WorldWideScience

Sample records for rock magnetic investigation

  1. Search for magnetic minerals in Martian rocks: Overview of the Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) magnet investigation on Spirit and Opportunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetz, W.; Leer, K.; Gunnlaugsson, H.P.

    2008-01-01

    The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) on board the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) is a grinding tool designed to remove dust coatings and/or weathering rinds from rocks and expose fresh rock material. Four magnets of different strengths that are built into the structure of the RAT have been attracting...... is interpreted as magnetite. The amount of abraded rock material adhering to the magnets varied strongly during the mission and is correlated in a consistent way to the amount of magnetite inferred from Mossbauer spectra for the corresponding rock. The RAT magnet experiment as performed on Opportunity also...

  2. Rock and mineral magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    O’Reilly, W

    1984-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed a revolution in the earth sciences. The quantitative, instrument-based measurements and physical models of. geophysics, together with advances in technology, have radically transformed the way in which the Earth, and especially its crust, is described. The study of the magnetism of the rocks of the Earth's crust has played a major part in this transformation. Rocks, or more specifically their constituent magnetic minerals, can be regarded as a measuring instrument provided by nature, which can be employed in the service of the earth sciences. Thus magnetic minerals are a recording magnetometer; a goniometer or protractor, recording the directions of flows, fields and forces; a clock; a recording thermometer; a position recorder; astrain gauge; an instrument for geo­ logical surveying; a tracer in climatology and hydrology; a tool in petrology. No instrument is linear, or free from noise and systematic errors, and the performance of nature's instrument must be assessed and ...

  3. Mapping local singularities using magnetic data to investigate the volcanic rocks of the Qikou depression, Dagang oilfield, eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The spatial structural characteristics of geological anomaly, including singularity and self-similarity, can be analysed using fractal or multifractal modelling. Here we apply the multifractal methods to potential fields to demonstrate that singularities can characterise geological bodies, including rock density and magnetic susceptibility. In addition to enhancing weak gravity and magnetic anomalies with respect to either strong or weak background levels, the local singularity index (α ≈ 2 can be used to delineate the edges of geological bodies. Two models were established to evaluate the effectiveness of mapping singularities for extracting weak anomalies and delineating edges of buried geological bodies. The Qikou depression of the Dagang oilfield in eastern China has been chosen as a study area for demonstrating the extraction of weak anomalies of volcanic rocks, using the singularity mapping technique to analyse complex magnetic anomalies caused by complex geological background. The results have shown that the singularities of magnetic data mapped in the paper are associated with buried volcanic rocks, which have been verified by both drilling and seismic survey, and the S–N and E–W faults in the region. The targets delineated for deeply seated faults and volcanic rocks in the Qikou depression should be further investigated for the potential application in undiscovered oil and gas reservoirs exploration.

  4. The physical principles of rock magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Frank

    1974-01-01

    Developments in Solid Earth Geophysics 5: The Physical Principles of Rock Magnetism explores the physical principles of rock magnetism, with emphasis on the properties of finely divided magnetic materials. It discusses the origin and stability of rock magnetizations, the role of remanent magnetism in interpreting magnetic surveys, magnetic anisotropy as an indicator of rock fabric, and the relationship between piezomagnetic changes and seismic activity. Organized into 13 chapters, this volume discusses the properties of solids, magnetite and hematite grains, and rocks with magnetite grains

  5. Rock stress investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, A.; Heusermann, St.; Braeuer, V.; Gloeggler, W.

    1989-04-01

    On the research project 'Rock Stress Mesurements' the BGR has developed and tested several methods for use in boreholes at a depth of 200 m. Indirect stress measurements using overcoring methods with BGR-probes and CSIR-triaxial cells as well as direct stress measurements using the hydraulic-fracturing method were made. To determine in-situ rock deformation behavior borehole deformation tests, using a BGR-dilatometer, were performed. Two types of the BGR-probe were applied: a four-component-probe to determine horizontal stresses and a five-component-probe to determine a quasi three-dimensional stress field. The first time a computer for data processing was installed in the borehole together with the BGR-probe. Laboratory tests on low cylinders were made to study the stress-deformation behavior. To validate and to interprete the measurement results some test methods were modelled using the finite-element method. The dilatometer-tests yielded high values of Young's modulus, whereas laboratory tests showed lower values with a distinct deformation anisotropy. Stress measurements with the BGR-probe yielded horizontal stresses being higher than the theoretical overburden pressure. These results are comparable to the results of the hydraulic fracturing tests, whereas stresses obtained with CSIR-triaxial cells are lower. The detailed geological mapping of the borehole indicated relationships between stress and geology. With regard to borehole depth different zones of rock structure joint frequency, joint orientation, and orientation of microfissures as well as stress magnitude, stress direction, and degree of deformation anisotropy could be distinguished. (author) 4 tabs., 76 figs., 31 refs

  6. A detailed paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic investigation of the Matuyama-Bruhnes geomagnetic reversal recorded in tephra-paleosol sequence of Tlaxcala(Central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Soler-Arechalde

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Geomagnetic reversals are global phenomena, for about 50 years the paleomagnetists attempted to acquire as many detailed records as possible using the magnetic memory of sediments and lava flows. Yet, transitional field behavior remains poorly characterized largely because of sporadic aspect of volcanic eruptions. In some specific cases, paleosols such as those developed from alluvial or aeolian sediments, may also record the variations of the Geomagnetic Field across the polarity changes. Here, we report a detailed paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic investigation on some radiometrically dated chromic luvisols located in Central Mexico carrying detrital or chemical remanent magnetization. The research was developed in order i to demonstrate the primary origin of the magnetic remanence and ii to show that paleosoils are good candidates to provide a high resolution record of the behavior of geomagnetic field during reversals. The lower part of the paleosoil sequence shows a clearly defined reverse polarity magnetization followed by geomagnetically unstable transitional field and ended by normal polarity remanence. Our AMS and rock magnetic data suggest that magnetization is acquired during the initial stage of soil formation in context of active volcanic activity since magnetic fabric is essentially sedimentary and reverse and normal polarity paleodirections are almost antipodal. Titanomagnetites are identified as main magnetic carriers of rock-magnetic measurements including thermomagnetics and hysteresis cycles. We propose that the transition recorded in this study correspond to the B-M boundary, considering the K-Ar datings available at the sequence bottom and that the chromic luvisols are potentially good recorders of the paleosecular variation. The identification of the B-M boundary within the studied sequence has fundamental significance for improving the chronological scale of Tlaxcala paleosol-sedimentary sequence and its correlation with the

  7. Spin-polarized investigation of ferromagnetism on magnetic semiconductors MnxCa1−xS in the rock-salt phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choutri, H.; Ghebouli, M.A.; Ghebouli, B.; Bouarissa, N.; Uçgun, E.; Ocak, H.Y.

    2014-01-01

    The structural, elastic, electronic and magnetic properties of the diluted magnetic semiconductors Mn x Ca 1−x S in the rock-salt phase have been investigated using first-principles calculations with both LDA and LDA + U functional. Features such as lattice constant, bulk modulus, elastic constants, spin-polarized band structure, total and local densities of states have been computed. We predict the values of the exchange constants and the band edge spin splitting of the valence and conduction bands. The hybridization between S-3p and Mn-3d produces small local magnetic moment on the nonmagnetic Ca and S sites. The ferromagnetism is induced due to the exchange splitting of S-3p and Mn-3d hybridized bands. The total magnetic moment per Mn of Mn x Ca 1−x S is 4.4μ B and 4.5μ B for LDA and LDA + U functional and is independent of the Mn concentration. The unfilled Mn-3d levels reduce the local magnetic moment of Mn from its free space charge value of 5μ B –4.4μ B and4.5μ B for LDA and LDA + U functional due to 3p–3d hybridization. - Highlights: • Fundamental properties of magnetic semiconductors Mn x Ca 1−x S. • Rock-salt phase of Mn x Ca 1−x S. • Magnetic properties of the diluted magnetic semiconductors Mn x Ca 1−x S. • The use of LDA + U functionals

  8. Spin-polarized investigation of ferromagnetism on magnetic semiconductors Mn{sub x}Ca{sub 1−x}S in the rock-salt phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choutri, H.; Ghebouli, M.A. [LMSE Laboratory, University of Bachir Ibrahimi, 34265 Bordj-Bou-Arréridj (Algeria); Ghebouli, B. [Laboratory of Surface and Interface Studies of Solid Materials, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Setif University 1, Setif 19000 (Algeria); Bouarissa, N., E-mail: n_bouarissa@yahoo.fr [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of M' sila, 28000 M' sila (Algeria); Uçgun, E.; Ocak, H.Y. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Dumlupinar University, Kutahya (Turkey)

    2014-12-15

    The structural, elastic, electronic and magnetic properties of the diluted magnetic semiconductors Mn{sub x}Ca{sub 1−x}S in the rock-salt phase have been investigated using first-principles calculations with both LDA and LDA + U functional. Features such as lattice constant, bulk modulus, elastic constants, spin-polarized band structure, total and local densities of states have been computed. We predict the values of the exchange constants and the band edge spin splitting of the valence and conduction bands. The hybridization between S-3p and Mn-3d produces small local magnetic moment on the nonmagnetic Ca and S sites. The ferromagnetism is induced due to the exchange splitting of S-3p and Mn-3d hybridized bands. The total magnetic moment per Mn of Mn{sub x}Ca{sub 1−x}S is 4.4μ{sub B} and 4.5μ{sub B} for LDA and LDA + U functional and is independent of the Mn concentration. The unfilled Mn-3d levels reduce the local magnetic moment of Mn from its free space charge value of 5μ{sub B}–4.4μ{sub B} and4.5μ{sub B} for LDA and LDA + U functional due to 3p–3d hybridization. - Highlights: • Fundamental properties of magnetic semiconductors Mn{sub x}Ca{sub 1−x}S. • Rock-salt phase of Mn{sub x}Ca{sub 1−x}S. • Magnetic properties of the diluted magnetic semiconductors Mn{sub x}Ca{sub 1−x}S. • The use of LDA + U functionals.

  9. Magnetic mineralogy and rock magnetic properties of silicate and carbonatite rocks from Oldoinyo Lengai volcano (Tanzania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, H. B.; Balashova, A.; Almqvist, B. S. G.; Bosshard-Stadlin, S. A.; Weidendorfer, D.

    2018-06-01

    Oldoinyo Lengai, a stratovolcano in northern Tanzania, is most famous for being the only currently active carbonatite volcano on Earth. The bulk of the volcanic edifice is dominated by eruptive products produced by silica-undersaturated, peralkaline, silicate magmas (effusive, explosive and/or as cumulates at depth). The recent (2007-2008) explosive eruption produced the first ever recorded pyroclastic flows at this volcano and the accidental lithics incorporated into the pyroclastic flows represent a broad variety of different rock types, comprising both extrusive and intrusive varieties, in addition to various types of cumulates. This mix of different accidental lithics provides a unique insight into the inner workings of the world's only active carbonatite volcano. Here, we focus on the magnetic mineralogy and the rock magnetic properties of a wide selection of samples spanning the spectrum of Oldoinyo Lengai rock types compositionally, as well from a textural point of view. Here we show that the magnetic properties of most extrusive silicate rocks are dominated by magnetite-ulvöspinel solid solutions, and that pyrrhotite plays a larger role in the magnetic properties of the intrusive silicate rocks. The natrocarbonatitic lavas, for which the volcano is best known for, show distinctly different magnetic properties in comparison with the silicate rocks. This discrepancy may be explained by abundant alabandite crystals/blebs in the groundmass of the natrocarbonatitic lavas. A detailed combination of petrological/mineralogical studies with geophysical investigations is an absolute necessity in order to understand, and to better constrain, the overall architecture and inner workings of the subvolcanic plumbing system. The results presented here may also have implications for the quest in order to explain the genesis of the uniquely natrocarbonatitic magmas characteristic of Oldoinyo Lengai.

  10. Methods in rock magnetism and palaeomagnetism techniques and instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Collinson, D W

    1983-01-01

    During the last 30 years the study of the magnetic properties of rocks and minerals has substantially contributed to several fields of science. Perhaps the best known and most significant advances have resulted from the study of palaeomagnetism, which led to quantitative confirmation of continental drift and polar wandering through interpretation of the direction of remanent magnetism observed in rocks of different ages from different continents. Palaeomagnetism has also, through observations of reversals of magnetiz­ ation, ancient secular variation and ancient field intensities provided data relevant to the origin of the geomagnetic field, and other investigations have contributed significantly to large-scale and local geological studies, the dating of archaeological events and artefacts and more recently to lunar and meteoritic studies. Rock and mineral magnetism has proved to be an interesting study in its own right through the complex magnetic properties and interactions observed in the iron-titanium ox...

  11. Palaeomagnetism or Palaeomagic? Misconceptions about Rock Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The study and understanding of paleomagnetism has been pivotal in the development of the theory of plate tectonics. When it is taught in schools there are a number possible misconceptions that need to be addressed. This article attempts to provide an explanation of rock magnetism as well as strategies to avoid reinforcing some commonly identified…

  12. Geostatistical investigations of rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matar, J.A.; Sarquis, M.A.; Girardi, J.P.; Tabbia, G.H.

    1987-01-01

    The geostatistical tehniques applied for the selection of a minimun fracturation volume in Sierra del Medio allow to quantify and qualify the variability of mechanic characteristics and density of fracture and also the level of reliability in estimations. The role of geostatistics is discussed in this work so as to select minimun fracturation blocks as a very important site selection step. The only variable used is the 'jointing density' so as to detect the principal fracture systems affecting the rocky massif. It was used on the semivariograms corresponding to the previously mentioned regionalized variables. The different results of fracturation are compared with the deep and shallow geological survey to obtain two and three dimensional models. The range of the geostatistical techniques to detect local geological phenomena such as faults is discussed. The variability model obtained from the borehole data computations is investigated taking as basis the vertical Columnar Model of Discontinuity (fractures) hypothesis derived from geological studies about spatial behaviour of the joint systems and from geostatistical interpretation. (Author) [es

  13. Investigation of the porosity of rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellmuth, K.H.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.

    1990-06-01

    Methods for characterizing the nature of rock porosity in conjunction with diffusion experiments, are amongst the primary tools used in repository-site selection investigations. At this time no experimental method, alone, is capable of giving an unambiguous picture of the narrow-aperture pore space in crystalline rock. Methods giving information on overall properties must be complemented by those having high spatial resolution; then the lateral distribution of porosity within the matrix and its association with particular mineral phases or features, such as microfissures, fissure fillings, weathered or altered mineral phases etc, and the identification of diffusion pathways in inhomogeneous rock matrices can be determined. Nonsorbing, nonelectrolytic tracers should be used when one wants to determine rock-typical properties of the internal porosity without interference of interactions with surfaces. Preliminary information on a new method fulfilling these criteria is given. Impregnating rock samples with methylmethacrylate labeled with carbon-14 which, after impregnation, was polymerized by gamma radiation, gave specimens that made preparation of sections suitable for quantification by autoradiographic methods easy. Diffusion experiments can be conducted so that labeled MMA diffuses out of rock specimens into inactive free, MMA. Additional information may be gained by leaching PMMA fractions of lower molecular weight from the matrix

  14. Theoretical study of rock mass investigation efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmen, Johan G.; Outters, Nils

    2002-05-01

    The study concerns a mathematical modelling of a fractured rock mass and its investigations by use of theoretical boreholes and rock surfaces, with the purpose of analysing the efficiency (precision) of such investigations and determine the amount of investigations necessary to obtain reliable estimations of the structural-geological parameters of the studied rock mass. The study is not about estimating suitable sample sizes to be used in site investigations.The purpose of the study is to analyse the amount of information necessary for deriving estimates of the geological parameters studied, within defined confidence intervals and confidence level In other words, how the confidence in models of the rock mass (considering a selected number of parameters) will change with amount of information collected form boreholes and surfaces. The study is limited to a selected number of geometrical structural-geological parameters: Fracture orientation: mean direction and dispersion (Fisher Kappa and SRI). Different measures of fracture density (P10, P21 and P32). Fracture trace-length and strike distributions as seen on horizontal windows. A numerical Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) was used for representation of a fractured rock mass. The DFN-model was primarily based on the properties of an actual fracture network investigated at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The rock mass studied (DFN-model) contained three different fracture sets with different orientations and fracture densities. The rock unit studied was statistically homogeneous. The study includes a limited sensitivity analysis of the properties of the DFN-model. The study is a theoretical and computer-based comparison between samples of fracture properties of a theoretical rock unit and the known true properties of the same unit. The samples are derived from numerically generated boreholes and surfaces that intersect the DFN-network. Two different boreholes are analysed; a vertical borehole and a borehole that is

  15. Investigation of ULF magnetic pulsations, air conductivity changes, and infra red signatures associated with the 30 October Alum Rock M5.4 earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bleier

    2009-04-01

    ionization reported to be associated with radon emission from the ground (Ouzounov, 2007, and a series of laboratory rock stressing experiments (Freund, 2006, 2007a, b, c to determine if field data was consistent either of these accounts. We could not find a data set with pre-earthquake radon measurements taken near the Alum Rock epicenter to compare against our field data. However, based on the Alum Rock data set example and another data set at Parkfield, the field tests are at least consistent with the lab experiments showing currents, magnetic field disturbances, air conductivity changes, and IR signatures. This is encouraging, but more instrumented earthquake examples are needed to prove a repeating pattern for these types of pre-earthquake EM signatures.

  16. Paleomagnetism and magnetic fabric of the Triassic rocks from Spitsbergen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzisz, K.; Szaniawski, R.; Michalski, K.; Manby, G.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the origin and directions of the natural remanent magnetization and the tectonic deformation pattern reflected in magnetic fabric is of importance for investigation of the West Spitsbergen Fold and Thrust Belt (WSFTB) and its foreland. Previous research carried out on Triassic rocks from the study area concluded that these rocks record a composite magnetization of both, normal and reverse polarity, consisting of a primary Triassic remanence that is overlapped by a secondary post-folding component. Standard paleomagnetic procedures were conducted in order to determine the remanence components and a low-field AMS was applied to assess the degree and pattern of deformation. The AMS results from the WSFTB reveal a magnetic foliation that parallels the bedding planes and a dominantly NNW-SSE oriented magnetic lineation that is sub-parallel to the regional fold axial trend. These results imply a low to moderate degree of deformation and a maximum strain orientation parallel to that of the fold belt. These data are consistent with an orthogonal convergence model for the WSFTB formation. In turn, the magnetic fabric on the undeformed foreland displays a distinct NNE-SSW orientation that we attribute to the paleocurrent direction. Rock-magnetic analyses reveal that the dominant ferrimagnetic carriers are magnetite and titanomagnetite. The Triassic rocks are characterised by complicated NRM patterns often with overlapping unblocking temperature spectra of particular components. The dominant magnetisation is characterised, however, by a steep inclination of 70-80º. The derived paleomagnetic direction from the WSFTB falls on the Jurassic - recent sector of the apparent polar wander path (APWP) of Baltica after tectonic unfolding. These data imply that at least some of the identified secondary components could have originated before the Eurekan folding event (K/Pg), for example, in Early Cretaceous time which corresponds to the period of rifting events on Barents

  17. The Juno Magnetic Field Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Benn, Mathias; Bjarnø, Jonas Bækby

    2017-01-01

    The Juno Magnetic Field investigation (MAG) characterizes Jupiter’s planetary magnetic field and magnetosphere, providing the first globally distributed and proximate measurements of the magnetic field of Jupiter. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent magnetometer sensor ...

  18. Magnetic coupling at perovskite and rock-salt structured interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matvejeff, M., E-mail: mikko.matvejeff@picosun.com [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, 277-8581 Chiba (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Aalto University, Kemistintie 1, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Ahvenniemi, E. [Department of Chemistry, Aalto University, Kemistintie 1, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Takahashi, R.; Lippmaa, M. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, 277-8581 Chiba (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    We study magnetic coupling between hole-doped manganite layers separated by either a perovskite or a rock-salt barrier of variable thickness. Both the type and the quality of the interface have a strong impact on the minimum critical barrier thickness where the manganite layers become magnetically decoupled. A rock-salt barrier layer only 1 unit cell (0.5 nm) thick remains insulating and is able to magnetically de-couple the electrode layers. The technique can therefore be used for developing high-performance planar oxide electronic devices such as magnetic tunnel junctions and quantum well structures that depend on magnetically and electronically sharp heterointerfaces.

  19. Experimental investigation of incipient shear failure in foliated rock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikari, Matt J.; Niemeijer, André R.; Marone, Chris

    It has long been known that rock fabric plays a key role in dictating rock strength and rheology throughout Earth's crust; however the processes and conditions under which rock fabric impacts brittle failure and frictional strength are still under investigation. Here, we report on laboratory

  20. Rock-Magnetic Method for Post Nuclear Detonation Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, J.; Petrosky, J.; Bailey, W.; Watts, D. R.; Tauxe, L.; Heger, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    A magnetic signature characteristic of a Nuclear Electromagnetic Pulse (NEMP) may still be detectable near the sites of atmospheric nuclear tests conducted at what is now the Nevada National Security Site. This signature is due to a secondary magnetization component of the natural remanent magnetization of material containing traces of ferromagnetic particles that have been exposed to a strong pulse of magnetic field. We apply a rock-magnetic method introduced by Verrier et al. (2002), and tested on samples exposed to artificial lightning, to samples of rock and building materials (e.g. bricks, concrete) retrieved from several above ground nuclear test sites. The results of magnetization measurements are compared to NEMP simulations and historic test measurements.

  1. Preliminary rock mechanics laboratory: Investigation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oschman, K.P.; Hummeldorf, R.G.; Hume, H.R.; Karakouzian, M.; Vakili, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    This document presents the rationale for rock mechanics laboratory testing (including the supporting analysis and numerical modeling) planned for the site characterization of a nuclear waste repository in salt. This plan first identifies what information is required for regulatory and design purposes, and then presents the rationale for the testing that satisfies the required information needs. A preliminary estimate of the minimum sampling requirements for rock laboratory testing during site characterization is also presented. Periodic revision of this document is planned

  2. Comparison of Magnetic and Moessbauer Results Obtained for Palaeozoic Rocks of Hornsund, Southern Spitsbergen, Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szlachta, K.; Galazka-Friedman, J.; Michalski, K.; Brzozka, K.; Gorka, B.

    2008-01-01

    This analysis was performed as a part of the palaeomagnetic project focused on the reconstruction of the palaeogeographic position of the Svalbard Archipelago and adjacent crustal units (European Arctic) in the Palaeozoic and Mesozoic. Three rock formations | Cambrian, Devonian and Carboniferous were sampled in the area of Hornsund, southern Spitsbergen. The main aim of the presented study is to identify ferromagnetic minerals (sensu lato) - the carriers of the natural remanent magnetisation in the investigated rocks. A wide range of magnetic methods were used: the Lowrie tests, unblocking temperatures determinations and the measurement of coercivity spectra as well as the Moessbauer studies. In Devonian and Carboniferous samples all applied methods indicate the domination of the hematite natural remanent magnetisation carrier. In Cambrian rocks magnetic measurements reveal a mixture of ferromagnetic (sensu lato) minerals with varying coercivities and unblocking temperatures. The Moessbauer data improve the identification, suggesting that in Cambrian rocks the carrier of the dominating natural remanent magnetisation component is maghemite. (authors)

  3. Engineering rock mass classification of the Olkiluoto investigation site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeikaes, K. [ed.; Hagros, A.; Johansson, E. [Saanio and Riekkola Consulting Engineers, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    2000-06-01

    Olkiluoto in Eurajoki is being investigated as a possible site for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel from the Finnish nuclear power plants. The selection of the depth, placement and layout of the repository is affected by the constructability of the bedrock. The constructability, in turn, is influenced by several properties of the host rock, such as its Ethology, the extent of fracturing, its hydrogeological properties and rock engineering characteristics and also by the magnitude and orientation of the in situ stresses and the chemistry of the groundwater. The constructability can be evaluated by the application of a rock classification system in which the properties of the host rock are assessed against common rock engineering judgements associated with underground construction. These judgements are based partly on measurements of in situ stresses and the properties of the bedrock determined from rock samples, but an important aspect is also the practical experience which has been gained during underground excavation in similar conditions and rock types. The aim of the engineering rock mass classification was to determine suitable bedrock volumes for the construction of the repository and has used data from the site characterisation programme carried out at Olkiluoto, which consisted of both surface studies and borehole investigations. The classification specifies three categories of constructability - normal, demanding and very demanding. In addition, rock mass quality has also been classified according to the empirical Q-system to enable a comparison to be made. The rock mass parameters that determine the constructability of the bedrock at Olkiluoto depend primarily on the depth and the Ethology, as well as on whether construction takes place in intact or in fractured rock. The differences in the characteristics of intact rock within a single rock type have been shown to be small. The major lithological unit at Olkiluoto, the mica gneiss, lies in the

  4. The paleomagnetic field and possible mechanisms for the formation of reversed rock magnetization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trukhin, Vladimir I.; Bezaeva, Natalia; Kurochkina, Evgeniya

    2006-01-01

    Investigations of ancient magnetized rocks show that their natural remanent magnetization (NRM) can be oriented in the direction of modern geomagnetic field (GMF) as well as in the opposite direction. It is supposed that reversed NRM is related to reversals of the GMF in the past geological periods. During reversals, the strength of the GMF is near zero and can cause the destruction of living organisms as a result of powerful space and solar radiation, which, in the absence of the GMF, can reach the Earth's surface. That is why the question of reality of the GMF reversals is of global ecological importance. There is also another natural mechanism for the formation of reversed NRM-the self-reversal of magnetization as a result of thermomagnetization of rocks. In the paper, both natural processes for the formation of reversed NRM in rocks are discussed, and the results of experimental research on the physical mechanism of self-reversal of magnetization in continental and oceanic rocks are presented. The results of computer modeling of the self-reversal phenomenon are also presented

  5. The paleomagnetic field and possible mechanisms for the formation of reversed rock magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trukhin, Vladimir I. [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: trukhin@phys.msu.ru; Bezaeva, Natalia [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kurochkina, Evgeniya [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-05-15

    Investigations of ancient magnetized rocks show that their natural remanent magnetization (NRM) can be oriented in the direction of modern geomagnetic field (GMF) as well as in the opposite direction. It is supposed that reversed NRM is related to reversals of the GMF in the past geological periods. During reversals, the strength of the GMF is near zero and can cause the destruction of living organisms as a result of powerful space and solar radiation, which, in the absence of the GMF, can reach the Earth's surface. That is why the question of reality of the GMF reversals is of global ecological importance. There is also another natural mechanism for the formation of reversed NRM-the self-reversal of magnetization as a result of thermomagnetization of rocks. In the paper, both natural processes for the formation of reversed NRM in rocks are discussed, and the results of experimental research on the physical mechanism of self-reversal of magnetization in continental and oceanic rocks are presented. The results of computer modeling of the self-reversal phenomenon are also presented.

  6. Preliminary Geophysical Investigations of the Ship Rock Diatreme, Navajo Nation, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, E. M.; McCarthy, L.; Namingha, G.; Bank, C.; Noblett, J.; Semken, S.

    2003-12-01

    Magnetic and gravity data were collected at the Ship Rock minette neck and dikes, part of the Navajo volcanic field in the central Colorado Plateau, to investigate their subsurface structure. The deep root system of Ship Rock, an exhumed Oligocene maar-diatreme complex, has not been resolved. The diatreme is largely composed of minette tuff-breccia with a large wallrock fraction, whereas the dikes are composed of hypabyssal minette. The country rock is the Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale. Density and magnetic contrasts between the igneous rock and surrounding shale suggest that the buried structure of Ship Rock can be imaged. Preliminary geophysical investigations were carried out in order to test this hypothesis. We collected magnetic and gravitational data along four lines selected to transect the major south and northeast dikes and to partly encircle the diatreme. Modeling differently sized, oriented and shaped intrusions, we created theoretical Free Air anomaly curves to try to match the two clearest anomalies. Modeling necessitates (i) that the major north-south dike dips west and (ii) the presence of a high-density, deep body near the diatreme. The Free Air anomaly curves show that smaller dikes might not be detected from gravity data; however, they are necessary to determine the presence of large, dense bodies. Although not modeled, the magnetics curves show that smaller dikes can easily be detected. Our study results are promising, and we plan a more thorough investigation in the future which will produce a magnetic map to determine if further buried dikes exist in the vicinity, and measure gravity along additional profiles to better constrain the location of the dense body at depth.

  7. Site investigations: Strategy for rock mechanics site descriptive model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Johan; Christiansson, Rolf; Hudson, John

    2002-05-01

    As a part of the planning work for the Site Investigations, SKB has developed a Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Modelling Strategy. Similar strategies are being developed for other disciplines. The objective of the strategy is that it should guide the practical implementation of evaluating site specific data during the Site Investigations. It is also understood that further development may be needed. This methodology enables the crystalline rock mass to be characterised in terms of the quality at different sites, for considering rock engineering constructability, and for providing the input to numerical models and performance assessment calculations. The model describes the initial stresses and the distribution of deformation and strength properties of the intact rock, of fractures and fracture zones, and of the rock mass. The rock mass mechanical properties are estimated by empirical relations and by numerical simulations. The methodology is based on estimation of mechanical properties using both empirical and heroretical/numerical approaches; and estimation of in situ rock stress using judgement and numerical modelling, including the influence of fracture zones. These approaches are initially used separately, and then combined to produce the required characterisation estimates. The methodology was evaluated with a Test Case at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The quality control aspects are an important feature of the methodology: these include Protocols to ensure the structure and coherence of the procedures used, regular meetings to enhance communication, feedback from internal and external reviewing, plus the recording of an audit trail of the development steps and decisions made. The strategy will be reviewed and, if required, updated as appropriate

  8. Site investigations: Strategy for rock mechanics site descriptive model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden); Christiansson, Rolf [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Hudson, John [Rock Engineering Consultants, Welwyn Garden City (United Kingdom)

    2002-05-01

    As a part of the planning work for the Site Investigations, SKB has developed a Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Modelling Strategy. Similar strategies are being developed for other disciplines. The objective of the strategy is that it should guide the practical implementation of evaluating site specific data during the Site Investigations. It is also understood that further development may be needed. This methodology enables the crystalline rock mass to be characterised in terms of the quality at different sites, for considering rock engineering constructability, and for providing the input to numerical models and performance assessment calculations. The model describes the initial stresses and the distribution of deformation and strength properties of the intact rock, of fractures and fracture zones, and of the rock mass. The rock mass mechanical properties are estimated by empirical relations and by numerical simulations. The methodology is based on estimation of mechanical properties using both empirical and heroretical/numerical approaches; and estimation of in situ rock stress using judgement and numerical modelling, including the influence of fracture zones. These approaches are initially used separately, and then combined to produce the required characterisation estimates. The methodology was evaluated with a Test Case at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The quality control aspects are an important feature of the methodology: these include Protocols to ensure the structure and coherence of the procedures used, regular meetings to enhance communication, feedback from internal and external reviewing, plus the recording of an audit trail of the development steps and decisions made. The strategy will be reviewed and, if required, updated as appropriate.

  9. Magnetic minerals in Pliocene and Pleistocene marine marls from Southern Italy : rock magnetic properties and alteration during thermal demagnetization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Velzen, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    The rock magnetic properties of two different Pliocene to Pleistocene marine marls from southern Italy are studied. Different conditions during sedimentation have led to two completely different magnetic mineralogies in these marls. Chapters 2, 3 and 4 examine the rock magnetic properties of the

  10. Specific investigations related to salt rock behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vons, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper results are given of work in various countries in rather unrelated areas of research. Nevertheless, since the studies have been undertaken to better understand salt behaviour, both from mechanical and chemical points of view, some connection between the studies can be found. In the French contribution the geological conditions have been investigated that might promote or prevent the formation of salt domes from layers in view of possible use of the latter type of formation. This was done theoretically by the finite element method, and a start was made with centrifuge tests. The density of a number of samples from salt and overburden from the Bresse basin was measured and it was shown that a favourable condition exists in this region for waste disposal. In the German contribution various subjects are touched upon, one being the effect of water on the mobility in the early stages of salt dome formation. Evidence was found for an anisotropy in salt. One Dutch contribution describes results of studies on the effect of small amounts of water on the rheology of salt. The results imply that flow laws obtained for salt at rapid strain rates and/or low confining pressure cannot be reliably extrapolated to predict the long term behaviour of wet or even very dry material under natural conditions. Preliminary results on the effect of water upon ion-mobility indicate a certain pseudo-absorptive capacity of salt e.g. for Sr

  11. Laboratory investigations into fracture propagation characteristics of rock material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, B. N. V. Siva; Murthy, V. M. S. R.

    2018-04-01

    After Industrial Revolution, demand of materials for building up structures have increased enormously. Unfortunately, failures of such structures resulted in loss of life and property. Rock is anisotropic and discontinuous in nature with inherent flaws or so-called discontinuities in it. Rock is apparently used for construction in mining, civil, tunnelling, hydropower, geothermal and nuclear sectors [1]. Therefore, the strength of the structure built up considering rockmass as the construction material needs proper technical evaluation during designing stage itself to prevent and predict the scenarios of catastrophic failures due to these inherent fractures [2]. In this study, samples collected from nine different drilling sites have been investigated in laboratory for understanding the fracture propagation characteristics in rock. Rock material properties, ultrasonic velocities through pulse transmission technique and Mode I Fracture Toughness Testing of different variants of Dolomites and Graywackes are determined in laboratory and the resistance of the rock material to catastrophic crack extension or propagation has been determined. Based on the Fracture Toughness values and the rock properties, critical Energy Release Rates have been estimated. However further studies in this direction is to be carried out to understand the fracture propagation characteristics in three-dimensional space.

  12. Precise measurement of remanent magnetism of rocks under non-magnetic fields; Mujikaika deno ganseki zanryu jiki no seimitsu sokutei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Y; Nakatsuka, K [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    Various magnetic information data from solidification or deposition up to date are contained in rocks. For the analysis of remanent magnetism, in general, the stable thermal remanent magnetization and the secondary magnetization are separately evaluated using vector variations determined by the location changes of magnetic pole from ac demagnetization or thermal demagnetization. Especially, in geothermal fields, the remanent magnetism in rocks is complicated due to the predominant alteration. When the remanent magnetism of rocks can be precisely measured and the primary and secondary magnetization can be evaluated, important data can be obtained, which represent oriented core samples required for evaluating the geothermal reservoirs. A rock remanent magnetism measuring system using superconductive magnetic shield has been developed, to evaluate the location of magnetic pole. This system can distinguish the remanent magnetization in rocks, and can be applied to the remanent magnetism in rocks in which the location of dipole model is shifted from the center of core. Important basic data of orientation information in rocks can be provided. 6 figs.

  13. The Juno Magnetic Field Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Benn, M.; Bjarno, J. B.; Denver, T.; Espley, J.; Jorgensen, J. L.; Jorgensen, P. S.; Lawton, P.; Malinnikova, A.; Merayo, J. M.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Schnurr, R.; Sheppard, D.; Smith, E. J.

    2017-11-01

    The Juno Magnetic Field investigation (MAG) characterizes Jupiter's planetary magnetic field and magnetosphere, providing the first globally distributed and proximate measurements of the magnetic field of Jupiter. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent magnetometer sensor suites, each consisting of a tri-axial Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM) sensor and a pair of co-located imaging sensors mounted on an ultra-stable optical bench. The imaging system sensors are part of a subsystem that provides accurate attitude information (to ˜20 arcsec on a spinning spacecraft) near the point of measurement of the magnetic field. The two sensor suites are accommodated at 10 and 12 m from the body of the spacecraft on a 4 m long magnetometer boom affixed to the outer end of one of 's three solar array assemblies. The magnetometer sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics boards within the magnetometer electronics package mounted inside Juno's massive radiation shielded vault. The imaging sensors are controlled by a fully hardware redundant electronics package also mounted within the radiation vault. Each magnetometer sensor measures the vector magnetic field with 100 ppm absolute vector accuracy over a wide dynamic range (to 16 Gauss = 1.6 × 106 nT per axis) with a resolution of ˜0.05 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range (±1600 nT per axis). Both magnetometers sample the magnetic field simultaneously at an intrinsic sample rate of 64 vector samples per second. The magnetic field instrumentation may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. The attitude determination system compares images with an on-board star catalog to provide attitude solutions (quaternions) at a rate of up to 4 solutions per second, and may be configured to acquire images of selected targets for science and engineering analysis. The system tracks and catalogs objects that pass through the imager field of

  14. Determining the Accuracy of Paleomagnetic Remanence and High-Resolution Chronostratigraphy for Sedimentary Rocks using Rock Magnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, K. P.

    2017-12-01

    The talk will consider two broad topics in rock magnetism and paleomagnetism: the accuracy of paleomagnetic remanence and the use of rock magnetics to measure geologic time in sedimentary sequences. The accuracy of the inclination recorded by sedimentary rocks is crucial to paleogeographic reconstructions. Laboratory compaction experiments show that inclination shallows on the order of 10˚-15˚. Corrections to the inclination can be made using the effects of compaction on the directional distribution of secular variation recorded by sediments or the anisotropy of the magnetic grains carrying the ancient remanence. A summary of all the compaction correction studies as of 2012 shows that 85% of sedimentary rocks studied have enjoyed some amount of inclination shallowing. Future work should also consider the effect of grain-scale strain on paleomagnetic remanence. High resolution chronostratigraphy can be assigned to a sedimentary sequence using rock magnetics to detect astronomically-forced climate cycles. The power of the technique is relatively quick, non-destructive measurements, the objective identification of the cycles compared to facies interpretations, and the sensitivity of rock magnetics to subtle changes in sedimentary source. An example of this technique comes from using rock magnetics to identify astronomically-forced climate cycles in three globally distributed occurrences of the Shuram carbon isotope excursion. The Shuram excursion may record the oxidation of the world ocean in the Ediacaran, just before the Cambrian explosion of metazoans. Using rock magnetic cyclostratigraphy, the excursion is shown to have the same duration (8-9 Myr) in southern California, south China and south Australia. Magnetostratigraphy of the rocks carrying the excursion in California and Australia shows a reversed to normal geomagnetic field polarity transition at the excursion's nadir, thus supporting the synchroneity of the excursion globally. Both results point to a

  15. Time-scale invariances in preseismic electromagnetic radiation, magnetization and damage evolution of rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kawada

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the time-scale invariant changes in electromagnetic and mechanical energy releases prior to a rock failure or a large earthquake. The energy release processes are caused by damage evolutions such as crack propagation, motion of charged dislocation, area-enlargement of sheared asperities and repetitive creep-rate changes. Damage mechanics can be used to represent the time-scale invariant evolutions of both brittle and plastic damages. Irreversible thermodynamics applied to the damage mechanics reveals that the damage evolution produces the variations in charge, dipole and electromagnetic signals in addition to mechanical energy release, and yields the time-scale invariant patterns of Benioff electromagnetic radiation and cumulative Benioff strain-release. The irreversible thermodynamic framework of damage mechanics is also applicable to the seismo-magnetic effect, and the time-scale invariance is recognized in the remanent magnetization change associated with damage evolution prior to a rock failure.

  16. Identification of igneous rocks in a superimposed basin through integrated interpretation dominantly based on magnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, S.

    2017-12-01

    Identification of igneous rocks in the basin environment is of great significance to the exploration for hydrocarbon reservoirs hosted in igneous rocks. Magnetic methods are often used to alleviate the difficulties faced by seismic imaging in basins with thick cover and complicated superimposed structures. We present a case study on identification of igneous rocks in a superimposed basin through integrated interpretation based on magnetic and other geophysical data sets. The study area is located in the deepest depression with sedimentary cover of 14,000 m in Huanghua basin, which is a Cenozoic basin superimposed on a residual pre-Cenozoic basin above the North China craton. Cenozoic and Mesozoic igneous rocks that are dominantly intermediate-basic volcanic and intrusive rocks are widespread at depth in the basin. Drilling and seismic data reveal some volcanic units and intrusive rocks in Cenozoic stratum at depths of about 4,000 m. The question remains to identify the lateral extent of igneous rocks in large depth and adjacent areas. In order to tackle the difficulties for interpretation of magnetic data arisen from weak magnetic anomaly and remanent magnetization of igneous rocks buried deep in the superimposed basin, we use the preferential continuation approach to extract the anomaly and magnetic amplitude inversion to image the 3D magnetic units. The resultant distribution of effective susceptibility not only correlates well with the locations of Cenozoic igneous rocks known previously through drilling and seismic imaging, but also identifies the larger scale distribution of Mesozoic igneous rocks at greater depth in the west of the basin. The integrated interpretation results dominantly based on magnetic data shows that the above strategy is effective for identification of igneous rocks deep buried in the superimposed basin. Keywords: Identification of igneous rocks; Superimposed basin; Magnetic data

  17. Disintegration of rocks based on magnetically isolated high voltage discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mengbing; Jiang, Jinbo; Huang, Guoliang; Liu, Jun; Li, Chengzu

    2013-02-01

    Recently, a method utilizing pulsed power technology for disintegration of rocks arouses great interest of many researchers. In this paper, an improved method based on magnetic switch and the results shown that the uniform dielectrics like plastic can be broken down in water is presented, and the feasible mechanism explaining the breakdown of solid is proposed and proved experimentally. A high voltage pulse of 120 kV, rise time 0.2 μs was used to ignite the discharging channel in solids. When the plasma channel is formed in the solid, the resistance of the channel is quiet small; even if a relatively low voltage is applied on the channel on this occasion, it will produce high current to heat the plasma channel rapidly, and eventually disintegrate the solids. The feasibility of promising industrial application in the drilling and demolition of natural and artificial solid materials by the method we presented is verified by the experiment result in the paper.

  18. Rock Magnetic Properties of Remagnetised Devonian and Carboniferous Carbonate and Clastic Rocks From The NE Rhenish Massif, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwing, A.; Matzka, J.; Bachtadse, V.; Soffel, H. C.

    Previous studies on remagnetised carbonate rocks from the North American and Eu- ropean Variscides reported characteristic rock magnetic properties which are thought to be diagnostic for a chemical remagnetisation event. Their hysteresis properties with high ratios of Mrs/Ms and Hcr/Hc indicate the presence of a mixture of single-domain and superparamagnetic magnetite (Jackson, et al. 1990). In order to test if this fin- gerprint can be identified in remagnetised carbonate and clastic rocks from the NE Rhenish Massif, Germany, a series of rock magnetic experiments has been carried out. The hysteresis properties of the remagnetised clastic rocks indicate the domi- nance of large MD particles, as can be expected for detrital sediments. The carbon- ates yield significantly higher ratios of Mrs/Ms and Hcr/Hc than the clastic rocks, but only partly correspond to the characteristic properties of remagnetised carbon- ates described above. The latter might be attributed to detrital input into the carbonate platforms. Additional low-temperature remanence measurements show a wide vari- ety of phenomena, including Verwey transitions and indications for the presence of superparamagnetic grains. However, the low-temperature experiments do not allow a straightforward discrimination between the clastic and carbonate rocks and suggest more complex magnetomineralogies than expected from the hysteresis measurements alone.

  19. Preliminary paleomagnetic and rock magnetic results from 17 to 22 ka sediment of Jeju Island, Korea: Geomagnetic excursional behavior or rock magnetic anomalies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyeon-Seon; Sohn, Young Kwan; Lee, Jin-Young; Kim, Jin Cheul

    2018-05-01

    Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic investigations were performed on a 64-cm-thick section of nonmarine unconsolidated muddy sediment from the Gosan Formation on Jeju Island, Korea. This sediment was recently dated to have been deposited between 22 and 17 kyr BP calibrated, with a sedimentation rate of 13-25 cm/kyr, based on many radiocarbon ages. Interestingly, stepwise alternating field (AF) demagnetization revealed characteristic natural remanent magnetizations with anomalous directions, manifested by marked deviations from the direction of today's axial dipole field, for some separate depth levels. On the other hand, stepwise thermal (TH) demagnetization showed more complex behavior, resulting in the identification of multiple remanence components. For all TH-treated specimens, consistently two different components are predominant: a low-temperature component unblocked below 240-320 °C entirely having normal-polarity apparently within the secular variation range of the Brunhes Chron, and a high-temperature component with unblocking temperatures (Tubs) between 240-320 and 520-580 °C that have anomalous directions, concentrated in the 13-34-cm-depth interval ( 17-19 ka in inferred age) and possibly below 53 cm depth (before 20 ka). Rock magnetic results also infer the dominance of low-coercivity magnetic particles having 300 and 580 °C Curie temperature as remanence carriers, suggestive of (titano)maghemite and/or Ti-rich titanomagnetite and magnetite (or Ti-poor titanomagnetite), respectively. A noteworthy finding is that AF demagnetizations in this study often lead to incomplete separation of the two remanence components possibly due to their strongly overlapping AF spectra. The unusual directions do not appear to result from self-reversal remanences. Then, one interpretation is that the low-temperature components are attributable to post-depositional chemical remanences, associated possibly with the later formation of the mineral phase having Tub 300

  20. Assessment of Rock Magnetic Parameters for Fly Ash Pollution Screening in Topsoil of the Deccan Trap Basalt Area, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, U.; Basavaiah, N.; Das, P. K.; Deenadayalan, K.

    2012-04-01

    Rock magnetic parameters of highly magnetic topsoil of the Deccan Trap basalt area are evaluated for their suitability for efficient environmental magnetic pollution screening. Parameters, such as magnetic susceptibility (χ), frequency dependence of magnetic susceptibility (κ fd%), anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM), saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM), soft isothermal remanent magnetization (Soft IRM), as well as thermo-magnetic analysis (κ-T) are compared and assessed for best depiction of topsoil contamination due to ash deposition around the Nashik thermal power station (NTPS). Fifty-five topsoil samples, collected along north-south and west-east stretching transects of 24 km length, are the basis for evaluation of the specific ash distribution pattern around the plant and its adjacent ash pond. Similar decline of the magnetic signals with increasing distance from the point source is observed in the concentration dependent magnetic parameters and can be modeled. The magnetic grain size parameters instead reveal increasing trends with increasing distance. Verwey-transition and Hopkinson peak obtained from κ-T analyses demonstrate to be important parameters to prove fly ash accumulation in soils of basaltic origin. The importance of magnetic parameters for indirect tracing of pollutants, such as heavy metals, is shown by Pb, Zn and Cu data, revealing similar distribution pattern as obtained from the concentration dependent magnetic parameters. Confirmation of the presence of a very high amount of ash particles in the vicinity of the NTPS and a low number of particles in more distant areas is provided by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on quantitatively extracted magnetic particles at 5.5 km and 11.9 km distance in eastern direction. The investigation demonstrates that the majority of the rock magnetic parameters has the potential to be successfully applied in environmental magnetic studies in areas with high magnetic background

  1. Rock sealing - large scale field test and accessory investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1988-03-01

    The experience from the pilot field test and the basic knowledge extracted from the lab experiments have formed the basis of the planning of a Large Scale Field Test. The intention is to find out how the 'instrument of rock sealing' can be applied to a number of practical cases, where cutting-off and redirection of groundwater flow in repositories are called for. Five field subtests, which are integrated mutually or with other Stripa projects (3D), are proposed. One of them concerns 'near-field' sealing, i.e. sealing of tunnel floors hosting deposition holes, while two involve sealing of 'disturbed' rock around tunnels. The fourth concerns sealing of a natural fracture zone in the 3D area, and this latter test has the expected spin-off effect of obtaining additional information on the general flow pattern around the northeastern wing of the 3D cross. The fifth test is an option of sealing structures in the Validation Drift. The longevity of major grout types is focussed on as the most important part of the 'Accessory Investigations', and detailed plans have been worked out for that purpose. It is foreseen that the continuation of the project, as outlined in this report, will yield suitable methods and grouts for effective and long-lasting sealing of rock for use at stategic points in repositories. (author)

  2. Search for Magnetic Monopoles in Polar Volcanic Rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtz, K.; Milstead, D.; Hächler, H. -P.

    2013-01-01

    following the passage of igneous rock samples through a SQUID-based magnetometer. A total of 24.6 kg of rocks from various selected sites, among which 23.4 kg are mantle-derived rocks from the Arctic and Antarctic areas, was analyzed. No monopoles were found, and a 90% confidence level upper limit of 9.8 x...

  3. Online plot services for paleomagnetism and rock magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, T.

    2017-12-01

    In paleomagnetism and rock magnetism, a lot of types of original plots are used for obtained data from measurements. Many researchers in paleomagnetism often use not only general-purpose plotting programs such as Microsoft Excel but also single-purpose tools. A large benefit of using the latter tools is that we can make a beautiful figure for our own data. However, those programs require specific environment for their operation such as type of hardware and platform, type of operation system and its version, libraries for execution and so on. Therefore, it is difficult to share the result and graphics among the collaborators who use different environments on their PCs. Thus, one of the best solution is likely a program operated on popular environment. The most popular is web environment as we all know. Almost all current operating systems have web browsers as standard and all people use them regularly. Now we provide a web-based service plotting paleomagnetic results easily.We develop original programs with a command-line user interface (non-GUI), and we prepared web pages for input of the simple measured data and options and a wrapper script which transfers the entered values to the program. The results, analyzed values and plotted graphs from the program are shown in the HTML page and downloadable. Our plot services are provided in http://mage-p.org/mageplot/. In this talk, we introduce our program and service and discuss the philosophy and efficiency of these services.

  4. Preliminary Geochemical and Rock Magnetic Study of a Stalagmite From Quintana Roo, Northeastern Yucatan Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Perez-Cruz, L.; Zhao, X.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Rodriguez, A.

    2012-04-01

    We present the preliminary results of geochemical, stable isotopes and rock magnetic studies of a stalagmite from a cave in eastern Quintana Roo, northern Yucatan peninsula. In the past years, there has been increased interest in understanding the paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental evolution of the Yucatan peninsula and northern Central America, investigating the relationships between climate variations and the development of the Maya civilization. In particular, the variations in regional precipitation and occurrence of several drought periods, which might have been related to the collapse of the Classic Maya period. Stable isotope data on speleothems from different sites in Yucatan and Central America have provided evidence on changes in precipitation, which have affected the Maya region. The stalagmite is ~47 cm long and about 4-5 cm wide at its base. It was collected from the Hilariós Well cave in Tulum, Quintana Roo. Magnetic susceptibility and geochemical analyses have been completed as part of the initial characterization of the stalagmite, with measurements taken every centimeter. Geochemical analyses have been carried out for x-ray fluorescence, with a Niton XRF analyzer. Magnetic susceptibility was determined with a Bartington MS2 instrument using the high resolution surface probe. Additional rock magnetic analyses include magnetic hysteresis loops and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition, and saturation IRM demagnetization, which have been measured with a MicroMag instrument. Hysteresis loops are diamagnetic, with small varying low-coercivity ferromagnetic components. The elemental compositions of major oxides and trace elements vary with depth. Calcium is the major element and displays a pattern of small amplitude fluctuations with a trend to lower values at the bottom, which are also shown in other elements such as barium. Silica and elements such as titanium and strontium are positively correlated and show an apparent cyclic pattern

  5. An investigation of rock fall and pore water pressure using LIDAR in Highway 63 rock cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this research work is compare LIDAR scanning measurements of rock fall with the natural changes in groundwater level to determining the effect of water pressures (levels) on rock fall. To collect the information of rock cut volume chan...

  6. UV, visible, and near-IR reflectivity data for magnetic soils/rocks from Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vempati, R. K.; Morris, R. V.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Coey, J. M. D.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to obtain UV, visible, and near-IR reflectivity spectra for several magnetic Brazilian soils/rocks and compare them to corresponding data for Mars to see if these materials satisfy both magnetic and spectral constraints for Mars. Selected physical properties of the magnetic Brazilian soils/rocks are presented. In general, the spectral features resulting from ferric crystal-field transitions are much better defined in the spectra of the magnetic Brazilian soils/rocks than in Martian spectral data. Presumably, this results from a relatively higher proportion of crystalline ferric oxides for the former. The apparent masking of the spectral signature of maghemite by hematite or goethite for the Brazilian samples implies the magnetic and spectral constraints for Mars can be decoupled. That is, maghemite may be present in magnetically-significant but optically-insignificant amounts compared to crystalline hematite.

  7. Recent investigations on refrigerants for magnetic refrigerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, T.

    1986-01-01

    In development of the magnetic refrigerator, an important problem is selection of magnetic materials as refrigerants. The main purpose of the present paper is to discuss the magnetic and thermal properties necessary for these refrigerants and to report recent investigations. Magnetic refrigerants can be expediently divided into two groups, one for the Carnottype magnetic refrigerator below 20 K and the other for the Ericsson-type refrigerator. The required physical properties of refrigerants in each type of the magnetic refrigerator are first discussed. And then, the results of recent investigations on the magnetic, thermal and magnetocaloric characters of several promising magnetic refrigerants are shown. Finally, a brief prospect of the magnetic refrigerants and refrigerators is given

  8. Characterization of steel grit recovered from ornamental rocks waste by magnetic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junca, E.; Telles, V.B.; Rodrigues, G.F.; Oliveira, J.R. de; Tenorio, J.A.S.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is characterization of steel grit recovered from ornamental rock waste by magnetic separation. The magnetic separation was realized in three steps: first, using a high intensity wet magnetic separator, which used only the remaining magnetic field of equipment. In the second step, the magnetic material obtained in the first phase was subjected to a new manual magnetic separation using rare earth magnets. In a third step, magnetic material obtained with rare earth magnets was subjected to manual magnetic separation using ferrite magnets. After the magnetic separation, the material was sent to characterization which was obtained by chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and size analysis. The size analysis showed that the concentrate range from 0,5 to 563,67 μm with 4 wt.% over 100 μm and content metallic iron of 93 wt%. (author)

  9. Rock magnetic signature of paleoenvironmental changes in the Izu Bonin rear arc over the last 1 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kars, Myriam; Vautravers, Maryline; Musgrave, Robert; Kodama, Kazuto

    2015-04-01

    climatic proxies in order to investigate the rock magnetic signature of climate changes in the Izu Bonin rear arc in the Late Pleistocene.

  10. Magnetic separation as a method to assist mineralogical characterization of rocks by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Amanda Luzia da; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de; Fernandes, Maria Lourdes Souza

    2013-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction (XRD) corresponds to one of the main techniques for characterization of structures in crystalline materials widely used in the identification of minerals in samples of geological materials such as rocks. However, the large number of mineral phases present in a rock sample can generate excess peaks in the diffractogram, and it can promote overlapping peaks and induce erroneous identification. The purpose of this study was to perform magnetic separation of minerals from rock samples in order to enable the identification of the minerals by XRD. For this magnetic separation, two samples of rock were selected: a sample of high silica content and a sample with low silica content. The magnetic separation of minerals from each sample was performed using the magnetic separator isodynamic Frantz. Posteriorly, the fractions obtained in magnetic separations were analyzed by XRD. In the sample with high silica content, it was obtained a fraction where was identified the accessory mineral epidote, which had not been identified in the total sample diffractogram. In the sample with low silica content, the magnetic separation into several mineral fractions made possible to obtain diffraction patterns with fewer peaks and peaks with higher relative intensities, which allowed its mineralogical characterization. The results showed that the mineral separation by the magnetic separator Frantz made the identification of accessory minerals by XRD and the characterization of samples which have many mineral phases possible, which proves that magnetic separation by Frantz is a method which can assist analyses by XRD. (author)

  11. Magnetic separation as a method to assist mineralogical characterization of rocks by X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Amanda Luzia da; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de; Fernandes, Maria Lourdes Souza, E-mail: amanda@igc.ufmg.br, E-mail: heeren@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: amanda@igc.ufmg.br, E-mail: lurdesfernandes@ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horionte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The X-ray diffraction (XRD) corresponds to one of the main techniques for characterization of structures in crystalline materials widely used in the identification of minerals in samples of geological materials such as rocks. However, the large number of mineral phases present in a rock sample can generate excess peaks in the diffractogram, and it can promote overlapping peaks and induce erroneous identification. The purpose of this study was to perform magnetic separation of minerals from rock samples in order to enable the identification of the minerals by XRD. For this magnetic separation, two samples of rock were selected: a sample of high silica content and a sample with low silica content. The magnetic separation of minerals from each sample was performed using the magnetic separator isodynamic Frantz. Posteriorly, the fractions obtained in magnetic separations were analyzed by XRD. In the sample with high silica content, it was obtained a fraction where was identified the accessory mineral epidote, which had not been identified in the total sample diffractogram. In the sample with low silica content, the magnetic separation into several mineral fractions made possible to obtain diffraction patterns with fewer peaks and peaks with higher relative intensities, which allowed its mineralogical characterization. The results showed that the mineral separation by the magnetic separator Frantz made the identification of accessory minerals by XRD and the characterization of samples which have many mineral phases possible, which proves that magnetic separation by Frantz is a method which can assist analyses by XRD. (author)

  12. Rock-magnetism and ore microscopy of the magnetite-apatite ore deposit from Cerro de Mercado, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Goguitchaichvili, A.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Caballero-Miranda, C.; Vivallo, W.

    2001-03-01

    Rock-magnetic and microscopic studies of the iron ores and associated igneous rocks in the Cerro de Mercado, Mexico, were carried out to determine the magnetic mineralogy and origin of natural remanent magnetization (NRM), related to the thermo-chemical processes due to hydrothermalism. Chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) seems to be present in most of investigated ore and wall rock samples, replacing completely or partially an original thermoremanent magnetization (TRM). Magnetite (or Ti-poor titanomagnetite) and hematite are commonly found in the ores. Although hematite may carry a stable CRM, no secondary components are detected above 580°, which probably attests that oxidation occurred soon enough after the extrusion and cooling of the ore-bearing magma. NRM polarities for most of the studied units are reverse. There is some scatter in the cleaned remanence directions of the ores, which may result from physical movement of the ores during faulting or mining, or from perturbation of the ambient field during remanence acquisition by inhomogeneous internal fields within these strongly magnetic ore deposits. The microscopy study under reflected light shows that the magnetic carriers are mainly titanomagnetite, with significant amounts of ilmenite-hematite minerals, and goethite-limonite resulting from alteration processes. Magmatic titanomagnetites, which are found in igneous rocks, show trellis, sandwich, and composite textures, which are compatible with high temperature (deuteric) oxy-exsolution processes. Hydrothermal alteration in ore deposits is mainly indicated by martitization in oxide minerals. Grain sizes range from a few microns to >100 mm, and possible magnetic state from single to multidomain, in agreement with hysteresis measurements. Thermal spectra, continuous susceptibility measurements, and IRM (isothermal remanent magnetization) acquisition suggest a predominance of spinels as magnetic carriers, most probably titanomagnetites with low

  13. High-resolution rock-magnetic variability in shallow marine sediment: a sensitive paleoclimatic metronome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Kohsaku; Sakai, Hideo; Konishi, Kenji

    1997-05-01

    An outer shelf deposit in central Japan centered on the Olduvai normal polarity event in the reversed Matuyama chron reveals a close correlation of both the magnetic susceptibility and remanent intensity with the sedimentary cyclicities apparent in lithologies and molluscan assemblages. Two sedimentary cycles are characterized by distinctly similar, but double-peaked magnetic cyclicities. The rock-magnetic variability is primarily attributed to the relative abundance of terrigenous magnetic minerals, and the double peak of the variability is characterized by the concentration of finer-grained magnetic minerals. The concentration is suspected to be controlled by both climatic change and shifting proximity of the shoreline as a function of rise and fall of the sea level due to glacio-eustasy. Rock-magnetic study reveals the record of a 21 ka period of orbital precession cycles within the sedimentary cyclicity attributable to a 41 ka period of orbital obliquity forcing.

  14. Rock magnetic characterization of faulted sediments with associated magnetic anomalies in the Albuquerque Basin, Rio Grande rift, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M.R.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Minor, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Variations in rock magnetic properties are responsible for the many linear, short-wavelength, low-amplitude magnetic anomalies that are spatially associated with faults that cut Neogene basin sediments in the Rio Grande rift, including the San Ysidro normal fault, which is well exposed in the northern part of the Albuquerque Basin. Magnetic-susceptibility measurements from 310 sites distributed through a 1200-m-thick composite section of rift-filling sediments of the Santa Fe Group and prerift Eocene and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks document large variations of magnetic properties juxtaposed by the San Ysidro fault. Mean volume magnetic susceptibilities generally increase upsection through eight map units: from 1.7 to 2.2E-4 in the prerift Eocene and Cretaceous rocks to 9.9E-4-1.2E-3 in three members of the Miocene Zia Formation of the Santa Fe Group to 1.5E-3-3.5E-3 in three members of the Miocene-Pleistocene Arroyo Ojito Formation of the Santa Fe Group. Rock magnetic measurements and petrography indicate that the amount of detrital magnetite and its variable oxidation to maghemite and hematite within the Santa Fe Group sediments are the predominant controls of their magnetic property variations. Magnetic susceptibility increases progressively with sediment grain size within the members of the Arroyo Ojito Formation (deposited in fluvial environments) but within members of the Zia Formation (deposited in mostly eolian environments) reaches highest values in fine to medium sands. Partial oxidation of detrital magnetite is spatially associated with calcite cementation in the Santa Fe Group. Both oxidation and cementation probably reflect past flow of groundwater through permeable zones. Magnetic models for geologic cross sections that incorporate mean magnetic susceptibilities for the different stratigraphic units mimic the aeromagnetic profiles across the San Ysidro fault and demonstrate that the stratigraphic level of dominant magnetic contrast changes with

  15. Hydrological and geochemical investigation on the volcanic rock and gneissic rock area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Yong Kwon; Jeong, Chan Ho; Ryu, Kun Seok; Kim, Byoung Yeop; Park, Hyung Kun; Yu, Sang Woo; Jang, Hyu Kun; Lee, Suk Chi; Choi, Ki Young; Jeon, Hyu Woong; Kim, Do Hyoung [Daejong University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    The purpose of this study is to supply the basic data and optimum study site among volcanic rock area and gneissic rock area for high-level radioactive waste disposal. For this purpose, geological, hydrogeological and geochemical data from previously published literatures were collected and analyzed. In this study, we selected 36 volcanic rock sites and 26 gneissic sites as the candidate sites for high level radwaste disposal. Finally, for four sites(M-1, M-13, V-1 and V-13 sites) were selected as the study sites. The geochemical characteristics of groundwaters of each study site were statistically analyzed. The nitrate contamination and the sea water mixing will be important factors on the assessment of behaviour of radionuclides under groundwater environment. From the deep geothermal study, alkaline and sodium-bicarbonate chemical environment, and sea water mixing should be considered as the key factors for the deep disposal of high-level radioactive waste

  16. The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Online Database: Uploading, Searching and Visualizing Paleomagnetic and Rock Magnetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Pisarevsky, S. A.; Jackson, M.; Solheid, P.; Banerjee, S.; Johnson, C.

    2006-12-01

    remain available for download by the public (in both text and Excel format). Finally, the contents of these template files are automatically parsed into the online relational database, making the data available for online searches in the paleomagnetic and rock magnetic search nodes. The MagIC database contains all data transferred from the IAGA paleomagnetic poles database (GPMDB), the lava flow paleosecular variation database (PSVRL), lake sediment database (SECVR) and the PINT database. Additionally, a substantial number of data compiled under the Time Averaged Field Investigations project is now included plus a significant fraction of the data collected at SIO and the IRM. Ongoing additions of legacy data include over 40 papers from studies on the Hawaiian Islands and Mexico, data compilations from archeomagnetic studies and updates to the lake sediment dataset.

  17. Rock magnetism and magnetic fabric of the Triassic rocks from the West Spitsbergen Fold-and-Thrust Belt and its foreland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzisz, Katarzyna; Szaniawski, Rafał; Michalski, Krzysztof; Chadima, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic fabric and magnetomineralogy of the Early Triassic sedimentary rocks, collected along the length of the West Spitsbergen Fold-and-Thrust Belt (WSFTB) and from subhorizontal beds on its foreland, is presented with the aim to compare magnetic mineralogy of these areas, determine the carriers of magnetic fabric and identify tectonic deformation reflected in the magnetic fabric. Magnetic mineralogy varies and only in part depends on the lithology. The magnetic fabric at all sampling sites is controlled by paramagnetic minerals (phyllosilicates and Fe-carbonates). In the fold belt, it reflects the low degree of deformation in a compressional setting with magnetic lineation parallel to fold axis (NW-SE). This is consistent with pure orthogonal compression model of the WSFTB formation, but it also agrees with decoupling model. Inverse fabric, observed in few sites, is carried by Fe-rich carbonates. In the WSFTB foreland, magnetic lineation reflects the Triassic paleocurrent direction (NE-SW). The alternation between normal and inverse magnetic fabric within the stratigraphic profile could be related to sedimentary cycles.

  18. Investigation of block foundations resting on soil–rock and rock–rock media under coupled vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renuka Darshyamkar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the dynamic response of block foundations of different equivalent radius to mass (Ro/m ratios under coupled vibrations is investigated for various homogeneous and layered systems. The frequency-dependent stiffness and damping of foundation resting on homogeneous soils and rocks are determined using the half-space theory. The dynamic response characteristics of foundation resting on the layered system considering rock–rock combination are evaluated using finite element program with transmitting boundaries. Frequencies versus amplitude responses of block foundation are obtained for both translational and rotational motion. A new methodology is proposed for determination of dynamic response of block foundations resting on soil–rock and weathered rock–rock system in the form of equations and graphs. The variations of dimensionless natural frequency and dimensionless resonant amplitude with shear wave velocity ratio are investigated for different thicknesses of top soil/weathered rock layer. The dynamic behaviors of block foundations are also analyzed for different rock–rock systems by considering sandstone, shale and limestone underlain by basalt. The variations of stiffness, damping and amplitudes of block foundations with frequency are shown in this study for various rock–rock combinations. In the analysis, two resonant peaks are observed at two different frequencies for both translational and rotational motion. It is observed that the dimensionless resonant amplitudes decrease and natural frequencies increase with increase in shear wave velocity ratio. Finally, the parametric study is performed for block foundations with dimensions of 4 m × 3 m × 2 m and 8 m × 5 m × 2 m by using generalized graphs. The variations of natural frequency and peak displacement amplitude are also studied for different top layer thicknesses and eccentric moments.

  19. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Rock Dynamic Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Mirmohammadlou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development of engineering activities expands through a variety of rock engineering processes such as drilling, blasting, mining and mineral processing. These activities require rock dynamic fracture mechanics method to characterize the rock behavior. Dynamic fracture toughness is an important parameter for the analysis of engineering structures under dynamic loading. Several experimental methods are used for determination of dynamic fracture properties of materials. Among them, the Hopkinson pressure bar and the drop weight have been frequently used for rocks. On the other hand, numerical simulations are very useful in dynamic fracture studies. Among vast variety of numerical techniques, the powerful extended finite element method (XFEM enriches the finite element approximation with appropriate functions extracted from the fracture mechanics solution around a crack-tip. The main advantage of XFEM is its capability in modeling different on a fixed mesh, which can be generated without considering the existence of discontinuities. In this paper, first, the design of a drop weight test setup is presented. Afterwards, the experimental tests on igneous (basalt and calcareous (limestone rocks with single-edge-cracked bend specimen are discussed. Then, each experimental test is modeled with the XFEM code. Finally, the obtained experimental and numerical results are compared. The results indicate that the experimentally predicted dynamic fracture toughness has less than 8 percent difference with calculated dynamic fracture toughness from extended finite element method

  20. Interpretation of Oil Seepage of Source Rock Based Magnetic Survey in Cipari Cilacap District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukmaji Anom Raharjo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic survey had been conducted in Village of Cipari, District of Cipari, Region of  Cilacap to interpret to the location of the oil seepage source rock. Boundary of the research area is 108.75675°E – 108.77611°E and 7.42319°S – 7.43761°S. The observed total magnetic data is corrected and reducted to obtain the local magnetic anomaly data. The local magnetic anomaly data is applied to model the subsurface bodies anomalies based on the Mag2DC for Windows software. With be supported the geological information, the some bodies anomalies are interpreted as the basaltic igneous rock (c = 0.0051, the alternately of sandstone and claystone and insert of marl from Halang Formation (c = 0.0014, the breccia from Kumbang Formation (c = 0.0035, the alternately of sandstones and claystone with insert of marl and breccia from Halang Formation (c = 0.0036, the claystone from Tapak Formation (c = 0.0015, the alternately of sandstones and claystone with insert of marl and compacted breccia from Halang Formation (c = 0.0030, and the alternately of sandstone and claystone from   Halang Formation (c = 0.0020. The plantonic foraminifer fossils as resources of oil seepage are estimated in the sedimentaries rocks, where the oil flows from those rocks into the         reservoir (source rock. Based on the interpretation results, the source rock is above basaltic igneous rock with the approximate position is 108.76164°W and 7.43089°S; and the depth is 132.09 meters below the average topographic.

  1. Analysis of the Variations in Rock Magnetic Properties of the Quaternary Blackwater Draw (Eolian) Formation, West Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stine, J. M.; Ferguson, J. F.; Geissman, J. W.; Sweet, D. E.

    2017-12-01

    The Quaternary Blackwater Draw Formation consists of the surficial deposits ( 10 + m thick) that directly overlie the Neogene Ogallala Formation in the Southern High Plains (SHP). These Quaternary deposits display a rhythmic pattern where eolian derived sediments (loess) are in turn punctuated by several paleosol layers, implying that Quaternary glacial-interglacial climate cycles are recorded in the Blackwater Draw Formation. In order to investigate this hypothesis, several rock magnetic parameters obtained from the Blackwater Draw Formation were analyzed using exploratory data analysis (EDA) techniques. The Blackwater Draw Formation was sampled at high resolution (2.5-5 cm intervals in depth, which serves as a proxy for time). Rock magnetic parameters measured are bulk magnetic susceptibility (χ, median: 1.56 * 10-4 SI volume), anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM, median: 0.1612 A/m), and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM, median: 2.5367 A/m) intensity, which allow for the determination of two common environmental magnetic ratios (ARM/χ and ARM/IRM, medians: 1051 and 0.068 respectively) that are often used to approximate magnetic grain size. The data were analyzed using robust EDA methods for classification, correlation, and signal extraction. Using these techniques, it becomes evident that a good correspondence exists between the geophysical data and the geologic model (stratigraphy). For example, the cross plots showed that the magnetic data segregate into clusters corresponding to stratigraphy. Smoothing of the magnetic ratio data produces an oscillatory signal that may correspond to climate cyclicity. Additionally the smoothed models show a noticeable change in periodicity, where the ARM, IRM and χ values in the uppermost section exhibit a much higher amplitude and lower frequency than the bottom part of the section (with the reverse being true for the ratios). When comparing the data to the geologic model this change appears to correlate with

  2. Palaeointensity determinations and rock magnetic properties on rocks from Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore-arc (IODP Exp. 352).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvallo, Claire; Camps, Pierre; Sager, Will; Poidras, Thierry

    2017-04-01

    IODP Expedition 352 cored igneous rocks from the Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore-arc crust: Sites U1440 and U1441 recovered Eocene basalts and related rocks whereas Sites U1439 and U1442 recovered Eocene boninites and related rocks. We selected samples from Holes U1439C, U1440B and U1440A for paleointensity measurements. Hysteresis measurements and high and low-temperature magnetization curves show that samples from Hole U1440B undergo magnetochemical changes when heated and are mostly composed of single-domain (SD) or pseudo-single-domain (PSD) titanomaghemite. In contrast, the same measurements show that most selected samples from Holes U1439C and U1442A are thermally stable and are composed of either SD or PSD titanomagnetite with very little titanium content, or SD ferromagnetic grains with a large paramagnetic contribution. Thellier-Thellier paleointensity experiments carried out on U1439C and U1442A samples give a good success rate of 25/60 and Virtual Dipole Moment values between 1.3 and 3.5 ×1022 Am2. Multispecimen paleointensity experiments carried out on 55 samples from Hole U1440B (divided into 4 groups) and 20 from Hole U1439C gave poor quality result, but they seem to indicate a VDM around 4-6 ×1022 Am2 in Hole U1440B fore-arc basalts. These results are in agreement with the low few VDM values previously measured on rocks from Eocene. However, they do not support an inverse relationship between intensity of the field and rate of reversal, since the rate of reversal in Eocene was rather low.

  3. Fulgurites: a rock magnetic study of mineralogical changes caused by lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begnini, G. S.; Tohver, E.; Schmieder, M.

    2013-05-01

    Fulgurites are natural glass samples produced by lightning strikes on rock or soil substrates. Instantaneous electrical discharges of 10-200 kA are typical, and the temperatures produced by lightning strikes exceed 1700C, the melting temperature of quartz. Paleomagnetic observations of lightning strikes typically include high intensity remanent magnetizations with highly-variable to random magnetic directions. Alternating field demagnetization is commonly used to remove the overprinting effects of Lightning Induced Remanent Magnetization (LIRM), indicating low coercivities of the magnetic carriers. We conducted a rock magnetic analysis of 15 specimens of natural fulgurite from South Africa including hysteresis and thermoremanent heating and cooling experiments using a Variable Field Translational Balance. The analysed specimens demonstrate two distinct ranges of Curie temperature: 440-600C and 770-778C, suggesting the presence of both iron oxides (likely Fe-rich magnetite) and a reduced iron alloy, likely kamacite. High temperature, highly reduced assemblages have been reported from petrological observations of fulgurites. Our rock magnetic observations of a metallic iron phase in the fulgurite samples from a terrestrial, surficial environment demonstrates a mineralogical resemblance to differentiated, iron-rich meteorites. We suggest that LIRMs in lightning-struck localities may include a chemical remagnetization associated with lightning-induced electrolysis or reduction of iron oxides.

  4. Investigations on retention effects in barrier system rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memmert, G.

    1989-01-01

    A surface complex model is described for Sr, Ni and U, which is based on the measurement of cation exchange capacity, groundwater analysis and absorption experiments on sediment/groundwater systems from the Gorleben rocks. The results of through column and shaking experiments are shown. The data on absorption of Tc were reviewed. The research project was carried out together with the EEC CHEMVAL/MIRAGE project. (DG) [de

  5. Experimental investigation of fundamental processes in mining induced fracturing and rock instability.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Napier, JAL

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The main themes of the project GAP601b have been experimental investigations of creep effects, further underground observations of time-dependent behaviour, investigation of scale effects and rock mass stability and studies of the interaction...

  6. Transitional geomagnetic impulse hypothesis: Geomagnetic fact or rock-magnetic artifact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Pierre; Coe, Robert S.; PréVot, Michel

    1999-08-01

    A striking feature of the Steens Mountain (Oregon) geomagnetic polarity reversal is the two (maybe three) extremely rapid field directional changes (6 degrees per day) proposed to account for unusual behavior in direction of remanent magnetization in a single lava flow. Each of these very fast field changes, or impulses, is associated with a large directional gap (some 90°) in the record. In order to check the spatial reproducibility of the paleomagnetic signal over distances up to several kilometers, we have carried out a paleomagnetic investigation of two new sections (B and F) in the Steens summit region which cover the second and the third directional gap. The main result is the description of two new directions, which are located between the pre second and post second impulse directions. These findings weigh against the hypothesis that the geomagnetic field cause the unusual intraflow fluctuations, which now appears to be more ad hoc as an explanation of the paleomagnetic data. However, the alternative baking hypothesis remains also ad hoc since we have to assume variable rock magnetic properties that we have not yet been able to detect within the flows at the original section Steens A and D 1.5 km to the north. In addition, new results for 22 transitional and normal lava flows in section B are presented that correlate well with earlier results from section A.

  7. Anisotropy of out-of-phase magnetic susceptibility of rocks as a tool for direct determination of magnetic subfabrics of some minerals: an introductory study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrouda, F.; Chadima, Martin; Ježek, J.; Pokorný, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 208, č. 1 (2017), s. 385-402 ISSN 0956-540X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00130801 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : magnetic and electrical properties * magnetic fabrics and anisotropy * magnetic mineralogy and petrology * rock and mineral magnetism Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 2.414, year: 2016

  8. Acoustic investigations of concert halls for rock music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelman-Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2007-01-01

    Objective measurement data and subjective evaluations have been collected from 20 small-/medium-sized halls in Denmark used for amplified rhythmic music concerts (pop, rock, jazz). The purpose of the study was to obtain knowledge about optimum acoustic conditions for this type of hall. The study...... is motivated by the fact that most concert tickets sold in Denmark relate to concerts within these genres in this kind of venue. The subjective evaluations were carried out by professional musicians and sound engineers who responded on the basis of their experiences working in these (and other) halls. From...

  9. The RRP Project: investigating radionuclide retardation in the host rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, W.R.; Frieg, B.; Ota, K.; Bossart, P.

    1996-01-01

    The Radionuclide Retardation Project (RRP), which is a joint Nagra/PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp.) project, has two components: the first (the Excavation Project, EP) looks at the behaviour of radionuclides which are so strongly retarded in the experimental shear zone that they cannot pass through the zones in experimentally reasonable times. In order to determine where radionuclide retardation has occurred in the pore space, as well as the flowpath geometry in the shear zone, the entire injection zone has to be excavated and taken back to the laboratory for analysis of the sites of retardation of the radionuclides. This approach has the advantage of allowing a detailed 3D description of the experimental shear zone. The aim of the second component of the project (Connected Porosities, CP) is to examine the fate of those radionuclides which diffuse out of the main water-conducting features in the shear zone and into the pore spaces of the rock matrix, where they become trapped. This represents a potentially significant retardation mechanism in a repository host rock. (author) 8 figs., refs

  10. Magnetic and microstructural investigation of pipeline steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groessinger, R.; Mehmood, N.; Hiram Espina, J.; Keplinger, F.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic studies (as e.g. hysteresis loop, minor loops initial susceptibility, Barkhausen noise etc.) on pipeline tubes can be used to detect local errors, scratches, stress centres etc. There exist up to now several papers characterising the stress-state of such steels however not yet a systematic investigation correlating the microstructure with intrinsic magnetic properties of the material. Within this paper three different types of steel, which are generally used for pipelines, will be investigated with respect to their microstructure, their magnetic properties (hysteresis) and their magnetostriction. In order to investigate the effect of texture, one sample was cut parallel to the tube direction (longitudinal), one was cut perpendicular to the tube direction (transversal). The microstructure was investigated using a light microscope. The topological structure was investigated using an AFM, the domain structure was observed by a MFM. From all steels frame shaped samples were made which were used to measure the hysteresis loop in a magnetically closed arrangement. (author)

  11. Contrasting Nature of Magnetic Anomalies over Thin Sections Made out of Barrandien’s Basaltic Rocks Points to their Origin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kletetschka, Günther; Pruner, Petr; Schnabl, Petr; Šifnerová, Kristýna

    -, special issue (2012), s. 69-70 ISSN 1335-2806. [Castle meeting New Trends in Geomagnetism : Paleo, rock and environmental magnetism/13./. 17.06.2012-23.06.2012, Zvolen] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/10/2351 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : magnetic anomalies * thin sections * volcanic rocks Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://gauss.savba.sk/GPIweb/conferences/Castle2012/abstrCastle.pdf

  12. Paleomagnetic and Rock Magnetic Study of Oligocene-Holocene Sedimentary Rocks from Northern Dominican Republic: Evidence of Vertical Axis Rotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anson Sanchez, M.; Kodama, K. P.; Pueyo, E. L.; Soto, R.; Garcia-Senz, J.; Escuder-Viruete, J.; Pastor-Galan, D.

    2017-12-01

    A paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study was conducted in the northern Dominican Republic to detect vertical axis rotations in an active left-lateral, strike slip fault zone. 191 samples from 21 sites were collected from a variety of lithologies including limestones, conglomerates, calcarenites and marls that ranged in age from the Oligocene to the Holocene. The rock magnetic portion of the study focused on the identification of magnetic minerals using coercivity, and Curie temperature (c vs temperature) measurement, modeling of IRM acquisition curves, and thermal demagnetization of IRMs (Lowrie, 19901). In the paleomagnetic portion of the study characteristic remanences (ChRMs) were isolated using thermal demagnetization (19 steps up to 680ºC) and alternating field (AF) demagnetization (17 steps up to 100 mT). In most cases the characteristic remanence is carried by magnetite, with peak unblocking temperatures of 575ºC. This interpretation was supported by c vs. T results that yielded Curie temperatures of 580˚C. In only a few cases (7 samples) higher unblocking temperatures suggested hematite as the magnetic carrier. The modeling of IRM acquisition curves, that shows two coercivity components, further supports the presence of magnetite. 75% of the IRM is carried by the low-coercivity component (100-300 mT, magnetite). 25% of the IRM is carried by the high-coercivity component (1.2-1.6T) characteristic of hematite. The IRM acquisition data was collected from 24 samples (3-4 from each of the lithologies sampled). IRMs were acquired in fields from 4mT to 1T in 23 steps. The paleomagnetic results show a grouping by tectonic blocks with one group having westerly ChRM declinations (268˚-295˚) and a second group having northerly ChRM declinations (357˚-035˚). In most cases, inclinations are intermediate ( 35˚), in agreement with the 24˚-31˚ expected inclinations for Dominican Republic in the period Oligocene to Holocene. The rotation of the tectonic blocks, as

  13. Investigating the resetting of OSL signals in rock surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza; Murray, Andrew S.; Jain, Mayank

    2011-01-01

    were insensitive. Dose recovery tests using solar simulator and IR diodes on both K-feldspar grains and solid slices taken from the inner parts of the rocks are discussed. Preheat plateau results using surface grains and slices show that significant thermal transfer in naturally bleached samples can...... be avoided by keeping preheat temperatures low. Equivalent doses from surface K-feldspar grains were highly scattered and much larger than expected (0.02 Gy to >100 Gy), while solid surface slices gave more reproducible small doses (mean = 0.17±0.02 Gy, n = 32). Neither crushing nor partial bleaching were...... factors were derived for two samples. These indicate that, for instance, bleaching at a depth of 2 mm into these samples occurs at about ∼28% of the rate at the surface. We conclude that it should be possible to derive meaningful burial doses of >1 Gy from such cobbles; younger samples would probably...

  14. Experimental investigation of magnetically confined plasma loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenfelde, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Arch-shaped magnetic flux tubes generated in a pulsed-power plasma experiment were investigated with a variety of diagnostics concerning their expansion properties. Specifically, the expansion velocity was of interest, which is observed as constant for a wide range of experimental parameters. An MHD transport mechanism is investigated as possible cause of a uniform arch cross section: Axial transport of poloidal magnetic flux along the plasma may cause a pinch force leading to a uniform diameter along the arch. Despite numerous experimental findings at a very similar experimental setup, no indication for the relevance of this process could be found. Instead, magnetic probe data showed that the plasma current in the apex region is constant. A constant expansion velocity was observed for considerably different experimental conditions. This included different plasma source designs with fundamentally different toroidal magnetic field topology and variation of the working gas, which lead to plasma densities lower by an order of magnitude. Inside the current channel of the arch, Alfven velocities were estimated. To this end, plasma density profiles obtained from interferometry were inverted to obtain local densities, which were in turn verified by means of Stark broadening of hydrogen Balmer lines. Furthermore, measurements of multiple components of the magnetic field of the plasma arch were performed. An estimate for the conductivity was obtained from Spitzer's formula for fully ionized plasma using electron temperatures obtained from elementary optical emission spectroscopy. From the presented data of ccd imaging, magnetic field probes, and to lesser extent, interferometry, the underlying assumption of residual plasma (and considerable plasma currents through it) below the actual arch structure is very plausible. Rough estimates of the electric field strength along the arch and results of the magnetic field measurements showed, that the detected expansion

  15. Experimental investigation of magnetically confined plasma loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenfelde, Jan

    2012-12-11

    Arch-shaped magnetic flux tubes generated in a pulsed-power plasma experiment were investigated with a variety of diagnostics concerning their expansion properties. Specifically, the expansion velocity was of interest, which is observed as constant for a wide range of experimental parameters. An MHD transport mechanism is investigated as possible cause of a uniform arch cross section: Axial transport of poloidal magnetic flux along the plasma may cause a pinch force leading to a uniform diameter along the arch. Despite numerous experimental findings at a very similar experimental setup, no indication for the relevance of this process could be found. Instead, magnetic probe data showed that the plasma current in the apex region is constant. A constant expansion velocity was observed for considerably different experimental conditions. This included different plasma source designs with fundamentally different toroidal magnetic field topology and variation of the working gas, which lead to plasma densities lower by an order of magnitude. Inside the current channel of the arch, Alfven velocities were estimated. To this end, plasma density profiles obtained from interferometry were inverted to obtain local densities, which were in turn verified by means of Stark broadening of hydrogen Balmer lines. Furthermore, measurements of multiple components of the magnetic field of the plasma arch were performed. An estimate for the conductivity was obtained from Spitzer's formula for fully ionized plasma using electron temperatures obtained from elementary optical emission spectroscopy. From the presented data of ccd imaging, magnetic field probes, and to lesser extent, interferometry, the underlying assumption of residual plasma (and considerable plasma currents through it) below the actual arch structure is very plausible. Rough estimates of the electric field strength along the arch and results of the magnetic field measurements showed, that the detected expansion

  16. Magnetic rock properties of the gabbros from the ODP Drill Hole 1105A of the Atlantis Bank, southwest Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, D.G.; Krishna, K.S.

    . Comparison of modal proportions of the oxides, grain sizes and magnetization parameters of the rocks has con rmed that most coarse-grained oxide mineral bearing rocks record low Koenigsberger ratio (2 to 5) and median destructive elds (5 to 7 mT). Average...- swered is to what extent lower crustal rocks con- tribute to linear marine magnetic anomalies. The Atlantis Bank (32 43:130S; 57 16:650E), east of the Atlantis II Fracture Zone is a window in the Indian Ocean where lower crustal rocks, gabbros...

  17. Ferrian Ilmenites: Investigating the Magnetic Phase Diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagroix, F.

    2007-12-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the magnetic phase changes within the hematite-ilmenite solid solution, yFeTiO3·(1-y)·Fe2O3. Two sets of synthetic ferrian ilmenites of y-values equal to 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, and 1.0 were available for this study. As currently drawn, the magnetic phase diagram, proposed by Ishikawa et al. [1985, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. v.54, 312-325], predicts for increasing y values (0.5magnetic odering from paramagnetism to (1) ferrimagnetism, or (2) to superparamagnetism then ferrimagnetism, or (3) to superparamagnetism then antiferromagnetism. Moreover, for y values ranging between 0.65 and 1.0 a transition into a spin glass state is expected at 100K or below. Ilmenite, y=1.0, is antiferromagnetic. Various low tempreature experiments including temperature dependance of remanence and induced magnetizations and AC susceptibility were conducted in order to characterize the magnetic behaviour and changes of magnetic states. In general, the data confirms the predicted phase changes for the different compositions investigated. The y=1.0 sample, pure ilmenite, is antiferromagnetic below 57K, the measured Néel temperature. The y=0.9 sample magnetically orders at about 100K in a superparamagnetic state. Hysteresis loops remain effectively closed down to 60K below which an antiferromagnetic order prior to reaching the spin glass state is ambiguous. The y=0.8 sample magnetically orders at about 270K in an initially superparamagnetic states before entering a ferrimagnetic state below about 250K. Lastly, as previously demonstrated in Lagroix et al. [2004, JGR-B, v.109, doi:10.1029/2004JB003076], the y=0.7 samples order ferrimagnetically at 380K. However, like the y=0.7 samples which also demonstrated an antiferromagnetic state at temperature above the Curie temperature, hysteresis loops for y=0.9 and y=0.8 only achieve perfect linearity at 190K and 340K respectively. All samples (except y=1.0) show a frequency dependent amplitude non

  18. Neutron pole figures compared with magnetic preferred orientations of different rock types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Anke; Chadima, Martin; Cifelli, Francesca; Brokmeier, H.-G.Heinz-Guenter; Siemes, Heinrich

    2004-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is an excellent tool for pole figure measurement of rock samples. Due to high penetration depth of neutrons for most materials neutron diffraction represents an efficient tool to measure complete pole figures with reliable grain statistics even in coarse grained or inequi-granular materials. In the field of structural geology, the measurement of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility is a standard technique to reveal the tectonic history of deformed rocks. The application of both techniques on still ongoing studies of Precambrian, Carboniferous and Quaternary rocks which are characterised by fundamental different tectonic evolutions and mineralogical compositions shows the wide field of relevance and importance of these methods in understanding tectonic processes in detail

  19. Magnetic resonance investigation of magnetic-labeled baker's yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy Morais, J.P.M.; Azevedo, R.B.; Silva, L.P.; Lacava, Z.G.M.; Bao, S.N.; Silva, O.; Pelegrini, F.; Gansau, C.; Buske, N.; Safarik, I.; Safarikova, M.; Morais, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the interaction of DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles (5 and 10 nm core-size) with Saccharomyces cerevisae was investigated using magnetic resonance (MR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM micrographs revealed magnetite nanoparticles attached externally to the cell wall. The MR data support the strong interaction among the nanoparticles supported by the cells. A remarkable shift in the resonance field was used as signature of particle attachment to the cell wall

  20. Rock magnetism of the offshore soils of Lake Qinghai in the western China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng eZhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lake Qinghai is the largest lake in China and situated in an important climate-sensitive zone on the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, making it an ideal place to study the environmental evolution of the northwest China as well as the interplay between the Asian monsoon and the westerlies in late Quaternary. In this study, detailed rock magnetic measurements were carried out on the offshore soils of Lake Qinghai. The dry grassland samples have higher magnetic susceptibility than that of the wet grassland samples, which suggests a higher concentration of magnetic minerals in the dry grassland and lower concentration of magnetic minerals in the wet grassland near the lake edge. The high concentration of the superparamagnetic (SP magnetic minerals related to pedogenesis may also contribute to the high magnetic susceptibility of the dry grassland. The low magnetic susceptibility of the wet grassland may result from the conversion of strongly to weakly magnetic minerals and/or the dissolution of magnetic minerals. In addition, the Hm/(Gt+Hm value has a positive correlation with the water content, thus can be taken as an effective proxy for the soil moisture.

  1. Characterization of deep-seated rock masses by means of borehole investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    Swedish State Power Board. The main objective of the programme was to test a method of measuring in-situ rock stresses in the deep, water-filled boreholes and to correlate measured rock stresses with the hydraulic and geological properties of the rock mass. The investigations consist of the following activities: - Coredrillin of two main boreholes with a depth of 500 m and 250 m respectively. - Rock stress measurements at 11 and 9 main levels in the boreholes respectively. At each level at least 3 complete measurements were made. - Logging of the cores with respect to rock type, fractures and fracture characteristics. - Water injection tests in the boreholes. The rock mass investigated is composed of a gneiss granite of Svecocarelian age (1500 Ma), with inclusions of younger pegmatites and greenstones of variable ages. The fracture density is as a mean 2 fractures per meter with a marked decrease in frequency with increased depth. The fractures are generally coated with calcite and chlorite as the dominating coating minerals. For the rock stress measurements, the method of Leeman and Hayes was chosen. The result show that there is a very high stress level in the rock mass, recordings of about 70 MPa were taken below a horizontal fracture zone at 320 m depth. In this lower rock masses the high stresses were also illustrated by intense disking of the hollow core which made measurements impossible in large sections of the boreholes. Water injection tests were performed, mainly as double-packer tests alon the entire boreholes. For the evaluation, both stationary and transient calculation theories were used and the results show a good agreement. The hyddraulic conductivities of the rock mass vary from below 10 -10 m/s up to 10 -7 m/s. The conductivity decreases with depth, though there are zones even at great depth with high conductivity. (Author)

  2. NEESROCK: A Physical and Numerical Modeling Investigation of Seismically Induced Rock-Slope Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, K. N.; Wartman, J.; Keefer, D. K.; Maclaughlin, M.; Adams, S.; Arnold, L.; Gibson, M.; Smith, S.

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, seismically induced rock-slope failures have been responsible for approximately 30% of the most significant landslide catastrophes of the past century. They are among the most common, dangerous, and still today, least understood of all seismic hazards. Seismically Induced Rock-Slope Failure: Mechanisms and Prediction (NEESROCK) is a major research initiative that fully integrates physical modeling (geotechnical centrifuge) and advanced numerical simulations (discrete element modeling) to investigate the fundamental mechanisms governing the stability of rock slopes during earthquakes. The research is part of the National Science Foundation-supported Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation Research (NEES) program. With its focus on fractures and rock materials, the project represents a significant departure from the traditional use of the geotechnical centrifuge for studying soil, and pushes the boundaries of physical modeling in new directions. In addition to advancing the fundamental understanding of the rock-slope failure process under seismic conditions, the project is developing improved rock-slope failure assessment guidelines, analysis procedures, and predictive tools. Here, we provide an overview of the project, present experimental and numerical modeling results, discuss special considerations for the use of synthetic rock materials in physical modeling, and address the suitability of discrete element modeling for simulating the dynamic rock-slope failure process.

  3. Multifractal magnetic susceptibility distribution models of hydrothermally altered rocks in the Needle Creek Igneous Center of the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Gettings

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic susceptibility was measured for 700 samples of drill core from thirteen drill holes in the porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit of the Stinkingwater mining district in the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming. The magnetic susceptibility measurements, chemical analyses, and alteration class provided a database for study of magnetic susceptibility in these altered rocks. The distribution of the magnetic susceptibilities for all samples is multi-modal, with overlapping peaked distributions for samples in the propylitic and phyllic alteration class, a tail of higher susceptibilities for potassic alteration, and an approximately uniform distribution over a narrow range at the highest susceptibilities for unaltered rocks. Samples from all alteration and mineralization classes show susceptibilities across a wide range of values. Samples with secondary (supergene alteration due to oxidation or enrichment show lower susceptibilities than primary (hypogene alteration rock. Observed magnetic susceptibility variations and the monolithological character of the host rock suggest that the variations are due to varying degrees of alteration of blocks of rock between fractures that conducted hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of rock from the fractures inward progressively reduces the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the rock. The model introduced in this paper consists of a simulation of the fracture pattern and a simulation of the alteration of the rock between fractures. A multifractal model generated from multiplicative cascades with unequal ratios produces distributions statistically similar to the observed distributions. The reduction in susceptibility in the altered rocks was modelled as a diffusion process operating on the fracture distribution support. The average magnetic susceptibility was then computed for each block. For the purpose of comparing the model results with observation, the simulated magnetic susceptibilities were then averaged over the same

  4. Multifractal magnetic susceptibility distribution models of hydrothermally altered rocks in the Needle Creek Igneous Center of the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettings, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility was measured for 700 samples of drill core from thirteen drill holes in the porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit of the Stinkingwater mining district in the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming. The magnetic susceptibility measurements, chemical analyses, and alteration class provided a database for study of magnetic susceptibility in these altered rocks. The distribution of the magnetic susceptibilities for all samples is multi-modal, with overlapping peaked distributions for samples in the propylitic and phyllic alteration class, a tail of higher susceptibilities for potassic alteration, and an approximately uniform distribution over a narrow range at the highest susceptibilities for unaltered rocks. Samples from all alteration and mineralization classes show susceptibilities across a wide range of values. Samples with secondary (supergene) alteration due to oxidation or enrichment show lower susceptibilities than primary (hypogene) alteration rock. Observed magnetic susceptibility variations and the monolithological character of the host rock suggest that the variations are due to varying degrees of alteration of blocks of rock between fractures that conducted hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of rock from the fractures inward progressively reduces the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the rock. The model introduced in this paper consists of a simulation of the fracture pattern and a simulation of the alteration of the rock between fractures. A multifractal model generated from multiplicative cascades with unequal ratios produces distributions statistically similar to the observed distributions. The reduction in susceptibility in the altered rocks was modelled as a diffusion process operating on the fracture distribution support. The average magnetic susceptibility was then computed for each block. For the purpose of comparing the model results with observation, the simulated magnetic susceptibilities were then averaged over the same interval as the

  5. Investigating Microbial Biofilm Formations on Crustal Rock Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, M.; D'Angelo, T.; Carr, S. A.; Orcutt, B.

    2017-12-01

    Ocean crust hosts microbial life that, in some cases, alter the component rocks as a means of obtaining energy. Variations in crust lithology, included trace metal and mineral content, as well as the chemistry of the fluids circulating through them, provide substrates for some microbes to metabolize, leading to formation of biofilm community structures. Microbes have different parameters for the situations in which they will form biofilms, but they must have some source of energy in excess at the site of biofilm formation for them to become stationary and form the carbohydrate-rich structures connecting the cells to one another and the substrate. Generally, the requirements for microbes to form biofilms on crustal minerals are unclear. We designed two experiments to test (1) mineral preference and biofilm formation rates by natural seawater microbial communities, and (2) biofilm development as a function of phosphate availability for an organism isolated from subseafloor ocean crust. In Experiment 1, we observed that phyric basalt groundmass is preferentially colonized over aphyric basalt or metal sulfides in a shallow water and oxic seawater environment. In experiment 2, tests of the anaerobic heterotroph Thalassospira bacteria isolated from oceanic crustal fluids showed that they preferentially form biofilms, lose motility, and increase exponentially in number over time in higher-PO4 treatments (50 micromolar), including with phosphate-doped basalts, than in treatments with low phosphate concentrations (0.5 micromolar) often found in crustal fluids. These observations suggest phosphate as a main driver of biofilm formation in subsurface crust. Overall, these data suggest that the drivers of microbial biofilm formation on crustal substrates are selective to the substrate conditions, which has important implications for estimating the global biomass of life harbored in oceanic crust.

  6. Investigation on the Vibration Effect of Shock Wave in Rock Burst by In Situ Microseismic Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingshi Gao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rock burst is a physical explosion associated with enormous damage at a short time. Due to the complicity of mechanics of rock burst in coal mine roadway, the direct use of traditional investigation method applied in tunnel is inappropriate since the components of surrounding rock are much more complex in underground than that of tunnel. In addition, the reliability of the results obtained through these methods (i.e., physical simulation, theoretical analysis, and monitoring in filed application is still not certain with complex geological conditions. Against this background, present experimental study was first ever conducted at initial site to evaluate the effect of shock wave during the rock burst. TDS-6 microseismic monitoring system was set up in situ to evaluate the propagation of shock wave resulting in microexplosions of roadway surrounding rock. Various parameters including the distance of epicentre and the characteristic of response have been investigated. Detailed test results revealed that (1 the shock wave attenuated exponentially with the increase of the distance to seismic source according to the equation of E=E0e-ηl; particularly, the amplitude decreased significantly after being 20 m apart from explosive resource and then became very weak after being 30 m apart from the seismic source; (2 the response mechanics are characteristic with large scatter based on the real location of surrounding rock despite being at the same section. That is, the surrounding rock of floor experienced serious damage, followed by ribs, the roof, and the humeral angles. This in situ experimental study also demonstrated that microseismic monitoring system can be effectively used in rock burst through careful setup and data investigation. The proposed in situ monitoring method has provided a new way to predict rock burst due to its simple instalment procedure associated with direct and reasonable experimental results.

  7. Experimental investigation of creep behavior of clastic rock in Xiangjiaba Hydropower Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many fracture zones crossing the dam foundation of the Xiangjiaba Hydropower Project in southwestern China. Clastic rock is the main media of the fracture zone and has poor physical and mechanical properties. In order to investigate the creep behavior of clastic rock, triaxial creep tests were conducted using a rock servo-controlling rheological testing machine. The results show that the creep behavior of clastic rock is significant at a high level of deviatoric stress, and less time-dependent deformation occurs at high confining pressure. Based on the creep test results, the relationship between axial strain and time under different confining pressures was investigated, and the relationship between axial strain rate and deviatoric stress was also discussed. The strain rate increases rapidly, and the rock sample fails eventually under high deviatoric stress. Moreover, the creep failure mechanism under different confining pressures was analyzed. The main failure mechanism of clastic rock is plastic shear, accompanied by a significant compression and ductile dilatancy. On the other hand, with the determined parameters, the Burgers creep model was used to fit the creep curves. The results indicate that the Burgers model can exactly describe the creep behavior of clastic rock in the Xiangjiaba Hydropower Project.

  8. Investigation on natural radioactive nuclide contents of rock products in Xi'an construction materials market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Chunlin; Han Feng; Shang Aiguo; Li Tiantuo; Guo Huiping; Yie Lichao; Li Guifang

    2001-01-01

    The author reports the investigation results on natural radioactive nuclide contents of rock products from Xi'an construction materials market. The products were classified according to the national standard. The results show that natural radioactive nuclide contents in sampled rock products are in normal radioactive background levels. The radio-activity ranges of 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K are 2.7 - 181.8, 0.92 - 271.0, 0.63 - 148.0, 1.8 - 1245 Bq·kg -1 , respectively. According to the national standard (JC 518-93), the application of some rock products must be limited

  9. Magnetic moment investigation by frequency mixing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teliban, I; Thede, C; Chemnitz, S; Bechtold, C; Quadakkers, W J; Schütze, M; Quandt, E

    2009-11-01

    Gas turbines and other large industrial equipment are subjected to high-temperature oxidation and corrosion. Research and development of efficient protective coatings is the main task in the field. Also, knowledge about the depletion state of the coating during the operation time is important. To date, practical nondestructive methods for the measurement of the depletion state do not exist. By integrating magnetic phases into the coating, the condition of the coating can be determined by measuring its magnetic properties. In this paper, a new technique using frequency mixing is proposed to investigate the thickness of the coatings based on their magnetic properties. A sensor system is designed and tested on specific magnetic coatings. New approaches are proposed to overcome the dependency of the measurement on the distance between coil and sample that all noncontact techniques face. The novelty is a low cost sensor with high sensibility and selectivity which can provide very high signal-to-noise ratios. Prospects and limitations are discussed for future use of the sensor in industrial applications.

  10. The ARASE (ERG) magnetic field investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Ayako; Teramoto, Mariko; Nomura, Reiko; Nosé, Masahito; Fujimoto, Akiko; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Shinohara, Manabu; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Obana, Yuki; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Mita, Makoto; Takashima, Takeshi; Shinohara, Iku

    2018-03-01

    The fluxgate magnetometer for the Arase (ERG) spacecraft mission was built to investigate particle acceleration processes in the inner magnetosphere. Precise measurements of the field intensity and direction are essential in studying the motion of particles, the properties of waves interacting with the particles, and magnetic field variations induced by electric currents. By observing temporal field variations, we will more deeply understand magnetohydrodynamic and electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves in the ultra-low-frequency range, which can cause production and loss of relativistic electrons and ring-current particles. The hardware and software designs of the Magnetic Field Experiment (MGF) were optimized to meet the requirements for studying these phenomena. The MGF makes measurements at a sampling rate of 256 vectors/s, and the data are averaged onboard to fit the telemetry budget. The magnetometer switches the dynamic range between ± 8000 and ± 60,000 nT, depending on the local magnetic field intensity. The experiment is calibrated by preflight tests and through analysis of in-orbit data. MGF data are edited into files with a common data file format, archived on a data server, and made available to the science community. Magnetic field observation by the MGF will significantly improve our knowledge of the growth and decay of radiation belts and ring currents, as well as the dynamics of geospace storms.

  11. Solving the challenges of data preprocessing, uploading, archiving, retrieval, analysis and visualization for large heterogeneous paleo- and rock magnetic datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Jarboe, N. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) provides an archive for the wealth of rock- and paleomagnetic data and interpretations from studies on natural and synthetic samples. As with many fields, most peer-reviewed paleo- and rock magnetic publications only include high level results. However, access to the raw data from which these results were derived is critical for compilation studies and when updating results based on new interpretation and analysis methods. MagIC provides a detailed metadata model with places for everything from raw measurements to their interpretations. Prior to MagIC, these raw data were extremely cumbersome to collect because they mostly existed in a lab's proprietary format on investigator's personal computers or undigitized in field notebooks. MagIC has developed a suite of offline and online tools to enable the paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, and affiliated scientific communities to easily contribute both their previously published data and data supporting an article undergoing peer-review, to retrieve well-annotated published interpretations and raw data, and to analyze and visualize large collections of published data online. Here we present the technology we chose (including VBA in Excel spreadsheets, Python libraries, FastCGI JSON webservices, Oracle procedures, and jQuery user interfaces) and how we implemented it in order to serve the scientific community as seamlessly as possible. These tools are now in use in labs worldwide, have helped archive many valuable legacy studies and datasets, and routinely enable new contributions to the MagIC Database (http://earthref.org/MAGIC/).

  12. Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory project. Rock mechanical investigations annual report for fiscal year 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Toshinori; Sanada, Hiroyuki; Tanno, Takeo

    2015-02-01

    In order to establish the scientific and technical basis for geological disposal of technology, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is pursuing the geoscientific research project namely the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) in the crystalline rock environment at Tono Geoscience Center (TGC). In the MIU Project, geoscientific research is being carried out in three overlapping phases; Surface-based Investigation Phase (Phase I: FY1996 - 2004), Construction Phase (Phase II: FY2004- in progress) and Operation Phase (Phase III: FY2010- in progress). In the rock mechanical investigations at the Phase II, the research aims at “Characterization of geological environment in the Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ)” from the viewpoint of safety assessment. For the research, the specific information of the EDZ such as (1) size and structures, (2) petrophysical/geomechanical properties, and (3) stress state are required. The research also aims at “Characterization of geomechanical stability around tunnel” from the viewpoint of design and construction of underground facilities. For the research, the specific information such as (4) local stress regime, (5) spatial variability of petrophysical/geomechanical properties of rocks, and (6) distribution of discontinuities intersecting underground tunnels are required. The measurement system for rock mass behavior has been manufactured and set for groundwater recovery experiment in the Phase III. This report presents the results of following rock mechanical investigations conducted in FY 2013. In-situ stress measurements using Compact Conical-ended Borehole Overcoring Technique were performed at the - 500m stage. Measurement system for rock mass displacement using optical fiber was installed at the - 500m stage as part of the groundwater recovery experiment. Study on the modeling based on equivalent continuum model was continued. Phenomenological study and theoretical study on long-term behavior of crystalline rock were

  13. Analysis of microseismic signals and temperature recordings for rock slope stability investigations in high mountain areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Occhiena

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The permafrost degradation is a probable cause for the increase of rock instabilities and rock falls observed in recent years in high mountain areas, particularly in the Alpine region. The phenomenon causes the thaw of the ice filling rock discontinuities; the water deriving from it subsequently freezes again inducing stresses in the rock mass that may lead, in the long term, to rock falls. To investigate these processes, a monitoring system composed by geophones and thermometers was installed in 2007 at the Carrel hut (3829 m a.s.l., Matterhorn, NW Alps. In 2010, in the framework of the Interreg 2007–2013 Alcotra project no. 56 MASSA, the monitoring system has been empowered and renovated in order to meet project needs.

    In this paper, the data recorded by this renewed system between 6 October 2010 and 5 October 2011 are presented and 329 selected microseismic events are analysed. The data processing has concerned the classification of the recorded signals, the analysis of their distribution in time and the identification of the most important trace characteristics in time and frequency domain. The interpretation of the results has evidenced a possible correlation between the temperature trend and the event occurrence.

    The research is still in progress and the data recording and interpretation are planned for a longer period to better investigate the spatial-temporal distribution of microseismic activity in the rock mass, with specific attention to the relation of microseismic activity with temperatures. The overall goal is to verify the possibility to set up an effective monitoring system for investigating the stability of a rock mass under permafrost conditions, in order to supply the researchers with useful data to better understand the relationship between temperature and rock mass stability and, possibly, the technicians with a valid tool for decision-making.

  14. Investigations on the magnetization behavior of magnetic composite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichholz, Christian [Process Research and Chemical Engineering, BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Knoll, Johannes, E-mail: johannes.knoll@kit.edu [Institute of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Lerche, Dietmar [L.U.M. GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Nirschl, Hermann [Institute of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    In life sciences the application of surface functionalized magnetic composite particles is establishing in diagnostics and in downstream processing of modern biotechnology. These magnetic composite particles consist of non-magnetic material, e.g. polystyrene, which serves as a matrix for the second magnetic component, usually colloidal magnetite. Because of the multitude of magnetic cores these magnetic beads show a complex magnetization behavior which cannot be described with the available approaches for homogeneous magnetic material. Therefore, in this work a new model for the magnetization behavior of magnetic composite particles is developed. By introducing an effective magnetization and considering an overall demagnetization factor the deviation of the demagnetization of homogeneously magnetized particles is taken into account. Calculated and experimental results show a good agreement which allows for the verification of the adapted model of particle magnetization. Besides, a newly developed magnetic analyzing centrifuge is used for the characterization of magnetic composite particle systems. The experimental results, also used for the model verification, give both, information about the magnetic properties and the interaction behavior of particle systems. By adding further components to the particle solution, such as salts or proteins, industrial relevant systems can be reconstructed. The analyzing tool can be used to adapt industrial processes without time-consuming preliminary tests with large samples in the process equipments. - Highlights: • New model for magnetizability calculation of magnetic composite particles. • New method for particle bulk characterization relating to their magnetizability. • Model verification due to experimental data.

  15. Investigations on the magnetization behavior of magnetic composite particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichholz, Christian; Knoll, Johannes; Lerche, Dietmar; Nirschl, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    In life sciences the application of surface functionalized magnetic composite particles is establishing in diagnostics and in downstream processing of modern biotechnology. These magnetic composite particles consist of non-magnetic material, e.g. polystyrene, which serves as a matrix for the second magnetic component, usually colloidal magnetite. Because of the multitude of magnetic cores these magnetic beads show a complex magnetization behavior which cannot be described with the available approaches for homogeneous magnetic material. Therefore, in this work a new model for the magnetization behavior of magnetic composite particles is developed. By introducing an effective magnetization and considering an overall demagnetization factor the deviation of the demagnetization of homogeneously magnetized particles is taken into account. Calculated and experimental results show a good agreement which allows for the verification of the adapted model of particle magnetization. Besides, a newly developed magnetic analyzing centrifuge is used for the characterization of magnetic composite particle systems. The experimental results, also used for the model verification, give both, information about the magnetic properties and the interaction behavior of particle systems. By adding further components to the particle solution, such as salts or proteins, industrial relevant systems can be reconstructed. The analyzing tool can be used to adapt industrial processes without time-consuming preliminary tests with large samples in the process equipments. - Highlights: • New model for magnetizability calculation of magnetic composite particles. • New method for particle bulk characterization relating to their magnetizability. • Model verification due to experimental data

  16. Modelling of water-rock interaction at TVO investigation sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Leino-Forsman, H.

    1992-12-01

    The geochemistry of the groundwater at the Kivetty, Syyry and Olkiluoto site investigation areas in Finland for nuclear waste disposal is evaluated. The hydrogeological data is collected from boreholes drilled down to 100-m depth into crystalline bedrock. The interpretation is based on groundwater chemistry and isotope data, mineralogical data, and the structure and hydrology of the bedrock, using correlation diagrams and the thermodynamic calculations (PHREEQE,EQ3NR). The hydrogeochemistry and major processes controlling the groundwater chemistry are discussed

  17. Investigation into relations between physical and electrical properties of rocks and concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertçelik, İbrahim; Kurtuluş, Cengiz; Sertçelik, Fadime; Pekşen, Ertan; Aşçı, Metin

    2018-02-01

    The physical and electrical properties of natural rocks, namely limestone, sandstone, amphibolite, arkose, schist, granite, basalt, and concrete were investigated in order to characterize the relationships between these properties. The measurements were conducted on 96 cylindrical specimens of limestone, sandstone, amphibolite, arkose, schist, granite, basalt, and 14 cubic concrete samples. Strong correlations between ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV), uniaxial compressive strength (UCS), electrical resistivity, and chargeability were confirmed. High correlation coefficients were observed among the properties, varying between 0.53 and 0.92 for all the rocks and concrete. Test results show the following relations among the corresponding parameters: the UPV increases with the increase in UCS, resistivity decreases with the decrease in chargeability for all rocks and concrete, and the electrical resistivities of rock and concrete decrease with the increase in chargeability.

  18. Rock mechanics investigations of structural stability in the Bulli seam at West Cliff Colliery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaggar, F

    1978-03-01

    Rock mechanics investigations were conducted at West Cliff colliery to obtain rock properties and stress measurements and study the stability of mining structures. The roof and floor were drilled in order to obtain core for rock testing and lump samples of coal were collected in order to measure the coal properties. Absolute stress measurements were obtained using CSIR cells. The strata were sufficiently uniform and competent to overcore the emplaced cells. Testing revealed that the rocks were better than average for coal measure sedimentary strata and the stresses indicated the existence of a moderately high horizontal stress field. The coal is of average strength only with some marked variation relating to the very banded nature of the seam. Finite element analyses showed that the rectangular roadways driven using roof bolts and timber supports were stable and adequately stable by an indicative factor of safety of about l.5.

  19. In situ tests for investigating thermal and mechanical rock behaviors at an underground research tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Sangki; Cho, Won-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of the thermal and mechanical behaviors expected to be happened around an underground high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository is important for a successful site selection, construction, operation, and closure of the repository. In this study, the thermal and mechanical behaviors of rock and rock mass were investigated from in situ borehole heater test and the studies for characterizing an excavation damaged zone (EDZ), which had been carried out at an underground research tunnel, KURT, constructed in granite for the validation of a HLW disposal concept. Thermal, mechanical, and hydraulic properties in EDZ could be predicted from various in situ and laboratory tests as well as numerical simulations. The complex thermo-mechanical coupling behavior of rock could be modeled using the rock properties. (author)

  20. Neutron scattering investigations of frustated magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Tom

    This thesis describes the experimental investigation of frustrated magnetic systems based on the pyrochlore lattice of corner-sharing tetrahedra. Ho2Ti207 and Dy2Ti207 are examples of spin ices, in which the manifold of disordered magnetic groundstates maps onto that of the proton positions in ice. Using single crystal neutron scattering to measure Bragg and diffuse scattering, the effect of applying magnetic fields along different directions in the crystal was investigated. Different schemes of degeneracy removal were observed for different directions. Long and short range order, and the coexistence of both could be observed by this technique.The field and temperature dependence of magnetic ordering was studied in Ho2Ti207 and Dy2Ti207. Ho2Ti2()7 has been more extensively investigated. The field was applied on [00l], [hh0], [hhh] and [hh2h]. Dy2Ti207 was studied with the field applied on [00l] and [hho] but more detailed information about the evolution of the scattering pattern across a large area of reciprocal space was obtained.With the field applied on [00l] both materials showed complete degeneracy removal. A long range ordered structure was formed. Any magnetic diffuse scattering vanished and was entirely replaced by strong magnetic Bragg scattering. At T =0.05 K both materials show unusual magnetization curves, with a prominent step and hysteresis. This was attributed to the extremely slow dynamics of spin ice materials at this temperature.Both materials were studied in greatest detail with the field applied on [hh0]. The coexistence of long and short range order was observed when the field was raised at T = 0.05 K. The application of a field in this direction separated the spin system into two populations. One could be ordered by the field, and one remained disordered. However, via spin-spin interactions, the field restricted the degeneracy of the disordered spin population. The neutron scattering pattern of Dy2Ti207 shows that the spin system was separated

  1. Electromagnetic Emissions During Rock-fracturing Experiments Inside Magnetic Field Free Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, T.; Jin, H.

    2012-12-01

    Abnormal electromagnetic emission (EME) signal is one type of the most important precursors before earthquake, which has been widely observed and recorded before large earthquake, but the physical mechanism underlying the phenomenon is unclear and under controversy. Monitoring the EME signals during rock-fracturing experiments in laboratory is an effective way to study the phenomena and their underlying mechanism. Electromagnetic noise is everywhere because industrial and civilian electrical equipments have been widely used, which make difficulties to the in-lab experiments and field monitoring. To avoid the interference from electromagnetic noise, electromagnetic experiments must be carried out inside shielded space. Magnetic Field Free Space (MFFS) was constructed by Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration in 1980s. MFFS is a near-spherical polyhedron 'space' with 26 faces and inside diameter about 2.3 m. It is enclosed by 8-layer permalloy 1J85 for shielding magnetic field and 2-layer purified aluminium for shielding electric field. MFFS mainly shields static magnetic field by a factor of 160-4000 for the magnetic signals with the frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz. The intensity of magnetic field inside the space is less than 20 nT and its fluctuation is less than 0.3 nT in 90 hours. MFFS can dramatically shield EME signals in the frequency range of EME antennas utilized in our experiments, (several to ~320) kHz, by at least 90%, based on observation. Rock specimens (granite, marble) were fractured by two ways inside MFFS. 1) Cuboid bulk specimens were drilled, filled with static cracking agent, and then dilated from inside until fracture. 2) Cylindrical rock specimens were stressed until fracture by using a non-magnetic rock testing machine with the maximum testing force 300kN. EME, acoustic emission (AE) and strain signals were collected synchronously by the same data acquisitor, Acoustic Emission Workstation made by Physical Acoustics

  2. Analytical TEM investigations of nanoscale magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meingast, A.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical transmission electron microscopy has been applied within this thesis to investigate several novel approaches to design and fabricate nanoscale magnetic materials. As the size of the features of interest rank in the sub-nanometer range, it is necessary to employ techniques with a resolution – both spatial and analytical – well below this magnitude. Only at this performance level it is possible to examine material properties, necessary for the further tailoring of materials. Within this work two key aspects have been covered: First, analytical TEM (transmission electron microscopy) investigations were carried out to get insight into novel magnetic materials with high detail. Second, new analytical and imaging possibilities enabled with the commissioning of the new ASTEM (Austrian scanning transmission electron microscope) were explored. The aberration corrected TITAN® microscope (© FEI Company) allows resolving features in scanning transmission mode (STEM) with 70 pm distance. Thereby, direct imaging of light elements in STEM mode by using the annular bright field method becomes possible. Facilitated through high beam currents within the electron probe, an increased acquisition speed of analytical signals is possible. For energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) a new four detector disc geometry around the specimen was implemented, which increases the accessible collection angle. With the integration of the latest generation of image filter and electron spectrometer (GIF QuantumERS), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is boosted through the high acquisition speed and the dual spectroscopy mode. The high acquisition speed allows to record up to 1000 spectra per second and the possibility to record atomically resolved EELS maps is at hand. Hereby it is important to avoid beam damage and alteration of the material during imaging and analysis. With the simultaneous acquisition of the low and the high loss spectral region, an extended range for

  3. Forensic Excavation of Rock Masses: A Technique to Investigate Discontinuity Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, J.; Hencher, S. R.; West, L. J.; Handley, K.

    2017-11-01

    True persistence of rock discontinuities (areas with insignificant tensile strength) is an important factor controlling the engineering behaviour of fractured rock masses, but is extremely difficult to quantify using current geological survey methodologies, even where there is good rock exposure. Trace length as measured in the field or using remote measurement devices is actually only broadly indicative of persistence for rock engineering practice and numerical modelling. Visible traces of discontinuities are treated as if they were open fractures within rock mass classifications, despite many such traces being non-persistent and actually retaining considerable strength. The common assumption of 100% persistence, based on trace length, is generally extremely conservative in terms of strength and stiffness, but not always so and may lead to a wrong prediction of failure mechanism or of excavatability. Assuming full persistence would give hopelessly incorrect predictions of hydraulic conductivity. A new technique termed forensic excavation of rock masses is introduced, as a procedure for directly investigating discontinuity persistence. This technique involves non-explosive excavation of rock masses by injecting an expansive chemical splitter along incipient discontinuities. On expansion, the splitter causes the incipient traces to open as true joints. Experiments are described in which near-planar rock discontinuities, through siltstone and sandstone, were opened up by injecting the splitter into holes drilled along the lines of visible traces of the discontinuities in the laboratory and in the field. Once exposed the surfaces were examined to investigate the pre-existing persistence characteristics of the incipient discontinuities. One conclusion from this study is that visible trace length of a discontinuity can be a poor indicator of true persistence (defined for a fracture area with negligible tensile strength). An observation from this series of experiments

  4. Rock magnetic properties of sediments from Lake Sanabria and its catchment (NW Spain): paleoenvironmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrasoaña, J. C.; Borruel, V.; Gómez-Paccard, M.; Rico, M.; Valero-Garces, B.; Moreno-Caballud, A.; Soto, R.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Sanabria is located in the NW Spanish mountains at 1000 m a.s.l., and constitutes the largest lake of glacial origin in the Iberian Peninsula. Here we present an environmental magnetic study of a Late Pleistocene-Holocene sediment core from Lake Sanabria and from different lithologies that crop out in its catchment, which includes Paleozoic plutonic, metamorphic and vulcanosedimentary rocks, and Quaternary deposits of glacial origin. This study was designed to complement sedimentologic and geochemical studies aimed at unraveling the climatic evolution of the NW Iberian Peninsula during the last deglaciation. Our results indicate that magnetite and pyrrhotite dominate the magnetic assemblage of both the sediments from the lower half of the studied sequence (25.6 - 13 cal kyr BP) deposited in a proglacial environment, and the Paleozoic rocks that make up most of the catchment of the lake. The occurrence of these minerals both in the catchment rocks and in the lake sediments indicates that sedimentation was then driven by the erosion of a glacial flour, which suffered minimal chemical transformation in response to a rapid and short routing to the lake. Sediments from the upper half of the studied sequence, accumulated after 12.4 cal kyr BP in a fluviolacustrine environment, contain magnetite and greigite. This points to a prominent role of post-depositional reductive dissolution, driven by a sharp increase in the accumulation of organic matter into the lake and the creation of anoxic conditions in the sediments, in shaping the magnetic assemblage of Holocene sediments. Pyrrhotite is stable under reducing conditions as opposed to magnetite, which is unstable. We therefore interpret that previous pedogenic processes occurred in the then deglaciated catchment of the lake were responsible for the oxidation of pyrrhotite and authigenic formation of magnetite, which survived subsequent reductive diagenesis given its initial larger concentrations. This interpretation is

  5. Investigating the sealing capacity of a seal system in rock salt (DOPAS project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantschik, Kyra; Moog, Helge C.; Czaikowski, Oliver; Wieczorek, Klaus [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    This paper describes research and development work on plugging and sealing repositories, an issue of fundamental importance for the rock salt option which represents one of the three European repository options, besides the clay rock and the crystalline rock options. The programme aims at providing experimental data needed for the theoretical analysis of the long-term sealing capacity of concrete- based sealing materials. In order to demonstrate hydro-mechanical material stability under representative load scenarios, a comprehensive laboratory testing programme is carried out. This comprises investigation of the sealing capacity of the combined seal system and impact of the so-called excavation-damaged zones (EDZ) as well as investigation of the hydro-chemical long-term stability of the seal in contact with different brines under diffusive and advective conditions. This paper presents experimental approaches and preliminary results from laboratory investigations on salt concrete and combined systems as obtained to date.

  6. Sedimentary and rock magnetic signatures and event scenarios of deglacial outburst floods from the Laurentian Channel Ice Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Wei; von Dobeneck, Tilo; Bergmann, Fenna; Just, Janna; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; St-Onge, Guillaume; Piper, David J. W.

    2018-04-01

    Eastern Canadian margin sediments bear testimony to several catastrophic deglacial meltwater discharges from the retreating Laurentide Ice Sheet. The reddish-brown plumite layers deposited on the levees of the Laurentian Fan valleys have been recognized as indications of multiple outburst floods between Heinrich events 2 and 1. Five event layers have been consistently recorded in three new gravity cores retrieved on the SW Grand Banks slope and comply with the previously published Laurentian Fan core MD95-2029. The apparently huge extent of these outburst plumes around the Laurentian Fan as well as their causes and consequences are investigated in this study using physical properties, rock magnetic and grain-size analyses, together with seismoacoustic profiling. We provide the first detailed 14C ages of the outburst event sequence and discuss their recurrence intervals in the context of regional ice retreat. Compared to the hemipelagic interlayers, event layers have overall uniform and systematic changes of rock-magnetic properties. Hematite contents increase over time and proximally while magnetite grain sizes fine upwards and spatially away from the fan. Based on the sediment composition and load, we argue that these plumites were formed by recurrent erosion of glacial mud deposits in the Laurentian Channel by meltwater outbursts. Three alternative glaciological scenarios are evaluated: in each case, the provenance of the transported sediment is not an indicator of the precise source of the meltwater.

  7. Reverse polarity magnetized melt rocks from the Chicxulub impact structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Marin, Luis E.; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Quezada, Juan Manuel

    1993-03-01

    Further paleomagnetic data for core samples of melt rock recovered in the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) exploratory wells within the Chicxulub structure, northern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico are reported. A previous report by Sharpton showed that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts, and an Ar-40/Ar-39 age of 65.2 plus or minus 0.4 Ma. The geomagnetic polarity determined for two samples is reverse (R) and was correlated with chron 29R that includes the K/T boundary. Our present analysis is based on two samples from each of three clasts of the melt rock from PEMEX well Y6-N17 (1295 to 1299 m b.s.l.). This study concentrates on the vectorial nature and stability of the remanence (NRM), the magnetic mineralogy and remanence carriers (i.e., the reliability and origin of the record), and on the implications (correlation with expected paleolatitude and polarity). The relative orientation of the drill core samples with respect to the horizontal is known. Samples were stable under alternating field (AF) and thermal treatments, and after removal of a small component they exhibited single-vectorial behavior. The characteristic remanence inclinations show small dispersion and a mean value (-43 deg) in close agreement with the expected inclination and paleolatitude (derived from the North American apparent polar wander path). Isothermal remenence (IRM) acquisition experiments, Lowrie-Fuller tests, coercivity and unblocking temperature spectra of NRM and saturation IRM, susceptibility and Q-coefficient analyses, and the single-component nature indicate a dominant mineralogy of iron-rich titanomagnetites with single or pseduo-single domain states. The stable characteristic magnetization may be interpreted as a result of shock heating of the rock at the time of formation of the inpact structure and its polarity, age, and paleolatitude are consistent with a time about the K/T boundary.

  8. Popping Rocks Revealed: Investigations from 14°N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanless, V. D.; Jones, M.; Kurz, M. D.; Soule, S. A.; Fornari, D. J.; Bendana, S.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.

    2017-12-01

    The popping rock, recovered in dredge 2πD43 in 1985, is commonly considered to be one of the most representative samples of undegassed upper mantle, based on high volatile and noble gas abundances. While this basalt is used to reconstruct mantle volatile contents and CO2 fluxes from mid-ocean ridges (MOR), the origin of the popping rock has remained ambiguous due to a lack of geologic context. Here, we present results from the first combined geochemical, geophysical, and geologic investigation of popping rocks from 14N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. By combining lava compositions with high-resolution bathymetric maps, we show that the popping rocks are confined to a single geographic area, at the transition between magmatic and tectonic segments. Fifteen popping rocks were collected in situ using the Alvin submersible in 2016. X-ray microtomography indicates that these lavas have variable vesicle abundances; including the highest vesicularities (>19%) recorded for any MOR basalt. Dissolved CO2 contents (163-175 ppm) are similar to proximal non-popping rocks and are in equilibrium at their eruption depths (>3600 m); however, total CO2 contents (based on vesicularity, dissolved CO2, and vesicle gas contents) are higher than non-popping rocks, ranging from 2800-14150 ppm. The popping rocks have average 3He/4He ratios of 8.17 ± 0.1 Ra and 4He concentrations of 1.84e-5 to 7.67e-5 cc/g STP. Compared to non-popping lavas, the popping rocks have a narrow range of major and trace element concentrations, suggesting little to no crystallization occurred during ascent or eruption. REE patterns and trace element ratios are indistinguishable in the popping rocks (La/Sm = 2.89 ± 0.05), indicating similar mantle sources and extents of melting. Based on lava compositions and spatial distribution, we suggest that the popping rocks at 14N were produced under similar magmatic conditions and erupted over short timescales, perhaps during a series of closely timed eruptions.

  9. ENSI - Evaluation of NAGRA’s planned investigation of Brown Dogger host rock - Expert report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitterli-Dreher, P; Burkhalter, R.

    2011-06-01

    This report published by the Swiss National Safety Inspectorate ENSI discusses the reports published on the Brown Dogger host rock formations and the investigations planned as part of Phase 2 of the planning process for deep repositories for low and medium-active nuclear wastes. After a review of the tasks to be carried out, two expert reports are introduced. In the first report, Dr. Peter Bitterli-Dreher looks at the geological situation in central Europe and rock conditions in northern Switzerland. The situation in the Dogger formations with their calcium carbonate and clay-like components in various locations in northern Switzerland are discussed, including water flow in the rocks. The second report from Dr. Reto Burkhalter also discusses the Brown Dogger formations and comments on the investigations proposed by NAGRA in detail. Work yet to be planned is looked at

  10. The use of magnetic resonance sounding for quantifying specific yield and transmissivity in hard rock aquifers: The example of Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouillamoz, J. M.; Lawson, F. M. A.; Yalo, N.; Descloitres, M.

    2014-08-01

    Hundreds of thousands of boreholes have been drilled in hard rocks of Africa and Asia for supplying human communities with drinking water. Despite the common use of geophysics for improving the siting of boreholes, a significant number of drilled holes does not deliver enough water to be equipped (e.g. 40% on average in Benin). As compared to other non-invasive geophysical methods, magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) is selective to groundwater. However, this distinctive feature has not been fully used in previous published studies for quantifying the drainable groundwater in hard rocks (i.e. the specific yield) and the short-term productivity of aquifer (i.e. the transmissivity). We present in this paper a comparison of MRS results (i.e. the water content and pore-size parameter) with both specific yield and transmissivity calculated from long duration pumping tests. We conducted our experiments in six sites located in different hard rock groups in Benin, thus providing a unique data set to assess the usefulness of MRS in hard rock aquifers. We found that the MRS water content is about twice the specific yield. We also found that the MRS pore-size parameter is well correlated with the specific yield. Thus we proposed two linear equations for calculating the specific yield from the MRS water content (with an uncertainty of about 10%) and from the pore-size parameter (with an uncertainty of about 20%). The later has the advantage of defining a so-named MRS cutoff time value for indentifying non-drainable MRS water content and thus low groundwater reserve. We eventually propose a nonlinear equation for calculating the specific yield using jointly the MRS water content and the pore-size parameters, but this approach has to be confirmed with further investigations. This study also confirmed that aquifer transmissivity can be estimated from MRS results with an uncertainty of about 70%. We conclude that MRS can be usefully applied for estimating aquifer specific yield and

  11. Application of magnetic susceptibility as a paleoclimatic proxy on Paleozoic sedimentary rocks and characterization of the magnetic signal – IGCP-580 projects and event

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    da Silva, A-Ch.; Whalen, M. T.; Hladil, Jindřich; Koptíková, Leona; Chen, D.; Spassov, S.; Boulvain, F.; Devleeschouwer, X.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2014), s. 87-95 ISSN 0705-3797 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : rock magnetism * high-resolution stratigraphy * palaeoclimatic archives * computing * Paleozoic * Phanerozoic * Recent Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.000, year: 2014 http://www.episodes.co.in/contents/2014/june/pp87-95.pdf

  12. Paleolatitudes of the Tibetan Himalaya from primary and secondary magnetizations of Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wentao; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Dekkers, Mark J.; Garzanti, Eduardo; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume; Lippert, Peter C.; Li, Xiaochun; Maffione, Marco; Langereis, Cor G.; Hu, Xiumian; Guo, Zhaojie; Kapp, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The Tibetan Himalaya represents the northernmost continental unit of the Indian plate that collided with Asia in the Cenozoic. Paleomagnetic studies on the Tibetan Himalaya can help constrain the dimension and paleogeography of "Greater India," the Indian plate lithosphere that subducted and underthrusted below Asia after initial collision. Here we present a paleomagnetic investigation of a Jurassic (limestones) and Lower Cretaceous (volcaniclastic sandstones) section of the Tibetan Himalaya. The limestones yielded positive fold test, showing a prefolding origin of the isolated remanent magnetizations. Detailed paleomagnetic analyses, rock magnetic tests, end-member modeling of acquisition curves of isothermal remanent magnetization, and petrographic investigation reveal that the magnetic carrier of the Jurassic limestones is authigenic magnetite, whereas the dominant magnetic carrier of the Lower Cretaceous volcaniclastic sandstones is detrital magnetite. Our observations lead us to conclude that the Jurassic limestones record a prefolding remagnetization, whereas the Lower Cretaceous volcaniclastic sandstones retain a primary remanence. The volcaniclastic sandstones yield an Early Cretaceous paleolatitude of 55.5°S [52.5°S, 58.6°S] for the Tibetan Himalaya, suggesting it was part of the Indian continent at that time. The size of "Greater India" during Jurassic time cannot be estimated from these limestones. Instead, a paleolatitude of the Tibetan Himalaya of 23.8°S [21.8°S, 26.1°S] during the remagnetization process is suggested. It is likely that the remagnetization, caused by the oxidation of early diagenetic pyrite to magnetite, was induced during 103-83 or 77-67 Ma. The inferred paleolatitudes at these two time intervals imply very different tectonic consequences for the Tibetan Himalaya.

  13. Investigations on magnetic field induced optical transparency in magnetic nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Dillip Kumar; Philip, John

    2018-02-01

    We study the magnetic field induced optical transparency and its origin in magnetic nanoemulsion of droplets of average size ∼200 nm containing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Beyond a certain volume fraction (Φ > 0.0021) of magnetic nanoemulsion and a critical magnetic field (Hc1), the transmitted light intensity increases drastically and reaches a maximum at another critical magnetic field (Hc2), beyond which the transmitted light intensity decreases and reaches a plateau. Interestingly, the transmitted light intensity at Hc2 is found to increase linearly with Φ and the critical magnetic fields Hc1 and Hc2 follow power law decay with Φ (i.e. Hc ∼ Φ-x), with exponents 0.48 and 0.27, respectively. The light intensity recovers to its initial value when the magnetic field is switched off, indicating the perfect reversibility of the field induced transparency process. The observed straight line scattered patterns above Hc2, on a screen placed perpendicular to the incident beam, confirms the formation of rod like anisotropic nanostructures perpendicular to the direction of light propagation. The magneto-optical measurements in the emulsion confirm that the observed field induced transparency in magnetic emulsions for Φ > 0.0021 is due to the optical birefringence caused by the rod like nanostructures. The reduced birefringence is found to be proportional to the square of the applied magnetic field. This finding offers several possibilities in using magnetic nanofluids in tunable optical devices.

  14. Rock Magnetic Properties of Laguna Carmen (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina): Implications for Paleomagnetic Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogorza, C. G.; Orgeira, M. J.; Ponce, F.; Fernández, M.; Laprida, C.; Coronato, A.

    2013-05-01

    We report preliminary results obtained from a multi-proxy analysis including paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic studies of two sediment cores of Laguna Carmen (53°40'60" S 68°19'0" W, ~83m asl) in the semiarid steppe in northern Tierra del Fuego island, Southernmost Patagonia, Argentina. Two short cores (115 cm) were sampled using a Livingstone piston corer during the 2011 southern fall. Sediments are massive green clays (115 to 70 cm depth) with irregularly spaced thin sandy strata and lens. Massive yellow clay with thin sandy strata continues up to 30 cm depth; from here up to 10 cm yellow massive clays domain. The topmost 10 cm are mixed yellow and green clays with fine sand. Measurements of intensity and directions of Natural Remanent Magnetization (NRM), magnetic susceptibility, isothermal remanent magnetization, saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM), back field and anhysteretic remanent magnetization at 100 mT (ARM100mT) were performed and several associated parameters calculated (ARM100mT/k and SIRM/ ARM100mT). Also, as a first estimate of relative magnetic grain-size variations, the median destructive field of the NRM (MDFNRM), was determined. Additionally, we present results of magnetic parameters measured with vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The stability of the NRM was analyzed by alternating field demagnetization. The magnetic properties have shown variable values, showing changes in both grain size and concentration of magnetic minerals. It was found that the main carrier of remanence is magnetite with the presence of hematite in very low percentages. This is the first paleomagnetic study performed in lakes located in the northern, semiarid fuegian steppe, where humid-dry cycles have been interpreted all along the Holocene from an aeolian paleosoil sequence (Orgeira et el, 2012). Comparison between paleomagnetic records of Laguna Carmen and results obtained in earlier studies carried out at Laguna Potrok Aike (Gogorza et al., 2012

  15. The stability test of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) vulcanic rock of merapi mountain in central Java

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husna; Rauf, Nurlela; Bijaksana, Satria

    2002-01-01

    An assessment has been done on magnetic properties of the rock from the area around the top of Merapi Mountain. The research conducted In form of stability test of Natural Remanent Magnetization (NRM), Which 16 specimens that used in that test were taken from Pasar Bubar, Kali Gendol and Kali Gendong Alternating Field Demagnetization Methods applied on measurement of intensity and direction of NRM and demagnetization process. The result shown that the rock from Pasar Bubar had mean intensity of 2255486 mA/meter with a range of declination 32.80 -650 and inclination -37.40 -3.90, Kali Gendol had mean intensity of 2469.387 mA/meter with range of declination of 356.10-110 and inclination of -490 --0.10, and Kali Gendong had mean Intensity of 4139.062 mA/meter with range of declination of 62.10 -12540 and inclination of -0.80 -3520. The stability test is determined from intensity curve, stereo net Plot. Zijderveld diagram and Maximum Angular Deviation (MAD) According the result, the specimen from kali gendol were the most stable and qualifield for further used on paleomagnetic study

  16. Fifteen years of microbiological investigation in Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leupin, O.X. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); Bernier-Latmani, R.; Bagnoud, A. [Swiss Federal Office of Technology EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland); Moors, H.; Leys, N.; Wouters, K. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Stroes-Gascoyne, S. [University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada)

    2017-04-15

    Microbiological studies related to the geological disposal of radioactive waste have been conducted at the Mont Terri rock laboratory in Opalinus Clay, a potential host rock for a deep geologic repository, since 2002. The metabolic potential of microorganisms and their response to excavation-induced effects have been investigated in undisturbed and disturbed claystone cores and in pore- (borehole) water. Results from nearly 15 years of research at the Mont Terri rock laboratory have shown that microorganisms can potentially affect the environment of a repository by influencing redox conditions, metal corrosion and gas production and consumption under favourable conditions. However, the activity of microorganisms in undisturbed Opalinus Clay is limited by the very low porosity, the low water activity, and the largely recalcitrant nature of organic matter in the claystone formation. The presence of microorganisms in numerous experiments at the Mont Terri rock laboratory has suggested that excavation activities and perturbation of the host rock combined with additional contamination during the installation of experiments in boreholes create favourable conditions for microbial activity by providing increased space, water and substrates. Thus effects resulting from microbial activity might be expected in the proximity of a geological repository i.e., in the excavation damaged zone, the engineered barriers, and first containments (the containers). (authors)

  17. Fifteen years of microbiological investigation in Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leupin, O.X.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Bagnoud, A.; Moors, H.; Leys, N.; Wouters, K.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.

    2017-01-01

    Microbiological studies related to the geological disposal of radioactive waste have been conducted at the Mont Terri rock laboratory in Opalinus Clay, a potential host rock for a deep geologic repository, since 2002. The metabolic potential of microorganisms and their response to excavation-induced effects have been investigated in undisturbed and disturbed claystone cores and in pore- (borehole) water. Results from nearly 15 years of research at the Mont Terri rock laboratory have shown that microorganisms can potentially affect the environment of a repository by influencing redox conditions, metal corrosion and gas production and consumption under favourable conditions. However, the activity of microorganisms in undisturbed Opalinus Clay is limited by the very low porosity, the low water activity, and the largely recalcitrant nature of organic matter in the claystone formation. The presence of microorganisms in numerous experiments at the Mont Terri rock laboratory has suggested that excavation activities and perturbation of the host rock combined with additional contamination during the installation of experiments in boreholes create favourable conditions for microbial activity by providing increased space, water and substrates. Thus effects resulting from microbial activity might be expected in the proximity of a geological repository i.e., in the excavation damaged zone, the engineered barriers, and first containments (the containers). (authors)

  18. Integrated system for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre -Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-08-18

    A system for investigating non-linear properties of a rock formation around a borehole is provided. The system includes a first sub-system configured to perform data acquisition, control and recording of data; a second subsystem in communication with the first sub-system and configured to perform non-linearity and velocity preliminary imaging; a third subsystem in communication with the first subsystem and configured to emit controlled acoustic broadcasts and receive acoustic energy; a fourth subsystem in communication with the first subsystem and the third subsystem and configured to generate a source signal directed towards the rock formation; and a fifth subsystem in communication with the third subsystem and the fourth subsystem and configured to perform detection of signals representative of the non-linear properties of the rock formation.

  19. Investigation of Anisotropic Bonded Magnets in Permanent Magnet Machine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazdozian, H. A.; McCall, S. K.; Kramer, M. J.; Paranthaman, M. P.; Nlebedim, I. C.

    Rare earth elements (REE) provide the high energy product necessary for permanent magnets, such as sintered Nd2Fe14B, in many applications like wind energy generators. However, REEs are considered critical materials due to risk in their supply. To reduce the use of critical materials in permanent magnet machines, the performance of anisotropic bonded NdFeB magnets, aligned under varying magnetic field strength, was simulated using 3D finite element analysis in a 3MW direct-drive permanent magnet generator (DDPMG), with sintered N42 magnets used as a baseline for comparison. For direct substitution of the anisotropic bonded magnets, approximately 85% of the efficiency of the baseline model was achieved, irrespective of the alignment field. The torque and power generation of the DDPMG was not found to vary significantly with increase in the alignment field. Finally, design changes were studied to allow for the achievement of rated torque and power with the use of anisotropic bonded magnets, demonstrating the potential for reduction of critical materials in permanent magnets for renewable energy applications. This work was supported by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office.

  20. Investigations into stress shell characteristics of surrounding rock in fully mechanized top-coal caving face

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, G.X.; Chang, J.C.; Yang, K. [Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China)

    2009-01-15

    A key issue in underground mining is to understand and master the evolving patterns of stress induced by mining, and to control and utilize the action of rock pressure. Numerical and physical modeling tests have been carried out to investigate the distribution patterns of stress in the rock surrounding a fully mechanized top-coal caving (FMTC) face. The results showed that a macro-stress shell composed of high stress exists in the rock surrounding an FMTC face. The stress of the shell is higher than its internal and external stress and the stresses at its skewback producing abutment pressure for the surrounding rock. The stress shell lies in the virgin coal and rock mass in the vicinity of the face and its sagging zone. The stress shell, which bears and transfers the loads of overlying strata, acts as the primary supporting system of forces, and is the corpus of characterizing three-dimensional and macro-rock pressure distribution of mining face. Its external and internal shape changes with the variations in the working face structure as the face advances. Within the low-stress zone inside the stress shell, another structure, i.e. voussoir beam, which only bears parts of the load from the lower-lying strata, will produce periodic pressures on the face instead of great dynamic pressure even if the beam ruptures and loses stability. The results show that the FMTC face is situated within the lower-stress zone, which is protected by the stress shell of the overlying surrounding rock. We give an explanation of lower occurrence of rock pressure on FMTC faces, and reveal the mechanical nature of the top coal of an FMTC face acting as a 'cushion'. The strata behaviors of the face and its neighboring gates are under control of the stress shell. Drastic rock pressure in mine may occur when the balance of the stress shell is destruction or the forces system of the stress shell transfers. Crown Copyright

  1. Transcranial magnetic stimulation techniques in clinical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currà, A; Modugno, N; Inghilleri, M; Manfredi, M; Hallett, M; Berardelli, A

    2002-12-24

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a technique that can activate cortical motor areas and the corticospinal tract without causing the subject discomfort. Since TMS was introduced, numerous applications of the technique have been developed for the evaluation of neurologic diseases. Standard TMS applications (central motor conduction time, threshold and amplitude of motor evoked potentials) allow the evaluation of motor conduction in the CNS. Conduction studies provide specific information in neurologic conditions characterized by clinical and subclinical upper motor neuron involvement. In addition, they have proved useful in monitoring motor abnormalities and the recovery of motor function. TMS also gives information on the pathophysiology of the processes underlying the various clinical conditions. More complex TMS applications (paired-pulse stimulation, silent period, ipsilateral silent period, input-output curve, and evaluation of central fatigue) allow investigation into the mechanisms of diseases causing changes in the excitability of cortical motor areas. These techniques are also useful in monitoring the effects of neurotrophic drugs on cortical activity. TMS applications have an important place among the investigative tools to study patients with motor disorders.

  2. Investigation and hazard assessment of the 2003 and 2007 Staircase Falls rock falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Wieczorek

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Since 1857 more than 600 rock falls, rock slides, debris slides, and debris flows have been documented in Yosemite National Park, with rock falls in Yosemite Valley representing the majority of the events. On 26 December 2003, a rock fall originating from west of Glacier Point sent approximately 200 m3 of rock debris down a series of joint-controlled ledges to the floor of Yosemite Valley. The debris impacted talus near the base of Staircase Falls, producing fragments of flying rock that struck occupied cabins in Curry Village. Several years later on 9 June 2007, and again on 26 July 2007, smaller rock falls originated from the same source area. The 26 December 2003 event coincided with a severe winter storm and was likely triggered by precipitation and/or frost wedging, but the 9 June and 26 July 2007 events lack recognizable triggering mechanisms. We investigated the geologic and hydrologic factors contributing to the Staircase Falls rock falls, including bedrock lithology, weathering, joint spacing and orientations, and hydrologic processes affecting slope stability. We improved upon previous geomorphic assessment of rock-fall hazards, based on a shadow angle approach, by using STONE, a three-dimensional rock-fall simulation computer program. STONE produced simulated rock-fall runout patterns similar to the mapped extent of the 2003 and 2007 events, allowing us to simulate potential future rock falls from the Staircase Falls detachment area. Observations of recent rock falls, mapping of rock debris, and simulations of rock fall runouts beneath the Staircase Falls detachment area suggest that rock-fall hazard zones extend farther downslope than the extent previously defined by mapped surface talus deposits.

  3. Investigation and hazard assessment of the 2003 and 2007 Staircase Falls rock falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, G. F.; Stock, G. M.; Reichenbach, P.; Snyder, J. B.; Borchers, J. W.; Godt, J. W.

    2008-05-01

    Since 1857 more than 600 rock falls, rock slides, debris slides, and debris flows have been documented in Yosemite National Park, with rock falls in Yosemite Valley representing the majority of the events. On 26 December 2003, a rock fall originating from west of Glacier Point sent approximately 200 m3 of rock debris down a series of joint-controlled ledges to the floor of Yosemite Valley. The debris impacted talus near the base of Staircase Falls, producing fragments of flying rock that struck occupied cabins in Curry Village. Several years later on 9 June 2007, and again on 26 July 2007, smaller rock falls originated from the same source area. The 26 December 2003 event coincided with a severe winter storm and was likely triggered by precipitation and/or frost wedging, but the 9 June and 26 July 2007 events lack recognizable triggering mechanisms. We investigated the geologic and hydrologic factors contributing to the Staircase Falls rock falls, including bedrock lithology, weathering, joint spacing and orientations, and hydrologic processes affecting slope stability. We improved upon previous geomorphic assessment of rock-fall hazards, based on a shadow angle approach, by using STONE, a three-dimensional rock-fall simulation computer program. STONE produced simulated rock-fall runout patterns similar to the mapped extent of the 2003 and 2007 events, allowing us to simulate potential future rock falls from the Staircase Falls detachment area. Observations of recent rock falls, mapping of rock debris, and simulations of rock fall runouts beneath the Staircase Falls detachment area suggest that rock-fall hazard zones extend farther downslope than the extent previously defined by mapped surface talus deposits.

  4. Investigations on THM effects in buffer, EDZ and argillaceous host rock. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobmann, M.; Breustedt, M.; Li, S.; Polster, M.; Schirmer, S.

    2013-11-15

    In the Federal Republic of Germany the final disposal of heat-generating radioactive waste in clay formations is investigated as an alternative to the reference concept in a salt formation. The main concern when switching to a clay host rock is the high amount of heat released from the canisters into the clay rock over a long period of time. It is still an open question to what extent the host rock formation is affected by the released heat and if this is a threat to safety. The released heat from the canisters is a load on the whole barrier system, which consists of the geotechnical barriers (buffer and plugs) and the geological barrier. The temperature has a direct impact on the buffer, the excavative damaged zone (EDZ) and the surrounding host rock. The buffer has specific thermo-physical properties that significantly influence the temperature evolution in the near field so that a temperature load on the buffer is of special concern. Thus, with regard to thermal criteria, the buffer plays a significant role for the design of the emplacement fields. An open question is whether the use of admixtures could enhance the thermo-physical properties so that the heat release into the host rock would be more efficient. Due to the permanent heat release and the continuous emplacement of additional canisters, the in-situ stress state in the vicinity of the emplacement boreholes continuously varies during the operational period and beyond. It is an open question how the EDZ of emplacement boreholes evolves in the long term with regard to its fissure system and mainly its permeability. A closure of the EDZ and a corresponding decrease in its permeability are necessary to enhance the tightness of the barrier system, especially to avoid a preferential pathway through the EDZ around the openings. The host rock has specific properties that are necessary to ensure a safe enclosure of the waste. A change in the host rock temperature may change these properties irreversibly. This is

  5. Rock mechanics studies for SMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haimson, B.C.

    1981-01-01

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems capable of storing thousands of MWh develop tremendous magnetically induced forces when charged. To prevent rutpure of the magnets these forces must be confined. Bedrock offers a practical and relatively inexpensive magnet containment structure. This paper examines the need for rock mechanics research in connection with the construction and use of SMES rock caverns; the unique problems related to housing superconducting magnets in bedrock; site investigations of granite, quartzite and dolomite deposits in Wisconsin; and cavern design requirements to assure cavern stability and limited deformation under the expected mechanical leads. Recommendations are made for siting SMES caverns

  6. Detrital and early chemical remanent magnetization in redbeds and their rock magnetic signature: Zicapa Formation, southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Rojas, Maria Isabel; Molina-Garza, Roberto Stanley

    2018-06-01

    Poles from continental redbeds are a large fraction of the world's palaeomagnetic database. Nonetheless, the time of acquisition and origin of the remanent magnetization of redbeds has been long debated. We report palaeomagnetic data, rock magnetic data and microscope observations for Lower Cretaceous redbeds in southern Mexico. These data allow us to discriminate between the hysteresis properties of remanent magnetizations of detrital and chemical origin, and to establish the early origin of a chemical remanence. Red sandstones of the Zicapa Formation contain a multicomponent remanence revealed by thermal demagnetization, and consisting of three stable components with partially overlapping laboratory unblocking temperatures of 600 °C, (low, intermediate and high temperature, respectively). They are interpreted as a viscous remanence residing in detrital magnetite, a chemical remanence residing in authigenic hematite and a depositional remanence residing in detrital hematite, respectively. The low-temperature component is nearly parallel to the recent dipole field. The tilt-corrected overall site means of the intermediate (chemical) and high temperature (depositional) components are indistinguishable (Dec = 282.0°, Inc = 12.4°, k = 13.33, α95 = 10.1°, N = 17, for the intermediate temperature; and Dec = 272.5°, Inc = 16.5°, k = 14.04, α95 = 11, N = 14, for the high temperature). Elongation/inclination analysis suggests that depositional and chemical components require applying an f = factor of approximately 0.4. Both of these components define a magnetic polarity zonation, but the polarity of the chemical and detrital components may or may not be the same. The chemical remanence coincides, more often than not, with the polarity of the depositional remanence of the overlying (younger) strata, suggesting a delay in remanence acquisition of tens to a few hundred ka for the chemical component. Pigmentary and detrital haematite were recognized with microscopic

  7. Magnetic resonance: discovery, investigations, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessenikh, Aleksandr V

    2009-01-01

    The history of the development of the theoretical ideas and experimental methods of magnetic resonance, as well as the applications of these methods in modern natural science, technology, and medicine, are outlined, with allowance for the contribution of Russian researchers. An assessment of some promising trends of studies and applications of magnetic resonance is given. (from the history of physics)

  8. Anisotropy of susceptibility in rocks which are magnetically nonlinear even in low fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrouda, František; Chadima, Martin; Ježek, Josef

    2018-06-01

    Theory of the low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) assumes a linear relationship between magnetization and magnetizing field, resulting in field-independent susceptibility. This is valid for diamagnetic and paramagnetic minerals by definition and also for pure magnetite, while in titanomagnetite, pyrrhotite and hematite the susceptibility may be clearly field-dependent even in low fields used in common AMS meter. Consequently, the use of the linear AMS theory is fully legitimate in the former minerals, but in principle incorrect in the latter ones. Automated measurement of susceptibility in 320 directions in variable low-fields ranging from 5 to 700 A m-1 was applied to more than 100 specimens of various pyrrhotite-bearing and titanomagnetite-bearing rocks. Data analysis showed that the anisotropic susceptibility remains well represented by an ellipsoid in the entire low-field span even though the ellipsoid increases its volume and eccentricity. The principal directions do not change their orientations with low-field in most specimens. Expressions for susceptibility as a function of field were found in the form of diagonal tensor whose elements are polynomials of low order. In a large proportion of samples, the susceptibility expressions can be further simplified to have one common skeleton polynomial.

  9. The results of the investigations on rock mechanics in HDB-9-11 boreholes and update of the rock mechanical model around the Horonobe URL construction area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanada, Hiroyuki; Niunoya, Sumio; Matsui, Hiroya

    2008-09-01

    Horonobe URL (Underground Research Laboratory) Project is conducted at Horonobe-cho, Teshio-gun, Hokkaido. This research report shows the result of the rock mechanical investigations which have been carried out from 2004 to 2005 as a part of the project. The objectives of the rock mechanical investigation are as follows: To obtain the data which were necessary for construction design of URL. To confirm the distribution of rock mechanical properties in and around URL construction area. The results of the investigations are summarized as follows: 1) Variation and values of depth direction of physical and mechanical properties in the laboratory construction area corresponded approximately to the results obtained from the rock mechanical investigations of HDB-1-8. 2) The major redesign had been not had about physical and mechanical properties in the laboratory construction area being able to divide into three zones and length of its own zone in updating rock mechanical model. 3) From the results of initial stress measured by hydraulic fracturing, the results that the direction of the maximum principle stress is E-W was no different from results obtained from the investigations of HDB-1-8, but the magnitude correlation among maximum, minimum principle stress and overburden pressure measured around G.L.-927 m showed different trends compared with the results of HDB-1-8. 4) Diatomaceous mudstone was yielded under isotropic compression. Cam-clay model as constitutive law of diatomaceous mudstone should be used for tunnel excavation analysis. 5) Uniaxial compression strength of rock saturated under saline water is larger than that of saturated under freshwater. Poisson's ratio of rock saturated under saline water is smaller than that of saturated under saline water. 6) The effective confining pressure increases with the equivalent opening width and permeability decreases. 7) The value of principle stress obtained from DSCA method is larger than that obtained from hydraulic

  10. Theoretical and laboratory investigations of flow through fractures in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witherspoon, P.A.; Watkins, D.J.; Tsang, Y.W.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical model developed for flow through a deformable fracture subject to stresses was successfully tested against laboratory experiments. The model contains no arbitrary parameters and can be used to predict flow rates through a single fracture if the fractional fracture contact area can be estimated and if stress-deformation data are available. These data can be obtained from laboratory or in situ tests. The model has considerable potential for practical application. The permeability of ultralarge samples of fractured crystalline rock as a function of stresses was measured. Results from tests on a pervasively fractured 1-m-diameter specimen of granitic rock showed that drastically simplifying assumptions must be used to apply theoretical models to this type of rock mass. Simple models successfully reproduce the trend of reduced permeability as stress is applied in a direction normal to the fracture plane. The tests also demonstrated how fracture conductivity increases as a result of dilatancy associated with shear displacements. The effect of specimen size on the hydraulic properties of fractured rock was also investigated. Permeability tests were performed on specimens of charcoal black granite containing a single fracture subjected to normal stress. Results are presented for tests performed on a 0.914-m-diameter specimen and on the same specimen after it had been reduced to 0.764 m in diameter. The data show that fracture conductivity is sensitive to stress history and sample disturbance

  11. Investigation of wire motion in superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogitsu, T.; Tsuchiya, K.; Devred, A.

    1990-09-01

    The large Lorentz forces occuring during the excitation of superconducting magnets can provoke sudden motions of wire, which eventually release enough energy to trigger a quench. These wire motions are accompanied by two electromagnetic effects: an induced emf along the moved wire, and a local change in flux caused by the minute dislocation of current. Both effects cause spikes in the coil voltage. Voltage data recorded during the excitation of a superconducting quadrupole magnet which early exhibit such events are here reported. Interpretations of the voltage spikes in terms of energy release are also presented, leading to insights on the spectrum of the disturbances which occur in real magnets. 15 refs

  12. Experimental Investigation of Mechanical Properties of Black Shales after CO2-Water-Rock Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Lyu, Qiao; Ranjith, Pathegama Gamage; Long, Xinping; Ji, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The effects of CO2-water-rock interactions on the mechanical properties of shale are essential for estimating the possibility of sequestrating CO2 in shale reservoirs. In this study, uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) tests together with an acoustic emission (AE) system and SEM and EDS analysis were performed to investigate the mechanical properties and microstructural changes of black shales with different saturation times (10 days, 20 days and 30 days) in water dissoluted with gaseous/supe...

  13. Investigation of magnetically enhanced swelling behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Starch; iron oxide; nanotechnology; nanoparticles; superparamagnetic; drug delivery. Abstract. The present study follows a novel strategy for the preparation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles of cross-linked starch impregnated homogeneously with nanosized iron oxide. The prepared magnetic nanoparticles ...

  14. Forsmark site investigation. Assessment of the validity of the rock domain model, version 1.2, based on the modelling of gravity and petrophysical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaksson, Hans; Stephens, Michael B.

    2007-11-01

    This document reports the results gained by the geophysical modelling of rock domains based on gravity and petrophysical data, which is one of the activities performed within the site investigation work at Forsmark. The main objective with this activity is to assess the validity of the geological rock domain model version 1.2, and to identify discrepancies in the model that may indicate a need for revision of the model or a need for additional investigations. The verification is carried out by comparing the calculated gravity model response, which takes account of the geological model, with a local gravity anomaly that represents the measured data. The model response is obtained from the three-dimensional geometry and the petrophysical data provided for each rock domain in the geological model. Due to model boundary conditions, the study is carried out in a smaller area within the regional model area. Gravity model responses are calculated in three stages; an initial model, a base model and a refined base model. The refined base model is preferred and is used for comparison purposes. In general, there is a good agreement between the refined base model that makes use of the rock domain model, version 1.2 and the measured gravity data, not least where it concerns the depth extension of the critical rock domain RFM029. The most significant discrepancy occurs in the area extending from the SFR office to the SFR underground facility and further to the northwest. It is speculated that this discrepancy is caused by a combination of an overestimation of the volume of gabbro (RFM016) that plunges towards the southeast in the rock domain model, and an underestimation of the volume of occurrence of pegmatite and pegmatitic granite that are known to be present and occur as larger bodies around SFR. Other discrepancies are noted in rock domain RFM022, which is considered to be overestimated in the rock domain model, version 1.2, and in rock domain RFM017, where the gravity

  15. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Overview of the investigations 1986-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanfors, R.; Erlstroem, M.; Markstroem, I.

    1991-06-01

    In order to prepare for the siting and licensing of a spent fuel repository SKB has decided to construct a new underground research laboratory. The pre-investigations for the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory started in late 1986. This report gives a comprehensive compilation of the different investigations performed during the pre-investigation phase (1986-1990). The information is mainly compiled in CAD-generated maps and illustrations in which the reader can gather information concerning the scope of work as well as references to more detailed reports for further study. (au)

  16. Theoretical investigation of the extinction coefficient of magnetic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Xiaopeng; Xuan Yimin, E-mail: ymxuan@mail.njust.edu.cn; Li Qiang [Nanjing University of Science and Technology, School of Energy and Power Engineering (China)

    2013-05-15

    A new theoretical approach for calculating the extinction coefficient of magnetic fluid is proposed, which is based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and T-matrix method. By means of this approach, the influence of particle diameter, particle volume fraction, and external magnetic filed on the extinction coefficient of magnetic fluid is investigated. The results show that the extinction coefficient of the magnetic fluid linearly increases with increase in the particle volume fraction. For a given particle volume fraction, the extinction coefficient increases with increase in the particle diameter which varies from 5 to 20 nm. When a uniform external magnetic filed is applied to the magnetic fluid, the extinction coefficient of the magnetic fluid presents an anisotropic feature. These results agree well with the reported experimental results. The proposed approach is applicable to investigating the optical properties of magnetic fluids.

  17. The USANS technique for the investigation of structure from hydrated gels to porous rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crompton, Kylie; Forsythe, John; Bertram, Willem; Knott, R.B.; Barker, John

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The Ultra Small Angle Neutron Scattering (USANS) technique extends the range of the Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique into the tens of micron size range. This is extremely useful for many systems particularly those where sample preparation for optical or electron microscopy can cause major changes to the microstructure under investigation. Two examples will be presented to highlight different aspects of the technique. Firstly, the structure was investigated of a full hydrated polymer scaffold for stem cells constructed from chitosan. Stem cells interact with the scaffold on the micron scale however information on the nanoscale (i e individual chitosan polymer chains) is also required in order the tailor the scaffold structure. The soft, hydrated gel is unsuitable for optical or electron microscopy. Secondly, the structure was investigated of natural oil-bearing and synthetic rock. The scattering data from different thickness of rock was analysed using a Fourier Transform method to remove multiple scattering effects and to simulate scattering from a thin rock. In this case bulk properties such as porosity are of interest. (authors)

  18. Spanish participation in the Haw Project: Laboratory investigations on Gamma irradiation effects in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuevas, C. de las; Miralles, L.; Teixidor, P.; Garcia Veigas, J.; Dies, X.; Ortega, X.; Pueyo, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    In order to prove the safe disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HAW) in salt rock, a five years test disposal of thirty highly radioactive radiation sources is planned in the Asse salt mine, in the Federal Republic of Germany. The thirty radiation sources consist of steel canisters containing the vitrified radionuclides Caesium 137 and Strontium 90 in quantities sufficient to cover the bandwidth of heat generation and gamma radiation of real HAW. The radiation sources will be emplaced in six boreholes located in two galleries at the 800 m level. Two electrical heater tests were already started in November 1988 and are continuosly surveyed in respect of the rock mass. Also the handling system necessary for the emplacement of the radioactive canisters was developed and succesfully tested. A laboratory investigation programme on radiation effects in salt is being performed in advance to the radioactive canister emplacement. This programme includes the investigation of thermally and radiolytically induced water and gas release from the rock salt and the radiolytical decomposition of salt minerals. Part of this programme has been carried out since 1988 at the University of Barcelona, basically what refers to colloidal sodium determinations by light absorption measurements and microstructural studies on irradiated salt samples. For gamma dose and dose rate measurements in the test field, measuring systems consisting of ionisation chambers as well as solid state dosemeters were developed and tested. Thermomechanical computer code validation is performed by calculational predictions and parallel investigation of the stress and displacement fields in the underground test field

  19. Geophysical Properties of Hard Rock for Investigation of Stress Fields in Deep Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbo, M.; Young, R. P.; Schmitt, D. R.; Milkereit, B.

    2014-12-01

    A complication in geophysical monitoring of deep mines is the high-stress dependency of the physical properties of hard rocks. In-mine observations show anisotropic variability of the in situ P- and S-wave velocities and resistivity of the hard rocks that are likely related to stress field changes. As part of a comprehensive study in a deep, highly stressed mine located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, data from in situ monitoring of the seismicity, conductivity, stress, and stress dependent physical properties has been obtain. In-laboratory experiments are also being performed on borehole cores from the Sudbury mines. These experiments will measure the Norite borehole core's properties including elastic modulus, bulk modulus, P- and S-wave velocities, and density. Hydraulic fracturing has been successfully implemented in industries such as oil and gas and enhanced geothermal systems, and is currently being investigated as a potential method for preconditioning in mining. However, further research is required to quantify how hydraulic fractures propagate through hard, unfractured rock as well as naturally fractured rock typically found in mines. These in laboratory experiments will contribute to a hydraulic fracturing project evaluating the feasibility and effectiveness of hydraulic fracturing as a method of de-stressing hard rock mines. A tri-axial deformation cell equipped with 18 Acoustic Emission (AE) sensors will be used to bring the borehole cores to a tri-axial state of stress. The cores will then be injected with fluid until the the hydraulic fracture has propagated to the edge of the core, while AE waveforms will be digitized continuously at 10 MHz and 12-bit resolution for the duration of each experiment. These laboratory hydraulic fracture experiments will contribute to understanding how parameters including stress ratio, fluid injection rate, and viscosity, affect the fracturing process.

  20. Groundwater flow through fissured rock: field investigations and interpretation in the Albigna dam area, Graubuenden, Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovari, K.; Arn, Th.; Gmuender, Ch.

    1989-11-01

    The rock foundation of a dam was chosen as the site for repeated observations of flow patterns in a fissured rock. Our project was carried out at the Albigna Dam in the Canton of Graubuenden, Switzerland, where the greatest fluctuation in the level of the lake was approximately 100 m. In the area of the dam the rock consists of a fresh, solid granite, whose fissure systems were well known as regards position and distribution. The measurement program for assessing the flow conditions consisted of two elements: piezometric pressure measurements in boreholes and strain measurements in boreholes. Pressure measurements were accomplished to define the potential field. Strain measurements were accomplished to detect fracture opening and closing as a function of the fluctuations in the lake level. From a combination of the two sets of observations it was hoped to be able to determine the interaction between hydraulics and mechanics, i.e. the coupling of two key processes with a possible influence on a changing permeability of the rock. Using the 'sliding micrometer', the continuous strain distribution was determined along two boreholes in the measuring plane. Pressures were measured using the 'Piezodex' system. Mathematical investigations were conducted with the AQUA-ROCK finite element program on a 2D-model. From just a visual comparison of the measured and calculated values it is clear that a different model achieves the best correlation depending on the level of the lake. For the maximum lake level, however, it is essential to take account of the action of the fissures either by way of the idealization according to Snow (main model 2) or by considering the individual fissures (main model 3). (author) figs., tabs., 12 refs

  1. Rock magnetic expression of fluid infiltration in the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault (Longmen Shan thrust belt, China)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, T.; Yang, Xiaosong; Duan, Qingbao; Chen, J.; Dekkers, M.J.

    Fluid infiltration within fault zones is an important process in earthquake rupture. Magnetic properties of fault rocks convey essential clues pertaining to physicochemical processes in fault zones. In 2011, two shallow holes (134 and 54 m depth, respectively) were drilled into the Yingxiu-Beichuan

  2. Recognition of primary and diagenetic magnetizations to determine the magnetic polarity record and timing of deposition of the moat-fill rocks of the Oligocene Creede Caldera, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Richard L.; Rosenbaum, Joseph G.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Lanphere, Marvin A.; Robert, Andrew P.; Verosub, Kenneth L.

    2000-01-01

    Sedimentary and volcaniclastic rocks of the Oligocene Creede Formation fill the moat of the Creede caldera, which formed at about 26.9 Ma during the eruption of the Snowshoe Mountain Tuff. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic studies of two cores (418 and 703 m long) that penetrated the lower half of the Creede Formation, in addition to paleomagnetic and isotopic dating studies of stratigraphically bracketing volcanic units, provide information on the age and the time span of sedimentation of the caldera fill. Normal polarity magnetization are found in Snowshoe Mountain Tuff beneath the moat sediments; in detrital-magnetite-bearing graded tuffs near the bottom of the moat fill; in an ash-fall deposit about 200 m stratigraphically about the top of core 2; and in postcaldera lava flows of the Fisher Dacite that overlie the Creede Formation. Normal polarity also characterizes detrital-magnetite-bearing tuff and sandstone unites within the caldera moat rocks that did not undergo severe sulfidic alteration. The combination of initially low magnitude of remanent magnetization and the destructive effects of subsequent diagenetic sulfidization on detrital iron oxides results in a poor paleomagnetic record for the fine-grained sedimentary rocks of the Creede Formation. these fine-grained rocks have either normal or revered polarity magnetizations that are carried by magnetite and/or maghemite. Many more apparent reversals are found that can be accommodated by any geomagnetic polarity time scale over the interval spanned by the ages of the bracketing extrusive rocks. Moreover, opposite polarity magnetization are found in specimens separated by only a few centimeters, without intervening hiatuses, and by specimens in several tuff beds, each of which represents a single depositional event. These polarity changes cannot, therefore, be attributed to detrital remanent magnetization. Many polarity changes are apparently related to chemical remanent magnetizations carried by

  3. Investigation of Rock Mass Stability Around the Tunnels in an Underground Mine in USA Using Three-Dimensional Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yan; Kulatilake, P. H. S. W.; Sandbak, L. A.

    2018-02-01

    The stability of the rock mass around the tunnels in an underground mine was investigated using the distinct element method. A three-dimensional model was developed based on the available geological, geotechnical, and mine construction information. It incorporates a complex lithological system, persistent and non-persistent faults, and a complex tunnel system including backfilled tunnels. The strain-softening constitutive model was applied for the rock masses. The rock mass properties were estimated using the Hoek-Brown equations based on the intact rock properties and the RMR values. The fault material behavior was modeled using the continuously yielding joint model. Sequential construction and rock supporting procedures were simulated based on the way they progressed in the mine. Stress analyses were performed to study the effect of the horizontal in situ stresses and the variability of rock mass properties on tunnel stability, and to evaluate the effectiveness of rock supports. The rock mass behavior was assessed using the stresses, failure zones, deformations around the tunnels, and the fault shear displacement vectors. The safety of rock supports was quantified using the bond shear and bolt tensile failures. Results show that the major fault and weak interlayer have distinct influences on the displacements and stresses around the tunnels. Comparison between the numerical modeling results and the field measurements indicated the cases with the average rock mass properties, and the K 0 values between 0.5 and 1.25 provide satisfactory agreement with the field measurements.

  4. Linking Rock Magnetic Parameters and Tropical Paleoclimate in Postglacial Carbonates of the Tahitian Coral Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzman, E. S.; Lund, S.; Camoin, G.; Thouveny, N.

    2009-12-01

    In areas far away from active plate boundaries and previously glaciated regions, ecologically sensitive coral reefs provide an ideal laboratory for studying the timing and extent of deglaciation events as well as climatic change/variability at sub-millennial timescales. We have studied the Post Last-Glacial-Maximum (Post-LGM) coral reef terrace sediments recovered from the island of Tahiti on IODP Expedition 310. Samples for magnetic analysis were obtained from 632 meters of core from three reef tracts (Maraa, Tiarei, Faaa) surrounding the island (37 holes at 22 sites). The Post-LGM sediments are composed of >95% carbonate residing in a mixture of macroscopic framework corals, encrusting coralline algae, and bacterial microbialites (60% of the total core volume). Detailed paleomagnetic and rock magnetic measurements indicate that the microbialites carry a strong and stable natural magnetic remanence residing almost entirely in titanomagnetite derived from the Tahitian volcanic edifice. Within each tract, paleomagnetic results (inclination, relative paleointensity) were correlated to build a composite magnetic stratigraphy, which we could then compile with radiocarbon dates to develop an absolute chronostratigraphy. At the Maraa tract, for example, we use 54 radiocarbon dates to date our composite section to 7,500 to 13,500 cal. ybp. and demonstrate that the reef developed in a smooth and coherent manner over this interval. Overlaying the chronostratigraphy on measurements of the variation in magnetic properties including susceptibility, ARM, and IRM we can monitor changes in concentration, composition and grainsize of the influx of volcanogenic sediment over time. The ARM, IRM, and CHI intensities (normalized to sample weight) show a single strong peak between~9-10,000 years ago. We also observe a ~500-yr cyclicity in magnetic grain size and a clear increase in grain size associated with the Younger Dryas that we interpret to be related to rainfall variability. The

  5. Optical investigation of effective permeability of dilute magnetic dielectrics with magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Ananya, E-mail: banerjee.ananya2008@gmail.com; Sarkar, A. [Dept. of Physics, Bijoy Krishna Girls’ College, 5/3 M.G. Road, Howrah 711101, W.B. (India)

    2016-05-06

    The prime objective of this paper is to investigate the magnetic nature of dilute magnetic dielectrics (DMD) under variation of external magnetic field. The said variation is studied over developed nano-sized Gadolinium Oxide as a DMD system. The observed experimental field variation of the effective magnetic permeability is analyzed results of optical experiment. The experiment records the variation of Brewster angle of incident polarized LASER beam from the surface of developed DMD specimen with applied out of plane external magnetic field. The effective refractive index and hence relative magnetic permeability were estimated following electro-magnetic theory. The overall results obtained and agreement between theory and experiment are good.

  6. Optical investigation of effective permeability of dilute magnetic dielectrics with magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Ananya; Sarkar, A.

    2016-05-01

    The prime objective of this paper is to investigate the magnetic nature of dilute magnetic dielectrics (DMD) under variation of external magnetic field. The said variation is studied over developed nano-sized Gadolinium Oxide as a DMD system. The observed experimental field variation of the effective magnetic permeability is analyzed results of optical experiment. The experiment records the variation of Brewster angle of incident polarized LASER beam from the surface of developed DMD specimen with applied out of plane external magnetic field. The effective refractive index and hence relative magnetic permeability were estimated following electro-magnetic theory. The overall results obtained and agreement between theory and experiment are good.

  7. Investigation of the magnetic field of the permanent magnet applied in the DIRAC experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Batyuk, P; Yazkov, V

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of the experimental data obtained during the run of 2011 has revealed the effect of degradation of the permanent magnet used. This effect is investigated, and average magnetic field is estimated for each day of the run.

  8. Investigation of trace uranium content in rock phosphate ore samples from Kurun-Uro area, Nuba Mountains, Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Abdel Majid Abdel Galil Mohammed

    1999-07-01

    This investigation was carried out mainly to test the trace uranium level content in rock phosphate, which was used as a low cost fertilizer. Two types of rock phosphate were examined, namely, Kurun and Uro rocks from Nuba Mountains in the Southern Kurdufan province, Sudan.This area has a high background natural radioactivity. Moreover, it contains a rock phosphate zone lying between J. Kurun and Uro. The work included analytical methods carried out for thr rock phosphate samples using spectrophotometric and X-ray fluorescence techniques. The results obtained were compared with the data from literature and they showed a good agreement.The data was statistically analyzed to compare the results by the two techniques. The results of uranium content determined by the two analytical methods were significantly similar.The instrumental analysis revealed that different. Uranium content in the rocks phosphate samples of Uro type was found to be 1.6 times higher than Kurun type. (Author)

  9. Geochemical investigation of petroleum source rocks by using Rock- Eval data in the Agha-Jari oilfield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad khani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 40 drilling cutting of the Pabdeh, Gurpi, kazhdumi and Gadvan Formations from the Agha-Jari Oilfield were analyzed by using Rock-Eval pyrolysis. In order to recognizing sedimentary environmental conditions of studied Formations, they are divided to 4 zones which A (Kazhdumi Formation#187 and C (Kazhdumi Formation#140 zones show reduction conditions by presence of sea organic materials and B (Gadvan Formation #140 and D(Gadvan Formation#187 zones show oxidation conditions by presence of continental organic materials to basin. Based on the Rock-Eval pyrolysis data, the Pabeh, Gurpi, Kazhdumi and Gadvan Formations have variable hydrocarbon generative potential. HI vs. OI plot revealed that the kerogen type in this Formations is a mixed of types II & III. The intensity of matrix effect in the Pabdeh, Gurpi, Kazhdumi and Gadvan Formations was compared by using S2 vs. TOC plot and calculating its regression equation. The results show that the significant amount of S2 adsorption by matrix was happened in the Pabdeh (4.98-6.96 mg HC/gr rock in wells 113 and 121 and Gurpi Formations ‌(4.33 mg HC/gr rock in well 113 which is due to their low thermal maturity‌(Tmax

  10. Investigation of magnetically enhanced swelling behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mer produced by many plants as a source of stored energy. (Corre et al 2010). It is an .... A vibrating-sample magnetometer (VSM) was used to study the magnetic ... were prepared: saline water (0·9 g NaCl), synthetic urine. (0·8 g NaCl, 0·10 g ...

  11. Identification and characterization of tsunami deposits off southeast coast of India from the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami: Rock magnetic and geochemical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerasingam, S.; Venkatachalapathy, R.; Basavaiah, N.; Ramkumar, T.; Venkatramanan, S.; Deenadayalan, K.

    2014-06-01

    The December 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami (IOT) had a major impact on the geomorphology and sedimentology of the east coast of India. Estimation of the magnitude of the tsunami from its deposits is a challenging topic to be developed in studies on tsunami hazard assessment. Two core sediments (C1 and C2) from Nagapattinam, southeast coast of India were subjected to textural, mineral, geochemical and rock-magnetic measurements. In both cores, three zones (zone I, II and III) have been distinguished based on mineralogical, geochemical and magnetic data. Zone II is featured by peculiar rock-magnetic, textural, mineralogical and geochemical signatures in both sediment cores that we interpret to correspond to the 2004 IOT deposit. Textural, mineralogical, geochemical and rock-magnetic investigations showed that the tsunami deposit is featured by relative enrichment in sand, quartz, feldspar, carbonate, SiO 2, TiO 2, K 2O and CaO and by a depletion in clay and iron oxides. These results point to a dilution of reworked ferromagnetic particles into a huge volume of paramagnetic materials, similar to what has been described in other nearshore tsunami deposits (Font et al. 2010). Correlation analysis elucidated the relationships among the textural, mineral, geochemical and magnetic parameters, and suggests that most of the quartz-rich coarse sediments have been transported offshore by the tsunami wave. These results agreed well with the previously published numerical model of tsunami induced sediment transport off southeast coast of India and can be used for future comparative studies on tsunami deposits.

  12. The investigation of nanostructures of magnetic recording media by TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yingguo; Ohkubo, Tadakatsu; Laughlin, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Diverse applications of transmission electron microscopy techniques used in investigating the nanostructures of magnetic recording materials are presented. Specimen preparation methods are discussed for the specific case of magnetic thin film recording media. Investigations of the crystallographic orientation, grain size and distribution, and interfacial nanostructures are presented

  13. Investigation Procedure of Magnetic Performances of NdFeB Permanent Magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calin, Marius-Daniel; Helerea, Elena; Ritchie, Ewen

    2011-01-01

    The permanent magnet applications based on carbon steel magnets, hard ferrites and AlNiCo magnets classes are renewed with new classes of advanced magnetic materials based on rare earth elements, the Sm-Co and NdFeB types. Performance increase of the hard magnetic materials and their use in speci......The permanent magnet applications based on carbon steel magnets, hard ferrites and AlNiCo magnets classes are renewed with new classes of advanced magnetic materials based on rare earth elements, the Sm-Co and NdFeB types. Performance increase of the hard magnetic materials and their use...... in specific applications impose also great advances in the field of magnetic measurement. New researches need to be validated in order to investigate the NdFeB permanent magnets performances, including their stability under different thermal operational regimes. In this paper a specific investigation...... procedure of magnetic performances of NdFeB permanent magnets in correlation with the range of operating temperature is proposed based on modern hysteresisgraph method and impulse magnetization technique....

  14. Sedimentology and Rock Magnetism of Bailey River Peat Cores, Sudbury Area: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtseven, A.; Cioppa, M. T.; Dean, K.

    2009-05-01

    by 200 mT, and S-ratios between 0.9 and 0.93). More detailed rock magnetic property measurements could reveal variations grain size and magnetic mineralogy that could reflect climatic or watershed changes.

  15. Investigation of Rock Failure Pattern in Creep by Digital Speckle Correlation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunliang Tan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the mechanical characteristics from creep deformation to failure of rock, the tests of uniaxial compression and pushing steel-plate anchored in rock were performed, by using RLJW-2000 servo test synchronizing with Digital Speckle Correlation Method (DSCM. The investigations showed that for a uniaxial compressive specimen, when load arrived at 0.5σc, displacement clusters orderly formed, which was ahead of the macrocreep strain occurring in a slight jump mode when load arrived at 0.7σc. When the load level arrived at 0.8σc, displacement clusters gathered to be a narrow band. After that, the specimen abruptly fractured in a shear mode. In the creep pushing steel-plate test, when pushing force arrived at 25 kN, crack began to occur, the horizontal displacement field as well as shear strain field concentrated continuously along the interface between steel-plate and rock, and a new narrow concentrating band gathered in the upper layer. When pushing force arrived at 27.5 kN, another new narrow shear deformation band formed in the lower layer. Then, the steel-plate was pushed out quickly accompanying strong creep deformation.

  16. Experimental and Modelling Investigations of the Coupled Elastoplastic Damage of a Quasi-brittle Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiu-Chang

    2018-02-01

    Triaxial compression tests are conducted on a quasi-brittle rock, limestone. The analyses show that elastoplastic deformation is coupled with damage. Based on the experimental investigation, a coupled elastoplastic damage model is developed within the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. The coupling effects between the plastic and damage dissipations are described by introducing an isotropic damage variable into the elastic stiffness and yield criterion. The novelty of the model is in the description of the thermodynamic force associated with damage, which is formulated as a state function of both elastic and plastic strain energies. The latter gives a full consideration on the comprehensive effects of plastic strain and stress changing processes in rock material on the development of damage. The damage criterion and potential are constructed to determine the onset and evolution of damage variable. The return mapping algorithms of the coupled model are deduced for three different inelastic corrections. Comparisons between test data and numerical simulations show that the coupled elastoplastic damage model is capable of describing the main mechanical behaviours of the quasi-brittle rock.

  17. Methodology Investigation Automatic Magnetic Recording Borescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    or other brushless signal coupling devices to the extent possible and feasible to reduce or eliminate the need for slip ring and brush type signal...the inspection head, is used to magnetically couple the necessary energy across the rotary interface. Because there is (1) an appreciable air gap in...were written. (2) As required by the contract, the signal conditioners in the MB employ automatic gain control to compensate for the changes in

  18. New Investigations of the Gow Lake Impact Structure, Saskatchewan, Canada: Impact Melt Rocks, Astronaut Training, and More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinski, G. R.; Singleton, A. C.; Ozaruk, A.; Hansen, J. R.

    2012-03-01

    New investigations of the Gow Lake impact structure has revealed an almost complete sequence of impactites from the crater floor upward through a series of melt-free and melt-bearing rocks. This research involved an astronaut training component.

  19. Petrology and Rock Magnetism of the peridotites of Pindos Ophiolite (Greece), insights into the serpentinization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnemains, D.; Carlut, J. H.; Mevel, C.; Andreani, M.; Escartin, J.; Debret, B.

    2015-12-01

    We present a petrological and magnetic study of a suite of serpentinized peridotites from the Pindos ophiolite spanning a wide range in the degree of serpentinization (from ~10 to 100%). The Pindos ophiolite, in Northern Greece, is a portion of Late Triassic oceanic lithosphere obducted during the convergence of the Apulian and Pelagonian micro-continents. This ophiolite is interpreted mainly as the result of a supra-subduction zone spreading process but its complete history remains largely unknown. Therefore, it is not clear when the ultramafic section was exposed to fluid circulation that resulted in its serpentinization. Element partitioning during serpentinization reactions is dependent on parameters such as temperature and water-rock ratio. In particular, they affect the behavior of the iron released by olivine, which can be taken up either by magnetite, serpentine and/or brucite. Analyses of the reaction products are therefore a key to constrain the conditions during the main stage of the alteration. Our study was designed to gain insight on the conditions prevailing during hydration. Our results indicate that even fully serpentinized samples have a very low magnetization and magnetite content. Moreover, microprobe and μXanes results show that serpentine is the main host of iron in the divalent but also trivalent form. These results are compared with a set of data from serpentinized ultramafics sampled from the ocean floors, as well as from various other ophiolites. We suggest that serpentinization at Pindos occurred at relatively low-temperature (less than 200 °C), therefore not at a ridge environment. In addition, we stress that the presence of trivalent iron in serpentine indicates that serpentinization may remain a producer of hydrogen even when very little magnetite is formed.

  20. Microscale experimental investigation of deformation and damage of argillaceous rocks under cyclic hydric and mechanical loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Linlin; Yang, Diansen; Heripre, Eva; Chanchole, Serge; Bornert, Michel; Pouya, Ahmad; Halphen, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    loading, the behavior of argillaceous rocks under mechanical loading is also investigated. Firstly, uniaxial compression tests are conducted maintaining relative humidity constant in the ESEM's chamber, by means of a new in situ rig designed to prescribe both the temperature and the load of the sample. The mechanisms of deformation and damage of such rocks are investigated. Moreover, the test under combined hydric and mechanical loadings is performed: the specimen is subjected to a staged humidification (20 %RH - 80 %RH - 99 %RH). Reaching the moisture equilibrium for each humidity sate, uniaxial compression test is performed on the specimen: a moderate loading-unloading cycle for the first two humidity states (20 %RH, 80 %RH) has been considered, while the mechanical loading was increased up to failure for the high humidity state (99 %RH). By means of such test, the influence of saturation (water content) on the mechanical behavior of argillaceous rocks is investigated, and the spatial distribution of hydric swelling/shrinking strains and mechanical strains can be compared on a same sample. (authors)

  1. Magnetic properties, acid neutralization capacity, and net acid production of rocks in the Animas River Watershed Silverton, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCafferty, Anne E.; Yager, Douglas B.; Horton, Radley M.; Diehl, Sharon F.

    2006-01-01

    Federal land managers along with local stakeholders in the Upper Animas River watershed near Silverton, Colorado are actively designing and implementing mine waste remediation projects to mitigate the effects of acid mine drainage from several abandoned hard rock metal mines and mills. Local source rocks with high acid neutralization capacity (ANC) within the watershed are of interest to land managers for use in these remediation projects. A suite of representative samples was collected from propylitic to weakly sericitic-altered volcanic and plutonic rocks exposed in outcrops throughout the watershed. Acid-base accounting laboratory methods coupled with mineralogic and geochemical characterization provide insight into lithologies that have a range of ANC and net acid production (NAP). Petrophysical lab determinations of magnetic susceptibility converted to estimates for percent magnetite show correlation with the environmental properties of ANC and NAP for many of the lithologies. A goal of our study is to interpret watershed-scale airborne magnetic data for regional mapping of rocks that have varying degrees of ANC and NAP. Results of our preliminary work are presented here.

  2. Radionuclide migration in fractured rock: hydrological investigations at an experimental site in the Carnmennellis granite, Cornwall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, M.J.; Durrance, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives, methods and results of hydrological investigation of the granite at an experimental site in Cornwall are described and discussed. Constant head injection tests and radioactive tracer experiments have revealed a fracture permeability in which water movement is confined to discrete fractures separated by rock of very low permeability. Data on flow path frequency, orientation and effective hydraulic aperture, required for network modelling, are presented for a 700 m borehole, with additional hydraulic data from three other boreholes. In addition to fractures of average hydraulic conductivity a small number of major hydraulic features (''main drains'') with major implications for radionuclide migration have been identified. A mean hydraulic conductivity for the granite investigated of 1.57x10 -7 ms -1 has been obtained, 2.11x10 -8 ms -1 if the major hydraulic features are excluded

  3. Rock magnetic properties in the sulfate reduction zone in IODP 350 Hole 1437B, Izu Bonin rear arc: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, R. J.; Kars, M. A. C.; Kodama, K.

    2014-12-01

    During the northern Spring 2014 (April-May), IODP Expedition 350 drilled a 1806.5 m deep hole at Site U1437 in the Izu-Bonin rear arc, in order to understand, among other objectives, the compositional evolution of the arc since the Miocene and track the missing half of the subduction factory. The good recovery of mostly fine grained sediments at this site enables a high resolution paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study. Particularly, variations in magnetic properties and mineralogy are well documented. The onboard magnetostratigraphy established from the study of the archive halves highlighted remagnetized intervals that produced "ghost" repetitions of geomagnetic reversals ~10's meters below their actual stratigraphic position in specific intervals. Onboard paleo- and rock magnetic analyses showed that remagnetization is probably due to a chemical remanence carried by iron sulfides (putatively identified as greigite). The rock magnetic parameters, SIRM/k and the S-ratio are consistent with the presence of ferromagnetic iron sulfides in Site U1437. A mixture of iron oxides and iron sulfides was found within the sulfate reduction zone, which was identified by onboard pore water analyses at ~50-60 meters below sea floor (mbsf) by a minimum in sulfate (~5 mM) coupled with a maximum in alkalinity. Below 50 mbsf, the sulfate content increases up to ~29 mM at ~460 mbsf. The particular downhole profile of the sulfate content in Site U1437 is probably triggered by fluid circulation. Evolution of sulfate content, pyritization process and fluid circulation are closely linked. Onshore research is focusing on further downhole characterization of the iron sulfides including their abundance, grain size and composition. Routine magnetic properties (NRM, magnetic susceptibility) and rock magnetic analyses at high resolution (every ~20-50 cm), including hysteresis properties and low temperature magnetic measurements, have been conducted on about 400 discrete samples in the first 200

  4. Investigating the polar electrojet using Swarm satellite magnetic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aakjær, Cecilie Drost; Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Chris

    The aim of this study is to investigate the magnetic perturbations caused by the polar electrojets, which are described by means of a model consisting of a series of infinite line currents placed at the height of the ionosphere along QD latitudes. The method is applied to Swarm magnetic scalar...... of the polar electrojets as well as their temporal evolution. In addition, applying the method to data taken by the Swarm satellites Alpha and Beta allows investigating longitudinal differences of the electrojets....

  5. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-12-31

    This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer

  6. A balloon-borne experiment to investigate the Martian magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingenschuh, K.; Feldhofer, H.; Koren, W.; Jernej, I.; Stachel, M.; Riedler, W.; Slamanig, H.; Auster, H.-U.; Rustenbach, J.; Fornacon, H. K.; Schenk, H. J.; Hillenmaier, O.; Haerendel, G.; Yeroshenko, Ye.; Styashkin, V.; Zaroutzky, A.; Best, A.; Scholz, G.; Russell, C. T.; Means, J.; Pierce, D.; Luhmann, J. G.

    1996-03-01

    The Space Research Institute of the Austrian Academy, of Sciences (Graz, Austria) in cooperation with MPE (Berlin, Germany), GFZ Potsdam (Obs. Niemegk, Germany) IZMIRAN/IOFAN (Moscow, Russian) and IGPP/UCLA (Los Angeles, USA) is designing the magnetic field experiment MAGIBAL (MAGnetic field experiment aboard a martian BALloon) to investigate the magnetic field on the surface of Mars. The dual sensor fluxgate magnetometer is part of the MARS-98/MARS-TOGETHER balloon payload. During a ten days period the balloon will float over a distance of about 2000 km at altitudes between 0 and 4 km. Due to the limited power and telemetry allocation the magnetometer can transmit only one vector per ten seconds and spectral information in the frequency range from 2 - 25 Hz. The dynamic range is +/- 2000 nT. The main scientific objectives of the experiment are: • Determination of the magnetism of the Martian rocksInvestigation of the leakage of the solar wind induced magnetosphere using the correlation between orbiter and balloon observations • Measurement of the magnetic field profile between the orbiter and the surface of Mars during the descent phase of the balloon. Terrestrial test flights with a hot air balloon were performed in order to test the original MAGIBAL equipment under balloon flight conditions.

  7. Discrimination of Thermal versus Mechanical Effects of Shock on Rock Magnetic Properties of Spherically Shocked up to 10-160 GPa Basalt and Diabase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezaeva, N. S.; Swanson-Hysell, N.; Tikoo, S.; Badyukov, D. D.; Kars, M. A. C.; Egli, R.; Chareev, D. A.; Fairchild, L. M.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding how shock waves generated during hypervelocity impacts affect rock magnetic properties is key for interpreting the paleomagnetic records of lunar rocks, meteorites, and cratered planetary surfaces. Laboratory simulations of impacts show that ultra-high shocks may induce substantial post-shock heating of the target material. At high pressures (>10 GPa), shock heating occurs in tandem with mechanical effects, such as grain fracturing and creation of crystallographic defects and dislocations within magnetic grains. This makes it difficult to conclude whether shock-induced changes in the rock magnetic properties of target materials are primarily associated with mechanical or thermal effects. Here we present novel experimental methods to discriminate between mechanical and thermal effects of shock on magnetic properties and illustrate it with two examples of spherically shocked terrestrial basalt and diabase [1], which were shocked to pressures of 10 to >160 GPa, and investigate possible explanations for the observed shock-induced magnetic hardening (i.e., increase in remanent coercivity Bcr). The methods consist of i) conducting extra heating experiments at temperatures resembling those experienced during high-pressure shock events on untreated equivalents of shocked rocks (with further comparison of Bcr of shocked and heated samples) and ii) quantitative comparison of high-resolution first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams (field step: 0.5-0.7 mT) for shocked, heated and untreated specimens. Using this approach, we demonstrated that the shock-induced coercivity hardening in our samples is predominantly due to solid-state, mechanical effects of shock rather than alteration associated with shock heating. Indeed, heating-induced changes in Bcr in the post-shock temperature range were minor. Visual inspection of FORC contours (in addition to detailed analyses) reveals a stretching of the FORC distribution of shocked sample towards higher coercivities

  8. Site investigation SFR. Rock type coding, overview geological mapping and identification of rock units and possible deformation zones in drill cores from the construction of SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersson, Jesper (Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Stockholm (Sweden)); Curtis, Philip; Bockgaard, Niclas (Golder Associates AB (Sweden)); Mattsson, Haakan (GeoVista AB, Luleaa (Sweden))

    2011-01-15

    This report presents the rock type coding, overview lithological mapping and identification of rock units and possible deformation zones in drill cores from 32 boreholes associated with the construction of SFR. This work can be seen as complementary to single-hole interpretations of other older SFR boreholes earlier reported in /Petersson and Andersson 2010/: KFR04, KFR08, KFR09, KFR13, KFR35, KFR36, KFR54, KFR55, KFR7A, KFR7B and KFR7C. Due to deficiencies in the available material, the necessary activities have deviated somewhat from the established methodologies used during the recent Forsmark site investigations for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The aim of the current work has been, wherever possible, to allow the incorporation of all relevant material from older boreholes in the ongoing SFR geological modelling work in spite of the deficiencies. The activities include: - Rock type coding of the original geological mapping according to the nomenclature used during the preceding Forsmark site investigation. As part of the Forsmark site investigation such rock type coding has already been performed on most of the old SFR boreholes if the original geological mapping results were available. This earlier work has been complemented by rock type coding on two further boreholes: KFR01 and KFR02. - Lithological overview mapping, including documentation of (1) rock types, (2) ductile and brittle-ductile deformation and (3) alteration for drill cores from eleven of the boreholes for which no original geological borehole mapping was available (KFR31, KFR32, KFR34, KFR37,KFR38, KFR51, KFR69, KFR70, KFR71, KFR72 and KFR89). - Identification of possible deformation zones and merging of similar rock types into rock units. This follows SKB's established criteria and methodology of the geological Single-hole interpretation (SHI) process wherever possible. Deviations from the standard SHI process are associated with the lack of data, for example BIPS images

  9. Site investigation SFR. Rock type coding, overview geological mapping and identification of rock units and possible deformation zones in drill cores from the construction of SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersson, Jesper; Curtis, Philip; Bockgaard, Niclas; Mattsson, Haakan

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the rock type coding, overview lithological mapping and identification of rock units and possible deformation zones in drill cores from 32 boreholes associated with the construction of SFR. This work can be seen as complementary to single-hole interpretations of other older SFR boreholes earlier reported in /Petersson and Andersson 2010/: KFR04, KFR08, KFR09, KFR13, KFR35, KFR36, KFR54, KFR55, KFR7A, KFR7B and KFR7C. Due to deficiencies in the available material, the necessary activities have deviated somewhat from the established methodologies used during the recent Forsmark site investigations for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The aim of the current work has been, wherever possible, to allow the incorporation of all relevant material from older boreholes in the ongoing SFR geological modelling work in spite of the deficiencies. The activities include: - Rock type coding of the original geological mapping according to the nomenclature used during the preceding Forsmark site investigation. As part of the Forsmark site investigation such rock type coding has already been performed on most of the old SFR boreholes if the original geological mapping results were available. This earlier work has been complemented by rock type coding on two further boreholes: KFR01 and KFR02. - Lithological overview mapping, including documentation of (1) rock types, (2) ductile and brittle-ductile deformation and (3) alteration for drill cores from eleven of the boreholes for which no original geological borehole mapping was available (KFR31, KFR32, KFR34, KFR37,KFR38, KFR51, KFR69, KFR70, KFR71, KFR72 and KFR89). - Identification of possible deformation zones and merging of similar rock types into rock units. This follows SKB's established criteria and methodology of the geological Single-hole interpretation (SHI) process wherever possible. Deviations from the standard SHI process are associated with the lack of data, for example BIPS images, or a

  10. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory - feasibility and usefulness of site investigation methods. Experiences from the pre-investigation phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almen, K E [ed.; KEA GEO-Konsult (Sweden); Olsson, Paer [SKANSKA, (Sweden); Rhen, I [VBB VIAK AB, Malmoe (Sweden); Stanfors, R [RS Consulting, (Sweden); Wikberg, P [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1994-08-01

    One of the main goals set up by SKB for the Aespoe HRL project is to `test the quality and appropriateness of different methods for characterizing the bedrock with respect to conditions of importance for a final repository`. An extensive investigation programme was carried out during the projects pre-investigation phase that in part was based in experience from SKBs previous site investigations and in part entailed the testing of new or other unestablished methods. Previous technical reports have described the methods that have been used and the results, models and predictions that have been produced. All the methods used are discussed in the present report in terms of how they have contributed in different analysis stages to the total geoscientific characterization of the rock at Aespoe. The usefulness of each method for modelling and prediction in different scales is evaluated, and aspects of the practical execution of the methods under different conditions are discussed. The report sheds light on the importance of dividing large investigation programmes such as this one into suitable stages to get an opportunity to evaluate the results obtained and plan in detail the investigations in the next stage. Furthermore, the way in which the characterization/modelling work in different geometric scales has been done for the different investigation stages is discussed, along with whether this has been found to be a suitable approach. The importance of pursuing an interdisciplinary strategy throughout the pre-investigation process cannot be overemphasized. For the planning, execution, analysis and reporting of the results of the pre-investigations, this has been guaranteed by an organization in which an interdisciplinary group has been in charge of the investigations, together with the project manager. 52 refs, numerous tabs and figs.

  11. Radioactive waste storage in mined caverns in crystalline rock: results of field investigations at Stripa, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    1980-10-01

    It is generally agreed that the most practicable method of isolating nuclear wastes from the biosphere is by deep burial in suitable geologic formations. Such burial achieves a high degree of physical isolation but raises questions concerning the rate at which some of these wastes may return to the biosphere through transport by groundwater. Any suitable repository site will be disturbed first by excavation and second by the thermal pulse caused by the radioactive decay of the wastes. To assess the effectiveness of geologic isolation it is necessary to develop the capability of predicting the response of a rock mass to such a thermal pulse. Ultimately, this requires field measurements below the surface in media representative of those likely to be encountered at an actual repository. Access to a granitic rock mass adjacent to a defunct iron ore mine at Stripa, Sweden, at a depth of about 350 m below surface has provided a unique opportunity to conduct a comprehensive suite of hydrological and thermo-mechanical experiments under such conditions. The results of these field tests have shown the importance of geologic structure and the functional dependence of the thermo-mechanical properties on temperature in developing a valid predictive model. The results have also demonstrated the vital importance of carrying out large-scale investigations in a field test facility

  12. Site investigation methods used in Canada's nuclear fuel waste management program to determine the hydrogeological conditions of plutonic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is investigating the concept of disposing of Canada's nuclear fuel wastes in a mined vault at a depth of 500 m to 1000 m within a plutonic rock body. Much effort has been directed at developing site investigation methods that can be used to determine the hydrogeological conditions of plutonic rock bodies. The primary objective of this research is to define the physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater flow systems at the various scales that are relevant to the prediction of potential radionuclide migration from a disposal vault. Groundwater movement through plutonic rock is largely controlled by fractures within the rock, and the hydrogeological parameters of fractured geological media are extremely scale dependent

  13. Structural investigation of chemically synthesized ferrite magnetic nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyanga, E.; Sangaa, D.; Hirazawa, H.; Tsogbadrakh, N.; Jargalan, N.; Bobrikov, I. A.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2018-05-01

    In recent times, interest in ferrite magnetic nanomaterials has considerably grown, mainly due to their highly promising medical and biological applications. Spinel ferrite powder samples, with high heat generation abilities in AC magnetic fields, were studied for their application to the hyperthermia treatment of cancer tumors. These properties of ferrites strongly depend on their chemical composition, ion distribution between crystallographic positions, magnetic structure and method of preparation. In this study, crystal and magnetic structures of several magnetic spinels were investigated by neutron diffraction. The explanation of the mechanism triggering the heat generation ability in the magnetic materials, and the electronic and magnetic states of ferrite-spinel type structures, were theoretically defined by a first-principles method. Ferrites with the composition of CuxMg1-xFe2O4 have been investigated as a heat generating magnetic nanomaterial. Atomic fraction of copper in ferrite was varied between 0 and 100% (that is, x between 0 and 1.0 with 0.2 steps), with the copper dope limit corresponding to appear a tetragonal phase.

  14. Experimental Investigation of the Influence of Confining Stress on Hard Rock Fragmentation Using a Conical Pick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xibing; Wang, Shaofeng; Wang, Shanyong

    2018-01-01

    High geostress is a prominent condition in deep excavations and affects the cuttability of deep hard rock. This study aims to determine the influence of confining stress on hard rock fragmentation as applied by a conical pick. Using a true triaxial test apparatus, static and coupled static and dynamic loadings from pick forces were applied to end faces of cubic rock specimens to break them under biaxial, uniaxial and stress-free confining stress conditions. The cuttability indices (peak pick force, insertion depth and disturbance duration), failure patterns and fragment sizes were measured and compared to estimate the effects of confining stress. The results show that the rock cuttabilities decreased in order from rock breakages under stress-free conditions to uniaxial confining stress and then to biaxial confining stress. Under biaxial confining stress, only flake-shaped fragments were stripped from the rock surfaces under the requirements of large pick forces or disturbance durations. As the level of uniaxial confining stress increased, the peak pick force and the insertion depth initially increased and then decreased, and the failure patterns varied from splitting to partial splitting and then to rock bursts with decreasing average fragment sizes. Rock bursts will occur under elastic compression via ultra-high uniaxial confining stresses. There are two critical uniaxial confining stress levels, namely stress values at which peak pick forces begin to decrease and improve rock cuttability, and those at which rock bursts initially occur and cutting safety decreases. In particular, hard rock is easiest to split safely and efficiently under stress-free conditions. Moreover, coupled static preloading and dynamic disturbance can increase the efficiency of rock fragmentation with increasing preloading levels and disturbance amplitudes. The concluding remarks confirm hard rock cuttability using conical pick, which can improve the applicability of mechanical excavation in

  15. Aespoe hard rock laboratory. Field investigation methodology and instruments used in the preinvestigation phase, 1986-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, K.E.; Zellman, O.

    1991-12-01

    The Aespoe hard rock laboratory project started in 1986. The pre-investigation phase, 1986-1990, involved extensive field measurements from the surface as well as from boreholes, aimed at characterizing the rock formation with regard to geology, geohydrology, hydrochemistry and rock mechanics. The field investigation methodology used in the project was based on experience from and developments during the previous SKB study site investigation programme. However, in some respects the techniques were changed or modified. Major changes have been possible due to a new drilling technique, telescope-type drilling. This report describes the logistics of the investigation programme, characterized to a large extent by multi-purpose planning and performance of the activities in order to optimize the use of available resources; time, personnel and equipment. Preliminary hydraulic testing and groundwater sampling were conducted during the drilling of each borehole. When the drilling was completed an extensive set of singlehole investigations were carried out: geophysical logging, borehole radar, hydraulic tests of different kinds, water sampling and rock stress measurements. Multipackers were installed in the boreholes as soon as possible after the borehole investigations. The system enables monitoring of groundwater pressure, water sampling and groundwater flow measurements to be performed by means of dilution tests and tracer injection. Boreholes with such equipment were used as observation holes during interference pumping tests and long term hydraulic and tracer tests. The monitoring programme will continue during the subsequent phases of construction and operation of the Aespoe hard rock laboratory. (83 refs., 94 figs.) (au)

  16. Characterization of steel grit recovered from ornamental rocks waste by magnetic separation; Caracterizacao da granalha de aco recuperada do residuo de rochas ornamentais por separacao magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junca, E.; Telles, V.B.; Rodrigues, G.F.; Oliveira, J.R. de; Tenorio, J.A.S., E-mail: eduardojunca@gmail.co [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais; Instituto Federal de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Espirito Santo (IFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this work is characterization of steel grit recovered from ornamental rock waste by magnetic separation. The magnetic separation was realized in three steps: first, using a high intensity wet magnetic separator, which used only the remaining magnetic field of equipment. In the second step, the magnetic material obtained in the first phase was subjected to a new manual magnetic separation using rare earth magnets. In a third step, magnetic material obtained with rare earth magnets was subjected to manual magnetic separation using ferrite magnets. After the magnetic separation, the material was sent to characterization which was obtained by chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and size analysis. The size analysis showed that the concentrate range from 0,5 to 563,67 {mu}m with 4 wt.% over 100 {mu}m and content metallic iron of 93 wt%. (author)

  17. Investigation of strain-induced magnetization change in ferromagnetic microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuklanov, A P; Nurgazizov, N I; Bizyaev, D A; Khanipov, T F; Bukharaev, A A; Yu Petukhov, V; Chirkov, V V; Gumarov, G G

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to investigation of magnetoelastic strain effect on the ferromagnetic microparticles of permalloy. An original method of sample fabrication with compressed microparticles is proposed. Magnetic force microscopy and magneto-optical Kerr experiments were carried out with unstrained and compressed microparticles. The domain walls transformation in compressed microparticles is in good agreement with numerical calculations. Hard axis of magnetization was observed on the compressed sample. (paper)

  18. Slip Torque Investigation and Magnetic Redesign of Motor Integrated Permanent Magnet Gear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Tommy Vestergaard; Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of 20% difference between the measured and calculated slip torque of a Motor Integrated Permanent Magnet Gear (MIPMG) prototype. The High Speed (HS) side of the Magnetic Gear (MG) was fixed by loading the motor when conducting the slip torque measurement. Susp...

  19. Time-Dependent Damage Investigation of Rock Mass in an In Situ Experimental Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Quan; Cui, Jie; Chen, Jing

    2012-01-01

    In underground tunnels or caverns, time-dependent deformation or failure of rock mass, such as extending cracks, gradual rock falls, etc., are a costly irritant and a major safety concern if the time-dependent damage of surrounding rock is serious. To understand the damage evolution of rock mass in underground engineering, an in situ experimental testing was carried out in a large belowground tunnel with a scale of 28.5 m in width, 21 m in height and 352 m in length. The time-dependent damage of rock mass was detected in succession by an ultrasonic wave test after excavation. The testing results showed that the time-dependent damage of rock mass could last a long time, i.e., nearly 30 days. Regression analysis of damage factors defined by wave velocity, resulted in the time-dependent evolutional damage equation of rock mass, which corresponded with logarithmic format. A damage viscoelastic-plastic model was developed to describe the exposed time-dependent deterioration of rock mass by field test, such as convergence of time-dependent damage, deterioration of elastic modules and logarithmic format of damage factor. Furthermore, the remedial measures for damaged surrounding rock were discussed based on the measured results and the conception of damage compensation, which provides new clues for underground engineering design.

  20. Investigation of magnetic interactions in sulfides by means of magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veen, G. van.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations have been designed to gather more information about magnetic pair interactions in sulfides by isomorphic substitution of the magnetic ions in suitable chosen diamagnetic host lattices and measurement of electron spin resonance of coupled pairs and of electron spin resonance or electron nuclear double resonance of the hyperfine interaction due to the nuclei of diamagnetic cations. The greater part of this thesis is devoted to preliminaries of magnetic resonance interpretation and sample selection and preparation. The measurements on the magnetically diluted compounds, which are described, only have an exploratory nature. (Auth.)

  1. Experimental Investigation of Mechanical Properties of Black Shales after CO2-Water-Rock Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Lyu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of CO2-water-rock interactions on the mechanical properties of shale are essential for estimating the possibility of sequestrating CO2 in shale reservoirs. In this study, uniaxial compressive strength (UCS tests together with an acoustic emission (AE system and SEM and EDS analysis were performed to investigate the mechanical properties and microstructural changes of black shales with different saturation times (10 days, 20 days and 30 days in water dissoluted with gaseous/super-critical CO2. According to the experimental results, the values of UCS, Young’s modulus and brittleness index decrease gradually with increasing saturation time in water with gaseous/super-critical CO2. Compared to samples without saturation, 30-day saturation causes reductions of 56.43% in UCS and 54.21% in Young’s modulus for gaseous saturated samples, and 66.05% in UCS and 56.32% in Young’s modulus for super-critical saturated samples, respectively. The brittleness index also decreases drastically from 84.3% for samples without saturation to 50.9% for samples saturated in water with gaseous CO2, to 47.9% for samples saturated in water with super-critical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2. SC-CO2 causes a greater reduction of shale’s mechanical properties. The crack propagation results obtained from the AE system show that longer saturation time produces higher peak cumulative AE energy. SEM images show that many pores occur when shale samples are saturated in water with gaseous/super-critical CO2. The EDS results show that CO2-water-rock interactions increase the percentages of C and Fe and decrease the percentages of Al and K on the surface of saturated samples when compared to samples without saturation.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Mechanical Properties of Black Shales after CO2-Water-Rock Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Qiao; Ranjith, Pathegama Gamage; Long, Xinping; Ji, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The effects of CO2-water-rock interactions on the mechanical properties of shale are essential for estimating the possibility of sequestrating CO2 in shale reservoirs. In this study, uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) tests together with an acoustic emission (AE) system and SEM and EDS analysis were performed to investigate the mechanical properties and microstructural changes of black shales with different saturation times (10 days, 20 days and 30 days) in water dissoluted with gaseous/super-critical CO2. According to the experimental results, the values of UCS, Young’s modulus and brittleness index decrease gradually with increasing saturation time in water with gaseous/super-critical CO2. Compared to samples without saturation, 30-day saturation causes reductions of 56.43% in UCS and 54.21% in Young’s modulus for gaseous saturated samples, and 66.05% in UCS and 56.32% in Young’s modulus for super-critical saturated samples, respectively. The brittleness index also decreases drastically from 84.3% for samples without saturation to 50.9% for samples saturated in water with gaseous CO2, to 47.9% for samples saturated in water with super-critical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2). SC-CO2 causes a greater reduction of shale’s mechanical properties. The crack propagation results obtained from the AE system show that longer saturation time produces higher peak cumulative AE energy. SEM images show that many pores occur when shale samples are saturated in water with gaseous/super-critical CO2. The EDS results show that CO2-water-rock interactions increase the percentages of C and Fe and decrease the percentages of Al and K on the surface of saturated samples when compared to samples without saturation. PMID:28773784

  3. Experimental Investigation of Mechanical Properties of Black Shales after CO₂-Water-Rock Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Qiao; Ranjith, Pathegama Gamage; Long, Xinping; Ji, Bin

    2016-08-06

    The effects of CO₂-water-rock interactions on the mechanical properties of shale are essential for estimating the possibility of sequestrating CO₂ in shale reservoirs. In this study, uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) tests together with an acoustic emission (AE) system and SEM and EDS analysis were performed to investigate the mechanical properties and microstructural changes of black shales with different saturation times (10 days, 20 days and 30 days) in water dissoluted with gaseous/super-critical CO₂. According to the experimental results, the values of UCS, Young's modulus and brittleness index decrease gradually with increasing saturation time in water with gaseous/super-critical CO₂. Compared to samples without saturation, 30-day saturation causes reductions of 56.43% in UCS and 54.21% in Young's modulus for gaseous saturated samples, and 66.05% in UCS and 56.32% in Young's modulus for super-critical saturated samples, respectively. The brittleness index also decreases drastically from 84.3% for samples without saturation to 50.9% for samples saturated in water with gaseous CO₂, to 47.9% for samples saturated in water with super-critical carbon dioxide (SC-CO₂). SC-CO₂ causes a greater reduction of shale's mechanical properties. The crack propagation results obtained from the AE system show that longer saturation time produces higher peak cumulative AE energy. SEM images show that many pores occur when shale samples are saturated in water with gaseous/super-critical CO₂. The EDS results show that CO₂-water-rock interactions increase the percentages of C and Fe and decrease the percentages of Al and K on the surface of saturated samples when compared to samples without saturation.

  4. Synthesis of FeCo magnetic nanoalloys and investigation of heating properties for magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Özer; Fırat, Tezer

    2018-06-01

    In this study, size controlled FeCo colloidal magnetic nanoalloys in the range of 11.5-37.2 nm were synthesized by surfactant assistant ball milling method. Magnetic separation technique was performed subsequent to synthesis process so as to obtain magnetic nanoalloy fluid with narrow size distribution. Particle distribution was determined by transmission electron microscope (TEM) while X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements verified FeCo alloy formation as BCC structure. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) method was used to investigate magnetic properties of nanoalloys. Maximum saturation magnetization and maximum coercivity were obtained as 172 Am2/kg for nanoparticles with the mean size of 37.2 nm and 19.4 mT for nanoparticles with the mean size of 13.3 nm, respectively. The heating ability of FeCo magnetic nanoalloys was determined through calorimetrical measurements for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) applications. Heat generation mechanisms were investigated by using linear response theory and Stoner-Wohlfarth (S-W) model. Specific absorption rate (SAR) values were obtained in the range of 2-15 W/g for magnetic field frequency of 171 kHz and magnetic field strength in between 6 and 14 mT.

  5. Investigation of the Capture of Magnetic Particles From High-Viscosity Fluids Using Permanent Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraud, Alexandra; Velez, Camilo; Shah, Yash; Garraud, Nicolas; Kozissnik, Bettina; Yarmola, Elena G; Allen, Kyle D; Dobson, Jon; Arnold, David P

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates the practicality of using a small, permanent magnet to capture magnetic particles out of high-viscosity biological fluids, such as synovial fluid. Numerical simulations are used to predict the trajectory of magnetic particles toward the permanent magnet. The simulations are used to determine a "collection volume" with a time-dependent size and shape, which determines the number of particles that can be captured from the fluid in a given amount of time. The viscosity of the fluid strongly influences the velocity of the magnetic particles toward the magnet, hence, the collection volume after a given time. In regards to the design of the magnet, the overall size is shown to most strongly influence the collection volume in comparison to the magnet shape or aspect ratio. Numerical results showed good agreement with in vitro experimental magnetic collection results. In the long term, this paper aims to facilitate optimization of the collection of magnetic particle-biomarker conjugates from high-viscosity biological fluids without the need to remove the fluid from a patient.

  6. Rock magnetic survey of Himalaya-Karakoram ranges, northern Pakistan; Pakistan hokubu, Himalaya-Karakoram tai no ganseki jikigakuteki chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, M [Geoscience Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Khadim, I; Ahmad, M [Geological Survey of Pakistan, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    1997-10-22

    This paper describes results of the rock magnetic survey mainly including measurement of magnetic susceptibility conducted in the northern Pakistan from 1992 to 1997. Magnetic characteristics in Himalaya-Karakoram ranges and prospective ore deposits are also described. Magnetic susceptibility data measured in this district were summarized as a frequency map in each geological block. Granitoids in the northern part of Kohistan batholith and granitoids of Ladakh batholith showed remarkably high magnetic susceptibility values, which suggested they are magnetite-series magmatism. It has been known that magnetite-series magmatism often accompanies sulfide-forming mineral resources, which suggests high potentiality of abundant mineral resources containing Mo, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ag and Au. From the results of the magnetic susceptibility measurements and the above-mentioned models, accordingly, it can be pointed out that the northern part of Kohistan batholith, the distribution area of Ladakh batholith, and surrounding areas are promising targets for mineral resources exploration in the Himalaya-Karakoram ranges, northern Pakistan. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Surface effect on the electronic and the magnetic properties of rock-salt alkaline-earth metal silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialek, Beata; Lee, Jaeil

    2011-01-01

    An all electron ab-initio method was employed to study the electronic and the magnetic properties of the (001) surface of alkaline-earth metal silicides, CaSi, SrSi, and BaSi, in the rock-salt structure. The three compounds retain their ferromagnetic metallic properties at the surface. Due to the surface effects, the magnetism of the topmost layer is changed as compared with the bulk. This is a short-range effect. In CaSi, the magnetism of the surface layer is noticeably reduced, as compared with the bulk: magnetic moments (MMs) on both Ca and Si atoms are reduced. In SrSi (001), the polarization of electrons in the surface atoms is similar to that in the bulk atoms, and the values of MMs on the component atoms in the topmost layer do not change as much as in CaSi. In BaSi (001), the magnetic properties of Si surface atoms are enhanced slightly, and the magnetism of Ba atoms is not affected considerably by the surface effect. The calculated densities of states confirm the short-range effect of the surface on the electronic properties of the metal silicides.

  8. Investigation on the oxygen transport mechanisms in the Sarcheshmeh waste rock dumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Yousefi

    2015-04-01

    present in some samples. The carbonate content as the major neutralizing agent was zero in all samples. Due to the presence of sulfide minerals, mainly as pyrite, and also lack of any carbonate minerals, the AMD generation from the Sarcheshmeh waste rocks during the weathering reactions is predictable. At the Sarcheshmeh mine waste, several secondary minerals such as butlerite, jarosite and gypsum were detected by XRD at some depths. Moreover, amorphous iron oxyhydroxide minerals visually observed in waste dumps were not detected by XRD due to being negligible and low level of crystallinity. Hence, they were measured in terms of (Feo-h by ASTM standard test method. The ASTM-D2492 standard test showed that pyrite, sulphate and iron oxyhydroxide minerals (Feo-h are present in all samples. Against the XRD method, the test even detected the negligible content of the minerals. The paste pH tests showed that 15 samples were acid-producing because they had pH lower than 4. On the basis of moisture content results, the samples by name A6, A7, B1 and B2 showed high level of moisture which can be sign of the particular status in them. Discussion According to the field observations, channels with a strong flow of warm and humid air were detected in the depth of 3 to 5 meters of the investigated waste rock dumps. High content of humidity (8.25 and 13.43 percent and sulfate (4.5 and 7.02 percent were observed together with low content of pyrite (1.5 and 6.23 percent and acidic paste pH values (3.13 and 2.88 around these channels. Therefore, from the relation of these occurrences, it can be inferred that the air convection is important for supply oxygen to pyrite oxidation in the waste dumps of Sarcheshmeh. The results also indicate that, two main factors including grain size distribution and formation of hardpan layer on top of old weathered rocks are responsible for the decreasing of oxygen transformation rate via the molecular diffusion mechanism through the waste rock dumps

  9. Distribution of cesium between colloid-rock phases-establishment of experimental system and investigation of Cs distribution between colloid and rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Kotaro

    2006-01-01

    Distribution and re-distribution of cesium between 3-phases (colloid, rock and water) was investigated. Analcite and bentonite colloid ware used as colloid phase and muscovite was used as rock phase. Before investigating the distribution between 3-phases, sorption and desorption behavior of Cs on analcite colloid, bentonite colloid and muscovite was investigated. It was found some fraction of Cs sorbed irreversibly on analcite colloid, while Cs sorbed reversibly on bentonite colloid. The experimental system was established for assessment of the distribution of nuclides between 3-phases by using combination of membrane filter and experimental cell. Since colloid and muscovite were separated by membrane filter, sorption of colloid on muscovite could be prevented and we could obtain distribution of Cs as ion. The distribution of Cs between 3-phases were obtained by this experimental system. Furthermore, re-distribution experiment was also carried out by using this system. After 7 days contact of colloid with Cs, distribution of sorbed Cs on colloid to liquid or muscovite phase was investigated. Comparing sorption and desorption isotherm with the distribution of Cs between 3-phases, it was found that Kd value of colloid (ratio of Cs concentration in liquid phase to amount of sorbed Cs on colloid phase) estimated in 2-phases (water and colloid) is different from that in 3-phases. Furthermore, in the case of analcite colloid, Kd value of colloid obtained in 3-phases distribution experiment was different from that obtained in re-distribution experiment. This is considered because of the irreversibility of Cs sorption on analcite colloid. Thus, it was found distribution of Cs in 3-phases was not predictable from sorption and desorption isotherm or Kd value of 2-phases (water-rock, water-colloid). (author)

  10. Investigation of the THM behaviour of the buffer and rock-buffer interaction during the canister retrieval test performed in the ASPÖ Hard Rock Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millard, A.; Barnichon, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the THERESA European project, numerical modelling of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) and thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) behaviour of buffer (bentonite) and buffer-rock interfaces for deep underground nuclear waste repositories has been undertaken, with focus on the performance assessments. A major step of the project was the analysis of a large scale test, called the Canister Retrieval test, which has been performed in Aspö Hard Rock Laboratory. It consists in a full scale test of the emplacement of a canister with the surrounding buffer material. A deposition hole was first bored, and then the canister with heaters was installed together with bentonite blocks. The gap between the rock and the bentonite blocks was filled with bentonite pellets. The whole set was artificially wetted from its external boundary in order to accelerate the expected natural rehydration by the surrounding rock. The evolution of the THM processes was recorded over 5 years. Before analysing the whole CRT experiment, a preliminary simpler problem has been defined, which consisted in modelling a disc of buffer at canister mid-height. Thanks to the available experimental recorded measurements, it has been possible to numerically investigate the respective influence of the various THM parameters involved in the modelling of the physical processes. The theoretical model is based on one hand on the Richard's approximation for the flow calculation, and on the other hand on a Biot's type model for the hydro-mechanical behaviour. It has revealed the large influence of the liquid relative permeability, which is unfortunately in general not directly available from experiments and must be determined through inverse analysis techniques. Then, in a second stage, the whole CRT experiment has been analysed. For simplicity reasons, an axisymetrical model has been adopted, although the presence of a neighbouring experiment did influence the CRT results. The comparisons of

  11. Neutron scattering investigation of magnetic excitations at high energy transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loong, C.K.

    1984-01-01

    With the advance of pulsed spallation neutron sources, neutron scattering investigation of elementary excitations in magnetic materials can now be extended to energies up to several hundreds of MeV. We have measured, using chopper spectrometers and time-of-flight techniques, the magnetic response functions of a series of d and f transition metals and compounds over a wide range of energy and momentum transfer. In PrO 2 , UO 2 , BaPrO 3 and CeB 6 we observed crystal-field transitions between the magnetic ground state and the excited levels in the energy range from 40 to 260 MeV. In materials exhibiting spin-fluctuation or mixed-valent character such as Ce 74 Th 26 , on the other hand, no sharp crystal-field lines but a broadened quasielastic magnetic peak was observed. The line width of the quasielastic component is thought to be connected to the spin-fluctuation energy of the 4f electrons. The significance of the neutron scattering results in relation to the ground state level structure of the magnetic ions and the spin-dynamics of the f electrons is discussed. Recently, in a study of the spin-wave excitations in itinerant magnetic systems, we have extended the spin-wave measurements in ferromagnetic iron up to about 160 MeV. Neutron scattering data at high energy transfers are of particular interest because they provide direct comparison with recent theories of itinerant magnetism. 26 references, 7 figures

  12. Experimental Investigation on the Fatigue Mechanical Properties of Intermittently Jointed Rock Models Under Cyclic Uniaxial Compression with Different Loading Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Dai, Feng; Dong, Lu; Xu, Nuwen; Feng, Peng

    2018-01-01

    Intermittently jointed rocks, widely existing in many mining and civil engineering structures, are quite susceptible to cyclic loading. Understanding the fatigue mechanism of jointed rocks is vital to the rational design and the long-term stability analysis of rock structures. In this study, the fatigue mechanical properties of synthetic jointed rock models under different cyclic conditions are systematically investigated in the laboratory, including four loading frequencies, four maximum stresses, and four amplitudes. Our experimental results reveal the influence of the three cyclic loading parameters on the mechanical properties of jointed rock models, regarding the fatigue deformation characteristics, the fatigue energy and damage evolution, and the fatigue failure and progressive failure behavior. Under lower loading frequency or higher maximum stress and amplitude, the jointed specimen is characterized by higher fatigue deformation moduli and higher dissipated hysteresis energy, resulting in higher cumulative damage and lower fatigue life. However, the fatigue failure modes of jointed specimens are independent of cyclic loading parameters; all tested jointed specimens exhibit a prominent tensile splitting failure mode. Three different crack coalescence patterns are classified between two adjacent joints. Furthermore, different from the progressive failure under static monotonic loading, the jointed rock specimens under cyclic compression fail more abruptly without evident preceding signs. The tensile cracks on the front surface of jointed specimens always initiate from the joint tips and then propagate at a certain angle with the joints toward the direction of maximum compression.

  13. Inspired by nature: investigating tetrataenite for permanent magnet applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, L H; Mubarok, A; Poirier, E; Bordeaux, N; Manchanda, P; Kashyap, A; Skomski, R; Goldstein, J; Pinkerton, F E; Mishra, R K; Kubic, R C; Barmak, K

    2014-02-12

    Chemically ordered L10-type FeNi, also known as tetrataenite, is under investigation as a rare-earth-free advanced permanent magnet. Correlations between crystal structure, microstructure and magnetic properties of naturally occurring tetrataenite with a slightly Fe-rich composition (~ Fe55Ni44) obtained from the meteorite NWA 6259 are reported and augmented with computationally derived results. The tetrataenite microstructure exhibits three mutually orthogonal crystallographic variants of the L10 structure that reduce its remanence; nonetheless, even in its highly unoptimized state tetrataenite provides a room-temperature coercivity of 95.5 kA m(-1) (1200 Oe), a Curie temperature of at least 830 K and a largely temperature-independent anisotropy that preliminarily point to a theoretical magnetic energy product exceeding (BH)max = 335 kJ m(-3) (42 MG Oe) and approaching those found in today's best rare-earth-based magnets.

  14. Rock mass evaluation for predicting tunnel constructability in the preliminary investigation stage. Phenomena causing difficult tunneling and rockburst prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Koichi; Sawada, Masataka; Inohara, Yoshiki; Shidahara, Takumi; Hatano, Teruyoshi

    2011-01-01

    For the selection of the Detailed Investigation Areas for HLW disposal, predicting the tunnel constructability is one of the requirements together with assessing long-term safety. This report is the 1st of the three papers dealing with the evaluation of tunnel constructability. This paper deals with the geological factors relating to difficult tunneling such as squeezing, rockburst, and others. Also it deals with the prediction of rockburst. The 2nd paper will deal with the prediction of squeezing. The 3rd paper deals with the engineering characteristics of rock mass through rock mass classification. This paper about difficult tunneling has been based upon analysis of more than 500 tunneling reports about 280 tunnel constructions. The causes of difficult tunneling are related to (1) underground water, (2) mechanical properties of the rock, or (3) others such as gas. The geological factors for excessive water inflow are porous volcanic product of Quarternary, fault crush zone and hydrothermally altered zone of Green Tuff area, and degenerated mixed rock in accretionary complex. The geological factors for squeezing are solfataric clay at Quarternary volcanic zone, fault crush zone and hydrothermally altered zone of Green Tuff area, mudstone and fault crush zone of sedimentary rock of Neogene and later. Information useful for predicting rockburst has been gathered from previous reports. In the preliminary investigation stage, geological survey, geophysical survey and borehole survey from the surface are the source of information. Therefore rock type, P-wave velocity from seismic exploration and in-situ rock stress from hydrofracturing have been considered. Majority of rockburst events occurred at granitic rock, excluding coal mine where different kind of rockburst occurred at pillars. And P-wave velocity was around 5 km/s at the rock of rockburst events. Horizontal maximum and minimum stresses SH and Sh have been tested as a criterion for rockburst. It has been

  15. Multi-scale investigation into the mechanisms of fault mirror formation in seismically active carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Markus; Chatzaras, Vasileios; Niemeijer, Andre; King, Helen; Drury, Martyn; Plümper, Oliver

    2017-04-01

    Mirror surfaces along principal slip zones in carbonate rocks have recently received considerable attention as they are thought to form during fault slip at seismic velocities and thus may be a marker for paleo-seismicity (Siman-Tov et al., 2013). Therefore, these structures represent an opportunity to improve our understanding of earthquake mechanics in carbonate faults. Recent investigations reported the formation of fault mirrors in natural rocks as well as in laboratory experiments and connected their occurrence to the development of nano-sized granular material (Spagnuolo et al., 2015). However, the underlying formation and deformation mechanisms of these fault mirrors are still poorly constrained and warrant further research. In order to understand the influence and significance of these fault products on the overall fault behavior, we analysed the micro-, and nanostructural inventory of natural fault samples containing mirror slip surfaces. Here we present first results on the possible formation mechanisms of fault mirrors and associated deformation mechanisms operating in the carbonate fault gouge from two seismically active fault zones in central Greece. Our study specifically focuses on mirror slip surfaces obtained from the Arkitsa fault in the Gulf of Evia and the Schinos fault in the Gulf of Corinth. The Schinos fault was reactivated by a magnitude 6.7 earthquake in 1981 while the Arkitsa fault is thought to have been reactivated by a magnitude 6.9 earthquake in 1894. Our investigations encompass a combination of state-of-the-art analytical techniques including X-ray computed tomography, focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. Using this multiscale analytical approach, we report decarbonation-reaction structures, considerable calcite twinning and grain welding immediately below the mirror slip surface. Grains or areas indicating decarbonation reactions show a foam

  16. An experimental investigation of transient heat transfer in surrounding rock mass of high geothermal roadway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A self-designed experimental installation for transient heat transfer in the modelling surrounding rock mass of high geothermal roadways was elaborated in this paper. By utilizing the new installation, the temperature variation rules in surrounding rock mass of the high geothermal roadway during mechanical ventilation were studied. The results show that the roadway wall temperature decreases dramatically at the early stage of ventilation, and the temperature at every position of the surrounding rock mass is decreasing constantly with time passing by. From roadway wall to deep area, the temperature gradually increases until reaching original rock temperature. The relationship between dimensionless temperature and dimensionless radius demonstrates approximately exponential function. Meanwhile, the temperature disturbance range in the simulated surrounding rock mass extends gradually from the roadway wall to deep area in the surrounding rock mass. Besides, as the air velocity increases, heat loss in the surrounding rock mass rises and the ratio of temperature reduction becomes larger, the speed of disturbance range expansion also gets faster.

  17. Investigations of some rock stress measuring techniques and the stress field in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanssen, Tor Harald

    1997-12-31

    Rock stresses are important to the safe construction and operation of all man-made structures in rock, whether In mining, civil or petroleum engineering. The crucial issue is their relative magnitude and orientation. This thesis develops equipment and methods for further rock stress assessment and reevaluates existing overcoring rock stress measurements, and relates this information to the present geological setting. Both laboratory work and field work are involved. In the field, rock stresses are measured by the overcoring and the hydraulic fracturing technique. An observation technique for assessing likely high stresses is developed. The field data refer to several hydropower projects and to some offshore hydrocarbon fields. The principal sections are: (1) Tectonic setting in the western Fennoscandia, (2) Triaxial rock stress measurements by overcoring using the NTH cell (a strain gauge cell developed at the Norwegian technical university in Trondheim and based on the CSIR cell of the South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research), (3) Laboratory testing of the NTH cell, (4) Quality ranking of stresses measured by the NTH cell, (4) Recalculated rock stresses and implications to the regional stress field, (5) Hydraulic fracturing stress measurements. 113 refs., 98 figs., 62 tabs.

  18. Investigations of some rock stress measuring techniques and the stress field in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanssen, Tor Harald

    1998-12-31

    Rock stresses are important to the safe construction and operation of all man-made structures in rock, whether In mining, civil or petroleum engineering. The crucial issue is their relative magnitude and orientation. This thesis develops equipment and methods for further rock stress assessment and reevaluates existing overcoring rock stress measurements, and relates this information to the present geological setting. Both laboratory work and field work are involved. In the field, rock stresses are measured by the overcoring and the hydraulic fracturing technique. An observation technique for assessing likely high stresses is developed. The field data refer to several hydropower projects and to some offshore hydrocarbon fields. The principal sections are: (1) Tectonic setting in the western Fennoscandia, (2) Triaxial rock stress measurements by overcoring using the NTH cell (a strain gauge cell developed at the Norwegian technical university in Trondheim and based on the CSIR cell of the South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research), (3) Laboratory testing of the NTH cell, (4) Quality ranking of stresses measured by the NTH cell, (4) Recalculated rock stresses and implications to the regional stress field, (5) Hydraulic fracturing stress measurements. 113 refs., 98 figs., 62 tabs.

  19. Investigation of natural gas theft by magnetic remanence mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobó, Zsolt; Kovács, Helga; Tóth, Pál; Palotás, Árpád B

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas theft causes major losses in the energy industry in Hungary. Among the non-technical losses occurring in natural gas networks, fraudulent residential consumption is one of the main factors. Up to 2014, gas meters that are most widely used in residential monitoring are manufactured with ferromagnetic moving components, which makes it possible to alter or disrupt the operation of the meters non-intrusively by placing permanent magnets on the casing of the meters. Magnetic remanence mapping was used to investigate a sample of 80 recalled residential meters and detect potentially fraudulent activity. 10% of the meters were found suspect by magnetic remanence measurement, of which 50% were confirmed to be potentially hijacked by further mechanical investigation. The details of the technique are described in this paper, along with experimental results and the discussion of the analysis of the real-world samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. I. Some results from a field investigation of thermo-mechanical loading of a rock mass when heaters are emplaced in the rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hood, M.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented of a field experiment to monitor the response of a rock mass to thermomechanical loading from electrically heated canisters emplaced in the rock at a depth of 340 m. Measurements made to date of temperature, displacement, and stress fields indicate that heat is transferred through the rock mainly by conduction; discontinuities within the rock mass have a minimal effect on the heat flow. Displacements within the rock from thermal expansion are shown to be much less than those predicted by linear thermoelastic theory. A plausible, though not complete, reason for these reduced displacements is the absorption of the initial rock expansions into discontinuities within the rock mass. Difficulties have been experienced in obtaining reliable stress measurement data using borehole deformation gauges to monitor changes in rock stress. Some data have been obtained and are being analyzed. Rock decrepitation in the heater boreholes is discussed

  1. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations on Agglomeration of Magnetic Colloidal Particles in Magnetic Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketomi, Susamu; Takahashi, Hiromasa; Inaba, Nobuyuki; Miyajima, Hideki

    1991-05-01

    Macro-clusters formation of the magnetic colloidal particles in magnetic fluids is investigated. Experiments of an optical microscope observation of the macro-clusters formation and of anomalous light scattering by the magnetic fluid are reported. Looking upon the anomalous light scattering of the magnetic fluid as a kind of critical opalescence and using Debye’s opalescence theory, we derive a thermodynamical instability theory of the colloidal particles’ dispersion. Relations among the instability theory of Cebers, that of Sano and Doi, and ours are discussed. An interaction energy among the colloidal particles is evaluated from the light scattering experiment. Similarities among the macro-cluster formation, spinodal decomposition of precipitation-type magnetic alloys, and flux-line lattice formation in type-II superconductors are discussed.

  2. Production, deformation and mechanical investigation of magnetic alginate capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwar, Elena; Kemna, Andre; Richter, Lena; Degen, Patrick; Rehage, Heinz

    2018-02-01

    In this article we investigated the deformation of alginate capsules in magnetic fields. The sensitivity to magnetic forces was realised by encapsulating an oil in water emulsion, where the oil droplets contained dispersed magnetic nanoparticles. We solved calcium ions in the aqueous emulsion phase, which act as crosslinking compounds for forming thin layers of alginate membranes. This encapsulating technique allows the production of flexible capsules with an emulsion as the capsule core. It is important to mention that the magnetic nanoparticles were stable and dispersed throughout the complete process, which is an important difference to most magnetic alginate-based materials. In a series of experiments, we used spinning drop techniques, capsule squeezing experiments and interfacial shear rheology in order to determine the surface Young moduli, the surface Poisson ratios and the surface shear moduli of the magnetically sensitive alginate capsules. In additional experiments, we analysed the capsule deformation in magnetic fields. In spinning drop and capsule squeezing experiments, water droplets were pressed out of the capsules at elevated values of the mechanical load. This phenomenon might be used for the mechanically triggered release of water-soluble ingredients. After drying the emulsion-filled capsules, we produced capsules, which only contained a homogeneous oil phase with stable suspended magnetic nanoparticles (organic ferrofluid). In the dried state, the thin alginate membranes of these particles were rather rigid. These dehydrated capsules could be stored at ambient conditions for several months without changing their properties. After exposure to water, the alginate membranes rehydrated and became flexible and deformable again. During this swelling process, water diffused back in the capsule. This long-term stability and rehydration offers a great spectrum of different applications as sensors, soft actuators, artificial muscles or drug delivery systems.

  3. The colloid investigations conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2000-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus [Geopoint AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Wold, Susanna [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry] (eds.)

    2005-12-15

    In 2000, SKB decided to initiate an international colloid project at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The objectives of the colloid project are to: (i) study the role of bentonite as a colloid source, (ii) verify the background colloid concentration at Aespoe HRL and, (iii) investigate the potential for colloid formation/transport in natural groundwater concentrations. The experimental concepts for the colloid project are: laboratory experiments with bentonite, background field measurements of natural colloids, borehole specific bentonite colloid stability experiments and a fracture specific transport experiment. The activities concerning the laboratory experiments and background field measurements are described in this work; the other activities are ongoing or planned. The following conclusions were made: The bentonite colloid stability is strongly dependent on the groundwater ionic strength. Natural colloids are organic degradation products such as humic and fulvic acids, inorganic colloids (clay, calcite, iron hydroxide) and microbes. Microbes form few but large particles and their concentration increase with increasing organic carbon concentrations. The small organic colloids are present in very low concentrations in deep granitic groundwater. The concentrations can be rather high in shallow waters. The colloid concentration decreases with depth and salinity, since colloids are less stable in saline waters. The colloid content at Aespoe is less than 300 ppb. The colloid content at repository level is less than 50 ppb. The groundwater variability obtained in the boreholes reflects well the natural groundwater variability along the whole HRL tunnel.

  4. The colloid investigations conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2000-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus; Wold, Susanna

    2005-12-01

    In 2000, SKB decided to initiate an international colloid project at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The objectives of the colloid project are to: (i) study the role of bentonite as a colloid source, (ii) verify the background colloid concentration at Aespoe HRL and, (iii) investigate the potential for colloid formation/transport in natural groundwater concentrations. The experimental concepts for the colloid project are: laboratory experiments with bentonite, background field measurements of natural colloids, borehole specific bentonite colloid stability experiments and a fracture specific transport experiment. The activities concerning the laboratory experiments and background field measurements are described in this work; the other activities are ongoing or planned. The following conclusions were made: The bentonite colloid stability is strongly dependent on the groundwater ionic strength. Natural colloids are organic degradation products such as humic and fulvic acids, inorganic colloids (clay, calcite, iron hydroxide) and microbes. Microbes form few but large particles and their concentration increase with increasing organic carbon concentrations. The small organic colloids are present in very low concentrations in deep granitic groundwater. The concentrations can be rather high in shallow waters. The colloid concentration decreases with depth and salinity, since colloids are less stable in saline waters. The colloid content at Aespoe is less than 300 ppb. The colloid content at repository level is less than 50 ppb. The groundwater variability obtained in the boreholes reflects well the natural groundwater variability along the whole HRL tunnel

  5. Experimental and Numerical Investigations on Colloid-facilitated Plutonium Reactive Transport in Fractured Tuffaceous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Z.; Wolfsberg, A. V.; Zhu, L.; Reimus, P. W.

    2017-12-01

    Colloids have the potential to enhance mobility of strongly sorbing radionuclide contaminants in fractured rocks at underground nuclear test sites. This study presents an experimental and numerical investigation of colloid-facilitated plutonium reactive transport in fractured porous media for identifying plutonium sorption/filtration processes. The transport parameters for dispersion, diffusion, sorption, and filtration are estimated with inverse modeling for minimizing the least squares objective function of multicomponent concentration data from multiple transport experiments with the Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis (SCEM). Capitalizing on an unplanned experimental artifact that led to colloid formation and migration, we adopt a stepwise strategy to first interpret the data from each experiment separately and then to incorporate multiple experiments simultaneously to identify a suite of plutonium-colloid transport processes. Nonequilibrium or kinetic attachment and detachment of plutonium-colloid in fractures was clearly demonstrated and captured in the inverted modeling parameters along with estimates of the source plutonium fraction that formed plutonium-colloids. The results from this study provide valuable insights for understanding the transport mechanisms and environmental impacts of plutonium in fractured formations and groundwater aquifers.

  6. 'Escher' Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Chemical Changes in 'Endurance' Rocks [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock dubbed 'Escher' on the southwestern slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' Scientists believe the rock's fractures, which divide the surface into polygons, may have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Opportunity has spent the last 14 sols investigating Escher, specifically the target dubbed 'Kirchner,' and other similar rocks with its scientific instruments. This image was taken on sol 208 (Aug. 24, 2004) by the rover's panoramic camera, using the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters. The graph above shows that rocks located deeper into 'Endurance Crater' are chemically altered to a greater degree than rocks located higher up. This chemical alteration is believed to result from exposure to water. Specifically, the graph compares ratios of chemicals between the deep rock dubbed 'Escher,' and the more shallow rock called 'Virginia,' before (red and blue lines) and after (green line) the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drilled into the rocks. As the red and blue lines indicate, Escher's levels of chlorine relative to Virginia's went up, and sulfur down, before the rover dug a hole into the rocks. This implies that the surface of Escher has been chemically altered to a greater extent than the surface of Virginia. Scientists are still investigating the role water played in influencing this trend. These data were taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

  7. Study on investigation and evaluation methods of deep seated sedimentary rocks. Chemical weathering, pore water squeezing and relationships of physical properties of sedimentary rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Takahiro; Suzuki, Koichi

    2006-01-01

    Chemical weathering, porewater squeezing and physical properties for the sedimentary rocks were examined. Chemical weathering potential of rocks was described by the sulfur as a acceleration factor of weathering and carbonate contents as a neutralization factor of it. The carbonate contents in the rocks were measured accurately by the gas pressure measurement method. Pore water squeezing method was applied for the semi-hard sedimentary rocks (Opalinusclay). The chemical change of extracted pore water under high pressure conditions was estimated. Physical property of sedimentary rocks have relationship among the porosity and permeability and resistivity coefficient in the same rock types. It is possible to estimate the water permeability from the geophysical tests. (author)

  8. An integrated geophysical and hydraulic investigation to characterize a fractured-rock aquifer, Norwalk, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J.W.; Williams, J.H.; Johnson, C.D.; Savino, D.M.; Haeni, F.P.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted an integrated geophysical and hydraulic investigation at the Norden Systems, Inc. site in Norwalk, Connecticut, where chlorinated solvents have contaminated a fractured-rock aquifer. Borehole, borehole-to-borehole, surface-geophysical, and hydraulic methods were used to characterize the site bedrock lithology and structure, fractures, and transmissive zone hydraulic properties. The geophysical and hydraulic methods included conventional logs, borehole imagery, borehole radar, flowmeter under ambient and stressed hydraulic conditions, and azimuthal square-array direct-current resistivity soundings. Integrated interpretation of geophysical logs at borehole and borehole-to-borehole scales indicates that the bedrock foliation strikes northwest and dips northeast, and strikes north-northeast to northeast and dips both southeast and northwest. Although steeply dipping fractures that cross-cut foliation are observed, most fractures are parallel or sub-parallel to foliation. Steeply dipping reflectors observed in the radar reflection data from three boreholes near the main building delineate a north-northeast trending feature interpreted as a fracture zone. Results of radar tomography conducted close to a suspected contaminant source area indicate that a zone of low electromagnetic (EM) velocity and high EM attenuation is present above 50 ft in depth - the region containing the highest density of fractures. Flowmeter logging was used to estimate hydraulic properties in the boreholes. Thirty-three transmissive fracture zones were identified in 11 of the boreholes. The vertical separation between transmissive zones typically is 10 to 20 ft. Open-hole and discrete-zone transmissivity was estimated from heat-pulse flowmeter data acquired under ambient and stressed conditions. The open-hole transmissivity ranges from 2 to 86 ft2/d. The estimated transmissivity of individual transmissive zones ranges from 0.4 to 68 ft2/d. Drawdown monitoring

  9. The seismic investigation of rock properties at the Carwynnen test mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New, B.M.

    1984-11-01

    The research described follows on from the seismic velocity tomography carried out previously at this site and describes an attempt to map the rock mass in terms of its attenuative properties. This is done by comparison of the spectral distributions of energy within wave packets observed at various distances from numerous source locations. The method was not found sensitive to the variations in natural rock condition at this site as the spectra were dominated by the effects of man-made openings and rock damage which appeared to control the energy input/output transfer function at each location. The seismic shadow caused by the presence of a major void in the area was clearly identified and suggested that similar observations could considerably enhance the value of velocity tomography techniques. Shear and compressional wave velocities are used to obtain estimates of the dynamic elastic properties of the rock mass. Brief recommendations regarding future seismic research are given. (author)

  10. Investigation of magnetic drift on transport of plasma across magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarika, Parismita; Chakraborty, Monojit; Das, Bidyut; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak

    2015-01-01

    When a metallic body is inserted inside plasma chamber it is always associated with sheath which depends on plasma and wall condition. The effect of sheath formed in the magnetic drift and magnetic field direction on cross field plasma transport has been investigated in a double Plasma device (DPD). The drifts exist inside the chamber in the transverse magnetic field (TMF) region in a direction perpendicular to both magnetic field direction and axis of the DPD chamber. The sheath are formed in the magnetic drift direction in the experimental chamber is due to the insertion of two metallic plates in these directions and in the magnetic field direction sheath is formed at the surface of the TMF channels. These metallic plates are inserted in order to obstruct the magnetic drift so that we can minimised the loss of plasma along drift direction and density in the target region is expected to increase due to the obstruction. It ultimately improves the negative ion formation parameters. The formation of sheath in the transverse magnetic field region is studied by applying electric field both parallel and antiparallel to drift direction. Data are acquired by Langmuir probe in source and target region of our chamber. (author)

  11. Strongly magnetic soil developed on a non-magnetic rock basement: A case study from NW Bulgaria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grison, Hana; Petrovský, Eduard; Jordanova, N.; Kapička, Aleš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2011), s. 697-716 ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB300120604 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : magnetic susceptibility * magnetite * soil * pollution * climate * limestone Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.700, year: 2011

  12. Paleointensity Variation of The Earth's Magnetic Field Obtained from Neogene and Quaternary Volcanic Rocks in Central Anatolian Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Nurcan; Makaroǧlu, Özlem; Hisarlı, Z. Mümtaz

    2017-04-01

    We present the variation of the earth magnetic field intensity obtained from Neogene and Quaternary volcanic rocks located in the Central Anatolian plateau. Total of four hundred and fifty volcanic rocks were sub-sampled in eighteen different sites around the study region. A modified Thellier method including the Leonhardt protocol was used to determine paleointensity values. Paleointensity results from ten sites were accepted according to the confidence criteria . According to first results the average total paleointensity field values, indicated by F, are 51.797±5.044 μT for site NK8,NK17,NK18,NK15 with age of 4.4-10.7 my, 51.91±4.651 for site NK4, NK3, NK12, NK6, NK11, NK14 with age of 0.1-2.6 m.y. The average VDMs (Virtual Dipol Moments) correspond to 8.39x1022 , 8.92x1022 Am2 for the four Neogene and six Quaternary rocks sites respectively. Our data were correlated with IAGA database that were obtained from the surrounding area. The correlation showed that the paleointensity data from the Central Anatolia plateau considerably agree with the IAGA data.

  13. DEM investigation of weathered rocks using a novel bond contact model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenming Shi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The distinct element method (DEM incorporated with a novel bond contact model was applied in this paper to shed light on the microscopic physical origin of macroscopic behaviors of weathered rock, and to achieve the changing laws of microscopic parameters from observed decaying properties of rocks during weathering. The changing laws of macroscopic mechanical properties of typical rocks were summarized based on the existing research achievements. Parametric simulations were then conducted to analyze the relationships between macroscopic and microscopic parameters, and to derive the changing laws of microscopic parameters for the DEM model. Equipped with the microscopic weathering laws, a series of DEM simulations of basic laboratory tests on weathered rock samples was performed in comparison with analytical solutions. The results reveal that the relationships between macroscopic and microscopic parameters of rocks against the weathering period can be successfully attained by parametric simulations. In addition, weathering has a significant impact on both stress–strain relationship and failure pattern of rocks.

  14. Investigation of magnetism in aluminum-doped silicon carbide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad

    2013-11-01

    The effect of aluminum doping on the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of (8,0) silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNT) is investigated using spin-polarized density functional theory. It is found from the calculation of the formation energies that aluminum substitution for silicon atom is preferred. Our results show that the magnetization depends on the substitutional site, aluminum substitution at silicon site does not introduce any spin-polarization, whereas the aluminum substitution for carbon atom yields a spin polarized, almost dispersionless π band within the original band gap.

  15. Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory project. Rock mechanical investigations measurement of the rock strain and displacement during shaft excavation at GL.-200m level of research galley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Toru; Seno, Yasuhiro; Hikima, Ryoichi; Matsui, Hiroya

    2011-09-01

    In order to establish the scientific and technical basis for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is proceeding with the geoscientific research in the research galleries excavated at the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU). One of the scientific and technical objectives of this project is to understand the change of geological environment due to excavation of research galleries. The investigation described herein is the measurement of the rock strain / displacement while pre-excavation grouting or excavating of the shaft around the GL.-200m level of research gallery. A brief summary is presented as follows. 1) Apparent strain with pre-excavation grouting: Injection pressure during pre-excavation grouting could explain the observed strain. Maximum principal strain 'E1' (extension) was oriented to NS direction. The measured fracture system at the site includes a fracture set perpendicular to E1. We infer that these fracture expanded due to grout injection pressure. 2) Apparent strain during excavation of the shaft: Rock behavior of stress release was observed when the bottom of shaft passed by and lining of shaft was constructed. The observed strain was very small and almost same scale as the expected strain for elastic material. But the observed strain of radial direction was compression whereas the expected strain was extension. Therefore it was estimated that rock behavior was affected by cracks. 3) Applicability of the FBG sensors for in situ displacement measurement near the shaft: FBG sensors were stable and reliable in comparison to strain meters or inclinometers. There was no electrical equipment trouble nor large drift in measurements. FBG results can lead to understand bending mode of borehole. But we cannot specify the displacement direction from these data in some cases. (author)

  16. Magnetic rock properties of the gabbros from the ODP Drill Hole ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R.Narasimhan(krishtel emaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    most coarse-grained oxide mineral bearing rocks record low Koenigsberger ratio (2 to 5) and median .... K. S. Krishna. Figure 2. (c) Stable remanence data of oxide gabbro (sample 29R-4, 54) which is nearly ..... the oxide gabbro with a mean around 3500×10−6 SI ..... Glover L 1994 The EDGE Experiment and the US East.

  17. Palaeointensity determinations and magnetic properties on Eocene rocks from Izu-Bonin-Mariana forearc (IODP Exp. 352)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvallo, C.; Camps, P.; Sager, W. W.; Poidras, T.

    2017-09-01

    IODP Expedition 352 cored igneous rocks from the Izu-Bonin-Mariana forearc crust. Cores from Sites U1440 and U1441 recovered Eocene basalts and related rocks and cores from Sites U1439 and U1442 recovered Eocene boninites and related rocks. We selected samples from Holes U1439C, U1440B and U1442A for palaeointensity measurements. Hysteresis measurements and high and low-temperature magnetization curves show that samples from Hole U1440B undergo magneto-chemical changes when heated and are mostly composed of single-domain (SD) or pseudo-single-domain (PSD) titanomaghemite. In contrast, the same measurements show that most selected samples from Holes U1439C and U1442A are thermally stable and are composed of either SD or PSD titanomagnetite with very little titanium content, or SD ferromagnetic grains with a large paramagnetic contribution. Thellier-Thellier palaeointensity experiments carried out on U1439C and U1442A samples give a good success rate of 25/60 and Virtual Dipole Moment (VDM) values between 1.3 and 3.5 × 1022 Am2. Multispecimen palaeointensity experiments with the domain-state corrected method carried out on 55 samples from Hole U1440B (divided into four groups) and 20 from Hole U1439C gave poor quality results, but indicated a VDM around 4-6 × 1022 Am2 in Hole U1440B forearc basalts. These results are in agreement with the few, low VDM values previously measured on Eocene rocks. However, they do not support an inverse relationship between field intensity and reversal rate for this period of time, since the Eocene reversal rate was low.

  18. Theoretical investigation of flute modes in a magnetic quadrupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    This research developed theories and conducted numerical investigations of electrostatic flute modes in a plasma confined in a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter I presents the discussion of relevant background. Chapter II contains a brief discussion of the basic flute-mode operator L 0 for intermediate- and low-frequency regimes. Chapter III develops a simple theory for a flute mode with frequency between the electron and ion bounce frequencies in the uniform density and temperature regions of a magnetic quadrupole. The frequency is predicted to be inversely proportional to the wave number. Chapter IV describes the kinetic approach. Chapter V contains the derivation of an eigenvalue equation for electrostatic waves with frequencies below the ion frequency in the private flux region of a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter VI develops a theory for electrostatic waves with frequency below the ion bounce frequency in the shared flux region of a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter VII contains the derivation of a dispersion equation for flute modes with frequencies between the electron and ion bounce frequencies in a plasma confined to a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter VIII presents a summary of the research described

  19. Investigation of the THM behaviour of the buffer and rock-buffer interaction during the canister retrieval test performed in the ASPÖ Hard Rock Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millard, A., E-mail: alain.millard@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DANS, DM2S, SEMT, LM2S, F91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barnichon, J.D. [IRSN/DEI/SARG/LR2S, F-92260 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2014-04-01

    In the framework of the THERESA European project, numerical modelling of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) and thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) behaviour of buffer (bentonite) and buffer-rock interfaces for deep underground nuclear waste repositories has been undertaken, with focus on the performance assessments. A major step of the project was the analysis of a large scale test, called the Canister Retrieval test, which has been performed in Aspö Hard Rock Laboratory. It consists in a full scale test of the emplacement of a canister with the surrounding buffer material. A deposition hole was first bored, and then the canister with heaters was installed together with bentonite blocks. The gap between the rock and the bentonite blocks was filled with bentonite pellets. The whole set was artificially wetted from its external boundary in order to accelerate the expected natural rehydration by the surrounding rock. The evolution of the THM processes was recorded over 5 years. Before analysing the whole CRT experiment, a preliminary simpler problem has been defined, which consisted in modelling a disc of buffer at canister mid-height. Thanks to the available experimental recorded measurements, it has been possible to numerically investigate the respective influence of the various THM parameters involved in the modelling of the physical processes. The theoretical model is based on one hand on the Richard's approximation for the flow calculation, and on the other hand on a Biot's type model for the hydro-mechanical behaviour. It has revealed the large influence of the liquid relative permeability, which is unfortunately in general not directly available from experiments and must be determined through inverse analysis techniques. Then, in a second stage, the whole CRT experiment has been analysed. For simplicity reasons, an axisymetrical model has been adopted, although the presence of a neighbouring experiment did influence the CRT results. The

  20. Geochemical, isotopic, and petrographic investigations of rocks from the Bosumtwi impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losiak, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Bosumtwi structure is a 1.07 milion year old, well-preserved, 10.5 km wide complex impact crater. It is associated with one of only four tektite strewn fields known on Earth and it is the source of the Ivory Coast tektites. It was drilled in 2004 by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP), and since then it has been the object of intensive research on various aspects of impact cratering process. This thesis is a continuation of those studies. Chapter 3 of this thesis presents a full and detailed characterization of the three granitoid intrusions and one mafic dike located in the vicinity of the Bosumtwi crater in terms of petrology, major and trace element geochemistry, geochronology, as well as isotopic composition. This allows us to characterize magmatic evolution of the West African Craton in this area and better understand the geological framework and target rocks of the impact. This study shows that the similar composition (strongly peraluminous muscovite granites and granodiorites) and age (between 2092±6 Ma and 2098±6 Ma) of granitic intrusions in the proximity of the Bosumtwi crater suggest that they are co-genetic. The granitoids were probably formed as a result of anatexis of TTGs (or rocks derived from them) at relatively low pressure and temperature. We propose that the intrusions from the Bosumtwi area are genetically related to the Banso granite occurring to the east of the crater and can be classified as basin-type, late-stage granitoids. Also a mafic dike located to the NE of the Bosumtwi crater seems to be genetically related to those felsic intrusions. Based on those findings a revised version of the geological map of the Bosumtwi crater area is proposed. Chapter 4 presents results of the investigation of the spatial relations between a statistically significant number of shocked quartz grains (278) showing PDFs (409) developed within a given area of a single thin section (⁓35 mm 2 ) from the Bosumtwi impact crater

  1. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility of silicic rocks from quarries in the vicinity of São Marcos, Rio Grande do Sul, South Brazil: Implications for emplacement mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañón-Tapia, Edgardo; Raposo, M. Irene B.

    2018-04-01

    The Paraná-Etendeka Large Igneous Province includes acid volcanic rocks that can be found throughout its extension. Several aspects concerning those rocks remain controversial, including their mechanism of emplacement and location of their eruptive sources. Opening of several quarries of dimension stone near the city of Sao Marcos, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, offers a unique opportunity to study in detail the acid products. Here, we present the results of a study of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) completed in some rocks that had been interpreted as the roots of volcanic conduits. Our results, and reexamination of the textural features of the rocks, lead to a reinterpretation that suggests that these rocks were emplaced subaerially, and involved assimilation and remelting of clastic components of previous products. Due to the inferred conditions of emplacement, it is unlikely that the eruptive vents are located far from the area of study, therefore ruling out the long-travelled nature of these products.

  2. Investigation of transient electrical, magnetic, and mechanical phenomena in large superconducting magnet coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sihler, C.

    1996-07-01

    The progress in the field of technology for superconducting magnets led to the necessity of transferring existing calculation methods from electrical power engineering, modifying these tools to satisfy the boundary conditions for superconducting magnets, and also developing new calculation methods for special purposes. In this work suitable calculation methods are elaborated. Their validity and applicability is demonstrated in employing these scientific engineering tools to actual developments of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. In detail this work deals with: 1. calculating eddy current and force densities in the conducting environment of a superconducting magnet or magnet system. 2. the effects of eddy current forces in experimental engineering; 3. transient effects of electrical surges acting on new coil designs; and 4. the electrical and magnetic properties of superconducting cables. Especially, the magnetic properties can lead to an inhomogeneous current distribution in the cable and, thus, to a considerable reduction of the current carrying capacity of the whole magnet. These investigations demonstrate that a detailed analysis of electrodynamic phenomena is indispensable in order to find the optimum technical way to make use of the physical potential of superconductivity. (orig./MM) [de

  3. Theoretical Investigations on the Influence of Artificially Altered Rock Mass Properties on Mechanical Excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlieb, Philipp; Bock, Stefan

    2018-03-01

    This study presents a theoretical analysis of the influence of the rock mass rating on the cutting performance of roadheaders. Existing performance prediction models are assessed for their suitability for forecasting the influence of pre-damaging the rock mass with alternative methods like lasers or microwaves, prior to the mechanical excavation process. Finally, the RMCR model was chosen because it is the only reported model incorporating a range of rock mass properties into its calculations. The results show that even very tough rocks could be mechanically excavated if the occurrence, orientation and condition of joints are favourable for the cutting process. The calculated improvements in the cutting rate (m3/h) are up to 350% for the most favourable cases. In case of microwave irradiation of hard rocks with an UCS of 200 MPa, a reasonable improvement in the performance by 120% can be achieved with as little as an extra 0.7 kWh/m3 (= 1% more energy) compared to cutting only.

  4. In-situ experiments to investigate rock matrix retention properties in ONKALO, Olkiluoto, Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutilainen, Mikko; Helariutta, Kerttuli [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Chemistry; Poteri, Antti [Technical Research Centre of Finland VTT (Finland); and others

    2015-07-01

    Spent nuclear fuel from nuclear power plants, owned by TVO (Teollisuuden Voima Oy) and Fortum, is planned to be disposed to a repository at a depth of more than 400 meters in the bedrock of Olkiluoto (Eurajoki, Finland). The repository system of multiple release barriers consists of both manmade and natural barriers. The surrounding rock acts as the last barrier if other barriers fail during passage of the millennia. Therefore, safe disposal of spent nuclear fuel requires information on the radionuclide transport and retention properties within the porous and water-containing rock matrix along the water conducting flow paths. To this end, various types of experiments are being performed and planned within ONKALO, the underground rock characterization facility in Olkiluoto, as part of the project @''rock matrix REtention PROperties'' (REPRO). The research site is located at a depth of 420 meters close to the repository site. The aim is to study the diffusion and sorption properties of nuclear compounds in the rock matrix under real in-situ conditions. The first in-situ experiment was performed during 2012 using HTO, Na-22, Cl-36 and I-125 as tracer nuclides. Breakthrough curves show retention and asymptotic behavior that are in-line with those caused by matrix diffusion and sorption were observed in their breakthrough curves. Weak sorption was also observed in the breakthrough curves of Na-22 and I-125.

  5. Investigated Miscible CO2 Flooding for Enhancing Oil Recovery in Wettability Altered Chalk and Sandstone Rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabrizy, Vahid Alipour

    2012-07-01

    The thesis addresses oil recovery by miscible CO2 flooding from modified sandstone and chalk rocks. Calcite mineral surface is modified with stearic acid (SA) and asphaltene, and the silicate mineral surfaces are modified with N,N-dimethyldodecylamine (NN-DMDA) and asphaltene. The stability of adsorbed polar components in presence of SO4 2- and Mg2 + ions is also investigated. Recovery from sandstone cores is consistently lower than that from chalk cores saturated with the same oil and flooded with CO2 at all miscible flooding conditions. This may be due to the larger permeability contrasts in sandstone cores, which promote the fingering phenomenon. Miscible CO2 flooding for chalk and sandstone cores with distilled water, as initial water saturation, shows also lower oil recovery than cores saturated with different ions. At higher miscible flooding conditions, higher oil recovery is obtained. However, presence of light components (such as C1 or C3) in oil reduced the recovery. Oil recovery in presence of methane (C1) is lower than that in presence of methane and propane (C1/C3). A ternary diagram was constructed in order to understand the CO2 flooding mechanism(s) at the different flooding conditions and in presence of light components. The side effect of the flooding with CO2 is the probability for asphaltene deposition. An approach based on solubility parameter in the liquid, is used to assess the risk for asphaltene deposition during CO2 miscible flooding. The light components (C1/C3) and higher flooding conditions enhanced the risk for asphaltene instability. It is also shown higher amount of asphaltene deposition in chalk cores than that in sandstone cores at similar miscibility conditions.(au)

  6. Joint seismic, hydrogeological, and geomechanical investigations of a fracture zone in the Grimsel Rock Laboratory, Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majer, E.L.; Myer, L.R.; Peterson, J.E. Jr.; Karasaki, K.; Long, J.C.S.; Martel, S.J.; Bluemling, P.; Vomvoris, S.

    1990-06-01

    This report is one of a series documenting the results of the Nagra-DOE Cooperative (NDC-I) research program in which the cooperating scientists explore the geological, geophysical, hydrological, geochemical, and structural effects anticipated from the use of a rock mass as a geologic repository for nuclear waste. From 1987 to 1989 the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Swiss Cooperative for the Storage of Nuclear Waste (Nagra) participated in an agreement to carryout experiments for understanding the effect of fractures in the storage and disposal of nuclear waste. As part of this joint work field and laboratory experiments were conducted at a controlled site in the Nagra underground Grimsel test site in Switzerland. The primary goal of these experiments in this fractured granite was to determine the fundamental nature of the propagation of seismic waves in fractured media, and to relate the seismological parameters to the hydrological parameters. The work is ultimately aimed at the characterization and monitoring of subsurface sites for the storage of nuclear waste. The seismic experiments utilizes high frequency (1000 to 10,000 Hertz) signals in a cross-hole configuration at scales of several tens of meters. Two-, three-, and four-sided tomographic images of the fractures and geologic structure were produced from over 60,000 raypaths through a 10 by 21 meter region bounded by two nearly horizontal boreholes and two tunnels. Intersecting this region was a dominant fracture zone which was the target of the investigations. In addition to these controlled seismic imaging experiments, laboratory work using core from this region were studied for the relation between fracture content, saturation, and seismic velocity and attenuation. In-situ geomechanical and hydrologic tests were carried out to determine the mechanical stiffness and conductivity of the fractures. 20 refs., 90 figs., 6 tabs

  7. Hydraulic properties and scale effects investigation in regional rock aquifers, south-western Quebec, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastev, M.; Savard, M. M.; Lapcevic, P.; Lefebvre, R.; Martel, R.

    This paper reports on the characterization of hydraulic properties of regional rock aquifers carried out within a groundwater resources assessment project in the St. Lawrence Lowlands of south-western Quebec. To understand the aquifer behavior at both the fracture level and at field scale, hydraulic investigations were carried out using various aquifer tests. The groundwater flow at the local scale is controlled mostly by the fracture system. Results of the constant-head injection tests show a weak decreasing trend of hydraulic conductivity with depth indicating that a major part of the groundwater flow occurs in the first meters of the rock sequence. At the regional scale, the equivalent porous media approach is applicable. The hydraulic conductivity measurements were correlated to the scale of the aquifer tests expressed with the investigated aquifer volume. A simple interpolation procedure for the hydraulic conductivity field was developed based on the distance between field measurements and the tested aquifer volumes. The regional distribution of the hydraulic conductivity for the major fractured aquifer units indicates that dolostone is the most permeable whereas sandstone and crystalline rocks are the least permeable units. Este artículo trata de la caracterización de las propiedades hidráulicas en acuíferos regionales rocosos, la cual se llevó a cabo dentro del proyecto de evaluación de los recursos de agua subterránea en St. Lawrence Lowlands al suroeste de Quebec. Para entender el comportamiento del acuífero tanto a nivel de fractura como a escala del campo, se ejecutaron investigaciones hidráulicas usando varias pruebas de acuífero. El flujo del agua subterránea a escala local está controlado principalmente por el sistema de fracturas. Los resultados de las pruebas de inyección con cabeza constante muestran una tendencia decreciente débil de la conductividad hidráulica con la profundidad, indicando que la mayor parte del flujo de agua

  8. Anisotropy of susceptibility in rocks that are magnetically non-linear even in weak fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chadima, Martin; Ježek, J.; Hrouda, F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, EGU General Assembly 2017 (2017) ISSN 1029-7006. [European Geosciences Union General Assembly. 23.04.2017-28.04.2017, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility * field-dependent susceptibility * second-rank tensor Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2017/EGU2017-7210-1.pdf

  9. Limits of out-of-phase susceptibility in magnetic granulometry of rocks and soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrouda, F.; Pokorný, J.; Chadima, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 2 (2015), s. 294-308 ISSN 0039-3169 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : out-of-phase susceptibility * frequency-dependent susceptibility measurement accuracy * environmetal magnetism * loess * soil * paleoclimatic reconstruction Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism , Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.818, year: 2015

  10. The change of magnetic properties of minerals and rocks after their microwave heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianèin Jaroslav

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of microwaves utilisation in drying processes of different materials (e.g. wood, textiles, coffee, paper, treating of synthetics, glass and ceramic materials, vulcanisation of gum, melting of ferrous and non-ferrous ores, intensification processes of disintegration of raw materials, desulphurization of coal as well as in processes of disposing hazardous wastes is studied. The presented paper describes the influence of microwave radiation on on the change of magnetic properties of minerals and ores. The modification of magnetic properties of valuable components of irradiated ores increases the efficiency of process of their magnetic separation. Changes of magnetic properties of samples were evaluated by measuring the magnetic susceptibility and by X-ray diffraction analysis before and after their microwave heating.Thermal pretreatment of weakly magnetic ores by applying of microwave radiation is tested on the samples of iron spathic ore from the Rudòany deposit (25.1 % of Fe, 5.1 % of SiO2 and the Nižná Slaná ore (31.1 % of Fe, 9.6 % of SiO2. The influence of microwave on a rate of change of iron spathic ore to magnetite depending on the time of heating was observed for a grain size of 0.5 – 1 mm at a constant oven output of 900 W. The weight of tested samples was 100 g. After 10 min. of heating, an essential change of magnetic properties of ore samples from both deposits occurs and after 15 min. a rapid growth of magnetic susceptibility value is observed. This fact testifies about an intensive decomposition of siderite. The achieved values of magnetic susceptibility, results of chemical analyses as well as the X-ray diffraction records of irradiated samples confirmed the formation of new strongly magnetic mineral phases. Finally, after 40 min. of heating, a sintering of grains resulting in agglomerates, accompanied by molten mass creation, were observed.

  11. Natural remanent magnetization and rock magnetic parameters from the North-East Atlantic continental margin : Insights from a new, automated cryogenic magnetometer at the Geological Survey of Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Martin; Fabian, Karl; Knies, Jochen; Sauer, Simone

    2017-04-01

    Natural remanent magnetization (NRM) and rock magnetic parameters from two locations, West Barents Sea ( 71.6°N,16.2°E) and Vestnesa Ridge, NW Svalbard ( 79.0°N, 6.9°E), were acquired using a new, automatically operating cryogenic magnetometer system at the Geological Survey of Norway. The magnetometer setup comprises an automated robot sample feeding, dynamic operation and measurement monitoring, and customised output-to-database data handling. The setup is designed to dynamically enable a variety of parallel measurements with several coupled devices (e.g. balance, MS2B) to effectively use dead-time in between the otherwise time-consuming measurements with the cryogen magnetometer. Web-based access allows remote quality control and interaction 24/7 and enables high sample throughput. The magnetic properties are combined with geophysical, geochemical measurements and optical imaging, both radiographic and colour images, from high-resolution core-logging. The multidisciplinary approach enables determination and interpretation of content and formation of the magnetic fraction, and its development during diagenetic processes. Besides palaeomagnetic age determination the results offer the opportunity to study sediment transformation processes that have implications for the burial and degradation of organic matter. The results also help to understand long and short-term variability of sediment accumulation. Chemical sediment stability is directly linked to environmental and climate variability in the polar marine environment during the recent past.

  12. Investigation of Coupled Processes and Impact of High Temperature Limits in Argillite Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Kim, Kunhwi; Houseworth, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The focus of research within the UFD Campaign is on repository-induced interactions that may affect the key safety characteristics of an argillaceous rock. These include thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) process interactions that occur as a result of repository construction and waste emplacement. Some of the key questions addressed in this report include the development of fracturing in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) and THMC effects on the near-field argillaceous rock and buffer minerals and petrophysical characteristics, particularly the impacts of induced temperature rise caused by waste heat.

  13. Investigation of Coupled Processes and Impact of High Temperature Limits in Argillite Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kim, Kunhwi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, Jim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The focus of research within the UFD Campaign is on repository-induced interactions that may affect the key safety characteristics of an argillaceous rock. These include thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) process interactions that occur as a result of repository construction and waste emplacement. Some of the key questions addressed in this report include the development of fracturing in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) and THMC effects on the near-field argillaceous rock and buffer minerals and petrophysical characteristics, particularly the impacts of induced temperature rise caused by waste heat.

  14. Greigite (Fe3S4) as an indicator of drought - The 1912-1994 sediment magnetic record from White Rock Lake, Dallas, Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R.L.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Van Metre, P.; Tuttle, M.; Callender, E.; Goldin, A.

    1999-01-01

    Combined magnetic and geochemical studies were conducted on sediments from White Rock Lake, a reservoir in suburban Dallas (USA), to investigate how land use has affected sediment and water quality since the reservoir was filled in 1912. The chronology of a 167-cm-long core is constrained by the recognition of the pre-reservoir surface and by 137Cs results. In the reservoir sediments, magnetic susceptibility (MS) and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) are largely carried by detrital titanomagnetite that originally formed in igneous rocks. Titanomagnetite and associated hematite are the dominant iron oxides in a sample from the surficial deposit in the watershed but are absent in the underlying Austin Chalk. Therefore, these minerals were transported by wind into the watershed. After about 1960, systematic decreases in Ti, Fe, and Al suggest diminished input of detrital Fe-Ti oxides from the surficial deposits. MS and IRM remain constant over this interval, however, implying compensation by an increase in strongly magnetic material derived from human activity. Anthropogenic magnetite in rust and ferrite spherules (from fly ash?) are more common in sediment deposited after about 1970 than before and may account for the constant magnetization despite the implied decrease in detrital Fe-Ti oxides. An unexpected finding is the presence of authigenic greigite (Fe3S4), the abundance of which is at least partly controlled by climate. Greigite is common in sediments that predate about 1975, with zones of concentration indicated by relatively high IRM/MS. High greigite contents in sediment deposited during the early to mid-1950s and during the mid-1930s correspond to several-year periods of below-average precipitation and drought from historical records. Relatively long water-residence times in the reservoir during these periods may have led to elevated levels of sulfate available for bacterial sulfate reduction. The sulfate was probably derived via the oxidation of

  15. Strategy for the use of laboratory methods in the site investigations programme for the transport properties of the rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widestrand, Henrik; Byegaard, Johan; Ohlsson, Yvonne; Tullborg, Eva-Lena

    2003-06-01

    This report comprises a strategy for the handling of laboratory investigations of diffusivity and sorption characteristics within the discipline-specific programme 'Transport Properties of the Rock' in the SKB site investigations. The aim of the transport programme is to investigate the solute transport properties at a site in order to acquire data that are required for an assessment of the long-term performance and radiological safety of the deep repository. The result of the transport programme is the Transport Properties Site Descriptive Model, i.e. a description of the site-specific properties for the transport of solutes in the groundwater at a site. A strategy for the methodology, control of sampling and characterisation programme and interpretation of the results, is proposed. The basis for the laboratory investigations is a conceptual geological model based on the geological model produced in the geology programme. Major and minor types of rock and fractures are defined and characterised according to the quality of the general database and site-specific needs. The selection of samples and analyses is determined in close co-operation with the geology, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry and rock mechanics programmes. The result of the laboratory investigations is a retardation model, which is used as an input in the Transport Properties Site Descriptive Model. The interpretation and production of a retardation model is described and exemplified. Lastly, method-specific strategies and recommendations are given, including strategies for the selection of tracers in the experiments and for the treatment of the sampled geologic materials

  16. Uploading, Searching and Visualizing of Paleomagnetic and Rock Magnetic Data in the Online MagIC Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Donadini, F.

    2007-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is commissioned to implement and maintain an online portal to a relational database populated by both rock and paleomagnetic data. The goal of MagIC is to archive all available measurements and derived properties from paleomagnetic studies of directions and intensities, and for rock magnetic experiments (hysteresis, remanence, susceptibility, anisotropy). MagIC is hosted under EarthRef.org at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/ and will soon implement two search nodes, one for paleomagnetism and one for rock magnetism. Currently the PMAG node is operational. Both nodes provide query building based on location, reference, methods applied, material type and geological age, as well as a visual map interface to browse and select locations. Users can also browse the database by data type or by data compilation to view all contributions associated with well known earlier collections like PINT, GMPDB or PSVRL. The query result set is displayed in a digestible tabular format allowing the user to descend from locations to sites, samples, specimens and measurements. At each stage, the result set can be saved and, where appropriate, can be visualized by plotting global location maps, equal area, XY, age, and depth plots, or typical Zijderveld, hysteresis, magnetization and remanence diagrams. User contributions to the MagIC database are critical to achieving a useful research tool. We have developed a standard data and metadata template (version 2.3) that can be used to format and upload all data at the time of publication in Earth Science journals. Software tools are provided to facilitate population of these templates within Microsoft Excel. These tools allow for the import/export of text files and provide advanced functionality to manage and edit the data, and to perform various internal checks to maintain data integrity and prepare for uploading. The MagIC Contribution Wizard at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/upload.htm executes the upload

  17. Investigation of influence of falling rock size and shape on traveling distance due to earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochigi, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    In evaluation of seismic stability of surrounding slope in a nuclear power plant, as a part of residual risk evaluation, it is essential to confirm the effects of surrounding slope failure on a important structure, when slope failure probability is not sufficiently small for extremely large earthquake. So evaluation of slope failure potential based on a falling rocks analyses considering slope failure using discontinuous model such as distinct element method(DEM) will be employed in near future. But, these slope collapse analysis by discontinuous model needs determination of input data of falling rock size and shape, and some problems about determination method of these size and shape condition and analysis accuracy are remained. In this study, the results of slope collapse experiment by shaking table and numerical simulation of this experiment by DEM is conducted to clarify the influence of falling rock size and shape on traveling distance. As a results, it is indicated that more massive and larger rock model gives safety side evaluation for traveling distance. (author)

  18. Rock Magnetic Characterization of fine Particles from car Engines, Break pads and Tobacco: An Environmental Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Bervera, E.; Lopez, V. A.; Gerstnecker, K.; Swilley, B.

    2017-12-01

    Today, it is very well known that small magnetic particles are very harmful to the health of humans. For the first time we have conducted an environmental pilot study of fine magnetic particles on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, of particulate matter (pm) 60, pm=10, and pm= 2.5. In order to do a rock magnetic characterization we have preformed low field susceptibility versus temperature (k-T) experiments to determine the Curie points of small particles collected from exhaust pipes, as well as from brake pads of 4 different types of car engines using octane ratings of 85, 87 and 92. The Curie point determinations are very well defined and range from 292 °C through 393 °C to 660 °C. In addition, we have conducted magnetic granulometry experiments on raw tobacco, burnt ashes as well as on car engines and brake pads in question. The results of the experiments show ferro- and ferrimagnetic hysteresis loops with magnetic grain sizes ranging from superparamagnetic-multidomain (SP_MD), multi-domain (MD) and pseudo-single domain (PSD) shown on the modified Day et al. diagram of Dunlop (2002). Thus far, the results we have obtained from this pilot study are in agreement with other studies conducted from cigarette ashes from Bulgaria (Jordanova et al., 2005). Our results could be correlated to the traffic-related PM in Rome, Italy where the SP fraction mainly occurs as coating of MD particles that originated by localized stress in the oxidized outer shell surrounding the unoxidized core of magnetite like grains as published by Sagnotti and Winkler (2012).

  19. Rock Magnetic Study of IODP/ICDP Expedition 364 Site M0077A Drill Cores: Post-Impact Sediments, Impact Breccias, Melt, Granitic Basement and Dikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Tikoo, S.; Zylberman, W.; Lofi, J.

    2017-12-01

    Drilling at Site M0077 sampled post-impact sediments overlying a peak ring consisting of impact breccias, melt rock and granitoids. Here we focus on characterizing the peak ring using magnetic properties, which vary widely and depend on mineralogy, depositional and emplacement conditions and secondary alterations. Rock magnetic properties are integrated with Multi-Sensor Core Logger (MSCL) data, vertical seismic profile, physical properties, petrographic and chemical analyses and geophysical models. We measure low-field magnetic susceptibility at low- and high-frequencies, intensity and direction of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) and laboratory-induced isothermal (IRM) and anhysteretic (ARM) magnetizations, alternating-field demagnetization of NRM, IRM and NRM, susceptibility variation with temperature, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, hysteresis and IRM back-field demagnetization. Post-impact carbonates show low susceptibilities and NRM intensities, variable frequency-dependent susceptibilities and multivectorial remanences residing in low and high coercivity minerals. Hysteresis loops show low coercivity saturation magnetizations and variable paramagnetic mineral contents. Impact breccias (suevites) and melt rock show higher susceptibilities, low frequency-dependent susceptibilities, high NRM, ARM and IRM intensities and moderate ARM intensity/susceptibility ratios. Magnetic signal is dominated by fine-grained magnetite and titanomagnetites with PSD domain states. Melt rocks at the base of impactite section show the highest susceptibilities and remanence intensities. Basement section is characterized by low susceptibilities in the granites and higher values in the dikes, with NRM and ARM intensities increasing towards the base. The high susceptibilities and remanence intensities correlate with high seismic velocities, density and decreased porosity and electrical resistivity. Fracturing and alteration account for the reduced seismic velocities

  20. Reactive Transport Modeling Investigation of High Dissolved Sulfide Concentrations in Sedimentary Basin Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, M.; Mayer, U. K.; MacQuarrie, K. T. B.

    2017-12-01

    Water with total dissolved sulfide in excess of 1 mmol L-1is widely found in groundwater at intermediate depths in sedimentary basins, including regions of the Michigan basin in southeastern Ontario, Canada. Conversely, at deeper and shallower depths, relatively low total dissolved sulfide concentrations have been reported. The mechanisms responsible for the occurrence of these brackish sulfide-containing waters are not fully understood. Anaerobic microbial sulfate reduction is a common process resulting in the formation of high sulfide concentrations. Sulfate reduction rates depend on many factors including the concentration of sulfate, the abundance of organic substances, redox conditions, temperature, salinity and the species of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). A sedimentary basin-specific conceptual model considering the effect of salinity on the rate of sulfate reduction was developed and implemented in the reactive transport model MIN3P-THCm. Generic 2D basin-scale simulations were undertaken to provide a potential explanation for the dissolved sulfide distribution observed in the Michigan basin. The model is 440 km in the horizontal dimension and 4 km in depth, and contains fourteen sedimentary rock units including shales, sandstones, limestones, dolostone and evaporites. The main processes considered are non-isothermal density dependent flow, kinetically-controlled mineral dissolution/precipitation and its feedback on hydraulic properties, cation exchange, redox reactions, biogenic sulfate reduction, and hydromechanical coupling due to glaciation-deglaciation events. Two scenarios were investigated focusing on conditions during an interglacial period and the transient evolution during a glaciation-deglaciation cycle. Inter-glaciation simulations illustrate that the presence of high salinity brines strongly suppress biogenic sulfate reduction. The transient simulations show that glaciation-deglaciation cycles can have an impact on the maximum depth of

  1. Investigating Natural Analogues for Co{sub 2} Sequestration in Ultra Mafic Rocks: A Reactive Transport Modelling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gherardi, F. [Istituto di Geoscienze e Georisorse, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa (Italy)

    2013-07-15

    Serpentinites of Ligurian ophiolites are studied as natural analogues for CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration in Italy. Mineralogical and geochemical observations indicate that silicification and carbonation are typical alteration processes induced by the interaction of CO{sub 2} charged fluids with pristine ultramafic rocks. Multicomponent reactive transport models have been applied to reproduce natural patterns and investigate carbon sequestration efficiency under high P{sub CO2} conditions. Temporal changes in porosity and permeability are predicted to affect the spatial and temporal occurrence of secondary minerals. The feedback between mineralogical transformations and transport properties of the geological media emerges as a key factor controlling the mineral carbonation potential of the investigated ultramafic rocks. (author)

  2. Theoretical and experimental investigations of frustrated pyrochlore magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, John Dickon Mathison

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes the investigation of frustrated magnetic systems based on the pyrochlore lattice of corner-sharing tetrahedra. Monte Carlo simulations and analytical calculations have been performed on a pyrochlore ferromagnet with local (111) easy-axis anisotropy related to the problem of 'spin ice'. The anisotropy-temperature-magnetic field phase diagram was determined. It contained a tricritical point as well as features related to some real ferroelectrics. A pyrochlore antiferromagnet with local (111) easy-plane anisotropy was studied by Monte Carlo simulation. A general expression for its degenerate ground states was discovered and normal- modes out of the ground states were calculated. Both systems are frustrated yet have a long-range ordered state at low temperature. The degeneracy lifting observed is discussed as well as the reasons for its presence. The rare-earth titanate series Ln 2 Ti 2 O 7 (Ln = rare earth), crystallizes in the Fd3-barm space group, with the magnetic ions situated on the 16c sites which constitute the pyrochlore lattice. Crystal-field effects are known to play a significant role in the frustration observed in these compounds. Powder neutron diffraction was performed on gadolinium and erbium titanate. Both systems are frustrated antiferromagnets yet show long-range magnetic order at ∼ 1 K and ∼ 1.2 K respectively. The magnetic structures of both these compounds have been determined by powder neutron diffraction techniques and related to other theoretical results as well as the theoretical results of the author. Further neutron scattering experiments on the 'spin ice' materials Ho 2 Ti 2 O 7 and Dy 2 Ti 2 O 7 are also described. (author)

  3. Geological Development of the Izu-Bonin Forearc Since the Eocene Based on Biostratigraphic, Rock Magnetic, and Sediment Provenance Observations from IODP Expedition 352 Drill Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronotis, K. E.; Robertson, A.; Kutterolf, S.; Avery, A.; Baxter, A.; Schindlbeck, J. C.; Wang, K. L.; Acton, G.

    2016-12-01

    International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 352 recovered early Oligocene to recent sediments above Eocene igneous basement at 4 sites in the Izu-Bonin Forearc. The sites were selected to investigate the forearc region since subduction initiation in the Eocene, with Sites U1439 and U1442 being cored into the upper trench slope and Sites U1440 and U1441 into the lower trench slope. Postcruise studies of biostratigraphy, sediment chemistry, tephra composition and chronology and magnetic properties, along with observations from prior coring help constrain the regional geological development. Volcanic activity in the area, as inferred from its influence on sediment composition, has varied between long periods of activity and quiescence. Combined whole-rock sediment chemistry and tephra compositions suggest that during the Oligocene to earliest Miocene ( 30-22 Ma) tuffaceous input of predominantly dacitic composition was mainly derived from the intra-oceanic Izu-Bonin Arc. The early Miocene interval ( 22-15 Ma) lacks tuffaceous input, as supported by rock magnetic data. During this period, the forearc subsided beneath the carbonate compensation depth (CCD), as evidenced by radiolarian-bearing mud and metal-rich silty clay. This was followed by input of tephra with bimodal felsic and mafic compositions from the Izu-Bonin Arc from 15 to 5 Ma. Middle Miocene to Quaternary time was characterized by increased carbonate preservation, coupled with abundant, predominantly felsic tephra input, which is chemically indicative of a Japan continental arc source (Honshu), with additional chemically distinctive input from the Izu-Bonin Arc. Extending back to 32 Ma, tephra layers can be correlated between the upper-slope sites, extrapolated to the less well-dated lower-slope sites, and further correlated with onland Japanese tephra (Kutterolf et al., 2016; Goldschmidt Conference). Overall, the new results provide an improved understanding of the regional tectonic evolution.

  4. Investigation on the Possible Relationship between Magnetic Pulsations and Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusoh, M.; Liu, H.; Yumoto, K.; Uozumi, T.; Takla, E. M.; Yousif Suliman, M. E.; Kawano, H.; Yoshikawa, A.; Asillam, M.; Hashim, M.

    2012-12-01

    The sun is the main source of energy to the solar system, and it plays a major role in affecting the ionosphere, atmosphere and the earth surface. The connection between solar wind and the ground magnetic pulsations has been proven empirically by several researchers previously (H. J. Singer et al., 1977, E. W. Greenstadt, 1979, I. A. Ansari 2006 to name a few). In our preliminary statistical analysis on relationship between solar and seismic activities (Jusoh and Yumoto, 2011, Jusoh et al., 2012), we observed a high possibility of solar-terrestrial coupling. We observed high tendency of earthquakes to occur during lower phase solar cycles which significantly related with solar wind parameters (i.e solar wind dynamic pressure, speed and input energy). However a clear coupling mechanism was not established yet. To connect the solar impact on seismicity, we investigate the possibility of ground magnetic pulsations as one of the connecting agent. In our analysis, the recorded ground magnetic pulsations are analyzed at different ranges of ultra low frequency; Pc3 (22-100 mHz), Pc4 (6.7-22 mHz) and Pc5 (1.7-6.7 mHz) with the occurrence of local earthquake events at certain time periods. This analysis focuses at 2 different major seismic regions; north Japan (mid latitude) and north Sumatera, Indonesia (low latitude). Solar wind parameters were obtained from the Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA via the OMNIWeb Data Explorer and the Space Physics Data Facility. Earthquake events were extracted from the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) database. The localized Pc3-Pc5 magnetic pulsations data were extracted from Magnetic Data Acquisition System (MAGDAS)/Circum Pan Magnetic Network (CPMN) located at Ashibetsu (Japan); for earthquakes monitored at north Japan and Langkawi (Malaysia); for earthquakes observed at north Sumatera. This magnetometer arrays has established by International Center for Space Weather Science and Education, Kyushu University, Japan. From the

  5. Investigating automated depth modelling of archaeo-magnetic datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheyney, Samuel; Hill, Ian; Linford, Neil; Leech, Christopher

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic surveying is a commonly used tool for first-pass non-invasive archaeological surveying, and is often used to target areas for more detailed geophysical investigation, or excavation. Quick and routine processing of magnetic datasets mean survey results are typically viewed as 2D greyscale maps and the shapes of anomalies are interpreted in terms of likely archaeological structures. This technique is simple, but ignores some of the information content of the data. The data collected using dense spatial sampling with modern precise instrumentation are capable of yielding numerical estimates of the depths to buried structures, and their physical properties. The magnetic field measured at the surface is a superposition of the responses to all anomalous magnetic susceptibilities in the subsurface, and is therefore capable of revealing a 3D model of the magnetic properties. The application of mathematical modelling techniques to very-near-surface surveys such as for archaeology is quite rare, however similar methods are routinely used in regional scale mineral exploration surveys. Inverse modelling techniques have inherent ambiguity due to the nature of the mathematical "inverse problem". Often, although a good fit to the recorded values can be obtained, the final model will be non-unique and may be heavily biased by the starting model provided. Also the run time and computer resources required can be restrictive. Our approach is to derive as much information as possible from the data directly, and use this to define a starting model for inversion. This addresses both the ambiguity of the inverse problem and reduces the task for the inversion computation. A number of alternative methods exist that can be used to obtain parameters for source bodies in potential field data. Here, methods involving the derivatives of the total magnetic field are used in association with advanced image processing techniques to outline the edges of anomalous bodies more accurately

  6. Experimental investigation of the trigger problem in magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, Noam; Egedal, Jan; Fox, Will; Le, Ari; Vrublevskis, Arturs; Bonde, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection releases magnetic energy not only in steady state, but also in time-dependent and often explosive events. Here, we investigate the trigger mechanism for this explosive release by using a toroidal experiment in the strong guide-field regime. We observe spontaneous reconnection events with exponentially growing reconnection rates, and we characterize the full 3D dynamics of these events using multiple internal probes. The reconnection is asymmetric: it begins at one toroidal location and propagates around in both directions. The spontaneous onset is facilitated by an interaction between the x-line current channel and a global mode, which appears in the electrostatic potential. It is this mode which breaks axisymmetry and enables a localized decrease in x-line current. We apply a simple model - which relies on ion polarization currents for current continuity - to reproduce the exponential growth and compute the growth rate. The result agrees well with the experimental growth rate.

  7. Basic investigation and analysis for preferred host rocks and natural analogue study area with reference to high level radioactive waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Ryul; Park, J. K.; Hwang, D. H.; Lee, J. H.; Yun, H. S.; Kim, D. Y.; Park, H. S.; Koo, S. B.; Cho, J. D.; Kim, K. E. [Korea Inst. of Geology, Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this study is basic investigation and analysis for preferred host rocks and natural analogue study area to develope underground disposal technique of high level radioactive waste in future. The study has been done for the crystalline rocks(especially granitic rocks) with emphasis of abandoned metallic mines and uranium ore deposits, and for the geological structure study by using gravity and aeromagnetic data. 138 refs., 54 tabs., 130 figs. (author)

  8. An investigation of fine structure of the bursts produced by muons in the rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashi, S.; Kajino, F.; Nakashita, M.; Osaki, S.; Takahashi, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    1981-01-01

    Two dimensional lateral structures of the shower particles in the bursts, produced by high energy muons in the rock, have been studied by using the four layers of proportional counters. The mean lateral distributions measured fit well to those of Monte Carlo simulation of electromagnetic cascade showers. The distributions of reduced chi 2 which correspond to the fluctuations of each lateral distribution from the mean value show that the rates of the events giving high chi 2 for the data are somewhat greater than those expected from the simulation. The rates of these excesses to the total events are about 10% in the burst size range 578 - 8277 particles which are induced by the muons in the energy range 714 - 9900 GeV. These excesses could be explained by the contributions from the muon nuclear interactions in the rock

  9. Weathering behavior of mine tailings and waste rock: A surface investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domvile, S.J.; Li, M.G.; Sollner, D.D.; Nesbitt, W.

    1994-01-01

    A study focusing on the ion movement in the near surface of sulfide minerals was conducted to better understand the weathering mechanisms of mine waste materials. Tailings and waste rock samples from Canadian mines were subjected to controlled weathering studies using various chemical leachants. Leachates were analyzed for various parameters, and petrographic analyses were conducted on the solid residues. Laboratory oxidation studies of pure pyrrhotite and arsenopyrite were carried out using the surface techniques X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The data derived from the weathering study and the surface techniques were correlated to determine mechanisms of oxidation. Several results were observed during the project: ferric iron constitutes one third of the iron present in pyrrhotite, sulfide oxidation is initiated when rock is blasted, sulfide sulfur is oxidized to di- and poly-sulfides prior to forming sulfates, and significantly more sulfate is produced upon exposure to aqueous environments than to air alone

  10. Experimental investigation of acoustic emissions and their moment tensors in rock during failure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aker, E.; Kühn, D.; Vavryčuk, Václav; Soldal, M.; Oye, V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 70, September (2014), s. 286-295 ISSN 1365-1609 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP210/12/1491 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 230669 - AIM Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : acoustic emissions * focal mechanisms * moment tensors * rock fracturing * hoop stresses * laboratory experiment Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.686, year: 2014

  11. Magnetic properties of high-Ti basaltic rocks from the Krušné hory/Erzgebirge Mts. (Bohemia/Saxony), and their relation to mineral chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schnabl, Petr; Novák, Jiří Karel; Cajz, Vladimír; Lang, Miloš; Balogh, K.; Pécskay, Z.; Chadima, Martin; Šlechta, Stanislav; Kohout, Tomáš; Pruner, Petr; Ulrych, Jaromír

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 1 (2010), s. 77-94 ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300130706 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : high-Ti basaltic rocks * magnetic petrology * thermomagnetic experiments * Curie temperature variation * field-dependent susceptibility * Ohře/Eger Rift Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.123, year: 2010

  12. Investigations of garnets from polymetamorphic rocks of the Lapland Granulite Belt of the Kandalaksha Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miłosz A. Huber

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Lapland Granulite Belt is placed on the Kandalaksha region (Kola Peninsula, Russia. The rocks of this Belt are composed mainly of amphibolites and granulites.Materials and methods: The research were focused on the garnets from the amphibolite and granulite rocks of Lapland Granulite Belt. The petrological methods like polarizing microscopy (PM, SEM-EDS, XRD for powdered samples and single crystal diffraction were used together with IR and Mössbauer spectroscopy and REE analysis by ion–microprobe.Results: It was found that the garnets from studied amphibolite and granulite rocks could be classified to pyralspite group without hydrogarnets components, so they were formed in high metamorphic facies.Conclusions: The joint geological observations and results of the performed experiments suggest that the garnets were subject of a blastesy, i.e. there were formed in long lasting metamorphic processes of low dynamics, except of those garnets from tectonic zones, found in the vicinity of mineral veins.

  13. micro-mechanical experimental investigation and modelling of strain and damage of argillaceous rocks under combined hydric and mechanical loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.

    2012-01-01

    The hydro-mechanical behavior of argillaceous rocks, which are possible host rocks for underground radioactive nuclear waste storage, is investigated by means of micro-mechanical experimental investigations and modellings. Strain fields at the micrometric scale of the composite structure of this rock, are measured by the combination of environmental scanning electron microscopy, in situ testing and digital image correlation technique. The evolution of argillaceous rocks under pure hydric loading is first investigated. The strain field is strongly heterogeneous and manifests anisotropy. The observed nonlinear deformation at high relative humidity (RH) is related not only to damage, but also to the nonlinear swelling of the clay mineral itself, controlled by different local mechanisms depending on RH. Irreversible deformations are observed during hydric cycles, as well as a network of microcracks located in the bulk of the clay matrix and/or at the inclusion-matrix interface. Second, the local deformation field of the material under combined hydric and mechanical loadings is quantified. Three types of deformation bands are evidenced under mechanical loading, either normal to stress direction (compaction), parallel (microcracking) or inclined (shear). Moreover, they are strongly controlled by the water content of the material: shear bands are in particular prone to appear at high RH states. In view of understanding the mechanical interactions a local scale, the material is modeled as a composite made of non-swelling elastic inclusions embedded in an elastic swelling clay matrix. The internal stress field induced by swelling strain incompatibilities between inclusions and matrix, as well as the overall deformation, is numerically computed at equilibrium but also during the transient stage associated with a moisture gradient. An analytical micro-mechanical model based on Eshelby's solution is proposed. In addition, 2D finite element computations are performed. Results

  14. GEOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF CO₂-BRINE-ROCK INTERACTIONS OF THE KNOX GROUP IN THE ILLINOIS BASIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoksoulian, Lois; Berger, Peter; Freiburg, Jared; Butler, Shane; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    Increased output of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide (CO₂), into the atmosphere from anthropogenic sources is of great concern. A potential technology to reduce CO₂ emissions is geologic carbon sequestration. This technology is currently being evaluated in the United States and throughout the world. The geology of the Illinois Basin exhibits outstanding potential as a carbon sequestration target, as demonstrated by the ongoing Illinois Basin – Decatur Project that is using the Mt. Simon Sandstone reservoir and Eau Claire Shale seal system to store and contain 1 million tonnes of CO₂. The Knox Group-Maquoketa Shale reservoir and seal system, located stratigraphically above the Mt. Simon Sandstone-Eau Claire Shale reservoir and seal system, has little economic value as a resource for fossil fuels or as a potable water source, making it ideal as a potential carbon sequestration target. In order for a reservoir-seal system to be effective, it must be able to contain the injected CO₂ without the potential for the release of harmful contaminants liberated by the reaction between CO₂-formation fluids and reservoir and seal rocks. This study examines portions of the Knox Group (Potosi Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, New Richmond Sandstone) and St. Peter Sandstone, and Maquoketa Shale from various locations around the Illinois Basin. A total of 14 rock and fluid samples were exposed to simulated sequestration conditions (9101–9860 kPa [1320–1430 psi] and 32°–42°C [90°– 108°F]) for varying amounts of time (6 hours to 4 months). Knox Group reservoir rocks exhibited dissolution of dolomite in the presence of CO₂ as indicated by petrographic examination, X-ray diffraction analysis, and fluid chemistry analysis. These reactions equilibrated rapidly, and geochemical modeling confirmed that these reactions reached equilibrium within the time frames of the experiments. Pre-reaction sample mineralogy and postreaction fluid geochemistry from this

  15. An integrated rock-magnetic and geochemical approach to loess/paleosol sequences from Bohemia and Moravia (Czech Republic): Implications for the Upper Pleistocene paleoenvironment in central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hošek, J.; Hambach, U.; Lisá, Lenka; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Horáček, I.; Meszner, S.; Knésl, I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 418, 15 January (2015), s. 344-358 ISSN 0031-0182 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : loess/paleosols sequences * rock-magnetism * geochemical proxies * Upper Pleistocene * paleoclimate * Central Europe Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy; DD - Geochemistry (UACH-T) Impact factor: 2.525, year: 2015

  16. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-01-01

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  17. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-06-20

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  18. Thermodynamic modeling using BINGO-ANTIDOTE: A new strategy to investigate metamorphic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanari, Pierre; Duesterhoeft, Erik

    2016-04-01

    BINGO-ANTIDOTE is a new program, combing the achievements of the two petrological software packages XMAPTOOLS[1] and THERIAK-DOMINO[2]. XMAPTOOLS affords information about compositional zoning in mineral and local bulk composition of domains at the thin sections scale. THERIAK-DOMINO calculates equilibrium phase assemblages from given bulk rock composition, temperature T and pressure P. Primarily BINGO-ANTIDOTE can be described as an inverse THERIAK-DOMINO, because it uses the information provided by XMAPTOOLS to calculate the probable P-T equilibrium conditions of metamorphic rocks. Consequently, the introduced program combines the strengths of forward Gibbs free energy minimization models with the intuitive output of inverse thermobarometry models. In order to get "best" P-T equilibrium conditions of a metamorphic rock sample and thus estimating the degree of agreement between the observed and calculated mineral assemblage, it is critical to define a reliable scoring strategy. BINGO uses the THERIAKD ADD-ON[3] (Duesterhoeft and de Capitani, 2013) and is a flexible model scorer with 3+1 evaluation criteria. These criteria are the statistical agreement between the observed and calculated mineral-assemblage, -proportions (vol%) and -composition (mol). Additionally, a total likelihood, consisting of the first three criteria, allows the user an evaluation of the most probable equilibrium P-T condition. ANTIDOTE is an interactive user interface, displaying the 3+1 evaluation criteria as probability P-T-maps. It can be used with and without XMAPTOOLS. As a stand-alone program, the user is able to give the program macroscopic observations (i.e., mineral names and proportions), which ANTIDOTE converts to a readable BINGO input. In this manner, the use of BINGO-ANTIDOTE opens up thermodynamics to students and people with only a basic knowledge of phase diagrams and thermodynamic modeling techniques. This presentation introduces BINGO-ANTIDOTE and includes typical examples

  19. Foliation: Geological background, rock mechanics significance, and preliminary investigations at Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milnes, A.G.; Hudson, J.; Wikstroem, L.; Aaltonen, I.

    2006-01-01

    A well developed, pervasive foliation is a characteristic feature of the migmatites and gneisses in the Olkiluoto bedrock, and is expected to have a significant influence on the underground construction, the design and layout and the groundwater flow regime of a deep spent nuclear fuel repository. This Working Report reviews the geological background and rock mechanics significance of foliation, and develops a methodology for the systematic acquisition of foliation data in cored boreholes and in tunnels at the Olkiluoto site, to provide the necessary basis for future geological, rock mechanics and hydrogeological modelling. The first part of the methodology concerns foliation characterisation, and develops a characterisation scheme based on two variables: the foliation type (G = gneissic, B = banded, S = schistose), which is a function of mineral composition and degree of smallscale heterogeneity, and the foliation intensity (1 = low, 2 = intermediate, 3 = high), which is a function of the type and intensity of the deformation by which it was produced (under high-grade metamorphic conditions in the core of the Svecofennian orogenic belt). At the suggested reference scales (1 m length of core, 10 m 2 area of tunnel wall), the most representative foliation type and intensity is assessed using a standard set of core photographs, which are included as an Appendix at the end of the report, providing a systematic description in terms of 9 descriptive types (G1, G2, G3, B1, B2, B3, S1, S2, S3). As a further step, the rock mechanics significance of these types is assessed and a rock mechanics foliation (RMF) number is assigned (RMF 0 = no significance, RMF 1, RMF 2 and RMF 3 = low, intermediate and high significance, respectively). The second part of the methodology concerns the orientations of the foliation within the same 1 m core lengths or 10 m2 wall areas, which have been characterised as above. This combined analysis of foliation character and foliation orientation

  20. An integrated rock magnetic and EPR study in soil samples from a hydrocarbon prospective area

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, F.; Aldana, M.; Costanzo-Álvarez, V.; Díaz, M.; Romero, I.

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) and organic matter free radical concentration (OMFRC) determined by electron paramagnetic resonance, have been measured in soil samples (≈1.5 m depth) from an oil prospective area located at the southern flank of the Venezuelan Andean Range. S-ratios close to 1, as well as high temperature susceptibility analyses, reveal magnetite as the chief magnetic phase in most of these samples. Ethane concentrations, MS and OMFRC normalized data have been plotted against the relative position of 22 sampling sites sequentially arranged from north to south. Although there is not a linear correlation between MS and OMFRC data, these two profiles seem to vary in like fashion. A MS and OMFRC southern anomaly coincides with the zone of highest ethane concentration that overlies a “Cretaceous kitchen”. OMFRC highs could be linked to the degradation or alteration of organic matter, the possible result of hydrocarbon gas leakage, whose surface expression is the stressed fern observed by remote sensing studies previously performed in the area. Ethane anomalies are associated to this seepage that also produces changes in the magnetic mineralogies detected as MS positive anomalies.

  1. Strategy for the use of laboratory methods in the site investigations programme for the transport properties of the rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widestrand, Henrik; Byegaard, Johan [Geosigma AB, Kungaelv (Sweden); Ohlsson, Yvonne [SWECO VIAK AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)

    2003-06-01

    This report comprises a strategy for the handling of laboratory investigations of diffusivity and sorption characteristics within the discipline-specific programme 'Transport Properties of the Rock' in the SKB site investigations. The aim of the transport programme is to investigate the solute transport properties at a site in order to acquire data that are required for an assessment of the long-term performance and radiological safety of the deep repository. The result of the transport programme is the Transport Properties Site Descriptive Model, i.e. a description of the site-specific properties for the transport of solutes in the groundwater at a site. A strategy for the methodology, control of sampling and characterisation programme and interpretation of the results, is proposed. The basis for the laboratory investigations is a conceptual geological model based on the geological model produced in the geology programme. Major and minor types of rock and fractures are defined and characterised according to the quality of the general database and site-specific needs. The selection of samples and analyses is determined in close co-operation with the geology, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry and rock mechanics programmes. The result of the laboratory investigations is a retardation model, which is used as an input in the Transport Properties Site Descriptive Model. The interpretation and production of a retardation model is described and exemplified. Lastly, method-specific strategies and recommendations are given, including strategies for the selection of tracers in the experiments and for the treatment of the sampled geologic materials.

  2. Site investigation SFR. Water-rock interaction and mixing modelling in the SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimeno, Maria J.; Auque, Luis F.; Gomez, Javier B.; Acero, Patricia (University of Zaragoza (Spain))

    2011-10-15

    During 2008, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) initiated an investigation programme for a future expansion of the final repository for low and medium level radioactive operational waste, SFR, located about 150 km north of Stockholm. The purpose of the investigations was to define and characterise a bedrock volume large enough to allow further storage of operational waste from existing Swedish nuclear power plants and future waste from the decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear power plant reactors (SKB 2008). Of several alternatives, a selected location was investigated southwest of the present SFR tunnel system. As part of the SFR Site Descriptive Model, the objective of the hydrogeochemical site description is to describe the chemistry, origin and distribution of groundwaters in the bedrock and the hydrogeochemical processes involved in their evolution. Hydrogeochemical information (salinity distribution, groundwater residence time, palaeohydrogeochemical input, etc.) are also of importance to help constrain the hydrogeological descriptive model. The hydrogeochemical modelling work has been performed in three steps, resulting in three model versions (0.1, 0.2 and 1.0). In versions 0.1 and 0.2, explorative analyses using traditional geochemical approaches (trend plots, x-y scatter plots, 3D visualisations, etc.) were performed to describe the data and to provide an early insight and understanding of the site. The final hydrogeochemical site description version 1.0 (Nilsson et al. 2011) includes data from the previous versions, as well as subsequent complementary data from the SFR extension project, and all these data are further evaluated using additional modelling approaches and techniques. In this context, the present report gives a more detailed analysis of the available data for some hydrogeochemical systems and a detailed description of the results of the geochemical and statistical modelling. One of the main aims is to establish

  3. Site investigation SFR. Water-rock interaction and mixing modelling in the SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimeno, Maria J.; Auque, Luis F.; Gomez, Javier B.; Acero, Patricia

    2011-10-01

    During 2008, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) initiated an investigation programme for a future expansion of the final repository for low and medium level radioactive operational waste, SFR, located about 150 km north of Stockholm. The purpose of the investigations was to define and characterise a bedrock volume large enough to allow further storage of operational waste from existing Swedish nuclear power plants and future waste from the decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear power plant reactors (SKB 2008). Of several alternatives, a selected location was investigated southwest of the present SFR tunnel system. As part of the SFR Site Descriptive Model, the objective of the hydrogeochemical site description is to describe the chemistry, origin and distribution of groundwaters in the bedrock and the hydrogeochemical processes involved in their evolution. Hydrogeochemical information (salinity distribution, groundwater residence time, palaeohydrogeochemical input, etc.) are also of importance to help constrain the hydrogeological descriptive model. The hydrogeochemical modelling work has been performed in three steps, resulting in three model versions (0.1, 0.2 and 1.0). In versions 0.1 and 0.2, explorative analyses using traditional geochemical approaches (trend plots, x-y scatter plots, 3D visualisations, etc.) were performed to describe the data and to provide an early insight and understanding of the site. The final hydrogeochemical site description version 1.0 (Nilsson et al. 2011) includes data from the previous versions, as well as subsequent complementary data from the SFR extension project, and all these data are further evaluated using additional modelling approaches and techniques. In this context, the present report gives a more detailed analysis of the available data for some hydrogeochemical systems and a detailed description of the results of the geochemical and statistical modelling. One of the main aims is to establish

  4. Magnetic Polarity Stratigraphy and Rock Magnetic Data From the Continuous Cored Record of Triassic Continental Environmental Change, the Colorado Plateau Coring Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissman, J. W.; McIntosh, J.; Buhedma, H. M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Despite the fact that the Triassic Period (ca. 251.9-201.3 Ma) is bound by two of Earth's largest mass extinctions, experienced giant bolide impacts and eruption of three large igneous provinces, and witnessed evolution of the main components of modern tetrapod communities, the time interval has sparse geochronologic calibration. The US NSF- and ICDP-funded coring of Phase 1 of the CPCP was completed in 2013, with the recovery of two major cores (6.35 cm diameter: 1A, 518m length and 2B, 253m; 31km apart) from the Petrified Forest National Park spanning the Chinle and Moenkopi fms. Core 1A has been fully sampled, with specimens obtained either by drilling or by extraction of core fragments and packing in ceramic boxes. Specimens are subjected to progressive thermal demagnetization or a combination of alternating field (AF) followed by thermal treatment. In several cases, specimens were extracted from each core segment to test for internal consistency. Chinle hematitic mudstones and siltstones have NRM intensities between 130 to 0.5 mA/m, with bulk susceptibilities from 2 x 10-2 to 5 x 10-5 SI units. More indurated hematitic siltstones/ medium sandstones of the Moenkopi Fm have NRM intensities and bulk susceptibilities that are far less variable (NRM: 9.0 to 1.2 mA/m, MS: 3.0 X 10-4 and 0.5 x 10-5 SI vol). Thermal demagnetization typically isolates magnetizations of N declination and shallow inclination (interpreted as normal polarity) and antipodes (reverse) (image), a polarity stratigraphy is being compiled for much of the section. Response is typically more interpretable for very hematitic Chinle mudstone sections and most Moenkopi rocks. Coarser grained, less hematitic Chinle strata rarely yield interpretable results, likely due to coarse-grained detrital magnetite, and it is likely that these intervals will not yield robust polarity information. Some core segments yield well-resolved magnetizations that are inconsistent with a Triassic field and we suspect

  5. Device for investigation of magnetic flux jumps in ribbon superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrianov, A.V.; Bashkirov, Yu.A.; Kremlev, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    A device for simulation of magnetic flux jumps in superconductors of conducting magnet sandwich-type windings super-applyed of a ribbon conductor is described. A superconducting magnet with a measuring cassetter are the main elements of the device. An external magnetic field is generated by a two-sectional superconducting magnet permitting to simulate the shape of the magnetic field characteristic for sandwich-type windings. Maximum radial component of the magnetic field is 2 T. Jumps of the magnetic flux are recorded by induction transducers and the magnetic field-by Hall trasducer. The effect of coating of standard metal on magnetic flux jumps in Nb 3 Sn base superconducting ribbon is considered

  6. The investigation of the superconducting NMR-imaging main magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Han, S.; Feng, Z.X.

    1989-01-01

    The design principles of MRI main magnets and the problems in the design process have been analyzed. A computer program in which the critical characteristics of superconductor, the uniformity of the magnetic field, the economization of magnet and the selection of magnet constructions are considered has been established. The program can also be used to design high uniformity superconducting magnet in some other uses. In designing MRI superconducting main magnet, five different magnet constructions have been analyzed. Using this computer program the authors made a series of designs of MRI superconducting main magnets with different construction, different central magnetic field, and different bore diameters. By analyzing the computing results some conclusions useful for the practical design of the MRI superconducting main magnets are obtained

  7. Dynamics of colloidal systems of magnetic nanoparticles under influence of magnetic fields investigated by XPCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schavkan, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    This thesis investigates structural properties and the underlying microscopic dynamics of suspensions of α-FeOOH goethite platelets in water under the influence of magnetic fields. Goethite particles show unusual physical properties and a rich phase diagram, which makes their suspensions an object of high interest for research in the area of ''smart nanoparticles''. Five nanoparticle concentrations were chosen such that different liquid crystal phases could be studied. The suspensions of platelets of these chosen concentrations were exposed to magnetic fields of varying strength. Small angle X-ray scattering and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy data were taken and evaluated. The appearing phases and phase transitions were studied as a function of concentration and applied magnetic field. For this purpose, order parameters, ellipticity, radial and azimuthal peak positions and widths of scattering features were investigated to clarify the structural properties in detail. For the analysis of the underlying dynamics, the relaxation rates and the shape of measured time correlation functions were evaluated. The results show that with increasing magnetic field a partial realignment of the platelets occurs. This realignment is connected to the magnetic properties of the particles. The dynamics of the corresponding phases revealed a dependence on the concentration of nanoparticles in the suspension. At a concentration of c=20 vol% the transition from the nematic to the anti-nematic phase traverses a mixed state. The nematic and anti-nematic phases show ballistic motion and very similar properties, even though a realignment of the particles from an orientation with the long axis parallel to the applied magnetic field in the nematic phase to an orientation with the long axis perpendicular to the magnetic field in the anti-nematic phase occurs. The mixed state of 20 vol%-suspension exhibits a diffusive motion of the particles and different characteristics. A significant

  8. Dynamics of colloidal systems of magnetic nanoparticles under influence of magnetic fields investigated by XPCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schavkan, Alexander

    2017-05-15

    This thesis investigates structural properties and the underlying microscopic dynamics of suspensions of α-FeOOH goethite platelets in water under the influence of magnetic fields. Goethite particles show unusual physical properties and a rich phase diagram, which makes their suspensions an object of high interest for research in the area of ''smart nanoparticles''. Five nanoparticle concentrations were chosen such that different liquid crystal phases could be studied. The suspensions of platelets of these chosen concentrations were exposed to magnetic fields of varying strength. Small angle X-ray scattering and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy data were taken and evaluated. The appearing phases and phase transitions were studied as a function of concentration and applied magnetic field. For this purpose, order parameters, ellipticity, radial and azimuthal peak positions and widths of scattering features were investigated to clarify the structural properties in detail. For the analysis of the underlying dynamics, the relaxation rates and the shape of measured time correlation functions were evaluated. The results show that with increasing magnetic field a partial realignment of the platelets occurs. This realignment is connected to the magnetic properties of the particles. The dynamics of the corresponding phases revealed a dependence on the concentration of nanoparticles in the suspension. At a concentration of c=20 vol% the transition from the nematic to the anti-nematic phase traverses a mixed state. The nematic and anti-nematic phases show ballistic motion and very similar properties, even though a realignment of the particles from an orientation with the long axis parallel to the applied magnetic field in the nematic phase to an orientation with the long axis perpendicular to the magnetic field in the anti-nematic phase occurs. The mixed state of 20 vol%-suspension exhibits a diffusive motion of the particles and different

  9. A Novel Dual–Parallelogram Passive Rocking Vibration Isolator: A Theoretical Investigation and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibration isolators with quasi-zero stiffness (QZS perform well for low- or ultra-low-frequency vibration isolation. This paper proposes a novel dual-parallelogram passive rocking vibration isolator with QZS that could effectively attenuate in-plane disturbances with low-frequency vibration. First, a kinematic model of the proposed vibration isolator was established and four linear spring configuration schemes were developed to implement the QZS. Next, an optimal scheme with good high-static-low-dynamic stiffness (HSLDS performance was obtained through comparison and analysis, and used as a focus for the QZS model. Subsequently, a dynamic model-based Lagrangian equation that considered the spring stiffness and damping and the influence of the payload gravity center on the vibration isolation system was developed, and an average approach was used to analyze the vibration transmissibility. Finally, the prototype and test system were constructed. A comparison of the simulation and experimental results showed that this novel passive rocking vibration isolator could bolster a heavy payload. Experimentally, the vibration amplitude decreased by 53% and 86% under harmonic disturbances of 0.08 Hz and 0.35 Hz, respectively, suggesting the great practical applicability of this presented vibration isolator.

  10. Development of an investigation method for redox condition of rocks by self potential (SP) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kenji; Inohara, Yoshiki; Oyama, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    One of the major issues in subsurface disposal of low level radioactive wastes is that long term behaviors of sedimentary rocks can be affected by geochemical factors. Redox conditions can affect to corrosion of metal included in artificial barrier or wastes and adsorption characteristics of a nuclide. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a method for evaluating the redox conditions around natural barrier at waste facilities. In general, geochemical properties are acquired by rock samples or water sampling at a borehole. However, there is a possibility not to acquire data we want to evaluate. If geophysical methods are applied, redox conditions can be evaluated widely and briefly. There is a possibility that self potential (SP) and redox conditions have a correlation. So we have conducted self potential method around test caverns where redox front can be observed at the Rokkasho site. The results demonstrated that self potential decreased around redox front. There was a positive correlation between self potential and pH. One of the factors of self potential change is difference of elevation, however, self potential change around redox front was larger than that expected from elevation difference. Zeta potential is one of the important factors for determination of self potential, and it had a correlation with self potential or pH. Therefore, there is a possibility that self potential change occurs by geochemical condition changes around redox front, and redox condition can be detected by self potential method. (author)

  11. Theoretical and Numerical Investigation of the Cavity Evolution in Gypsum Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Einstein, Herbert H.

    2017-11-01

    When water flows through a preexisting cylindrical tube in gypsum rock, the nonuniform dissolution alters the tube into an enlarged tapered tube. A 2-D analytical model is developed to study the transport-controlled dissolution in an enlarged tapered tube, with explicit consideration of the tapered geometry and induced radial flow. The analytical model shows that the Graetz solution can be extended to model dissolution in the tapered tube. An alternative form of the governing equations is proposed to take advantage of the invariant quantities in the Graetz solution to facilitate modeling cavity evolution in gypsum rock. A 2-D finite volume model was developed to validate the extended Graetz solution. The time evolution of the transport-controlled and the reaction-controlled dissolution models for a single tube with time-invariant flow rate are compared. This comparison shows that for time-invariant flow rate, the reaction-controlled dissolution model produces a positive feedback between the tube enlargement and dissolution, while the transport-controlled dissolution does not.

  12. Experimental investigation of thermal de-stratification in rock bed TES systems for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okello, Denis; Nydal, Ole J.; Banda, Eldad J.K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • High thermal stratifications exists rock bed TES when charge with high temperature heat. • Faster thermal degradation occurs in highly stratified bed irrespective of the bed length. • Average rate of heat loss as a function of storage time increases with increasing average bed temperature. - Abstract: Solar energy fluctuates so much that it cannot promote continuous use. Integration of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) with solar energy collection devices has the potential of making solar energy available on demand. Thermal energy can be stored in a bed of rocks at temperatures suitable for applications like cooking, boiling space heating, etc. During charging, temperature stratification is observed in the bed. In a stratified system, if the heat is used immediately, then it is possible to extract heat at reasonably high temperature from the top. For cases where the system is to be used after sometime (later at night or the following morning), the high temperature heat at the top is observed to degrade as the system tries to establish thermal equilibrium irrespective of the bed height. The average rate of heat loss from the TES unit to the ambient is found to increase with increasing average bed temperatures

  13. Sedimentology, geochemistry and rock magnetic properties of beach sands in Galapagos Islands - implications for nesting marine turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cruz, L.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Vazquez-Gutierrez, F.; Carranza-Edwards, A.

    2007-12-01

    Marine turtles are well known for their navigation ability in the open ocean and fidelity to nesting beaches. Green turtle adult females migrate from foraging areas to island nesting beaches, traveling hundreds or thousands of kilometers each way. The marine turtle breeding in the Galapagos Islands is the Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas agassisi); fairly common throughout the islands but with nesting sites located at Las Bachas (Santa Cruz), Barahona and Quinta Playa (Isabela), Salinas (Baltra), Gardner Bay (Española) and Bartolomé Islet. In order to characterize and to identify the geochemical signature of nesting marine turtle beaches in Galapagos Islands, sedimentological, geochemical and rock magnetic parameters are used. A total of one hundred and twenty sand samples were collected in four beaches to relate compositional characteristics between equivalent areas, these are: Las Bachas, Salinas, Barahona and Quinta Playa. Grain size is evaluated using laser particle analysis (Model Coulter LS 230). Bulk ICP-MS geochemical analysis is performed, following trace elements are analyzed: Al, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Ba, Pb, Fe, Mn, K, Na, Mg, Sr, Ca and Hg; and low-field magnetic susceptibility is measured in all samples at low and high frequencies. Granulometric analysis showed that Barahona and Quinta Playa are characterized for fine grained sands. In contrast, Salinas and Las Bachas exhibit medium to coarse sands. Trace metals concentrations and magnetic susceptibility show different distribution patterns in the beach sands. Calcium is the most abundant element in the samples. In particular, Co, K, and Na show similar concentrations in the four beaches. Las Bachas beach shows highest concentrations of Pb and Hg (maximum values 101.1 and 118.5 mg/kg, respectively), we suggest that the enrichment corresponds to an anthropogenic signal. Salinas beach samples show high concentrations of Fe, V, Cr, Zn, Mn and the highest values of magnetic susceptibility (maximum

  14. Investigation of the Rock Fragmentation Process by a Single TBM Cutter Using a Voronoi Element-Based Numerical Manifold Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quansheng; Jiang, Yalong; Wu, Zhijun; Xu, Xiangyu; Liu, Qi

    2018-04-01

    In this study, a two-dimensional Voronoi element-based numerical manifold method (VE-NMM) is developed to analyze the granite fragmentation process by a single tunnel boring machine (TBM) cutter under different confining stresses. A Voronoi tessellation technique is adopted to generate the polygonal grain assemblage to approximate the microstructure of granite sample from the Gubei colliery of Huainan mining area in China. A modified interface contact model with cohesion and tensile strength is embedded into the numerical manifold method (NMM) to interpret the interactions between the rock grains. Numerical uniaxial compression and Brazilian splitting tests are first conducted to calibrate and validate the VE-NMM models based on the laboratory experiment results using a trial-and-error method. On this basis, numerical simulations of rock fragmentation by a single TBM cutter are conducted. The simulated crack initiation and propagation process as well as the indentation load-penetration depth behaviors in the numerical models accurately predict the laboratory indentation test results. The influence of confining stress on rock fragmentation is also investigated. Simulation results show that radial tensile cracks are more likely to be generated under a low confining stress, eventually coalescing into a major fracture along the loading axis. However, with the increase in confining stress, more side cracks initiate and coalesce, resulting in the formation of rock chips at the upper surface of the model. In addition, the peak indentation load also increases with the increasing confining stress, indicating that a higher thrust force is usually needed during the TBM boring process in deep tunnels.

  15. The Influence Of Hydrothermal Alteration And Weathering On Rock Magnetic Properties Of Granites From The Eps-1 Drilling (soultz-sous-forÊts / France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, J.; Schleicher, A.; Kontny, A.; de Wall, H.

    The EPS-1 drilling in Soultz-sous-Forêts (Rhinegraben, France) recovered a core pro- file of Tertiary to Permo-Mesozoic sediments deposited on a Variscan granitic base- ment. Magnetic susceptibility (k) measurements on the core material revealed a con- tinous increase from the basement/cover boundary (kmean 0.4 x 10-3 SI) into the magnetite-bearing granite (kmean 13 x 10-3 SI) over a depth range of 1417 U 1555 m. Rock magnetic and mineralogic studies were performed for the fresh granite, the hydrothermally altered granite near a fault zone and the altered granite from the fossil land surface near the basement/cover boundary. The decrease in susceptibility can be correlated with a gradual decomposition of magnetite to hematite and an alteration of the matrix minerals feldspars, biotite and hornblende to clay minerals and carbon- ates. Along with this transition, characteristic rock magnetic signatures can be dis- criminated for different degrees of alteration. While temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility k(T)-curves in fresh granites indicate a typical multidomain magnetite course with good reversibility, different types of irreversible courses are observed for the altered granite. However, hematite could not be identified in the k(T)-curves. Al- tered granite shows relatively weak magnetic behaviour in AF-demagnetisation exper- iments, untypical for hematite. The alteration of the fresh granite also causes a change in magnetic fabric parameter, especially of the anisotropy factor. The magnetic min- eralogy from the altered granite in respect to the changes in rock magnetic properties will be discussed.

  16. Literature investigation into radiation effects in rock salt. Evaluation of Russian literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, L.; Herzog, C.; Krause, H.; Liebscher, B.

    1994-01-01

    A total of 121 published and unpublished papers was evaluated. In the field of radiation induced defect formation of alkali halide crystals, Russian research institutes have performed manifold studies. Above all expansive basic research was carried out. The same refers to the use of natural rock salt for this type of studies. The majority of the activities are of a basic character and designed to achieve understanding of subprocesses, and therefore they concentrated mainly on monocrystals and on synthetic NaCl crystals doped with anionic or cationic additives. During the studies the influence factors which are most important for radiation detriment, such as type of radiation, irradiation temperature and contamination degree, varied, and different temperature influences after irradiation were considered. The results achieved give information on radiation detriment, kinetics, and on the efficiency of the respective influence factor. (orig.) [de

  17. Investigation of the erosional stability of waste rock dumps under simulated rainfall: a proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, S.J.; East, T.J.

    1990-12-01

    There are large volumes of material involved in the rehabilitation structures at Ranger uranium mine and the areas of disturbance are extensive. The major agent of erosion of these structures will be water, either as concentrated or distributed flow across the surface of the structure or as soil-water and groundwater flow. It is proposed to use simulated rainfall and concentrated surface flow to study the erodibility characteristics of the surface materials and to assess the impact on erosion rates of different surface materials, slope geometries (gradients, shapes and lengths) and ground covers (vegetation and rock material). Concentrated flow will be produced by discharging water through a flume siting on the slopes. The experiment will enable existing hydrological and erosion models to be tested and will allow new models to be developed. 67 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  18. Experimental InvestigationMagnetic Assisted Electro Discharge Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesava Reddy, Chirra; Manzoor Hussain, M.; Satyanarayana, S.; Krishna, M. V. S. Murali

    2018-04-01

    Emerging technology needs advanced machined parts with high strength and temperature resistance, high fatigue life at low production cost with good surface quality to fit into various industrial applications. Electro discharge machine is one of the extensively used machines to manufacture advanced machined parts which cannot be machined by other traditional machine with high precision and accuracy. Machining of DIN 17350-1.2080 (High Carbon High Chromium steel), using electro discharge machining has been discussed in this paper. In the present investigation an effort is made to use permanent magnet at various positions near the spark zone to improve surface quality of the machined surface. Taguchi methodology is used to obtain optimal choice for each machining parameter such as peak current, pulse duration, gap voltage and Servo reference voltage etc. Process parameters have significant influence on machining characteristics and surface finish. Improvement in surface finish is observed when process parameters are set at optimum condition under the influence of magnetic field at various positions.

  19. A pedological investigation of soils associated with rocks of the Ventersdorp supergroup in the western Transvaal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viljoen, J.N.J.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study was the collecting of information pertaining to soils overlying the rocks of the Ventersdorp Supergroup and an evaluation of the influence of these rocks on soil formation. The area studied was divided into six sub-areas, and one or two sample areas were allocated to each of these sub-areas. In each sample area the soil was studied in catenary sequence. Profile pits were described and samples taken for physical and chemical analyses. The sand fraction was separated into light and heavy mineral fractions. The surface of quartz grains were studied with a petrographic microscope and the aid of an electron microscope. X-ray diffraction was used to determine the mineralogy of the silt and light mineral fractions and a number of selected clay mineral samples. The following characteristics were observed despite the universal presence of wind transported material: epidote, angular quartz grains with undulatory extinction as well as a high percentage silt, coarse and medium sand and fragments of amygdaloids. Aeolian sand in variable amounts is present in all the profiles, and is an important factor affecting the genesis of the soil. Aeolian sand of different ages was possibly distributed and deposited during dry phases in the Quaternary. The influence of aeolian sand on soil formation was evaluated on the basis of mineralogy, grain size distribution, surface characteristics and undulatory extinction of quartz grains as well as soil morphology. The weathering products of different origin were subsequently mixed in situ by bioturbation. The present soil mantle is a product of a number of processes associated with climatic changes in the past, the present climate and mixtures of parent materials of different origin

  20. Investigation of multi-scale flash-weakening of rock surfaces during high speed slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbery, M. R.; Saber, O.; Chester, F. M.; Chester, J. S.

    2017-12-01

    A significant reduction in the coefficient of friction of rock can occur if sliding velocity approaches seismic rates as a consequence of weakening of microscopic sliding contacts by flash heating. Using a high-acceleration and -speed biaxial apparatus equipped with a high-speed Infra-Red (IR) camera to capture thermographs of the sliding surface, we have documented the heterogeneous distribution of temperature on flash-heated decimetric surfaces characterized by linear arrays of high-temperature, mm-size spots, and streaks. Numerical models that are informed by the character of flash heated surfaces and that consider the coupling of changes in temperature and changes in the friction of contacts, supports the hypothesis that independent mechanisms of flash weakening operate at different contact scales. Here, we report on new experiments that provide additional constraints on the life-times and rest-times of populations of millimeter-scale contacts. Rock friction experiments conducted on Westerly granite samples in a double-direct shear configuration achieve velocity steps from 1 mm/s to 900 mm/s at 100g accelerations over 2 mm of displacement with normal stresses of 22-36 MPa and 30 mm of displacement during sustained high-speed sliding. Sliding surfaces are machined to roughness similar to natural fault surfaces and that allow us to control the characteristics of millimeter-scale contact populations. Thermographs of the sliding surface show temperatures up to 200 C on millimeter-scale contacts, in agreement with 1-D heat conduction model estimates of 180 C. Preliminary comparison of thermal modeling results and experiment observations demonstrate that we can distinguish the different life-times and rest-times of contacts in thermographs and the corresponding frictional weakening behaviors. Continued work on machined surfaces that lead to different contact population characteristics will be used to test the multi-scale and multi-mechanism hypothesis for flash

  1. The Steens Mountain (Oregon) geomagnetic polarity transition: 1. Directional history, duration of episodes, and rock magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankinen, Edward A.; Prevot, M.; Gromme, C. Sherman; Coe, Robert S.

    1985-01-01

    The thick sequence of Miocene lava flows exposed on Steens Mountain in southeastern Oregon is well known for containing a detailed record of a reversed‐to‐normal geomagnetic polarity transition. Paleomagnetic samples were obtained from the sequence for a combined study of the directional and intensity variations recorded; the paleointensity study is reported in a companion paper. This effort has resulted in the first detailed history of total geomagnetic field behavior during a reversal of polarity. A comparison of the directional variation history of the reversed and normal polarity intervals on either side of the transition with the Holocene record has allowed an estimate of the duration of these periods to be made. These time estimates were then used to calculate accumulation rates for the volcanic sequence and thereby provide a means for estimating time periods within the transition itself. The polarity transition was found to consist of two phases, each with quite different characteristics. At the onset of the first phase, a one‐third decrease in magnetic field intensity may have preceded the first intermediate field directions by about 600 years. Changes in field direction were confined near the local north‐south vertical plane when the actual reversal in direction occurred and normal polarity directions may have been attained within 550±150 years. The end of the first phase of the transition was marked by a brief (possibly 100–300 years) period with normal polarity and a pretransitional intensity which suggests a quasi‐normal dipole field structure existed during this interval. The second phase of the transition was characterized by a return to very low field intensities with the changes in direction describing a long counterclockwise loop in contrast to the earlier narrowly constrained changes. This second phase lasted 2900±300 years, and both normal directions and intensities were recovered at the same time. Both directional and intensity

  2. The performance of various palaeointensity techniques as a function of rock magnetic behaviour - A case study for La Palma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monster, Marilyn W. L.; de Groot, Lennart V.; Biggin, Andrew J.; Dekkers, Mark J.

    2015-05-01

    Three different palaeointensity methods were applied to six historical and three carbon-dated flows from the island of La Palma (Spain); in total fifteen sites were processed. The two 20th-century flows were sampled at multiple locations as their obtained directions and intensities can be compared directly to those from the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). After determination of the declinations and inclinations of the natural remanent magnetisation (NRM) by thermal and alternating-field demagnetisation, the samples were subjected to standard rock magnetic analyses to determine their Curie and alteration temperatures. Based on these characteristics, the sites were allocated to one of four rock magnetic groups labelled L∗, L, C, and H, a division primarily based on the temperature-dependent behaviour of the low-field susceptibility that has been used in studies of other volcanic edifices. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations revealed little oxidation and exsolution (oxidation classes I to III). Palaeointensities were determined using the classic Thellier-Thellier method (Aitken and IZZI protocols), the microwave method and the domain-state-corrected multispecimen method. Thellier-Thellier and microwave results were analysed using the ThellierTool A and B sets of selection criteria as modified by Paterson et al. (2014). Their combined success rate was around 40%. Of the eight IGRF sites, two yielded average intensities within 10% of the IGRF value. For the microwave method, three sites reproduced the IGRF intensity within 10%. In the domain-state-corrected multispecimen protocol, just one site (site 9, 1971) passed the 'ARM-test' (applied in retrospect) and showed less than 3% progressive alteration. Its multispecimen result reproduced the palaeofield within error. The other IGRF sites over- or underestimated the palaeofield by up to 50%. The seven older sites produced plausible palaeointensities, generally within a few μT of model data

  3. Electron magnetic resonance investigation of chromium diffusion in yttria powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biasi, R.S. de, E-mail: rsbiasi@ime.eb.b [Secao de Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, Pr. General Tiburcio, 80, 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Grillo, M.L.N., E-mail: mluciag@uerj.b [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-03-01

    The electron magnetic resonance (EMR) technique was used to investigate the diffusion of chromium in yttria (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powders. The EMR absorption intensity was measured for several annealing times and three different temperatures of isothermal annealing: 1273, 1323 and 1373 K. The activation temperature for diffusion, calculated from the experimental data using a theoretical model based on the Fick equation, was found to be E{sub A}=342+-5 kJ mol{sup -1}. This value is larger than the activation energy for the diffusion of chromium in rutile (TiO{sub 2}), periclase (MgO) and cobalt monoxide (CoO) and smaller than the activation energy for the diffusion of chromium in chrysoberyl (BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}).

  4. AN INVESTIGATION ON SOFT MAGNETIC AND NON-MAGNETIC MATERIALS UNDER LOW FREQUENCY FOR BIOMEDICAL SENSOR APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheroz Khan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In consequence of the recent development of magnetic sensors in biomedical sector, the investigation of magneticmaterials has been a contributing factor in application stage. This paper proposes a novel technique to investigate materials by obtaining unique distinctive impedance peaks with unique impedance values. A magneto-inductive sensoris used to measure the induction of magnetic and non-magnetic impedance peaks related to the change in permeability, thus characterizing the materials under low frequency.

  5. Investigation of turbulent structures in the edge of magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nold, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Rising energy cost and progressing climate change will exacerbate existing and give birth to new conflicts. Energy savings and the development of new technologies can counteract the reasons for these conflicts. Beside renewable energy sources, nuclear fusion can help to meet this challenge. To build future fusion power plants smaller and more efficient, the magnetic confinement must be improved and the load on plasma facing components reduced. To this end, better understanding is required of turbulent transport processes in magnetized plasmas. Within the frame of the present work, the properties and dynamics of turbulent density structures (''blobs'') have been investigated, as well as their interaction with shear flows. Langmuir-probe measurements have been conducted in the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade and in the stellarator TJ-K, and compared with GEMR plasma turbulence simulations. It has been shown, that blobs are generated at the last closed flux surface (LCFS) of ASDEX Upgrade. They propagate perpendicular to the magnetic field lines in the radial and poloidal directions. The poloidal E x B-drift depends on the radial variation of the plasma potential. The latter is given by the electron temperature profile in front of the electrically conducting wall. Experimental results show, that this can lead to a shear layer inside the scrape-off layer (SOL) of a divertor tokamak due to inhomogeneous connection lengths to the wall. Blobs can hardly cross such a shear layer unchanged. This investigation shows how blobs can exchange particles and energy across a shear layer without changing their shapes and velocities substantially. However, the dynamics of the structures are different between both sides of the shear layer. Parallel drift-wave dynamics are dominant on the plasma core side, i.e. density and potential of the blobs are in phase. Outside of the shear layer, the interchange mechanism dominates due to shorter parallel connection lengths to the wall. The poloidal

  6. Flake graphite cast iron investigated by a magnetic method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vértesy, G.; Uchimoto, T.; Takagi, T.; Tomáš, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 4 (2014), s. 6200404 ISSN 0018-9464 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : cast iron * magnetic adaptive testing (MAT) * magnetic nondestructive evaluation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.386, year: 2014

  7. INVESTIGATION OF ROCKS FOR PROJECTS AT BLASTING IN »KRIŽ« AND »BELSKI DOL« QUARRIES APPLICATION OF THE SHALLOW SEIZMIC REFRACTION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Božić

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Field investigations of softer and harder dolomite zones, measurements of naturally divided fragments in rock masses and investigations of rock mass by refractional geophysical method in the blasting area of the quarry were carried out. The obtained results provided the basis for selective projects of exploitation and blasting. Safety measures regarding possible damage to adjacent housing estates during blasting were determined (the paper is published in Croatian.

  8. Preliminary investigations on the carbon dioxide sequestering potential of the ultramafic rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.; Guthrie, G.; Counce, D.; Kluk, E.; Bergfeld, D.; Snow, M.

    1997-08-01

    Fossil fuels continue to provide major sources of energy to the modern world even though global emissions of CO{sub 2} are presently at levels of 19 Gt/yr. Future antipollution measures may include sequestering of waste CO{sub 2} as magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}) by processing ultramafic rocks to obtain reactable Mg. Huge ultramafic deposits consisting of relatively pure Mg-rich silicates exist throughout much of the world in ophiolites and layered intrusions. Peridotites (especially dunites) and serpentinites comprise the best ores because they contain the most Mg by weight and are relatively reactive to hot acids such as HCl. Although mining such deposits on a large scale would have environmental impacts, the sequestering process could provide Cr, Ni, and other metals as byproducts and could dispose of existing waste (white) asbestos. Small ultramafic bodies ({approximately} 1 km{sup 3}) can potentially sequester about 1 Gt of CO{sub 2} or about 20% of annual US emissions. A single large deposit of dunite ({approximately} 30 km{sup 3}) could dispose of about 20 yr of current US CO{sub 2} emissions. The cost and environmental impact of mining these deposits must be weighed against the increased costs of energy and benefits to the atmosphere and climate.

  9. Investigation of Key Parameters of Rock Cracking Using the Expansion of Vermiculite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Chi-Hyung; Hu, Jong Wan

    2015-01-01

    The demand for the development of underground spaces has been sharply increased in lieu of saturated ground spaces because the residents of cities have steadily increased since the 1980s. The traditional widely used excavation methods (i.e., explosion and shield) have caused many problems, such as noise, vibration, extended schedule, and increased costs. The vibration-free (and explosion-free) excavation method has currently attracted attention in the construction site because of the advantage of definitively solving these issues. For such reason, a new excavation method that utilizes the expansion of vermiculite with relatively fewer defects is proposed in this study. In general, vermiculite materials are rapidly expanded in volume when they receive thermal energy. Expansion pressure can be produced by thermal expansion of vermiculite in a steel tube, and measured by laboratory tests. The experimental tests are performed with various influencing parameters in an effort to seek the optimal condition to effectively increase expansion pressure at the same temperature. Then, calibrated expansion pressure is estimated, and compared to each model. After analyzing test results for expansion pressure, it is verified that vermiculite expanded by heat can provide enough internal pressure to break hard rock during tunneling work. PMID:28793610

  10. Investigation of Key Parameters of Rock Cracking Using the Expansion of Vermiculite Materia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hyung Ahn

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The demand for the development of underground spaces has been sharply increased in lieu of saturated ground spaces because the residents of cities have steadily increased since the 1980s. The traditional widely used excavation methods (i.e., explosion and shield have caused many problems, such as noise, vibration, extended schedule, and increased costs. The vibration-free (and explosion-free excavation method has currently attracted attention in the construction site because of the advantage of definitively solving these issues. For such reason, a new excavation method that utilizes the expansion of vermiculite with relatively fewer defects is proposed in this study. In general, vermiculite materials are rapidly expanded in volume when they receive thermal energy. Expansion pressure can be produced by thermal expansion of vermiculite in a steel tube, and measured by laboratory tests. The experimental tests are performed with various influencing parameters in an effort to seek the optimal condition to effectively increase expansion pressure at the same temperature. Then, calibrated expansion pressure is estimated, and compared to each model. After analyzing test results for expansion pressure, it is verified that vermiculite expanded by heat can provide enough internal pressure to break hard rock during tunneling work.

  11. Investigated conductive fracture in the granitic rocks by flow-meter logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Nobuhisa; Koide, Kaoru; Takeichi, Atsushi

    1997-01-01

    Test of the use of a measurement technique for the hydraulic conductivity of geological structures which act as flow paths or are impermeable to groundwater flow. In order to prove the value of flow-meter logging as an in-situ technique for detecting conductive fractures in granitic rocks, the method has been applied to a borehole near the Tono uranium mine, Gifu, Japan. This study in involved with detecting a conductive fracture and calculating the hydraulic conductivities. The results were as follows: (1) In a zone of groundwater inflow into the borehole, the hydraulic conductivity was calculated to be of the order of the 10 -3 - 10 -4 (cm/sec) from flow-meter logging. This value agreed with the results of a in-situ borehole permeability test carried out with a similar depth interval. (2) The study showed that flow-meter logging is effective for detecting the distribution of high conductivity fractures and calculating the hydraulic conductivity. (author)

  12. Experimental and Numerical Investigations on Feasibility and Validity of Prismatic Rock Specimen in SHPB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibing Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experimental and numerical studies on the feasibility and validity of using prismatic rock specimens in split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB test. Firstly, the experimental tests are conducted to evaluate the stress and strain uniformity in the prismatic specimens during impact loading. The stress analysis at the ends of the specimen shows that stress equilibrium can be achieved after about three wave reflections in the specimen, and the balance can be well maintained for a certain time after peak stress. The strain analysis reveals that the prismatic specimen deforms uniformly during the dynamic loading period. Secondly, numerical simulation is performed to further verify the stress and strain uniformity in the prismatic specimen in SHPB test. It indicates that the stress equilibrium can be achieved in prismatic specimen despite a certain degree of stress concentration at the corners. The comparative experiments demonstrate that the change of specimen shape has no significant effect on dynamic responses and failure patterns of the specimen. Finally, a dynamic crack propagation test is presented to show the application of the present work in studying fracturing mechanisms under dynamic loading.

  13. Investigation of magnetic modes in the ASDEX tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zohm, H.

    1990-10-01

    Properties of MHD-modes in the ASDEX Tokamak have been investigated by application and further development of the MIRNOV-diagnostics, i.e. measurement of magnetic field fluctuations. In addition to evaluation methods supported by models, also a model-independent statistical data analysis makes sense. The very important physics of mode locking, i.e. the slowing-down of rotating modes is examined. An elaborated theoretical model allows an interpretation of experimental results. Especially interesting is the loss of the angular momentum of rotating plasmas by mode locking. Experiments for mode stabilisation and prevention of electric current breakdown are discussed. Additional MHD-processes under different plasma conditions are treated on the fundament of the devloped model ideas. The author shows that the main tokamak plasma is described very well by one-dimensional models with cylindrical geometry, while the boundary zone of the plasma demands a more complex analysis. In the appendix a concept for the investigation of the MHD-activity in ASDEX-Upgrade is discussed. (AH)

  14. An investigation of cerebral magnetic resonance angiography, 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Sadanori; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Ohue, Shiro; Todo, Hirooki; Sakaki, Saburo.

    1992-01-01

    A number of studies of MR angiography (MRA) as a noninvasive screening method for vascular diseases have been reported recently. Almost all of them were investigated using high tesla magnets (1.5 tesla). We have been investigating three-dimensional MRA using a medium tesla (0.5 tesla) system (HITACHI G-50). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of 3-D MRA for the screening of cerebral aneurysms. Twenty patients with 25 cerebral aneurysms were included in this study. The sizes of the aneurysms ranged from 2 to 35 mm. Twenty-three aneurysms were located on the anterior circulation, and 2 on the posterior circulation. MR angiography was performed with a gradient-echo sequence at a TR of 50 msec, a TE of 16 msec, and a flip angle of 25 degrees. The imaging volumes ranged in thickness from 48 to 64 mm, with 32 partitions. We used a sequence-subtraction technique composed of rephased and dephased sequences; it provides a good visualization of the main cerebral arteries. Cerebral aneurysms were detected on 3-D MRA in 23 lesions (92%). We consider that 0.5 tesla 3-D MRA could be useful for the screening of nonruptured aneurysms. (author)

  15. Rock and stone weathering at Citadel fortifications, Gozo (Malta): benefits from terrestrial laser scanning combined with conventional investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapete, D.; Gigli, G.; Mugnai, F.; Vannocci, P.; Pecchioni, E.; Morelli, S.; Fanti, R.; Casagli, N.

    2012-04-01

    Military architecture heritage is frequently built on rock masses affected by slope instability and weathering processes, which progressively undermine the foundations and cause collapses and toppling of the masonries. The latter can be also weakened by alteration of the stone surfaces, as a consequence of the interactions with the local environmental conditions. These conservation issues are emphasized for those sites, whose susceptibility to structural damages is also due to the similarity between the lithotypes constituting the geologic substratum and the construction materials. Effective solutions for the protection from such a type of phenomena can be achieved if the whole "rock mass - built heritage system" is analyzed. In this perspective, we propose a new approach for the study of the weathering processes affecting historic hilltop sites, taking benefits from the combination of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and conventional investigations, the latter including geotechnical and minero-petrographic analyses. In particular, the results here presented were obtained from specific tests on the fortifications of Citadel, Gozo (Malta), performed in co-operation with the Restoration Unit, Works Division, Maltese Ministry for Resources and Rural Affairs and the private company Politecnica Ingegneria e Architettura. The Citadel fortifications are built at the top of a relatively stiff and brittle limestone plate, formed by Upper Coralline Limestone (UCL) and overlying a thick Blue Clay (BC) layer. Differential weathering creates extensively fractured ledges on the cap and erosion niches in the strata beneath, thereby favouring block detachment, even rockfall events, such as the last one occurred in 2001. The locally quarried Globigerina Limestone (GL), historically employed in restoration masonries, is also exposed to alveolization and powdering, and several collapses damaged the underwalling interventions. Since the erosion pattern distribution suggested a

  16. Photothermal investigation of local and depth dependent magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelzl, J; Meckenstock, R

    2010-01-01

    To achieve a spatially resolved measurement of magnetic properties two different photothermal approaches are used which rely on heat dissipated by magnetic resonance absorption or thermal modulation of the magnetic properties, respectively. The heat produced by modulated microwave absorption is detected by the classical photothermal methods such as photoacoustic effect and mirage effect. Examples comprise depth resolution of the magnetization of layered tapes and visualisation of magnetic excitations in ferrites. The second photothermal technique relies on the local modulation of magnetic properties by a thermal wave generated with an intensity modulated laser beam incident on the sample. This technique has a higher spatial resolution and sensitivity and has been used to characterize lateral magnetic properties of multilayers and spintronic media. To extend the lateral resolution of the ferromagnetic resonance detection into the nm-range techniques have been developed which are based on the detection of the modulated thermal microwave response by the thermal probe of an atomic force microscope (AFM) or by detection the thermal expansion of the magnetic sample in the course of the resonant microwave absorption with an AFM or tunnelling microscope. These thermal near field based techniques in ferromagnetic resonance have been successfully applied to image magnetic inhomogeneities around nano-structures and to measure the ferromagnetic resonance from magnetic nano-dots.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of bentonite systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Furo, Istvan (Industrial NMR Centre and Div. of Physical Chemistry, Dept. of Chemistry, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-09-15

    This report summarizes results from a set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments performed on Ca and Na montmorillonite samples interacting with water. The primary goal with these studies was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during and after different physical processes such as swelling and sedimentation and on the time scale from minutes to years. Additionally, we also studied the distribution of foreign particles (such as native minerals as well as magnetic model particles) within bentonite systems and performed some diffusion NMR experiments with the aim of characterizing the state of colloids that form after clay dissolution. Both natural montmorillonites and purified and ion-exchanged montmorillonite clays were investigated. The primary variables were clay composition and water ionic strength. Bulk samples confined in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated. A critical issue for the stability of clay buffer layer in deep underground repository is to prevent or minimize the release of clay particles into the water phase. In our experiments, the most significant particle losses were found for Na-MX80 clay exposed to water with low ionic strength. With increasing the concentration of CaCl{sub 2} in the water phase both swelling and particle release are slowed down but not completely eliminated due probably to gradual change of water ion content via ion exchange with the clay itself. For natural MX80 samples, in spite of significant swelling expansion, no clay particle release above the sensitivity limit of 0.001 volume% was observed. Ca-MX80 exhibited the smallest expansion and no trace of clay particle released into the aqueous phase

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of bentonite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Furo, Istvan

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes results from a set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments performed on Ca and Na montmorillonite samples interacting with water. The primary goal with these studies was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during and after different physical processes such as swelling and sedimentation and on the time scale from minutes to years. Additionally, we also studied the distribution of foreign particles (such as native minerals as well as magnetic model particles) within bentonite systems and performed some diffusion NMR experiments with the aim of characterizing the state of colloids that form after clay dissolution. Both natural montmorillonites and purified and ion-exchanged montmorillonite clays were investigated. The primary variables were clay composition and water ionic strength. Bulk samples confined in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated. A critical issue for the stability of clay buffer layer in deep underground repository is to prevent or minimize the release of clay particles into the water phase. In our experiments, the most significant particle losses were found for Na-MX80 clay exposed to water with low ionic strength. With increasing the concentration of CaCl 2 in the water phase both swelling and particle release are slowed down but not completely eliminated due probably to gradual change of water ion content via ion exchange with the clay itself. For natural MX80 samples, in spite of significant swelling expansion, no clay particle release above the sensitivity limit of 0.001 volume% was observed. Ca-MX80 exhibited the smallest expansion and no trace of clay particle released into the aqueous phase

  19. Characterization of magnetic phase transitions in PrMn2Ge2 compound investigated by magnetization and hyperfine field measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bosch-Santos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic properties of PrMn2Ge2 compound have been investigated by perturbed γ−γ angular correlation (PAC spectroscopy using 111In(111Cd as probe nuclei as well as by magnetization measurements. This ternary intermetallic compound exhibits different magnetic structures depending on the temperature. The magnetic ordering is mainly associated with the magnetic moment of 3d-Mn sublattice but at low temperatures a magnetic contribution due to ordering of the magnetic moment from 4f-Pr sublattice appears. PAC results with 111Cd probe nuclei at Mn sites show that the temperature dependence of hyperfine field Bhf(T follows the expected behavior for the host magnetization, which could be fitted by two Brillouin functions, one for antiferromagnetic phase and the other for ferromagnetic phase, associated with the magnetic ordering of Mn ions. Magnetization measurements showed the magnetic behavior due to Mn ions highlighting the antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic transition around 326 K and an increase in the magnetization around 36 K, which is ascribed to Pr ions ordering.

  20. Induced magnetism at the interfaces of a Fe/V superlattice investigated by resonant magnetic x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnuson, Martin, E-mail: Martin.Magnuson@ifm.liu.se

    2017-01-15

    The induced magnetic moments in the V 3d electronic states of interface atomic layers in a Fe(6ML)/V(7ML) superlattice was investigated by x-ray resonant magnetic scattering. The first V atomic layer next to Fe was found to be strongly antiferromagnetically polarized relatively to Fe and the magnetic moments of the next few atomic layers in the interior V region decay exponentially with increasing distance from the interface, while the magnetic moments of the Fe atomic layers largely remain bulk-like. The induced V moments decay more rapidly as observed by x-ray magnetic scattering than in standard x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. The theoretical description of the induced magnetic atomic layer profile in V was found to strongly rely on the interface roughness within the superlattice period. These results provide new insight into interface magnetism by taking advantage of the enhanced depth sensitivity to the magnetic profile over a certain resonant energy bandwidth in the vicinity of the Bragg angles. - Highlights: • Magnetic moments of buried layers are probed by XRMS in a Fe/V superlattice. • The induced V magnetic moments in XRMS are more rapidly decaying than previously observed by XMCD. • The magnetic depth profile sensitivity is enhanced at an energy bandwidth in the vicinity of the Bragg angles.

  1. Forsmark site investigation. Detailed ground magnetic survey and lineament interpretation in the Forsmark area, 2006-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaksson, Hans; Thunehed, Hans; Pitkaenen, Timo; Keisu, Mikael

    2007-12-01

    axis. The fold is U-shaped and opens to the southeast. Within the fold the magnetic pattern is more varied with gently banded to more irregular patterns and from low to high magnetic intensity. The fold pattern is most prominent in the Asphaellsfjaerden area but is also repeated recurrently from northwest to the southeast. The area between Bolundsfjaerden and the road to drill site DS6 forms the core of the fold structure with a more irregular magnetic pattern. Northeast of the SFR office the pattern is characterised by a broad, southeast-northwest trending magnetic low, coincident with the Singoe deformation zone. The low magnetic relief give less information on the structural pattern within this area. Further northeast of this structure and in the area around the SFR underground facilities, the magnetic pattern is less regular and gently folded, indicating a varying and complex folding pattern. The interpretation of the magnetic data has been directed towards identification of linear features but also a few areas with very low magnetisation and low magnetic relief has been outlined. Destruction of ferromagnetic minerals is a probable cause; however, the origin of these features is uncertain and would require further investigations. Areas with a diffuse magnetic pattern might indicate larger depth to the magnetic source or occurrences of fractured and/or altered bedrock surface. Narrow, low magnetic linear features occurring concordant with the general bedrock foliation are difficult to determine as related to fracture zones or to rock types with low magnetization. In this work, these linear features are identified as lineaments with a separate character called 'minima connections'. From all detailed magnetic surveys a total of 1,855 magnetic lineaments have been identified of which 811 are characterized as 'minima connections', 380 and 733 magnetic lineaments have a low and high uncertainty, respectively. The lineaments are graded in low, medium and high uncertainty

  2. Acoustic investigation of magnetic susceptibility of liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekuchev, V.V.; Barashkov, B.I.; Ivanova, I.V.; Rygalov, L.N.

    2008-01-01

    An acoustic method is proposed for studying the specific magnetic susceptibility of metal melts. For the first time, magnetic susceptibilities of francium, beryllium, scandium, yttrium, vanadium, niobium, rhenium, palladium, and platinum in the liquid phase at their melting points, as well as temperature dependences of magnetic susceptibilities of cesium, yttrium, and vanadium over the temperature range from melting points to boiling points have been estimated [ru

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation: Improved coil design for deep brain investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, L. J.; Marketos, P.; Williams, P. I.; Melikhov, Y.; Jiles, D. C.; Starzewski, J. H.

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports on a design for a coil for transcranial magnetic stimulation. The design shows potential for improving the penetration depth of the magnetic field, allowing stimulation of subcortical structures within the brain. The magnetic and induced electric fields in the human head have been calculated with finite element electromagnetic modeling software and compared with empirical measurements. Results show that the coil design used gives improved penetration depth, but also indicates the likelihood of stimulation of additional tissue resulting from the spatial distribution of the magnetic field.

  4. Investigations into the design of multi-terawatt magnetic switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harjes, H.C.; Penn, K.J.; Mann, G.A.; Neau, E.L.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic switches were successfully used for pulse compression in the CometII pulsed power module to deliver 2.7 MV and 3.7 TW to a 2 Ω matched load. However, the Comet switches suffered interwinding dielectric breakdowns and failed in <100 shots. Initial results from experiments on magnetic switch core insulations indicate that the insulation scheme used in the Comet switches was not optimal and better configurations exist. The Comet magnetic switch failures have been duplicated and studied on the Magnetic Switch Test Module (MSTM), a coaxial, 2 Ω PFL driven by a 600 kV Marx generator. The results of these experiments are discussed in detail

  5. Identification and characterization of tsunami deposits off southeast coast of India from the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami: Rock magnetic and geochemical approach.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Veerasingam, S.; Venkatachalapathy, R.; Basavaiah, N.; Ramkumar, T.; Venkatramanan, S.; Deenadayalan, K.

    to find the relationships among the sediment texture, mineral, geochemical, and rock-magnetic param- eters in sediments using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) and Minitab softwares, respectively. 4. Results and discussion 4.1 Sediment... Deenadayalan4 1CSIR – National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 403 004, India. 2Department of Physics, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar 608 002, Tamil Nadu, India. 3Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University, Parangipettai 608 502, Tamil...

  6. Magnetic properties of natural pyrrhotite Part I : Behaviour of initial susceptibility and saturation-magnetization-related rock-magnetic parameters in a grain-size dependent framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The grain-size dependence of the initial susceptibility, saturation magnetization, saturation remanence , coercive force, remanent coercive force and remanent acquisition coercive force, is reported for four natural pyrrhotites in a grain-size range from 250 µm down to <5 µm.

  7. Prediction of mining conditions from bore core information: rock mechanics investigations in the Whybrow Seam at Wambo Colliery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, A.; Levers, R.; Smith, K.

    1979-12-01

    Rock mechanics investigations were conducted at Wambo Colliery as part of the series designed to study the stability of mining structures and obtain geomechanical properties. The roof and floor were drilled in order to obtain core for rock testing and samples of coal were collected to measure the coal properties. A successful overcoring of a CSIR strain cell was achieved to determine the absolute stress field. The core which was recovered was logged prior to laboratory testing to determine a C index (modified RQD index based on core fragmentation). This was used to estimate the in-situ strata properties from the laboratory results. The roof material was found to consist predominantly of a competent laminite. The Whybrow seam above the Cow Manure band had an average uniaxial strength of 26 MPa. The Cow Manure band was extremely weak with a strength of 1 MPa, while the coal below this band was much weaker than the upper section coal with a strength of 7 MPa. The floor strata was made up of competent carbonaceous siltstone and alternate bands of shale and sandstone. Finite element analyses indicate very stable roof, floor and rib, corresponding closely to the in-situ conditions.

  8. Experimental investigation of the brittle-viscous transition in mafic rocks - Interplay between fracturing, reaction, and viscous deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Sina; Stünitz, Holger; Heilbronner, Renée; Plümper, Oliver; Drury, Martyn

    2017-12-01

    Rock deformation experiments are performed on fault gouge fabricated from 'Maryland Diabase' rock powder to investigate the transition from dominant brittle to dominant viscous behaviour. At the imposed strain rates of γ˙ = 3 ·10-5 - 3 ·10-6 s-1, the transition is observed in the temperature range of (600 °C < T < 800 °C) at confining pressures of (0.5 GPa ≤ Pc ≤ 1.5 GPa). The transition thereby takes place by a switch from brittle fracturing and cataclastic flow to viscous dissolution-precipitation creep and grain boundary sliding. Mineral reactions and resulting grain size refinement by nucleation are observed to be critical processes for the switch to viscous deformation, i.e., grain size sensitive creep. In the transitional regime, the mechanical response of the sample is a mixed-mode between brittle and viscous rheology and microstructures associated with both brittle and viscous deformation are observed. As grain size reduction by reaction and nucleation is a time dependent process, the brittle-viscous transition is not only a function of T but to a large extent also of microstructural evolution.

  9. Petrology, Magnetic susceptibility, Tectonic setting and mineralization associated with Plutonic and Volcanic Rocks, Eastern Bajestan and Taherabad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Ghoorchi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Study area is located in district of Bajestan and Ferdows cities, NE of Iran. Structurally, this area is part of Lut block. The oldest exposed rocks, to the north of intrusive rocks and in Eastern Bajestan, are meta-chert, slate, quartzite, thin-bedded crystalline limestone and meta-argillite. The sedimentary units are: Sardar Formation (Carboniferous, Jamal Formation (Permian, Sorkh Shale and Shotori Formations (Triassic, carbonateous rocks (Cretaceous and lithostratigraphically equivalent to Kerman conglomerate (Cretaceous-Paleocene are exposed in this area. Based on relative age, magmatism in eastern Bajestan and Taherabad started after Late Cretaceous and it has been active and repeated during Tertiary time. At least, three episodes of volcanic activities are recognized in this area. The first stage was mainly volcanic flow with mafic composition and minor intermediate. The second episode was mainly intermediate in composition. The third stage was changed to acid-intermediate in composition. Since the plutonic rocks intruded the volcanic rocks, therefore they may be Oligo-Miocene age. Bajestan intrusive rocks are granite-granodiorite-quartz monzonite. Taherabad intrusive rocks are diorite-quartz diorite- monzonite-latite. Bajestan intrusive rocks are reduced type (ilmenite series and Taherabad intrusive rocks are oxidized type (magnetite series.Based on geochemical analysis including trace elements, REE and isotopic data, Bajestan intrusive rocks formed in continental collision zone and the magma has crustal origin. Taherabad intrusive rocks were formed in subduction zone and magma originated from oceanic crust. Taherabad intrusive rock has exploration potential for Cu-Au and pb.

  10. Ex vivo investigation of magnetically targeted drug delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Fukui, S.; Fujimoto, S.; Mishima, F.; Takeda, S.; Izumi, Y.; Ohtani, S.; Fujitani, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2007-01-01

    In conventional systemic drug delivery the drug is administered by intravenous injection; it then travels to the heart from where it is pumped to all regions of the body. When the drug is aimed at a small target region, this method is extremely inefficient and leads to require much larger doses than those being necessary. In order to overcome this problem a number of targeted drug delivery methods are developed. One of these, magnetically targeted drug delivery system (MT-DDS) will be a promising way, which involves binding a drug to small biocompatible magnetic particles, injecting these into the blood stream and using a high gradient magnetic field to pull them out of suspension in the target region. In the present paper, we describe an ex vivo experimental work. It is also reported that navigation and accumulation test of the magnetic particles in the Y-shaped glass tube was performed in order to examine the threshold of the magnetic force for accumulation. It is found that accumulation of the magnetic particles was succeeded in the blood vessel when a permanent magnet was placed at the vicinity of the blood vessel. This result indicates the feasibility of the magnetically drug targeting in the blood vessel

  11. Thermal investigations of a room temperature magnetic refrigerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smaili, Arezki; Chiba, Younes [Ecole Nationale Polytechnique d' Alger (Algeria)], email: arezki.smaili@enp.edu.dz

    2011-07-01

    Magnetic refrigeration is a concept based on the magnetocaloric effect that some materials exhibit when the external magnetic field changes. The aim of this paper is to assess the performance of a numerical model in predicting parameters of an active magnetic regenerator refrigerator. Numerical simulations were conducted to perform a thermal analysis on an active magnetic regenerator refrigerator operating near room temperature with and without applied cooling load. Curves of temperature span, cooling capacity and thermal efficiency as functions of the operating conditions were drawn and are presented in this paper. Results showed that at fixed frequency Ql versus mf has an optimum and COP was increased with cycle frequency values. This study demonstrated that the proposed numerical model could be used to predict parameters of an active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as it provides consistent results.

  12. Quantitative Investigation of Roasting-magnetic Separation for Hematite Oolitic-ores: Mechanisms and Industrial Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Tiefeng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural high-quality iron can be directly applied to pyro-metallurgy process, however, the availability of these ores has become less and less due to exploitation. This research reports a systematic approach using reduction roasting and magnetic separation for oolitic iron ores from west Hubei Province. Firstly, a mineralogical study was performed and it was shown that the oolitic particles were mainly composed of hematite, with some silicon-quartz inside the oolitic particle. Then, the roasting temperature was examined and shown to have significant influence on both Fe recovery and the Fe content of the concentrate. Also the Fe content gradually increased as the temperature increased from 700 to 850 °C. The most important aspects are the quantitative investigation of change of mineral phases, and reduction area (with ratio during the reduction roasting process. The results showed that Fe2O3 decreased with temperature, and Fe3O4 (magnetite increased considerably from 600 to 800 °C. The reductive reaction was found to occur from the outside in, the original oolitic structure and embedding relationship among the minerals did not change after roasting. Finally, 5% surrounding rock was added to mimic real industrial iron beneficiation. This study could provides useful insight and practical support for the utilization of such iron ores.

  13. Investigations into the sorption of neptunium by loose rock from the cap rock of the Gorleben salt dome under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlenweg, U.

    1988-01-01

    In the experiments with the natural loose rock the sorption behaviour of neptunium was essentially determined by the chemical form in which the neptunium occurred in the ground waters. Under aerobic conditions with Eh values of 300 mV, neptunium in its oxidation state +5 occurred. At a pH of 2 + , and at pH > 8 as carbonato complex. The found neptunium species were relatively mobile, with sorption values from 1 ml/g to 20 ml/g. The sorption of neptunium is comparable to that of alkali and alkaline earth ions, such as Cs + or Sr 2+ . Cations attached to the rock surface are exchanged for NpO 2 + . Sorption in this case is reversible. (orig.) [de

  14. Archaeological investigation of caves and rock shelters on Guam and Tinian : a synthesis of their use through time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, B.; Schaefer, R.

    2014-01-01

    Archaeological investigations in the Micronesian archipelago of the Mariana Islands have generally focused on habitation sites occupied from the Pre-Latte through Latte Period, with more recent attention to palaeoenvironmental studies such as wetland sediment cores, residue analysis of ceramics and tools, agricultural soil analyses, and climate change modeling. One site type recognized as having an early and repeated record of human use over the 3500 year history of the islands is the cave and/or rock shelter. This paper examines their use through time on Guam and Tinian, not as an ancillary feature to habitation sites, but as an independent measure of social and ecological processes in the Western Pacific. (author)

  15. Moessbauer and magnetic investigation of Fe-Mn alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousif, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    Moessbauer, X-ray, magnetization and susceptibility measurements were performed to study Fe 100-x Mn x , x = 5, 15, 39, 50. The different phases of Fe-Mn were identified, and hyperfine interaction parameters and average magnetic moments of some samples were determined. The average hyperfine field and average magnetic moment decrease as x increases. The influence of the Mn neighbourhood on the derived parameters is discussed in the light of calculations using the first principle discrete variational method in the local density approximation. (orig.)

  16. Experimental Investigation of the Influence of Joint Geometric Configurations on the Mechanical Properties of Intermittent Jointed Rock Models Under Cyclic Uniaxial Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Dai, Feng; Fan, Pengxian; Xu, Nuwen; Dong, Lu

    2017-06-01

    Intermittent joints in rock mass are quite sensitive to cyclic loading conditions. Understanding the fatigue mechanical properties of jointed rocks is beneficial for rational design and stability analysis of rock engineering projects. This study experimentally investigated the influences of joint geometry (i.e., dip angle, persistency, density and spacing) on the fatigue mechanism of synthetic jointed rock models. Our results revealed that the stress-strain curve of jointed rock under cyclic loadings is dominated by its curve under monotonic uniaxial loadings; the terminal strain in fatigue curve is equal to the post-peak strain corresponding to the maximum cyclic stress in the monotonic stress-strain curve. The four joint geometrical parameters studied significantly affect the fatigue properties of jointed rocks, including the irreversible strains, the fatigue deformation modulus, the energy evolution, the damage variable and the crack coalescence patterns. The higher the values of the geometrical parameters, the lower the elastic energy stores in this jointed rock, the higher the fatigue damage accumulates in the first few cycles, and the lower the fatigue life. The elastic energy has certain storage limitation, at which the fatigue failure occurs. Two basic micro-cracks, i.e., tensile wing crack and shear crack, are observed in cyclic loading and unloading tests, which are controlled principally by joint dip angle and persistency. In general, shear cracks only occur in the jointed rock with higher dip angle or higher persistency, and the jointed rock is characterized by lower fatigue strength, larger damage variable and lower fatigue life.

  17. Staging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma investigated by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jincheng; Wei Baoqing; Chen Wenzhan; Qian Pudong; Zhang Yiqin; Wei Qing; Cha Wenwu; Li Feng; Ni Ming

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the American Joint Commission on Cancer (AJCC) sixth edition staging system of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Patients and methods: One hundred and fifty-nine non-disseminated biopsy-proven NPC patients were studied with MRI before treatment. Retrieval of MRI information enabled us to restage all patients accurately according to the sixth edition of the AJCC staging system. Splitting the respective T and N stages by the significant defining factors identified, the cancer death hazard ratios were modeled by the Cox model in SPSS 10.0 for windows (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL). Results: Single site of skull base abnormality (HR=3.91, 95% CI: 0.74-20.56) has a superior result to others involved in T3 (HR=5.83, 95% CI: 1.24-27.29). Involvement of either anterior or posterior cranial nerves solely (HR=6.02, 95% CI: 1.55-35.60) was not found to be as a poor prognostic indicator as others involved in T4 (HR=7.81, 95% CI: 1.81-33.63). Less than or equal to 3 cm of N1 (HR=4.01, 95% CI: 0.48-33.83) and N2 (HR=4.72, 95% CI: 0.62-35.78) have a better result than >3 cm of N1 (HR=8.09, 95% CI: 0.95-68.97) and N2 (HR=10.58, 95% CI: 1.32-84.62), respectively. Conclusions: Perhaps, it is better to down-stage single site of skull base abnormality from T3 to T2, and involvement of either anterior or posterior cranial nerves solely from T4 to T3, meanwhile, ≤3 cm of N2 down-stage to N1, >3 cm of N1 up-stage to N2

  18. Investigation of the chain of 5T full-scale superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ageev, A.I.; Aleksandrov, G.M.; Aleksandrov, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Bench investigations of the chain of dipoles with warm magnetic screen, connected in series, are being conducted in the framework of the IHEP program of the UNK superconducting magnet simulation. At the given stage conditions of accidental magnet transition to the normal state are being investigated. The study of processes of propagation of the normal phase, temperature fields and pressure growth dynamics, processes of energy and helium evacuation from magnet chain is given. Results of measuring electric and nonstationary processes in the chain during transition of one of superconducting magnets to the normal state are presented

  19. Acoustic investigation of structure of magnetic fluids based on transformer oil mogul

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudelcik, J.; Bury, P.; Kopcansky, P.; Timko, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the authors study the influence of temperature on the changes of the acoustic attenuation in magnetic fluids based on transformer oil MOGUL caused by an external magnetic field measured. The influences of both magnetic field and temperature on the structures of investigated magnetic fluids based on the transformer oil MOGUL were observed using acoustic spectroscopy. The effect of external magnetic field on the creation of clusters of nanoparticles in magnetic fluids was confirmed and their influence on the development of attenuation was described. In this type of magnetic fluid complicated structures of clusters at magnetic field over 100 mT are created. These structures are than at higher magnetic field almost stable. This state of equilibrium is not function of time. Measurements also confirmed that the lifetime of these structures or clusters is very short. The further investigation of the time and temperature dependences of the acoustic attenuation on the magnetic field at different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles and various direction of magnetic field are necessary to understand all processes in this magnetic fluid. (authors)

  20. Combined geophysical techniques for detailed groundwater flow investigation in tectonically deformed fractured rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Alexopoulos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a combination of several near surface geophysical investigation techniques with high resolution remote sensing image interpretations, in order to define the groundwater flow paths and whether they can be affected by future seismic events. A seasonal spring (Amvrakia located at the foot of Meteora pillars near the village of Kastraki (Greece was chosen as a test site. The Meteora conglomeratic formations crop out throughout the study area and are characterized by large discontinuities caused by post Miocene till present tectonic deformation [Ferriere et al. 2011, Royden and Papanikolaou 2011]. A network of groundwater pathways has been developed above the impermeable marls underlying the conglomeratic strata. Our research aims to define these water pathways in order to investigate and understand the exact mechanism of the spring by mapping the exposed discontinuity network with classic field mapping and remote sensing image interpretation and define their underground continuity with the contribution of near surface geophysical techniques. Five Very Low Frequency (VLF profiles were conducted with different directions around the spring aiming to detect possible conductive zones in the conglomeratic formations that the study area consists of. Moreover, two Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT sections of a total length of 140m were carried out parallel to the VLF profiles for cross-checking and verifying the geophysical information. Both techniques revealed important conductive zones (<200 Ohm m within the conglomerate strata, which we interpret as discontinuities filled with water supplying the spring, which are quite vulnerable to displacements as the hydraulic connections between them might be easily disturbed after a future seismic event.

  1. Magnetic and Structural Investigations of Nanocrystalline Cobalt-Ferrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sharifi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt ferrite is an important magnetic material due to their large magneto-crystalline anisotropy, high cohercivity, moderate saturation magnetization and chemical stability.In this study, cobalt ferrites Nanoparticles have been synthesized by the co-precipitation method and a new microemulsion route. We examined the cation occupancy in the spinel structure based on the “Rietveld with energies” method. The Xray measurements revealed the production of a broad single ferrite cubic phase with the average particle sizes of about 12 nm and 7nm, for co-precipitation and micro-emulsion methods, respectively. The FTIR measurements between 400 and 4000 cm-1 confirmed the intrinsic cation vibrations of the spinelstructure for the two methods. Furthermore, the Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM was carried out at room temperature to study the structural and magnetic properties. The results revealed that by changing the method from co-precipitation to the reverse micelle the material exhibits a softer magnetic behavior in such a way that both saturation magnetization and coercivity decrease from 58 to 29 emu/g and from 286 to 25 Oe, respectively.

  2. Numerical investigation of a plasma beam entering transverse magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, J.; Geary, J.L.; Tajima, T.; Rostoker, N.

    1988-11-01

    We study plasma beam injection into transverse magnetic fields using both electrostatic and electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) codes. In the case of small beam momentum or energy (low drift kinetic /beta/) we study both large and small ion gyroradius beams. Large ion gyroradius beams with a large dielectric constant /epsilon/ /muchreverse arrowgt/ (M/m)/sup /1/2// are found to propagate across the magnetic field via E /times/ B drifts at nearly the initial injection velocity, where /epsilon/ = 1 + (/omega//sup pi//sup 2/)/(/Omega//sub i//sup 2/) and (M/m) is the ion to electron mass ratio. Beam degradation and undulations are observed in agreement with previous experimental and analytical results. When /epsilon/ is on the order of (M/m)/sup /1/2//, the plasma beam propagates across field lines at only half its initial velocity and loses its coherent structure. When /epsilon/ is much less than (M/m)/sup /1/2//, the beam particles decouple at the magnetic field boundary, scattering the electrons and slightly deflecting the ions. For small ion gyroradius beam injection a flute type instability is observed at the beam magnetic fields interface. In the case of large beam momentum or energy (high drift kinetic /beta/) we observe good penetration of a plasma beam which shields the magnetic field from the interior of the beam (diagmagnetism). 25 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  3. The Use of Magnetic Orientation as a Pinning Modality for Investigation of Photon-Magnon Interactions in Magnetic Nanoparticle Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuong, Giap Van; Su, Luong Van; Tue, Nguyen Anh; Khanh, Hoang Quoc; Tuan, Nguyen Anh

    2018-06-01

    In this work, an experimental setup to study the dependence of a visible-light transmission through a magnetic granular film on the magnetic field direction was presented. The results measured the transmission (T) of the visible light, with the wavelengths λ were in the range from 560 to 695 nm, by the magnetic nanogranular films Cox-(Al2O3)100-x system, with Co compositions are x = 10 ÷ 45 at.%, as a function of the magnetic field direction were reported. These investigations were carried out under an external magnetic field of H = 400 Oe, which directs to the normal of the sample surface by an angle varied in the range of φ = 0° ÷ 45°, to magnetize the magnetization direction of all the Co particles following this direction. Consequently, the angle φ between the magnetization direction with the incident-light direction, which sets as the optical axis of the system and always keeps fixedly to the normal of the sample surface, is established. The experimental results showed the different dependencies of T on the angle φ, the magnetic field H, the Co composition x, and the wavelength λ. These dependencies attributed to a behavior that relates to so-called photon-magnon interaction.

  4. Forsmark site investigation. Detailed ground magnetic survey and lineament interpretation in the Forsmark area, 2006-2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaksson, Hans; Thunehed, Hans; Pitkaenen, Timo; Keisu, Mikael (GeoVista AB, Luleaa (SE))

    2007-12-15

    . The fold is U-shaped and opens to the southeast. Within the fold the magnetic pattern is more varied with gently banded to more irregular patterns and from low to high magnetic intensity. The fold pattern is most prominent in the Asphaellsfjaerden area but is also repeated recurrently from northwest to the southeast. The area between Bolundsfjaerden and the road to drill site DS6 forms the core of the fold structure with a more irregular magnetic pattern. Northeast of the SFR office the pattern is characterised by a broad, southeast-northwest trending magnetic low, coincident with the Singoe deformation zone. The low magnetic relief give less information on the structural pattern within this area. Further northeast of this structure and in the area around the SFR underground facilities, the magnetic pattern is less regular and gently folded, indicating a varying and complex folding pattern. The interpretation of the magnetic data has been directed towards identification of linear features but also a few areas with very low magnetisation and low magnetic relief has been outlined. Destruction of ferromagnetic minerals is a probable cause; however, the origin of these features is uncertain and would require further investigations. Areas with a diffuse magnetic pattern might indicate larger depth to the magnetic source or occurrences of fractured and/or altered bedrock surface. Narrow, low magnetic linear features occurring concordant with the general bedrock foliation are difficult to determine as related to fracture zones or to rock types with low magnetization. In this work, these linear features are identified as lineaments with a separate character called 'minima connections'. From all detailed magnetic surveys a total of 1,855 magnetic lineaments have been identified of which 811 are characterized as 'minima connections', 380 and 733 magnetic lineaments have a low and high uncertainty, respectively. The lineaments are graded in low, medium and

  5. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of advanced energy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George D.

    In order to better understand the physical electrochemical changes that take place in lithium ion batteries and asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been useful to probe and identify changes on the atomic and molecular level. NMR is used to characterize the local environment and investigate the dynamical properties of materials used in electrochemical storage devices (ESD). NMR investigations was used to better understand the chemical composition of the solid electrolyte interphase which form on the negative and positive electrodes of lithium batteries as well as identify the breakdown products that occur in the operation of the asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors. The use of nano-structured particles in the development of new materials causes changes in the electrical, structural and other material properties. NMR was used to investigate the affects of fluorinated and non fluorinated single wall nanotubes (SWNT). In this thesis three experiments were performed using solid state NMR samples to better characterize them. The electrochemical reactions of a lithium ion battery determine its operational profile. Numerous means have been employed to enhance battery cycle life and operating temperature range. One primary means is the choice and makeup of the electrolyte. This study focuses on the characteristics of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that is formed on the electrodes surface during the charge discharge cycle. The electrolyte in this study was altered with several additives in order to determine the influence of the additives on SEI formation as well as the intercalation and de-intercalation of lithium ions in the electrodes. 7Li NMR studies where used to characterize the SEI and its composition. Solid state NMR studies of the carbon enriched acetonitrile electrolyte in a nonaqueous asymmetric hybrid supercapacitor were performed. Magic angle spinning (MAS) coupled with cross polarization NMR

  6. Investigation of energy losses in low-coercivity resin-bonded magnets in alternating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milov, E. V.; Sipin, I. A.; Milov, V. N.; Andreenko, A. S.; Balan, I. A.

    2017-01-01

    Energy losses during alternating remagnetization of low-coercitivity resin-bonded magnets and commercially produced electrical steels were studied experimentally. The studies were conducted on several samples of resin-bonded magnets with different manufacturing technologies and samples of electrical steel sheets of various thicknesses. The static and dynamic magnetic properties of the samples were measured on a vibration magnetometer and a specially designed apparatus, respectively. It was found that the studied samples of bonded magnets have a relatively high level of hysteresis losses associated with high coercivity, which reaches a value of 4-5 Oe. At the same time, the remagnetization losses due to the Foucault currents in the bonded magnets are considerably lower than in electrical steels. The measurement results show that bonded magnets at high frequencies of remagnetization, especially in high-rpm motors, can be competitive in comparison with electrical steels.

  7. Investigation of Unbalanced Magnetic Force in Magnetic Geared Machine Using Analytical Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    The electromagnetic structure of the magnetic geared machine (MGM) may induce a significant unbalanced magnetic force (UMF). However, few methods have been developed to theoretically reveal the essential reasons for this issue in the MGM. In this paper, an analytical method based on an air....... Second, the magnetic field distribution in the MGM is modeled by an exact subdomain method, which allows the magnetic forces to be calculated quantitatively. The magnetic forces in two MGMs are then studied under no-load and full-load conditions. Finally, the finite-element calculation confirms......-gap relative permeance theory is first developed to qualitatively study the origins of the UMF in the MGM. By means of formula derivations, three kinds of magnetic field behaviors in the air gaps are found to be the potential sources of UMF. It is also proved that the UMF is possible to avoid by design choices...

  8. MAGNETIC INVESTIGATION OF AN UNUSUAL DISSYMMETRIC BINUCLEAR MANGANESE CARBOXYLATE COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghenadie Novitchi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic susceptibility (χT of an unusual dissymmetric binuclear manganese corboxylate complex has been measured from 2 to 300K. The magnetic data which have been fitted with help of the Heisenberg Dirac Van Vleck HDVV spin-exchange Hamiltonian H = − J S 1 S 2 , indicate that an antiferromagnetic interaction equal to J = -0.90(1 cm-1 is present. A correlation between J values and Mn-H2O-Mn angles has been tempted.

  9. Dynamical Monte Carlo investigation of spin reversals and nonequilibrium magnetization of single-molecule magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Gui-Bin; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we combine thermal effects with Landau-Zener (LZ) quantum tunneling effects in a dynamical Monte Carlo (DMC) framework to produce satisfactory magnetization curves of single-molecule magnet (SMM) systems. We use the giant spin approximation for SMM spins and consider regular lattices of SMMs with magnetic dipolar interactions (MDI). We calculate spin reversal probabilities from thermal-activated barrier hurdling, direct LZ tunneling, and thermal-assisted LZ tunnelings in the pr...

  10. In Silico Investigations of Chemical Constituents of Clerodendrum colebrookianum in the Anti-Hypertensive Drug Targets: ROCK, ACE, and PDE5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Hemant; Syed, Safiulla Basha; Singh, Sorokhaibam Sureshkumar; Ampasala, Dinakar R; Coumar, Mohane Selvaraj

    2017-06-16

    Understanding the molecular mode of action of natural product is a key step for developing drugs from them. In this regard, this study is aimed to understand the molecular-level interactions of chemical constituents of Clerodendrum colebrookianum Walp., with anti-hypertensive drug targets using computational approaches. The plant has ethno-medicinal importance for the treatment of hypertension and reported to show activity against anti-hypertensive drug targets-Rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase (ROCK), angiotensin-converting enzyme, and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5). Docking studies showed that three chemical constituents (acteoside, martinoside, and osmanthuside β6) out of 21 reported from the plant to interact with the anti-hypertensive drug targets with good glide score. In addition, they formed H-bond interactions with the key residues Met156/Met157 of ROCK I/ROCK II and Gln817 of PDE5. Further, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of protein-ligand complexes suggest that H-bond interactions between acteoside/osmanthuside β6 and Met156/Met157 (ROCK I/ROCK II), acteoside and Gln817 (PDE5) were stable. The present investigation suggests that the anti-hypertensive activity of the plant is due to the interaction of acteoside and osmanthuside β6 with ROCK and PDE5 drug targets. The identified molecular mode of binding of the plant constituents could help to design new drugs to treat hypertension.

  11. Comparison of Geochemical, Grain-Size, and Magnetic Proxies for Rock Flour and Ice- Rafted Debris in the Late Pleistocene Mono Basin, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, S. H.; Hemming, S. R.; Kent, D. V.

    2008-12-01

    Advance and retreat of mountain glaciers are important indicators of climate variability, but the most direct proxy record, mapping and dating of moraines, is by nature discontinous. The Sierra Nevada form the western boundary of the Mono Lake basin, and the proximity of the large Pleistocene lake to the glacial canyons of the Sierra presents a rare opportunity to examine glacial variability in a continuous, well-dated lacustrine sequence. We have applied a geochemical proxy for rock flour to the glacial silts of the late Pleistocene Wilson Creek Formation, but because it is time- and sample-intensive, another method is required for a high-resolution record. Previous microscopic examination, thermomagnetic measurements, XRD analysis, and new isothermal remnant magnetization (IRM) acquisition curves show that the magnetic mineralogy is dominated by fine-grained, unaltered magnetite. Bulk measurements show strong susceptibility (mean ~ 16 x 10- 6 m3/kg) and remanent magnetization (mean IRM ~ 10-2 Am2/kg) compared to diluting components (carbonate, smectite, rhyolitic ash). The Wilson Creek type section sediments also contain a coarse lithic fraction, quantified by counting the >2cm clasts in outcrop and the >425 μm fraction in the bulk sediment. Susceptibility, IRM, and ARM (anhysteretic remnant magnetization) are quite similar throughout the type section, with the abundance of coarse lithic fraction correlative to the ratio k/IRM. Because the magnetic fraction of the rock flour is fine-grained magnetite, IRM should capture the changes in concentration of flour through time, and the major features of the (low-resolution) geochemical flour proxy record are identifiable in the IRM record. Flux-correction of the IRM results in a rock flour proxy record with major peaks between 36 and 48 ka, similar to a rock flour record from neighboring Owens Lake. This regional glacial signal contrasts with peaks in coarse lithics between 58 and 68 ka in the Wilson Creek record

  12. Magnetic Susceptibility as a Tool for Investigating Igneous Rocks—Experience from IODP Expedition 304

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger C. Searle

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Continuous measurements of magnetic susceptibility have been commonly used on Ocean Drilling Program (ODP and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODPexpeditions to study minor lithological variations (forexample, those related to climatic cycles in sedimentary rocks, but they have been less frequently used on igneous rocks, although important post-cruise studies have utilized them (e.g., Ildefonse and Pezard, 2001. Here I report its use (and that of the closely related electrical conductivity on IODP Expedition 304 to examine igneous crustal rocks. Expedition 304/305 targeted the Atlantis Massif, an oceanic core complex on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and recovered a suite of igneous rocks comprising mainly gabbros, troctolites, and some diabases (Blackman et al., 2006; Ildefonse et al., 2006, 2007; IODP Expeditions 304 and 305 Scientists, 2005. Shipboard measurements (on D/V JOIDES Resolution of physical properties were made to characterize lithological units and alteration products, to correlate cored material with down-hole logging data, and to interpret broader-scale geophysical data.

  13. Emplacement, petrological and magnetic susceptibility characteristics of diverse magmatic epidote-bearing granitoid rocks in Brazil, Argentina and Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sial, A. N.; Toselli, A. J.; Saavedra, J.; Parada, M. A.; Ferreira, V. P.

    1999-03-01

    Magmatic epidote (mEp)-bearing granitoids from five Neoproterozoic tectonostratigraphic terranes in Northeastern (NE) Brazil, Early Palaeozoic calc-alkalic granitoids in Northwestern (NW) Argentina and from three batholiths in Chile have been studied. The elongated shape of some of these plutons suggests that magmas filled fractures and that dyking was probably the major mechanism of emplacement. Textures reveal that, in many cases, epidote underwent partial dissolution by host magma and, in these cases, may have survived dissolution by relatively rapid upward transport by the host magma. In plutons where such a mechanism is not evident, unevenly distributed epidote at outcrop scale is armoured by biotite or near-solidus K-feldspar aggregates, which probably grew much faster than epidote dissolution, preventing complete resorption of epidote by the melt. Al-in-hornblende barometry indicates that, in most cases, amphibole crystallized at P≥5 kbar. Kyanite-bearing thermal aureoles surrounding plutons that intruded low-grade metamorphic rocks in NE Brazil support pluton emplacement at intermediate to high pressure. mEp show overall chemical variation from 20 to 30 mol% (mole percent) pistacite (Ps) and can be grouped into two compositional ranges: Ps 20-24 and Ps 27-30. The highest Ps contents are in epidotes of plutons in which hornblende solidified under Pcorrosion of individual epidote crystals included in plagioclase in high-K calc-alkalic granitoids in NE Brazil, emplaced at 5-7 kbar pressure, yielded estimates of magma transport rate from 70 to 350 m year -1. Most of these plutons lack Fe-Ti oxide minerals and Fe +3 is mostly associated with the epidote structure. Consequently, magnetic susceptibility (MS) in the Neoproterozoic granitoids in NE Brazil, as well as Early Palaeozoic plutons in Argentina and Late Palaeozoic plutons in Chile, is usually low (3.0×10 -3 SI, typical of magnetite-series granitoids crystallized under higher oxygen fugacity. In NE

  14. Inelastic Neutron Scattering Investigations of the Magnetic Excitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feile, R; Kjems, Jørgen; Hauser, A.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetic excitations perpendicular to the antiferromagnetic chains in CsVX3 (X = Cl, Br, I) have been measured in the ordered state by inelastic neutron scattering. The dispersion relations and intensity distributions are those expected for ordinary spin waves in a triangular xy-model....

  15. Temperature-dependent magnetic EXAFS investigation of Gd

    CERN Document Server

    Wende, H; Poulopoulos, P N; Rogalev, A; Goulon, J; Schlagel, D L; Lograsso, T A; Baberschke, K

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic EXAFS (MEXAFS) is the helicity-dependent counterpart of the well-established EXAFS technique. By means of MEXAFS it is possible not only to analyze the local magnetic structure but also to learn about magnetic fluctuations. Here we present the MEXAFS of a Gd single crystal at the L sub 3 sub , sub 2 -edges in the temperature range of 10-250 K. For the first time MEXAFS was probed over a large range in reduced temperature of 0.04<=T/T sub C<=0.85 with T sub C =293 K. We show that the vibrational damping described by means of a Debye temperature of theta sub D =160 K must be taken into account for the spin-dependent MEXAFS before analyzing magnetic fluctuations. For a detailed analysis of the MEXAFS and the EXAFS, the experimental data are compared to ab initio calculations. This enables us to separate the individual single- from the multiple-scattering contributions. The MEXAFS data have been recorded at the ID 12A beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). To ensure that th...

  16. Experimental Investigation of the Neutral sheet Profile During Magnetic Reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trintchouk, F.; Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Kulsrud, R.; Hsu, S.; Carter, T.

    1999-01-01

    During magnetic reconnection, a ''neutral sheet'' current is induced, heating the plasma. The resultant plasma thermal pressure forms a stationary equilibrium with the opposing magnetic fields. The reconnection layer profile holds significant clues about the physical mechanisms which control reconnection. On the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment [M. Yamada et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 1936 (1997)], a quasi steady-state and axisymmetric neutral sheet profile has been measured precisely using a magnetic probe array with spatial resolution equal to one quarter of the ion gyro-radius. It was found that the reconnecting field profile fits well with a Harris-type profile [E. G. Harris, Il Nuovo Cimento 23, 115 (1962)], B(x) approximately tanh(x/delta). This agreement is remarkable since the Harris theory does not take into account reconnection and associated electric fields and dissipation. An explanation for this agreement is presented. The sheet thickness delta is found to be approximately 0.4 times the ion skin depth, which agrees with a generalized Harris theory incorporating non-isothermal electron and ion temperatures and finite electric field. The detailed study of additional local features of the reconnection region is also presented

  17. Investigation of Magnetic Field in the Subway Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ctibor Henzl

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper deals with computing of magnetic field in the rails surroundings of subway (underground. The calculation of field is made by using of an analytical method in Excel VBA. There is also used commercial FEM software ANSYS and finite element method. Output results of the both methods are finally compared.

  18. Application of Magnetic and Geotechnical Methods for Archaeological Site Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    national historic preservation act NRM natural remnant magnetism NS north-south nT nano Tesla ID inside diameter OSB oriented strand board psi...3.4 Soil Box Experiments Compaction tests were conducted by loading soil into a wooden box (1 m3) constructed of oriented strand board ( OSB ) and

  19. Investigation of Non-Linear Dynamics of the Rock Massive,Using Seismological Catalogue data and Induction Electromagnetic Monitoring Data in a Rock Burst Mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachay, O. A.; Khachay, O. Y.; Klimko, V. K.; Shipeev, O. V.

    2012-04-01

    Geological medium is an open dynamical system, which is influenced on different scales by natural and man-made impacts, which change the medium state and lead as a result to a complicated many ranked hierarchic evolution. That is the subject of geo synergetics. Paradigm of physical mesomechanics, which was advanced by academician Panin V.E. and his scientific school, which includes the synergetic approach is a constructive method for research and changing the state of heterogenic materials [1]. That result had been obtained on specimens of different materials. In our results of research of no stationary geological medium in a frame of natural experiments in real rock massifs, which are under high man-made influence it was shown, that the state dynamics can be revealed with use synergetics in hierarchic medium. Active and passive geophysical monitoring plays a very important role for research of the state of dynamical geological systems. It can be achieved by use electromagnetic and seismic fields. Our experience of that research showed the changing of the system state reveals on the space scales and times in the parameters, which are linked with the peculiarities of the medium of the second or higher ranks [2-5]. Results of seismological and electromagnetic information showed the mutual additional information on different space-time levels of rock massive state, which are energetic influenced by explosions, used in mining technology. It is revealed a change of nonlinearity degree in time of the massive state by active influence on it. The description of massive movement in a frame of linear dynamical system does not satisfy the practical situation. The received results are of great significance because for the first time we could find the coincidences with the mathematical theory of open systems and experimental natural results with very complicated structure. On that base we developed a new processing method for the seismological information which can be used in

  20. Dynamical Monte Carlo investigation of spin reversal and nonequilibrium magnetization of single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gui-Bin; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we combine thermal effects with Landau-Zener (LZ) quantum tunneling effects in a dynamical Monte Carlo (DMC) framework to produce satisfactory magnetization curves of single-molecule magnet (SMM) systems. We use the giant spin approximation for SMM spins and consider regular lattices of SMMs with magnetic dipolar interactions (MDIs). We calculate spin-reversal probabilities from thermal-activated barrier hurdling, direct LZ tunneling, and thermal-assisted LZ tunnelings in the presence of sweeping magnetic fields. We do systematical DMC simulations for Mn12 systems with various temperatures and sweeping rates. Our simulations produce clear step structures in low-temperature magnetization curves, and our results show that the thermally activated barrier hurdling becomes dominating at high temperature near 3 K and the thermal-assisted tunnelings play important roles at intermediate temperature. These are consistent with corresponding experimental results on good Mn12 samples (with less disorders) in the presence of little misalignments between the easy axis and applied magnetic fields, and therefore our magnetization curves are satisfactory. Furthermore, our DMC results show that the MDI, with the thermal effects, have important effects on the LZ tunneling processes, but both the MDI and the LZ tunneling give place to the thermal-activated barrier hurdling effect in determining the magnetization curves when the temperature is near 3 K. This DMC approach can be applicable to other SMM systems and could be used to study other properties of SMM systems.

  1. Experimental investigation of plasma sheaths in magnetic mirror and cusp configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhengqi; Wei, Zi-an; Ma, J. X.

    2017-11-01

    Sheath structures near a metal plate in a magnetized plasma were experimentally investigated in magnetic mirror and cusp configurations. Plasma parameters and the sheath potential distributions were probed by a planar and an emissive probe, respectively. The measured sheath profiles in the mirror configuration show that the sheath thickness first decreases and then increases when the magnetic strength is raised. A magnetic flux-tube model was used to explain this result. In the cusp configuration, the measured sheath thickness decreases with the increase of the coil current creating the magnetic cusp. However, when normalized by the electron Debye length, the dependence of the sheath thickness on the coil current is reversed.

  2. Transformer core modeling for magnetizing inrush current investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Yahiou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The inrush currents generated during an energization of power transformer can reach very high values and may cause many problems in power system. This magnetizing inrush current which occurs at the time of energization of a transformer is due to temporary overfluxing in the transformer core. Its magnitude mainly depends on switching parameters such as the resistance of the primary winding and the point-on-voltage wave (switching angle. This paper describes a system for measuring the inrush current which is composed principally of an acquisition card (EAGLE, and LabVIEW code. The system is also capable of presetting various combinations of switching parameters for the energization of a 2 kVA transformer via an electronic card. Moreover, an algorithm for calculating the saturation curve is presented taking the iron core reactive losses into account, thereby producing a nonlinear inductance. This curve is used to simulate the magnetizing inrush current using the ATP-EMTP software.

  3. Performance investigation on DCSFCL considering different magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiaxin; Zhou, Hang; Zhong, Yongheng; Gan, Pengcheng; Gao, Yanhui; Muramatsu, Kazuhiro; Du, Zhiye; Chen, Baichao

    2018-05-01

    In order to protect high voltage direct current (HVDC) system from destructive consequences caused by fault current, a novel concept of HVDC system fault current limiter (DCSFCL) was proposed previously. Since DCSFCL is based on saturable core reactor theory, iron core becomes the key to the final performance of it. Therefore, three typical kinds of soft magnetic materials were chosen to find out their impact on performances of DCSFCL. Different characteristics of materials were compared and their theoretical deductions were carried out, too. In the meanwhile, 3D models applying those three materials were built separately and finite element analysis simulations were performed to compare these results and further verify the assumptions. It turns out that materials with large saturation flux density value Bs like silicon steel and short demagnetization time like ferrite might be the best choice for DCSFCL, which can be a future research direction of magnetic materials.

  4. Geochemical normalization of magnetic susceptibility for investigation of floodplain sediments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Faměra, Martin; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Elznicová, J.; Grison, Hana

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 5 (2018), č. článku 189. ISSN 1866-6280 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-00340S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : Background functions * Geochemical normalization * Mass-specific magnetic susceptibility * Post-depositional processes * Provenance Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7); Geology (GFU-E) Impact factor: 1.569, year: 2016

  5. Investigation of genetic structure between deep and shallow populations of the southern Rock Lobster, Jasus edwardsii in Tasmania, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M J Morgan

    Full Text Available The southern rock lobster, Jasus edwardsii, shows clear phenotypic differences between shallow water (red coloured and deeper water (pale coloured individuals. Translocations of individuals from deeper water to shallower waters are currently being trialled as a management strategy to facilitate a phenotypic change from lower value pale colouration, common in deeper waters, to the higher value red colouration found in shallow waters. Although panmixia across the J. edwardsii range has been long assumed, it is critical to assess the genetic variability of the species to ensure that the level of population connectivity is appropriately understood and translocations do not have unintended consequences. Eight microsatellite loci were used to investigate genetic differentiation between six sites (three shallow, three deep across southern Tasmania, Australia, and one from New Zealand. Based on analyses the assumption of panmixia was rejected, revealing small levels of genetic differentiation across southern Tasmania, significant levels of differentiation between Tasmania and New Zealand, and high levels of asymmetric gene flow in an easterly direction from Tasmania into New Zealand. These results suggest that translocation among Tasmanian populations are not likely to be problematic, however, a re-consideration of panmictic stock structure for this species is necessary.

  6. Investigation on trace elements in crude oil and organic matter extracted from rocks with instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Zuguo; Chai Zhifang

    1990-01-01

    Solvent extraction, column chromatography and instrumental neutron activation analysis(INAA) have been used to investigate the trace elements in crude oil, organic matter extracted from rocks and their related fractions. With these methods, about 70 crude oil samples from eight different oil fields in China and 6 extracted asphaltene samples of the lower paleozoic from the upper Yangtze region have been analyzed, and about 40 elements of interest have been determined. Those elements include Al, As, Au, Ba, Br, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hf, I, Ir, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Rb, Re, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Sr, Th, Zn, V and parts of REE. The experimental results show that the method possesses several advantages, i.e. non-destructive, multi-elements, sensitive, precise and accurate. Without ashing samples, the loss of volatile elements such as Cl, S, Se and Sb are avoided. The column chromatography makes it possible to study the distributions of trace elements in different fractions of crude oil and organic matter extracted. Meanwhile, the characters of trace elements in them have also been discussed

  7. Rock Magnetic Properties, Paleosecular Variation Record and Relative Paleointensity Stack between 11 and 21 14C kyr B.P. From Sediment Cores, Lake Moreno (Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogorza, C. S.; Irurzun, M. A.; Lirio, J. M.; Nunez, H.; Chaparro, M. A.; Sinito, A. M.

    2008-05-01

    We conducted a detailed study of natural remanence and rock magnetic properties on sediments cores from lake Moreno (South-Western Argentina). Based on these measurements, we constructed a paleosecular variation (PSV) record (Irurzun et al., 2008) and a relative paleointensity stack for the period 11-21 14C. The Declination and Inclination logs of the characteristic remanent magnetization for the cores as function of shortened depth are obtained. The data from all cores were combined to obtain a composite record using the Fisher method. Comparison between stacked inclination and declination records of lake Moreno and results obtained in previous works, lake Escondido (Gogorza et al., 1999; Gogorza et al., 2002) and lake El Trébol (Irurzun et al., 2008), shows good agreement. This agreement made possible to transform the stacked curves into time series that spans the interval 11 and 21 14C kyr B.P. Rock magnetic properties of the sediments cores showed uniform magnetic mineralogy and grain size, suggesting that they were suitable for relative paleointensity studies. The remanent magnetization at 20mT (NRM20mT) was normalized using the anhysteric remanent magnetization at 20mT (ARM20mT), the saturation of the isothermal remanent magnetization at 20mT (SIRM20mT) and the low field magnetic susceptibility {k}. Coherence analysis showed that the normalized records were not affected by local environmental conditions. The recorded pseudo-Thellier paleointensity was compared with records obtained from conventional normalizing methods. Comparing the paleointensity curves with others obtained previously in other lakes in the area has allowed us to reach reliable conclusions about centennial-scale features. References: Gogorza, C.S.G., Sinito, A.M., Di Tommaso, I., Vilas, J.F., Creer, K., Núnez, H. Holocene Geomagnetic Secular Variations Recorded by Sediments from Escondido lake (South Argentina). Earth, Planets and Space, V51(2), 93- 106. 1999. Gogorza, C.S.G., Sinito, A

  8. An Investigation of Hall Currents Associated with Tripolar Magnetic Fields During Magnetospheric Kelvin Helmholtz Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturner, A. P.; Eriksson, S.; Newman, D. L.; Lapenta, G.; Gershman, D. J.; Plaschke, F.; Ergun, R.; Wilder, F. D.; Torbert, R. B.; Giles, B. L.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    Kinetic simulations and observations of magnetic reconnection suggest the Hall term of Ohm's Law is necessary for understanding fast reconnection in the Earth's magnetosphere. During high (>1) guide field plasma conditions in the solar wind and in Earth's magnetopause, tripolar variations in the guide magnetic field are often observed during current sheet crossings, and have been linked to reconnection Hall magnetic fields. Two proposed mechanisms for these tripolar variations are the presence of multiple nearby X-lines and magnetic island coalescence. We present results of an investigation into the structure of the electron currents supporting tripolar guide magnetic field variations during Kelvin-Helmholtz wave current sheet crossings using the Magnetosphere Multiscale (MMS) Mission, and compare with bipolar magnetic field structures and with kinetic simulations to understand how these tripolar structures may be used as tracers for magnetic islands.

  9. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Sekine, Megumi; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface

  10. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  11. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke, E-mail: shunsuke.ikeda@riken.jp; Sekine, Megumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Romanelli, Mark [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States); Cinquegrani, David [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kumaki, Masafumi [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Horioka, Kazuhiko [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  12. Long Term Sorption Diffusion Experiment (LTDE-SD). Supporting laboratory program - Sorption diffusion experiments and rock material characterisation. With supplement of adsorption studies on intact rock samples from the Forsmark and Laxemar site investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widestrand, Henrik; Byegaard, Johan; Selnert, Eva; Skaalberg, Mats; Hoeglund, Susanne; Gustafsson, Erik (Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    The LTDE-SD experiment, (Long Term Sorption Diffusion Experiment) aims at increasing the scientific knowledge of sorption and diffusion under in situ conditions and to provide data for performance and safety assessment calculations. In this report, performance and results of laboratory sorption and diffusion experiments and porosity investigations using site-specific crushed and intact rock materials are presented, including a geological and mineralogical characterization of the samples. A synthetic groundwater and a part of the radionuclide tracer cocktail that was used for the in situ experiment were used also in the laboratory experiments. 13 radionuclide tracers were analysed in the laboratory experiments. The method descriptions from SKB Site Investigations were applied in order to enable comparisons with Site Investigations data. The water saturation porosity of 10 unaltered matrix rock samples from KA3065A02 and A03 is 0.26 +- 0.08% and two fracture material samples show porosities of 2.4% and 5.2% respectively. 14C-methylmethacrylate impregnation (the PMMA-method) show that the unaltered rock matrix porosity is relatively homogeneous with grain boundary porosity, while the porosity of fracture samples is heterogeneous and have increased porosity up to more than 10% in some parts. Through-diffusion experiments using tritiated water (H3HO) give a matrix diffusivity in the range from 2.7centre dot10-14 to 6.5centre dot10-14 m2/s in four samples from KA3065A02 and A03. The results of the porosity and diffusion measurements are coherent in ranges with earlier LTDE-SD measurements and are also in line with the SKB Site Investigations results. In the batch sorption experiments using crushed rock material, two matrix rock samples of Aevroe granodiorite, one red-stained altered Aevroe granodiorite sample and two chlorite-calcite dominated fracture samples were analysed for three different size fractions as a function of time up to 186 days contact time. The

  13. Investigation of magnetic active core sizes and hydrodynamic diameters of a magnetically fractionated ferrofluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Büttner, Markus; Weber, Peter; Schmidl, Frank; Seidel, Paul; Röder, Michael; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Wagner, Kerstin; Görnert, Peter; Glöckl, Gunnar; Weitschies, Werner

    2011-01-01

    In this work we address the question which relates between the size of the magnetically active core of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and the size of the overall particle in the solution (the so-called hydrodynamic diameter d hyd ) exists. For this purpose we use two methods of examination that can deliver conclusions about the properties of MNP which are not accessible with normal microscopy. On the one hand, we use temperature dependent magnetorelaxation (TMRX) method, which enables direct access to the energy barrier distribution and by using additional hysteresis loop measurements can provide details about the size of the magnetically active cores. On the other hand, to determine the size of the overall particle in the solution, we use the magnetooptical relaxation of ferrofluids (MORFF) method, where the stimulation is done magnetically while the reading of the relaxation signal, however, is done optically. As a basis for the examinations in this work we use a ferrofluid that was developed for medicinal purposes and which has been fractioned magnetically to obtain differently sized fractions of MNPs. The two values obtained through these methods for each fraction shows the success in fractioning the original solution. Therefore, one can conclude a direct correlation between the size of the magnetically active core and the size of the complete particle in the solution from the experimental results. To calculate the size of the magnetically active core we found a temperature dependent anisotropy constant which was taken into account for the calculations. Furthermore, we found relaxation signals at 18 K for all fractions in these TMRX measurements, which have their origin in other magnetic effects than the Néel relaxation.

  14. Magnetic resonance techniques for investigation of multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Alex; Laule, Cornelia; Li, David K. B.; Meyers, Sandra M.; Russell-Schulz, Bretta; Vavasour, Irene M.

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common neurological disease which can cause loss of vision and balance, muscle weakness, impaired speech, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction and even paralysis. The key pathological processes in MS are inflammation, edema, myelin loss, axonal loss and gliosis. Unfortunately, the cause of MS is still not understood and there is currently no cure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important clinical and research tool for MS. 'Conventional' MRI images of MS brain reveal bright lesions, or plaques, which demark regions of severe tissue damage. Conventional MRI has been extremely valuable for the diagnosis and management of people who have MS and also for the assessment of therapies designed to reduce inflammation and promote repair. While conventional MRI is clearly valuable, it lack pathological specificity and, in some cases, sensitivity to non-lesional pathology. Advanced MR techniques have been developed to provide information that is more sensitive and specific than what is available with clinical scanning. Diffusion tensor imaging and magnetization transfer provide a general but non-specific measure of the pathological state of brain tissue. MR spectroscopy provides concentrations of brain metabolites which can be related to specific pathologies. Myelin water imaging was designed to assess brain myelination and has proved useful for measuring myelin loss in MS. To combat MS, it is crucial that the pharmaceutical industry finds therapies which can reverse the neurodegenerative processes which occur in the disease. The challenge for magnetic resonance researchers is to design imaging techniques which can provide detailed pathological information relating to the mechanisms of MS therapies. This paper briefly describes the pathologies of MS and demonstrates how MS-associated pathologies can be followed using both conventional and advanced MR imaging protocols.

  15. Photometric investigation of the magnetic star 53 Camelopardalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muciek, M.; Gertner, J.; North, P.; Rufener, F.

    1985-01-01

    New photometric results obtained in the Geneva system are presented for the star 53 Cam. Earlier photometric results obtained in another system are used as well to show the existence of about four ''null-wavelength regions'' between 3400 and 7700 A and to draw the pseudocontinuum of this star. Assuming axisymmetry about the magnetic axis, a simple model of brightness and equivalent width distribution on the surface of the star are proposed. The distribution of the intensity of the γ 5200 depression is given and a slight inhomogeneity of the distribution of effective temperature is suggested. 28 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs. (author)

  16. Investigation Effects of Magnetetic Impurity Doping on Average Magnetization of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Ghafourian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT extensively are attractive from both theoretical and experimental point of view, due to its technological applications such as nano electronics devises. SWCNT are created by rolling a graphen sheet into a cyclindrical form. We have investigated the possibility of making a ferromagnetic semiconductor zigzag SWCNT by doping magnetic impurities. We found by increasing magnetic impurities doping on a zigzag SWCNT, average magnetization is increased and one can make a ferromagnetic semiconductor

  17. Investigation of magnetic nanoparticle targeting in a simplified model of small vessel aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzababaei, S.N. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Noshirvani Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gorji, Tahereh B., E-mail: gorji.tahereh@stu.nit.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Noshirvani Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baou, M.; Gorji-Bandpy, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Noshirvani Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fatouraee, Nasser [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    An in simulacra study was conducted to investigate the capture efficiency (CE) of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in aneurysm model, under the effect of a bipolar permanent magnetic system positioned at the vicinity of the model vessel. The bipolar magnetic system with an active space of 9 cm was designed by FEMM software. The MNPs were magnetite nanoparticles synthesized by the hydrothermal method which were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and magnetometer measurements. Ferrofluid velocity, magnetic field strength, and aneurysm volume all proved to be important parameters which affect the capturing of MNPs. Overall, the results of this in simulacra study confirmed the effectiveness of magnetic targeting for possible aneurysm embolization. - Highlights: • An in simulacra investigation of the magnetic targeting in mechanical aneurysm embolization was conducted. • A bipolar permanent magnetic system with an active space of 9 cm was designed by FEMM software. • Magnetic nanofluid was synthetized and applied in an experimental setup to study the effect of different flow, magnetic field and geometry parameters on the capture efficiency of the magnetic particles acting as a dug carrier agent.

  18. Microstructural investigations on carbonate fault core rocks in active extensional fault zones from the central Apennines (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortinovis, Silvia; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Storti, Fabrizio

    2017-04-01

    The study of the microstructural and petrophysical evolution of cataclasites and gouges has a fundamental impact on both hydraulic and frictional properties of fault zones. In the last decades, growing attention has been payed to the characterization of carbonate fault core rocks due to the nucleation and propagation of coseismic ruptures in carbonate successions (e.g., Umbria-Marche 1997, L'Aquila 2009, Amatrice 2016 earthquakes in Central Apennines, Italy). Among several physical parameters, grain size and shape in fault core rocks are expected to control the way of sliding along the slip surfaces in active fault zones, thus influencing the propagation of coseismic ruptures during earthquakes. Nevertheless, the role of grain size and shape distribution evolution in controlling the weakening or strengthening behavior in seismogenic fault zones is still not fully understood also because a comprehensive database from natural fault cores is still missing. In this contribution, we present a preliminary study of seismogenic extensional fault zones in Central Apennines by combining detailed filed mapping with grain size and microstructural analysis of fault core rocks. Field mapping was aimed to describe the structural architecture of fault systems and the along-strike fault rock distribution and fracturing variations. In the laboratory we used a Malvern Mastersizer 3000 granulometer to obtain a precise grain size characterization of loose fault rocks combined with sieving for coarser size classes. In addition, we employed image analysis on thin sections to quantify the grain shape and size in cemented fault core rocks. The studied fault zones consist of an up to 5-10 m-thick fault core where most of slip is accommodated, surrounded by a tens-of-meters wide fractured damage zone. Fault core rocks consist of (1) loose to partially cemented breccias characterized by different grain size (from several cm up to mm) and variable grain shape (from very angular to sub

  19. Investigations of the polymer/magnetic interface of organic spin-valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morley, N.A., E-mail: n.a.morley@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Dost, R.; Lingam, A.S.V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Barlow, A.J. [National EPSRC XPS Users’ Service, School of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Metal carbide and sulphide species are detected at a polymer–magnetic interface. • Top magnetic electrodes on P3HT have uniaxial anisotropy. • Top magnetic electrodes on PBTTT are isotropic. - Abstract: This work investigates the top interface of an organic spin-valve, to determine the interactions between the polymer and top magnetic electrode. The polymers studied are regio-regular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (RR-P3HT) and poly(2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (PBTTT) and the magnetic top electrodes are NiFe and Fe. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to determine the bonding at the interface, along with the extent of how oxidised the magnetic layers are, while atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to determine the surface roughness. A magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) magnetometer is used to study the magnetic properties of the top electrode. It is shown that at the organic–magnetic interface the magnetic atoms interact with the polymer, as metallic–sulphide and metallic-carbide species are present at the interface. It is also shown that the structure of the polymer influences the anisotropy of the magnetic electrode, such that the magnetic electrodes grown on RR-P3HT have uniaxial anisotropy, while those grown on PBTTT are isotropic.

  20. Investigation of the field dependent spin structure of exchange coupled magnetic heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurieva, Tatiana

    2016-05-01

    This thesis describes the investigation of the field dependent magnetic spin structure of an antiferromagnetically (AF) coupled Fe/Cr heterostructure sandwiched between a hardmagnetic FePt buffer layer and a softmagnetic Fe top layer. The depth-resolved experimental studies of this system were performed via Magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE), Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM) and various measuring methods based on nuclear resonant scattering (NRS) technique. Nucleation and evolution of the magnetic spiral structure in the AF coupled Fe/Cr multilayer structure in an azimuthally rotating external magnetic field were observed using NRS. During the experiment a number of time-dependent magnetic side effects (magnetic after-effect, domain-wall creep effect) caused by the non-ideal structure of a real sample were observed and later explained. Creation of the magnetic spiral structure in rotating external magnetic field was simulated using a one-dimensional micromagnetic model.The cross-sectional magnetic X-ray diffraction technique was conceived and is theoretically described in the present work. This method allows to determine the magnetization state of an individual layer in the magnetic heterostructure. It is also applicable in studies of the magnetic structure of tiny samples where conventional x-ray reflectometry fails.

  1. Magnetic and structural investigation of growth induced magnetic anisotropies in Fe50Co50 thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neri I.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the magnetic properties of Fe50 Co50 polycrystalline thin films, grown by dc-magnetron sputtering, with thickness (t ranging from 2.5 nm up to 100 nm. We focused on the magnetic properties of the samples to highlight the effects of possible intrinsic stress that may develop during growth, and their dependence on film thickness. Indeed, during film deposition, due to the growth technique and growth conditions, a metallic film may display an intrinsic compressive or tensile stress. In our case, due to the Fe50Co50 magnetolastic properties, this stress may in its turn promote the development of magnetic anisotropies. Samples magnetic properties were monitored with a SQUID magnetometer and a magneto–optic Kerr effect apparatus, using both an in–plane and an out–of–plane magnetic field. Magnetoresistance measurements were collected, as well, to further investigate the magnetic behavior of the samples. Indications about the presence of intrinsic stress were obtained accessing samples curvature with an optical profilometer. For t ≤ 20 nm, the shape of the in-plane magnetization loops is squared and coercivity increases with t, possibly due to fact that, for small t values, the grain size grows with t. The magnetoresistive response is anisotropic in character. For t > 20 nm, coercivity smoothly decreases, the approach to saturation gets slower and the shape of the whole loop gets less and less squared. The magnetoresistive effect becomes almost isotropic and its intensity increases of about one order of magnitude. These results suggest that the magnetization reorientation process changes for t > 20 nm, and are in agreement with the progressive development of an out-of-plane easy axis. This hypothesis is substantiated by profilometric analysis that reveals the presence of an in-plane compressive stress.

  2. Structural looseness investigation in slow rotating permanent magnet generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrimpas, Georgios Alexandros; Mijatovic, Nenad; Sweeney, Christian Walsted

    2016-01-01

    Structural looseness in electric machines is a condition influencing the alignment of the machine and thus the overall bearing health. In this work, assessment of the above mentioned failure mode is tested on a slow rotating (running speed equal to 0.7Hz) permanent magnet generator (PMG), while...... collecting vibration and current data in order to cross-reference the indications from the two monitoring techniques. It is found that electric signature analysis shows no response even when two hold down bolts are untightened, whereas the analysis results from the vibration data exhibit superior performance....... The vibration-based condition indicators with the best response are the stator slot pass frequency, which can be directly related to the cogging torque in PMGs, and the 4th electric frequency harmonic, whose amplitudes increase due to the overall lower structure damping coefficient under looseness...

  3. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Ground magnetic survey at site for planned facility for calibration of borehole orientation equipment at Aespoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Haakan (GeoVista AB (Sweden))

    2012-01-15

    This report presents survey description and results of ground magnetic measurements carried out by GeoVista AB at Aespoe in December, 2011. The purpose of the ground magnetic measurement was to measure variations in the earth magnetic field and to gain knowledge of the magnetization of the bedrock in an area where SKB plan to build a facility for calibration of equipment for measurements of borehole orientation. A total of 312 data points were collected along three survey lines, 104 points/profile. The data show nice and smooth variations that appear to be natural. There is a clear consistency of the magnetic field variations between the three survey lines, which indicates that the variations in the magnetic field reflect geological variations related to lithology and content of magnetic minerals. There are no indications of artifacts or erroneous data. The anomaly field averages at -32 nT with peak values of Min = -1,016 nT and Max = +572 nT. The strongest anomalies occur at profile length c. 130-140 m. Adding the background field of 50,823 nT, measured at a base station located close to the survey area, the total magnetic field averages at 50,791+-226 nT. The ground magnetic measurement gives background information before the construction of the calibration facility. The magnetic anomaly at c. 130-140 m give possibilities to control disturbances of magnetic-accelerometer based instruments. The magnetic measurements show that it is possible to construct the facility at the site

  4. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Ground magnetic survey at site for planned facility for calibration of borehole orientation equipment at Aespoe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattsson, Haakan

    2012-01-01

    This report presents survey description and results of ground magnetic measurements carried out by GeoVista AB at Aespoe in December, 2011. The purpose of the ground magnetic measurement was to measure variations in the earth magnetic field and to gain knowledge of the magnetization of the bedrock in an area where SKB plan to build a facility for calibration of equipment for measurements of borehole orientation. A total of 312 data points were collected along three survey lines, 104 points/profile. The data show nice and smooth variations that appear to be natural. There is a clear consistency of the magnetic field variations between the three survey lines, which indicates that the variations in the magnetic field reflect geological variations related to lithology and content of magnetic minerals. There are no indications of artifacts or erroneous data. The anomaly field averages at -32 nT with peak values of Min = -1,016 nT and Max = +572 nT. The strongest anomalies occur at profile length c. 130-140 m. Adding the background field of 50,823 nT, measured at a base station located close to the survey area, the total magnetic field averages at 50,791±226 nT. The ground magnetic measurement gives background information before the construction of the calibration facility. The magnetic anomaly at c. 130-140 m give possibilities to control disturbances of magnetic-accelerometer based instruments. The magnetic measurements show that it is possible to construct the facility at the site

  5. Preliminary investigation on the sedimentary facies of the middle silurian uraniferous rock formations in western Qinling Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Yunian; Min Yongming.

    1987-01-01

    The Middle Silurian stratabound uranium deposits in Western Qinling were formed due to hydrothermal modification of ground water and reconcentration of uranium from the sedimentary source rocks. The Silurian system consists of the sediments deposited in the marginal sea of the passive continent, to the south of which is the Ruoergai palaeocontinent. The Middle Silurian is divided into three formations. The lower members of each formation are composed of fine-grained clastic rocks with bay-lagoon facies, while the upper members of each formation are uraniferous rock formations consisted of carbonaceous-siliceous-limestone-argillaceous rocks. During the Middle Silurian period there occurred an island chain barrier which is roughly parallel to the palaeocoast and was formed by undersea uplifts. The uraniferous rock formations belong to the assemblage of lagoon-reef-back tidal flat-reef beach facies. Nearshore shallow water environment, abundant terrestrial fine detritus, local reduction facies and zones are three cardinal conditions for the formation of uranium-rich sediments. Uranium deposition mainly took place in the environments of the inner part of reef beach and reef-back tidal flat, which are characterized by having medium to slightly lower energy, the terrestrial fine detritus involved, and local reduction field resulting from the decomposition of organism after their massive death. Furing the process of relative slow deposition, UO 2 2+ in the sea water was formed by means of infiltration, diffusion and alternative absorption of water at the bottom into organic matter and clay

  6. Investigation of the electronic, magnetic and optical properties of newest carbon allotrope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Samira; Moradian, Rostam

    2018-05-01

    We investigate triple properties of monolayer pentagon graphene that include electronic, magnetic and optical properties based on density functional theory (DFT). Our results show that in the electronic and magnetic properties this structure with a direct energy gap of about 2.2 eV along Γ - Γ direction and total magnetic moment of 0.0013 μB per unit cell is almost a non-magnetic semiconductor. Also, its optical properties show that if this allotrope used in solar cell technology, its efficiency in the low energy will be better, because, in the range of energy, its loss energy function and reflectivity will be minimum.

  7. Using Moessbauer spectroscopy as key technique in the investigation of nanosized magnetic particles for drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, P. C., E-mail: pcmor@unb.br [Universidade de Brasilia, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, Instituto de Fisica (Brazil)

    2008-01-15

    This paper describes how cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, suspended as ionic or biocompatible magnetic fluids, can be used as a platform to built complex nanosized magnetic materials, more specifically magnetic drug delivery systems. In particular, the paper is addressed to the discussion of the use of the Moessbauer spectroscopy as an extremely useful technique in supporting the investigation of key aspects related to the properties of the hosted magnetic nanosized particle. Example of the use of the Moessbauer spectroscopy in accessing information regarding the nanoparticle modification due to the empirical process which provides long term chemical stability is included in the paper.

  8. Experimental investigation on the repetitively nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge with the parallel magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yidi; Yan, Huijie; Guo, Hongfei; Fan, Zhihui; Wang, Yuying; Ren, Chunsheng

    2018-02-01

    The effects of a parallel magnetic field on the unipolar positive nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge are experimentally investigated through electrical and spectral measurements. The discharge is produced between two parallel-plate electrodes in the ambient air with a parallel magnetic field of 1.4 T. Experimental results show that both the discharge intensity and uniformity are improved in the discharge with the parallel magnetic field. The intensity ratio of the spectrum at 371.1 nm and 380.5 nm, which describes the average electron density, is increased by the parallel magnetic field. Meanwhile, the intensity ratio of the spectrum at 391.4 nm and 337.1 nm, which describes the electron temperature, is also increased. It is speculated that both the average electron density and the electron temperature are increased by the parallel magnetic field. The aforementioned phenomena have been explained by the confinement effect of the parallel magnetic field on the electrons.

  9. An experimental investigation of the internal magnetic field topography of an operating Hall thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Peter Y.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Haas, James M.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic field measurements were made in the discharge channel of the 5 kW-class P5 laboratory-model Hall thruster to investigate what effect the Hall current has on the static, applied magnetic field topography. The P5 was operated at 1.6 and 3.0 kW with a discharge voltage of 300 V. A miniature inductive loop probe (B-Dot probe) was employed to measure the radial magnetic field profile inside the discharge channel of the P5 with and without the plasma discharge. These measurements are accomplished with minimal disturbance to thruster operation with the High-speed Axial Reciprocating Probe system. The results of the B-Dot probe measurements indicate a change in the magnetic field topography from that of the vacuum field measurements. The measured magnetic field profiles are then examined to determine the possible nature and source of the difference between the vacuum and plasma magnetic field profiles

  10. Experimental Investigation of the Spiral Structure of a Magnetic Capsule Endoscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanan Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fitting a wireless capsule endoscope (WCE with a navigation feature can maximize its functional benefits. The rotation of a spiral-type capsule can be converted to translational motion. The study investigated how the spiral structure and rotational speed affected the capsule's translation speed. A hand-held instrument, including two permanent magnets, a stepper motor, a controller and a power supplier, were designed to generate rotational magnetic fields. The surfaces of custom-built permanent magnet rings magnetized radially were mounted in spiral lines with different lead angles and diameters, acting as mock-up capsules. The experimental results demonstrate that the rotational speed of the magnetic field and the spiral have significant effects on the translational speed of a capsule. The spiral line with a larger lead angle and the rotating magnetic field with a higher speed can change the capsule's rotation into a translational motion more efficiently in the intestine.

  11. Rock fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.S.; Green, S.J.; Hakala, W.W.; Hustrulid, W.A.; Maurer, W.C. (eds.)

    1976-01-01

    Experts in rock mechanics, mining, excavation, drilling, tunneling and use of underground space met to discuss the relative merits of a wide variety of rock fragmentation schemes. Information is presented on novel rock fracturing techniques; tunneling using electron beams, thermocorer, electric spark drills, water jets, and diamond drills; and rock fracturing research needs for mining and underground construction. (LCL)

  12. Investigation study of geometric dimensions of the magnetic system of the switched-reluctance machine influence on magnetic moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrushin, A.; Shevkunova, A.

    2018-02-01

    The article deals with the investigation concentrated to optimizing the active part of the switched-reluctance motor with the aim of increasing the value of the average electromagnetic torque. Susceptibility of the average value of the electromagnetic torque to changes of the geometric dimensions of the magnetic system found in the optimization process was set.

  13. A density functional investigation on the electronic and magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bCommerce Circulation School, Anhui Institute of International Business, Anhui 231131,. People's Republic of ... gaps are increased and exhibit oscillating behavior from LaSi to LuSi. ... research, therefore, is to provide a detailed investigation.

  14. Investigation of electronic and magnetic properties of FeS: First principle and Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouachraoui, Rachid; El Hachimi, Abdel Ghafour; Ziat, Younes; Bahmad, Lahoucine; Tahiri, Najim

    2018-06-01

    Electronic and magnetic properties of hexagonal Iron (II) Sulfide (hexagonal FeS) have been investigated by combining the Density functional theory (DFT) and Monte Carlo simulations (MCS). This compound is constituted by magnetic hexagonal lattice occupied by Fe2+ with spin state (S = 2). Based on ab initio method, we calculated the exchange coupling JFe-Fe between two magnetic atoms Fe-Fe in different directions. Also phase transitions, magnetic stability and magnetizations have been investigated in the framework of Monte Carlo simulations. Within this method, a second phase transition is observed at the Néel temperature TN = 450 K. This finding in good agreement with the reported data in the literature. The effect of the applied different parameters showed how can these parameters affect the critical temperature of this system. Moreover, we studied the density of states and found that the hexagonal FeS will be a promoting material for spintronic applications.

  15. Rocks under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-05-01

    Physicists have used nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate the destructive effects of the crystallization of salt. Salt-weathering is one of the main causes of rock disintegration in nature, particularly in deserts, polar regions and along coastlines. However, it is also a very widespread cause of damage to man-made constructions. Bridges, for example, are attacked by de-icing salts, and cities such as Bahrain, Abu Dhabi and Adelaide are affected by rising damp from high ground-water levels. Indeed, many examples of cultural heritage, including the Islamic sites of Bokhara and Petra in Jordan and the Sphinx in Egypt, may ultimately be destroyed due to the effects of salt-weathering. Now Lourens Rijniers and colleagues at Eindhoven University in the Netherlands have developed a way to observe the solubility of various salts inside porous materials directly (Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 075503). (U.K.)

  16. Investigation of Condensed Media in Weak Fields by the Method of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, V. V.; Myazin, N. S.; Dudkin, V. I.; Velichko, E. N.

    2018-05-01

    A compact design of a rapid-response nuclear magnetic spectrometer for investigation of condensed media in weak fields is reported. As a result of investigation of different condensed media, special features of recording a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal in a weak magnetic field from a small volume of the medium under study are established. For the first time the NMR absorption spectra of condensed media in a weak field are collected. Based on the results of experimental studies, the potential of using a compact NMR-spectrometer for condensed media monitoring in a rapid response mode is determined.

  17. Rock magnetic and geochemical analyses of surface sediment characteristics in deep ocean environments: A case study across the Ryukyu Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, N.; Kawamura, K.; Ishikawa, N.

    2008-03-01

    Magnetic minerals in marine sediments are often dissolved or formed with burial depth, thereby masking the primary natural remanent magnetization and paleoclimate signals. In order to clarify the present sedimentary environment and the progressive changes with burial depth in the magnetic properties, we studied seven cores collected from the Ryukyu Trench, southwest Japan. Magnetic properties, organic geochemistry, and interstitial water chemistry of seven cores are described. Bottom water conditions at the landward slope, trench floor, and seaward slope are relatively suboxic, anoxic, and oxic, respectively. The grain size of the sediments become gradually finer with the distance from Okinawa Island and finer with increasing water depth. The magnetic carriers in the sediments are predominantly magnetite and maghemized magnetite, with minor amounts of hematite. In the topmost sediments from the landward slope, magnetic minerals are diluted by terrigenous materials and microfossils. The downcore variations in magnetic properties and geochemical data provided evidence for the dissolution of fine-grained magnetite with burial depth under an anoxic condition.

  18. Rock stresses (Grimsel rock laboratory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, A.; Heusermann, S.; Braeuer, V.; Gloeggler, W.

    1989-01-01

    On the research and development project 'Rock Stress Measurements' the BGR has developed and tested several test devices and methods at GTS for use in boreholes at a depth of 200 m and has carried out rock mechanical and engineering geological investigations for the evaluation and interpretation of the stress measurements. The first time a computer for data processing was installed in the borehole together with the BGR-probe. Laboratory tests on hollow cylinders were made to study the stress-deformation behavior. To validate and to interprete the measurement results some test methods were modelled using the finite-element method. The dilatometer-tests yielded high values of Young's modulus, whereas laboratory tests showed lower values with a distinct deformation anisotropy. Stress measurements with the BGR-probe yielded horizontal stresses being higher than the theoretical overburden pressure and vertical stresses which agree well with the theoretical overburden pressure. These results are comparable to the results of the hydraulic fracturing tests, whereas stresses obtained with CSIR-triaxial cells are generally lower. The detailed geological mapping of the borehole indicated relationships between stress and geology. With regard to borehole depth different zones of rock structure joint frequency, joint orientation, and orientation of microfissures as well as stress magnitude, stress direction, and degree of deformation anisotropy could be distinguished. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and Polychlorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in vito

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-06

    L. Narayanan. and B. M. Jamot. ’Effects of Peulluoro-n- octanoic Acid , Perfluoro-n-decanoic Acid , and Clofibrate on Hepatic Phosphorus Metabolism in...pathways and examined the impact of perfluorocarboxylic acid exposure. This investigative strategy will delineate the metabolic effices exerted by...Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and Polychlorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in Vivo Principal Investigator: Nicholas V. Reo

  20. Investigation of HTSC; influence of microstructure, magnetic and of non-magnetic impurities; synthesis of new systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlleben, D.

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated intensively the parameters of preparation of HTSC of the BiCaSrCuO system and could prepare the 2212- and 2232 phases separately in X-ray pure form. Concerning the 123-system the substitution of Cu by 3d-elements changed the superconducting behaviour strongly where as a replacement of Y by other Rare Earth-elements does not influence much the superconducting properties. Fluctuations occur in a wide range around T c . The layered-structure and granular character of the HTSC determine strongly the magnetic behaviour of HTSC especially the so-called Meissnereffect. Our first magnetic data of HTSC showed that even in magnetic fields smaller than Hc 1 (perpendicular) we did not receive 100% fluxexpulsion (Meissner). The fluxexpulsion of most of our samples was only 1/3 of -1/4 π. However in very small fields ( [de

  1. Investigation of the magnetic properties of electrodeposited NiFe thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakkaloglu, O. F.; Bedir, M.; Oeztas, M.; Karahan, I. H.

    2002-01-01

    Most magnetic devices used today are based on the magnetic thin film. Rapid and extensive developments in magnetic sensor / actuator and magnetic recording technology place a growing demand on the use of different thin film fabrication techniques for magnetic materials. The electroplating technique is especially interesting due to its low cost, high throughput and high quality of the deposits which are extensively used in the magnetic recording industry to deposit relatively thick permalloy layers. Much recent attention has focused on the electrodeposited NiFe thin films, which exhibit giant magneto resistive behaviour as well as anisotropic magnetoresistance properties. n this study, NiFe thin films were developed by using electrodeposition technique and their crystallinity structures were investigated by using x-ray diffractometer measurements. The magneto resistive properties of the samples were investigated by Wan der Pauw method with a home made electromagnet under the different magnetic fields. The magnetoresistance measurements of the samples were carried out in two configurations; current parallel ( longitudinal ) and perpendicular ( transverse ) to the magnetic field. In the longitudinal configuration giant magnetoresistance was observed while anisotropic magnetoresistance was detected in the other configuration

  2. Intergarted geophysical investigations by GPR and ERT on the largest rock fill dam in Europe: Monte Cotugno dam (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loperte, A.; Bavusi, M.; Cerverizzo, G.; Lapenna, V.; Soldovieri, F.

    2012-04-01

    This work is concerned with the first results of a survey based on the integration of geophysical techniques for the inspection of the Monte Cotugno dam, the largest rock fill dam in Europe. The Monte Cotugno dam, managed by National Irrigation Development and Agrarian Transformation in Puglia, Basilicata and Irpinia is located on the Sinni river (Basilicata District, South Italy) and represents the nodal point in the whole hydraulic system on the Ionic side of Italy; in fact, the dam allows harnessing of the Sinni river water for agricultural, industrial, drinking and domestic purposes. The dam is of the zoned type and consists of a central core in sandy silt and of gravelly-sandy shoulders; its water tightness is ensured by a bituminous conglomerate facing on the upstream side, welded at the bottom to the foundation sealing system. The latter is about 1,900m long and consist of a massive concrete cut-off wall based on the marly-clay formation, 300m long on the right and 600 m long on the left side. On the valley bottom it is made up of a reinforced concrete cut-off wall that is inserted in the marly-clay formation and is surmounted by an inspection and percolation water collection tunnel. The watertight face consists of a bottom levelling layer 7-8 cm thick in semi open-graded bituminous concrete, a 5 cm separation layer in dense-graded bituminous concrete, a drainage layer in very open-graded concrete varying in thickness from 10 to 16 cm from the top of the dam down, two 4-cm top layers in dense-graded bituminous concrete with stepped joints, a finishing sealing coat containing 1.5 kg/cm2 of asphalt. The shallowest part of this layering is started to show incipient small detachments due to thermal solicitations; these detachments represent a possible way for water infiltration in the dam. In this framework, it was decided to perform the identification, characterization and evaluation of the potential loss of water through small cracks in the bituminous concrete

  3. Investigation on the anisotropic mechanical behaviour of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock within the framework of ANDRA/GRS cooperation programme. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chun-Liang [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany); Armand, Gilles; Conil, Nathalie [French Agence Nationale Pour la Gestion de Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2015-01-15

    An underground repository for disposal of radioactive waste is planned to be constructed in the sedimentary Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous formation (COX) in France /AND 05/. The clay rock exhibits inherent anisotropy with bedding structure, which leads to directional dependences of the rock properties (e.g. mineralogical, physical, mechanical, hydraulic, thermal, etc.) with respect to the bedding planes. For the design of the repository and the assessment of its safety during the operation and post-closure phases it is necessary to characterise and predict the anisotropic properties and processes in the host rock, particularly in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) near the openings. Within the framework of the bilateral cooperation agreement between the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) and the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi), concerning the research activities in the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (MHM-URL), a joint research programme was initiated by ANDRA and GRS in 2013 to investigate mechanical anisotropy of the COX clay rock for the purpose of precise characterization, better understanding and reliable prediction of the development of EDZ around the repository. This programme was funded by ANDRA under contract number 059844 and performed by GRS during the time period of November 2013 to December 2014. GRS gratefully acknowledges the financial support from and the fruitful cooperation with ANDRA.

  4. Zinc isotope investigation of surface and pore waters in a mountain watershed impacted by acid rock drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aranda, Suzan [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Borrok, David M., E-mail: dborrok@utep.edu [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Wanty, Richard B. [US Geological Survey, MS 964d, Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225 (United States); Balistrieri, Laurie S. [U.S. Geological Survey, University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    The pollution of natural waters with metals derived from the oxidation of sulfide minerals like pyrite is a global environmental problem. However, the metal loading pathways and transport mechanisms associated with acid rock drainage reactions are often difficult to characterize using bulk chemical data alone. In this study, we evaluated the use of zinc (Zn) isotopes to complement traditional geochemical tools in the investigation of contaminated waters at the former Waldorf mining site in the Rocky Mountains, Colorado, U.S.A. Geochemical signatures and statistical analysis helped in identifying two primary metal loading pathways at the Waldorf site. The first was characterized by a circumneutral pH, high alkalinity, and high Zn/Cd ratios. The second was characterized by acidic pHs and low Zn/Cd ratios. Zinc isotope signatures in surface water samples collected across the site were remarkably similar (the {delta}{sup 66}Zn, relative to JMC 3-0749-L, for most samples ranged from 0.20 to 0.30 Per-Mille-Sign {+-} 0.09 Per-Mille-Sign 2{sigma}). This probably suggests that the ultimate source of Zn is consistent across the Waldorf site, regardless of the metal loading pathway. The {delta}{sup 66}Zn of pore water samples collected within a nearby metal-impacted wetland area, however, were more variable, ranging from 0.20 to 0.80 Per-Mille-Sign {+-} 0.09 Per-Mille-Sign 2{sigma}. Here the Zn isotopes seemed to reflect differences in groundwater flow pathways. However, a host of secondary processes might also have impacted Zn isotopes, including adsorption of Zn onto soil components, complexation of Zn with dissolved organic matter, uptake of Zn into plants, and the precipitation of Zn during the formation of reduced sulfur species. Zinc isotope analysis proved useful in this study; however, the utility of this isotopic tool would improve considerably with the addition of a comprehensive experimental foundation for interpreting the complex isotopic relationships found in

  5. Zinc isotope investigation of surface and pore waters in a mountain watershed impacted by acid rock drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aranda, Suzan; Borrok, David M.; Wanty, Richard B.; Balistrieri, Laurie S.

    2012-01-01

    The pollution of natural waters with metals derived from the oxidation of sulfide minerals like pyrite is a global environmental problem. However, the metal loading pathways and transport mechanisms associated with acid rock drainage reactions are often difficult to characterize using bulk chemical data alone. In this study, we evaluated the use of zinc (Zn) isotopes to complement traditional geochemical tools in the investigation of contaminated waters at the former Waldorf mining site in the Rocky Mountains, Colorado, U.S.A. Geochemical signatures and statistical analysis helped in identifying two primary metal loading pathways at the Waldorf site. The first was characterized by a circumneutral pH, high alkalinity, and high Zn/Cd ratios. The second was characterized by acidic pHs and low Zn/Cd ratios. Zinc isotope signatures in surface water samples collected across the site were remarkably similar (the δ 66 Zn, relative to JMC 3-0749-L, for most samples ranged from 0.20 to 0.30‰ ± 0.09‰ 2σ). This probably suggests that the ultimate source of Zn is consistent across the Waldorf site, regardless of the metal loading pathway. The δ 66 Zn of pore water samples collected within a nearby metal-impacted wetland area, however, were more variable, ranging from 0.20 to 0.80‰ ± 0.09‰ 2σ. Here the Zn isotopes seemed to reflect differences in groundwater flow pathways. However, a host of secondary processes might also have impacted Zn isotopes, including adsorption of Zn onto soil components, complexation of Zn with dissolved organic matter, uptake of Zn into plants, and the precipitation of Zn during the formation of reduced sulfur species. Zinc isotope analysis proved useful in this study; however, the utility of this isotopic tool would improve considerably with the addition of a comprehensive experimental foundation for interpreting the complex isotopic relationships found in soil pore waters. - Highlights: ► Zinc isotopes of water were measured in

  6. Zinc isotope investigation of surface and pore waters in a mountain watershed impacted by acid rock drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Suzan; Borrok, David M; Wanty, Richard B; Balistrieri, Laurie S

    2012-03-15

    The pollution of natural waters with metals derived from the oxidation of sulfide minerals like pyrite is a global environmental problem. However, the metal loading pathways and transport mechanisms associated with acid rock drainage reactions are often difficult to characterize using bulk chemical data alone. In this study, we evaluated the use of zinc (Zn) isotopes to complement traditional geochemical tools in the investigation of contaminated waters at the former Waldorf mining site in the Rocky Mountains, Colorado, U.S.A. Geochemical signatures and statistical analysis helped in identifying two primary metal loading pathways at the Waldorf site. The first was characterized by a circumneutral pH, high alkalinity, and high Zn/Cd ratios. The second was characterized by acidic pHs and low Zn/Cd ratios. Zinc isotope signatures in surface water samples collected across the site were remarkably similar (the δ(66)Zn, relative to JMC 3-0749-L, for most samples ranged from 0.20 to 0.30‰±0.09‰ 2σ). This probably suggests that the ultimate source of Zn is consistent across the Waldorf site, regardless of the metal loading pathway. The δ(66)Zn of pore water samples collected within a nearby metal-impacted wetland area, however, were more variable, ranging from 0.20 to 0.80‰±0.09‰ 2σ. Here the Zn isotopes seemed to reflect differences in groundwater flow pathways. However, a host of secondary processes might also have impacted Zn isotopes, including adsorption of Zn onto soil components, complexation of Zn with dissolved organic matter, uptake of Zn into plants, and the precipitation of Zn during the formation of reduced sulfur species. Zinc isotope analysis proved useful in this study; however, the utility of this isotopic tool would improve considerably with the addition of a comprehensive experimental foundation for interpreting the complex isotopic relationships found in soil pore waters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Polar and Magnetic Layered A Site and Rock Salt B Site-Ordered NaLnFeWO6 (Ln = La, Nd) Perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tetuerto, Maria [State University of New Jersey, The; Li, Mang-Rong [State University of New Jersey, The; Ignatov, Alexander [State University of New Jersey, The; Croft, Mark [State University of New Jersey, The; Ramanujachary, Kandalam V. [Rowan University; Chi, Songxue [ORNL; Hodges, Jason P [ORNL; Dachraoui, W. [University of Antwerp; Hadermann, Joke [University of Antwerp; Thao Tran, T. [University of Houston, Houston; Shiv Halasyamani, P. [University of Houston, Houston; Grams, C. [Universitat zu Koln, Koln, Germany; Hemberger, J. [Universitat zu Koln, Koln, Germany; Greenblatt, M. [State University of New Jersey, The

    2013-01-01

    We have expanded the double perovskite family of materials with the unusual combination of layered order in the A sublattice and rock salt order over the B sublattice to compounds NaLaFeWO6 and NaNdFeWO6. The materials have been synthesized and studied by powder X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, electron diffraction, magnetic measurements, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, dielectric measurements, and second harmonic generation. At room temperature, the crystal structures of both compounds can be defined in the noncentrosymmetric monoclinic P21 space group resulting from the combination of ordering both in the A and B sublattices, the distortion of the cell due to tilting of the octahedra, and the displacement of certain cations. The magnetic studies show that both compounds are ordered antiferromagnetically below TN 25 K for NaLaFeWO6 and at 21 K for NaNdFeWO6. The magnetic structure of NaNdFeWO6 has been solved with a propagation vector k = (1/2 0 1/2) as an antiferromagnetic arrangement of Fe and Nd moments. Although the samples are potential multiferroics, the dielectric measurements do not show a ferroelectric response.

  8. Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Sellmyer, David

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures is devoted to the fabrication, characterization, experimental investigation, theoretical understanding, and utilization of advanced magnetic nanostructures. Focus is on various types of 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' artificial nanostructures, as contrasted to naturally occurring magnetic nanostructures, such as iron-oxide inclusions in magnetic rocks, and to structures such as perfect thin films. Chapter 1 is an introduction into some basic concepts, such as the definitions of basic magnetic quantities. Chapters 2-4 are devoted to the theory of magnetic nanostructures, Chapter 5 deals with the characterization of the structures, and Chapters 6-10 are devoted to specific systems. Applications of advanced magnetic nanostructures are discussed in Chapters11-15 and, finally, the appendix lists and briefly discusses magnetic properties of typical starting materials. Industrial and academic researchers in magnetism and related areas such as nanotechnology, materials science, and theore...

  9. Investigation on magnetic field dependent modulus of epoxidized natural rubber based magnetorheological elastomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunus, N. A.; Mazlan, S. A.; Ubaidillah; Aziz, S. A. A.; Khairi, M. H. Ahmad; Wahab, N. A. A.; Shilan, S. T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the use of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) as a matrix of magnetorheological elastomers (MREs). Isotropic ENR-based MRE samples were synthesized by homogeneously mixed the ENR compound with carbonyl iron particles (CIPs). The microstructure of the sample was observed, and the magnetic field-dependent moduli were analyzed using rheometer. The influences of excitation frequency, CIPs content and magnetic field on the field-dependent moduli of ENR-based MREs were evaluated through dynamic shear test. The microstructure of MRE samples demonstrated the dispersed CIPs in the ENR matrix. The remarkable increment of storage and loss moduli of the ENR-based MREs has exhibited the magnetically controllable storage and loss moduli of the samples when exposed to the magnetic field. Consequently, the CIPs content, frequency and magnetic field were significantly influenced the dynamic moduli of the ENR-based MREs. (paper)

  10. Numerical investigation of magnetic field effect on pressure in cylindrical and hemispherical silicon CZ crystal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, F.; Bouabdallah, A.; Merah, A.; Oualli, H.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of axial magnetic field of different intensities on pressure in silicon Czochralski crystal growth is investigated in cylindrical and hemispherical geometries with rotating crystal and crucible and thermocapillary convection. As one important thermodynamic variable, the pressure is found to be more sensitive than temperature to magnetic field with strong dependence upon the vorticity field. The pressure at the triple point is proposed as a convenient parameter to control the homogeneity of the grown crystal. With a gradual increase of the magnetic field intensity the convection effect can be reduced without thermal fluctuations in the silicon melt. An evaluation of the magnetic interaction parameter critical value corresponding to flow, pressure and temperature homogenization leads to the important result that a relatively low axial magnetic field is required for the spherical system comparatively to the cylindrical one. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Numerical investigation of magnetic field effect on pressure in cylindrical and hemispherical silicon CZ crystal growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, F. [Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi Ouzou (Algeria); LTSE Laboratory, University of Science and Technology. BP 32 Elalia, Babezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Bouabdallah, A. [LTSE Laboratory, University of Science and Technology. BP 32 Elalia, Babezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Merah, A. [LTSE Laboratory, University of Science and Technology. BP 32 Elalia, Babezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); M' hamed Bougara University, Boumerdes (Algeria); Oualli, H. [EMP, Bordj ElBahri, Algiers (Algeria)

    2012-12-15

    The effect of axial magnetic field of different intensities on pressure in silicon Czochralski crystal growth is investigated in cylindrical and hemispherical geometries with rotating crystal and crucible and thermocapillary convection. As one important thermodynamic variable, the pressure is found to be more sensitive than temperature to magnetic field with strong dependence upon the vorticity field. The pressure at the triple point is proposed as a convenient parameter to control the homogeneity of the grown crystal. With a gradual increase of the magnetic field intensity the convection effect can be reduced without thermal fluctuations in the silicon melt. An evaluation of the magnetic interaction parameter critical value corresponding to flow, pressure and temperature homogenization leads to the important result that a relatively low axial magnetic field is required for the spherical system comparatively to the cylindrical one. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance structure investigations on crosslinked polyesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grobelny, J.

    1999-01-01

    Styrene-crosslinked mixed polyesters derived from maleic anhydride, 2,2-di(4-hydroxypropoxyphenyl)propane, oligo(propylene oxide) and 1,2-propylene glycol were investigated by high-resolution solid-state 13 C NMR spectroscopy. The structural modifications accompanying crosslinking were characterized in terms of spin-lattice relaxation times as a function of unsaturated polyester composition. Copolymerization and crosslinking effects were individually evaluated and the latter effect was related to variations in crosslinking density associated with the chemical structure of the unsaturated prepolymer. As the crosslinking effect is suppressed, the mechanical properties undergo expected changes, e.g., impact strength is increased and modulus of elasticity in tension is decreased. (author)

  13. Intensity of the Earth's Magnetic Field over the past 6 million years ; A case study from Basaltic Rocks in East Anatolian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Nurcan; Baydemir, Niyazi; Cengiz Cinku, Mualla; Hisarli, Z. Mümtaz; Keskin, Mehmet; Leonhardt, Roman

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the intensity variation of the earth magnetic field by using Miocene and Quaternary basaltic rocks in Eastern Anatolian region. A total of ninety one volcanic rocks at twelve different sites are sampled around the Van region. A modified Thellier method was used to determine paleointensity values. Paleointensity results from five sites were accepted according to our confidence criteria. The paleointensity values from the five reliable sites with normal polarity show relatively low paleointensity values compared to the present field of 47 µT. The total paleointensity field values F are 33.96± 3.54 µT for site VAN5 with an age of 5.5 m.y, 19.98± 6.79 µT for site VAN7 with an age of 4.3 m.y, 26.07 ±8.41 µT for site VAN8 with an age of 0.1 m.y, 29.98 ±1.71 µT for site VAN11 with an age of 0.4 m.y and 31.08 ±2.88 µT for site VAN12 with an age of 5.5 m.y. The average VDMs (Virtual Dipol Moments) correspond to 6.01x10²² Am² for the three Miocene sites and to 5.73x10²² Am² for the Quaternary rocks. Our data is in good coherence to previous studies of similar age ranges.

  14. Preparation of magnetic polylactic acid microspheres and investigation of its releasing property for loading curcumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Fengxia [Heilongjiang Key Laboratory of Molecular Design and Preparation of Flame Retarded Materials, College of Science, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Li Xiaoli, E-mail: lixiaoli0903@163.com [Heilongjiang Key Laboratory of Molecular Design and Preparation of Flame Retarded Materials, College of Science, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Li Bin, E-mail: libinzh62@163.com [Heilongjiang Key Laboratory of Molecular Design and Preparation of Flame Retarded Materials, College of Science, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China)

    2011-11-15

    In order to obtain a targeting drug carrier system, magnetic polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres loading curcumin were synthesized by the classical oil-in-water emulsion solvent-evaporation method. In the Fourier transform infrared spectra of microspheres, the present functional groups of PLA were all kept invariably. The morphology and size distribution of magnetic microspheres were observed with scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, respectively. The results showed that the microspheres were regularly spherical and the surface was smooth with a diameter of 0.55-0.75 {mu}m. Magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was loaded in PLA microspheres and the content of magnetic particles was 12 wt% through thermogravimetric analysis. The magnetic property of prepared microspheres was measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. The results showed that the magnetic microspheres exhibited typical superparamagnetic behavior and the saturated magnetization was 14.38 emu/g. Through analysis of differential scanning calorimetry, the curcumin was in an amorphous state in the magnetic microspheres. The drug loading, encapsulation efficiency and releasing properties of curcumin in vitro were also investigated by ultraviolet-visible spectrum analysis. The results showed that the drug loading and encapsulation efficiency were 8.0% and 24.2%, respectively. And curcumin was obviously slowly released because the cumulative release percentage of magnetic microspheres in the phosphate buffer (pH=7.4) solution was only 49.01% in 72 h, and the basic release of curcumin finished in 120 h. - Highlights: > We prepare magnetic polylactic acid microspheres loading curcumin. > The classical oil-in-water emulsion solvent-evaporation method is used. > The magnetic microspheres are regularly spherical with a diameter of 0.55-0.75 {mu}m. > They show a certain sustained release effect on in vitro drug releasing.

  15. Preparation of magnetic polylactic acid microspheres and investigation of its releasing property for loading curcumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fengxia; Li Xiaoli; Li Bin

    2011-01-01

    In order to obtain a targeting drug carrier system, magnetic polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres loading curcumin were synthesized by the classical oil-in-water emulsion solvent-evaporation method. In the Fourier transform infrared spectra of microspheres, the present functional groups of PLA were all kept invariably. The morphology and size distribution of magnetic microspheres were observed with scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, respectively. The results showed that the microspheres were regularly spherical and the surface was smooth with a diameter of 0.55-0.75 μm. Magnetic Fe 3 O 4 was loaded in PLA microspheres and the content of magnetic particles was 12 wt% through thermogravimetric analysis. The magnetic property of prepared microspheres was measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. The results showed that the magnetic microspheres exhibited typical superparamagnetic behavior and the saturated magnetization was 14.38 emu/g. Through analysis of differential scanning calorimetry, the curcumin was in an amorphous state in the magnetic microspheres. The drug loading, encapsulation efficiency and releasing properties of curcumin in vitro were also investigated by ultraviolet-visible spectrum analysis. The results showed that the drug loading and encapsulation efficiency were 8.0% and 24.2%, respectively. And curcumin was obviously slowly released because the cumulative release percentage of magnetic microspheres in the phosphate buffer (pH=7.4) solution was only 49.01% in 72 h, and the basic release of curcumin finished in 120 h. - Highlights: → We prepare magnetic polylactic acid microspheres loading curcumin. → The classical oil-in-water emulsion solvent-evaporation method is used. → The magnetic microspheres are regularly spherical with a diameter of 0.55-0.75 μm. → They show a certain sustained release effect on in vitro drug releasing.

  16. Investigate the capability of INAA absolute method to determine the concentrations of 238U and 232Th in rock samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alnour, I.A.

    2014-01-01

    This work aimed to study the capability of INAA absolute method in determining the elemental concentration of 238 U and 232 Th in the rock samples. The INAA absolute method was implemented in PUSPATI TRIGA Mark II research reactor, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NM). The accuracy of INAA absolute method was performed by analyzing the IAEA certified reference material (CRM) Soil-7. The analytical results showed the deviations between experimental and certified values were mostly less than 10 % with Z-score in most cases less than 1. In general, the results of analysed CRM Soil-7 show a good agreement between certified and experimental results which mean that the INAA absolute method can be used accurately for elemental analysis of uranium and thorium in various types of samples. The concentration of 238 U and 232 Th ranged from 1.77 to 24.25 and 0.88 to 95.50 ppm respectively. The highest value of 238 U and 232 Th was recorded for granite rock sample G17 of 238 U and sample G9 of 232 Th, whereas the lower value was 1.77 ppm of 238 U recorded in sandstone rock and 0.88 ppm of 232 Th for gabbro. Moreover, a comparison of the 238 U and 232 Th results obtained by the INAA absolute method shows an acceptable level of consistency with those obtained by the INAA relative method. (author)

  17. Theoretical investigation of electronic and magnetic properties of HoRh layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masrour, R.; Hlil, E.K.; Hamedoun, M.; Benyoussef, A.; Mounkachi, O.; Bahmad, L.; El Moussaoui, H.

    2013-01-01

    Self-consistent ab initio calculations, based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) approach and using Full potential Linear Augmented Plane Wave (FLAPW) method, are performed to investigate both electronic and magnetic properties of the HoRh layers. Polarized spin and spin–orbit coupling are included in calculations within the framework of the antiferromagnetic state between two sites of Ho. Magnetic moment considered to lie along (001) axes are computed. The data obtained from the ab initio calculations are then used as input for the high temperature series expansions (HTSEs) calculations to compute other magnetic parameters. The exchange integrals between the magnetic atoms in the same sites are given by using mean field theory. The HTSEs of the magnetic susceptibility of HoRh layers spin-S through the Ising model for HoRh layers, are studied to tenth order series in β=1/k B T. The critical exponent γ associated with the magnetic susceptibility is deduced for two models. - Highlights: • Ab initio calculations is using to investigate both electronic and magnetic properties of the HoRh layers. • Obtained data from ab initio calculations are used as input for the HTSEs. • The Néel temperature is obtained for HoRh layers

  18. Theoretical investigation of electronic and magnetic properties of HoRh layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masrour, R., E-mail: rachidmasrour@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Materials, Processes, Environment and Quality, Cady Ayyed University, National School of Applied Sciences, Sidi Bouzid, Safi (Morocco); LMPHE (URAC 12), Faculty of Science, Mohammed V-Agdal University, Rabat (Morocco); Hlil, E.K. [Institut Néel, CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Hamedoun, M. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Benyoussef, A. [LMPHE (URAC 12), Faculty of Science, Mohammed V-Agdal University, Rabat (Morocco); Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Hassan II Academy of Science and Technology, Rabat (Morocco); Mounkachi, O. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Bahmad, L. [LMPHE (URAC 12), Faculty of Science, Mohammed V-Agdal University, Rabat (Morocco); El Moussaoui, H. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco)

    2013-10-15

    Self-consistent ab initio calculations, based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) approach and using Full potential Linear Augmented Plane Wave (FLAPW) method, are performed to investigate both electronic and magnetic properties of the HoRh layers. Polarized spin and spin–orbit coupling are included in calculations within the framework of the antiferromagnetic state between two sites of Ho. Magnetic moment considered to lie along (001) axes are computed. The data obtained from the ab initio calculations are then used as input for the high temperature series expansions (HTSEs) calculations to compute other magnetic parameters. The exchange integrals between the magnetic atoms in the same sites are given by using mean field theory. The HTSEs of the magnetic susceptibility of HoRh layers spin-S through the Ising model for HoRh layers, are studied to tenth order series in β=1/k{sub B}T. The critical exponent γ associated with the magnetic susceptibility is deduced for two models. - Highlights: • Ab initio calculations is using to investigate both electronic and magnetic properties of the HoRh layers. • Obtained data from ab initio calculations are used as input for the HTSEs. • The Néel temperature is obtained for HoRh layers.

  19. Investigation of Vacuum Arc Voltage Characteristics Under Different Axial Magnetic Field Profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Shenli; Song Xiaochuan; Huo Xintao; Shi Zongqian; Wang Lijun

    2010-01-01

    Characteristics of the arc voltage under different profiles of axial magnetic field were investigated experimentally in a detachable vacuum chamber with five pairs of specially designed electrodes generating both bell-shaped and saddle-shaped magnetic field profile. The arc column and cathode spot images were photographed by a high speed digital camera. The dependence of the arc voltage on arcing evolution is analyzed. It is indicated that the axial magnetic field profile could affect the arc behaviors significantly, and the arc voltage is closely related to the arc light intensity.

  20. Investigation of magnetic nanoparticles in acrylonitrile-methyl methacrylate-divinylbenzene mesoporous template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabelo, D. E-mail: denilson@quimica.ufg.br; Lima, E.C.D.; Barbosa, D.P.; Silva, V.J.; Silva, O.; Azevedo, R.B.; Silva, L.P.; Lemos, A.P.C.; Morais, P.C

    2002-11-01

    Preparation and characterization of nanosized magnetic particles using alkaline oxidation of ferrous ion retained in acrylonitrile-methyl methacrylate-divinylbenzene (AN-MMA-DVB) spherical micron-sized polymer template is described. Atomic absorption, transmission electron microscopy and magnetic resonance were used to investigate chemically cycled nanoparticle-based composites. The resonance field shifts towards higher values as the nanoparticle concentration reduces in the polymeric template, following two very distinct regimes.

  1. Optical and magnetic resonance investigations of Zn1-x Mn x O magnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huawei; Shi Erwei; Chen Zhizhan; Liu Xuechao; Xiao Bing; Song Lixin

    2006-01-01

    Zn 1- x Mn x O crystallites were synthesized by hydrothermal method. X-ray diffraction, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra confirm the substitution of Zn site by Mn 2+ ion. The nonmonotonic variation of band gap exhibits that the short-ranged interactions between the d electrons of Mn and the s and p electrons of the host bands are dominated at lower Mn concentration (x). EPR spectra show that Mn 2+ is in exchange interaction at higher x. By using a Curie-Weiss equation on the EPR data, it is found that the dominant magnetic property is antiferromagnetic for higher x, and paramagnetic for lower x

  2. Rock Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  3. Enhanced methane flux event and sediment dispersal pattern in the Krishna–Godavari offshore basin: Evidences from rock magnetic techniques

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Usapkar, A.; Dewangan, P.; Kocherla, M.; Ramprasad, T.; Mazumdar, A.; Ramana, M.V.

    was higher in the past leading to upward shift of the SMTZ, and the HS- released by AOM facilitated the dissolution of magnetic iron oxide minerals at shallower depths. Alternatively, the HS- diffusing upward from the current depth...

  4. Optical dating and palaeoecological investigations of ancient mud-wasp nests: Progress and prospects in rock art chronometry and palaeoenvironmental reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.G.; Olley, J.M.; Walsh, G.L.; Murray, A.S.; Macphail, M.K.; Bowdery, D.E.; Jones, R.; Naumann, I.D.; Morwood, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: The spectacular rock art of northern Australia has long fascinated archaeologists but efforts to probe its probable great antiquity have been largely frustrated. Optical dating has been applied recently to ancient mud-wasp nests in the Kimberley region of Western Australia, the optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) being obtained from quartz grains extracted from the nest mud. These nests overlie and in some places underlie rock paintings, thereby providing a means of constraining the ages of specific art motifs, such as Wandjina and Bradshaw paintings. Also incorporated in the nest mud are pollen grains, spores and phytoliths from which a variety of palaeoecological information has been gleaned and which offer the possibility of direct AMS radiocarbon dating. A summary of the Holocene and late Pleistocene chronological and palaeoenvironmental records obtained so far will be presented, and avenues for future investigation will be discussed

  5. Numerical and experimental investigations of coupled electromagnetic and thermal fields in superconducting accelerator magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mierau, Anna

    2013-01-01

    and its individual components, which occur during acceleration cycles. The study and analysis of these physical characteristics of the superconducting magnets and the relation between thermal und magnetic fields are subject of this PhD thesis. The object of investigation was the first SIS100 full size fast ramped superconducting dipole magnet prototype. Due to the complex design of accelerator magnets numerical simulations as well as measurements on test models are commonly used methods to determine the characteristics of the electromagnetic and thermal fields of such magnets. In the frame of this work both methods have been used to study the properties of the static magnetic field in the aperture of the dipole magnet. The dynamic heat losses in the magnet and its vacuum chamber were measured using the calorimetrical method. The knowledge gained in this work has contributed to the development of superconducting dipole magnets which will satisfy the operational conditions of the SIS100 beam guiding magnets. Furthermore, the knowledge of the dynamic heat loads in individual dipole units is important for developing a reliable cooling system for the superconducting magnets in the accelerator ring and thus for the stable operation of the SIS100 heavy ion synchrotron.

  6. Lithology, microstructures, fluid inclusions, and geochemistry of rock salt and of the cap-rock contact in Oakwood Dome, East Texas: significance for nuclear waste storage. Report of investigations No. 120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dix, O.R.; Jackson, M.P.A.

    1982-01-01

    Oakwood salt dome in Leon and Freestone Counties, Texas, has a core composed of a diapiric salt stock at a depth of 355 m. A vertical borehole in the center of the salt stock yielded 57.3 m of continuous rock-salt core overlain by 137 m of anhydrite-calcite cap rock. The lower 55.3 m of rock salt exhibits a strong, penetrative schistosity and parallel cleavage dipping at 30 to 40 0 and more than 60 variably dipping layers of disseminated anhydrite. Anhydrite constitutes 1.3 +- 0.7 percent of the rock-salt core. The upper 2 m of rock salt is unfoliated, comprising a lower 1.4-m interval of medium-grained granoblastic rock salt and an upper 0.6-m interval of coarse-grained granoblastic rock salt. An abrupt, cavity-free contact separates rock salt from laminated cap rock consisting of granoblastic-polygonal anhydrite virtually devoid of halite or pore space. Microstructures and concentration gradients of fluid inclusions suggest that the unfoliated rock salt at the crest of the salt stock was once strongly foliated, but that this fabric was destroyed by solid-state recrystallization. Downward movement of brine from the rock-salt - cap-rock contact was apparently accompanied by two recrystallization fronts. Dissolution of halite at the contact released disseminated anhydrite that presumably accumulated as sand on the floor of the dissolution cavity. Renewed rise of the salt stock closed the cavity, and the anhydrite sand was accreted against the base of the cap rock. Much, if not all, of the lamination in the 80 m of anhydrite cap rock may result from cycles of dissolution, recrystallization, and upward movement in the salt stock, followed by accretion of anhydrite residuum as laminae against the base of the cap rock. These processes, which are strongly influenced by fluids, act both to breach waste repositories and to geologically isolate them

  7. Geology of the Wilkes land sub-basin and stability of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet: Insights from rock magnetism at IODP Site U1361

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauxe, L.; Sugisaki, S.; Jiménez-Espejo, F.; Escutia, C.; Cook, C. P.; van de Flierdt, T.; Iwai, M.

    2015-02-01

    IODP Expedition 318 drilled Site U1361 on the continental rise offshore of Adélie Land and the Wilkes subglacial basin. The objective was to reconstruct the stability of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) during Neogene warm periods, such as the late Miocene and the early Pliocene. The sedimentary record tells a complex story of compaction, and erosion (thus hiatuses). Teasing out the paleoenvironmental implications is essential for understanding the evolution of the EAIS. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) is sensitive to differential compaction and other rock magnetic parameters like isothermal remanence and anhysteretic remanence are very sensitive to changes in the terrestrial source region. In general, highly anisotropic layers correspond with laminated clay-rich units, while more isotropic layers are bioturbated and have less clay. Layers enriched in diatoms are associated with the latter, which also have higher Ba/Al ratios consistent with higher productivity. Higher anisotropy layers have lower porosity and moisture contents and have fine grained magnetic mineralogy dominated by maghemite, the more oxidized form of iron oxide, while the lower anisotropy layers have magnetic mineralogies dominated by magnetite. The different magnetic mineralogies support the suggestion based on isotopic signatures by Cook et al. (2013) of different source regions during low productivity (cooler) and high productivity (warmer) times. These two facies were tied to the coastal outcrops of the Lower Paleozoic granitic terranes and the Ferrar Large Igneous Province in the more inland Wilkes Subglacial Basin respectively. Here we present evidence for a third geological unit, one eroded at the boundaries between the high and low clay zone with a "hard" (mostly hematite) dominated magnetic mineralogy. This unit likely outcrops in the Wilkes subglacial basin and could be hydrothermally altered Beacon sandstone similar to that detected by Craw and Findlay (1984) in Taylor

  8. Theoretical investigation of magnetic properties in interfaces of magnetic nanoparticles and amorphous carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Shih-Jye, E-mail: sjs@nuk.edu.tw [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Hua-Shu [Department of Applied Physics, National Pingtung University, Pingtung 900, Taiwan (China); Ovchinnikov, Sergei [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Federal Research Center KSC SB RAS, Krasnoyarsk 660036 (Russian Federation); Chen, Guan-Long [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The interfaces of amorphous carbons will be graphited and antiferromagnetic. • The ferromagnetism on the Co interfaces is induced by the medium electrons. • The spin-wave excitation will change between the acoustic and optical modes. • The charge exchange in the interfaces changes the magnetism of the interfaces. - Abstract: Based on the experimental finding of the exchange bias in amorphous carbon samples with embedded Co nanoparticles and on the graphited character of the amorphous carbon interface confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations we have proposed the interface of graphited carbon to be antiferromagnetic. A theoretical model, which comprises the Kondo interactions in the interfaces of Co nanoparticles and the induced antiferromagnetic interactions in the graphited carbons, is employed to evaluate the ferromagnetism of the interfaces of Co nanoparticles. We have shown that the ferromagnetism of interfaces of Co nanoparticles will be enhanced by the increase of antiferromagnetic interaction as well as the increase of electron density in the graphited carbons. In particular, we found that the antiferromagnetic interactions in graphited carbons will change the spin-wave excitation in interfaces of Co nanoparticles from the quasiacoustic mode to the quasioptical one.

  9. An Experimental Investigation into Failure and Localization Phenomena in the Extension to Shear Fracture Transition in Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choens, R. C., II; Chester, F. M.; Bauer, S. J.; Flint, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid-pressure assisted fracturing can produce mesh and other large, interconnected and complex networks consisting of both extension and shear fractures in various metamorphic, magmatic and tectonic systems. Presently, rock failure criteria for tensile and low-mean compressive stress conditions is poorly defined, although there is accumulating evidence that the transition from extension to shear fracture with increasing mean stress is continuous. We report on the results of experiments designed to document failure criteria, fracture mode, and localization phenomena for several rock types (sandstone, limestone, chalk and marble). Experiments were conducted in triaxial extension using a necked (dogbone) geometry to achieve mixed tension and compression stress states with local component-strain measurements in the failure region. The failure envelope for all rock types is similar, but are poorly described using Griffith or modified Griffith (Coulomb or other) failure criteria. Notably, the mode of fracture changes systematically from pure extension to shear with increase in compressive mean stress and display a continuous change in fracture orientation with respect to principal stress axes. Differential stress and inelastic strain show a systematic increase with increasing mean stress, whereas the axial stress decreases before increasing with increasing mean stress. The stress and strain data are used to analyze elastic and plastic strains leading to failure and compare the experimental results to predictions for localization using constitutive models incorporating on bifurcation theory. Although models are able to describe the stability behavior and onset of localization qualitatively, the models are unable to predict fracture type or orientation. Constitutive models using single or multiple yield surfaces are unable to predict the experimental results, reflecting the difficulty in capturing the changing micromechanisms from extension to shear failure. Sandia

  10. Results of isotopic geochemical and mineralogical investigations of crystalline rocks of the Carpathian Massif in 1973-1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbak, N.P.; Bartnitskij, E.N.; Eliseeva, G.D.

    1979-01-01

    The most frequent accesory mineral in crystalline rocks in the Czechoslovak and Ukrainian Carpathians is zircon, the least frequent is monazite. The differences are described in the mineralogical properties of zircon of different origin. For dating volcanism, the content and the isotope composition was determined of U and Pb in zircon and of U, Pb and Th in monazite. The earliest volcanic processes occurred in the Eastern Carpathians approximately 600 to 640 million years ago, in the Western Carpathians approximately 400 million years ago. (Ha)

  11. Laser-induced spin protection and switching in a specially designed magnetic dot: A theoretical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G. P.; Si, M. S.; George, T. F.

    2011-04-01

    Most laser-induced femtosecond magnetism investigations are done in magnetic thin films. Nanostructured magnetic dots, with their reduced dimensionality, present new opportunities for spin manipulation. Here we predict that if a magnetic dot has a dipole-forbidden transition between the lowest occupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and the highest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO), but a dipole-allowed transition between LUMO+1 and HOMO, electromagnetically induced transparency can be used to prevent ultrafast laser-induced spin momentum reduction, or spin protection. This is realized through a strong dump pulse to funnel the population into LUMO+1. If the time delay between the pump and dump pulses is longer than 60 fs, a population inversion starts and spin switching is achieved. These predictions are detectable experimentally.

  12. Investigation of Thermal and Vacuum Transients on the LHC Prototype Magnet String

    CERN Document Server

    Cruikshank, P; Riddone, G; Tavian, L

    1996-01-01

    The prototype magnet string, described in a companion paper, is a full-scale working model of a 50-m length of the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN's new accelerator project, which will use high-field superconducting magnets operating below 2 K in superfluid helium. As such, it provides an excellent test bed for practising standard operating modes of LHC insulation vacuum and cryogenics, as well as for experimentally assessing accidental behaviour and failure modes, and thus verifying design calculations. We present experimental investigation of insulation vacuum pumpdown, magnet forced-flow cooldown and warmup, and evolution of residual vacuum pressures and temperatures in natural warmup, as well as catastrophic loss of insulation vacuum. In all these transient modes, experimental results are compared with simulated behaviour, using a non-linear, one-dimensional thermal model of the magnet string.

  13. Methods and results of the investigation of the thermomechanical behaviour of rock salt with regard to the final disposal of high-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieczorek, K.; Klarr, K.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the knowledge about thermal and mechanical behaviour of rock salt that has been accumulated by various R and D institutions in Germany from laboratory and in situ investigations. An important objective is to give a comprehensive overview of the investigation methods and instruments available and to discuss these methods and instruments with regard to their applicability and reliability for the investigation of the thermomechanical effects of high level radioactive waste emplacement in rock salt formations. The report is focused on the activities of the GSF-Institut fur Tieflagerung in the Asse mine regarding the disposal of high and intermediate level radioactive waste during the last decades. The design and the results of the most important in situ experiments are presented and discussed in detail. The results are compared to model calculations in order to evaluate the reliability of both the measurements and the calculation results. The relevance of the results for the situation in Spain is discussed in a separate chapter. As the investigations in Germany have been performed in domal salt, while the Spanish concept is based on waste disposal in bedded salt, significant differences in the thermomechanical behaviour cannot be excluded. The investigation methods, however, will be applicable. (Author)

  14. A coupled mechanical-hydrological investigation of crystalline rocks: Annual technical progress report, proposed test matrix, and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastian, R.J.; Voss, C.F.; Apted, M.J.; Shotwell, L.R.

    1988-02-01

    This report reviews the Fracture Flow Behavior in Rock Study being performed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The study's objective is to determine the feasibility of predicting mechanical-hydrological behavior of natural rock fractures by accurately characterizing fracture surface topography and mineralization. A laboratory-scale facility is currently being used to ensure optimum control of variables. Devising a technique to study small-scale samples is the first step to understanding the complex coupled processes encountered in geomechanics and hydrology. The major accomplishments during fiscal year 1987 were initial development of the innovative testing method, identification of appropriate specimens, substantial renovation to the facility, completion of several sets of experiments, and procurement of hardware components for a laser-imaging device used to characterize fracture surfaces. A complete set of preliminary results and findings is presented in this report. These results, gathered from a basalt core with a natural fracture, have demonstrated that the methodology is valid, and definite trends in the data are readily apparent. 10 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  15. Investigation of Macroscopic Brittle Creep Failure Caused by Microcrack Growth Under Step Loading and Unloading in Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaozhao; Shao, Zhushan

    2016-07-01

    The growth of subcritical cracks plays an important role in the creep of brittle rock. The stress path has a great influence on creep properties. A micromechanics-based model is presented to study the effect of the stress path on creep properties. The microcrack model of Ashby and Sammis, Charles' Law, and a new micro-macro relation are employed in our model. This new micro-macro relation is proposed by using the correlation between the micromechanical and macroscopic definition of damage. A stress path function is also introduced by the relationship between stress and time. Theoretical expressions of the stress-strain relationship and creep behavior are derived. The effects of confining pressure on the stress-strain relationship are studied. Crack initiation stress and peak stress are achieved under different confining pressures. The applied constant stress that could cause creep behavior is predicted. Creep properties are studied under the step loading of axial stress or the unloading of confining pressure. Rationality of the micromechanics-based model is verified by the experimental results of Jinping marble. Furthermore, the effects of model parameters and the unloading rate of confining pressure on creep behavior are analyzed. The coupling effect of step axial stress and confining pressure on creep failure is also discussed. The results provide implications on the deformation behavior and time-delayed rockburst mechanism caused by microcrack growth on surrounding rocks during deep underground excavations.

  16. Investigation of heat distribution during magnetic heating treatment using a polyurethane–ferrofluid phantom-model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrich, F.; Rahn, H.; Odenbach, S.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic heating treatment can be used as an adjuvant treatment for cancer therapy. In this therapy, magnetic nanoparticles are enriched inside the tumour and exposed to an alternating magnetic field. Due to magnetic losses the temperature in the tumour rises. The resulting temperature profile inside the tumour is useful for the therapeutic success. In this context heat transfer between tissue with nanoparticles and tissue without nanoparticles is a highly important feature which is actually not understood in detail. In order to investigate this, a phantom has been created which can be used to measure the temperature profile around a region enriched with magnetic nanoparticles. This phantom is composed of a material, which has similar thermal conductivity as human tissue. A tempered water bath surrounds the phantom to establish a constant surrounding temperature simulating the heat sink provided by the human body in a real therapeutic application. It has been found that even at a low concentration of magnetic nanoparticles around 13 mg/ml, sufficient heating of the enriched region can be achieved. Moreover it has been observed that the temperature drops rapidly in the material surrounding the enriched region. Corresponding numerical investigations provide a basis for future recalculations of the temperature inside the tumour using temperature data obtained in the surrounding tissue. - Highlights: • The temperature profile by magnetic hyperthermia was examined. • A model was built to get a deeper understanding of the temperature profile. • The temperature profile of the model inside magnetic fields was measured. • Based on the model a simulation of the temperature profile was performed. • The simulated temperature profile agreed well with the measured profile

  17. Investigation of Coupled Processes and Impact of High Temperature Limits in Argillite Rock: FY17 Progress. Predecisional Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Xu, Hao; Kim, Kunwhi; Voltolini, Marco; Cao, Xiaoyuan

    2017-07-03

    The focus of research within the Spent Fuel and Waste Science and Technology (SFWST) (formerly called Used Fuel Disposal) Campaign is on repository-induced interactions that may affect the key safety characteristics of EBS bentonite and an argillaceous rock. These include thermal-hydrologicalmechanical- chemical (THMC) process interactions that occur as a result of repository construction and waste emplacement. Some of the key questions addressed in this report include the development of fracturing in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) and THMC effects on the near-field argillaceous rock and buffer materials and petrophysical characteristics, particularly the impacts of temperature rise caused by waste heat. This report documents the following research activities. Section 2 presents THM model developments and validation, including modeling of underground heater experiments at Mont Terri and Bure underground research laboratories (URLs). The heater experiments modeled are the Mont Terri FE (Full-scale Emplacement) Experiment, conducted as part of the Mont Terri Project, and the TED in heater test conducted in Callovo-Oxfordian claystone (COx) at the Meuse/Haute-Marne (MHM) underground research laboratory in France. The modeling of the TED heater test is one of the Tasks of the DEvelopment of COupled Models and their VAlidation against EXperiments (DECOVALEX)-2019 project. Section 3 presents the development and application of thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) modeling to evaluate EBS bentonite and argillite rock responses under different temperatures (100 °C and 200 °C). Model results are presented to help to understand the impact of high temperatures on the properties and behavior of bentonite and argillite rock. Eventually the process model will support a robust GDSA model for repository performance assessments. Section 4 presents coupled THMC modeling for an in situ test conducted at Grimsel underground laboratory in Switzerland in the Full

  18. Investigation on the Influence of Abutment Pressure on the Stability of Rock Bolt Reinforced Roof Strata Through Physical and Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongpu; Li, Jianzhong; Yang, Jinghe; Gao, Fuqiang

    2017-02-01

    In underground coal mining, high abutment loads caused by the extraction of coal can be a major contributor to many rock mechanic issues. In this paper, a large-scale physical modeling of a 2.6 × 2.0 × 1.0 m entry roof has been conducted to investigate the fundamentals of the fracture mechanics of entry roof strata subjected to high abutment loads. Two different types of roof, massive roof and laminated roof, are considered. Rock bolt system has been taken into consideration. A distinct element analyses based on the physical modeling conditions have been performed, and the results are compared with the physical results. The physical and numerical models suggest that under the condition of high abutment loads, the massive roof and the laminated roof fail in a similar pattern which is characterized as vertical tensile fracturing in the middle of the roof and inclined shear fracturing initiated at the roof and rib intersections and propagated deeper into the roof. Both the massive roof and the laminated roof collapse in a shear sliding mode shortly after shear fractures are observed from the roof surface. It is found that shear sliding is a combination of tensile cracking of intact rock and sliding on bedding planes and cross joints. Shear sliding occurs when the abutment load is much less than the compressive strength of roof.

  19. Investigation into the magnetic properties of pyrochlore-type rare-earth hafnates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Jung Hwan; Kremer, Reinhard K.; Lin, Chengtian [MPI for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Cubic rare-earths transition metal pyrochlores with composition R{sub 2}TM{sub 2}O{sub 7} have attracted broad attention because of their unusual magnetic ground state properties related to geometrical frustration of the pyrochlores lattice. So far, the investigation focused mainly on 3d and 4d transition metal systems. The magnetic properties of rare-earths 5d TM pyrochlores are comparatively less well studied. Here we report on the single-crystal growth and the magnetic properties of some rare-earth hafnates (R =Nd, Gd, Dy; TM = Hf) of composition R{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Gd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} crystallize with the cubic pyrochlores structure whereas diverging reports on the structure of Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} are available in literature. Crystals of R{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} have been grown and their structural and magnetic properties have been investigated. Our investigations confirm Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Gd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} to crystallize in the cubic pyrochlores structure. Antiferromagnetic ordering below ∝0.5 K has been observed by magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity measurements for both compounds.

  20. Ab initio investigations of magnetic properties of ultrathin transition-metal films on 4d substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Zubi, Ali

    2010-12-22

    In this thesis, we investigate the magnetic properties of 3d transition-metal monolayers on 4d transition-metal substrates by means of state of the art first-principles quantum theory. In order to reveal the underlying physics of these systems we study trends by performing systematic investigations across the transition-metal series. Case studies are presented for which Rh has been chosen as exemplary 4d substrate. We consider two substrate orientations, a square lattice provided by Rh(001) and a hexagonal lattice provided by Rh(111). We find, all 3d transition-metal (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni) monolayers deposited on the Rh substrate are magnetic and exhibit large local moments which follow Hund's rule with a maximum magnetic moment for Mn of about 3.7 {mu}{sub B} depending on the substrate orientation. The largest induced magnetic moment of about 0.46 {mu}{sub B} is found for Rh atoms adjacent to the Co(001)-film. On Rh(001) we predict a ferromagnetic (FM) ground state for V, Co and Ni, while Cr, Mn and Fe monolayers favor a c(2 x 2) antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, a checkerboard arrangement of up and down magnetic moments. The magnetic anisotropy energies of these ultrathin magnetic films are calculated for the FM and the AFM states. With the exception of V and Cr, the easy axis of the magnetization is predicted to be in the film plane. With the exception of Fe, analogous results are obtained for the 3d-metal monolayers on Rh(111). For Fe on Rh(111) a novel magnetic ground state is predicted, a double-row-wise antiferromagnetic state along the [11 anti 2] direction, a sequence of ferromagnetic double-rows of atoms, whose magnetic moments couple antiferromagnetically from double row to double row. The magnetic structure can be understood as superposition of a left- and right-rotating flat spin spiral. In a second set of case studies the properties of an Fe monolayer deposited on varies hexagonally terminated hcp (0001) and fcc (111) surfaces of 4d

  1. Ab initio investigations of magnetic properties of ultrathin transition-metal films on 4d substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Zubi, Ali

    2010-12-22

    In this thesis, we investigate the magnetic properties of 3d transition-metal monolayers on 4d transition-metal substrates by means of state of the art first-principles quantum theory. In order to reveal the underlying physics of these systems we study trends by performing systematic investigations across the transition-metal series. Case studies are presented for which Rh has been chosen as exemplary 4d substrate. We consider two substrate orientations, a square lattice provided by Rh(001) and a hexagonal lattice provided by Rh(111). We find, all 3d transition-metal (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni) monolayers deposited on the Rh substrate are magnetic and exhibit large local moments which follow Hund's rule with a maximum magnetic moment for Mn of about 3.7 {mu}{sub B} depending on the substrate orientation. The largest induced magnetic moment of about 0.46 {mu}{sub B} is found for Rh atoms adjacent to the Co(001)-film. On Rh(001) we predict a ferromagnetic (FM) ground state for V, Co and Ni, while Cr, Mn and Fe monolayers favor a c(2 x 2) antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, a checkerboard arrangement of up and down magnetic moments. The magnetic anisotropy energies of these ultrathin magnetic films are calculated for the FM and the AFM states. With the exception of V and Cr, the easy axis of the magnetization is predicted to be in the film plane. With the exception of Fe, analogous results are obtained for the 3d-metal monolayers on Rh(111). For Fe on Rh(111) a novel magnetic ground state is predicted, a double-row-wise antiferromagnetic state along the [11 anti 2] direction, a sequence of ferromagnetic double-rows of atoms, whose magnetic moments couple antiferromagnetically from double row to double row. The magnetic structure can be understood as superposition of a left- and right-rotating flat spin spiral. In a second set of case studies the properties of an Fe monolayer deposited on varies hexagonally terminated hcp (0001) and fcc (111) surfaces of 4d-transition metals

  2. Ab initio investigations of magnetic properties of ultrathin transition-metal films on 4d substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Zubi, Ali

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate the magnetic properties of 3d transition-metal monolayers on 4d transition-metal substrates by means of state of the art first-principles quantum theory. In order to reveal the underlying physics of these systems we study trends by performing systematic investigations across the transition-metal series. Case studies are presented for which Rh has been chosen as exemplary 4d substrate. We consider two substrate orientations, a square lattice provided by Rh(001) and a hexagonal lattice provided by Rh(111). We find, all 3d transition-metal (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni) monolayers deposited on the Rh substrate are magnetic and exhibit large local moments which follow Hund's rule with a maximum magnetic moment for Mn of about 3.7 μ B depending on the substrate orientation. The largest induced magnetic moment of about 0.46 μ B is found for Rh atoms adjacent to the Co(001)-film. On Rh(001) we predict a ferromagnetic (FM) ground state for V, Co and Ni, while Cr, Mn and Fe monolayers favor a c(2 x 2) antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, a checkerboard arrangement of up and down magnetic moments. The magnetic anisotropy energies of these ultrathin magnetic films are calculated for the FM and the AFM states. With the exception of V and Cr, the easy axis of the magnetization is predicted to be in the film plane. With the exception of Fe, analogous results are obtained for the 3d-metal monolayers on Rh(111). For Fe on Rh(111) a novel magnetic ground state is predicted, a double-row-wise antiferromagnetic state along the [11 anti 2] direction, a sequence of ferromagnetic double-rows of atoms, whose magnetic moments couple antiferromagnetically from double row to double row. The magnetic structure can be understood as superposition of a left- and right-rotating flat spin spiral. In a second set of case studies the properties of an Fe monolayer deposited on varies hexagonally terminated hcp (0001) and fcc (111) surfaces of 4d-transition metals (Tc, Ru, Rh

  3. Magnetic effects on the solvent properties investigated by molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moosavi, Fatemeh, E-mail: moosavibaigi@um.ac.ir; Gholizadeh, Mostafa

    2014-03-15

    This paper investigates how an external constant magnetic field in the Z-direction affects the performance of a solvent. The molecular dynamics simulation comprised common inorganic and organic solvents including water, acetone, acetonitrile, toluene, and n-hexane at the ambient temperature and pressure. A static magnetic field applied in the simulation process is able to reduce the solvent mobility in the solution in order to enhance the solvent–solute reaction. Simulation results show that the diffusivity decreases because of increasing the effective interactions. Besides, magnetic field reduces the volume of the solvent and increases the strength of the hydrogen bonds by maximizing attractive electrostatic and vdW interactions caused by changes in the radial distribution function of the solvents. Hydrogen-bonding characteristics of solvents investigated by molecular dynamics simulations were evidence for the hydrogen bonding strength of O···H that is a more efficient intermolecular hydrogen-bonding in comparison with N···H. - Highlights: • Molecular dynamics simulation technique investigates the effect of magnetic field on transport dynamics inside the solvent bulk. • External constant magnetic field influences on intermolecular interactions, thermophysics, and transport properties of the solvents. • Applying magnetic field strengthened hydrogen bond maximizes attractive electrostatic interactions, charge distribution becomes stronger, and the molecule mobility is demoted. • The low diffusivity of the solvents in the solutions increases the performance of the interactions and promotes the interactions. • On introducing a magnetic field of flux density parallel to the Z-direction, solvent acts as an obstacle to diffusion of solutes.

  4. A preliminary combined geochemical and rock-magnetic study of tailings of non-magnetic ores from Tlalpujahua-El Oro mining districts, Michoacán and Estado de México States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, J.; Hernández-Bernal, M.; Corona-Chávez, P.

    2013-05-01

    Mining activities in Mexico have been continuously developed since 1550. Since then several thousands of million tons of waste produced as a result of the mining activity have been accumulated and scattered throughout the territory. These wastes can contain minerals with potentially toxic elements (PTEs) such as Cr, As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn, which show a distribution and mobility in the environment according to the chemical species in which are hosted. The Tlalpujahua - El Oro mining district (TOMD) concentrates an impressive number of mines and historical tailings. Due to their in-slope hydrographic position, the mining activities increase the risk of generating anthropogenic effluent that could contribute with a certain amount of mine-water with high contents of PTEs. Although magnetic methods have been widely applied to pollution studies of regions with high anthropogenic impact, its application to tailings is scarce in spite of the several studies that document the environmental effects as a result of the mining waste. We present the results obtained by combined geochemical and rock-magnetic studies in these tailings. Similarly to the traditional EPTs vs SiO2 diagrams, EPTs vs Fe show good linear (inverse) correlation with most of these health-risk elements. Fe concentrations determined magnetically from room-temperature susceptibility measurements agrees with those obtained by traditionally geochemical methods.

  5. Site investigations, design, construction, operation, shutdown and surveillance of repositories for low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in rock cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The report provides an overview and technical guidelines for considerations and for activities to be undertaken for safety assessment, site investigations, design, construction, operation, shutdown and surveillance of repositories for the disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in rock cavities. A generalized sequence of investigations is introduced which proceeds through region and site selection to the stage where the site is confirmed by detailed geoscientific investigations as being suitable for a waste repository. The different procedures and somewhat specific investigative needs with respect to existing mines are dealt with separately. General design, as well as specific requirements with respect to the different stages of design and construction, are dealt with. A review of activities related to the operational and post-operational stages of repositories in rock cavities is presented. The report describes in general terms the procedures related to different stages of disposal operation; also the conditions for shutdown together with essential shutdown and sealing activities and the related safety assessment requirements. Guidance is also given on the surveillance programme which will allow for inspection, testing, maintenance and security of a disposal facility during the operational phase, as well as for the post-operational stage for periods determined as necessary by the national authorities

  6. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the magnetization dynamics of an artificial square spin ice cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohlit, Merlin, E-mail: pohlit@physik.uni-frankfurt.de; Porrati, Fabrizio; Huth, Michael; Müller, Jens [Institute of Physics, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Stockem, Irina; Schröder, Christian [Bielefeld Institute for Applied Materials Research, FH Bielefeld-University of Applied Sciences, Bielefeld (Germany)

    2016-10-14

    We study the magnetization dynamics of a spin ice cluster which is a building block of an artificial square spin ice fabricated by focused electron-beam-induced deposition both experimentally and theoretically. The spin ice cluster is composed of twelve interacting Co nanoislands grown directly on top of a high-resolution micro-Hall sensor. By employing micromagnetic simulations and a macrospin model, we calculate the magnetization and the experimentally investigated stray field emanating from a single nanoisland. The parameters determined from a comparison with the experimental hysteresis loop are used to derive an effective single-dipole macrospin model that allows us to investigate the dynamics of the spin ice cluster. Our model reproduces the experimentally observed non-deterministic sequences in the magnetization curves as well as the distinct temperature dependence of the hysteresis loop.

  7. A new state-of-the-art tool to investigate rock friction under extreme slip velocities and accelerations: SHIVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeijer, André; di Toro, Giulio; Nielsen, Stefan; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Romeo, Gianni; di Stefano, Giuseppe; Smith, Steven; di Felice, Fabio; Mariano, Sofia

    2010-05-01

    Despite considerable effort over the past several decades, the mechanics of earthquakes rupture remain largely unknown. In order to complement fault drilling projects and field and seismological observations, recent friction experiments strive to reproduce as closely as possible in-situ (natural) conditions of slip velocity and acceleration on intact and fault rocks. In this contribution, we present a novel state-of-the-art experimental rotary shear apparatus (SHIVA or Slow to HIgh Velocity Apparatus) capable of shearing samples at sliding velocities up to 10 m/s, accelerations of ~ 40 m/s2 and normal stresses up to 50 MPa. In comparison with existing high speed friction machines, this apparatus extends the range of sliding velocities, normal stresses, sample size and, more importantly, accelerations. The apparatus consists of a pair of brushless electric motors (a low velocity motor, 10-6-10-3 m/s, power 5 kW, and a high velocity motor, 10-3 - 10 m/s, power 270 kW), that are connected by a gear system that allows a switch between motors without loss of velocity and force. The motors drive a rotary shaft which clamps ring-shaped samples (diameter 40- 50 mm). On the other side of the rotary shaft, a stationary shaft holds the other half of the sample assembly. The shaft is held stationary by a pair of stainless steel arms, one of which is attached to the side of the concrete-filled base where torque is measured by a tension cell. Axial force (maximum 37 kN) is applied on this side by a piston-cylinder couple with an arm to increase the force. The entire machine measures by 3.5 by 1.2 meters and weighs 3700 kg. We aim to perform experiments on rock samples of a variety of compositions using slip velocities and accelerations that simulate slip velocity functions that occur during earthquakes. In addition, we plan to develop a pore fluid system and a pressure vessel in order to perform experiments that include the physical-chemical processes that occur during slow

  8. Structural and magnetic investigation of dilute magnetic semiconductors based on GaN and ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kammermeier, Tom

    2010-01-19

    The two wide band gap dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS) Gd:GaN and Co:ZnO are among the most favored materials for spintronic applications. Despite intense research efforts during the last years, the origin of the magnetic order is still under debate. This work reports structural and magnetic investigations on these DMS materials employing several complementary techniques. The X-ray linear dichroism (XLD) has been used to gain element-specific insight into the local structure of dopants and cations. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to probe the global structural properties. Magnetic characterization by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been complemented by electron spin resonance (ESR) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). Gd:GaN samples were fabricated by focused-ion-beam (FIB) implantation and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Room temperature ferromagnetic-like behavior as found for some of our samples by SQUID could not be reliably reproduced. Instead XMCD measurements at the Gd L{sub 3}-edge reveal paramagnetic behavior of the dopant. Additionally a possible magnetic polarization of Ga atoms of the host crystal is shown to be too small to explain the total magnetization of these samples. In some samples the formation of Gd and GdN clusters was evidenced by ESR measurements but it can only account for low temperature ferromagnetic-like behavior. Intrinsic room temperature ferromagnetism of this material as seen by SQUID cannot be confirmed by any other technique - neither ESR nor XMCD. Co:ZnO samples used for this work were predominantly grown by reactive magnetron sputtering (RMS). As shown by XLD analysis, 95% of the Co atoms are incorporated on substitutional Zn-sites in samples of best structural quality. These samples consistently show paramagnetic behavior as found by SQUID, XMCD and ESR. RMS growth of Co:ZnO with reduced oxygen partial pressure yields a magnetic behavior known from ferromagnetic nanoclusters. The X

  9. Magnetic hydroxyapatite coatings as a new tool in medicine: A scanning probe investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambardella, A., E-mail: a.gambardella@biomec.ior.it [Laboratorio di NanoBiotecnologie (NaBi), Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano 1/10, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Bianchi, M. [Laboratorio di NanoBiotecnologie (NaBi), Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano 1/10, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Kaciulis, S.; Mezzi, A.; Brucale, M. [Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Salaria km 29.300, P.O. Box 10, 00015 Monterotondo Staz, Roma (Italy); Cavallini, M. [Magnetic Nanostructures for Spintronics and Nanomedicine, CNR-ISMN, Via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Chanda, G.; Uhlarz, M. [Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory (HLD-EMFL), Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Cellini, A.; Pedna, M.F. [Unità Operativa Microbiologia Laboratorio Unico del Centro Servizi AUSL della Romagna, Pievesestina, Cesena (Italy); Sambri, V. [Unità Operativa Microbiologia Laboratorio Unico del Centro Servizi AUSL della Romagna, Pievesestina, Cesena (Italy); Dipartimento di Medicina Specialistica, Diagnostica e Sperimentale (DIMES), Università degli Studi di Bologna, Via Zamboni 33, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Marcacci, M.; Russo, A. [Laboratorio di NanoBiotecnologie (NaBi), Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano 1/10, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Laboratorio di Biomeccanica ed Innovazione Tecnologica, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Via di Barbiano1/10, I-40136 Bologna (Italy)

    2016-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite films enriched with magnetite have been fabricated via a Pulsed Plasma Deposition (PPD) system with the final aim of representing a new platform able to disincentivate bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. The chemical composition and magnetic properties of films were respectively examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) measurements. The morphology and conductive properties of the magnetic films were investigated via a combination of scanning probe technologies including atomic force microscopy (AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Interestingly, the range of adopted techniques allowed determining the preservation of the chemical composition and magnetic properties of the deposition target material while STM analysis provided new insights on the presence of surface inhomogeneities, revealing the presence of magnetite-rich islands over length scales compatible with the applications. Finally, preliminary results of bacterial adhesion tests, indicated a higher ability of magnetic hydroxyapatite films to reduce Escherichia coli adhesion at 4 h from seeding compared to control hydroxyapatite films. - Highlights: • Pulsed Plasma Deposition technique is used to deposit magnetite-rich films of hydroxyapatite for antibacterial purposes. • The preservation of the chemical composition and magnetic properties of the deposition target material is demonstrated. • Scanning tunnelling microscopy is employed for the first time to reveal the presence of magnetite-rich states at the surface. • Preliminary tests suggest that Mag HA films hamper the adhesion of Escherichia coli compared to not magnetic films.

  10. Investigation of collisional effects within the bending magnet region of a DIII-D neutral beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, D.N.; Hong, R.; Kellman, D.H.

    1993-10-01

    The region between the pole faces of the DIII-D neutral beamline residual ion bending magnets is an area of transient high gas pressure which may cause beam defocusing and increased heating of beamline internal components due to collisional effects. An investigation of these effects helps in understanding residual ion trajectories and in providing information for studying in the beamline capability for operation with increased pulse duration. Examination of collisional effects, and of the possible existence of space charge blow-up, was carried out by injecting deuterium gas into the region between the magnet pole faces with rates varying from 0 to 18 torr-ell/sec. Thermocouple and waterflow calorimetry data were taken to measure the beamline component heating and beam powder deposition on the magnet pole shields, magnet louvers, ion dump, beam collimators, and calorimeter. Data was also taken at gas flow rates varying from 0 to 25 torr-ell/sec into the neutralizer cell and is compared with the magnet region gas injection data obtained. Results show that both collisional effects and space charge blow-up play a role in magnet region component heating and that neutralizer gas flow sufficiently reduces component heating without incurring unacceptable power losses through collisional effects

  11. Investigating Non-Equilibrium Fluctuations of Nanocolloids in a Magnetic Field Using Direct Imaging Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Ashley; Oprisan, Ana; Oprisan, Sorinel; Rice-Oprisan College of Charleston Team

    Nanoparticles of iron oxide have a high surface area and can be controlled by an external magnetic field. Since they have a fast response to the applied magnetic field, these systems have been used for numerous in vivo applications, such as MRI contrast enhancement, tissue repair, immunoassay, detoxification of biological fluids, hyperthermia, drug delivery, and cell separation. We performed three direct imaging experiments in order to investigate the concentration-driven fluctuations using magnetic nanoparticles in the absence and in the presence of magnetic field. Our direct imaging experimental setup involved a glass cell filled with magnetic nanocolloidal suspension and water with the concentration gradient oriented against the gravitational field and a superluminescent diode (SLD) as the light source. Nonequilibrium concentration-driven fluctuations were recorded using a direct imaging technique. We used a dynamic structure factor algorithm for image processing in order to compute the structure factor and to find the power law exponents. We saw evidence of large concentration fluctuations and permanent magnetism. Further research will use the correlation time to approximate the diffusion coefficient for the free diffusion experiment. Funded by College of Charleston Department of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities SURF grant.

  12. Summary of United States Geological Survey investigations of fluid-rock-waste reactions in evaporite environments under repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, D.B.; Jones, B.F.; Roedder, E.; Potter, R.W. II

    1980-01-01

    The interstitial and inclusion fluids contained in rock salt and anhydrite, though present in amounts less than 1 weight per cent, are chemically aggressive and may react with canisters or wastes. The three basic types of fluids are: (1) bitterns residual from saline mineral precipitation including later recrystallization reactions; (2) brines containing residual solutes from the formation of evaporite that have been extensively modified by reactions with contiguous carbonate of clastic rocks; and (3) re-solution brines resulting from secondary dehydration of evaporite minerals or solution of saline minerals by undersaturated infiltrating waters. Fluid composition can indicate that meteoric flow systems have contacted evaporites or that fluids from evaporites have migrated into other formations. The movement of fluids trapped in fluid inclusions in salt from southeast New Mexico is most sensitive to ambient temperature and to inclusion size, although several other factors such as thermal gradient and vapour/liquid ratio are also important. There is no evidence of a threshold temperature for movement of inclusions. Empirical data are given for determining the amount of brine reaching the heat source if the temperature, approximate amount of total dissolved solids, and Ca:Mg ratio in the brine are known. SrCl 2 and CsCl can reach high concentrations in saturated NaCl solutions and greatly depress the liquidus. The possibility that such fluids, if generated, could migrate from a high-level waste repository must be minimized because the fluid would contain its own radiogenic energy source in the first decades after repository closure, thus changing the thermal evolution of the repository from designed values. (author)

  13. Expected performance properties of the ASDEX upgrade toroidal field magnet derived from calculations and materials investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streibl, B.; Mukherjee, S.

    1989-11-01

    This is a summary of the TF-magnet calculation results for the 1984 phase-II proposal including supplements (also considering disturbances) of the performance of ASDEX Upgrade. Calculation results are as reliable as the assumptions incorporated, so that investigations of materials and design components were always used to complete the calculations. (orig.) [de

  14. Investigation of local fields in different barium ferrite sublattices by means of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utrecht, R.; Hankiewicz, J.

    1995-01-01

    The local fields on 57 Fe nuclei in ferrite (BaFe 12 O 19 ) polycrystals have been investigated by means of spin echo amplitudes measurements at 4.2 and 77 K. The magnetic moment orientation and local field intensity have been determined for five different ferrite sublattices

  15. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Heat Flow in Permanent Magnet Brushless DC Hub Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasil, Muhammed; Plesner, Daniel; Walther, Jens Honore

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the heat dissipation in the hub motor of an electric two-wheeler using lumped parameter (LP), finite element (FE) and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models. The motor uses external rotor permanent magnet brushless DC topology and nearly all of its losses are generated...

  16. Analytical Investigation on the Power Factor of a Flux-Modulated Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Jinglin

    2015-01-01

    Flux-modulated permanent-magnet synchronous machine (FM-PMSM) is characterized as a high-torque direct-drive electrical machine, but may suffer from the low power factor. This paper aims to investigate the issue of the low power factor in theory and explore the possibilities for improvement...

  17. Framework of collaboration investigation on neutron effect on superconducting magnet materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Arata; Takeuchi, Takao; Nishijima, Shigehiro; Izumi, Yoshinobu; Takakura, Kosuke; Ochiai, Kentaro; Henmi, Tsutomu; Nishijima, Gen; Watanabe, Kazuo; Sato, Isamu; Kurisita, Hiroaki; Narui, Minoru; Shikama, Tatsuo

    2009-01-01

    A fusion reactor will generate D-T neutron and the kinetic energy of the neutron will be converted to the thermal energy and electrical energy. The neutron has huge energy and will be able to penetrate a shielding blanket and stream out of ports for neutral beam injections. The penetrated and streamed out neutrons will reach superconducting magnets and make some damages on the magnet system. To investigate the neutron irradiation effects on the superconducting magnet materials, a collaborative network must be organized and the irradiation researches must be performed. This report will describe the framework of the collaboration investigation which has been established among neutronics, superconducting magnet and fusion system. After showing the collaboration scheme, some new results on 14 MeV neutron irradiation effect are presented. Then, a three years new project which was adopted as one of 'Nuclear basic infrastructure strategy study initiatives' by MEXT will be introduced as an example of collaborative program among superconducting materials, fission reactor and high magnetic field technology. (author)

  18. Critical issues in soft rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Milton Assis Kanji

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses several efforts made to study and investigate soft rocks, as well as their physico-mechanical characteristics recognized up to now, the problems in their sampling and testing, and the possibility of its reproduction through artificially made soft rocks. The problems in utilizing current and widespread classification systems to some types of weak rocks are also discussed, as well as other problems related to them. Some examples of engineering works in soft rock or in soft ...

  19. Rock engineering in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    Contains a large collection of short articles concerned with tunnels and underground caverns and their construction and use. The articles are grouped under the following headings: use of the subsurface space; water supply; waste water services; energy management (includes articles on power stations, district heating and oil storage and an article on coal storage); multipurpose tunnels; waste disposal; transport; shelters; sporting and recreational amenities located in rock caverns; storage facilities; industrial, laboratory, and service facilities; rock foundations; tourism and culture; utilization of rock masses; research on the disposal of nuclear waste; training and research in the field of rock engineering; site investigation techniques; design of structures in rock; construction; the environment and occupational safety; modern equipment technology; underground space in Helsinki.

  20. Investigation of intrinsic defect magnetic properties in wurtzite ZnO materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, A. S.; Visotin, M. A.; Kholtobina, A. S.; Kuzubov, A. A.; Mikhaleva, N. S.; Hsu, Hua Shu

    2017-10-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of the ferromagnetism induced by intrinsic defects inside wurtzite zinc oxide structures are performed using magnetic field-dependent circular dichroism (MCD-H), direct magnetization measurement (M-H) by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) as well as by generalized gradient density functional theory (GGA-DFT). To investigate localized magnetic moments of bulk material intrinsic defects - vacancies, interstitial atoms and Frenkel defects, various-size periodic supercells are calculated. It is shown that oxygen interstitial atoms (Oi) or zinc vacancies (Znv) generate magnetic moments of 1,98 и 1,26 μB respectively, however, the magnitudes are significantly reduced when the distance between defects increases. At the same time, the magnetic moments of oxygen Frenkel defects are large ( 1.5-1.8 μB) and do not depend on the distance between the defects. It is shown that the origin of the induced ferromagnetism in bulk ZnO is the extra spin density on the oxygen atoms nearest to the defect. Also dependence of the magnetization of ZnO (10 1 ̅ 0) and (0001) thin films on the positions of Oi and Znv in subsurface layers were investigated and it is shown that the magnetic moments of both defects are significantly different from the values inside bulk material. In order to check theoretical results regarding the defect induced ferromagnetism in ZnO, two thin films doped by carbon (C) and having Zn interstitials and oxygen vacancies were prepared and annealed in vacuum and air, respectively. According to the MCD-H and M-H measurements, the film, which was annealed in air, exhibits a ferromagnetic behavior, while the other does not. One can assume annealing of ZnO in vacuum should create oxygen vacancies or Zn interstitial atoms. At that annealing of the second C:ZnO film in air leads to essential magnetization, probably by annihilation of oxygen vacancies, formation of interstitial oxygen atoms or zinc vacancies

  1. Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and Polychlorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-05

    Goecke, L. Narayanan, and B. M. Jarnot. "Effects of Perfluoro-n- octanoic Acid , Perfluoro-n-decanoic Acid , and Clofibrate on Hepatic Phosphorus L...Carboxylic Acids and 4Polychiorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance G-AFOSR-90-0148 Investigation in Vivo ,IIC 6. AUTHOR(S a Nicholas V. Reo...Maxim um 200 words) This report outlines our research progress regarding toxicological investigations of perifluoro- n-octanoic acid (PFOA) and

  2. Rock magnetic and geochemical evidence for authigenic magnetite formation via iron reduction in coal-bearing sediments offshore Shimokita Peninsula, Japan (IODP Site C0020)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Stephen C.; Johnson, Joel E.; Clyde, William C.; Setera, Jacob B.; Maxbauer, Daniel P.; Severmann, Silke; Riedinger, Natascha

    2017-06-01

    Sediments recovered at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site C0020, in a fore-arc basin offshore Shimokita Peninsula, Japan, include numerous coal beds (0.3-7 m thick) that are associated with a transition from a terrestrial to marine depositional environment. Within the primary coal-bearing unit (˜2 km depth below seafloor) there are sharp increases in magnetic susceptibility in close proximity to the coal beds, superimposed on a background of consistently low magnetic susceptibility throughout the remainder of the recovered stratigraphic sequence. We investigate the source of the magnetic susceptibility variability and characterize the dominant magnetic assemblage throughout the entire cored record, using isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM), thermal demagnetization, anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM), iron speciation, and iron isotopes. Magnetic mineral assemblages in all samples are dominated by very low-coercivity minerals with unblocking temperatures between 350 and 580°C that are interpreted to be magnetite. Samples with lower unblocking temperatures (300-400°C), higher ARM, higher-frequency dependence, and isotopically heavy δ56Fe across a range of lithologies in the coal-bearing unit (between 1925 and 1995 mbsf) indicate the presence of fine-grained authigenic magnetite. We suggest that iron-reducing bacteria facilitated the production of fine-grained magnetite within the coal-bearing unit during burial and interaction with pore waters. The coal/peat acted as a source of electron donors during burial, mediated by humic acids, to supply iron-reducing bacteria in the surrounding siliciclastic sediments. These results indicate that coal-bearing sediments may play an important role in iron cycling in subsiding peat environments and if buried deeply through time, within the subsequent deep biosphere.

  3. Investigations of functional and structural changes in migraine with aura by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    technology to study these features of migraine with aura (MA) is functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which has the potential not only to detect, but also to localize hypersensitive cortex. The main objective of this thesis was to investigate the cortical responsivity of patients with MA during.......e. ≥= 90% of auras occurring in the same visual hemifield (study II). To circumvent bias relating to differences between right and left hemispheres (e.g. caused by physiological left/right bias, asymmetry of the visual stimulation or magnetic field inhomogeneity of the scanner), we included an equal number...

  4. Electromagnetic properties of inner double walled carbon nanotubes investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Bouhrara, M.; Abou-Hamad, E.; Alabedi, G.; Al-Taie, I.; Kim, Y.; Wagberg, T.; Goze-Bac, C.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analytical technique was used to investigate the double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) electromagnetic properties of inner walls. The local magnetic and electronic properties of inner nanotubes in DWNTs were analyzed using 25% 13C enriched C 60 by which the effect of dipolar coupling could be minimized. The diamagnetic shielding was determined due to the ring currents on outer nanotubes in DWNTs. The NMR chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) spectra and spin-lattice relaxation studies reveal the metallic properties of the inner nanotubes with a signature of the spin-gap opening below 70 K.

  5. Moessbauer investigation of magnetic hyperfine fields near bivalent Eu compounds under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Elmeguid, M.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with the pressure or volume dependence of hyperfine interactions of magnetically ordered, bivalent europium compounds. Emphasis is laid on the investigation of the pressure or volume dependence of magnetic hyperfine fields as they are found at the nuclear site of 151 Eu or of diamagnetic 119 Sn or 197 Au probe atoms. The measurements were carried out with the aid of the gamma resonance of 151 Eu (21.6 keV) 119 Sn (23.8 keV) and 167 Au (77.4 keV) at low temperatures and external pressures up to 65 kbar. (orig./WBU) [de

  6. Investigations about the effects of magnetic fields on QGP in heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inghirami, Gabriele; Bleicher, Marcus [FIAS, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Del Zanna, Luca [Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri - INAF, Firenze (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Haddadi, Mohsen [Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Becattini, Francesco [Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Beraudo, Andrea [INFN, Sezione di Torino (Italy); Rolando, Valentina [Universita degli Studi di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Ferrara (Italy)

    2016-07-01

    Numerical hydrodynamic simulations of heavy ion collisions are constantly refined through the addition of effects that may significantly improve the matching with experimental data, like viscosity or fluctuating initial conditions, but, so far, electromagnetic interactions have been almost completely neglected. However, recent lattice QCD computations and classical electrodynamics estimates both suggest that the magnetic fields produced immediately after the collisions between nuclei may live long enough and with a strength sufficient to produce measurable effects. We would like to present the results of some preliminary investigations about the influence on the properties of the medium due the presence of a strong magnetic field.

  7. Large-angle magnetization dynamics investigated by vector-resolved magnetization-induced optical second-harmonic generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, T.; Silva, T.J.; Nibarger, J.P.; Rasing, T.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    We examine the relationship between nonlinear magnetic responses and the change in the Gilbert damping parameter alpha for patterned and unpatterned thin Permalloy films when subjected to pulsed magnetic fields. An improved magnetization-vector-resolved technique utilizing magnetization-induced

  8. Theoretical investigation of electronic and magnetic properties of MnAu layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masrour, R., E-mail: rachidmasrour@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Materials, Processes, Environment and Quality, Cady Ayyed University, National School of Applied Sciences, BP 63, 46000, Sidi Bouzid, Safi (Morocco); LMPHE (URAC 12), Faculty of Science, Mohammed V-Agdal University, Rabat (Morocco); Hlil, E.K. [Institut Neel, CNRS et Universite Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Hamedoun, M. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Benyoussef, A. [LMPHE (URAC 12), Faculty of Science, Mohammed V-Agdal University, Rabat (Morocco); Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Hassan II Academy of Science and Technology, Rabat (Morocco); Mounkachi, O. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Bahmad, L. [LMPHE (URAC 12), Faculty of Science, Mohammed V-Agdal University, Rabat (Morocco)

    2013-01-15

    Self-consistent ab initio calculations, based on the density functional theory (DFT) approach and using the full potential linear augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method, are performed to investigate both electronic and magnetic properties of the MnAu layers. Polarized spin and spin-orbit coupling are included in calculations within the framework of the antiferromagnetic state between two adjacent Mn layers. Magnetic moment considered to lie along a axes are computed. The data obtained from the ab initio calculations are then used as input for the high temperature series expansions (HTSEs) calculation to compute other magnetic parameters. The exchange integrals between the magnetic atoms in the same layer and between the magnetic atoms in the bilayers adjacent are given by using mean field theory. The HTSEs of the magnetic susceptibility of MnAu antiferromagnetic spin-S through two model: Ising and XY layers consisting of l=2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and bulk ({infinity}) interacting layers, are studied to sixth order series in {beta}=1/k{sub B}T obtained for free-surface boundary conditions. The effects of finite size on critical-point behavior are studied by extrapolation of the high-temperature series. The Neel temperature T{sub N}(l) as a function of the number of l spin layers is obtained by HTSEs of the magnetic susceptibility series by using the Pade approximant method and by MFT theory. The critical exponent {gamma} associated with the magnetic susceptibility is deduced. T{sub N}(l) for the l-layers are estimated from the divergence of the staggered susceptibility with an exponent for Ising model of {gamma}(1)=2.96, and for XY model of {gamma}(2)=2.82, which is consistent with the basic assumptions of scaling laws. Our estimates for the shift exponent of the Neel temperature for the two models are obtained. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ab initio calculations is using to investigate both electronic and magnetic properties of the MnAu layers. Black

  9. Theoretical investigation of electronic and magnetic properties of MnAu layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masrour, R.; Hlil, E.K.; Hamedoun, M.; Benyoussef, A.; Mounkachi, O.; Bahmad, L.

    2013-01-01

    Self-consistent ab initio calculations, based on the density functional theory (DFT) approach and using the full potential linear augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method, are performed to investigate both electronic and magnetic properties of the MnAu layers. Polarized spin and spin–orbit coupling are included in calculations within the framework of the antiferromagnetic state between two adjacent Mn layers. Magnetic moment considered to lie along a axes are computed. The data obtained from the ab initio calculations are then used as input for the high temperature series expansions (HTSEs) calculation to compute other magnetic parameters. The exchange integrals between the magnetic atoms in the same layer and between the magnetic atoms in the bilayers adjacent are given by using mean field theory. The HTSEs of the magnetic susceptibility of MnAu antiferromagnetic spin-S through two model: Ising and XY layers consisting of l=2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and bulk (∞) interacting layers, are studied to sixth order series in β=1/k B T obtained for free-surface boundary conditions. The effects of finite size on critical-point behavior are studied by extrapolation of the high-temperature series. The Néel temperature T N (l) as a function of the number of l spin layers is obtained by HTSEs of the magnetic susceptibility series by using the Padé approximant method and by MFT theory. The critical exponent γ associated with the magnetic susceptibility is deduced. T N (l) for the l-layers are estimated from the divergence of the staggered susceptibility with an exponent for Ising model of γ(1)=2.96, and for XY model of γ(2)=2.82, which is consistent with the basic assumptions of scaling laws. Our estimates for the shift exponent of the Néel temperature for the two models are obtained. - Highlights: ► ab initio calculations is using to investigate both electronic and magnetic properties of the MnAu layers. ► Obtained data from ab initio calculations are used as input for the HTSEs

  10. Microscopic magnetic nature of layered cobalt dioxides investigated by muon-spin rotation and relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Jun; Ikedo, Yutaka; Mukai, Kazuhiko; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Russo, Peter L.; Ansaldo, Eduardo J.; Brewer, Jess H.; Andreica, Daniel; Amato, Alex

    2009-01-01

    In order to elucidate the nature of layered cobalt dioxides A x CoO 2 , we have investigated their microscopic magnetism by means of positive muon-spin rotation and relaxation (μ + SR) spectroscopy, in particular for A=Li, Na, and K. The dome-shaped magnetic phase diagram for Na x CoO 2 with x≥0.75 suggests the competition between the spin concentration and geometrical frustration on the two-dimensional triangular lattice of the CoO 2 plane. The additional experiment on Li x CoO 2 and K x CoO 2 indicates both a weakly coupled regime for the d electrons in the CoO 2 plane and an ignorable weak effect of the inter-plane interaction on their magnetic order at low T.

  11. Investigation of electrical and magnetic properties of ferro-nanofluid on transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Chen, Ping-Hei; Lee, Da-Sheng; Yang, Chin-Ting

    2011-03-28

    This study investigated a simple model of transformers that have liquid magnetic cores with different concentrations of ferro-nanofluids. The simple model was built on a capillary by enamel-insulated wires and with ferro-nanofluid loaded in the capillary. The ferro-nanofluid was fabricated by a chemical co-precipitation method. The performances of the transformers with either air core or ferro-nanofluid at different concentrations of nanoparticles of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 M were measured and simulated at frequencies ranging from 100 kHz to 100 MHz. The experimental results indicated that the inductance and coupling coefficient of coils grew with the increment of the ferro-nanofluid concentration. The presence of ferro-nanofluid increased resistance, yielding to the decrement of the quality factor, owing to the phase lag between the external magnetic field and the magnetization of the material.

  12. Theoretical investigation into the possibility of multiorbital magnetically ordered states in isotropically superstrained graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craco, L.

    2017-10-01

    Using density functional dynamical mean-field theory (DFDMFT) we address the problem of antiferromagnetic spin ordering in isotropically superstrained graphene. It is shown that the interplay between strain-induced one-particle band narrowing and sizable on-site electron-electron interactions naturally stabilizes a magnetic phase with orbital-selective spin-polarized p -band electronic states. While an antiferromagnetic phase with strong local moments arises in the pz orbitals, the px ,y bands reveal a metallic state with quenched sublattice magnetization. We next investigate the possibility of superconductivity to emerge in this selective magnetoelectronic state. Our theory is expected to be an important step to understanding the next generation of flexible electronics made of Mott localized carbon-based materials as well as the ability of superstrained graphene to host coexisting superconductivity and magnetism at low temperatures.

  13. Recreating Rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole R

    2008-01-01

    Nicole Posth and colleagues spent a month touring South African rock formations in their quest to understand the origin of ancient iron and silicate layers.......Nicole Posth and colleagues spent a month touring South African rock formations in their quest to understand the origin of ancient iron and silicate layers....

  14. An experimental investigation of geochromatography during secondary migration of petroleum performed under subsurface conditions with a real rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larter Steve

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the size of petroleum secondary migration systems is vital for successful exploration for petroleum reserves. Geochemists have suggested that compositional fractionation of petroleum accompanying the migration process (geochromatography can potentially be used to infer distances petroleum may have travelled and the ratio of oil in the reservoir to that lost in the carrier. To date, this has been attempted by measuring concentrations and distributions of specific steranes, and aromatic oxygen and nitrogen compounds in reservoired oils which have been proposed to respond to migration rather than to source maturity or other effects. We report here an experiment involving oil migration through an initially water wet siltstone under realistic subsurface carrier bed or reservoir conditions (48 MPa, 70°C where source facies and maturity effects are eliminated. We show that geochromatography does indeed occur even for initially water-saturated rocks and that the migration fractionations observed for alkylcarbazoles, benzocarbazoles and alkylphenols are very similar to those seen in field data sets. In contrast, sterane based migration parameters show no compositional fractionation under these conditions.

  15. Investigation of physical properties of porous rocks and fluid flow phenomena in porous media using computer assisted tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantzas, A.

    1990-01-01

    Computer assisted tomography is becoming a very attractive tool for petroleum engineers. The method can give an image of a core in two or three dimensions with a very fine resolution and high accuracy. The image data can be processed to give information about the physical properties of the core (density, porosity, mineralogy, heterogeneities) and the fluids within the core (saturation and saturation profiles). This paper presents a software package that uses the CAT scanner output data as input for petrographic and dynamic modelling of a porous rock. Core samples up to 10 cm in diameter are scanned at different x-ray energy levels using an EMI CT5005 full body scanner. The scanner computer is producing an array of normalized linear attenuation coefficients per scanned slice. The resolution is 0.75 mm x 0.75 mm while the slice thickness can vary from 15 mm down to 1 mm depending on the bulk density and size of the sample. The developed package analyzes the CAT scanner data for bulk and grain density, effective atomic number, static and dynamic porosity and fluid saturations for up to three fluids present. The capabilities and limitations of the presented algorithm are discussed and characteristic examples are presented

  16. Investigating the Magnetic Imprints of Major Solar Eruptions with SDO /HMI High-cadence Vector Magnetograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Xudong; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu Yang; Chen Ruizhu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kazachenko, Maria, E-mail: xudong@Sun.stanford.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-04-10

    The solar active region photospheric magnetic field evolves rapidly during major eruptive events, suggesting appreciable feedback from the corona. Previous studies of these “magnetic imprints” are mostly based on line of sight only or lower-cadence vector observations; a temporally resolved depiction of the vector field evolution is hitherto lacking. Here, we introduce the high-cadence (90 s or 135 s) vector magnetogram data set from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, which is well suited for investigating the phenomenon. These observations allow quantitative characterization of the permanent, step-like changes that are most pronounced in the horizontal field component (B {sub h}). A highly structured pattern emerges from analysis of an archetypical event, SOL2011-02-15T01:56, where B {sub h} near the main polarity inversion line increases significantly during the earlier phase of the associated flare with a timescale of several minutes, while B {sub h} in the periphery decreases at later times with smaller magnitudes and a slightly longer timescale. The data set also allows effective identification of the “magnetic transient” artifact, where enhanced flare emission alters the Stokes profiles and the inferred magnetic field becomes unreliable. Our results provide insights on the momentum processes in solar eruptions. The data set may also be useful to the study of sunquakes and data-driven modeling of the corona.

  17. Magnetic phase investigations on fluorine (F) doped LiFePO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhamani, A. V.

    2018-03-01

    LiFePO4 (LFP) is a very promising cathode material for Li-ion batteries due to its high thermal stability, less toxicity and high theoretical capacity (170 mAh g-1). Anion doping, especially fluorine (F) at the oxygen site is one way to improve the low electronic conductivity of the material. In this line, fluorine doped LFP was prepared at different fluorine concentrations (1 to 40 mol%) to study the structural, spectroscopic and magnetic properties in view of the material property optimization for battery applications. The investigation of the magnetic properties was found to be successful for the determination of small amounts of magnetic impurities which were not noticeably observed from structural characterizations. Determination of conducting magnetic impurities has its own relevance in the current scenario of Li-ion based battery applications. Systematic characterization studies along with the implications of magnetic phases on the material activity of fluorine doped LiFePO4 nanoparticles will be discussed in detail.

  18. The magnetic field investigation on the ARASE (ERG) mission: Data characteristics and initial scientific results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, A.; Teramoto, M.; Nomura, R.; Nose, M.; Fujimoto, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Shinohara, M.; Nagatsuma, T.; Shiokawa, K.; Obana, Y.; Miyoshi, Y.; Takashima, T.; Shinohara, I.

    2017-12-01

    The ARASE (ERG) satellite was successfully launched on December 20 2016. A fluxgate magnetometer (MGF) was built for the ARASE satellite to measure DC and low-frequency magnetic field. The requirements to the magnetic field measurements by ARASE was defined as (1) accuracy of the absolute field intensity is within 5 nT (2) angular accuracy of the field direction is within 1 degree (3) measurement frequency range is from DC to 60Hz or wider. MGF measures the vector magnetic field with the original sampling frequency of 256 Hz. The dynamic range is switched between +/-8000nT and +/- 60000nT according to the background field intensity. The MGF initial checkout was carried on January 10th 2017, when the MGF normal performance and downlinked data were confirmed. The 5-m length MAST for the sensor was deployed on 17th January. The nominal operation of MGF started in March 2017. The MGF data are calibrated based on the results from the ground experiments and in-orbit data analysis. The MGF CDF files are distributed by the ARASE Science Center and available by Space Physics Environment Data Analysis Software (SPEDAS). The acceleration process of the charged particles in the inner magnetosphere is considered to be closely related to the deformation and perturbation of the magnetic field. Accurate measurement of the magnetic field is required to understand the acceleration mechanism of the charged particles, which is one of the major scientific objectives of the ARASE mission. We designed a fluxgate magnetometer which is optimized to investigate following topics; (1) accurate measurement of the background magnetic field - the deformation of the magnetic field and its relationship with the particle acceleration. (2) MHD waves - measurement of the ULF electromagnetic waves of frequencies about 1mHz (Pc4-5), and investigation of the radiation-belt electrons radially diffused by the resonance with the ULF waves. (3) EMIC waves - measurement of the electromagnetic ion

  19. Preparation and investigation of structural, magnetic and microwave absorption properties of cerium doped barium hexaferrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kameli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the structure, magnetic and microwave absorption properties of cerium (Ce doped barium hexaferrite with general formulae BaCexFe12-xO19 (x=0.0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2 have been investigated. These samples have been prepared by sol- gel method. Influence of replacing Fe+3 ion by rare- earth Ce+3 ion on the structural, magnetic and microwave absorption properties have been investigated by X- ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR, Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM and vector network analyzer (VNA. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the samples are of single phase with space group p63/mmc. The magnetic properties of samples indicated that with the Ce doping the saturation magnetization show no regular behavior. Moreover, coercivity (Hc first decreased and reached to the minimum value for x=0.1 sample and then increased with Ce content increasing. Also, measurement of electromagnetic wave absorption in X and Ku frequency bands indicated that the maximum of reflection loss obtained for x=0.15 sample. Moreover, result indicated that absorption peak shifted toward a lower frequency when thickness was increased.