conditions of discontinuities. Though most of the churches are hewn from medium to high strength rock mass, discontinuities make them vulnerable to other deteriorating agents mainly weathering, and water infiltration. Most of the rock hewn churches are affected by pre-carving cooling joints and bedding plane discontinuities, and by mostly but not necessarily post-carving tectonic and seismic induced cracks and fractures. Material loss due to deep weathering triggered by rain water infiltration and uncontrolled groundwater seepage affects most of the churches, particularly the Bete Merqorios (Church of St. Mark) and Bete Aba Libanos (Church of Father Libanos) churches. The scoriaceous basalt which is porous and permeable allows easy passage of water while the underlying basalt is impermeable, increasing the residence time of water in the porous material, causing deep weathering and subsequent loss of material in some of the churches and adjoining courtyards.

  11. Classification of the medicinal plants of the genus Atractylodes using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and tandem mass spectrometry detection combined with multivariate statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-Deok; Kim, Unyong; Suh, Joon Hyuk; Eom, Han Young; Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Seul Gi; Choi, Yong Seok; Han, Sang Beom

    2016-04-01

    Analytical methods using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and tandem mass spectrometry detection were developed for the discrimination of the rhizomes of four Atractylodes medicinal plants: A. japonica, A. macrocephala, A. chinensis, and A. lancea. A quantitative study was performed, selecting five bioactive components, including atractylenolide I, II, III, eudesma-4(14),7(11)-dien-8-one and atractylodin, on twenty-six Atractylodes samples of various origins. Sample extraction was optimized to sonication with 80% methanol for 40 min at room temperature. High-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection was established using a C18 column with a water/acetonitrile gradient system at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, and the detection wavelength was set at 236 nm. Liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was applied to certify the reliability of the quantitative results. The developed methods were validated by ensuring specificity, linearity, limit of quantification, accuracy, precision, recovery, robustness, and stability. Results showed that cangzhu contained higher amounts of atractylenolide I and atractylodin than baizhu, and especially atractylodin contents showed the greatest variation between baizhu and cangzhu. Multivariate statistical analysis, such as principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis, were also employed for further classification of the Atractylodes plants. The established method was suitable for quality control of the Atractylodes plants. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Classification of breast masses in ultrasound images using self-adaptive differential evolution extreme learning machine and rough set feature selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabusankarlal, Kadayanallur Mahadevan; Thirumoorthy, Palanisamy; Manavalan, Radhakrishnan

    2017-04-01

    A method using rough set feature selection and extreme learning machine (ELM) whose learning strategy and hidden node parameters are optimized by self-adaptive differential evolution (SaDE) algorithm for classification of breast masses is investigated. A pathologically proven database of 140 breast ultrasound images, including 80 benign and 60 malignant, is used for this study. A fast nonlocal means algorithm is applied for speckle noise removal, and multiresolution analysis of undecimated discrete wavelet transform is used for accurate segmentation of breast lesions. A total of 34 features, including 29 textural and five morphological, are applied to a [Formula: see text]-fold cross-validation scheme, in which more relevant features are selected by quick-reduct algorithm, and the breast masses are discriminated into benign or malignant using SaDE-ELM classifier. The diagnosis accuracy of the system is assessed using parameters, such as accuracy (Ac), sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC), and area ([Formula: see text]) under receiver operating characteristics curve. The performance of the proposed system is also compared with other classifiers, such as support vector machine and ELM. The results indicated that the proposed SaDE algorithm has superior performance with [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] compared to other classifiers.

  13. Deformations of fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephansson, O.

    1977-09-01

    Results of the DBM and FEM analysis in this study indicate that a suitable rock mass for repository of radioactive waste should be moderately jointed (about 1 joint/m 2 ) and surrounded by shear zones of the first order. This allowes for a gentle and flexible deformation under tectonic stresses and prevent the development of large cross-cutting failures in the repository area. (author)

  14. Intellektuaalne rock

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Briti laulja-helilooja ja näitleja Toyah Willcox ning Bill Rieflin ansamblist R.E.M. ja Pat Mastelotto King Krimsonist esinevad koos ansamblitega The Humans ja Tuner 25. okt. Tallinnas Rock Cafés ja 27. okt Tartu Jaani kirikus

  15. Igneous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, Bruce R.

    “Igneous Rocks was written for undergraduate geology majors who have had a year of college-level chemistry and a course in mineralogy … and for beginning graduate students. Geologists working in industry, government, or academia should find this text useful as a guide to the technical literature up to 1981 and as an overview of topics with which they have not worked but which may have unanticipated pertinence to their own projects.” So starts the preface to this textbook.As one who works part time in research on igneous rocks, especially as they relate to mineral deposits, I have been looking for such a book with this avowed purpose in a field that has a choking richness of evolving terminology and a bewildering volume of interdisciplinary literature. In addition to the standard topics of igneous petrology, the book contains a chapter on the role of igneous activity in the genesis of mineral deposits, its value to geothermal energy, and the potential of igneous rocks as an environment for nuclear waste disposal. These topics are presented rather apologetically in the preface, but the author is to be applauded for including this chapter. The apology shows just how new these interests are to petrology. Recognition is finally coming that, for example, mineral deposits are not “sports of nature,” a view held even by many economic geologists as recently as the early 1960's; instead they are perfectly ordinary geochemical features formed by perfectly ordinary geologic processes. In fact, the mineral deposits and their attendant alteration zones probably have as much to tell us about igneous rocks as the igneous rocks have to tell us about mineral deposits.

  16. Classifying Classifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debus, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper critically analyzes seventeen game classifications. The classifications were chosen on the basis of diversity, ranging from pre-digital classification (e.g. Murray 1952), over game studies classifications (e.g. Elverdam & Aarseth 2007) to classifications of drinking games (e.g. LaBrie et...... al. 2013). The analysis aims at three goals: The classifications’ internal consistency, the abstraction of classification criteria and the identification of differences in classification across fields and/or time. Especially the abstraction of classification criteria can be used in future endeavors...... into the topic of game classifications....

  17. Characterization and quantification by mass spectrometry of mobile organic matter from clay rock: influence of the origin and of the sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huclier-Markai, S.; Landesman, C.; Montavon, G.; Grambow, B.; Monteau, F.; Fernandez, A.M.; Vinsot, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In environmental studies, Natural Organic Matter (NOM) plays a key role on the bioavailability and the toxicity of metallic compounds. If one wants to evaluate the mobility of heavy metals / radionuclides, which is in natura in most of the cases dependant on their interactions with NOM. One part of the organic inventory in the Callovo-Oxfordian formation (COx) exists as small dissolved compounds in the pore water but the weak content and the weak porosity of the formation (∼ 8 % of water in weight) make the complexation study with metal ions difficult. One part of the organic matter attached to the sediment (∼ 1 % in weight) can be mobilized in a synthetic pore water 1 and can be considered as similar to in situ pore water dissolved organic matter (DOM) regarding its size distribution. The collection of clay pore water has been done through percolation experiment, a unique and original experimental process developed to get pore water from a core sample,that have been described previously. From these experiments, it was shown that mobile organic matter concentration could reach 0.01 mol C/L by application of a pressure gradient up to 100 bars. Since part of the OM from the COx is known to be sensitive to air oxidation, the characterization and quantification of DOM were then performed under anoxic conditions (about - 170 mV vs Standard Hydrogen Electrode SHE). In addition, the chemical composition of NOM contained in the pore water from the argillite clay rock has been determined in in-situ like conditions by ESI-MS and APCI-MS, which are suitable techniques to identify the chemical composition of NOM contained in the COx pore water available from boreholes. Mostly low molecular weight molecules were identified, of whom structural features observed were mainly acidic compounds, fatty acids as well as aldehydes and amino acids. Fulvic and Humic Acids have such low concentrations in the COx formation, leading to a

  18. Comparison of three methods for measuring height in rehabilitation inpatients and the impact on body mass index classification: An open prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Karen E; Stewart, Alison J; Argiriou, Alison M; Huggins, Catherine E; New, Peter W

    2018-02-01

    To compare standing height, estimated current height and demi-span estimated height and examine their impact on body mass index (BMI) classification. Cross-sectional data was collected on 104 patients admitted to an adult rehabilitation ward and seen by the dietitian. Patient's standing, estimated current height and demi-span estimated height were collected and grouped by age: 19-64 and ≥65 years. The limits of agreement (95% confidence interval) for estimated current height compared with standing height were +9.9 cm and -7.9 cm, in contrast to +8.7 cm and -14.3 cm for demi-span estimated height. Demi-span underestimated height when compared with standing height in both age groups, 19-64 years: (mean ± SD) 3.0 ± 6.5 cm (P = 0.001, n = 68) and ≥ 65 year age group 4.0 ± 6.0 cm (P < 0.001, n = 36), resulting in a significantly greater mean BMI (analysis of variance P < 0.001, P = 0.02). In the 19-64 and ≥65 year age groups, 3% (2/68) and 10% (4/36) of patients, respectively, had a different BMI classification using demi-span estimated height compared with standing height. Estimated current height is a simple and practical alternative if standing height is unable to be obtained when performing a nutrition assessment. Demi-span estimated height should be used with caution when calculating BMI to assess nutritional status, particularly in the elderly. © 2017 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  19. Association of depression with body mass index classification, metabolic disease, and lifestyle: A web-based survey involving 11,876 Japanese people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidese, Shinsuke; Asano, Shinya; Saito, Kenji; Sasayama, Daimei; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2018-02-10

    Body mass index (BMI) and lifestyle-related physical illnesses have been implicated in the pathology of depression. We aimed to investigate the association of depression wih BMI classification (i.e., underweight, normal, overweight, and obese), metabolic disease, and lifestyle using a web-based survey in a large cohort. Participants were 1000 individuals who have had depression (mean age: 41.4 ± 12.3 years, 501 men) and 10,876 population-based controls (45.1 ± 13.6 years, 5691 men). The six-item Kessler scale (K6) test was used as a psychological distress scale. Compared to in the controls, obesity and hyperlipidemia were more common and frequency of a snack or night meal consumption was higher, whereas frequencies of breakfast consumption and vigorous and moderate physical activities were lower in the patients. K6 test scores were higher for underweight or obese people compared to normal or overweight people. A logistic regression analysis showed that the K6 test cut-off score was positively associated with being underweight, hyperlipidemia, and the frequency of a snack or night meal consumption, whereas it was negatively associated with the frequency of breakfast consumption in the patients. Logistic regression analyses showed that self-reported depression was positively associated with metabolic diseases and the frequency of a snack or night meal consumption, whereas it was negatively associated with the frequency of breakfast consumption. The observed associations of depression with BMI classification, metabolic disease, and lifestyle suggest that lifestyle and related physical conditions are involved in at least a portion of depressive disorders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A system of nomenclature for rocks in Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattila, J.

    2006-06-01

    Due to international interest in the Finnish deep repository project at Olkiluoto (SW Finland) and the need for collaboration between scientists involved in site investigations for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel in other countries, a well-documented system of rock nomenclature is required, based on existing classification schemes and international recommendations. The BGS (British Geological Survey) rock classification scheme is the most comprehensive rock classification scheme and the basic principles behind it are utilised for the system of nomenclature for rocks in Olkiluoto. The BGS classification system is based on the use of descriptive names and a clear hierarchy, making it possible to classify rocks at different levels depending on the specific goals of the study, the level of available information, and the expertise of the user. Each rock type is assigned a root name, which is based on structural and textural characteristics or modal compositions of the rock and the root names are refined with qualifier terms as prefixes. Qualifier terms refer to the structure or modal composition of the rock. The bedrock at the Olkiluoto site consists of metamorphic and igneous rocks. The metamorphic rocks consist of migmatitic gneisses and (non-migmatitic) gneisses, which are further divided according to their structural characteristics and modal compositions, the former into stromatic, veined, diatexitic gneisses, the latter into mica, quartz, mafic and TGG gneisses. Igneous rocks consist of pegmatitic granites, K-feldspar porphyry and diabases. (orig.)

  1. Classification of Tempranillo wines according to geographic origin: Combination of mass spectrometry based electronic nose and chemometrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cynkar, Wies, E-mail: wies.cynkar@awri.com.au [Australian Wine Research Institute, PO Box 197, Glen Osmond, SA 5064 (Australia); Dambergs, Robert [Australian Wine Research Institute, Tasmanian Institute of Agricultural Research, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 98, Hobart Tasmania 7001 (Australia); Smith, Paul; Cozzolino, Daniel [Australian Wine Research Institute, PO Box 197, Glen Osmond, SA 5064 (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    Rapid methods employing instruments such as electronic noses (EN) or gas sensors are used in the food and beverage industries to monitor and assess the composition and quality of products. Similar to other food industries, the wine industry has a clear need for simple, rapid and cost effective techniques for objectively evaluating the quality of grapes, wine and spirits. In this study a mass spectrometry based electronic nose (MS-EN) instrument combined with chemometrics was used to predict the geographical origin of Tempranillo wines produced in Australia and Spain. The MS-EN data generated were analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and stepwise linear discriminant analysis (SLDA) with full cross validation (leave-one-out method). The SLDA classified correctly 86% of the samples while PLS-DA 85% of Tempranillo wines according to their geographical origin. The relative benefits of using MS-EN will provide capability for rapid screening of wines. However, this technique does not provide the identification and quantitative determination of individual compounds responsible for the different aroma notes in the wine.

  2. Classification of Tempranillo wines according to geographic origin: Combination of mass spectrometry based electronic nose and chemometrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cynkar, Wies; Dambergs, Robert; Smith, Paul; Cozzolino, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Rapid methods employing instruments such as electronic noses (EN) or gas sensors are used in the food and beverage industries to monitor and assess the composition and quality of products. Similar to other food industries, the wine industry has a clear need for simple, rapid and cost effective techniques for objectively evaluating the quality of grapes, wine and spirits. In this study a mass spectrometry based electronic nose (MS-EN) instrument combined with chemometrics was used to predict the geographical origin of Tempranillo wines produced in Australia and Spain. The MS-EN data generated were analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and stepwise linear discriminant analysis (SLDA) with full cross validation (leave-one-out method). The SLDA classified correctly 86% of the samples while PLS-DA 85% of Tempranillo wines according to their geographical origin. The relative benefits of using MS-EN will provide capability for rapid screening of wines. However, this technique does not provide the identification and quantitative determination of individual compounds responsible for the different aroma notes in the wine.

  3. 深部岩体在高压水头作用下的渗透性状况试验%Experimental examination of permeability of deep rock mass under high water pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄震; 姜振泉; 孙晓倩; 曹丁涛; 王宗胜; 辛斌

    2015-01-01

    Water injection experiment is a particularly useful technique to determine the permeability of rock mass in deep geotechnical engineering. To probe the permeability of lower coal seam floor, high borehole pressure water injection experiment has been carried out to analyse the three segments of rock masses in one coal mine in Yanzhou, and numerous data have been obtained. Based on the formula of permeability coefficient as well as the analysis of the data, permeability coefficients of three segments of rock masses have been determined, and a generalized model has been established to describe the rela-tionship between permeability coefficients and pressure. The results show that the test pressure and the water discharge will suddenly change when the hydraulic fracturing occurs. The curves of permeability coefficient and pressure are provided with a significant geometric segmentation, which is stable before mutation and linear after mutation. Fissures will restore to be closed after water injection experiment, and the rock masses still have strong anti-permeability.%现场压水试验是揭示深部岩土工程中岩体渗透性能的可靠方法,为探究深部煤层底板岩体的渗透性,采用钻孔高压压水测试手段,对兖州矿区某矿下组煤底板三段岩体进行了现场压水试验,获得了大量压水测试数据.结合渗透系数计算公式,对试验数据进行了分析,获得了不同深度及不同岩性岩体的渗透系数值及渗透系数与压力关系的概化模式.研究结果表明:岩体发生渗流时,测试水压和流量会发生突变.岩体的渗透系数-压力关系曲线在几何形态表现出明显的分段性,即可分为突变点前的平稳段和突变点后的线性变化段.压水结束后,岩体裂隙会发生闭合,且仍具有较强的抗渗性.

  4. Failure mechanism and prevention measures of Majia potential unstable rock mass in Muping%穆坪镇马家危岩体破坏机制及治理措施研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏益; 任鸿凌

    2011-01-01

    At present,Majia potential unstable rock masses seriously deformed and posed a great threat to the free flowing on S210 provincial slope road and residents' safty.It may result in even more serious harm.According to structure characteristics,signs of deformation and failure of potential unstable rock masses,this paper analyzes its two kinds of failure mechanisms: rip-slip failure mode and rip-dumping failure mode.On this basis,through energy conservation law and the laws of kinematics,the paper analyzes movement characteristic of falling rock mass,the largest height of bouncing of falling rock mass is 2.9 m and the largest kinetic energy is 1 289.54 kJ.Then,combined with the construction conditions,we use RXI-150 type passive protective net to ensure the free flowing of provincial road and the residents' safety.%马家危岩体目前变形加剧,已严重威胁坡脚省道S210的畅通和居民安全,可能造成更严重的危害。根据危岩体结构特征和变形破坏迹象,分析了危岩体的2种破坏机制:拉裂—滑移式和拉裂—倾倒式。在此基础上,运用能量守恒定律和运动学规律研究危岩体失稳落石运动特征,落石运动到坡脚的最大弹跳高度为2.9 m,最大动能为1 289.54 kJ。结合施工条件,采用RXI-150型被动网来拦截落石,确保省道畅通和居民安全。

  5. Predicting rock bursts in mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spall, H.

    1979-01-01

    In terms of lives lost, rock bursts in underground mines can be as hazardous as earthquakes on the surface. So it is not surprising that fo the last 40 years the U.S Bureau of Mines has been using seismic methods for detecting areas in underground mines where there is a high differential stress which could lead to structural instability of the rock mass being excavated.

  6. Thermo-hydro-mechanics of fractured rock mass in nuclear waste studies. The measurement of electrical conductivity during the thermo-hydro-mechanical experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mursu, J.; Peltoniemi, M.

    1996-12-01

    The report reviews and summarizes the present state-of-the-art knowledge about electrical conductivity measurements of rock samples in high-temperature, high-pressure conditions. The special requirements for these measurements have been studied in terms of sample preparation, instrumentation, and experimental procedures. Possibilities to utilize a MTS System 815 testing unit, currently available at the Helsinki University of Technology, for these measurements have been studied. (17 refs.)

  7. White Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  8. Application of an Integrated and Self-contained Electromagnetic Acoustic Recorder for Monitoring the Rock Mass Structure and Development of Geodynamic Processes in Ore Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bespal’ko Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a block diagram of the recorder of electromagnetic and acoustic signals. The recorder provides monitoring of electromagnetic and acoustic signals under changing stress-strain state of heterogeneous materials and rocks. The analog amplifier input sensitivity of electromagnetic signals in 4 channels is 10 μV, that of the electromagnetic signal intensity is 10 μ and that of acoustic signals is 50 μV. The operating frequency range of recording is (1÷100 kHz. The averaging of electromagnetic and acoustic signal amplitudes is performed within 1 or 5 seconds. The data on electromagnetic and acoustic emission materials is recorded in digital format in the internal memory of the recorder. The recorder operates off-line within 7 days. Repeated testing of the recorder in natural conditions of the Tashtagol mine showed that the changes in the amplitude and frequency parameters of electromagnetic signals (EMC indicate the structural damage in mines made of rocks which differ in their electrical properties. Measurements of the intensity of electromagnetic signals enable monitoring the changes in the stress-strain state of rocks during and after blasting and other geodynamic phenomena.

  9. A new method to test rock abrasiveness based on physico-mechanical and structural properties of rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N. Oparin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new method to test rock abrasiveness is proposed based upon the dependence of rock abrasiveness on their structural and physico-mechanical properties. The article describes the procedure of presentation of properties that govern rock abrasiveness on a canonical scale by dimensionless components, and the integrated estimation of the properties by a generalized index. The obtained results are compared with the known classifications of rock abrasiveness.

  10. Lead isotope analyses of standard rock samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Eizo

    1990-01-01

    New results on lead isotope compositions of standard rock samples and their analytical procedures are reported. Bromide form anion exchange chromatography technique was adopted for the chemical separation lead from rock samples. The lead contamination during whole analytical procedure was low enough to determine lead isotope composition of common natural rocks. Silica-gel activator method was applied for emission of lead ions in the mass spectrometer. Using the data reduction of 'unfractionated ratios', we obtained good reproducibility, precision and accuracy on lead isotope compositions of NBS SRM. Here we present new reliable lead isotope compositions of GSJ standard rock samples and USGS standard rock, BCR-1. (author)

  11. Unbiased metabolite profiling by liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and multivariate data analysis for herbal authentication: classification of seven Lonicera species flower buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wen; Yang, Hua; Qi, Lian-Wen; Liu, E-Hu; Ren, Mei-Ting; Yan, Yu-Ting; Chen, Jun; Li, Ping

    2012-07-06

    Plant-based medicines become increasingly popular over the world. Authentication of herbal raw materials is important to ensure their safety and efficacy. Some herbs belonging to closely related species but differing in medicinal properties are difficult to be identified because of similar morphological and microscopic characteristics. Chromatographic fingerprinting is an alternative method to distinguish them. Existing approaches do not allow a comprehensive analysis for herbal authentication. We have now developed a strategy consisting of (1) full metabolic profiling of herbal medicines by rapid resolution liquid chromatography (RRLC) combined with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOF MS), (2) global analysis of non-targeted compounds by molecular feature extraction algorithm, (3) multivariate statistical analysis for classification and prediction, and (4) marker compounds characterization. This approach has provided a fast and unbiased comparative multivariate analysis of the metabolite composition of 33-batch samples covering seven Lonicera species. Individual metabolic profiles are performed at the level of molecular fragments without prior structural assignment. In the entire set, the obtained classifier for seven Lonicera species flower buds showed good prediction performance and a total of 82 statistically different components were rapidly obtained by the strategy. The elemental compositions of discriminative metabolites were characterized by the accurate mass measurement of the pseudomolecular ions and their chemical types were assigned by the MS/MS spectra. The high-resolution, comprehensive and unbiased strategy for metabolite data analysis presented here is powerful and opens the new direction of authentication in herbal analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. SEEPAGE FIELD-STRAIN FIELD COUPLING ANALYSIS FOR ROCK MASSES OF COAL SEAM FLOOR DURING MINING ABOVE A CONFINED AQUIFER%煤层底板岩体采动渗流场-应变场耦合分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚多喜; 鲁海峰

    2012-01-01

    根据五沟煤矿1018 工作面地质及水文地质条件,应用三维快速拉格朗日(FLAC3D)流固耦合分析模块,采用变渗透系数方法,对该工作面底板岩体采动渗流应变机制进行数值模拟研究.分析结果表明:采动影响下,围岩渗透系数发生较大的变化,处在采空区正上方的泥岩段最大达到原始渗透系数的1293倍;根据渗流场分析,工作面采动并没有破坏底板隔水层的阻水性能,采动裂隙没有导通灰岩含水层,灰岩水涌入回采工作面形成水害可能性较小;工作面正下方岩体单元安全度小于1的区域最大深度为30 m.综合渗流场以及隔水底板单元安全度分析结果,10煤底板下灰岩水溃入工作面形成水害可能性较小.%Based on the geological and hydrogeological conditions of the face 1018 in Wugou coal mine, the fluid-solid coupling module in FLAC3D with changeable permeability coefficient is adopted to simulate the whole process of damage and failure of rock masses at floor of the coal seam No. 10. The results indicate that the permeability coefficient of surrounding rocks changes a lot due to mining. The maximum permeability coefficient reaches 1 293 times of the original one, which happens at the immediate roof of mined-out area. According to the analysis of seepage field, mining does not destroy water resistance of floor aquifer. Mining fissures do not connect limestone aquifers, and water in the limestone is less likely to flow into stopes to cause damage. The maximum depth of rock masses with element safety degree less than one is about 30 m. According to the change of permeability coefficient of and the analytical results of element safety degree of rock masses, safe mining of the face 1018 can be ensured.

  13. Classification of obesity by means of the body mass index and verification by measurement of the body composition using the tritium dilution technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, W.; Fischer, S.; Weck, M.; Hanefeld, M.

    1988-01-01

    65 female and 142 male patients have been classified according to their body mass index (BMI) into the categories underweight (BMI 20 or less), normal weight (BMI over 20 - 25), overweight (BMI over 25 - 30), obesity (BMI over 30 - 40), and morbid obesity (BMI over 40). Body composition was measured in all patients using the tritium dilution method. Total body fat was calculated from the total body water values. Relative fat values increased from 17.1% (women) and 14.5% (men) resp. in underweight to 46.2% (women) and 43.3% (men) in morbid obesity. In all classes of BMI men exhibited higher values of body weight, body height and body water and lower values of absolute and relative fat as compared to women. However, the relative fat and water values, relative to 1 in the normal weight class, were equal for both sexes. The results demonstrate that the BMI is very well suited for the classification of obesity. (author)

  14. Differentiating benign from malignant solid breast masses: value of shear wave elastography according to lesion stiffness combined with greyscale ultrasound according to BI-RADS classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, A; Whelehan, P; Thomson, K; Brauer, K; Jordan, L; Purdie, C; McLean, D; Baker, L; Vinnicombe, S; Thompson, A

    2012-07-10

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of shear wave elastography combined with BI-RADS classification of greyscale ultrasound images for benign/malignant differentiation in a large group of patients. One hundred and seventy-five consecutive patients with solid breast masses on routine ultrasonography undergoing percutaneous biopsy had the greyscale findings classified according to the American College of Radiology BI-RADS. The mean elasticity values from four shear wave images were obtained. For mean elasticity vs greyscale BI-RADS, the performance results against histology were sensitivity: 95% vs 95%, specificity: 77% vs 69%, Positive Predictive Value (PPV): 88% vs 84%, Negative Predictive Value (NPV): 90% vs 91%, and accuracy: 89% vs 86% (all P>0.05). The results for the combination (positive result from either modality counted as malignant) were sensitivity 100%, specificity 61%, PPV 82%, NPV 100%, and accuracy 86%. The combination of BI-RADS greyscale and shear wave elastography yielded superior sensitivity to BI-RADS alone (P=0.03) or shear wave alone (P=0.03). The NPV was superior in combination compared with either alone (BI-RADS P=0.01 and shear wave P=0.02). Together, BI-RADS assessment of greyscale ultrasound images and shear wave ultrasound elastography are extremely sensitive for detection of malignancy.

  15. Rock stresses (Grimsel rock laboratory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, A.; Heusermann, S.; Braeuer, V.; Gloeggler, W.

    1989-01-01

    On the research and development project 'Rock Stress Measurements' the BGR has developed and tested several test devices and methods at GTS for use in boreholes at a depth of 200 m and has carried out rock mechanical and engineering geological investigations for the evaluation and interpretation of the stress measurements. The first time a computer for data processing was installed in the borehole together with the BGR-probe. Laboratory tests on hollow cylinders were made to study the stress-deformation behavior. To validate and to interprete the measurement results some test methods were modelled using the finite-element method. The dilatometer-tests yielded high values of Young's modulus, whereas laboratory tests showed lower values with a distinct deformation anisotropy. Stress measurements with the BGR-probe yielded horizontal stresses being higher than the theoretical overburden pressure and vertical stresses which agree well with the theoretical overburden pressure. These results are comparable to the results of the hydraulic fracturing tests, whereas stresses obtained with CSIR-triaxial cells are generally lower. The detailed geological mapping of the borehole indicated relationships between stress and geology. With regard to borehole depth different zones of rock structure joint frequency, joint orientation, and orientation of microfissures as well as stress magnitude, stress direction, and degree of deformation anisotropy could be distinguished. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Comparison of the effects in the rock mass of large-scale chemical and nuclear explosions. Final technical report, June 9, 1994--October 9, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spivak, A.A.

    1995-04-01

    It was found that in the first approximation the mechanical effect of underground nuclear explosion is analogous to the effect of chemical explosion. Really qualitative analysis shows that accompanying mechanical effects of nuclear and chemical explosions are the same: in the both cases explosion consequences are characterized by formation of the camouplet cavity (crater after explosion near free surface), destruction of the rock massif near explosion centre, creation of the stress wave, which forms seismoexplosive effect a long distance from explosion epicentre. Qualitative likeness of underground nuclear explosions and chemical explosions is the base of modelling the mechanical effects of the underground nuclear explosion. In this paper we`ll compare two explosions: nuclear (15-04-84) and chemical (27.06.95) with large power. These explosions were realized at the same geological conditions at Degelen test area, which is a part of the Semipalatinsk Test Site. In the case of the nuclear explosion, the charge was disposed in the face of the deep horizontal gallery. The charge of the chemical explosion was a semisphere from explosives at the rock massif surface. In the both case rock massif behavior after explosions was investigated at underground conditions (in the case of chemical explosion -- in the long underground excavation from explosion epicentre). Mechanical effects from the nuclear and chemical explosions were investigated with the same methods. The changes in geological medium after a large-scale explosive actions will be analyzed in detail too. Investigations of the influence of tectonic energy on the mechanical effects after underground nuclear, explosions represents the main interest. In this paper we`ll discuss this question on the data from underground nuclear explosion, realized 08.09.89 in the deep well at the Balapan test area, at the Semipalatinsk Test Site.

  17. Thermal Inertia of Rocks and Rock Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M. P.; Jakosky, B. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal inertia of rock populations on Mars and Earth is derived from a model of effective inertia versus rock diameter. Results allow a parameterization of the effective rock inertia versus rock abundance and bulk and fine component inertia. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. A coupled mechanical-hydrological methodology for modeling flow in jointed rock masses using laboratory data for the joint flow model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, C.F.; Bastian, R.J.; Shotwell, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) currently supports the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management in developing and evaluating analytical methods for assessing the suitability of sites for geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The research includes consideration of hydrological, geomechanical, geochemical, and waste package components and the evaluation of the degree of coupling that can occur between two or more of these components. The PNL effort and those of other research groups investing potential waste sites in the U.S. and abroad are producing a suite of computer codes to analyze the long-term performance of the proposed repository sites. This paper summarizes the ongoing research in rock mechanics at PNL involving flow through jointed rock. The objective of this research is to develop a methodology for modeling the coupled mechanical-hydrological process of flow through joints and then attempt to validate a ''simple'' model using small-scale laboratory test data as a basis for judging whether the approach has merit. This paper discusses the laboratory tests being conducted to develop a joint behavioral constitutive model for the numerical method under development and the modeling approach being considered

  19. Ethnic-Specific Criteria for Classification of Body Mass Index: A Perspective for Asian Indians and American Diabetes Association Position Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Anoop

    2015-09-01

    Definitions for overweight and obesity are universally applied using body mass index (BMI), based on morbidity and mortality data derived from white populations. However, several studies have shown higher body fat, excess metabolic perturbations, and cardiovascular risk factors at lower value of BMI in Asian versus white populations. Definitive guidelines have been published to classify a BMI of ≥23 kg/m(2) and ≥25 kg/m(2) as overweight and obese, respectively, by the Indian Consensus Group (for Asian Indians residing in India) and a BMI of ≥23 kg/m(2) for screening for diabetes by the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence of the United Kingdom (for migrant south Asians) and, in an encouraging initiative recently (2015), by the American Diabetes Association (for all Asian ethnic groups in the United States). Overall, multiple studies, and now several guidelines, emphasize early intervention with diet and physical activity in Asian ethnic groups for prevention and management of obesity-related noncommunicable diseases. By application of these guidelines, an additional 10-15% of the population in India would be labeled as overweight/obese, and more South Asians/Asians will be diagnosed with diabetes in the United Kingdom and the United States. Additional health resources need to be allocated to deal with increasing numbers of Asians with obesity-related noncommunicable diseases, and research is needed to evolve cost-effective interventions. Finally, consensus based on data is needed so that the World Health Organization and other international agencies could take definitive steps for revision of classification of BMI for Asian populations globally.

  20. Water - rock interaction in different rock environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamminen, S.

    1995-01-01

    The study assesses the groundwater geochemistry and geological environment of 44 study sites for radioactive waste disposal. Initially, the study sites were divided by rock type into 5 groups: (1) acid - intermediate rocks, (2) mafic - ultramafic rocks, (3) gabbros, amphibolites and gneisses that contain calc-silicate (skarn) rocks, (4) carbonates and (5) sandstones. Separate assessments are made of acid - intermediate plutonic rocks and of a subgroup that comprises migmatites, granite and mica gneiss. These all belong to the group of acid - intermediate rocks. Within the mafic -ultramafic rock group, a subgroup that comprises mafic - ultramafic plutonic rocks, serpentinites, mafic - ultramafic volcanic rocks and volcanic - sedimentary schists is also evaluated separately. Bedrock groundwaters are classified by their concentration of total dissolved solids as fresh, brackish, saline, strongly saline and brine-class groundwaters. (75 refs., 24 figs., 3 tabs.)

  1. An evaluation of a single-step extraction chromatography separation method for Sm-Nd isotope analysis of micro-samples of silicate rocks by high-sensitivity thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chaofeng; Li Xianhua; Li Qiuli; Guo Jinghui; Li Xianghui; Liu Tao

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Distribution curve of all eluting fractions for a BCR-2 (1-2-3.5-7 mg) on LN column using HCl and HF as eluting reagent. Highlights: → This analytical protocol affords a simple and rapid analysis for Sm and Nd isotope in minor rock samples. → The single-step separation method exhibits satisfactory separation effect for complex silicate samples. → Corrected 143 Nd/ 144 Nd data show excellent accuracy even if the 140 Ce 16 O + / 144 Nd 16 O + ratio reached to 0.03. - Abstract: A single-step separation scheme is presented for Sm-Nd radiogenic isotope system on very small samples (1-3 mg) of silicate rock. This method is based on Eichrom LN Spec chromatographic material and affords a straightforward separation of Sm-Nd from complex matrix with good purity and satisfactory blank levels, suitable for thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). This technique, characterized by high efficiency (single-step Sm-Nd separation) and high sensitivity (TIMS on NdO + ion beam), is able to process rapidly (3-4 h), with low procedure blanks ( 143 Nd/ 144 Nd ratios and Sm-Nd concentrations are presented for eleven international silicate rock reference materials, spanning a wide range of Sm-Nd contents and bulk compositions. The analytical results show a good agreement with recommended values within ±0.004% for the 143 Nd/ 144 Nd isotopic ratio and ±2% for Sm-Nd quantification at the 95% confidence level. It is noted that the uncertainty of this method is about 3 times larger than typical precision achievable with two-stage full separation followed by state-of-the-art conventional TIMS using Nd + ion beams which require much larger amounts of Nd. Hence, our single-step separation followed by NdO + ion beam technique is preferred to the analysis for microsamples.

  2. Evaluation of dynamic characteristics of hard rock based on numerical simulations of in situ rock tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Yuya; Ikusada, Koji; Jiang, Yujing

    2009-01-01

    In situ rock tests of hard rock of conglomerate in which discontinuities in high angle are dominant were conducted. In this study, in order to confirm the validity of the test results and the test condition, and in order to elucidate the deformation behaviour and the mechanism of shear strength of the rock mass, the numerical simulations of the in situ rock tests by using distinct element method were performed. As a result, it was clarified that the behaviour of the rock mass strongly depends on both geometrical distribution of discontinuities and those mechanical properties. It is thought that a series of evaluation processes showed in this study contribute to improve the reliability of the dynamic characteristic evaluation of the rock mass. (author)

  3. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Implications of Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Coupling on the Near-Field Safety of a Nuclear Waste Repository in a Homogeneous Rock Mass. Report of BMT1B/WP2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, L.

    2005-02-01

    This report presents the works performed for the second phase (BMT1B) of BMT1 of the DECOVALEX III project for the period of 1999-2002. The works of BMT1 is divided into three phases: BMT1A, BMT1B and BMT1C. The BMT1A concerns with calibration of the computer codes with a reference T-H-M experiment at Kamaishi Mine, Japan. The objective is to validate the numerical approaches, computer codes and material models, so that the teams simulating tools are at a comparable level of maturity and sophistication. The BMT1B uses the calibrated codes to perform scoping calculations, considering varying degrees of THM coupling and varying permeability values of the surrounding rock for a reference generic repository design without fractures. The aim is to identify the coupling mechanisms of importance for construction, performance and safety of the repository. The chosen measures for evaluating the long term safety and performance of the repository are the maximal temperature created by the thermal loading from the emplaced wastes, the time for re-saturation of the buffer, the maximal swelling stress developed in the buffer, the structural integrity of the rock mass and the permeability evolution in the rock mass. Six teams participated in BMT1B: IRSN/CEA (France), CNSC (Canada), ANDRA/INERIS (France), JNC (Japan), BGR/ISEB-ZAG (Germany) and SKI/KTH (Sweden). All teams used FEM approach except the ANDRA/INERIS team who used the FDM approach, with different codes. All research teams except ISEB/ZAG used models with full THM coupling capabilities. The governing equations in these models were derived within the framework of Biot's theory of consolidation and have for primary unknown variables: temperature, pore fluid pressure and displacements of the solid skeleton. Since the original Biot's theory of consolidation is applicable to saturated materials and isothermal conditions, the research teams have to extend Biot's theory in order to deal with thermal effects and the variably

  4. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Implications of Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Coupling on the Near-Field Safety of a Nuclear Waste Repository in a Homogeneous Rock Mass. Report of BMT1B/WP2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, L. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Engineering Geology; Nguyen, T.S. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, ON (Canada)] (eds.)

    2005-02-15

    This report presents the works performed for the second phase (BMT1B) of BMT1 of the DECOVALEX III project for the period of 1999-2002. The works of BMT1 is divided into three phases: BMT1A, BMT1B and BMT1C. The BMT1A concerns with calibration of the computer codes with a reference T-H-M experiment at Kamaishi Mine, Japan. The objective is to validate the numerical approaches, computer codes and material models, so that the teams simulating tools are at a comparable level of maturity and sophistication. The BMT1B uses the calibrated codes to perform scoping calculations, considering varying degrees of THM coupling and varying permeability values of the surrounding rock for a reference generic repository design without fractures. The aim is to identify the coupling mechanisms of importance for construction, performance and safety of the repository. The chosen measures for evaluating the long term safety and performance of the repository are the maximal temperature created by the thermal loading from the emplaced wastes, the time for re-saturation of the buffer, the maximal swelling stress developed in the buffer, the structural integrity of the rock mass and the permeability evolution in the rock mass. Six teams participated in BMT1B: IRSN/CEA (France), CNSC (Canada), ANDRA/INERIS (France), JNC (Japan), BGR/ISEB-ZAG (Germany) and SKI/KTH (Sweden). All teams used FEM approach except the ANDRA/INERIS team who used the FDM approach, with different codes. All research teams except ISEB/ZAG used models with full THM coupling capabilities. The governing equations in these models were derived within the framework of Biot's theory of consolidation and have for primary unknown variables: temperature, pore fluid pressure and displacements of the solid skeleton. Since the original Biot's theory of consolidation is applicable to saturated materials and isothermal conditions, the research teams have to extend Biot's theory in order to deal with thermal effects and

  5. Metrological system for y-ray spectrometry measurement of the specific activity and mass fraction of natural radioactive elements in soil and rock samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaikovich, I.M.; Fominykh, V.I.; Kirisyuk, E.M.; Belyachkov, Y.A.

    1994-01-01

    In the last few years a great deal of attention has been devoted to the study of the radiation conditions, which in some regions change markedly as a result of intense human activity. One reason for radioactive contamination of an area is dissemination during extraction and processing of radioactive ores or other minerals of natural radioactive elements with a high content of potassium, uranium (radium), and thorium. Estimation of the level of radioactive contamination is one of the main problems of ecological monitoring, and the quality of the measurements sometimes plays a deciding role in the fate of the object being investigated. This also pertains to, in particular, estimation of radioactive contamination of minerals employed for building homes and factories and other industrial structures. In order to draw unequivocal and well-founded conclusions from measurements of the content of natural radioactive elements in soil and rock samples, collected at the object being investigated, a great deal of attention must be devoted during the organization of the measurements to the metrological system

  6. Nagra technical report 14-02, Geological basics - Dossier VI - Barrier properties of proposed host rock sediments and neighbouring rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautschi, A.; Deplazes, G.; Traber, D.; Marschall, P.; Mazurek, M.; Gimmi, T.; Maeder, U.

    2014-01-01

    This dossier is the sixth of a series of eight reports concerning the safety and technical aspects of locations for the disposal of radioactive wastes in Switzerland. It discusses the barrier properties of the proposed host rock sediments and neighbouring rock layers. The mineralogical composition of the host rocks are discussed as are their pore densities and hydrological properties. Diffusion aspects are discussed. The aquifer systems in the proposed depository areas and their classification are looked at. The barrier properties of the host rocks and those of neighbouring sediments are discussed. Finally, modelling concepts and parameters for the transport of radionuclides in the rocks are discussed

  7. CERN Rocks

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The 15th CERN Hardronic Festival took place on 17 July on the terrace of Rest 3 (Prévessin). Over 1000 people, from CERN and other International Organizations, came to enjoy the warm summer night, and to watch the best of the World's High Energy music. Jazz, rock, pop, country, metal, blues, funk and punk blasted out from 9 bands from the CERN Musiclub and Jazz club, alternating on two stages in a non-stop show.  The night reached its hottest point when The Canettes Blues Band got everybody dancing to sixties R&B tunes (pictured). Meanwhile, the bars and food vans were working at full capacity, under the expert management of the CERN Softball club, who were at the same time running a Softball tournament in the adjacent "Higgs Field". The Hardronic Festival is the main yearly CERN music event, and it is organized with the support of the Staff Association and the CERN Administration.

  8. ANALYSES OF ROCK SURFACE COLOUR CHANGES DUE TO WEATHERING

    OpenAIRE

    GOKAY, Mehmet Kemal

    2018-01-01

    Description parameters of rock masses and minerals include their colours as well. Colours appear in daylight for surfaced rock masses are changing slightly due to weathering layers which have been covering its surface gradually. Healthy human eyes can manage to differentiate visible light spectrum to identify colours of substances including rock masses. Then visible blackish colours of magnetite minerals, reddish colours of Terra- Rosa soils, greenish colours of weathered copper ore, pure whi...

  9. ANALYSES OF ROCK SURFACE COLOUR CHANGES DUE TO WEATHERING

    OpenAIRE

    GÖKAY, Mehmet Kemal

    2018-01-01

    Description parameters of rock masses and minerals include their colours as well. Colours appear in daylight for surfaced rock masses are changing slightly due to weathering layers which have been covering its surface gradually. Healthy human eyes can manage to differentiate visible spectrum to identify the colours of substance including rock masses. Then visible blackish colours of magnetite minerals, reddish colours of Terra- Rosa soils, greenish colours of weathered copper ore, pure white ...

  10. A study on the characteristics of site-scale fracture system in granite and volcanic rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Su; Kim, Chun Soo; Bae, Dae Seok; Park, Byoung Yoon; Koh, Young Kown [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The safety of waste disposal can be achieved by a complete isolation of radioactive wastes from biosphere or by a retardation of nuclide migration to reach an acceptable dose level. For the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, the potential pathways of nuclide primarily depend on the spatial distribution characteristics of conductive fractures. Major key issues in the quantification of fracture system for a disposal site are involved in classification criteria, hydraulic parameters, geometry, field investigation methods etc. This research aims to characterize the spatial distribution characteristics of conductive fractures in granite and volcanic rock mass. 10 refs., 32 figs., 13 tabs. (Author)

  11. Uranium deposits in granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimori, R.K.; Ragland, P.C.; Rogers, J.J.W.; Greenberg, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    This report is a review of published data bearing on the geology and origin of uranium deposits in granitic, pegmatitic and migmatitic rocks with the aim of assisting in the development of predictive criteria for the search for similar deposits in the U.S. Efforts were concentrated on the so-called ''porphyry'' uranium deposits. Two types of uranium deposits are primarily considered: deposits in pegmatites and alaskites in gneiss terrains, and disseminations of uranium in high-level granites. In Chapter 1 of this report, the general data on the distribution of uranium in igneous and metamorphic rocks are reviewed. Chapter 2 contains some comments on the classification of uranium deposits associated with igneous rocks and a summary of the main features of the geology of uranium deposits in granites. General concepts of the behavior of uranium in granites during crustal evolution are reviewed in Chapter 3. Also included is a discussion of the relationship of uranium mineralization in granites to the general evolution of mobile belts, plus the influence of magmatic and post-magmatic processes on the distribution of uranium in igneous rocks and related ore deposits. Chapter 4 relates the results of experimental studies on the crystallization of granites to some of the geologic features of uranium deposits in pegmatites and alaskites in high-grade metamorphic terrains. Potential or favorable areas for igneous uranium deposits in the U.S.A. are delineated in Chapter 5. Data on the geology of specific uranium deposits in granitic rocks are contained in Appendix 1. A compilation of igneous rock formations containing greater than 10 ppM uranium is included in Appendix 2. Appendix 3 is a report on the results of a visit to the Roessing area. Appendix 4 is a report on a field excursion to eastern Canada

  12. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) Imaging of Cerebral Ischemia: Combined Analysis of Rat Brain Thin Cuts Toward Improved Tissue Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbekova, Anna; Lohninger, Hans; van Tilborg, Geralda A F; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Bonta, Maximilian; Limbeck, Andreas; Lendl, Bernhard; Al-Saad, Khalid A; Ali, Mohamed; Celikic, Minja; Ofner, Johannes

    2018-02-01

    Microspectroscopic techniques are widely used to complement histological studies. Due to recent developments in the field of chemical imaging, combined chemical analysis has become attractive. This technique facilitates a deepened analysis compared to single techniques or side-by-side analysis. In this study, rat brains harvested one week after induction of photothrombotic stroke were investigated. Adjacent thin cuts from rats' brains were imaged using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The LA-ICP-MS data were normalized using an internal standard (a thin gold layer). The acquired hyperspectral data cubes were fused and subjected to multivariate analysis. Brain regions affected by stroke as well as unaffected gray and white matter were identified and classified using a model based on either partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) or random decision forest (RDF) algorithms. The RDF algorithm demonstrated the best results for classification. Improved classification was observed in the case of fused data in comparison to individual data sets (either FT-IR or LA-ICP-MS). Variable importance analysis demonstrated that both molecular and elemental content contribute to the improved RDF classification. Univariate spectral analysis identified biochemical properties of the assigned tissue types. Classification of multisensor hyperspectral data sets using an RDF algorithm allows access to a novel and in-depth understanding of biochemical processes and solid chemical allocation of different brain regions.

  13. Proceedings of the 3. Canada-US rock mechanics symposium and 20. Canadian rock mechanics symposium : rock engineering 2009 : rock engineering in difficult conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This conference provided a forum for geologists, mining operators and engineers to discuss the application of rock mechanics in engineering designs. Members of the scientific and engineering communities discussed challenges and interdisciplinary elements involved in rock engineering. New geological models and methods of characterizing rock masses and ground conditions in underground engineering projects were discussed along with excavation and mining methods. Papers presented at the conference discussed the role of rock mechanics in forensic engineering. Geophysics, geomechanics, and risk-based approaches to rock engineering designs were reviewed. Issues related to high pressure and high flow water conditions were discussed, and new rock physics models designed to enhance hydrocarbon recovery were presented. The conference featured 84 presentations, of which 9 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs.

  14. Non-targeted volatile profiles for the classification of the botanical origin of Chinese honey by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Jin, Linghe; Fan, Chunlin; Wang, Wenwen

    2017-11-01

    A potential method for the discrimination and prediction of honey samples of various botanical origins was developed based on the non-targeted volatile profiles obtained by solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry combined with chemometrics. The blind analysis of non-targeted volatile profiles was carried out using solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry for 87 authentic honey samples from four botanical origins (acacia, linden, vitex, and rape). The number of variables was reduced from 2734 to 70 by using a series of filters. Based on the optimized 70 variables, 79.12% of the variance was explained by the first four principal components. Partial least squares discriminant analysis, naïve Bayes analysis, and back-propagation artificial neural network were used to develop the classification and prediction models. The 100% accuracy revealed a perfect classification of the botanical origins. In addition, the reliability and practicability of the models were validated by an independent set of additional 20 authentic honey samples. All 20 samples were accurately classified. The confidence measures indicated that the performance of the naïve Bayes model was better than the other two models. Finally, the characteristic volatile compounds of linden honey were tentatively identified. The proposed method is reliable and accurate for the classification of honey of various botanical origins. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Bosniak classification system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graumann, Ole; Osther, Susanne Sloth; Karstoft, Jens

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Bosniak classification was originally based on computed tomographic (CT) findings. Magnetic resonance (MR) and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) imaging may demonstrate findings that are not depicted at CT, and there may not always be a clear correlation between the findings...... at MR and CEUS imaging and those at CT. PURPOSE: To compare diagnostic accuracy of MR, CEUS, and CT when categorizing complex renal cystic masses according to the Bosniak classification. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From February 2011 to June 2012, 46 complex renal cysts were prospectively evaluated by three...... readers. Each mass was categorized according to the Bosniak classification and CT was chosen as gold standard. Kappa was calculated for diagnostic accuracy and data was compared with pathological results. RESULTS: CT images found 27 BII, six BIIF, seven BIII, and six BIV. Forty-three cysts could...

  16. Igneous rocks formed by hypervelocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinski, Gordon R.; Grieve, Richard A. F.; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Neish, Catherine D.; Pilles, Eric A.; Tornabene, Livio L.

    2018-03-01

    Igneous rocks are the primary building blocks of planetary crusts. Most igneous rocks originate via decompression melting and/or wet melting of protolith lithologies within planetary interiors and their classification and compositional, petrographic, and textural characteristics, are well-studied. As our exploration of the Solar System continues, so too does the inventory of intrusive and extrusive igneous rocks, settings, and processes. The results of planetary exploration have also clearly demonstrated that impact cratering is a ubiquitous geological process that has affected, and will continue to affect, all planetary objects with a solid surface, whether that be rock or ice. It is now recognized that the production of igneous rocks is a fundamental outcome of hypervelocity impact. The goal of this review is to provide an up-to-date synthesis of our knowledge and understanding of igneous rocks formed by hypervelocity impact. Following a brief overview of the basics of the impact process, we describe how and why melts are generated during impact events and how impact melting differs from endogenic igneous processes. While the process may differ, we show that the products of hypervelocity impact can