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Sample records for rock laboratory summary

  1. Large scale gas injection test (Lasgit) performed at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Summary report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuss, R.J.; Harrington, J.F.; Noy, D.J. (British Geological Survey (United Kingdom))

    2010-02-15

    This report describes the set-up, operation and observations from the first 1,385 days (3.8 years) of the large scale gas injection test (Lasgit) experiment conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. During this time the bentonite buffer has been artificially hydrated and has given new insight into the evolution of the buffer. After 2 years (849 days) of artificial hydration a canister filter was identified to perform a series of hydraulic and gas tests, a period that lasted 268 days. The results from the gas test showed that the full-scale bentonite buffer behaved in a similar way to previous laboratory experiments. This confirms the up-scaling of laboratory observations with the addition of considerable information on the stress responses throughout the deposition hole. During the gas testing stage, the buffer was continued to artificially hydrate. Hydraulic results, from controlled and uncontrolled events, show that the buffer continues to mature and has yet to reach full maturation. Lasgit has yielded high quality data relating to the hydration of the bentonite and the evolution in hydrogeological properties adjacent to the deposition hole. The initial hydraulic and gas injection tests confirm the correct working of all control and data acquisition systems. Lasgit has been in successful operation for in excess of 1,385 days

  2. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual Report 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-03-15

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) is an important part of SKB's work with the design and construction of a deep geological repository for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Aespoe HRL is located in the Simpevarp area in the municipality of Oskarshamn. One of the fundamental reasons behind SKB's decision to construct an underground laboratory was to create opportunities for research, development and demonstration in a realistic and undisturbed rock environment down to repository depth. The underground part of the laboratory consists of a tunnel from the Simpevarp peninsula to the southern part of Aespoe where the tunnel continues in a spiral down to a depth of 460 m. Aespoe HRL has been in operation since 1995 and considerable international interest has been shown in its research, as well as in the development and demonstration tasks. A summary of the work performed at Aespoe HRL during 2011 is given below.

  3. Aespoe hard rock laboratory. Annual report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-02-15

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) is an important part of SKB's work with the design and construction of a deep geological repository for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Aespoe HRL is located in the Simpevarp area in the municipality of Oskarshamn. One of the fundamental reasons behind SKB's decision to construct an underground laboratory was to create opportunities for research, development and demonstration in a realistic and undisturbed rock environment down to repository depth. The underground part of the laboratory consists of a tunnel from the Simpevarp peninsula to the southern part of Aespoe where the tunnel continues in a spiral down to a depth of 460 m. Aespoe HRL has been in operation since 1995 and considerable international interest has been shown in its research, as well as in the development and demonstration tasks. A summary of the work performed at Aespoe HRL during 2010 is given below

  4. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory Annual report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-09-01

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) constitutes an important part of SKB's work to design and construct a deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel and to develop and test methods for characterisation of a suitable site for a deep repository. One of the fundamental reasons behind SKB's decision to construct an underground laboratory was to create an opportunity for research, development and demonstration in a realistic and undisturbed rock environment down to repository depth. Aespoe HRL has been in operation since 1995 and the associated research, development, and demonstration tasks, have so far attracted considerable interest. A summary of work performed at Aespoe HRL during 2003 is given below. Seven organisations from six countries participated in the co-operation at Aespoe HRL during 2003 in addition to SKB. Most of the organisations are interested in groundwater flow, radionuclide transport and rock characterisation. Several of the organisations are participating in the experimental work as well as in the Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes. SKB is through Repository Technology co-ordinating three EC contracts and takes part in several EC projects of which the representation in five projects is channelled through Repository Technology. SKB takes also part in work within the IAEA framework.

  5. Laboratory characterization of rock joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiung, S.M.; Kana, D.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Ghosh, A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1994-05-01

    A laboratory characterization of the Apache Leap tuff joints under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loads has been undertaken to obtain a better understanding of dynamic joint shear behavior and to generate a complete data set that can be used for validation of existing rock-joint models. Study has indicated that available methods for determining joint roughness coefficient (JRC) significantly underestimate the roughness coefficient of the Apache Leap tuff joints, that will lead to an underestimation of the joint shear strength. The results of the direct shear tests have indicated that both under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loadings the joint resistance upon reverse shearing is smaller than that of forward shearing and the joint dilation resulting from forward shearing recovers during reverse shearing. Within the range of variation of shearing velocity used in these tests, the shearing velocity effect on rock-joint behavior seems to be minor, and no noticeable effect on the peak joint shear strength and the joint shear strength for the reverse shearing is observed.

  6. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual Report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-15

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) is an important part of SKB's work with the design and construction of a deep geological repository for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Aespoe HRL is located in the Simpevarp area in the municipality of Oskarshamn. One of the fundamental reasons behind SKB's decision to construct an underground laboratory was to create opportunities for research, development and demonstration in a realistic and undisturbed rock environment down to repository depth. The underground part of the laboratory consists of a tunnel from the Simpevarp peninsula to the southern part of Aespoe where the tunnel continues in a spiral down to a depth of 460 m. Aespoe HRL has been in operation since 1995 and considerable international interest has been shown in its research, as well as in the development and demonstration tasks. A summary of the work performed at Aespoe HRL during 2009 is given below. Geoscience Geoscientific research is a basic activity at Aespoe HRL. The aim of the current studies is to develop geoscientific models of the Aespoe HRL and increase the understanding of the rock mass properties as well as knowledge of applicable methods of measurement. A main task within the geoscientific field is the development of the Aespoe Site Descriptive Model (SDM) integrating information from the different fields. The main activities in the geoscientific fields have been: (1) Geology evaluation of geological mapping techniques leading to the decision to develop a SKB mapping system and finalization of the mapping of rock surfaces in the new tunnel, (2) Hydrogeology monitoring and storage of data in the computerised Hydro Monitoring System, (3) Geochemistry sampling of groundwater in the yearly campaign and for specific experiments and (4) Rock Mechanics finalised the field tests on thermally-induced spalling in deposition holes and evaluated the effect of counterforce in the deposition holes. Natural barriers At Aespoe HRL

  7. Developing a Virtual Rock Deformation Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Ougier-simonin, A.; Lisabeth, H. P.; Banker, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental rock physics plays an important role in advancing earthquake research. Despite its importance in geophysics, reservoir engineering, waste deposits and energy resources, most geology departments in U.S. universities don't have rock deformation facilities. A virtual deformation laboratory can serve as an efficient tool to help geology students naturally and internationally learn about rock deformation. Working with computer science engineers, we built a virtual deformation laboratory that aims at fostering user interaction to facilitate classroom and outreach teaching and learning. The virtual lab is built to center around a triaxial deformation apparatus in which laboratory measurements of mechanical and transport properties such as stress, axial and radial strains, acoustic emission activities, wave velocities, and permeability are demonstrated. A student user can create her avatar to enter the virtual lab. In the virtual lab, the avatar can browse and choose among various rock samples, determine the testing conditions (pressure, temperature, strain rate, loading paths), then operate the virtual deformation machine to observe how deformation changes physical properties of rocks. Actual experimental results on the mechanical, frictional, sonic, acoustic and transport properties of different rocks at different conditions are compiled. The data acquisition system in the virtual lab is linked to the complied experimental data. Structural and microstructural images of deformed rocks are up-loaded and linked to different deformation tests. The integration of the microstructural image and the deformation data allows the student to visualize how forces reshape the structure of the rock and change the physical properties. The virtual lab is built using the Game Engine. The geological background, outstanding questions related to the geological environment, and physical and mechanical concepts associated with the problem will be illustrated on the web portal. In

  8. Rock Slope Design Criteria : Executive Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Based on the stratigraphy and the type of slope stability problems, the flat lying, Paleozoic age, sedimentary rocks of Ohio were divided into three design units: 1) competent rock design unit consisting of sandstones, limestones, and siltstones that...

  9. Summary of Sandia Laboratories technical capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-05-01

    The technical capabilities of Sandia Laboratories are detailed in a series of companion reports. In this summary the use of the capabilities in technical programs is outlined and the capabilities are summarized. 25 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory Annual Report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-08-01

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory has been constructed as part of the preparations for the deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. The Tracer Retention Understanding Experiments are made to gain a better understanding of radionuclide retention in the rock and create confidence in the radionuclide transport models that are intended to be used in the licensing of a deep repository for spent fuel. The TRUE -1 experiment including tests with sorbing radioactive tracers in a single fracture over a distance of about 5 m has been completed. Diffusion and sorption in the rock matrix is the dominant retention mechanism over the time scales of the experiments. The main objective of the TRUE Block Scale Experiment is to increase understanding and our ability to predict tracer transport in a fracture network over spatial scales of 10 to 50 m. In total six boreholes have been drilled into the experimental volume located at the 450 m level. The Long-Term Diffusion Experiment is intended as a complement to the dynamic in-situ experiments and the laboratory experiments performed in the TRUE Programme. Diffusion from a fracture into the rock matrix will be studied in situ. The REX project focuses on the reduction of oxygen in a repository after closure due to reactions with rock minerals and microbial activity. Results show that oxygen is consumed within a few days both for the field and laboratory experiments. A new site for the CHEMLAB experiments was selected and prepared during 1999. All future experiment will be conducted in the J niche at 450 m depth. The Prototype Repository Test is focused on testing and demonstrating repository system function. A full-scale prototype including six deposition holes with canisters with electric heaters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite will be built and instrumented. Characterisation of the rock mass in the area of the Prototype repository is completed and the six deposition holes have been drilled. The Backfill and

  11. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual Report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-15

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) is an important part of SKB's work with the design and construction of a deep geological repository for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Aespoe HRL is located in the Simpevarp area in the municipality of Oskarshamn. One of the fundamental reasons behind SKB's decision to construct an underground laboratory was to create opportunities for research, development and demonstration in a realistic and undisturbed rock environment down to repository depth. The underground part of the laboratory consists of a tunnel from the Simpevarp peninsula to the southern part of Aespoe where the tunnel continues in a spiral down to a depth of 460 m. Aespoe HRL has been in operation since 1995 and considerable international interest has been shown in its research, as well as in the development and demonstration tasks. The work performed at Aespoe HRL during 2006 is in this report described in six chapters: Geo-science - experiments, analysis and modelling to increase the knowledge of the surrounding rock; Natural barriers - experiments, analysis and modelling to increase the knowledge of the repository barriers under natural conditions; Engineered barriers - demonstration of technology for and function of important engineered parts of the repository barrier system; Aespoe facility - operation, maintenance, data management, monitoring, public relations etc; Environmental research; and finally, International co-operation.

  12. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory has been constructed as part of the preparations for the deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. The surface and borehole investigations and the research work performed in parallel with construction have provided a thorough test of methods for investigation and evaluation of bedrock conditions for construction of a deep repository. The Tracer Retention Understanding Experiments are made to gain a better understanding of radionuclide retention in the rock and create confidence in the radionuclide transport models that are intended to be used in the licensing of a deep repository for spent fuel. The experimental results of the first tracer test with sorbing radioactive tracers have been obtained. These tests have been subject to blind predictions by the Aespoe Task Force on groundwater flow and transports of solutes. The manufacturing of the CHEMLAB probe was completed during 1996, and the first experiments were started early in 1997. During 1997 three experiments on diffusion in bentonite using {sup 57}Co, {sup 114}Cs,{sup 85}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 131}I were conducted. The Prototype Repository Test is focused on testing and demonstrating repository system function. A full scale prototype including six deposition holes with canisters with electric heaters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite will be built and instrumented. The characterization of the rock mass in the area of the prototype repository is in progress. The objectives of the Demonstration of Repository Technology are to develop, test, and demonstrate methodology and equipment for encapsulation and deposition of spent nuclear fuel. The demonstration of handling and deposition will be made in a new drift. The Backfill and Plug Test includes tests of backfill materials and emplacement methods and a test of a full scale plug. The backfill and rock will be instrumented with about 230 transducers for measuring the thermo-hydro-mechanical processes. The

  13. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory has been constructed as part of the preparations for the deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. The Tracer Retention Understanding Experiments are made to gain a better understanding of radionuclide retention in the rock and create confidence in the radionuclide transport models that are intended to be used in the licensing of a deep repository for spent fuel. Experiments with sorbing radioactive tracers have been completed in a single fracture over a distance of about 5 m. These tests have been subject to blind predictions by the Aespoe Task Force on groundwater flow and transports of solutes. Breakthrough of sorbing tracers in the TRUE-I tests is retarded more strongly than would be expected based on laboratory data alone. Results are consistent for all tracers and tracer tests. The main objective of the TRUE Block Scale Experiment is to increase understanding and our ability to predict tracer transport in a fracture network over spatial scales of 10 to 50 m. The total duration of the project is approximately 4.5 years with a scheduled finish at the end of the year 2000. The REX project focuses on the reduction of oxygen in a repository after closure due to reactions with rock minerals and microbial activity. Results show that oxygen is consumed within a few days both for the field and laboratory experiments. The project Degassing of groundwater and two phase flow was initiated to improve our understanding of observations of hydraulic conditions made in drifts and interpretation of experiments performed close to drifts. The analysis performed so far shows that the experimentally observed flow reductions indeed are consistent with the degassing hypothesis. The Prototype Repository Test is focused on testing and demonstrating repository system function. A full-scale prototype including six deposition holes with canisters with electric heaters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite will be built and

  14. Aespoe hard rock laboratory. Annual report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory constitutes an important component of SKB's work to design, construct, and implement a deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel and to develop and test methods for characterisation of selected repository sites. The retention effect of the rock has been studied by tracer tests in the Tracer Retention Understanding Experiments (TRUE) and the TRUE Block Scale (TRUE BS). These tests are supplemented by the new Long Term Diffusion Experiment (LTDE). During year 2000 the field experiments of TRUE BS (50 m scale) were completed and preparations made for the LTDE (migration through a fracture wall and into the rock), including boring of approximately 10 m deep hole with 300 mm diameter. Laboratory investigations have difficulties in simulating natural conditions and need supplementary field studies to support validation exercises. A special borehole probe, CHEMLAB, has therefore been designed for different kinds of validation experiments where data can be obtained representative for the in-situ properties of groundwater at repository depth. During 2000 migration experiments were made with actinides (Am, Np and Pu) in CHEMLAB 2, the simplified supplement to CHEMLAB 1. Colloids of nuclides as well as of bentonite might affect the migration of released radionuclides and a separate project was planned during 2000 to assess the existence, stability and mobility of colloids. The development of numerical modelling tools continues with the general objective to improve the numerical models in terms of flow and transport and to update the site-scale and laboratory scale models for the Aespoe HRL. The Matrix Fluid Chemistry project aims at determining the origin and age of matrix fluids and the experiment has been designed to sample matrix fluids from predetermined, isolated borehole sections by specialised equipment. The Aespoe HRL also has the task to demonstrate and perform full scale tests of the function of different components of

  15. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Summer Employment Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, A J

    2002-08-06

    This document will serve as a summary of my work activities as a summer employee for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The intent of this document is to provide an overview of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, to explain the role of the department that I am working for, and to discuss my specific assigned tasks and their impact on the NIF project as a whole.

  16. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-15

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), in the Simpevarp area in the municipality of Oskarshamn constitutes an important part of SKB's work with the design and construction of a deep geological repository for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. One of the fundamental reasons behind SKB's decision to construct an underground laboratory was to create an opportunity for research, development and demonstration in a realistic and undisturbed rock environment down to repository depth. The underground part of the laboratory consists of a tunnel from the Simpevarp peninsula to the southern part of Aespoe where the tunnel continues in a spiral down to a depth of 460 m. Aespoe HRL has been in operation since 1995 and considerable international interest has been shown in its associated research, as well as in the development and demonstration tasks. Most of the research is focused on processes of importance for the long-term safety of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel. Demonstration addresses the performance of the engineered barriers and practical means of constructing and operating a repository for spent fuel. To meet the overall time schedule for SKB's RD and D work, the following stage goals were initially defined for the work at the Aespoe HRL: 1. Verify pre-investigation methods. Demonstrate that investigations on the ground surface and in boreholes provide sufficient data on essential safety-related properties of the rock at repository level. 2. Finalise detailed investigation methodology. Refine and verify the methods and the technology needed for characterisation of the rock in the detailed site investigations. 3. Test models for description of the barrier functions at natural conditions. Further develop, and at repository depth, test methods and models for description of groundwater flow, radionuclide migration and chemical conditions during operation of a repository and after closure. 4. Demonstrate technology for and function of important

  17. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-01

    The Aespoe HRL was opened in 1994 as a research centre and underground laboratory. The experiments performed in Aespoe HRL are related to the rock, its properties, and in situ environmental conditions. Tests of models for groundwater flow, radionuclide migration and chemical/biological processes are some of the main purposes of the Aespoe HRL. The programme includes projects with the aim to evaluate the usefulness and reliability of different models and to develop and test methods for determination of parameters required as input to conceptual and numerical models. The retardation in rock is studied at different experiment scales in a programme called Tracer Retention Understanding Experiments (TRUE). The Long Term Diffusion Experiment constitutes a complement to performed diffusion and sorption laboratory experiments, and is a natural extension of the experiments conducted as part of the TRUE experiments. Radionuclide retention experiments are carried out with the aim to confirm result from laboratory experiments in situ, where conditions representative for the properties of groundwater at repository depth prevail. In CHEMLAB 1 two kinds of experiments to study the influence of radiolysis on the mobility of technetium in bentonite were started in the end of 2002. Experiments to study migration of actinides in natural fractures in drill cores are being carried out in CHELMAB 2. The findings of potential transport of solutes by colloids and access to more sensitive instruments for colloid measurements motivated a Colloid Project at Aespoe HRL. There are presently four specific microbial process areas identified that are of importance for proper repository functions and that are studied in the Microbe Project. The process areas are; biomobilisation of radionuclides, bioimmobilisation of radionuclides, microbial effects on the chemical stability, and microbial corrosion of copper. The main objectives of the Matrix Fluid Chemistry experiment are to understand the

  18. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual Report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-04-15

    The main activities in the geoscientific fields have been: (1) Geology - besides mapping of rock surfaces and drill cores a feasibility study concerning geological mapping techniques is performed, (2) Hydrogeology - completion of the modelling work for the detailed hydro-structural model for the -450 m level and monitoring/storage of data in the computerised Hydro Monitoring System, (3) Geochemistry - sampling of groundwater in the yearly campaign and for specific experiments and (4) Rock Mechanics - field work to determine the stress levels at which core disking occur followed by numerical modelling. Experiments are performed to develop and test methods and models for the description of groundwater flow, radionuclide migration, and chemical conditions at repository depth. The programme includes projects which aim to determine parameter values that are required as input to the conceptual and numerical models. At Aespoe HRL, experiments are performed under the conditions that are expected to prevail at repository depth. The experiments are related to the rock, its properties and in situ environmental conditions. The aim is to provide information about the long-term function of natural and repository barriers. Experiments are performed to develop and test methods and models for the description of groundwater flow, radionuclide migration, and chemical conditions at repository depth. The programme includes projects which aim to determine parameter values that are required as input to the conceptual and numerical models. An important goal is to demonstrate technology for and the function of important parts of the repository system. This implies translation of current scientific knowledge and state-of- the-art technology into engineering practice applicable in a real repository. It is important that development, testing and demonstration of methods and procedures are conducted under realistic conditions and at an appropriate scale. A number of large-scale field

  19. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual Report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-15

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) is an important part of SKB's work with the design and construction of a deep geological repository for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The main activities in the geoscientific fields have been: (1) Geology - completion of the feasibility study concerning geological mapping techniques and mapping of rock surfaces in the new tunnel, (2) Hydrogeology - monitoring and storage of data in the computerised Hydro Monitoring System, (3) Geochemistry - sampling of groundwater in the yearly campaign and for specific experiments and (4) Rock Mechanics - field tests to evaluate the counterforce needed to prevent thermally-induced spalling in deposition holes. At Aespoe HRL, experiments are performed under the conditions that are expected to prevail at repository depth. The aim is to provide information about the long-term function of natural and repository barriers. Experiments are performed to develop and test methods and models for the description of groundwater flow, radionuclide migration, and chemical conditions at repository depth. The programme includes projects which aim to determine parameter values that are required as input to the conceptual and numerical models. A number of large-scale field experiments and supporting activities concerning Engineered barriers are carried out at Aespoe HRL. The experiments focus on different aspects of engineering technology and performance testing: The Prototype Repository is a demonstration of the integrated function of the repository and provides a full-scale reference for tests of predictive models concerning individual components as well as the complete repository system; The Long Term Test of Buffer Material (Lot-experiment) aims at validating models and hypotheses concerning physical properties in a bentonite buffer material and of related processes regarding microbiology, radionuclide transport, copper corrosion and gas transport; The objective of the project Alternative

  20. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual Report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-09-01

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) constitutes an important part of SKB's work to design and construct a deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel and to develop and test methods for characterisation of a suitable site for a deep repository. One of the fundamental reasons behind SKB's decision to construct an underground laboratory was to create an opportunity for research, development and demonstration in a realistic and undisturbed rock environment down to repository depth. The bedrock with available fractures and fracture zones, its properties and on-going physical, chemical and biological processes which affect the integrity of the engineered barriers and the transport of radionuclides are denoted the natural barriers of a deep repository. Experiments are performed at Aespoe HRL at conditions that are expected to prevail at repository depth, with the aim to increase the knowledge of the long term function of the repository barriers. Another aim with the Aespoe HRL is testing of models for groundwater flow, radionuclide migration, chemical and biological processes. The programme for the testing of models includes evaluation of the usefulness and reliability of different models and the development and testing of methods for determination of parameters required as input to conceptual and numerical models. Ongoing projects are Tracer Retention Understanding Experiments, Long Term Diffusion Experiment, Radionuclide Retention Experiment, Microbial Project, Colloid Project, and Matrix Water Chemistry Experiments. The activities at Aespoe HRL include the evaluation of the usefulness and reliability of different calculation models and the development and testing of methods for determination of parameters required as input to the models. An important part of this work is performed in the Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes, an international co-operation project. The work within the Tasks 4 and 5 were reported

  1. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory Annual Report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-08-01

    At Aespoe HRL, methods for characterising a suitable site for a deep repository are being developed and tested. The underground part of the laboratory consists of a tunnel from the Simpevarp peninsula to the southern part of Aespoe where the tunnel continues in a spiral down to a depth of 460 m. Aespoe HRL has been in operation since 1995. Most of the research is focused on processes of importance for the long-term safety of a future deep repository. To meet the overall time schedule for SKB's RDandD work, the following stage goals were initially defined for the work at the Aespoe HRL. 1. Verify pre-investigation methods. Demonstrate that investigations on the ground surface and in boreholes provide sufficient data on essential safety-related properties of the rock at repository level. 2. Finalise detailed investigation methodology. Refine and verify the methods and the technology needed for characterisation of the rock in the detailed site investigations. 3. Test models for description of the barrier functions at natural conditions. Further develop and at repository depth test methods and models for description of groundwater flow, radionuclide migration, and chemical conditions during operation of a repository and after closure. 4. Demonstrate technology for and function of important parts of the repository system. Test, investigate and demonstrate on full-scale different components of importance for the long-term safety of a deep repository and to show that high quality can be achieved in design, construction, and operation of repository components. Stage goals 1 and 2 have been concluded at Aespoe HRL and the tasks have been transferred to the Site Investigation Department of SKB which performs site investigations at two sites, Simpevarp/Laxemar in the municipality of Oskarshamn and Forsmark in the municipality of Oesthammar. In order to reach present goals the following important tasks are performed at the Aespoe HRL: Develop, test, evaluate and

  2. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Hydro Monitoring Program. Report for 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wass, Eva; Nyberg, Goeran (GEOSIGMA, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2010-05-15

    The Aespoe island is situated close to the nuclear power plant of Simpevarp in southeastern Sweden. As part of the pre-investigations preceding excavation of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, registrations of the groundwater levels and electrical conductivity in packed-off borehole sections and levels in open boreholes started in 1987. The investigations are still ongoing and are planned to continue for a long period of time. As the tunnel excavation went on from the autumn 1990 and onwards, new boreholes were drilled in the tunnel and instrumented to enable groundwater pressure monitoring in packed-off sections. In addition, other hydro-related measurements such as water flow in the tunnel, electrical conductivity of tunnel water and inflow and outflow of water through tunnel pipes have been performed. This report is a summary of the monitoring during 2009. In order to allow for comparison with factors that may influence the groundwater level/pressure and flow, meteorological data are also presented in the report. From the end of 1991, the disturbance from the tunnel is the dominating factor influencing groundwater levels in the area. In one chapter, activities that may have an influence on the ground water situation are listed and briefly discussed

  3. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual Report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The construction of the laboratory was completed during 1995 and the operating phase has now begun. During the construction data has been collected from the tunnel and boreholes drilled from the tunnel. Results from these investigations have been reported and a comprehensive evaluation is in progress. The results will be used to design the site characterization program for the deep repository. Ten organizations from nine countries participate in the work at the laboratory. An important part of the cooperative work is performed within the framework of the task force on groundwater flow and transport of solutes. An evaluation has been made of the long term pumping test which was performed at Aespoe some years ago. It showed that the modelling tools that exist today have the ability to give a three-dimensional description of groundwater flow at a site like Aespoe. The task force will perform predictive modelling of the tracer experiments performed within the TRUE project. Characterization of the experimental site for TRUE and preparations for the tracer tests were completed during 1995. Tests of the engineering barriers have been started with the test of technology for backfilling of deposition tunnels. 55 refs, 36 figs, 7 tabs.

  4. A Virtual Rock Physics Laboratory Through Visualized and Interactive Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanorio, T.; Di Bonito, C.; Clark, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    As new scientific challenges demand more comprehensive and multidisciplinary investigations, laboratory experiments are not expected to become simpler and/or faster. Experimental investigation is an indispensable element of scientific inquiry and must play a central role in the way current and future generations of scientist make decisions. To turn the complexity of laboratory work (and that of rocks!) into dexterity, engagement, and expanded learning opportunities, we are building an interactive, virtual laboratory reproducing in form and function the Stanford Rock Physics Laboratory, at Stanford University. The objective is to combine lectures on laboratory techniques and an online repository of visualized experiments consisting of interactive, 3-D renderings of equipment used to measure properties central to the study of rock physics (e.g., how to saturate rocks, how to measure porosity, permeability, and elastic wave velocity). We use a game creation system together with 3-D computer graphics, and a narrative voice to guide the user through the different phases of the experimental protocol. The main advantage gained in employing computer graphics over video footage is that students can virtually open the instrument, single out its components, and assemble it. Most importantly, it helps describe the processes occurring within the rock. These latter cannot be tracked while simply recording the physical experiment, but computer animation can efficiently illustrate what happens inside rock samples (e.g., describing acoustic waves, and/or fluid flow through a porous rock under pressure within an opaque core-holder - Figure 1). The repository of visualized experiments will complement lectures on laboratory techniques and constitute an on-line course offered through the EdX platform at Stanford. This will provide a virtual laboratory for anyone, anywhere to facilitate teaching/learning of introductory laboratory classes in Geophysics and expand the number of courses

  5. Research in the Mont Terri Rock laboratory: Quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossart, Paul; Thury, Marc

    During the past 10 years, the 12 Mont Terri partner organisations ANDRA, BGR, CRIEPI, ENRESA, FOWG (now SWISSTOPO), GRS, HSK, IRSN, JAEA, NAGRA, OBAYASHI and SCK-CEN have jointly carried out and financed a research programme in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory. An important strategic question for the Mont Terri project is what type of new experiments should be carried out in the future. This question has been discussed among partner delegates, authorities, scientists, principal investigators and experiment delegates. All experiments at Mont Terri - past, ongoing and future - can be assigned to the following three categories: (1) process and mechanism understanding in undisturbed argillaceous formations, (2) experiments related to excavation- and repository-induced perturbations and (3) experiments related to repository performance during the operational and post-closure phases. In each of these three areas, there are still open questions and hence potential experiments to be carried out in the future. A selection of key issues and questions which have not, or have only partly been addressed so far and in which the project partners, but also the safety authorities and other research organisations may be interested, are presented in the following. The Mont Terri Rock Laboratory is positioned as a generic rock laboratory, where research and development is key: mainly developing methods for site characterisation of argillaceous formations, process understanding and demonstration of safety. Due to geological constraints, there will never be a site specific rock laboratory at Mont Terri. The added value for the 12 partners in terms of future experiments is threefold: (1) the Mont Terri project provides an international scientific platform of high reputation for research on radioactive waste disposal (= state-of-the-art research in argillaceous materials); (2) errors are explicitly allowed (= rock laboratory as a “playground” where experience is often gained through

  6. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Planning Report for 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-02-15

    This report presents the planned activities for the year 2009. The report is revised annually and details the programme carried out in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory as described in SKB's Research, Development and Demonstration Programme 2007, and serves as a basis for the management of the laboratory. The role of the Planning Report is to present the plans and scope of work for each project. Thereby the Status Reports may concentrate on work in progress and refers to this Planning Report for scope of work over the year. Background information on the projects is given in the Annual Report as well as findings and results.

  7. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Planning Report for 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-02-15

    This report presents the planned activities for the year 2011. The report is revised annually and details the programme carried out in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory as described in SKB's Research, Development and Demonstration Programme 2010, and serves as a basis for the management of the laboratory. The role of the Planning Report is to present the plans and scope of work for each project. Background information on the projects is given in the Annual Report as well as findings and results.

  8. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Planning Report for 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-05-15

    This report presents the planned activities for the year 2010. The report is revised annually and details the programme carried out in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory as described in SKB's Research, Development and Demonstration Programme 2007, and serves as a basis for the management of the laboratory. The role of the Planning Report is to present the plans and scope of work for each project. Thereby the Status Reports may concentrate on work in progress and refers to this Planning Report for scope of work over the year. Background information on the projects is given in the Annual Report as well as findings and results

  9. Rock mechanics modelling of rock mass properties - summary of primary data. Preliminary site description Laxemar subarea - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanaro, Flavio [Berg Bygg Konsult AB, Solna (Sweden); Oehman, Johan; Fredriksson, Anders [Golder Associates AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2006-05-15

    The results presented in this report are the summary of the primary data for the Laxemar Site Descriptive Modelling version 1.2. At this stage, laboratory tests on intact rock and fracture samples from borehole KSH01A, KSH02A, KAV01 (already considered in Simpevarp SDM version 1.2) and borehole KLX02 and KLX04 were available. Concerning the mechanical properties of the intact rock, the rock type 'granite to quartz monzodiorite' or 'Aevroe granite' (code 501044) was tested for the first time within the frame of the site descriptive modelling. The average uniaxial compressive strength and Young's modulus of the granite to quartz to monzodiorite are 192 MPa and 72 GPa, respectively. The crack initiation stress is observed to be 0.5 times the uniaxial compressive strength for the same rock type. Non negligible differences are observed between the statistics of the mechanical properties of the granite to quartz monzodiorite in borehole KLX02 and KLX04. The available data on rock fractures were analysed to determine the mechanical properties of the different fracture sets at the site (based on tilt test results) and to determine systematic differences between the results obtained with different sample preparation techniques (based on direct shear tests). The tilt tests show that there are not significant differences of the mechanical properties due to the fracture orientation. Thus, all fracture sets seem to have the same strength and deformability. The average peak friction angle for the Coulomb's Criterion of the fracture sets varies between 33.6 deg and 34.1 deg, while the average cohesion ranges between 0.46 and 0.52 MPa, respectively. The average of the Coulomb's residual cohesion and friction angle vary in the ranges 28.0 deg - 29.2 deg and 0.40-0.45 MPa, respectively. The only significant difference could be observed on the average cohesion between fracture set S{sub A} and S{sub d}. The direct shear tests show that the

  10. Fluid science laboratory for Columbus, executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defilippi, V.

    1988-03-01

    The role of the fluid science laboratory (FSL) on Columbus; FSL scientific objectives; and Columbus resources and interfaces to FSL are summarized. The FSL concept comprises a fully contained fluid facility, a partially contained fluid facility, a containerless fluid facility, and a convection controlled fluid facility; two double racks; non dedicated containers for fluids, and conditioning loops; fully automated working; diagnostic techniques; and possibilities to intervene when changing fluids, diagnostics, stimuli, or geometric environmental conditions. A power conditioning subsystem is necessary. A man tended free flyer option is also feasible.

  11. Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R Pace

    2007-04-01

    Over the past 13,500 years, human populations have lived in and productively utilized the natural resources offered by the cold desert environment of the northeastern Snake River Plain in eastern Idaho. Within an overall framework of hunting and gathering, groups relied on an intimate familiarity with the natural world and developed a variety of technologies to extract the resources that they needed to survive. Useful items were abundant and found everywhere on the landscape. Even the basaltic terrain and the rocks, themselves, were put to productive use. This paper presents a preliminary classification scheme for rock structures built on the Idaho National Laboratory landscape by prehistoric aboriginal populations, including discussions of the overall architecture of the structures, associated artifact assemblages, and topographic placement. Adopting an ecological perspective, the paper concludes with a discussion of the possible functions of these unique resources for the desert populations that once called the INL home.

  12. Microwave applications to rock specimen drying in laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihwan; Park, Hyeong-Dong

    2014-05-01

    Microwave heating is the process in which electromagnetic wave with 300 MHz - 300 GHz heats dielectric material. Although in the beginning microwave was mainly used in food industry to cook or heat the food, it soon became clear that microwave had a large potential for other applications. It was thus introduced in geological fields of investigation like mineral processing, oil sand and oil shale extraction, soil remediation, waste treatment. However, the drying techniques using microwave was rarely treated in geology field. According to the ISRM suggested methods, experimental rock specimens in laboratory test were dried in 105°C oven for a period of at least 24 hours. In this method, hot air transmits heats to material by means of thermal conduction, and the heat was transferred from the surface to the inside of the rock specimens. The thermal gradient and moisture gradient can deteriorate the specimens, and energy can be wasted in bulk heating the specimens. The aim of our study was to compare physical property, microstructural property, and energy efficiency between microwave drying method and conventional oven drying method, and to suggest new method for rock drying. Granite, basalt, and sandstone were selected as specimens and were made in cylinder shape with 54 mm diameter. To compare two different methods, one set of saturated specimens were dried in 105°C conventional oven and the other set of saturated specimens were dried in microwave oven. After dried, the specimens were cooled and saturated in 20°C water 48 hours. The saturation-drying were repeated 50 cycles, and the physical property and microstructural property were measured every 10 cycles. Absorption and elastic wave velocity were measured to investigate the change of physical property, and microscope image and X-ray computed tomography image were obtained to investigate the change of microstructural property of rock specimens. The electricity consumption of conventional oven and microwave oven

  13. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Status Report. April - June 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-07-01

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) constitutes an important part of SKB's work to design and construct a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel and to develop and test methods for characterisation of a suitable site. The plans for SKB's research and development of technique during the period 2005- 2010 are presented in SKB's RDandD-Programme 2004 /SKB 2004/. The information given in the RDandD-Programme related to Aespoe HRL is annually detailed in the Aespoe HRL Planning Report /SKB 2007/. This Aespoe HRL Status Report is a collection of the main achievements obtained during the second quarter 2007

  14. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The TASS-tunnel. Geological mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardenby, Carljohan (Vattenfall Power Consultant AB (Sweden)); Sigurdsson, Oskar (HAskGeokonsult AB (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    The project entitled 'Sealing of tunnel at great depth' (Fintaetning av tunnel paa stort djup) needed a new tunnel in an area as undisturbed as possible and with cross-cutting water-bearing structures. The new tunnel, which was given the name TASS, was excavated on the -450 m level of SKB's Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (Aespoe HRL). The length of the tunnel is approximately 80 m and the theoretical tunnel area 19 m2. As is the case with all the other tunnels of the Aespoe HRL, the new tunnel has been geologically mapped. In addition, laser scanning combined with digital photography has been carried out. The tunnel was also used to test various types of explosives, borehole layouts and drilling techniques. The geological mapping of tunnel floor, walls and roof took place on four major occasions when a halt was made in tunnel excavation to allow for various tests. Before the mapping started on these occasions, laser scanning took place. The tunnel faces were mapped after each round (drilling, blasting and unloading). The present report describes the geological features of the tunnel and briefly how the laser scanning was performed. Water-bearing structures have been compared to similar structures in the neighbouring tunnels. The rock type names used here follow the old established Aespoe HRL nomenclature. Narrow (<0.1 m wide) dykes are normally mapped as fracture fillings. The dominating rock type is Aespoe diorite, which constitutes some 90 % of the rock mass. It is mostly mapped as fresh rock. . Minor constituents of the rock mass are fine-grained granite, hybrid rock, pegmatite, quartz veins/lenses and undifferentiated mafic rock. The mapping of fractures and deformation zones considers a number of parameters such as number of fractures, open/healed, width, length, description of fracture surfaces (roughness, planarity, etc), fracture filling, alteration and water. The deformation zones are discriminated into two main categories (&apos

  15. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Status Report January - April 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-09-15

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) constitutes an important part of SKB's work to design and construct a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel and to develop and test methods for characterisation of a suitable site. The plans for SKB's research and development of technique during the period 2008-2013 are presented in SKB's RDandD-Programme 2007 /SKB 2007/. The information given in the RDandD-Programme related to Aespoe HRL is annually detailed in the Aespoe HRL Planning Report /SKB 2009/. This Aespoe HRL Status Report is a collection of the main achievements obtained during the period January to April 2009.

  16. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Status Report May - August 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-11-15

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) constitutes an important part of SKB's work to design and construct a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel and to develop and test methods for characterisation of a suitable site. The plans for SKB's research and development of technique during the period 2008-2013 are presented in SKB's RDandD-Programme 2007 /SKB 2007/. The information given in the RDandD-Programme related to Aespoe HRL is annually detailed in the Aespoe HRL Planning Report /SKB 2009/. This Aespoe HRL Status Report is a collection of the main achievements obtained during the period May to August 2009.

  17. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Status Report October - December 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-03-15

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) constitutes an important part of SKB's work to design and construct a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel and to develop and test methods for characterisation of a suitable site. The plans for SKB's research and development of technique during the period 2008-2013 are presented in SKB's RDandD-Programme 2007 /SKB 2007/. The information given in the RDandD-Programme related to Aespoe HRL is annually detailed in the Aespoe HRL Planning Report /SKB 2008/. This Aespoe HRL Status Report is a collection of the main achievements obtained during the fourth quarter of 2008.

  18. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Status Report May - August 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-02-15

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) constitutes an important part of SKB's work to design and construct a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel and to develop and test methods for characterisation of a suitable site. The plans for SKB's research and development of technique during the period 2008-2013 are presented in SKB's RDandD-Programme 2007 /SKB 2007/. The information given in the RD and D-Programme related to Aespoe HRL is annually detailed in the Aespoe HRL Planning Report /SKB 2010/. This Aespoe HRL Status Report is a collection of the main achievements obtained during the period May to August 2010.

  19. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Status Report. September - December 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-04-15

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) constitutes an important part of SKB's work to design and construct a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel and to develop and test methods for characterisation of a suitable site. In September 2010, the plans for SKB's research and development of technique during the period 2011-2016 were presented in SKB's RDandD-Programme 2010 /SKB 2010a/. The information given in the RDandD-Programme related to Aespoe HRL is annually detailed in the Aespoe HRL Planning Report and the information valid for 2010 is given in /SKB 2010b/. This Aespoe HRL Status Report is a collection of the main achievements obtained during the period September to December 2010

  20. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Status Report. January - April 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-10-15

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) constitutes an important part of SKB's work to design and construct a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel and to develop and test methods for characterisation of a suitable site. The plans for SKB's research and development of technique during the period 2008-2013 are presented in SKB's RDandD Programme 2007 /SKB 2007/. The information given in the RDandD-Programme related to Aespoe HRL is annually detailed in the Aespoe HRL Planning Report /SKB 2009/. This Aespoe HRL Status Report is a collection of the main achievements obtained during the period January to April 2010

  1. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Status Report. July - September 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) constitutes an important part of SKB's work to design and construct a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel and to develop and test methods for characterisation of a suitable site. The plans for SKB's research and development of technique during the period 2008-2013 are presented in SKB's RDandD-Programme 2007 /SKB 2007/. The information given in the RDandD-Programme related to Aespoe HRL is annually detailed in the Aespoe HRL Planning Report /SKB 2008/. This Aespoe HRL Status Report is a collection of the main achievements obtained during the third quarter of 2008.

  2. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Status Report. September - December 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-05-15

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) constitutes an important part of SKB's work to design and construct a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel and to develop and test methods for characterisation of a suitable site. The plans for SKB's research and development of technique during the period 2008-2013 are presented in SKB's RDandD Programme 2007 /SKB 2007/. The information given in the RDandD-Programme related to Aespoe HRL is annually detailed in the Aespoe HRL Planning Report /SKB 2009/. This Aespoe HRL Status Report is a collection of the main achievements obtained during the period September to December 2009

  3. Event triggered data acquisition in the Rock Mechanics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, R.D.

    1993-03-01

    Increasing complexity of experiments coupled with limitations of the previously used computers required improvements in both hardware and software in the Rock Mechanics Laboratories. Increasing numbers of input channels and the need for better graphics could no longer be supplied by DATAVG, an existing software package for data acquisition and display written by D. J. Holcomb in 1983. After researching the market and trying several alternatives, no commercial program was found which met our needs. The previous version of DATAVG had the basic features needed but was tied to obsolete hardware. Memory limitations on the previously used PDP-11 made it impractical to upgrade the software further. With the advances in IBM compatible computers it is now desirable to use them as data recording platforms. With this information in mind, it was decided to write a new version of DATAVG which would take advantage of newer hardware. The new version had to support multiple graphic display windows and increased channel counts. It also had to be easier to use.

  4. Summary of failure analysis activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowgill, M.G.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Franz, E.M.

    1996-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has for many years conducted examinations related to the failures of nuclear materials and components. These examinations included the confirmation of root cause analyses, the determination of the causes of failure, identification of the species that accelerate corrosion, and comparison of the results of nondestructive examinations with those obtained by destructive examination. The results of those examinations, which had previously appeared in various formats (formal and informal reports, journal articles, etc.), have been collected together and summarized in the present report. The report is divided into sections according to the general subject matter (for example, corrosion, fatigue, etc.). Each section presents summaries of the information contained in specific reports and publications, all of which are fully identified as to title, authors, report number or journal reference, date of publication, and FIN number under which the work was performed.

  5. Laboratory-Directed Research and Development 2016 Summary Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, Rekha Sukamar [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jacobson, Julie Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2C, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all INL programs. This report includes summaries of all INL LDRD research activities supported during Fiscal Year (FY) 2016. INL is the lead laboratory for the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE). The INL mission is to discover, demonstrate, and secure innovative nuclear energy solutions, other clean energy options, and critical infrastructure with a vision to change the world’s energy future and secure our critical infrastructure. Operating since 1949, INL is the nation’s leading research, development, and demonstration center for nuclear energy, including nuclear nonproliferation and physical and cyber-based protection of energy systems and critical infrastructure, as well as integrated energy systems research, development, demonstration, and deployment. INL has been managed and operated by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (a wholly owned company of Battelle) for DOE since 2005. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, is a partnership between Battelle, BWX Technologies, Inc., AECOM, the Electric Power Research Institute, the National University Consortium (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Ohio State University, North Carolina State University, University of New Mexico, and Oregon State University), and the Idaho university collaborators (i.e., University of Idaho, Idaho State University, and Boise State University). Since its creation, INL’s research and development (R&D) portfolio has broadened with targeted programs supporting national missions to advance nuclear energy

  6. Comparison of Laboratory, in Situ, and Rock Mass Measurements of the Hydraulic Conductivity of Metamorphic Rock at the Savannah River Plant Near Aiken, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine, I. Wendell

    1981-06-01

    In situ testing of exploratory wells in metamorphic rock indicates that two types of fracturing occur in the rock mass. Rock containing small openings that permit only extremely slow movement of water is termed virtually impermeable rock. Rock containing openings of sufficient size to permit transmission of water at a significantly faster rate is termed hydraulically transmissive rock. Laboratory methods are unsuitable for measuring hydraulic conductivity in hydraulically transmissive rock; however, for the virtually impermeable rock, values comparable to those of the in situ tests are obtained. The hydraulic conductivity of the rock mass over a large region is calculated by using the hydraulic gradient, porosity, and regional velocity. This velocity is determined by dividing the inferred travel distance by the age of water, which is determined by the helium content of the water. This rock mass hydraulic conductivity value is between the values measured for the two types of fractures but is closer to the measured value for the virtually impermeable rock. This relationship is attributed to the control of the regional flow rate by the virtually impermeable rock where the discrete fractures do not form a continuous open connection through the entire rock mass. Thus laboratory methods of measuring permeability in metamorphic rock are of value if they are properly applied.

  7. The Vaigat Rock Avalanche Laboratory, west-central Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, S.; Rosser, N. J.; Szczucinski, W.; Norman, E. C.; Benjamin, J.; Strzelecki, M.; Long, A. J.; Drewniak, M.

    2013-12-01

    Rock avalanches have unusually high mobility and pose both an immediate hazard, but also produce far-field impacts associated with dam breach, glacier collapse and where they run-out into water, tsunami. Such secondary hazards can often pose higher risks than the original landslide. The prediction of future threats posed by potential rock avalanches is heavily reliant upon understanding of the physics derived from an interpretation of deposits left by previous events, yet drawing comparisons between multiple events is normally challenging as interactions with complex mountainous terrain makes deposits from each event unique. As such numerical models and the interpretation of the underlying physics which govern landslide mobility is commonly case-specific and poorly suited to extrapolation beyond the single events the model is tuned to. Here we present a high-resolution LiDAR and hyperspectral dataset captured across a unique cluster of large rock avalanche source areas and deposits in the Vaigat straight, west central Greenland. Vaigat offers the unprecedented opportunity to model a sample of > 15 rock avalanches of various age sourced from an 80 km coastal escarpment. At Vaigat many of the key variables (topography, geology, post-glacial history) are held constant across all landslides providing the chance to investigate the variations in dynamics and emplacement style related to variable landslide volume, drop-heights, and thinning/spreading over relatively simple, unrestricted run-out zones both onto land and into water. Our data suggest that this region represents excellent preservation of landslide deposits, and hence is well suited to calibrate numerical models of run out dynamics. We use this data to aid the interpretation of deposit morphology, structure lithology and run-out characteristics in more complex settings. Uniquely, we are also able to calibrate our models using a far-field dataset of well-preserved tsunami run-up deposits, resulting from the 21

  8. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Sensor Data Report No 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudarzi, Reza; Johannesson, Lars-Erik (Clay Technology AB (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    The Prototype Repository Test consists of two sections. The installation of the first Section of Prototype Repository was made during summer and autumn 2001 and Section 2 was installed in spring and summer 2003. This report presents data from measurements in the Prototype Repository during the period 20010917-20100601. The report is organized so that the actual measured results are shown in Appendix 1-10, where Appendix 8 deals with measurements of canister displacements (by AITEMIN), Appendix 9 deals with geo-electric measurements in the backfill (by GRS), Appendix 10 deals with stress and strain measurement in the rock (by AaF) and Appendix 11 deals with measurement of water pressure in the rock (by VBB/VIAK). The main report and Appendix 1-7 deal with the rest of the measurements. Section 1. The following measurements are made in the bentonite in each of the two instrumented deposition holes in Section 1 (1 and 3): Temperature is measured in 32 points, total pressure in 27 points, pore water pressure in 14 points and relative humidity in 37 points. Temperature is also measured by all relative humidity gauges. Every measuring point is related to a local coordinate system in the deposition hole. The following measurements are made in the backfill in Section 1. Temperature is measured in 20 points, total pressure in 18 points, pore water pressure in 23 points and relative humidity in 45 points. Temperature is also measured by all relative humidity gauges. Furthermore, water content is measured by an electric chain in one section. Every measuring point is related to a local coordinate system in the tunnel. The following measurements are made on the surface of the canisters in Section 1: Temperature is measured every meter along two fiber optic cables. Furthermore, displacements of the canister in hole 3 are measured with 6 gauges. The following measurements are made in the rock in Section 1: Temperature is measured in 37 points in boreholes in the floor. Water

  9. The variation of the mechanical properties of rock on spatial scales from the laboratory to outcrop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, J.; Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.; Maclaughlin, M.; Turner, A. L.; GEOX^TM

    2011-12-01

    We have installed a dense array of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) strain and temperature sensors on the 4100'-level (1250 m) at the site of the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, SD. The sensor installation site is composed of the Precambrian Poorman formation that contains deformed and metamorphosed Precambrian sediments that is anisotropic including a well-developed foliation, quartz veins, and several joint sets. We have installed nine Micron Optics Inc. OS3600 tube gages. Four of these gages are mounted on the surface of the rock mass and attached to rock bolts that extend 2 m into the rock mass. The other five OS3600 sensors are embedded in drill holes into the rock mass. Additionally, we have developed a new method for measuring in situ strain and temperature in intact rock masses. Fiber optically instrumented rock strain and temperature strips (FROSTS) are 2 m-long strips of 304 stainless steel specially designed to measure temperature and both shortening and elongation in an intact rock mass. FROSTS have FBG strain and temperature sensors mounted on them at 30 cm interval and are grouted into a drill hole in a rock mass. In May 2011, we performed an active loading experiment that consisted of using two hydraulic rams to apply over 200 kN of force to the rock mass. Elastic strain was measured with the fiber optic sensor array. A one-dimensional Boussinesq solution calculates a Young's Modulus of 6.25 GPa for the rock mass. The laboratory-determined values for Young's Modulus in the Poorman formation vary between 49.6 and 94.5 GPa. The difference between the laboratory and field values can be attributed to the closing of fractures and microcracks in the rock mass making the rock mass more compliant than the smaller specimens used for the laboratory experiments. The results of the active loading experiment have implications for the up-scaling of rock mechanical properties between the laboratory and field scales.

  10. PROCESS MODELLING OF ROCK SAMPLE HANDLING IN PETROPHYSICAL LABORATORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adaleta Perković

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Everyday procedures carried out in petrophysical laboratory can be defined as a complete cycle of business processes. Sample handling process is one of the most significant and demanding procedures. It starts with sample receiving in laboratory and then subsequently, series of analyses and measurements are carrying out resulting in petrophysical parameters. Sample handling process ends with sample storage and archiving of obtained measurement data. Process model is used for description of repeating activities. Sample handling process is presented by graphical method and use of eEPC diagram (extended Event-Driven Process Chain which describe process based on events. Created process model jointly binds static laboratory resources (measuring instruments, computers and data, speeds up process with increasing the user’s efficiency and with improvements of data and information exchange. Besides flow of activity, model of data sample handling includes information about system components (laboratory equipment and software applications that carry out activities. Described model, with minor modifications and adaptations, can be used in any laboratory that is dealing with samples (the paper is published in Croatian.

  11. Effects of earthquake induced rock shear on containment system integrity. Laboratory testing plan development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, Rodney S. (RSRead Consulting Inc. (Canada))

    2011-07-15

    This report describes a laboratory-scale testing program plan to address the issue of earthquake induced rock shear effects on containment system integrity. The document contains a review of relevant literature from SKB covering laboratory testing of bentonite clay buffer material, scaled analogue tests, and the development of related material models to simulate rock shear effects. The proposed testing program includes standard single component tests, new two-component constant volume tests, and new scaled analogue tests. Conceptual drawings of equipment required to undertake these tests are presented along with a schedule of tests. The information in this document is considered sufficient to engage qualified testing facilities, and to guide implementation of laboratory testing of rock shear effects. This document was completed as part of a collaborative agreement between SKB and Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) in Canada

  12. Preliminary validation of rock mass models by comparison to laboratory frictional sliding experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolik, S.R.; Miller, J.D.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is studying Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada as a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Site characterization will be facilitated by the construction of an Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The ESF and potential repository will be excavated from both nonwelded and welded ashflow tuff with varying rock quality (degree of welding, rock mass strength, etc.) and fault and fracture characteristics. Design concerns for the construction of these facilities include the integrity of the structure during underground testing operations and, if it occurs, the emplacement and storage of high-level nuclear waste which could increase the local temperatures in the underground rock mass to as high as 300{degrees}C. Because of the associated issues regarding personnel and long-term environmental safety, sophisticated jointed rock mass models will be required to provide a high degree of confidence for decisions regarding the design, site characterization, and licensing of such facilities. The objective of the work documented in this report is to perform code validation calculations for three rock-mass computer models. The three rock-mass computer models used for this report are the discrete element code UDEC, Version 1.82; and the finite element continuum joint models JAC2D Version 5.10 and JAS3D Version 1.1. The rock mass behavior predicted by the models are compared to the results of laboratory experiments on layered polycarbonate (Lexan) and granite plate experiments. These experiments examine the rock mass behavior of well-defined jointed rock structures or models of jointed structures under uniaxial and biaxial loading. The laboratory environment allows control over the boundary conditions, material properties, and quality and quantity of the data obtained.

  13. Geoengineering Research for a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory in Sedimentary Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldon, M.

    2004-12-01

    A process to identify world-class research for a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) in the USA has been initiated by NSF. While allowing physicists to study, inter alia, dark matter and dark energy, this laboratory will create unprecedented opportunities for biologists to study deep life, geoscientists to study crustal processes and geoengineers to study the behavior of rock, fluids and underground cavities at depth, on time scales of decades. A substantial portion of the nation's future infrastructure is likely to be sited underground because of energy costs, urban crowding and vulnerability of critical surface facilities. Economic and safe development of subsurface space will require an improved ability to engineer the geologic environment. Because of the prevalence of sedimentary rock in the upper continental crust, much of this subterranean infrastructure will be hosted in sedimentary rock. Sedimentary rocks are fundamentally anisotropic due to lithology and bedding, and to discontinuities ranging from microcracks to faults. Fractures, faults and bedding planes create structural defects and hydraulic pathways over a wide range of scales. Through experimentation, observation and monitoring in a sedimentary rock DUSEL, in conjunction with high performance computational models and visualization tools, we will explore the mechanical and hydraulic characteristics of layered rock. DUSEL will permit long-term experiments on 100 m blocks of rock in situ, accessed via peripheral tunnels. Rock volumes will be loaded to failure and monitored for post-peak behavior. The response of large rock bodies to stress relief-driven, time-dependent strain will be monitored over decades. Large block experiments will be aimed at measurement of fluid flow and particle/colloid transport, in situ mining (incl. mining with microbes), remediation technologies, fracture enhancement for resource extraction and large scale long-term rock mass response to induced

  14. Summary of recreational hook and line caught sea turtles documented by the NOAA Galveston Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The database is a summary of sea turtles that are hook and line captured by recreational anglers in the region covered by the NOAA Galveston Laboratory through its...

  15. Summary report - development of laboratory tests and the stress- strain behaviour of Olkiluoto mica gneiss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakala, M.; Heikkilae, E. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland). Lab. of Rock Engineering

    1997-05-01

    This work summarizes the project aimed at developing and qualifying a suitable combination of laboratory tests to establish a statistically reliable stress-strain behaviour of the main rock types at Posiva Oy`s detailed investigation sites for disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The work includes literature study of stress-strain behaviour of brittle rock, development and qualification of laboratory tests, suggested test procedures and interpretation methods and finally testing of Olkiluoto mica gneiss. The Olkiluoto study includes over 130 loading tests. Besides the commonly used laboratory tests, direct tensile tests, damage controlled tests and acoustic emission measurements were also carried out. (orig.) (54 refs.).

  16. Laboratory Detection and Analysis of Organic Compounds in Rocks Using HPLC and XRD Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoi, D.; Kanik, I.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Sherrit, S.; Tsapin, A.; Kulleck, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this work we describe an analytical method for determining the presence of organic compounds in rocks, limestone, and other composite materials. Our preliminary laboratory experiments on different rocks/limestone show that the organic component in mineralogical matrices is a minor phase on order of hundreds of ppm and can be better detected using high precision liquid chromatography (HPLC). The matrix, which is the major phase, plays an important role in embedding and protecting the organic molecules from the harsh Martian environment. Some rocks bear significant amounts of amino acids therefore, it is possible to identify these phases using powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) by crystallizing the organic. The method of detection/analysis of organics, in particular amino acids, that have been associated with life will be shown in the next section.

  17. 0-6686 : improving DMS 9210 requirements for limestone rock asphalt : [project summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Limestone rock asphalt (LRA) mixtures have : been produced and placed for several decades : using specification requirements currently listed : under DMS 9210, Limestone Rock Asphalt (LRA). : Several Texas Department of Transportation : (TxDOT) distr...

  18. Influence of rock salt impurities on limestone aggregate durability : technical summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Non-durable coarse aggregate in concrete pavement can break down under : repeated freeze-thaw cycles. Application of rock salt may increase the severity of : exposure conditions because of trace compounds, such as calcium sulfate, in rock : salt. Con...

  19. Idaho National Laboratory Annual Report FY 2013 LDRD Project Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dena Tomchak

    2014-03-01

    The FY 2013 LDRD Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL’s technical capabilities support the current and future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to INL—it provides a means for the Laboratory to maintain scientific and technical vitality while funding highly innovative, high-risk science and technology research and development (R&D) projects. The program enhances technical capabilities at the Laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities to explore proof-of-principle ideas, advanced studies of innovative concepts, and preliminary technical analyses. Established by Congress in 1991, the LDRD Program proves its benefit each year through new programs, intellectual property, patents, copyrights, national and international awards, and publications.

  20. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2016 Annual Summary of Completed Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-03-30

    ORNL FY 2016 Annual Summary of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) Completed Projects. The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at ORNL operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2C, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (October 22, 2015), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. The LDRD program funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. ORNL reports its status to DOE in March of each year.

  1. Numerical modelling of brittle fracture and step-path failure: from laboratory to rock slope scale

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Ming

    2008-01-01

    Recent research indicates that brittle fracture and step-path failure are important considerations in both natural high-mountain and engineered rock slopes. Newly developed techniques for field survey and numerical modeling of brittle fracture and step-path failure are presented in this research in an attempt to overcome many of the limitations of traditional approaches. Research primarily focuses on the simulation of brittle fracture and step-path failure at both the laboratory and large slo...

  2. Change Analysis of Laser Scans of Laboratory Rock Slopes Subject to Wave Attack Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y.; Lindenbergh, R.; Hofland, B.; Kramer, R.

    2017-09-01

    For better understanding how coastal structures with gentle slopes behave during high energy events, a wave attack experiment representing a storm of 3000 waves was performed in a flume facility. Two setups with different steepness of slope were compared under the same conditions. In order to quantify changes in the rock slopes after the wave attack, a terrestrial laser scanner was used to obtain 3D coordinates of the rock surface before and after each experiment. Next, through a series of processing steps, the point clouds were converted to a suitable 2D raster for change analysis. This allowed to estimate detailed and quantitative change information. The results indicate that the area around the artificial coast line, defined as the intersection between sloped surface and wave surface, is most strongly affected by wave attacks. As the distances from the sloped surface to the waves are shorter, changes for the mildly sloped surface, slope 1 (1 : 10), are distributed over a larger area compared to the changes for the more steeply sloped surface, slope 2 (1 : 5). The results of this experiment show that terrestrial laser scanning is an effective and feasible method for change analysis of rock slopes in a laboratory setting. Most striking results from a process point of view is that the transport direction of the rocks change between the two different slopes: from seaward transport for the steeper slope to landward transport for the milder slope.

  3. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory waste management technology development activities. Summary progress report, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.J. (comp.)

    1980-10-01

    Summary reports on the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy-sponsored waste management technology development projects at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory describe progress for calendar year 1979. Activities in airborne, low-level, and transuranic waste management areas are discussed. Work progress on waste assay, treatment, disposal, and environmental monitoring is reviewed.

  4. Performance of the Opalinus Clay under thermal loading: experimental results from Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gens, A. [Universitat Politència de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) GmbH, Braunschweig (Germany); Gaus, I. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); and others

    2017-04-15

    The paper presents an overview of the behaviour of Opalinus Clay under thermal loading as observed in three in situ heating tests performed in the Mont Terri rock laboratory: HE-B, HE-D and HE-E. The three tests are summarily described; they encompass a broad range of test layouts and experimental conditions. Afterwards, the following topics are examined: determination of thermal conductivity, thermally-induced pore pressure generation and thermally-induced mechanical effects. The mechanisms underlying pore pressure generation and dissipation are discussed in detail and the relationship between rock damage and thermal loading is examined using an additional in situ test: SE-H. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the various thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) interactions identified in the heating tests. (authors)

  5. Fracture toughness properties of rocks in Olkiluoto: Laboratory measurements 2008-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siren, T.

    2012-05-15

    In Olkiluoto an underground rock characterization facility (ONKALO) for the final disposal site of spent nuclear fuel has been under thorough research many years, but further knowledge is needed on fracture toughness parameters. Fracture toughness parameters are important for example in fracture mechanics prediction for Posiva's Olkiluoto Spalling Experiment (POSE). This working report describes a laboratory campaign that was done between 2008 and 2009. The campaign aimed at determining the fracture mechanics parameters as well as density and ultrasonic velocities for Olkiluoto rocks. The specimens delivered were selected by Posiva; the core showed no damage and the quality of the delivered cores was good with varying sample diameter. Most of the test samples (9 out of 12) are gneissic rock. The Mode I fracture toughness was determined using two different methods to account for two different fracturing directions. The methods are the Chevron Bend (CB) test as proposed in the ISRM Suggested Method and a method based on the Brazilian Disk (BD) experiment. The Mode II fracture toughness was determined using the Punch-Through Shear with Confining Pressure experiment on the remaining pieces from the CB testing. The scatter in the results is very large, even within one piece of core sample. Usually the scatter of results is less than 5 %. The high scatter in the data at hand is believed to be due to the very inhomogeneous nature of the rock material. The magnitude of the determined Mode I fracture toughness compares well with available reported data for medium to coarse grained granitoide rocks. However the scatter of the mode II fracture toughness values is higher than experienced on other rock types, but the variability is reasonable for the inhomogeneous rock type. Distinguishing the fracture toughness values for different anisotropy directions would require more thorough testing with quality samples at different anisotropy directions. However since fracture

  6. Rock Mechanics Model - Summary of the primary data. Preliminary site description Forsmark area - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-12-15

    The present report summarises the laboratory results performed on samples of intact rock and natural fractures collected at Forsmark in relation to the Preliminary Site Descriptive Modelling, version 1.2. Uniaxial, triaxial and indirect tensile tests on intact rock and; tilt, normal and shear tests on natural fractures were performed on samples from boreholes KFM01A, KFM02A, KFM03A and KFM04A. The samples were mainly taken from the rock types: granite to granodiorite and tonalite to granodiorite. The uniaxial compressive strength of the granite and granodiorite is higher (225 MPa) than that of the tonalite (156 MPa) (SP results). The uniaxial compressive strength obtained at HUT gives on average 5% higher strength than that obtained at the SP Laboratory. The cohesion and friction angle of 28 MPa and 60 deg for the granite to granodiorite, respectively, and 30 MPa and 47 deg for the tonalite to granodiorite, respectively. The crack initiation stress of the intact rock was also determined. The values of the Young's modulus obtained range between 70 and 76 GPa on average for all rock types. The Poisson's ratio in uniaxial conditions, on the other hand, is on average 0.24 for the granite to granodiorite and 0.27 for the tonalite to granodiorite. The mechanical properties of the rock samples taken from some of the boreholes might indicate a decrease of strength for depth larger than about 600 m due to microcracking induced by the release of high stresses during drilling. Further studies on the depth dependency of the mechanical properties of the intact rock should be carried out. Natural fractures were also tested with the same technique by two laboratories, SP and NGI. Tilt tests show that the average JRC0 of the fractures is on average around 6 while the basic friction angle is around 30 deg. The average peak cohesion and friction angle of all the samples tested in direct shear by the SP Laboratory was 34 deg and 0.6 MPa, respectively. The SP results were

  7. Experiments at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory[Information for the general public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-12-01

    A dress rehearsal is being held in preparation for the construction of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel at SKB's underground Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) on Aespoe, outside Oskarshamn. Here we can test different technical solutions on a full scale and in a realistic environment. The Aespoe HRL is also used for field research. We are conducting a number of experiments here in collaboration with Swedish and international experts. In the Zedex experiment we have compared how the rock is affected around a drill-and-blast tunnel versus a bored tunnel. In a new experiment we will investigate how much the rock can take. A narrow pillar between two boreholes will be loaded to the point that the rock's ultimate strength is exceeded (Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment). In the Demo Test we are demonstrating emplacement of the copper canisters and the surrounding bentonite in the deposition holes. In the Prototype Repository we study what long-term changes occur in the barriers under the conditions prevailing in a deep repository. Horizontal deposition: Is it possible to deposit the canisters horizontally without compromising safety? Backfill and Plug Test: The tunnels in the future deep repository for spent nuclear fuel will be filled with clay and crushed rock and then plugged. Canister Retrieval Test: If the deep repository should not perform satisfactorily for some reason, we want to be able to retrieve the spent fuel. The Lot test is intended to show how the bentonite behaves in an environment similar to that in the future deep repository. The purpose of the TBT test is to determine how the bentonite clay in the buffer is affected by high temperatures. Two-phase flow means that liberated gas in the groundwater flows separately in the fractures in the rock. This reduces the capacity of the rock to conduct water. Lasgit: By pressurizing a canister with helium, we can measure how the gas moves through the surrounding buffer. Colloid Project: Can very small

  8. Implementation of the full-scale emplacement (FE) experiment at the Mont Terri rock laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, H.R.; Garitte, B.; Vogt, T.; and others

    2017-04-15

    Opalinus Clay is currently being assessed as the host rock for a deep geological repository for high-level and low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in Switzerland. Within this framework, the 'Full-Scale Emplacement' (FE) experiment was initiated at the Mont Terri rock laboratory close to the small town of St-Ursanne in Switzerland. The FE experiment simulates, as realistically as possible, the construction, waste emplacement, backfilling and early post-closure evolution of a spent fuel/vitrified high-level waste disposal tunnel according to the Swiss repository concept. The main aim of this multiple heater test is the investigation of repository-induced thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) coupled effects on the host rock at this scale and the validation of existing coupled THM models. For this, several hundred sensors were installed in the rock, the tunnel lining, the bentonite buffer, the heaters and the plug. This paper is structured according to the implementation timeline of the FE experiment. It documents relevant details about the instrumentation, the tunnel construction, the production of the bentonite blocks and the highly compacted 'granulated bentonite mixture' (GBM), the development and construction of the prototype 'backfilling machine' (BFM) and its testing for horizontal GBM emplacement. Finally, the plug construction and the start of all 3 heaters (with a thermal output of 1350 Watt each) in February 2015 are briefly described. In this paper, measurement results representative of the different experimental steps are also presented. Tunnel construction aspects are discussed on the basis of tunnel wall displacements, permeability testing and relative humidity measurements around the tunnel. GBM densities achieved with the BFM in the different off-site mock-up tests and, finally, in the FE tunnel are presented. Finally, in situ thermal conductivity and temperature measurements recorded during the first heating months

  9. Understanding chemical trends in rock surface compositions as measured by ChemCam at Gale crater, Mars: The signatures of rock coatings and rinds in LIBS laboratory data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, N.; Clegg, S. M.; Wiens, R. C.; Leveille, R. J.; Melikechi, N.; Ollila, A.; Tokar, R. L.; Newsom, H. E.; Blank, J. G.; Bridges, N. T.; Clark, B.; Deans, M. C.; Delapp, D.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Hardgrove, C. J.; Jackson, R.; Lasue, J.; McInroy, R.; Meslin, P.; Mezzacappa, A.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    On Earth, the physical and chemical breakdown of rocky materials occurs through interactions with the atmosphere, soil, biological processes, and aqueous solutions. These interactions produce alteration features on the surfaces of rocks, which record information about the amount and types of fluids with which the rock has interacted. Alteration features can also be indicators of and habitats for microbial life in terrestrial environments. Thus, detecting rock surface alteration is an important part of the NASA Curiosity rover mission to Gale crater, Mars. The ChemCam LIBS instrument onboard Curiosity is uniquely suited to detecting and analyzing rock surface alteration. The LIBS technique uses a pulsed laser microbeam (350-550 μm) to ablate small amounts of material from a target to form a plasma. Because some material is removed during each laser pulse, it is possible to obtain a depth profile of chemical composition by performing multiple laser pulses on one location. Each pulse returns a spectrum that represents the composition at a specific depth, with each subsequent shot sampling the composition at a slightly greater depth. Laboratory measurements of basalts have shown that each LIBS shot removes at least ~0.3-0.82 μm/shot, suggesting a removal of ~9-25 μm of the surface for a standard analysis of 30 shots in rocks of similar hardness. Here we present laboratory LIBS experiments on well-characterized terrestrial rock samples with coatings and rinds with the goal of understanding the signatures of such features in LIBS data from Mars. The terrestrial sample set includes a basalt with a ~0-50 μm thick Mn-rich rock varnish and a thin (Gale crater.

  10. Correlation of pre-earthquake electromagnetic signals with laboratory and field rock experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bleier

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the 2007 M5.4 Alum Rock earthquake near San José California showed that magnetic pulsations were present in large numbers and with significant amplitudes during the 2 week period leading up the event. These pulsations were 1–30 s in duration, had unusual polarities (many with only positive or only negative polarities versus both polarities, and were different than other pulsations observed over 2 years of data in that the pulse sequence was sustained over a 2 week period prior to the quake, and then disappeared shortly after the quake. A search for the underlying physics process that might explain these pulses was was undertaken, and one theory (Freund, 2002 demonstrated that charge carriers were released when various types of rocks were stressed in a laboratory environment. It was also significant that the observed charge carrier generation was transient, and resulted in pulsating current patterns. In an attempt to determine if this phenomenon occurred outside of the laboratory environment, the authors scaled up the physics experiment from a relatively small rock sample in a dry laboratory setting, to a large 7 metric tonne boulder comprised of Yosemite granite. This boulder was located in a natural, humid (above ground setting at Bass Lake, Ca. The boulder was instrumented with two Zonge Engineering, Model ANT4 induction type magnetometers, two Trifield Air Ion Counters, a surface charge detector, a geophone, a Bruker Model EM27 Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR spectrometer with Sterling cycle cooler, and various temperature sensors. The boulder was stressed over about 8 h using expanding concrete (Bustartm, until it fractured into three major pieces. The recorded data showed surface charge build up, magnetic pulsations, impulsive air conductivity changes, and acoustical cues starting about 5 h before the boulder actually broke. These magnetic and air conductivity pulse signatures resembled both the laboratory

  11. The colloid investigations conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2000-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus [Geopoint AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Wold, Susanna [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry] (eds.)

    2005-12-15

    In 2000, SKB decided to initiate an international colloid project at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The objectives of the colloid project are to: (i) study the role of bentonite as a colloid source, (ii) verify the background colloid concentration at Aespoe HRL and, (iii) investigate the potential for colloid formation/transport in natural groundwater concentrations. The experimental concepts for the colloid project are: laboratory experiments with bentonite, background field measurements of natural colloids, borehole specific bentonite colloid stability experiments and a fracture specific transport experiment. The activities concerning the laboratory experiments and background field measurements are described in this work; the other activities are ongoing or planned. The following conclusions were made: The bentonite colloid stability is strongly dependent on the groundwater ionic strength. Natural colloids are organic degradation products such as humic and fulvic acids, inorganic colloids (clay, calcite, iron hydroxide) and microbes. Microbes form few but large particles and their concentration increase with increasing organic carbon concentrations. The small organic colloids are present in very low concentrations in deep granitic groundwater. The concentrations can be rather high in shallow waters. The colloid concentration decreases with depth and salinity, since colloids are less stable in saline waters. The colloid content at Aespoe is less than 300 ppb. The colloid content at repository level is less than 50 ppb. The groundwater variability obtained in the boreholes reflects well the natural groundwater variability along the whole HRL tunnel.

  12. A transient laboratory method for determining the hydraulic properties of 'tight' rocks-I. Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, P.A.; Tracy, J.V.; Neuzil, C.E.; Bredehoeft, J.D.; Silliman, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    Transient pulse testing has been employed increasingly in the laboratory to measure the hydraulic properties of rock samples with low permeability. Several investigators have proposed a mathematical model in terms of an initial-boundary value problem to describe fluid flow in a transient pulse test. However, the solution of this problem has not been available. In analyzing data from the transient pulse test, previous investigators have either employed analytical solutions that are derived with the use of additional, restrictive assumptions, or have resorted to numerical methods. In Part I of this paper, a general, analytical solution for the transient pulse test is presented. This solution is graphically illustrated by plots of dimensionless variables for several cases of interest. The solution is shown to contain, as limiting cases, the more restrictive analytical solutions that the previous investigators have derived. A method of computing both the permeability and specific storage of the test sample from experimental data will be presented in Part II. ?? 1981.

  13. Summary of results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s vehicle evaluation data collection efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whalen, P.; Kelly, K.; Motta, R.; Broderick, J.

    1996-05-01

    The U.S. DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory conducted a data collection project for light-duty, alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) for about 4 years. The project has collected data on 10 vehicle models (from the original equipment manufacturers) spanning model years 1991 through 1995. Emissions data have also been collected from a number of vehicles converted to natural gas (CNG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Most of the vehicles involved in the data collection and evaluation are part of the General Services Administration`s fleet of AFVs. This evaluation effort addressed the performance and reliability, fuel economy, and emissions of light- duty AFVs, with comparisons to similar gasoline vehicles when possible. Driver-reported complaints and unscheduled vehicle repairs were used to assess the performance and reliability of the AFVs compared to the comparable gasoline vehicles. Two sources of fuel economy were available, one from testing of vehicles on a chassis dynamometer, and the other from records of in-service fuel use. This report includes results from emissions testing completed on 169 AFVs and 161 gasoline control vehicles.

  14. Mont Terri rock laboratory, 20 years of research: introduction, site characteristics and overview of experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossart, P. [Swisstopo, Federal Office of Topography, Wabern (Switzerland); Bernier, F. [Federal Agency for Nuclear Control FANC, Brussels (Belgium); Birkholzer, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley (United States); and others

    2017-04-15

    Geologic repositories for radioactive waste are designed as multi-barrier disposal systems that perform a number of functions including the long-term isolation and containment of waste from the human environment, and the attenuation of radionuclides released to the subsurface. The rock laboratory at Mont Terri (canton Jura, Switzerland) in the Opalinus Clay plays an important role in the development of such repositories. The experimental results gained in the last 20 years are used to study the possible evolution of a repository and investigate processes closely related to the safety functions of a repository hosted in a clay rock. At the same time, these experiments have increased our general knowledge of the complex behaviour of argillaceous formations in response to coupled hydrological, mechanical, thermal, chemical, and biological processes. After presenting the geological setting in and around the Mont Terri rock laboratory and an overview of the mineralogy and key properties of the Opalinus Clay, we give a brief overview of the key experiments that are described in more detail in the following research papers to this Special Issue of the Swiss Journal of Geosciences. These experiments aim to characterise the Opalinus Clay and estimate safety-relevant parameters, test procedures, and technologies for repository construction and waste emplacement. Other aspects covered are: bentonite buffer emplacement, high-pH concrete-clay interaction experiments, anaerobic steel corrosion with hydrogen formation, depletion of hydrogen by microbial activity, and finally, release of radionuclides into the bentonite buffer and the Opalinus Clay barrier. In the case of a spent fuel/high-level waste repository, the time considered in performance assessment for repository evolution is generally 1 million years, starting with a transient phase over the first 10,000 years and followed by an equilibrium phase. Experiments dealing with initial conditions, construction, and waste

  15. Laboratory Studies on Surface Sampling of Bacillus anthracis Contamination: Summary, Gaps, and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Hu, Rebecca

    2011-11-28

    This report summarizes previous laboratory studies to characterize the performance of methods for collecting, storing/transporting, processing, and analyzing samples from surfaces contaminated by Bacillus anthracis or related surrogates. The focus is on plate culture and count estimates of surface contamination for swab, wipe, and vacuum samples of porous and nonporous surfaces. Summaries of the previous studies and their results were assessed to identify gaps in information needed as inputs to calculate key parameters critical to risk management in biothreat incidents. One key parameter is the number of samples needed to make characterization or clearance decisions with specified statistical confidence. Other key parameters include the ability to calculate, following contamination incidents, the (1) estimates of Bacillus anthracis contamination, as well as the bias and uncertainties in the estimates, and (2) confidence in characterization and clearance decisions for contaminated or decontaminated buildings. Gaps in knowledge and understanding identified during the summary of the studies are discussed and recommendations are given for future studies.

  16. Swedish-German actinide migration experiment at ASPO hard rock laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienzler, B; Vejmelka, P; Römer, J; Fanghänel, E; Jansson, M; Eriksen, T E; Wikberg, P

    2003-03-01

    Within the scope of a bilateral cooperation between Svensk Kärnbränslehantering (SKB) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Nukleare Entsorgung (FZK-INE), an actinide migration experiment is currently being performed at the Aspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in Sweden. This paper covers laboratory and in situ investigations on actinide migration in single-fractured granite core samples. For the in situ experiment, the CHEMLAB 2 probe developed by SKB was used. The experimental setup as well as the breakthrough of inert tracers and of the actinides Am, Np and Pu are presented. The breakthrough curves of inert tracers were analyzed to determine hydraulic properties of the fractured samples. Postmortem analyses of the solid samples were performed to characterize the flow path and the sorbed actinides. After cutting the cores, the abraded material was analyzed with respect to sorbed actinides. The slices were scanned optically to visualize the flow path. Effective volumes and inner surface areas were measured. In the experiments, only breakthrough of Np(V) was observed. In each experiment, the recovery of Np(V) was < or = 40%. Breakthrough of Am(III) and Pu(IV) as well as of Np(IV) was not observed. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. Swedish-German actinide migration experiment at ÄSPÖ hard rock laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienzler, B.; Vejmelka, P.; Römer, J.; Fanghänel, E.; Jansson, M.; Eriksen, T. E.; Wikberg, P.

    2003-03-01

    Within the scope of a bilateral cooperation between Svensk Kärnbränslehantering (SKB) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Nukleare Entsorgung (FZK-INE), an actinide migration experiment is currently being performed at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in Sweden. This paper covers laboratory and in situ investigations on actinide migration in single-fractured granite core samples. For the in situ experiment, the CHEMLAB 2 probe developed by SKB was used. The experimental setup as well as the breakthrough of inert tracers and of the actinides Am, Np and Pu are presented. The breakthrough curves of inert tracers were analyzed to determine hydraulic properties of the fractured samples. Postmortem analyses of the solid samples were performed to characterize the flow path and the sorbed actinides. After cutting the cores, the abraded material was analyzed with respect to sorbed actinides. The slices were scanned optically to visualize the flow path. Effective volumes and inner surface areas were measured. In the experiments, only breakthrough of Np(V) was observed. In each experiment, the recovery of Np(V) was ≤40%. Breakthrough of Am(III) and Pu(IV) as well as of Np(IV) was not observed.

  18. U.S. National Committee for Rock Mechanics; and Conceptual model of fluid infiltration in fractured media. Project summary, July 28, 1997--July 27, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The title describes the two tasks summarized in this report. The remainder of the report contains information on meetings held or to be held on the subjects. The US National Committee for Rock Mechanics (USNC/RM) provides for US participation in international activities in rock mechanics, principally through adherence to the International Society for Rock Mechanics (ISRM). It also keeps the US rock mechanics community informed about new programs directed toward major areas of national concern in which rock mechanics problems represent critical or limiting factors, such as energy resources, excavation, underground storage and waste disposal, and reactor siting. The committee also guides or produces advisory studies and reports on problem areas in rock mechanics. A new panel under the auspices of the US National Committee for Rock Mechanics has been appointed to conduct a study on Conceptual Models of Fluid Infiltration in Fractured Media. The study has health and environmental applications related to the underground flow of pollutants through fractured rock in and around mines and waste repositories. Support of the study has been received from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project Office. The new study builds on the success of a recent USNC/RM report entitled Rock Fractures and Fluid Flow: Contemporary Understanding and Applications (National Academy Press, 1996, 551 pp.). A summary of the new study is provided.

  19. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Final report of the first stage of the tracer retention understanding experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winberg, A. [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Andersson, Peter [Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Hermanson, Jan [Golder Grundteknik, Solna (Sweden); Byegaard, Johan [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry; Cvetkovic, V. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Water Resources Engineering; Birgersson, Lars [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-03-15

    The first stage of the Tracer Retention Understanding Experiments (TRUE) was performed as a SKB funded project. The overall objectives of TRUE are to develop the understanding of radionuclide migration and retention in fractured rock, to evaluate the realism in applied model concepts, and to assess whether the necessary input data to the models can be collected from site characterisation. Further, to evaluate the usefulness and feasibility of different model approaches, and finally to provide in situ data on radionuclide migration and retention. The strive for address with multiple approaches is facilitated through a close collaboration with the Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes. The TRUE programme is a staged programme which addresses various scales from laboratory (< 0.5 m), detailed scale (< 10 m) and block scale (10-50 m). The First TRUE Stage was performed in the detailed scale with the specific objectives of providing data and conceptualising the investigated feature using conservative and sorbing tracers. Further, to improve methodologies for performing tracer tests, and to develop and test a methodology for obtaining pore volume/aperture data from epoxy resin injection, excavation and subsequent analyses. The experimental site is located at approximately 400 m depth in the northeastern part of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The identification of conductive fractures and the target feature has benefited from the use of BIPS borehole TV imaging combined with detailed flow logging. The assessment of the conductive geometry has been further sustained by cross-hole pressure interference data. The investigated target feature (Feature A) is a reactivated mylonite which has later undergone brittle deformation. The feature is oriented northwest, along the principal horizontal stress orientation, and is a typical conductor for Aespoe conditions. Hydraulic characterisation shows that the feature is relatively well isolated

  20. Summary review of workshop on movement of fluids in largely impermeable rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    As a starting point for the workshop, the following general question was posed, ''What data base, analytical methodology, and technology are necessary to adequately forecast the physical behavior of the subsurface disposal facility.'' The critical consideration was the movement of fluids through fractured rock masses. The first day of the workshop was devoted to general discussions of selected topics. On the second day, the participants were divided into six working groups: (1) definition and characterization of the fracture system; (2) in-situ measurement of fluid flow; (3) effects of perturbations on the flow system; (4) role of numerical modeling; (5) isotopic and geochemical methods; and (6) monitoring programs to verify flow system. The reports prepared by each working group were edited to some extent.

  1. Laboratory tools to quantify biogenic dissolution of rocks and minerals: a model rock biofilm growing in percolation columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz eSeiffert

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sub-aerial biofilms (SAB are ubiquitous, self-sufficient microbial ecosystems found on mineral surfaces at all altitudes and latitudes. SABs, which are the principal causes of weathering on exposed terrestrial surfaces, are characterised by patchy growth dominated by associations of algae, cyanobacteria, fungi and heterotrophic bacteria. A recently developed in vitro system to study colonisation of rocks exposed to air included two key SAB participants - the rock-inhabiting ascomycete Knufia petricola (CBS 123872 and the phototrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133. Both partners are genetically tractable and we used them here to study weathering of granite, K-feldspar and plagioclase. Small fragments of the various rocks or minerals (1 to 6 mm were packed into flow-through columns and incubated with 0.1% glucose and 10 µM thiamine-hydrochloride (90 µL.min-1 to compare weathering with and without biofilms. Dissolution of the minerals was followed by: analysing (i the degradation products in the effluent from the columns via Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy and (ii by studying polished sections of the incubated mineral fragment/grains using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses. K. petricola/N. punctiforme stimulated release of Ca, Na, Mg and Mn. Analyses of the polished sections confirmed depletion of Ca, Na and K near the surface of the fragments. The abrupt decrease in Ca concentration observed in peripheral areas of plagioclase fragments favoured a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. Percolation columns in combination with a model biofilm can thus be used to study weathering in closed systems. Columns can easily be filled with different minerals and biofilms, the effluent as well as grains can be collected after long-term exposure under axenic conditions and easily analysed.

  2. Laboratory tools to quantify biogenic dissolution of rocks and minerals: a model rock biofilm growing in percolation columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, Franz; Bandow, Nicole; Kalbe, Ute; Milke, Ralf; Gorbushina, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Sub-aerial biofilms (SAB) are ubiquitous, self-sufficient microbial ecosystems found on mineral surfaces at all altitudes and latitudes. SABs, which are the principal causes of weathering on exposed terrestrial surfaces, are characterised by patchy growth dominated by associations of algae, cyanobacteria, fungi and heterotrophic bacteria. A recently developed in vitro system to study colonisation of rocks exposed to air included two key SAB participants - the rock-inhabiting ascomycete Knufia petricola (CBS 123872) and the phototrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133. Both partners are genetically tractable and we used them here to study weathering of granite, K-feldspar and plagioclase. Small fragments of the various rocks or minerals (1 to 6 mm) were packed into flow-through columns and incubated with 0.1% glucose and 10 µM thiamine-hydrochloride (90 µL.min-1) to compare weathering with and without biofilms. Dissolution of the minerals was followed by: analysing (i) the degradation products in the effluent from the columns via Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy and (ii) by studying polished sections of the incubated mineral fragment/grains using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses. K. petricola/N. punctiforme stimulated release of Ca, Na, Mg and Mn. Analyses of the polished sections confirmed depletion of Ca, Na and K near the surface of the fragments. The abrupt decrease in Ca concentration observed in peripheral areas of plagioclase fragments favoured a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. Percolation columns in combination with a model biofilm can thus be used to study weathering in closed systems. Columns can easily be filled with different minerals and biofilms, the effluent as well as grains can be collected after long-term exposure under axenic conditions and easily analysed.

  3. Geomechanical behaviour of Opalinus Clay at multiple scales: results from Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amann, F.; Wild, K.M.; Loew, S. [Institute of Geology, Engineering Geology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Yong, S. [Knight Piesold Ltd, Vancouver (Canada); Thoeny, R. [Grundwasserschutz und Entsorgung, AF-Consult Switzerland AG, Baden (Switzerland); Frank, E. [Sektion Geologie (GEOL), Eidgenössisches Nuklear-Sicherheitsinspektorat (ENSI), Brugg (Switzerland)

    2017-04-15

    The paper represents a summary about our research projects conducted between 2003 and 2015 related to the mechanical behaviour of Opalinus Clay at Mont Terri. The research summarized covers a series of laboratory and field tests that address the brittle failure behaviour of Opalinus Clay, its undrained and effective strength, the dependency of petro-physical and mechanical properties on total suction, hydro-mechanically coupled phenomena and the development of a damage zone around excavations. On the laboratory scale, even simple laboratory tests are difficult to interpret and uncertainties remain regarding the representativeness of the results. We show that suction may develop rapidly after core extraction and substantially modifies the strength, stiffness, and petro-physical properties of Opalinus Clay. Consolidated undrained tests performed on fully saturated specimens revealed a relatively small true cohesion and confirmed the strong hydro-mechanically coupled behaviour of this material. Strong hydro-mechanically coupled processes may explain the stability of cores and tunnel excavations in the short term. Pore-pressure effects may cause effective stress states that favour stability in the short term but may cause longer-term deformations and damage as the pore-pressure dissipates. In-situ observations show that macroscopic fracturing is strongly influenced by bedding planes and faults planes. In tunnel sections where opening or shearing along bedding planes or faults planes is kinematically free, the induced fracture type is strongly dependent on the fault plane frequency and orientation. A transition from extensional macroscopic failure to shearing can be observed with increasing fault plane frequency. In zones around the excavation where bedding plane shearing/shearing along tectonic fault planes is kinematically restrained, primary extensional type fractures develop. In addition, heterogeneities such as single tectonic fault planes or fault zones

  4. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-12-31

    This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer

  5. The density of the rock covering Gran Sasso Laboratories in Central Apennines, Italy by underground gravity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, P.; De Luca, G.; Di Sena, F.; Gasparini, P.; Scarpa, R.

    1998-05-01

    Various nuclear physics experiments are being carried out in the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Laboratories that have been excavated in the Gran Sasso Massif in the Italian Apennines. These experiments make use of the shield effect provided by a 1400-m-thick rock cover that absorb cosmic rays. It is important to know the real density of the rock cover and the extent of its lateral variation. The density of different sections of the rock cover was determined using the correlation between measured underground gravity data and thickness of the rock cover. Observed gravity was corrected using a 3D model, for the mass deficiency covered by excavation of highway tunnels and the cavities that house the laboratories. The average density of the rock cover was found to be 2720±50 kg m -3. Lateral variations are contained within the uncertainty for most of the sections, except for two sections where densities are lowered by as much as 11% because of the presence of a shallow layer formed by loose Quaternary sediments.

  6. Laboratory Characterization of Cemented Rock Fill for Underhand Cut and Fill Method of Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, Upendra Kumar; Singh, Gauri Shankar Prasad

    2016-10-01

    Backfilling with controlled specifications is employed for improved ground support and pillar recovery in underground metalliferous mine workings. This paper reports the results of a laboratory study to characterise various mechanical properties of cemented rock fill (CRF) formulations for different compaction levels and cement content percentage for use in underhand cut and fill method of mining. Laboratory test set ups and procedures have been described for conducting compressive and bending tests of CRF block samples. A three dimensional numerical modelling study has also been carried out to overcome the limitations arising due to non-standard dimension of test blocks used in flexural loading test and the test setup devised for this purpose. Based on these studies, specific relations have been established between the compressive and the flexural properties of the CRF. The flexural strength of the wire mesh reinforced CRF is also correlated with its residual strength and the Young's modulus of elasticity under flexural loading condition. The test results of flexural strength, residual flexural strength and modulus show almost linear relations with cement content in CRF. The compressive strength of the CRF block samples is estimated as seven times the flexural strength whereas the compressive modulus is four times the flexural modulus. It has been found that the strengths of CRF of low compaction and no compaction are 75 and 60 % respectively to that of the medium compaction CRF. The relation between the strength and the unit weight of CRF as obtained in this study is significantly important for design and quality control of CRF during its large scale application in underhand cut and fill stopes.

  7. Viscoelastic Anisotropic Constitutive Law for Rock Shales based on Laboratory Creep Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzeciak, Maciej; Sone, Hiroki; Dabrowski, Marcin

    2017-04-01

    In situ stress prediction is critical for successful hydraulic fracturing and later exploitation of an unconventional shale gas/oil reservoir. In order to provide stress models during and after fracturing a reliable stress-strain constitutive law is needed. The most popular models used in the petroleum industry take into account only elastic constitutive laws, which have the assumption of no energy dissipation. As was shown by several authors (e.g. Warpinsky 1986, Gunzburger&Cornet 2007, Sone&Zoback 2013, 2014) viscoelastic creep strain and stress relaxation reach significant amounts in rock shales and should be considered in stress modeling. Viscoelastic functions needed for the constitutive law were obtained during creep experiments on horizontal and vertical shale plugs. We were not in the possesion of samples cut at 45˚ to bedding, and because of that the constitutive relation is limited to the normal strains and stresses. During experiments two creep functions, Ch(t)and Cv(t), and two hereditary Poisson's ratio functions v12(t)and v13(t)were measured. In this paper we present laboratory procedures for creep tests, basic theory of anisotropic (vertical transverse isotropy) viscoelastic constitutive modeling and a simple model of stress relaxation after application of constant strain.

  8. In-situ experiments on bentonite-based buffer and sealing materials at the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) GmbH, Braunschweig (Germany); Gaus, I. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); Mayor, J. C. [Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos SA (ENRESA), Madrid (Spain); and others

    2017-04-15

    Repository concepts in clay or crystalline rock involve bentonite-based buffer or seal systems to provide containment of the waste and limit advective flow. A thorough understanding of buffer and seal evolution is required to make sure the safety functions are fulfilled in the short and long term. Experiments at the real or near-real scale taking into account the interaction with the host rock help to make sure the safety-relevant processes are identified and understood and to show that laboratory-scale findings can be extrapolated to repository scale. Three large-scale experiments on buffer and seal properties performed in recent years at the Mont Terri rock laboratory are presented in this paper: The 1:2 scale HE-E heater experiment which is currently in operation, and the full-scale engineered barrier experiment and the Borehole Seal experiment which have been completed successfully in 2014 and 2012, respectively. All experiments faced considerable difficulties during installation, operation, evaluation or dismantling that required significant effort to overcome. The in situ experiments show that buffer and seal elements can be constructed meeting the expectations raised through small-scale testing. It was, however, also shown that interaction with the host rock caused additional effects in the buffer or seal that could not always be quantified or even anticipated from the experience of small-scale tests (such as re-saturation by pore-water from the rock, interaction with the excavation damaged zone in terms of preferential flow or mechanical effects). This led to the conclusion that testing of the integral system buffer/rock or seal/rock is needed. (authors)

  9. Argonne National Laboratory summary site environmental report for calendar year 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.

    2009-05-22

    This summary of Argonne National Laboratory's Site Environmental Report for calendar year 2007 was written by 20 students at Downers Grove South High School in Downers Grove, Ill. The student authors are classmates in Mr. Howard's Bio II course. Biology II is a research-based class that teaches students the process of research by showing them how the sciences apply to daily life. For the past seven years, Argonne has worked with Biology II students to create a short document summarizing the Site Environmental Report to provide the public with an easy-to-read summary of the annual 300-page technical report on the results of Argonne's on-site environmental monitoring program. The summary is made available online and given to visitors to Argonne, researchers interested in collaborating with Argonne, future employees, and many others. In addition to providing Argonne and the public with an easily understandable short summary of a large technical document, the participating students learn about professional environmental monitoring procedures, achieve a better understanding of the time and effort put forth into summarizing and publishing research, and gain confidence in their own abilities to express themselves in writing. The Argonne Summary Site Environmental Report fits into the educational needs for 12th grade students. Illinois State Educational Goal 12 states that a student should understand the fundamental concepts, principles, and interconnections of the life, physical, and earth/space sciences. To create this summary booklet, the students had to read and understand the larger technical report, which discusses in-depth many activities and programs that have been established by Argonne to maintain a safe local environment. Creating this Summary Site Environmental Report also helps students fulfill Illinois State Learning Standard 12B5a, which requires that students be able to analyze and explain biodiversity issues, and the causes and effects of

  10. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Evaluation of scaling records for TASA access tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ittner, Henrik (Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2009-07-01

    This report presents the result of a project accomplished during the summer 2009. It introduces a method to estimate the magnitude, mass distribution and cause of scaled blocks by tunnel mapping and evaluation of scaling data records. These issues are important for understanding the impact of the excavation method on the surrounding rock mass during excavation of the planned underground repository for spent nuclear fuel. The project includes mapping of the 3120 m drill and blast excavated part of the TASA access tunnel in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). In addition it includes development of a method for evaluation of the collected material together with scaling data records from the Site Characterization Database (SICADA). An interview has also been held with Erik Gabrielsson, who has been in charge of tunnel maintenance at Aespoe for many years. The mapping focused on to identify size and cause of areas with significant overbreaks in the tunnel roof. By distributing documented scaled volume in a tunnel section on several mapped overbreak areas in the same section it is possible to reconstruct the size of scaled blocks. The observed overbreak areas have been categorized in five different area types, depending on the cause of scaling: two geologically induced, one blast induced, one induced from a combination of geology and blasting and one unable to place in any category. For the calculated mass distribution the number of observations is declining with increasing block mass. 11% of the total blocks exceeding 400 Kg and 75% of the scaled blocks weights under 200 Kg. Most of the blocks are however lighter with 34% weighting 50 Kg or less. There is a relation between the mapped area type and the size distribution among the mapped overbreak areas. For example the areas caused by the end of blasting rounds are more frequently appearing then the other types but most of them are small in relation to the others The impression achieved from the tunnel mapping is

  11. An Aquatic Journey toward Aeolis Mons (Mount Sharp): Sedimentary Rock Evidence observed by Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanjeev; Edgar, Lauren; Williams, Rebecca; Rubin, David; Yingst, Aileen; Lewis, Kevin; Kocurek, Gary; Anderson, Ryan; Dromart, Gilles; Edgett, Ken; Hardgrove, Craig; Kah, Linda; Mangold, Nicolas; Milliken, Ralph; Minitti, Michelle; Palucis, Marisa; Rice, Melissa; Stack, Katie; Sumner, Dawn; Williford, Ken

    2014-05-01

    Since leaving Yellowknife Bay (summer 2013), Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity has investigated a number of key outcrops as it traverses along the Rapid Transit Route toward the entry point to begin its investigations of the extensive rock outcrops at the base of Mount Sharp. Rover observations are characterizing the variability of lithologies and sedimentary facies along the traverse and establishing stratigraphic relationships with the aim of reconstructing depositional processes and palaeoenvironments. Here, we report on sedimentological and stratigraphic observations based on images from the Mastcam and MAHLI instruments at Shaler and the Darwin waypoint. The informally named Shaler outcrop, which forms part of the Glenelg member of the Yellowknife Bay formation [1] is remarkable for the preservation of a rich suite of sedimentary structures and architecture, and was investigated on sols 120-121 and 309-324. The outcrop forms a pebbly sandstone body that is ~0.7 m thick and extends for up to 20 m. Shaler is largely characterized by pebbly sandstone facies showing well-developed decimeter-scale trough cross-stratification. Bedding geometries indicate sub-critical angles of climb, resulting in preservation of only the lee slope deposits. The grain size, and the presence and scale of cross-stratification imply sediment transport and deposition by unidirectional currents in a fluvial sedimentary environment. Curiosity investigated the informally named Darwin waypoint between sols 390 and 401, making detailed Mastcam and MAHLI observations at two separate locations. The Darwin outcrop comprises light-toned sandstone beds separated by darker pebbly sandstones. MAHLI observations permit differentiation of distinct sedimentary facies. The Altar Mountain facies is a poorly sorted pebbly sandstone that is rich in fine pebbles. Pebbles are sub-angular to sub-rounded in shape and show no preferred orientation or fabric. Pebbles and sand grains show clast-to-clast contacts

  12. 5-year chemico-physical evolution of concrete-claystone interfaces, Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mäder, U.; Jenni, A. [Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Berne, Berne (Switzerland); Lerouge, C. [French Geological Survey BRGM, Orléans (France); and others

    2017-04-15

    The Cement-Opalinus Clay Interaction (CI) Experiment at the Mont Terri rock laboratory is a long-term passive diffusion-reaction experiment between contrasting materials of relevance to engineered barrier systems/near-field for deep disposal of radioactive waste in claystone (Opalinus Clay). Reaction zones at interfaces of Opalinus Clay with two different types of concrete (OPC and 'low-pH'/ESDRED) were examined by sampling after 2.2 and 4.9 years. Analytical methods included element mapping (SEM, EPMA), select spot analysis (EDAX), 14C-MMA impregnation for radiography, and powder methods (IR, XRD, clay-exchanger characterisation) on carefully extracted miniature samples (mm). The presence of aggregate grains in concrete made the application of all methods difficult. Common features are a very limited extent of reaction within claystone, and a distinct and regularly zoned reaction zone within the cement matrix that is more extensive in the low-alkali cement (ESDRED). Both interfaces feature a de-calcification zone and overprinted a carbonate alteration zone thought to be mainly responsible for the observed porosity reduction. While OPC shows a distinct sulphate enrichment zone (indicative of ingress from Opalinus Clay), ESDRED displays a wide Mg-enriched zone, also with claystone pore-water as a source. A conclusion is that substitution of OPC by low-alkali cementitious products is not advantageous or necessary solely for the purpose of minimizing the extent of reaction between claystone and cementitious materials. Implications for reactive transport modelling are discussed. (authors)

  13. Characterization of Hydraulic Fractures Growth During the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory Experiment (Sweden)

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Comino, J. A.; Cesca, S.; Heimann, S.; Grigoli, F.; Milkereit, C.; Dahm, T.; Zang, A.

    2017-11-01

    A crucial issue to characterize hydraulic fractures is the robust, accurate and automated detection and location of acoustic emissions (AE) associated with the fracture nucleation and growth process. Waveform stacking and coherence analysis techniques are here adapted using massive datasets with very high sampling (1 MHz) from a hydraulic fracturing experiment that took place 410 m below surface in the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (Sweden). We present the results obtained during the conventional, continuous water injection experiment Hydraulic Fracture 2. The resulting catalogue is composed of more than 4000 AEs. Frequency-magnitude distribution from AE magnitudes (MAE) reveals a high b value of 2.4. The magnitude of completeness is also estimated approximately MAE 1.1, and we observe an interval range of MAE between 0.77 and 2.79. The hydraulic fractures growth is then characterized by mapping the spatiotemporal evolution of AE hypocentres. The AE activity is spatially clustered in a prolate ellipsoid, resembling the main activated fracture volume ( 105 m3), where the lengths of the principal axes ( a = 10 m; b = 5 m; c = 4 m) define its size and its orientation can be estimated for a rupture plane (strike 123°, dip 60°). An asymmetric rupture process regarding to the fracturing borehole is clearly exhibited. AE events migrate upwards covering the depth interval between 404 and 414 m. After completing each injection and reinjection phase, the AE activity decreases and appears located in the same area of the initial fracture phase, suggesting a crack-closing effect.

  14. Constraints on behaviour of a mining‐induced earthquake inferred from laboratory rock mechanics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, Arthur F.; Johnston, Malcolm J.; Boettcher, M.; Heesakkers, V.; Reches, Z.

    2013-01-01

    On December 12, 2004, an earthquake of magnitude 2.2, located in the TauTona Gold Mine at a depth of about 3.65 km in the ancient Pretorius fault zone, was recorded by the in-mine borehole seismic network, yielding an excellent set of ground motion data recorded at hypocentral distances of several km. From these data, the seismic moment tensor, indicating mostly normal faulting with a small implosive component, and the radiated energy were measured; the deviatoric component of the moment tensor was estimated to be M0 = 2.3×1012 N·m and the radiated energy ER = 5.4×108 J. This event caused extensive damage along tunnels within the Pretorius fault zone. What rendered this earthquake of particular interest was the underground investigation of the complex pattern of exposed rupture surfaces combined with laboratory testing of rock samples retrieved from the ancient fault zone (Heesakkers et al.2011a, 2011b). Event 12/12 2004 was the result of fault slip across at least four nonparallel fault surfaces; 25 mm of slip was measured at one location on the rupture segment that is most parallel with a fault plane inferred from the seismic moment tensor, suggesting that this segment accounted for much of the total seismic deformation. By applying a recently developed technique based on biaxial stick-slip friction experiments (McGarr2012, 2013) to the seismic results, together with the 25 mm slip observed underground, we estimated a maximum slip rate of at least 6.6 m/s, which is consistent with the observed damage to tunnels in the rupture zone. Similarly, the stress drop and apparent stress were found to be correspondingly high at 21.9 MPa and 6.6 MPa, respectively. The ambient state of stress, measured at the approximate depth of the earthquake but away from the influence of mining, in conjunction with laboratory measurements of the strength of the fault zone cataclasites, indicates that during rupture of the M 2.2 event, the normal stress acting on the large-slip fault

  15. Evaluation of stress and saturation effects on seismic velocity and electrical resistivity - laboratory testing of rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Jirků, Jaroslav; Slavík, Lubomír; Bárta, Jaroslav

    2016-04-01

    Repository, located in a deep geological formation, is today considered the most suitable solution for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. The geological formations, in combination with an engineered barrier system, should ensure isolation of the waste from the environment for thousands of years. For long-term monitoring of such underground excavations special monitoring systems are developed. In our research we developed and tested monitoring system based on repeated ultrasonic time of flight measurement and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). As a test site Bedřichov gallery in the northern Bohemia was selected. This underground gallery in granitic rock was excavated using Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM). The seismic high-frequency measurements are performed by pulse-transmission technique directly on the rock wall using one seismic source and three receivers in the distances of 1, 2 and 3 m. The ERT measurement is performed also on the rock wall using 48 electrodes. The spacing between electrodes is 20 centimeters. An analysis of relation of seismic velocity and electrical resistivity on water saturation and stress state of the granitic rock is necessary for the interpretation of both seismic monitoring and ERT. Laboratory seismic and resistivity measurements were performed. One series of experiments was based on uniaxial loading of dry and saturated granitic samples. The relation between stress state and ultrasonic wave velocities was tested separately for dry and saturated rock samples. Other experiments were focused on the relation between electrical resistivity of the rock sample and its saturation level. Rock samples with different porosities were tested. Acknowledgments: This work was partially supported by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic, project No. TA 0302408

  16. Remote Systems Experience at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory--A Summary of Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noakes, Mark W [ORNL; Burgess, Thomas W [ORNL; Rowe, John C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long history in the development of remote systems to support the nuclear environment. ORNL, working in conjunction with Central Research Laboratories, created what is believed to be the first microcomputer-based implementation of dual-arm master-slave remote manipulation. As part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program, ORNL developed the dual-arm advanced servomanipulator focusing on remote maintainability for systems exposed to high radiation fields. ORNL also participated in almost all of the various technical areas of the U.S. Department of Energy s Robotics Technology Development Program, while leading the Decontamination and Decommissioning and Tank Waste Retrieval categories. Over the course of this involvement, ORNL has developed a substantial base of working knowledge as to what works when and under what circumstances for many types of remote systems tasks as well as operator interface modes, control bandwidth, and sensing requirements to name a few. By using a select list of manipulator systems that is not meant to be exhaustive, this paper will discuss history and outcome of development, field-testing, deployment, and operations from a lessons learned perspective. The final outcome is a summary paper outlining ORNL experiences and guidelines for transition of developmental remote systems to real-world hazardous environments.

  17. Comparative analysis of rock porosity in a selected region in the Carpathians based on laboratory data and well logs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnaś Maciej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis of porosity is presented in the article. This was calculated from laboratory measurements and well logs for rocks from a selected region of the Carpathians. Analysis was performed for samples of sandstones, mudstones, shales and carbonates from four boreholes drilled in the Carpathian Foredeep region near Krakow, Poland. In laboratory measurements, porosity was assessed using two methods: helium pycnometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. Porosity from well logging was calculated from sonic profiling (SPHI. Cross-plots were used, which allowed for the assessment of the degree of correlation between the laboratory and well log data. The results obtained were analysed paying special attention to the relationship with geological structure. Based on the lithological criterion, the correlations turned out to be strong. The repeatability of the results obtained in different wells was verified. The results of the measurements are significant in relation to estimating porosity from well logs using laboratory data.

  18. Comparative analysis of rock porosity in a selected region in the Carpathians based on laboratory data and well logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaś, Maciej; Puskarczyk, Edyta

    2017-11-01

    A comparative analysis of porosity is presented in the article. This was calculated from laboratory measurements and well logs for rocks from a selected region of the Carpathians. Analysis was performed for samples of sandstones, mudstones, shales and carbonates from four boreholes drilled in the Carpathian Foredeep region near Krakow, Poland. In laboratory measurements, porosity was assessed using two methods: helium pycnometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Porosity from well logging was calculated from sonic profiling (SPHI). Cross-plots were used, which allowed for the assessment of the degree of correlation between the laboratory and well log data. The results obtained were analysed paying special attention to the relationship with geological structure. Based on the lithological criterion, the correlations turned out to be strong. The repeatability of the results obtained in different wells was verified. The results of the measurements are significant in relation to estimating porosity from well logs using laboratory data.

  19. P-wave velocity changes in freezing hard low-porosity rocks: a laboratory-based time-average model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Draebing

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available P-wave refraction seismics is a key method in permafrost research but its applicability to low-porosity rocks, which constitute alpine rock walls, has been denied in prior studies. These studies explain p-wave velocity changes in freezing rocks exclusively due to changing velocities of pore infill, i.e. water, air and ice. In existing models, no significant velocity increase is expected for low-porosity bedrock. We postulate, that mixing laws apply for high-porosity rocks, but freezing in confined space in low-porosity bedrock also alters physical rock matrix properties. In the laboratory, we measured p-wave velocities of 22 decimetre-large low-porosity (< 10% metamorphic, magmatic and sedimentary rock samples from permafrost sites with a natural texture (> 100 micro-fissures from 25 °C to −15 °C in 0.3 °C increments close to the freezing point. When freezing, p-wave velocity increases by 11–166% perpendicular to cleavage/bedding and equivalent to a matrix velocity increase from 11–200% coincident to an anisotropy decrease in most samples. The expansion of rigid bedrock upon freezing is restricted and ice pressure will increase matrix velocity and decrease anisotropy while changing velocities of the pore infill are insignificant. Here, we present a modified Timur's two-phase-equation implementing changes in matrix velocity dependent on lithology and demonstrate the general applicability of refraction seismics to differentiate frozen and unfrozen low-porosity bedrock.

  20. Empirical Mode Decomposition Analysis of Continuous Acoustic Emission (AE) Data from Laboratory Rock Deformation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, J. W.; Goodfellow, S. D.; Nasseri, M. H. B.; Reyes-Montes, J. M.; Young, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    Continuous acoustic emission (AE) data recorded during rock deformation tests facilitates the monitoring of fracture initiation and propagation due to applied stress changes. Changes in the frequency and energy content of AE waveforms have been previously observed associated with microcrack coalescence and the induction or mobilisation of large fractures which are naturally associated with larger amplitude AE events and lower frequency components. The shift from high to low dominant frequency components during the late stages of the deformation experiment, as the rate of AE events increases and the sample approaches failure, indicates a transition from the micro-cracking to macro-cracking regime, where large cracks generated result in material failure. To analyse and characterise these changes, a detailed time-frequency analysis of the continuous waveform data is required. Fourier-based techniques (e.g. STFT) and the Wavelet Transform have several drawbacks such as fixed window size (STFT), poor time-frequency resolution and some general assumption of linearity and/or stationarity. These techniques are not suitable for the detailed analysis of AE data which are generally nonstationary and nonlinear. The Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method is suitable for non-stationary and non-linear time-series analysis, with the ability to identify intrinsic features in the data. EMD adaptively decomposes a time-varying signal into a finite set of functions called intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), where each IMF represents an oscillatory term in the original signal in a different frequency band. The instantaneous frequency and amplitude of each IMF is derived by applying the Hilbert Transform (HT) to the IMFs which provides a high resolution time-frequency distribution of the data. This paper proposes the use of the combined EMD and HT method to analyse the continuous AE data recorded during a laboratory triaxial deformation experiment on a cylindrical sample of Westerly

  1. Geological modeling of a fault zone in clay rocks at the Mont-Terri laboratory (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakurina, M.; Guglielmi, Y.; Nussbaum, C.; Valley, B.

    2016-12-01

    Clay-rich formations are considered to be a natural barrier for radionuclides or fluids (water, hydrocarbons, CO2) migration. However, little is known about the architecture of faults affecting clay formations because of their quick alteration at the Earth's surface. The Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory provides exceptional conditions to investigate an un-weathered, perfectly exposed clay fault zone architecture and to conduct fault activation experiments that allow explore the conditions for stability of such clay faults. Here we show first results from a detailed geological model of the Mont Terri Main Fault architecture, using GoCad software, a detailed structural analysis of 6 fully cored and logged 30-to-50m long and 3-to-15m spaced boreholes crossing the fault zone. These high-definition geological data were acquired within the Fault Slip (FS) experiment project that consisted in fluid injections in different intervals within the fault using the SIMFIP probe to explore the conditions for the fault mechanical and seismic stability. The Mont Terri Main Fault "core" consists of a thrust zone about 0.8 to 3m wide that is bounded by two major fault planes. Between these planes, there is an assembly of distinct slickensided surfaces and various facies including scaly clays, fault gouge and fractured zones. Scaly clay including S-C bands and microfolds occurs in larger zones at top and bottom of the Mail Fault. A cm-thin layer of gouge, that is known to accommodate high strain parts, runs along the upper fault zone boundary. The non-scaly part mainly consists of undeformed rock block, bounded by slickensides. Such a complexity as well as the continuity of the two major surfaces are hard to correlate between the different boreholes even with the high density of geological data within the relatively small volume of the experiment. This may show that a poor strain localization occurred during faulting giving some perspectives about the potential for

  2. Modeling of laboratory experiments determining the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion properties of sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Ito, K.

    2008-12-01

    -osmotic properties of clay-rich materials have been demonstrated in laboratory experiments. However, it remains inconclusive whether chemical osmosis can retain the pressure disequilibrium and so influence groundwater flow in a geologic time scale. Therefore, systematic research involving field-scale investigations of pressure and salinity distributions and experimental estimations of the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusive properties of formation media is required. This study focuses on the development of a laboratory experimental system and the analytical solutions to estimate the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusive properties of formation media. The experimental system consists of a flexible-wall permeameter cell that loads confining pressures, along with a closed fluid circuit to perform osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion experiments under background fluid pressures. This experimental design enables simulating underground conditions at the depths required for safety assessments of geological waste disposal. The effectiveness of the experimental system and the analytical solutions are demonstrated with a set of osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion experiments performed using sedimentary rocks.

  3. Analysis of tectonic structures and excavation induced fractures in the Opalinus Clay, Mont Terri underground rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaum, Ch.; Bossart, P. [Federal Office of Topography swisstopo, Wabern (Switzerland); Amann, F. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Aubourg, Ch. [Laboratoire des fluides complexes et leurs reservoirs, Centre National de la Recherche Scientitfique CNRS, Universite de Pau, Pau (France)

    2011-09-15

    Excavated in the Opalinus Clay formation, the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory in the Jura Mountains of NW Switzerland is an important international test site for researching argillaceous formations, particularly in the context of deep geological disposal of radioactive waste. The rock laboratory is intersected by naturally formed tectonic structures, as well as artificial fractures primarily formed as a consequence of tunnel excavation and the associated stress redistribution. The description and characterisation of tectonic and artificial structures is, in many cases, of key importance for interpreting the results of the various in situ experiments conducted in the rock laboratory. Systematic small-scale mapping of the tunnel walls and floor, and adjacent niches, provides basic information about the geometry and the kinematics of the geological fractures intersecting the underground laboratory. A compilation of all tectonic structures identified is presented in this paper. The underground laboratory is located in the backlimb of the Mont Terri anticline, a NNW-vergent imbricate fault-bend fold, which is characterised by a pronounced along-strike asymmetry resulting from variously oriented inherited faults. The total shortening accommodated by this structure was estimated by mass (area) balancing to be approximately 2.1 km. The Mont Terri area is significantly affected by N- to NNE-striking normal faults of the Eo-Oligocene Rhine-Bresse transfer zone and by ENE-striking faults of Late Variscan age. Depending on their orientation with respect to the transport direction towards the NNW, these faults served as oblique and frontal ramps during the subsequent Jura thrusting in the Late Miocene. The various fault systems identified in the underground rock laboratory clearly correlate with the regional-scale structures. In addition to classical structural analysis, the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility was measured to determine the magnetic fabric and strain

  4. Scattering from Rock and Rock Outcrops

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Scattering from Rock and Rock Outcrops Derek R. Olson The Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory, P.O. Box 30 State...In terms of target detection and classification, scattering from exposed rock on the seafloor, (i.e., individual rocks and rock outcrops) presents...levels, and other statistical measures of acoustic scattering from rocks and rock outcrops is therefore critical. Unfortunately (and curiously

  5. Evaluation of laboratory-scale in situ capping sediments with purple parent rock to control the eutrophication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuejiao; Shi, Wenhao; Ni, Jiupai; Li, Zhenlun

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of controlling the eutrophication using purple parent rock to cap the sediments was evaluated in the laboratory scale. Sediments were collected from Sanxikou reservoir (China) in July 2013. Then, three types of purple parent rock (T 1 f, J 3 p, and J 2 s) which are distributed widely in southwest China were used to cap the sediments. Limestone and calcite were used as the contrast group, because they had been reported as effective controls on eutrophication. Then, they were incubated at 20 °C for 46 days. The results indicated that the application of purple parent rock as a barrier material can effectively inhibit the release of nutrient elements in sediments, and the inhibition rates of total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), ammonium (NH 4 -N), and nitrate (NO 3 -N) were much better than that of limestone and calcite. Among the three types of purple parent rock, J 3 p exhibited the best inhibitory effect on the release of nitrogen in sediments, and the inhibition efficiency of TN, NH 4 -N, and NO 3 -N was 59.7, 77.6, and 45.1%, respectively. As for T 1 f, it exhibited the best inhibitory effect on the release of TP in sediments with the inhibition rate of 94.4%. Whereas all these capping materials showed weak inhibition on release of organic matter in sediments, and the inhibition efficiencies were less than 20%. Moreover, these treatments could also cause distinct changes in the microbial community in sediments and overlying water, and the contents of TN and TP in all capping materials increased. All results demonstrated that purple parent rock could inhibit the release of nutrient in sediments through mechanical interception, physical adsorption, and chemical absorption as well as changing the microbial activity in the covering layer, sediments, or overlying water.

  6. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Interpretation of conductive features at the -450 m level, Aespoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markstroem, Ingemar; Bockgaard, Niklas (Golder Associates (Sweden)); Hardenby, Carljohan (Vattenfall Power Consultant, Stockholm (Sweden)); Hultgren, Peter (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-05-15

    The interpretation of conductive features at the -450 m described in this report concerns a part of the tunnel system of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (Aespoe HRL). The result of the modelling work is presented as an RVS-model (Rock Visualization System). When drilling some bore holes for the Mini-Can Project in the NASA3384A niche at Aespoe HRL some highly transmissive structures were penetrated. This gave a pressure drop response particularly in the Micobe experiment area (the end of TASJ-tunnel) but also in some adjacent areas at the same level. To better understand the complex hydraulic conditions of this part of the tunnel system it was understood that a new interpretation of conductive features was needed. The length axis of the model volume runs along the TASA-tunnel from section 3/260-3/600 m (end of tunnel in the Prototype repository). Laterally the model volume reaches 80 m perpendicular to the length axis in both directions and vertically it reaches to the 350 m and 500 m level respectively. All major water-bearing structures recorded by previously performed geological mapping of the tunnels and drifts (TASF, TASI, TASJ, TASG, TASQ and TASA) at this level of the Aespoe HRL were considered and formed the base for the modelling work. Also some potentially water-bearing open fractures in the tunnels were taken into account. Structures considered as large are those that can be traced over most of a tunnel periphery. No particular concern has been taken about deformation zones unless they were water bearing or acted as hydraulic barriers. A total of 212 cored boreholes penetrated or were identified close to the model volume. 39 of these were intersected by the modelled structures. Various features such as open fractures, fractures identified by bore hole radar, RQD, water inflow etc. were used in the modelling work. A number of earlier RVS-models such as the Geomod, the APSE, the Prototype, the TRUE BS model etc. that have been created within or close to

  7. Application of Sister Chromatid Exchange in Marine Polychaetes to Black Rock Harbor Sediment. Laboratory Documentation Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Gentile; Technical Coordinator was Mr. Walter Galloway; and Project Manager was Mr. Allan Beck. -~ Special thanks are due to Capt. Robert Alix and Dr...Research Board of Canada, Vol 34, pp 266-269. Lake, J., Hoffman, G., and Schimmel, S. 1984. "The Bioaccumulation of Contaminants /From Black Rock Harbor

  8. The NASA MSFC Electrostatic Levitation (ESL) Laboratory: Summary of Capabilities, Recent Upgrades, and Future Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Vermilion, David J.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory has a long history of providing materials research and thermophysical property data. A summary of the labs capabilities, recent upgrades, and ongoing and future work will be provided. The laboratory has recently added two new capabilities to its main levitation chamber: a rapid quench system and an oxygen control system. The rapid quench system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals. The oxygen control system consists of an oxygen sensor, oxygen pump, and a control unit. The sensor is a potentiometric device that determines the difference in oxygen activity between two gas compartments separated by an electrolyte, which is yttria-stabilized zirconia. The pump utilizes coulometric titration to either add or remove oxygen. The system is controlled by a desktop control unit, which can also be accessed via a computer. This system allows the oxygen partial pressure within the vacuum chamber to be measured and controlled, theoretically in the range from 10-36 to 100 bar. The ESL laboratory also has an emissometer, called the High-Temperature Emissivity Measurement System (HiTEMS). This system measures the spectral emissivity of materials from 600degC to 3,000degC. The system consists of a vacuum chamber, a black body source, and a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR). The system utilizes optics to swap the signal between the sample and the black body. The system was originally designed to measure the hemispherical spectral emissivity of levitated samples, which are typically 2.5mm spheres. Levitation allows emissivity measurements of molten samples, but more work is required to develop this capability. The system is currently setup measure the near-normal spectral emissivity of stationary samples, which has been used

  9. Active and passive seismic methods for characterization and monitoring of unstable rock masses: field surveys, laboratory tests and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombero, Chiara; Baillet, Laurent; Comina, Cesare; Jongmans, Denis; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate characterization and monitoring of potentially unstable rock masses may provide a better knowledge of the active processes and help to forecast the evolution to failure. Among the available geophysical methods, active seismic surveys are often suitable to infer the internal structure and the fracturing conditions of the unstable body. For monitoring purposes, although remote-sensing techniques and in-situ geotechnical measurements are successfully tested on landslides, they may not be suitable to early forecast sudden rapid rockslides. Passive seismic monitoring can help for this purpose. Detection, classification and localization of microseismic events within the prone-to-fall rock mass can provide information about the incipient failure of internal rock bridges. Acceleration to failure can be detected from an increasing microseismic event rate. The latter can be compared with meteorological data to understand the external factors controlling stability. On the other hand, seismic noise recorded on prone-to-fall rock slopes shows that the temporal variations in spectral content and correlation of ambient vibrations can be related to both reversible and irreversible changes within the rock mass. We present the results of the active and passive seismic data acquired at the potentially unstable granitic cliff of Madonna del Sasso (NW Italy). Down-hole tests, surface refraction and cross-hole tomography were carried out for the characterization of the fracturing state of the site. Field surveys were implemented with laboratory determination of physico-mechanical properties on rock samples and measurements of the ultrasonic pulse velocity. This multi-scale approach led to a lithological interpretation of the seismic velocity field obtained at the site and to a systematic correlation of the measured velocities with physical properties (density and porosity) and macroscopic features of the granitic cliff (fracturing, weathering and anisotropy). Continuous

  10. Strategy for the use of laboratory methods in the site investigations programme for the transport properties of the rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widestrand, Henrik; Byegaard, Johan [Geosigma AB, Kungaelv (Sweden); Ohlsson, Yvonne [SWECO VIAK AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)

    2003-06-01

    This report comprises a strategy for the handling of laboratory investigations of diffusivity and sorption characteristics within the discipline-specific programme 'Transport Properties of the Rock' in the SKB site investigations. The aim of the transport programme is to investigate the solute transport properties at a site in order to acquire data that are required for an assessment of the long-term performance and radiological safety of the deep repository. The result of the transport programme is the Transport Properties Site Descriptive Model, i.e. a description of the site-specific properties for the transport of solutes in the groundwater at a site. A strategy for the methodology, control of sampling and characterisation programme and interpretation of the results, is proposed. The basis for the laboratory investigations is a conceptual geological model based on the geological model produced in the geology programme. Major and minor types of rock and fractures are defined and characterised according to the quality of the general database and site-specific needs. The selection of samples and analyses is determined in close co-operation with the geology, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry and rock mechanics programmes. The result of the laboratory investigations is a retardation model, which is used as an input in the Transport Properties Site Descriptive Model. The interpretation and production of a retardation model is described and exemplified. Lastly, method-specific strategies and recommendations are given, including strategies for the selection of tracers in the experiments and for the treatment of the sampled geologic materials.

  11. Laboratory Experiments to Evaluate Matrix Diffusion of Dissolved Organic Carbon Carbon-14 in Southern Nevada Fractured-rock Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Ronald L. [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute; Fereday, Wyatt [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) carbon-14 (14C) is used to estimate groundwater ages by comparing the DIC 14C content in groundwater in the recharge area to the DIC 14C content in the downgradient sampling point. However, because of chemical reactions and physical processes between groundwater and aquifer rocks, the amount of DIC 14C in groundwater can change and result in 14C loss that is not because of radioactive decay. This loss of DIC 14C results in groundwater ages that are older than the actual groundwater ages. Alternatively, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 14C in groundwater does not react chemically with aquifer rocks, so DOC 14C ages are generally younger than DIC 14C ages. In addition to chemical reactions, 14C ages may also be altered by the physical process of matrix diffusion. The net effect of a continuous loss of 14C to the aquifer matrix by matrix diffusion and then radioactive decay is that groundwater appears to be older than it actually is. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure matrix diffusion coefficients for DOC 14C in volcanic and carbonate aquifer rocks from southern Nevada. Experiments were conducted using bromide (Br-) as a conservative tracer and 14C-labeled trimesic acid (TMA) as a surrogate for groundwater DOC. Outcrop samples from six volcanic aquifers and five carbonate aquifers in southern Nevada were used. The average DOC 14C matrix diffusion coefficient for volcanic rocks was 2.9 x 10-7 cm2/s, whereas the average for carbonate rocks was approximately the same at 1.7 x 10-7 cm2/s. The average Br- matrix diffusion coefficient for volcanic rocks was 10.4 x 10-7 cm2/s, whereas the average for carbonate rocks was less at 6.5 x 10-7 cm2/s. Carbonate rocks exhibited greater variability in

  12. The study of the elastic properties of carbonate rocks on a base of laboratory and field measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Stan-Kłeczek

    2016-04-01

    were carried out from different quarries from the south part of Poland. The shape of samples is a cuboid with dimensions 0,1 x 0,05 x 0,05 m. The Pundit Lab+ equipment was used for tests. It measures the transmission time of an ultrasonic wave. P- and S- wave velocity are obtained for each sample. Seismic velocity values allowed for the calculation of the dynamic elastic moduli. The application of laboratory methods allowed obtaining information about the physical properties of rocks. This knowledge makes easier recognition in preliminary stages during engineering study

  13. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Sensors data report (Period 010917-081201) Report No: 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudarzi, Reza; Johannesson, Lars-Erik (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-03-15

    The Prototype Repository Test consists of two sections. The installation of the first Section of Prototype Repository was made during summer and autumn 2001 and Section 2 was installed in spring and summer 2003. This report presents data from measurements in the Prototype Repository during the period 010917-081201. The report is organized so that the actual measured results are shown in Appendix 1-10, where Appendix 8 deals with measurements of canister displacements (by AITEMIN), Appendix 9 deals with geo-electric measurements in the backfill (by GRS), Appendix 10 deals with stress and strain measurement in the rock (by BBK) and Appendix 11 deals with measurement of water pressure in the rock (by VBB/VIAK). The main report and Appendix 1-7 deal with the rest of the measurements.

  14. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Sensors data report (Period 010917-090601) Report No: 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudarzi, Reza; Johannesson, Lars-Erik (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-07-15

    The Prototype Repository Test consists of two sections. The installation of the first Section of Prototype Repository was made during summer and autumn 2001 and Section 2 was installed in spring and summer 2003. This report presents data from measurements in the Prototype Repository during the period 010917-090601. The report is organized so that the actual measured results are shown in Appendix 1-10, where Appendix 8 deals with measurements of canister displacements (by AITEMIN), Appendix 9 deals with geo-electric measurements in the backfill (by GRS), Appendix 10 deals with stress and strain measurement in the rock (by BBK) and Appendix 11 deals with measurement of water pressure in the rock (by VBB/VIAK). The main report and Appendix 1-7 deal with the rest of the measurements.

  15. Paleoproterozoic structural evolution of rocks exposed in the underground science and engineering laboratory, Lead SD, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, M. P.; Redden, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    The lab provides a unique 3-dimensional view of the crustal structure of the Precambrian core of the Black Hills that lies along the margin of the Wyoming Craton. The Paleoproterozoic structural evolution of these rocks controls the distribution of lithologies and rock fabric and thus the rheologic properties in the lab. These properties have potential to influence later formed structures such as fractures and a range of experiments from in the areas hydrology to rock mechanics. The rock at the lab is composed of metamorphosed volcanic and sedimentary rocks that include, from oldest to youngest, the Yates unit, Poorman Formation, Homestake Formation and Ellison Formation. The Yates unit is a hornblende- plagioclase schist. The Poorman Formation is a sericite-biotite carbonate-bearing phyllite. The Homestake Formation is a grunerite-siderite schist with interbedded chlorite or biotite phyllite. The Ellison Formation is a sericite-biotite phyllite or schist with interbedded impure quartzite (biotite-quartzschist). Compilation of available structural data and analysis indicate a complex evolution of folds and fabrics between 1780 and 1715 Ma. The lab is located on a late upright SE-plunging anticlinorium which is interpreted to deform the earliest folds (NE trending?). The earliest phase resulted in repetition is Homestake Formation and associated units. Overprinting during later deformation events caused tightening and local dismemberment of these early folds that led to the previous interpretation that multiple iron formations existed in the lab. The second phase of folding shallow to moderate upright SE-plunging folds and associated northwest striking, steeply dipping foliation. The third phase of folding overprints the previous phase to varying degrees and produced four structural domains that are recognized by changes in the orientation of structural fabrics. The third phase of folding is best developed in the western part of the lab and is represented by steeply

  16. A Sequence of Laboratory Experiments for the Determination of Chemico-osmotic, Hydraulic and Diffusion Parameters of Rock Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Manaka, M.; Finsterle, S.; Ito, K.

    2012-12-01

    One of the key issues in the hydrogeologic characterization of sedimentary formations is the uncertainties of fluid pressure anomalies which could be caused by chemical osmosis. Chemical osmosis is the migration of water through a semi-permeable membrane driven by the difference of chemical potentials between waters to compensate for the difference in water potentials, leading to an increase in the pressure gradient. Accordingly, if geologic media can act as semi-permeable membranes, and if salinity is not uniform in the formation, localized fluid pressures may be generated by chemical osmosis. In order to identify the possibility of chemical osmosis in formations, it is essential to evaluate the membrane properties of representative rock types. However, for the examination of the magnitude and the duration time of osmotically induced pressures, the parameters relevant to the migration of water and dissolved substances, such as the hydraulic and diffusion parameters, are also necessary since they control the spatial variation of salinity and the dissipation of osmotically induced pressures. In order to obtain the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion parameters from a rock sample, this study developed a laboratory experimental system capable of performing chemical osmosis and permeability experiments under the confining pressure simulating in-situ effective stress conditions. The permeability and chemical-osmosis experiments are performed in sequence on a rock sample, and the progress of each experiment is monitored by measuring fluid pressures and salt concentrations in reservoirs contacting the ends of the disc-shaped rock sample. Analytical solutions for the permeability and chemical osmosis experiments were also derived for parameter determination. The semi-analytical solution for the chemical osmosis experiment involves five unknown parameters, i.e., the reflection coefficient, intrinsic permeability, specific storage and effective diffusion coefficient of

  17. SITE-94. Geochemical characterization of Simpevarp ground waters near the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glynn, P.D.; Voss, C.I. [US Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    1999-09-01

    The present report analyzes the geochemical data in order to evaluate collection and interpretation techniques that will be used to site the repository and to assess its safety. Ground waters near the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) may be grouped into five chemically and isotopically distinct water types, on the basis of their deuterium and chloride contents: 1) recent waters, 2) 5 g/L chloride waters, 3) deep waters, 4) seawater imprint waters, and 5) glacial melt waters. The sampled ground waters show a progressive change from a predominantly NaHCO{sub 3} composition at shallow depth to a CaCl{sub 2}-rich composition at depth. Despite the proximity of the Baltic, relatively few of the sampled ground waters contain any evidence of a seawater component. This finding, together with the rather shallow depths at which saline waters were found, indicates that Aespoe island is presently in a regional ground-water discharge area. The chemical and isotopic composition of the sampled waters also indicates that local recharge of dilute recent waters occurs only down to shallow depths (generally less than 100 in). The Aespoe ground waters are sulfidic and do not presently contain any dissolved oxygen. Measured E{sub H} values are generally near -300 mV, and on average are only about 50 mV lower than E{sub H} values calculated from the sulfide/sulfate couple. Maintenance of reducing conditions, such as presently found at the Aespoe HRL, is an important consideration in assessing the performance of nuclear waste disposal sites. Measurements of dissolved radon and of uranium concentrations in fracture-fill materials were used to calculate an average effective flow-wetted surface area of 3.1 m{sup 2} per liter of water for the Aespoe site. Estimation of flow-wetted surface areas is essential in determining the importance of matrix diffusion and surface sorption processes for radionuclide release calculations. The Rn calculation technique shows promise in helping narrow the

  18. Analysis of Copper-Bearing Rocks and Minerals for Their Metal Content Using Visible Spectroscopy: A First Year Chemistry Laboratory Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopegedera, A. M. R. P.

    2016-01-01

    General chemistry and introductory chemistry students were presented with a laboratory exploration for the determination of the mass percent of copper in rock and mineral samples. They worked independently in the laboratory, which involved multiple lab (pipetting, preparing standard solutions by quantitative dilution, recording visible spectra…

  19. SITE-94. Natural elemental mass movement in the vicinity of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.M.; Smith, G.M.; Towler, P.A.; Savage, D. [QuantiSci, Melton Mowbray (United Kingdom)

    1997-05-01

    The primary objective of this study is to quantify natural elemental fluxes at a location exhibiting typical characteristics of a site for a spent fuel repository in Sweden. The relevant pathways are considered to be: Groundwater transport; Glacial erosion; Non-glacial weathering; River transport. Calculations are made of elemental mass fluxes from a volume of rock equivalent to that which would hold a KBS-3 style repository. In addition, the radioactive flux associated with the natural series radionuclide mass fluxes from the repository are also calculated. These can be compared directly to performance assessment predictions of the releases from a repository. 88 refs, 13 figs, 24 tabs.

  20. Natural gas extraction and artificial gas injection experiments in Opalinus Clay, Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinsot, A.; Lundy, M. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Déchets Radioactifs ANDRA, Meuse Haute-Marne Center, Bure (France); Appelo, C.A.J. [Dr C.A.J. Appelo, Hydrochemical Consultant, Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2017-04-15

    Two experiments have been installed at Mont Terri in 2004 and 2009 that allowed gas circulation within a borehole at a pressure between 1 and 2 bar. These experiments made it possible to observe the natural gases that were initially dissolved in pore-water degassing into the borehole and to monitor their content evolution in the borehole over several years. They also allowed for inert (He, Ne) and reactive (H{sub 2}) gases to be injected into the borehole with the aim either to determine their diffusion properties into the rock pore-water or to evaluate their removal reaction kinetics. The natural gases identified were CO{sub 2}, light alkanes, He, and more importantly N{sub 2}. The natural concentration of four gases in Opalinus Clay pore-water was evaluated at the experiment location: N{sub 2} 2.2 mmol/L ± 25%, CH{sub 4} 0.30 mmol/L ± 25%, C{sub 2}H{sub 6} 0.023 mmol/L ± 25%, C{sub 3}H{sub 8} 0.012 mmol/L ± 25%. Retention properties of methane, ethane, and propane were estimated. Ne injection tests helped to characterize rock diffusion properties regarding the dissolved inert gases. These experimental results are highly relevant towards evaluating how the fluid composition could possibly evolve in the drifts of a radioactive waste disposal facility. (authors)

  1. Laboratory measurements of reservoir rock from the Geysers geothermal field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockner, D.A.; Summers, R.; Moore, D.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    Rock samples taken from two outcrops, as well as rare cores from three well bores at the Geysers geothermal field, California, were tested at temperatures and pressures similar to those found in the geothermal field. Both intact and 30?? sawcut cylinders were deformed at confining pressures of 200-1000 bars, pore pressure of 30 bars and temperatures of 150?? and 240??C. Thin-section and X-ray analysis revealed that some borehole samples had undergone extensive alteration and recrystallization. Constant strain rate tests of 10-4 and 10-6 per sec gave a coefficient of friction of 0.68. Due to the highly fractured nature of the rocks taken from the production zone, intact samples were rarely 50% stronger than the frictional strength. This result suggests that the Geysers reservoir can support shear stresses only as large as its frictional shear strength. Velocity of p-waves (6.2 km/sec) was measured on one sample. Acoustic emission and sliding on a sawcut were related to changes in pore pressure. b-values computed from the acoustic emissions generated during fluid injection were typically about 0.55. An unusually high b-value (approximately 1.3) observed during sudden injection of water into the sample may have been related to thermal cracking. ?? 1982.

  2. Sociality Affects REM Sleep Episode Duration Under Controlled Laboratory Conditions in the Rock Hyrax, Procavia capensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Gravett

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The rock hyrax, Procavia capensis, is a highly social, diurnal mammal. In the current study several physiologically measurable parameters of sleep, as well as the accompanying behavior, were recorded continuously from five rock hyraxes, for 72 h under solitary (experimental animal alone in the recording chamber, and social conditions (experimental animal with 1 or 2 additional, non-implanted animals in the recording chamber. The results revealed no significant differences between solitary and social conditions for total sleep times, number of episodes, episode duration or slow wave activity (SWA for all states examined. The only significant difference observed between social and solitary conditions was the average duration of rapid eye movement (REM sleep episodes. REM sleep episode duration was on average 20 s and 40 s longer under social conditions daily and during the dark period, respectively. It is hypothesized that the increase in REM sleep episode duration under social conditions could possibly be attributed to improved thermoregulation strategies, however considering the limited sample size and design of the current study further investigations are needed to confirm this finding. Whether the conclusions and the observations made in this study can be generalized to all naturally socially sleeping mammals remains an open question.

  3. The rock abrasion record at Gale Crater: Mars Science Laboratory results from Bradbury Landing to Rocknest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N.T.; Calef, F.J.; Hallett, B.W.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Lanza, N.L.; Le Mouélic, S.; Newman, C.E.; Blaney, D.L.; de Pablo, M.A.; Kocurek, G.A.; Langevin, Y.; Lewis, K.W.; Mangold, N.; Maurice, S.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Pinet, P.; Renno, N.O.; Rice, CM.S.; Richardson, M.E.; Sautter, V.; Sletten, R.S.; Wiens, R.C.; Yingst, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Ventifacts, rocks abraded by wind-borne particles, are found in Gale Crater, Mars. In the eastward drive from “Bradbury Landing” to “Rocknest,” they account for about half of the float and outcrop seen by Curiosity's cameras. Many are faceted and exhibit abrasion textures found at a range of scales, from submillimeter lineations to centimeter-scale facets, scallops, flutes, and grooves. The drive path geometry in the first 100 sols of the mission emphasized the identification of abrasion facets and textures formed by westerly flow. This upwind direction is inconsistent with predictions based on models and the orientation of regional dunes, suggesting that these ventifact features formed from very rare high-speed winds. The absence of active sand and evidence for deflation in the area indicates that most of the ventifacts are fossil features experiencing little abrasion today.

  4. Applying Squeezing Technique to Clayrocks: Lessons Learned from Experiments at Mont Terri Rock Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A. M.; Sanchez-Ledesma, D. M.; Tournassat, C.; Melon, A.; Gaucher, E.; Astudillo, E.; Vinsot, A.

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of the pore water chemistry in clay rock formations plays an important role in determining radionuclide migration in the context of nuclear waste disposal. Among the different in situ and ex-situ techniques for pore water sampling in clay sediments and soils, squeezing technique dates back 115 years. Although different studies have been performed about the reliability and representativeness of squeezed pore waters, more of them were achieved on high porosity, high water content and unconsolidated clay sediments. A very few of them tackled the analysis of squeezed pore water from low-porosity, low water content and highly consolidated clay rocks. In this work, a specially designed and fabricated one-dimensional compression cell two directional fluid flow was used to extract and analyse the pore water composition of Opalinus Clay core samples from Mont Terri (Switzerland). The reproducibility of the technique is good and no ionic ultrafiltration, chemical fractionation or anion exclusion was found in the range of pressures analysed: 70-200 MPa. Pore waters extracted in this range of pressures do not decrease in concentration, which would indicate a dilution of water by mixing of the free pore water and the outer layers of double layer water (Donnan water). A threshold (safety) squeezing pressure of 175 MPa was established for avoiding membrane effects (ion filtering, anion exclusion, etc.) from clay particles induced by increasing pressures. Besides, the pore waters extracted at these pressures are representative of the Opalinus Clay formation from a direct comparison against in situ collected borehole waters. (Author)

  5. Prevention and Control of Antimicrobial Resistant Healthcare-Associated Infections: The Microbiology Laboratory Rocks!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Alexandra S.; Couto, Isabel; Toscano, Cristina; Gonçalves, Elsa; Póvoa, Pedro; Viveiros, Miguel; Lapão, Luís V.

    2016-01-01

    In Europe, each year, more than four milion patients acquire a healthcare-associated infection (HAI) and almost 40 thousand die as a direct consequence of it. Regardless of many stategies to prevent and control HAIs, they remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with a significant economic impact: a recent estimate places it at the ten billion dollars/year. The control of HAIs requires a prompt and efficient identification of the etiological agent and a rapid communication with the clinician. The Microbiology Laboratory has a significant role in the prevention and control of these infections and is a key element of any Infection Control Program. The work of the Microbiology Laboratory covers microbial isolation and identification, determination of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, epidemiological surveillance and outbreak detection, education, and report of quality assured results. In this paper we address the role and importance of the Microbiology Laboratory in the prevention and control of HAI and in Antibiotic Stewardship Programs and how it can be leveraged when combined with the use of information systems. Additionally, we critically review some challenges that the Microbiology Laboratory has to deal with, including the selection of analytic methods and the proper use of communication channels with other healthcare services. PMID:27375577

  6. Physical properties and rock physics models of sediment containing natural and laboratory-formed methane gas hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W.J.; Pecher, I.A.; Waite, W.F.; Mason, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents results of shear strength and acoustic velocity (p-wave) measurements performed on: (1) samples containing natural gas hydrate from the Mallik 2L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories; (2) reconstituted Ottawa sand samples containing methane gas hydrate formed in the laboratory; and (3) ice-bearing sands. These measurements show that hydrate increases shear strength and p-wave velocity in natural and reconstituted samples. The proportion of this increase depends on (1) the amount and distribution of hydrate present, (2) differences, in sediment properties, and (3) differences in test conditions. Stress-strain curves from the Mallik samples suggest that natural gas hydrate does not cement sediment grains. However, stress-strain curves from the Ottawa sand (containing laboratory-formed gas hydrate) do imply cementation is present. Acoustically, rock physics modeling shows that gas hydrate does not cement grains of natural Mackenzie Delta sediment. Natural gas hydrates are best modeled as part of the sediment frame. This finding is in contrast with direct observations and results of Ottawa sand containing laboratory-formed hydrate, which was found to cement grains (Waite et al. 2004). It therefore appears that the microscopic distribution of gas hydrates in sediment, and hence the effect of gas hydrate on sediment physical properties, differs between natural deposits and laboratory-formed samples. This difference may possibly be caused by the location of water molecules that are available to form hydrate. Models that use laboratory-derived properties to predict behavior of natural gas hydrate must account for these differences.

  7. Experiments on thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of Opalinus Clay at Mont Terri rock laboratory, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Bossart

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Repositories for deep geological disposal of radioactive waste rely on multi-barrier systems to isolate waste from the biosphere. A multi-barrier system typically comprises the natural geological barrier provided by the repository host rock – in our case the Opalinus Clay – and an engineered barrier system (EBS. The Swiss repository concept for spent fuel and vitrified high-level waste (HLW consists of waste canisters, which are emplaced horizontally in the middle of an emplacement gallery and are separated from the gallery wall by granular backfill material (GBM. We describe here a selection of five in-situ experiments where characteristic hydro-mechanical (HM and thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM processes have been observed. The first example is a coupled HM and mine-by test where the evolution of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ was monitored around a gallery in the Opalinus Clay (ED-B experiment. Measurements of pore-water pressures and convergences due to stress redistribution during excavation highlighted the HM behaviour. The same measurements were subsequently carried out in a heater test (HE-D where we were able to characterise the Opalinus Clay in terms of its THM behaviour. These yielded detailed data to better understand the THM behaviours of the granular backfill and the natural host rock. For a presentation of the Swiss concept for HLW storage, we designed three demonstration experiments that were subsequently implemented in the Mont Terri rock laboratory: (1 the engineered barrier (EB experiment, (2 the in-situ heater test on key-THM processes and parameters (HE-E experiment, and (3 the full-scale emplacement (FE experiment. The first demonstration experiment has been dismantled, but the last two ones are on-going.

  8. SITE 94. Modelling of groundwater chemistry at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emren, A.T. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry

    1999-02-01

    In this report a model is described, which has been able to give agreement between observed and modelled values for more than ten element concentrations (including pH and pE values). The model makes use of a number of steady state waters which are mixed naturally after which the mixtures react with minerals in the fractures. The end member waters are supposed to have been present in the fracture system during a time interval which is long enough for the rock groundwater system to have reached a steady state. Some elements, e.g. chlorine, is modelled as conservative (inert with respect to the rock). Most element concentrations cannot be explained from mixing alone. Rather reactions with the fracture walls have to be taken into account. The situation is complicated by the fact that a system comprised of groundwater and a number of fracture minerals may violate Gibb`s phase rule. In such a system, no global equilibrium state exists, and thus the water can never reach equilibrium with respect to all the fracture minerals. The end member waters eventually formed can be expected to be in a steady state condition rather than equilibrium with respect to the fracture minerals. It should be noted that such a steady state is not an equilibrium state. Rather, the water chemistry has to fluctuate as a result of spatial variability in the local mineral set. In most cases when an end member water is sampled, a large number of local waters are mixed causing the fluctuations to cancel out. The CRACKER is a program which has been developed to handle this complicated chemical situation. It couples chemistry and transport, using elaborate chemical modelling in combination with a simplified transport model. The program simulates chemical reactions of groundwater flowing through a plane fracture. The simulation results show that although the end member waters are far from equilibrium with respect to most of the minerals, they are in a steady state with respect to the rock. The chemistry

  9. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Characterisation methods and instruments. Experiences from the construction phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-12-15

    This report describes the different investigation methods used during the Aespoe HRL construction phase which commenced 1990 and ended 1995. The investigation methods are described with respect to performance, errors, uncertainty and usefulness in determined, analysed and/or calculated parameter values or other kind of geoscientific information. Moreover, other comments of the different methods, like those related to the practical performance of the measurements or tests are given. The practical performance is a major task as most of the investigations were conducted in parallel with the construction work. Much of the wide range of investigations carried out during the tunnelling work required special efforts of the personnel involved. Experiences and comments on these operations are presented in the report. The pre-investigation methods have been evaluated by comparing predictions based on pre-investigation models with data and results from the construction phase and updated geoscientific models. In 1997 a package of reports describe the general results of the pre-investigations. The investigation methods are in this report evaluated with respect to usefulness for underground characterisation of a rock volume, concerning geological, geohydrological, hydrochemical and rock mechanical properties. The report describes out opinion of the methods after the construction phase, i.e. the same platform of knowledge as for the package of reports of 1997. The evaluation of usefulness of the underground investigation methods are structured according to the key issues used for the preinvestigation modelling and predictions, i.e. Geological-structural model, Groundwater flow (hydrogeology), Groundwater chemistry (hydrochemistry), Transport of solutes and Mechanical stability models (or rock mechanics). The investigation methods selected for the different subjects for which the predictions were made are presented. Some of the subjects were slightly modified or adjusted during

  10. A comparative study of the modelling of cement hydration and cement-rock laboratory experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David, E-mail: savaged@me.com [Quintessa Ltd., The Hub, 14 Station Road, Henley-on-Thames, RG9 1AY (United Kingdom); Soler, Josep M. [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Yamaguchi, Kohei; Walker, Colin; Honda, Akira; Inagaki, Manabu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1194 (Japan); Watson, Claire; Wilson, James; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., The Hub, 14 Station Road, Henley-on-Thames, RG9 1AY (United Kingdom); Gaus, Irina; Rueedi, Joerg [Nagra, Hardstrasse 73, Wettingen CH-5430 (Switzerland)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > A modelling intercomparison has shown that the dominant reaction pathways are well understood. > However, significant differences in model parameterisation produced similar results. > The modelling showed that there is benefit in keeping the numerical models as simple as possible. - Abstract: The use of cement and concrete as fracture grouting or as tunnel seals in a geological disposal facility for radioactive wastes creates potential issues concerning chemical reactivity. From a long-term safety perspective, it is desirable to be able model these interactions and changes quantitatively. The 'Long-term Cement Studies' (LCS) project was formulated with an emphasis on in situ field experiments with more realistic boundary conditions and longer time scales compared with former experiments. As part of the project programme, a modelling inter-comparison has been conducted, involving the modelling of two experiments describing cement hydration on one hand and cement-rock reaction on the other, with teams representing the NDA (UK), Posiva (Finland), and JAEA (Japan). This modelling exercise showed that the dominant reaction pathways in the two experiments are fairly well understood and are consistent between the different modelling teams, although significant differences existed amongst the precise parameterisation (e.g. reactive surface areas, dependences of rate upon pH, types of secondary minerals), and in some instances, processes (e.g. partition of alkali elements between solids and liquid during cement hydration; kinetic models of cement hydration). It was not conclusive if certain processes such as surface complexation (preferred by some modellers, but not by others) played a role in the cement-rock experiment or not. These processes appear to be more relevant at early times in the experiment and the evolution at longer timescales was not affected. The observed permeability profile with time could not be matched. The fact that no secondary

  11. Exploratory simulations of multiphase effects in gas injection and ventilation tests in an underground rock laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finsterle, S. (Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland). Versuchsanstalt fuer Wasserbau, Hydrologie und Glaciologie); Schlueter, E.; Pruess, K. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    This report is one of a series documenting the results of the Nagra-DOE Cooperative (NDC-I) research program in which the cooperating scientists explore the geological, geophysical, hydrological, geochemical, and structural effects was sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and the Swiss Nationale Genossenschaft fuer die Lagerung radioaktiver Abfaella (Nagra) and concluded in September 1989. 16 refs., 29 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Feral Cattle in the White Rock Canyon Reserve at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hansen, Leslie A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-27

    At the request of the Los Alamos Field Office (the Field Office), Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists placed remote-triggered wildlife cameras in and around the mouth of Ancho Canyon in the White Rock Canyon Reserve (the Reserve) to monitor use by feral cattle. The cameras were placed in October 2012 and retrieved in January 2013. Two cameras were placed upstream in Ancho Canyon away from the Rio Grande along the perennial flows from Ancho Springs, two cameras were placed at the north side of the mouth to Ancho Canyon along the Rio Grande, and two cameras were placed at the south side of the mouth to Ancho Canyon along the Rio Grande. The cameras recorded three different individual feral cows using this area as well as a variety of local native wildlife. This report details our results and issues associated with feral cattle in the Reserve. Feral cattle pose significant risks to human safety, impact cultural and biological resources, and affect the environmental integrity of the Reserve. Regional stakeholders have communicated to the Field Office that they support feral cattle removal.

  13. VIRTUS. Virtual underground laboratory in rock salt; VIRTUS. Virtuelles Untertagelabor im Steinsalz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieczorek, Klaus [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany); Behlau, Joachim; Heemann, Ulrich [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover (Germany); Masik, Steffen; Raab, Michael [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Fabrikbetrieb und -Automatisierung (IFF), Magdeburg (Germany); Mueller, Christian; Simo, Eric Kuate [DBE Technology GmbH, Peine (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Germany does not have an underground laboratory to study the behavior of geological formations for the use as final repository for radioactive high-level wastes. VIRTUS was developed to have an adequate tool to study the complex and safety relevant processes in geological structures for a fast and effective planning and testing of final repository design. The three-dimensional visualization of the numerical simulations results will help n the scientists and the interested public to understand the process flows in a final repository.

  14. A laboratory study on mix design to properly resemble a jointed brittle rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Asadizadeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper attempts have been done to create a mortar with relatively high uniaxial compressive strength (UCS, easy casting, high flexibility, instant hardening, low cost and easy availability. The main use of this material is to physically model the mechanical behavior of jointed rock-like blocks. The effect of four parameters such as joint roughness coefficient (JRC, bridge length (L, bridge angle (γ and joint inclination (θ on UCS of non-persistent jointed blocks were studied. For this purpose, 35 cylindrical specimens with a broad range of plaster content (P and cement content (C in different ages were tested. In order to increase the strength of blocky specimens, some retarder and lubricant were used. The results showed that using 3 wt. % (Weight percent lubricant MGAR106 and 0.05 wt. % Retarder decreases water content by 12.5% and increases plaster and cement content of 8.3% and 4.17 % respectively. Consequently, UCS of blocky specimens increased by 284.33%. In order to formulize the effect of P/C content and the age of cylindrical specimens (A on UCS, Multivariate Non-linear Regression (MNR and Bayesian Regularized Artificial Neural Network (BRANN models were deployed. The results showed that BRANN approach can provide more exact predictions of the specimen UCS than MNR model. Moreover, P/C content had more influence on UCS than the specimen age. Finally the UCS tests on blocky specimens indicated that increasing JRC, bridge length and bridge angle increases UCS and it takes its minimum ate joint inclination of 60°. Furthermore, the capability of produced material to model cracking behaviour of jointed blocks was approved.

  15. Materials research at selected Japanese laboratories. Based on a 1992 visit: Overview, summary of highlights, notes on laboratories and topics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    I visited Japan from June 29 to August 1, 1992. The purpose of this visit was to assess the status of materials science research at selected governmental, university and industrial laboratories and to established acquaintances with Japanese researchers. The areas of research covered by these visits included ceramics, oxide superconductors, intermetallics alloys, superhard materials and diamond films, high-temperature materials and properties, mechanical properties, fracture, creep, fatigue, defects, materials for nuclear reactor applications and irradiation effects, high pressure synthesis, self-propagating high temperature synthesis, microanalysis, magnetic properties and magnetic facilities, and surface science.

  16. Bayesian inference of spectral induced polarization parameters for laboratory complex resistivity measurements of rocks and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérubé, Charles L.; Chouteau, Michel; Shamsipour, Pejman; Enkin, Randolph J.; Olivo, Gema R.

    2017-08-01

    Spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements are now widely used to infer mineralogical or hydrogeological properties from the low-frequency electrical properties of the subsurface in both mineral exploration and environmental sciences. We present an open-source program that performs fast multi-model inversion of laboratory complex resistivity measurements using Markov-chain Monte Carlo simulation. Using this stochastic method, SIP parameters and their uncertainties may be obtained from the Cole-Cole and Dias models, or from the Debye and Warburg decomposition approaches. The program is tested on synthetic and laboratory data to show that the posterior distribution of a multiple Cole-Cole model is multimodal in particular cases. The Warburg and Debye decomposition approaches yield unique solutions in all cases. It is shown that an adaptive Metropolis algorithm performs faster and is less dependent on the initial parameter values than the Metropolis-Hastings step method when inverting SIP data through the decomposition schemes. There are no advantages in using an adaptive step method for well-defined Cole-Cole inversion. Finally, the influence of measurement noise on the recovered relaxation time distribution is explored. We provide the geophysics community with a open-source platform that can serve as a base for further developments in stochastic SIP data inversion and that may be used to perform parameter analysis with various SIP models.

  17. Strong interactions of hyperons. [Summaries of research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemethy, P.; Hungerbuehler, V.; Majka, R.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of the strong interaction results obtained with the Yale--FNAL--BNL hyperon beam at the Brookhaven AGS is presented. Differential cross sections are reported for hyperon-proton elastic scattering with samples of 6200 ..sigma../sup -/p events and 67 ..xi../sup -/p events. Also a report is made on a search for hyperon resonances in inelastic scattering. Finally, the prospects for new results on hyperon interactions are reviewed.

  18. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Studies of factors that affect and controls the Excavation Damaged/Disturbed Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Martin; Baeckstroem, Ann; Quanhong Feng (AaF - Berg och Maetteknik, Stockholm (Sweden)); Berglund, Johan (Vattenfall Power Consultant, Stockholm (Sweden)); Johansson, Malin; Mas Ivars, Diego (Itasca Geomekanik AB, Solna (Sweden)); Olsson, Mats (SweBefo, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-07-15

    A tunnel was developed at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in 2003 purposely for a large in-situ rock mechanics experiment, the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE). The tunnel had a large height/width ratio with a circular floor, primarily to control the stress situation around the tunnel and concentrate the stresses under the floor. An extensive set of data for understanding the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) was collected within section 47 of the tunnel. It consist of the blast design, blast sequences, convergence measurements during excavation, geological mapping of tunnel and cores, 3D-laser scanning of the tunnel geometry etc. Furthermore, in 2006, ultrasonic measurements along eight boreholes were carried out in order to estimate the extent of the EDZ in the tunnel. The collection of all these different information provides an opportunity to evaluate the mechanical damages caused by the excavation work. The overall aim with this project is to give feed-back to future planning of tunnelling on issues of importance for requirements with respect to minimising the EDZ in crystalline rock from the drill and blast method. A combination of the mapped geological features (tunnel and cores) and the geometry of the blasted tunnel obtained from the 3D-laser scanning were used to build a 3D model of the geology with emphasis on the geometry of the natural fractures. The rock mechanic response to the tunnelling was evaluated in a numerical model including the as-built geometry in combination with the 3D model of the geology. The modelling of the rock mechanical processes of importance for the EDZ could be calibrated against actual measurements. From observed changes in the ultrasonic wave velocity along the boreholes it was found that the locations of the velocity changes corresponded well with the location of the mapped fractures in the drill cores. This indicates that EDZ can be detected using the ultrasonic method with high accuracy. Furthermore, the

  19. Sandia National Laboratories and higher education in New Mexico: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories interacts extensively with colleges and universities in New Mexico. This report summarizes several of these relationships in employee education, research contracts, loaned equipment, temporary employment, and other areas.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories and higher education in New Mexico: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories interacts extensively with colleges and universities in New Mexico. This report summarizes several of these relationships in employee education, research contracts, loaned equipment, temporary employment and other areas. 8 tabs.

  1. Laboratory hydraulic fracturing experiments in intact and pre-fractured rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoback, M.D.; Rummel, F.; Jung, R.; Raleigh, C.B.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory hydraulic fracturing experiments were conducted to investigate two factors which could influence the use of the hydrofrac technique for in-situ stress determinations; the possible dependence of the breakdown pressure upon the rate of borehole pressurization, and the influence of pre-existing cracks on the orientation of generated fractures. The experiments have shown that while the rate of borehole pressurization has a marked effect on breakdown pressures, the pressure at which hydraulic fractures initiate (and thus tensile strength) is independent of the rate of borehole pressurization when the effect of fluid penetration is negligible. Thus, the experiments indicate that use of breakdown pressures rather than fracture initiation pressures may lead to an erroneous estimate of tectonic stresses. A conceptual model is proposed to explain anomalously high breakdown pressures observed when fracturing with high viscosity fluids. In this model, initial fracture propagation is presumed to be stable due to large differences between the borehole pressure and that within the fracture. In samples which contained pre-existing fractures which were 'leaky' to water, we found it possible to generate hydraulic fractures oriented parallel to the direction of maximum compression if high viscosity drilling mud was used as the fracturing fluid. ?? 1977.

  2. Gelatins as rock analog in laboratory models: a rheological study and preliminary applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbi, F.; di Giuseppe, E.; Funiciello, F.; Ranalli, G.; Faccenna, C.

    2009-12-01

    A laboratory model is a simplified scaled representation of nature. Thereby, according to ‘similarity criteria’, both rheological and physical parameters involved in the modeling must be properly scaled to natural conditions. In this work we systematically investigated the rheological and physical properties of a wide range of gelatins as functions of their temperature, composition, concentration, ageing and strain rate, in both gel- (i.e. solid) and sol-state (i.e. solution). Our results show that the complex mechanical behavior of gelatins reproduces gradually the full range of rheological behavior from purely elastic to visco-elasto-brittle to purely viscous (nonlinear) rheology going from the gel- to the sol-state. The handiness of the manipulation of the gelatins’ microstructure by calibrating the setting parameters and their resulting rheological variability appear promising for the potential use of these analog materials to simulate crustal and lithospheric rheological behavior. In particular, we found that pig skin 2.5 wt.% at 10 °C has the required rheological properties for a suitable experimental set-up to model crustal deformations.

  3. Does fault strengthening in laboratory rock friction experiments really depend primarily upon time and not slip?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Pathikrit; Rubin, Allan M.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2017-08-01

    The popular constitutive formulations of rate-and-state friction offer two end-member views on whether friction evolves only with slip (Slip law) or with time even without slip (Aging law). While rate stepping experiments show support for the Slip law, laboratory-observed frictional behavior near-zero slip rates has traditionally been inferred as supporting Aging law style time-dependent healing, in particular, from the slide-hold-slide experiments of Beeler et al. (1994). Using a combination of new analytical results and explicit numerical (Bayesian) inversion, we show instead that the slide-hold-slide data of Beeler et al. (1994) favor slip-dependent state evolution during holds. We show that, while the stiffness-independent rate of growth of peak stress (following reslides) with hold duration is a property shared by both the Aging and (under a more restricted set of parameter combinations) Slip laws, the observed stiffness dependence of the rate of stress relaxation during long holds is incompatible with the Aging law with constant rate-state parameters. The Slip law consistently fits the evolution of the stress minima at the end of the holds well, whether fitting jointly with peak stresses or otherwise. But neither the Aging nor Slip laws fit all the data well when a - b is constrained to values derived from prior velocity steps. We also attempted to fit the evolution of stress peaks and minima with the Kato-Tullis hybrid law and the shear stress-dependent Nagata law, both of which, even with the freedom of an extra parameter, generally reproduced the best Slip law fits to the data.

  4. Electric resistivity and seismic refraction tomography: a challenging joint underwater survey at Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ronczka

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tunnelling below water passages is a challenging task in terms of planning, pre-investigation and construction. Fracture zones in the underlying bedrock lead to low rock quality and thus reduced stability. For natural reasons, they tend to be more frequent at water passages. Ground investigations that provide information on the subsurface are necessary prior to the construction phase, but these can be logistically difficult. Geophysics can help close the gaps between local point information by producing subsurface images. An approach that combines seismic refraction tomography and electrical resistivity tomography has been tested at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL. The aim was to detect fracture zones in a well-known but logistically challenging area from a measuring perspective. The presented surveys cover a water passage along part of a tunnel that connects surface facilities with an underground test laboratory. The tunnel is approximately 100 m below and 20 m east of the survey line and gives evidence for one major and several minor fracture zones. The geological and general test site conditions, e.g. with strong power line noise from the nearby nuclear power plant, are challenging for geophysical measurements. Co-located positions for seismic and ERT sensors and source positions are used on the 450 m underwater section of the 700 m profile. Because of a large transition zone that appeared in the ERT result and the missing coverage of the seismic data, fracture zones at the southern and northern parts of the underwater passage cannot be detected by separated inversion. Synthetic studies show that significant three-dimensional (3-D artefacts occur in the ERT model that even exceed the positioning errors of underwater electrodes. The model coverage is closely connected to the resolution and can be used to display the model uncertainty by introducing thresholds to fade-out regions of medium and low resolution. A structural

  5. Electric resistivity and seismic refraction tomography: a challenging joint underwater survey at Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronczka, Mathias; Hellman, Kristofer; Günther, Thomas; Wisén, Roger; Dahlin, Torleif

    2017-06-01

    Tunnelling below water passages is a challenging task in terms of planning, pre-investigation and construction. Fracture zones in the underlying bedrock lead to low rock quality and thus reduced stability. For natural reasons, they tend to be more frequent at water passages. Ground investigations that provide information on the subsurface are necessary prior to the construction phase, but these can be logistically difficult. Geophysics can help close the gaps between local point information by producing subsurface images. An approach that combines seismic refraction tomography and electrical resistivity tomography has been tested at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). The aim was to detect fracture zones in a well-known but logistically challenging area from a measuring perspective. The presented surveys cover a water passage along part of a tunnel that connects surface facilities with an underground test laboratory. The tunnel is approximately 100 m below and 20 m east of the survey line and gives evidence for one major and several minor fracture zones. The geological and general test site conditions, e.g. with strong power line noise from the nearby nuclear power plant, are challenging for geophysical measurements. Co-located positions for seismic and ERT sensors and source positions are used on the 450 m underwater section of the 700 m profile. Because of a large transition zone that appeared in the ERT result and the missing coverage of the seismic data, fracture zones at the southern and northern parts of the underwater passage cannot be detected by separated inversion. Synthetic studies show that significant three-dimensional (3-D) artefacts occur in the ERT model that even exceed the positioning errors of underwater electrodes. The model coverage is closely connected to the resolution and can be used to display the model uncertainty by introducing thresholds to fade-out regions of medium and low resolution. A structural coupling cooperative inversion

  6. Laboratory directed research and development. FY 1991 program activities: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-15

    The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle``; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these project are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne. Areas of emphasis are (1) advanced accelerator and detector technology, (2) x-ray techniques in biological and physical sciences, (3) advanced reactor technology, (4) materials science, computational science, biological sciences and environmental sciences. Individual reports summarizing the purpose, approach, and results of projects are presented.

  7. Nano iron particles transport in fractured rocks: laboratory and field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Meirav; Weisbrod, Noam

    2017-04-01

    Our study deals with the transport potential of nano iron particles (NIPs) in fractured media. Two different systemswere used to investigate transport on two scales: (1 )a laboratory flow system of a naturally discrete fractured chalk core, 0.43 and 0.18 m in length and diamater, respectively; and (2) a field system of hydraulically connected boreholes located 47 m apart which penetrate a fractured chalk aquifer. We started by testing the transport potential of various NIPs under different conditions. Particle stability experiments were conducted using various NIPs and different stabilizersat two ionic strengths. Overall, four different NIPs and three stabilizers were tested. Particles and solution properties (stability, aggregate/particle size, viscosity and density) were tested in batch experiments, and transport experiments (breakthrough curves (BTCs) and recovery) were conduted in the fractured chalk core. We have learned that the key parameters controlling particle transport are the particle/aggregate size and stability, which govern NIP settling rates and ultimately their migration distance. The governing mechanism controlling NIP transport was found to be sedimentation, and to a much lesser extent, processes such as diffusion, straining or interception. On the basis of these experiments, Carbo-Iron® particles ( 800 nm activated carbon particles doped with nano zero valent iron particles) and Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilizer were selected for the field test injection. In the field, Carbo-Iron particles were initially injected into the fractured aquifer using an excess of stabilizer in order to ensure maximum recovery. This resulted in high particle recovery and fast arrival time, similar to the ideal tracer (iodide). The high recovery of the stable particle solution emphasized the importance of particle stability for transport in fractures. To test mobility manipulation potential of the particles and simulate more realistic scenarios, a second field

  8. Definition of experiments and instruments for a communication/navigation research laboratory. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    This study was undertaken to develop conceptual designs for a manned, space shuttle sortie mission laboratory capable of supporting a wide variety of experiments in conjunction with communications and navigation research. This space/laboratory would be one in which man may effectively increase experiment efficiency by certain observations, modifications, setup, calibration, and limited maintenance steps. In addition, man may monitor experiment progress and perform preliminary data evaluation to verify proper equipment functioning and may terminate or redirect experiments to obtain the most desirable end results. The flexibility and unique capabilities of man as an experimenter in such a laboratory will add greatly to the simplification of space experiments and this provides the basis for commonality in many of the supportive subsystems, thus reaping the benefits of reusability and reduced experiment costs. For Vol. 4, see N73-19268.

  9. Summary of proposed approach for deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1996-11-01

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL`s Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory, carried out under an Interagency Agreement (IAG) with the United States Department of Energy (DOE), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). The objective of this paper is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL.

  10. Fiberboard and hardboard research at the Forest Products Laboratory : a 50-year summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary C. Myers; J. Dobbin McNatt

    1985-01-01

    Many changes have occurred in the fiber-based panel products industries during the past 50 years. During this timespan the Forest Products Laboratory has conducted a considerable amount of research on processing and product evaluation of fiber-based panel product materials. Unfortunately about 26 percent of this information was never published. completed during this...

  11. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory Canister Retrieval Test. Microorganisms in buffer from the Canister Retrieval Test - numbers and metabolic diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lydmark, Sara; Pedersen, Karsten (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden))

    2011-03-15

    'Canister Retrieval Test' (CRT) is an experiment that started at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) 2000. CRT is a part of the investigations which evaluate a possible KBS-3 storage of nuclear waste. The primary aim was to see whether it is possible or not to retrieve a copper canister after storage under authentic KBS-3 conditions. However, CRT also provided a unique opportunity to investigate if bacteria survived in the bentonite buffer during storage. Therefore, in connection to the retrieval of the canister microbiological samples were extracted from the bentonite buffer and the bacterial composition was studied. In this report, microbiological analyses of a total of 66 samples at the C2, R10, R9 and R6 levels in the bentonite from CRT are presented and discussed. By culturing bacteria from the bentonite in specific media the following bacterial parameters were investigated: The total amount of culturable heterotrophic aerobic bacteria, sulphate-reducing bacteria, and bacteria that produce the organic compound acetate (acetogens). The biovolume in the bentonite was determined by detection of the ATP content. In addition, bacteria from the bentonite were cultured in different sulphate-reducing media. In these cultures, the presence of the biotic compounds sulphide and acetate was investigated, since these have potentially negative effect on the copper canister in a KBS-3 repository. The results were to some extent compared to density, water content, and temperature data provided by Clay Technology AB. The results showed that 100-102 viable sulphate-reducing and acetogenic bacteria and 102-104 heterotrophic aerobic bacteria g-1 bentonite were present after five years of storage in the rock. Bacteria with several morphologies could be found in the cultures with bentonite. The most bacteria were detected in the bentonite buffer close to the rock but in a few samples also in bentonite close to the copper canister. When the presence of bacteria in the

  12. 2014 Annual Site Environmental Report Summary Pamphlet for Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Stacy Rene

    2016-02-01

    This ASER Summary Pamphlet presents the environmental protection, restoration, and monitoring programs in place at SNL/NM during calendar year 2014. It also discusses Sandia’s compliance with environmental regulations, and it highlights significant environmental program efforts and accomplishments. The environmental programs and waste management activities at SNL/NM meet or exceed the requirements of federal, state, and local environmental regulations, as well as DOE directives in the contract between Sandia and DOE. This document, prepared in accordance with and as required by DOE Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting, is a key component of DOE’s efforts to keep the public informed about environmental conditions throughout the DOE/NNSA nuclear weapons complex.

  13. Summary information and data sets for NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory, 1981 - 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, W.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the solar radiation and meteorological data collected at the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, from 1981 through 1991. The data collection was part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project. The report includes long-term averages and monthly and annual variability for key solar radiation elements and describes the hourly data sets for 1981 through 1991. Described in the report are how the elements were measured and how the data were collected and processed into hourly values. Procedures used for quality assessment of the hourly data values are presented, and the position of the solar radiation and meteorological elements in the data sets are defined; samples of read statements are provided.

  14. Stable isotope sales: Mound Laboratory customer and shipment summaries, FY 1976 and FY 1976A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruwe, A.H. Jr. (comp.)

    1977-06-06

    A listing is given of Mound Laboratory's sales of stable isotopes of noble gases, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, and sulfur for fiscal years 1976 and 1976A (the period July 1, 1975 through September 30, 1976). Purchasers are listed alphabetically and are divided into domestic and foreign groups. A cross-reference index by location is included for domestic customers. Cross-reference listings by isotope purchased are included for all customers.

  15. Modeling of the Influence of the Swedish Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) on Groundwater Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gylling, B.; Hartley, L.; Rhen, I.; Selroos, J.

    2008-12-01

    Three-dimensional, regional, numerical models of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured crystalline rock are used for two sites in Sweden that are considered for geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel. As a part of the site descriptive modeling for one of the sites, Laxemar, a number of simulations have been carried out to investigate if the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), an approximately 450 m deep tunnel below the island of Äspö located outside the Laxemar area, has an impact on the groundwater flow situation at Äspö and Laxemar. In the reference case, a specified head boundary condition was set on the top surface. For this study, two simulations were performed for each set of hydraulic properties and boundary conditions considered: one with the Äspö HRL present and water abstracted according to the inflow rates measured in the tunnel weirs; and a simulation under undisturbed conditions. In both simulations, the calculations start at 1960 using appropriate models of palaeo-hydrogeology without any disturbance for the initial condition and then the models are run until 2006 with a one year time-step. The cases were compared in terms of modeled drawdown, and changes to the Darcy velocity and hydro-geochemistry. Sensitivities of the results were considered in relation to the top surface boundary condition including a maximum infiltration of 165 mm/year or 80 m/year, and varying the hydraulic contact between the sea and the bedrock beneath. A number of comparisons with field data can be made to assess which of the variants is considered to best reflect site conditions and to possibly inform future developments of the site descriptive model. Drawdown measurements are available for several percussion drilled boreholes. Data are also available for salinity of the water collected in the weirs within the tunnel. Essentially, this can be used as a long-term interference test with the Äspö HRL as the sink and the percussion drilled boreholes as

  16. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Analyses of microorganisms, gases and water chemistry in buffer and backfill, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lydmark, Sara (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden))

    2010-09-15

    The Prototype repository is an international project to build and study a full-scale model of the planned Swedish final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The Prototype repository differs from a real storage in that it is drained. For example, this makes the swelling pressure lower in the Prototype repository compared with a real storage. The project is being conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in crystalline rock at a depth of approximately 450 m. A monitoring programme is investigating the evolution of the water chemistry, gas, and microbial activity at the site, and one of the specific aims is to monitor the microbial consumption of oxygen in situ in the Prototype repository. This document describes the results of the analyses of microbes, gases, and chemistry inside and outside the Prototype in 2009. Hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, ethane, and ethene were analysed in the following sampling points in the Prototype repository: KBU10001, KBU10002, KBU10004, KBU10006, KBU10008, KFA01 and KFA04. Where the sampling points in the Prototype delivered pore water, the water was analysed for amount of ATP (i.e., the biovolume), cultivable heterotrophic aerobic bacteria (CHAB), sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB), autotrophic acetogens (AA) and in some cases iron-reducing bacteria (IRB). Cultivation methods were also compared with qPCR molecular techniques to evaluate these before next year's decommission of the Prototype repository. The collected pore water from the Prototype repository was subject to chemistry analysis (as many analyses were conducted as the amount of water allowed). In addition, groundwater from two borehole sections in the rock surrounding the Prototype was analysed regarding its gas composition, microbiology and redox. Chemistry data from a previous investigation of the groundwater outside the Prototype repository were compared with the pore water

  17. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2007-09-28

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. Modification Number 1 to this Title V Operating Permit was issued on June 15, 2006 (Permit No P-100M1) and includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2006. LANL's 2006 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  18. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Environmental Stewardship Group

    2010-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2009. LANL's 2009 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  19. Litho- and biostratigraphy of the Opalinus Clay and bounding formations in the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hostettler, B. [Naturhistorisches Museum der Burgergemeinde Berne, Berne (Switzerland); Reisdorf, A. G. [Geologisch-Paläontologisches InstitutUniversität Basle, Basle (Switzerland); Jaeggi, D. [Swisstopo, Federal Office of Topography, Wabern (Switzerland); and others

    2017-04-15

    A 250 m-deep inclined well, the Mont Terri BDB-1, was drilled through the Jurassic Opalinus Clay and its bounding formations at the Mont Terri rock laboratory (NW Switzerland). For the first time, a continuous section from (oldest to youngest) the topmost members of the Staffelegg Formation to the basal layers of the Hauptrogenstein Formation is now available in the Mont Terri area. We extensively studied the drill core for lithostratigraphy and biostratigraphy, drawing upon three sections from the Mont Terri area. The macropaleontological, micropaleontological, and palynostratigraphical data are complementary, not only spatially but they also cover almost all biozones from the Late Toarcian to the Early Bajocian. We ran a suite of geophysical logs to determine formational and intraformational boundaries based on clay content in the BDB-1 well. In the framework of an interdisciplinary study, analysis of the above-mentioned formations permitted us to process and derive new and substantial data for the Mont Terri area in a straightforward way. Some parts of the lithologic inventory, stratigraphic architecture, thickness variations, and biostratigraphic classification of the studied formations deviate considerably from occurrences in northern Switzerland that crop out further to the east. For instance, with the exception of the Sissach Member, no further lithostratigraphic subdivision in members is proposed for the Passwang Formation. Also noteworthy is that the ca. 130 m-thick Opalinus Clay in the BDB-1 core is 20 m thinner than that equivalent section found in the Mont Terri tunnel. The lowermost 38 m of the Opalinus Clay can be attributed chronostratigraphically solely to the Aalensis Zone (Late Toarcian). Deposition of the Opalinus Clay began at the same time farther east in northern Switzerland (Aalensis Subzone, Aalensis Zone), but in the Mont Terri area the sedimentation rate was two or three orders of magnitude higher. (authors)

  20. Corrosion of carbon steel in clay environments relevant to radioactive waste geological disposals, Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Necib, S. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Déchets Radioactifs ANDRA, Meuse Haute-Marne, Center RD 960, Bure (France); Diomidis, N. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); Keech, P. [Nuclear Waste Management Organisation NWMO, Toronto (Canada); Nakayama, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency JAEA, Horonobe-Cho (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Carbon steel is widely considered as a candidate material for the construction of spent fuel and high-level waste disposal canisters. In order to investigate corrosion processes representative of the long term evolution of deep geological repositories, two in situ experiments are being conducted in the Mont Terri rock laboratory. The iron corrosion (IC) experiment, aims to measure the evolution of the instantaneous corrosion rate of carbon steel in contact with Opalinus Clay as a function of time, by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The Iron Corrosion in Bentonite (IC-A) experiment intends to determine the evolution of the average corrosion rate of carbon steel in contact with bentonite of different densities, by using gravimetric and surface analysis measurements, post exposure. Both experiments investigate the effect of microbial activity on corrosion. In the IC experiment, carbon steel showed a gradual decrease of the corrosion rate over a period of 7 years, which is consistent with the ongoing formation of protective corrosion products. Corrosion product layers composed of magnetite, mackinawite, hydroxychloride and siderite with some traces of oxidising species such as goethite were identified on the steel surface. Microbial investigations revealed thermophilic bacteria (sulphate and thiosulphate reducing bacteria) at the metal surface in low concentrations. In the IC-A experiment, carbon steel samples in direct contact with bentonite exhibited corrosion rates in the range of 2 µm/year after 20 months of exposure, in agreement with measurements in absence of microbes. Microstructural and chemical characterisation of the samples identified a complex corrosion product consisting mainly of magnetite. Microbial investigations confirmed the limited viability of microbes in highly compacted bentonite. (authors)

  1. Laboratory Visualization Experiments of Temperature-induced Fractures Around a Borehole (Cryogenic Fracturing) in Shale and Analogue Rock Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.; Wu, Y. S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2014-12-01

    In tight shales, hydraulic fracturing is the dominant method for improving reservoir permeability. However, injecting water-based liquids can induce formation damage and disposal problems, thus other techniques are being sought. One alternative to hydraulic fracturing is producing fractures thermally, using low-temperature fluids (cryogens). The primary consequence of thermal stimulation is that shrinkage fractures are produced around the borehole wall. Recently, cryogenic stimulation produced some promising results when the cryogen (typically liquid nitrogen and cold nitrogen gas) could be brought to reservoir depth. Numerical modeling also showed possible significant increases in gas production from a shale reservoir after cryogenic stimulation. However, geometry and the dynamic behavior of these thermally induced fractures under different stress regimes and rock anisotropy and heterogeneity is not yet well understood.Currently, we are conducting a series of laboratory thermal fracturing experiments on Mancos Shale and transparent glass blocks, by injecting liquid nitrogen under atmospheric pressure into room temperature blocks under various anisotropic stress states. The glass blocks allow clear optical visualization of fracture development and final fracturing patterns. For the shale blocks, X-ray CT is used to image both pre-existing and induced fractures. Also, the effect of borehole orientation with respect to the bedding planes and aligned preexisting fractures is examined. Our initial experiment on a uniaxially compressed glass block showed fracturing behavior which was distinctly different from conventional hydraulic fracturing. In addition to tensile fractures in the maximum principal stress directions, the thermal contraction by the cryogen induced (1) chaotic, spalling fractures around the borehole wall, and (2) a series of disk-shaped annular fractures perpendicular to the borehole. When applied to a horizontal borehole, the propagation plane of the

  2. Spectral variations in rocks and soils containing ferric iron hydroxide and(or) sulfate minerals as seen by AVIRIS and laboratory spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Barnaby W.

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data covering the Big Rock Candy Mountain area of the Marysvale volcanic field, west-central Utah, identified abundant rocks and soils bearing jarosite, goethite, and chlorite associated with volcanic rocks altered to propylitic grade during the Miocene (2321 Ma). Propylitically-altered rocks rich in pyrite associated with the relict feeder zones of convecting, shallow hydrothermal systems are currently undergoing supergene oxidation to natrojarosite, kaolinite, and gypsum. Goethite coatings are forming at the expense of jarosite where most pyrite has been consumed through oxidation in alluvium derived from pyrite-bearing zones. Spectral variations in the goethite-bearing rocks that resemble variations found in reference library samples of goethites of varying grain size were observed in the AVIRIS data. Rocks outside of the feeder zones have relatively low pyrite content and are characterized by chlorite, epidote, and calcite, with local copper-bearing quartz-calcite veins. Iron-bearing minerals in these rocks are weathering directly to goethite. Laboratory spectral analyses were applied to samples of iron-bearing rock outcrops and alluvium collected from the area to determine the accuracy of the AVIRIS-based mineral identification. The accuracy of the iron mineral identification results obtained by analysis of the AVIRIS data was confirmed. In general, the AVIRIS analysis results were accurate in identifying medium-grained goethite, coarse-grained goethite, medium- to coarse-grained goethite with trace jarosite, and mixtures of goethite and jarosite. However, rock fragments from alluvial areas identified as thin coatings of goethite with the AVIRIS data were found to consist mainly of medium- to coarse-grained goethite based on spectral characteristics in the visible and near-infrared. To determine if goethite abundance contributed to the spectral variations observed in goethite-bearing rocks

  3. ISOTHERMAL AIR INGRESS VALIDATION EXPERIMENTS AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: DESCRIPTION AND SUMMARY OF DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2010-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory performed air ingress experiments as part of validating computational fluid dynamics code (CFD). An isothermal stratified flow experiment was designed and set to understand stratified flow phenomena in the very high temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) and to provide experimental data for validating computer codes. The isothermal experiment focused on three flow characteristics unique in the VHTR air-ingress accident: stratified flow in the horizontal pipe, stratified flow expansion at the pipe and vessel junction, and stratified flow around supporting structures. Brine and sucrose were used as heavy fluids and water was used as light fluids. The density ratios were changed between 0.87 and 0.98. This experiment clearly showed that a stratified flow between heavy and light fluids is generated even for very small density differences. The code was validated by conducting blind CFD simulations and comparing the results to the experimental data. A grid sensitivity study was also performed based on the Richardson extrapolation and the grid convergence index method for modeling confidence. As a result, the calculated current speed showed very good agreement with the experimental data, indicating that the current CFD methods are suitable for predicting density gradient stratified flow phenomena in the air-ingress accident.

  4. Summary Report of Summer 2009 NGSI Human Capital Development Efforts at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougan, A; Dreicer, M; Essner, J; Gaffney, A; Reed, J; Williams, R

    2009-11-16

    In 2009, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) engaged in several activities to support NA-24's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). This report outlines LLNL's efforts to support Human Capital Development (HCD), one of five key components of NGSI managed by Dunbar Lockwood in the Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243). There were five main LLNL summer safeguards HCD efforts sponsored by NGSI: (1) A joint Monterey Institute of International Studies/Center for Nonproliferation Studies-LLNL International Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis Course; (2) A Summer Safeguards Policy Internship Program at LLNL; (3) A Training in Environmental Sample Analysis for IAEA Safeguards Internship; (4) Safeguards Technology Internships; and (5) A joint LLNL-INL Summer Safeguards Lecture Series. In this report, we provide an overview of these five initiatives, an analysis of lessons learned, an update on the NGSI FY09 post-doc, and an update on students who participated in previous NGSI-sponsored LLNL safeguards HCD efforts.

  5. Emissions inventory report summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for calendar year 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2009-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory’s potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2008. LANL’s 2008 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  6. Completion Summary for Well NRF-16 near the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Fisher, Jason C.; Bartholomay, Roy C.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Naval Reactors Laboratory Field Office, Idaho Branch Office cored and completed well NRF-16 for monitoring the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP) aquifer. The borehole was initially cored to a depth of 425 feet below land surface and water samples and geophysical data were collected and analyzed to determine if well NRF-16 would meet criteria requested by Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) for a new upgradient well. Final construction continued after initial water samples and geophysical data indicated that NRF-16 would produce chemical concentrations representative of upgradient aquifer water not influenced by NRF facility disposal, and that the well was capable of producing sustainable discharge for ongoing monitoring. The borehole was reamed and constructed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act monitoring well complete with screen and dedicated pump. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected after coring and final completion of the monitoring well. Geophysical logs were examined in conjunction with the borehole core to identify primary flow paths for groundwater, which are believed to occur in the intervals of fractured and vesicular basalt and to describe borehole lithology in detail. Geophysical data also were examined to look for evidence of perched water and the extent of the annular seal after cement grouting the casing in place. Borehole videos were collected to confirm that no perched water was present and to examine the borehole before and after setting the screen in well NRF-16. Two consecutive single-well aquifer tests to define hydraulic characteristics for well NRF-16 were conducted in the eastern SRP aquifer. Transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity averaged from the aquifer tests were 4.8 x 103 ft2/d and 9.9 ft/d, respectively. The transmissivity for well NRF-16 was within the range of values determined from past aquifer

  7. Groundwater degassing and two-phase flow in fractured rock: Summary of results and conclusions achieved during the period 1994-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarsjoe, J.; Destouni, G. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Water Resources Engineering; Gale, J. [Fracflow Consultants Inc., (Canada)

    2001-06-01

    drifts, by summarising and systematically interpreting all available laboratory and field investigations that have been conducted within the SKB degassing and two-phase flow programme. Data from various sites in Sweden show that the volumetric percent gas coming out of solution as the pressure of deep groundwater is lowered down to atmospheric pressure is generally less than 5%. Laboratory experiments and an analytical expression showed that conditions often are favourable for trapping and accumulation of gas bubbles in the fracture pore space (once bubbles are formed), implying that local fracture gas saturation degrees may become considerable, even though the evolved percent gas per unit volume flowing water is relatively low. For instance, a saturation degree of 40% was observed in a laboratory fracture for 7% evolved gas. However, degassing effects such as inflow reductions to boreholes and drifts will not be considerable unless the potential degassing zone (where the water pressure is lower than the gas bubble pressure) is sufficiently large in relation to the total length of the fracture. A series of borehole test conducted at Aespoe HRL between 300 and 450 meters depth indicated that degassing only causes considerable flow reductions for gas contents that are well above the normal ones in Swedish granitic bedrock. This field result was reproduced by a predictive degassing model, developed considering independent degassing observations in the laboratory. Since the model predictions were shown to be robust with regard to plausible variable ranges for rock fractures intersecting boreholes at depths between 20 and 600 metres, we conclude more generally that groundwater degassing will not cause considerable inflow reductions in fractures intersecting open boreholes under conditions normal for Swedish granitic bedrock. We also considered the relatively large drift inflow reductions observed in the Stripa simulated drift experiment. These reductions were hypothesised to

  8. Argonne National Laboratory summary site environmental report for calendar year 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH/QA Oversight

    2008-03-27

    This booklet is designed to inform the public about what Argonne National Laboratory is doing to monitor its environment and to protect its employees and neighbors from any adverse environmental impacts from Argonne research. The Downers Grove South Biology II class was selected to write this booklet, which summarizes Argonne's environmental monitoring programs for 2006. Writing this booklet also satisfies the Illinois State Education Standard, which requires that students need to know and apply scientific concepts to graduate from high school. This project not only provides information to the public, it will help students become better learners. The Biology II class was assigned to condense Argonne's 300-page, highly technical Site Environmental Report into a 16-page plain-English booklet. The site assessment relates to the class because the primary focus of the Biology II class is ecology and the environment. Students developed better learning skills by working together cooperatively, writing and researching more effectively. Students used the Argonne Site Environmental Report, the Internet, text books and information from Argonne scientists to help with their research on their topics. The topics covered in this booklet are the history of Argonne, groundwater, habitat management, air quality, Argonne research, Argonne's environmental non-radiological program, radiation, and compliance. The students first had to read and discuss the Site Environmental Report and then assign topics to focus on. Dr. Norbert Golchert and Mr. David Baurac, both from Argonne, came into the class to help teach the topics more in depth. The class then prepared drafts and wrote a final copy. Ashley Vizek, a student in the Biology class stated, 'I reviewed my material and read it over and over. I then took time to plan my paper out and think about what I wanted to write about, put it into foundation questions and started to write my paper. I rewrote and revised so I

  9. Monitoring and modelling of thermo-hydro-mechanical processes - main results of a heater experiment at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingeborg, G.; Alheid, H.J. [BGR - Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, Hannover (Germany); Jockwerz, N. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) - Final Repository Research Division, Braunschweig (Germany); Mayor, J.C. [ENRESA - Empresa Nacional des Residuos Radioactivos, Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Siner, J.L. [AITEMIN -Asociacion para la Investigacion y Desarrollo Industrial de los Recursos Naturales, Madrid, (Spain); Alonso, E. [CIMNE - Centre Internacional de Metodos Numerics en Ingenyeria, UPC, Barcelona (Spain); Weber, H.P. [NAGRA - National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Wettingen (Switzerland); Plotze, M. [ETHZ - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, IGT, Zurich, (Switzerland); Klubertanz, G. [COLENCO Power Engineering Ltd., Baden (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    The long-term safety of permanent underground repositories relies on a combination of engineered and geological barriers, so that the interactions between the barriers in response to conditions expected in a high-level waste repository need to be identified and fully understood. Co-financed by the European Community, a heater experiment was realized on a pilot plant scale at the underground laboratory in Mont Terri, Switzerland. The experiment was accompanied by an extensive programme of continuous monitoring, experimental investigations on-site as well as in laboratories, and numerical modelling of the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical processes. Heat-producing waste was simulated by a heater element of 10 cm diameter, held at a constant surface temperature of 100 C. The heater element (length 2 m) operated in a vertical borehole of 7 m depth at 4 to 6 m depth. It was embedded in a geotechnical barrier of pre-compacted bentonite blocks (outer diameter 30 cm) that were irrigated for 35 months before the heating phase (duration 18 months) began. The host rock is a highly consolidated stiff Jurassic clay stone (Opalinus Clay). After the heating phase, the vicinity of the heater element was explored by seismic, hydraulic, and geotechnical tests to investigate if the heating had induced changes in the Opalinus Clay. Additionally, rock mechanic specimens were tested in the laboratory. Finally, the experiment was dismantled to provide laboratory specimens of post - heating buffer and host rock material. The bentonite blocks were thoroughly wetted at the time of the dismantling. The volume increase amounted to 5 to 9% and was thus below the bentonite potential. Geo-electrical measurements showed no decrease of the water content in the vicinity of the heater during the heating phase. Decreasing energy input to the heater element over time suggests hence, that the bentonite dried leading to a decrease of its thermal conductivity. Gas release during the heating period occurred

  10. Effects of elevated CO2 levels on eggs and larvae of a North Pacific flatfish (northern rock sole, Lepidopsetta polyxystra) from laboratory experiment studies from 2012-02-01 to 2013-09-30 (NCEI Accession 0136906)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains the results of a laboratory experiment study to understand the effect of ocean acidification on eggs and larvae of northern rock sole,...

  11. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype repository. Analyses of microorganisms, gases, and water chemistry in buffer and backfill, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lydmark, Sara [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Moelnlycke (Sweden)

    2011-06-15

    The prototype repository (hereafter, 'Prototype') is an international project to build and study a fullscale model of the planned Swedish final repository for spent nuclear fuel. However, the Prototype differs from a real storage in that it is drained, which makes the swelling pressure lower in the Prototype than in a real storage facility. The heat from the radioactive decay is simulated by electrical heaters. The project is being conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in crystalline rock at a depth of approximately 450 m. A monitoring programme is investigating the evolution of the water chemistry, gas, and microbial activity at the site, and a specific aim is to monitor the microbial consumption of oxygen in situ in the Prototype. This document describes the results of the analyses of microbes, gases, and chemistry inside the Prototype in 2010. Hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, ethane, and ethene were analysed at the following sampling points in the Prototype: KBU10001, KBU10002, KBU10004, KBU10008, and KFA04. Where the sampling points in the Prototype delivered pore water, the water was analysed for amount of ATP (i.e. the biovolume), culturable heterotrophic aerobic bacteria (CHAB), sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB), and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB). The pore water collected from the Prototype was subject to as many chemical analyses as the amount of water allowed. Chemical analyses were also performed on pore water from two additional sampling points, KBU10005 and KBU10006. Chemical data from a previous investigation of the groundwater outside the Prototype were compared with the pore water chemistry. The improved sampling and analysis protocols introduced in 2007 worked very well. The International Progress Report (IPR) 08-01 (Eriksson 2008) revealed that many of the hydrochemical sampling points differ greatly from each other. The 16 sampling points were

  12. Geochemical signature of paleofluids in microstructures from Main Fault in the Opalinus Clay of the Mont Terri rock laboratory, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauer, N. [Laboratoire d’Hydrologie et de Géochimie de Strasbourg (CNRS-UdS), Strasbourg (France); Techer, I. [Equipe Associée, Chrome, Université de Nîmes, Nîmes (France); Nussbaum, Ch. [Swiss Geological Survey, Federal Office of Topography Swisstopo, Wabern (Switzerland); Laurich, B. [Structural Geology, Tectonics and Geomechanics, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Laurich, B. [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources BGR, Hannover (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    The present study reports on elemental and Sr isotopic analyses of calcite and associated celestite infillings of various microtectonic features collected mostly in the Main Fault of the Opalinus Clay from Mont Terri rock laboratory. Based on a detailed microstructural description of veins, slickensides, scaly clay aggregates and gouges, the geochemical signatures of the infillings were compared to those of the leachates from undeformed Opalinus Clay, and to the calcite from veins crosscutting Hauptrogenstein, Passwang and Staffelegg Formations above and below the Opalinus Clay. Vein calcite and celestite from Main Fault yield identical {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios that are also close to those recorded in the Opalinus Clay matrix inside the Main Fault, but different from those of the diffuse Opalinus Clay calcite outside the fault. These varied {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios of the diffuse calcite evidence a lack of interaction among the associated connate waters and the flowing fluids characterized by a homogeneous Sr signature. The {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr homogeneity at 0.70774 ± 0.00001 (2σ) for the infillings of most microstructures in the Main Fault, as well as of veins from nearby limestone layer and sediments around the Opalinus Clay, claims for an 'infinite' homogeneous marine supply, whereas the gouge infillings apparently interacted with a fluid chemically more complex. According to the known regional paleogeographic evolution, two seawater supplies were inferred and documented in the Delémont Basin: either during the Priabonian (38-34 Ma ago) from western Bresse graben, and/or during the Rupelian (34-28 Ma ago) from northern Rhine Graben. The Rupelian seawater that yields a mean {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr signature significantly higher than those of the microstructural infillings seems not to be the appropriate source. Alternatively, Priabonian seawater yields a mean {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio precisely matching that of the leachates from diffuse

  13. Eastern Gas Shales Project: Pennsylvania No. 3 well, Erie County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-09-01

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Pennsylvania No. 3 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. This data presented was obtained from the study of approximately 422 feet of core retrieved from a well drilled in Erie County of north-western Pennsylvania.

  14. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Backfill and Plug test. Hydraulic testing of core drilled boreholes in the ZEDEX drift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludvigson, Jan-Erik; Nordqvist, Rune; Ekman, Lennart; Hansson, Kent (GEOSIGMA AB, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2009-07-01

    The present report documents the performance and results of hydraulic testing in selected core boreholes in the Zedex drift. The holes will be used as rock instrumentation boreholes during the Backfill and Plug Test at Aespoe HRL. The testing involves both 1 m long boreholes with 56 mm diameter as well as longer boreholes c. 5 m, 8 m and 25 m long with 56 mm or 76 mm diameter. Only single-hole tests were performed. The tests were carried out as short-time constant head injection tests since all boreholes tested (except one) were non-flowing before tests. The injection phase was followed by a pressure recovery phase. Furthermore, the tests were carried out as single-packer tests. A specially designed test system was used for the tests. The main evaluation of the tests was performed on data from the recovery phase by a new approach based on a non-linear regression technique combined with a flow simulation model (SUTRA). The tests in the 1 m-holes (testing the interval c. 0.3-0.7 m in the rock perpendicular to the tunnel face) show that the hydraulic conductivity of the superficial rock around the Zedex drift in general is low. However, during testing in some boreholes, visible leakage in the rock occurred through superficial fractures into the tunnel. These fractures were mainly located in the floor of the Zedex drift and are probably blast-induced. These fractures have a high hydraulic conductivity. The tests in the longer boreholes show that the hydraulic conductivity further into the rock in general is below c. 1x10-10 m/s. Increased hydraulic conductivity (c.1.5x10-8 m/s) was only observed in the flowing borehole KXZSD8HL.

  15. Microbiology of shallow subsurface aquifer and carbonate rocks studied by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. Preliminary results on an underground laboratory, the LSBB, Rustrel, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galès Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the microbiology of a shallow subsurface site, the LSBB, located near Avignon. This site lies in carbonate rocks, belonging to the Urgonian facies. Rock, concrete and water samples were collected and directly transferred to the laboratory. Studies of microorganisms as pure cultures are the only way to get their real physiological properties. Nevertheless, microbiologists cannot cultivate and isolate the majority of microorganisms for several reasons, one being our lack of understanding of their minimal needs. Molecular studies, e.g. extraction and sequencing of the total nucleic acids present in an environment provide phylogenetic and metabolic information on uncultivated microorganisms. We performed aerobic and anaerobic culture with various electron acceptors and donors, searching for heterotrophic, methanogenic, sulphate- nitrate- and FeIII- reducing Prokaryotes. We also performed DNA extractions and PCR amplification of ribosomal RNA genes, to test if our protocols were adapted to this environment. Our results show that the LSBB galleries are colonized by a low diversity microbiote, with a strong influence of anthropogenic activities. Further studies will link the microorganisms biodiversity and the petrophysic properties of rocks.

  16. Hydro-mechanical evolution of the EDZ as transport path for radionuclides and gas: insights from the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Marschall, P.; Giger, S. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); La Vassière De, R. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Déchets Radioactifs ANDRA, Meuse Haute-Marne, Center RD 960, Bure (France); and others

    2017-04-15

    The excavation damaged zone (EDZ) around the backfilled underground structures of a geological repository represents a release path for radionuclides, which needs to be addressed in the assessment of long-term safety. Additionally, the EDZ may form a highly efficient escape route for corrosion and degradation gases, thus limiting the gas overpressures in the backfilled repository structures. The efficiency of this release path depends not only on the shape and extent of the EDZ, but also on the self-sealing capacity of the host rock formation and the prevailing state conditions, such as in situ stresses and pore pressure. The hydro-mechanical and chemico-osmotic phenomena associated with the formation and temporal evolution of the EDZ are complex, thus precluding a detailed representation of the EDZ in conventional modelling tools for safety assessment. Therefore, simplified EDZ models, able to mimic the safety-relevant functional features of the EDZ in a traceable manner are required. In the framework of the Mont Terri Project, a versatile modelling approach has been developed for the simulation of flow and transport processes along the EDZ with the goal of capturing the evolution of hydraulic significance of the EDZ after closure of the backfilled underground structures. The approach draws on both empirical evidence and experimental data, collected in the niches and tunnels of the Mont Terri rock laboratory. The model was benchmarked with a data set from an in situ self-sealing experiment at the Mont Terri rock laboratory. This paper summarises the outcomes of the benchmark exercise that comprises relevant empirical evidence, experimental data bases and the conceptual framework for modelling the evolution of the hydraulic significance of the EDZ around a backfilled tunnel section during the entire re-saturation phase. (authors)

  17. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Analysis of fracture networks based on the integration of structural and hydrogeological observations on different scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossart, P. [Geotechnical Inst. Ltd., Bern (Switzerland); Hermanson, Jan [Golder Associates, Stockholm (Sweden); Mazurek, M. [Univ. of Bern (Switzerland)

    2001-05-01

    Fracture networks at Aespoe have been studied for several rock types exhibiting different degrees of ductile and brittle deformation, as well as on different scales. Mesoscopic fault systems have been characterised and classified in an earlier report, this report focuses mainly on fracture networks derived on smaller scales, but also includes mesoscopic and larger scales. The TRUE-1 block has been selected for detailed structural analysis on a small scale due to the high density of relevant information. In addition to the data obtained from core materials, structural maps, BIP data and the results of hydro tests were synthesised to derive a conceptual structural model. The approach used to derive this conceptual model is based on the integration of deterministic structural evidence, probabilistic information and both upscaling and downscaling of observations and concepts derived on different scales. Twelve fracture networks mapped at different sites and scales and exhibiting various styles of tectonic deformation were analysed for fractal properties and structural and hydraulic interconnectedness. It was shown that these analysed fracture networks are not self-similar. An important result is the structural and hydraulic interconnectedness of fracture networks on all scales in the Aespoe rocks, which is further corroborated by geochemical evidence. Due to the structural and hydraulic interconnectedness of fracture systems on all scales at Aespoe, contaminants from waste canisters placed in tectonically low deformation environments would be transported - after having passed through the engineered barriers -from low-permeability fractures towards higher permeability fractures and may thus eventually reach high-permeability features.

  18. Geomechanics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Geomechanics Laboratory allows its users to measure rock properties under a wide range of simulated service conditions up to very high pressures and complex load...

  19. Deformation mechanisms and evolution of the microstructure of gouge in the Main Fault in Opalinus Clay in the Mont Terri rock laboratory (CH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurich, Ben; Urai, Janos L.; Vollmer, Christian; Nussbaum, Christophe

    2018-01-01

    We studied gouge from an upper-crustal, low-offset reverse fault in slightly overconsolidated claystone in the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland). The laboratory is designed to evaluate the suitability of the Opalinus Clay formation (OPA) to host a repository for radioactive waste. The gouge occurs in thin bands and lenses in the fault zone; it is darker in color and less fissile than the surrounding rock. It shows a matrix-based, P-foliated microfabric bordered and truncated by micrometer-thin shear zones consisting of aligned clay grains, as shown with broad-ion-beam scanning electron microscopy (BIB-SEM) and optical microscopy. Selected area electron diffraction based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows evidence for randomly oriented nanometer-sized clay particles in the gouge matrix, surrounding larger elongated phyllosilicates with a strict P foliation. For the first time for the OPA, we report the occurrence of amorphous SiO2 grains within the gouge. Gouge has lower SEM-visible porosity and almost no calcite grains compared to the undeformed OPA. We present two hypotheses to explain the origin of gouge in the Main Fault: (i) authigenic generation consisting of fluid-mediated removal of calcite from the deforming OPA during shearing and (ii) clay smear consisting of mechanical smearing of calcite-poor (yet to be identified) source layers into the fault zone. Based on our data we prefer the first or a combination of both, but more work is needed to resolve this. Microstructures indicate a range of deformation mechanisms including solution-precipitation processes and a gouge that is weaker than the OPA because of the lower fraction of hard grains. For gouge, we infer a more rate-dependent frictional rheology than suggested from laboratory experiments on the undeformed OPA.

  20. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Aespoe Task Force on Engineered Barrier System. Modelling of THM-coupled processes for benchmark 2.1.1 and 2.1.2 with the code GeoSys/RockFlow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, Thomas; Kunz, Herbert (Federal Inst. for Geosciences and Natural Resources, Hannover (Germany))

    2009-03-15

    In 2004 the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) initiated the project 'Task Force on Engineered Barrier Systems'. This project has the objectives to verify the ability to model THM-coupled processes (task 1) and gas migration processes (task 2) in the clay-rich buffer materials. The tasks are performed on the basis of appropriate benchmarks. This report describes the final results for the modelling of the THM-benchmarks 2.1.1(Buffer/Container Experiment) and 2.1.2 (Isothermal Test) with the code GeoSys/RockFlow. Both in-situ experiments were conducted in the Canadian Whiteshell Underground Research Laboratory (URL). An interim report (NOWAK 2008) documented the results of two axially symmetric models. This report documents the calculations of a laboratory experiment on the buffer material that is used as calibration for the hydraulic properties of the buffer material, the setting-up of a 3-D model of the URL for both ITT and BCE and the modelling results in comparison to measured values.

  1. Experimental Investigation of the Anisotropic Mechanical Properties of a Columnar Jointed Rock Mass: Observations from Laboratory-Based Physical Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, H.; Zhang, J. C.; Xu, W. Y.; Wang, R. B.; Wang, H. L.; Yan, L.; Lin, Z. N.

    2017-07-01

    Because of the complex geological structure, determination of the field mechanical parameters of the columnar jointed rock mass (CJRM) was a challenging task in the design and construction of the Baihetan hydropower plant. To model the mechanical behaviour of the CJRM, uniaxial compression tests were conducted on artificial CJRM specimens with geological structure similar to that found in the actual CJRM. Based on the test results, the anisotropic deformation and strength were mainly analysed. The empirical correlations of evaluating the field mechanical parameters were derived based on the joint factor approach and the modulus reduction factor method. The findings of the physical model tests were then used to estimate the field moduli and unconfined compressive strengths of the Baihetan CJRM. The results predicted by physical model tests were compared with those obtained from the field tests and the RMR classification system. It is concluded that physical model tests were capable of providing valuable estimations on the field mechanical parameters of the CJRM.

  2. CRIEPI and SKB cooperation report No. 4. Numerical analysis for the effect of tunnel excavation on groundwater flow at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Yasuharu; Miyakawa, Kimio; Igarashi; Toshifumi [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Abiko, Chiba (Japan). Abiko Research Lab

    2000-05-01

    A numerical analysis was performed for the hydraulic impact of the tunnel excavated in crystalline rock for the construction of an underground research laboratory at Aespoe Island in Sweden. The subject of this study is to clarify the influence of excavation of the tunnel section from 700 m to 2,545 m. The size of the modeled region for the analysis is 1,800 meters from east to west and 2,000 meters from north to south so that it includes all the area of Aespoe Island. The lower boundary of the model is 1,000 meters under the ground. The existence of 19 major fracture zones was confirmed through geological survey and values of transmissivity, storativity and width were assigned to the fracture zones individually in the numerical model. On the other hand, uniform hydraulic characteristics were assigned to the whole rock formation except the fracture zones. Reduction of the hydraulic conductivities was taken into account for the grouted fracture zones. The analysis was performed by using a numerical code, FEGM, developed by CRIEPI for three-dimensional groundwater flow analysis. Drawdowns were observed during tunnel excavation at the boreholes excavated from the ground surface in Aespoe Island and were compared with the calculated results. The calculated drawdowns agreed will with the observed ones, indicating that the analytical method was proved effective. (author)

  3. Laboratory investigation on streaming potential for sandy soil and weathered rock; Shitsunai jikken ni yoru sashitsu jiban oyobi fuka ganban no ryudo den`i no kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, H.; Shima, H. [OYO Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Laboratory experiment on sandy soil and weathered rock was conducted to clarify the generation mechanism of streaming potential due to underground fluid. Streaming potential is caused by underground fluid flow, namely by fluid flow in porous substances as electrokinetic phenomenon. In experiment, Inagi sand, Toyoura sand and strongly decomposed weathered granite were used. In Inagi and Toyoura sands, positive streaming potential was observed downstream in fluid flow. Streaming potential could be nearly determined as primary function of fluid velocity, and generated streaming potential increased with fluid resistivity. Streaming potential was higher in Inagi sand than Toyoura sand, probably depending on hydraulic radius, size of bleeding channel, and conductivity of sand surface. In weathered granite, negative streaming potential was measured. In the case of positive {zeta} potential, negative streaming potential is theoretically generated downstream in fluid flow. This experiment suggested possible generation of negative streaming potential in some kinds of ground. 2 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Summary of FY 17 Assessments Sandia National Laboratories: Evaluation of FY16 SNL FCT M2 Milestone Deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Gordon John

    2017-03-01

    This report is the milestone deliverable M4FT-17SN111102091 “Summary of Assessments Performed FY17 by SNL QA POC” for work package FT-17SN11110209 titled “Quality Assurance – SNL”. This report summarizes the FY17 assessment performed on Fuel Cycle Technologies / Spent Fuel and Waste Disposition efforts.

  5. The Geothermic Fatigue Hydraulic Fracturing Experiment in Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden: New Insights Into Fracture Process through In-situ AE Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, G.; Plenkers, K.; Zang, A.; Stephansson, O.; Stenberg, L.

    2016-12-01

    The geothermic Fatigue Hydraulic Fracturing (FHF) in situ experiment (Nova project 54-14-1) took place in the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory/Sweden in a 1.8 Ma old granitic to dioritic rock mass. The experiment aims at optimizing geothermal heat exchange in crystalline rock mass by multistage hydraulic fracturing at 10 m scale. Six fractures are driven by three different water injection schemes (continuous, cyclic, pulse pressurization) inside a 28 m long, horizontal borehole at depth level 410 m. The rock volume subject to hydraulic fracturing and monitored by three different networks with acoustic emission (AE), micro-seismicity and electromagnetic sensors is about 30 m x 30 m x 30 m in size. The 16-channel In-situ AE monitoring network by GMuG monitored the rupture generation and propagation in the frequency range 1000 Hz to 100,000 Hz corresponding to rupture dimensions from cm- to dm-scale. The in-situ AE monitoring system detected and analyzed AE activity in-situ (P- and S-wave picking, localization). The results were used to review the ongoing microfracturing activity in near real-time. The in-situ AE monitoring network successfully recorded and localized 196 seismic events for most, but not all, hydraulic fractures. All AE events detected in-situ occurred during fracturing time periods. The source parameters (fracture sizes, moment magnitudes, static stress drop) of AE events framing injection periods were calculated using the combined spectral fitting/spectra ratio techniques. The AE activity is clustered in space and clearly outline the fractures location, its orientation, and expansion as well as their temporal evolution. The outward migration of AE events away from the borehole is observed. Fractures extend up to 7 m from the injection interval in the horizontal borehole. The fractures orientation and location correlate for most fractures roughly with the results gained by image packer. Clear differences in seismic response between hydraulic fractures in

  6. Proceedings of the second NATO-CCMS information meeting on dry hot rock geothermal energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, J.J. (comp.)

    1977-11-01

    A summary is presented of the second and last NATO-CCMS (North Atlantic Treaty Organization--Committee on Challenges of Modern Society) Geothermal Pilot Study Information Meeting on Dry Hot Rock Geothermal Energy. Only summaries of the formal presentations are included. Overviews of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) geothermal projects are included with emphasis on the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Project. Reports of developments in nine foreign countries and on geothermal projects in US universities are also presented.

  7. Summary of Environmental Data Analysis and Work Performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Support of the Navajo Nation Abandoned Mine Lands Project at Tse Tah, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taffet, Michael J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Esser, Bradley K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Madrid, Victor M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-17

    This report summarizes work performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under Navajo Nation Services Contract CO9729 in support of the Navajo Abandoned Mine Lands Reclamation Program (NAMLRP). Due to restrictions on access to uranium mine waste sites at Tse Tah, Arizona that developed during the term of the contract, not all of the work scope could be performed. LLNL was able to interpret environmental monitoring data provided by NAMLRP. Summaries of these data evaluation activities are provided in this report. Additionally, during the contract period, LLNL provided technical guidance, instructional meetings, and review of relevant work performed by NAMLRP and its contractors that was not contained in the contract work scope.

  8. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Temperature Buffer Test. Sensors data report (Period 030326-080701) Report No:12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudarzi, Reza; Aakesson, Mattias; Hoekmark, Harald (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2008-07-01

    TBT (Temperature Buffer Test) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modeling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at understanding and modeling the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test is carried out in Aespoe HRL in a 8 meters deep and 1.75 m diameter deposition hole, with two heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter), surrounded by a MX 80 bentonite buffer and a confining plug on top anchored with 9 rods. It was installed during spring 2003. Two buffer arrangements are being investigated: - The lower heater is surrounded by bentonite in the usual way, allowing the temperature of the bentonite to exceed 100 deg C locally. - The higher heater is surrounded by a ring of sand acting as thermal protection for the bentonite, the temperature of which is kept below 100 deg C. The canisters were heated with 1500 W power from day 15 to day 1171, when the power was raised to 1600 W. Around day 1700, the power was by steps raised in the lower heater to 2000 W and reduced in the upper heater to 1000 W. This report presents data from the measurements in the Temperature Buffer Test from 030326 to 080701 (26 March 2003 to 01 July 2008). The following measurements are made in the bentonite: Temperature is measured in 92 points, total pressure in 29 points, pore water pressure in 8 points and relative humidity in 35 points. Temperature is also measured by all gauges as an auxiliary measurement used for compensation. The following additional measurements are done: temperature is measured in 40 points in the rock, in 11 points on the surface of each canister and in 6 points inside each canister. The force on the confining plug is measured in 3 of the 9 rods and its vertical displacement is measured in three points. The water inflow and water pressure in the outer sand filter is also measured. Temperature and total pressure measurements

  9. Conference scene: Summary of the 6th Conference of the Romanian Association of Medical Laboratories with international participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasevici, Eugen

    2011-10-01

    The Romanian Association of Medical Laboratories (RAML) conferences have acquired a reputation for standing out as the most prominent and efficient meetings in the national community of laboratory medicine, being a landmark of the development in this field in Romania and an active affiliation to international forums. This year, the conference setting was Piatra Neamt, in the northeast part of Romania, which produced a friendly and stimulating professional environment. As in previous years, leading experts in the fields of laboratory medicine attended the event. This year, we enjoyed the opportunity to have such distinguished guests as the members of the executive board of International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC); Graham Beastall, IFCC President; Päivi Hannele Laitinen, IFCC secretary; and Grazyna Sypniewska, IFCC Communication and Publication Division, and editor of the electronic journal of the IFCC. As usual, the conference program included all aspects of clinical laboratory activity, with a special focus on technology development, instrumentation and laboratory management. Fully aware of the fact that the complexity and depth of laboratory practice have undergone an impressive and rapid evolution, the specific goals of the event were to increase knowledge in the fundamentals of new molecular investigation, areas which show the tendency to become routine in our daily activity. In addition, laboratory management and the place of medical laboratories in the process of translational medicine were subjects of focus. The 6th Conference of the Romanian Association of Medical Laboratories was held from Wednesday 1st to Saturday 4th of June 2011. A total of 273 participants from all local branches of the Association attended. The scientific program included seven plenary sessions where 22 lectures and 18 short communications were delivered, and three poster sessions with 44 poster presentations. Session topics covered issues of

  10. Illustration of Uncertainties in Assessments of Flow and Transport in a Block Scale Fracture Network an Example from the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteri, A.; Cvetkovic, V.; Dershowitz, W.; Billaux, D.; Winberg, A.

    2006-12-01

    Tracer experiments have been performed since 1995 at the underground SKB Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, southeastern Sweden. Non-sorbing and sorbing radioactive tracer experiments of the TRUE Block Scale Project were conducted in single fractures and a network of fractures with support from a comprehensive program of laboratory experiments, geological, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical characterisation and associated modelling. The collected information have resulted in the definition of two generalised fracture types, one fault type with fault gouge (Type 1) and one non-fault type (Type 2) without fault gouge, the latter corresponding to background fractures. These two generic fracture types were characterized by a multiple immobile zone porosity model, referred to as the "microstructural model". Understanding gained from the TRUE Block Scale Project was used to investigate and model a previously non- tested part of the investigated rock volume. These "predictive" experiments were carried out to test and improve our conceptual understanding of solute transport in fractured rocks, and to demonstrate the current state of our predictive capabilities. The modelling included assessment of effects of geometry, macro- structure, and micro-structure, with a particular focus on the role of lower conductivity background fractures within transport pathways. Following a basic characterisation including tracer dilution and non-reactive tracer pre-tests, sorbing tracer tests were conducted in a) a single Type 1 fracture flow path and b) a flow path involving injection in a single background fracture of Type 2 connected to a major Type 1 structure. The structural model characterization of the rock indicated that the Type 1 pathway has a path length comparable to the Euclidian distance of about 20 m, but the background fracture pathways including both Type 1 and Type 2 fractures, although with an Euclidian similar to the single structure Type 1 pathway, in fact has an evaluated

  11. Boring of full scale deposition holes at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Operational experiences including boring performance and a work time analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Christer [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Johansson, Aasa [SWECO, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    Thirteen experimental deposition holes similar to those in the present KBS-3 design have been bored at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, Oskarshamn, Sweden. The objective with the boring program was to test and demonstrate the current technique for boring of large vertical holes in granitic rock. Conclusions and results from this project is used in the planning process for the deposition holes that will be bored in the real repository for spent nuclear fuel. The boreholes are also important for three major projects. The Prototype Repository, the Canister Retrieval Test and the Demonstration project will all need full-scale deposition holes for their commissioning. The holes are bored in full scale and have a radius of 1.75 m and a depth of 8.5 m. To bore the holes an existing TBM design was modified to produce a novel type Shaft Boring Machine (SBM) suitable for boring 1.75 m diameter holes from a relatively small tunnel. The cutter head was equipped with two types of roller cutters: two row carbide button cutters and disc cutters. Removal of the cuttings was made with a vacuum suction system. The boring was monitored and boring parameters recorded by a computerised system for the evaluation of the boring performance. During boring of four of the holes temperature, stress and strain measurements were performed. Acoustic emission measurements were also performed during boring of these four holes. The results of these activities will not be discussed in this report since they are reported separately. Criteria regarding nominal borehole diameter, deviation of start and end centre point, surface roughness and performance of the machine were set up according to the KBS-3 design and were fulfilled with a fair margin. The average total time for boring one deposition hole during this project was 105 hours.

  12. The interaction of sorbing and non-sorbing tracers with different Aespoe rock types. Sorption and diffusion experiments in the laboratory scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byegaard, J.; Johansson, Henrik; Skaalberg, M. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry; Tullborg, E.L. [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)

    1998-11-01

    Laboratory experiments studying the sorption and diffusivity of different tracers in Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (Aespoe HRL) site specific conditions have been performed. The experiments were conducted by applying both the batch sorption and the through diffusion technique. The investigation was focused on slightly sorbing tracers, i e, alkaline metals (Na{sup +}, Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +}) and alkaline earth metals (Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+}), but some presumed non-sorbing species have also been included. The dominating generic rock material from Aespoe HRL, Aespoe-diorite and fine-grained granite, were used as well as some altered wall rock and mylonite from the Feature A fracture, the fracture where in situ migration studies have been performed. Synthetic groundwater was used; similar to the high saline groundwater found at the 350m level at Aespoe HRL and at the Feature A site. The results of batch experiments show that the sorption of the tracers increase in the order Na

  13. Frutexites-like structures formed by iron oxidizing biofilms in the continental subsurface (Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Heim

    Full Text Available Stromatolitic iron-rich structures have been reported from many ancient environments and are often described as Frutexites, a cryptic microfossil. Although microbial formation of such structures is likely, a clear relation to a microbial precursor is lacking so far. Here we report recent iron oxidizing biofilms which resemble the ancient Frutexites structures. The living Frutexites-like biofilms were sampled at 160 m depth in the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. Investigations using microscopy, 454 pyrosequencing, FISH, Raman spectroscopy, biomarker and trace element analysis allowed a detailed view of the structural components of the mineralized biofilm. The most abundant bacterial groups were involved in nitrogen and iron cycling. Furthermore, Archaea are widely distributed in the Frutexites-like biofilm, even though their functional role remains unclear. Biomarker analysis revealed abundant sterols in the biofilm most likely from algal and fungal origins. Our results indicate that the Frutexites-like biofilm was built up by a complex microbial community. The functional role of each community member in the formation of the dendritic structures, as well as their potential relation to fossil Frutexites remains under investigation.

  14. Gas generation and retention in Tank 101-SY: A summary of laboratory studies, tank data, and information needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pederson, L.R. (comp.) (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Ashby, E.C. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States)); Jonah, C.; Meisel, D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Strachan, D.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-06-01

    Chemical and radioactive wastes from processes used to separate plutonium from uranium are stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in Washington state. In March 1981, it was observed that the volume of wastes in Tank 101-SY slowly increased, followed by a rapid decrease and the venting of large quantities of gases. These cycles occurred every 8 to 15 weeks and continue to the present time. Subsequent analyses showed that these gases were composed primarily of hydrogen and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). In response to the potential for explosion and release of hazardous materials to the environment, laboratory programs were initiated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), to develop a better understanding of the physical and chemical processes occurring in this waste tank. An aggressive sampling and analysis effort is also under way to characterize the wastes as fully as possible. These efforts will provide a technically defensible basis for safety analyses and future mitigation/remediation of the tank and its contents.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory summary plan to fabricate mixed oxide lead assemblies for the fissile material disposition program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buksa, J.J.; Eaton, S.L.; Trellue, H.R.; Chidester, K.; Bowidowicz, M.; Morley, R.A.; Barr, M.

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes an approach for using existing Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory) mixed oxide (MOX) fuel-fabrication and plutonium processing capabilities to expedite and assure progress in the MOX/Reactor Plutonium Disposition Program. Lead Assembly MOX fabrication is required to provide prototypic fuel for testing in support of fuel qualification and licensing requirements. It is also required to provide a bridge for the full utilization of the European fabrication experience. In part, this bridge helps establish, for the first time since the early 1980s, a US experience base for meeting the safety, licensing, safeguards, security, and materials control and accountability requirements of the Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In addition, a link is needed between the current research and development program and the production of disposition mission fuel. This link would also help provide a knowledge base for US regulators. Early MOX fabrication and irradiation testing in commercial nuclear reactors would provide a positive demonstration to Russia (and to potential vendors, designers, fabricators, and utilities) that the US has serious intent to proceed with plutonium disposition. This report summarizes an approach to fabricating lead assembly MOX fuel using the existing MOX fuel-fabrication infrastructure at the Laboratory.

  16. Boring and excavation technologies for Opalinus clay in the rock laboratories at Mont Terri; Techniques de forages et d'excavations dans les argiles à Opalinus, laboratoire souterrain du Mont Terri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossart, P.; Nussbaum, Ch. [Swiss Federal Office of Topography swisstopo, Wabern (Switzerland); Burrus, F. [Groupe Grands Travaux GGT, Porrentruy (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    This comprehensive article discusses the work done since 1996 at the rock laboratories at Mont Terri in the Swiss Jura Mountains. The work being done by fifteen international partners on the characterisation of the Opalinus clay with regard to its geological, hydro-geological, geochemical and geotechnical characteristics is reported on. Various methods of drilling are described that are able to preserve any tectonic crevices in the rock. Drilling under special conditions, including the use of nitrogen and argon atmospheres to prevent bacterial contamination, is looked at, as are the methods used in tunnelling without having to use water.

  17. Rock fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.S.; Green, S.J.; Hakala, W.W.; Hustrulid, W.A.; Maurer, W.C. (eds.)

    1976-01-01

    Experts in rock mechanics, mining, excavation, drilling, tunneling and use of underground space met to discuss the relative merits of a wide variety of rock fragmentation schemes. Information is presented on novel rock fracturing techniques; tunneling using electron beams, thermocorer, electric spark drills, water jets, and diamond drills; and rock fracturing research needs for mining and underground construction. (LCL)

  18. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

  19. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Group 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

  20. Long term test of buffer material at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, LOT project. Final report on the A2 test parcel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, Ola; Olsson, Siv; Dueck, Ann; Birgersson, Martin; Nilsson, Ulf; Hernan-Haakansson, Tania (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)); Pedersen, Karsten (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden); Goeteborg Univ., Dept. of Cell and Molecular Biology, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Nilsson, Sara; Eriksen, Trygve E. (School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Nuclear chemistry, Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)); Rosborg, Bo (Rosborg Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden))

    2009-11-15

    In the Swedish repository concept for nuclear waste (KBS-3 concept), the spent nuclear fuel will be stored in copper canisters surrounded by compacted bentonite. The decaying power of the fuel will increase the temperature in the repository which, in combination with the uptake of ground-water, are expected to result in minor mineralogical changes in the bentonite. The ongoing LOT test series at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) are focused on identifying and quantifying such mineralogical alterations in the bentonite exposed to typical repository-like conditions. Further, buffer-related processes concerning copper corrosion, cation transport, and bacterial survival/activity are studied. In total, the LOT project includes seven test parcels, which contain a central Cu-tube surrounded by cylindrical bentonite blocks with a diameter of 30 cm, and gauges for temperature, total pressure, water pressure and humidity. Electrical heaters placed inside the copper tube are used to simulate the power from the decaying spent fuel. Three parcels are exposed to standard KBS-3 conditions (maximum temperature below 100 deg C) and four parcels to adverse conditions (maximum temperature below approx140 deg C). Both the standard and the adverse test series include short term tests (1 to 2 years), medium term tests (>5 years) and long term tests (>10 years). The present report concerns the A2 test parcel, which was a medium term test exposed to adverse conditions. Cu-coupons, 60Co tracers, bacteria and specific chemical substances were placed in the bentonite at defined positions. After field exposure, the entire test parcel was released from the rock by overlapping percussion drilling and wire sawing. The parcel was lifted and divided at test site and the bentonite material was sampled for specified analyses performed by nine different laboratories in five countries. The main aspects of the various tests and analyses may be summarized in the following items: - physical

  1. Development of a Laboratory Micron-Resolution X-ray Microprobe to Map Mineralogy and Trace Elements at PPM Sensitivity for Digital Rock, Magma, and Mining Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, W.; Lewis, S.; Stripe, B.; Chen, S.; Reynolds, D.; Spink, I.; Lyon, A.

    2015-12-01

    We are developing a patent-pending x-ray microprobe with substantially unprecedented performance attributes: 2 cm, narrow spectral bandwidth, and large x-ray flux. The outstanding performance is enabled by: (1) a revolutionary new type of high flux x-ray source designed to be >10X brighter than the brightest rotating anode x-ray source available; (2) an axially symmetric x-ray mirror lens with large solid angle collection and high focusing efficiency; and (3) a detector configuration that enables the collection of 10X more x-rays than current microXRF designs. The sensitivity will be ppm-scale, far surpassing charged particle analysis (e.g. EPMA and SEM-EDS), and >1000X throughput over the leading micro-XRFs. Despite the introduction of a number of laboratory microXRF systems in the past decade, the state-of-the-art has been limited primarily by low resolution (~30 μm) and low throughput. This is substantially attributable to a combination of low x-ray source brightness and poor performance x-ray optics. Here we present our initial results in removing the x-ray source bottleneck, in which we use a novel x-ray source using Fine Anode Array Source Technology (Sigray FAAST™). When coupled with our proprietary high efficiency x-ray mirror lens, the throughput achieved is comparable to that of many synchrotron microXRF beamlines. Potential applications of the x-ray microprobe include high throughput mapping of mineralogy at high resolution, including trace elements, such as rare earth metals, and deposits (e.g. siderite, clays), with ppm sensitivity, providing information for properties such as permeability and elastic/mechanical properties, and to provide compositional information for Digital Rock. Additional applications include those in which the limited penetration of electrons limits achieving adequate statistics, such as determining the concentration of precious minerals in mine tailings.

  2. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as Whiteoak'' Creek).

  3. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as ``Whiteoak`` Creek).

  4. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  5. Summaries of FY 1993 geosciences research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the geosciences that are germane to the DOE`s many missions. The Geosciences Research Program is supported by the Office of Energy Research. The participants in this program include DOE laboratories, academic institutions, and other governmental agencies. These activities are formalized by a contract or grant between the DOE and the organization performing the work, providing funds for salaries, equipment, research materials, and overhead. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geophysics, geochemistry, resource evaluation, solar-terrestrial interactions, and their subdivisions including earth dynamics, properties of earth materials, rock mechanics, underground imaging, rock-fluid interactions, continental scientific drilling, geochemical transport, solar-atmospheric physics, and modeling, with emphasis on the interdisciplinary areas.

  6. Completion summary for boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, drilled and constructed boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory in southeast Idaho. Borehole USGS 140 initially was cored to collect continuous geologic data, and then re-drilled to complete construction as a monitor well. Borehole USGS 141 was drilled and constructed as a monitor well without coring. Boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 are separated by about 375 feet (ft) and have similar geologic layers and hydrologic characteristics based on geophysical and aquifer test data collected. The final construction for boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 required 6-inch (in.) diameter carbon-steel well casing and 5-in. diameter stainless-steel well screen; the screened monitoring interval was completed about 50 ft into the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, between 496 and 546 ft below land surface (BLS) at both sites. Following construction and data collection, dedicated pumps and water-level access lines were placed to allow for aquifer testing, for collecting periodic water samples, and for measuring water levels. Borehole USGS 140 was cored continuously, starting from land surface to a depth of 543 ft BLS. Excluding surface sediment, recovery of basalt and sediment core at borehole USGS 140 was about 98 and 65 percent, respectively. Based on visual inspection of core and geophysical data, about 32 basalt flows and 4 sediment layers were collected from borehole USGS 140 between 34 and 543 ft BLS. Basalt texture for borehole USGS 140 generally was described as aphanitic, phaneritic, and porphyritic; rubble zones and flow mold structure also were described in recovered core material. Sediment layers, starting near 163 ft BLS, generally were composed of fine-grained sand and silt with a lesser amount of clay; however, between 223 and 228 ft BLS, silt

  7. Characterizing the influence of stress-induced microcracks on the laboratory strength and fracture development in brittle rocks using a finite-discrete element method-micro discrete fracture network FDEM-μDFN approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooya Hamdi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity is an inherent component of rock and may be present in different forms including mineral heterogeneity, geometrical heterogeneity, weak grain boundaries and micro-defects. Microcracks are usually observed in crystalline rocks in two forms: natural and stress-induced; the amount of stress-induced microcracking increases with depth and in-situ stress. Laboratory results indicate that the physical properties of rocks such as strength, deformability, P-wave velocity and permeability are influenced by increase in microcrack intensity. In this study, the finite-discrete element method (FDEM is used to model microcrack heterogeneity by introducing into a model sample sets of microcracks using the proposed micro discrete fracture network (μDFN approach. The characteristics of the microcracks required to create μDFN models are obtained through image analyses of thin sections of Lac du Bonnet granite adopted from published literature. A suite of two-dimensional laboratory tests including uniaxial, triaxial compression and Brazilian tests is simulated and the results are compared with laboratory data. The FDEM-μDFN models indicate that micro-heterogeneity has a profound influence on both the mechanical behavior and resultant fracture pattern. An increase in the microcrack intensity leads to a reduction in the strength of the sample and changes the character of the rock strength envelope. Spalling and axial splitting dominate the failure mode at low confinement while shear failure is the dominant failure mode at high confinement. Numerical results from simulated compression tests show that microcracking reduces the cohesive component of strength alone, and the frictional strength component remains unaffected. Results from simulated Brazilian tests show that the tensile strength is influenced by the presence of microcracks, with a reduction in tensile strength as microcrack intensity increases. The importance of microcrack heterogeneity in

  8. 76 FR 28460 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Rock Burst...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ...; Rock Burst Control Plan--Pertains to Underground Metal and Nonmetal Mines ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... rock burst plan within 90 days after a rock burst has been experienced. Stress data are normally...

  9. The uranium behaviour during rock-water interaction in the granites from the Itu complex (Sao Paulo, Brazil): a laboratory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Helen S.B. da; Marques, Leila S.; Kawauchi, Roberto K., E-mail: leila@iag.usp.br, E-mail: keiji@iag.usp.br [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas. Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In order to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the process of uranium leaching due to the rock-water interaction in the granitic rocks from Itu Complex (Sao Paulo, Brazil), an experimental arrangement was developed and built. About 2.5kg of crushed rock fragments from Cabreuva and Indaiatuba Intrusions were maintained at room temperature within a glass flask filled with circulating water. The percolating water was removed periodically (from 10 to 30 days) for uranium analysis and then replaced by an equal volume of fresh water. Alpha spectrometry was used to determine the activity concentrations of {sup 234}U and {sup 238}U, and {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios, of the waters as well as of the granites. The results for both samples showed that most of the uranium is leached in the first days after the contact between rock and water. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios were significantly greater than unity, indicating radioactive disequilibrium between those isotopes, probably due to alpha recoil. Although the uranium activity concentrations in the water samples diminished with the increasing of time, it was not observed considerable variations of the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios. It was also noticed that, the amount of leached uranium as well as the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios are characteristics of each sample submitted to leaching, reflecting the differences of the granite facies mineralogy.(author)

  10. Summary Report of Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, Gretchen M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Terusaki, Stan H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    An ecological risk assessment is required as part of the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal process for Miscellaneous Units subject to 22 CCR 66270.23. This risk assessment is prepared in support of the RCRA permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF) at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). LLNL collected soil samples and used the resulting data to produce a scoping-level ecological risk assessment pursuant to the Department of Toxic Substances Control, Guidance for Ecological Risk Assessment at Hazardous Waste Sites and Permitted Facilities, Part A: Overview, July 4, 1996. The scoping-level ecological risk assessment provides a framework to determine the potential interaction between ecological receptors and chemicals of concern from hazardous waste treatment operations in the area of EWTF. A scoping-level ecological risk assessment includes the step of conducting soil sampling in the area of the treatment units. The Sampling Plan in Support of the Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, (Terusaki, 2007), outlines the EWTF project-specific soil sampling requirements. Soil samples were obtained and analyzed for constituents from four chemical groups: furans, explosives, semi-volatiles and metals. Analytical results showed that furans, explosives and semi-volatiles were not detected; therefore, no further analysis was conducted. The soil samples did show the presence of metals. Soil samples analyzed for metals were compared to site-wide background levels, which had been developed for site -wide cleanup activities pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Total metal concentrations from 28 discrete soil samples obtained in the EWTF area were all below CERCLA-developed background levels. Therefore, following DTSC 1996

  11. Recreating Rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole R

    2008-01-01

    Nicole Posth and colleagues spent a month touring South African rock formations in their quest to understand the origin of ancient iron and silicate layers.......Nicole Posth and colleagues spent a month touring South African rock formations in their quest to understand the origin of ancient iron and silicate layers....

  12. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  13. Rock Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Rock physics is the discipline linking petrophysical properties as derived from borehole data to surface based geophysical exploration data. It can involve interpretation of both elastic wave propagation and electrical conductivity, but in this chapter focus is on elasticity. Rock physics is based...... on continuum mechanics, and the theory of elasticity developed for statics becomes the key to petrophysical interpretation of velocity of elastic waves. In practice, rock physics involves interpretation of well logs including vertical seismic profiling (VSP) and analysis of core samples. The results...

  14. Characterizing water/rock interaction in simulated comet nuclei via calorimetry: Tool for in-situ science, laboratory analysis, and sample preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, Judith H.; Gooding, James L.

    1991-01-01

    Although results from the Giotto and Vega spacecraft flybys of comet P/Halley indicate a complex chemistry for both the ices and dust in the nucleus, carbonaceous chondrite meteorites are still regarded as useful analogs for the rocky components. Carbonaceous chondrites mixed with water enable simulation of water/rock interactions which may occur in cometary nuclei. Three general types of interactions can be expected between water and minerals at sub-freezing temperatures: heterogeneous nucleation of ice by insoluble minerals; adsorption of water vapor by hygroscopic phases; and freezing and melting point depression of liquid water sustained by soluble minerals. Two series of experiments were performed in a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with homogenized powders of the following whole-rock meteorites and comparison samples: Allende (CV3), Murchison (CM2), Orgueil (CI), Holbrook (L6), and Pasamonte (eucrite) meteorites as well as on peridotite (PCC-1, USGS), saponite (Sap-Ca-1, CMS), montmorillonite (STx-1, CMS), and serpentine (Franciscan Formation, California). Results are briefly discussed.

  15. Summary of the Issues Regarding The Martian Subsurface Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustes, A. W., III; Gertsch, L. S.; Lu, N.; Bridgford, E.; Tischler, A.; Stoner, M. S.; Wilcox, B. H.

    2000-01-01

    This is a summary of research work accomplished to date for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory by the Colorado School of Mines and the Michigan Technological University for the Martian Subsurface Explorer (SSX). The task involved a thorough review of the state of the art in drilling in the petroleum and mining industries in the following areas: 1) Drilling mechanics and energy requirements. 2) Sidewall friction in boreholes. 3) Rock property characteristics of basalt, permafrost, and ice. 4) Cuttings transport and recompaction of cuttings. and 5) Directional control at odd angle interfaces.

  16. Phase I (Year 1) Summary of Research--Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Michael Grammer

    2005-11-09

    This topical report covers the first 12 months of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). Phase I tasks, including Developing a Reservoir Catalog for selected dolomite reservoirs in the Michigan Basin, Characterization of Dolomite Reservoirs in Representative Fields and Technology Transfer have all been initiated and progress is consistent with our original scheduling. The development of a reservoir catalog for the 3 subject formations in the Michigan Basin has been a primary focus of our efforts during Phase I. As part of this effort, we currently have scanned some 13,000 wireline logs, and compiled in excess of 940 key references and 275 reprints that cover reservoir aspects of the 3 intervals in the Michigan Basin. A summary evaluation of the data in these publications is currently ongoing, with the Silurian Niagara Group being handled as a first priority. In addition, full production and reservoir parameter data bases obtained from available data sources have been developed for the 3 intervals in Excel and Microsoft Access data bases. We currently have an excess of 25 million cells of data for wells in the Basin. All Task 2 objectives are on time and on target for Phase I per our original proposal. Our mapping efforts to date, which have focused in large part on the Devonian Dundee Formation, have important implications for both new exploration plays and improved enhanced recovery methods in the Dundee ''play'' in Michigan--i.e. the interpreted fracture-related dolomitization control on the distribution of hydrocarbon reservoirs. In an exploration context, high-resolution structure mapping using quality-controlled well data should provide leads to convergence zones of fault

  17. The impact of mechanical properties of rock to the collision of rock piece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borut Macuh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analytical solution of the rock piece motion considering influences of geometrical and mechanical characteristics of rock mass on the arbitrary slope. The main objective of the paper is to determine the motion of the rock piece considering possibility of rock piece failure due to collision. Brief description of the analytical solution of the rock piece motion on a steep slope is given. The laboratory tests were performed to determine uniaxial compressive strength and elastic properties of the considered rock mass. Further, velocities that cause rock piece failure were determined. These maximum velocities indirectly belong to certain mass of rock piece and can be lower than velocities calculated in rock-fall analysis for certain slope geometry. Consequently, the energy magnitude is limited, because at certain velocity and mass of rock piece bigger pieces crash at collision.

  18. Towards a new generation of flow and transport models for the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Main results from the project Aespoe models 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Urban (ed.) (Computer-aided Fluid Engineering AB (CFE AB), SE-602 10 Norrkoeping (Sweden)); Vidstrand, Patrik (Bergab AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Neretnieks, Ivars (Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)); Wallin, Bill (Geokema, Lidingoe (Sweden))

    2008-05-15

    This report constitutes the outcome of a project called 'Aespoe models 2005'. The main objective of the project has been to provide a first step towards a new generation of numerical models of flow and transport, for the Aespoe HRL. In order to achieve this goal, work has been carried out along three parallel lines; discussion of basic concepts, compilation and analysis of data and model applications. A number of sub tasks are reported as appendices in the report. In fact, these appendices represent the main achievements of the project: an analysis of fracture properties, compilation of isotope and chemical data, dispersion and mixing in fractured rocks and model results. The conclusion of the project is that significant contributions to a new generation of Aespoe models have been obtained. It has further been demonstrated that working numerical simulations are up and running. Recommendations are provided for the continued work

  19. Source rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakr F. Makky

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available West Beni Suef Concession is located at the western part of Beni Suef Basin which is a relatively under-explored basin and lies about 150 km south of Cairo. The major goal of this study is to evaluate the source rock by using different techniques as Rock-Eval pyrolysis, Vitrinite reflectance (%Ro, and well log data of some Cretaceous sequences including Abu Roash (E, F and G members, Kharita and Betty formations. The BasinMod 1D program is used in this study to construct the burial history and calculate the levels of thermal maturity of the Fayoum-1X well based on calibration of measured %Ro and Tmax against calculated %Ro model. The calculated Total Organic Carbon (TOC content from well log data compared with the measured TOC from the Rock-Eval pyrolysis in Fayoum-1X well is shown to match against the shale source rock but gives high values against the limestone source rock. For that, a new model is derived from well log data to calculate accurately the TOC content against the limestone source rock in the study area. The organic matter existing in Abu Roash (F member is fair to excellent and capable of generating a significant amount of hydrocarbons (oil prone produced from (mixed type I/II kerogen. The generation potential of kerogen in Abu Roash (E and G members and Betty formations is ranging from poor to fair, and generating hydrocarbons of oil and gas prone (mixed type II/III kerogen. Eventually, kerogen (type III of Kharita Formation has poor to very good generation potential and mainly produces gas. Thermal maturation of the measured %Ro, calculated %Ro model, Tmax and Production index (PI indicates that Abu Roash (F member exciting in the onset of oil generation, whereas Abu Roash (E and G members, Kharita and Betty formations entered the peak of oil generation.

  20. Forensic Investigation of AC and PCC Pavements with Extended Service Life : Volume 2 : Petrographic Examination of PCC Core Samples at Lankard Materials Laboratory ; Executive Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    The overall purpose of this research project as described in : the Executive Summary Report for Volume 1 : (FHWA/OH-2010/04A) is to identify flexible, rigid and : composite pavements that have not received any structural : maintenance since construct...

  1. Intellektuaalne rock

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Briti laulja-helilooja ja näitleja Toyah Willcox ning Bill Rieflin ansamblist R.E.M. ja Pat Mastelotto King Krimsonist esinevad koos ansamblitega The Humans ja Tuner 25. okt. Tallinnas Rock Cafés ja 27. okt Tartu Jaani kirikus

  2. [REPORTING CRITICAL LAB RESULTS, A CHALLENGE FOR THE LAB AND THE PHYSICIAN - A SUMMARY OF FOUR YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN MEIR MEDICAL CENTER LABORATORIES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Gloria; Goldman, Jacob; Weinstein, Doron; Tohami, Tali; Neumark, Eran; Weiss, Eli

    2015-08-01

    Critical laboratory results require prompt reporting to the attending physician, as they may indicate that a patient is in a life-threatening condition. Although this important subject has been covered in many publications, it needs more attention from our healthcare organizations, which have no official policy on the subject. Matching expectations between the doctor and the laboratory needs to be better defined. The aim of this work was to inform the community of doctors and laboratories about the multiple problems concerning the reporting of critical laboratory results, to create a platform for exchanging views and ideas, and to build an extensive infrastructure for developing a unified plan to address this important issue. We present the results of four years of experience of reporting critical laboratory values at the Meir Medical Center Laboratories. The idea leading this work was to present the relatively low rate of critical results reported by the laboratories in 2010, sharing the problems discovered while investigating the situation in depth, and presenting the solutions that enabled us to obtain the desired results within four years. Gradual implementation of these improvements resulted in critical value reporting increasing from 55% in 2010 to 95% currently. We suggest a model for improving critical laboratory values reporting based on our 4-year experience, which emphasizes: (1) The importance of selecting proper tests and values for critical results; (2) The significance of using technology and computerized measures to support the process; and (3) Developing quick procedures for monitoring and controlling the process.

  3. Igneous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, Bruce R.

    “Igneous Rocks was written for undergraduate geology majors who have had a year of college-level chemistry and a course in mineralogy … and for beginning graduate students. Geologists working in industry, government, or academia should find this text useful as a guide to the technical literature up to 1981 and as an overview of topics with which they have not worked but which may have unanticipated pertinence to their own projects.” So starts the preface to this textbook.As one who works part time in research on igneous rocks, especially as they relate to mineral deposits, I have been looking for such a book with this avowed purpose in a field that has a choking richness of evolving terminology and a bewildering volume of interdisciplinary literature. In addition to the standard topics of igneous petrology, the book contains a chapter on the role of igneous activity in the genesis of mineral deposits, its value to geothermal energy, and the potential of igneous rocks as an environment for nuclear waste disposal. These topics are presented rather apologetically in the preface, but the author is to be applauded for including this chapter. The apology shows just how new these interests are to petrology. Recognition is finally coming that, for example, mineral deposits are not “sports of nature,” a view held even by many economic geologists as recently as the early 1960's; instead they are perfectly ordinary geochemical features formed by perfectly ordinary geologic processes. In fact, the mineral deposits and their attendant alteration zones probably have as much to tell us about igneous rocks as the igneous rocks have to tell us about mineral deposits.

  4. Explosion Source Characteristics in Frozen and Unfrozen Rock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonner, Jessie L; Leidig, Mark R; Murphy, Katherine; Dougherty, Sara L; Martin, Randolph J

    2008-01-01

    .... Laboratory studies have demonstrated that frozen rock is significantly stronger than unfrozen rock, and it has been hypothesized that this increased strength, due to ice in the pores and cracks, can alter seismic yield...

  5. White Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  6. Mergeable summaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Graham, Graham; Huang, Zengfeng

    2013-01-01

    means that the summaries can be merged in a way akin to other algebraic operators such as sum and max, which is especially useful for computing summaries on massive distributed data. Several data summaries are trivially mergeable by construction, most notably all the sketches that are linear functions...... to geometric summaries such as ϵ-approximations which permit approximate multidimensional range counting queries. While most of the results in this article are theoretical in nature, some of the algorithms are actually very simple and even perform better than the previously best known algorithms, which we...

  7. Range sections as rock models for intensity rock scene segmentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mkwelo, S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available can be used to extract intensity edges of relevance in terms of orientation and position. Conventional polynomial fitting is used to extract the underlying rock shape as a final segmentation. Preliminary results on a small laboratory data set using...

  8. Rock breakage mechanisms with a PDC cutter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Some aspects of chip generation by a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) cutter moving through a rock can be understood by examining the shapes of the chips and the fracture patterns in the remaining rock. Data from laboratory experiments have led to general conclusions about the uniformity of chip generation mechanisms in different kinds of rock and about crack nucleation position relative to the cutter tip. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Summaries of FY 92 geosciences research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the geosciences that are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The Division of Engineering and Geosciences, part of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Office of Energy Research, supports the Geosciences Research Program. The participants in this program include Department of Energy laboratories, academic institutions, and other governmental agencies. These activities are formalized by a contract or grant between the Department of Energy and the organization performing the work, providing funds for salaries, equipment, research materials, and overhead. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geophysics, geochemistry, resource evaluation, solar-terrestrial interactions and their subdivisions including Earth dynamics, properties of Earth materials, rock mechanics, underground imaging, rock-fluid interactions, continental scientific drilling, geochemical transport, solar/atmospheric physics, and modeling, with emphasis on the interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either directly or indirectly to the Department of Energy's long-range technological needs.

  10. Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three articles relevant to school crisis response: (1) "Factors Contributing to Posttraumatic Growth," summarized by Steve DeBlois; (2) "Psychological Debriefing in Cross-Cultural Contexts" (Stacey Rice); and (3) "Brain Abnormalities in PTSD" (Sunny Windingstad). The first summary reports the findings of a…

  11. Laboratory investigations of the effects of nitrification-induced acidification on Cr cycling in vadose zone material partially derived from ultramafic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Christopher T.; Goldhaber, Martin B.

    2012-01-01

    Sacramento Valley (California, USA) soils and sediments have high concentrations of Cr(III) because they are partially derived from ultramafic material. Some Cr(III) is oxidized to more toxic and mobile Cr(VI) by soil Mn oxides. Valley soils typically have neutral to alkaline pH at which Cr(III) is highly immobile. Much of the valley is under cultivation and is both fertilized and irrigated. A series of laboratory incubation experiments were conducted to assess how cultivation might impact Cr cycling in shallow vadose zone material from the valley. The first experiments employed low (7.1 mmol N per kg soil) and high (35 mmol N kg− 1) concentrations of applied (NH4)2SO4. Initially, Cr(VI) concentrations were up to 45 and 60% greater than controls in low and high incubations, respectively. After microbially-mediated oxidation of all NH4+, Cr(VI) concentrations dropped below control values. Increased nitrifying bacterial populations (estimated by measurement of phospholipid fatty acids) may have increased the Cr(VI) reduction capacity of the vadose zone material resulting in the observed decreases in Cr(VI). Another series of incubations employed vadose zone material from a different location to which low (45 meq kg− 1) and high (128 meq kg− 1) amounts of NH4Cl, KCl, and CaCl2 were applied. All treatments, except high concentration KCl, resulted in mean soil Cr(VI) concentrations that were greater than the control. High concentrations of water-leachable Ba2 + (mean 38 μmol kg− 1) in this treatment may have limited Cr(VI) solubility. A final set of incubations were amended with low (7.1 mmol N kg− 1) and high (35 mmol N kg− 1) concentrations of commercial liquid ammonium polyphosphate (APP) fertilizer which contained high concentrations of Cr(III). Soil Cr(VI) in the low APP incubations increased to a concentration of 1.8 μmol kg− 1 (5 × control) over 109 days suggesting that Cr(III) added with the APP fertilizer was more

  12. Summary review of the chemical characterization of liquid and sludge contained in the Old Hydrofracture tanks, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, C.W.; Herbes, S.E.

    1997-02-01

    This report presents analytical data developed from samples collected from the five inactive tanks located at the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The samples were collected during December 1995 and January 1996. The purpose of the sampling and analysis project was (1) to determine whether the tank contents meet ORNL waste acceptance criteria, as specified in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Liquid Waste Treatment Systems, Waste Evaluation Criteria; (2) to determine various physical properties of the tank contents that would affect the design of a sludge mobilization system; and (3) to gather information to support a baseline risk assessment. The report focuses on the analytical results used to evaluate the tank contents with regard to nuclear criticality safety requirements and to regulatory waste characterization.

  13. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement, Summary

    OpenAIRE

    United States Department of Energy

    1995-01-01

    This document analyzes (at a programmatic level) the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. F...

  14. Executive summary--2002 assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the San Juan Basin Province, exclusive of Paleozoic rocks, New Mexico and Colorado: Chapter 1 in Total petroleum systems and geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the San Juan Basin Province, exclusive of Paleozoic rocks, New Mexico and Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2013-01-01

    In 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimated undiscovered oil and gas resources that have the potential for additions to reserves in the San Juan Basin Province (5022), New Mexico and Colorado (fig. 1). Paleozoic rocks were not appraised. The last oil and gas assessment for the province was in 1995 (Gautier and others, 1996). There are several important differences between the 1995 and 2002 assessments. The area assessed is smaller than that in the 1995 assessment. This assessment of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in the San Juan Basin Province also used a slightly different approach in the assessment, and hence a number of the plays defined in the 1995 assessment are addressed differently in this report. After 1995, the USGS has applied a total petroleum system (TPS) concept to oil and gas basin assessments. The TPS approach incorporates knowledge of the source rocks, reservoir rocks, migration pathways, and time of generation and expulsion of hydrocarbons; thus the assessments are geologically based. Each TPS is subdivided into one or more assessment units, usually defined by a unique set of reservoir rocks, but which have in common the same source rock. Four TPSs and 14 assessment units were geologically evaluated, and for 13 units, the undiscovered oil and gas resources were quantitatively assessed.

  15. Latest Cretaceous and Cenozoic magmatic rocks of Alaska: polygon data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map is a statewide summary of magmatic (igneous) rocks grouped into geologic units that can be portrayed cartographically at 1:2,500,000. This dataset consists...

  16. Public health approach to detection of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli: summary of two outbreaks and laboratory procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffzin, J K; Coronado, F; Dumas, N B; Root, T P; Halse, T A; Schoonmaker-Bopp, D J; Lurie, M M; Nicholas, D; Gerzonich, B; Johnson, G S; Wallace, B J; Musser, K A

    2012-02-01

    Routine laboratory testing may not detect non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) reliably. Active clinical, epidemiological, environmental health, and laboratory collaboration probably influence successful detection and study of non-O157 STEC infection. We summarized two outbreak investigations in which such coordinated efforts identified non-O157 STEC disease and led to effective control measures. Outbreak 1 involved illness associated with consuming unpasteurized apple cider from a local orchard. Public health personnel were notified by a local hospital; stool specimens from ill persons contained O111 STEC. Outbreak 2 involved bloody diarrhoea at a correctional facility. Public health personnel were notified by the facility infection control officer; O45 STEC was the implicated agent. These reports highlight the ability of non-O157 STEC to cause outbreaks and demonstrate that a coordinated effort by clinicians, infection-control practitioners, clinical diagnostic laboratorians, and public health personnel can lead to effective identification, investigation, and prevention of non-O157 STEC disease.

  17. Experiments in the Underground Laboratory for Dosimetry and Spectrometry (UDO) of the PTB in the Asse II salt mine - summary highlighting work performed and outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Neumaier, S; Zwiener, R

    2003-01-01

    Due to its extremely low area dose rate, the Underground Laboratory for Dosimetry and Spectrometry (UDO) of the PTB at the 925 m level of the Asse II Salt Mine offers unique possibilities for the investigation and calibration of dosimetry systems of high sensitivity as are used, for example, in environmental monitoring. Due to its low area dose rate, this laboratory has an outstanding position worldwide. The low ambient dose equivalent rate in the UDO of approx. 1 nSv/h, that means of only approx. 1 percent of the ambient dose rate typically encountered at the Earth's surface, is mainly due to the following reasons: - At the depth at which the UDO is situated, the penetrating muon component of cosmic radiation which considerably contributes to the environmental equivalent dose rate at the Earth's surface (in Braunschweig, for example, approx. one third) is already attenuated by more than five orders of magnitude and is therefore completely negligible for dosimetric investigations; - The activity concentration...

  18. ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clinton Lum

    2002-02-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3

  19. Survey Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nursing home summary information for the Health and Fire Safety Inspections currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including dates of the three most recent...

  20. Meteorological Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multi-year summaries of one or more meteorological elements at a station or in a state. Primarily includes Form 1078, a United States Weather Bureau form designed...

  1. Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 1: Laboratory Experiments and Application to EBR-II Secondary Sodium System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R. Sherman

    2005-04-01

    Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decommissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidified carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, U.S.A. This report is Part 1 of a two-part report. It is divided into three sections. The first section describes the chemistry of carbon dioxide-water-sodium reactions. The second section covers the laboratory experiments that were conducted in order to develop the residual sodium deactivation process. The third section discusses the application of the deactivation process to the treatment of residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary sodium cooling system. Part 2 of the report, under separate cover, describes the application of the technique to residual sodium

  2. Flow heterogeneity in reservoir rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosman, A.; Simon, R.

    1975-01-01

    A study by Chevron Oil Field Research Co. shows that microscopic flow heterogeneity values are essential for interpreting laboratory displacement data and properly evaluating field displacement projects. Chevron discusses microscopic flow heterogeneity in reservoir rocks: a measuring method, results of some measurements, and several applications to reservoir engineering problems. Heterogeneity is expressed in terms of both breakthrough recovery and the Dykstra-Parsons permeability variation. Microscopic flow heterogeneity in a reservoir rock is related to pore size, pore shape, and location of the different pore sizes that determine flow paths of various permeabilities. This flow heterogeneity affects secondary recovery displacement efficiency, residual oil and water saturations, and capillary pressure measurements.

  3. Summary of Adsorption Capacity and Adsorption Kinetics of Uranium and Other Elements on Amidoxime-based Adsorbents from Time Series Marine Testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Gary A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Sequim, WA (United States). Marine Sciences Lab.; Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Sequim, WA (United States). Marine Sciences Lab.; Strivens, Jonathan E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Sequim, WA (United States). Marine Sciences Lab.; Wood, Jordana R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Sequim, WA (United States). Marine Sciences Lab.; Schlafer, Nicholas J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Sequim, WA (United States). Marine Sciences Lab.; Janke, Christopher J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Das, Sadananda [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mayes, Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Saito, Tomonori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Suree S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tsouris, Constantinos [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tsouris, Costas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wai, Chien M. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); LCW Supercritical Technologies, Seattle, WA (United States); Pan, Horng-Bin [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    2016-09-29

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been conducting marine testing of uranium adsorbent materials for the Fuel Resources Program, Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) beginning in FY 2012. The marine testing program is being conducted at PNNL’s Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL), located at Sequim Bay, along the coast of Washington. One of the main efforts of the marine testing program is the determination of adsorption capacity and adsorption kinetics for uranium and selected other elements (e.g. vanadium, iron, copper, nickel, and zinc) for adsorbent materials provided primarily by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), but also includes other Fuel Resources Program participants. This report summarizes the major marine testing results that have been obtained to date using time series sampling for 42 to 56 days using either flow-through column or recirculating flume exposures. The major results are highlighted in this report, and the full data sets are appended as a series of Excel spreadsheet files. Over the four year period (2012-2016) that marine testing of amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbents was conducted at PNNL’s Marine Science Laboratory, there has been a steady progression of improvement in the 56-day adsorbent capacity from 3.30 g U/kg adsorbent for the ORNL 38H adsorbent to the current best performing adsorbent prepared by a collaboration between the University of Tennessee and ORNL to produce the adsorbent SB12-8, which has an adsorption capacity of 6.56 g U/kg adsorbent. This nearly doubling of the adsorption capacity in four years is a significant advancement in amidoxime-based adsorbent technology and a significant achievement for the Uranium from Seawater program. The achievements are evident when compared to the several decades of work conducted by the Japanese scientists beginning in the 1980’s (Kim et al., 2013). The best adsorbent capacity reported by the Japanese scientists was 3.2 g U/kg adsorbent for a

  4. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Creek watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, January--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borders, D.M.; Ziegler, K.S.; Reece, D.K.; Watts, J.A.; Frederick, B.J.; McCalla, W.L.; Pridmore, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    This report summarizes, for the 12-month period January through December 1994, the available dynamic hydrologic data collected on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed as well as information collected on surface flow systems in the surrounding vicinity that may affect the quality or quantity of surface water in the watershed. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to characterize the quantity and quality of water in the surface flow system, assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities, provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance of these data, and support long-term measures of contaminant fluxes at a spatial scale to provide a comprehensive picture of watershed performance that is commensurate with future remedial actions.

  5. CERN Rocks

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The 15th CERN Hardronic Festival took place on 17 July on the terrace of Rest 3 (Prévessin). Over 1000 people, from CERN and other International Organizations, came to enjoy the warm summer night, and to watch the best of the World's High Energy music. Jazz, rock, pop, country, metal, blues, funk and punk blasted out from 9 bands from the CERN Musiclub and Jazz club, alternating on two stages in a non-stop show.  The night reached its hottest point when The Canettes Blues Band got everybody dancing to sixties R&B tunes (pictured). Meanwhile, the bars and food vans were working at full capacity, under the expert management of the CERN Softball club, who were at the same time running a Softball tournament in the adjacent "Higgs Field". The Hardronic Festival is the main yearly CERN music event, and it is organized with the support of the Staff Association and the CERN Administration.

  6. The Usability of Rock-Like Materials for Numerical Studies on Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Enes; Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal

    2017-04-01

    The approaches of synthetic rock material and mass are widely used by many researchers for understanding the failure behavior of different rocks. In order to model the failure behavior of rock material, researchers take advantageous of different techniques and software. But, the majority of all these instruments are based on distinct element method (DEM). For modeling the failure behavior of rocks, and so to create a fundamental synthetic rock material model, it is required to perform related laboratory experiments for providing strength parameters. In modelling studies, model calibration processes are performed by using parameters of intact rocks such as porosity, grain size, modulus of elasticity and Poisson ratio. In some cases, it can be difficult or even impossible to acquire representative rock samples for laboratory experiments from heavily jointed rock masses and vuggy rocks. Considering this limitation, in this study, it was aimed to investigate the applicability of rock-like material (e.g. concrete) to understand and model the failure behavior of rock materials having complex inherent structures. For this purpose, concrete samples having a mixture of %65 cement dust and %35 water were utilized. Accordingly, intact concrete samples representing rocks were prepared in laboratory conditions and their physical properties such as porosity, pore size and density etc. were determined. In addition, to acquire the mechanical parameters of concrete samples, uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) tests were also performed by simultaneously measuring strain during testing. The measured physical and mechanical properties of these extracted concrete samples were used to create synthetic material and then uniaxial compressive tests were modeled and performed by using two dimensional discontinuum program known as Particle Flow Code (PFC2D). After modeling studies in PFC2D, approximately similar failure mechanism and testing results were achieved from both experimental and

  7. Handbook of acute toxicity of chemicals to fish and aquatic invertebrates : summaries of toxicity tests conducted at Columbia National Fisheries Research Laboratory, 1965-78

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. Waynon; Finley, Mack T.

    1980-01-01

    Acute toxicity is a major subject of research at Columbia National Fisheries Research Laboratory for evaluating the impact of toxic chemicals on fishery resources. The Laboratory has played a leading role in developing research technology for toxicity testing and data interpretation. In 1965-78, more than 400 chemicals were tested against a variety of invertebrates and fish species representative of both cold- and warm-water climates.The use of acute toxicity tests for assessing the potential hazard of chemical contaminants to aquatic organisms is well documented (Boyd 1957; Henderson et al. 1960; Sanders and Cope 1966; Macek and McAllister 1970). Static acute toxicity tests provide rapid and (within limits) reproducible concentration-response curves for estimating toxic effects of chemicals on aquatic organisms. These tests provide a database for determining relative toxicity of a large number of chemicals to a variety of species and for estimating acute effects of chemical spills on natural aquatic systems; they also assist in determining priority and design of additional toxicity studies.Acute toxicity tests usually provide estimates of the exposure concentration causing 50% mortality (LC50) to test organisms during a specified period of time. For certain invertebrates, the effective concentration is based on immobilization, or some other identifiable endpoint, rather than on lethality. The application of the LC50 has gained acceptance among toxicologists and is generally the most highly rated test for assessing potential adverse effects of chemical contaminants to aquatic life (Brungs and Mount 1978; American Institute for Biological Sciences 1978a).The literature contains numerous papers dealing with the acute toxicity of chemicals to freshwater organisms. However, there is a tremendous need for a concise compendium of toxicity data covering a large variety of chemicals and test species. This Handbook is a compilation of a large volume of acute toxicity data

  8. Report on summary results of the inspection of issues regarding the scope of the accident investigation of the TRISTAN Fire at the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The subject final report is provided to inform you of our findings and recommendations concerning our review of issues regarding the scope of the accident investigation of a March 31, 1994, fire at the Terrific Reactor Isotope Separator To Analyze Nuclides (TRISTAN) experiment at the Department of Energy (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, New York. The Chicago Operations Office (CH) Manager appointed a Type B Accident Investigation Board (Board) to investigate the fire. In a June 16, 1994, letter to the Inspector General, DOE, the CH Manager requested the Inspector General to look into an allegation by a former Board member that senior Chicago management consciously violated the requirements of DOE Order 5484.1, {open_quotes}Environmental Protection, Safety, And Health Protection Information Reporting Requirements,{close_quotes} in attempting to control the investigation. The former Board member alleged that there was not a clear verbal agreement among the Board members regarding the focus of the scope of the investigation. He said that the Board Chairman wanted to focus on the physical causes of the fire, while he (the former Board member) believed that the Board should focus on the apparent management deficiencies that allowed TRISTAN to operate without a proper safety analysis and in violation of DOE orders for so many years.

  9. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2 -- Appendix A: Characterization methods and data summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5. This appendix presents background regulatory and technical information regarding the solid waste management units (SWMUs) at WAG 5 to address requirements established by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The US Department of Energy (DOE) agreed to conduct remedial investigations (RIs) under the FFA at various sites at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including SWMUs and other areas of concern on WAG 5. The appendix gives an overview of the regulatory background to provide the context in which the WAG 5 RI was planned and implemented and documents how historical sources of data, many of which are SWMU-specific, were evaluated and used.

  10. Field grouting summary report on the WAG seeps 4 and 6 removal action project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    During the summer of 1996, a unique multi-phase, multi-stage, low-pressure permeation grouting pilot program was performed inside portions of four unlined waste disposal trenches at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The project was deemed a non-time-critical removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); however, due to a history of heavy precipitation in the fall, the schedule was fast-tracked to meet an October 31, 1996 grouting completion date. The technical objective of the removal action was to reduce the off-site transport of Strontium 90 ({sup 90}Sr) by grouting portions of four waste disposal trenches believed to be responsible for over 70% of the {sup 90}Sr leaving the site. A goal of the grouting operation was to reduce the average in situ hydraulic conductivity of the grouted waste materials to a value equal to or less than 1 x 10{sup {minus}6} cm/sec. This target hydraulic conductivity value was established to be at least two orders of magnitude lower than that of the surrounding natural ground.

  11. Field grouting summary report on the WAG 4 seeps 4 and 6 removal action project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3. Appendixes E and F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    During the summer of 1996, a unique multi-phase, multi-stage, low-pressure permeation grouting pilot program was performed inside portions of four unlined waste disposal trenches at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The project was deemed a non-time-critical removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); however, due to a history of heavy precipitation in the fall, the schedule was fast-tracked to meet an October 31, 1996 grouting completion date. The technical objective of the removal action was to reduce the off-site transport of j Strontium 90 ({sup 90}Sr) by grouting portions of four waste disposal trenches believed to be responsible for over 70 percent of the {sup 90}Sr leaving the site. A goal of the grouting operation was to reduce the average in situ hydraulic conductivity of the grouted waste materials to a value equal to or less than 1 x 10{sup -6} cm/sec. This target hydraulic conductivity value was established to be at least two orders of magnitude lower than that of the surrounding natural ground.

  12. Site characterization summary report for Waste Area Grouping 10 Wells at the Old Hydrofracture Facility, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by Martin Marietta Energy Systems (Energy Systems). As part of its DOE mission, ORNL has pioneered waste disposal technologies throughout the years of site operations since World War II. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to develop a permanent disposal alternative to the surface impoundments at ORNL at the request of the National Academy of Sciences. One such technology, the hydrofracture process, involved forming fractures in an underlying geologic host formation (a low-permeability shale) at depths of up to 1000 ft and subsequently injecting a grout slurry containing low-level liquid waste, cement, and other additives at an injection pressure of about 2000 psi. The objective of the effort was to develop a grout slurry that could be injected as a liquid but would solidify after injection, thereby immobilizing the radioisotopes contained in the low-level liquid waste. The scope of this site characterization was the access, sampling, logging, and evaluation of observation wells near the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) in preparation for plugging, recompletion, or other final disposition of the wells.

  13. Summary Report of Comprehensive Laboratory Testing to Establish the Effectiveness of Proposed Treatment Methods for Unremediated and Remediated Nitrate Salt Waste Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Funk, David John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hargis, Kenneth Marshall [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-04

    The inadvertent creation of transuranic waste carrying hazardous waste codes D001 and D002 requires the treatment of the material to eliminate the hazardous characteristics and allow its eventual shipment and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report documents the effectiveness of two treatment methods proposed to stabilize both the unremediated and remediated nitrate salt waste streams (UNS and RNS, respectively) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The two technologies include the addition of zeolite (with and without the addition of water as a processing aid) and cementation. Surrogates were developed to evaluate both the solid and liquid fractions expected from parent waste containers, and both the solid and liquid fractions were tested. Both technologies are shown to be effective at eliminating the characteristic of ignitability (D001), and the addition of zeolite was determined to be effective at eliminating corrosivity (D002), with the preferred option1 of adding zeolite currently planned for implementation at LANL’s Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF). The course of this work verified the need to evaluate and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed remedy for debris material, if required. The evaluation determined that WypAlls, cheesecloth, and Celotex absorbed with saturated nitrate salt solutions exhibit the ignitability characteristic (all other expected debris is not classified as ignitable). Finally, liquid surrogates containing saturated nitrate salts did not exhibit the characteristic of ignitability in their pure form (those neutralized with Kolorsafe and mixed with sWheat did exhibit D001). Sensitivity testing and an analysis were conducted to evaluate the waste form for reactivity. Tests included subjecting surrogate material to mechanical impact, friction, electrostatic discharge and thermal insults. The testing confirmed that the waste does not exhibit the characteristic of

  14. Infiltration Flow Path Distributions in Unsaturated Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, T. K.; Olson, K. R.; Wan, J.

    2004-12-01

    Spatial distributions of infiltration flow paths through rock formations are complex networks that determine flow velocities, control rates of natural geochemical reactions in the subsurface, as well as rates of contaminant transport to underlying groundwater. Despite these important consequences, distributions of infiltration paths and locally fast seepage rates through rocks are not well understood. Laboratory-based studies on fractured rocks cannot easily be conducted on systems large enough to include sufficient fracture network complexity, so that inferences of field-scale flux distributions cannot be reliably made. Field-based studies to date have permitted quantification of only a small fraction of the flow distribution, typically while imposing extremely high fluxes, and therefore have not allowed comprehensive delineation of flow distributions expected under natural recharge. Based on hydraulic scaling considerations, we hypothesize that unsaturated flow path distributions in rock deposits will be similar to those occurring in fractured rock formations under low overall infiltration rates. Talus rock deposits and mine waste rock piles control flow and transport into their respective underlying groundwaters. All of these reasons motivated infiltration experiments in rock packs. Experiments have been conducted on 4 different rock types and system scales ranging from 1 to 46 rock layers. Our experiments showed that infiltration through rocks conforms to no previously reported behavior in soils, and that flow paths do not progressively converge into fewer and fewer flow paths. Instead, a fundamentally different hydraulic structure develops, having an exponential (geometric) flux distribution, with the characteristic scale determined by the characteristic rock size. Although the phenomena are very different, the evolution of flow path distributions and local seepage rate distributions is predictable based on a statistical mechanical model for energy

  15. Rollerjaw Rock Crusher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Gregory; Brown, Kyle; Fuerstenau, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The rollerjaw rock crusher melds the concepts of jaw crushing and roll crushing long employed in the mining and rock-crushing industries. Rollerjaw rock crushers have been proposed for inclusion in geological exploration missions on Mars, where they would be used to pulverize rock samples into powders in the tens of micrometer particle size range required for analysis by scientific instruments.

  16. Summary adjudication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freudenthal, M.

    1998-01-01

    The 1987 World Congress on Procedural Law had as its main theme: ‘Justice and Efficiency’. One of the general reports was entitled: ‘Use and Abuse of Summary Proceedings’.2 Today, 10 years later, the scholarly attention to the subject of accelerated or expedited proceedings is still as important

  17. Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three recent crisis management publications: (1) "School Violence: Associations With Control, Security/Enforcement, Educational/Therapeutic Approaches, and Demographic Factors," reviewed by Ashlee Barton; (2) "The Relationship Between Cognitive Coping Styles and PTSD in Survivors of Traffic Accidents," summarized…

  18. Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three recent crisis management publications: (1) "The Impact of School Violence on School Personnel," summarized by Kimberly de Deaux; (2) "Children Exposed to War/Terrorism," summarized by Jennifer DeFago; and (3) "Suicide Survivors Seeking Mental Health Services," summarized by Kimberly de Deaux. The first…

  19. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 6. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S

    2007-09-05

    Throughout fifty-three years of operations, an estimated 792,000 Ci (29,300 TBq) of tritium have been released to the atmosphere at the Livermore site of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); about 75% was tritium gas (HT) primarily from the accidental releases of 1965 and 1970. Routine emissions contributed slightly more than 100,000 Ci (3,700 TBq) HT and about 75,000 Ci (2,800 TBq) tritiated water vapor (HTO) to the total. A Tritium Dose Reconstruction was undertaken to estimate both the annual doses to the public for each year of LLNL operations and the doses from the few accidental releases. Some of the dose calculations were new, and the others could be compared with those calculated by LLNL. Annual doses (means and 95% confidence intervals) to the potentially most exposed member of the public were calculated for all years using the same model and the same assumptions. Predicted tritium concentrations in air were compared with observed mean annual concentrations at one location from 1973 onwards. Doses predicted from annual emissions were compared with those reported in the past by LLNL. The highest annual mean dose predicted from routine emissions was 34 {micro}Sv (3.4 mrem) in 1957; its upper confidence limit, based on very conservative assumptions about the speciation of the release, was 370 {micro}Sv (37 mrem). The upper confidence limits for most annual doses were well below the current regulatory limit of 100 {micro}Sv (10 mrem) for dose to the public from release to the atmosphere; the few doses that exceeded this were well below the regulatory limits of the time. Lacking the hourly meteorological data needed to calculate doses from historical accidental releases, ingestion/inhalation dose ratios were derived from a time-dependent accident consequence model that accounts for the complex behavior of tritium in the environment. Ratios were modified to account for only those foods growing at the time of the releases. The highest dose from an

  20. 75 FR 30750 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Arkansas Waterway, Little Rock, AR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ..., Little Rock, AR AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard... Waterway at mile 119.6 at Little Rock, AR, so that vessel operators will contact the remote drawbridge... the Baring Cross Railroad Drawbridge, mile 119.6, at Little Rock, AR is maintained in the closed...

  1. 75 FR 66306 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Arkansas Waterway, Little Rock, AR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    ..., Little Rock, AR AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: Drawbridge operations for the Baring Cross Railroad Drawbridge across the Arkansas Waterway at Mile 119.6 at Little Rock, Arkansas... (NPRM) entitled Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Arkansas Waterway, Little ] Rock, AR in the Federal...

  2. DECOVALEX III III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Approaches to Upscaling Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Processes in a Fractured Rock. Mass and its Significance for Large-Scale Repository Performance Assessment. Summary of Findings. Report of BMT2/WP3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan (comp.) [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden); Staub, Isabelle (comp.) [Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Knight, Les (comp.) [Nirex UK Ltd, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-15

    The Benchmark Test 2 of DECOVALEX III and Work Package 3 of BENCHPAR concerns the upscaling Thermal (T), Hydrological (H) and Mechanical (M) processes in a fractured rock mass and its significance for large-scale repository performance assessment. The work is primarily concerned with the extent to which various thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings in a fractured rock mass adjacent to a repository are significant in terms of solute transport typically calculated in large-scale repository performance assessments. Since the presence of even quite small fractures may control the hydraulic, mechanical and coupled hydromechanical behaviour of the rock mass, a key of the work has been to explore the extent to which these can be upscaled and represented by 'equivalent' continuum properties appropriate PA calculations. From these general aims the BMT was set-up as a numerical study of a large scale reference problem. Analysing this reference problem should: help explore how different means of simplifying the geometrical detail of a site, with its implications on model parameters, ('upscaling') impacts model predictions of relevance to repository performance, explore to what extent the THM-coupling needs to be considered in relation to PA-measures, compare the uncertainties in upscaling (both to uncertainty on how to upscale or uncertainty that arises due to the upscaling processes) and consideration of THM couplings with the inherent uncertainty and spatial variability of the site specific data. Furthermore, it has been an essential component of the work that individual teams not only produce numerical results but are forced to make their own judgements and to provide the proper justification for their conclusions based on their analysis. It should also be understood that conclusions drawn will partly be specific to the problem analysed, in particular as it mainly concerns a 2D application. This means that specific conclusions may have limited applicability

  3. Larval development of the rock shrimp Rhynchocinetes typus Milne Edwards, 1937 (Decapoda, Caridea reared in the laboratory Desarrollo larval del camarón de roca Rhynchocinetes typus Milne Edwards, 1937 (Decapoda, Caridea cultivados en laboratorio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ENRIQUE DUPRÉ

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The first description of the larval stages of a representative of the family Rhynchocinetidae from the southeastern Pacific coast of South América is presented. Larvae of the rock shrimp Rhynchocinetes typus, from rocky subtidal environment of the Chile-Pera coast were reared in the laboratory at 22 °C, salinity 32 and feeding with Anemia franciscana. Seven zoeal stages, which occur through 10 successive moults, are described and illustrated in detail. Morphological comparison made between R. typus and other congeneric and related species belonging to Rhynchocinetid showed the main characteristic for the diagnosis of zoeal stages are: (a the pereiopods appear in the third stage, (b the exopod of the antennae have six segments, and (c no pleopods were found on the seven stages. The main difference with related species was the presence of three lacinia in the right mandible at stage VIL.Se describe por primera vez el desarrollo larval de un representante de la familia Rhynchocinetidae en aguas del Pacífico suroriental. Las larvas de camarón de roca Rhynchocinetes typus Milne Edwards, 1937 que habita en el submareal rocoso de la costa de Chile-Perú, se cultivaron en laboratorio a 22 °C, con salinidad de 32 y se alimentaron con Anemia franciscana. Se determinaron siete estados de zoea que ocurren a través de 10 mudas sucesivas. Cada uno de los estados se describió e ilustró detalladamente. La comparación morfológica con otras especies congenéricas y otras especies de la familia Rhynchocinetidae indicó que las principales características distintivas de los estados de zoea fueron: (a el primer par de pereiópodos aparece en la zoea III, (b el exopodito de la antena presenta seis segmentos, y (c no se observaron pleópodos en ninguno de los siete estados descritos. La principal característica que diferencia la zoea de R. typus de las demás especies es la presencia de tres lacinias en la mandíbula derecha en el estado VIL.

  4. A Novel Mobile Testing Equipment for Rock Cuttability Assessment: Vertical Rock Cutting Rig (VRCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Serdar; Yilmaz, Ali Osman

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a new mobile rock cutting testing apparatus was designed and produced for rock cuttability assessment called vertical rock cutting rig (VRCR) which was designed specially to fit into hydraulic press testing equipment which are available in almost every rock mechanics laboratory. Rock cutting trials were initiated just after the production of VRCR along with calibration of the measuring load cell with an external load cell to validate the recorded force data. Then, controlled rock cutting tests with both relieved and unrelieved cutting modes were implemented on five different volcanic rock samples with a standard simple-shaped wedge tool. Additionally, core cutting test which is an important approach for roadheader performance prediction was simulated with VRCR. Mini disc cutters and point attack tools were used for execution of experimental trials. Results clearly showed that rock cutting tests were successfully realized and measuring system is delicate to rock strength, cutting depth and other variables. Core cutting test was successfully simulated, and it was also shown that rock cutting tests with mini disc cutters and point attack tools are also successful with VRCR.

  5. Rocks Can Wow? Yes, Rocks Can Wow!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Sally; Luke, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Rocks and fossils appear in the National Curriculum of England science programmes of study for children in year 3 (ages 7-8). A frequently asked question is "How do you make the classification of rocks engaging?" In response to this request from a school, a set of interactive activities was designed and organised by tutors and students…

  6. Summary guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsnaes, K.; Painuly, J.P.; Turkson, J.; Meyer, H.J.; Markandya, A.

    1999-09-01

    This document is a summary version of the methodological guidelines for climate change mitigation assessment developed as part of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) project Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations; Methodological Guidelines. The objectives of this project have been to develop a methodology, an implementing framework and a reporting system which countries can use in the construction of national climate change mitigation policies and in meeting their future reporting obligations under the FCCC. The methodological framework developed in the Methodological Guidelines covers key economic concepts, scenario building, modelling tools and common assumptions. It was used by several country studies included in the project. (au) 13 refs.

  7. Rock Slope Design Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Based on the stratigraphy and the type of slope stability problems, the flat lying, Paleozoic age, sedimentary : rocks of Ohio were divided into three design units: 1) competent rock design unit consisting of sandstones, limestones, : and siltstones ...

  8. Rock slope design guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    This Manual is intended to provide guidance for the design of rock cut slopes, rockfall catchment, and : rockfall controls. Recommendations presented in this manual are based on research presented in Shakoor : and Admassu (2010) entitled Rock Slop...

  9. The Rock Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raman J.; Bushee, Jonathan

    1977-01-01

    Presents a rock cycle diagram suitable for use at the secondary or introductory college levels which separates rocks formed on and below the surface, includes organic materials, and separates products from processes. (SL)

  10. Summary of Research through Phase II/Year 2 of Initially Approved 3 Phase/3 Year Project - Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Grammer

    2007-09-30

    This final scientific/technical report covers the first 2 years (Phases I and II of an originally planned 3 Year/3 Phase program). The project was focused on evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin. The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs was the major focus of our efforts in Phases I and II of the project. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault-related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in these 2 studied intervals (based upon fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. In the Niagaran (Silurian), there is a general trend of increasing dolomitization shelfward, with limestone predominant in more basinward positions. A major finding is that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, are directly related to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites which increases the predictability of reservoir quality in these units. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that the results should be exportable throughout the basin. Much of the data synthesis and modeling for the project was scheduled to be part of Year 3/Phase III, but the discontinuation of funding after Year 2 precluded those efforts

  11. My Pet Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  12. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1953-1970: Description of individual studies, data files, codes, and summaries of significant findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahn, D.; Fox, C.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    Between 1953 and 1970, studies on the long-term effects of external x-ray and {gamma} irradiation on inbred and hybrid mouse stocks were carried out at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory. The results of these studies, plus the mating, litter, and pre-experimental stock records, were routinely coded on IBM cards for statistical analysis and record maintenance. Also retained were the survival data from studies performed in the period 1943-1953 at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. The card-image data files have been corrected where necessary and refiled on hard disks for long-term storage and ease of accessibility. In this report, the individual studies and data files are described, and pertinent factors regarding caging, husbandry, radiation procedures, choice of animals, and other logistical details are summarized. Some of the findings are also presented. Descriptions of the different mouse stocks and hybrids are included in an appendix; more than three dozen stocks were involved in these studies. Two other appendices detail the data files in their original card-image format and the numerical codes used to describe the animal`s exit from an experiment and, for some studies, any associated pathologic findings. Tabular summaries of sample sizes, dose levels, and other variables are also given to assist investigators in their selection of data for analysis. The archive is open to any investigator with legitimate interests and a willingness to collaborate and acknowledge the source of the data and to recognize appropriate conditions or caveats.

  13. Propagation des ondes élastiques dans les matériaux non linéaires Aperçu des résultats de laboratoire obtenus sur les roches et des applications possibles en géophysique Propagation of Elastic Waves in Nonlinear Materials Survey of Laboratory Results on Rock and Geophysical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasolofosaon P.

    2006-12-01

    non-linéarité sous fort confinement, et qui pourraient engendrer un signal résultant d'une interaction onde-onde . Tempérant ce pessimisme, il faut noter qu'un éventuel signal d'interaction non linéaire présenterait l'avantage, quant à sa détection, d'être dans une bande de fréquence différente de celle des ondes utilisées pour l'engendrer. Bien que nous n'ayons pas connaissance d'essais d'application actuels, les perspectives paraissent plus encourageantes dans le domaine du génie civil ou minier. C'est dans le domaine diagraphique, où des distances de propagation sont très faibles, que des applications semblent possibles à moyen terme. Si l'on en juge par le dépôt très récent de plusieurs brevets, les compagnies de logging poursuivraient des recherches dans cette voie. A general and important characteristic of rocks is their elastically nonlinear behavior resulting in significant effects on wave propagation. The nonlinear response of rock is a direct consequence of the compliant nature of rock : the macro-and micro-structure of the material (microcracks, grain-to-grain contacts, etc. . As a result, the material modulus varies as a function of the applied pressure. Interest has grown significantly in the last several years, as illustrated by the increasing number of publications regarding this topic. Here we present a summary of the fundamentals of theory and of experimental observations characteristic of rock, and we address possible applications in geophysics. Two disciplines regarding the nonlinear elasticity of rock have been developed over recent years in tandem :- Acoustoelasticity where wave propagation in statically, prestressed materials is studied. Here one relates the variation in applied pressure to the elastic wavespeed in order to extract the nonlinear coefficients. This area of study includes the topic of stress-induced anisotropy. - Acoustic nonlinearity where we are interested in the temporary and local variation in the elastic

  14. New approach to rock burst forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, V.V.; Fokin, A.N.; Pimonov, A.G. (Kuzbasskii Politekhnicheskii Institut (USSR))

    1990-10-01

    Deals with the problem of rock burst forecasting that departs from the concept of solid body strength and breaking and from equations that relate endurance of a solid body to continuous stress. A formula is derived that permits the lifetime of a rock volume under stress to be calculated. A block diagram of a laboratory automatic system is presented that is capable of monitoring the stress state of a rock sample and of forecasting the time to sample destruction. The system consists of a loading fixture, electromagnetic emission sensor, frequency meter, microprocessor and plotter. An example of a plot of the rate of fissure formation as a function of time is shown and a monitor screen display of a sample life versus time is also presented. It is maintained that the system creates a basis for developing a system that would monitor and forecast rock burst hazards in a continuous manner. 4 refs.

  15. Kinetics of dissolution of mechanically comminuted rock-forming oxides and silicates—II. Deformation and dissolution of oxides and silicates in the laboratory and at the Earth's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovich, Radomir

    1981-10-01

    Comparison of the patterns of fracture under tensile stress, indentation, and scratching of periclase. quartz, and corundum indicates that the properties relevant to dissolution of rock-forming oxides and of rock-forming non-layer silicates should be changed by mechanical comminution in essentially the same way as those of quartz. The changes are accomplished by brittle fracture under the tensile component of the stress field, which does not generate subsurface damage, and by microplastic behavior under local stresses with high net compressive and shear components, which does. Mechanical comminution should therefore affect the apparent rates of dissolution (rates calculated with respect to the initial interface area) of rock-forming oxides and of rock-forming non-layer silicates in essentially the same way in which it affects the apparent rate of dissolution of quartz. This is supported by the available evidence on the effect of dry grinding on the kinetics of dissolution of feldspars, pyroxenes, and olivines in aqueous solutions. Different effects of mechanical comminution on solubilities and dissolution rate constants can be related to certain measured or calculated properties of the considered minerals. Notably, the effect of grain size on the dissolution rate constant can be rigorously related to the Kelvin effect. The available evidence on the mechanical comminution at the bases of dry-based glaciers in highgradient segments of streams, in certain high-energy coastal and epeiric environments, and in sandy deserts indicates that such mechanical comminution should significantly affect the simultaneous or subsequent dissolution of the comminuted material.

  16. Determining the specific electric resistance of rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persad' ko, V.Ia.

    1982-01-01

    Data are presented on perfecting the method of laboratory determination of the specific electric resistance of a rock formation. The average error in determining the specific electric resistance of the core at various locations is no more than two percent with low resistance values (2-5 ohms).

  17. Geochemistry of rock samples from the National Geochemical Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set contains geochemical data for rock samples collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel and analyzed either in the analytical laboratories of...

  18. The ISRM suggested methods for rock characterization, testing and monitoring 2007-2014

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of ISRM suggested methods for testing or measuring properties of rocks and rock masses both in the laboratory and in situ, as well as for monitoring the performance of rock engineering structures. The first collection (Yellow Book) has been published in 1981. In order to provide access to all the Suggested Methods in one volume, the ISRM Blue Book was published in 2007 (by the ISRM via the Turkish National Group) and contains the complete set of Suggested Methods from 1974 to 2006 inclusive. The papers in this most recent volume have been published during the last seven years in international journals, mainly in Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering. They offer guidance for rock characterization procedures and laboratory and field testing and monitoring in rock engineering. These methods provide a definitive procedure for the identification, measurement and evaluation of one or more qualities, characteristics, or properties of rocks or rock systems that produces a test result.

  19. Summaries of FY 1995 geosciences research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geophysics, geochemistry, resource evaluation, solar-terrestrial interactions, and their subdivisions including earth dynamics, properties of earth materials, rock mechanics, underground imaging, rock-fluid interactions, continental scientific drilling, geochemical transport, solar/atmospheric physics, and modeling, with emphasis on the interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either direct or indirect to the Department of Energy`s long-range technological needs.

  20. Rock Magnetism: Successes and Mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    governs a rock's induced response to weak fields like the Earth's. In particular, the Hopkinson peak in susceptibility near the Curie temperature - a potential source of "missing magnetism" in the deep lithosphere - increases steadily over at least a decade of decreasing grain size in magnetite. Single-domain recorders, in addition to their strong and long-lasting memory, have the property of TRM additivity and independence. This makes possible the Thellier method of determining paleofield intensity, a much more demanding undertaking than tracking paleomagnetic field directions, in which the ancient magnetic moment is gradually replaced by a set of partial TRMs produced in a known laboratory field. Partial TRMs produced in nature by heating during deep burial are also additive and independent. The temperature at which these overprints are removed in the laboratory yields - after correction for the very different natural and laboratory heating times - the burial temperature. This is the basis of magnetic paleothermometry. The interplay of time and temperature in TRM when combined with thermal history models provides estimates of when the global magnetic field of a planet, e.g., Mars, was born and died. But the grand conclusions so important to geophysics rest ultimately on the fidelity of the microscopic recorders in rocks and here, despite many advances, our understanding is still a work in progress.

  1. Airbag roll marks & displaced rocks and soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Looking southwest from the lander, soil disturbances indicating the spacecraft rolled through the landing site are visible. Arriving from the east, the lander, still encased in its protective airbags, rolled up a slight rise and then rolled back down to its final position. The inset at left shows displaced rocks near the rock 'Flat Top.' Dark patches of disturbed soil indicate where the rocks had originally rested Both insets show rocks that were pushed into the soil from the weight of the lander, visible from the areas of raised rims of dark, disturbed soil around several rocks. The south summit of Twin Peaks is in the background, while a lander petal, deflated airbag, and rear rover deployment ramp are in the foreground.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  2. Target Rock National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Target Rock National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1981 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  3. Target Rock National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Target Rock National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1982 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  4. Target Rock National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Target Rock National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1983 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  5. Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Red Rock Lakes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1992 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  6. Probabilistic Rock Slope Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    distances or may reflect errors or uncertainties in sample collection and evaluation. 58. Typical variograms for fracture set properties are illustrated... uncertainties in their measurement and estimation imply the probabilistic nature of parameters re- quired for rock slope engineering. Therefore, statistical...strengths of geologic discontinuities and also by the local stress field. Natural variabilities in these rock mass properties and uncertainties in their

  7. Rock Cycle Roulette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stan M.; Palmer, Courtney

    2000-01-01

    Introduces an activity on the rock cycle. Sets 11 stages representing the transitions of an earth material in the rock cycle. Builds six-sided die for each station, and students move to the stations depending on the rolling side of the die. Evaluates students by discussing several questions in the classroom. Provides instructional information for…

  8. The Rock that Hit New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meade, Roger Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Keksis, August Lawrence [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-03

    On January 12, 1975, a rock seemed to fall from the sky over New York State’s Schoharie County hitting the tractor of a local farmer, who was “preparing his fields for spring planting.” As the farmer later described the event to a reporter from the UFO INVESTIGATOR, the object glanced off the tractor, fell to the ground, and melted its way through a patch of ice that was two and one half inches thick. The farmer, Leonard Tillapaugh, called the county sheriff, Harvey Stoddard, who recovered the rock, noting that it “was still warm.” Why and how a sample of the rock came to Los Alamos is not known. However, it captivated a wide Laboratory audience, was subjected to rigorous testing and evaluation. Los Alamos used the scientific method in the manner promoted by Hynek. Did Los Alamos solve the mystery of the rock’s origin? Not definitively. Although the exact origin could not be determined, it was shown conclusively that the rock was not from outer space. With that said, the saga of Rock that hit New York came to an end. Nothing more was said or written about it. The principals involved have long since passed from the scene. The NICAP ceased operations in 1980. And, the rock, itself, has disappeared.

  9. Digital Rock Studies of Tight Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, Dmitriy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-08-07

    This technical report summarizes some recently developed approaches to studies of rock properties at a pore scale. Digital rock approach is complementary to laboratory and field studies. It can be especially helpful in situations where experimental data are uncertain, or are difficult or impossible to obtain. Digitized binary images of the pore geometries of natural rocks obtained by different imaging techniques are the input data. Computer-generated models of natural rocks can be used instead of images in a case where microtomography data are unavailable, or the resolution of the tools is insufficient to adequately characterize the features of interest. Simulations of creeping viscous flow in pores produce estimates of Darcy permeability. Maximal Inscribed Spheres calculations estimate two-phase fluid distribution in capillary equilibrium. A combination of both produce relative permeability curves. Computer-generated rock models were employed to study two-phase properties of fractured rocks, or tight sands with slit-like pores, too narrow to be characterized with micro-tomography. Various scenarios can simulate different fluid displacement mechanisms, from piston-like drainage to liquid dropout at the dew point. A finite differences discretization of Stokes equation is developed to simulate flow in the pore space of natural rocks. The numerical schemes are capable to handle both no-slip and slippage flows. An upscaling procedure estimates the permeability by subsampling a large data set. Capillary equilibrium and capillary pressure curves are efficiently estimated with the method of maximal inscribed spheres both an arbitrary contact angle. The algorithms can handle gigobytes of data on a desktop workstation. Customized QuickHull algorithms model natural rocks. Capillary pressure curves evaluated from computer-generated images mimic those obtained for microtomography data.

  10. Pore Type Classification on Carbonate Reservoir in Offshore Sarawak using Rock Physics Model and Rock Digital Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubis, L. A.; Harith, Z. Z. T.

    2014-03-01

    It has been recognized that carbonate reservoirs are one of the biggest sources of hydrocarbon. Clearly, the evaluation of these reservoirs is important and critical. For rigorous reservoir characterization and performance prediction from geophysical measurements, the exact interpretation of geophysical response of different carbonate pore types is crucial. Yet, the characterization of carbonate reservoir rocks is difficult due to their complex pore systems. The significant diagenesis process and complex depositional environment makes pore systems in carbonates far more complicated than in clastics. Therefore, it is difficult to establish rock physics model for carbonate rock type. In this paper, we evaluate the possible rock physics model of 20 core plugs of a Miocene carbonate platform in Central Luconia, Sarawak. The published laboratory data of this area were used as an input to create the carbonate rock physics models. The elastic properties were analyzed to examine the validity of an existing analytical carbonate rock physics model. We integrate the Xu-Payne Differential Effective Medium (DEM) Model and the elastic modulus which was simulated from a digital carbonate rock image using Finite Element Modeling. The results of this integration matched well for the separation of carbonate pore types and sonic P-wave velocity obtained from laboratory measurement. Thus, the results of this study show that the integration of rock digital image and theoretical rock physics might improve the elastic properties prediction and useful for more advance geophysical techniques (e.g. Seismic Inversion) of carbonate reservoir in Sarawak.

  11. Mechanical changes in thawing permafrost rocks and their influence on rock stability at the Zugspitze summit, Germany - a research concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamot, Philipp; Scandroglio, Riccardo; Krautblatter, Michael

    2015-04-01

    During the last century, alpine permafrost warmed up by 0.5 to 0.8 °C in the upper decameters. Its degradation can influence the stability of rock slopes in alpine environments. An increasing number of rockfalls and rockslides of all magnitudes are reported to originate from permafrost-affected rock faces which reveal massive ice at their detachment scarps after failure. Discontinuity patterns and their mechanical properties present a key control of rock slope stability. These fractures are considered to experience considerable mechanical changes during transition from frozen to unfrozen state: the shear resistance of rocks is reduced in terms of decreased critical fracture toughness of intact rock bridges and shear strength; compressive strength and tensile strength of the intact rock are reduced in the same way. The impact of rising rock temperature on rock-mechanical properties which control early stages of destabilization remains poorly understood. In this study we combine rock-mechanical testing in the laboratory with geotechnical, kinematic and geophysical monitoring at the Zugspitze summit, Germany, to investigate the influence of thawing rock on its rock-mechanical properties focusing on mechanisms of destabilization along discontinuities. Our investigations will contribute to a better rock-ice-mechanical process understanding of degrading permafrost rocks. To assess stability conditions at the Zugspitze summit we conduct field work at an unstable area of about 104 m3 of rock at the crest at 2885 m a.s.l. that is affected by degrading permafrost. This is indicated by a persistent ice filled cave with direct contact to the area of instability. Our preliminary work consists of i) continuous and discontinuous fracture displacement measurements since 2009 which reveal deformation rates of 0.06 to 1.7 cm/year, ii) electrical resistivity (ERT) and seismic refraction tomography (SRT) in the August of 2014 and iii) uniaxial compressive strength and tensile

  12. Rock fracture image acquisition with both visible and ultraviolet illuminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weixing; Hakami, Eva

    2006-02-01

    Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) have identified the need for a better understanding of radionuclide transport and retention processes in fractured rock since 1994. In the study, the first hard problem is to obtain rock fracture images of a good quality, since rock surface is very rough, and composed of complicated and multiple fractures, as a result, image acquisition is the first important. As a cooperation project between Sweden and China, we sampled a number of rock specimens for analyzing rock fracture network by visible and ultraviolet image technique, in the field. The samples are resin injected, in which way; opened fractures can be seen clearly by means of UV light illumination, and the rock surface information can be obtained by using visible optical illumination. We used different digital cameras and microscope to take images by two illuminations. From the same samples; we found that UV illumination image gives the clear information of fracture opening or closing, and the visible optical illumination gives the information of the rock surface (e.g. filling materials inside of fractures). By applying this technique, the minimum width of rock fracture 0.01 mm can be analyzed. This paper presents: (1) Rock fracture image acquiring techniques; (2) Rock fracture image acquisition by using UV light illumination and visible optical illumination; and (3) Conclusions. The studied method can be used both in the field and a laboratory.

  13. Scattering from Rock and Rock Outcrops

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-23

    quantities correspond to values of 0.86 and 18 respectively. SCATTERING FROM ROCKS 3 Figure 2. ( color online) Rough interface results from a glacially abraded...surface in (a) the low-resolution mode, and (b) the high-resolution mode. The glaciers flowed in the negative y direction. The color bar corresponds...to height reference to the surface mean, and the brightness, or black/ white information communicates the surface slope. The dashed box in (a

  14. Rock-brine chemical interactions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-02-01

    The results of experimental interaction of powdered volcanic rock with aqueous solutions are presented at temperatures from 200 to 400/sup 0/C, 500 to 1000 bars fluid pressure, with reaction durations of approximately 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. The aim of this research is to develop data on the kinetics and equilibria of rock solution interactions that will provide insight into the complex geochemical processes attending geothermal reservoir development, stimulation, and reinjection. The research was done in the Stanford Hydrothermal Lab using gold cell equipment of the Dickson design. This equipment inverts the solution rock mixture several times a minute to ensure thorough mixing. Solution samples were periodically withdrawn without interruption of the experimental conditions. The data from these experiments suggests a path dependent series of reactions by which geothermal fluids might evolve from meteoric or magmatic sources.

  15. Do Bare Rocks Exist on the Moon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Carlton; Bandfield, Joshua; Greenhagen, Benjamin; Hayne, Paul; Leader, Frank; Paige, David

    2017-01-01

    Astronaut surface observations and close-up images at the Apollo and Chang'e 1 landing sites confirm that at least some lunar rocks have no discernable dust cover. However, ALSEP (Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package) measurements as well as astronaut and LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer) orbital observations and laboratory experiments possibly suggest that a fine fraction of dust is levitated and moves across and above the lunar surface. Over millions of years such dust might be expected to coat all exposed rock surfaces. This study uses thermal modeling, combined with Diviner (a Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter experiment) orbital lunar eclipse temperature data, to further document the existence of bare rocks on the lunar surface.

  16. Rock Equity Holdings, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA is providing notice of an Administrative Penalty Assessment in the form of an Expedited Storm Water Settlement Agreement against Rock Equity Holdings, LLC, for alleged violations at The Cove at Kettlestone/98th Street Reconstruction located at 3015

  17. Eclogite facies rocks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carswell, D. A

    1990-01-01

    ... of eclogite evolution and genesis. The authors present a thorough treatment of the stability relations and geochemistry of these rocks, their intimate association with continental plate collision zones and suture zones...

  18. Pop & rock / Berk Vaher

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vaher, Berk, 1975-

    2001-01-01

    Uute heliplaatide Redman "Malpractice", Brian Eno & Peter Schwalm "Popstars", Clawfinger "A Whole Lot of Nothing", Dario G "In Full Color", MLTR e. Michael Learns To Rock "Blue Night" lühitutvustused

  19. Rock kinoekraanil / Katrin Rajasaare

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rajasaare, Katrin

    2008-01-01

    7.-11. juulini kinos Sõprus toimuval filminädalal "Rock On Screen" ekraanile jõudvatest rockmuusikuid portreteerivatest filmidest "Lou Reed's Berlin", "The Future Is Unwritten: Joe Strummer", "Control: Joy Division", "Hurriganes", "Shlaager"

  20. Rock and Soil Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristescu, Nicolae; Ene, Horia I.

    The first part of the volume contains theoretical considerations of the physical properties of soils and rocks. Articles on the mechanical and kinematical behavior of rocks as well as mathematical models are the base for the understanding of the physical properties of natural systems. In the second part articles deal with experiments and applications regarding creep deformation of clay, underground cavities, tunnels and deformation of sand and lamistrine sediments.

  1. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics LaboratoryThe Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose of...

  2. Bioassay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Bioassay Laboratory is an accredited laboratory capable of conducting standardized and innovative environmental testing in the area of aquatic ecotoxicology. The...

  3. Location-Related Differences in Weathering Behaviors and Populations of Culturable Rock-Weathering Bacteria Along a Hillside of a Rock Mountain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Rongrong; He, Linyan; Sheng, Xiafang

    2017-05-01

    Bacteria play important roles in rock weathering, elemental cycling, and soil formation. However, little is known about the weathering potential and population of bacteria inhabiting surfaces of rocks. In this study, we isolated bacteria from the top, middle, and bottom rock samples along a hillside of a rock (trachyte) mountain as well as adjacent soils and characterized rock-weathering behaviors and populations of the bacteria. Per gram of rock or surface soil, 10 6 -10 7 colony forming units were obtained and total 192 bacteria were isolated. Laboratory rock dissolution experiments indicated that the proportions of the highly effective Fe (ranging from 67 to 92 %), Al (ranging from 40 to 48 %), and Cu (ranging from 54 to 81 %) solubilizers were significantly higher in the top rock and soil samples, while the proportion of the highly effective Si (56 %) solubilizers was significantly higher in the middle rock samples. Furthermore, 78, 96, and 6 % of bacteria from the top rocks, soils, and middle rocks, respectively, significantly acidified the culture medium (pH bacteria (79 %) from the rocks were different to those from the soils and most of them (species level) have not been previously reported. Furthermore, location-specific rock-weathering bacterial populations were found and Bacillus species were the most (66 %) frequently isolated rock-weathering bacteria in the rocks based on cultivation methods. Notably, the top rocks and soils had the highest and lowest diversity of rock-weathering bacterial populations, respectively. The results suggested location-related differences in element (Si, Al, Fe, and Cu) releasing effectiveness and communities of rock-weathering bacteria along the hillside of the rock mountain.

  4. Tensile rock mass strength estimated using InSAR

    KAUST Repository

    Jonsson, Sigurjon

    2012-11-01

    The large-scale strength of rock is known to be lower than the strength determined from small-scale samples in the laboratory. However, it is not well known how strength scales with sample size. I estimate kilometer-scale tensional rock mass strength by measuring offsets across new tensional fractures (joints), formed above a shallow magmatic dike intrusion in western Arabia in 2009. I use satellite radar observations to derive 3D ground displacements and by quantifying the extension accommodated by the joints and the maximum extension that did not result in a fracture, I put bounds on the joint initiation threshold of the surface rocks. The results indicate that the kilometer-scale tensile strength of the granitic rock mass is 1–3 MPa, almost an order of magnitude lower than typical laboratory values.

  5. Layered Rocks in Ritchey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    14 May 2004 This March 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light- and dark-toned layered rock outcrops on the floor of Ritchey Crater, located near 28.9oS, 50.8oW. Some or all of these rocks may be sedimentary in origin. Erosion has left a couple of buttes standing on a more erosion-resistant plain. This picture covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  6. Forecast Jointed Rock Mass Compressive Strength Using a Numerical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protosenya Anatoliy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of forecasting the strength of the jointed rock mass by numerical modeling of finite element method in ABAQUS was described. The paper presents advantages of this method to solve the problem of determining the mechanical characteristics of jointed rock mass and the basic steps of creating a numerical geomechanical model of jointed rock mass and numerical experiment. Numerical simulation was carried out with jointed rock mass in order to obtain the ratio of strain and stress while loading the numerical model, determining parameters of quantitative assessment of the impact of the discontinuities orientation on the value of the compressive strength, compressive strength anisotropy. The results of the numerical experiment are compared with the data of experimental studies investigations. Innovative materials and structures are analyzed in this paper. The results that were obtained by calculation show qualitative agreement with the results of laboratory experiments of jointed rock mass.

  7. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Geology and mechanical properties of the rock in TASQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staub, Isabelle [Golder Associates AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Andersson, J. Christer; Magnor, Bjoern

    2004-03-01

    An extensive characterization programme has been performed in the drift, TASQ, excavated for the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment, APSE, including the rock volume that will host the experiment pillar between the two deposition holes. The two major objectives with the characterization has been to 1) derive material properties for the final numerical modelling of the experiment and 2) to ensure that the pillar location is suitable from a structural and rock mechanical point of view. In summary the following activities have been performed: Geological mapping of the drift, the pilot holes cores and deposition hole DQ0066G01. 3D-visualisation of the geological mapping in the experiment (pillar) volume of TASQ. Convergence measurements during the excavation and back calculation of the results for determination of the stress tensor and the rock mass Young's modulus. Laboratory tests on core samples from the 15{phi}76 mm core boreholes drilled around the pillar volume for determination of: compressive strength, thermal properties and fracture properties. P-wave velocity measurements on core samples and between boreholes for estimation of the excavation damaged zone and rock mass properties. The geological mapping and the 3D-visualisation gives a good description of the TASQ drift in general and the experiment volume in the drift in particular. The fracturing of the drift follows the pattern of the rest of Aespoe. Three fracture sets have been mapped in TASQ. The major fracture set is sub-vertical and trending NW, in principle parallel to {sigma}{sub 1}. This set is the most conductive at Aespoe and is the only water bearing set in TASQ. A second less pronounced set is trending NE, parallel to TASQ, and is also sub-vertical. The third set is sub-horizontal. It is interesting to note that the third set is the only one that almost completely consists of sealed fractures. The first two sets have mostly open fractures. One unique feature in the drift is a heavily

  8. Fault Rock Variation as a Function of Host Rock Lithology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagereng, A.; Diener, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fault rocks contain an integrated record of the slip history of a fault, and thereby reflect the deformation processes associated with fault slip. Within the Aus Granulite Terrane, Namibia, a number of Jurassic to Cretaceous age strike-slip faults cross-cut Precambrian high grade metamorphic rocks. These strike-slip faults were active at subgreenschist conditions and occur in a variety of host rock lithologies. Where the host rock contains significant amounts of hydrous minerals, representing granulites that have undergone retrogressive metamorphism, the fault rock is dominated by hydrothermal breccias. In anhydrous, foliated rocks interlayered with minor layers containing hydrous phyllosilicates, the fault rock is a cataclasite partially cemented by jasper and quartz. Where the host rock is an isotropic granitic rock the fault rock is predominantly a fine grained black fault rock. Cataclasites and breccias show evidence for multiple deformation events, whereas the fine grained black fault rocks appear to only record a single slip increment. The strike-slip faults observed all formed in the same general orientation and at a similar time, and it is unlikely that regional stress, strain rate, pressure and temperature varied between the different faults. We therefore conclude that the type of fault rock here depended on the host rock lithology, and that lithology alone accounts for why some faults developed a hydrothermal breccia, some cataclasite, and some a fine grained black fault rock. Consequently, based on the assumption that fault rocks reflect specific slip styles, lithology was also the main control on different fault slip styles in this area at the time of strike-slip fault activity. Whereas fine grained black fault rock is inferred to represent high stress events, hydrothermal breccia is rather related to events involving fluid pressure in excess of the least stress. Jasper-bearing cataclasites may represent faults that experienced dynamic weakening as seen

  9. Introductory materials for committee members: 1) instructions for the Los Alamos National Laboratory fiscal year 2010 capability reviews 2) NPAC strategic capability planning 3) Summary self-assessment for the nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics an

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Antonio [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses external peer review to measure and continuously improve the quality of its science, technology and engineering (STE). LANL uses capability reviews to assess the STE quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. STE capabilities are define to cut across directorates providing a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. LANL plans to perform a complete review of the Laboratory's STE capabilities (hence staff) in a three-year cycle. The principal product of an external review is a report that includes the review committee's assessments, commendations, and recommendations for STE. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). This report will be used by Laboratory Management for STE assessment and planning. The report is also provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of LANL's Annual Performance Plan and to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC's Science and Technology Committee (STC) as part of its responsibilities to the LANS Board of Governors.

  10. A summary of laboratory testing performed to characterize and select an elastomeric O-ring material to be used in the redesigned solid rocket motors of the space transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    An elastomeric O-ring material is used in the joints of the redesigned solid motors (RSRM's) of the National Space Transportation System (NSTS). The selection of the O-ring material used in the RSRM's was a very thorough process that included efforts by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the Langley Research Center, and the Thiokol Corporation. One of the efforts performed at MSFC was an extensive in-house laboratory test regime to screen potential O-ring materials and ultimately to characterize the elastomeric material that was chosen to be used in the RSRM's. The laboratory tests performed at MSFC are summarized.

  11. Geomechanical rock properties of a basaltic volcano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren N Schaefer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In volcanic regions, reliable estimates of mechanical properties for specific volcanic events such as cyclic inflation-deflation cycles by magmatic intrusions, thermal stressing, and high temperatures are crucial for building accurate models of volcanic phenomena. This study focuses on the challenge of characterizing volcanic materials for the numerical analyses of such events. To do this, we evaluated the physical (porosity, permeability and mechanical (strength properties of basaltic rocks at Pacaya Volcano (Guatemala through a variety of laboratory experiments, including: room temperature, high temperature (935 °C, and cyclically-loaded uniaxial compressive strength tests on as-collected and thermally-treated rock samples. Knowledge of the material response to such varied stressing conditions is necessary to analyze potential hazards at Pacaya, whose persistent activity has led to 13 evacuations of towns near the volcano since 1987. The rocks show a non-linear relationship between permeability and porosity, which relates to the importance of the crack network connecting the vesicles in these rocks. Here we show that strength not only decreases with porosity and permeability, but also with prolonged stressing (i.e., at lower strain rates and upon cooling. Complimentary tests in which cyclic episodes of thermal or load stressing showed no systematic weakening of the material on the scale of our experiments. Most importantly, we show the extremely heterogeneous nature of volcanic edifices that arise from differences in porosity and permeability of the local lithologies, the limited lateral extent of lava flows, and the scars of previous collapse events. Input of these process-specific rock behaviors into slope stability and deformation models can change the resultant hazard analysis. We anticipate that an increased parameterization of rock properties will improve mitigation power.

  12. Fluids in metamorphic rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touret, J.L.R.

    2001-01-01

    Basic principles for the study of fluid inclusions in metamorphic rocks are reviewed and illustrated. A major problem relates to the number of inclusions, possibly formed on a wide range of P-T conditions, having also suffered, in most cases, extensive changes after initial trapping. The

  13. Rock support design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandewalle, M. [N.V. Bekaert (Belgium)

    1999-02-01

    Steel fibre imparts to concrete and shotcrete a high degree of ductibility which not only allow the linings to absorb rock movement but also increases its bearing capacity by a redistribution of the loads. The article discusses the variety of uses of shotcrete for support of underground excavations, mainly for support of permanent mine openings such as ramps, haulages, shaft stations and crusher chambers.

  14. The River Rock School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gereaux, Teresa Thomas

    1999-01-01

    In the early 1920s, the small Appalachian community of Damascus, Virginia, used private subscriptions and volunteer labor to build a 15-classroom school made of rocks from a nearby river and chestnut wood from nearby forests. The school building's history, uses for various community activities, and current condition are described. (SV)

  15. Reducing Rock Climbing Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attarian, Aram

    1998-01-01

    Provides checklists that can be used as risk-management tools to evaluate rock-climbing programs: developing goals, policies, and procedures; inspecting the climbing environment; maintaining and inspecting equipment; protecting participants; and managing staff (hiring, training, retraining, and evaluating) and campers (experience level, needs, and…

  16. Umhlanga Rocks coastal defense

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, L.; De Jong, B.; Ivanova, M.; Gerritse, A.; Rietberg, D.; Dorrepaal, S.

    2014-01-01

    The eThekwini coastline is a vulnerable coastline subject to chronic erosion and damage due to sea level rise. In 2007 a severe storm caused major physical and economic damage along the coastline, proving the need for action. Umhlanga Rocks is a densely populated premium holiday destination on the

  17. Semantic modeling of plastic deformation of polycrystalline rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaie, Hassan A.; Davarpanah, Armita

    2018-02-01

    We have developed the first iteration of the Plastic Rock Deformation (PRD) ontology by modeling the semantics of a selected set of deformational processes and mechanisms that produce, reconfigure, displace, and/or consume the material components of inhomogeneous polycrystalline rocks. The PRD knowledge model also classifies and formalizes the properties (relations) that hold between instances of the dynamic physical and chemical processes and the rock components, the complex physio-chemical, mathematical, and informational concepts of the plastic rock deformation system, the measured or calculated laboratory testing conditions, experimental procedures and protocols, the state and system variables, and the empirical flow laws that define the inter-relationships among the variables. The ontology reuses classes and properties from several existing ontologies that are built for physics, chemistry, biology, and mathematics. With its flexible design, the PRD ontology is well positioned to incrementally develop into a model that more fully represents the knowledge of plastic deformation of polycrystalline rocks in the future. The domain ontology will be used to consistently annotate varied data and information related to the microstructures and the physical and chemical processes that produce them at different spatial and temporal scales in the laboratory and in the solid Earth. The PRDKB knowledge base, when built based on the ontology, will help the community of experimental structural geologists and metamorphic petrologists to coherently and uniformly distribute, discover, access, share, and use their data through automated reasoning and integration and query of heterogeneous experimental deformation data that originate from autonomous rock testing laboratories.

  18. Development of rock bolt grout and shotcrete for rock support and corrosion of steel in low-pH cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boden, Anders (Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Vaellingby (Sweden)); Pettersson, Stig (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2011-04-15

    It is foreseen that cementitious products will be utilized in the construction of the final repository. The use of conventional cementitious material creates pulses in the magnitude of pH 12.13 in the leachates and release alkalis. Such a high pH is detrimental mainly to impairment of bentonite functioning, but also to possibly enhanced dissolution of spent fuel and alteration of fracture filling materials. It also complicates the safety analysis of the repository, as the effect of a high pH-plume should be considered in the evaluation. As no reliable pH-plume models exist, the use of products giving a pH below 11 in the leachates facilitates the safety analysis, although limiting the amount of low-pH cement is recommended. In earlier studies it was found that shotcreting, standard casting and rock bolting with low-pH cement (pH . 11 in the leachate) should be possible without any major development work. This report summarizes the results of development work done during 2008 and 2009 in the fields of low-pH rock bolt grout, low-pH shotcrete and steel corrosion in low-pH concrete. Development of low-pH rock bolt grout mixes and laboratory testing of the selected grout was followed by installation of twenty rock bolts for rock support at Aspo HRL using the chosen low-pH grout. The operation was successful and the bolts and grout are subject to follow up the next ten years. Low-pH shotcrete for rock support was initially developed within the ESDRED project, which was an Integrated Project within the European Commission sixth framework for research and technological development. ESDRED is an abbreviation for Engineering Studies and Demonstrations of Repository Designs. ESDRED was executed from 1st February 2004 to 31st January 2009. The development of the mix design described in this report was based on the results from ESDRED. After laboratory testing of the chosen mix, it was field tested in niche NASA 0408A at Aspo HRL. Further, some areas in the TASS-tunnel were

  19. Energy Efficiency, Water Efficiency, and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Seneca Rocks Discovery Center, Seneca Rocks, West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiatreungwattana, Kosol [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Salasovich, James [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kandt, Alicen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-22

    As part of ongoing efforts by the U.S. Forest Service to reduce energy use and incorporate renewable energy technologies into its facilities, the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory performed an energy efficiency and renewable energy site assessment of the Seneca Rocks Discovery Center in Seneca Rocks, West Virginia. This report documents the findings of this assessment, and provides site-specific information for the implementation of energy and water conservation measures, and renewable energy measures.

  20. Teaching the Rock Cycle with Ease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereki, Debra

    2000-01-01

    Describes a hands-on lesson for teaching high school students the concept of the rock cycle using sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks. Students use a rock cycle diagram to identify pairs of rocks. From the rock cycle, students explain on paper how their first rock became the second rock and vice versa. (PVD)

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1995--FY 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    This report discusses the institutional plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the next five years (1995-2000). Included in this report are the: laboratory director`s statement; laboratory mission, vision, and core competencies; laboratory plan; major laboratory initiatives; scientific and technical programs; critical success factors; summaries of other plans; and resource projections.

  2. Summary of bacteria found in captive sea turtles 2002-Present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The database contains a summary of bacteria which have been isolated in sea turtles dead and alive at the NOAA Galveston Laboratory and is based on reports received...

  3. Blackroom Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables evaluation and characterization of materials ranging from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared (LWIR).DESCRIPTION: The Blackroom Laboratory is...

  4. Photometrics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Photometrics Laboratory provides the capability to measure, analyze and characterize radiometric and photometric properties of light sources and filters,...

  5. Target Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — [Part of the ATLAS user facility.] The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces targets and foils of various thickness and substrates,...

  6. Rock melting technology and geothermal drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    National awareness of the potential future shortages in energy resources has heightened interest in exploration and utilization of a variety of geothermal energy (GTE) reservoirs. The status of conventional drilling of GTE wells is reviewed briefly and problem areas which lead to higher drilling costs are identified and R and D directions toward solution are suggested. In the immediate future, an expanded program of drilling in GTE formations can benefit from improvements in drilling equipment and technology normally associated with oil or gas wells. Over a longer time period, the new rock-melting drill bits being developed as a part of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Subterrene Program offer new solutions to a number of problems which frequently hamper GTE drilling, including the most basic problem - high temperature. Two of the most favorable characteristics of rock-melting penetrators are their ability to operate effectively in hot rock and produce glass linings around the hole as an integral part of the drilling process. The technical advantages to be gained by use of rock-melting penetrators are discussed in relation to the basic needs for GTE wells.

  7. Environmental monitoring for the hot dry rock geothermal energy development project. Annual report, July 1975--June 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettitt, R.A. (comp.)

    1976-09-01

    The objectives of this environmental monitoring report are to provide a brief conceptual and historical summary of the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project, a brief overview of the environmental monitoring responsibilities and activities of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, and descriptions of the studies, problems, and results obtained from the various monitoring programs. Included are descriptions of the work that has been done in three major monitoring areas: (1) water quality, both surface and subsurface; (2) seismicity, with a discussion of the monitoring strategy of regional, local, and close-in detection networks; and (3) climatology. The purpose of these programs is to record baseline data, define potential effects from the project activities, and determine and record any impacts that may occur.

  8. Site-specific evaluation of safety issues for high-level waste disposal in crystalline rocks. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobmann, M. (ed.) [DBE Technology GmbH, Peine (Germany)

    2016-03-31

    In the past, German research and development (R and D) activities regarding the disposal of radioactive waste, including spent nuclear fuel, focused mainly on domal rock salt because rock salt was the preferred host rock formation. In addition, generic R and D work regarding alternative host rocks (crystalline rocks and claystones) had been performed as well for a long time but with lower intensity. Around the year 2000, as a consequence of the moratorium on the Gorleben site, the Federal Government decided to have argillaceous rocks and crystalline rocks investigated in more detail. As Germany does not have any underground research and host rock characterization facilities, international cooperation received a high priority in the German R and D programme for high-level waste (HLW) disposal in order to increase the knowledge regarding alternative host rocks. Major cornerstones of the cooperation are joint projects and experiments conducted especially in underground research laboratories (URL) in crystalline rocks at the Grimsel Test Site (Switzerland) and the Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) Aespoe(Sweden) and in argillaceous rocks at the URL Mont Terri (Switzerland) and Bure (France). In 2001, the topic of radioactive waste disposal was integrated into the agreement between the former Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy (Minatom, now Rosatom) and the German Ministry of Labor (BMWA), now Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi), on cooperation regarding R and D on the peaceful utilization of nuclear power (agreement on ''Wirtschaftlich-Technische Zusammenarbeit'' WTZ). The intention was to have a new and interesting opportunity for international R and D cooperation regarding HLW disposal in crystalline rocks and the unique possibility to perform site-specific work, to test the safety demonstration tools available, and to expand the knowledge to all aspects specific to these host rocks. Another motivation for joining this cooperation was the

  9. Rock critics as 'Mouldy Modernists'

    OpenAIRE

    Shepherd, Becky

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary rock criticism appears to be firmly tied to the past. The specialist music press valorise rock music of the 1960s and 1970s, and new emerging artists are championed for their ‘retro’ sounding music by journalists who compare the sound of these new artists with those included in the established ‘canon’ of rock music. This article examines the narrative tropes of authenticity and nostalgia that frame the retrospective focus of this contemporary rock writing, and most significantly,...

  10. Knowledge representation of rock plastic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarpanah, Armita; Babaie, Hassan

    2017-04-01

    The first iteration of the Rock Plastic Deformation (RPD) ontology models the semantics of the dynamic physical and chemical processes and mechanisms that occur during the deformation of the generally inhomogeneous polycrystalline rocks. The ontology represents the knowledge about the production, reconfiguration, displacement, and consumption of the structural components that participate in these processes. It also formalizes the properties that are known by the structural geology and metamorphic petrology communities to hold between the instances of the spatial components and the dynamic processes, the state and system variables, the empirical flow laws that relate the variables, and the laboratory testing conditions and procedures. The modeling of some of the complex physio-chemical, mathematical, and informational concepts and relations of the RPD ontology is based on the class and property structure of some well-established top-level ontologies. The flexible and extensible design of the initial version of the RPD ontology allows it to develop into a model that more fully represents the knowledge of plastic deformation of rocks under different spatial and temporal scales in the laboratory and in solid Earth. The ontology will be used to annotate the datasets related to the microstructures and physical-chemical processes that involve them. This will help the autonomous and globally distributed communities of experimental structural geologists and metamorphic petrologists to coherently and uniformly distribute, discover, access, share, and use their data through automated reasoning and enhanced data integration and software interoperability.

  11. Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory. Descriptions and cost assessment. Danish summary[Denmark]; Dekommissionering af Risoes nukleare anlaeg - vurdering af opgaver og omkostninger. Dansk sammenfatning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauridsen, Kurt

    2001-02-01

    The report gives a brief description of relevant aspects of the decommissioning of all nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory, including the necessary operations to be performed and the associated costs. Together with a more detailed report, written in English, this report is the result of a project initiated by Risoe in the summer of 2000. The English report has undergone an international review, the results of which are summarised in the present report. (au)

  12. Electronic discharge summaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetson, Peter D; Keselman, Alla; Rappaport, Daniel; Van Vleck, Tielman; Cooper, Mary; Boyer, Aurelia; Hripcsak, George

    2005-01-01

    Timely completion of Discharge Summaries is a requirement of high quality care. We developed a system for writing electronic Discharge Summaries. DSUM Writer has generated 2464 of 7349 total summaries (34%) and has paid for itself during its first 8 weeks in production. DSUM Writer is a component of a suite of tools (eNote) for electronic physician documentation used to support clinical care, billing and narrative analysis research.

  13. Generating automated meeting summaries

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinbauer, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The thesis at hand introduces a novel approach for the generation of abstractive summaries of meetings. While the automatic generation of document summaries has been studied for some decades now, the novelty of this thesis is mainly the application to the meeting domain (instead of text documents) as well as the use of a lexicalized representation formalism on the basis of Frame Semantics. This allows us to generate summaries abstractively (instead of extractively). Die vorliegende Arbeit ...

  14. The physiology of rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Luisa V; Rhodes, Edward C; Taunton, Jack E

    2006-01-01

    In general, elite climbers have been characterised as small in stature, with low percentage body fat and body mass. Currently, there are mixed conclusions surrounding body mass and composition, potentially because of variable subject ability, method of assessment and calculation. Muscular strength and endurance in rock climbers have been primarily measured on the forearm, hand and fingers via dynamometry. When absolute hand strength was assessed, there was little difference between climbers and the general population. When expressed in relation to body mass, elite-level climbers scored significantly higher, highlighting the potential importance of low body mass. Rock climbing is characterised by repeated bouts of isometric contractions. Hand grip endurance has been measured by both repeated isometric contractions and sustained contractions, at a percentage of maximum voluntary contraction. Exercise times to fatigue during repeated isometric contractions have been found to be significantly better in climbers when compared with sedentary individuals. However, during sustained contractions until exhaustion, climbers did not differ from the normal population, emphasising the importance of the ability to perform repeated isometric forearm contractions without fatigue becoming detrimental to performance. A decrease in handgrip strength and endurance has been related to an increase in blood lactate, with lactate levels increasing with the angle of climbing. Active recovery has been shown to provide a better rate of recovery and allows the body to return to its pre-exercised state quicker. It could be suggested that an increased ability to tolerate and remove lactic acid during climbing may be beneficial. Because of increased demand placed upon the upper body during climbing of increased difficulty, possessing greater strength and endurance in the arms and shoulders could be advantageous. Flexibility has not been identified as a necessary determinant of climbing success

  15. Summaries of FY 1994 geosciences research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    The Geosciences Research Program is directed by the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Energy Research (OER) through its Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES). Activities in the Geosciences Research Program are directed toward the long-term fundamental knowledge of the processes that transport, modify, concentrate, and emplace (1) the energy and mineral resources of the earth and (2) the energy byproducts of man. The Program is divided into five broad categories: Geophysics and earth dynamics; Geochemistry; Energy resource recognition, evaluation, and utilization; Hydrogeology and exogeochemistry; and Solar-terrestrial interactions. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs in these main areas and their subdivisions including earth dynamics, properties of earth materials, rock mechanics, underground imaging, rock-fluid interactions, continental scientific drilling, geochemical transport, solar/atmospheric physics, and modeling, with emphasis on the interdisciplinary areas.

  16. FEMA Disaster Declarations Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The FEMA Disaster Declarations Summary is a summarized dataset describing all federally declared disasters, starting with the first disaster declaration in 1953,...

  17. Rock burst governance of working face under igneous rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhenxing; Yu, Yue

    2017-01-01

    As a typical failure phenomenon, rock burst occurs in many mines. It can not only cause the working face to cease production, but also cause serious damage to production equipment, and even result in casualties. To explore how to govern rock burst of working face under igneous rock, the 10416 working face in some mine is taken as engineering background. The supports damaged extensively and rock burst took place when the working face advanced. This paper establishes the mechanical model and conducts theoretical analysis and calculation to predict the fracture and migration mechanism and energy release of the thick hard igneous rock above the working face, and to obtain the advancing distance of the working face when the igneous rock fractures and critical value of the energy when rock burst occurs. Based on the specific conditions of the mine, this paper put forward three kinds of governance measures, which are borehole pressure relief, coal seam water injection and blasting pressure relief.

  18. Rock and mineral magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    O’Reilly, W

    1984-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed a revolution in the earth sciences. The quantitative, instrument-based measurements and physical models of. geophysics, together with advances in technology, have radically transformed the way in which the Earth, and especially its crust, is described. The study of the magnetism of the rocks of the Earth's crust has played a major part in this transformation. Rocks, or more specifically their constituent magnetic minerals, can be regarded as a measuring instrument provided by nature, which can be employed in the service of the earth sciences. Thus magnetic minerals are a recording magnetometer; a goniometer or protractor, recording the directions of flows, fields and forces; a clock; a recording thermometer; a position recorder; astrain gauge; an instrument for geo­ logical surveying; a tracer in climatology and hydrology; a tool in petrology. No instrument is linear, or free from noise and systematic errors, and the performance of nature's instrument must be assessed and ...

  19. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential.

  20. Geological constraints for muon tomography: The world beyond standard rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechmann, Alessandro; Mair, David; Ariga, Akitaka; Ariga, Tomoko; Ereditato, Antonio; Käser, Samuel; Nishiyama, Ryuichi; Scampoli, Paola; Vladymyrov, Mykhailo; Schlunegger, Fritz

    2017-04-01

    In present day muon tomography practice, one often encounters an experimental setup in which muons propagate several tens to a few hundreds of meters through a material to the detector. The goal of such an undertaking is usually centred on an attempt to make inferences from the measured muon flux to an anticipated subsurface structure. This can either be an underground interface geometry or a spatial material distribution. Inferences in this direction have until now mostly been done, thereby using the so called "standard rock" approximation. This includes a set of empirically determined parameters from several rocks found in the vicinity of physicist's laboratories. While this approach is reasonable to account for the effects of the tens of meters of soil/rock around a particle accelerator, we show, that for material thicknesses beyond that dimension, the elementary composition of the material (average atomic weight and atomic number) has a noticeable effect on the measured muon flux. Accordingly, the consecutive use of this approximation could potentially lead into a serious model bias, which in turn, might invalidate any tomographic inference, that base on this standard rock approximation. The parameters for standard rock are naturally close to a granitic (SiO2-rich) composition and thus can be safely used in such environments. As geophysical surveys are not restricted to any particular lithology, we investigated the effect of alternative rock compositions (carbonatic, basaltic and even ultramafic) and consequentially prefer to replace the standard rock approach with a dedicated geological investigation. Structural field data and laboratory measurements of density (He-Pycnometer) and composition (XRD) can be merged into an integrative geological model that can be used as an a priori constraint for the rock parameters of interest (density & composition) in the geophysical inversion. Modelling results show that when facing a non-granitic lithology the measured muon

  1. Rock discontinuity surface roughness variation with scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitenc, Maja; Kieffer, D. Scott; Khoshelham, Kourosh

    2017-04-01

    ABSTRACT: Rock discontinuity surface roughness refers to local departures of the discontinuity surface from planarity and is an important factor influencing the shear resistance. In practice, the Joint Roughness Coefficient (JRC) roughness parameter is commonly relied upon and input to a shear strength criterion such as developed by Barton and Choubey [1977]. The estimation of roughness by JRC is hindered firstly by the subjective nature of visually comparing the joint profile to the ten standard profiles. Secondly, when correlating the standard JRC values and other objective measures of roughness, the roughness idealization is limited to a 2D profile of 10 cm length. With the advance of measuring technologies that provide accurate and high resolution 3D data of surface topography on different scales, new 3D roughness parameters have been developed. A desirable parameter is one that describes rock surface geometry as well as the direction and scale dependency of roughness. In this research a 3D roughness parameter developed by Grasselli [2001] and adapted by Tatone and Grasselli [2009] is adopted. It characterizes surface topography as the cumulative distribution of local apparent inclination of asperities with respect to the shear strength (analysis) direction. Thus, the 3D roughness parameter describes the roughness amplitude and anisotropy (direction dependency), but does not capture the scale properties. In different studies the roughness scale-dependency has been attributed to data resolution or size of the surface joint (see a summary of researches in [Tatone and Grasselli, 2012]). Clearly, the lower resolution results in lower roughness. On the other hand, have the investigations of surface size effect produced conflicting results. While some studies have shown a decrease in roughness with increasing discontinuity size (negative scale effect), others have shown the existence of positive scale effects, or both positive and negative scale effects. We

  2. Limados : Rock peruano

    OpenAIRE

    García Morete, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    Incentivado por la corriente nuevaolera que llegaba de México, fue señalado por especialistas como pionero del punk. Aunque el plan, era tocar con lo que hubiera. Un recodo ínfimo de un período breve pero sorprendentemente poderoso, los 60 en un país que hizo del rock una expresión propia de su cultura. Facultad de Periodismo y Comunicación Social

  3. Rock Mechanical Properties from Logs Petrophysics : Concepts and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillot, Philippe; Crawford, Brian; Alramahi, Bashar; Karner, Steve

    2010-05-01

    The objective of the "geomechanics from logs" (GML) research project is to develop model-driven predictive software for determining rock mechanical properties (specifically rock strength, compressibility and fracability) from other, more easily measured, rock properties (e.g. lithology, porosity, clay volume, velocity) routinely derived from nuclear, resistivity and acoustic logging tools. To this end, geomechanics from logs seeks to increase fundamental understanding of the primary geologic controls on rock mechanical properties and to translate this new insight into novel predictive tools. In detail, GML predictors rely on (i) the generation of relational rock mechanical properties databases incorporating QC'd core-based laboratory measurements (both in-house and high-precision published data); (ii) the use of established rock physics models (e.g. friable sand, contact cement models) to investigate theoretical relationships between geologic processes, reservoir environment, rock microstructure and elastic, bulk and transport petrophysical attributes/properties; (iii) the subdivision of database rocks into generic lithotypes (e.g. sand, shaly sand, sandy shale, shale) with common petrophysical attributes/properties; (iv) the use of multivariate statistics to generate lithotype-dependent empirical predictive relationships between mechanical properties and log-derived petrophysical attributes/properties; (v) the estimation of uncertainties associated with predictive function parameters; (vi) the application and validation of mechanical properties predictive tools to well-documented case studies (e.g. sand strength for perforation stability, rock compressibility for reservoir simulation) to test overall performance and quantify uncertainty in predictions. This paper presents the results of various rock strength, rock compressibility and rock fracability case studies conducted in wells of different stratigraphic age and depositional environment. Overall, GML (i

  4. Rock pushing and sampling under rocks on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, H.J.; Liebes, S.; Crouch, D.S.; Clark, L.V.

    1978-01-01

    Viking Lander 2 acquired samples on Mars from beneath two rocks, where living organisms and organic molecules would be protected from ultraviolet radiation. Selection of rocks to be moved was based on scientific and engineering considerations, including rock size, rock shape, burial depth, and location in a sample field. Rock locations and topography were established using the computerized interactive video-stereophotogrammetric system and plotted on vertical profiles and in plan view. Sampler commands were developed and tested on Earth using a full-size lander and surface mock-up. The use of power by the sampler motor correlates with rock movements, which were by plowing, skidding, and rolling. Provenance of the samples was determined by measurements and interpretation of pictures and positions of the sampler arm. Analytical results demonstrate that the samples were, in fact, from beneath the rocks. Results from the Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer of the Molecular Analysis experiment and the Gas Exchange instrument of the Biology experiment indicate that more adsorbed(?) water occurs in samples under rocks than in samples exposed to the sun. This is consistent with terrestrial arid environments, where more moisture occurs in near-surface soil un- der rocks than in surrounding soil because the net heat flow is toward the soil beneath the rock and the rock cap inhibits evaporation. Inorganic analyses show that samples of soil from under the rocks have significantly less iron than soil exposed to the sun. The scientific significance of analyses of samples under the rocks is only partly evaluated, but some facts are clear. Detectable quantities of martian organic molecules were not found in the sample from under a rock by the Molecular Analysis experiment. The Biology experiments did not find definitive evidence for Earth-like living organisms in their sample. Significant amounts of adsorbed water may be present in the martian regolith. The response of the soil

  5. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ayat, R

    2001-05-24

    This Annual Report provides an overview of the FY2000 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents a summary of the results achieved by each project during the year.

  6. Rock in Rio: forever young

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ferreira Freitas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of Rock in Rio: The Musical, as herald of megafestival Rock in Rio. Driven by the success that musicals have reached in Brazil, we believe that the design of this spectacle of music, dance and staging renews the brand of the rock festival, once it adds the force of young and healthy bodies to its concept. Moreover, the musical provides Rock in Rio with some distance from the controversal trilogy of sex, drugs and rock and roll, a strong mark of past festivals around the world. Thus, the musical expands the possibilities of growth for the brand.

  7. NFSMI Research Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Mary Frances

    2014-01-01

    The NFSMI Research Summary is a continuing series of summaries reporting recently completed research and research-based resources funded by the National Food Service Management Institute. The following research studies are summarized in this article: (1) Succession Planning for Management Level Staff in School Nutrition Programs; (2)…

  8. Summary: High Temperature Downhole Motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Directional drilling can be used to enable multi-lateral completions from a single well pad to improve well productivity and decrease environmental impact. Downhole rotation is typically developed with a motor in the Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) that develops drilling power (speed and torque) necessary to drive rock reduction mechanisms (i.e., the bit) apart from the rotation developed by the surface rig. Historically, wellbore deviation has been introduced by a “bent-sub,” located in the BHA, that introduces a small angular deviation, typically less than 3 degrees, to allow the bit to drill off-axis with orientation of the BHA controlled at the surface. The development of a high temperature downhole motor would allow reliable use of bent subs for geothermal directional drilling. Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing the development of a high temperature motor that will operate on either drilling fluid (water-based mud) or compressed air to enable drilling high temperature, high strength, fractured rock. The project consists of designing a power section based upon geothermal drilling requirements; modeling and analysis of potential solutions; and design, development and testing of prototype hardware to validate the concept. Drilling costs contribute substantially to geothermal electricity production costs. The present development will result in more reliable access to deep, hot geothermal resources and allow preferential wellbore trajectories to be achieved. This will enable development of geothermal wells with multi-lateral completions resulting in improved geothermal resource recovery, decreased environmental impact and enhanced well construction economics.

  9. 78 FR 6128 - Accreditation of R. Markey & Sons, Inc., Markan Laboratories, as a Commercial Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Accreditation of R. Markey & Sons, Inc., Markan Laboratories... Security. ACTION: Notice of accreditation of R. Markey & Sons, Inc., Markan Laboratories, as a commercial laboratory. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given, pursuant to the CBP regulations, that R. Markey & Sons, Inc...

  10. The PIGRET assay, a method for measuring Pig-a gene mutation in reticulocytes, is reliable as a short-term in vivo genotoxicity test: Summary of the MMS/JEMS-collaborative study across 16 laboratories using 24 chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Takafumi; Horibata, Katsuyoshi; Miura, Daishiro; Chikura, Satsuki; Okada, Yuki; Ukai, Akiko; Itoh, Satoru; Nakayama, Shiho; Sanada, Hisakazu; Koyama, Naomi; Muto, Shigeharu; Uno, Yoshifumi; Yamamoto, Mika; Suzuki, Yuta; Fukuda, Takayuki; Goto, Ken; Wada, Kunio; Kyoya, Takahiro; Shigano, Miyuki; Takasawa, Hironao; Hamada, Shuichi; Adachi, Hideki; Uematsu, Yasuaki; Tsutsumi, Eri; Hori, Hisako; Kikuzuki, Ryuta; Ogiwara, Yosuke; Yoshida, Ikuma; Maeda, Akihisa; Narumi, Kazunori; Fujiishi, Yohei; Morita, Takeshi; Yamada, Masami; Honma, Masamitsu

    2016-11-15

    The in vivo mutation assay using the X-linked phosphatidylinositol glycan class A gene (Pig-a in rodents, PIG-A in humans) is a promising tool for evaluating the mutagenicity of chemicals. Approaches for measuring Pig-a mutant cells have focused on peripheral red blood cells (RBCs) and reticulocytes (RETs) from rodents. The recently developed PIGRET assay is capable of screening >1×10 6 RETs for Pig-a mutants by concentrating RETs in whole blood prior to flow cytometric analysis. Additionally, due to the characteristics of erythropoiesis, the PIGRET assay can potentially detect increases in Pig-a mutant frequency (MF) sooner after exposure compared with a Pig-a assay targeting total RBCs (RBC Pig-a assay). In order to test the merits and limitations of the PIGRET assay as a short-term genotoxicity test, an interlaboratory trial involving 16 laboratories was organized by the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group of the Japanese Environmental Mutagenicity Society (MMS/JEMS). First, the technical proficiency of the laboratories and transferability of the assay were confirmed by performing both the PIGRET and RBC Pig-a assays on rats treated with single doses of N-nitroso-N-ethylurea. Next, the collaborating laboratories used the PIGRET and RBC Pig-a assays to assess the mutagenicity of a total of 24 chemicals in rats, using a single treatment design and mutant analysis at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after the treatment. Thirteen chemicals produced positive responses in the PIGRET assay; three of these chemicals were not detected in the RBC Pig-a assay. Twelve chemicals induced an increase in RET Pig-a MF beginning 1 week after dosing, while only 3 chemicals positive for RBC Pig-a MF produced positive responses 1 week after dosing. Based on these results, we conclude that the PIGRET assay is useful as a short-term test for in vivo mutation using a single-dose protocol. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Guide to the Use of Propellant-Embedded Anchors in Coral and Rock Seafloors. (Supplement)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    GUIDE TO THE USE OF PROPELLANT- EMBEDDED ANCHORS IN CORAL AND ROCK SEA FLOORS I(Final), by R.M.Beard TR-882S 15 pp illus June 1982 Unclassified I 1...propellant-embedded anchoring in rock sea - floors. This supplement to Technical Report R-882 provides guidance on the use of propellant-embedded anchors in...M. Beard (1980). Propellant-embedded anchois- Prediction of holding capacity in coral and rock sea - floors. Civil Engineering Laboratory, Technical

  12. Uniaxial Compressive Strengths of Rocks Drilled at Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, G. H.; Carey, E. M.; Anderson, R. C.; Abbey, W. J.; Kinnett, R.; Watkins, J. A.; Schemel, M.; Lashore, M. O.; Chasek, M. D.; Green, W.; Beegle, L. W.; Vasavada, A. R.

    2018-01-01

    Measuring the physical properties of geological materials is important for understanding geologic history. Yet there has never been an instrument with the purpose of measuring mechanical properties of rocks sent to another planet. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover employs the Powder Acquisition Drill System (PADS), which provides direct mechanical interaction with Martian outcrops. While the objective of the drill system is not to make scientific measurements, the drill's performance is directly influenced by the mechanical properties of the rocks it drills into. We have developed a methodology that uses the drill to indicate the uniaxial compressive strengths of rocks through comparison with performance of an identically assembled drill system in terrestrial samples of comparable sedimentary class. During this investigation, we utilize engineering data collected on Mars to calculate the percussive energy needed to maintain a prescribed rate of penetration and correlate that to rock strength.

  13. From stones to rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, Marie-Astrid; Jean-Leroux, Kathleen; Cirio, Raymond

    2013-04-01

    With the Aquila earthquake in 2009, earthquake prediction is more and more necessary nowadays, and people are waiting for even more accurate data. Earthquake accuracy has increased in recent times mainly thanks to the understanding of how oceanic expansion works and significant development of numerical seismic prediction models. Despite the improvements, the location and the magnitude can't be as accurate as citizen and authorities would like. The basis of anticipating earthquakes requires the understanding of: - The composition of the earth, - The structure of the earth, - The relations and movements between the different parts of the surface of the earth. In order to answer these questions, the Alps are an interesting field for students. This study combines natural curiosity about understanding the predictable part of natural hazard in geology and scientific skills on site: observing and drawing landscape, choosing and reading a representative core drilling, replacing the facts chronologically and considering the age, the length of time and the strength needed. This experience requires students to have an approach of time and space radically different than the one they can consider in a classroom. It also limits their imagination, in a positive way, because they realize that prediction is based on real data and some of former theories have become present paradigms thanks to geologists. On each location the analyzed data include landscape, core drilling and the relation established between them by students. The data is used by the students to understand the meaning, so that the history of the formation of the rocks tells by the rocks can be explained. Until this year, the CBGA's perspective regarding the study of the Alps ground allowed students to build the story of the creation and disappearance of the ocean, which was a concept required by French educational authorities. But not long ago, the authorities changed their scientific expectations. To meet the

  14. Computational Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains a number of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house software packages allowing for both statistical analysis as well as mathematical modeling...

  15. Effects of Stress on Permeation and Diffusive Properties of Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.

    2008-12-01

    Safety assessment of facilities associated with geological disposal of various kinds of hazardous wastes, including radioactive nuclear waste, is generally performed by means of mass transport simulations combined with uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. Transport of contaminants, such as radionuclides, through an engineered and natural barrier system is principally controlled by the processes of advection, dispersion, sorption, and chain decay. Among these mechanisms, chain decay can be determined from nuclear physics, sorption can be evaluated from chemical properties of both the nuclides and rock minerals, advection and dispersion are controlled by the permeation and diffusive properties of a rock. Compared to properties related to the former two mechanisms, properties related to the latter two mechanisms are very sensitive to stress conditions. Although the effects of stress conditions on permeation or hydraulic properties of rock specimens are relatively easier to be determined and/or assessed through laboratory permeability tests, diffusion tests on rock specimens under high confining and pore pressure conditions are technically impractical, and most of laboratory diffusion tests have been performed only under atmospheric conditions. In this study, an overview of the studies related to the effects of stress on permeation properties of different types of rock is performed. Some representative experimental results illustrating the effects of stress history on permeability of sedimentary and igneous rocks obtained by the author are also presented. An approach based on empirical equations between rock permeability and porosity, effective diffusion coefficient and porosity, porosity and ground pressure, and diffusive coefficient of an interested tracer in water is proposed to predict the effective diffusion coefficient at depths, i.e., the effects of stress on diffusive properties of rocks. The applicabilities of this newly proposed approach are discussed and

  16. Biofuels: Project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The US DOE, through the Biofuels Systems Division (BSD) is addressing the issues surrounding US vulnerability to petroleum supply. The BSD goal is to develop technologies that are competitive with fossil fuels, in both cost and environmental performance, by the end of the decade. This document contains summaries of ongoing research sponsored by the DOE BSD. A summary sheet is presented for each project funded or in existence during FY 1993. Each summary sheet contains and account of project funding, objectives, accomplishments and current status, and significant publications.

  17. Summary big data

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This work offers a summary of Cukier the book: "Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How we Live, Work, and Think" by Viktor Mayer-Schonberg and Kenneth. Summary of the ideas in Viktor Mayer-Schonberg's and Kenneth Cukier's book: " Big Data " explains that big data is where we use huge quantities of data to make better predictions based on the fact we identify patters in the data rather than trying to understand the underlying causes in more detail. This summary highlights that big data will be a source of new economic value and innovation in the future. Moreover, it shows that it will

  18. Elastic properties of granulite facies rocks of Mahabalipuram, Tamil ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The average values of the Poisson's ratio of acidic, intermediate and basic granulites have been found to be 0.210, 0.241 and 0.279 respectively. The variations in velocities and attenuation in these low porosity crystalline rocks are found to be strongly influenced by their mineral composition. The laboratory velocity data ...

  19. High Iridium concentration of alkaline rocks of Deccan and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan, Krishtel eMaging Solutions

    and implications to K/T boundary. P N Shukla, N Bhandari∗, Anirban Das, A D Shukla and J S Ray. Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380 009, India. ∗e-mail: bhandari@prl.ernet.in. We report here an unusually high concentration of iridium in some alkali basalts and alkaline rocks of Deccan region having an age ...

  20. Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-01-29

    This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

  1. Rock Properties Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Lum

    2004-09-16

    The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process.

  2. A smart rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressel, Phil

    2014-12-01

    This project was to design and build a protective weapon for a group of associations that believed in aliens and UFO's. They collected enough contributions from societies and individuals to be able to sponsor and totally fund the design, fabrication and testing of this equipment. The location of this facility is classified. It also eventually was redesigned by the Quartus Engineering Company for use at a major amusement park as a "shoot at targets facility." The challenge of this project was to design a "smart rock," namely an infrared bullet (the size of a gallon can of paint) that could be shot from the ground to intercept a UFO or any incoming suspicious item heading towards the earth. Some of the challenges to design this weapon were to feed cryogenic helium at 5 degrees Kelvin from an inair environment through a unique rotary coupling and air-vacuum seal while spinning the bullet at 1500 rpm and maintain its dynamic stability (wobble) about its spin axis to less than 10 micro-radians (2 arc seconds) while it operated in a vacuum. Precision optics monitored the dynamic motion of the "smart rock."

  3. Rock critics as 'Mouldy Modernists'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becky Shepherd

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary rock criticism appears to be firmly tied to the past. The specialist music press valorise rock music of the 1960s and 1970s, and new emerging artists are championed for their ‘retro’ sounding music by journalists who compare the sound of these new artists with those included in the established ‘canon’ of rock music. This article examines the narrative tropes of authenticity and nostalgia that frame the retrospective focus of this contemporary rock writing, and most significantly, the maintenance of the rock canon within contemporary popular culture. The article concludes by suggesting that while contemporary rock criticism is predominately characterised by nostalgia, this nostalgia is not simply a passive romanticism of the past. Rather, this nostalgia fuels a process of active recontextualisation within contemporary popular culture.

  4. 78 FR 63999 - Notice of Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) Symposium: Tools To Improve Laboratory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ...) Symposium: Tools To Improve Laboratory Measurement SUMMARY: The National Institutes of Health, Office of... include commercial assay manufacturers; commercial, clinical, and research laboratory personnel; vitamin D...-laboratory comparison and commutability studies demonstrating its effectiveness; (3) demonstrate how tools...

  5. Remedial site evaluation report for the waste area grouping 10 wells associated with the new hydrofracture facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Evaluation, interpretation, and data summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Lockheed Martin Energy System (Energy Systems). ORNL has pioneered waste disposal technologies since World War II as part of its DOE mission. In the late 1950s, at the request of the National Academy of Sciences, efforts were made to develop a permanent disposal alternative to the surface and tanks at ORNL. One such technology, the hydrofracture process, involved inducing fractures in a geologic host formation (a low-permeability shale) at depths of up to 1100 ft and injecting a radioactive grout slurry containing low-level liquid or tank sludge waste, cement, and other additives at an injection pressure of 2000 to 8500 psi. The objective of the effort was to develop a grout dig could be injected as a slurry and would solidify after injection, thereby entombing the radioisotopes contained in the low-level liquid or tank sludge waste. Four sites at ORNL were used: two experimental (HF-1 and HF-2); one developmental, later converted to batch process [Old Hydrofracture Facility (BF-3)]; and one production facility [New Hydrofracture Facility (BF-4)]. This document provides the environmental, restoration program with information about the the results of an evaluation of WAG 10 wells associated with the New Hydrofracture Facility at ORNL.

  6. Oceanographic Monthly Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Monthly Summary contains sea surface temperature (SST) analyses on both regional and ocean basin scales for the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans....

  7. Global Climate Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Hourly Summaries are simple indicators of observational normals which include climatic data summarizations and frequency distributions. These typically...

  8. Worldwide Airfield Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Worldwide Airfield Summary contains a selection of climatological data produced by the U.S. Air Force, Air Weather Service. The reports were compiled from dozens...

  9. Annual Meteorological Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Single-year summaries of observations at Weather Bureau and cooperative stations across the United States. Predominantly the single page Form 1066, which includes...

  10. Cancer Information Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer-reviewed, evidence-based summaries on topics including adult and pediatric cancer treatment, supportive and palliative care, screening, prevention, genetics, and complementary and alternative medicine. References to published literature are included.

  11. Summary of Research 1997

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, William B.; Cleary, David D.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains summaries of research projects in the Department of Physics. A list of recent publications in also included which consists of conference presentations and publications, books, contributions to books, published jounal papers, technical reports, and thesis abstracts.

  12. MSIS State Summary Datamarts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This page provides background needed to take advantage of the capabilities of the MSIS State Summary Datamart. This mart allows the user to develop high-level...

  13. Summary of blog

    CERN Document Server

    Reader, Capitol

    2013-01-01

    This ebook consists of a summary of the ideas, viewpoints and facts presented by Hugh Hewitt in his book "Blog: Understanding the Information Reformation that's Changing Your World". This summary offers a concise overview of the entire book in less than 30 minutes reading time. However this work does not replace in any case Hugh Hewitt's book.Hewitt argues that blogs have an important potential and he believes that it would be a dreadful mistake to avoid their power.

  14. Fusion Plasma Theory project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This Project Summary book is a published compilation consisting of short descriptions of each project supported by the Fusion Plasma Theory and Computing Group of the Advanced Physics and Technology Division of the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy. The summaries contained in this volume were written by the individual contractors with minimal editing by the Office of Fusion Energy. Previous summaries were published in February of 1982 and December of 1987. The Plasma Theory program is responsible for the development of concepts and models that describe and predict the behavior of a magnetically confined plasma. Emphasis is given to the modelling and understanding of the processes controlling transport of energy and particles in a toroidal plasma and supporting the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A tokamak transport initiative was begun in 1989 to improve understanding of how energy and particles are lost from the plasma by mechanisms that transport them across field lines. The Plasma Theory program has actively-participated in this initiative. Recently, increased attention has been given to issues of importance to the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Particular attention has been paid to containment and thermalization of fast alpha particles produced in a burning fusion plasma as well as control of sawteeth, current drive, impurity control, and design of improved auxiliary heating. In addition, general models of plasma behavior are developed from physics features common to different confinement geometries. This work uses both analytical and numerical techniques. The Fusion Theory program supports research projects at US government laboratories, universities and industrial contractors. Its support of theoretical work at universities contributes to the office of Fusion Energy mission of training scientific manpower for the US Fusion Energy Program.

  15. Engineering Annual Summary 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimolitsas, S.; Gerich, C.

    2000-04-11

    a 100 percent data capture rate. came to an end. Within an intense three-month period, Engineering effectively transitioned its 150 employees working on this project to other Laboratory projects. We leveraged our competence in microsystems and biosciences to establish a robust technical presence in the field of biological and chemical weapons defense. This year, we saw successful operational tests of several hand-held versions of our analytical instruments. Concurrently, we saw our efforts in information technologies and medical devices pay off significantly, when both these areas grew robustly. In the operations area, Engineering underwent an important change in its technology investment strategy. In 1998, we consolidated our nine technical thrust areas into five Engineering Technology Centers and restructured these centers to form the Engineering Science and Technology Program, reporting directly to my office. In 1999, we completed the selection of four of the five Directors to lead each of these areas and moved from startup to true enterprise. This 1999 Summary highlights these five Centers.

  16. Oak Ridge National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1996--FY 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    This report discusses the institutional plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the next five years. Included in the report are: laboratory director`s statement; laboratory mission, vision, and core competencies; laboratory strategic plan; major laboratory initiatives; scientific and technical programs; critical success factors; summaries of other plans; resource projections; appendix which contains data for site and facilities, user facility, science and mathematic education and human resources; and laboratory organization chart.

  17. Apollo rocks, fines and soil cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J.; Bevill, T.

    Apollo rocks and soils not only established basic lunar properties and ground truth for global remote sensing, they also provided important lessons for planetary protection (Adv. Space Res ., 1998, v. 22, no. 3 pp. 373-382). The six Apollo missions returned 2196 samples weighing 381.7 kg, comprised of rocks, fines, soil cores and 2 gas samples. By examining which samples were allocated for scientific investigations, information was obtained on usefulness of sampling strategy, sampling devices and containers, sample types and diversity, and on size of sample needed by various disciplines. Diversity was increased by using rakes to gather small rocks on the Moon and by removing fragments >1 mm from soils by sieving in the laboratory. Breccias and soil cores are diverse internally. Per unit weight these samples were more often allocated for research. Apollo investigators became adept at wringing information from very small sample sizes. By pushing the analytical limits, the main concern was adequate size for representative sampling. Typical allocations for trace element analyses were 750 mg for rocks, 300 mg for fines and 70 mg for core subsamples. Age-dating and isotope systematics allocations were typically 1 g for rocks and fines, but only 10% of that amount for core depth subsamples. Historically, allocations for organics and microbiology were 4 g (10% for cores). Modern allocations for biomarker detection are 100mg. Other disciplines supported have been cosmogenic nuclides, rock and soil petrology, sedimentary volatiles, reflectance, magnetics, and biohazard studies . Highly applicable to future sample return missions was the Apollo experience with organic contamination, estimated to be from 1 to 5 ng/g sample for Apollo 11 (Simonheit &Flory, 1970; Apollo 11, 12 &13 Organic contamination Monitoring History, U.C. Berkeley; Burlingame et al., 1970, Apollo 11 LSC , pp. 1779-1792). Eleven sources of contaminants, of which 7 are applicable to robotic missions, were

  18. Rock the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    Created in 2005, the Swiss rock band "Wind of Change" is now candidate for the Eurovision Song Contest 2011 with a new song " Night & Light " with the music video filmed at CERN.   With over 20 gigs under their belt and two albums already released, the five members of the band (Alex Büchi, vocals; Arthur Spierer, drums; David Gantner, bass; Romain Mage and Yannick Gaudy, guitar) continue to excite audiences. For their latest composition "Night & Light", the group filmed their music video in the Globe of Science and Innovation. Winning the Eurovision contest would be a springboard in their artistic career for these young musicians. The selection results will be available December 11, 2010.      

  19. Robotic Rock Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Martial

    1999-01-01

    This report describes a three-month research program undertook jointly by the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University and Ames Research Center as part of the Ames' Joint Research Initiative (JRI.) The work was conducted at the Ames Research Center by Mr. Liam Pedersen, a graduate student in the CMU Ph.D. program in Robotics under the supervision Dr. Ted Roush at the Space Science Division of the Ames Research Center from May 15 1999 to August 15, 1999. Dr. Martial Hebert is Mr. Pedersen's research adviser at CMU and is Principal Investigator of this Grant. The goal of this project is to investigate and implement methods suitable for a robotic rover to autonomously identify rocks and minerals in its vicinity, and to statistically characterize the local geological environment. Although primary sensors for these tasks are a reflection spectrometer and color camera, the goal is to create a framework under which data from multiple sensors, and multiple readings on the same object, can be combined in a principled manner. Furthermore, it is envisioned that knowledge of the local area, either a priori or gathered by the robot, will be used to improve classification accuracy. The key results obtained during this project are: The continuation of the development of a rock classifier; development of theoretical statistical methods; development of methods for evaluating and selecting sensors; and experimentation with data mining techniques on the Ames spectral library. The results of this work are being applied at CMU, in particular in the context of the Winter 99 Antarctica expedition in which the classification techniques will be used on the Nomad robot. Conversely, the software developed based on those techniques will continue to be made available to NASA Ames and the data collected from the Nomad experiments will also be made available.

  20. Analysis of compressive fracture in rock using statistical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, S.C.

    1994-12-01

    Fracture of rock in compression is analyzed using a field-theory model, and the processes of crack coalescence and fracture formation and the effect of grain-scale heterogeneities on macroscopic behavior of rock are studied. The model is based on observations of fracture in laboratory compression tests, and incorporates assumptions developed using fracture mechanics analysis of rock fracture. The model represents grains as discrete sites, and uses superposition of continuum and crack-interaction stresses to create cracks at these sites. The sites are also used to introduce local heterogeneity. Clusters of cracked sites can be analyzed using percolation theory. Stress-strain curves for simulated uniaxial tests were analyzed by studying the location of cracked sites, and partitioning of strain energy for selected intervals. Results show that the model implicitly predicts both development of shear-type fracture surfaces and a strength-vs-size relation that are similar to those observed for real rocks. Results of a parameter-sensitivity analysis indicate that heterogeneity in the local stresses, attributed to the shape and loading of individual grains, has a first-order effect on strength, and that increasing local stress heterogeneity lowers compressive strength following an inverse power law. Peak strength decreased with increasing lattice size and decreasing mean site strength, and was independent of site-strength distribution. A model for rock fracture based on a nearest-neighbor algorithm for stress redistribution is also presented and used to simulate laboratory compression tests, with promising results.

  1. Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka [RAWRA, Czech Republic

    2013-02-01

    A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

  2. Laboratory Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  3. Laboratory Microcomputing

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, William B.

    1984-01-01

    Microcomputers will play a major role in the laboratory, not only in the calculation and interpretation of clinical test data, but also will have an increasing place of importance in the management of laboratory resources in the face of the transition from revenue generating to the cost center era. We will give you a glimpse of what can be accomplished with the management data already collected by many laboratories today when the data are processed into meaningful reports.

  4. The Rock Climbing Teaching Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudlas, John

    The product of 10 years of rock climbing instruction, this guide provides material from which an instructor can teach basic climbing concepts and safety skills as well as conduct a safe, enjoyable rock climbing class in a high school setting. It is designed for an instructor with limited experience in climbing; however, the need for teacher…

  5. Rockin' around the Rock Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frack, Susan; Blanchard, Scott Alan

    2005-01-01

    In this activity students will simulate how sedimentary rocks can be changed into metamorphic rocks by intense pressure. The materials needed are two small pieces of white bread, one piece of wheat bread, and one piece of a dark bread (such as pumpernickel or dark rye) per student, two pieces of waxed paper, scissors, a ruler, and heavy books.…

  6. Bakhtin's Dialogics and Rock Lyrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jeff Parker

    Rock music is ideological both implicitly (in its intrinsic valuing of change, and resistance to authority, for instance), and explicitly (in political records from activist artists such as John Lennon and U2). The texts of the rock genre offer rhetorical experiences. A dialogic conception may help scholars to account for and describe the…

  7. Selected characteristics of vibration signal at a minimal energy consumption for the rock disintegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viera Miklúšová

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The rock disintegration process involves the action of disintegrating tool, resulting in the formation of forced mechanicaloscillations of all components, i.e. the disintegration device, tool and the rock. The vibration signal scanned during the process dependson all of the presented components, on their properties and on the regime parameters. The paper presents relations of the vibrationsignal characteristics, effective values of the acceleration of vibration oscillations and dominant frequencies, and the energyconsumption needed for the rock disintegration, which is characterized by a specific disintegration energy. Presented results wereacquired as a part of laboratory experimental research on the rotary drilling of rocks.

  8. Psychology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides testing stations for computer-based assessment of cognitive and behavioral Warfighter performance. This 500 square foot configurable space can...

  9. Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: To conduct fundamental studies of highway materials aimed at understanding both failure mechanisms and superior performance. New standard test methods are...

  10. Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Dynamics Lab replicates vibration environments for every Navy platform. Testing performed includes: Flight Clearance, Component Improvement, Qualification, Life...

  11. Propulsion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Propulsion Lab simulates field test conditions in a controlled environment, using standardized or customized test procedures. The Propulsion Lab's 11 cells can...

  12. Visualization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Evaluates and improves the operational effectiveness of existing and emerging electronic warfare systems. By analyzing and visualizing simulation results...

  13. Montlake Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NWFSC conducts critical fisheries science research at its headquarters in Seattle, WA and at five research stations throughout Washington and Oregon. The unique...

  14. Rock Physics of Reservoir Rocks with Varying Pore Water Saturation and Pore Water Salinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina

    and in the Smart Water project performed in a laboratory scale in order to evaluate the EOR processes in selected core plugs. A major step towards this evaluation is to identify the composition of the injected water that leads to increased oil recovery in reservoirs and to define changes in the petrophysical...... properties of the rock due to the water injection. During advanced waterflooding of reservoirs, or in the Smart Water project, during core flooding experiments, several chemical and petrophysical processes occur in the grains and pore space due to rock, brine and oil interactions. These processes may affect...... be performed on specific geological structures and why it is sometimes successful; has yet to be established. The presence of both oil and water in the pore space, several different ions present in the injected water that contact the pore walls, possible changes in the fluid wetting the surface of the grains...

  15. Rock suitability classification RSC 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, T. (ed.) [McEwen Consulting, Leicester (United Kingdom); Kapyaho, A. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Hella, P. [Saanio and Riekkola, Helsinki (Finland); Aro, S.; Kosunen, P.; Mattila, J.; Pere, T.

    2012-12-15

    This report presents Posiva's Rock Suitability Classification (RSC) system, developed for locating suitable rock volumes for repository design and construction. The RSC system comprises both the revised rock suitability criteria and the procedure for the suitability classification during the construction of the repository. The aim of the classification is to avoid such features of the host rock that may be detrimental to the favourable conditions within the repository, either initially or in the long term. This report also discusses the implications of applying the RSC system for the fulfilment of the regulatory requirements concerning the host rock as a natural barrier and the site's overall suitability for hosting a final repository of spent nuclear fuel.

  16. The historical and cultural heritage from Brazil: rocks and deterioration patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Antônio

    2014-05-01

    This summary provides information on the results of a research in progress, which focuses on the investigation of stone materials, as steatites, serpentinites, quartzites and schists, widely used in construction of buildings belonging to the cultural heritage of Brazil, especially in those that are in the state of Minas Gerais. These historic buildings, some of those with more than three hundred years of existence and constructed with the use of different rocks, function as open-air laboratories and because of that assists on the study of the deterioration of these materials. In its early stages, the research has focused on macroscopic characterization of the employed materials, following with the lifting of their respective areas of occurrence. Then samples for the survey of other features, such as its chemical and physical-mechanical properties were collected. The investigated physical-mechanical properties were as follows: thermal dilatation coefficient, compressive and flexural strength, abrasion resistance, water absorption coefficient by capillarity, real and apparent density, total and open porosity. Currently, the research focuses on issues such as: evidence of degradation and extent of deterioration in these monuments, as a result of the performance of different processes of alteration and decay. In this investigation it is understood that the first processes are associated with modifications of stone materials, which do not necessarily imply in worsening of the characteristics of these materials from the point of view of conservation and seconds are related to chemical and physical changes of intrinsic properties of rocks used in the construction of this heritage, which can lead to a loss of value, or some impediment of use, according to the indications of the illustrated glossary on patterns of deterioration of rocks proposed by ICOMOS. For this purpose macroscopic descriptions of monuments and its applied rocks, accompanied by detailed photographic

  17. Control of rock joint parameters on deformation of tunnel opening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Panthee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tunneling in complex rock mass conditions is a challenging task, especially in the Himalayan terrain, where a number of unpredicted conditions are reported. Rock joint parameters such as persistence, spacing and shear strength are the factors which significantly modify the working environments in the vicinity of the openings. Therefore, a detailed tunnel stability assessment is critically important based on the field data collection on the excavated tunnel's face. In this context, intact as well as rock mass strength and deformation modulus is obtained from laboratory tests for each rock type encountered in the study area. Finite element method (FEM is used for stability analysis purpose by parametrically varying rock joint persistence, spacing and shear strength parameters, until the condition of overbreak is reached. Another case of marginally stable condition is also obtained based on the same parameters. The results show that stability of tunnels is highly influenced by these parameters and the size of overbreak is controlled by joint persistence and spacing. Garnetiferous schist and slate characterized using high persistence show the development of large plastic zones but small block size, depending upon joint spacing; whereas low persistence, low spacing and low shear strength in marble and quartzite create rock block fall condition.

  18. Supplementation of male pheromone on rock substrates attracts female rock lizards to the territories of males: a field experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Martín

    Full Text Available Many animals produce elaborated sexual signals to attract mates, among them are common chemical sexual signals (pheromones with an attracting function. Lizards produce chemical secretions for scent marking that may have a role in sexual selection. In the laboratory, female rock lizards (Iberolacerta cyreni prefer the scent of males with more ergosterol in their femoral secretions. However, it is not known whether the scent-marks of male rock lizards may actually attract females to male territories in the field.In the field, we added ergosterol to rocks inside the territories of male lizards, and found that this manipulation resulted in increased relative densities of females in these territories. Furthermore, a higher number of females were observed associated to males in manipulated plots, which probably increased mating opportunities for males in these areas.These and previous laboratory results suggest that female rock lizards may select to settle in home ranges based on the characteristics of scent-marks from conspecific males. Therefore, male rock lizards might attract more females and obtain more matings by increasing the proportion of ergosterol when scent-marking their territories. However, previous studies suggest that the allocation of ergosterol to secretions may be costly and only high quality males could afford it, thus, allowing the evolution of scent-marks as an honest sexual display.

  19. Thermal conductivity of rocks associated with energy extraction from hot dry rock geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibbitt, W.L.; Dodson, J.G.; Tester, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    Results of thermal conductivity measurements are given for 14 drill core rock samples taken from two exploratory HDR geothermal wellbores (maximum depth of 2929 m (9608 ft) drilled into Precambrian granitic rock in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. These samples have been petrographically characterized and in general represent fresh competent Precambrian material of deep origin. Thermal conductivities, modal analyses, and densities are given for all core samples studied under dry and water-saturated conditions. Additional measurements are reported for several sedimentary rocks encountered in the upper 760 m (2500 ft) of that same region. A cut-bar thermal conductivity comparator and a transient needle probe were used for the determinations with fused quartz and Pyroceram 9606 as the standards. The maximum temperature range of the measurements was from the ice point to 250/sup 0/C. The measurements on wet, water-saturated rock were limited to the temperature range below room temperature. Conductivity values of the dense core rock samples were generally within the range from 2 to 2.9 W/mK at 200/sup 0/C. Excellent agreement was achieved between these laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity and those obtained by in situ measurements used in the HDR wellbores. By using samples of sufficient thickness to provide a statistically representative heat flow path, no difference between conductivity values and their temperature coefficients for orthogonal directions (heat flow parallel or perpendicular to core axis) was observed. This isotropic behavior was even found for highly foliated gneissic specimens. Estimates of thermal conductivity based on a composite dispersion analysis utilizing pure minerallic phase conductivities and detailed modal analyses usually agreed to within 9 percent of the experimental values.

  20. Prediction of thermal conductivity of sedimentary rocks from well logs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Förster, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The calculation of heat-flow density in boreholes requires reliable values for the change of temperature and rock thermal conductivity with depth. As rock samples for laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity (TC) are usually rare geophysical well logs are used alternatively to determine TC...... combinations of standard geophysical well-logs. In combination with a feasible mixing-model (i.e. geometric mean model) bulk TC is computed along borehole profiles. The underlying approach was proposed by Fuchs & Förster (2014) and rests upon the detailed analysis of the interrelations between major physical...

  1. Geo-Engineering Evaluation of Rock Masses for Crushed Rock and Cut Stones in Khartoum State, Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirelseed, E. E.; Ming, T. H.; Abdalla, S. B.

    The purpose of this study is to find artificial coarse aggregates and cut stones around Khartoum. To meat the objectives of the study, data from both field and laboratory are collected. The field data includes geological investigations based on different methods and samples collection, whereas the laboratory tests consists of specific gravity, water absorption, impact value, crushing value, Los Angeles abrasion, soundness tests. The field and laboratory results were weighed and compiled together to reveal the engineering performance of the different rock masses in term of cut stone and crushed aggregates. The results show that most of the examined rock masses are suitable for crushing, building and dressed stones. For decorative slabs only foliated granite and syenite masses can be used.

  2. Microbial Fluid-Rock Interactions in Chalk Samples and Salinity Factor in Divalent Ca2+ ions Release for Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery Purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimoh, Ismaila Adetunji; Rudyk, Svetlana Nikolayevna; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2011-01-01

    In this study, laboratory experiments were performed on chalk samples from Danish sector of the North Sea to study microbial fluid-rock interactions with carbonate rock and to evaluate the dissolution of rock matrix (CaCO3). Result showed that the average concentration of Ca2+ ions after microbia...

  3. Site investigations: Strategy for rock mechanics site descriptive model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden); Christiansson, Rolf [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Hudson, John [Rock Engineering Consultants, Welwyn Garden City (United Kingdom)

    2002-05-01

    As a part of the planning work for the Site Investigations, SKB has developed a Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Modelling Strategy. Similar strategies are being developed for other disciplines. The objective of the strategy is that it should guide the practical implementation of evaluating site specific data during the Site Investigations. It is also understood that further development may be needed. This methodology enables the crystalline rock mass to be characterised in terms of the quality at different sites, for considering rock engineering constructability, and for providing the input to numerical models and performance assessment calculations. The model describes the initial stresses and the distribution of deformation and strength properties of the intact rock, of fractures and fracture zones, and of the rock mass. The rock mass mechanical properties are estimated by empirical relations and by numerical simulations. The methodology is based on estimation of mechanical properties using both empirical and heroretical/numerical approaches; and estimation of in situ rock stress using judgement and numerical modelling, including the influence of fracture zones. These approaches are initially used separately, and then combined to produce the required characterisation estimates. The methodology was evaluated with a Test Case at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The quality control aspects are an important feature of the methodology: these include Protocols to ensure the structure and coherence of the procedures used, regular meetings to enhance communication, feedback from internal and external reviewing, plus the recording of an audit trail of the development steps and decisions made. The strategy will be reviewed and, if required, updated as appropriate.

  4. Design of Rock Slope Reinforcement: An Himalayan Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Gaurav; Latha, Gali Madhavi

    2016-06-01

    The stability analysis of the two abutment slopes of a railway bridge proposed at about 359 m above the ground level, crossing a river and connecting two hill faces in the Himalayas, India, is presented. The bridge is located in a zone of high seismic activity. The rock slopes are composed of a heavily jointed rock mass and the spacing, dip and dip direction of joint sets are varying at different locations. Geological mapping was carried out to characterize all discontinuities present along the slopes. Laboratory and field investigations were conducted to assess the geotechnical properties of the intact rock, rock mass and joint infill. Stability analyses of these rock slopes were carried out using numerical programmes. Loads from the foundations resting on the slopes and seismic accelerations estimated from site-specific ground response analysis were considered. The proposed slope profile with several berms between successive foundations was simulated in the numerical model. An equivalent continuum approach with Hoek and Brown failure criterion was initially used in a finite element model to assess the global stability of the slope abutments. In the second stage, finite element analysis of rock slopes with all joint sets with their orientations, spacing and properties explicitly incorporated into the numerical model was taken up using continuum with joints approach. It was observed that the continuum with joints approach was able to capture the local failures in some of the slope sections, which were verified using wedge failure analysis and stereographic projections. Based on the slope deformations and failure patterns observed from the numerical analyses, rock anchors were designed to achieve the target factors of safety against failure while keeping the deformations within the permissible limits. Detailed design of rock anchors and comparison of the stability of slopes with and without reinforcement are presented.

  5. Upper limb injuries associated with rock climbing.

    OpenAIRE

    Bannister, P; Foster, P

    1986-01-01

    Four cases of upper limb injuries secondary to rock-climbing or training for rock climbing are presented. All four cases had diagnosis and treatment delayed because of unawareness of the range of injuries seen in high grade rock climbing.

  6. They will rock you!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    On 30 September, CERN will be the venue for one of the most prestigious events of the year: the concert for the Bosons&More event, the Organization’s celebration of the remarkable performance of the LHC and all its technical systems, as well as the recent fundamental discoveries. Topping the bill will be the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, the CERN Choir, the Zürcher Sing-Akademie and the Alan Parsons Live Project rock group, who have joined forces to create an unforgettable evening’s entertainment.   The Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, directed by Maestro Neeme Järvi, artistic and musical director of the OSR. (Image: Grégory Maillot). >>> From the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande… Henk Swinnen, General Manager of the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande (OSR), answers some questions for the CERN Bulletin, just a few days before the event. How did this project come about? When CERN invited us to take part in the B...

  7. Shotgun cartridge rock breaker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

    1995-01-01

    A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

  8. Characterization and evaluation of sites for deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in fractured rocks. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The third Aespoe International Seminar was organised by SKB to assess the state of the art in characterisation and evaluation of sites for deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in fractured rocks. Site characterisation and evaluation are important elements for determining the site suitability and long-term safety of a geological repository for radioactive waste disposal. Characterisation work also provides vital information for the design of the underground facility and the engineered barrier system that will contain the waste. The aim of the seminar was to provide a comprehensive assessment of the current know-how on this topic based on world-wide experience from more than 20 years of characterisation and evaluation work. The seminar, which was held at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory was attended by 72 scientists from 10 different countries. The program was divided into four sessions of which two were run in parallel. A total of 38 oral and 5 poster presentations were given at the seminar. The presentations gave a comprehensive summary of recently completed and current work on site characterisation, modelling and application in performance assessments. The results presented at the seminar generally show that significant progress has been made in this field during the last decade. New characterisation techniques have become available, strategies for site investigations have developed further, and model concepts and codes have reached new levels of refinement. Data obtained from site characterisation have also successfully been applied in several site specific performance assessments. The seminar clearly showed that there is a solid scientific basis for assessing the suitability of sites for actual repositories based on currently available site characterisation technology and modelling capabilities. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 38 of the presentations

  9. Dynamic rock fragmentation: thresholds for long runout rock avalanches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.T. Bowman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic fragmentation of rock within rock avalanches is examined using the fragmentation concepts introduced by Grady and co-workers. The analyses use typical material values for weak chalk and limestone in order to determine theoretical strain rate thresholds for dynamic fragmentation and resulting fragment sizes. These are found to compare favourably with data obtained from field observations of long runout rock avalanches and chalk cliff collapses in spite of the simplicity of the approach used. The results provide insight as to the energy requirements to develop long runout behaviour and hence may help to explain the observed similarities between large rock avalanches and much smaller scale chalk cliff collapses as seen in Europe.

  10. Blast-induced damage:a summary of SveBeFo investigations

    OpenAIRE

    Saiang, David

    2008-01-01

    This report presents a summary of the blast damage investigation carried out by SveBeFo (Swedish Rock Engineering Research) during the period 1991 to 2003 at various hard rock sites in Sweden. The objective of this report is to present a synopsis of the important factors that influence the development and extent of the blast-induced damage zone, nature and characteristics of blast-induced fractures, and a summary of the blast-damage thickness with reference to the existing perimeter blasting ...

  11. Develop guidelines for the design of pillar systems for shallow and intermediate depth, tabular, hard rock mines and provide methodology for assessing hangingwall stability and support requirements for the panels between pillars

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Haile, AT

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available The overall view of the research being conducted at Impala platinum was to improve pillar design techniques through a rock testing programme, underground instrumentation and back analysis. The laboratory rock testing programme has provided a useful...

  12. Multiverso: Rock'n'Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, J. A.

    2012-05-01

    In the last few years, there have been several projects involving astronomy and classical music. But have a rock band ever appeared at a science conference or an astronomer at a rock concert? We present a project, Multiverso, in which we mix rock and astronomy, together with poetry and video art (Caballero, 2010). The project started in late 2009 and has already reached tens of thousands people in Spain through the release of an album, several concert-talks, television, radio, newspapers and the internet.

  13. Healthcare. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem; Beach, Bennett H.

    2012-01-01

    This executive summary highlights several findings about healthcare. These are: (1) Healthcare is 18 percent of the U.S. economy, twice as high as in other countries; (2) There are two labor markets in healthcare: high-skill, high-wage professional and technical jobs and low-skill, low-wage support jobs; (3) Demand for postsecondary education in…

  14. Station Climatic Summaries, Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    274 MALAYSIA SINGAPORE APRT 486940 8505 (OCDS) ................................................... 278 NORTH KOREA CHANGJON/ONSEIRI 470610 6809 (CB...526 BURSA 171160 8709 (OCDS) ................................................... 528 CIGLI/IZMIR 172180...SUMMARY * STATION: SINGAPORE AIRPORT, MALAYSIA STATION #: 486940 ICAO ID: WSSS LOCATION: 01022N, 10400E ELEVATION (FEET): 21 LST - GMT +8 PREPARED BY

  15. Geothermal energy. Program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    Brief descriptions of geothermal projects funded through the Department of Energy during FY 1978 are presented. Each summary gives the project title, contractor name, contract number, funding level, dates, location, and name of the principal investigator, together with project highlights, which provide informaion such as objectives, strategies, and a brief project description. (MHR)

  16. Summary and future directions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Summary and future directions. Reservoirs of HEV. Subclinical infection: likely; Animals: unlikely to be important in India. HEV infection in cirrhosis leads to decompensation. Immune responses. CD8 cells unlikely to play a role in liver injury; Non-specific immune ...

  17. Crisis Management: Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Dorman, Sally; Anderson, Luke; McNair, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three studies relevant to school crisis response. The first report, "A Framework for International Crisis Intervention" (Sally Dorman), is a review of how existing crisis intervention models (including the NASP PREPaRE model) have been adapted for international use. The second article, "Responding…

  18. Hard rock drilling: from conventional technologies to the potential use of laser; Perfuracao em rochas duras: das tecnologias convencionais ate o potencial uso do laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaro, Renato; Lomba, Rosana Fatima Teixieira [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Perez, Maria Angelica Acosta; Valente, Luiz Carlos Guedes; Braga, Arthur Martins Barbosa [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the drilling of the carbonate rocks of the Pre-salt is to overcome the low penetration rates that have been obtained in the drilling of the reservoir rock in the vertical and directional wells. To overcome this challenge, a great effort is being developed in several lines of research, both in developing new concepts in drill bits and in the selection of a drilling system that together with appropriate type of bit provide an expected improvement in performance. To achieve these results, procedures are being prioritized and drilling systems with lower vibration levels are being used, since this phenomenon of vibration reduces the performance of penetration rate also affecting the lifetime of the equipment and consequently causes a reduction in reliability of all system and raises the cost per meter of drilling. Thus, new drill bit technology and new drilling systems are under development and, among these technologies we can distinguish those that promote improvements in conventional technologies and innovative technologies frankly which uses new mechanisms to cut or weaken the rock. This paper presents an overview of the conventional technology of drilling systems and drill bits, and provides information about the researches that have been developed with the use of innovative technologies which is presented as highly promising, among these innovative technologies, laser drilling and the drilling itself assisted by laser. In this process the laser beam has the main function to weaken the rock improving the rate of penetration. This paper presents a summary of studies and analyzes which are underway to investigate the potential of laser technology, also presents some results of laboratory tests already carried out. The drilling fluid in which the laser will have to pass through in the future applications is analyzed on the approach of their physicochemical properties. Thus, a better understanding of the interaction with the drilling

  19. Audio Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides an environment and facilities for auditory display research. A primary focus is the performance use of binaurally rendered 3D sound in conjunction...

  20. Elastomers Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Primary capabilities include: elastomer compounding in various sizes (micro, 3x5, 8x12, 8x15 rubber mills); elastomer curing and post curing (two 50-ton presses, one...

  1. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... age and race What you eat and drink Medicines you take How well you followed pre-test instructions Your doctor may also compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  2. Chemical methods of rock analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeffery, P. G; Hutchison, D

    1981-01-01

    A practical guide to the methods in general use for the complete analysis of silicate rock material and for the determination of all those elements present in major, minor or trace amounts in silicate...

  3. Defending dreamer’s rock

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Günter U.

    2007-01-01

    Defending dreamer’s rock : Geschichte, Geschichtsbewusstsein und Geschichtskultur im Native drama der USA und Kanadas. - Trier : WVT Wiss. Verl. Trier, 2007. - 445 S. - (CDE - Studies ; 14). - Zugl.: Augsburg, Univ., Diss., 2006

  4. Beach rock from Goa Coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Wagle, B.G.

    constituents of beach rock found along Goa coast is dealt with in detail. While discussing the various views on its origin, it is emphasized that the process of cementation is chiefly controlled by ground water evaporation, inorganic precipitation and optimum...

  5. The Chronology of Rock Art

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Such phases are tentatively ascribed to different archaeological cultures on the basis of the contextual availability, stylistic similarities and so on. Ethnographic analogies are also attempted in the dating of rock art .

  6. Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory is a research laboratory which complements the Optical Measurements Laboratory. The laboratory provides for Hall...

  7. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A. [eds.

    1995-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory.

  8. Emakumeak Punk-Rock taldeetan

    OpenAIRE

    Altuna Etxeberria, Maialen

    2010-01-01

    Ikerketa honen helburua emakumeek punk-rock taldeetan izan duten parte hartzea aztertzea da. Lanaren abiapuntua galdera bat izan da: zergatik daude hain emakume gutxi punk-rock musika eremuko taldeetan parte hartzen eta are gutxiago instrumentuak jotzen? Genero sistemak parte hartze urri horretan izan duen eragina aztertzeko lehenik eta behin musika herrikoia eta generoaren inguruan egindako lanetara hurbilpena egin da. Bestalde, punk-rockak izan duen ibilbidea aztertu da. Behin gaia kok...

  9. Granular Salt Summary: Reconsolidation Principles and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Frank; Popp, Till; Wieczorek, Klaus; Stuehrenberg, Dieter

    2014-07-01

    The purposes of this paper are to review the vast amount of knowledge concerning crushed salt reconsolidation and its attendant hydraulic properties (i.e., its capability for fluid or gas transport) and to provide a sufficient basis to understand reconsolidation and healing rates under repository conditions. Topics covered include: deformation mechanisms and hydro-mechanical interactions during reconsolidation; the experimental data base pertaining to crushed salt reconsolidation; transport properties of consolidating granulated salt and provides quantitative substantiation of its evolution to characteristics emulating undisturbed rock salt; and extension of microscopic and laboratory observations and data to the applicable field scale.

  10. Thermally induced rock stress increment and rock reinforcement response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakala, M. [KMS Hakala Oy, Nokia (Finland); Stroem, J.; Nujiten, G.; Uotinen, L. [Rockplan, Helsinki (Finland); Siren, T.; Suikkanen, J.

    2014-07-15

    This report describes a detailed study of the effect of thermal heating by the spent nuclear fuel containers on the in situ rock stress, any potential rock failure, and associated rock reinforcement strategies for the Olkiluoto underground repository. The modelling approach and input data are presented together repository layout diagrams. The numerical codes used to establish the effects of heating on the in situ stress field are outlined, together with the rock mass parameters, in situ stress values, radiogenic temperatures and reinforcement structures. This is followed by a study of the temperature and stress evolution during the repository's operational period and the effect of the heating on the reinforcement structures. It is found that, during excavation, the maximum principal stress is concentrated at the transition areas where the profile changes and that, due to the heating from the deposition of spent nuclear fuel, the maximum principal stress rises significantly in the tunnel arch area of NW/SW oriented central tunnels. However, it is predicted that the rock's crack damage (CD, short term strength) value of 99 MPa will not be exceeded anywhere within the model. Loads onto the reinforcement structures will come from damaged and loosened rock which is assumed in the modelling as a free rock wedge - but this is very much a worst case scenario because there is no guarantee that rock cracking would form a free rock block. The structural capacity of the reinforcement structures is described and it is predicted that the current quantity of the rock reinforcement is strong enough to provide a stable tunnel opening during the peak of the long term stress state, with damage predicted on the sprayed concrete liner. However, the long term stability and safety can be improved through the implementation of the principles of the Observational Method. The effect of ventilation is also considered and an additional study of the radiogenic heating effect on the

  11. Strontium flame-emission determination in powder samples of rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmanova, N.G.; Pogrebnyak, Yu.F. (AN SSSR, Ulan-ude. Geologicheskij Inst.)

    1981-01-01

    A direct method of emission analysis of powder samples of rocks for Sr content with an aid of ''graphite capsule-flame'' atomizer is suggested. Silicate and carbonate rocks serve as objects for the study. It is established that the maximum emission signal is observed at summary flow rate of gases of the combustible mixture (acetylene-air) of 360 l/hr and when a slightly reducing flame is applied. According to the results of 10 parallel determinations of Sr the variation coefficients, varying from 8 to 15%, are calculated. The absolute limit of strontium determination in the mixtures analyzed constitutes 5.0x10/sup -9/ g. It has been found according to the trebled value of the standard deviation of the minimum recorded signal.

  12. 3D Printing and Digital Rock Physics for Geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, M. J.; Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging techniques for the analysis of porous structures have revolutionized our ability to quantitatively characterize geomaterials. Digital representations of rock from CT images and physics modeling based on these pore structures provide the opportunity to further advance our quantitative understanding of fluid flow, geomechanics, and geochemistry, and the emergence of coupled behaviors. Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, has revolutionized production of custom parts with complex internal geometries. For the geosciences, recent advances in 3D printing technology may be co-opted to print reproducible porous structures derived from CT-imaging of actual rocks for experimental testing. The use of 3D printed microstructure allows us to surmount typical problems associated with sample-to-sample heterogeneity that plague rock physics testing and to test material response independent from pore-structure variability. Together, imaging, digital rocks and 3D printing potentially enables a new workflow for understanding coupled geophysical processes in a real, but well-defined setting circumventing typical issues associated with reproducibility, enabling full characterization and thus connection of physical phenomena to structure. In this talk we will discuss the possibilities that these technologies can bring to geosciences and present early experiences with coupled multiscale experimental and numerical analysis using 3D printed fractured rock specimens. In particular, we discuss the processes of selection and printing of transparent fractured specimens based on 3D reconstruction of micro-fractured rock to study fluid flow characterization and manipulation. Micro-particle image velocimetry is used to directly visualize 3D single and multiphase flow velocity in 3D fracture networks. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U

  13. Idaho National Laboratory Human Capitol Development Program Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rynes, Amanda R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative HCD Subprogram has successfully employed unique nuclear capabilities and employee expertise through INL to achieve multiple initiatives in FY14. These opportunities range from internship programs to university and training courses. One of the central facets of this work has been the international safeguards pre inspector training course. Another significant milestone is the INL led university engagement effort which resulted in courses being offered at ISU and University of Utah.

  14. Sleep in the rock hyrax, Procavia capensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravett, Nadine; Bhagwandin, Adhil; Lyamin, Oleg I; Siegel, Jerome M; Manger, Paul R

    2012-01-01

    We investigated sleep in therock hyrax, Procavia capensis, a social mammal that typically lives in colonies on rocky outcrops throughout most parts of Southern Africa. The sleep of 5 wild-captured, adult rock hyraxes was recorded continuously for 72 h using telemetric relay of signals and allowing unimpeded movement. In addition to waking, slow wave sleep (SWS) and an unambiguous rapid eye movement (REM) state, a sleep state termed somnus innominatus (SI), characterized by low-voltage, high-frequency electroencephalogram, an electromyogram that stayed at the same amplitude as the preceding SWS episode and a mostly regular heart rate, were identified. If SI can be considered a form of low-voltage non-REM, the implication would be that the rock hyrax exhibits the lowest amount of REM recorded for any terrestrial mammal studied to date. Conversely, if SI is a form of REM sleep, it would lead to the classification of a novel subdivision of this state; however, further investigation would be required. The hyraxes spent on average 15.89 h (66.2%) of the time awake, 6.02 h (25.1%) in SWS, 43 min (3%) in SI and 6 min (0.4%) in REM. The unambiguous REM sleep amounts were on average less than 6 min/day. The most common state transition pathway in these animals was found to be wake → SWS → wake. No significant differences were noted with regard to total sleep time, number of episodes and episode duration for all states between the light and dark periods.Thus, prior classification of the rock hyrax as strongly diurnal does not appear to hold under controlled laboratory conditions. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Our world was rocked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hironaka, L Kari; Trozzi, Maria; Augustyn, Marilyn

    2010-06-01

    Nicole is a beautiful 14-month wide-eyed girl who presents for routine health care maintenance in your office. Since her 9 month visit, her weight has fallen from the 25th percentile to significantly less than the 5th percentile. Her height has dropped from the 10th percentile to slightly less than the 5th percentile, while her head circumference has remained at about the 25th percentile. Her language, motor, cognitive, and social development are normal. She is 2 months late for this visit as her family has recently had significant family loss because of the earthquake in Haiti. When you take a feeding history, she seems to eat age-appropriate foods--macaroni, chicken pieces--but her mother notes that she tends to be restless and fidgety while eating and will no longer sit still in her mother's lap while she feeds her. Her stools tend to be frequent, with particles of food seen. Urine is normal. There are no symptoms of respiratory or neurological disease, and her review of systems is otherwise negative. She has been a healthy child and this is the first time they have fallen behind in routine health care maintenance visits. Her medical history is entirely unremarkable. She was born at term, weighing 3.5 kg, without any perinatal complications. The family has lived in the United States for the last 10 years. Mother recalls that there were other children in her family who were deemed small as young children but who caught up later in childhood. Mother describes a history of increased sadness and worry in the last 2 months. They receive phone calls from family in Haiti several times per week and she admits to being upset during and after these calls. When asked how the event has impacted her family, she states, "It has rocked our entire world but Nicole is just a baby who won't eat!" Parents are married, and there is no history of abuse or violence in the household. Her physical examination is essentially normal. Her anterior fontanelle is still open, roughly 2 cm

  16. White Rock in False Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation. This false color image shows the wind eroded deposit in Pollack Crater called 'White Rock'. This image was collected during the Southern Fall Season. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -8, Longitude 25.2 East (334.8 West). 0 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington

  17. Reinforcement of Underground Excavation with Expansion Shell Rock Bolt Equipped with Deformable Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korzeniowski Waldemar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The basic type of rock mass reinforcement method for both preparatory and operational workings in underground metal ore mines, both in Poland and in different countries across the world, is the expansion shell or adhesive-bonded rock bolt. The article discusses results of static loading test of the expansion shell rock bolts equipped with originally developed deformable component. This component consists of two profiled rock bolt washers, two disk springs, and three guide bars. The disk spring and disk washer material differs in stiffness. The construction materials ensure that at first the springs under loading are partially compressed, and then the rock bolt washer is plastically deformed. The rock bolts tested were installed in blocks simulating a rock mass with rock compressive strength of 80 MPa. The rock bolt was loaded statically until its ultimate loading capacity was exceeded. The study presents the results obtained under laboratory conditions in the test rig allowing testing of the rock bolts at their natural size, as used in underground metal ore mines. The stress-strain/displacement characteristics of the expansion shell rock bolt with the deformable component were determined experimentally. The relationships between the geometric parameters and specific strains or displacements of the bolt rod were described, and the percentage contribution of those values in total displacements, resulting from the deformation of rock bolt support components (washer, thread and the expansion shell head displacements, were estimated. The stiffness of the yielded and stiff bolts was empirically determined, including stiffness parameters of every individual part (deformable component, steel rod. There were two phases of displacement observed during the static tension of the rock bolt which differed in their intensity.

  18. Photovoltaic Energy Program Contract Summary; Fiscal Year 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surek, T.

    1999-02-16

    This document provides individual summaries of some 200 photovoltaics research projects performed in house and by subcontractors to Department of Energy national laboratories and field offices, including the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Golden Field Office, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Albuquerque Field Office, and Boston Support Office. The document is divided into the following sections: research and development, technology development, and systems engineering and applications. Three indexes are included: performing organizations by name, performing organizations by state, and performing organizations by technology area.

  19. A study on the measurement of dynamic properties of rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S. O.; Hwang, H.; Lee, S.

    2011-12-01

    With the increase of property damage as well as human casualty caused by an earthquake, the importance of an earthquake-resistant design for geotechnical structure is being emphasized. The dynamic properties of geotechnical structure, especially, are essential in earthquake-resistant design and can be achieved from both field and laboratory tests. And the free-free resonant column test is known to be the most common laboratory test. In general, the resonant frequency which can be obtained from the resonant tests intends a natural frequency of the structure. When the ground vibration occurs by an earthquake and the vibration frequency coincides with the natural frequency of the structures, it is known that the ground vibration can be amplified and may cause the unstability of the structures. In this study, consequently, the free-free resonant column test has been performed to determine the characteristics of natural frequency of rock mass. Among the dynamic characteristics of rock mass, the relationship between the rock strength and the resonant frequency has been focused together with the relationship between the joint distribution pattern and the dynamic properties of rock mass.

  20. Energy system contributions in indoor rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzi, Rômulo Cássio de Moraes; Franchini, Emerson; Kokubun, Eduardo; Kiss, Maria Augusta Peduti Dal Molin

    2007-10-01

    The present study cross-sectionally investigated the influence of training status, route difficulty and upper body aerobic and anaerobic performance of climbers on the energetics of indoor rock climbing. Six elite climbers (EC) and seven recreational climbers (RC) were submitted to the following laboratory tests: (a) anthropometry, (b) upper body aerobic power, and (c) upper body Wingate test. On another occasion, EC subjects climbed an easy, a moderate, and a difficult route, whereas RC subjects climbed only the easy route. The fractions of the aerobic (W(AER)), anaerobic alactic (W(PCR)) and anaerobic lactic (W[La(-)]) systems were calculated based on oxygen uptake, the fast component of excess post-exercise oxygen uptake, and changes in net blood lactate, respectively. On the easy route, the metabolic cost was significantly lower in EC [40.3 (6.5) kJ] than in RC [60.1 (8.8) kJ] (P climbing an easy route were 39.7 (5.0), 34.0 (5.8), and 26.3% (3.8), respectively. These results indicate that the main energy systems required during indoor rock climbing are the aerobic and anaerobic alactic systems. In addition, climbing economy seems to be more important for the performance of these athletes than improved energy metabolism.

  1. Mineralogical and experimental study of serpentine minerals and ultramafic rocks with application to carbon capture and storage by mineralisation

    OpenAIRE

    Lacinska, Alicja M.

    2016-01-01

    The type of feedstock and host rock utilised in ex situ and in situ Carbon Capture and Storage by Mineralisation (CCSM) is an important aspect of these technologies, and detailed appraisal of candidate mineral/rock performance in the presence of CO2 may greatly improve CCSM efficiency. Here, a detailed mineralogical and geochemical investigation of serpentine minerals and ultramafic rocks under laboratory-controlled experiments simulating ex situ and in situ process conditions is presented. ...

  2. Failure Mechanism of Rock Bridge Based on Acoustic Emission Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE technique is widely used in various fields as a reliable nondestructive examination technology. Two experimental tests were carried out in a rock mechanics laboratory, which include (1 small scale direct shear tests of rock bridge with different lengths and (2 large scale landslide model with locked section. The relationship of AE event count and record time was analyzed during the tests. The AE source location technology and comparative analysis with its actual failure model were done. It can be found that whether it is small scale test or large scale landslide model test, AE technique accurately located the AE source point, which reflected the failure generation and expansion of internal cracks in rock samples. Large scale landslide model with locked section test showed that rock bridge in rocky slope has typical brittle failure behavior. The two tests based on AE technique well revealed the rock failure mechanism in rocky slope and clarified the cause of high speed and long distance sliding of rocky slope.

  3. Indexing for summary queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Ke; Wang, Lu; Wei, Zhewei

    2014-01-01

    returned by reporting queries. In this article, we design indexing techniques that allow for extracting a statistical summary of all the records in the query. The summaries we support include frequent items, quantiles, and various sketches, all of which are of central importance in massive data analysis......), of a particular attribute of these records. Aggregation queries are especially useful in business intelligence and data analysis applications where users are interested not in the actual records, but some statistics of them. They can also be executed much more efficiently than reporting queries, by embedding...... properly precomputed aggregates into an index. However, reporting and aggregation queries provide only two extremes for exploring the data. Data analysts often need more insight into the data distribution than what those simple aggregates provide, and yet certainly do not want the sheer volume of data...

  4. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons to...

  5. Summary of Research 2001

    OpenAIRE

    Faculty of the Naval Postgraduate School

    2001-01-01

    The views expressed in this report are those of the authors and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or U.S. Government. This report contains project summaries of the research undertaken at the Naval Postgraduate School. A list of recent publications is also included which consists of conference presentations, books, contributions to books, published journal papers, and technical reports. The research was conducted in the areas of National Se...

  6. Summary of Research 2003

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The views expressed in this report are those of the authors and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or U.S. Government. This report contains project summaries of the research undertaken at the Naval Postgraduate School. A list of recent publications is also included which consists of conference presentations, books, contributions to books, published journal papers, and technical reports. The research was conducted in the areas of National Se...

  7. Summary of Research 2004

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The views expressed in this report are those of the authors and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or U.S. Government. This report contains project summaries of the research undertaken at the Naval Postgraduate School. A list of recent publications is also included which consists of conference presentations, books, contributions to books, published journal papers, and technical reports. The research was conducted in the areas of national-se...

  8. Volumetric measurement of rock movement using photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Donovan J; Iverson, Stephen R; Martin, Lewis A; Johnson, Jeffrey C; Raffaldi, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    NIOSH ground control safety research program at Spokane, Washington, is exploring applications of photogrammetry to rock mass and support monitoring. This paper describes two ways photogrammetric techniques are being used. First, photogrammetric data of laboratory testing is being used to correlate energy input and support deformation. This information can be used to infer remaining support toughness after ground deformation events. This technique is also demonstrated in a field application. Second, field photogrammetric data is compared to crackmeter data from a deep underground mine. Accuracies were found to average 8 mm, but have produced results within 0.2 mm of true displacement, as measured by crackmeters. Application of these techniques consists of monitoring overall fault activity by monitoring multiple points around the crackmeter. A case study is provided in which a crackmeter is clearly shown to have provided insufficient information regarding overall fault ground deformation. Photogrammetry is proving to be a useful ground monitoring tool due to its unobtrusiveness and ease of use.

  9. Mars Science Laboratory Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okon, Avi B.; Brown, Kyle M.; McGrath, Paul L.; Klein, Kerry J.; Cady, Ian W.; Lin, Justin Y.; Ramirez, Frank E.; Haberland, Matt

    2012-01-01

    This drill (see Figure 1) is the primary sample acquisition element of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) that collects powdered samples from various types of rock (from clays to massive basalts) at depths up to 50 mm below the surface. A rotary-percussive sample acquisition device was developed with an emphasis on toughness and robustness to handle the harsh environment on Mars. It is the first rover-based sample acquisition device to be flight-qualified (see Figure 2). This drill features an autonomous tool change-out on a mobile robot, and novel voice-coil-based percussion. The drill comprises seven subelements. Starting at the end of the drill, there is a bit assembly that cuts the rock and collects the sample. Supporting the bit is a subassembly comprising a chuck mechanism to engage and release the new and worn bits, respectively, and a spindle mechanism to rotate the bit. Just aft of that is a percussion mechanism, which generates hammer blows to break the rock and create the dynamic environment used to flow the powdered sample. These components are mounted to a translation mechanism, which provides linear motion and senses weight-on-bit with a force sensor. There is a passive-contact sensor/stabilizer mechanism that secures the drill fs position on the rock surface, and flex harness management hardware to provide the power and signals to the translating components. The drill housing serves as the primary structure of the turret, to which the additional tools and instruments are attached. The drill bit assembly (DBA) is a passive device that is rotated and hammered in order to cut rock (i.e. science targets) and collect the cuttings (powder) in a sample chamber until ready for transfer to the CHIMRA (Collection and Handling for Interior Martian Rock Analysis). The DBA consists of a 5/8-in. (.1.6- cm) commercial hammer drill bit whose shank has been turned down and machined with deep flutes designed for aggressive cutting removal. Surrounding the shank of the

  10. Correlation of the Rock Mass Rating (RMR) System with the Unified Soil Classification System (USCS): Introduction of the Weak Rock Mass Rating System (W-RMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sean N.; Kallu, Raj R.; Barnard, Chase K.

    2016-11-01

    Underground gold mines in Nevada are exploiting increasingly deeper ore bodies comprised of weak to very weak rock masses. The Rock Mass Rating (RMR) classification system is widely used at underground gold mines in Nevada and is applicable in fair to good-quality rock masses, but is difficult to apply and loses reliability in very weak rock mass to soil-like material. Because very weak rock masses are transition materials that border engineering rock mass and soil classification systems, soil classification may sometimes be easier and more appropriate to provide insight into material behavior and properties. The Unified Soil Classification System (USCS) is the most likely choice for the classification of very weak rock mass to soil-like material because of its accepted use in tunnel engineering projects and its ability to predict soil-like material behavior underground. A correlation between the RMR and USCS systems was developed by comparing underground geotechnical RMR mapping to laboratory testing of bulk samples from the same locations, thereby assigning a numeric RMR value to the USCS classification that can be used in spreadsheet calculations and geostatistical analyses. The geotechnical classification system presented in this paper including a USCS-RMR correlation, RMR rating equations, and the Geo-Pick Strike Index is collectively introduced as the Weak Rock Mass Rating System (W-RMR). It is the authors' hope that this system will aid in the classification of weak rock masses and more usable design tools based on the RMR system. More broadly, the RMR-USCS correlation and the W-RMR system help define the transition between engineering soil and rock mass classification systems and may provide insight for geotechnical design in very weak rock masses.

  11. Multiscale imaging of carbonate rocks and upscaling for digital rock physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, H.; Lee, J. H.; Dewers, T. A.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2016-12-01

    Nano-porous geomaterials such as shales and carbonate rocks are important for subsurface emerging problems such as unconventional gas and oil resources, enhanced oil recovery, and geologic storage of CO2. In this work, integrated multiscale imaging of carbonate rocks from nanometer to centimeter scales was applied to characterize 3D pore structures using laser scanning confocal microscopy, dual focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), and micro computed tomography (micro-CT). With imaging techniques advanced for nano-pore characterization, it is critical to define representative sampling of FIB-SEM images and apply it to the thin-section or larger scale. Several texture characterization techniques are applied for segmentation clusters represented by a couple of 3D FIB-SEM image stacks per each cluster. With primary pore textures honored, 3D digital pore networks are reconstructed using several stochastic approaches. In particular, one of 3D FIB-SEM image stacks was used to generate stochastic ensemble members using an image quilting technique based on the multipoint statistics. For efficient stochastic realizations of nano-porous carbonate rock we then applied a dimension reduction method to reduce the dimension of the stochastic members. Lattice Boltzmann simulations and several analyses of characteristics of pore structures are used to obtain permeability and multipoint statistics at several different scales. Upscaling of permeability to the Darcy scale (e.g., the thin-section scale) with image dataset will be discussed with emphasis on understanding microfracture-matrix interaction, representative volume for FIB-SEM sampling, and multiphase flow and reactive transport. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. 3D surface roughness recreation and data processing of granitic rocks and claystones, potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buocz, Ildikó; Török, Ákos; Rozgonyi-Boissinot, Nikoletta

    2015-04-01

    The determination and modelling of the stability of rock slopes, tunnels, or underground spaces, i.e. radioactive waste disposal facilities, is an important task in engineering. The appropriate estimation of the mechanical parameters for a realistic description of the behaviour of rocks results in higher safety and more economic design. The failure of stability is primarily due to the shear failure of the rock masses along fractures and joints: therefore the correct determination of the shear strength is crucial. One of the most important parameters influencing the shear strength along rock joints is their surface roughness. Although the quantification of surface roughness has been an open question during the past century, several attempts have been made, starting with 2D and continuing with 3D measurements, to provide engineers with a method for determining shear strength numerically. As technology evolved, the 3D methods became more popular and several scientists started to investigate the surface properties through laser scanning and different photogrammetrical methods. This paper shows a photogrammetric method for the 3D digital recreation of joint surfaces of granitic rock and claystone, both potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal. The rocks derived from Bátaapáti (South Hungary) and Mont Terri (North Switzerland) respectively. The samples are laboratory scaled specimens with an areal size of 50x50 mm. The software used is called ShapeMetrix3D, developed by 3GSM GmbH in Austria. The major steps of the creation of the 3D picture are presented, as well as the following data processing which leads to the quantification of the 3D surface roughness.

  13. Finding the Balance: Fertility Control for the Management of Fragmented Populations of a Threatened Rock-Wallaby Species

    OpenAIRE

    Nicole Willers; Martin, Graeme B.; Phill Matson; Mawson, Peter R.; Keith Morris; Roberta Bencini

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Black-flanked rock-wallabies (Petrogale lateralis lateralis) can reach high numbers in fragmented populations in the West Australian wheat-belt, where they can damage crops and cause habitat degradation. As they are threatened, we wanted a non-permanent control method that did not adversely affect the body condition of treated females compared to untreated females, using body condition as an indicator of general health and fitness. We gave adult female rock-wallabies deslorelin...

  14. Alternative Neutron Detection Testing Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-04-08

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. Most currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large area neutron detector. This type of neutron detector is used in the TSA and other RPMs installed in international locations and in the Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation RPMs deployed primarily for domestic applications. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world and, thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. These technologies are: 1) Boron trifluoride-filled proportional counters, 2) Boron-lined proportional counters, 3) Lithium-loaded glass fibers, and 4) Coated wavelength-shifting plastic fibers. Reported here is a summary of the testing carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on these technologies to date, as well as measurements on 3He tubes at various pressures. Details on these measurements are available in the referenced reports. Sponsors of these tests include the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and the Department of Defense (DoD), as well as internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory funds.

  15. New approaches in the indirect quantification of thermal rock properties in sedimentary basins: the well-log perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Balling, Niels; Förster, Andrea

    Numerical temperature models generated for geodynamic studies as well as for geothermal energy solutions heavily depend on rock thermal properties. Best practice for the determination of those parameters is the measurement of rock samples in the laboratory. Given the necessity to enlarge databases...

  16. Rock Pore Structure as Main Reason of Rock Deterioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrášik Martin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Crashed or dimensional rocks have been used as natural construction material, decoration stone or as material for artistic sculptures. Especially old historical towns not only in Slovakia have had experiences with use of stones for construction purposes for centuries. The whole buildings were made from dimensional stone, like sandstone, limestone or rhyolite. Pavements were made especially from basalt, andesite, rhyolite or granite. Also the most common modern construction material - concrete includes large amounts of crashed rock, especially limestone, dolostone and andesite.

  17. Design and development of a dust dispersion chamber to quantify the dispersibility of rock dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Inoka E; Sapko, Michael J; Harris, Marcia L; Zlochower, Isaac A; Weiss, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    Dispersible rock dust must be applied to the surfaces of entries in underground coal mines in order to inert the coal dust entrained or made airborne during an explosion and prevent propagating explosions. 30 CFR. 75.2 states that "… [rock dust particles] when wetted and dried will not cohere to form a cake which will not be dispersed into separate particles by a light blast of air …" However, a proper definition or quantification of "light blast of air" is not provided. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has, consequently, designed a dust dispersion chamber to conduct quantitative laboratory-scale dispersibility experiments as a screening tool for candidate rock dusts. A reproducible pulse of air is injected into the chamber and across a shallow tray of rock dust. The dust dispersed and carried downwind is monitored. The mass loss of the dust tray and the airborne dust measurements determine the relative dispersibility of the dust with respect to a Reference rock dust. This report describes the design and the methodology to evaluate the relative dispersibility of rock dusts with and without anti-caking agents. Further, the results of this study indicate that the dispersibility of rock dusts varies with particle size, type of anti-caking agent used, and with the untapped bulk density. Untreated rock dusts, when wetted and dried forming a cake that was much less dispersible than the reference rock dust used in supporting the 80% total incombustible content rule.

  18. DEM analysis of the effect of joint geometry on the shear behavior of rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mingjing; Liu, Jun; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Li, Tao

    2017-11-01

    In order to comprehensively investigate the effect of different joint geometries on the shear behavior of rocks, the Distinct Element Method (DEM) was utilized with a new bond contact model. A series of direct shear tests on coplanar and non-coplanar jointed rocks was simulated using the PFC2D software, which incorporates our bond contact model. Both coplanar jointed rocks with different joint persistence and non-coplanar ones with different joint inclinations were simulated and investigated numerically. The numerical results were compared and discussed with relevant laboratory tests as well as some reported numerical works. The results show that for coplanar jointed rocks, the peak shear stress decreases nonlinearly with the joint persistence, and the failure process can be divided into four stages: elastic shearing phase, crack propagation, failure of rock bridges, and residual phase. For non-coplanar jointed rocks, as the absolute value of the inclination angle of the rock joints increases, its shear strength increases, changing the failure patterns and the length of new fractures between existing cracks. When the absolute value increases from 15° to 30°, the average shear capacity increases the most as 39%, while the shear capacity increases the least as 2.9% when the absolute value changes from 45° to 60°. There is a good consistency of the failure patterns obtained from experiments and numerical tests. All these demonstrate that the DEM can be further applied to rock mechanics and practical rock engineering with confidence in the future.

  19. Analysis of controlling parameters for shear behavior of rock joints with FLAC3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Prasoon

    The research investigation is conducted to perform an analysis of sensitivity of parameters affecting the strength of joints in rock mass. Friction angle, normal stiffness, shear stiffness and shear displacement are the parameters analyzed with respect to shear strength of rock joints. Discontinuities have an important influence on the deformational behavior of rock systems; hence, proper consideration of the physical and mechanical properties of discontinuities is necessary during experimental investigation, in order to correctly evaluate the shear behavior. These parameters are utilized to simulate the in situ stress condition in numerical modeling, which is important for safe and economical design of various engineering constructions. These concerns require accurate quantification of shear strength of unfilled and in-filled joints, proper understanding of the basic mechanics of discontinuity and the principals involved in their shear deformation. This can be achieved through laboratory testing on natural rock core samples. In the present work, the detailed account of test results of direct shear tests performed on rock joints is presented. Rock samples are obtained by core drilling in an underground mine, in Nevada. These rock samples, containing joint, are used to perform direct shear strength test. Calibration of numerical model is done on average values obtained from direct shear strength test. Analysis of sensitivity of parameters effecting shear strength of rock is done in FLAC3D shear test environment. A numerical parametric study is done, according to the Mohr-Coulomb constitutive model, and results obtained are plotted to estimate performance of rock joints.

  20. Rheology of rock salt for salt tectonics modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Yuan Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Numerical modeling of salt tectonics is a rapidly evolving field; however, the constitutive equations to model long-term rock salt rheology in nature still remain controversial. Firstly, we built a database about the strain rate versus the differential stress through collecting the data from salt creep experiments at a range of temperatures (20–200 °C in laboratories. The aim is to collect data about salt deformation in nature, and the flow properties can be extracted from the data in laboratory experiments. Moreover, as an important preparation for salt tectonics modeling, a numerical model based on creep experiments of rock salt was developed in order to verify the specific model using the Abaqus package. Finally, under the condition of low differential stresses, the deformation mechanism would be extrapolated and discussed according to microstructure research. Since the studies of salt deformation in nature are the reliable extrapolation of laboratory data, we simplified the rock salt rheology to dislocation creep corresponding to power law creep (n = 5 with the appropriate material parameters in the salt tectonic modeling.

  1. Solution chemistry and scaling in hot dry rock geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tester, J.W.; Holley, C.E. Jr.; Blatz, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    Field and laboratory experiments have focused on measuring the kinetics and equilibria associated with the transport of minerals from granite to circulating aqueous solutions. Presently two wellbores drilled to a depth of approximately 10,000 ft in the Valles Caldera region of the New Mexico Jemez mountains permit closed-loop circulation of fluid through a hydraulically fractured granite geothermal reservoir containing rock at 200/sup 0/C. Field measurements have dealth primarily with the buildup of dissolved and suspended material in water as it is circulated through the fractured region. Chemical treatment methods, involving the selective dissolution of quartz (SiO/sub 2/), a major component of granite, with sodium carbonate solutions have been employed to increase the in situ permeability of the rock matrix. Laboratory measurements have concentrated on identifying the effects of temperature, pH and chemical additives on the solubility of granite samples taken from the two test wellbores. Promising results from these solubility experiments are tested in a laboratory-scale circulating system to examine kinetic parameters influencing rock dissolution and reprecipitation (scaling) under conditions that simulate the in situ reservoir and heat exchange environments.

  2. Posted summaries of marital therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heins, T

    1978-12-01

    Summaries of marital therapy sessions, similar to those used in group psychotherapy by Yalom, were posted to reach couples three or four days after each session. The summaries of 600 to 4,000 words included a narrative account of the session and some editorial comment by the therapist. Couples completed a questionnaire assessing the use of the summaries. Replies to questionnaires and clinical impressions indicate the summaries had good acceptability. Couples felt the summaries increased their focus on marital problems between the sessions and provided helpful clarification.

  3. The Institute for Rock Magnetism Facility Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M. J.; Sølheid, P.; Bowles, J. A.; Moskowitz, B. M.; Feinberg, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Institute for Rock Magnetism (IRM) is one of 19 National Multi-User Facilities supported by the Instruments and Facilities program of NSF for geoscience research that requires complex, expensive and advanced instrumentation. Visiting and in-house researchers at the IRM have access to sensitive laboratory instruments for magnetometry, magnetic microscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy, for carrying out a wide variety of experiments under a range of applied field and temperature conditions. Results are used to gain insight into a very diverse assortment of natural materials and phenomena including biomagnetism, environmental magnetism, petrofabrics, nanophase materials, shocked materials, and paleomagnetism of terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials. A comprehensive laboratory database has been in operation since 2004, storing detailed experimental data and metadata for more than 250 facility users, with measurements on over 50,000 specimens, including over one million remanence measurements and 45,000 hysteresis loops. Custom software tools provide consistent and reliable handling of basic data processing (e.g., mass normalization and unit conversion), as well as more advanced interactive analysis (e.g., deconvolution of u-channel paleomagnetic data; filtering and statistical tests for high-field nonlinearity in calculating hysteresis loop parameters; thermal fluctuation tomography using T-dependent switching-field distributions from backfield remanence measurements or hysteresis loops). Users are also able to access their data and the custom software tools remotely once they leave the IRM for their home institutions. A key advantage of an integrated database/software system for a facility like the IRM is that it provides a rapid and automatic means of combining different kinds of data measured on different instruments. An important design consideration in the development of the facility database has been structural compatibility with the community-wide Mag

  4. Comparison of Crack Initiation, Propagation and Coalescence Behavior of Concrete and Rock Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Enes; Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal

    2017-04-01

    There are many previously studies carried out to identify crack initiation, propagation and coalescence behavior of different type of rocks. Most of these studies aimed to understand and predict the probable instabilities on different engineering structures such as mining galleries or tunnels. For this purpose, in these studies relatively smaller natural rock and synthetic rock-like models were prepared and then the required laboratory tests were performed to obtain their strength parameters. By using results provided from these models, researchers predicted the rock mass behavior under different conditions. However, in the most of these studies, rock materials and models were considered as contains none or very few discontinuities and structural flaws. It is well known that rock masses naturally are extremely complex with respect to their discontinuities conditions and thus it is sometimes very difficult to understand and model their physical and mechanical behavior. In addition, some vuggy rock materials such as basalts and limestones also contain voids and gaps having various geometric properties. Providing that the failure behavior of these type of rocks controlled by the crack initiation, propagation and coalescence formed from their natural voids and gaps, the effect of these voids and gaps over failure behavior of rocks should be investigated. Intact rocks are generally preferred due to relatively easy side of their homogeneous characteristics in numerical modelling phases. However, it is very hard to extract intact samples from vuggy rocks because of their complex pore sizes and distributions. In this study, the feasibility of concrete samples to model and mimic the failure behavior vuggy rocks was investigated. For this purpose, concrete samples were prepared at a mixture of %65 cement dust and %35 water and their physical and mechanical properties were determined by laboratory experiments. The obtained physical and mechanical properties were used to

  5. AFSC/RACE/FBEP/Laurel: Substrate preference and delayed settlement in northern rock sole larvae Lepidopsetta polyxystra

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is from laboratory experiments testing the onset and ontogenetic changes in habitat selection of pre- and post-settling northern rock sole (NRS) larvae,...

  6. Polygon/Cracked Sedimentary Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    4 December 2004 Exposures of sedimentary rock are quite common on the surface of Mars. Less common, but found in many craters in the regions north and northwest of the giant basin, Hellas, are sedimentary rocks with distinct polygonal cracks in them. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example from the floor of an unnamed crater near 21.0oS, 311.9oW. Such cracks might have formed by desiccation as an ancient lake dried up, or they might be related to ground ice freeze/thaw cycles or some other stresses placed on the original sediment or the rock after it became lithified. The 300 meter scale bar is about 328 yards long. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  7. Idaho National Laboratory Mission Accomplishments, Fiscal Year 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Todd Randall [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wright, Virginia Latta [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A summary of mission accomplishments for the research organizations at the Idaho National Laboratory for FY 2015. Areas include Nuclear Energy, National and Homeland Security, Science and Technology Addressing Broad DOE Missions; Collaborations; and Stewardship and Operation of Research Facilities.

  8. The permeability of heterogeneous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvadurai, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Darcy's original concept of permeability is largely associated with estimation of the hydraulic conductivity characteristics of isotropic and homogeneous porous media where the fluid flow characteristics can be estimated by appeal to a single scalar measure. Naturally occurring geomaterials are heterogeneous and the estimation of the effective permeability characteristics of such geomaterials presents a challenge not only in terms of the experimental procedures that should be used to ensure flow through the porous medium but also in the correct use of the theoretical concepts needed to accurately interpret the data. Relatively widely referred to rocks such as Indiana Limestone can exhibit spatial heterogeneity in the permeability characteristics even though the visual appearance can suggest the absence of such spatial and directional attributes (Selvadurai and Selvadurai, 2010). Argillaceous rocks such as the Cobourg Limestone found in southern Ontario, Canada can display hydraulic heterogeneity that is attributed to the presence of dolomitic and calcite nodular regions separated by calcite rock partings that contain an argillaceous component (Figure 1). Also, these rocks have extremely low permeability that requires the use of transient hydraulic pulse tests for the estimation of permeability. The performance of such pulse tests will be influenced by the bulk compressibility and bulk porosity of the porous skeleton consisting of the identifiable phases and their spatial distributions. The concepts of effective compressibilities and porosities therefore needs to be introduced if convenient procedures are to be developed for the accurate interpretation of even bench scale experiments (Selvadurai and Gɫowacki, 2017). The paper will describe both experimental and theoretical approaches for interpreting the effective Darcy permeability of the heterogeneous rocks using both experimental and computational approaches. In particular, the applicability of the "Geometric

  9. Advanced energy projects; FY 1995 research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The AEP Division supports projects to explore novel energy-related concepts which are typically at an early stage of scientific development, and high-risk, exploratory concepts. Topical areas presently receiving support are: novel materials for energy technology, renewable and biodegradable materials, exploring uses of new scientific discoveries, alternate pathways to energy efficiency, alternative energy sources, and innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction. There were 46 research projects during FY 1995; ten were initiated during that fiscal year. The summaries are separated into grant and laboratory programs, and small business innovation research programs.

  10. Evaluation of Rock Joint Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audy, Ondřej; Ficker, Tomáš

    2017-10-01

    A computer method for evaluation of rock joint coefficients is described and several applications are presented. The method is based on two absolute numerical indicators that are formed by means of the Fourier replicas of rock joint profiles. The first indicator quantifies the vertical depth of profiles and the second indicator classifies wavy character of profiles. The absolute indicators have replaced the formerly used relative indicators that showed some artificial behavior in some cases. This contribution is focused on practical computations testing the functionality of the newly introduced indicators.

  11. Occupational Health Hazards in the Interventional Laboratory: Progress Report of the Multispecialty Occupational Health Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    fluoroscopy laboratories. The MSOHG was formed in 2005 to address the occupational hazards of interventionalists, with particular emphasis on the...mutual benefit. SUMMARY The interventional laboratory presents occupational hazards to operators and staff that must be acknowledged, understood and

  12. Leg 179 summary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pettigrew, T.J.; Casey, J.F.; Miller, D.J.; Araki, E.; Boissonnas, R.; Busby, R.; Einaudi, F.; Gerdom, M.; Guo, Z.P.; Hopkins, H.; Myers, G.; Rao, D.G.; Shibata, T.; Thy, P.

    Pettigrew, T.L., Casey, J.F., Miller, D.J., et al., 1999 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Initial Reports Volume 179 1. LEG 179 SUMMARY 1 Shipboard Scientific Party 2 ABSTRACT Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 179 set out with two primary objectives... a hole, then simultaneously deepen that hole and stabilize its walls with casing. This system is an adaptation of pneu- matically driven drilling systems that have successfully drilled in envi- ronments not unlike those that present our greatest...

  13. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ({bar p}) physics presented at the LEAP `92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, {bar N}N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, {bar N} annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy {bar p}`s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with {bar p} (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new {bar p} facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ({ge} 2 GeV/c).

  14. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ([bar p]) physics presented at the LEAP '92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, [bar N]N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, [bar N] annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy [bar p]'s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with [bar p] (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new [bar p] facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ([ge] 2 GeV/c).

  15. Lunar laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

  16. Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory (Saxton Laboratory) is a state-of-the-art facility for conducting transportation operations research. The laboratory...

  17. 2015 Cross-Domain Deterrence Seminar Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-11

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) hosted the 2nd Annual Cross-Domain Deterrence Seminar on November 17th, 2015 in Livermore, CA. The seminar was sponsored by LLNL’s Center for Global Security Research (CGSR), National Security Office (NSO), and Global Security program. This summary covers the seminar’s panels and subsequent discussions.

  18. FWP executive summaries: Basic energy sciences materials sciences programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samara, G.A.

    1996-02-01

    This report provides an Executive Summary of the various elements of the Materials Sciences Program which is funded by the Division of Materials Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

  19. Summary I - accelerator ion sources, fundamentals and diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moehs, Douglas P.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    The 11th International Symposium on the Production and Neutralization of Negative Ions and Beams was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 12-15, 2006 and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This summary covers the first three oral sessions of the symposium.

  20. Summaries of FY 1980 research in the chemical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-09-01

    Brief summaries are given of research programs being pursued by DOE laboratories and offsite facilities in the fields of photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations, analysis, and chemical engineering sciences. No actual data is given. Indexes of topics, offsite institutions, and investigators are included. (DLC)

  1. 3D Printing and Digital Rock Physics for the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, M. J.; Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    Imaging techniques for the analysis of porous structures have revolutionized our ability to quantitatively characterize geomaterials. For example, digital representations of rock from CT images and physics modeling based on these pore structures provide the opportunity to further advance our quantitative understanding of fluid flow, geomechanics, and geochemistry, and the emergence of coupled behaviors. Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, has revolutionized production of custom parts, to the point where parts might be cheaper to print than to make by traditional means in a plant and ship. Some key benefits of additive manufacturing include short lead times, complex shapes, parts on demand, zero required inventory and less material waste. Even subtractive processing, such as milling and etching, may be economized by additive manufacturing. For the geosciences, recent advances in 3D printing technology may be co-opted to print reproducible porous structures derived from CT-imaging of actual rocks for experimental testing. The use of 3D printed microstructure allows us to surmount typical problems associated with sample-to-sample heterogeneity that plague rock physics testing and to test material response independent from pore-structure variability. Together, imaging, digital rocks and 3D printing potentially enables a new workflow for understanding coupled geophysical processes in a real, but well-defined setting circumventing typical issues associated with reproducibility, enabling full characterization and thus connection of physical phenomena to structure. In this talk we will discuss the possibilities that the marriage of these technologies can bring to geosciences, including examples from our current research initiatives in developing constitutive laws for transport and geomechanics via digital rock physics. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of

  2. Geomechaical Behavior of Shale Rocks Under High Pressure and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamor Lora, R.; Ghazanfari, E.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanical properties of shale are demanding parameters for a number of engineering and geomechanical purposes. Borehole stability modeling, geophysics, shale oil and shale gas reservoirs, and underground storage of CO2 in shale formations are some of these potential applications to name a few. The growing interest in these reservoirs, as a source for hydrocarbons production, has resulted in an increasing demand for fundamental rock property data. These rocks are known to be non-linear materials. There are many factors, including induced cracks and their orientation, partial saturation, material heterogeneity and anisotropy, plasticity, strain rate, and temperature that may have an impact on the geomechanical behaviour of these shales.Experimental results and theoretical considerations have shown that the elastic moduli are not single-value, well-defined parameters for a given rock. Finding suitable values for these parameters is of vital importance in many geomechanical applications. In this study, shale heterogeneity and its geomechanical properties are explored through an extensive laboratory experimental program. A series of hydrostatic and triaxial tests were performed in order to evaluate the elasticity, viscoplasticity, yielding and failure response of Marcellus shale samples as a function of pressure and temperature. Additional characterization includes mineralogy, porosity, and permeability measurements. The shale samples were taken from a Marcellus outcrop at State Game Lands 252, located in Lycoming and Union counties, Allenwood, Pennsylvania. Laboratory experiments have shown that creep behaviour is highly sensitive to temperature. Furthermore, the non-linear nature of these rocks reveals interesting behaviour of the elastic moduli highly dependent on stress history of the rock. Results from cyclic triaxial tests point out the different behaviour between 1st-loading and unloading-reloading cycles. Experimental results of these Marcellus shales are

  3. Experimental Study of the Shear Strength of Bonded Concrete-Rock Interfaces: Surface Morphology and Scale Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouzannar, Hussein; Bost, Marion; Leroux, Madly; Virely, Didier

    2017-10-01

    The shear strength of the concrete-rock interface is a key factor to justify the stability of a hydraulic structure foundation. The Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion is usually used as shear strength and evaluated by extrapolating shear tests results carried out in a laboratory on small-sized samples. This paper presents an experimental study on the concrete-rock interface shear behavior. The effect of rock surface morphology on shear behavior was studied by performing laboratory direct shear tests on prepared square samples with a previously characterized rock surface. The scale effect and the test conditions were also studied by comparing the results to those obtained by performing usual laboratory shear tests on cored samples at lower scale. The tested interfaces were composed of the same concrete and granite and have a natural rock surface. The results displayed that the peak shear strength is strongly dependent on the concrete-rock bonding, the rock surface morphology and the applied normal load. A new surface morphology description tool was developed in order to characterize the main waviness. Moreover, the concrete-rock shear behavior at medium scale was reproduced by a 2D finite elements model to study the stress distribution along the sheared interface. Under low normal load, the concrete-rock adhesion is thus progressively mobilized according to the waviness on the rock surface and the local shear failure mechanisms depend on the type of this main waviness. Consequently the shear strength of a concrete-rock interface must be analyzed with respect to the various morphology aspects on its rock surface.

  4. Improved Inversion of Needle Probe Data for the Determination of Rock Thermal Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bording, Thue Sylvester; Balling, N.; Nielsen, S.B.

    Heat flow, thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity are essential properties in subsurface temperature modelling. We present initial results of a novel inversion approach for laboratory measurements of rock thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity by the needle probe method. Instead...... of analytical expressions, we use a numerical finite element procedure for the forward temperature response. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo Metropolis Hastings inversion procedure produces estimates of rock thermal parameters with uncertainties. .....

  5. New Approaches for Teaching Soil and Rock Mechanics Using Information and Communication Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Tomás, Roberto; Cano, Miguel; Santamarta, Juan C.; Hernández-Gutiérrez, Luis E.

    2015-01-01

    Soil and rock mechanics are disciplines with a strong conceptual and methodological basis. Initially, when engineering students study these subjects, they have to understand new theoretical phenomena, which are explained through mathematical and/or physical laws (e.g. consolidation process, water flow through a porous media). In addition to the study of these phenomena, students have to learn how to carry out estimations of soil and rock parameters in laboratories according to standard tests....

  6. Instrumentation program for rock mechanics and spent fuel tests at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, H.R.; Hustrulid, W.H.; Simonson, R.

    1978-08-01

    This report contains a discussion of an instrumentation and rock mechanics program recommended for consideration as part of the overall Lawrence Livermore nuclear waste storage program at NTS. It includes a discussion of (1) rationale for the heater tests, spent fuel facility evaluation, heated room tests, (2) recommended instrumentation types together with estimated delivery schedules, (3) recommended instrumentation layouts, (4) other proposed rock mechanics tests both laboratory and in situ, and (5) data acquisition and reduction requirements.

  7. Intern Summary Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Topics covered include: Probe Station Antenna Range; LERCIP 2004 Summary; L.E.R.C.I.P. Internship Summary; Hubble Space Telescope Bi-Stem Thermal Shield Analyses; GRABER - the Duct Tape of Space and JIMO Heat Conducting Foam; CDF and PDF Comparison Between Humacao, Puerto Rico and Florida; Development of the On-board Aircraft Network; Development of the Planar Inlet Design and Analysis Process (PINDAP); An Overview of My 2004 Summer Internship [Non-destructive Evaluation]; My Summer Experience as an Administrative Officer Assistant [in the Safety and Assurance Directorate Office]; Programming an Experiment Control System; Reducing the Cation Exchange Capacity of Lithium Clay to Form Better Dispersed; Polymer-Clay Nanocomposites; Feasibility of EB Welded Hastelloy X and Combination of Refractory Metals; My Work in the NASA Glenn History Office and Records Management Office; Education, Technology, and Media: A Peak into My Summer Internship at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio; [The Engineering and Technical Services Directorate at the Glenn Research Center]; Drinking Water Database; Design of an EXB Probe; and Texturing Carbon-carbon Composite Radiator Surfaces Utilizing Atomic Oxygen.

  8. Multiscale properties of unconventional reservoir rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, W. F.

    A multidisciplinary study of unconventional reservoir rocks is presented, providing the theory, forward modeling and Bayesian inverse modeling approaches, and laboratory protocols to characterize clay-rich, low porosity and permeability shales and mudstones within an anisotropic framework. Several physical models characterizing oil and gas shales are developed across multiple length scales, ranging from microscale phenomena, e.g. the effect of the cation exchange capacity of reactive clay mineral surfaces on water adsorption isotherms, and the effects of infinitesimal porosity compaction on elastic and electrical properties, to meso-scale phenomena, e.g. the role of mineral foliations, tortuosity of conduction pathways and the effects of organic matter (kerogen and hydrocarbon fractions) on complex conductivity and their connections to intrinsic electrical anisotropy, as well as the macro-scale electrical and elastic properties including formulations for the complex conductivity tensor and undrained stiffness tensor within the context of effective stress and poroelasticity. Detailed laboratory protocols are described for sample preparation and measurement of these properties using spectral induced polarization (SIP) and ultrasonics for the anisotropic characterization of shales for both unjacketed samples under benchtop conditions and jacketed samples under differential loading. An ongoing study of the effects of kerogen maturation through hydrous pyrolysis on the complex conductivity is also provided in review. Experimental results are catalogued and presented for various unconventional formations in North America including the Haynesville, Bakken, and Woodford shales.

  9. Anisotropy of strength and deformability of fractured rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Noorian Bidgoli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anisotropy of the strength and deformation behaviors of fractured rock masses is a crucial issue for design and stability assessments of rock engineering structures, due mainly to the non-uniform and non-regular geometries of the fracture systems. However, no adequate efforts have been made to study this issue due to the current practical impossibility of laboratory tests with samples of large volumes containing many fractures, and the difficulty for controlling reliable initial and boundary conditions for large-scale in situ tests. Therefore, a reliable numerical predicting approach for evaluating anisotropy of fractured rock masses is needed. The objective of this study is to systematically investigate anisotropy of strength and deformability of fractured rocks, which has not been conducted in the past, using a numerical modeling method. A series of realistic two-dimensional (2D discrete fracture network (DFN models were established based on site investigation data, which were then loaded in different directions, using the code UDEC of discrete element method (DEM, with changing confining pressures. Numerical results show that strength envelopes and elastic deformability parameters of tested numerical models are significantly anisotropic, and vary with changing axial loading and confining pressures. The results indicate that for design and safety assessments of rock engineering projects, the directional variations of strength and deformability of the fractured rock mass concerned must be treated properly with respect to the directions of in situ stresses. Traditional practice for simply positioning axial orientation of tunnels in association with principal stress directions only may not be adequate for safety requirements. Outstanding issues of the present study and suggestions for future study are also presented.

  10. Mineralogical comparisons of experimental results investigating the biological impacts on rock transport processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Doris; Milodowski, Antoni E; West, Julia M; Wragg, Joanna; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the influence of microbes on fluid transport in sedimentary and igneous host rock environments. It particularly focuses on granodiorite rock (Äspö; Sweden) and mudstone (Horonobe; Japan) that were utilised during laboratory-based column experiments. The results showed that biofilms form on both rock types in low nutrient conditions. Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy showed that the morphology of biofilaments varied from filamentous meshwork (in crushed granodiorite column experiments) to clusters of rod-like cells (fracture surfaces in mudstone). X-ray diffraction analysis of the fine fractions (containment and migration of contaminants.

  11. Investigations of some rock stress measuring techniques and the stress field in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanssen, Tor Harald

    1997-12-31

    Rock stresses are important to the safe construction and operation of all man-made structures in rock, whether In mining, civil or petroleum engineering. The crucial issue is their relative magnitude and orientation. This thesis develops equipment and methods for further rock stress assessment and reevaluates existing overcoring rock stress measurements, and relates this information to the present geological setting. Both laboratory work and field work are involved. In the field, rock stresses are measured by the overcoring and the hydraulic fracturing technique. An observation technique for assessing likely high stresses is developed. The field data refer to several hydropower projects and to some offshore hydrocarbon fields. The principal sections are: (1) Tectonic setting in the western Fennoscandia, (2) Triaxial rock stress measurements by overcoring using the NTH cell (a strain gauge cell developed at the Norwegian technical university in Trondheim and based on the CSIR cell of the South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research), (3) Laboratory testing of the NTH cell, (4) Quality ranking of stresses measured by the NTH cell, (4) Recalculated rock stresses and implications to the regional stress field, (5) Hydraulic fracturing stress measurements. 113 refs., 98 figs., 62 tabs.

  12. The determination of the acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks from compressional velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, R.D.

    1969-01-01

    A statistical analysis was made of the relationship of various acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks to compressional wave velocities for data obtained in a volcanic region in Nevada. Some additional samples, chiefly granitic rocks, were also included in the study to extend the range of parameters and the variety of siliceous rock types sampled. Laboratory acoustic measurements obtained on 62 dry core samples were grouped with similar measurements obtained from geophysical logging devices at several depth intervals in a hole from which 15 of the core samples had been obtained. The effects of lithostatic and hydrostatic load on changing the rock acoustic parameters measured in the hole were noticeable when compared with the laboratory measurements on the same core. The results of the analyses determined by grouping all of the data, however, indicate that dynamic Young's, shear and bulk modulus, shear velocity, shear and compressional characteristic impedance, as well as amplitude and energy reflection coefficients may be reliably estimated on the basis of the compressional wave velocities of the rocks investigated. Less precise estimates can be made of density based on the rock compressional velocity. The possible extension of these relationships to include many siliceous rocks is suggested. ?? 1969.

  13. MAP3S precipitation chemistry network: sixth periodic summary report (1982)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothert, J.E.; Dana, M.T.

    1983-07-01

    This report contains complete field and chemical data from the MAP3S Precipitation Chemistry Network for the year 1982. Included is an update on network status and a summary of the USGS blind sample analysis program and laboratory sample exchanges during 1982. The statistical summary is deferred to a forthcoming publication.

  14. Plant Communities of Rough Rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Linda

    A unit of study on plants grown in the Navajo community of Rough Rock, Arizona, is presented in sketches providing the common Navajo name for the plant, a literal English translation, the English name of the plant, and the Latin name. A brief description of each plant includes where the plant grows, how the Navajos use the plant, and the color and…

  15. Stress wave propagation in rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E

    1977-01-01

    Earth penetration, design and hardening of structures to explosive or earthquake-induced ground shock effects, rapid excavation, and in situ preparation of coal, shale, or geothermal deposits are representative problems in which accurate constitutive descriptions of the geological medium are required to provide meaningful predictions. The rock or rock masses involved undergo complex, finite amplitude deformation during the process of transient dynamic loading, and quasi-static experimental compression techniques are normally used to provide much of the necessary data base. Strain rates typically range between 10/sup 1//s and 10/sup 5//s in the problems of interest, however, and further studies are required to determine the importance of rate dependence in the mechanical constitutive behavior of rock. Material response at the higher strain rates can be investigated with impact generated stress waves where controlled strain rates between about 10/sup 4//s to 10/sup 7//s can be achieved. Experimental methods have been developed to conduct and analyze impact-induced shock wave, ramp wave, and tensile fracture studies. Experimental results on some select crustal silicate and carbonate rocks show that strain rate dependence and the processes of phase transformation, compressive yielding, and fracture are important features in the dynamic constitutive response.

  16. Metamorphic Rocks in West Irian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegen, van der G.

    1971-01-01

    Low-grade metamorphics of West Irian occur to the east of Geelvink Bay associated with two narrow belts of basic and ultrabasic igneous rocks which represent ophiolitic suites of an eugeosynclinical development beginning in Early Mesozoic time. In both of these belts there are indications of

  17. Rock Music and Music Videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendren; Strasburger

    1993-10-01

    Sex, violence, sexual violence, drugs, suicide, satanic worship, and racism are common themes in modern rock lyrics. The authors examine their effect on adolescent development and identity, concluding with a discussion of the roles of parents and health care professionals in addressing the problem.

  18. Los abuelos de nuestro rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobo Celnik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Los Yetis. Una bomba atómica a go go. La historia de los abuelos de nuestro rock. Diego Londoño; Pulso & Letra Editores, Instituto para el Desarrollo de Antioquia, Instituto de Cultura y Patrimonio de Antioquia, 2014, 98 págs., fotografías.

  19. Simulation of rock deformation behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Я. И. Рудаев

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A task of simulating the deformation behavior of geomaterials under compression with account of over-extreme branch has been addressed. The physical nature of rock properties variability as initially inhomogeneous material is explained by superposition of deformation and structural transformations of evolutionary type within open nonequilibrium systems. Due to this the description of deformation and failure of rock is related to hierarchy of instabilities within the system being far from thermodynamic equilibrium. It is generally recognized, that the energy function of the current stress-strain state is a superposition of potential component and disturbance, which includes the imperfection parameter accounting for defects not only existing in the initial state, but also appearing under load. The equation of state has been obtained by minimizing the energy function by the order parameter. The imperfection parameter is expressed through the strength deterioration, which is viewed as the internal parameter of state. The evolution of strength deterioration has been studied with the help of Fokker – Planck equation, which steady form corresponds to rock statical stressing. Here the diffusion coefficient is assumed to be constant, while the function reflecting internal sliding and loosening of the geomaterials is assumed as an antigradient of elementary integration catastrophe. Thus the equation of state is supplemented with a correlation establishing relationship between parameters of imperfection and strength deterioration. While deformation process is identified with the change of dissipative media, coupled with irreversible structural fluctuations. Theoretical studies are proven with experimental data obtained by subjecting certain rock specimens to compression.

  20. Compressibility of granulated rock salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinebaugh, R.E.

    1979-08-01

    Crushed rock salt will be used extensively at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as a material for backfilling underground openings. This document addresses one of the characteristics of crushed salt which must be known to assess the consequences of its usage, namely, compressibility.