WorldWideScience

Sample records for robusta coffee beans

  1. Polysaccharides of green Arabica and Robusta coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M; Reimann, S; Trovato, V; Redgwell, R J

    2001-01-15

    Two independent procedures for the quantitative determination of the polysaccharide content of Arabica Caturra (Coffea arabica var. Caturra) and Robusta ROM (Coffea canephora var. ROM) green coffee beans showed that they both contained identical amounts of polysaccharide. Cell wall material (CWM) was prepared from the beans and partial solubilisation of component polysaccharides was effected by sequential extraction with water, 1 M KOH, 0.3% NaClO2, 4 M KOH and 8 M KOH. The monosaccharide compositions of the CWMs were similar, although Arabica beans contained slightly more mannose than Robusta. In the latter, more arabinogalactan was solubilised during preparation of the CWM and the water-soluble fraction of the CWM contained higher amounts of galactomannan than in Arabica. Linkage analysis indicated that the galactomannans possessed unbranched to branched mannose ratios between 14:1 and 30:1 which is higher than previously reported. No major difference in the structural features of the galactomannans between species was found. The arabinogalactans were heterogeneous both with regard to the degree of branching and the degree of polymerisation of their arabinan side-chains. Compared to Arabica, Robusta appeared to contain greater amounts of arabinogalactans with longer side chains. It is concluded that there was no detectable difference between the Arabica and Robusta varieties of this study in their absolute polysaccharide content or in the gross structural features of their galactomannans. Differences were apparent both in the structural features and ease of solubility of the arabinogalactans but a more detailed study of several varieties of Arabica and Robusta will be required to determine whether these differences occur consistently between species.

  2. Effect of Superheated Steam Roasting on Radical Scavenging Activity and Phenolic Content of Robusta Coffee Beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ooi Ee Shan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Robusta coffee is one of the coffee species grown in Malaysia. However, there is little research conducted on Robusta coffee beans as Arabica coffee is more popular among the consumers. Coffee is a rich source of antioxidants, therefore research on antioxidant properties of Robusta coffee beans is important to explore its market value. Nowadays, most of coffee analysis is on conventional roasted coffee which reduces their antioxidant properties. In this study, Robusta coffee beans (Coffea canephora were subjected to superheated steam roasting at 200, 220 and 240 ˚C for 20-40 min to obtain light, medium and dark roast. The effect of different roasting temperature and time on the total phenolic content (TPC and radical scavenging activity (RSA of Robusta coffee bean was investigated. Total phenolic content of coffee brews decreased with the increase of roasting degree due to the degradation of phenolic compounds. The highest phenolic content was found at 220 ˚C for 20 min. Meanwhile, brews extracted from light roasted coffee and medium roasted at 220 ˚C for 20 min showed a maximum scavenging activity than those from green coffee. Brews from dark roasted coffee showed lowest radical scavenging activity and total phenol content. Hence, based on the results from this study, the best superheated steam roasting condition is at 220 ˚C for 20 min (medium roast to achieve a maximum antioxidant activity and highest phenolic content.

  3. Discrimination of green arabica and Robusta coffee beans by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidel, Anke; von Stetten, David; Rodrigues, Carla; Máguas, Cristina; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2010-11-10

    This paper presents an approach that may be applied as an accurate and rapid tool for classifying coffee beans on the basis of the specific kahweol content. Using Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopy with 1064 nm excitation it is possible to monitor the characteristic Raman bands of kahweol in green coffee beans without chemical and physical processing of the beans. The procedure was optimized on the basis of 83 and 125 measurements of whole and ground beans, respectively, using coffee samples of two different species, Coffea arabica L. and Coffea canephora L. (var. Robusta), and different origins (Asia, Africa, and South America). The relative contribution of the kahweol in individual beans can be determined quantitatively by means of a component analysis of the spectra, yielding a spectral kahweol index (σka) that is proportional to the relative content of kahweol in a coffee bean. The reproducibility of the spectroscopic measurement and analysis was found to be 3.5%. Individual beans of the same type and origin reveal a scattering of the σka values. Nevertheless, an unambiguous distinction between Arabica and Robusta samples is possible on the basis of single-bean measurements as the σka values are greater than and less than 10 for Arabica and Robusta coffees, respectively. Measurements of whole and ground beans afforded very similar results, despite the heterogeneous distribution of kahweol within a bean. Unlike conventional analytical techniques, the single-bean sensitivity of the present approach may also allow for a rapid detection of unwanted admixtures of low-value Robusta coffee to high-quality and more expensive Arabica coffee.

  4. Elemental detection of arabica and robusta green bean coffee using laser-induced plasma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Meilina, Hesti; Hedwig, Rinda; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    The elemental detection of green bean of arabica and robusta coffee from Gayo Highland, Aceh-Indonesia, has been identified by using fundamental Nd-YAG Laser at 10 Torr of surrounding air gas pressure for distinguishing the characteristics of both coffees. As the preliminary study, we have detected the elements of K 766.49 nm, Na 588.9 nm, Ca 393.3 nm, CN band at 388.3 nm, N 337.13 nm and C 247.8 nm of both coffees. It is noticed that the order of elements concentration from highest to lowest are Ca>K>CN> Na>N> C for arabica and K>Ca>CN >Na>C>N for robusta. The emission intensity of K 766.49 nm is almost same for both of coffee. However, the emission intensity of Na 588.9 nm is lower in Arabica coffee. To distinguish the Arabica coffee and Robusta Coffee, we take the ratio intensity of K/C, Na/C, CN/C, and Ca/C. It is found that the ratio intensities of CN/C and Ca/C in arabica bean are significantly different with robusta bean. That ratio intensities can be used as a marker to discriminate kind of coffee. We also noted that the arabica green bean is 1.3 harder than robusta green bean. These findings prove that the technique of laser-induced plasma spectroscopy can be used to make rapid identification of elements in coffee and can potentially be applied to measure the concentration of blended coffee for the purpose of authentication.

  5. Recognition of spectral identifier from green coffee beans of arabica and robusta varieties using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggraeni, Karina; Nasution, Aulia; Suyanto, Hery

    2016-11-01

    Coffee is one of the world's commodity that is cultivated in more than 50 countries. Production of coffee in Indonesia is positioned of fourth rank in the world, after Brazil, Vietnam, and Colombia. There are two varieties of coffee grown in Indonesia, i.e. the arabica and robusta. The chemical compositions between arabica and robusta are different each other. A trained coffee tester can distinguish these differences from its taste, but it is very subjective. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a spectroscopic technique based on the analysis of micro-plasma induced on the surface sample after being shot with a laser pulse. In this study, elemental spectra acquired using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique were analysed to differentate between green coffee beans of arabica and robusta, which are collected from plantations in Malang, Bondowoso, Prigen, and Pasuruan. Results show that optimum conditions for acquiring spectra from green coffee beans using LIBS are at 120 mJ of laser energy and 1,0 μs of delay time. Green coffee beans of arabica and robusta contain some elements such as Ca, W, Sr, Mg, Be, Na, H, N, K, Rb, and O. Discriminant analysis method was then applied to distinguish the green beans of arabica and robusta coffee. Element identifiers of green coffee beans are Ca, W, Mg, Be, Na, and Sr. The abundant element in green coffee beans is Calcium (Ca), and depth-profile testing shows that Ca is homogeneous inside the beans.

  6. Impact of Long Dry Season on Bean Characteristics of Robusta Coffee (Coffea canephora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ucu Sumirat

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Bean characteristics in Robusta coffee (Coffea canephora should be taken into considerations in coffee breeding. Beside genetic factor, environment has been known as an important factor in the formation and change of composition of bean characteristics. This research aimed to find out the effect of long dry season on changes of bean characteristics. The population observed consisted of 277 genotypes originated from reciprocal crossings of three parental namely BP 409, BP 961 and Q 121. Observation was conducted in Kaliwining Experimental Garden of ICCRI in Jember, East Java during two years with different drought intensity i.e. 2005—2006 and 2006—2007 production years. The result showed that long dry season decreased the range value of population of normal beans, pea beans and triage beans, and followed by decreasing in the mean value except for normal beans. Long dry season also influence the change of value range of empty bean to higher proportion, and followed by increasing in the mean value. Distribution pattern of normal beans tend in to remain at high proportion, in contrast to those of pea and triage beans. In other side, long dry season tended to change distribution pattern of empty beans to at high proportion. Correlation analysis among beans characteristics showed that normal beans had negative correlations with pea beans and empty beans. Pea beans had a positive correlation with empty beans. Long dry season decreased proportion of pea bean and triage bean, in contrast to those of empty beans. Increasing proportion of empty bean was caused by failure of growth to normal bean under stress condition. Key words : Coffee canephora, bean characteristics, long dry season, variation, correlation, composition.

  7. Effect of Robusta coffee beans ointment on full thickness wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yorinta Putri Kenisa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic lesions, whether chemical, physical, or thermal in nature, are among the most common lesion in the mouth. Wound healing is essential for the maintenance of normal structure, function, and survival of organisms. Experiments of Robusta coffee powder on rat-induced alloxan incision wound, clinically demonstrated similar healing rate with the povidone iodine 10%. No studies that look directly the effect of coffee extract in ointment form when viewed in terms of histopathology. Robusta coffee bean (Coffea canephora consists of chlorogenic acid (CGA and caffeic acid which are belived to act as antioxidant and take part in wound healing process. Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify the enhancement of healing process of full-thickness skin wound after Robusta coffee beans extract ointment application. Methods: Sample consisted of 20 Cavia cabaya treated with full-thickness with wounds and was given Robusta coffee beans extract ointment concentration range of 22.5%, 45%, and 90% except the control group which was given ointment base material. Animals were then harvested on the fourth day and made for histopathological preparations. Data were calculated and compared by one-way ANOVA test and LSD test. Results: The study showed that Robusta coffee bean extract ointment can increase the number of lymphocytes, plasma cells, macrophages, fibroblasts, and blood vessels by the presence of chlorogenic acid (CGA and Caffeic acid. Conclusion: In conclusion Robusta coffee bean extract ointment enhance the healing process of fullthickness skin wound of Cavia cabaya.Latar belakang: Lesi traumatik, baik akibat rangsang kimia, fisik, atau termal, merupakan lesi yang paling umum terjadi di dalam rongga mulut. Penyembuhan luka yang terjadi ini penting untuk pemeliharaan struktur normal, fungsi, dan kelangsungan hidup organisme. Percobaan pemberian bubuk kopi Robusta terhadap luka sayatan pada tikus yang diinduksi aloksan, secara klinis

  8. ANALYSIS OF GENETIC PARAMETERS FOR BEAN PHYSICAL QUALITY CHARACTERS AND CLUSTERIZATIONS OF ELEVEN GENOTYPES OF ROBUSTA COFFEE (Coffea canephora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubiyo Rubiyo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The genetic parameters of coffee related to their bean physical quality characters are important for breeder to improve the  bean quality. Eleven genotypes of robusta coffee were identified and their genetic relationship to the bean physical quality were characterized. The research was conducted at coffee plantation of the Association of Indonesian Coffee Exporters in West Lampung, altitude of 800 m above sea level, Latosol type of soil, and A type of climate, starting from 2010 to 2012. The objectives of this study were to estimate the genotypic coefficient of variation, heritability and genetic advance of the bean physical quality characters, and clusterization analysis of eleven genotypes of robusta coffee. A randomized complete block design with eleven treatments of coffee genotypes and three replications was used in this study. The results showed that the estimated values of genotypic coefficient of variation, heritability and genetic advance for small-size normal bean characters of robusta coffee were very high, so the genetic improvement for these characters has a high probability of success by direct selection. Clusterization of the genotypes resulted three clusters with their respective characteristics. The study implies that future breeding program especially for hybridization should be conducted between genotypes arising from different clusters to obtain the possible high heterosis effects.

  9. Identification of nutritional descriptors of roasting intensity in beverages of Arabica and Robusta coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicho, Natalina Cavaco; Leitão, Antóanto Eduardo; Ramalho, José Cochicho; De Alvarenga, Nuno Bartolomeu; Lidon, Fernando Cebola

    2011-12-01

    Arabica and Robusta coffee beans were roasted at 220 ± 10°C for 7, 9 and 11 min to identify chemical descriptors in the beverages. The pH of the beverages showed the lowest value in the medium roasting level. In each degree of browning, the soluble solids content remained slightly higher in Arabica drinks. The contents of caffeine did not vary, but trigonelline decreased with burning up intensity. Chlorogenic acids also decreased with increasing roasting time. The 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid prevailed in Arabica and Robusta beverages, but the isomers of dicaffeoylquinic and feruolilquínic acids remained higher in Robusta. It was concluded that trigonelline and total caffeoylquinic, fatty dicaffeoylquinic and fatty feruolilquínic acids detached the beverages according to roasting intensity. Caffeine and pH allowed drinks separation between both species. Soluble solids take apart Arabica and Robusta drinks in each degree of roasting. All the individual groups of chlorogenic acids also explained 90% of the variance among samples.

  10. Effect of different drying techniques on bioactive components, fatty acid composition, and volatile profile of robusta coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjiang; Hu, Rongsuo; Chu, Zhong; Zhao, Jianping; Tan, Lehe

    2017-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of different drying techniques, namely, room-temperature drying (RTD), solar drying (SD), heat-pump drying (HPD), hot-air drying (HAD), and freeze drying (FD), on bioactive components, fatty acid composition, and the volatile compound profile of robusta coffee beans. The data showed that FD was an effective method to preserve fat, organic acids, and monounsaturated fatty acids. In contrast, HAD was ideal for retaining polyunsaturated fatty acids and amino acids. Sixty-two volatile compounds were identified in the differently dried coffee beans, representing 90% of the volatile compounds. HPD of the coffee beans produced the largest number of volatiles, whereas FD resulted in the highest volatile content. A principal component analysis demonstrated a close relationship between the HPD, SD, and RTD methods whereas the FD and HAD methods were significantly different. Overall, the results provide a basis for potential application to other similar thermal sensitive materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hierarchical scheme for liquid chromatography/multi-stage spectrometric identification of 3,4,5-triacyl chlorogenic acids in green Robusta coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Rakesh; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2010-08-15

    Liquid chromatography/multi-stage spectrometry (LC/MS(n)) (n = 2-4) has been used to detect and characterize in green Robusta coffee beans eight quantitatively minor triacyl chlorogenic acids with seven of them not previously reported in nature. These comprise 3,4,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid (Mr 678); 3,5-dicaffeoyl-4-feruloylquinic acid, 3-feruloyl-4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid and 3,4-dicaffeoyl-5-feruloylquinic acid (Mr 692); 3-caffeoyl-4,5-diferuloylquinic acid and 3,4-diferuloyl-5-caffeoylquinic acid (Mr 706); and 3,4-dicaffeoyl-5-sinapoylquinic acid and 3-sinapoyl-4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (Mr 722). Structures have been assigned on the basis of LC/MS(n) patterns of fragmentation. A new hierarchical key for the identification of triacyl quinic acids is presented, based on previously established rules of fragmentation. Fifty-two chlorogenic acids have now been characterized in green Robusta coffee beans. In this study five samples of green Robusta coffee beans and fifteen samples of Arabica coffee beans were analyzed with triacyl chlorogenic acids only found in Robusta coffee bean extracts. These triacyl chlorogenic acids could be considered as useful phytochemical markers for the identification of Robusta coffee beans. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Levels of Antioxidant Activity and Fluoride Content in Coffee Infusions of Arabica, Robusta and Green Coffee Beans in According to their Brewing Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolska, J; Janda, Katarzyna; Jakubczyk, K; Szymkowiak, M; Chlubek, D; Gutowska, I

    2017-02-22

    Coffee is a rich source of dietary antioxidants, and this property links with the fact that coffee is one of the world's most popular beverages. Moreover, it is a source of macro- and microelements, including fluoride. The aim of this work was to determine antioxidant activity of coffee beverages and fluoride content depending on different coffee species and conditions of brewing. Three species of coffee, arabica, robusta and green coffee beans obtained from retail stores in Szczecin (Poland) were analyzed. Five different techniques of preparing drink were used: simple infusion, french press, espresso maker, overflow espresso and Turkish coffee. Antioxidant potential of coffee beverages was investigated spectrophotometrically by DPPH method. Fluoride concentrations were measured by potentiometric method with a fluoride ion-selective electrode. Statistical analysis was performed using Stat Soft Statistica 12.5. Antioxidant activity of infusions was high (71.97-83.21% inhibition of DPPH) depending on coffee species and beverage preparing method. It has been shown that the method of brewing arabica coffee and green coffee significantly affects the antioxidant potential of infusions. The fluoride concentration in the coffee infusions changed depending, both, on the species and conditions of brewing, too (0.013-0.502 mg/L). Methods of brewing didn't make a difference to the antioxidant potential of robusta coffee, which had also the lowest level of fluoride among studied species. Except overflow espresso, the fluoride content was the highest in beverages from green coffee. The highest fluoride content was found in Turkish coffee from green coffee beans.

  13. Robusta coffee beans post-harvest microflora: Lactobacillus plantarum sp. as potential antagonist of Aspergillus carbonarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djossou, Olga; Perraud-Gaime, Isabelle; Mirleau, Fatma Lakhal; Rodriguez-Serrano, Gabriela; Karou, Germain; Niamke, Sebastien; Ouzari, Imene; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Roussos, Sevastianos

    2011-12-01

    Coffee contamination by ochratoxigenic fungi affects both coffee quality as well as coffee price with harmful consequences on the economy of the coffee exporting countries for whom which is their main source of income. Fungal strains were isolated from coffee beans and identified as black Aspergilli. Ochratoxigenic moulds like Aspergillus carbonarius were screened and selected for detailed studies. Also lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from silage coffee pulp and their antifungal activity was tested on dual-culture agar plate. Ten of the isolated LAB demonstrated antifungal effect against A. carbonarius. API 50 CH and APIZYM were used to perform phenotypic identification. 16S rDNA sequencing was made to confirm the results. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Profile and characterization of the chlorogenic acids in green Robusta coffee beans by LC-MS(n): identification of seven new classes of compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Rakesh; Patras, Maria Alexandra; Eravuchira, Pinkie Jacob; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2010-08-11

    LC-MS(n) (n = 2-4) has been used to detect and characterize in green Robusta coffee beans 15 quantitatively minor sinapic acid and trimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid-containing chlorogenic acids, all reported for the first time from this source, with 13 of them not previously reported in nature. These comprise 3-sinapoylquinic acid, 4-sinapoylquinic acid, and 5-sinapoylquinic acid (M(r) 398); 3-sinapoyl-5-caffeoylquinic acid, 3-sinapoyl-4-caffeoylquinic acid, and 4-sinapoyl-3-caffeoylquinic acid (M(r) 560); 3-(3,5-dihydroxy-4-methoxy)cinnamoyl-4-feruloylquinic acid (M(r) 560); 3-sinapoyl-5-feruloylquinic acid, 3-feruloyl-4-sinapoylquinic acid, and 4-sinapoyl-5-feruloylquinic acid (M(r) 574); 4-trimethoxycinnamoyl-5-caffeoylquinic acid, 3-trimethoxycinnamoyl-5-caffeoylquinic acid (M(r) 574); and 5-feruloyl-3-trimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid, 3-trimethoxycinnamoyl-4-feruloylquinic acid, and 4-trimethoxycinnamoyl-5-feruloylquinic acid (M(r) 588). Furthermore, a series of structures including nine new triacyl quinic acids have been assigned on the basis of LC-MS(n) patterns of fragmentation, relative hydrophobicity, and analogy of fragmentation patterns if compared to feruloyl, caffeoyl, and dimethoxycinnamoyl quinic acids. Sixty-nine chlorogenic acids have now been characterized in green Robusta coffee beans.

  15. Impact of Long Dry Season on Bean Characteristics of Robusta Coffee (Coffea canephora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ucu Sumirat

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe characteristics of pod related to cocoa pod borer resistance (CPB, Conopomorpha cramerella Snell. had been identified in a series study. This research has objective to evaluate performance of the characteristics using more diverse of genetic background to select criteria for selection. Genetic materials for this study were 25 cocoa clones which be planted in Central Sulawesi for resistant evaluation. Field evaluation of the resistance were assessed using the variable of the percentage of unextractable bean, number of entry and exit hole larvae by which the clones were grouped into 5 groups of resistance. A laboratory works were carried out to assess pod characteristics based on the number of trichome, granule of tannin and thickness the lignified-tissue of sclerotic layer using micro-technique method at the different level of pod maturity (3.0; 3.5; 4.0 months. Correlation between groups of those variables was analyzed using Canonical Correlation. The analysis performed a positive association between the thickness of sclerotic layer at the secondary furrow with the number of entry holes and the number of entry holes through sclerotic layer. The thickness performed a higher value of the coefficient in association with the variables of canonical for pod characteristics (0.59; 0.55; 0.43 and the variables of canonical for CPB resistance (0.54; 0.51; 0.39 that would presenting the characteristics of pod related to CPB resistance. Lignification at sclerotic layer was considered as genotypic expressions due to the thickness at the secondary furrow at 3.0, 3.5 and 4.0 months of pod maturity performed high value of broad-sense heritability i.e. 0.75, 0.89 and 0.92 respectively. A qualitative assessment of the lignification clearly differentiate the resistant clones (ARDACIAR 10 with the susceptible clones (ICCRI 04, KW 516 and KW 564.Key words : cocoa pod borer, Theobroma cacao L., pod characteristics, resistance

  16. Relationship between caffeine content and flavor with light intensity of several coffee Robusta clones

    OpenAIRE

    Novie Pranata Erdiansyah; Yusianto Yusianto

    2012-01-01

    Coffee is a refreshing beverage product and its price is determined by physical quality and flavor. An excellent coffee flavor is resulted only from qualified coffee beans, produced by well managed plantation. The objective of this experiment was to study the effect of sunlight intensity entering coffee farm on flavor profiles and caffeine content of Robusta coffee. The experiment was conducted at the field experimental Kaliwining Estate of Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute (ICCR...

  17. Effect of a Combination of Extract of Centella asiaticaL. Leaves and Extract of Green Coffee (Coffea canephora robusta P.) Beans in a Cream Preparation for Grade 1-3 Cellulite and Slimming

    OpenAIRE

    Riska Febriadne Primastuti; Wong Lip Wih; Abdul Mun’im

    2013-01-01

    An accumulation of fat in the subcutaneous tissue causes cellulite and dimpling on the surface of the skin. Although not related to obesity, obesity worsens cellulite. There are abundant topical anticellulite creams on the market, but the efficacy of these creams has not been scientifically proven. A combination of Centella asiaticaL. leaves extract and green coffee (Coffea canephora robustaP.) bean extract in a cream preparation was clinically tested in 30 women for 84 days in the absence of...

  18. Homostachydrine (pipecolic acid betaine) as authentication marker of roasted blends of Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora (Robusta) beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servillo, Luigi; Giovane, Alfonso; Casale, Rosario; Cautela, Domenico; D'Onofrio, Nunzia; Balestrieri, Maria Luisa; Castaldo, Domenico

    2016-08-15

    The occurrence of pipecolic acid betaine (homostachydrine) and its biosynthetic precursor N-methylpipecolic acid was detected for the first time in green coffee beans of Robusta and Arabica species. The analyses were conducted by HPLC-ESI tandem mass spectrometry and the metabolites identified by product ion spectra and comparison with authentic standards. N-methylpipecolic acid was found at similar levels in green coffee beans of Robusta and Arabica, whereas a noticeable difference of homostachydrine content was observed between the two green coffee bean species. Interestingly, homostachydrine content was found to be unaffected by coffee bean roasting treatment because of a noticeable heat stability, a feature that makes this compound a candidate marker to determine the content of Robusta and Arabica species in roasted coffee blends. To this end, a number of certified pure Arabica and Robusta green beans were analyzed for their homostachydrine content. Results showed that homostachydrine content was 1.5±0.5mg/kg in Arabica beans and 31.0±10.0mg/kg in Robusta beans. Finally, to further support the suitability of homostachydrine as quality marker of roasted blends of Arabica and Robusta coffee beans, commercial samples of roasted ground coffee blends were analyzed and the correspondence between the derived percentages of Arabica and Robusta beans with those declared on packages by manufacturers was verified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Low-field (1)H NMR spectroscopy for distinguishing between arabica and robusta ground roast coffees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defernez, Marianne; Wren, Ella; Watson, Andrew D; Gunning, Yvonne; Colquhoun, Ian J; Le Gall, Gwénaëlle; Williamson, David; Kemsley, E Kate

    2017-02-01

    This work reports a new screening protocol for addressing issues of coffee authenticity using low-field (60MHz) bench-top (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Using a simple chloroform-based extraction, useful spectra were obtained from the lipophilic fraction of ground roast coffees. It was found that 16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC, a recognized marker compound for robusta beans) gives rise to an isolated peak in the 60MHz spectrum, which can be used as an indicator of the presence of robusta beans in the sample. A total of 81 extracts from authenticated coffees and mixtures were analysed, from which the detection limit of robusta in arabica was estimated to be between 10% and 20% w/w. Using the established protocol, a surveillance exercise was conducted of 27 retail samples of ground roast coffees which were labelled as "100% arabica". None were found to contain undeclared robusta content above the estimated detection limit.

  20. Evolution of robusta green coffee redox enzymatic activities with maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montavon, Philippe; Bortlik, Karlheinz

    2004-06-02

    Oxidation reactions in coffee involve redox-sensitive polyphenols and appear to control the fragmentation of coffee storage proteins both in solution and during roasting. Coffee-specific nitrogenous flavor precursors may derive from this process. Accordingly, data converge to suggest that the redox status of the green bean before roasting might control the development of subsequent redox reactions during roasting. Consequently, we decided to identify biological events that may trigger or prevent oxidation during maturation of the coffee cherry and set the final redox status of the green bean. In a previous study, we observed that the sensitivity of green coffee to oxidative processes decreased along maturation. By using the very same samples originating from open-pollinated Robusta clones, we followed the activity of three essential redox enzymes: catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and polyphenoloxidase (PPO). While CAT and POD activities increased with maturation, PPO activities decreased. Thanks to the identification of an atypical immature subclass, it appeared that CAT might be an essential factor in setting the final redox status of the green bean before the roasting event.

  1. Rapid approach to identify the presence of Arabica and Robusta species in coffee using 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Ruge, Winfried; Kuballa, Thomas; Ilse, Maren; Winkelmann, Ole; Diehl, Bernd; Thomas, Freddy; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2015-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy was used to verify the presence of Arabica and Robusta species in coffee. Lipophilic extracts of authentic roasted and green coffees showed the presence of established markers for Robusta (16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC)) and for Arabica (kahweol). The integration of the 16-OMC signal (δ 3.165 ppm) was used to estimate the amount of Robusta in coffee blends with an approximate limit of detection of 1-3%. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of 77 commercial coffee samples (coffee pods, coffee capsules, and coffee beans). Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the spectra of lipophilic and aqueous extracts of 20 monovarietal authentic samples. Clusters of the two species were observed. NMR spectroscopy can be used as a rapid prescreening tool to discriminate Arabica and Robusta coffee species before the confirmation applying the official method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Relationship between caffeine content and flavor with light intensity of several coffee Robusta clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novie Pranata Erdiansyah

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is a refreshing beverage product and its price is determined by physical quality and flavor. An excellent coffee flavor is resulted only from qualified coffee beans, produced by well managed plantation. The objective of this experiment was to study the effect of sunlight intensity entering coffee farm on flavor profiles and caffeine content of Robusta coffee. The experiment was conducted at the field experimental Kaliwining Estate of Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute (ICCRI during 2009–2011. Treatments were Robusta coffee clones and sunlight intensity. Experimental design was split plot design with three replications. Robusta clones used were BP 409, BP 534, BP 936 and BP 939, planted in 2002. The sunligt intensity treatments were 100% (without shade tree, 50—60% (Leucaena leucocephala shade, and 20—30% (Hibiscus macrophyllus and Melia azedarach L. shades. Only red coffee cherries were harvested for flavor and caffeine analysis. Coffee cherries were washed, depulped and sundried until moisture content of less than 12%. The green coffee bean samples were roasted at medium level (Agtron Scale at 65# for cupping test which involved five expert panelists by using ICCRI protocol. Caffeine content was determined by spectrophotometric method. The experiment result indicated that high sunlight intensity resulted in strong aroma of Robusta coffee, while good flavor coffee need medium light intensity. Cafein content had positive correlation with light intensity entering the coffee farm, whereas cafein content had no direct effect on Robusta coffee flavor.Key words: Coffea canephora, clone, sunlight intensity, flavor, caffeine. 

  3. Antibacterial ability of arabica (Coffea arabica and robusta (Coffea canephora coffee extract on Lactobacillus acidophilus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willy Wijaya

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental caries is the most commonly dental health problem found in Indonesia. Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus is bacteria playing a role in the development and continuation of caries. Some researches in Dentistry Faculty show that many plants are efficacious for oral health. One of them is coffee bean. Coffee bean containing caffeine, phenolic, trigonelline, and chlorogenic acid is reported to have antimicrobial activity. Purpose: This research aimed to determine the differences in the inhibition of Arabica and Robusta coffee extract to L. acidophilus. Method: This research was an laboratory experimental research. The method used was well diffusion method using seven samples for each treatment group. BHI-A and inoculated L.acidophilus bacteria was poured into each petri dish, and then 8 pitted holes were made with a diameter of 5mm and a depth of 3mm using a ring. Next, Arabica or Robusta coffee extracts at a concentration of 100%, 75%, 50%, 12.5%, 6.25%, and 3.125% were put into each of the pitted hole until it was full, and a negative control was also prepared. They then were put in an incubator at a temperature of 37 °C for 24 hours. Afterwards, measurements and observations were conducted on inhibition zone area. Result: Robusta coffee extract at the concentrations of 100% and 75% had greater inhibitory than Arabica coffee extract (p0.05. Conclusion: In conclusion, Robusta and Arabica coffee extracts have inhibitory effects on L.acidophilus. Robusta coffee bean extract, nevertheless, has better inhibitory effects than Arabica coffee bean extract.

  4. Determination of the 2H/1H and 15N/14N ratios of Alkylpyrazines from coffee beans (Coffea arabica L. and Coffea canephoravar. robusta) by isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richling, Elke; Preston, Christina; Kavvadias, Dominique; Kahle, Kathrin; Heppel, Christopher; Hummel, Silvia; König, Thorsten; Schreier, Peter

    2005-10-05

    The delta15N(AIR) and delta2H(VSMOW) data for several alkylpyrazines formed during the roasting process of coffee are reported. Samples of commercially available roasted (n = 9) as well as self-roasted (n = 8) coffee beans (Coffea arabica L. and Coffea canephora var. robusta) of different origins were investigated. By use of extracts prepared by simultaneous distillation extraction (SDE) and subsequently fractionated by liquid chromatography on silica gel, on-line capillary gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry was employed in the combustion (C) and pyrolysis (P) modes (HRGC-C/P-IRMS) to determine the delta15N(AIR) and delta2H(VSMOW) values, respectively. In addition to the constituents of coffee beans, data for commercial synthetic alkylpyrazines and substances declared to be "natural" were determined. The delta15N(AIR) data for coffee alkylpyrazines under study-2-ethyl-5-methylpyrazine (1) and 2-ethyl-6-methylpyrazine (2) (measured as sum 1/2), 2-ethyl-3-methylpyrazine (3), 2-methylpyrazine (4), 2,5-dimethylpyrazine (5) and 2,6-dimethylpyrazine (6) (measured as sum 5/6), and 2,3-dimethylpyrazine (7), as well as 2,3,5-trimethylpyrazine (8)-varied in the range from +8.3 to -10.2 per thousand, thus revealing their biogeneration from amino acids (delta15N(AIR) ranging from +8 per thousand to -10 per thousand). The delta2H(VSMOW) values were determined in the range from -5 per thousand to -127 per thousand. Owing to the analytical differentiation observed between coffee alkylpyrazines and synthetic/"natural" samples of 3, 4, and 7, authenticity assessment of coffee-flavored products seems to be promising, provided that extended data will be available in the future. In the literature, there were no IRMS data available for the alkylpyrazines (1-8) under study.

  5. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for spectral characterization of regular coffee beans and luwak coffee bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nufiqurakhmah, Nufiqurakhmah; Nasution, Aulia; Suyanto, Hery

    2016-11-01

    Luwak (civet) coffee refers to a type of coffee, where the cherries have been priorly digested and then defecated by a civet (Paradoxurus Hermaphroditus), a catlike animals typically habited in Indonesia. Luwak will only selectively select ripe cherries, and digesting them by enzymatic fermentation in its digestive system. The defecated beans is then removed and cleaned from the feces. It is regarded as the world's most expensive coffee, Traditionally the quality of the coffee is subjectively determined by a tester. This research is motivated by the needs to study and develop quantitative parameters in determining the quality of coffee bean, which are more objective to measure the quality of coffee products. LIBS technique was used to identify the elemental contents of coffee beans based on its spectral characteristics in the range 200-900 nm. Samples of green beans from variant of arabica and robusta, either regular and luwak, were collected from 5 plantations in East Java. From the recorded spectra, intensity ratio of nitrogen (N), hydrogen (H), and oxygen (O) as essential elements in coffee is applied. In general, values extracted from luwak coffee bean is higher with increases 0.03% - 79.93%. A Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA) also applied to identify marker elements that characterize the regular and luwak beans. Elements of Ca, W, Sr, Mg, and H are the ones used to differentiate the regular and luwak beans from arabica variant, while Ca and W are the ones used to differentiate the regular and luwak beans of robusta variant.

  6. Spectral identifiers from roasting process of Arabica and Robusta green beans using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirani, Ayu Puspa; Nasution, Aulia; Suyanto, Hery

    2016-11-01

    Coffee (Coffea spp.) is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world. World coffee consumption is around 70% comes from Arabica, 26% from Robusta , and the rest 4% from other varieties. Coffee beverages characteristics are related to chemical compositions of its roasted beans. Usually testing of coffee quality is subjectively tasted by an experienced coffee tester. An objective quantitative technique to analyze the chemical contents of coffee beans using LIBS will be reported in this paper. Optimum experimental conditions was using of 120 mJ of laser energy and delay time 1 μs. Elements contained in coffee beans are Ca, W, Sr, Mg, Na, H, K, O, Rb, and Be. The Calcium (Ca) is the main element in the coffee beans. Roasting process will cause the emission intensity of Ca decreased by 42.45%. In addition, discriminant analysis was used to distinguish the arabica and robusta variants, either in its green and roasted coffee beans. Observed identifier elements are Ca, W, Sr, and Mg. Overall chemical composition of roasted coffee beans are affected by many factors, such as the composition of the soil, the location, the weather in the neighborhood of its plantation, and the post-harvesting process of the green coffee beans (drying, storage, fermentation, and roasting methods used).

  7. Characteristics of Quality Profile and Agribusiness of Robusta Coffee in Tambora Mountainside, Sumbawa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lya Aklimawati

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Coffee development in Indomesia by means of optimalizing local resources needs to be done for increasing national coffee production as well as for expanding domestic and international markets. These opportunities must be used to gain benefit as a strategic action for raising farmer’s prosperity. This study was aimed to observe physical quality and flavor profile of Robusta coffee from Tambora mountainside, and to identify agribusiness coffee system applied by the farmers, including problem identification at farmer’s level. This research was carried out at Pekat Subdistrict (Dompu District and Tambora Subdistrict (Bima District, West Nusa Tenggara Province. Direct observation and in-depth interviews were conducted in this study. Data collected consisted of primary and secondary data, as well as 11 green coffee samples from farmers to be analysed its physical quality and flavor profile. The number of respondents were nine stakeholders consisted of three farmers, two farmer group leaders, one field officer, one duty officer, one trader, and one large planter official. Respondents selection were based on convenience sampling method. The results showed that physical quality of coffee bean was belonged to Grade 4—6 (fair to poor quality, while broken beans shared the highest number of physical defects. Robusta coffee from Tambora mountainside performed good taste profile, that the coffee can be promoted to be fine Robusta by improving post harvest handling. Robusta coffee farming at Tambora mountainside was characterized by monoculture cropping system, average of land ownerships about 1 ha/household, and average productivity about 900—1,000 kg green coffee/ha/year. Major problems on Robusta coffee farming at Tambora mountainside consisted of lack of coffee plant maintenance as well as limited accessibility to financing and technology. Key words: agribusiness, physical quality, flavor, Robusta coffee, Tambora

  8. Ochratoxin A-producing Aspergilli in Vietnamese green coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, S L; Hien, L T; An, T V; Trang, N T; Hocking, A D; Scott, E S

    2007-09-01

    To determine the incidence and severity of infection by ochratoxin A (OA)-producing fungi in Vietnamese green coffee beans. Aspergillus carbonarius, A. niger and yellow Aspergilli (A. ochraceus and related species in section Circumdati) were isolated by direct plating of surface-disinfected Robusta (65 samples) and Arabica (11 samples) coffee beans from southern and central Vietnam. Significantly, more Robusta than Arabica beans were infected by fungi. Aspergillus niger infected 89% of Robusta beans, whereas A. carbonarius and yellow Aspergilli each infected 12-14% of beans. OA was not produced by A. niger (98 isolates) or A. ochraceus (77 isolates), but was detected in 110 of 113 isolates of A. carbonarius, 10 isolates of A. westerdijkiae and one isolate of A. steynii. The maximum OA observed in samples severely infected with toxigenic species was 1.8 microg kg(-1); however, no relationship between extent of infection and OA contamination was observed. Aspergillus niger is the dominant species infecting Vietnamese coffee beans, yet A. carbonarius is the likely source of OA contamination. Vietnamese green coffee beans were more severely infected with fungi than the levels reported for beans from other parts of the world, yet OA contamination appears to be infrequent.

  9. Development of ochratoxin A during robusta (Coffea canephora) coffee cherry drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucheli, P; Kanchanomai, C; Meyer, I; Pittet, A

    2000-04-01

    The occurrence and formation of ochratoxin A (OTA) in Robusta coffee was studied for three consecutive seasons under tropical conditions in Thailand. Sun drying of coffee cherries consistently led to OTA formation in the pulp and parchment (husks) of the cherries. In replicated trials, dried coffee beans (green coffee) were shown to contain on average OTA concentrations that were approximately 1% of those found in husks. OTA contamination of green coffee depended on cherry maturity, with green cherries being the least, and overripe cherries the most susceptible. Defects, and in particular the inclusion of husks, are the most important source of OTA contamination. OTA contamination occurred independently of whether cherries were placed on concrete, on bamboo tables, or on the ground. The study suggests that better raw material quality, an appropriate drying and dehulling procedure combined with a reduction of green coffee defects can effectively contribute to the reduction of OTA in green coffee.

  10. Decaffeination process characteristic of Robusta coffee in single column reactor using ethyl acetate solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Consumers drink coffee not as nutrition source, but as refreshment drink. For coffee consumers who have high tolerance for caffeine, coffee may warm up and refresh their bodies. High caffeine content in coffee beans may cause several complaints to consumers who are susceptible to caffeine. One of the efforts, for coffee market expansion is product diversification to decaffeinated coffee. Decaffeination process is one of process to reduce caffeine content from agricultural products. Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute in collaboration with Bogor Agricultural University has developed a single column reactor for coffee beans decaffeination. The aim of this research is to study process characteristic of coffee decaffeination in single column reactor using ethyl acetate (C4H8O2 solvent. Treatments applicated in the research were time and temperature process. Temperature treatment were 50—60OC, 60—70OC, 70—80OC, 80—90OC and 90—100OC. Time treatment were 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 8 h, 10 h, and 12 h Size of Robusta coffee beans used were less than 5.5 mm (A4, between 5.5 mm and 6.5 mm (A3, between 6.5 mm and 7.5 mm (A2, and more than 7.5 mm (A1. The result showed that decaffeination process with ethyl acetate solvent will be faster when its temperature was higher and smaller bean size. For bean size less than 5,5 mm, decaffeination process by 10% ethyl acetat can be done 8—10 hours in 90—100OC solvent temperature or 12 hours in 60—70OC solvent temperature for 0.3% caffein content. Organoleptic test showed that 90—100OC temperature solvent treatment decreased coffee flavor, which aroma, bitterness and body values were 1.9 each . Key words : Coffee, caffeine, decaffeination, quality, single column.

  11. Effect of a Combination of Extract of Centella asiaticaL. Leaves and Extract of Green Coffee (Coffea canephora robusta P. Beans in a Cream Preparation for Grade 1-3 Cellulite and Slimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riska Febriadne Primastuti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An accumulation of fat in the subcutaneous tissue causes cellulite and dimpling on the surface of the skin. Although not related to obesity, obesity worsens cellulite. There are abundant topical anticellulite creams on the market, but the efficacy of these creams has not been scientifically proven. A combination of Centella asiaticaL. leaves extract and green coffee (Coffea canephora robustaP. bean extract in a cream preparation was clinically tested in 30 women for 84 days in the absence of diet and exercise. The descriptive-true experimental before (T-0-after (T-84 method was used to classify the cellulite (grade 1–3 and to determine the slimming effect. The cellulite appearance and the body circumferences (abdominal and thighperimeters were photographed 5cm and 10cm below the navel and below the gluteal fold. The results of before and after the treatment showed that grade 1 cellulite lower (p< 0.000, the measurement of abdominal circumference showed reduction (p< 0.013, but the measurement of both thigh circumference showed insignificantly reduction (p< 0.512. The combination of both extracts reduce cellulite and fat deposits in the abdominal area, making the volunteers look slimmer.

  12. Covering the different steps of the coffee processing: Can headspace VOC emissions be exploited to successfully distinguish between Arabica and Robusta?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colzi, Ilaria; Taiti, Cosimo; Marone, Elettra; Magnelli, Susanna; Gonnelli, Cristina; Mancuso, Stefano

    2017-12-15

    This work was performed to evaluate the possible application of PTR-ToF-MS technique in distinguishing between Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora var. robusta (Robusta) commercial stocks in each step of the processing chain (green beans, roasted beans, ground coffee, brews). volatile organic compounds (VOC) spectra from coffee samples of 7 Arabica and 6 Robusta commercial stocks were recorded and submitted to multivariate statistical analysis. Results clearly showed that, in each stage of the coffee processing, the volatile composition of coffee is highly influenced by the species. Actually, with the exception of green beans, PTR-ToF-MS technique was able to correctly recognize Arabica and Robusta samples. Particularly, among 134 tentatively identified VOCs, some masses (16 for roasted coffee, 12 for ground coffee and 12 for brewed coffee) were found to significantly discriminate the two species. Therefore, headspace VOC analyses was showed to represent a valuable tool to distinguish between Arabica and Robusta. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Physical Characteristics of Coffee Beans from Steaming Processin Single Column Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Sukrisno Widyotomo; Sri Mulato; Hadi K. Purwadaria; A.M Syarief

    2010-01-01

    One of important steps in decaffeination process is steaming. The aim of steaming is to expand coffee beans porosity in order to obtain optimal condition for decaffeination process. Steaming can be done in single column reactor using saturated water vapour as media. The objective of this research is to study physical characteristics of coffee beans after steaming process using single column reactor. Material tested was Robusta coffee with 13—14% moisture content after dry processing. Reactor ...

  14. A Real Option Analysis applied to the production of Arabica and Robusta Coffee in Ecuador

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andres R. Jácome; Alberto Garrido

    2017-01-01

    .... Arabica and Robusta coffee are produced in 23 provinces of Ecuador. A decade-long decline of coffee production prompted the Ecuadorian government to launch a public program for replanting coffee trees towards the end of 2011...

  15. Ion beam analysis of ground coffee and roasted coffee beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debastiani, R.; dos Santos, C. E. I.; Yoneama, M. L.; Amaral, L.; Dias, J. F.

    2014-01-01

    The way that coffee is prepared (using roasted ground coffee or roasted coffee beans) may influence the quality of beverage. Therefore, the aim of this work is to use ion beam techniques to perform a full elemental analysis of packed roasted ground coffee and packed roasted coffee beans, as well as green coffee beans. The samples were analyzed by PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission). Light elements were measured through RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) experiments. Micro-PIXE experiments were carried out in order to check the elemental distribution in the roasted and green coffee beans. In general, the elements found in ground coffee were Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr. A comparison between ground coffee and grinded roasted beans shows significant differences for several elements. Elemental maps reveal that P and K are correlated and practically homogeneously distributed over the beans.

  16. Distribution Pattern of Coffee Berry Borer (Hypothenemus Hampei on Arabica and Robusta Coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soekadar Wiryadiputra

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Coffee berry borer [CBB, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferr.] is the main pest on coffee causing a significant losses. Distribution pattern of the pest is not known deeply until now, especially in Indonesia. The data of distribution pattern of pest is very important in constructing the strategy of integrated pest management, especially to determine a sampling method for monitoring of the pest. This experiment aimed to reveal the distribution pattern of CBB both spatially and vertically. The experiment was conducted on Arabica and Robusta coffee, located in Kalibendo estate in Banyuwangi East Java. A plot with 400 (20 x 20 of coffee trees were observed for infestation and population of CBB, at four branches on south, north, east and west directions for each tree. Collected data were analyzed to obtain the value of mean, variance (=s2, variance/mean relationship (=I, index of Morisita (=Iδ, coefficient of Green (=Cx and k exponent of Negative Binomial. Results of the experiment revealed that spatial distribution pattern of CBB, both on Arabica an Robusta coffee, as well as for infestation and population parameters, was fit with aggregated or clumped distribution. For vertical distribution, it inclined that CBB infestation and population in the lower part of coffee tree was higher than in central and upper part of coffee tree. Plenty of infested coffee berries leaved on soil surface may result in higher infestation and population in the lower part.Key words: Arabica coffee, Robusta coffee, Hypothenemus hampei, spatial distribution, vertical distribution.

  17. Chemical characterisation of non-defective and defective green arabica and robusta coffees by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Juliana C F; Franca, Adriana S; Oliveira, Leandro S; Nunes, Marcella

    2008-11-15

    The coffee roasted in Brazil is considered to be of low quality, due to the presence of defective coffee beans that depreciate the beverage quality. These beans, although being separated from the non-defective ones prior to roasting, are still commercialized in the coffee trading market. Thus, it was the aim of this work to verify the feasibility of employing ESI-MS to identify chemical characteristics that will allow the discrimination of Arabica and Robusta species and also of defective and non-defective coffees. Aqueous extracts of green (raw) defective and non-defective coffee beans were analyzed by direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and this technique provided characteristic fingerprinting mass spectra that not only allowed for discrimination of species but also between defective and non-defective coffee beans. ESI-MS profiles in the positive mode (ESI(+)-MS) provided separation between defective and non-defective coffees within a given species, whereas ESI-MS profiles in the negative mode (ESI(-)-MS) provided separation between Arabica and Robusta coffees. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fumonisin B2 production by Aspergillus niger in Thai coffee beans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noonim, P.; Mahakarnchanaku, W.; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2009-01-01

    During 2006 and 2007, a total of 64 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea arabica) from two growing sites in Chiangmai Province and 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea canephora) from two growing sites in Chumporn Province, Thailand, were collected and assessed for fumonisin contamination...... by black Aspergilli. No Fusarium species known to produce fumonisin were detected, but black Aspergilli had high incidences on both Arabica and Robusta Thai coffee beans. Liquid chromatography (LC) with high-resolution mass spectrometric (HRMS) detection showed that 67% of Aspergillus niger isolates from...... coffee beans were capable of producing fumonisins B2 (FB2) and B4 when grown on Czapek Yeast Agar with 5% NaCl. Small amounts (1-9.7 ng g-1) of FB2 were detected in seven of 12 selected coffee samples after ion-exchange purification and LC-MS/MS detection. Two samples also contained FB4...

  19. Isolation, identification and toxigenic potential of ochratoxin A-producing Aspergillus species from coffee beans grown in two regions of Thailand.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noonim, P.; Mahakarnchanakul, W.; Nielsen, K.F.; Frisvad, J.C.; Samson, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    In 2006 and 2007, 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea arabica) from two growing sites of Chiang Mai Province, and 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea canephora var. robusta) from two growing sites of Chumphon Province, Thailand, were collected and assessed for the distribution of fungi w

  20. Isolation, identification and toxigenic potential of ochratoxin A-producing Aspergillus species from coffee beans grown in two regions of Thailand.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noonim, P.; Mahakarnchanakul, W.; Nielsen, K.F.; Frisvad, J.C.; Samson, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    In 2006 and 2007, 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea arabica) from two growing sites of Chiang Mai Province, and 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea canephora var. robusta) from two growing sites of Chumphon Province, Thailand, were collected and assessed for the distribution of fungi

  1. Fumonisin B2 production by Aspergillus niger in Thai coffee beans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noonim, P.; Mahakarnchanaku, W.; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2009-01-01

    by black Aspergilli. No Fusarium species known to produce fumonisin were detected, but black Aspergilli had high incidences on both Arabica and Robusta Thai coffee beans. Liquid chromatography (LC) with high-resolution mass spectrometric (HRMS) detection showed that 67% of Aspergillus niger isolates from...

  2. Effect of Roasting Conditions on Concentration in Elements of Vietnam Robusta Coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Cuong Tran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vietnam Robusta Coffee was roasted at different roasting degree and roasting temperature and 9 element concentrations (K, Mg, Ca, Na, Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn and Pb of roasted coffee were analyzed by Flame atomic absorption method (FAAS in this study. The results showed that the concentrations were ranged in 1447.97 ~ 1342.10 (mg/100g, 768.22 ~ 1259.44 (μg/g,10.35 ~ 13.15 (μg/g, and 17.38 ~ 20.97 (μg/g for element of K, Ca, Cu and Mn in green and roasted coffee beans, respectively. All determined elements were the smallest value in green coffee, then increased with increasing roasting level and reached the highest value in Spain roast (roasting temperature of 250°C. Mg concentration ranged in 682.70 ~ 3647.73 (μg/g; Fe concentration ranged in 37.20 ~ 53.44 (μg/g; Zn concentration ranged in 5.97 ~ 6.89 (μg/g and Pb concentration ranged in 2.18 ~ 15.04 (μg/100g. Concentrations of all determined elements didn’t change with the increased roasting process.

  3. Microclimate, development and productivity of robusta coffee shaded by rubber trees and at full sun

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    André Vasconcellos Araújo; Fábio Luiz Partelli; Gleison Oliosi; José Ricardo Macedo Pezzopane

    2016-01-01

      There are few studies about the shading of Robusta coffee with rubber trees. The aim of this study was evaluate the microclimate, development and yield of Coffea canephora grown at full sun and shaded by rubber trees...

  4. Quantification of Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora var. robusta in roasted and ground coffee blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliani, Laura Ruth; Pellegrino, Gloria; Giugno, Graziella; Consonni, Roberto

    2013-03-15

    This study reports direct quantification of arabica in roasted and ground coffee blends of Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora var. robusta. (1)H-NMR analysis of water extracts of coffee blends were combined with multivariate statistical analysis to obtain an OPLS model with high predictive capability. This approach allowed to evaluate the composition of coffee blends of unknown arabica and robusta content, on the basis of multiple chemical components. Differences in geographical origin of the analyzed samples did not affected the compositional determination of coffee blends. This approach represents a valid tool in authentication procedures of arabica and robusta blends of roasted and ground coffee. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A field survey on coffee beans drying methods of Indonesian small holder farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siagian, Parulian; Setyawan, Eko Y.; Gultom, Tumiur; Napitupulu, Farel H.; Ambarita, Himsar

    2017-09-01

    Drying agricultural product is a post-harvest process that consumes significant energy. It can affect the quality of the product. This paper deals with literature review and field survey of drying methods of coffee beans of Indonesia farmers. The objective is to supply the necessary information on developing continuous solar drier. The results show that intermittent characteristic of sun drying results in a better quality of coffee beans in comparison with constant convective drying. In order to use energy efficiently, the drying process should be divided into several stages. In the first stage when the moist content is high, higher drying air temperature is more effective. After this step, where the moist content is low, lower drying air temperature is better. The field survey of drying coffee beans in Sumatera Utara province reveals that the used drying process is very traditional. It can be divided into two modes and depend on the coffee beans type. The Arabica coffee is firstly fermented and dried to moisture content of 80% using sun drying method, then followed by Green House model of drying up to moisture content about 12%. The latter typically spends 3 days of drying time. On the other hand, The Robusta coffee is dried by exposing to the sun directly without any treatment. After the coffee beans dried follow by peeled process. These findings can be considered to develop a continuous solar drying that suitable for coffee beans drying.

  6. Quantification of the Robusta fraction in a coffee blend via Raman spectroscopy: proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermelinger, Thomas; D'Ambrosio, Lucio; Klopprogge, Babette; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2011-09-14

    Among the 100 different known Coffea species, Coffea arabica L. (Arabica) and Coffea canephora Pierre (Robusta) are the only two of commercial interest. They differ in a range of agronomic, genetic, and chemical properties. Due to the significant price difference between Arabica and Robusta, there is an economic incentive to illicitly replace Arabica with Robusta. Therefore, it is crucial to have accurate methods to determine the Robusta-to-Arabica-ratio in blends. This paper presents the proof of principle of a new and fast approach to determine the Robusta fraction in a blend based on Raman spectroscopy. The oils of two references (a pure Robusta and pure Arabica coffee) and six blends thereof consisting of different Robusta and Arabica fractions were extracted using a Soxhlet system. The solutes were analyzed by means of Raman spectroscopy without further workup. Using the intensity ratio between two Raman peaks, one characteristic for kahweol and one characteristic for fatty acids, allowed determinination of the Robusta content in a given mixture. The intensity ratio is linearly dependent on the Robusta content of the compound. Above a Robusta content of 75 wt %, kahweol was not detectable. The Raman data are in agreement with results obtained from the very time-consuming multistep DIN 10777 procedures based on HPLC.

  7. Investigation of optimum roasting conditions to obtain possible health benefit supplement, antioxidants from coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza; Moon, Joon-Kwan; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2011-09-01

    In order to investigate the role of roasting conditions in antioxidant formation, methanol and hot water extracts from Robusta coffee beans roasted for various lengths of time and at various temperatures were analyzed for total phenolic acid, chlorogenic acid, and caffeine content, as well as for their antioxidant activities using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryhydrazyl (DPPH), thiobarbituric acid (TBA), and malonaldehyde/gas chromatography (MA/GC) assays. The amount of total phenolics in methanol extracts decreased linearly over the roasting temperature from 63.51 ± 0.77 mg chlorogenic acid equivalent (CAE)/g coffee beans (roasted at 200°C) to 42.56 ± 0.33 mg CAE/g coffee beans (roasted at 240°C). The total chlorogenic acid content decreased when the roasting time was increased from 78.33 ± 1.41 mg/g (green coffee beans) to 4.31 ± 0.23 mg/g (roasted for 16 min at 250°C). All methanol extracts from roasted coffee beans possessed over 90% antioxidant activities in the DPPH assay. The antioxidant activity of methanol extracts ranged from 41.38 ± 1.77% (roasted at 250°C for 10 min) to 98.20 ± 1.49% (roasted at 230°C for 16 min) as tested by the TBA assay. The antioxidant activity of methanol extracts of green coffee beans and roasted coffee beans ranged from 93.01% (green coffee beans) to 98.62 ± 1.32% (roasted at 250°C for 14 min) in the MA/GC assays. All hot water extracts exhibited moderate pro-oxidant activities in TBA and MA/GC assays. The results indicated that roasting conditions of coffee beans play an important role in the formation of antioxidants in brewed coffee, which can be dietary supplements having beneficial effect to human health.

  8. On the role of (-)-2-methylisoborneol for the aroma of Robusta coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Imre; Grosch, Werner

    2002-07-31

    The role of 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) in coffee aroma is controversially discussed in the literature. MIB is known as an off-flavor compound in drinking water and food, but it has also been suggested as a key flavor component of Robusta coffee, discriminating Robusta from Arabica coffee. To check this hypothesis the role of MIB in coffee brews was studied. Two reference samples containing pure Arabica and Robusta coffee brews were compared with five samples of Arabica coffee brews containing increasing amounts of MIB. The sensory panel consisting of 12 assessors perceived a distinct difference in the Arabica coffee odor and flavor in the presence of 10-25 ng/kg MIB, which is close to its threshold value in water. The sensory impression was described as musty, mold-like, and earthy. The intensity increased with increasing concentration of MIB. The panelists agreed that there was no similarity with the Robusta reference sample. The Arabica coffee brew spiked with MIB was no longer palatable due to the odor and flavor defect formed.

  9. Physical Characteristics of Coffee Beans from Steaming Processin Single Column Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available One of important steps in decaffeination process is steaming. The aim of steaming is to expand coffee beans porosity in order to obtain optimal condition for decaffeination process. Steaming can be done in single column reactor using saturated water vapour as media. The objective of this research is to study physical characteristics of coffee beans after steaming process using single column reactor. Material tested was Robusta coffee with 13—14% moisture content after dry processing. Reactor capacity is 6 kg dried coffee beans and 30 l water to produce water vapour. Dried coffee beans classified in 4 grades, i.e. diameter size (d d>7,5 mm; 6,5coffee beans expanded 8.6—9.5% in length, 12.2—13.3% in width, and 18.3—20.6% in thickness. Coffee bean volume increased 30—50%. Coffee bean moisture content increased f. Aritmatic diameter increased 8—13% while geometric diameter increased 9—18%. Sphericity not affected. Surface area increased 18—37%. True density increased 19—30% while bulk density was while. Porosity increased from 13—18% to 24—39% while coffee beans texture decreased from 323—384 g/1 mm to 212—225 g/1 mm. Color change increased from 14—20 to 38—40. The optimum steaming process was 3 hours.Key words : Coffee, steaming, single column reactor, decaffeination.

  10. Decaffeination process characteristic of Robusta coffee in single column reactor using ethyl acetate solvent

    OpenAIRE

    Sukrisno Widyotomo; Sri Mulato; Hadi K. Purwadaria; A.M Syarief

    2009-01-01

    Consumers drink coffee not as nutrition source, but as refreshment drink. For coffee consumers who have high tolerance for caffeine, coffee may warm up and refresh their bodies. High caffeine content in coffee beans may cause several complaints to consumers who are susceptible to caffeine. One of the efforts, for coffee market expansion is product diversification to decaffeinated coffee. Decaffeination process is one of process to reduce caffeine content from agricultural products. Indonesian...

  11. Isolation, identification and toxigenic potential of ochratoxin A-producing Aspergillus species from coffee beans grown in two regions of Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noonim, P.; Mahakarnchanakul, W.; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2008-01-01

    In 2006 and 2007, 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea arabica) from two growing sites of Chiang Mai Province, and 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea canephora var. robusta) from two growing sites of Chumphon Province, Thailand, were collected and assessed for the distribution of fungi...... with the potential to produce ochratoxin A (OTA). The overall percentage of fungal contamination in coffee was 98% and reduced to 60% after surface disinfection. There were remarkable ecological differences in the composition of ochratoxigenic species present in these two regions. Arabica coffee bean samples from...... the North had an average of 78% incidence of colonization with Aspergillus of section Circumdati with Aspergillus westerdijkiae and A. melleus as the predominant species. Aspergillus spp. of section Nigri were found in 75% of the samples whereas A. ochraceus was not detected. Robusta coffee beans from...

  12. The composition of wax and oil in green coffee beans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folstar, P.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for the isolation of wax and oil from green coffee beans were studied and a method for the quantitative extraction of coffee oil from the beans was introduced. Coffee wax, coffee oil and wax-free coffee oil as well as the unsaponifiable matter prepared from each were fractionated by column c

  13. The composition of wax and oil in green coffee beans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folstar, P.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for the isolation of wax and oil from green coffee beans were studied and a method for the quantitative extraction of coffee oil from the beans was introduced. Coffee wax, coffee oil and wax-free coffee oil as well as the unsaponifiable matter prepared from each were fractionated by column c

  14. Fungal contamination in green coffee beans samples: A public health concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Carla; Pacífico, Cátia; Faria, Tiago; de Oliveira, Ana Cebola; Caetano, Liliana Aranha; Carolino, Elisabete; Gomes, Anita Quintal; Viegas, Susana

    2017-05-26

    Studies on the microbiology of coffee cherries and beans have shown that the predominant toxigenic fungal genera (Aspergillus and Penicillium) are natural coffee contaminants. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of fungi in Coffea arabica L. (Arabica coffee) and Coffea canephora L. var. robusta (Robusta coffee) green coffee samples obtained from different sources at the pre-roasting stage. Twenty-eight green coffee samples from different countries of origin (Brazil, Timor, Honduras, Angola, Vietnam, Costa Rica, Colombia, Guatemala, Nicaragua, India, and Uganda) were evaluated. The fungal load in the contaminated samples ranged from 0 to 12330 colony forming units (CFU)/g, of which approximately 67% presented contamination levels below 1500 CFU/g, while 11% exhibited intermediate contamination levels between 1500 and 3000 CFU/g. Contamination levels higher than 3000 CFU/g were found in 22% of contaminated coffee samples. Fifteen different fungi were isolated by culture-based methods and Aspergillus species belonging to different sections (complexes). The predominant Aspergillus section detected was Nigri (39%), followed by Aspergillus section Circumdati (29%). Molecular analysis detected the presence of Aspergillus sections Fumigati and Circumdati. The% coffee samples where Aspergillus species were identified by culture-based methods were 96%. Data demonstrated that green coffee beans samples were contaminated with toxigenic fungal species. Since mycotoxins may be resistant to the roasting process, this suggests possible exposure to mycotoxins through consumption of coffee. Further studies need to be conducted to provide information on critical points of coffee processing, such that fungal contamination may be reduced or eliminated and thus exposure to fungi and mycotoxins through coffee handling and consumption be prevented.

  15. Evaluation of green coffee beans quality using near infrared spectroscopy: a quantitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, João Rodrigo; Sarraguça, Mafalda C; Rangel, António O S S; Lopes, João A

    2012-12-01

    Characterisation of coffee quality based on bean quality assessment is associated with the relative amount of defective beans among non-defective beans. It is therefore important to develop a methodology capable of identifying the presence of defective beans that enables a fast assessment of coffee grade and that can become an analytical tool to standardise coffee quality. In this work, a methodology for quality assessment of green coffee based on near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is proposed. NIRS is a green chemistry, low cost, fast response technique without the need of sample processing. The applicability of NIRS was evaluated for Arabica and Robusta varieties from different geographical locations. Partial least squares regression was used to relate the NIR spectrum to the mass fraction of defective and non-defective beans. Relative errors around 5% show that NIRS can be a valuable analytical tool to be used by coffee roasters, enabling a simple and quantitative evaluation of green coffee quality in a fast way. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characteristics of Quality Profile and Agribusiness of Robusta Coffee in Tambora Mountainside, Sumbawa

    OpenAIRE

    Lya Aklimawati; Yusianto .; Surip Mawardi

    2014-01-01

    Coffee development in Indomesia by means of optimalizing local resources needs to be done for increasing national coffee production as well as for expanding domestic and international markets. These opportunities must be used to gain benefit as a strategic action for raising farmer’s prosperity. This study was aimed to observe physical quality and flavor profile of Robusta coffee from Tambora mountainside, and to identify agribusiness coffee system applied by the farmers, including problem id...

  17. Rapid authentication of coffee blends and quantification of 16-O-methylcafestol in roasted coffee beans by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schievano, Elisabetta; Finotello, Claudia; De Angelis, Elisabetta; Mammi, Stefano; Navarini, Luciano

    2014-12-24

    Roasted coffee is subject to commercial frauds, because the high-quality Coffea arabica species, described as "100% Arabica" or "Highland coffee", is often mixed with the less expensive Coffea canephora var. Robusta. The quantification of 16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC) is useful to monitor the authenticity of the products as well as the Robusta content in blends. The German standard method DIN 10779 is used in the determination of 16-OMC in roasted coffee beans to detect C. canephora in blends, but it is laborious and time-consuming. Here, we introduce a new method that provides a quantitative determination of esterified 16-OMC directly in coffee extracts by means of high-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 5 and 20 mg/kg, respectively, which are adequate to detect the presence of Robusta at percentages lower than 0.9%. The proposed method is much faster, more sensitive, and much more reproducible than the DIN standard method.

  18. A Real Option Analysis applied to the production of Arabica and Robusta Coffee in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres R. Jácome

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The coffee market is distinguished for being volatile and uncertain in terms of domestic and international prices. Arabica and Robusta coffee are produced in 23 provinces of Ecuador. A decade-long decline of coffee production prompted the Ecuadorian government to launch a public program for replanting coffee trees towards the end of 2011. A grower’s decision to enter, remain in or exit the coffee sector is based on fluctuating profits from each year’s harvest sale. We analyzed the hypothesis whereby the coffee grower’s decision to leave the sector is explained by volatile and uncertain prices. This paper aimed to evaluate the coffee sector with an application of Real Option Analysis for the period 2002-2012. We also defined entry (H and exit (L prices for Arabica and Robusta coffee for the analyzed period. Our findings revealed high H and L prices encourage growers to leave the sector for the most part of the analyzed period. High H and L prices resulted from high variable cost due to increasing wages for farm workers. The Ecuadorian government is developing a policy to help growers make production more efficient, encouraging them to remain in the sector in the long run.

  19. Effect of roasting conditions on several chemical constituents of Vietnam Robusta coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran VAN CUONG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effect of roasting conditions on chemical constituents of Vietnam robusta coffee. The contents of acrylamide, chlorogenic acid and tannins were higher in green coffee than in roasted coffee and decreased as roasting condition increased, which ranged from 6.53 to 91.36 μg/100g, 1.54 to 55.51 mg/g and 3.14 to 651.59 mg/10g, respectively. In addition, the content of trigonelline ranged from 1.43 to 64.24 mg/10g, which gave the highest value in green coffee, then decreased rapidly, while in the Italian roast it was not present at all. Caffeine content ranged from 15.30 to 35.91 mg/g and presented the lowest value in the case of green coffee, then increased reaching the highest value at 240 oC, after that decreasing gradually and slowly.

  20. Viability of post acclimatized plantlets of Robusta coffee (Coffea canephora after storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teguh Iman Santoso

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This research related to the storage method of planting materials in the form of post acclimatized plantlets of Robusta coffee multiplied by somatic embryogenesis using plastic film that wraped the whole of plantlets. This information is important to support the delivery of clonal planting materials to distribution points, especially Robusta coffee plantlets viability based on condition of the container, storage period and density of plantlets. The research was conducted at Kaliwining Experimental Station of Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute, located at 45 m asl. D rainfall type (Schmidt—Ferguson classification. The first experiment determind the effect of container condition and storage duration on viability of Robusta coffee plantlets. Each experimental unit contained 100 plantlets and each treatment was repeated three times with completely randomized design in factorial. The first factor was condition of storage container, i.e. airtight and non air tight. The second factor was storage period levels: 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 days. The storage container was cardboard volume 11 dm3. The second experiment was conducted for the optimization of storage volume and storage period. Each treatment using 100 plantlets was repeated three times in completly randomized design with factorial. The first factor was storage volume of 7 dm3 and 11 dm3, the second factor was storage period levels: 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 days. The results indicated that the maximum store period was obtained in an airtight storage treatment with 10 days, 96.3% plantlets viability, 1% fallen leaves, 3.3% water loss and not significantly different to control. For packing 100 plantlets with height 8—10 cm and leaf number 4—6 can use the volume of container store up to 7 dm3, which showed no significant difference to container volume 11 dm3 in the percentage of viability, the percentage of fallen leaves, loss of water. Key words : Robusta coffee, plantlets, storage

  1. Differentiation of Chinese robusta coffees according to species, using a combined electronic nose and tongue, with the aid of chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjiang; Zhao, Jianping; Hu, Rongsuo; Dong, Yunping; Tan, Lehe

    2017-08-15

    Electronic nose and tongue sensors and chemometric multivariate analysis were applied to characterize and classify 7 Chinese robusta coffee cultivars with different roasting degrees. Analytical data were obtained from 126 samples of roasted coffee beans distributed in the Hainan Province of China. Physicochemical qualities, such as the pH, titratable acidity (TA), total soluble solids (TSS), total solids (TS), and TSS/TA ratio, were determined by wet chemistry methods. Data fusion strategies were investigated to improve the performance of models relative to the performance of a single technique. Clear classification of all the studied coffee samples was achieved by principal component analysis, K-nearest neighbour analysis, partial least squares discriminant analysis, and a back-propagation artificial neural network. Quantitative models were established between the sensor responses and the reference physicochemical qualities, using partial least squares regression (PLSR). The PLSR model with a fusion data set was considered the best model for determining the quality parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Rapid Prediction of Moisture Content in Intact Green Coffee Beans Using Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Adnan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Moisture content (MC is one of the most important quality parameters of green coffee beans. Therefore, its fast and reliable measurement is necessary. This study evaluated the feasibility of near infrared (NIR spectroscopy and chemometrics for rapid and non-destructive prediction of MC in intact green coffee beans of both Coffea arabica (Arabica and Coffea canephora (Robusta species. Diffuse reflectance (log 1/R spectra of intact beans were acquired using a bench top Fourier transform NIR instrument. MC was determined gravimetrically according to The International Organization for Standardization (ISO 6673. Samples were split into subsets for calibration (n = 64 and independent validation (n = 44. A three-component partial least squares regression (PLSR model using raw NIR spectra yielded a root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP of 0.80% MC; a four component PLSR model using scatter corrected spectra yielded a RMSEP of 0.57% MC. A simplified PLS model using seven selected wavelengths (1155, 1212, 1340, 1409, 1724, 1908, and 2249 nm yielded a similar accuracy (RMSEP: 0.77% MC which opens the possibility of creating cheaper NIR instruments. In conclusion, NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy appears to be suitable for rapid and reliable MC prediction in intact green coffee; no separate model for Arabica and Robusta species is needed.

  3. Rapid Prediction of Moisture Content in Intact Green Coffee Beans Using Near Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Adnan; Hörsten, Dieter von; Pawelzik, Elke; Mörlein, And Daniel

    2017-05-19

    Moisture content (MC) is one of the most important quality parameters of green coffee beans. Therefore, its fast and reliable measurement is necessary. This study evaluated the feasibility of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and chemometrics for rapid and non-destructive prediction of MC in intact green coffee beans of both Coffeaarabica (Arabica) and Coffeacanephora (Robusta) species. Diffuse reflectance (log 1/R) spectra of intact beans were acquired using a bench top Fourier transform NIR instrument. MC was determined gravimetrically according to The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 6673. Samples were split into subsets for calibration (n = 64) and independent validation (n = 44). A three-component partial least squares regression (PLSR) model using raw NIR spectra yielded a root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.80% MC; a four component PLSR model using scatter corrected spectra yielded a RMSEP of 0.57% MC. A simplified PLS model using seven selected wavelengths (1155, 1212, 1340, 1409, 1724, 1908, and 2249 nm) yielded a similar accuracy (RMSEP: 0.77% MC) which opens the possibility of creating cheaper NIR instruments. In conclusion, NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy appears to be suitable for rapid and reliable MC prediction in intact green coffee; no separate model for Arabica and Robusta species is needed.

  4. Isolation, identification and toxigenic potential of ochratoxin A-producing Aspergillus species from coffee beans grown in two regions of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonim, Paramee; Mahakarnchanakul, Warapa; Nielsen, Kristian F; Frisvad, Jens C; Samson, Robert A

    2008-12-10

    In 2006 and 2007, 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea arabica) from two growing sites of Chiang Mai Province, and 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea canephora var. robusta) from two growing sites of Chumphon Province, Thailand, were collected and assessed for the distribution of fungi with the potential to produce ochratoxin A (OTA). The overall percentage of fungal contamination in coffee was 98% and reduced to 60% after surface disinfection. There were remarkable ecological differences in the composition of ochratoxigenic species present in these two regions. Arabica coffee bean samples from the North had an average of 78% incidence of colonization with Aspergillus of section Circumdati with Aspergillus westerdijkiae and A. melleus as the predominant species. Aspergillus spp. of section Nigri were found in 75% of the samples whereas A. ochraceus was not detected. Robusta coffee beans from the South were 98-100% contaminated with predominantly A. carbonarius and A. niger. A. westerdijkiae was only found in one sample. The diversity of the fungal population was probably correlated with the geographical origin of the coffee, coffee cultivar, and processing method. Representative isolates of section Circumdati (52) and Nigri (82) were examined for their OTA production using HPLC with fluorescence detection. Aspergillus westerdijkiae (42 isolates out of 42), A. steynii (13/13), and A. carbonarius (35/35) in general produced large amounts of OTA, while one isolate of A. sclerotiorum produced intermediate amounts of OTA. 13% of the A. niger isolates produced OTA in intermediate amounts. OTA levels in coffee bean samples were analyzed using the Ridascreen OTA ELISA kits. Of the 64 coffee bean samples analyzed, 98% were contaminated with OTA in levels of Robusta). Presence of OTA in representative coffee samples was also confirmed by LC-MS/MS after ion-exchange purification.

  5. Development of genic and genomic SSR markers of robusta coffee (Coffea canephora Pierre Ex A. Froehner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad S Hendre

    Full Text Available Coffee breeding and improvement efforts can be greatly facilitated by availability of a large repository of simple sequence repeats (SSRs based microsatellite markers, which provides efficiency and high-resolution in genetic analyses. This study was aimed to improve SSR availability in coffee by developing new genic-/genomic-SSR markers using in-silico bioinformatics and streptavidin-biotin based enrichment approach, respectively. The expressed sequence tag (EST based genic microsatellite markers (EST-SSRs were developed using the publicly available dataset of 13,175 unigene ESTs, which showed a distribution of 1 SSR/3.4 kb of coffee transcriptome. Genomic SSRs, on the other hand, were developed from an SSR-enriched small-insert partial genomic library of robusta coffee. In total, 69 new SSRs (44 EST-SSRs and 25 genomic SSRs were developed and validated as suitable genetic markers. Diversity analysis of selected coffee genotypes revealed these to be highly informative in terms of allelic diversity and PIC values, and eighteen of these markers (∼ 27% could be mapped on a robusta linkage map. Notably, the markers described here also revealed a very high cross-species transferability. In addition to the validated markers, we have also designed primer pairs for 270 putative EST-SSRs, which are expected to provide another ca. 200 useful genetic markers considering the high success rate (88% of marker conversion of similar pairs tested/validated in this study.

  6. Personal exposure to dust and endotoxin in Robusta and Arabica coffee processing factories in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakwari, Gloria; Mamuya, Simon H D; Bråtveit, Magne; Larsson, Lennart; Pehrson, Christina; Moen, Bente E

    2013-03-01

    Endotoxin exposure associated with organic dust exposure has been studied in several industries. Coffee cherries that are dried directly after harvest may differ in dust and endotoxin emissions to those that are peeled and washed before drying. The aim of this study was to measure personal total dust and endotoxin levels and to evaluate their determinants of exposure in coffee processing factories. Using Sidekick Casella pumps at a flow rate of 2l/min, total dust levels were measured in the workers' breathing zone throughout the shift. Endotoxin was analyzed using the kinetic chromogenic Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Separate linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate exposure determinants for dust and endotoxin. Total dust and endotoxin exposure were significantly higher in Robusta than in Arabica coffee factories (geometric mean 3.41 mg/m(3) and 10 800 EU/m(3) versus 2.10 mg/m(3) and 1400 EU/m(3), respectively). Dry pre-processed coffee and differences in work tasks explained 30% of the total variance for total dust and 71% of the variance for endotoxin exposure. High exposure in Robusta processing is associated with the dry pre-processing method used after harvest. Dust and endotoxin exposure is high, in particular when processing dry pre-processed coffee. Minimization of dust emissions and use of efficient dust exhaust systems are important to prevent the development of respiratory system impairment in workers.

  7. Development of genic and genomic SSR markers of robusta coffee (Coffea canephora Pierre Ex A. Froehner).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendre, Prasad S; Aggarwal, Ramesh K

    2014-01-01

    Coffee breeding and improvement efforts can be greatly facilitated by availability of a large repository of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) based microsatellite markers, which provides efficiency and high-resolution in genetic analyses. This study was aimed to improve SSR availability in coffee by developing new genic-/genomic-SSR markers using in-silico bioinformatics and streptavidin-biotin based enrichment approach, respectively. The expressed sequence tag (EST) based genic microsatellite markers (EST-SSRs) were developed using the publicly available dataset of 13,175 unigene ESTs, which showed a distribution of 1 SSR/3.4 kb of coffee transcriptome. Genomic SSRs, on the other hand, were developed from an SSR-enriched small-insert partial genomic library of robusta coffee. In total, 69 new SSRs (44 EST-SSRs and 25 genomic SSRs) were developed and validated as suitable genetic markers. Diversity analysis of selected coffee genotypes revealed these to be highly informative in terms of allelic diversity and PIC values, and eighteen of these markers (∼ 27%) could be mapped on a robusta linkage map. Notably, the markers described here also revealed a very high cross-species transferability. In addition to the validated markers, we have also designed primer pairs for 270 putative EST-SSRs, which are expected to provide another ca. 200 useful genetic markers considering the high success rate (88%) of marker conversion of similar pairs tested/validated in this study.

  8. Microclimate, development and productivity of robusta coffee shaded by rubber trees and at full sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Vasconcellos Araújo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT There are few studies about the shading of Robusta coffee with rubber trees. The aim of this study was evaluate the microclimate, development and yield of Coffea canephora grown at full sun and shaded by rubber trees. The experiment consisted of a Robusta coffee crop (Coffea canephora grown at under full sun and another coffee crop intercropped with rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis. The rubber trees and coffee crop were planted in the East/West direction, in Jaguaré, Espírito Santo, Brazil. Was evaluated the luminosity, temperature and relative humidity, leaf nutrient concentrations; internodes of the plagiotropic and orthotropic branches, leaf area; relative chlorophyll index, and tree yield of the coffee crops. The shading directly influenced the microclimate by reducing the air temperature in the summer and winter, as well as by increasing relative humidity. Luminosity in the summer had an average decrease of 905 lumens ft-2 throughout the day, which was equivalent to 72.49%, and luminosity in the winter had an average decrease of 1665 lumens ft-2, which was equivalent to 88.04%. The shading provided greater etiolation of the plagiotropic and orthotropic branches as well as greater leaf expansion as compared to the full sun. The leaf concentration of Fe and Mn were higher in the shaded coffee. Estimated chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll were greater in the coffee crop grown at under full sun. The dense shading produced by rubber trees provided losses in the coffee crop yield, however, there is the formation of the rubber tree.

  9. The cholesterol-raising factor from coffee beans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urgert, R.; Katan, M.B.

    1996-01-01

    Coffee beans and some types of coffee brew - not the regular types of coffee prepared with a paper filter or with soluble coffee granules - contain the diterpenes cafestol and kahweol. Cafestol and kahweol raise the serum concentration of cholesterol and triglycerides in humans, and they also appear

  10. Export and Competitiveness of Indonesian Coffee Bean in International Market: Strategic Implication for the Development of Organic Coffee Bean

    OpenAIRE

    Bambang Drajat; Adang Agustian; Ade Supriatna

    2007-01-01

    The performance of Indonesian coffee bean export from 1995 to 2004was not satisfactory. This implied that there were problems of the competitiveness of Indonesian coffee bean export. This study was expected to come up withsome views related with the problem. This study was aimed to analyze the competitiveness of Indonesian coffee bean export in international markets. Somepolicy implication would be derived following the conclusions. In addition,this study was aimed to deliver some arguments r...

  11. Variation of Potential Yield of Hybrid Population of Robusta coffee (Coffea canepor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novie Pranata Erdiansyah

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The low yield of Robusta coffee in Indonesia may be due to the use of planting materials derived from seeds. The research objective was to determine the variation of Robusta coffee yield wich local propagated by using seeds. The study was conducted in Kaliwining experimental Station of ICCRI (Indonesian Coffee andCocoa Research Institute. There were two populations observed. Number of progeny used in this study were 186 genotypes consisting of two groups from crossesBP 409 x Q 121 with 89 progenies and BP 961 x BP 409 with 81 progenies. The results showed that planting materials from seeds exhibit properties mixed results.Progeny that have the best results (yield more than 2 ton/ha not more than 5% of the total population. In both populations there is a big difference between the progenythat has high and low yield. Highest yield B population could reach 2,500 kg/ha and the C population reached 2,200 kg/ha. The lowest yield can only produce coffee270 kg/ha in populations B and 120 kg/ha in population C.Key words: Coffea canephora, hybrid, variation, yield

  12. Variation in caffeine concentration in single coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Glen P; Wu, Alex; Yiran, Liang; Force, Lesleigh

    2013-11-13

    Twenty-eight coffee samples from around the world were tested for caffeine levels to develop near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) calibrations for whole and ground coffee. Twenty-five individual beans from five of those coffees were used to develop a NIRS calibration for caffeine concentration in single beans. An international standard high-performance liquid chromatography method was used to analyze for caffeine content. Coffee is a legal stimulant and possesses a number of heath properties. However, there is variation in the level of caffeine in brewed coffee and other caffeinated beverages. Being able to sort beans on the basis of caffeine concentration will improve quality control in the level of caffeine in those beverages. The range in caffeine concentration was from 0.01 mg/g (decaffeinated coffee) to 19.9 mg/g (Italian coffee). The majority of coffees were around 10.0-12.0 mg/g. The NIRS results showed r(2) values for bulk unground and ground coffees were >0.90 with standard errors caffeine concentration of individual coffee beans. One application of this calibration could be sorting beans on caffeine concentration to provide greater quality control for high-end markets. Furthermore, bean sorting may open new markets for novel coffee products.

  13. Influence of conjunctive use of coffee effluent and fresh water on performance of robusta coffee and soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salakinkop, S R; Shivaprasad, P

    2012-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the influence of treated coffee effluent irrigation on performance of established robusta coffee, nutrient contribution and microbial activities in the soil. The results revealed that the field irrigated with coffee effluent from aerobic tank having COD of 1009 ppm, did not affect the yield of clean coffee (1309 kg/ha) and it was statistically similar (on par) with the plots irrigated with fresh water (1310 kg/ha) with respect to clean coffee yield. Effluent irrigation increased significantly the population bacteria, yeast, fungi, actinomycetes and PSB (122, 52, 12, 34 and 6 x 104/g respectively)) in the soil compared to the soil irrigated with fresh water (87, 22, 5, 24 and 2 x 10(4)/g respectively). The organic carbon (2.60%), available nutrients in the soil like P (57.2 kg/ha), K (401.6 kg/ha, Ca (695.3 ppm), S (5.3 ppm),Cu (4.09 ppm) and Zn(4.78 ppm) were also increased due to effluent irrigation compared to fresh water irrigation. Thus analysis of coffee effluent for major and minor plant nutrients content revealed its potential as source of nutrients and water for plant growth.

  14. Humification degree and its relationship with some soil physical characteristics on robusta coffee (Coffea canephora plantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J.N.F.I.A. Putra

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture stress in coffee plant impacts on the productivity of coffee fruit at PT. Perkebunan Nusantara XII, it is because the low ability of the soil to store water. The ability of the soil to store water can be increased by increasing the organic matter content of soil, especially humic substances. Soil organic matter plays an important role in the improvement of soil physical properties, especially the availability of soil moisture for plants. The purpose of this study was to analyze several humification parameters at four age of plantations plots of coffee and its relation to the water distribution potensial on Inceptisol PT. Perkebunan Nusantara XII Malang district. The research was conducted at PT. Perkebunan Nusantara XII were taken soil samples from 8, 28, 40, and 80 years old robusta coffee plots at 0-30 cm and 30-60 cm soil depth. The results showed that the increasing the age of the coffee plantations significantly increased the input of organic matter in the soil, with indicators of increased litter on soil surface, increased levels of soil C-organic and N-total, humic acid and soil pH. Increasing age of coffee plantations until 80 years did not affect to the value of humification parameters (C/N ratio, HA/FA ratio, E4/E6 ratio, and the humification rate (HR. The age of coffee plantations affected the total acidity, carboxylic groups and phenolic OH, where the values tended to decrease with the older of coffee plantations in the 0-30 cm of soil layers and increased in 30-60 cm. Increasing age of coffee plantations improved the total pores and available water content in the 0-30 cm of soil layer.

  15. Examining growth, yield and bean quality of Ethiopian coffee trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bote, Adugna

    2016-01-01

    Coffee (Coffeaarabica L.)bean production and quality are determined by a diversity of interacting factors (e.g. shade, nitrogen, crop traits). Bean yield increases with increase in radiation, but adequate fertilizer suppliesare needed to sustain the productivity. This thesis analysed coffee tree gro

  16. Examining growth, yield and bean quality of Ethiopian coffee trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bote, Adugna

    2016-01-01

    Coffee (Coffeaarabica L.)bean production and quality are determined by a diversity of interacting factors (e.g. shade, nitrogen, crop traits). Bean yield increases with increase in radiation, but adequate fertilizer suppliesare needed to sustain the productivity. This thesis analysed coffee tree

  17. Soil Moisture and Turgidity of Selected Robusta Coffee Clones on Alluvial Plain with Seasonal Rainfall Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Erwiyono

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Observation on the seasonal variations of hydrological condition and turgidity of selected Robusta coffee clones has been carried out in Kaliwining Experimental Station, Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute in Jember. The aim was to evaluate the effect of hydrological variation on the coffee plants and the degree of soil moisture effect on plant performance. Experimental site overlays on alluvial plain, + 45 m a.s.l., 8o 15’ South with D rainfall type. Observation was conducted by survey method at the experimental plots of organic fertilizer and nitogen treatments on selected Robusta coffee clones derived from rooted cuttings, i.e. BP 436, BP 42, BP 936 and BP 358. Observation was only conducted at the experimental blocks of organic matter trials of 20 l/tree/year at nitrogen (Urea application of locally recommanded rate during the subsequent years of 1999 to 2001. Parameters observed included plant turgidity and soil moisture content of three different depths, i.e. 0—20, 20—40 and 40—60 cm and the weather. Observation was carried out in five replicates designed as blocks of barn manure treatment and N-fertilizer of recommended rate as basal fertilizer. The results showed that meteorological condition and soil moisture of experimental site through the years have seasonal patterns following the seasonal pattern of rainfall. Compared to other meteorological characteristics, relative humidity dominantly determined evaporation and plant turgidity. Plant turgi-dity was not only determined by soil moisture condition, but also atmospheric demand. When relative humidity (RH was relatively high, plant turgidity was relatively stable although soil moisture of surface layers was very low, and the reversal when soil moisture content was high plant turgidity was controlled by atmospheric demand (relative humidity. With a 3—4 dry month period, relative turgidity of the coffee plants was relatively stable above 82%, except when soil

  18. Biochemical and molecular characterization of alpha-D-galactosidase from coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marraccini, Pierre; Rogers, W John; Caillet, Victoria; Deshayes, Alain; Granato, Dominique; Lausanne, Françoise; Lechat, Sylvianne; Pridmore, David; Pétiard, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Alpha-D-Galactosidase (alpha-Gal; EC 3.2.1.22) is one of three principal enzymes involved in the modification or degradation of plant cell wall galactomannans. In the present paper it is shown that alpha-galactosidase activities in field-grown coffee beans are variable amongst cultivars of the two species investigated (Coffea arabica and C. canephora var. Robusta). Higher activities were found in Arabica cultivars. Using beans from greenhouse-cultivated C. arabica as a model, we showed that alpha-Gal activity was undetectable in the bean perispem tissue, but increased gradually during the endosperm development, to reach a peak at approximately 30 weeks after flowering (WAF) which coincided with the hardening of the endosperm. Alpha-Gal-specific transcripts detected at 22 and 27 WAF accompanied the peak of alpha-Gal activity, but were reduced to be undetectable in mature beans at 30 WAF, while alpha-Gal activity still persisted. Two isoforms were distinguished in 2-DE profiles of crude protein extracts by N-terminal sequencing analysis. Analysis of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis profiles demonstrated that both isoforms accumulated in a linear fashion throughout grain maturation. Alpha-Gal activity was also observed to increase to high levels during in vitro germination of coffee beans suggesting an important function of this enzyme in this process. Alpha-Gal cDNA sequences from Arabica and Robusta were sequenced and their deduced proteins appeared to be very similar, differing by only eight amino acids. Southern-blot analysis suggests that the enzyme was encoded by at least two genes in C. arabica that could explain the existence of the two isoforms identified in 2-DE profiles.

  19. Analysis of Cutting Growth Characteristics in Robusta Coffee(Coffea canephora Pierre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ucu Sumirat

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of Robusta coffee clones needs special characteristics for rootstock. This research was aimed to study the characteristics of cutting growth of Robusta coffee as influenced by genetic factor. The research was conducted at Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute using 269 progenies originated from reciprocal crossing populations among three parentals, namely BP 409, BP 961, and Q 121. BP 308 an easy cutting-propagated genotype was used as control. The research was arranged in three replications of randomized completely block design with 10 cuttings per replication. Each cutting was single planted in plastic polybag of 15 cm x 25 cm without any growth-regulator treatment. Cluster analysis procedure showed root growth characteristics which could be divided into three groups namely easy (85.3%, 3.82 and 6.68 cm, moderate (57.6%, 1.73 and 4.01 cm and difficult (25.1%, 0.58 dan 1.44 cm based on proportion of rooted cuttings, number of primary root and length of root, respectively. On the other side, growth of sprout showed good homogenous characteristic, mainly indicated by proportion of sprouted cuttings which generally achieved up to 98% in average. Study on shoot-root ratio of cuttings resulted in two groups of progenies, namely the first which tended to be dominant on sprout growth and the second which tended to balance their root and sprout growth. Based on proportion of sprouted cuttings which almost achieved up to 100% and various proportion of rooted cutting, it could be indicated that growth of cuttings was started and dominated by the growth of sprout. Key words: Coffee canephora, progeny, genetic variation, cutting, rooting, sprouting

  20. Identification and Analysis of Jasmonate Pathway Genes in Coffea canephora (Robusta Coffee) by In Silico Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, Kosaraju; Sreenath, H L

    2017-07-01

    Coffea canephora is the commonly cultivated coffee species in the world along with Coffea arabica. Different pests and pathogens affect the production and quality of the coffee. Jasmonic acid (JA) is a plant hormone which plays an important role in plants growth, development, and defense mechanisms, particularly against insect pests. The key enzymes involved in the production of JA are lipoxygenase, allene oxide synthase, allene oxide cyclase, and 12-oxo-phytodienoic reductase. There is no report on the genes involved in JA pathway in coffee plants. We made an attempt to identify and analyze the genes coding for these enzymes in C. canephora. First, protein sequences of jasmonate pathway genes from model plant Arabidopsis thaliana were identified in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database. These protein sequences were used to search the web-based database Coffee Genome Hub to identify homologous protein sequences in C. canephora genome using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST). Homologous protein sequences for key genes were identified in the C. canephora genome database. Protein sequences of the top matches were in turn used to search in NCBI database using BLAST tool to confirm the identity of the selected proteins and to identify closely related genes in species. The protein sequences from C. canephora database and the top matches in NCBI were aligned, and phylogenetic trees were constructed using MEGA6 software and identified the genetic distance of the respective genes. The study identified the four key genes of JA pathway in C. canephora, confirming the conserved nature of the pathway in coffee. The study expected to be useful to further explore the defense mechanisms of coffee plants. JA is a plant hormone that plays an important role in plant defense against insect pests. Genes coding for the 4 key enzymes involved in the production of JA viz., LOX, AOS, AOC, and OPR are identified in C. canephora (robusta coffee) by

  1. Characterization of Fatty Acid, Amino Acid and Volatile Compound Compositions and Bioactive Components of Seven Coffee (Coffea robusta Cultivars Grown in Hainan Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjiang Dong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Compositions of fatty acid, amino acids, and volatile compound were investigated in green coffee beans of seven cultivars of Coffea robusta grown in Hainan Province, China. The chlorogenic acids, trigonelline, caffeine, total lipid, and total protein contents as well as color parameters were measured. Chemometric techniques, principal component analysis (PCA, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA, and analysis of one-way variance (ANOVA were performed on the complete data set to reveal chemical differences among all cultivars and identify markers characteristic of a particular botanical origin of the coffee. The major fatty acids of coffee were linoleic acid, palmitic acid, oleic acid, and arachic acid. Leucine (0.84 g/100 g DW, lysine (0.63 g/100 g DW, and arginine (0.61 g/100 g DW were the predominant essential amino acids (EAAs in the coffee samples. Seventy-nine volatile compounds were identified and semi-quantified by HS-SPME/GC-MS. PCA of the complete data matrix demonstrated that there were significant differences among all cultivars, HCA supported the results of PCA and achieved a satisfactory classification performance.

  2. Characterization of Fatty Acid, Amino Acid and Volatile Compound Compositions and Bioactive Components of Seven Coffee (Coffea robusta) Cultivars Grown in Hainan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjiang; Tan, Lehe; Zhao, Jianping; Hu, Rongsuo; Lu, Minquan

    2015-09-14

    Compositions of fatty acid, amino acids, and volatile compound were investigated in green coffee beans of seven cultivars of Coffea robusta grown in Hainan Province, China. The chlorogenic acids, trigonelline, caffeine, total lipid, and total protein contents as well as color parameters were measured. Chemometric techniques, principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), and analysis of one-way variance (ANOVA) were performed on the complete data set to reveal chemical differences among all cultivars and identify markers characteristic of a particular botanical origin of the coffee. The major fatty acids of coffee were linoleic acid, palmitic acid, oleic acid, and arachic acid. Leucine (0.84 g/100 g DW), lysine (0.63 g/100 g DW), and arginine (0.61 g/100 g DW) were the predominant essential amino acids (EAAs) in the coffee samples. Seventy-nine volatile compounds were identified and semi-quantified by HS-SPME/GC-MS. PCA of the complete data matrix demonstrated that there were significant differences among all cultivars, HCA supported the results of PCA and achieved a satisfactory classification performance.

  3. Impact of roasting time on the sensory profile of arabica and robusta coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicho, Natalina Cavaco; Leitão, António Eduardo; Ramalho, José Cochicho; de Alvarenga, Nuno Bartolomeu; Lidon, Fernando Cebola

    2013-01-01

    Roasted coffee samples of the two major trade species (Coffea arabica and C. canephora) were studied to identify sensory descriptors that might be used to determine blends production and evaluation, following the expectations of consumers. Coffee beans were roasted at 220 + 10 °C, for 7, 9, and 11 min, and the sensory profiles of the beverages were assessed. From descriptive analysis the eigenvalues allowed the identification of two principal components (PCs), being the variance between samples 68.9% and 21.1%. In the first PC the characteristic odor, astringency, body, bitter flavor, burned aroma, and residual, typical, and burned tastes prevailed. The correlation coefficient between the second PC and citric acid flavor and aroma reached 0.96 and 0.78, respectively. It was concluded that in beverages of these species, the descriptors of both components can be separated according to bean roasting time. Considering roasting time, the overall quality was also rated.

  4. Prediction of specialty coffee cup quality based on near infrared spectra of green coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolessa, Kassaye; Rademaker, Michael; De Baets, Bernard; Boeckx, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    The growing global demand for specialty coffee increases the need for improved coffee quality assessment methods. Green bean coffee quality analysis is usually carried out by physical (e.g. black beans, immature beans) and cup quality (e.g. acidity, flavour) evaluation. However, these evaluation methods are subjective, costly, time consuming, require sample preparation and may end up in poor grading systems. This calls for the development of a rapid, low-cost, reliable and reproducible analytical method to evaluate coffee quality attributes and eventually chemical compounds of interest (e.g. chlorogenic acid) in coffee beans. The aim of this study was to develop a model able to predict coffee cup quality based on NIR spectra of green coffee beans. NIR spectra of 86 samples of green Arabica beans of varying quality were analysed. Partial least squares (PLS) regression method was used to develop a model correlating spectral data to cupping score data (cup quality). The selected PLS model had a good predictive power for total specialty cup quality and its individual quality attributes (overall cup preference, acidity, body and aftertaste) showing a high correlation coefficient with r-values of 90, 90,78, 72 and 72, respectively, between measured and predicted cupping scores for 20 out of 86 samples. The corresponding root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) was 1.04, 0.22, 0.27, 0.24 and 0.27 for total specialty cup quality, overall cup preference, acidity, body and aftertaste, respectively. The results obtained suggest that NIR spectra of green coffee beans are a promising tool for fast and accurate prediction of coffee quality and for classifying green coffee beans into different specialty grades. However, the model should be further tested for coffee samples from different regions in Ethiopia and test if one generic or region-specific model should be developed.

  5. Looking into individual coffee beans during the roasting process: direct micro-probe sampling on-line photo-ionisation mass spectrometric analysis of coffee roasting gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz-Schünemann, Romy; Streibel, Thorsten; Ehlert, Sven; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    A micro-probe (μ-probe) gas sampling device for on-line analysis of gases evolving in confined, small objects by single-photon ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SPI-TOFMS) was developed. The technique is applied for the first time in a feasibility study to record the formation of volatile and flavour compounds during the roasting process within (inside) or in the direct vicinity (outside) of individual coffee beans. A real-time on-line analysis of evolving volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC and SVOC) as they are formed under the mild pyrolytic conditions of the roasting process was performed. The soft-ionisation mass spectra depict a molecular ion signature, which is well corresponding with the existing knowledge of coffee roasting and evolving compounds. Additionally, thereby it is possible to discriminate between Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta). The recognized differences in the roasting gas profiles reflect the differences in the precursor composition of the coffee cultivars very well. Furthermore, a well-known set of marker compounds for Arabica and Robusta, namely the lipids kahweol and cafestol (detected in their dehydrated form at m/z 296 and m/z 298, respectively) were observed. If the variation in time of different compounds is observed, distinctly different evolution behaviours were detected. Here, phenol (m/z 94) and caffeine (m/z 194) are exemplary chosen, whereas phenol shows very sharp emission peaks, caffeine do not have this highly transient behaviour. Finally, the changes of the chemical signature as a function of the roasting time, the influence of sampling position (inside, outside) and cultivar (Arabica, Robusta) is investigated by multivariate statistics (PCA). In summary, this pilot study demonstrates the high potential of the measurement technique to enhance the fundamental knowledge of the formation processes of volatile and semi-volatile flavour compounds inside the individual coffee bean.

  6. Changes of physical properties of coffee beans during roasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokanović Marija R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of heating time on physical changes (weight, volume, texture and colour of coffee beans (Outspan and Guaxupe coffee were investigated. The roasting temperature of both samples was 170°C and samples for analysis were taken at the intervals of 7 minutes during 40 minutes of roasting. Total weight loss at the end of the roasting process was 14.43 % (light roasted and 17.15 % (medium to dark roasted for Outspan and Guaxupe coffee beans, respectively. Significant (P < 0.05 changes in the coffee bean breaking force values were noted between the 7th and 14th minutes, and statistically not significant (P > 0.05 between the 35th and 40th minutes of the roasting. According to the L* colour parameter as a criterion for the classification of roasted coffee colour (light, medium, dark, the Outspan sample was medium and Guaxupe sample was dark roasted.

  7. The effect of fungal fermentation in phenolics content in robusta coffee husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lady Rossana Palomino García

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Coffee husk is an abundant by-product generated by the coffee industry and it can be used for the production of-value-added phenolic compounds. Currently, this residue has no commercial use due to the presence of anti-nutritional compounds and it is returned to the soil or burned. The aim of this study was to evaluate the content of phenolic compounds in Robusta coffee husk, the adequacy of this residue as substrate for fermentation processes, as well as evaluating the influence of fungal solid state fermentation to obtain phenolic compounds from this residue. In the present study, the use of different solvents for the extraction of polyphenols was evaluated and the content was found to be in the range of 96.9-159.5 mg of galic acid (GA·g-1 substrate, depending on the solvent used. The best solvent was acetone, therefore it was selected for extraction. Studies were carried out to evaluate the effect of solid-state fermentation in the release of phenolic compounds, using the filamentous fungi Penicillium purpurogenum. The total phenolic content increased from 159.5 up to 243.2 mg GA·g-1 substrate as a result the solid-state fermentation.

  8. Discrimination between arabica and robusta coffee species on the basis of their amino acid enantiomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Susana; Alves, M Rui; Mendes, Eulália; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Ferreira, Margarida A

    2003-10-22

    This work reports the results for the composition of robusta and arabica coffee species in terms of their amino acid enantiomers in the green and roasted states. The analyses were conducted for the free amino acids, as well as for the amino acids obtained after acid hydrolysis. The amino acids were extracted/hydrolyzed and isolated by SPE on strong cation exchange columns, derivatized to their N-ethoxycarbonylheptafluorobutyl esters, and analyzed by gas chromatography/FID on a Chirasil l-Val column. Multivariate analyses applied to the results showed that the free amino acids can be used as a tool for discrimination between coffee species, with a special reference to l-glutamic acid, l-tryptophan, and pipecolic acid. There is also some evidence that these compounds can be used for discrimination between green coffees subjected to different postharvest processes. It is also shown that the amino acid levels observed after acid hydrolysis can be used for the same purposes, although displaying less discriminatory power.

  9. Zinc supplementation, production and quality of coffee beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herminia Emilia Prieto Martinez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Besides its importance in the coffee tree nutrition, there is almost no information relating zinc nutrition and bean quality. This work evaluated the effect of zinc on the coffee yield and bean quality. The experiment was conducted with Coffea arabica L. in "Zona da Mata" region, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Twelve plots were established at random with 4 competitive plants each. Treatments included plants supplemented with zinc (eight plots and control without zinc supplementation (four plots. Plants were subjected to two treatments: zinc supplementation and control. Yield, number of defective beans, beans attacked by berry borers, bean size, cup quality, beans zinc concentration, potassium leaching, electrical conductivity, color index, total tritable acidity, pH, chlorogenic acids contents and ferric-reducing antioxidant activity of beans were evaluated. Zinc positively affected quality of coffee beans, which presented lower percentage of medium and small beans, lower berry borer incidence, lower potassium leaching and electrical conductivity, higher contents of zinc and chlorogenic acids and higher antioxidant activity in comparison with control beans.

  10. Export and Competitiveness of Indonesian Coffee Bean in International Market: Strategic Implication for the Development of Organic Coffee Bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Drajat

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The performance of Indonesian coffee bean export from 1995 to 2004was not satisfactory. This implied that there were problems of the competitiveness of Indonesian coffee bean export. This study was expected to come up withsome views related with the problem. This study was aimed to analyze the competitiveness of Indonesian coffee bean export in international markets. Somepolicy implication would be derived following the conclusions. In addition,this study was aimed to deliver some arguments referring to organic coffee development as an alternative export development. Data used in this study wastime series data ranging from 1995 to 2004 supported with some primary data.The export data were analyzed descriptively and the Revealed ComparativeAdvantage (RCA Index employed to analyze the competitiveness of Indonesian coffee bean export. The results of the analysis gave some conclusions, asfollows : (1 The export of Indonesian coffee bean was product oriented notmarket oriented. (2 The Indonesian coffee bean export was characterized withlow quality with no premium price, different from that of Vietnam coffee export. (3 Besides quality, the uncompetitive Indonesian coffee export was related to market hegemony by buyers, emerging issue of Ochratoxin A. contamination and high cost economy in export. (4 The competitiveness of Indonesian coffee export was lower than those other countries, such as Columbia,Honduras, Peru, Brazil, and Vietnam. (5 Indonesia still held opportunity todevelop organic coffee for export. Some policy implications emerged from thediscussion were as follows : (1 The Government should facilitate market development through the provisions of market information and export incentives.(2 The Government should develop and applied national standard of coffeebean referring to that of international, as well as, improve processing technology equipments in the farm level for both wet and dry process. (3 Besides improving quality, the improvement

  11. Optimal conditions and operational parameters for conversion of Robusta coffee residues in a continuous stirred tank reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Msambichaka, B.L.; Kivaisi, A.K.; Rubindamayugi, M.S.T. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam, Applied Microbiology Unit (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This experiment studied the possibility of optimizing anaerobic degradation, developing microbial adaptation and establishing long term process stability in a Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) running on Robusta coffee hulls as feed substrate. Decrease in lag phase and increase in methane production rate in batch culture experiment conducted before and after process stabilization of each operational phase in the CSTR clearly suggested that microbial adaptation to increasing coffee percentage composition was attained. Through gradual increase of coffee percentage composition, from 10% coffee, 2% VS, 20 days HRT and a 1 g VS/1/day loading rate to 80% coffee, 4.5% VS, 12 days HRT and a loading rate of 3 g VS/1/day the CSTR system was optimized at a maximum methane yield of 535 ml/g VS. Again it was possible to attain long term process stability at the above mentioned optimal operational parameters for a further 3 month period. (au)

  12. Arabica and robusta coffees: identification of major polar compounds and quantification of blends by direct-infusion electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Rafael; Vaz, Boniek G; Hovell, Ana Maria C; Eberlin, Marcos N; Rezende, Claudia M

    2012-05-02

    Considering that illegal admixture of robusta coffee into high-quality arabica coffee is an important task in coffee analysis, we evaluated the use of direct-infusion electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) data combined with the partial least-squares (PLS) multivariate calibration technique as a fast way to detect and quantify arabica coffee adulterations by robusta coffee. A total of 16 PLS models were built using ESI± quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) and ESI± Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) MS data from hot aqueous extracts of certified coffee samples. The model using the 30 more abundant ions detected by ES+ FT-ICR MS produced the most accurate coffee blend percentage prediction, and thus, it was later successfully employed to predict the blend composition of commercial robusta and arabica coffee. In addition, ESI± FT-ICR MS analysis allowed for the identification of 22 compounds in the arabica coffee and 20 compounds in the robusta coffee, mostly phenolics.

  13. Modulation of coffee aroma via the fermentation of green coffee beans with Rhizopus oligosporus: I. Green coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Liang Wei; Cheong, Mun Wai; Curran, Philip; Yu, Bin; Liu, Shao Quan

    2016-11-15

    Modulation of coffee aroma via the biotransformation/fermentation of different coffee matrices during post-harvest remains sparingly explored despite some studies showing their positive impacts on coffee aroma. Therefore, this is an unprecedented study aimed at modulating coffee aroma via the fermentation of green coffee beans with a food-grade fungus Rhizopus oligosporus. The objective of part I of this two-part study was to characterize the volatile and non-volatile profiles of green coffee beans after fermentation. Proteolysis during fermentation resulted in 1.5-fold increase in the concentrations of proline and aspartic acid which exhibited high Maillard reactivity. Extensive degradation of ferulic and caffeic acids led to 2-fold increase in the total concentrations of volatile phenolic derivatives. 36% of the total volatiles detected in fermented green coffee beans were generated during fermentation. Hence, the work presented demonstrated that R. oligosporus fermentation of green coffee beans could induce modification of the aroma precursors of green coffees.

  14. Performance Evaluation of Rotating Cylinder Type Coffee Bean Roaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutarsi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available One strategy attempts to reduce dependence on primary commodity markets are overseas market expansion and development of secondary products. In the secondary product processing coffee beans is required of supporting equipment to facilitate these efforts. Research Center for Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa has developed coffee bean roaster. However, there are still many people who do not know about the technical aspects of roaster machine type of rotating cylinder so that more people use traditional ways to roast coffee beans. In order for the benefits of this machine is better known society it is necessary to study on the technical aspects. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the technical performance of the coffee beans roaster machine type of rotating cylinder. These include the technical aspects of work capacity of the machine, roasting technical efficiency, fuel requirements, and power requirements of using roaster machine. Research methods are including data collection, calculation and analysis. The results showed that the roaster machine type of a rotating cylinder has capacity of 12.3 kg/hour. Roasting efficiency is 80%. Fuel consumption is 0.6 kg. The calculated amount of the used power of current measurement is the average of 0.616 kW.

  15. Discrimination between washed Arabica, natural Arabica and Robusta coffees by using near infrared spectroscopy, electronic nose and electronic tongue analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, Susanna; Sinelli, Nicoletta; Bertone, Elisa; Venturello, Alberto; Casiraghi, Ernestina; Geobaldo, Francesco

    2015-08-30

    The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a 'holistic' approach, using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and electronic devices (electronic nose and electronic tongue), as instrumental tools for the classification of different coffee varieties. Analyses were performed on green coffee, on ground roasted coffee and on coffee beverage. Principal component analysis was applied on spectral and sensory data to uncover correlations between samples and variables. After variable selection, linear discriminant analysis was used to classify the samples on the basis of the three coffee classes: Robusta, natural Arabica and washed Arabica. Linear discriminant analysis demonstrates the practicability of this approach: the external test set validation performed with NIR data showed 100% of correctly classified samples. Moreover, a satisfying percentage of correct classification in cross-validation was obtained for the electronic devices: the average values of correctly classified samples were 81.83% and 78.76% for electronic nose and electronic tongue, respectively. NIR spectroscopy was shown to be a very reliable and useful tool to classify coffee samples in a fast, clean and inexpensive way compared to classical analysis, while the electronic devices could assume the role of investigating techniques to depict the aroma and taste of coffee samples. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Prospective of Innovative Technologies for Quality Supervision and Classification of Roasted Coffee Beans

    OpenAIRE

    Correa Hernando, Eva Cristina; Barreiro Elorza, Pilar; Hills, B. P.; Bongaers, E.; Jiménez Ariza, Heidi Tatiana; Melado Herreros, Angela; Diezma Iglesias, Belen; Diaz Barcos, Virginia; Meneses, Beatriz; Oteros, R.

    2011-01-01

    Color sorting is the major procedure employed for establish roast degree of coffee beans. However, color-based procedures have been proven to be ineffective, since coffee beans roasted to different degrees can present the same average readings in light reflectance measurements with significant quality variations. Besides to color, other major changes in beans are volume (swell), mass, form, bean pop and density. Eight samples of arabica coffee from Colombia and Guatemala have been roasted und...

  17. Physicochemical characteristics of green coffee: comparison of graded and defective beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalakshmi, K; Kubra, I R; Rao, L J M

    2007-06-01

    Defective (triage) coffee beans are beans rejected after separating the graded ones according to the size and color. These coffee beans represent about 15% to 20% of coffee production in India but are not utilized for beverages since these affect the quality of coffee brew. In the present study, physical characteristics such as bean density, brightness, titratable acidity, pH, moisture, and total soluble solids and also chemical composition, namely, caffeine, chlorogenic acids, lipids, sucrose, total polyphenols, and proteins, were evaluated in defective as well as in graded green coffee beans. The physical parameters such as weight, density, and brightness of defective coffee beans were low compared to the graded beans, which is due to the presence of immature, broken, bleached, and black beans. Caffeine content was low in triage beans compared to graded beans. Chlorogenic acids, one of the composition in coffee responsible for antioxidant activity, was found to be intact (marginally high in some cases) in defective coffee beans. Hence, triage coffee beans can be evaluated as a source of antioxidant or radical scavenging conserve for food systems.

  18. Modulation of coffee aroma via the fermentation of green coffee beans with Rhizopus oligosporus: II. Effects of different roast levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Liang Wei; Cheong, Mun Wai; Curran, Philip; Yu, Bin; Liu, Shao Quan

    2016-11-15

    This study aims to evaluate how changes of the volatile and non-volatile profiles of green coffees induced by Rhizopus oligosporus fermentation of green coffee beans (Part I) translated to changes in the volatile and aroma profiles of light, medium and dark roasted coffees and non-volatile profile of roasted coffee where fermentation effects were most distinctive (light roast). R. oligosporus fermentation resulted in 1.7-, 1.5- and 1.3-fold increases in pyrazine, 2-methylpyrazine and 2-ethylpyrazine levels in coffees of all roast degrees, respectively. This corresponded with the greater extent of amino acids degradation in light roasted fermented coffee. Ethyl palmitate was detected exclusively in medium and dark roasted fermented coffees. The sweet attribute of light and dark roasted coffees were increased following fermentation along with other aroma profile changes that were roast degree specific. This work aims to develop a direct but novel methodology for coffee aroma modulation through green coffee beans fermentation.

  19. Effects of Robusta coffee (Coffea canephora brewing on levels of RANKL and TGF- β1 in orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herniyati Herniyati

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Orthodontic tooth movement will be followed by periodontal ligament and alveolar bone remodeling. Orthodontic mechanical force (OMF will be distributed through the teeth to periodontal ligament and alveolar bone and then will generate local pressure resulting in bone resorption and tension areas that will form new bone. Robusta coffee contains caffeine, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid. Caffeine may increase osteoclastogenesis, and caffeic acid has antioxidant effects that may reduce oxidative stress in osteoblasts. Purpose: This study conducted to analyze the effect Robusta coffee steeping on levels of RANKL and TGF-β1 in orthodontic tooth movement. Method: 16 male rats were divided into 2 groups. Group C: rats given OMF, Group T: given OMF and coffee brew at 20 mg/ 100 g BW. OMF in rats was conducted by applying ligature wire on the molar-1 (M-1 and both incisivus of right maxilla. Subsequently, M-1 of right maxilla was moved to mesial with a Niti closed coil spring. Observations were made on days 15 and 22 by taking the GCF by putting paper point on the gingival sulcus of mesio- and disto-palatal areas of M-1 of right maxilla to determine the levels of RANKL and TGF-β1 using ELISA method. Result: The administration of coffee brew was effective to increase levels of RANKL and TGF-β1 in the compression and tension areas (p <0.05. RANKL levels in compression area were higher than in the tension area (p <0.05, while the levels of TGF-β1 in the tension area were higher than in the compression area (p <0.05. Conclusion: The administration of coffee brew was effective to increase the levels of RANKL and TGF-β, therefore it might improve alveolar bone remodeling process.

  20. UHPLC-PDA-ESI-TOF/MS metabolic profiling and antioxidant capacity of arabica and robusta coffee silverskin: Antioxidants vs phytotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panusa, Alessia; Petrucci, Rita; Lavecchia, Roberto; Zuorro, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    A deeper knowledge of the chemical composition of coffee silverskin (CS) is needed due to the growing interest in its use as a food additive or an ingredient of dietary supplements. Accordingly, the aim of this paper was to investigate the metabolic profile of aqueous extracts of two varieties of CS, Coffee arabica (CS-A), Coffee canephora var. robusta (CS-R) and of a blend of the two (CS-b) and to compare it to the profile of Coffee arabica green coffee (GC). Chlorogenic acids, caffeine, furokauranes, and atractyligenins, phytotoxins not previously detected in CS, were either identified or tentatively assigned. An unknown compound, presumably a carboxyatractyligenin glycoside was detected only in GC. Caffeine and chlorogenic acids were quantified while the content of furokauranes and atractyligens was estimated. GC and CS were also characterized in terms of total polyphenols and antioxidant capacity. Differences in the metabolites distribution, polyphenols and antioxidant capacity in GC and CS were detailed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Comparison of green coffee beans volatiles chemical composition of Hainan main area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rong-Suo; Chu, Zhong; Gu, Feng-Lin; Lu, Min-Quan; Lu, Shao-Fang; Wu, Gui-Ping; Tan, Le-He

    2013-02-01

    Chemical component of Hainan green coffee beans was analyzed with solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the discrepancy between two green coffee beans was differentiated through the spectrum database retrieval and retention index of compound characterization. The experimental results show that: the chemical composition of Wanning coffee beans and Chengmai coffee beans is basically the same. The quantity of analyzed compound in Wanning area coffee is 91, and in Chengmai area coffee is 106, the quantity of the same compound is 66, and the percent of the same component is 75.52%. The same compounds accounted for 89.86% of the total content of Wanning area coffee, and accounted for 85.70% of the total content of Chengmai area coffee.

  2. Separate effects of the coffee diterpenes cafestol and kahweol on serum lipids and liver transaminases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urgert, R.; Essed, N.; Weg, van der G.; Kosmeijer-Schuil, T.G.; Katan, M.B.

    1997-01-01

    The coffee diterpene cafestol occurs in both robusta and arabica beans. It is present in unfiltered coffee brews and raises serum concentrations of cholesterol, triacylglycerols, and alanine aminotransferase in humans. The effects are linear with the cafestol dose. Unfiltered coffee also contains

  3. 力争第二的Coffee Bean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡正蓁

    2003-01-01

    一个小雨的午后,在新加坡繁华的Orchard大街上的连锁咖啡店“Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf”里,维克多·沙宣从他的座位上一跃而起,脱口而出:“下雨了,我得把屋顶打开。”短短几秒钟之内,在天井上方。

  4. Stable Radical Content and Anti-Radical Activity of Roasted Arabica Coffee: From In-Tact Bean to Coffee Brew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troup, Gordon J.; Navarini, Luciano; Liverani, Furio Suggi; Drew, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    The roasting of coffee beans generates stable radicals within melanoidins produced by non-enzymatic browning. Roasting coffee beans has further been suggested to increase the antioxidant (AO) capacity of coffee brews. Herein, we have characterized the radical content and AO capacity of brews prepared from Coffea arabica beans sourced directly from an industrial roasting plant. In-tact beans exhibited electron paramagnetic resonance signals arising from Fe3+, Mn2+ and at least three distinct stable radicals as a function of roasting time, whose intensity changed upon grinding and ageing. In coffee brews, the roasting-induced radicals were harboured within the high molecular weight (> 3 kD) melanoidin-containing fraction at a concentration of 15 nM and was associated with aromatic groups within the melanoidins. The low molecular weight (coffee is dominated by low molecular weight phenolic compounds. PMID:25856192

  5. THE OCCURRENCE OF INSECTS, FUNGI AND ORGANOLEPTIC CHARACTERISTICS IN STORED COFFEE BEANS IN LAMPUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OKKY s. DHARMAPUTRA

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey on postharvest handling and technology processing of coffee beans at farmer, trader and exporter levels was conducted in West Lampung a nd Tanggamus regencies of Lampung province during harvest time (July 1998. Interviews and sampling of coffee beans were carried out during the survey. The number of respondents at farmer, trader and exporter levels was 22, 20 and 4, respectively, while the number of samples collected from each level was 20. All samples were analyzed for moisture content, physical quality, insect and fungal infestation, reducing sugar content, and coffee cupping. The results of the interviews indicated that posth arvest handling and technol ogy processing became better from farmers to exporters. Moisture contents of coffee beans collected from farmers and traders were higher than the tolerable limit recommended by SNI (13%. Physical quality of coffee beans collected from exporters was higher than that collected from farmers and traders. Insects were found on coffee beans collected from farmers, traders and exporters, but the number of species and the percentage of samples infested by insects from each level were relatively low. The predominant species was Liposcelis entomophila. The number of fungal species on coffee beans collected from farmers was higher than that collected from traders and exporters. The predominant species at the three levels was Aspergillus niger, but the lowest percentage of beans infected by this fungus was found on coffee beans collected from expo rters. The lowest percentage of samples infected by all fungi was also found on coffee beans collected from exporters. Reducing sugar content of coffee beans collected from exporters was lower than that from farmers and traders. Aroma and flavor values tended to increase from farmers through traders to exporters, while the body decreased. Some off-flavors (i.e. earthy, mouldy, fermented and woody were encountered in a few coffee samples from farmers as

  6. Survey of Philippine coffee beans for the presence of ochratoxigenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvindia, Dionisio G; de Guzman, Monica F

    2016-05-01

    In 2012 to 2014, Philippine green coffee beans from Coffea arabica in Benguet and Ifugao; Coffea canephora var. Robusta in Abra, Cavite, and Ifugao; and Coffea liberica and Coffea excelsea from Cavite were collected and assessed for the distribution of fungi with the potential to produce ochratoxin A (OTA). The presence of fungal species was evaluated both before and after surface sterilization. There were remarkable ecological and varietal differences in the population of OTA-producing species from the five provinces. Aspergillus ochraceus, A. westerdijkiae, and Penicillium verruculosum were detected from Arabica in Benguet and Ifugao while Aspergillus carbonarius, Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus japonicus were isolated in Excelsa, Liberica, and Robusta varieties from Abra, Cavite, and Davao. Contamination by Aspergillus and Penicillium species was found on 59 and 19 %, respectively, of the 57 samples from five provinces. After disinfection with 1% sodium hypochlorite, the levels of infection by Aspergillus and Penicillium fell to 40 and 17%, respectively. A total of 1184 fungal isolates were identified to species level comprising Aspergillus sections Circumdati (four species), Clavati (one), Flavi (one), Fumigati (one), Nigri (three), and Terrie (one). Within section Circumdati, 70% of A. ochraceus produced OTA as high as 16238 ng g(-1) while 40% of A. westerdijkiae produced maximum OTA of 36561 ng g(-1) in solid agar. Within section Nigri, 16.76% of A. niger produced OTA at the highest 18439 ng g(-1), 10% of A. japonicus at maximum level of 174 ng g(-1), and 21.21% of A. carbonarius yielded maximum OTA of 1900 ng g(-1). Of the 12 species of Penicillium isolated, P. verruculosum was ochratoxigenic, with a maximum OTA production of 12 ng g(-1).

  7. Effect of edible coating on the aromatic attributes of roasted coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Supriya; Parande, A K; Ramalakshmi, K; Nagaraju, V D

    2015-09-01

    Coffee is known throughout the world for its distinct aroma and flavour which results from a number of volatile compounds present in it. It is very difficult to arrest the aromatic compounds once the roasting process is complete and it becomes even more challenging to store the beans for a longer time with the retained volatiles as these compounds are easily lost during industrialized processing such as the grinding of roasted coffee beans and storage of ground coffee. Thus, an attempt was made to minimise the loss of volatile from roasted coffee beans by coating with Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), Hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC) and Whey protein concentrate. Coffee volatiles were analysed by Gas chromatography and 14 major compounds were identified and compared in this study. Results showed an increase in the relative area of major volatile compounds in coated roasted coffee beans when compared with unroasted coffee beans for consecutive two months. Moreover, effect of coating on textural properties and non-volatiles were also analysed. The results have indicated that edible coatings preserve the sensory properties of roasted coffee beans for a longer shelf life and cellulose derivatives, as an edible coating, exhibited the best protecting effect on roasted coffee beans.

  8. Fumonisin B2 production by Aspergillus niger in Thai coffee beans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noonim, P.; Mahakarnchanakul, W.; Nielsen, K.F.; Frisvad, J.C.; Samson, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    During 2006 and 2007, a total of 64 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea arabica) from two growing sites in Chiangmai Province and 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea canephora) from two growing sites in Chumporn Province, Thailand, were collected and assessed for fumonisin contamination by

  9. Development of new genomic microsatellite markers from robusta coffee (Coffea canephora Pierre ex A. Froehner showing broad cross-species transferability and utility in genetic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendre Prasad

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Species-specific microsatellite markers are desirable for genetic studies and to harness the potential of MAS-based breeding for genetic improvement. Limited availability of such markers for coffee, one of the most important beverage tree crops, warrants newer efforts to develop additional microsatellite markers that can be effectively deployed in genetic analysis and coffee improvement programs. The present study aimed to develop new coffee-specific SSR markers and validate their utility in analysis of genetic diversity, individualization, linkage mapping, and transferability for use in other related taxa. Results A small-insert partial genomic library of Coffea canephora, was probed for various SSR motifs following conventional approach of Southern hybridisation. Characterization of repeat positive clones revealed a very high abundance of DNRs (1/15 Kb over TNRs (1/406 kb. The relative frequencies of different DNRs were found as AT >> AG > AC, whereas among TNRs, AGC was the most abundant repeat. The SSR positive sequences were used to design 58 primer pairs of which 44 pairs could be validated as single locus markers using a panel of arabica and robusta genotypes. The analysis revealed an average of 3.3 and 3.78 alleles and 0.49 and 0.62 PIC per marker for the tested arabicas and robustas, respectively. It also revealed a high cumulative PI over all the markers using both sib-based (10-6 and 10-12 for arabicas and robustas respectively and unbiased corrected estimates (10-20 and 10-43 for arabicas and robustas respectively. The markers were tested for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, linkage dis-equilibrium, and were successfully used to ascertain generic diversity/affinities in the tested germplasm (cultivated as well as species. Nine markers could be mapped on robusta linkage map. Importantly, the markers showed ~92% transferability across related species/genera of coffee. Conclusion The conventional approach of genomic

  10. Development of new genomic microsatellite markers from robusta coffee (Coffea canephora Pierre ex A. Froehner) showing broad cross-species transferability and utility in genetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendre, Prasad Suresh; Phanindranath, Regur; Annapurna, V; Lalremruata, Albert; Aggarwal, Ramesh K

    2008-04-30

    Species-specific microsatellite markers are desirable for genetic studies and to harness the potential of MAS-based breeding for genetic improvement. Limited availability of such markers for coffee, one of the most important beverage tree crops, warrants newer efforts to develop additional microsatellite markers that can be effectively deployed in genetic analysis and coffee improvement programs. The present study aimed to develop new coffee-specific SSR markers and validate their utility in analysis of genetic diversity, individualization, linkage mapping, and transferability for use in other related taxa. A small-insert partial genomic library of Coffea canephora, was probed for various SSR motifs following conventional approach of Southern hybridisation. Characterization of repeat positive clones revealed a very high abundance of DNRs (1/15 Kb) over TNRs (1/406 kb). The relative frequencies of different DNRs were found as AT > AG > AC, whereas among TNRs, AGC was the most abundant repeat. The SSR positive sequences were used to design 58 primer pairs of which 44 pairs could be validated as single locus markers using a panel of arabica and robusta genotypes. The analysis revealed an average of 3.3 and 3.78 alleles and 0.49 and 0.62 PIC per marker for the tested arabicas and robustas, respectively. It also revealed a high cumulative PI over all the markers using both sib-based (10-6 and 10-12 for arabicas and robustas respectively) and unbiased corrected estimates (10-20 and 10-43 for arabicas and robustas respectively). The markers were tested for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, linkage dis-equilibrium, and were successfully used to ascertain generic diversity/affinities in the tested germplasm (cultivated as well as species). Nine markers could be mapped on robusta linkage map. Importantly, the markers showed ~92% transferability across related species/genera of coffee. The conventional approach of genomic library was successfully employed although with low

  11. Recognition of Roasted Coffee Bean Levels using Image Processing and Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, T. H.; Andayani, U.

    2017-03-01

    The coffee beans roast levels have some characteristics. However, some people cannot recognize the coffee beans roast level. In this research, we propose to design a method to recognize the coffee beans roast level of images digital by processing the image and classifying with backpropagation neural network. The steps consist of how to collect the images data with image acquisition, pre-processing, feature extraction using Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) method and finally normalization of data extraction using decimal scaling features. The values of decimal scaling features become an input of classifying in backpropagation neural network. We use the method of backpropagation to recognize the coffee beans roast levels. The results showed that the proposed method is able to identify the coffee roasts beans level with an accuracy of 97.5%.

  12. Confirmation of Transgenic Robusta Coffee (Coffea canephora Transformed by Chitinase-encoding Gene and Its Propagation Through Somatic Embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyono .

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Genetic engineering of Robusta coffee resistant to fungal diseases might be done by introducing a chitinase-encoding gene into genome of this plant. This research was aimed to confirm transgenic plant of BP 308 clone Robusta coffee transformed by chi gene and to evaluate its ability for the somatic embryogenesis. Confirmation of transgenic was carried out by analysis the presence of NPTII gene as a selectable marker for Canamysin resistant using PCR technique. The somatic embryo initiation and reproduction were evaluated in 11 plant accessions. Three kinds of sucrose concentration, 20%, 30% and 40% were applied in initiation stage of somatic embryo germination. The suitability of 4 medium, namely M1 (without addition by liquid medium, M2 (addition by liquid medium contained 0.25 mg/l kinetin, M3 (addition by liquid medium contained 0.25 mg/l IAA and M4 (addition by liquid medium contained 0.25 mg/l GA3 was evaluated for somatic embryo maturation. The result showed that 8 out of 10 plant accessions tested were transgenic and they could be propagated through somatic embryogenesis. The ability of transgenic plant for somatic embryo initiation, reproduction and regeneration were similar with that of nontransgenic one. Germination of somatic embryo could be improved by using 40% sucrose. Maturation of somatic embryo could be improved by addition of fresh liquid medium on the ancient gelled medium that used for somatic embryos reproduction. The best result was obtained on addition of fresh medium contained 0.25 mg/l GA 3 in which 65% of the somatic embryos developed to pre-germinate somatic embryo. Key words: Coffea canephora, transgenic plant, somatic embryogenesis.

  13. Effect of edible coating on the aromatic attributes of roasted coffee beans

    OpenAIRE

    Rattan, Supriya; Parande, A. K.; Ramalakshmi, K.; Nagaraju, V. D.

    2015-01-01

    Coffee is known throughout the world for its distinct aroma and flavour which results from a number of volatile compounds present in it. It is very difficult to arrest the aromatic compounds once the roasting process is complete and it becomes even more challenging to store the beans for a longer time with the retained volatiles as these compounds are easily lost during industrialized processing such as the grinding of roasted coffee beans and storage of ground coffee. Thus, an attempt was ma...

  14. Evaluation of Somatic Embryogenesis Ability in Robusta Coffee (Coffea canephora Pierre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyono Priyono

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Embriogenesis somatik diharapkan sebagai metode perbanyakan tanaman yang sangat efektif pada kopi. Evaluasi dua jenis proses embriogenesis somatik, yaitu proses langsung dan tidak langsung akan bermanfaat untuk menggambarkan kemampuan proliferasi sel. Penelitian untuk mengevaluasi embriogenesis somatik kopi Robusta (Coffea canephora yang mempunyai tingkat keragaman genetik tinggi telah dilakukan di Nestlé R&D Centre Tours, Perancis. Bahan tanam menggunakan kopi Robusta koleksi Nestle Perancis dan tiga klon koleksi Pusat Penelitian Kopi dan Kakao Indonesia (Puslitkoka. Tiga aspek, yaitu proses embriogenesis, keragaman embriogenesis dan kemantapan embriogenesis dievaluasi dalam penelitian ini. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa baik embriogenesis somatik langsung maupun tidak langsung dapat diamati. Penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa kedua proses embriogenesis somatik tersebut merupakan dua mekanisme yang berbeda. Dalam penelitian ini ditunjukkan bahwa kemampuan embriognesis somatik tergantung pada genotipe, baik antar maupun di dalam kelompok genetik kopi Robusta, yaitu Congolese,Guinean dan Conillon. Lebih lanjut diketahui bahwa kedua proses embriogenesis somatik tersebut stabil terhadap indukan sebagai sumber eksplan. Kemampuan embriogenesis somatik tidak langsung ketiga klon Puslitkoka (BP409, BP961 dan Q121 sangat beragam, sehingga memberikan harapan adanya pola segregasi yang baik berdasarkan kemampuan embriogenesis somatik tidak langsung pada populasi yang dibuat dari silangan klon tersebut.Key words: Coffea canephora, somatic embryogenesis, variability, stability, genotype.

  15. The effect of bean origin and temperature on grinding roasted coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uman, Erol; Colonna-Dashwood, Maxwell; Colonna-Dashwood, Lesley; Perger, Matthew; Klatt, Christian; Leighton, Stephen; Miller, Brian; Butler, Keith T.; Melot, Brent C.; Speirs, Rory W.; Hendon, Christopher H.

    2016-04-01

    Coffee is prepared by the extraction of a complex array of organic molecules from the roasted bean, which has been ground into fine particulates. The extraction depends on temperature, water chemistry and also the accessible surface area of the coffee. Here we investigate whether variations in the production processes of single origin coffee beans affects the particle size distribution upon grinding. We find that the particle size distribution is independent of the bean origin and processing method. Furthermore, we elucidate the influence of bean temperature on particle size distribution, concluding that grinding cold results in a narrower particle size distribution, and reduced mean particle size. We anticipate these results will influence the production of coffee industrially, as well as contribute to how we store and use coffee daily.

  16. Physiological and biochemical abilities of robusta coffee leaves for acclimation to cope with temporal changes in light availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-López, Nelson F; Cavatte, Paulo C; Silva, Paulo E M; Martins, Samuel C V; Morais, Leandro E; Medina, Eduardo F; Damatta, Fábio M

    2013-09-01

    The effects of varying intensities of light on plants depend on when they occur, even if the total amount of light received is kept constant. We designed an experiment using two clones of robusta coffee (Coffea canephora) intercropped with shelter trees in such a way that allowed us to compare coffee bushes shaded in the morning (SM) with those shaded in the afternoon (SA), and then confronting both with bushes receiving full sunlight over the course of the day (FS). The SM bushes displayed better gas-exchange performance than their SA and FS counterparts, in which the capacity for CO2 fixation was mainly constrained by stomatal (SA bushes) and biochemical (FS bushes) factors. Physiological traits associated with light capture were more responsive to temporal fluctuations of light rather than to the amount of light received, although this behavior could be a clone-specific response. The activity of key antioxidant enzymes differed minimally when comparing the SM and SA clones, but was much larger in FS clones. No signs of photoinhibition or cell damage were found regardless of the light treatments. Acclimations to varying light supplies had no apparent additional cost for constructing and maintaining the leaves regardless of the light supply. Both the SM and SA individuals displayed higher return in terms of revenue streams (e.g. higher mass-based light-saturated photosynthetic rates, photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiencies and long-term water use efficiencies) than their FS counterparts. In conclusion, shading may improve the physiological performance of coffee bushes growing in harsh, tropical environments. © 2012 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  17. Two novel species of Aspergillus section Nigri from Thai coffee beans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noonim, P.; Mahakarnchanakul, W.; Varga, J.; Frisvad, J.C.; Samson, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Two novel species of Aspergillus section Nigri from Thai coffee beans are described as Aspergillus aculeatinus sp. nov. and Aspergillus sclerotiicarbonarius sp. nov. Their taxonomic status was determined using a polyphasic taxonomic approach with phenotypic (morphology and extrolite profiles) and

  18. Two novel species of Aspergillus section Nigri from Thai coffee beans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noonim, Paramee; Mahakarnchanakul, Warapa; Varga, Janos

    2008-01-01

    Two novel species of Aspergillus section Nigri from Thai coffee beans are described as Aspergillus aculeatinus sp. nov. and Aspergillus sclerotiicarbonarius sp. nov. Their taxonomic status was determined using a polyphasic taxonomic approach with phenotypic (morphology and extrolite profiles...

  19. Authentication of coffee by means of PCR-RFLP analysis and lab-on-a-chip capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniolas, Stelios; May, Sean T; Bennett, Malcolm J; Tucker, Gregory A

    2006-10-04

    Coffee is one of the most important world food commodities, commercial trade consisting almost entirely of Arabica and Robusta varieties. The former is considered to be of superior quality and thus attracts a premium price. Methods to differentiate these coffee species could prove to be beneficial for the detection of either deliberate or accidental adulteration. This study describes a molecular genetics approach to differentiate Arabica and Robusta coffee beans. This employs a Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism to monitor a single nucleotide polymorphism within the chloroplastic genome. Samples were analyzed with a lab-on-a-chip capillary electrophoresis system. Coffee powder mixtures were analyzed with this technique, displaying a 5% limit of detection. The plastid copy number was found to be relatively constant across a wide range of bean samples, suggesting that this methodology can also be employed for the quantification of any adulteration of Arabica with Robusta beans.

  20. Determination of Harvesting Time and Fermentation Conditions of Coffee (Coffee sp) Beans Based on the Fruit Pericarp Enzyme Activity)

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Said Didu

    2001-01-01

    Pectinase enzyme of coffee pericarp, containing pectinesterase and polymetilesterase, is potential to determine harvesting time or to classify coffee beans. The activity of the enzyme on the green fruit is higher than on the yellow one. When the fruit become light red, the activity increaed for the second time and then decrease when the fruit is overripe (dark colored)The optimum fermentation condition of the fruit is depending on the maturation degree. Study on the fermentation process at 25...

  1. Stable radical content and anti-radical activity of roasted Arabica coffee: from in-tact bean to coffee brew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troup, Gordon J; Navarini, Luciano; Suggi Liverani, Furio; Drew, Simon C

    2015-01-01

    The roasting of coffee beans generates stable radicals within melanoidins produced by non-enzymatic browning. Roasting coffee beans has further been suggested to increase the antioxidant (AO) capacity of coffee brews. Herein, we have characterized the radical content and AO capacity of brews prepared from Coffea arabica beans sourced directly from an industrial roasting plant. In-tact beans exhibited electron paramagnetic resonance signals arising from Fe3+, Mn2+ and at least three distinct stable radicals as a function of roasting time, whose intensity changed upon grinding and ageing. In coffee brews, the roasting-induced radicals were harboured within the high molecular weight (> 3 kD) melanoidin-containing fraction at a concentration of 15 nM and was associated with aromatic groups within the melanoidins. The low molecular weight (brew. While other non-AO functions of the roasting-induced radical and metal complexes may be possible in vivo, we confirm that the in vitro antiradical activity of brewed coffee is dominated by low molecular weight phenolic compounds.

  2. Stable radical content and anti-radical activity of roasted Arabica coffee: from in-tact bean to coffee brew.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon J Troup

    Full Text Available The roasting of coffee beans generates stable radicals within melanoidins produced by non-enzymatic browning. Roasting coffee beans has further been suggested to increase the antioxidant (AO capacity of coffee brews. Herein, we have characterized the radical content and AO capacity of brews prepared from Coffea arabica beans sourced directly from an industrial roasting plant. In-tact beans exhibited electron paramagnetic resonance signals arising from Fe3+, Mn2+ and at least three distinct stable radicals as a function of roasting time, whose intensity changed upon grinding and ageing. In coffee brews, the roasting-induced radicals were harboured within the high molecular weight (> 3 kD melanoidin-containing fraction at a concentration of 15 nM and was associated with aromatic groups within the melanoidins. The low molecular weight (< 3 kD fraction exhibited the highest AO capacity using DPPH as an oxidant. The AO activity was not mediated by the stable radicals or by metal complexes within the brew. While other non-AO functions of the roasting-induced radical and metal complexes may be possible in vivo, we confirm that the in vitro antiradical activity of brewed coffee is dominated by low molecular weight phenolic compounds.

  3. Effect of fungal infection on phenolic compounds during the storage of coffee beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This work was undertaken to study the effect of Aspergillus infection on phenolic compounds in beans from four cultivars of the coffee plant (Coffea arabica L.. The effects of storage conditions of the coffee beans were also examined. Methodology and results: Beans from four varieties of coffee were artificially infected with three species of Aspergillus: A. niger, A. melleus and A. alliacus, and stored at 0, 8 and 25 ± 2 °C. After 3, 6 and 9 months, the contents of phenolic compounds in the beans were determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Conclusion, significance and impact study: The results of this study showed that phenolic compounds were qualitatively and quantitatively higher in the inoculated beans as compared with the uninfected control beans, reflecting a possible induced defense mechanism in the infected beans. Increased storage periods resulted in higher levels of phenols, but the average total, bound and free phenols did not differ between the cultivars tested. Effective control of Apergillus infection in coffee beans can prevent such changes in phenolics that may affect their commercial value.

  4. Antioxidant and Antiradical Activity of Coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Yashin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes published information concerning the determination of antioxidant activity (AA in coffee samples by various methods (ORAC, FRAP, TRAP, TEAC, etc. in vitro and limited data of antiradical activity of coffee products in vitro and in vivo. Comparison is carried out of the AA of coffee Arabica and coffee Robusta roasted at different temperatures as well as by different roasting methods (microwave, convection, etc.. Data on the antiradical activity of coffee is provided. The antioxidant activity of coffee, tea, cocoa, and red wine is compared. At the end of this review, the total antioxidant content (TAC of coffee samples from 21 coffee-producing countries as measured by an amperometric method is provided. The TAC of green and roasted coffee beans is also compared.

  5. Antioxidant and Antiradical Activity of Coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashin, Alexander; Yashin, Yakov; Wang, Jing Yuan; Nemzer, Boris

    2013-10-15

    This review summarizes published information concerning the determination of antioxidant activity (AA) in coffee samples by various methods (ORAC, FRAP, TRAP, TEAC, etc.) in vitro and limited data of antiradical activity of coffee products in vitro and in vivo. Comparison is carried out of the AA of coffee Arabica and coffee Robusta roasted at different temperatures as well as by different roasting methods (microwave, convection, etc.). Data on the antiradical activity of coffee is provided. The antioxidant activity of coffee, tea, cocoa, and red wine is compared. At the end of this review, the total antioxidant content (TAC) of coffee samples from 21 coffee-producing countries as measured by an amperometric method is provided. The TAC of green and roasted coffee beans is also compared.

  6. Mixture resolution according to the percentage of robusta variety in order to detect adulteration in roasted coffee by near infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, C; Esteban-Díez, I; González-Sáiz, J M

    2007-03-07

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), combined with multivariate calibration methods, has been used to quantify the robusta variety content of roasted coffee samples, as a means for controlling and avoiding coffee adulteration, which is a very important issue taking into account the great variability of the final sale price depending on coffee varietal origin. In pursuit of this aim, PLS regression and a wavelet-based pre-processing method that we have recently developed called OWAVEC were applied, in order to simultaneously operate two crucial pre-processing steps in multivariate calibration: signal correction and data compression. Several pre-processing methods (mean centering, first derivative and two orthogonal signal correction methods, OSC and DOSC) were additionally applied in order to find calibration models with as best a predictive ability as possible and to evaluate the performance of the OWAVEC method, comparing the respective quality of the different regression models constructed. The calibration model developed after pre-processing derivative spectra by OWAVEC provided high quality results (0.79% RMSEP), the percentage of robusta variety being predicted with a reliability notably better than that associated with the models constructed from raw spectra and also from data corrected by other orthogonal signal correction methods, and showing a higher model simplicity.

  7. Reliable characterization of coffee bean aroma profiles by automated headspace solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with the support of a dual-filter mass spectra library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondello, Luigi; Costa, Rosaria; Tranchida, Peter Quinto; Dugo, Paola; Lo Presti, Maria; Festa, Saverio; Fazio, Alessia; Dugo, Giovanni

    2005-06-01

    This investigation is based on the automated solid phase microextraction GC-MS analysis of the volatile fraction of a variety of coffee bean matrices. Volatile analytes were extracted by headspace (HS)-SPME which was achieved with the support of automated instrumentation. The research was directed towards various important aspects relating to coffee aroma analysis: monitoring of the volatile fraction formation during roasting; chromatographic differentiation of the two main coffee species (Arabica and Robusta) and of a single species from different geographical origins; evaluation of the influence of specific industrial treatments prior to roasting. Reliable peak assignment was carried out through the use of a recently laboratory-constructed "flavour and fragrance" library and a dual-filter MS spectral search procedure. Further emphasis was placed on the automated SPME instrumentation and on its ability to supply highly repeatable chromatographic data.

  8. Mozambioside Is an Arabica-Specific Bitter-Tasting Furokaurane Glucoside in Coffee Beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Roman; Klade, Stefan; Beusch, Anja; Dunkel, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Sensory-guided fractionation of a roasted coffee beverage revealed a highly polar, bitter-tasting subfraction, from which the furokaurane glucoside mozambioside was isolated and identified in its chemical structure by means of HDMS and NMR spectra. Sensory evaluation revealed a bitter taste recognition threshold of 60 (± 10) μmol/L. UPLC-HDMS quantitation of raw coffee beans showed that Arabica coffees contained 396-1188 nmol/g mozambioside, whereas only traces (coffees, thus suggesting that mozambioside can be used as an analytical marker for Arabica coffee. Roasted Arabica contained a substantially reduced concentration (232 ± 37 nmol/g), indicating partial degradation of mozambioside during coffee roasting. Mozambioside was nearly quantitatively extracted into the aqueous brew during coffee-making (86-98%).

  9. Comparison of Candida albicans colony amount in heat-cured acrylic and thermoplastic nylon resin after immersion in Ulee Kareng coffee (Coffea robusta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iin Sundari

    2017-03-01

    Introduction: Heat-cured acrylic resin is the most often used material in the manufacture of denture base. Along with the development of science and technology, to overcome the shortcomings of heat-cured acrylic resin, repairment of denture base material was done, one of them is a thermoplastic nylon resin. On the use of denture often found Candida albicans attached to the denture. This study aimed to determine the comparison of the amount of Candida albicans colony on heat-cured acrylic and thermoplastic nylon resin after immersed in the Ulee Kareng coffee (Coffea robusta. Methods: The number of specimens in this study were 8 specimens; 4 Meliodent® heat-cured acrylic resins and 4 Bio Tone® thermoplastic nylon resins with size of 10 x 10 x 2 mm. The methods of this study was experimental laboratory. The specimens were stored in a solution of Ulee Kareng coffee (Coffea robusta for 7 days. Each specimen was contaminated with Candida albicans, then the number of Candida albicans colony was counted with Colony counter, from threshing results of heat-cured acrylic and thermoplastic nylon resins. Data were analyzed with unpaired t test. Results: Unpaired t test results showed that there were significant differences (P < 0.05 between the number of colonies of Candida albicans in heat-cured acrylic resin (4.5 CFU / ml and thermoplastic nylon resin (1.5 CFU / ml after both immersed in the Ulee Kareng coffee (Coffea robusta. Conclusion: The amount of Candida albicans colony on heat-cured acrylic resin was higher than on thermoplastic nylon resin.

  10. Presence of Aspergillus and other fungal symbionts in coffee beans from Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamboa-Gaitán Miguel Ángel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are common inhabitants of plants and plant-derived products. Some of these fungal species are potentially dangerous to human health since they are able to produce chemical substances that alter normal physiological activity. There are no studies about natural mycoflora associated with coffee beans in Colombia, and nothing is known about the presence and abundance of toxigenic fungal species in Colombian coffee. In this study 5,000 coffee beans were studied by plating them on potato-based artificial culture medium and it was shown that potentially toxigenic fungal taxa (mostly from genera Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium, are currently found in Colombian coffee beans. This is true for all steps of coffee processing, from berries in trees to toasted grains, including packed coffee ready for retail in supermarkets. Results show that the distribution of these fungi is not random among different steps of coffee processing, which means that some steps are more vulnerable to infection with some fungi that others. The convenience of establishing a program devoted to detect fungi and/or mycotoxins in Colombian commodities, specially coffee, is discussed here.

  11. Headspace Analysis of Philippine Civet Coffee Beans Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Electronic Nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongo, E.; Sevilla, F.; Antonelli, A.; Sberveglieri, G.; Montevecchi, G.; Sberveglieri, V.; de Paola, E. L.; Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.

    2011-11-01

    Civet coffee, the most expensive and best coffee in the world, is an economically important export product of the Philippines. With a growing threat of food adulteration and counterfeiting, a need for quality authentication is essential to protect the integrity and strong market value of Philippine civet coffee. At present, there is no internationally accepted method of verifying whether a bean is an authentic civet coffee. This study presented a practical and promising approach to identify and establish the headspace qualitative profile of Philippine civet coffee using electronic nose (E-nose) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). E-nose analysis revealed that aroma characteristic is one of the most important quality indicators of civet coffee. The findings were supported by GC-MS analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) exhibited a clearly separated civet coffees from their control beans. The chromatographic fingerprints indicated that civet coffees differed with their control beans in terms of composition and concentration of individual volatile constituents.

  12. Robusta coffee rootstocks resistants to Meloidogyne paranaensis and M. incognita races 1 and 2/ Porta-enxertos de café robusta resistentes aos nematóides Meloidogyne paranaensis e M. incognita raças 1 e 21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Cristina de Batista Fonseca

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The Meloidogyne paranaensis and M. incognita races 1 and 2 are the most pathogenic root knot nematodes of coffee crop in Paraná state, Brazil. The use of susceptible arabica cultivars on resistant rootstock robusta cultivars, especially cultivar Apoatã IAC-2258 of Coffea canephora var. robusta, has been successful, but there are segregations to susceptible ones. The aim of this research was to identify C. canephora var. robusta coffee trees with simultaneous resistance to M. paranaensis, M. incognita races 1 and 2. Twenty-four C. canephora genotypes were evaluated using Taylor´s evaluation method, conducted in randomized blocks design with three replications and 30 plants per plot. The cultivar Mundo Novo IAC 376-4 was used as susceptible standard. The variables evaluated were nematodes incidence and root volume. The resistance levels founded among plants were resistant, moderately resistant and susceptible. Six genotypes of C. canephora var. robusta with simultaneous resistance, probably in homozygous, to M. paranaensis, M. incognita race 1 and M. incognita race 2 were found, all with good root volume. The mother plants of these six better treatments will be vegetatively propagated and used to begin seed production of rootstock cultivars.No Estado do Paraná, os nematóides mais danosos para o café são Meloidogyne paranaensis e M. incognita raças 1 e 2. A enxertia de cultivares suscetíveis de Coffea arabica sobre C. canephora resistentes tem sido bem sucedida, especialmente com o porta-enxerto Apoatã IAC-2258, porém existe segregação para a resistência. O objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar cafeeiros de C. canephora var. robusta com resistência simultânea aos nematóides M. paranaensis e M. incognita raças 1 e 2. Avaliaramse 24 genótipos de C. canephora na metodologia de Taylor, no delineamento em blocos ao acaso com três repetições e parcelas de 30 plantas. Como testemunha suscetível utilizou-se a cultivar Mundo Novo

  13. Incidence, level, and behavior of aflatoxins during coffee bean roasting and decaffeination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, K M

    2002-12-04

    Screening for aflatoxins (Afs), isolation and identification of Aspergillus flavus, and the effect of decaffeination and roasting on the level of contamination in coffee beans are studied. The percent frequency of A. flavus ranged between 4 and 80% in green coffee beans (GCB), whereas in ground roasted coffee beans (GRCB), it ranged between 1 and 71%. Aflatoxins were detected in 76.5 and 54.6% of the infected samples with averages of 4.28 and 2.85 microg/kg of GCB and GRCB, respectively. Roasting was demonstrated to lower the concentration of Afs in GCB. The Afs levels were reduced by approximately 42.2-55.9% depending on the type and temperature of roasting. The highest yields of Afs were detected in the decaffeinated green coffee beans (24.29 microg/kg) and roasted coffee beans (16.00 microg/kg). The growth of A. flavus in liquid medium containing 1 or 2% caffeine was reduced by 50%, and the level of aflatoxin in the medium was undetectable.

  14. Decaffeinated Green Coffee Bean Extract Attenuates Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Jin Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether decaffeinated green coffee bean extract prevents obesity and improves insulin resistance and elucidated its mechanism of action. Male C57BL/6N mice (N=48 were divided into six dietary groups: chow diet, HFD, HFD-supplemented with 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.9% decaffeinated green coffee bean extract, and 0.15% 5-caffeoylquinic acid. Based on the reduction in HFD-induced body weight gain and increments in plasma lipids, glucose, and insulin levels, the minimum effective dose of green coffee bean extract appears to be 0.3%. Green coffee bean extract resulted in downregulation of genes involved in WNT10b- and galanin-mediated adipogenesis and TLR4-mediated proinflammatory pathway and stimulation of GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane in white adipose tissue. Taken together, decaffeinated green coffee bean extract appeared to reverse HFD-induced fat accumulation and insulin resistance by downregulating the genes involved in adipogenesis and inflammation in visceral adipose tissue.

  15. Decaffeinated Green Coffee Bean Extract Attenuates Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Su Jin; Choi, Sena; Park, Taesun

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether decaffeinated green coffee bean extract prevents obesity and improves insulin resistance and elucidated its mechanism of action. Male C57BL/6N mice (N = 48) were divided into six dietary groups: chow diet, HFD, HFD-supplemented with 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.9% decaffeinated green coffee bean extract, and 0.15% 5-caffeoylquinic acid. Based on the reduction in HFD-induced body weight gain and increments in plasma lipids, glucose, and insulin levels, the minimum effective dose of green coffee bean extract appears to be 0.3%. Green coffee bean extract resulted in downregulation of genes involved in WNT10b- and galanin-mediated adipogenesis and TLR4-mediated proinflammatory pathway and stimulation of GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane in white adipose tissue. Taken together, decaffeinated green coffee bean extract appeared to reverse HFD-induced fat accumulation and insulin resistance by downregulating the genes involved in adipogenesis and inflammation in visceral adipose tissue. PMID:24817902

  16. Transcripts of pectin-degrading enzymes and isolation of complete cDNA sequence of a pectate lyase gene induced by coffee white stem borer (Xylotrechus quadripes) in the bark tissue of Coffea canephora (robusta coffee).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, Kosaraju; Santosh, P; Sreenath, H L

    2017-05-01

    Of the two commercially cultivated coffee (Coffea) species, C. arabica (arabica) is highly susceptible and C. canephora (robusta) is highly resistant to the insect pest Xylotrechus quadripes (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), commonly known as coffee white stem borer (CWSB). We constructed a forward-subtracted cDNA library by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) from robusta bark tissue for profiling genes induced by CWSB infestation. Among the 265 unigenes of the SSH EST library, 7 unigenes (5 contigs and 2 singletons) matching different pectin-degrading enzymes were discovered. These ESTs matched one pectate lyase, three polygalacturonases, and one pectin acetylesterase gene. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that CWSB infestation strongly induces the pectate lyase gene at 72 h. Complete cDNA sequence of the pectate lyase gene was obtained through 3' and 5' RACE reactions. It was a 1595 bp long sequence that included full CDS and both UTRs. Against C. canephora genome sequences in Coffee Genome Hub database ( http://coffee-genome.org/ ), it had 22 matches to different pectate lyase genes mapped on 9 of the 11 pseudochromosomes, the top match being Cc07_g00190 Pectate lyase. In NCBI database, it matched pectate lyase sequences of several plants. Apart from C. canephora, the closest pectate lyase matches were from Sesamum indicum and Nicotiana tabacum. The pectinolytic enzymes discovered here are thought to play a role in the production of oligogalacturonides (OGs) which act as Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern (DAMP) signals eliciting innate immunity in plants. The pectate lyase gene, induced by CWSB infestation, along with other endogenous pectinolytic enzymes and CWSB-specific elicitors, may be involved in triggering basal defense responses to protect the CWSB-damaged tissue against pathogens, as well as to contain CWSB in robusta.

  17. The influence of water management and environmental conditions on the chemical composition and beverage quality of coffee beans

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,Emerson A da; MAZZAFERA, Paulo; Brunini,Orivaldo; Sakai,Emílio; Flávio B. Arruda; Mattoso,Luiz Henrique C.; Carvalho, Cássia R. L.; Pires, Regina Célia M.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of environmental conditions and irrigation on the chemical composition of green coffee beans and the relationship of these parameters to the quality of the beverage were investigated in coffee plantations in the regions of Adamantina, Mococa and Campinas, in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The chemical composition and physical aspects of green coffee beans produced in the three regions were related through Principal Component Analyses (PCA) to the quality of beverage, as determi...

  18. Decaffeinated Green Coffee Bean Extract Attenuates Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether decaffeinated green coffee bean extract prevents obesity and improves insulin resistance and elucidated its mechanism of action. Male C57BL/6N mice (N = 48) were divided into six dietary groups: chow diet, HFD, HFD-supplemented with 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.9% decaffeinated green coffee bean extract, and 0.15% 5-caffeoylquinic acid. Based on the reduction in HFD-induced body weight gain and increments in plasma lipids, glucose, and insulin levels, the minimum effectiv...

  19. Determination of acrylamide during roasting of coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdonaite, Kristina; Derler, Karin; Murkovic, Michael

    2008-08-13

    In this study different Arabica and Robusta coffee beans from different regions of the world were analyzed for acrylamide after roasting in a laboratory roaster. Due to the complex matrix and the comparably low selectivity of the LC-MS at m/ z 72, acrylamide was analyzed after derivatization with 2-mercaptobenzoic acid at m/ z 226. Additionally, the potential precursors of acrylamide (3-aminopropionamide, carbohydrates, and amino acids) were studied. The highest amounts of acrylamide formed in coffee were found during the first minutes of the roasting process [3800 ng/g in Robusta ( Coffea canephora robusta) and 500 ng/g in Arabica ( Coffea arabica)]. When the roasting time was increased, the concentration of acrylamide decreased. It was shown that especially the roasting time and temperature, species of coffee, and amount of precursors in raw material had an influence on acrylamide formation. Robusta coffee contained significantly larger amounts of acrylamide (mean = 708 ng/g) than Arabica coffee (mean = 374 ng/g). Asparagine is the limiting factor for acrylamide formation in coffee. 3-Aminopropionamide formation was observed in a dry model system with mixtures of asparagine with sugars (sucrose, glucose). Thermal decarboxylation and elimination of the alpha-amino group of asparagine at high temperatures (>220 degrees C) led to a measurable but low formation of acrylamide.

  20. Differential regulation of grain sucrose accumulation and metabolism in Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta) revealed through gene expression and enzyme activity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privat, Isabelle; Foucrier, Séverine; Prins, Anneke; Epalle, Thibaut; Eychenne, Magali; Kandalaft, Laurianne; Caillet, Victoria; Lin, Chenwei; Tanksley, Steve; Foyer, Christine; McCarthy, James

    2008-01-01

    * Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta) are the two main cultivated species used for coffee bean production. Arabica genotypes generally produce a higher coffee quality than Robusta genotypes. Understanding the genetic basis for sucrose accumulation during coffee grain maturation is an important goal because sucrose is an important coffee flavor precursor. * Nine new Coffea genes encoding sucrose metabolism enzymes have been identified: sucrose phosphate synthase (CcSPS1, CcSPS2), sucrose phosphate phosphatase (CcSP1), cytoplasmic (CaInv3) and cell wall (CcInv4) invertases and four invertase inhibitors (CcInvI1, 2, 3, 4). * Activities and mRNA abundance of the sucrose metabolism enzymes were compared at different developmental stages in Arabica and Robusta grains, characterized by different sucrose contents in mature grain. * It is concluded that Robusta accumulates less sucrose than Arabica for two reasons: Robusta has higher sucrose synthase and acid invertase activities early in grain development - the expression of CcSS1 and CcInv2 appears to be crucial at this stage and Robusta has a lower SPS activity and low CcSPS1 expression at the final stages of grain development and hence has less capacity for sucrose re-synthesis. Regulation of vacuolar invertase CcInv2 activity by invertase inhibitors CcInvI2 and/or CcInvI3 during Arabica grain development is considered.

  1. Comparison of antioxidant activity between green and roasted coffee beans using molecular methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priftis, Alexandros; Stagos, Dimitrios; Konstantinopoulos, Konstantinos; Tsitsimpikou, Christina; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristides M; Tzatzarakis, Manolis N; Kouretas, Demetrios

    2015-11-01

    Coffee is one of the most popular and widely consumed beverages worldwide due to its pleasant taste and aroma. A number of studies have been performed to elucidate the possible beneficial effects of coffee consumption on human health and have shown that coffee exhibits potent antioxidant activity, which may be attributed mainly to its polyphenolic content. However, there is also evidence to suggest that coffee roasting (the procedure which turns green coffee beans to the dark, roasted ones from which the beverage derives) may alter the polyphenolic profile of the beans (e.g., via the Maillard reaction) and, concomitantly, their antioxidant activity. In the present study, the antioxidant activity of 13 coffee varieties was examined in both green and roasted coffee bean extracts using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS•+)- radical scavenging assays. In addition, 5 selected varieties were also examined for their protective effects against peroxyl and hydroxyl radical‑induced DNA strand cleavage. Finally, C2C12 murine myoblasts were treated with non‑cytotoxic concentrations of the most potent extract in order to examine its effects on the cellular redox status by measuring the glutathione (GSH) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels by flow cytometry. Our results revealed that, in 8 out of the 13 coffee varieties, roasting increased free radical scavenging activity as shown by DPPH and ABTS•+ assays. Moreover, we found that when one coffee variety was roasted for different amounts of time, the increase in the antioxidant activity depended on the roasting time. By contrast, in 5 varieties, roasting reduced the antioxidant activity. Similar differences between the roasted and green beans were also observed in the free radical‑induced DNA strand cleavage assay. The observed differences in the antioxidant activity between the different coffee varieties may be attributed to their varying

  2. Avaliação de genótipos de cafeeiros Arabica e Robusta no estado do Acre Evaluation of Arabica and Robusta coffee genotypes in the state of Acre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Luis Bergo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Conduziu-se este trabalho, com o objetivo de introduzir e avaliar 40 genótipos de cafeeiros das espécies Coffea arabica e Coffea canephora nas condições edafoclimáticas do Estado do Acre, visando disponibilizar aos cafeicultores acreanos, cultivares com melhor potencial produtivo. Da espécie C. arabica foram avaliados genótipos das cultivares Icatu, Bourbon, Mundo Novo, Catuaí, Obatã e Catimor. Da espécie C. canephora foram avaliadas as cultivares Conilon e Robusta, caracterizadas como Grupo Robusta. Os genótipos utilizados foram provenientes do Instituto Agronômico de Campinas (IAC e da Embrapa Rondônia. O experimento foi conduzido no Campo Experimental da Embrapa Acre, Rio Branco, AC, no período de 1995 a 2004. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos casualizados com cinco repetições. As características avaliadas foram: produtividade, altura, diâmetro da copa e vigor. Da espécie C. arabica, grupo Icatu, destacou-se Icatu-PR-182039-1(IAC H 4782-7-788 com produtividade média de café beneficiado de 34 sc/ ha, Icatu IAC-4041; Icatu IAC-2945; Icatu IAC-2944-MT; Icatu IAC-4040 e Icatu IAC-4046 com produtividade variando de 20 a 26 sacas. Para o grupo Catuaí os melhores genótipos foram Obatã IAC 4275, Obatã IAC 1169 e Catimor IAC 4466 com produtividade média de café beneficiado de 49, 45 e 37 sacas por hectare respectivamente. Na espécie C. canephora foram avaliados 8 genótipos das cultivares Conilon e Robusta e quanto à produtividade não houve diferença estatística, observou-se incremento de 7 sacas/ha para a variedade Conilon IAC 66-3 quando comparado ao Conilon plantado na região. Nesta espécie os genótipos apresentaram sintomas de deficiência hídrica na época seca (julho/agosto.This work aimed to introduce and evaluate 40 coffee genotypes of Coffea arabica e Coffea canephora species in soil and weather conditions of Acre and had as main goal to provide cultivars to coffee producers with better potential of

  3. Botanical and geographical characterization of green coffee (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora): chemometric evaluation of phenolic and methylxanthine contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Salces, Rosa M; Serra, Francesca; Reniero, Fabiano; Héberger, Károly

    2009-05-27

    Green coffee beans of the two main commercial coffee varieties, Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta), from the major growing regions of America, Africa, Asia, and Oceania were studied. The contents of chlorogenic acids, cinnamoyl amides, cinnamoyl glycosides, free phenolic acids, and methylxanthines of green coffee beans were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with UV spectrophotometry to determine their botanical and geographical origins. The analysis of caffeic acid, 3-feruloylquinic acid, 5-feruloylquinic acid, 4-feruloylquinic acid, 3,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-5-feruloylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-4-feruloylquinic acid, 3-p-coumaroyl-4-caffeoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-4-dimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-5-dimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid, p-coumaroyl-N-tryptophan, feruloyl-N-tryptophan, caffeoyl-N-tryptophan, and caffeine enabled the unequivocal botanical characterization of green coffee beans. Moreover, some free phenolic acids and cinnamate conjugates of green coffee beans showed great potential as means for the geographical characterization of coffee. Thus, p-coumaroyl-N-tyrosine, caffeoyl-N-phenylalanine, caffeoyl-N-tyrosine, 3-dimethoxycinnamoyl-5-feruloylquinic acid, and dimethoxycinnamic acid were found to be characteristic markers for Ugandan Robusta green coffee beans. Multivariate data analysis of the phenolic and methylxanthine profiles provided preliminary results that allowed showing their potential for the determination of the geographical origin of green coffees. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) provided classification models that correctly identified all authentic Robusta green coffee beans from Cameroon and Vietnam and 94% of those from Indonesia. Moreover, PLS-DA afforded independent models for Robusta samples from these three countries with sensitivities and specificities of classifications close to 100% and for Arabica samples from America and

  4. Stability of ochratoxin A (OTA) during processing and decaffeination in commercial roasted coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehad, E A; Farag, M M; Kawther, M S; Abdel-Samed, A K M; Naguib, K

    2005-08-01

    The fate of ochratoxin A (OTA) during the processing of artificially contaminated green coffee beans, the effect of decaffeination on the production of OTA in green and roasted coffee beans, and the effect of caffeine on the growth and OTA production by Aspergillus ochraceus were studied. The data indicated that the roasting, milling and decoction (brewing and Turkish coffee making) processes caused different percentage reductions in OTA. Decaffeinated samples showed a significantly higher concentration of OTA production than the caffeinated ones. A significantly higher percentage of OTA was reduced when the decaffeination process was performed before roasting treatment. Caffeine at 1.0 and 2.0% concentrations completely prevented OTA production and completely inhibited A. ochraceus growth in YES medium after 3-21 days.

  5. Transferring results from NIR-hyperspectral to NIR-multispectral imaging systems: A filter-based simulation applied to the classification of Arabica and Robusta green coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvini, Rosalba; Amigo, Jose Manuel; Ulrici, Alessandro

    2017-05-15

    Due to the differences in terms of both price and quality, the availability of effective instrumentation to discriminate between Arabica and Robusta coffee is extremely important. To this aim, the use of multispectral imaging systems could provide reliable and accurate real-time monitoring at relatively low costs. However, in practice the implementation of multispectral imaging systems is not straightforward: the present work investigates this issue, starting from the outcome of variable selection performed using a hyperspectral system. Multispectral data were simulated considering four commercially available filters matching the selected spectral regions, and used to calculate multivariate classification models with Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) and sparse PLS-DA. Proper strategies for the definition of the training set and the selection of the most effective combinations of spectral channels led to satisfactory classification performances (100% classification efficiency in prediction of the test set). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Differential regulation of caffeine metabolism in Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrois, Charlène; Strickler, Susan R; Mathieu, Guillaume; Lepelley, Maud; Bedon, Lucie; Michaux, Stéphane; Husson, Jwanro; Mueller, Lukas; Privat, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is a metabolite of great economic importance, especially in coffee, where it influences the sensorial and physiological impacts of the beverage. Caffeine metabolism in the Coffea species begins with the degradation of purine nucleotides through three specific N-methyltransferases: XMT, MXMT and DXMT. A comparative analysis was performed to clarify the molecular reasons behind differences in caffeine accumulation in two Coffea species, namely Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora var. robusta. Three different genes encoding N-methyltransferase were amplified in the doubled haploid Coffea canephora: CcXMT1, CcMXMT1 and CcDXMT. Six genes were amplified in the haploid Coffea arabica: CaXMT1, CaXMT2, CaMXMT1, CaMXMT2, CaDXMT1, and CaDXMT2. A complete phylogenic analysis was performed to identify specific key amino acids defining enzymatic function for each protein identified. Furthermore, a quantitative gene-expression analysis was conducted on leaves and on maturing coffee beans, simultaneously analyzing caffeine content. In the different varieties analyzed, caffeine accumulation is higher in leaves than in the coffee bean maturation period, higher in Robusta than in Arabica. In Robusta, CcXMT1 and CcDXMT gene expressions are predominant and transcriptional activity is higher in leaves than in maturing beans, and is highly correlated to caffeine accumulation. In Arabica, the CaXMT1 expression level is high in leaves and CaDXMT2 as well to a lesser extent, while global transcriptional activity is weak during bean maturation, suggesting that the transcriptional control of caffeine-related genes differs within different organs and between Arabica and Robusta. These findings indicate that caffeine accumulation in Coffea species has been modulated by a combination of differential transcriptional regulation and genome evolution.

  7. Application of EPR spectroscopy to the examination of pro-oxidant activity of coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowian, Daniel; Skiba, Dominik; Kudelski, Adam; Pilawa, Barbara; Ramos, Paweł; Adamczyk, Jakub; Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna

    2014-05-15

    Free radicals present in coffee may be responsible for exerting toxic effects on an organism. The objectives of this work were to compare free radicals properties and concentrations in different commercially available coffees, in solid and liquid states, and to determine the effect of roasting on the formation of free radicals in coffee beans of various origins. The free radicals content of 15 commercially available coffees (solid and liquid) was compared and the impact of processing examined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at X-band (9.3 GHz). First derivative EPR spectra were measured at microwave power in the range of 0.7-70 mW. The following parameters were calculated for EPR spectra: amplitude (A), integral intensity (I), and line-width (ΔBpp); g-Factor was obtained from resonance condition. Our study showed that free radicals exist in green coffee beans (10(16) spin/g), roasted coffee beans (10(18) spin/g), and in commercially available coffee (10(17)-10(18) spin/g). Free radical concentrations were higher in solid ground coffee than in instant or lyophilised coffee. Continuous microwave saturation indicated homogeneous broadening of EPR lines from solid and liquid commercial coffee samples as well as green and roasted coffee beans. Slow spin-lattice relaxation processes were found to be present in all coffee samples tested, solid and liquid commercial coffees as well as green and roasted coffee beans. Higher free radicals concentrations were obtained for both the green and roasted at 240 °C coffee beans from Peru compared with those originating from Ethiopia, Brazil, India, or Colombia. Moreover, more free radicals occurred in Arabica coffee beans roasted at 240 °C than Robusta. EPR spectroscopy is a useful method of examining free radicals in different types of coffee. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Climatic factors directly impact the volatile organic compound fingerprint in green Arabica coffee bean as well as coffee beverage quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, B; Boulanger, R; Dussert, S; Ribeyre, F; Berthiot, L; Descroix, F; Joët, T

    2012-12-15

    Coffee grown at high elevations fetches a better price than that grown in lowland regions. This study was aimed at determining whether climatic conditions during bean development affected sensory perception of the coffee beverage and combinations of volatile compounds in green coffee. Green coffee samples from 16 plots representative of the broad range of climatic variations in Réunion Island were compared by sensory analysis. Volatiles were extracted by solid phase micro-extraction and the volatile compounds were analysed by GC-MS. The results revealed that, among the climatic factors, the mean air temperature during seed development greatly influenced the sensory profile. Positive quality attributes such as acidity, fruity character and flavour quality were correlated and typical of coffees produced at cool climates. Two volatile compounds (ethanal and acetone) were identified as indicators of these cool temperatures. Among detected volatiles, most of the alcohols, aldehydes, hydrocarbons and ketones appeared to be positively linked to elevated temperatures and high solar radiation, while the sensory profiles displayed major defects (i.e. green, earthy flavour). Two alcohols (butan-1,3-diol and butan-2,3-diol) were closely correlated with a reduction in aromatic quality, acidity and an increase in earthy and green flavours. We assumed that high temperatures induce accumulation of these compounds in green coffee, and would be detected as off-flavours, even after roasting. Climate change, which generally involves a substantial increase in average temperatures in mountainous tropical regions, could be expected to have a negative impact on coffee quality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Behavior of Ochratoxin A during Green Coffee Roasting and Soluble Coffee Manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc; Pittet; Muñoz-Box; Viani

    1998-02-16

    As considerable inconsistencies are found in the literature regarding the influence of roasting and subsequent operations on the ochratoxin A (OTA) content of green coffee, experiments were undertaken to assess the evolution of OTA along an industrial soluble coffee manufacturing line. Both the variability and the amount of OTA naturally present in a lot of Thai Robusta green coffee were drastically reduced during soluble coffee manufacture. A small proportion of OTA was eliminated during green coffee cleaning, but the most significant reduction took place during roasting. The roast and ground coffee contained only 16% of the OTA originally present in the green coffee. Two phenomena are responsible for the elimination of OTA during roasting: a thermal degradation and a removal with chaff. Thermal degradation is the most important route of elimination, with manufacture, so that the powder contained only 13% of the OTA initially present in the green beans.

  10. Effect of vacuum roasting on acrylamide formation and reduction in coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anese, Monica; Nicoli, Maria Cristina; Verardo, Giancarlo; Munari, Marina; Mirolo, Giorgio; Bortolomeazzi, Renzo

    2014-02-15

    Coffea arabica beans were roasted in an oven at 200 °C for increasing lengths of time under vacuum (i.e. 0.15 kPa). The samples were then analysed for colour, weight loss, acrylamide concentration and sensory properties. Data were compared with those obtained from coffee roasted at atmospheric pressure (i.e. conventional roasting), as well as at atmospheric pressure for 10 min followed by vacuum treatment (0.15 kPa; i.e. conventional-vacuum roasting). To compare the different treatments, weight loss, colour and acrylamide changes were expressed as a function of the thermal effect received by the coffee beans during the different roasting processes. Vacuum-processed coffee with medium roast degree had approximately 50% less acrylamide than its conventionally roasted counterpart. It was inferred that the low pressure generated inside the oven during the vacuum process exerted a stripping effect preventing acrylamide from being accumulated. Vacuum-processed coffee showed similar colour and sensory properties to conventionally roasted coffee. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of N and K doses in nutritive solution on growth, production and coffee bean size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junia Maria Clemente

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An adequate supply of nutrients is essential for obtaining high yields of coffee. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of N, K and the N:K ratio on vegetative and reproductive growth of coffee. For this purpose, coffee plants were grown in nutrient solution containing K in the concentrations of 1.08; 2.15; 3.23 and 5.38 mmol L-1 combined with a dose of 6 mmol L-1 N, resulting in the N:K ratios (w/w: 1:0.5; 1:1; 1:1.5 and 1:2.5. The control treatment consisted of the doses 3 and 1.61 mmol L-1 of N and K respectively, resulting in the N:K ratio (w/w 1.0:1.5. The following variables were evaluated: height, stem diameter, number of nodes of the eighth plagiotrofic branch (index branch, pairs of plagiotrofic branches and number of nodes in the orthotropic branch every three weeks from the beginning of the experiment. Additionally, it was evaluated the chemical composition of processed beans and leaves between the flowering and the rapid expansion stage of the cherry beans, production of cherry beans per plant and classification of beans according to the size. N influenced mainly the characteristics of vegetative growth and K influenced mainly the reproductive growth evaluated by the production. The lowest production resulted in the highest percentages of beans retained on sieves with holes larger than 16/64", while the highest production promoted an increase in the percentage of beans retained on sieves with holes smaller than 16/64".

  12. Coffee bean extracts rich and poor in kahweol both give rise to elevation of liver enzymes in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schouten Evert G

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coffee oil potently raises serum cholesterol levels in humans. The diterpenes cafestol and kahweol are responsible for this elevation. Coffee oil also causes elevation of liver enzyme levels in serum. It has been suggested that cafestol is mainly responsible for the effect on serum cholesterol levels and that kahweol is mainly responsible for the effect on liver enzyme levels. The objective of this study was to investigate whether coffee oil that only contains a minute amount of kahweol indeed does not cause elevation of liver enzyme levels. Methods The response of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALAT and aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT to Robusta coffee oil (62 mg/day cafestol, 1.6 mg/day kahweol was measured in 18 healthy volunteers. Results After nine days one subject was taken off Robusta oil treatment due to an ALAT level of 3.6 times the upper limit of normal (ULN. Another two subjects stopped treatment due to other reasons. After 16 days another two subjects were taken off Robusta oil treatment. One of those subjects had levels of 5.8 ULN for ALAT and 2.0 ULN for ASAT; the other subject had an ALAT level of 12.4 ULN and an ASAT level of 4.7 ULN. It was then decided to terminate the study. The median response of subjects to Robusta oil after 16 days was 0.27 ULN (n = 15, 25th,75th percentile: 0.09;0.53 for ALAT and 0.06 ULN (25th,75th percentile -0.06;0.22 for ASAT. Conclusions We conclude that the effect on liver enzyme levels of coffee oil containing hardly any kahweol is similar to that of coffee oil containing high amounts of kahweol. Therefore it is unlikely that kahweol is the component of coffee oil that is responsible for the effect. Furthermore, we conclude that otherwise unexplained elevation of liver enzyme levels observed in patients might be caused by a switch from consumption of filtered coffee to unfiltered coffee.

  13. Performance of a Horizontal Double Cylinder Type of Fresh Coffee Cherries Pulping Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Pulping is one important step in wet coffee processing method. Usually, pulping process uses a machine which constructed using wood or metal materials. A horizontal single cylinder type coffee pulping machine is the most popular machine in coffee processor and market. One of the weakness of a horizontal single cylinder type coffee pulping machine is high of broken beans. Broken beans is one of major aspect in defect system that result in low quality. Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute has designed and tested a horizontal double cylinder type coffee pulping machine. Material tested is Robusta cherry, mature, 60—65% (wet basis moisture content, which size compostition of coffee cherries was 50.8% more than 15 mm diameter, 32% more than 10 mm diameter, and 16.6% to get through 10 mm hole diameter; 690—695 kg/m3 bulk density, and clean from methal and foreign materials. The result showed that this machine has 420 kg/h optimal capacity in operational conditions, 1400 rpm rotor rotation speed for unsorted coffee cherries with composition 53.08% whole parchment coffee, 16.92% broken beans, and 30% beans in the wet skin. For small size coffee cherries, 603 kg/h optimal capacity in operational conditions, 1600 rpm rotor rotation speed with composition 51.30% whole parchment coffee, 12.59% broken beans, and 36.1% beans in the wet skin. Finally, for medium size coffee cherries, 564 kg/h optimal capacity in operational conditions, 1800 rpm rotor rotation speed with composition 48.64% whole parchment coffee, 18.5% broken beans, and 32.86% beans in the wet skin.Key words : coffee, pulp, pulper, cylinder, quality.

  14. Intrauterine midgut volvulus without malrotation:Diagnosis from the 'coffee bean sign'

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Seok Park; Seong Jae Cha; Beom Gyu Kim; Yong Seok Kim; Yoo Shin Choi; In Talk Chang; Gwang Jun Kim; Woo Seok Lee; Gi Hyeon Kim

    2008-01-01

    Fetal midgut volvulus is quite rare,and most cases areassociated with abnormalities of intestinal rotation orfixation.We report a case of midgut volvulus withoutmalrotation,associated with a meconium pellet,duringthe gestation period.This 2.79 kg,33-wk infant was bornvia a spontaneous vaginal delivery caused by pretermlabor.Prenatal ultrasound showed dilated bowel loopswith the appearance of a 'coffee bean sign" This patienthad an unusual presentation with a distended abdomenshowing skin discoloration.An emergency laparotomyrevealed a midgut volvulus and a twisted small bowel,caused by complicated meconium ileus.Such nonspecificprenatal radiological signs and a low index of suspicionof a volvulus during gestation might delay appropriatesurgical management and result in ischemic necrosis of the bowel.Preterm labor,specific prenatal sonographicfindings (for example,the coffee bean sign) and bluishdiscoloration of the abdominal wall could suggestintrauterine midgut volvulus requiring prompt surgicalintervention.

  15. Oligopolistic differentiation of the Colombian green bean coffee in the US market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Julián Rendón Cardona

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available New Empirical Industrial Organization (NEIO literature notes that imperfect foreign competition among commodities may be characterized by prices, quantities and product differentiation. This paper shows that the effectiveness of the differentiation strategy of Colombian green bean coffee in the US market has caused Colombia to compete in terms of quantities with its major opponent, Brazil. In order to show it, this paper brings a set of models which allow us to identify the competitive structure followed by Brazil and Colombia in the United States market of green bean coffee imports. These models are evaluated through a likelihood ratio test to determine which of them best explains the data. Stackelberg is the best model showing Brazil’s leadership in terms of quantities.

  16. Lipolytic activity of Svetol®, a decaffeinated green coffee bean extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, John; Bily, Antoine; Rolland, Yohan; Roller, Marc

    2014-06-01

    The beneficial health effects of chlorogenic acids (CGAs), major components of coffee beans, are well known and have been attributed to multiple mechanisms of action. However, the lipolytic activity of CGAs does not appear to have been reported. We studied the effects of varying concentrations of Svetol®, a decaffeinated green coffee bean extract enriched in CGAs, on the liberation of free fatty acids from human adipocytes following short-term (2 h) and long-term (192 h) exposure. The results showed that although lipolytic activity observed following short-term incubation could be tentatively linked to residual caffeine traces in the sample, longer-term exposure clearly showed the effects of Svetol® on release of free fatty acids, and this effect was not due to caffeine. The results of this study provide a further mechanism by which to explain the long-term health benefits of CGAs and Svetol®.

  17. COFFEE BEAN MYCO-CONTAMINANTS AND OXALIC ACID PRODUCING ASPERGILLUS NIGER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Yassin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Coffee bean-contaminating fungi were determined in random samples collected in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, using the direct plating technique. Forty-five samples were examined and 12 fungal species belonging to 5 genera were isolated. Aspergillus niger was the most widely distributed and most frequently isolated fungus (86.67%. The ability of the predominant fungus, A. niger, to produce oxalic acid was evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography. About 50% of the tested A. niger isolates produced oxalic acid; the amount produced was in the range of 90–550 ppm of oxalic acid. Because A. niger was the predominant and most widely distributed toxigenic fungus in the examined samples, more efforts should be directed to minimize the risk of oxalic acid contamination of commoditized coffee beans in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

  18. Tingkat Kesukaan Konsumen Terhadap Kopi Campuran Robusta Dengan Arabika

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsera Br Tarigan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available (Level Of Consumers Preferences On Coffee Blend Of Robusta And Arabica ABSTRACT. Coffee is the third most consumption beverage after water and tea. The popularity of coffee as beverage makes coffee consumption becomes a habit in rural and urban communities. Arabica and robusta coffee is the most widely sell in the market. Both have distinctive characteristics, arabica has an excellent taste and high selling prices, whereas robusta has high productivity and affordable by the consument. Improving the quality and price of coffee, this study conducted robusta and arabica coffee blending and acceptance tested using the 32 respondents who are semi-skilled respondents. Hedonic test is done to see consumer acceptance of blended coffee between robusta and arabica with a ratio of 3: 1, 2: 1, 1: 1 and robusta as control. The parameters observed were color, aroma, flavor, acidity, body, after taste and overall, using a Likert scale. Respondents consisted of 59.4% men and 40.6% women, with the age range 16 times a week, where the most respondents consume coffee instant. The result of hedonic test of four types of coffee served, male preferred blended coffee 3: 1 specially color, aroma and flavor. However female also prefer blended coffee 3: 1 with dominant variable color and aroma. The correlation between age and the variables especially taste and after-taste for the older male respondents increasingly like the taste of coffee served, and in contrary with the women .

  19. Bean counting: fair trade, Delft Reactor Institute shoots neutrons at coffee beans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwers, A.

    2003-01-01

    Apart from oil, coffee is the worlds most important export product. The large-scale intensive coffee plantations are also one of the worlds biggest users of pesticides. But cautious signs are emerging of return to the traditional, practically pesticide-free, organic growing methods, a trend that

  20. Bean counting: fair trade, Delft Reactor Institute shoots neutrons at coffee beans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwers, A.

    2003-01-01

    Apart from oil, coffee is the worlds most important export product. The large-scale intensive coffee plantations are also one of the worlds biggest users of pesticides. But cautious signs are emerging of return to the traditional, practically pesticide-free, organic growing methods, a trend that sta

  1. Ionic Liquids as Additives of Coffee Bean Oil in Steel-Steel Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Grace

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Environmental awareness and ever-growing restrictive regulations over contamination have increased the need for more environmentally-friendly lubricants. Due to their superior biodegradability and lower toxicity, vegetable oils are a good alternative to replace currently-used mineral oils. However, vegetable oils show low oxidation and thermal stability and poor anti-wear properties. Most of these drawbacks can be attenuated through the use of additives. In the last decade, ionic liquids have emerged as high-performance fluids and lubricant additives due to their unique characteristics. In this study, the tribological behavior of two phosphonium-based ionic liquids is investigated as additives of coffee bean oil in steel-steel contact. Coffee bean oil-ionic liquid blends containing 1, 2.5, and 5 wt% of each ionic liquid are studied using a block-on-flat reciprocating tribometer and the test results are compared to commercially-available, fully-formulated lubricant. Results showed that the addition of the ionic liquids to the coffee bean oil reduces wear volume of the steel disks, and wear values achieved are comparable to that obtained when the commercially-available lubricant is used.

  2. Fungal and mycotoxin contamination of coffee beans in Benguet province, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culliao, Audrey Glenn L; Barcelo, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Coffee remains an important agricultural product in Benguet province, Philippines, but is highly susceptible to fungal and mycotoxin contamination in various stages of growth and processing and in different local climates. In this study, pre- and post-harvest coffee bean samples from temperate and warm farming areas were assessed for their fungal and mycotoxin contaminants. One hundred eighty-five fungal isolates belonging to six genera were isolated representing 88.1% of mycotoxigenic fungi. The predominant species belonged to the genus Aspergillus, which are known producers of mycotoxins. Coffee beans from the post-harvest temperate group were found to have the highest percentage mycotoxigenic contamination of 98.4%, suggesting that the risk for fungal contamination is high after drying. Determination of the mycotoxins indicated 28.6% contamination. Ochratoxin A was found to be highest in dried whole cherries which contained 97.3 μg kg(-1), whilst sterigmatocystin was also highest in dried whole cherries at 193.7 μg kg(-1). These results indicate that there are risks of fungal and mycotoxin contamination of Benguet coffee at the post-harvest stage.

  3. Effects of nitrogen and potassium on the chemical composition of coffee beans and on beverage quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junia Maria Clemente

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The ratio of nitrogen (N to potassium (K is important in the production of specialty coffees because the relative amounts of N and K can either suppress the formation or increase the concentration of compounds that are essential to the flavor and aroma of specialty coffees. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different N:K ratios (w/w and K doses on the cup quality of coffee. The concentrations of chemical compounds essentials to achieve good flavor and aroma, the N and K contents, and the caffeine contents of coffee leaves and beans were evaluated in this study. The N:K ratio and the K dose were found to be important factors in cup quality, the best quality corresponding to an N:K ratio of 1:1.56. The best cup quality was obtained from beans with greater PPO activity, caffeine, color index, and sugars and lower total tritatable acidity, pH, electrical conductivity and leached potassium.

  4. Determination of Harvesting Time and Fermentation Conditions of Coffee (Coffee sp Beans Based on the Fruit Pericarp Enzyme Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Said Didu

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Pectinase enzyme of coffee pericarp, containing pectinesterase and polymetilesterase, is potential to determine harvesting time or to classify coffee beans. The activity of the enzyme on the green fruit is higher than on the yellow one. When the fruit become light red, the activity increaed for the second time and then decrease when the fruit is overripe (dark coloredThe optimum fermentation condition of the fruit is depending on the maturation degree. Study on the fermentation process at 25oC, suggest sorting of harvesting fruits in three groups. (1 fruits are harvested 9-24 days after the fruits reach its yellowish green color, Ao, (2 25 - 32 days after Ao, and (3 33 - 38 days after Ao.Fermenting at 35o C grouping into four types of maturation degree. (1 9 - 11 days after Ao, (2 12 - 22 days after Ao, (3 23 - 30 days after Ao, and (4 24-36 days after Ao. The optimum harvesting time is when the beans reach light red until the color starts getting dark. The optimum activity of the enzyme pectinase is at 35oC.

  5. Analysis of coffee bean extracts by use of ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel James O’Driscoll

    2014-01-01

    The number of flavour chemicals identified in coffee has reached over 1000 [1], [2]. Coffee is one of the world's most popular beverages [3], highly studied for its health-related properties [4], [5], [6]. Studies on coffee associated with human health have focused on the negative aspects, such as the toxicity of caffeine [7], [8]. Complex chemistry happens during coffee roasting and according to the literature, a number of compounds have been detected and quantified in coffee beans samples b...

  6. Evaluation of Biofunctional Compounds Content from Brewed Coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca C. Fărcaş

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Coffee, one of the most popular beverages worldwide, is an infusion of ground, roasted coffee beans. Today, coffee is considered a functional food, especially due to its high content of compounds that exert antioxidant and other beneficial biological properties. The annual consumption exceeds 5 billion kilograms of coffee, which corresponds to 500 billion cups. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the content in total phenolic compounds, flavonoids, caffeine as well as the antioxidant activity of three brewed coffee samples in order to assess the amount of these bioactive compounds in a cup of coffee. The quantification of total phenolic compounds was achieved by Folin-Ciocalteu method, while the flavonoids content was determined using a chromogenic system of NaNO2–Al(NO33–NaOH based spectrophotometric method. The caffeine was extracted from brewed coffee samples with dichlormethane and then was quantified by measuring the absorbance of the extract at 260 nm. The antioxidant capacity of each coffee sample was assessed by evaluating their radical scavenging activity on DPPH radical. Even though Arabica coffee variety is appreciated for its fine aroma profile, Robusta variety has proved to be richer in phenolic compounds, flavonoids and caffeine. The larger amount of compounds with antioxidant properties found in Robusta brewed coffee was also confirmed by the obtained antioxidant capacity values.

  7. Supercritical CO2 decaffeination of unroasted coffee beans produces melanoidins with distinct NF-κB inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yumin; Brown, Peter H; Hu, Kang; Black, Richard M; Prior, Ronald L; Ou, Boxin; Chu, Yi-Fang

    2011-09-01

    The supercritical CO(2)-decaffeination process causes unroasted coffee beans to turn brown. Therefore, we suspected that the decaffeinated beans contained melanoidins. Decaffeinated unroasted coffee extract absorbed light at 405 nm with a specific extinction coefficient, K(mix 405 nm), of 0.02. Membrane dialysis (molecular weight cut-off, 12 to 14 kDa) increased the K(mix 405 nm) value 15 fold. Gel filtration chromatography showed that the high-MW fraction (MW > 12 kDa) had an elution profile closer to that of melanoidins of medium-roast coffee than to the corresponding fraction of unroasted coffee, indicating the presence of melanoidins in decaffeinated unroasted beans. Using murine myoblast C2C12 cells with a stably transfected nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) luciferase reporter gene, we found that the high-MW fraction of decaffeinated unroasted beans had an NF-κB inhibitory activity of IC(50) = 499 μg/mL, more potent than that of regular-roast coffee (IC(50) = 766 μg/mL). Our results indicate that melanoidins form during the supercritical CO(2)-decaffeination process and possess biological properties distinct from those formed during the regular roasting process. We discovered the roasting effect of decaffeination process, reporting the discovery of melanoidins in green (unroasted) decaf coffee beans. Our results indicated that melanoidins form during the supercritical CO2-decaffeination process and possess biological properties distinct from those formed during the regular roasting process. Our results offer new insights into the formation of bioactive coffee components during coffee decaffeination process. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Positive and negative aspects of green coffee consumption - antioxidant activity versus mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeszka-Skowron, Magdalena; Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Agnieszka; Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Stępień, Łukasz; Stanisz, Ewa

    2017-09-01

    The quality of coffee depends not only on the contents of healthy compounds but also on its contamination with microorganisms that can produce mycotoxins during development, harvesting, preparation, transport and storage. The antioxidant activity of green coffee brews measured in this study by ABTS, DPPH and Folin-Ciocalteu assays showed that coffee extracts from Robusta beans possessed higher activity in all assays than extracts from Arabica beans. The occurrence of ochratoxin A and aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1 and G2) in green coffee beans was studied using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Apart from mycotoxins, the content of ergosterol as a marker indicating fungal occurrence was also determined. Among aflatoxins, aflatoxin B1 was the dominant mycotoxin in coffee bean samples, with the highest level at 17.45 ng g(-1) . Ochratoxin A was detected in four samples at levels ranging from 1.27 to 4.34 ng g(-1) , and fungi potentially producing this toxin, namely Aspergillus oryzae, Alternaria sp., Aspergillus foetidus, Aspergillus tamarii and Penicillium citrinum, were isolated. Steaming and decaffeination of coffee beans increased antioxidant activities of brews in comparison with those prepared from unprocessed beans. Although toxins can be quantified in green coffee beans and novel fungi were isolated, their concentrations are acceptable according to legal limits. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. OIL CONTENT OF GREEN BEANS FROM SOME COFFEE SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAZZAFERA PAULO

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The oil content was determined in seeds of several continental African species of the coffee germplasm bank of Instituto Agronômico de Campinas, State of São Paulo, Brazil. Oil was extracted from seeds with hexane in Soxhlet apparatus. Due to the economic importance, C. arabica and C. canephora have been the best studied species concerning oil content and composition, and the results obtained are in agreement with the reported in the literature. On the other hand, only one report in the literature describes the results of oil analyses in other few species of the African continent, although it does not allow comparison with our results. The oil content of most of the species varied from 9 to 15%, therefore, similar to the range observed for C. arabica and C. canephora. The exception was C. salvatrix, with 29% of oil in the seeds.

  10. Advances in genomics for the improvement of quality in coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hue Tm; Lee, L Slade; Furtado, Agnelo; Smyth, Heather; Henry, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    Coffee is an important crop that provides a livelihood to millions of people living in developing countries. Production of genotypes with improved coffee quality attributes is a primary target of coffee genetic improvement programmes. Advances in genomics are providing new tools for analysis of coffee quality at the molecular level. The recent report of a genomic sequence for robusta coffee, Coffea canephora, is a major development. However, a reference genome sequence for the genetically more complex arabica coffee (C. arabica) will also be required to fully define the molecular determinants controlling quality in coffee produced from this high quality coffee species. Genes responsible for control of the levels of the major biochemical components in the coffee bean that are known to be important in determining coffee quality can now be identified by association analysis. However, the narrow genetic base of arabica coffee suggests that genomics analysis of the wild relatives of coffee (Coffea spp.) may be required to find the phenotypic diversity required for effective association genetic analysis. The genomic resources available for the study of coffee quality are described and the potential for the application of next generation sequencing and association genetic analysis to advance coffee quality research are explored. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Antioksidan Ekstrak Air Biji Kopi Robusta Lampung dalam Menghambat Degenerasi Sel Hati Tikus Model Hepatitis yang Diinduksi CCL4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Sukohar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Liver plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis and is critical for physiological functions of other organs. Morphological changes of the liver will have an impact on changes in liver function and may appear as clinical manifestations. Hepatitis is a serious disorder that causes inflammation of the liver cells and is caused by viruses, chemicals and toxins. Reactions that occur in the form of oxidative stress, free radicals dominant condition of antioxidants. Traditionally coffee is used as an everyday beverage and known as antioxidants because it contains flavonoids (chlorogenic acid. This study aim was to determine the hepatoprotective/antioxidant effect of coffee growing in Pesawaran Lampung, on the description of hepatocyte cell damage in Wistar rats hepatitis model induced with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4. Laboratory experimental research has been conducted in Pharmacology >Department, Faculty Medicine Padjadjaran University Bandung and pathology examinations was performed at the Hospital Abdoel Moeloek Lampung in December 2008–July 2009, using 15 male Wistar rats divided in three groups, the negative control group, positive control as a model of hepatitis, and hepatitis model that received the water extract of robusta coffee beans 25 mg/kgBW/days for 7 days and then received CCl4 induction. The results were analyzed by analysis of variance and independent t test. Administration of water extract of robusta coffee beans can prevented damage to the liver cell degeneration picture from 58.4±7.09 to 34.4±5.85, these results differed significantly (p≤0.05 compared with positive and negative control. In conclusion, water extract of robusta coffee beans has the potential to prevent interference with the effects of liver function as antioxidants in the ra model of hepatitis which has been inducted with CCL4.

  12. Two-dimensional 1H-13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based comprehensive analysis of roasted coffee bean extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Feifei; Furihata, Kazuo; Hu, Fangyu; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2011-09-14

    Coffee was characterized by proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. To identify the coffee components, a detailed and approximately 90% signal assignment was carried out using various two-dimensional NMR spectra and a spiking method, in which authentic compounds were added to the roasted coffee bean extract (RCBE) sample. A total of 24 coffee components, including 5 polysaccharide units, 3 stereoisomers of chlorogenic acids, and 2 stereoisomers of quinic acids, were identified with the NMR spectra of RCBE. On the basis of the signal assignment, state analyses were further launched for the metal ion-citrate complexes and caffeine-chlorogenate complexes. On the basis of the signal integration, the coffee components were successfully quantified. This NMR methodology yielded detailed information on RCBE using only a single observation and provides a systemic approach for the analysis of other complex mixtures.

  13. Inhibitory activity of chlorogenic acids in decaffeinated green coffee beans against porcine pancreas lipase and effect of a decaffeinated green coffee bean extract on an emulsion of olive oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Yusaku; Iwai, Kazuya; Fukunaga, Taiji; Nakagiri, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    A decaffeinated green coffee bean extract (DGCBE) inhibited porcine pancreas lipase (PPL) activity with an IC50 value of 1.98 mg/mL. Six different chlorogenic acids in DGCBE contributed to this PPL inhibition, accounting for 91.8% of the inhibitory activity. DGCBE increased the droplet size and decreased the specific surface area of an olive oil emulsion.

  14. Composição volátil dos defeitos intrínsecos do café por CG/EM-headspace Volatile composition of intrinsic defective coffee beans by GC/MS-headspace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel D. C. C. Bandeira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available About 20% of Brazilian raw coffee production is considered inappropriate for exportation. Consequently, these beans are incorporated to good quality beans in the Brazilian market. This by-product of coffee industry is called PVA due to the presence of black (P, green (V and sour (A defective beans which are known to contribute considerably for cup quality decrease. Data on the volatile composition of Brazilian defective coffee beans are scarce. In this study, we evaluated the volatile composition of immature, black-immature, black defective beans and PVA compared to good quality beans. Potential defective beans markers were identified.

  15. Exhaustive Qualitative LC-DAD-MS(n) Analysis of Arabica Green Coffee Beans: Cinnamoyl-glycosides and Cinnamoylshikimic Acids as New Polyphenols in Green Coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, Gema; Sarriá, Beatriz; Bravo, Laura; Mateos, Raquel

    2016-12-28

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages in the world, due to its unique aroma and stimulant properties. Although its health effects are controversial, moderate intake seems to be beneficial. The present work deals with the characterization and quantification of polyphenols and methylxanthines in four Arabica green coffee beans from different geographical origins. The antioxidant activity was also evaluated. Forty-three polyphenols (cinnamic acid, cinnamoyl-amide, 5 cinammoyl-glycosides, and 36 cinnamate esters) were identified using LC-MS(n). Among these, cinnamate esters of six different chemical groups (including two dimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid isomers, three caffeoyl-feruloylquinic acid isomers, caffeoyl-sinapoylquinic acid, p-coumaroyl-feruloylquinic acid, two caffeoylshikimic acid isomers, and trimethoxycinnamoylshikimic acid) in addition to five isomers of cinnamoyl-glycosides called caffeoyl-2,7-anhydro-3-deoxy-2-octulopyranosic acid (CDOA) are described for the first time in Arabica green coffee beans. Moreover, 38 polyphenols (6-7% w/w) and 2 methylxanthines (1.3% w/w) were quantified by HPLC-DAD. Caffeoylquinic was the most abundant group of compounds (up to 85.5%) followed by dicaffeoylquinic and feruloylquinic acids (up to 8 and 7%, respectively) and the newly identified cinnamoyl-glycosides (CDOA) (up to 2.5%). Caffeine was the main methylxanthine (99.8%), with minimal amounts of theobromine (0.2%). African coffees (from Kenya and Ethiopia) showed higher polyphenolic content than American beans (from Brazil and Colombia), whereas methylxanthine contents varied randomly. Both phenols and methylxanthines contributed to the antioxidant capacity associated with green coffee, with a higher contribution of polyphenols. We conclude that green coffee represents an important source of polyphenols and methylxanthines, with high antioxidant capacity.

  16. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of ochratoxin A contamination in green coffee beans using Fourier transform near infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taradolsirithitikul, Panchita; Sirisomboon, Panmanas; Dachoupakan Sirisomboon, Cheewanun

    2017-03-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination is highly prevalent in a variety of agricultural products including the commercially important coffee bean. As such, rapid and accurate detection methods are considered necessary for the identification of OTA in green coffee beans. The goal of this research was to apply Fourier transform near infrared spectroscopy to detect and classify OTA contamination in green coffee beans in both a quantitative and qualitative manner. PLSR models were generated using pretreated spectroscopic data to predict the OTA concentration. The best model displayed a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.814, a standard error of prediction (SEP and bias of 1.965 µg kg(-1) and 0.358 µg kg(-1) , respectively. Additionally, a PLS-DA model was also generated, displaying a classification accuracy of 96.83% for a non-OTA contaminated model and 80.95% for an OTA contaminated model, with an overall classification accuracy of 88.89%. The results demonstrate that the developed model could be used for detecting OTA contamination in green coffee beans in either a quantitative or qualitative manner. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Role of water state and mobility on the antiplasticization of green and roasted coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocculi, Pietro; Sacchetti, Giampiero; Venturi, Luca; Cremonini, Mauro; Dalla Rosa, Marco; Pittia, Paola

    2011-08-10

    The effect of water on "antiplasticization" and plasticization of green and roasted coffee was studied by textural analysis, sorption isotherms, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). From BET monolayer value to a(w) = 0.61 and 0.75 for green and roasted coffee, respectively, the solid matrix hydration occurred and water induced hardening. Very short NMR T(2) values and the concomitant absence of any DSC endothermic peak assignable to water freezing were observed at these a(w) values. When solid matrix hydration was completed, water started to act as a plasticizing agent, the compressive modulus started to decrease, and NMR revealed the appearance of a new proton pool with increased mobility. According to DSC, only when the plasticizing effect became important did water present enough mobility to freeze. Above this moisture value (a(w) = 0.78 and 0.86 for green and roasted coffee, respectively), water determined a decrease of bean hardness and a further decrease of the elastic modulus.

  18. Performance of a table vibration type coffee grading machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available One of important coffee beans quality is the size uniformity. To confirm with the standart requirement, coffee beans have to be graded before being traded. Until now, grading process is still carried out fully manual, so that the grading cost is very expensive about 40% of total processing cost. Meanwhile, shortage of skill workers is as a limiting factor of the process. Therefore, machine for grading coffee beans is good alternative for grading cost. Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute has designed a table vibration type coffee grading machine for grouping of coffee beans in order to consistent quality and reduce grading cost. The machine has dimension of 272 cm length, 126 cm height, and 144 cm width. The machine has three primary components, i.e. grader table, combustion engine, and beam. The machine has three kinds of grader table that each grader table has different holes size, i.e. 7 mm x 7 mm for top grader table, 5 mm x 5 mm for axle grader table, and 4 mm x 4 mm for bottom grader table. Each grader table has dimension of 206 cm length, 105.5 cm height, and 14 cm width. The grading mechanism is by vibration grader table with the power source 5.5 HP combustion engine. The results shown that the outlet are in farms of three grades of coffee beans with connected to each compartement. Assessment of the grading machine reveals that the optimum capacity of 1,406 kg/hour reached when the speed 2,600 rpm and the angle 10O. Economic analysis showed that operational cost for grading one kilogram Robusta coffee beans with moisture content 13—14% wet basis is Rp 7.17.Key words : grading, coffee, quality, vibration table.

  19. UV/VIS SPECTROMETER DETERMINATION OF CAFFEINE IN GREEN COFFEE BEANS FROM HARARGHE, ETHIOPIA, USING BEER-LAMBERT’S LAW AND INTEGRATED ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EPHREM G. DEMISSIE

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A total of fifteen samples of green coffee (Coffea arabica L. beans from the major producing region of Hararghe Ethiopia were studied using UV-Vis spectrometer measurement caffeine quantitative analysis from coffee beans. The number density of caffeine in green coffee beans has been reported using Beer-Lambert’s law and integrating absorption coefficient technique. Our results obtained using integrated absorption and Beer-Lambert’s law has a good agreement and we observed a maximum difference of 10.4 %. Based on their low caffeine concentrations among the samples collected were found in Jarso coffee. Coffee beans from the Harar Aboker were characterized by higher concentrations of caffeine. The determined concentration for caffeine in coffee beans (% w/w ranged 0.601 % to 0.903 %. The concentrations of the caffeine varied significantly, depending on the geographical origin of the beans. The concentrations of caffeine in coffee collected from in Hararghe region were noticeably lower than their counterpart (1.0 - 1.2 % grows in the other parts of Ethiopia.

  20. Evaluation of alignment methods and data pretreatments on the determination of the most important peaks for the discrimination of coffee varieties Arabica and Robusta using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovell, A M C; Pereira, E J; Arruda, N P; Rezende, C M

    2010-09-30

    Coffee samples were analyzed by GC/MS in order to determine the most important peaks for the discrimination of the varieties Arabica and Robusta. The resulting peak tables from chromatographic analysis were aligned and pretreated before being submitted to multivariate analysis. A rapid and easy-to-perform peak alignment procedure, which does not require advanced programming skills to use, was compared with the tedious manual alignment procedure. The influence of three types of data pretreatment, normalization, logarithmic and square root transformations and their combinations, on the variables selected as most important by the regression coefficients of partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), are shown. Test samples different from those used in the calibration and comparison with the substances already known as being responsible for Arabica and Robusta coffees discrimination were used to determine the best pretreatments for both datasets. The data pretreatment consisting of square root transformation followed by normalization (RN) was chosen as being the most appropriate. The results obtained showed that the much quicker automated aligned method could be used as a substitute for the manually aligned method, allowing all the peaks in the chromatogram to be used for multivariate analysis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Phytochemical Composition, Antioxidant Activity, and the Effect of the Aqueous Extract of Coffee (Coffea arabica L.) Bean Residual Press Cake on the Skin Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voytena, Ana Paula Lorenzen; Fanan, Simone; Pitz, Heloísa; Coelho, Daniela Sousa; Horstmann, Ana Luiza; Pereira, Aline; Uarrota, Virgílio Gavicho; Hillmann, Maria Clara; Varela, Lucas Andre Calbusch; Ribeiro-do-Valle, Rosa Maria; Maraschin, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The world coffee consumption has been growing for its appreciated taste and its beneficial effects on health. The residual biomass of coffee, originated in the food industry after oil extraction from coffee beans, called coffee beans residual press cake, has attracted interest as a source of compounds with antioxidant activity. This study investigated the chemical composition of aqueous extracts of coffee beans residual press cake (AE), their antioxidant activity, and the effect of topical application on the skin wound healing, in animal model, of hydrogels containing the AE, chlorogenic acid (CGA), allantoin (positive control), and carbopol (negative control). The treatments' performance was compared by measuring the reduction of the wound area, with superior result (p < 0.05) for the green coffee AE (78.20%) with respect to roasted coffee AE (53.71%), allantoin (70.83%), and carbopol (23.56%). CGA hydrogels reduced significantly the wound area size on the inflammatory phase, which may be associated with the well known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions of that compound. The topic use of the coffee AE studied improved the skin wound healing and points to an interesting biotechnological application of the coffee bean residual press cake. PMID:27965732

  2. Phytochemical Composition, Antioxidant Activity, and the Effect of the Aqueous Extract of Coffee (Coffea arabica L. Bean Residual Press Cake on the Skin Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Celis Lopes Affonso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The world coffee consumption has been growing for its appreciated taste and its beneficial effects on health. The residual biomass of coffee, originated in the food industry after oil extraction from coffee beans, called coffee beans residual press cake, has attracted interest as a source of compounds with antioxidant activity. This study investigated the chemical composition of aqueous extracts of coffee beans residual press cake (AE, their antioxidant activity, and the effect of topical application on the skin wound healing, in animal model, of hydrogels containing the AE, chlorogenic acid (CGA, allantoin (positive control, and carbopol (negative control. The treatments’ performance was compared by measuring the reduction of the wound area, with superior result (p<0.05 for the green coffee AE (78.20% with respect to roasted coffee AE (53.71%, allantoin (70.83%, and carbopol (23.56%. CGA hydrogels reduced significantly the wound area size on the inflammatory phase, which may be associated with the well known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions of that compound. The topic use of the coffee AE studied improved the skin wound healing and points to an interesting biotechnological application of the coffee bean residual press cake.

  3. 咖啡豆的烘焙条件对其成分含量的影响研究%Effect of Roasting Conditions on Several Component Content of Coffee Beans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tran Van Cuong; 张宗玲; 郭康权; 夏南; 商晋; 陈贤情

    2016-01-01

    The effects of roasting conditions on the contents of proteins, sugars, starch, lipids and ashes of Vietnam Robusta green coffee beans and roasting coffee beans were studied using different analytical and detection methods such as Kjeldahl method, visible spectrophotometry method, burette method, muffle furnace method and Soxhlet extraction methods . The data were analyzed using the statistical software SPSS17.0. The results demonstrated that Vietnam Robusta coffee variety was rich in protein but lower in fat content. With the increase in roasting degree and roasting temperature , their protein and starch contents were initially increased then decreased slightly, total sugar content was reduced significantly whereas significant increase were observed in fat and ash contents. The ranges of variation in different components were:proteins 14.50%to 17.20%, starch 16.30%to 25.30%, total sugars 0.687%to 4.340%, lipids 7.64%to 12.5%and ash 3.47%to 5.23%.%用凯氏定氮法、可见分光光度法、滴定管法、马弗炉法和索氏抽提法等分析检测手段及SPSS17.0数据统计分析软件,研究了烘焙条件对越南罗巴斯达咖啡生豆和烘焙豆的蛋白质、总糖、淀粉、脂肪和灰分等品质成分的影响。结果表明,越南罗巴斯达咖啡属于蛋白质含量较高、脂肪含量低的咖啡豆品种,随烘焙程度和烘焙温度的增加,其蛋白质和淀粉含量先升高后稍下降、总糖含量却显著降低、脂肪和灰分含量明显增高,各成分变化范围:蛋白质含量14.50%~17.20%、淀粉含量16.30%~25.30%、总糖含量0.687%~4.340%、脂肪含量7.64%~12.50%,灰分含量3.47%~5.23%。

  4. Application of Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transformed Infrared (ATR-FTIR) Spectroscopy To Determine the Chlorogenic Acid Isomer Profile and Antioxidant Capacity of Coffee Beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ningjian; Lu, Xiaonan; Hu, Yaxi; Kitts, David D

    2016-01-27

    The chlorogenic acid isomer profile and antioxidant activity of both green and roasted coffee beans are reported herein using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy combined with chemometric analyses. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) quantified different chlorogenic acid isomer contents for reference, whereas ORAC, ABTS, and DPPH were used to determine the antioxidant activity of the same coffee bean extracts. FTIR spectral data and reference data of 42 coffee bean samples were processed to build optimized PLSR models, and 18 samples were used for external validation of constructed PLSR models. In total, six PLSR models were constructed for six chlorogenic acid isomers to predict content, with three PLSR models constructed to forecast the free radical scavenging activities, obtained using different chemical assays. In conclusion, FTIR spectroscopy, coupled with PLSR, serves as a reliable, nondestructive, and rapid analytical method to quantify chlorogenic acids and to assess different free radical-scavenging capacities in coffee beans.

  5. In vitro evaluation and determination of responsible fraction of coffee beans and dried sugar beet leaves for alpha-glucosidase inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Singh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Recent studies have identified that hydrophobic phenolic phytochemicals and hydrophilic Amadori compounds have potential for type 2 diabetes management via inhibition of carbohydrate hydrolysis enzymes. Here, we determined the phenolic content, α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, and pancreatic α-amylase inhibitory activity of water extracts of roasted and unroasted coffee beans and dried sugar beet leaves. Sugar beet leaves appeared to have the lowest total phenolic content while unroasted and roasted coffee beans had similar phenolic contents (1.49 and 1.40 mg/mL GAE DW respectively. All tested samples resulted to a dose-dependent α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Sugar beet leaves had significant inhibitory activity (78% at the highest dose and after C18 extraction this activity appeared to be both hydrophilic and hydrophobic compound dependent.  Roasted coffee beans had significantly higher α-glucosidase inhibitory activity when compared to green coffee beans at all tested doses. Roasted coffee beans were subjected to C18 extraction and the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity was evaluated and determined to be solely hydrophobic compound dependent. When the α-amylase inhibitory activity was evaluated, no inhibition was observed with all tested samples. Our findings indicate that the observed bioactivities in coffee beans is hydrophobic compound dependent, while in sugar beet leaves the observed effect is possibly due to the synergistic effect of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions. This is the first report on the carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzyme inhibition of roasted coffee beans and sugar beet leaves.Industrial Relevance. Sugar beets are widely cultivated in Europe and Northern Asia for the production of table sugar. After the harvesting of sugar beets large quantities of sugar beet leaves remain on the field and are either left to become fertilizer or appropriately disposed. Identification of appropriate strategies to

  6. Optimizing of Arabica Coffee Bean Fermentation Process Using a Controlled Fermentor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available One  of  primary  coffee  processing  steps  which  affect  the  end  quality  isfermentation.  Fermentation  using  a  controlled  fermentor  might  be  usefulbecause  all  of  parameters  which  influence  coffee  quality  can  be  controlled.The  aim of this  research is to evaluate  performance  of  controlled fermentor forfermentation  process  of  Arabica  coffee  beans.  Main  material  of  this  researchwas ripe Arabica coffee cherries from Andungsari Research Station in Bondowoso district.  Research  parameters  were  temperature  with  four  levels  i.e.:  ambient temperature,  30o C,  35oC  and  40oC,  and  fermentation  time  with  three  levels  i.e.: 6  hours,  12  hours,  and  18  hours.  A  horizontal  type  of  modified  fermentor  has been  tested  with  20  kg/batch  or  50%  of  maximum  loading  capacity.  The  result showed  that  an  electric  heater  as  energy  source  can  raise  temperature  duringfermentation  process.  Fermentation  process  using  fermentor  at  30-40oC had  not  significant  effect  on  physical  properties  change  such  as  density,  beancount  per  100  g  and  distribution  of  beans.  Optimum  condition  for  Arabica fermentation  process  in  a  modified  fermentor  reactor  was  25oC  temperature, and  12  hours  fermentation  time.  By  this  condition,  green  beans  have  good organoleptic  score  than  other  fermentation  process  treatments. Key words: Fermentor, fermentation, coffee, quality, organoleptic, horizontal cylinder.

  7. N,N-dimethylpiperidinium (mepiquat) Part 2. Formation in roasted coffee and barley during thermal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermann, Silke; Theurillat, Viviane; Verzegnassi, Ludovica; Hofmann, Jocelyne; Kuchenbecker, Ralf; Constable, Anne; Delatour, Thierry; Stadler, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Previous work in model systems has demonstrated that mepiquat can be formed under typical roasting conditions from the amino acid lysine via the Maillard reaction and trigonelline, the latter alkaloid serving as a methyl donor. This study shows for the first time that mepiquat is formed in low mg kg(-1) amounts during the coffee roasting process and consequently can be detected in roast and ground as well as soluble coffee up to levels of 1.4 mg kg(-1). Darker roast coffees contain relatively higher amounts of mepiquat versus light roasted beans, with an excellent correlation of mepiquat formation to roast colour (r(2) = 0.99) in robusta beans. A survey of 20 of the major green coffee origins (robusta and arabica coffees) showed the absence of mepiquat (coffee containing 1.4 mg kg(-1) mepiquat in the coffee powder (the highest amount measured in this study), the resulting intake would exhaust less than 0.2% of the ADI of mepiquat.

  8. Effect of coffee combining green coffee bean constituents with typical roasting products on the Nrf2/ARE pathway in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, Nadine; Boettler, Ute; Winkler, Swantje; Teller, Nicole; Schwarz, Christoph; Bakuradze, Tamara; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Haupt, Larissa; Griffiths, Lyn R; Stiebitz, Herbert; Bytof, Gerhard; Lantz, Ingo; Lang, Roman; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika; Marko, Doris

    2012-09-26

    This study investigated Nrf2-activating properties of a coffee blend combining raw coffee bean constituents with 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (CGA) as a lead component with typical roasting products such as N-methylpyridinium (NMP). In cell culture (HT29) the respective coffee extract (CN-CE) increased nuclear Nrf2 translocation and enhanced the transcription of ARE-dependent genes as exemplified for NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)A1, reflected in the protein level by an increase in GST enzyme activity. In a pilot human intervention study (29 healthy volunteers), daily consumption of 750 mL of CN-coffee for 4 weeks increased Nrf2 transcription in peripheral blood lymphocytes on average. However, the transcriptional response pattern of Nrf2/ARE-dependent genes showed substantial interindividual variations. The presence of SNPs in the Nrf2-promoter, reported recently, as well as the detection of GSTT1*0 (null) genotypes in the study collective strengthens the hypothesis that coffee acts as a modulator of Nrf2-dependent gene response in humans, but genetic polymorphisms play an important role in the individual response pattern.

  9. Isolation, selection and evaluation of yeasts for use in fermentation of coffee beans by the wet process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Pandey, Ashok; Medeiros, Adriane Bianchi Pedroni; Andrade Lara, João Marcos Rodrigues; Gollo, André Luiz; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2014-10-01

    During wet processing of coffee, the ripe cherries are pulped, then fermented and dried. This study reports an experimental approach for target identification and selection of indigenous coffee yeasts and their potential use as starter cultures during the fermentation step of wet processing. A total of 144 yeast isolates originating from spontaneously fermenting coffee beans were identified by molecular approaches and screened for their capacity to grow under coffee-associated stress conditions. According to ITS-rRNA gene sequencing, Pichia fermentans and Pichia kluyveri were the most frequent isolates, followed by Candida Candida glabrata, quercitrusa, Saccharomyces sp., Pichia guilliermondii, Pichia caribbica and Hanseniaspora opuntiae. Nine stress-tolerant yeast strains were evaluated for their ability to produce aromatic compounds in a coffee pulp simulation medium and for their pectinolytic activity. P. fermentans YC5.2 produced the highest concentrations of flavor-active ester compounds (viz., ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate), while Saccharomyces sp. YC9.15 was the best pectinase-producing strain. The potential impact of these selected yeast strains to promote flavor development in coffee beverages was investigated for inoculating coffee beans during wet fermentation trials at laboratory scale. Inoculation of a single culture of P. fermentans YC5.2 and co-culture of P. fermentans YC5.2 and Saccharomyces sp. YC9.15 enhanced significantly the formation of volatile aroma compounds during the fermentation process compared to un-inoculated control. The sensory analysis indicated that the flavor of coffee beverages was influenced by the starter cultures, being rated as having the higher sensory scores for fruity, buttery and fermented aroma. This demonstrates a complementary role of yeasts associated with coffee quality through the synthesis of yeast-specific volatile constituents. The yeast strains P. fermentans YC5.2 and Saccharomyces sp. YC9.15 have a great

  10. Effect of post-exercise caffeine and green coffee bean extract consumption on blood glucose and insulin concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Jason R; Gibson, Ann L; Kerksick, Chad M; Conn, Carole A; White, Ailish C; Mermier, Christine M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ingesting caffeine and green coffee bean extract on blood glucose and insulin concentrations during a post-exercise oral glucose tolerance test. Ten male cyclists (age: 26 ± 5 y; height: 179.9 ± 5.4 cm; weight: 77.6 ± 13.3 kg; body mass index: 24 ± 4.3 kg/m(2); VO2 peak: 55.9 ± 8.4 mL·kg·min(-1)) participated in this study. In a randomized order, each participant completed three 30-min bouts of cycling at 60% of peak power output. Immediately after exercise, each participant consumed 75 g of dextrose with either 5 mg/kg body weight of caffeine, 10 mg/kg of green coffee bean extract (5 mg/kg chlorogenic acid), or placebo. Venous blood samples were collected immediately before and after exercise during completion of the oral glucose tolerance test. No significant time × treatment effects for blood glucose and insulin were found. Two-h glucose and insulin area under the curve values, respectively, for the caffeine (658 ± 74 mmol/L and 30,005 ± 13,304 pmol/L), green coffee bean extract (637 ± 100 mmol/L and 31,965 ± 23,586 pmol/L), and placebo (661 ± 77 mmol/L and 27,020 ± 12,339 pmol/L) trials were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Caffeine and green coffee bean extract did not significantly alter postexercise blood glucose and insulin concentrations when compared with a placebo. More human research is needed to determine the impact of these combined nutritional treatments and exercise on changes in blood glucose and insulin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Effect of Orlistat, Green Coffee Bean Extract, and Its Combinations on Lipid Profi le and Adiponectin Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Setyono

    2017-01-01

    and ethanol extract of green coffee beans at a dose of 400 mg/kg. Lipid profi les and adiponectin levels were measured with a spectrophotometer at 500nm absorbance. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, and then post hoc Least Significant Difference (LSD with α = 0.05. Result: Ethanol extract of green coffee is more effi cient in lowering LDL cholesterol, increasing HDL cholesterol, and lowering the total cholesterol levels on HFD diet-induced mice, but there was no difference in lowering triglycerides . The combination of ethanol extract of green coffee with orlistat showedthe increasing of adiponectin levels were highest than the other treatment groups. Discussion: The ethanol extract of green coffee readily diffuses through the digestive tract epithelium. Green coffee contains chlorogenic acid active compounds that can increase the body’s metabolism, increase fatty acid oxidation, reduce levels of triglycerides in the liver, and working to inhibit lipase and amylase pancreaticenzymes. In addition to chlorogenic acid, polyphenol content in coffee is also potentially reduce visceral fat accumulation. Preparations extract by ethanol allows the absorption process is done effi ciently and quickly. Keywords: obesity, orlistat, greencoffee, lipid profi le, adiponectin

  12. Evaluation des critères physiques des fèves de caféier Robusta (Coffea canephora P. introduit dans les zones de basse altitude au Cameroun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngongang Nono, JC.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of Physical Criteria of Introduced Coffee Robusta (Coffea canephora P. Beans in Low Altitude of Cameroon. A study based on physical criteria of Robusta coffee beans (Coffea canephora P. was performed in two agro-ecological areas of IRAD (Institute of Agricultural Research for Development, at Nkolbisson in the centre and Barombi-Kang in the south west Cameroon. Eight clones (B5, B11 and B42 from the Republic of Central Africa, C5 and C6 from Ivory Coast, J13 and J21 from Java, M5 from Madagascar were the study material. Harvested cherries were evaluated for the rate of caracolis, bean size distribution and weight of one hundred beans. Mean weights of hundred beans are between 19.14 and 10.99 grams. The rate of caracolis at Barombi-Kang is 23.5% for the clone C5 and 10.6% for M5. The rates of the others are minor than 5%. At Nkolbisson, four clones have their rate of caracolis between 35 and 60% (C5, J13, J21 and M5. The results showed a highly significant difference (P< 0.01 among clones for bean size distribution and rate of caracolis. Only one group was found homogenous according to Newman-Keuls test, despite significant difference observed for caracolis rate. The results showed also that globally observed parameters depend nor to location, nor to clone.

  13. A simple method to measure effective catalase activities: optimization, validation, and application in green coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montavon, Philippe; Kukic, Koraljka Rade; Bortlik, Karlheinz

    2007-01-15

    Oxidative metabolism in coffee cherries during maturation appears to be regulated by the timely expression of redox enzymes such as catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), and polyphenoloxidase (PPO). Among these enzymes, CAT is suspected to contribute significantly in setting the redox status of the healthy cherry and the processed bean. The initial redox status of the green bean might further control the nature and dynamics of reactions induced by roasting and eventually quality aspects of the end product. In this respect, Arabica (Coffea arabica) and Robusta (Coffea canephora) typically differ by their cup coffee flavor profiles. We developed an assay that allowed us to screen numerous green coffee samples for effective CAT activities. The proposed assay, which monitors CAT activities by online oxygen sensing in green coffee crude suspensions incubated with H2O2, seeks to integrate potential effects of endogenous inhibitors and activators. After optimization and validation of the assay, 23 Arabicas, 23 Robustas, and 8 Arabustas were analyzed. Nearly all Arabicas (22 of 23) harbored high CAT activity levels, whereas all Robustas harbored low ones. Arabustas performed like Arabicas of the lower CAT activity range. The traditional spectrophotometric assay did not reveal these specificities. Because of its simplicity, our assay might be valuable for assessing effective CAT activities in various plant tissues.

  14. Identification of 3-methylbutanoyl glycosides in green Coffea arabica beans as causative determinants for the quality of coffee flavors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Keiko; Setoyama, Daiki; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Seta, Harumichi; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Miura, Daisuke; Wariishi, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Chifumi; Nakahara, Koichi

    2015-04-15

    The quality of coffee green beans is generally evaluated by the sensory cupping test, rather than by chemical compound-based criteria. In this study, we examined the relationship between metabolites and cupping scores for 36 varieties of beans, using a nontargeted LC-MS-based metabolic profiling technique. The cupping score was precisely predicted with the metabolic information measured using LC-MS. Two markers that strongly correlated with high cupping scores were determined to be isomers of 3-methylbutanoyl disaccharides (3MDs; 0.01-0.035 g/kg of beans) by spectroscopic analyses after purification, and one of them was a novel structure. Further, both the 3MDs were determined to be precursors of 3-methylbutanoic acid that enhance the quality of coffee. The applicability of 3MDs as universal quality indicators was validated with another sample set. It was concluded that 3MDs are the causative metabolites determining beverage quality and can be utilized for green bean selection and as key compounds for improving the beverage quality.

  15. Use of colour parameters for roasted coffee assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalina Cavaco Bicho

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Fast and non-destructive indicators were evaluated as tools to measure the technological quality of Arabica and Robusta coffee. Accordingly, considering the roasting intensity in highly valuable commercial samples, volume, mass, apparent density, moisture, total ash, ash insoluble in hydrochloric acid, and ether extract were characterized. The chromatic parameters L*, C*, Hº were measured using illuminants D65 and C. It was found that in roasted coffee beans, the parameters L*, C*, Hº, and coordinate b* had an antagonist interaction due to an increase in the roasting intensity, whereas after milling, only L* and Hº decreased progressively. Considering that the parameters L* and Hº followed similar patterns using both illuminants, D65 and C, it can be concluded that they are appropriate to evaluate coffee colour changes during roasting, enabling a relationship with coffee quality.

  16. Coffee seed physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eira, M.T.S.; Silva, da E.A.A.; Castro, de R.D.; Dussert, S.; Walters, C.; Bewley, J.D.; Hilhorst, H.W.M.

    2006-01-01

    Coffee is a member of the Rubiaceae family and the genus Coffea. There are more than 70 species of coffee but only two are economically important: Coffea arabica L. and Coffea canephora Pierre; 70 % of the coffee traded in the world is arabica and 30 % is robusta (C. canephora). Other species such a

  17. Coffee seed physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eira, M.T.S.; Silva, da E.A.A.; Castro, de R.D.; Dussert, S.; Walters, C.; Bewley, J.D.; Hilhorst, H.W.M.

    2006-01-01

    Coffee is a member of the Rubiaceae family and the genus Coffea. There are more than 70 species of coffee but only two are economically important: Coffea arabica L. and Coffea canephora Pierre; 70 % of the coffee traded in the world is arabica and 30 % is robusta (C. canephora). Other species such

  18. Agroclimatic zoning of robusta coffee in the State of Paraná and impacts of climate changeZoneamento agroclimático de café robusta no Estado do Paraná e impactos das mudanças climáticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane de Conti Medina

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was the agroclimatic zoning of robusta coffee (Coffea canephora Pierre ex Froehner in the state of Paraná, and to verify changes caused by temperature rise related to global warming, as predictions for the next 100 years reported by the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. An alternative to keep coffee production in the state of Paraná will be the introduction of robusta coffee, original from Africa, adapted to areas with annual mean temperatures between 22 and 26oC. We used the historical weather database from IAPAR (Agronomic Institute of Paraná and considered as apt for cropping the areas within the following conditions: risk of annual frost lower than 25% of probability, annual mean temperature between 22 and 26 °C, and annual water deficiency below 150 mm. The spatial analyzes were based on the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM and crossed into the environment of a Geographic Information System (GIS, generating maps of the agroclimatic zoning of Coffea canephora for the current climate and scenarios of climate change with the addition of 1.8 and 4 °C in the mean temperature. The zoning for the current weather indicated that parts of northwestern and western regions of Paraná are suitable for cultivation. Under climate change scenarios, considering the rainfall regime unchanged, the area suitable for cultivation expands, justifying studies on this species in the state of Paraná. O objetivo do trabalho foi realizar o zoneamento agroclimático de café robusta (Coffea canephora Pierre ex Froehner no estado do Paraná e verificar as alterações causadas neste, pelo incremento de temperatura, provocado pelo aquecimento global, conforme prognósticos para os próximos 100 anos divulgados pelo IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Uma alternativa para manter a produção cafeeira no estado do Paraná poderá ser a introdução do café robusta, originário da África, adaptado a regiões com

  19. Coffee bean polyphenols ameliorate postprandial endothelial dysfunction in healthy male adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Ryuji; Sugiura, Yoko; Otsuka, Kazuhiro; Katsuragi, Yoshihisa; Hashiguchi, Teruto

    2015-05-01

    To reveal the effect of coffee bean polyphenols (CBPs) on blood vessels, this study aimed to investigate the effect of CBPs on acute postprandial endothelial dysfunction. Thirteen healthy non-diabetic men (mean age, 44.9 ± 1.4 years) consumed a test beverage (active: containing CBPs, placebo: no CBPs) before a 554-kcal test meal containing 14 g of protein, 30 g of fat and 58 g of carbohydrates. Then, a crossover analysis was performed to investigate the time-dependent changes in flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in the brachial artery. In the active group, the postprandial impairment of FMD was significantly improved, the two-hour postprandial nitric oxide metabolite levels were significantly increased and the six-hour postprandial urinary 8-epi-prostaglandin F2α levels were significantly reduced compared to the placebo group. The test meal increased the levels of blood glucose, insulin and triglycerides in both groups with no significant intergroup differences. These findings indicate that CBPs intake ameliorates postprandial endothelial dysfunction in healthy men.

  20. Detailed Structural Analyses of KOH Activated Carbon from Waste Coffee Beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahata, Tomokazu; Toda, Ikumi; Ono, Hiroki; Ohshio, Shigeo; Akasaka, Hiroki; Himeno, Syuji; Kokubu, Toshinori; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2009-11-01

    The relationship of the detailed structural change of KOH activated carbon and hydrogen storage ability was investigated in activated carbon materials fabricated from waste coffee beans. The specific surface area of porous carbon materials calculated from N2 adsorption isotherms stood at 2070 m2/g when the weight ratio of KOH to carbon materials was 5:1, and pore size was in the range of approximately 0.6 to 1.1 nm as micropores. In the structural analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis and Raman spectroscopy indicated structural change in these carbon materials through KOH activation. The order of the graphite structure changed to a smaller scale with this activation. It is theorized that specific surface area increased using micropores provided by carbon materials developed from the descent of the graphite structure. Hydrogen storage ability improved with these structural changes, and reached 0.6 wt % at 2070 m2/g. These results suggest that hydrogen storage ability is conferred by the chemical effect on graphite of carbon materials.

  1. Molecular Markers Detect Cryptic Predation on Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by Silvanid and Laemophloeid Flat Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae) in Coffee Beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Sheina B; Yoneishi, Nicole M; Brill, Eva; Geib, Scott M; Follett, Peter A

    2016-02-01

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a serious pest of coffee worldwide. It was first detected in Hawai'i in 2010. Two predatory beetles, Cathartus quadricollis (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) and Leptophloeus sp. (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae), have been observed in H. hampei-infested coffee. Under laboratory conditions, colony-reared C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. prey upon all life stages of H. hampei. However, the H. hampei life cycle occurs almost exclusively within a coffee bean obscured from direct observation. Thus, it is unknown if C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. consume H. hampei as prey in the wild. To demonstrate predation of H. hampei by C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp., a molecular assay was developed utilizing species-specific primers targeting short regions of the mitochondrial COI gene to determine species presence. Using these primers, wild C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. were collected and screened for the presence of H. hampei DNA using PCR. Analysis of collections from five coffee farms revealed predation of C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. on H. hampei. Further laboratory testing showed that H. hampei DNA could be detected in predators for as long as 48 h after feeding, indicating the farm-caught predators had preyed on H. hampei within 2 d of sampling. This study demonstrates the utility of molecular markers for the study of the ecology of predators and prey with cryptic behavior, and suggests C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. might be useful biocontrol agents against H. hampei. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Analysis of amino acids and carbohydrates in green coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murkovic, Michael; Derler, Karin

    2006-11-30

    The analysis of carbohydrates and amino acids in green coffee is of the utmost importance since these two classes of compounds act as precursors of the Maillard reaction during which the colour and aroma are formed. During the course of the Maillard reaction potentially harmful substances like acrylamide or 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural accrue as well. The carbohydrates were analysed by anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection and the amino acids by reversed phase chromatography after derivatization with 6-amino-quinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate and fluorescence detection. Both methods had to be optimized to obtain a sufficient resolution of the analytes for identification and quantification. Sucrose is the dominant carbohydrate in green coffee with a concentration of up to 90 mg/g (mean = 73 mg/g) in arabica beans and significantly lower amounts in robusta beans (mean=45 mg/g). Alanine is the amino acid with the highest concentration (mean = 1200 microg/g) followed by asparagine (mean = 680 microg/g) in robusta and 800 microg/g and 360 microg/g in arabica respectively. In general, the concentration of amino acids is higher in robusta than in arabica.

  3. Grãos defeituosos em café colhido verde Occurrence of commercial defective coffee beans in unripe fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Teixeira

    1971-01-01

    Full Text Available Frutos de café Mundo Novo, colhidos verdes, após o benefício, foram analisados quanto aos defeitos comerciais que apresentaram. A classificação foi efetuada independentemente, por três classificadores, com a contagem de grãos "normais" e daqueles considerados defeitos, isto é, "verde" (três categorias, "ardido" e "prêto". Notou-se uma elevada porcentagem de grãos normais quanto à coloração, e também a ocorrência de grãos dos tipos "ardido" e "prêto", no café não maduro. Com a remoção da película prateada verificou-se uma redução na porcentagem de grãos "verdes" e um acentuado aumento na porcentagem de grãos "ardidos", e um aumento menor na de grãos "normais" e "prêtos". Estas observações indicam que os grãos normalmente classificados no comércio como "verdes" devem esta característica à côr .anormal da película, e que os grãos "ardidos" têm, como uma das suas origens, a colheita de frutos verdes.The frequency of defective coffee beans was determined in samples of unripe fruits of the cultivar Mundo Novo (Coffea arabica.Ten samples of 1000 seeds each obtained from green fruits after sundrying and shelling were independently scored for the commercial defects by three coffee classifiers. Each one of the classifiers recorded the occurrence of green-coated, brown and black beans before and after removal of the silver skin. The data revealed that more than half of the beans had normal green color whereas 44.9 per cent were green-coated, 3.5 per cent were brown and 0.1 per cent were black beans. The removal of the silver skin affected the previous classification giving 59.7 per cent of normal green beans, 39.5 per cent of brown and 0.3 per cent of black beans. These observations indicated that the so-called green-coated beans are caused by the presence of the silver skin which retains green pigments probably chlorophyll. On the other hand the browns which have been considered as product of over-fermentation were

  4. Determination of antibacterial activity of green coffee bean extract on periodontogenic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharath, Nagaraj; Sowmya, Nagur Karibasappa; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of pure green coffee bean extract on periodonto pathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were used to assess the antibacterial effect of pure green coffee bean extract against periodonto pathogenic bacteria by micro dilution method and culture method, respectively. MIC values of Pg, Pi and Aa were 0.2 μg/ml whereas Fn showed sensitive at concentration of 3.125 μg/ml. MBC values mirrors the values same as that of MIC. Antimicrobial activity of pure green coffee bean extract against Pg, Pi, Fn and Aa suggests that it could be recommended as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the management of periodontal disease.

  5. Determination of antibacterial activity of green coffee bean extract on periodontogenic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitrostudy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj Bharath

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of pure green coffee bean extract on periodonto pathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, Prevotella intermedia (Pi, Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa. Materials and Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC were used to assess the antibacterial effect of pure green coffee bean extract against periodonto pathogenic bacteria by micro dilution method and culture method, respectively. Results: MIC values of Pg, Pi and Aa were 0.2 μg/ml whereas Fn showed sensitive at concentration of 3.125 μg/ml. MBC values mirrors the values same as that of MIC. Conclusion: Antimicrobial activity of pure green coffee bean extract against Pg, Pi, Fn and Aa suggests that it could be recommended as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the management of periodontal disease.

  6. Can volatile organic metabolites be used to simultaneously assess microbial and mite contamination level in cereal grains and coffee beans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Angelo C; Baptista, Inês; Barros, António S; Gomes, Newton C M; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide; Rocha, Silvia M

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-ToFMS) was developed for the simultaneous screening of microbial and mite contamination level in cereals and coffee beans. The proposed approach emerges as a powerful tool for the rapid assessment of the microbial contamination level (ca. 70 min versus ca. 72 to 120 h for bacteria and fungi, respectively, using conventional plate counts), and mite contamination (ca. 70 min versus ca. 24 h). A full-factorial design was performed for optimization of the SPME experimental parameters. The methodology was applied to three types of rice (rough, brown, and white rice), oat, wheat, and green and roasted coffee beans. Simultaneously, microbiological analysis of the samples (total aerobic microorganisms, moulds, and yeasts) was performed by conventional plate counts. A set of 54 volatile markers was selected among all the compounds detected by GC×GC-ToFMS. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied in order to establish a relationship between potential volatile markers and the level of microbial contamination. Methylbenzene, 3-octanone, 2-nonanone, 2-methyl-3-pentanol, 1-octen-3-ol, and 2-hexanone were associated to samples with higher microbial contamination level, especially in rough rice. Moreover, oat exhibited a high GC peak area of 2-hydroxy-6-methylbenzaldehyde, a sexual and alarm pheromone for adult mites, which in the other matrices appeared as a trace component. The number of mites detected in oat grains was correlated to the GC peak area of the pheromone. The HS-SPME/GC×GC-ToFMS methodology can be regarded as the basis for the development of a rapid and versatile method that can be applied in industry to the simultaneous assessment the level of microbiological contamination and for detection of mites in cereals grains and coffee beans.

  7. Can volatile organic metabolites be used to simultaneously assess microbial and mite contamination level in cereal grains and coffee beans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo C Salvador

    Full Text Available A novel approach based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-ToFMS was developed for the simultaneous screening of microbial and mite contamination level in cereals and coffee beans. The proposed approach emerges as a powerful tool for the rapid assessment of the microbial contamination level (ca. 70 min versus ca. 72 to 120 h for bacteria and fungi, respectively, using conventional plate counts, and mite contamination (ca. 70 min versus ca. 24 h. A full-factorial design was performed for optimization of the SPME experimental parameters. The methodology was applied to three types of rice (rough, brown, and white rice, oat, wheat, and green and roasted coffee beans. Simultaneously, microbiological analysis of the samples (total aerobic microorganisms, moulds, and yeasts was performed by conventional plate counts. A set of 54 volatile markers was selected among all the compounds detected by GC×GC-ToFMS. Principal Component Analysis (PCA was applied in order to establish a relationship between potential volatile markers and the level of microbial contamination. Methylbenzene, 3-octanone, 2-nonanone, 2-methyl-3-pentanol, 1-octen-3-ol, and 2-hexanone were associated to samples with higher microbial contamination level, especially in rough rice. Moreover, oat exhibited a high GC peak area of 2-hydroxy-6-methylbenzaldehyde, a sexual and alarm pheromone for adult mites, which in the other matrices appeared as a trace component. The number of mites detected in oat grains was correlated to the GC peak area of the pheromone. The HS-SPME/GC×GC-ToFMS methodology can be regarded as the basis for the development of a rapid and versatile method that can be applied in industry to the simultaneous assessment the level of microbiological contamination and for detection of mites in cereals grains and coffee beans.

  8. Isoflavones in coffee: influence of species, roast degree, and brewing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Rita C; Almeida, Ivone M C; Casal, Susana; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P

    2010-03-10

    This paper reports the isoflavone contents of roasted coffee beans and brews, as influenced by coffee species, roast degree, and brewing procedure. Total isoflavone level is 6-fold higher in robusta coffees than in arabica ones, mainly due to formononetin. During roasting, the content of isoflavones decreases, whereas their extractability increases (especially for formononetin). Total isoflavones in espresso coffee (30 mL) varied from approximately 40 microg (100% arabica) to approximately 285 microg (100% robusta), with long espressos (70 mL) attaining more than double isoflavones of short ones (20 mL). Espressos (30 mL) prepared from commercial blends contained average amounts of 6, 17, and 78 microg of genistein, daidzein, and formononetin, respectively. Comparison of different brewing methods revealed that espresso contained more isoflavones ( approximately 170 microg/30 mL) than a cup of press-pot coffee ( approximately 130 microg/60 mL), less than a mocha coffee ( approximately 360 microg/60 mL), and amounts similar to those of a filtered coffee cup ( approximately 180 microg/120 mL).

  9. 珠海口岸进境咖啡生豆检疫情况分析%The epidemic situation analysis of imported coffee bean in Zhuhai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎财慧; 廖力; 陈伟琪; 洪昱斌; 张建军; 吴长坤

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the epidemic situation of the pest insects and diseases of coffee bean increased with the increase number of imported coffee bean in Zhuhai. In this paper,we analysised the epidemic situation of imported coffee bean, combined the epidemic situation happened around the world and the situation of the coffee planded in our contry, finally tried to discuss the quarantine emphasis of imported coffee bean.%近年来,随着珠海口岸咖啡生豆进口量的增加,口岸截获咖啡果小蠹等有害生物的疫情也不断增加.本文通过对珠海地区进境咖啡生豆截获疫情分析,结合国外疫情发生情况,对我国口岸进境咖啡生豆检疫工作的重点进行探讨.

  10. A Review: Gayo Arabica Cupping Quality from Coffee Cherry to Green Bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Hasni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available (Ulasan Ilmiah : Mutu Cita Rasa  Kopi Arabika Gayo dari Buah hingga Kopi Beras  ABSTRACT. Arabica coffee as primary commodity attracts intensive study over the years in the whole coffee sectors. This review aims to compile relevant information related to coffee botany and its production, fermentation as post-harvest process as well as the impacts of its sensory quality and composition. Many researchers prior to acknowledge that the coffee holistic production, where started from breeding to brewing ultimately affects coffee quality as beverage. Future trends attempt to determine the impact of climate change on coffee quality, processing techniques of coffee waste as well as isolation active components which impact sensory quality.

  11. PERBANDINGAN KARAKTERISTIK KIMIA DAN NILAI SENSORI ANTARA KOPI LUWAK DAN KOPI BIASA DARI VARIETAS ARABICA (Cafeea arabica. L) DAN ROBUSTA (Cafeea canephora. L)

    OpenAIRE

    Mahendradatta, Meta; Zainal; Israyanti; Abu Bakar, Tawali

    2012-01-01

    "Luwak??? coffee is well known as an extraordinary coffee due to its taste and high sell price. Special taste and odor of ???luwak??? coffee are caused by the change of protein, fat and caffeine content. This research aimed to know the comparison of caffein content, proximate analysis (protein and fat), taste and odor between ???luwak??? coffee and original coffee from arabika (Caffea arabica L) and robusta (Caffea canephora L) varieties. The treatments were robusta ???luwak???, arabica ???lu...

  12. PERBANDINGAN KARAKTERISTIK KIMIA DAN NILAI SENSORI ANTARA KOPI LUWAK DAN KOPI BIASA DARI VARIETAS ARABICA (Cafeea arabica. L) DAN ROBUSTA (Cafeea canephora. L)

    OpenAIRE

    Mahendradatta, Meta; Zainal; Israyanti; Abu Bakar, Tawali

    2012-01-01

    "Luwak??? coffee is well known as an extraordinary coffee due to its taste and high sell price. Special taste and odor of ???luwak??? coffee are caused by the change of protein, fat and caffeine content. This research aimed to know the comparison of caffein content, proximate analysis (protein and fat), taste and odor between ???luwak??? coffee and original coffee from arabika (Caffea arabica L) and robusta (Caffea canephora L) varieties. The treatments were robusta ???luwak???, arabica ???lu...

  13. Identification of coffee components that stimulate dopamine release from pheochromocytoma cells (PC-12).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J; Rohm, B; Lang, R; Pariza, M W; Hofmann, T; Somoza, V

    2012-02-01

    Coffee and caffeine are known to affect the limbic system, but data on the influence of coffee and coffee constituents on neurotransmitter release is limited. We investigated dopamine release and Ca(2+)-mobilization in pheochromocytoma cells (PC-12 cells) after stimulation with two lyophilized coffee beverages prepared from either Coffea arabica (AR) or Coffea canephora var. robusta (RB) beans and constituents thereof. Both coffee lyophilizates showed effects in dilutions between 1:100 and 1:10,000. To identify the active coffee compound, coffee constituents were tested in beverage and plasma representative concentrations. Caffeine, trigonelline, N-methylpyridinium, chlorogenic acid, catechol, pyrogallol and 5-hydroxytryptamides increased calcium signaling and dopamine release, although with different efficacies. While N-methylpyridinium stimulated the Ca(2+)-mobilization most potently (EC(200): 0.14±0.29μM), treatment of the cells with pyrogallol (EC(200): 48±14nM) or 5-hydroxytryptamides (EC(200): 10±3nM) lead to the most pronounced effect on dopamine release. In contrast, no effect was seen for the reconstituted biomimetic mixture. We therefore conclude that each of the coffee constituents tested stimulated the dopamine release in PC-12 cells. Since no effect was found for their biomimetic mixture, we hypothesize other coffee constituents being responsible for the dopamine release demonstrated for AR and RB coffee brews. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Study of composition of espresso coffee prepared from various roast degrees of Coffea arabica L. coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kučera, Lukáš; Papoušek, Roman; Kurka, Ondřej; Barták, Petr; Bednář, Petr

    2016-05-15

    Espresso coffee samples prepared at various roasting degrees defined according to its basic conventional classification (light, medium, medium-dark and dark roasted) were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Obtained raw data were processed using multivariate statistical analysis (Principal Component Analysis, PCA) to evaluate chemical differences between each roasting degrees (untargeted part of study). All four roasting degrees were resolved in appropriate Score plot. Orthogonal Projections to Latent Structures provided signals of significant markers describing the differences among particular roasting degrees. Detailed interpretation of those signals by targeted LC/MS(2) analysis revealed four groups of compounds. The first two groups involve chlorogenic acids and related lactones. The signals of other two sets of markers were ascribed to some specific atractylosides and particular melanoidins. Ratios of contents of selected representatives of each group to the sum of all identified markers were proposed as definite parameters for determination of roasting degree of Brazilian coffee Arabica.

  15. EFFECTS OF GREEN COFFEE BEAN EXTRACT IN SOME BIOMARKERS OF ADULT BRAZILIAN SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Adriana de Assis JÁCOME

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze the acute effects of the green coffee extracts consumption in some biomarkers of adult Brazilian subjects. Twenty healthy adult subjects between 18 and 35 years old of different sex and ethnic groups took part in the present study. All participants were submitted a 12 hours overnight fast before experiments. Plasma and serum biochemical parameters were measured in distinct intervals after a breakfast standard ingestion and 0.6 L of green coffee been extract consumption. No statistically differences (Wilcoxon test on serum lipid profi le and plasmatic homocysteine concentration were noted after green coffee beverage intake. Caffeine has been associated with increase of the glycaemia in roasted coffee consumers. In the present study, a signifi cant increase (p= 0.03 in glycaemia was observed thirty minutes after the green coffee beverage ingestion and, then, there was a tendency of glycaemia maintenance. The low amount of free caffeine found in green coffee matrix could explain the quick stabilization of the glycaemia. The ingestion of green coffee beverage also signifi cantly reduced uricaemia (p= 0.03 (Wilcoxon test. It is possible that the polyphenols, present in high amounts in this beverage, could act inhibiting the xanthine oxidase enzyme. Therefore, the consumption of green coffee has to stabilize blood glucose 30 minutes after ingestion of test meal, and reduction of uricaemia.

  16. Analysis of coffee bean extracts by use of ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Daniel James

    2014-01-01

    The number of flavour chemicals identified in coffee has reached over 1000 [1], [2]. Coffee is one of the world's most popular beverages [3], highly studied for its health-related properties [4], [5], [6]. Studies on coffee associated with human health have focused on the negative aspects, such as the toxicity of caffeine [7], [8]. Complex chemistry happens during coffee roasting and according to the literature, a number of compounds have been detected and quantified in coffee beans samples by UPLC-Q-TOF/MS [9], [10], [11], [12]. The following method offers a simple approach for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of coffee bean extracts using a Waters Acquity G2 UPLC-Q-TOF/MS instrument adapted from the method by Kenny et al., [12]. The following modifications were made:•The method by Kenny et al. was developed on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, the below method was developed on a Q-TOF MS.•A combination of utilising both base peak index and mass extraction at 0.05 Da allows for a sensitive, quantitative technique amidst poor background noise and poor separation with high mass accuracy (<5 ppm).•By use of MS(E) centroid experiment, greater mass spectral information for metabolite profiling could be obtained.

  17. Influence of roasting and brew preparation on the ochratoxin A content in coffee infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez De Obanos, A; González-Peñas, E; López De Cerain, A

    2005-05-01

    A study of the effect of coffee processing in the ochratoxin A (OTA) level has been carried out from the green beans to the drinking form. The analysis of OTA has been carried out by an in-house validated HPLC method with fluorescence detection. The limits of detection were 0.04 microg/kg for green and roasted coffee, and 0.01 microg/L for coffee brew. Thirty-six green coffee samples of different origin (Colombia, Costa Rica, Brazil, Vietnam, India and Uganda) were analysed. The highest concentrations of OTA were found in Vietnamese samples -- Robusta species treated by dry processing -- (range 0.64-8.05 microg/kg), that also showed the highest percentage of defective beans (7.6%). These contaminated samples were roasted in a process that controlled loss of weight and color, as in the industry. A mean reduction of 66.5% was obtained, but the reduction seems to be heterogeneous. Coffee brew was prepared by the three brewing processes more utilized in Europe: moka, auto-drip and espresso. A reduction of the OTA level has been attained, being greater when using a espresso coffee maker (49.8%) than when using auto-drip (14.5%) or moka brewing (32.1%). Therefore, the method of coffee brew preparation plays a key role in the final OTA human exposure.

  18. Complex mixture analysis of organic compounds in green coffee bean extract by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Feifei; Furihata, Kazuo; Hu, Fangyu; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2010-11-01

    A complex mixture analysis by one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was carried out for the first time for the identification and quantification of organic compounds in green coffee bean extract (GCBE). A combination of (1)H-(1)H DQF-COSY, (1)H-(13)C HSQC, and (1)H-(13)C CT-HMBC two-dimensional sequences was used, and 16 compounds were identified. In particular, three isomers of caffeoylquinic acid were identified in the complex mixture without any separation. In addition, GCBE components were quantified by the integration of carbon signals by use of a relaxation reagent and an inverse-gated decoupling method without a nuclear Overhauser effect. This NMR methodology provides detailed information about the kinds and amounts of GCBE components, and in our study, the chemical makeup of GCBE was clarified by the NMR results. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Coffee seed physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Eira, M.T.S.; Silva, DA; Castro, de, JFM; Dussert, S.; Walters, C.; Bewley, J.D.; Hilhorst, H.W.M.

    2006-01-01

    Coffee is a member of the Rubiaceae family and the genus Coffea. There are more than 70 species of coffee but only two are economically important: Coffea arabica L. and Coffea canephora Pierre; 70 % of the coffee traded in the world is arabica and 30 % is robusta (C. canephora). Other species such as C. congensis, C. dewevrei and C. racemosa have some interesting genetic characteristics, including resistance to pests and diseases and are used in breeding programs. To satisfy the demand for co...

  20. Utilization of chemically treated municipal solid waste (spent coffee bean powder) as reinforcement in cellulose matrix for packaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagamani, Senthil Muthu Kumar; Nagarajan, Rajini; Jawaid, Mohammad; Anumakonda, Varadarajulu; Siengchin, Suchart

    2017-07-31

    As the annual production of the solid waste generable in the form of spent coffee bean powder (SCBP) is over 6 million tons, its utilization in the generation of green energy, waste water treatment and as a filler in biocomposites is desirable. The objective of this article is to analyze the possibilities to valorize coffee bean powder as a filler in cellulose matrix. Cellulose matrix was dissolved in the relatively safer aqueous solution mixture (8% LiOH and 15% Urea) precooled to -12.5°C. To the cellulose solution (SCBP) was added in 5-25wt% and the composite films were prepared by regeneration method using ethyl alcohol as a coagulant. Some SCBP was treated with aq. 5% NaOH and the composite films were also prepared using alkali treated SCBP as a filler. The films of composites were uniform with brown in color. The cellulose/SCBP films without and with alkali treated SCBP were characterized by FTIR, XRD, optical and polarized optical microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile tests. The maximum tensile strength of the composite films with alkali treated SCBP varied between (106-149MPa) and increased with SCBP content when compared to the composites with untreated SCBP. The thermal stability of the composite was higher at elevated temperatures when alkali treated SCBP was used. Based on the improved tensile properties and photo resistivity, the cellulose/SCBP composite films with alkali treated SCBP may be considered for packaging and wrapping of flowers and vegetables. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Robusta (Coffea canephora P.) coffee cherries quantity put out for sun drying on contamination by fungi and ochratoxin A (OTA) under tropical humid zone (Côte d'Ivoire).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouadio, Irène Ahou; Koffi, Louis Ban; Nemlin, Jean Gnopo; Dosso, Mireille Bretin

    2012-06-01

    The effect of coffee cherries quantity put out for sun drying on the kinetics of the drying, chemical components variation, fungal growth and ochratoxin A production was evaluated. The results showed that the more coffee cherries quantity on the drying area was important, the slower they dried. Indeed, the drying durations were 12, 17, 21, 26, 31 and 32 days respectively for the lots of 10 kg, 20 kg, 30 kg, 40 kg, 50 kg and 60 kg of cherries by square meter of drying area. The slowness of the drying led to the increasing of fungal development and ochratoxin A production in the cherries. Indeed, samples more contaminated were those from the lots of 50 kg and 60 kg of cherries by square meter of drying area with between 10% and 100% of infected beans and with levels of ochratoxin A ranging from 0.92 to 118.47 and 1.4 to 131.33 μg kg(-1) respectively. The slowness of the drying led also to the acidification of the cherries (pH=5.55-4.54) and the degradation of their chlorogenic acids content (13.03-11.69) while for their caffeine content (2.52-2.54), any significant difference was observed whatever the drying duration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Naturally occurring diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione concentrations associated with roasting and grinding unflavored coffee beans in a commercial setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon H. Gaffney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, concerns have been raised about potential respiratory health effects associated with occupational exposure to the flavoring additives diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione. Both of these diketones are also natural components of many foods and beverages, including roasted coffee. To date, there are no published studies characterizing workplace exposures to these diketones during commercial roasting and grinding of unflavored coffee beans. In this study, we measured naturally occurring diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, and respirable dust at a facility that roasts and grinds coffee beans with no added flavoring agents. Sampling was conducted over the course of three roasting batches and three grinding batches at varying distances from a commercial roaster and grinder. The three batches consisted of lightly roasted soft beans, lightly roasted hard beans, and dark roasted hard beans. Roasting occurred for 37 to 41 min, and the grinding process took between 8 and 11 min. Diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, and respirable dust concentrations measured during roasting ranged from less than the limit of detection (bean/roast combination and sample location, diketone concentrations during grinding were higher than those measured during roasting. During grinding, concentrations decreased with increased distance from the source. Measured concentrations of both diketones were higher during grinding of soft beans than hard beans. The results indicate that airborne concentrations of naturally occurring diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione associated with unflavored coffee processing: (1 are similar to the concentrations that have been measured in food flavoring facilities; (2 are likely to exceed some

  3. Polyphenolic and hydroxycinnamate contents of whole coffee fruits from China, India, and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, W; Nemzer, B; Stalmach, A; Ali, S; Combet, E

    2013-06-01

    Air-dried whole coffee fruits, beans, and husks from China, India, and Mexico were analyzed for their chlorogenic acids (CGA), caffeine, and polyphenolic content. Analysis was by HPLC and Orbitrap exact mass spectrometry. Total phenol, total flavonol, and antioxidant capacity were measured. The hydroxycinnamate profile consisted of caffeoylquinic acids, feruloyquinic acids, dicaffeoylquinic acids, and caffeoyl-feruloylquinic acids. A range of flavan-3-ols as well as flavonol conjugates were detected. The CGA content was similar for both Mexican and Indian coffee fruits but was much lower in the samples from China. Highest levels of flavan-3-ols were found in the Indian samples, whereas the Mexican samples contained the highest flavonols. Amounts of CGAs in the beans were similar to those in the whole fruits, but flavan-3-ols and flavonols were not detected. The husks contained the same range of polyphenols as those in the whole fruits. The highest levels of caffeine were found in the Robusta samples.

  4. Bloei en bloeislaging van de robusta koffie op Sumatra's Westkust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenen, W.J.

    1936-01-01

    As an insight into flowering and fruit yield the percentage of flowers yielding fruits was estimated. To allow for variation between branches, many flowers must be taken. The extent of flowering of robusta coffee depended on the relation between vegetative and generative growth, both showing a

  5. Conducting starter culture-controlled fermentations of coffee beans during on-farm wet processing: Growth, metabolic analyses and sensorial effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius; Neto, Ensei; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Medeiros, Adriane Bianchi Pedroni; Woiciechowski, Adenise Lorenci; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the potential use of Pichia fermentans YC5.2 as a starter culture to conduct controlled coffee bean fermentations during on-farm wet processing was investigated. Inoculated fermentations were conducted with or without the addition of 2% (w/v) sucrose, and the resultant microbial growth and metabolism, bean chemistry and beverage quality were compared with spontaneous (control) fermentation. In both inoculated treatments, P. fermentans prevailed over indigenous microbiota and a restricted microbial composition was observed at the end of fermentation process. The inoculation also increased the production of specific volatile aroma compounds (e.g., ethanol, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate) and decreased the production of lactic acid during the fermentation process. Sucrose supplementation did not significantly interfere with the growth and frequency of P. fermentans YC5.2 inoculum but maintained high levels of wild bacteria population and lactic acid production similar to the spontaneous process. In roasted beans, the content of sugars and organic acids were statistically (pcoffee beans by increasing the concentration of yeast-derived metabolites compared to control. Sensory analysis of coffee beverages demonstrated that the use of the YC5.2 strain was favorable for the production of high-quality coffees with distinctive characteristics, e.g., intense perception of 'vanilla' taste and 'floral' aromas. In conclusion, the use of P. fermentans YC5.2 in coffee processing was shown to be a viable alternative to control the fermentation step and to ensure consistent quality of finished products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecularly imprinted coated graphene oxide solid-phase extraction monolithic capillary column for selective extraction and sensitive determination of phloxine B in coffee bean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Haiyun, E-mail: zhaihaiyun@126.com [College of Pharmacy, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Su, Zihao [College of Pharmacy, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Chen, Zuanguang, E-mail: chenzg@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Pharmaceutical Science, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Liu, Zhenping; Yuan, Kaisong; Huang, Lu [College of Pharmacy, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2015-03-20

    Highlights: • A new GO-MISPE monolithic capillary column was prepared. • The column showed ability of impurities removal and excellent selectivity. • Phloxine B existed in real sample was enriched more than 90 times. • The GO-MISPE column presented good recovery and high stability. • The method was prospered to analyze phloxine B and LOD achieved 0.3 ng g{sup −1}. - Abstract: A method was developed to sensitively determine phloxine B in coffee bean by molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) coated graphene oxide (GO) solid-phase extraction (GO-MISPE) coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography and laser-induced fluorescence detection (HPLC–LIF). The GO-MISPE capillary monolithic column was prepared by water-bath in situ polymerization, using GO as supporting material, phloxine B, methacrylic acid (MAA), and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) as template, functional monomer, and cross-linker, respectively. The properties of the homemade GO-MISPE capillary monolithic column, including capacity and specificity, were investigated under optimized conditions. The GO-MIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The mean recoveries of phloxine B in coffee bean ranged from 89.5% to 91.4% and the intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviation (RSD) values all ranged from 3.6% to 4.7%. Good linearity was obtained over 0.001–2.0 μg mL{sup −1} (r = 0.9995) with the detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.075 ng mL{sup −1}. Under the selected conditions, enrichment factors of over 90-fold were obtained and extraction on the monolithic column effectively cleaned up the coffee bean matrix. The results demonstrated that the proposed GO-MISPE HPLC–LIF method can be applied to sensitively determine phloxine B in coffee bean.

  7. Antihypertensive Potential of Combined Extracts of Olive Leaf, Green Coffee Bean and Beetroot: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Crossover Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel H.X. Wong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Extracts of olive leaf, green coffee bean and beetroot may deliver cardiovascular benefits. This study sought to evaluate the effects of regularly consuming a combination of these extracts on blood pressure (BP, arterial compliance, blood lipids, blood glucose and insulin sensitivity. A double-blind randomised placebo-controlled crossover trial was conducted in adults with untreated high normal or borderline elevated BP. They were randomised to take an active supplement, comprising 500 mg olive leaf extract, 100 mg green coffee bean extract and 150 mg beet powder, or a matching placebo twice daily for six weeks, followed by the alternate supplement for a further six weeks. Assessments of 24-h ambulatory BP (ABP, clinic BP arterial compliance (pulse-wave analysis, blood lipids, blood glucose and insulin were obtained at baseline and at the end of each treatment phase. Baseline clinic BP in 37 overweight middle-aged men and women who completed the trial averaged 145/84 mmHg. There was no significant effect of treatment on ABP or any other outcome measure. The failure to confirm prior evidence of the antihypertensive benefits of these extracts emphasises the importance of placebo control and the value of ABP monitoring. Further dose-response evaluation of olive leaf, green coffee bean or beetroot extracts is required to confirm or refute the purported benefits.

  8. QuEChERS Method for the Determination of Pesticide Residues in Indonesian Green Coffee Beans using Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmoko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A method using QuEChERS sample preparation followed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESIMS/MS was developed for quantitative determination of 14 pesticide residues in Indonesian green coffee beans. The European Standard Method EN 15662:2008 was modified to obtain an appropriate extraction and clean-up procedure for green coffee bean samples. Homogenous slurry samples were extracted with 1% acetic acid in acetonitrile and the extracts were cleaned up by a high pigment dispersive SPE. LC-ESI-MS/MS was operated in the MRM mode for two specific precursor-product ion transitions per target compound to obtain 4 identification points. Representative matrix-matched calibration curves were applied to compensate matrix effects. This method was validated according to the requirements of SANCO/12495/2011. Limits of detection (LODs and limits of quantification (LOQs were obtained in the ranges of 0.2-2.9 μg kg-1 and 0.8-9.7 μg kg-1 respectively, showing lower values than the maximum residu limits (MRLs set by importing countries. The method was applied to determine 14 pesticide residues in 181 Indonesian green coffee bean samples that were taken from different regions. Some pesticide residues were found in these samples and detected to be higher than the MRLs.

  9. Antihypertensive potential of combined extracts of olive leaf, green coffee bean and beetroot: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rachel H X; Garg, Manohar L; Wood, Lisa G; Howe, Peter R C

    2014-11-05

    Extracts of olive leaf, green coffee bean and beetroot may deliver cardiovascular benefits. This study sought to evaluate the effects of regularly consuming a combination of these extracts on blood pressure (BP), arterial compliance, blood lipids, blood glucose and insulin sensitivity. A double-blind randomised placebo-controlled crossover trial was conducted in adults with untreated high normal or borderline elevated BP. They were randomised to take an active supplement, comprising 500 mg olive leaf extract, 100 mg green coffee bean extract and 150 mg beet powder, or a matching placebo twice daily for six weeks, followed by the alternate supplement for a further six weeks. Assessments of 24-h ambulatory BP (ABP), clinic BP arterial compliance (pulse-wave analysis), blood lipids, blood glucose and insulin were obtained at baseline and at the end of each treatment phase. Baseline clinic BP in 37 overweight middle-aged men and women who completed the trial averaged 145/84 mmHg. There was no significant effect of treatment on ABP or any other outcome measure. The failure to confirm prior evidence of the antihypertensive benefits of these extracts emphasises the importance of placebo control and the value of ABP monitoring. Further dose-response evaluation of olive leaf, green coffee bean or beetroot extracts is required to confirm or refute the purported benefits.

  10. Microwave assisted thermal treatment of defective coffee beans press cake for the production of adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franca, Adriana S; Oliveira, Leandro S; Nunes, Anne A; Alves, Cibele C O

    2010-02-01

    Defective coffee press cake, a residue from coffee oil biodiesel production, was evaluated as an adsorbent for removal of basic dyes (methylene blue--MB) from aqueous solutions. The adsorbent was prepared by microwave treatment, providing a significant reduction in processing time coupled to an increase in adsorption capacity in comparison to conventional carbonization in a muffle furnace. Batch adsorption tests were performed at 25 degrees C and the effects of particle size, contact time, adsorbent dosage and initial solution pH were investigated. Adsorption kinetics was better described by a second-order model. The experimental adsorption equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin adsorption models, with Langmuir providing the best fit. The results presented in this study show that microwave activation presents great potential as an alternative method in the production of adsorbents.

  11. Recovery plan for Chorizanthe robusta var. robusta (Robust Spineflower)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Current Status: Chorizanthe robusta var. robusta (robust spineflower), which is federally endangered, is restricted to sandy soils along the coast and near-coastal...

  12. Daily intake of trace metals through coffee consumption in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suseela, B; Bhalke, S; Kumar, A V; Tripathi, R M; Sastry, V N

    2001-02-01

    The trace element contents of five varieties of instant coffee powder available in the Indian market have been analysed. Ca, Cr, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Ni, Sr, Zn and Pb, Cd, Cu have been determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry and differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry, respectively. The metal levels in the coffee powders observed in this study are comparable with those reported for green coffe beans (Arabica and Robusta variety) reported worldwide with the exception of Sr and Zn, which were on the lower side of the reported values. Concentrations of these metals have been converted into intake figures based on coffee consumption. The daily intakes of the above metals through ingestion of coffee are 1.4 mg, 1.58 microg, 124 microg, 41.5 mg, 4.9 mg, 17.9 microg, 2.9 microg, 3.8 microg, 12.5 microg, 0.2 microg, 0.03 microg and 15.5 microg, respectively. The values, which were compared with the total dietary, intake of metals through ingestion by the Mumbai population, indicate that the contribution from coffee is less than or around 1% for most of the elements except for Cr and Ni which are around 3%.

  13. The 'PUCE CAFE' Project: the First 15K Coffee Microarray, a New Tool for Discovering Candidate Genes correlated to Agronomic and Quality Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leroy Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of coffee biology will have an impact on future agronomical improvements for this economically important tree. During the past years, EST collections were generated in Coffee, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics. Results The "PUCE CAFE" Project, organized by the scientific consortium NESTLE/IRD/CIRAD, has developed an oligo-based microarray using 15,721 unigenes derived from published coffee EST sequences mostly obtained from different stages of fruit development and leaves in Coffea Canephora (Robusta. Hybridizations for two independent experiments served to compare global gene expression profiles in three types of tissue matter (mature beans, leaves and flowers in C. canephora as well as in the leaves of three different coffee species (C. canephora, C. eugenoides and C. arabica. Microarray construction, statistical analyses and validation by Q-PCR analysis are presented in this study. Conclusion We have generated the first 15 K coffee array during this PUCE CAFE project, granted by Génoplante (the French consortium for plant genomics. This new tool will help study functional genomics in a wide range of experiments on various plant tissues, such as analyzing bean maturation or resistance to pathogens or drought. Furthermore, the use of this array has proven to be valid in different coffee species (diploid or tetraploid, drastically enlarging its impact for high-throughput gene expression in the community of coffee research.

  14. The 'PUCE CAFE' Project: the first 15K coffee microarray, a new tool for discovering candidate genes correlated to agronomic and quality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privat, Isabelle; Bardil, Amélie; Gomez, Aureliano Bombarely; Severac, Dany; Dantec, Christelle; Fuentes, Ivanna; Mueller, Lukas; Joët, Thierry; Pot, David; Foucrier, Séverine; Dussert, Stéphane; Leroy, Thierry; Journot, Laurent; de Kochko, Alexandre; Campa, Claudine; Combes, Marie-Christine; Lashermes, Philippe; Bertrand, Benoit

    2011-01-05

    Understanding the genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of coffee biology will have an impact on future agronomical improvements for this economically important tree. During the past years, EST collections were generated in Coffee, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics. The "PUCE CAFE" Project, organized by the scientific consortium NESTLE/IRD/CIRAD, has developed an oligo-based microarray using 15,721 unigenes derived from published coffee EST sequences mostly obtained from different stages of fruit development and leaves in Coffea Canephora (Robusta). Hybridizations for two independent experiments served to compare global gene expression profiles in three types of tissue matter (mature beans, leaves and flowers) in C. canephora as well as in the leaves of three different coffee species (C. canephora, C. eugenoides and C. arabica). Microarray construction, statistical analyses and validation by Q-PCR analysis are presented in this study. We have generated the first 15 K coffee array during this PUCE CAFE project, granted by Génoplante (the French consortium for plant genomics). This new tool will help study functional genomics in a wide range of experiments on various plant tissues, such as analyzing bean maturation or resistance to pathogens or drought. Furthermore, the use of this array has proven to be valid in different coffee species (diploid or tetraploid), drastically enlarging its impact for high-throughput gene expression in the community of coffee research.

  15. Volatile compounds profiles in unroasted Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora beans from different countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel KNYSAK

    Full Text Available Abstract Aroma is the most important factor in assessing the quality of coffee. The volatile compounds profile could be very important to confirm the authenticity of Coffea arabica. The study was carried out on two species of unroasted coffee beans: Coffea arabica from Colombia and Nepal and Coffea robusta from Uganda and Vietnam. Both Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora were imported to the country of analysis approximately 5 months prior to the research. Before the analysis, the coffee beans were kept in a sealed, dark container, at 21 °C. The tests were performed using an electronic nose. Its functioning is based on gas chromatography with two columns of different polarities in parallel and with 2 ultra sensitive Flame Ionization Detectors (FID. With multivariate statistics – Principal Components Analysis – it was possible to reduce the number of links and present them in two dimensions, which allowed for the unambiguous identification and assignment of samples to a particular species of coffee. By using an electronic nose, one can distinguish and group unroasted coffee beans’ flavours depending on the country of origin and species.

  16. Quantitative studies on the influence of the bean roasting parameters and hot water percolation on the concentrations of bitter compounds in coffee brew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Simone; Frank, Oliver; Hofmann, Thomas

    2010-03-24

    To investigate the influence of roasting time and temperature on the degradation of the bitter precursors 3-O-caffeoyl quinic acid (1), 5-O-caffeoyl quinic acid (2), and 4-O-caffeoyl quinic acid (3) as well as the formation of bitter tastants during coffee roasting, we prepared coffee brews from beans roasted either at 260 degrees C for 60-600 s or for 240 s at 190-280 degrees C. By means of HPLC-UV/vis and HPLC-MS/MS, bitter-tasting monocaffeoyl quinides (4-8), dicaffeoyl quinides (9-11), and 4-vinylcatechol oligomers (12-20) as well as the parent bitter precursors 1-3 were quantitatively analyzed in these brews. Quinides 4-11, exhibiting a coffee-typical bitter taste profile, were found to be preferentially formed under slight to medium roasting degrees and were observed to be degraded again to generate harsh bitter-tasting 4-vinylcatechol oligomers under more severe roasting conditions, thus matching the change in bitter taste quality observed by means of sensory studies. In addition, quantitative studies of the release profile of bitter compounds from ground coffee upon water percolation revealed that compounds 1-8 were rapidly extracted, dicaffeoyl quinides 9-11 were released rather slowly, and, in particular, compounds 12-17 were found to show strong retention to the ground coffee material. These data imply that the knowledge-based control of the roasting and/or the extraction conditions might be helpful in tailoring the bitter taste signature of coffee beverages.

  17. Molecular markers detect cryptic predation on coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by silvanid and laemophloeid flat bark beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae) in coffee beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei(Coleoptera: Curculionidae)(Ferrari), is a serious pest of coffee worldwide and has been recently introduced in Hawai’i, first detected in the state in 2010. Adult silvanid flat bark beetles, Cathartus quadricollis (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) and adult laemoph...

  18. KARAKTERISASI ISOTERM SORPSI AIR BIJI KOPI DENGAN MODEL BET DAN GAB Water soption isotherms characterization of green coffee beans by BET and GAB models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2012-03-01

    32 oC and 25 oC temperature storage were 11.93 % and 11.22 % by BET model, and 12.81 % and 11.87 % by GAB model. For Arabica, 11.07 % and 11.09 % by BET model, and 11.65 % and 11.78 % by GAB model.   Keywords : Coffee, water sorption isotherm, water activity, BET, GAB ABSTRAK   Permasalahan dalam mempertahankan mutu selama penyimpanan dan pengiriman berkaitan dengan kadar air dan aktivitas air di dalam bahan. Equilibrium of Moisture Content (EMC didefinisikan sebagai kandungan air pada bahan yang seimbang dengan kandungan air udara sekitarnya. EMC merupakan tolok ukur kemampuan berkembangnya mikro organisme yang menyebabkan terjadinya kerusakan atau pembusukan bahan pada saat penyimpanan. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk menentukan karakteristik isotermi sorpsi air biji kopi dengan menggunakan model BET dan GAB. Kondisi suhu yang digunakan adalah 25-39 oC sesuai dengan kondisi penyimpanan di daerah tropis. Biji kopi yang digunakan adalah kopi Arabika dan Robusta hasil pengolahan kering dari Sulawesi Selatan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa berdasarkan pembagian daerah sorpsi, hasil analisis persamaan garis isotermi sorpsi model BET menunjukkan bahwa kadar air kopi Robusta yang berkeseimbangan dengan menggunakan model BET dan GAB pada kelembaban relatif 70 % pada suhu 32 oC masing-masing 11,93 % dan 11,22 %, sedangkan pada suhu 25 oC adalah 12,81 % dan 11,87 %. Untuk kopi Arabika pada suhu 32 oC masing-masing adalah 11,07 % dan 11,09 %, sedangkan pada suhu 25 oC adalah 11,65 % dan 11,78 %.   Kata kunci : Kopi, isotermi sorpsi air, aktivitas air, BET, GAB

  19. Contribution à la reconnaissance des zones favorables à la culture du caféier Robusta (Coffea canephora Pierre au Sud-Cameroun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Ranst, E.

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Contribution to the reconnaissance of the favourable zones for Robusta coffee (Coffea canephora Pierre cultivation in South-Cameroon. In this study we have tried to give a global appreciation of the land suitability of Cameroon, South of the 7°N latitude, for Robusta coffee cultivation, based on an evaluation of climatic and pedological characteristics. The used method is based on the interpretation of these characteristics in function of the climatic and pedological requirements of the Robusta coffee, described in literature. These characteristics are quantified as to determine the FAO land classes. This classification has allowed us to establish suitability maps.

  20. Wide electrochemical window of supercapacitors from coffee bean-derived phosphorus-rich carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Congcong; Sun, Ting; Hulicova-Jurcakova, Denisa

    2013-12-01

    Phosphorus-rich carbons (PCs) were prepared by phosphoric acid activation of waste coffee grounds in different impregnation ratios. PCs were characterized by nitrogen and carbon dioxide adsorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicate that the activation step not only creates a porous structure, but also introduces various phosphorus and oxygen functional groups to the surface of carbons. As evidenced by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and wide potential window tests, a supercapacitor constructed from PC-2 (impregnation ratio of 2), with the highest phosphorus content, can operate very stably in 1 M H2 SO4 at 1.5 V with only 18 % degradation after 10 000 cycles at a current density of 5 A g(-1) . Due to the wide electrochemical window, a supercapacitor assembled with PC-2 has a high energy density of 15 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 75 W kg(-1) . The possibility of widening the potential window above the theoretical potential for the decomposition of water is attributed to reversible electrochemical hydrogen storage in narrow micropores and the positive effect of phosphorus-rich functional groups, particularly the polyphosphates on the carbon surface. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Comparison of SNP-based detection assays for food analysis: Coffee authentication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniolas, Stelios; Bazakos, Christos; Tucker, Gregory A; Bennett, Malcolm J

    2014-01-01

    Recently, DNA-based authentication methods were developed to serve as complementary approaches to analytical chemistry techniques. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based reaction chemistries, when combined with the existing detection methods, could result in numerous analytical approaches, all with particular advantages and disadvantages. The dual aim of this study was (a) to develop SNP-based analytical assays such as the single-base primer extension (SNaPShot) and pyrosequencing in order to differentiate Arabica and Robusta varieties for the authentication of coffee beans and (b) to compare the performances of SNaPshot, pyrosequencing and the previously developed polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer on the basis of linearity (R2) and LOD, expressed as percentage of the adulterant species, using green coffee beans (Arabica and Robusta) as a food model. The results showed that SNaPshot analysis exhibited the best LOD, whereas pyrosequencing revealed the best linearity (R2 = 0.997). The PCR-RFLP assay using the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer could prove to be a very useful method for a laboratory that lacks sequencing facilities but it can be used only if a SNP creates/deletes a restriction site.

  2. Komunitas Nematoda pada Tanaman Kopi (Coffea Canephora Var. Robusta Muda di Kabupaten Tanggamus Lampung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I GEDE SWIBAWA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Community of Nematode in The Young Coffee ( Coffea Canephora Var. Robusta Crops in Tanggamus District, Lampung. Tanggamus district is one of coffee production center in Lampung province. Since year of 2013, farmers in Tanggamus have been replaced the unproductive old coffee by coffee seed introduced from East Java. Introducing coffe seed from outside area at risk of carrying plant parasitic nematodes. The purpose of this research was to study community of nematode associated with young coffee crops in Tanggamus. Survey was conducted in coffee robusta (Coffea canephora var. robusta fields belonging to farmer on September 2014. Soil samples were collected from three sites: Margo Mulyo, Sumber Rejo and Batu Bedil. Nematodes were extracted by sieving and centrifugation with sugar solution method. The results show that were 20 genera consisted of 9 genera of plant parasitic and 11 genera of free living nematodes associated with young coffee in Tanggamus. The nematode community was dominated by Pratylenchus and Radopholus. The population of Pratylenchus and Radopholus in Sumber Rejo site were 421 and 846 individual per 300 ml of soil respectively. It was needed to indentify up to species taxonomic level for Pratylenchus and Radopholus associated with young coffee in Tanggamus.

  3. KARAKTER FISIOLOGIS KLON KOPI ROBUSTA BP 358 PADA JENIS PENAUNG YANG BERBEDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ummi Sholikhah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Shade plants for coffee plantation generally use dadap, lamtoro andothers. Today there many change the use of shade plant from lamtoro to sengon because economic value and increasing demand for sengon wood. Due to thechanging in different type of shade plant cause affect on coffee plantationmicroclimate. On the coffee plantation also use some coffee clones. The differences type of shade and coffee clones can affect the differences physiological and morphological characters of coffee plant that affect the production.The aim of this research is expected to give information about physiological characters of robusta coffee clones in different shade plant, factors that affect the robusta coffee photosynthesis process, the relationship of photosynthesis with the production and robusta coffee clones that have high production. This research was conducted in coffee plantation at Sidomulyo village, the district of Silo, Jember regency located at a 560 meters above sea level. This research was done on May up to June 2011. The area determination method was chosen based on the consideration that Sidomulyo village is one of the popular coffee producer in Jember. The experiment used field experiment with the quadrant method use to observation and collect the data of 12 years old BP 358. The support parameter observed were light intensity, temperature, humidity and assessed fruit production. The data from the observation wereproduction branch than photosynthesis activity. The result showed coffee clones BP 358  with sengon shade had higher photosynthesis activity than lamtoro shade. The photosynthesis activity was more affected by the stomatal conductivity and the light intensity. Keyword: Physiological Characters, Coffee Clones BP 358,  Types of Shade

  4. The cholesterol-raising factor from coffee beans, cafestol, as an agonist ligand for the farnesoid and pregnane X receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricketts, Marie-Louise; Boekschoten, Mark V.; Kreeft, Arja J.; Hooiveld, Guido J. E. J.; Moen, Corina J. A.; Mueller, Michael; Frants, Rune R.; Kasanmoentalib, Soemini; Post, Sabine M.; Princen, Hans M. G.; Porter, J. Gordon; Katan, Martijn B.; Hofker, Marten H.; Moore, David D.

    Cafestol, a diterpene present in unfiltered coffee brews such as Scandinavian boiled, Turkish, and cafetiere coffee, is the most potent cholesterol-elevating compound-knownin the human diet. Several genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis have previously been shown to be targets of cafestol,

  5. The cholesterol-raising factor from coffee beans, cafestol, as an agonist ligand for the farnesoid and pregnane X receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricketts, Marie-Louise; Boekschoten, Mark V.; Kreeft, Arja J.; Hooiveld, Guido J. E. J.; Moen, Corina J. A.; Mueller, Michael; Frants, Rune R.; Kasanmoentalib, Soemini; Post, Sabine M.; Princen, Hans M. G.; Porter, J. Gordon; Katan, Martijn B.; Hofker, Marten H.; Moore, David D.

    2007-01-01

    Cafestol, a diterpene present in unfiltered coffee brews such as Scandinavian boiled, Turkish, and cafetiere coffee, is the most potent cholesterol-elevating compound-knownin the human diet. Several genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis have previously been shown to be targets of cafestol, inclu

  6. Coffee bean extracts rich and poor in kahweol both give rise to elevation of liver enzymes in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekschoten, M.V.; Schouten, E.G.; Katan, M.B.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Coffee oil potently raises serum cholesterol levels in humans. The diterpenes cafestol and kahweol are responsible for this elevation. Coffee oil also causes elevation of liver enzyme levels in serum. It has been suggested that cafestol is mainly responsible for the effect on serum

  7. Coffee bean extracts rich and poor in kahweol both give rise to elevation of liver enzymes in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekschoten, M.V.; Schouten, E.G.; Katan, M.B.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Coffee oil potently raises serum cholesterol levels in humans. The diterpenes cafestol and kahweol are responsible for this elevation. Coffee oil also causes elevation of liver enzyme levels in serum. It has been suggested that cafestol is mainly responsible for the effect on serum chole

  8. The cholesterol-raising factor from coffee beans, cafestol, as an agonist ligand for the farnesoid and pregnane X receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricketts, Marie-Louise; Boekschoten, Mark V.; Kreeft, Arja J.; Hooiveld, Guido J. E. J.; Moen, Corina J. A.; Mueller, Michael; Frants, Rune R.; Kasanmoentalib, Soemini; Post, Sabine M.; Princen, Hans M. G.; Porter, J. Gordon; Katan, Martijn B.; Hofker, Marten H.; Moore, David D.

    2007-01-01

    Cafestol, a diterpene present in unfiltered coffee brews such as Scandinavian boiled, Turkish, and cafetiere coffee, is the most potent cholesterol-elevating compound-knownin the human diet. Several genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis have previously been shown to be targets of cafestol, inclu

  9. The Cholesterol-Raising Factor from Coffee Beans, Cafestol, as an Agonist Ligand for the Farnesoid and Pregnane X Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricketts, M.L.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Kreeft, A.J.; Hooiveld, G.J.E.J.; Moen, C.J.A.; Müller, M.R.; Frants, R.R.; Kasanmoentalib, S.; Post, S.M.; Princen, H.M.G.; Porter, J.G.; Katan, M.B.; Hofker, M.H.; Moore, D.D.

    2007-01-01

    Cafestol, a diterpene present in unfiltered coffee brews such as Scandinavian boiled, Turkish, and cafetière coffee, is the most potent cholesterol-elevating compound known in the human diet. Several genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis have previously been shown to be targets of cafestol, incl

  10. [Coffee and health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2013-01-01

    The coffee bean contains over 2000 chemical compounds, the health effects of which are known only to a limited extent. Previous coffee researchers and laymen focused solely on caffeine and its positive effect on mental alertness. Other ingredients in coffee, especially its polyphenols, also have an influence on our health. In Finland, coffee is the source of more than half of the so-called antioxidants that are thought to be important for health. Coffee drinkers have lower mortality and morbidity rates than non-drinkers in respect of many common chronic diseases.

  11. Influência dos grãos deteriorados ("tipo" sobre a qualidade da "bebida" de café Influence of deteriorated coffee beans on the taste of the beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Lazzarini

    1958-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foi estudada a hipótese de que os grãos de café deteriorados - parcial ou totalmente - existentes normalmente no café beneficiado, pudessem ocasionar desvalorização na qualidade da BEBIDA além do natural rebaixamento do TIPO. Em amostras de café de diversas procedências foi constatado que há acentuada influência dos grãos deteriorados na qualidade da bebida. Cafés isentos de grãos deteriorados foram classificados como de bebida estritamente mole ou mole tornando-se de bebida dura quando nesse mesmo café se encontrou elevada quantidade daqueles grãos. Com menores proporções de grãos deteriorados eram obtidas bebidas de classificação intermediária. Para os cafés de bebida Rio não houve variação na classificação: as amostras com ou sem grãos deteriorados se apresentavam sempre com a mesma bebida.Partly or fully deteriorated beans are present in varying amounts in commercial coffee. They seem to have been affected by external agents prior to drying and vary in color from almost normal to black. The experiments reported in this paper were designed to study the influence of the deteriorated beans on the coffee flavor. Samples were secured from the various coffee growing areas of São Paulo: Campinas, Ribeirão Prêto, Mococa, Pindorama, and Vale do Paraíba. Each was hand--graded, the partly or fully deteriorated beans being separated from the normal ones. The normal beans were then mixed with varying amounts of partly or fully deteriorated beans from the same samples. The following blends were prepared for each of the coffee sources: 1 . normal beans only 2. partly deteriorated beans exclusively 3. mixture of normal beans plus 10% in weight of partly deteriorated ones 4. ditto with 20% 5. ditto with 40% 6. ditto with 2.5% of fully deteriorated beans 7. ditto with 5% 8. ditto with 10% The 8 treatments for each source were replicated 4 times, giving thus a total of 256 variables. They were then submitted to

  12. Efeito da irrigação sobre a classificação do café Irrigation effect on coffee beans classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselmo A. de P. Custódio

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Foi estudado o efeito da irrigação sobre a classificação do café grão cru, quanto ao tipo, formato do grão e sua granulometria, nas cinco primeiras safras, em lavoura irrigada por pivô- central, aplicando-se cinco lâminas de irrigação em função do balanço entre a evaporação do tanque classe A (ECA e precipitação (P, além de tratamento-testemunha (não-irrigado. A cultivar plantada foi a Rubi, em março de 1999, no espaçamento de 3,5 m entre linhas e 0,8 m entre plantas. Não foi observado efeito significativo da irrigação sobre os aspectos estudados: tipo (defeitos intrínsecos, formato (grãos chatos e moca e granulometria dos grãos (peneiras. Contudo, entre as classes de defeito, os grãos verdes e ardidos foram os que apresentaram os maiores percentuais de defeitos para todas as safras estudadas e lâminas aplicadas. No que se refere às classes granulométricas, os tratamentos que receberam lâminas de 60% e 80% da ECA apresentaram os maiores percentuais de café médio (peneiras 15 e 16, 55,6% e 55,3%, respectivamente. O efeito da irrigação sobre a classificação do café grão cru, quanto ao tipo (número de defeitos, apresentou-se mais suscetível devido aos maiores coeficientes de variabilidade (C.V. obtidos quando comparados a granulometria e o formato dos grãos.This study was carried on to verify the irrigation effects on coffee classification related to bean type, shape and size. These characteristics were investigated. The plants were irrigated by a center pivot where five different water depths were applied based on the difference between precipitation and evaporation from a Class A Pan (ECA. The cultivar planted was Rubi, installed in March 1999, spaced 3.5 meters between rows and 0.8 meters between plants. Statistical differences were not observed on the studied factors type (intrinsic defects, format (plain beans and "moca" and size (sieves. Among the types of defects, green and sour beans were the ones

  13. Marketing Strategies Evolved by Entrepreneurs in Marketing the Coffee Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Thangaraja

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Results of conjoint analysis showed quality attributes preferred by the entrepreneurs. They were Arabica and Robusta (50:50 mixed variety, mixing of 70:30 coffee, chicory ratio, keeping quality up to 6 months, medium level of taste/aroma, filter size of the powder and roasting time of 15 minutes/ 10 kg of seeds. About 83.00 per cent of entrepreneurs produced coffee powder as a final form of coffee product, nearly two-third (63.00 % of the entrepreneurs did not have any brand name or logo, cent per cent of them reported manual packing only. Major criteria to fix different price rate of coffee product were International daily market price (90.00 %, factors affecting the price policy were market price fluctuation (93.33 %, season (90.00 % and Cent per cent of them had adopted coffee price forecasting broadcasted by various media. Selection of the location depends on nearby town and coffee potential area, techniques to overcome the competitor were better pricing and supply of quality coffee product, attraction of customers depends on personal contact, attractive display boards, quality, taste, aroma and flavor. Promotional activities carried out by the entrepreneurs were developing the customer base (83.33 % and working towards building customer loyalty (76.67%. Relationships followed among stakeholders were good partnership, price and profit sharing, commission basis, service and quality, supply-service and demand. Further, market demand reported by entrepreneurs were: the demand for coffee beans peaked during July to November, coffee powder were more demand in three seasons namely rainy season (June-September, winter season (December- January and summer holidays (April-May. Feedback mechanism reported by coffee entrepreneurs were: quality analysis report received from the export organization, physical analysis, cup test, personal contact through phone, e-mail and also personal letters.

  14. lon beam analysis of Brazilian coffee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debastiani, R.; Santos, C.E.I. dos; Ramos, M.M.; Souza, V.S.; Yoneama, M.L.; Amaral, L.; Dias, J.F. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande so Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2013-07-01

    Full text: Coffee is one of the most popular and consumed beverages worldwide. Consumers can make the beverage from different types of coffee such as ground coffee, instant coffee or grinding roasted coffee beans. Each type of coffee leads to different characteristics in flavor and scent. The aim of this work is to perform an elemental analysis of ground coffee and roasted coffee beans. To that end, eight popular Brazilian ground coffee brands have been chosen to make a comparative study among brands. One of these brands was selected for a complete study of the beverage preparation process. This same brand offers packages of roasted coffee beans, which allowed the elemental comparison between ground coffee and roasted coffee beans. Roasted coffee beans were ground with a pestle and mortar. The beverage was prepared using a typical coffee pot. The spent and liquid coffees were submitted to a heat treatment and subsequently homogenized and pressed into pellets. The filters used in the coffee pot were analyzed as well. For micro-PIXE studies, coffee beans were cut in different parts for analysis. Samples of ground coffee and roasted coffee beans (grind) were analyzed by PIXE, while light elements like C, O and N were analyzed by RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry). The roasted coffee beans were analyzed by micro-PIXE to check the elemental distribution in the beans. The elements found in powder coffee were Mg, AI, Si, P, S, CI, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rb. Potassium is the element with higher concentration, while Ti and Zn are trace elements. AI, Si and Ti showed the same concentration for all brands. Potassium and chlorine have high solubility, and about 80% of their concentration is transferred from the powder to the beverage during the infusion. Mg, P, CI, K, Mn, Fe, Zn and Rb showed significant variation between ground coffee and roasted coffee beans. The elemental maps show that potassium and phosphorus are correlated, and iron appears in particular

  15. Development of a Compound Beverage of Adzuki Beans and Coffee%红豆咖啡复合饮料的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨雁; 吴荣书

    2013-01-01

      以红豆和咖啡为原料,对红豆咖啡复合饮料的最佳配方进行了探讨,先通过单因素试验,分别考察红豆汁、咖啡、蔗糖和柠檬酸添加量对复合饮料品质的影响,确定各因素的适宜水平。再通过响应面分析法对复合饮料的最佳配方进行优化。结果表明,红豆咖啡复合饮料的最佳配方为:红豆汁35.73%、咖啡0.90%、蔗糖12.22%、柠檬酸0.08%。%  Taking the aduki beans and coffe as the main raw materials to discuss the best formula composite of the compound beverage. Choosing adzuki beans juice's addition, coffee’s addition, sugar addition and citiric acid’s addi-tion to do the single factor experiment, to determin the appropriate lever of various factors. The prescription of com-posite beverage was optimized by the response surface method. The result showed that the optimum prescription was found as follows: adzuki beans juice content 35.73%, coffee content 0.90%, sugar content 12.22%, citric acid con-tent 0.08%.

  16. SEGMENTACIÓN DE FRUTOS DE CAFÉ MEDIANTE MÉTODOS DE CRECIMIENTO DE REGIONES SEGMENTATION OF COFFEE BEANS BY MEANS OF SEEDED REGION GROWING TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Andrés Betancur Acevedo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan tres diferentes sistemas de segmentación los cuales utilizan la técnica de crecimiento de regiones a partir de semillas SRG (Seeded Region Growing. El primero de ellos, llamado Sistema Euclídeo, hace uso de la distancia euclídea con el fin de encontrar la región de interés (grano de café. El Sistema ACB-PCB utiliza dos medidas de discontinuidad llamadas contraste promedio y contraste periférico, las cuales se derivan del promedio de las componentes de color de los pıxeles que conforman la región y aquellos que conforman dos de sus contornos. Luego de un proceso iterativo, se halla el contorno de contraste promedio ACB y el contorno de contraste periférico PCB, que se usan para segmentar el grano de café. Por último, el Sistema Híbrido utiliza la información de las principales componentes geométricas presentes en la escena (dadas por un Detector de Bordes de Color, y la medida de contraste promedio. Las herramientas de segmentación fueron aplicadas a imágenes de frutos de café, adquiridas bajo condiciones controladas. Los resultados obtenidos muestran un buen desempeño del detector de bordes de color implementado, así como de los sistemas de segmentación, en especial de los sistemas ACB-PCB e Híbrido.Three segmentation systems are presented which use the Seeded Region Growing Technique SRG. The first one, called the Euclidean System, uses a Euclidean distance measure in order to find the region of interest (coffee bean. The ACB-PCB System uses two discontinuity measures called average contrast and peripheral contrast, which are derived from the mean of the color components of the pixels that form the region and those that form two of its boundaries. Following an iterative process, the Average Contrast Boundary ACB and the Peripheral Contrast Boundary PCB are computed for use in performing the coffee bean segmentation. Finally, the Hybrid System uses both information from the principal geometrical components in

  17. Study on use of Indonesian Robusta coffee bean in coffee drink development%印尼罗布斯塔咖啡豆应用于咖啡饮料开发的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁胜; 周婀; 王艳萍

    2010-01-01

    印度尼西亚产的罗布斯塔咖啡豆多用于咖啡饮料的工业生产.分析了不同烘焙程度对该咖啡豆香气成分的影响.以水为介质,研究了该咖啡豆烘焙度、粉碎粒度、萃取温度以及萃取料液比对咖啡萃取的影响.通过4因素3水平正交试验确定了最佳处理条件为:烘焙度L=19±1、粉碎粒度No.18-On=70%±1% & Pan<5%、萃取温度90±2℃、萃取料液比1:14.

  18. Teor de óleo e de cafeína em variedades de café Oil and caffeine content in the coffee bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Tango

    1963-01-01

    content in the coffee bean. The value of the lr allele was stressed in reducing the caffeine content in the coffee selected cultivars.

  19. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, linear dose, crossover study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a green coffee bean extract in overweight subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinson JA

    2012-01-01

    .Keywords: green coffee bean extract, chlorogenic acid, body mass index, weight loss, body fat mass, blood pressure, heart rate

  20. Ochratoxigenic fungi associated with green coffee beans (Coffea arabica L.) in conventional and organic cultivation in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fátima Rezende, Elisângela; Borges, Josiane Gonçalves; Cirillo, Marcelo Ângelo; Prado, Guilherme; Paiva, Leandro Carlos; Batista, Luís Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The genera Aspergillus comprises species that produce mycotoxins such as aflatoxins, ochratoxins and patulin. These are cosmopolitan species, natural contaminants of agricultural products. In coffee grains, the most important Aspergillus species in terms of the risk of presenting mycotoxins belong to the genera Aspergillus Section Circumdati and Section Nigri. The purpose of this study was to assess the occurrence of isolated ochratoxigenic fungi of coffee grains from organic and conventional cultivation from the South of Minas Gerais, Brazil, as well as to evaluate which farming system presents higher contamination risk by ochratoxin A (OTA) produced by fungi. Thirty samples of coffee grains (Coffea arabica L.) were analysed, being 20 of them of conventional coffee grains and 10 of them organic. The microbiological analysis was done with the Direct Plating Technique in a Dichloran Rose Bengal Chloramphenicol Agar (DRBC) media. The identification was done based on the macro and micro morphological characteristics and on the toxigenic potential with the Plug Agar technique. From the 30 samples analysed, 480 filamentous fungi of the genera Aspergillus of the Circumdati and Nigri Sections were isolated. The ochratoxigenic species identified were: Aspergillus auricoumus, A. ochraceus, A. ostianus, A. niger and A. niger Aggregate. The most frequent species which produces ochratoxin A among the isolated ones was A. ochraceus, corresponding to 89.55%. There was no significant difference regarding the presence of ochratoxigenic A. ochreceus between the conventional and organic cultivation systems, which suggests that the contamination risk is similar for both cultivation systems. PMID:24294225

  1. Coffee brew melanoidins Structural and Functional Properties of Brown-Colored Coffee Compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekedam, E.K.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the work presented in this thesis was the identification of structural and functional properties of coffee brew melanoidins, and their formation mechanisms, that are formed upon roasting of coffee beans.

  2. Coffee brew melanoidins Structural and Functional Properties of Brown-Colored Coffee Compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekedam, E.K.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the work presented in this thesis was the identification of structural and functional properties of coffee brew melanoidins, and their formation mechanisms, that are formed upon roasting of coffee beans.

  3. PRESENCE OF ASPERGILLUS AND OTHER FUNGAL SYMBIONTS IN COFFEE BEANS FROM COLOMBIA Presencia de Aspergillus y otros simbiontes fúngicos en granos de café procedentes de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIGUEL ÁNGEL GAMBOA-GAITÁN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are common inhabitants of plants and plant-derived products. Some of these fungal species are potentially dangerous to human health since they are able to produce chemical substances that alter normal physiological activity. There are no studies about natural mycoflora associated with coffee beans in Colombia, and nothing is known about the presence and abundance of toxigenic fungal species in Colombian coffee. In this study 5,000 coffee beans were studied by plating them on potato-based artificial culture medium and it was shown that potentially toxigenic fungal taxa (mostly from genera Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium, are currently found in Colombian coffee beans. This is true for all steps of coffee processing, from berries in trees to toasted grains, including packed coffee ready for retail in supermarkets. Results show that the distribution of these fungi is not random among different steps of coffee processing, which means that some steps are more vulnerable to infection with some fungi that others. The convenience of establishing a program devoted to detect fungi and/or mycotoxins in Colombian commodities, specially coffee, is discussed hereLos hongos son comúnmente encontrados tanto en plantas como en sus productos, bien sea para uso humano o animal. Algunos de tales hongos son potencialmente peligrosos para la salud porque producen compuestos químicos fisiológicamente activos, como alcaloides y toxinas. En Colombia no hay estudios sobre la micoflora naturalmente asociada a granos de café, ni sobre la presencia de especies toxígenas en dicho producto. En este estudio se tomaron muestras de 5.000 granos de café en diferentes estadios de su procesamiento, encontrando que taxones fúngicos potencialmente toxígenos, tales como Aspergillus, Fusarium y Penicillium, son comúnmente encontrados en todos los estadios del procesamiento de café. El estudio incluyó muestras desde el fruto en el árbol hasta café tostado y empacado

  4. A multi-residue method for pesticides analysis in green coffee beans using gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry in selective ion monitoring mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzutti, Ionara R; de Kok, Andre; Dickow Cardoso, Carmem; Reichert, Bárbara; de Kroon, Marijke; Wind, Wouter; Weber Righi, Laís; Caiel da Silva, Rosselei

    2012-08-17

    In this study, a new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method, using the very selective negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode, was developed and applied in combination with a modified acetonitrile-based extraction method (QuEChERS) for the analysis of a large number of pesticide residues (51 pesticides, including isomers and degradation products) in green coffee beans. A previously developed integrated sample homogenization and extraction method for both pesticides and mycotoxins analysis was used. An homogeneous slurry of green milled coffee beans and water (ratio 1:4, w/w) was prepared and extracted with acetonitrile/acetic acid (1%), followed by magnesium sulfate addition for phase separation. Aliquots from this extract could be used directly for LC-MS/MS analysis of mycotoxins and LC-amenable pesticides. For GC-MS analysis, a further clean-up was necessary. C18- and PSA-bonded silica were tested as dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) sorbents, separate and as a mixture, and the best results were obtained using C18-bonded silica. For the optimal sensitivity and selectivity, GC-MS detection in the NCI-selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode had to be used to allow the fast analysis of the difficult coffee bean matrix. The validation was performed by analyzing recovery samples at three different spike concentrations, 10, 20 and 50 μg kg(-1), with 6 replicates (n=6) at each concentration. Linearity (r(2)) of calibration curves, estimated instrument and method limits of detection and limits of quantification (LOD(i), LOD(m), LOQ(i) and LOQ(m), respectively), accuracy (as recovery %), precision (as RSD%) and matrix effects (%) were determined for each individual pesticide. From the 51 analytes (42 parent pesticides, 4 isomers and 5 degradation products) determined by GC-MS (NCI-SIM), approximately 76% showed average recoveries between 70-120% and 75% and RSD ≤ 20% at the lowest spike concentration of 10 μg kg(-1), the target method LOQ. For the

  5. Classification of Coffee Beans by GC-C-IRMS, GC-MS, and 1H-NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Andrea Arana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous work using 1H-NMR we reported encouraging steps towards the construction of a robust expert system for the discrimination of coffees from Colombia versus nearby countries (Brazil and Peru, to assist the recent protected geographical indication granted to Colombian coffee in 2007. This system relies on fingerprints acquired on a 400 MHz magnet and is thus well suited for small scale random screening of samples obtained at resellers or coffee shops. However, this approach cannot easily be implemented at harbour’s installations, due to the elevated operational costs of cryogenic magnets. This limitation implies shipping the samples to the NMR laboratory, making the overall approach slower and thereby more expensive and less attractive for large scale screening at harbours. In this work, we report on our attempt to obtain comparable classification results using alternative techniques that have been reported promising as an alternative to NMR: GC-MS and GC-C-IRMS. Although statistically significant information could be obtained by all three methods, the results show that the quality of the classifiers depends mainly on the number of variables included in the analysis; hence NMR provides an advantage since more molecules are detected to obtain a model with better predictions.

  6. KAJIAN CIDER SEBAGAI ALTERNATIF PENGANEKARAGAMAN PRODUK KOPI Study of Cider as Alternative Product Diversivication from Coffee

    OpenAIRE

    Suharyono Apno Sugito

    2012-01-01

    Coffee is an important export commodity from Indonesia. There are not many processed product from coffee, and sincecoffee is a delightful refreshing beverage, it is interesting to make product diversivication from coffee. An alternative processing could be a cider. Coffee used in this research were decaffeinated, Robusta and Arabica coffee. The amount of added sugar were 15 %, 20 %, and 25 %. Natural cultures, combination of Sacharomyces cerevisiae and Acetobacter xylinum, combination of Sach...

  7. CARACTERIZACIÓN DE CAFÉ CEREZA EMPLEANDO TÉCNICAS DE VISIÓN ARTIFICIAL AN ARTIFICIAL VISION SYSTEM FOR CLASSIFICATION OF COFFEE BEANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulma Liliana Sandoval Niño

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Se desarrolló un sistema de visión artificial para la clasificación de frutos de café en once categorías dependiendo de su estado de madurez. Para la descripción de la forma, el color y la textura de cada fruto de café se extrajeron 208 características. La reducción del conjunto de características de 208 a 9 se hizo con base en los resultados de dos métodos de selección de características, uno univariado y otro multivariado. Las características seleccionadas corresponden a 4 características de textura, 3 de color y 2 de forma. Este conjunto final de características se evaluó en dos técnicas de clasificación: Bayesiano y redes neuronales. Con el clasificador Bayesiano se obtuvo un error de clasificación del 5,43% y requirió un tiempo de clasificación de 5,5 ms, mientras que usando redes neuronales el error de clasificación fue de 7,46%, pero disminuyó el tiempo de clasificación a 0,8 ms.An artificial vision system for classification of coffee beans, in eleven categories, according to its state of maturity was developed. The description of the coffee beans was done by using 208 characteristics (form, color and texture characteristics. The reduction of the set of characteristics from 208 to 9 was done by using two methods of characteristic selection. The final set of characteristics is composed by 4 texture characteristics, 3 color characteristics and 2 shape characteristics. This final set was evaluated in two classifiers: The Bayesian and a neuronal networks classifier. The classification error obtained by the Bayesian classifier was 5,43%, it required 5,5 ms for the classification process, while the error obtained by neuronal networks classifier was 7,46% and the classification time decreased to 0,8 ms.

  8. Oxidative stability of lard and sunflower oil supplemented with coffee extracts under storage conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budryn, Grażyna

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative stability of sunflower oil and lard supplemented with water extracts of green and roasted, Arabica and Robusta coffee beans was estimated. A decrease in the rate of fat oxidation reactions during the storage of samples for 12 weeks at ambient temperature which resulted from the addition of coffee extracts was evaluated using standard chemical methods such as the determination of peroxide and p-anisidine value and the assays of conjugated dienes and trienes as well as physical methods such as the determination of thermal profile by DSC. The sensory properties of all fat samples were also determined. These measurements showed that 0.1% water coffee extracts in fats decreased (p < 0.05 the quantities assayed by the chemical methods as compared to the control samples and approximately halved the rate of fat oxidation. In addition, the thermal profile analysis revealed that supplementing with coffee extracts reduced the extent of negative changes in the thermal properties of fats. The effectiveness of the tested coffee extracts decreased in the order: green Robusta > green Arabica > roasted Robusta > roasted Arabica.

    La estabilidad oxidativa de manteca y aceite de girasol suplementados con extractos acuosos de granos de café verde o tostado Arábica y Robusta fue estimada. Un descenso en la velocidad de las reacciones de oxidación de la grasa durante el almacenamiento de las muestras durante 12 semana a temperatura ambiente, que resulto de la adición de los extractos de café, fue evaluada usando métodos químicos estándares tales como la determinación de peróxidos y el índice de paranisidina y ensayos de dienos y trienos conjugados, así como métodos físicos tales como la determinación del perfil térmico por DSC. También las propiedades sensoriales de todas las grasas fueron estimadas. Estas medidas mostraron que extractos acuosos de café al 0.1% en la grasa decrecieron (p < 0.05 los valores obtenidos por los m

  9. Damage of Coffee Bean Weevil ( Araecerus fasciculatus De Geer) on Its New Host Jatropha curcas L.%咖啡豆象对新寄主麻疯树的危害

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴跃开; 陈波涛; 欧国腾

    2011-01-01

    [ Objective] Coffee bean weevil (Araecerus fasciculatus De Geer) is a worldwide important pest in storehouse,which distributes in tropical and subtropical region with overlapping ecological zone with the important biofuel plant Jatropha curcas L. The paper was to investigate the damage of coffee bean weevil on J. curcas. [ Method] Taking cropping area in Luodian of Guizhou Province as the investigation point, the forest stand of J. curcas in field and the indoor stored fruits were investigated ,and the occurrence condition and damage consequence of the pest were grasped. Furthermore,the taxonomic status of the pest was also confirmed. [ Result ] Coffee bean weevil had common distribution in planting area of J. curcas in Luodian,which was found to cause damage both in field and indoor condition. The adults of coffee bean weevil fed on fungi with little direct damage on the fruit of J. curcas;however,the adults of the pest laid their eggs inside the peel of fruit,and the larv~ would hatch and feed inside the peel and bored the fruit peel into empty ,thus causing direct damage on the fruit;in addition ,coffee bean weevil might have series of potential damages including direct feeding on seeds,spreading diseases,and posing damage on other economic crops in production area,etc. [ Conclusion]J. curcas was an important new host for coffee bean weevil. The pest had certain damage on the plant,which also had potential damage on plant products and other economic crops. The research and control efforts on coffee bean weevil should be strengthened.%[目的]咖啡豆象是世界性仓储害虫,主要分布于热带亚热带地区,与重要能源植物麻疯树的生态区重叠,有必要调查其时麻疯树的危害性.[方法]以贵州罗甸种植区为调查点,对野外麻疯树林分及室内果实储藏物进行调查,掌握害虫发生情况及其为害后果,并对其分类地位进行确定.[结果]咖啡豆象在罗甸麻疯树种植区普遍分布,室内及林间均

  10. Safety and Efficacy of Banaba-Moringa oleifera-Green Coffee Bean Extracts and Vitamin D3 in a Sustained Release Weight Management Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohs, Sidney J; Kaats, Gilbert R; Preuss, Harry G

    2016-04-01

    This 60-day, 30-subject pilot study examined a novel combination of ingredients in a unique sustained release (Carbopol matrix) tablet consumed twice daily. The product was composed of extracts of banaba leaf, green coffee bean, and Moringa oleifera leaf and vitamin D3. Safety was assessed using a 45-measurement blood chemistry panel, an 86-item self-reported Quality of Life Inventory, bone mineral density, and cardiovascular changes. Efficacy was assessed by calculating a body composition improvement index (BCI) based on changes in dual energy X-ray absorptiometry measured fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) as well as between the study group (SG) and a historical placebo group. No changes occurred in any blood chemistry measurements. Positive changes were found in the Quality of Life (QOL) inventory composite scores. No adverse effects were observed. Decreases occurred in FM (p = 0.004) and increases in FFM (p = 0.009). Relative to the historical placebo group, the SG lost more FM (p < 0.0001), gained more FFM (p = <0.0001), and had a negative BCI of -2.7 lb. compared with a positive BCI in the SG of 3.4 lb., a 6.1 discordance (p = 0.0009). The data support the safety and efficacy of this unique product and demonstrate importance of using changes in body composition versus scale weight and BMI.

  11. Vírus da mancha anular do cafeeiro (Coffee ringspot virus - CoRSV: influência na qualidade da bebida e na produção de grãos de café Coffee ringspot virus (CoRSV: influence on the beverage quality and yield of coffee beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra de Jesus Boari

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A mancha anular do cafeeiro, causada pelo Coffee ringspot virus (CoRSV que é transmitido pelo ácaro Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes (Acari: Tenuipalpidae, tem sido observada em altas incidências em várias regiões cafeeiras do Estado de Minas Gerais. O CoRSV causa manchas cloróticas arrendondadas ou irregulares nas folhas, caules e frutos. Foi feita uma avaliação do efeito da infecção de frutos do cafeeiro pelo CoRSV na qualidade da bebida por meio de teste bioquímico e de degustação, e também na eventual perda de peso nos grãos. Testes revelaram que grãos provenientes de frutos de café infectados pelo CoRSV apresentavam menor teor de açúcares redutores e maior condutividade elétrica. Houve também depreciação na qualidade de bebida gerada pelos frutos infectados por meio do teste de degustação (teste de xícara. O peso médio dos grãos provenientes de frutos manchados foi cerca de 5% menor do que dos grãos de frutos sem sintomas.Coffee ringspot virus (CoRSV, transmitted by the tenuipalpid mite Brevipalpus phoenicis, has been found in high incidences in several regions of the state of Minas Gerais. It induces chlorotic spots on the leaves and fruits and may induce severe fall of the leaves with implication in the yield. An evaluation was made on the effects of CoRSV-infected coffee berries on the beverage quality as well as on the weight of the beans. Infected beans had less reducing sugars and presented an increase in the electrical conductivity. The quality of the beverage prepared from infected fruits was lower than that of healthy fruits. There was a reduction of about 5% in the weight of beans from infected fruits.

  12. Distribution of Radopholus similisand Pratylenchus CoffeaeNematodes in Coffee Plantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Hulupi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A research to evaluate the difference of damage levels caused by two species nematodes, Radopholus similis and Pratylenchus coffeae on Arabica and Robusta coffee which were planted in the same endemic area have been conducted at Kalibendo (700 m asl. climate type B and Blawan coffee estate (1200 m asl., climate type D for two years. The results showed that in the medium highland (700 m asl. R. similis attacked Arabica coffee with necrotic root scale higher than surface Robusta coffee. Distribution of R. similis population in the 50 cm depth below soil surface was likely with their root distribution. On the other hand P. coffeae in 30 cm depth below soil therefore their resistance to R. similis was more likely due to the escape reason, as result of their different distribution population of those species in different depth. Key words : Radopholus similis, Pratylenchus coffeae, Arabica coffee, Robusta coffee, distribution population.

  13. Understanding the Effects of Roasting on Antioxidant Components of Coffee Brews by Coupling On-line ABTS Assay to High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Sebastian E W; Goodman, Bernard A; Keller, Marco; Smrke, Samo; Wellinger, Marco; Schenker, Stefan; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2017-03-01

    Coffee is a widely consumed beverage containing antioxidant active compounds. During roasting the phytochemical composition of the coffee bean changes dramatically and highly polymeric substances are produced. Besides chlorogenic acids that are already present in green coffee beans, melanoidins show antioxidant capacity as well. To employ post-column derivatisation by coupling high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) to an antioxidant assay to investigate the effect of roasting on the properties of antioxidant active compounds in coffee brews. We have investigated the antioxidant capacity of Coffea arabica (Arabica) and C. canephora (Robusta) beans that were roasted over the full spectrum of roast conditions (four roasting speeds to three roast degrees) by comparing the results from HPSEC coupled on-line to the ABTS assay with those from two batch assays, Folin Ciocalteu (FC) and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. The antioxidant capacity showed a general decrease towards slower and darker roasted coffee for all three assays, indicative of heat degradation of active compounds. Hence, low molecular weight (LMW) compounds such as chlorogenic acids (CGAs) decreased progressively already from relatively mild roasting conditions. In contrast, high molecular weight (HMW) compounds (e.g. melanoidins) increased from light to dark roast degrees with lowering magnitude towards slower roasting profiles. By coupling HPSEC on-line to the ABTS assay we were able to separately quantify the contribution of HMW and LMW compounds to the total antioxidant capacity, increasing our understanding of the roast process. © 2016 The Authors. Phytochemical Analysis Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors. Phytochemical Analysis Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Understanding the Effects of Roasting on Antioxidant Components of Coffee Brews by Coupling On‐line ABTS Assay to High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Sebastian E.W.; Goodman, Bernard A.; Keller, Marco; Smrke, Samo; Wellinger, Marco; Schenker, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Coffee is a widely consumed beverage containing antioxidant active compounds. During roasting the phytochemical composition of the coffee bean changes dramatically and highly polymeric substances are produced. Besides chlorogenic acids that are already present in green coffee beans, melanoidins show antioxidant capacity as well. Objective To employ post‐column derivatisation by coupling high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) to an antioxidant assay to investigate the effect of roasting on the properties of antioxidant active compounds in coffee brews. Methodology We have investigated the antioxidant capacity of Coffea arabica (Arabica) and C. canephora (Robusta) beans that were roasted over the full spectrum of roast conditions (four roasting speeds to three roast degrees) by comparing the results from HPSEC coupled on‐line to the ABTS assay with those from two batch assays, Folin Ciocalteu (FC) and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. Results The antioxidant capacity showed a general decrease towards slower and darker roasted coffee for all three assays, indicative of heat degradation of active compounds. Hence, low molecular weight (LMW) compounds such as chlorogenic acids (CGAs) decreased progressively already from relatively mild roasting conditions. In contrast, high molecular weight (HMW) compounds (e.g. melanoidins) increased from light to dark roast degrees with lowering magnitude towards slower roasting profiles. Conclusion By coupling HPSEC on‐line to the ABTS assay we were able to separately quantify the contribution of HMW and LMW compounds to the total antioxidant capacity, increasing our understanding of the roast process. © 2016 The Authors. Phytochemical Analysis Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:28008674

  15. Sistemas de produção de feijão intercalado com cafeeiro adensado recém-plantado Production systems for bean associated with recently planted dense coffee shrub cropping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abner José de Carvalho

    2007-02-01

    cafeeiro recém-plantado quando se utiliza seis linhas intercalares de feijoeiro.A field experiment was carried out in a typical dystrophic Red Latosol at the campus of the Universidade Federal de Lavras, in order to study the effects of the row numbers and fertilization level of the bean plant (Phaseolus vulgaris L. upon the agronomic performance of the coffee shrub (Coffea arabica L. associated with bean plant. The experimental randomized block design was used with three replicates and factorial scheme 4 x 4 + 1, as involving four intercalary row numbers of the bean plant (one, three, four, and six lines by each inter row of coffee shrub and four fertilization doses (0, 50, 100, and 150% from the fertilization recommended for monocropping, consisting of 20 kg ha-1 N, 40 kg ha-1 P2O5 and 20 kg ha-1 K2O at planting timeplus 30 kg ha-1 N side-dressing, as well as one more additional treatment (monocropping of either coffee shrub or bean plant. The assay was conducted in a recently planted commercial Catucaí farming, whereas the cultivar of the bean plant was BRS-MG-Talismã. The following variables were evaluated for the bean plant: the initial and final stands; the plant heights; and the productivity of the beans with its primary components (pod number per plant, graim number per pod, and average100 graim weight. In coffee shrub, the characteristics under evaluation were the emission of leaf pairs and the increment in either plant height and stem diameter observed between sowing and harvesting the bean plant, as well as the mortality of the coffee shrubs. According to the results the increased number of the bean-plant intercalary rows rather rises the productivity of this leguminous, but reduces the increment of the stem diameter in the recently-planted coffee shrub. From four bean plant rows there is tendency to increased mortality of coffee shrubs, mainly in the absence of the leguminous fertilization. The fertilization up to 150% of the dose recommended to monocropping

  16. Molecular identification of Aspergillus spp. isolated from coffee beans Identificação molecular de Aspergillus spp. isolados de grãos de café

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marciane Magnani

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Some species belonging to the genus Aspergillus are potential producers of ochratoxin A (OA, a mycotoxin with nephrotoxic, immunosuppressive, teratogenic and carcinogenic effects. The aim of the present study was to identify the species of Aspergillus that contaminate the inside of coffee beans collected in the stage of maturation and drying, from 16 producing areas located in the northern region of the State of Paraná, in the South of Brazil. A total of 108 isolates of Aspergillus spp. was identified at the species level, by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 of ribosomal DNA (rDNA. The results revealed the presence of potentially ochratoxigenic species in 82% of the geographic regions studied, among which Aspergillus niger was the species most frequently detected, followed by A. ochraceus and A. carbonarius. The presence of A. carbonarius in immature coffee fruits harvested from trees is reported for the first time.Algumas espécies pertencentes ao gênero Aspergillus possuem potencial para produção de Ocratoxina A (OA, uma micotoxina de efeitos nefrotóxicos, imunossupressivos, teratogênicos e carcinogênicos. Com o objetivo de identificar as espécies de Aspergillus que contaminam o interior de grãos de café, foram coletadas amostras em diferentes estádios de maturação do produto, em 16 propriedades produtoras do norte do estado do Paraná. Um total de 108 isolados de Aspergillus spp. foram identificados ao nível de espécie, pelo sequenciamento dos espaços internos transcritos (ITS1-5,8S-ITS2 do DNA ribossomal (rDNA. Os resultados revelaram a presença de espécies potencialmente ocratoxigênicas em 82% das regiões analisadas, sendo dentre estas, Aspergillus niger a espécie mais freqüentemente detectada,seguida por A. ochraceus, e A. carbonarius. É relatada pela primeira vez a presença de A. carbonarius em frutos de café coletados na árvore.

  17. Overview on the mechanisms of coffee germination and fermentation and their significance for coffee and coffee beverage quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Deborah M; Arendt, Elke K; Moroni, Alice V

    2017-01-22

    Quality of coffee is a complex trait and is influenced by physical and sensory parameters. A complex succession of transformations during the processing of seeds to roasted coffee will inevitably influence the in-cup attributes of coffee. Germination and fermentation of the beans are two bioprocesses that take place during post-harvest treatment, and may lead to significant modifications of coffee attributes. The aim of this review is to address the current knowledge of dynamics of these two processes and their significance for bean modifications and coffee quality. The first part of this review gives an overview of coffee germination and its influence on coffee chemistry and quality. The germination process initiates while these non-orthodox seeds are still inside the cherry. This process is asynchronous and the evolution of germination depends on how the beans are processed. A range of metabolic reactions takes place during germination and can influence the carbohydrate, protein, and lipid composition of the beans. The second part of this review focuses on the microbiota associated with the beans during post-harvesting, exploring its effects on coffee quality and safety. The microbiota associated with the coffee cherries and beans comprise several bacterial, yeast, and fungal species and affects the processing from cherries to coffee beans. Indigenous bacteria and yeasts play a role in the degradation of pulp/mucilage, and their metabolism can affect the sensory attributes of coffee. On the other hand, the fungal population occurring during post-harvest and storage negatively affects coffee quality, especially regarding spoilage, off-tastes, and mycotoxin production.

  18. Safety and Efficacy of Banaba–Moringa oleifera–Green Coffee Bean Extracts and Vitamin D3 in a Sustained Release Weight Management Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaats, Gilbert R.; Preuss, Harry G.

    2016-01-01

    This 60‐day, 30‐subject pilot study examined a novel combination of ingredients in a unique sustained release (Carbopol matrix) tablet consumed twice daily. The product was composed of extracts of banaba leaf, green coffee bean, and Moringa oleifera leaf and vitamin D3. Safety was assessed using a 45‐measurement blood chemistry panel, an 86‐item self‐reported Quality of Life Inventory, bone mineral density, and cardiovascular changes. Efficacy was assessed by calculating a body composition improvement index (BCI) based on changes in dual energy X‐ray absorptiometry measured fat mass (FM) and fat‐free mass (FFM) as well as between the study group (SG) and a historical placebo group. No changes occurred in any blood chemistry measurements. Positive changes were found in the Quality of Life (QOL) inventory composite scores. No adverse effects were observed. Decreases occurred in FM (p = 0.004) and increases in FFM (p = 0.009). Relative to the historical placebo group, the SG lost more FM (p < 0.0001), gained more FFM (p = <0.0001), and had a negative BCI of −2.7 lb. compared with a positive BCI in the SG of 3.4 lb., a 6.1 discordance (p = 0.0009). The data support the safety and efficacy of this unique product and demonstrate importance of using changes in body composition versus scale weight and BMI. © 2016 The Authors Phytotherapy Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd PMID:26871553

  19. Liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet absorbance detection, electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation and tandem mass spectrometry on a triple quadrupole for the on-line characterization of polyphenols and methylxanthines in green coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Salces, Rosa Maria; Guillou, Claude; Berrueta, Luis A

    2009-02-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled with a photodiode array detector, electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-DAD/ESI-CID-MS/MS) on a triple quadrupole (QqQ) has been used to detect and characterize polyphenols and methylxanthines in green coffee beans: three phenolic acids (caffeic acid, ferulic acid and dimethoxycinnamic acid), three isomeric caffeoylquinic acids (M(r) 354), three feruloylquinic acids (M(r) 368), one p-coumaroylquinic acid (M(r) 338), three dicaffeoylquinic acids (M(r) 516), three feruloyl-caffeoylquinic acids (M(r) 530), four p-coumaroyl-caffeoylquinic acids (M(r) 500), three diferuloylquinic acids (M(r) 544), six dimethoxycinnamoyl-caffeoylquinic acids (M(r) 544), three dimethoxycinnamoyl-feruloylquinic acids (M(r) 558), six cinnamoyl-amino acid conjugates, three cinnamoyl glycosides, and three methylxanthines (caffeine, theobromine and theophylline). Dimethoxycinnamic acid, three isomers of dimethoxycinnamoyl-caffeoylquinic acids and another three of dimethoxycinnamoyl-feruloylquinic acids, as well as the three cinnamoyl glycosides, had not previously been reported in coffee beans. Structures have been assigned on the basis of the complementary information obtained from UV-visible spectra, relative hydrophobicity, scan mode MS spectra, and fragmentation patterns in MS(2) spectra (both in the positive and negative ion modes) obtained using a QqQ at different collision energies. A structure diagnosis scheme is provided for the identification of different isomers of polyphenols and methylxanthines.

  20. Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy for Coffee Variety Identification: Comparison of Pattern Recognition Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential of using mid-infrared transmittance spectroscopy combined with pattern recognition algorithm to identify coffee variety was investigated. Four coffee varieties in China were studied, including Typica Arabica coffee from Yunnan Province, Catimor Arabica coffee from Yunnan Province, Fushan Robusta coffee from Hainan Province, and Xinglong Robusta coffee from Hainan Province. Ten different pattern recognition methods were applied on the optimal wavenumbers selected by principal component analysis loadings. These methods were classified as highly effective methods (soft independent modelling of class analogy, support vector machine, back propagation neural network, radial basis function neural network, extreme learning machine, and relevance vector machine, methods of medium effectiveness (partial least squares-discrimination analysis, K nearest neighbors, and random forest, and methods of low effectiveness (Naive Bayes classifier according to the classification accuracy for coffee variety identification.

  1. Respiratory symptoms, exhaled nitric oxide, and lung function among workers in Tanzanian coffee factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakwari, Gloria; Mamuya, Simon H D; Bråtveit, Magne; Moen, Bente E

    2013-05-01

    To compare chronic respiratory symptoms, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO), and lung function between Robusta and Arabica coffee workers and a control group. Chronic respiratory symptoms were assessed by a questionnaire (n = 138 coffee workers and n = 120 controls). The FENO was measured by NIOX MINO device (Aerocrine AB, Solna, Sweden). Lung function was examined by a portable spirometer. Coffee workers had higher prevalence of chronic respiratory and asthma symptoms than controls. Robusta coffee workers were exposed to higher levels of endotoxin and had more asthma symptoms than Arabica coffee workers (38% vs. 18%). Coffee workers had reduced lung function associated with cumulative exposure to total dust and endotoxin. Work in coffee factories is associated with small but significant lung function impairment. These changes were not associated with the level of FENO.

  2. Studies of acrylamide level in coffee and coffee substitutes: influence of raw material and manufacturing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojska, Hanna; Gielecińska, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Many animal studies have shown that acrylamide is both neurotoxic and carcinogenic. The first reports of acrylamide actually having been found in foodstuffs were published in 2002 by the Swedish National Food Agency in conjunction with scientists from the University of Stockholm. It has since been demonstrated that acrylamide arises in foodstuffs by the Maillard reaction, ie. between free asparagine and reducing sugars at temperatures >120 degrees C. Coffee in fact, forms one of the principal dietary sources of acrylamide, where it is normally drunk in large quantities throughout many countries worldwide that includes Poland. Thus, it constitutes a major dietary component in a wide range of population groups, mainly ranging from late adolescents to the elderly. To determine the acrylamide level in commercial samples of roasted and instant coffee and in coffee substitutes by LC-MS/MS method. The influence of coffee species and colour intensity of coffee on acrylamide level was also detailed. A total of 42 samples of coffee were analysed which included 28 that were ground roasted coffee, 11 instant coffees and 3 coffee substitutes (grain coffee). Analytical separation of acrylamide from coffee was performed by liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). To evaluate the colour intensity of ground roasted coffee and instant coffee we used method of arranging (sequence). The highest mean acrylamide concentrations were found in coffee substitutes (818 pg/kg) followed by instant coffee (358 microg/kg) and then roasted coffee (179 microg/kg). One single cup of coffee (160 ml) delivered on average from 0.45 microg acrylamide in roasted coffee to 3.21 microg in coffee substitutes. There were no significant differences in acrylamide level between the coffee species ie. Arabica vs Robusta or a mixture thereof. The various methods of coffee manufacture also showed no differences in acrylamide (ie. freeze-dried coffee vs agglomerated coffee). A

  3. Coffee: biochemistry and potential impact on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Iziar A; Clifford, Michael N; Lean, Michael E J; Ashihara, Hiroshi; Crozier, Alan

    2014-08-01

    This review provides details on the phytochemicals in green coffee beans and the changes that occur during roasting. Key compounds in the coffee beverage, produced from the ground, roasted beans, are volatile constituents responsible for the unique aroma, the alkaloids caffeine and trigonelline, chlorogenic acids, the diterpenes cafestol and kahweol, and melanoidins, which are Maillard reaction products. The fate of these compounds in the body following consumption of coffee is discussed along with evidence of the mechanisms by which they may impact on health. Finally, epidemiological findings linking coffee consumption to potential health benefits including prevention of several chronic and degenerative diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, and Parkinson's disease, are evaluated.

  4. Production, composition, and application of coffee and its industrial residues

    OpenAIRE

    Mussatto, Solange I.; Machado, Ercília M. S.; Martins, Silvia; Teixeira, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages in the world and is the second largest traded commodity after petroleum. Due to the great demand of this product, large amounts of residues are generated in the coffee industry, which are toxic and represent serious environmental problems. Coffee silverskin and spent coffee grounds are the main coffee industry residues, obtained during the beans roasting, and the process to prepare “instant coffee”, respectively. Recently, some attempts have been m...

  5. Coffee fermentation and flavor--An intricate and delicate relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Liang Wei; Cheong, Mun Wai; Curran, Philip; Yu, Bin; Liu, Shao Quan

    2015-10-15

    The relationship between coffee fermentation and coffee aroma is intricate and delicate at which the coffee aroma profile is easily impacted by the fermentation process during coffee processing. However, as the fermentation process in coffee processing is conducted mainly for mucilage removal, its impacts on coffee aroma profile are usually neglected. Therefore, this review serves to summarize the available literature on the impacts of fermentation in coffee processing on coffee aroma as well as other unconventional avenues where fermentation is employed for coffee aroma modulation. Studies have noted that proper control over the fermentation process imparts desirable attributes and prevents undesirable fermentation which generates off-flavors. Other unconventional avenues in which fermentation is employed for aroma modulation include digestive bioprocessing and the fermentation of coffee extracts and green coffee beans. The latter is an area that should be explored further with appropriate microorganisms given its potential for coffee aroma modulation.

  6. Drinking Coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøbæk, Pernille Solveig

    2015-01-01

    The chapter explores how coffee is an integral part of our daily life. Focusing on coffee drinking at home, at work, and on the go I show that coffee consumption is a social practice. The chapter illustrates through everyday examples that coffee is more than a caffeine drug. Coffee, with or without...... caffeine, is a social lubricant. We talk to each other and share emotions with one another as we share a cup of coffee. Coffee makes conversation and we embrace coffee, to stay or to go, in the daily rhythm of our busy and global social existence. The practice and sociality of coffee consumption provide...... the coffee industry with the opportunity to make money on our coffee preferences – indeed, also for those of us who actually dislike the taste of coffee. Would you prefer coffee mixed and stirred with non-coffee products such as salt, caramel and licorice? Then you are one of us in the modern age of coffee...

  7. Coffee oil as a potential feedstock for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Leandro S; Franca, Adriana S; Camargos, Rodrigo R S; Ferraz, Vany P

    2008-05-01

    A preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of producing biodiesel using oil extracted from defective coffee beans was conducted as an alternative means of utilizing these beans instead of roasting for consumption of beverage with depreciated quality. Direct transesterifications of triglycerides from refined soybean oil (reference) and from oils extracted from healthy and defective coffee beans were performed. Type of alcohol employed and time were the reaction parameters studied. Sodium methoxide was used as alkaline catalyst. There was optimal phase separation after reactions using both soybean and healthy coffee beans oils when methanol was used. This was not observed when using the oil from defective beans which required further processing to obtain purified alkyl esters. Nevertheless, coffee oil was demonstrated to be a potential feedstock for biodiesel production, both from healthy and defective beans, since the corresponding oils were successfully converted to fatty acid methyl and ethyl esters.

  8. Recent advances in the genetic transformation of coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, M K; Slater, A

    2012-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most important plantation crops, grown in about 80 countries across the world. The genus Coffea comprises approximately 100 species of which only two species, that is, Coffea arabica (commonly known as arabica coffee) and Coffea canephora (known as robusta coffee), are commercially cultivated. Genetic improvement of coffee through traditional breeding is slow due to the perennial nature of the plant. Genetic transformation has tremendous potential in developing improved coffee varieties with desired agronomic traits, which are otherwise difficult to achieve through traditional breeding. During the last twenty years, significant progress has been made in coffee biotechnology, particularly in the area of transgenic technology. This paper provides a detailed account of the advances made in the genetic transformation of coffee and their potential applications.

  9. Recent Advances in the Genetic Transformation of Coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Mishra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is one of the most important plantation crops, grown in about 80 countries across the world. The genus Coffea comprises approximately 100 species of which only two species, that is, Coffea arabica (commonly known as arabica coffee and Coffea canephora (known as robusta coffee, are commercially cultivated. Genetic improvement of coffee through traditional breeding is slow due to the perennial nature of the plant. Genetic transformation has tremendous potential in developing improved coffee varieties with desired agronomic traits, which are otherwise difficult to achieve through traditional breeding. During the last twenty years, significant progress has been made in coffee biotechnology, particularly in the area of transgenic technology. This paper provides a detailed account of the advances made in the genetic transformation of coffee and their potential applications.

  10. Numerical simulation of thin layer coffee drying by control volumes

    OpenAIRE

    CIRO-VELÁSQUEZ, HÉCTOR J.; ABUD-CANO, LUIS C.; PÉREZ-ALEGRÍA, LUIS. R.

    2011-01-01

    The thin layer drying model proposed by Sokhansanj and Bruce (1987) was implemented to model the drying process of parchment coffee beans. A computational model based on a control volume approach was developed to simulate the drying process of parchment coffee. A one dimensional transient analysis was implemented in the radial direction applied to a spherical coffee bean of equivalent radius. The results found that, even though the numerical value for the mass transfer coefficient is a small ...

  11. UPLC法测定咖啡豆中绿原酸和咖啡因的含量%Determination of Chlorogenic Acid and Caffeine in Coffee Beans by UPLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨清山; 蔡荣华; 徐猛; 王磊; 高伟

    2015-01-01

    A Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatographic method was developed for the determination of chlorogenic acid and caffeine in coffee beans. Coffee bean sample was smashed and ultraphonic extracted with methanol-water (70:30, by volumn). The separation of chlorogenic acid and caffeine were achieved with a Waters BEH C18 (100 mm×2.1 mm, 1.7μm)column by using a mixture of acidic property acetonitrile-water as the mobile phase. The ultraviolet detector was set at 274 nm. The chlorogenic acid and caffeine in coffee bean was extracted completely. There was a good linear relationship between chromatographic peak areas and the concentrations of chlorogenic acid in the range of 88.4 mg/L-442 mg/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.999 3. The RSDs of the method were in the range of 2.81%, and the average recoveries were between 98.24%and 99.72%. There was also a good linear relationship between chromatographic peak areas and the concentrations of caffeine in the range of 28.8 mg/L-143 mg/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.999 8. The RSDs of the method were in the range of 1.34 %, and the average recoveries were between 98.50 % and 101.32 %. The results showed that the method was successfully applied in the analysis of chlorogenic acid and caffeine in coffee bean with its good repeatability and sensitivity.%建立了咖啡豆中绿原酸和咖啡因的超高效液相色谱测定方法. 咖啡豆粉碎后经70 %甲醇水溶液超声提取后,在Waters BEH C18(100 mm×2.1 mm,1.7μm)上以酸性乙腈水为流动相,采用紫外检测器在274 nm测定.在优化试验条件下,咖啡豆中绿原酸和咖啡因提取完全.绿原酸在88.4 mg/L~442 mg/L时峰强度与浓度成良好线性(r2=0.999 3),相对标准偏差为2.81%,平均回收率为98.24%~99.72%.咖啡因在28.8 mg/L~143 mg/L时峰强度与浓度成良好线性(r2=0.999 8),相对标准偏差为1.34%,平均回收率为98.50%~101.32%.方法准确可靠,适用于咖啡豆中绿原酸和咖啡因含量的测定.

  12. Roasting Effects on Formation Mechanisms of Coffee Brew Melanoidins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekedam, E.K.; Loots, M.J.; Schols, H.A.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Smit, G.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the roasting degree on coffee brew melanoidin properties and formation mechanisms was studied. Coffee brew fractions differing in molecular weight (Mw) were isolated from green and light-, medium-, and dark-roasted coffee beans. Isolated fractions were characterized for their melanoidi

  13. A GC method for simultaneous analysis of bornesitol, other polyalcohols and sugars in coffee and its substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Matute, Ana Isabel; Montilla, Antonia; del Castillo, Maria Dolores; Martínez-Castro, Isabel; Sanz, Maria Luz

    2007-03-01

    A GC method has been developed for the determination of polyalcohols and sugars in aqueous extracts from green coffee beans, ground roasted coffee beans submitted to either conventional or torrefacto processes, coffee blends and soluble instant coffees. Bornesitol was detected in aqueous coffee extracts for the first time. Mannitol, myo-inositol, mannose, fructose, galactose, glucose and sucrose have also been determined. Results seem to indicate that coffee manufacturing processes, such as roasting or decaffeination, do not affect the polyalcohol content. Coffee substitutes based on cereals, carob or chicory, have also been studied. The possibility to characterize their presence in coffee extracts was evaluated.

  14. Qualidade de grãos de café beneficiados em resposta à adubação potássica Potassium fertilization and the quality of processed coffee beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enilson de Barros Silva

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available O clima e o solo tem elevada influência na qualidade dos grãos de café (Coffea arabica L. beneficiado. Foram instalados dois experimentos sobre latossolo (Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico e Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo distrófico com o objetivo de verificar a qualidade dos grãos de café beneficiados submetidos à adubação potássica em duas condições edafoclimáticas. Em ambos os locais, os experimentos foram delineados em blocos casualizados, em esquema de parcelas subdivididas, utilizando-se três fontes de K: cloreto de potássio (KCl, sulfato de potássio (K2SO4 e nitrato de potássio (KNO3 nas parcelas e quatro doses de K (0, 100, 200 e 400 kg ha-1 aplicadas nas subparcelas com quatro repetições. Usou-se nos experimentos o cultivar Catuaí Vermelho no espaçamento 3,5 x 0,7 m, com uma planta por cova. As avaliações foram: atividade enzimática da polifenoloxidase, índice de coloração e açúcares totais. Os valores das características qualitativas dos grãos mostraram que a fonte KCl teve uma resposta inferior em termos de qualidade dos grãos em relação às fontes K2SO4 e KNO3. Estas últimas fontes tiveram melhor resposta quando aplicadas nas condições de São Sebastião do Paraíso do que nas de Patrocínio. Em termos de doses aplicadas, os melhores resultados para qualidade dos grãos foram obtidos com as doses de 200 kg de K ha-1 na forma de KCl e K2SO4 e 100 kg de K ha-1 na forma de KNO3.Climate and soil strongly influence the quality of processed coffee (Coffea arabica L. beans. This work studied the influence of potassium fertilization on the quality of processed coffee beans grown on two Oxisols (Rhodic Acrudox and Xanthic Acrustox. Trials were set up in a completely randomized split plot block design, to test the influence of three sources and four potassium rates - potassium chloride (KCl, potassium sulphate (K2SO4 and potassium nitrate (KNO3 at 0; 100; 200 and 400 kg ha-1, applied to plants of cv. Catua

  15. Difference Spectroscopy in the Analysis of the Effects of Coffee Cherry Processing Variables on the Flavor of Brewed Coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald J. Lyman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrared difference spectroscopy was used to study how changes in the processing of Arabica coffee cherries into green beans affected the flavor of coffee brewed from roasted green beans. Paired samples of green beans, in which the drying step or fermentation/washing step in their processing was altered, were roasted and brewed in a standard manner and their ATR-FT-IR spectra obtained. Difference spectra of the 1800 to 1680 cm−1 carbonyl region of water-subtracted spectra of paired samples of these brewed coffees provided data which indicated differences in brewed coffee flavor due to changes in fermentation/washing steps and drying steps involved in the processing of coffee cherries. The role of acid, ketone, aldehyde, ester, lactone, and vinyl ester carbonyl components on the flavor of brewed coffee is proposed that is consistent with the flavors as perceived by the coffee tasters.

  16. An exploratory investigation of coffee and lemon scents and odor identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosofsky, Alexis; Haupert, Margaret L; Versteeg, Schyler W

    2011-04-01

    Fragrance sellers often provide coffee beans to their customers as a "nasal palate cleanser," to reduce the effects of olfactory adaptation and habituation. To test this idea, college students smelled three fragrances multiple times, rating odors each time. After completing nine trials, participants sniffed coffee beans, lemon slices, or plain air. Participants then indicated which of four presented fragrances had not been previously smelled; Coffee beans did not yield better performance than lemon slices or air.

  17. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure, acid secretion, and blood gastrin after coffee consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deventer, G; Kamemoto, E; Kuznicki, J T; Heckert, D C; Schulte, M C

    1992-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that differences in the processing of raw coffee beans can account for some of the variability in gastric effects of coffee drinking. Coffees were selected to represent several ways that green coffee beans are treated, ie, processing variables. These included instant and ground coffee processing, decaffeination method (ethyl acetate or methylene chloride extraction), instant coffee processing temperature (112 degrees F or 300 degrees F), and steam treatment. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure, acid secretion, and blood gastrin was measured in eight human subjects after they consumed each of the different coffees. Consumption of coffee was followed by a sustained decrease in lower esophageal sphincter pressure (P less than 0.05) except for three of the four coffees treated with ethyl acetate regardless of whether or not they contained caffeine. Caffeinated ground coffee stimulated more acid secretion that did decaf ground coffees (P less than 0.05), but not more than a steam-treated caffeinated coffee. Instant coffees did not differ in acid-stimulating ability. Ground caffeinated coffee resulted in higher blood gastrin levels than other ground coffees (P less than 0.05). Freeze-dried instant coffee also tended toward higher gastrin stimulation. It is concluded that some of the observed variability in gastric response to coffee consumption can be traced to differences in how green coffee beans are processed.

  18. Determination Of Coffee Alkoloids And Their Biochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    ÇAĞLARIRMAK, Necla; Ünal, Kemal

    2000-01-01

    One of the important compounds of coffee is the caffeine playing an important role in human body , whose chemical name is 1.3.7 - Trimetil 2,6 dioxypurin, or 1,3,7 - trimetil xantin. The other important compound is trigonelline, which converts to vitamin masın when green coffee bean is roasted at high temperature. In this study, the change of caffeine and trigonellin amount when green coffee bean roasted, was examined. HPLC (High pressure liquid chromatgrapy) was used to detect two compounds...

  19. Growth and quality of Grevillea robusta provenances in Ruhande ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    evaluate the performance of seven provenances and one landrace of G. robusta in terms of ... Key words: Grevillea robusta, land race, provenance, agroecosystems, ..... natural populations and attribute this to be a result of very small founder.

  20. Effect of Household Coffee Processing on Pesticide Residues as a Means of Ensuring Consumers' Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonen, Seblework; Ambelu, Argaw; Spanoghe, Pieter

    2015-09-30

    Coffee is a highly consumed and popular beverage all over the world; however, coffee beans used for daily consumption may contain pesticide residues that may cause adverse health effects to consumers. In this monitoring study, the effect of household coffee processing on pesticide residues in coffee beans was investigated. Twelve pesticides, including metabolites and isomers (endosulfan α, endosulfan β, cypermethrin, permethrin, deltamethrin, chlorpyrifos ethyl, heptachlor epoxide, hexachlorobenzene, p'p-DDE, p'p-DDD, o'p-DDT, and p'p-DDT) were spiked in coffee beans collected from a local market in southwestern Ethiopia. The subsequent household coffee processing conditions (washing, roasting, and brewing) were established as closely as possible to the traditional household coffee processing in Ethiopia. Washing of coffee beans showed 14.63-57.69 percent reduction, while the roasting process reduced up to 99.8 percent. Chlorpyrifos ethyl, permethrin, cypermethrin, endosulfan α and β in roasting and all of the 12 pesticides in the coffee brewing processes were not detected. Kruskal-Wallis analysis indicated that the reduction of pesticide residues by washing is significantly different from roasting and brewing (P coffee roasting and brewing (P > 0.05). The processing factor (PF) was less than one (PF coffee beans. The cumulative effect of the three processing methods has a paramount importance in evaluating the risks associated with ingestion of pesticide residues, particularly in coffee beans.

  1. Estimation of Carbon Stocks in Coffee Plantation in East Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Wibawa

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Global warming is closely related with the amount of carbon stored in an ecosystem. A research to determine the amount of carbon stock in the coffee farms has been conducted in Sumberbaru and Silo Sub-districts in Jember district, Kaliwining Experimental Station (ES in Jember district, Sumberasin ES in Malang district and Andungsari ES in Bondowoso district. Carbon stock was measured using the method of Rapid Carbon Stock’s Assessment (RaCSA developed by ICRAF. Measurements were made on the observation plots of 200 m2, with 3 replications. Results of measurement of carbon stock on coffee plantations showed that the increased carbon stock was proportional with the age of plants. Carbon stock in coffee plantation depends on the shade tree system. In the monoculture coffee leucaena used as shade trees, the carbon stock was lower then in multistrata system (agroforestry used several kinds of shade trees. Carbon stock on coffee plant in the estate more than smallholder. The average of carbon stock on Robusta coffee at the age of 30 years amounted to 29.38 Mg ha-1, it is greater than the carbon deposit on Arabica coffee that is 22.02 Mg ha-1.Key words: Carbon stock, coffee plantation, Arabica, Robusta, smallholder, agroforestri

  2. Coffee dietary fiber contents and structural characteristics as influenced by coffee type and technological and brewing procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gniechwitz, Diana; Brueckel, Birgit; Reichardt, Nicole; Blaut, Michael; Steinhart, Hans; Bunzel, Mirko

    2007-12-26

    Coffee brews contain considerable amounts of soluble dietary fiber, mainly low substituted galactomannans and type II arabinogalactans. Factors possibly influencing the content and structures of dietary fiber in coffee brews, such as type of coffee, roasting and grinding degree, and brewing procedure, were studied. In addition, several commercial samples such as instant espresso, instant coffee, instant cappuccino, decaffeinated coffees, and coffee pads were analyzed. The dietary fiber contents of the coffee brews ranged from 0.14 to 0.65 g/100 mL (enzymatic-gravimetric methodology), proving an influence of the factors investigated. For example, the drip brew of an arabica coffee contained significantly more soluble dietary fiber than the drip brew of a comparable robusta coffee, and depending on the brewing procedure, the soluble dietary fiber content of beverages obtained from the same coffee sample ranged from 0.26 to 0.38 g/100 mL. Dietary fiber contents of coffee brews were enhanced only up to a certain degree of roast. Drip brews of decaffeinated arabica coffees (commercial samples) contained significantly less dietary fiber than any non-decaffeinated drip brew investigated in this study. The observed differences in the dietary fiber contents were accompanied by changes in the structural characteristics of fiber polysaccharides, such as galactomannan/arabinogalactan ratio, galactose substitution degree of mannans, or galactose/arabinose ratio of arabinogalactans as analyzed by methylation analysis.

  3. Finite element based model of parchment coffee drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeda Prakotmak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Heat and mass transfer in the parchment coffee during convective drying represents a complicated phenomena since it is important to consider not only the transport phenomena during drying but also the various changes of the drying materials. In order to describe drying of biomaterials adequately, a suitable mathematical model is needed. The aim of the present study was to develop a 3-D finite element model to simulate the transport of heat and mass within parchment coffee during the thin layer drying. Thin layer drying experiments of coffee bean and parchment coffee were conducted in the temperature range of 40-60o C, the relative humidity ranged from 14 to 28% and drying air velocity of 1.4 m/s. The moisture diffusivities in different coffee’s components (parchment and coffee bean were determined by minimizing the RMSE between the predicted and the experimental data of moisture contents. The simulated results showed that the moisture diffusivities of coffee bean were three orders of magnitude higher than those of the parchment. Moisture diffusivities of coffee components were found to significantly increase (P<0.05 with the increase in drying air temperature and were expressed by Arrhenius-type equations. Moreover, the model was also used to predict the moisture gradient in coffee bean during drying. The model simulates the moisture contents in different components of parchment coffee well and it provides a better understanding of the transport processes in the different components of the parchment coffee

  4. Study on the Property of α-Galactosidase from the Germinating Coffee Bean%发芽咖啡豆α-半乳糖苷酶的性质研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈汪洋; 金征宇

    2011-01-01

    [ Objective ] The research aimed to study the enzymatic properties of α-Gal from the germinating coffee bean. [ Method ] α-Gal was ex tracted from the germinating coffee bean. The enzyme activities in the different temperature and pH were studied. Moreover,the optimum tempera ture and pH were determined. The influences of different metal ions and ion strengths (NaCl) on the enzyme activity of α-Gal were studied. Lin eweaver-Burk double reciprocal plot was used to measure Km and Vmax of α-Gal. [ Result]The optimum temperature and pH of α-Gal were respec tively 45 ℃ and 6. 0. The thermal stable temperature range was 20 - 50 ℃ ,and pH stable range was 5.0 - 7.0. The influences of Na+ ,K + ,Mg2+and Cu2+ on the enzyme activity of α-Gal weren' t big. Zn2+ promoted the enzyme activity,and Ba2+ slightly inhibited the enzyme activity. Hg2+ strongly inhibited the activity of α-Gal. When the ion strength (NaCl) was during 0 -0.25 mol/L,the activity of α-Gal Wasn' t affected. By Lineweaver-Burk double reciprocal plot ,Km and Vmax of α-Gal were respectively 0.556 mmol/L and 1.19 μmol/min. [ Conclusion]The research provided the theory guidance for the further application of α-Gal from the germinating coffee bean.%[目的]研究发芽咖啡豆α-半乳糖苷酶的酶学性质.[方法]从发芽咖啡豆中提取α-半乳糖苷酶,研究不同温度和pH下的酶活,并确定该酶的最适温度和pH.研究了不同金属离子和不同离子强度(NaCl)对α-半乳糖苷酶酶活的影响.Lineweaver-Burk双倒数作图法测定该酶的Km和Vmax.[结果]α-半乳糖苷酶的最适温度和pH分别为45 ℃、6.0,热稳定温度范围为20~50 ℃,pH稳定范围为5.0~7.0.Na+、K+、Mg2+和Cu2+对α-半乳糖苷酶酶活的影响不大,Zn2+促进酶活,Ba2+对酶活稍有抑制,Hg2+强烈抑制α-半乳糖苷酶的活性.在0~0.25 mol/L离子强度(NaCI)范围内,α-半乳糖苷酶的酶活不受影响.Lineweaver-Burk双倒数作图法测定该酶的Km和Vmax

  5. Plant biochemistry: a naturally decaffeinated arabica coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvarolla, Maria B; Mazzafera, Paulo; Fazuoli, Luiz C

    2004-06-24

    The adverse side effects of caffeine have increased the market for decaffeinated coffee to about 10% of coffee consumption worldwide (http://www.ncausa.org), despite the loss of key flavour compounds in the industrial decaffeinating process. We have discovered a naturally decaffeinated Coffea arabica plant from Ethiopia, a species normally recognized for the high quality of its beans. It should be possible to transfer this trait to commercial varieties of arabica coffee plants by intraspecific hybridization--a process likely to be simpler than an interspecific hybridization strategy, which could require more than 30 years of breeding to fix the decaffeinated trait and would probably result in an inferior cup of coffee.

  6. PAH in tea and coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duedahl-Olesen, Lene; Navarantem, Marin; Adamska, Joanna

    For food regulation in the European Union maximum limits on other foods than tea and coffee includes benzo[a]pyrene and the sum of PAH4 (sum of benzo[a]pyrene, chrysene, benz[a]anthracene and benzo[b]fluoranthene). This study includes analysis of the above mentioned PAH in both, tea leaves, coffee...... for accumulation of PAH in tea leaves. Different varieties of tea leaves were analyzed and highest concentrations were found in leaves from mate and black tea with maximum concentrations of 32 μg/kg for benzo[a]pyrene and 115 μg/kg for the sum of PAH4. Also, coffee beans are roasted during processing. However......, both benzo[a]pyrene and PAH4 concentrations were more than ten times lower for coffee beans than for tea leaves. Highest levels were found for PAH4 of solid instant coffee (5.1 μg/kg). Data were used to calculate the exposure of benzo[a]pyrene (15%) and sum of PAH4 (10%) from tea and coffee...

  7. Ocorrência dos principais defeitos do café em várias fases de maturação dos frutos Occurrence of the main coffee beans deffects in several stages of ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Carvalho

    1970-01-01

    samples were monthly collected during the year 1967 and 1968. The so-called abnormal dried fruits have a dull black exocarp, whereas the normal ones have bright black colored shells. The total production of three plants was harvested every month, separated according to the different ripening stages, and then, after drying, were shelled and the proportion of defective beans was scored. The data showed that the so-called green coated beans appear in significant proportions in all stages studied. The highest percentage of these was found in the unriped fruits and in the abnormal dried fruits. Its occurrence decreases as the fruits become more and more mature. The lowest percentage was found in the samples of dried fruits which had fallen on the ground. The green color is produced by the silver skin which retains the green pigment, probably chrolophyll. The brown beans appear more frequently in the fallen fruits and they also occur in a decreasing proportion in the normal and abnormal dried berries and from unriped to over-riped fruits. This type have been considered to be caused by over-fermentation, however our results indicate that it may have other causes, due to their appearance even in the unriped fruits. The high percentage of brown beans in the fruits dried on the tree indicates that the berries must be harvested in the cherry stage to have a high quality product. The black beans, characterized exclusively by the black endosperm, were more frequently found in the berries dried on the tree or in the dried fruits fallen on the ground. It seems reasonable to assume that the black beans represent a more advanced stage of deterioration of the endosperm. The initial stages would, probably, be characterized by the different shades of brown. Based on these findings it is proposed a revision on the defective beans nomenclature in Brazil. Considering the Brazilian system of coffee classification it was suggested that for the nomenclature of the defective beans more emphasis

  8. Factors influencing the norharman and harman contents in espresso coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Rita C; Casal, Susana; Oliveira, Beatriz P P

    2007-03-07

    Espresso coffee (EC) brews were analyzed for beta-carboline [norharman (NH) and harman (H)] contents, by RP-HPLC with fluorescence detection. The influence of the coffee species (arabica or robusta), the roast degree, and the brew length was studied. The results show that the content of NH and H in EC is dependent primarily on the coffee species, followed by brew length. The roast degree has only a minor influence on the final content of NH and H in EC. When compared with other coffee brews, EC has an amount of these beta-carbolines (in micrograms per liter) similar to that of mocha coffee, both being more concentrated than filter and press-pot coffees. Therefore, the consumer's preferences will determine the amount of NH and H ingested daily. For the caffeinated 30 mL of EC, the arabica coffees contain about 4.08 microg of NH and 1.54 microg of H. Commercial blends (usually with a maximum of 30% robusta) range from the cited arabica values to 10.37 microg of NH and 4.35 microg of H.

  9. What's Inside That Seed We Brew? A New Approach To Mining the Coffee Microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan, Michael Joe; Mitchell, Thomas; McSpadden Gardener, Brian B.

    2015-01-01

    Coffee is a critically important agricultural commodity for many tropical states and is a beverage enjoyed by millions of people worldwide. Recent concerns over the sustainability of coffee production have prompted investigations of the coffee microbiome as a tool to improve crop health and bean quality. This review synthesizes literature informing our knowledge of the coffee microbiome, with an emphasis on applications of fruit- and seed-associated microbes in coffee production and processin...

  10. The coffee genome hub: a resource for coffee genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereeper, Alexis; Bocs, Stéphanie; Rouard, Mathieu; Guignon, Valentin; Ravel, Sébastien; Tranchant-Dubreuil, Christine; Poncet, Valérie; Garsmeur, Olivier; Lashermes, Philippe; Droc, Gaëtan

    2015-01-01

    The whole genome sequence of Coffea canephora, the perennial diploid species known as Robusta, has been recently released. In the context of the C. canephora genome sequencing project and to support post-genomics efforts, we developed the Coffee Genome Hub (http://coffee-genome.org/), an integrative genome information system that allows centralized access to genomics and genetics data and analysis tools to facilitate translational and applied research in coffee. We provide the complete genome sequence of C. canephora along with gene structure, gene product information, metabolism, gene families, transcriptomics, syntenic blocks, genetic markers and genetic maps. The hub relies on generic software (e.g. GMOD tools) for easy querying, visualizing and downloading research data. It includes a Genome Browser enhanced by a Community Annotation System, enabling the improvement of automatic gene annotation through an annotation editor. In addition, the hub aims at developing interoperability among other existing South Green tools managing coffee data (phylogenomics resources, SNPs) and/or supporting data analyses with the Galaxy workflow manager. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Antioxidant and genoprotective effects of spent coffee extracts in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Jimena; Arbillaga, Leire; de Peña, M Paz; Cid, Concepcion

    2013-10-01

    Spent coffee has been shown as a good source of hydrophilic antioxidant compounds. The ability of two spent coffee extracts rich in caffeoylquinic acids, mainly dicaffeoylquinic acids, and caffeine (Arabica filter and Robusta espresso) to protect against oxidation and DNA damage in human cells (HeLa) was evaluated at short (2 h) and long (24 h) exposure times. Cell viability (MTT) was not affected by spent coffee extracts (>80%) up to 1000 μg/mL after 2 h. Both spent coffee extracts significantly reduced the increase of ROS level and DNA strand breaks (29-73% protection by comet assay) induced by H₂O₂. Pretreatment of cells with robusta spent coffee extract also decreased Ro photosensitizer-induced oxidative DNA damage after 24 h exposure. The higher effectiveness of Robusta spent coffee extract, with less caffeoylquinic acids and melanoidins, might be due to other antioxidant compounds, such as caffeine and other Maillard reaction products. This work evidences the potential antioxidant and genoprotective properties of spent coffee in human cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of High Performance Liquid Chromatography with Fluorescence Detector and with Tandem Mass Spectrometry methods for detection and quantification of Ochratoxin A in green and roasted coffee beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Duarte da Costa Cunha Bandeira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Two analytical methods for the determination and confirmation of ochratoxin A (OTA in green and roasted coffee samples were compared. Sample extraction and clean-up were based on liquid-liquid phase extraction and immunoaffinity column. The detection of OTA was carried out with the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC combined either with fluorescence detection (FLD, or positive electrospray ionization (ESI+ coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS. The results obtained with the LC-ESI-MS/MS were specific and more sensitive, with the advantages in terms of unambiguous analyte identification, when compared with the HPLC-FLD.

  13. Pengaruh Bionematisida Berbahan Aktif Jamur Paecilomyces lilacinus Strain 251 terhadap Serangan Pratylenchus coffeae pada Kopi Robusta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soekadar Wiryadiputra

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Experiment on the effect of P. lilacinus on the infestation of P. coffeae on robusta coffee was conducted in Sumber Asin Experimental Garden, Malang. The treatments were dosages of bionematicide i.e. : 0 (control, 0.25, 0.50, 1.00, 2.00, and 4.00 g; carbofuran (3 % active ingredient 50 g/plant and organic soil treatment (OST at 100 g/plant. Each treatment was replicated four times, and each replication consists of five coffee trees. The results in second year observation revealed that the population of P. coffeae in the roots on PL 251 treatments was not significantly different compared to the control, whereas in soil samples the population of both P. coffeae and Rotylenchulus reniformis inclined to be lower than the control, although they were not statistically significant. The lowest infestation was observed on PL 251 treatment at a dosage level of 4.00 g/tree. On nematode infestation, no significant difference on treatments of carbofuran and OST compared to the control. The yield of green coffee (market coffee was the highest on the treatment of PL 251 at a dosage of 4.00 g/tree and significantly higher than the control and carbofuran treatments, with increasing levels of 225.3 and 198.9%, respectively. Keywords: bionematicide Paecilomyces lilacinus strain 251 (PL 251, Pratylenchus coffeae, Rotylenchulus reniformis

  14. Spent coffee grounds as a versatile source of green energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondamudi, Narasimharao; Mohapatra, Susanta K; Misra, Mano

    2008-12-24

    The production of energy from renewable and waste materials is an attractive alternative to the conventional agricultural feed stocks such as corn and soybean. This paper describes an approach to extract oil from spent coffee grounds and to further transesterify the processed oil to convert it into biodiesel. This process yields 10-15% oil depending on the coffee species (Arabica or Robusta). The biodiesel derived from the coffee grounds (100% conversion of oil to biodiesel) was found to be stable for more than 1 month under ambient conditions. It is projected that 340 million gallons of biodiesel can be produced from the waste coffee grounds around the world. The coffee grounds after oil extraction are ideal materials for garden fertilizer, feedstock for ethanol, and as fuel pellets.

  15. Influência do tempo decorrido entre a colheita e o despolpamento de café cereja, sôbre a qualidade da bebida Influence of the time intervals between harvesting and the pulping process of cherry coffee beans on the beverage quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayrton Rigitano

    1967-01-01

    Full Text Available São apresentados resultados de ensaios relativos à influência do tempo decorrido entre a colheita e o despolpamento de café maduro, sôbre a qualidade da bebida, na zona ecológica de Campinas. Os resultados acusaram não haver influência do tempo de armazenamento até 46 1/2 horas após a colheita. Todos os tratamentos alcançaram valores correspondentes a bebida "mole" ou "apenas mole".Experiments were carried out in 1958 and 1959 to determine the influence of the time intervals between harvesting and the pulping process of cherry coffee beans on the beverage quality. The green coffee was the Mundo Novo variety which came from the São Quirino farm (massape soil located in the rural zone of the city of Campinas. The treatments were represented by 13 lots of cherry coffee with different time intervals of pulping after harvesting: 0, 4, 51/2, 81/2, 14 1/2, 26 1/2 and 46 1/2 hours Coffee was harvested at the beginning of the day, midday and the end of the day. Some lots of beans were exposed to the sun and some others were shaded. The cup tests were carried out in the Sensory Evaluation Laboratory of the Instituto Agronômico of Campinas, by trained panel with 8 tasters. The data were based on 32 determinations (8 tasters x 4 replications and showed no difference among treatments; all of them were scored as soft and softish coffee. The autors arrived at the conclusion that the pulping process at Campinas conditions can be made up to 46 1/2 hours after harvesting without causing any "off flavor" to the coffee beverage. The results obtained are true for the pulped cherry beans for the rural zone of Campinas. To any other locality with different climate and soil, the conclusions can't be extended without previous experimental works.

  16. Heat of Combustion of Dried and Undried Coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giso, Mathew; Amanuel, Samuel

    Globally, over two billion cups of coffee are consumed per day. During roasting, 15-20% of the weight of the coffee beans is lost. We studied the gasses released during the roasting process using an IR spectrometer and identified the evaporation profile of water as a function of temperature. The heat of combustion (Hºc) of the beans was also determined using an Isoperibol Oxygen-Bomb calorimeter and the Hºc of dry beans were determined to be 21.24 +/-0.13 MJ/kg while the Hºc of the wet beans were determined to be 19.56 +/-0.12 MJ/kg. This study can potentially lead to developing more economical and environmentally friendly techniques of roasting coffee beans. This work was partially supported by NSF-DMR: 1229142.

  17. Review on utilization and composition of coffee silverskin

    OpenAIRE

    Narita, Yusaku; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2014-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most frequently consumed drinks in the world. Coffee silverskin (CS) is the only by-product produced during the coffee beans roasting process, and large amounts of CS are produced by roasters in coffee-consuming countries. However, methods for the effective utilization of CS have not been developed. Reuse of CS, which is the primary residue from the coffee industry, is important for the environment and economy. Recently, there have been some attempts to reuse CS for biolo...

  18. variation for green bean caffeine, chlorogenic acid, sucrose and

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2 University of the Free State, PO Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300, Republic of South Africa. ABSTRACT: ... green bean caffeine, chlorogenic acid, sucrose and trigonelline contents and values ranged from 0.91- ... Hence, coffee production and.

  19. Character of Main Cultivated Coffee Varieties%咖啡主要栽培品种特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亚男; 李荣福; 黄家雄; 王万东; 程金焕; 王雪松

    2012-01-01

    Three protospecies of coffee (Coffea arabica, Coffea robusta, Coffea liberica) were introduced, as well as the source, characteristic of Coffea Arabica, so as to provide basis for coffee research and production.%主要介绍咖啡的3大原种:小粒种(Coffea arabica)、中粒种(Coffea robusta)和大粒种(Coffea liberica),并重点介绍了小粒种的主要品种来源及特性,为科研、生产提供参考依据.

  20. HOW COFFEE COMPANIES CAN STAY COMPETITIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RALUCA DANIELA RIZEA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The coffee shop industry in the U.S. includes 20,000 stores with combined annual revenue of about $11 billion. Major companies include Starbucks, Dunkin’ Donuts, Caribou, Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf, and Diedrich (Gloria Jean’s. The industry is highly concentrated at the top and fragmented at the bottom: the top 50 companies have over 70 percent of industry sales. Coffee is one of the world’s largest commodities. The top green coffee producing countries are Brazil, Colombia, and Vietnam. Many grower countries are small, poor developing nations that depend on coffee to sustain local economies. The U.S. is the world’s largest importer of green coffee beans and the largest consumer of coffee. The main objective of this study is to investigate the competitive strategies that U.S. coffee franchise companies adopt considering customers’ expectations and industry best practices. In order to achieve this objective, a best practice benchmarking analysis was performed taking into account the top U.S. coffee companies This analysis showed that product and service innovation are necessary in order to stay competitive in the market and attract new or to keep existing customers successfully. Many customers focus on the special atmosphere each store has and which is characterized by the location, music, interior design, seating or whether internet access is provided. Particularly for specialty coffee shops it is important not to sell only the beverage but the whole experience. Coffee shops have to establish a unique image that prevents customers from buying products from another shop or use home-brewing systems which are also on the rise in American households. In addressing the increased level of competition, every company’s focus should be on differentiating from the rest of the market in every possible business segment (products, atmosphere, location, image etc..

  1. HOW COFFEE COMPANIES CAN STAY COMPETITIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RALUCA DANIELA RIZEA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The coffee shop industry in the U.S. includes 20,000 stores with combined annual revenue of about $11 billion. Major companies include Starbucks, Dunkin’ Donuts, Caribou, Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf, and Diedrich (Gloria Jean’s. The industry is highly concentrated at the top and fragmented at the bottom: the top 50 companies have over 70 percent of industry sales. Coffee is one of the world’s largest commodities. The top green coffee producing countries are Brazil, Colombia, and Vietnam. Many grower countries are small, poor developing nations that depend on coffee to sustain local economies. The U.S. is the world’s largest importer of green coffee beans and the largest consumer of coffee. The main objective of this study is to investigate the competitive strategies that U.S. coffee franchise companies adopt considering customers’ expectations and industry best practices. In order to achieve this objective, a best practice benchmarking analysis was performed taking into account the top U.S. coffee companies This analysis showed that product and service innovation are necessary in order to stay competitive in the market and attract new or to keep existing customers successfully. Many customers focus on the special atmosphere each store has and which is characterized by the location, music, interior design, seating or whether internet access is provided. Particularly for specialty coffee shops it is important not to sell only the beverage but the whole experience. Coffee shops have to establish a unique image that prevents customers from buying products from another shop or use home-brewing systems which are also on the rise in American households. In addressing the increased level of competition, every company’s focus should be on differentiating from the rest of the market in every possible business segment (products, atmosphere, location, image etc..

  2. Secagem de café cereja descascado por ar quente e microondas Drying pulped coffee cherry beans by means of hot air ond microwaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Cunha

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou estudar a viabilidade de produzir café cereja descascado seco pela aplicação de microondas para assistir a secagem convencional a ar quente, a fim de reduzir o tempo de processo, com o aumento do rendimento industrial e da qualidade do produto perante os métodos tradicionais de secagem. Dois ciclos de secagem foram testados: a processo em secador rotativo convencional a ar quente, com umidade do produto reduzida de 45-50 a 11-13% b.u.; b processo subdividido em uma primeira etapa de pré-secagem convencional a ar quente de 45-50 a 30% b.u., seguida de etapa de secagem final por ar quente e microondas, com redução de 30 a 11-13% b.u. de umidade do produto. O tempo global do primeiro para o segundo ciclo de secagem foi reduzido de 15 a 37,5 para pouco mais de 10 horas, respectivamente. A qualidade sensorial do produto foi avaliada pela "prova da xícara", complementada por análises de microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV, com resultados satisfatórios. Um estudo preliminar dos aspectos econômicos envolvidos na ampliação de escala para uma linha industrial de processamento de café com a inclusão de um sistema a microondas foi também delineado.This research concerns a process development study focussing the application of microwaves to pulped coffee cherries production, in order to reduce the drying time and increase the industrial yield and product quality when compared to conventional drying processes. Two drying cycles were tested: a a hot air drying process using a conventional batch rotary dryer from 45-50 to 11-13% w.b. product moisture; b a two stage process, whereby the product was pre dried with hot air from 45-50 to 30% w.b., followed by a final microwave and hot air drying stage, to reduce product moisture from 30 to 11-13% w.b. The overall drying time was reduced from 15 to 37.5 hours to about 10 hours, respectively. The sensory quality of the product was evaluated by the "cup test", complemented

  3. Development of mathematic model for coffee decaffeination with leaching method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple mathematic model for caffeine kinetic description during the extraction process (leaching of coffee bean was developed. A non­steady diffusion equation coupled with a macroscopic mass transfer equation for solvent was developed and them solved analytically. The kinetic of caffeine extraction from coffee bean is depend on initial caffeine content, final caffeine content, caffeine content at certain time, mass­transfer coefficient, solvent volume, surface area of coffee beans, process time, radius of coffee bean, leaching rate of caffeine, caffeine diffusivity and a are constan, solvent concentration, activation energy, temperature absolute and gas constant. Caffeine internal mass diffusivity was estimated by fitting the model to an experiment using acetic acid and liquid waste of cocoa beans fermentation. The prediction equation for leaching rate of caffeine in coffee beans has been found. It was found that Dk (m2/sec=1.345x10­7—4.1638x10­7, and kL (m/sec=2.445x10­5—5.551x10­5 by acetic acid as solvent depended on temperature and solvent concentration. The prediction equation for length of time to reduce initial caffeine content to certain concentration in coffee beans has been developed, Caffeine diffusivity (Dk and mass­transfer coefficient (kL was found respectively 1.591x 10­7—2.122x10­7 m2/sec and 4.897x10­5—6.529x10­5 m/sec using liquid waste of cocoa bean fermentation as solvent which depend on temperature and solvent concentration. Key words: Coffee, caffeine, decaffeination, leaching, mathematic model.

  4. Pulverization of coffee silverskin extract as a source of antioxidant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S.; Kusumocahyo, S. P.; Widiputri, D. I.

    2016-11-01

    Coffee silverskin (CS) is waste from coffee roasting process that has a value as source of antioxidant. In this research, two types of variant coffee Robusta and Arabica CS were extracted for their phenolic content, flavonoid content, and antioxidant activity. The extraction was done at 40°C for 60 minutes using hydroalcoholic solvent. The phenolic, flavonoid content, and antioxidant activity of Robusta CS extract were 816.75 ± 63.24 mg GAE/L and 32.82 ± 2.47 mg QE/L, and 54.80% inhibition respectively, while for Arabica CS extract were 473.51 ± 56.70 mg GAE/L, 18.58 ± 2.47 mg QE/L, and 26.30% inhibition respectively. Thus, the Robusta coffee silverskin extract has higher value of total phenolic content, flavonoid content, and antioxidant activity than Arabica coffee silverskin extract. To produce high antioxidant powder of CS extract, the effect of drying method (freeze drying and spray drying) affecting the phenolic content, flavonoid content, and antioxidant activity was evaluated. The effect of evaporation prior to both drying processes was also evaluated. Evaporation caused up to 23% of total phenolic content degradation. Spray drying resulted in dried CS extract with degradation of total phenolic content up to 17%. On the other hand, freeze drying resulted no major degradation of total phenolic content. However, the coffee silverskin extract can be directly spray dried without evaporation resulting in higher amount of phenolic content in the powder than the one which was evaporated first.

  5. Effect of inclusion of hydroxycinnamic and chlorogenic acids from green coffee bean in β-cyclodextrin on their interactions with whey, egg white and soy protein isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budryn, Grażyna; Pałecz, Bartłomiej; Rachwał-Rosiak, Danuta; Oracz, Joanna; Zaczyńska, Donata; Belica, Sylwia; Navarro-González, Inmaculada; Meseguer, Josefina María Vegara; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to characterise the interactions of hydroxycinnamic and chlorogenic acids (CHAs) from green coffee, with isolates of proteins from egg white (EWP), whey (WPC) and soy (SPI), depending on pH and temperature. The binding degree was determined by liquid chromatography coupled to a diode array detector and an ultrahigh resolution hybrid quadruple-time-of-flight mass spectrometer with ESI source (LC-QTOF-MS/MS). As a result of binding, the concentration of CHAs in proteins ranged from 9.44-12.2, 11.8-13.1 and 12.1-14.4g/100g for SPI, WPC and EWP, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters of protein-ligand interactions were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and energetics of interactions at the atomic level by molecular modelling. The amount of CHAs released during proteolytic digestion was in the range 0.33-2.67g/100g. Inclusion of CHAs with β-cyclodextrin strongly limited these interactions to a level of 0.03-0.06g/100g.

  6. Green coffee decontamination by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemtanu, Monica R. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Department of Electron Accelerators, 409 Atomistilor St., P.O. Box MG-36, RO 76 900, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)]. E-mail: monica@infim.ro; Brasoveanu, Mirela [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Department of Electron Accelerators, 409 Atomistilor St., P.O. Box MG-36, RO 76 900, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Grecu, Maria Nicoleta [National Institute for Materials Physics, RO 77 125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Minea, R. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Department of Electron Accelerators, 409 Atomistilor St., P.O. Box MG-36, RO 76 900, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2005-10-15

    Microbiological load of green coffee is a real problem considering that it is extremely sensitive to contamination. Irradiation is a decontamination method for a lot of foodstuffs, being a feasible, very effective and environment friendly one. Beans and ground green coffee were irradiated with electron beams up to 40 kGy. Microbial load, rheological behavior, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and visible spectroscopy were carried out. The results show that electron beam irradiation of green coffee could decontaminate it without severe changes in its properties.

  7. Green coffee decontamination by electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtanu, Monica R.; Brasoveanu, Mirela; Grecu, Maria Nicoleta; Minea, R.

    2005-10-01

    Microbiological load of green coffee is a real problem considering that it is extremely sensitive to contamination. Irradiation is a decontamination method for a lot of foodstuffs, being a feasible, very effective and environment friendly one. Beans and ground green coffee were irradiated with electron beams up to 40 kGy. Microbial load, rheological behavior, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and visible spectroscopy were carried out. The results show that electron beam irradiation of green coffee could decontaminate it without severe changes in its properties.

  8. Coffee aroma--statistical analysis of compositional data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonová, M; Hron, K; Klimcíková, D; Müller, L; Bednár, P; Barták, P

    2009-12-15

    Solid-phase microextraction in headspace mode coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied to the determination of volatile compounds in 30 commercially available coffee samples. In order to differentiate and characterize Arabica and Robusta coffee, six major volatile compounds (acetic acid, 2-methylpyrazine, furfural, 2-furfuryl alcohol, 2,6-dimethylpyrazine, 5-methylfurfural) were chosen as the most relevant markers. Cluster analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to the raw chromatographic data and data processed by centred logratio transformation.

  9. Exposure to lead from intake of coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Max; Sloth, Jens Jørgen; Rasmussen, Rie Romme

    Food and beverages is one of the primary sources of intake of and exposure to lead, with beverages accounting for almost 50%. Previous studies from Denmark have estimated that the intake of lead from coffee is very high and may contribute to up to 20% of the total lead intake from food...... and beverages. This estimate is, however, based on older, non-published data. In the current project extensive chemical analyses of coffee beans, drinking water and ready-to-drink coffee have been performed. The results hereof have been compared to calculations of the total intake of lead from food...... and beverages. The results show that the intake of lead from coffee is considerably lower than previously estimated and account for 4.2% and 3.3% of the total lead intake from food and beverages for Danish men and women, respectively. It can generally be concluded that the intake of lead from coffee is low...

  10. Extraction and characterization of polysaccharides from green and roasted Coffea arabica beans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterveld, A.; Harmsen, H.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Schols, H.A.

    2003-01-01

    Polysaccharides were sequentially extracted from green and roasted Coffea arabica beans with water (90 °C), EDTA, 0.05, 1, and 4 M NaOH and characterized chemically. Additionally, the beans were subjected to a single extraction with water at 170 °C. Green arabica coffee beans contained large proport

  11. Difference Spectroscopy in the Analysis of the Effects of Coffee Cherry Processing Variables on the Flavor of Brewed Coffee

    OpenAIRE

    Lyman, Donald J.; Robert M. Benck; Merle, Scott F.

    2011-01-01

    Infrared difference spectroscopy was used to study how changes in the processing of Arabica coffee cherries into green beans affected the flavor of coffee brewed from roasted green beans. Paired samples of green beans, in which the drying step or fermentation/washing step in their processing was altered, were roasted and brewed in a standard manner and their ATR-FT-IR spectra obtained. Difference spectra of the 1800 to 1680 cm−1 carbonyl region of water-subtracted spectra of paired samples ...

  12. Difference Spectroscopy in the Analysis of the Effects of Coffee Cherry Processing Variables on the Flavor of Brewed Coffee

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Infrared difference spectroscopy was used to study how changes in the processing of Arabica coffee cherries into green beans affected the flavor of coffee brewed from roasted green beans. Paired samples of green beans, in which the drying step or fermentation/washing step in their processing was altered, were roasted and brewed in a standard manner and their ATR-FT-IR spectra obtained. Difference spectra of the 1800 to 1680 cm−1 carbonyl region of water-subtracted spectra of paired samples ...

  13. Antiradical activity, phenolics profile, and hydroxymethylfurfural in espresso coffee: influence of technological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Rita C; Costa, Anabela S G; Jerez, María; Casal, Susana; Sineiro, Jorge; Núñez, María J; Oliveira, Beatriz

    2010-12-08

    The influence of technological factors (decaffeination, brew volume, coffee species, and roast degree) on antiradical activity and phenolics content of espresso coffee is described. The screenings of phenolics profile and other compounds (caffeine and trigonelline), as well as the quantification of hydroxymethylfurfural, were performed by LC-DAD-ESI-MS. Significantly lower (p decaffeinated espressos when compared with regular ones (32 vs 38% and 324 vs 410 mg/30 mL cup, respectively). A long espresso (70 mL) offers more than twice the phenolics amount of a short one (20 mL). Robusta brews showed higher (p 0.05) were observed for scavenging activities of differently roasted robusta brews, whereas an increase in medium-dark brews was observed for arabica samples. Total phenolics in robusta espressos decreased (p 0.05) were found between arabica espressos from different roasts. By LC-DAD-ESI-MS, 23 hydroxycinnamic derivatives were found, including chlorogenic acids, lactones, and cinnamoyl-amino acid conjugates. The amount of each compound was differently affected by species and roast. Robusta brews presented superior levels of caffeine and chlorogenic acids, whereas arabica ones contained more trigonelline. Hydroxymethylfurfural contents in the brew (30 mL) varied from 2.60 to 0.84 mg for light- and dark-roasted arabicas and from 1.29 to 0.68 mg for light- and dark-roasted robustas, respectively.

  14. Detection of corn adulteration in Brazilian coffee (Coffea arabica) by tocopherol profiling and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee is a high-value commodity that is a target for adulteration, especially after the beans have been roasted and ground. Countries such as Brazil, the second largest coffee producer, have set limits on the allowable amount of coffee contamination and adulteration. Therefore, there is significant...

  15. Use of colour parameters for roasted coffee assessment Utilização dos parâmetros de cor para avaliação do café torrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalina Cavaco Bicho

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Fast and non-destructive indicators were evaluated as tools to measure the technological quality of Arabica and Robusta coffee. Accordingly, considering the roasting intensity in highly valuable commercial samples, volume, mass, apparent density, moisture, total ash, ash insoluble in hydrochloric acid, and ether extract were characterized. The chromatic parameters L*, C*, Hº were measured using illuminants D65 and C. It was found that in roasted coffee beans, the parameters L*, C*, Hº, and coordinate b* had an antagonist interaction due to an increase in the roasting intensity, whereas after milling, only L* and Hº decreased progressively. Considering that the parameters L* and Hº followed similar patterns using both illuminants, D65 and C, it can be concluded that they are appropriate to evaluate coffee colour changes during roasting, enabling a relationship with coffee quality.Avaliaram-se indicadores não destrutivos e de execução rápida, para aferir a qualidade tecnológica de cafés Arábica e Robusta. Neste contexto, considerando a intensidade da torra em amostras com elevado interesse comercial, caracterizaram-se o volume, massa, densidade aparente, umidade, cinzas totais e insolúveis em ácido clorídrico e do extrato etéreo. Foram então analisados os parâmetros cromáticos L*, C*, Hº utilizando os iluminantes D65 e C. Verificou-se que em grãos de café torrado os parâmetros L*, C*, Hº e a coordenada b* mostraram uma interação antagônica face ao acréscimo da intensidade da torra, enquanto, após a moagem, apenas o L* e o Hº decresceram progressivamente. Considerando que a coordenada L* não variou significativamente com a aplicação dos dois iluminantes, concluiu-se que este parâmetro é o mais adequado para estudar a evolução da cor durante a torra, permitindo ainda estabelecer uma correlação com a qualidade.

  16. Health risks due to coffee dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, Marcus; Bittner, Cordula; Baur, Xaver

    2009-08-01

    This study assessed current health risks due to occupational exposure to coffee dust. We performed a cross-sectional study in a coffee haulage company (n = 24), a coffee silo (n = 19), and a decaffeinating company (n = 17). Cross-shift and cross-week case histories of these employees as well as lung function values were recorded. During the handling of green coffee, measurements of airborne dust were conducted. The employees in these workplaces were mainly affected by erythematous and rhinoconjunctival symptoms. They occurred especially in subjects exposed to a high dust load (> 10 mg of inhalable dust per cubic meter of air; n = 28) [Pearson chi(2) test, p = 0.020 and p = 0.023]. IgE antibodies to green coffee and castor beans were detected in 3 workers and 10 workers, respectively. The majority of them (two employees and six employees, respectively) had shown respiratory symptoms during the past 12 months. The preshift lung function values were below average but were not dependent on the level of the inhalable coffee dust exposure. Employees with a coffee dust load > 10 mg/m(3) of air showed higher unspecific bronchial responsiveness more frequently than those with lower exposures. During the transshipment (especially during unloading) of green coffee, a high and clinically relevant exposure to irritative and sensitizing dust occurs. Therefore, efforts to reduce these dust exposures are generally recommended.

  17. Chemical Characterization of Potentially Prebiotic Oligosaccharides in Brewed Coffee and Spent Coffee Grounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Freeman, Samara; Corey, Mark; German, J Bruce; Barile, Daniela

    2017-04-05

    Oligosaccharides are indigestible carbohydrates widely present in mammalian milk and in some plants. Milk oligosaccharides are associated with positive health outcomes; however, oligosaccharides in coffee have not been extensively studied. We investigated the oligosaccharides and their monomeric composition in dark roasted coffee beans, brewed coffee, and spent coffee grounds. Oligosaccharides with a degree of polymerization ranging from 3 to 15, and their constituent monosaccharides, were characterized and quantified. The oligosaccharides identified were mainly hexoses (potentially galacto-oligosaccharides and manno-oligosaccharides) containing a heterogeneous mixture of glucose, arabinose, xylose, and rhamnose. The diversity of oligosaccharides composition found in these coffee samples suggests that they could have selective prebiotic activity toward specific bacterial strains able to deconstruct the glycosidic bonds and utilize them as a carbon source.

  18. Processing of a novel powdered herbal coffee (Pistacia Terebinthus L. Fruits Coffee) and its sensorial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secilmis, S S; Yanık, D Kocak; Gogus, F

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the effects of roasting method, grinding and reduction in oil content on the characteristics of Pistacia terebinthus fruit coffee were investigated. Pistacia terebinthus fruit was roasted by microwave, pan and combined (microwave and convection) methods. The degree of roasting was determined by L*, a*, b* color values. The roasting times were 1,500, 1,900 and 1,620 s for microwave, pan and combined roasting methods, respectively. Cold press was used to reduce the oil content both prior to roasting and after the roasting. The oil content was reduced to around 21.5 % in all roasting methods to approach to that of coffee beans. Powdered Pistacia terebinthus fruit coffee brews were compared with each other and Turkish coffee in terms of aroma, flavor, acidity aftertaste, and overall acceptability. Sensorial analysis results showed that coffee brews prepared by pressing after the roasting process were better than those pressing prior to roasting.

  19. Removal of lead ions in drinking water by coffee grounds as vegetable biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokimoto, Toshimitsu; Kawasaki, Naohito; Nakamura, Takeo; Akutagawa, Jyunichi; Tanada, Seiki

    2005-01-01

    In an attempt to reuse food waste for useful purposes, we investigated the possibility of using coffee grounds to remove lead ions from drinking water. We studied the lead ion adsorption characteristics of coffee beans and grounds by measuring their fat and protein content, adsorption isotherms for lead ions, and adsorption rates for lead ions. The number of lead ions adsorbed by coffee grounds did not depend on the kind of coffee beans or the temperature at which adsorption tests were performed. The rate of lead ion adsorption by coffee grounds was directly proportional to the amount of coffee grounds added to the solution. When coffee grounds were degreased or boiled, the number of lead ions decreased. When proteins contained in coffee grounds were denatured, the lead ion adsorption was considerably reduced. The lead ion adsorption capacity of coffee grounds decreased with increased concentration of perchloric acid used for treating them and disappeared with 10% perchloric acid. The experiments demonstrated that proteins contained in coffee beans depend upon the adsorption of lead ion. The present study gave an affirmative answer to the possibility of using coffee grounds, an abundant food waste, for removing lead ions from drinking water.

  20. What's Inside That Seed We Brew? A New Approach To Mining the Coffee Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Michael Joe; Mitchell, Thomas; McSpadden Gardener, Brian B

    2015-10-01

    Coffee is a critically important agricultural commodity for many tropical states and is a beverage enjoyed by millions of people worldwide. Recent concerns over the sustainability of coffee production have prompted investigations of the coffee microbiome as a tool to improve crop health and bean quality. This review synthesizes literature informing our knowledge of the coffee microbiome, with an emphasis on applications of fruit- and seed-associated microbes in coffee production and processing. A comprehensive inventory of microbial species cited in association with coffee fruits and seeds is presented as reference tool for researchers investigating coffee-microbe associations. It concludes with a discussion of the approaches and techniques that provide a path forward to improve our understanding of the coffee microbiome and its utility, as a whole and as individual components, to help ensure the future sustainability of coffee production.

  1. Incidência de ocratoxina A em diferentes frações do café (Coffea arabica L.: bóia, mistura e varrição após secagem em terreiros de terra, asfalto e cimento Incidence of ochratoxin A in fraction diferents coffee beans (Coffea Arabica L: "boia", mixes and "varrição"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Roberto Batista

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A incidência de ocratoxina A foi estudada em café mistura, bóia e varrição secas em três tipos de terreiro: terra, cimento e asfalto. Foram analisadas 238 amostras coletadas em 11 municípios da região sul do Estado de Minas Gerais, sendo 35 bóia, 97 - mistura e 106 varrição. Das amostras analisadas, em 40% não foi detectada a presença de ocratoxina A, em 31%, foram detectadas a presença de ocratoxina A em níveis que variaram de 0,1 a 5,0 µg/Kg de café. Estes resultados demonstram que 169 amostras (71% analisadas estariam dentro dos limites em estudo da Legislação Européia que regulamenta a concentração máxima de ocratoxina A em grãos de café torrado. As espécies de Aspergillus identificadas como produtoras de ocratoxina A foram Aspergillus ochraceus, A. sclerotiorum e A. sulphureus. Os níveis de contaminação de ocratoxina A em grãos de café foram maiores na fração varrição e nas frações bóia e mistura, secas em terreiro de terra. Os resultados deste estudo concluem que o terreiro de terra aumenta o risco de contaminação com ocratoxina A em grãos de café. A fração varrição devido aos riscos de exposição a ocratoxina A, deve ser reduzida através da adoção de boas práticas agrícolas e não ser utilizada para fins de consumo humano e animal.The ochratoxin incidence was studied in coffee it mixes, it "bóia" and "varrição" dry in three yard types: earth, cement and asphalt. 238 samples were analyzed collected in 11 municipal districts of the south of Minas Gerais state, being 35 "bóia", 97 - it mixes and 106 varrição. Of the analyzed samples, in 40% the ochratoxin A presence it was not detected, in 74 samples, 31%, ochratoxin A presence were detected the in levels that varied from 0,1 to 5,0 µg/Kg of coffee beans. These results demonstrate that in 169 samples (71% analyzed they would be inside of the limits in study of the European Legislation that regulates the maximum concentration of

  2. Green Coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... devil's claw, fenugreek, garlic, guar gum, horse chestnut, Panax ginseng, psyllium, Siberian ginseng, and others.Herbs and ... herbs include angelica, clove, danshen, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, Panax ginseng, and others.IronCertain components of green coffee ...

  3. PAH in tea and coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duedahl-Olesen, Lene; Navarantem, Marin; Adamska, Joanna;

    For food regulation in the European Union maximum limits on other foods than tea and coffee includes benzo[a]pyrene and the sum of PAH4 (sum of benzo[a]pyrene, chrysene, benz[a]anthracene and benzo[b]fluoranthene). This study includes analysis of the above mentioned PAH in both, tea leaves, coffee...... beans and ready-to-drink preparations. Compared to other food matrices (e.g. fish), the analytical methods were challenged by the hot water extracts. Preparation of tea includes roasting and drying of the tea leaves using combustion gases from burning wood, oil, or coal. These are responsible...... for accumulation of PAH in tea leaves. Different varieties of tea leaves were analyzed and highest concentrations were found in leaves from mate and black tea with maximum concentrations of 32 μg/kg for benzo[a]pyrene and 115 μg/kg for the sum of PAH4. Also, coffee beans are roasted during processing. However...

  4. Contribution of chlorogenic acids to the iron-reducing activity of coffee beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Daniel P; Monteiro, Mariana C; Ribeiro-Alves, Mirna; Donangelo, Carmen M; Trugo, Luiz C

    2005-03-09

    The iron-reducing activity of coffee beverages was determined by the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. The influence on FRAP due to the degree of roasting (light, medium, and dark), species (Coffea arabica and Coffea robusta), and caffeine content (regular and decaffeinated) was investigated using ground and soluble coffee samples. The concentration of specific chlorogenic acids and caffeine in the beverages was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and related to FRAP using Pearson correlation coefficients. All measurements were expressed per unit of soluble solids. Beverages prepared with ground coffee had, on average, 27% higher FRAP values than those prepared with soluble coffee (p 0.91) was found between FRAP and the total content of chlorogenic acids, particularly that of the caffeoylquinic acid isomers. The iron-reducing activity of coffee beverages was not influenced by caffeine.

  5. A simple method of DNA extraction from coffee seeds suitable for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-19

    Feb 19, 2008 ... suitable for PCR analysis ... adulteration that will benefit the consumers worldwide. ... DNA isolation for molecular analysis, need to be freeze- dried using ..... extraction and analysis from processed coffee beans. J. Agric. Food.

  6. FOTOSÍNTESIS NETA Y CONCENTRACIÓN DE COMPENSACIÓN DE CO2 EN TRES GENOTIPOS DE CAFÉ (Coffea sp., FRÍJOL Y MAÍZ BAJO TRES TEMPERATURA NET PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND CO2 COMPENSATION CONCENTRATION IN THREE COFFEE (Coffea sp. GENOTYPES, BEAN AND MAIZE UNDER THREE TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyda Patricia Mosquera Sánchez

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Se expusieron plantas de café Coffea arabica L. de los genotipos Colombia, Caturra e Híbrido de Timor, fríjol (Phaseolus vulgaris L., maíz (Zea mays L., a tres temperaturas ( 15 °C, 25 °C y 35 °C; se midió la fotosíntesis neta (P N y se obtuvo la concentración de compensación de CO2 (GCO2. P N en las hojas de café fueron similares para los tres genotipos a 15 °C [5,0 - 5,3 µmol(CO2 m-2s-1] y 35 °C [4.9 - 5,5 µmol(CO2 m-2s-1] pero más bajas a 25 °C [5,4 - 11,7 µmol(CO2 m-2s-1]. El GCO2 en café y fríjol se incrementó con la temperatura, mientras en maíz no se presentó ningún efecto. Los valores observados P N y de GCO2, en los genotipos de café fueron los típicos de plantas C3.The coffee (Coffea arabica L. genotypes Colombia, Caturra, and Híbrido de Timor, and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and maize (Zea mays L. plants were exposed to three temperatures ( 15°C, 25°C and 35°C, and net photosynthetic rates (P N and CO2 compensation concentrations (GCO2 were measured. P N in coffee leaves was similar for the three genotypes at 15 °C [5,0 - 5,3 µmol(CO2 m-2s-1] and 35 °C [4,9 - 5,5 µmol(CO2 m-2s-1], but lower at 25 °C [5,4 - 11,7 µmol(CO2 m-2s-1]. GCO2 increased with temperature in coffee and bean, while in maize no effect was observed. P N and GCO2 values documented in coffee genotypes were typical for C3 plants.

  7. Performance of a Big Scale Green House Type Dryer for Coffee Drying Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dying is one of important steps in coffee processing to produce good quality. Greenhouse is one of artificial drying alternatives that potential for coffee drying method cause of cleans environmental friendly, renewable energy sources and chippers. Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute has developed and testing a big scale greenhouse type dryer for fresh coffee cherries and wet parchment coffee drying process. Greenhouse has 24 m length, 18 m width, also 3 m high of the front side and 2 m high of the rear side. The maximum capacity of greenhouse is 40 tons fresh coffee cherries. Fiber Reinforced Plastic (FRP used as greenhouse roof that combined with I and C profile of steel. Fresh coffee cherries and wet parchment coffee from Robusta variety use as main materials in this research. The treatment of this research was 30 kg/m2, 60 kg/m2 and 90 kg/m2 for coffee density. String process has done by manual, two times a day in the morning and in the afternoon. As control, fresh coffee cherries and wet parchment coffee has dried by fully sun drying method. The result showed that a big scale greenhouse has heat drying efficiency between 29.9-58.2% depend on type and density of coffee treatments. On the full sunny day, greenhouse has produced maximum drying air temperature up to 52oC. In radiation cumulative level 4-5 kW-jam/m2 per day, 12.9-38.8 tons fresh coffee cherries or wet parchment coffee with 58-64% moisture content can be dried to 12% moisture content for 6 up to 14 days drying process. Slowly drying mechanism can be avoided negative effect to degradation of quality precursor compound. Capacity of the dryer can be raise and fungi can be reduce with application of controllable mechanical stirring in the greenhouse. Keywords: greenhouse, coffee, drying, quality

  8. Impact of drying surface and raking frequencies on mold incidence, ochratoxin A contamination, and cup quality during preparation of arabica and robusta cherries at the farm level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmourougane, Kulandaivelu; Bhat, Rajeev; Gopinandhan, Thirukonda Nannier

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact and contribution of various drying surfaces (soil, cement, and tarpaulin) and raking frequencies (1 and 4/day) on the incidence of toxigenic molds, ochratoxin A (OTA) production, and on the overall cup quality during preparation of arabica and robusta coffee cherry in India. Two individual experimental batches (run 1 at the begin of harvest and run 2 at the end of harvest) were set up for the study. Results showed high incidence of molds in coffee dried on soil surface compared with that on cement and tarpaulin surfaces. In both arabica and robusta, OTA could be detected in Aspergillus ochraceus contaminated samples at the end of harvest. Raking of the cherries 4 times/day showed lower fungal incidence with no OTA levels detected. Overall, coffee cherry prepared by drying on tarpaulin surface with 4 rakings/day showed lower OTA and fungal incidence with good and acceptable cup quality, and this is recommended to be practiced at the farm level.

  9. Antiviral activities of coffee extracts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Ichinose, Masao; Uozaki, Misao; Tsujimoto, Kazuko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Koyama, A Hajime

    2008-06-01

    Both hot water extracts of coffee grinds and instant coffee solutions inhibited the multiplication of herpes simplex virus type 1, a representative enveloped DNA virus, when they were added to the culture medium of the virus-infected cells at a dose of one fifth the concentration suitable for drinking. The antiherpetic activity was independent of the suppliers (companies) of the coffee grinds and of the locations where the coffee beans were produced. Further characterization revealed that there are two different mechanisms, by which the coffee extracts exert inhibitory activities on the virus infection; (1) a direct inactivation of the infectivity of virus particle (i.e., a virucidal activity) and (2) the inhibition of progeny infectious virus formation at the late stage of viral multiplication in the infected cells. Caffeine, but not quinic acid and chlorogenic acid, inhibited the virus multiplication to some extent, but none of them showed the virucidal activity, suggesting that other component(s) in the coffee extracts must play a role in the observed antiviral activity. In addition, the coffee extracts inhibited the multiplication of poliovirus, a non-enveloped RNA virus, but showed no virucidal effect on this virus.

  10. Challenges in Specialty Coffee Processing and Quality Assurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmiro Poltronieri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is an important crop that assures a sustainable economy to farmers in tropical regions. A dramatic concern for coffee production is currently represented by climate change, which threatens the survival of Coffea arabica cultivation worldwide and imposes modifications of the agronomic practices to prevent this risk. The quality of coffee beans depends on optimized protocols of cultivation, ripe berries collection, and removal of the outer fruit layers by dry or wet processes and moisture reduction. Storage and shipment represent two steps where bean quality needs to be preserved by preventing fungal contamination that may impact the final product and form mycotoxins, mainly ochratoxin A. In this review, we describe the challenges faced by the coffee industry to guarantee quality from production to roasting and brewing. An overview of novel technologies, such as the application of starter cultures in fermentation and the exploitation of industrial enzymes in accelerating the process of flavour development in coffee beans, is given. Moreover, the results of studies on microbial populations on coffee and the differences found in fungi, yeasts and bacteria composition among the investigations, are summarized. In particular, this review describes new attempts to contain the development of mycotoxigenic fungi, through the application of antagonistic microorganisms such as S. cerevisiae. The new wave of specialty coffees, i.e., those with a cupping score higher than 85/100, is also presented. It is shown how, through careful coffee production methods and controlled fermentation processes, coffee producers may increase their income by assuring high standards of quality and high added value for the coffee experience sector.

  11. Enzymatic hydrolysis of spent coffee ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jooste, T; García-Aparicio, M P; Brienzo, M; van Zyl, W H; Görgens, J F

    2013-04-01

    Spent coffee ground (SCG) is the main residue generated during the production of instant coffee by thermal water extraction from roasted coffee beans. This waste is composed mainly of polysaccharides such as cellulose and galactomannans that are not solubilised during the extraction process, thus remaining as unextractable, insoluble solids. In this context, the application of an enzyme cocktail (mannanase, endoglucanase, exoglucanase, xylanase and pectinase) with more than one component that acts synergistically with each other is regarded as a promising strategy to solubilise/hydrolyse remaining solids, either to increase the soluble solids yield of instant coffee or for use as raw material in the production of bioethanol and food additives (mannitol). Wild fungi were isolated from both SCG and coffee beans and screened for enzyme production. The enzymes produced from the selected wild fungi and recombinant fungi were then evaluated for enzymatic hydrolysis of SCG, in comparison to commercial enzyme preparations. Out of the enzymes evaluated on SCG, the application of mannanase enzymes gave better yields than when only cellulase or xylanase was utilised for hydrolysis. The recombinant mannanase (Man1) provided the highest increments in soluble solids yield (17 %), even when compared with commercial preparations at the same protein concentration (0.5 mg/g SCG). The combination of Man1 with other enzyme activities revealed an additive effect on the hydrolysis yield, but not synergistic interaction, suggesting that the highest soluble solid yields was mainly due to the hydrolysis action of mannanase.

  12. Studies on acrylamide levels in roasting, storage and brewing of coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Ingo; Ternité, Ruediger; Wilkens, Jochen; Hoenicke, Katrin; Guenther, Helmut; van der Stegen, Gerrit H D

    2006-11-01

    The content of acrylamide in coffee reaches a peak early in the roasting process, reflecting occurrence of both formation and destruction of acrylamide during roasting. Levels of acrylamide in the fully roasted product are a small fraction of the peak reached earlier. Glucose and moisture in green coffee do not show a significant correlation with acrylamide in roasted coffee. Pre-roasting levels of asparagine show a correlation only in Arabica coffee. The main factors affecting the level of acrylamide in roasted coffee appear to be the Arabica/Robusta ratio, with Robusta giving higher levels; time and degree of roast, with both shorter and lighter roasting at the edges of the normal roasting range giving higher levels; storage condition and time, with clear reduction at ambient storage. This storage reduction of acrylamide followed second order reaction kinetics with an activation energy of 73 KJ/mole. The acrylamide in roasted coffee is largely extracted into the brew and stable within usual time of consumption. As these four main factors also substantially affect the sensorial characteristics of the brew, and as modifications of the process have to comply with the consumer-accepted boundaries of taste profiles, only small effects on the acrylamide level are expected to be achievable.

  13. Determination of serotonin released from coffee wax by liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kele, M; Ohmacht, R

    1996-04-12

    A simple hydrolysis and extraction method was developed for the release of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) from a coffee wax sample obtained from decaffeination of coffee beans. The recoverable amount of serotonin was determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with gradient elution and UV detection, using the standard addition method. Different type of basic deactivated chromatographic columns were used for the separation.

  14. Toxigenic fungi in coffee samples: a menace to public health

    OpenAIRE

    Viegas, Carla; Pacífico, Cátia; Oliveira, Ana Cebola; Gomes, Anita Quintal; Viegas, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction - Mycotoxin contamination was reported to occur in some food and commodities, such as coffee, particularly due to the presence of toxigenic fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium spp. Aspergilli are known to produce high levels of mycotoxins, such as ochratoxin and aflatoxin. Aspergillus ochraceus has been proposed as the major cause of ochratoxin A contamination in coffee beans. Aim of the study - The aim of this work was to evaluate the prevalence of Aspergillus se...

  15. Análise de compostos bioativos, grupos ácidos e da atividade antioxidante do café arábica (Coffea arabica do cerrado e de seus grãos defeituosos (PVA submetidos a diferentes torras Bioactive compounds, acids groups and antioxidant activity analysis of arabic coffee (Coffea arabica and its defective beans from the Brazilian savannah submitted to different roasting degrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Antônio Lemos de Morais

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho estudou os compostos bioativos (ácidos clorogênicos, trigonelina, cafeína, fenóis totais e proantocianidinas, grupos hidroxila ácidos e atividade antioxidante de um café arábica proveniente do Cerrado Mineiro e de seu PVA (grãos pretos, verdes e ardidos. As amostras foram preparadas nas torras clara (180 ± 10 °C; 6,0 ± 1,0 minutos, média (180 ± 10 °C; 8,0 ± 1,0 minutos e escura (180 ± 10 °C; 10,0 ± 1,0 minutos. Considerando-se a média das três torras do café e do PVA, a diferença observada no teor de todos os constituintes acima não foi significativa (p > 0,05, exceto com o teor de grupos hidroxila ácidos que foi ligeiramente superior no PVA e cafeína calculada pelo método semiquantitativo que foi superior no café. Portanto, dentre esses constituintes, os compostos com grupos ácidos seriam os únicos que poderiam contribuir para explicar a grande diferença de sabor existente entre o café de grãos sadios e o de PVA. Tanto o café como o PVA apresentaram atividade seqüestradora do radical DPPH. nas três torras, sendo a atividade do café sempre superior. Analisando-se as variações dos teores de cafeína, fenóis totais, proantocianidinas, grupos hidroxila ácidos, trigonelina e ácidos clorogênicos, não foi possível explicar a atividade antioxidante superior apresentada pelo café da torra média (CE50 de 2,3 mg.mg-1 de DPPH..This work reports the results of the investigation of bioactive compounds (chlorogenic acids, trigonelline, caffeine, total phenolics, and proanthocyanidins, total acid groups, and the antioxidant activity of the Arabian coffee (Coffea arabica from the Brazilian cerrado (vast tropical savannah (Minas Gerais state and its defective beans (Black, green, and sour beans. The samples were prepared using three roasting degrees: light (180 ± 10 °C; 6,0 ± 1,0 minutes, medium (180 ± 10 °C; 8,0 ± 1,0 minutos, and dark (180 ± 10 °C; 10,0 ± 1,0 minutes. Considering the

  16. Role of food emulsifiers in milk coffee beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, A; Cho, H

    2015-07-01

    To emphasize the coffee flavor, many milk coffee beverages contain coffee extracts; these are the so-called "rich milk coffee" beverages. When the content of the coffee extracts increases, milk coffee beverages become unstable. The milk ring formation, or oiling off, is accelerated in these kinds of drinks. We prepared a "rich milk coffee" beverage and studied the stability of the emulsion. We also investigated the influence of the food emulsifiers on the stability of the emulsion. We tried to test the emulsifier system in order to improve the emulsion stability. When the milk coffee beverage with a low light value for the roasted coffee beans sterilized by UHT was stored at a low temperature, the milk component strongly separated. We found that the sucrose monoester with a high HLB and diglycerol monoester accelerated the milk separation, and the decaglycerol monoester controlled the milk separation. We discussed the milk separation mechanism and showed that maintaining the hydration of the hydrophilic group in the rich milk coffee beverage was related to the combination of emulsifiers that control the milk separation.

  17. The hypercholesterolemic effect of cafestol in coffee oil in gerbils and rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, A.H.M.; Katan, M.B.; Weusten-van, der M.P.M.E.; Roos, de B.; Beynen, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    Coffee beans contain the diterpene cafestol, which raises plasma cholesterol concentrations in humans. Daily consumption of 2 g coffee oil, which provides approximately 60 mg cafestol (equivalent to 5.7 mg cafestol/MJ), increases plasma cholesterol concentrations by 28%. We studied the effect of

  18. Growth Opportunities and Employment Creation Potential of Zambia’s Coffee Value Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomson Kalinda

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to identify the actors in the coffee value chain in Zambia as well as to identify and assess the opportunities and employment creation potential of the value chain. The study found that the potential for the growth of the coffee sector lies in Zambia’s production of the globally competitive Arabica coffee variety; the increasing global demand for specialty coffee in premium niche markets (mainly based on fair trade and organic farming principles; and the existence of institutional arrangements such as the Zambia Coffee Growers Association that promote, regulate and coordinate the development of coffee in Zambia. However, despite this potential, the coffee sector has been experiencing a downward trend in production and export of coffee beans. While a wide range of constraints from production to policy issues limit the growth of the coffee sector, the most noteworthy factors are the long production period of the coffee plant which acts as a disincentive to invest in coffee production; the lack of research programmes; limited Zambian brand recognition; and the lack of accessible and affordable financing for coffee growers. Sustainable growth and employment creation in the coffee sector can be achieved through coherent strategies such asthe government working with the private sector to come up with innovative ways of availing affordable financing mechanisms for farmers. The government should also facilitate the development of technologies and marketing strategies to ensure that Zambian coffee fetches premium prices on the world market.

  19. Interactions between major chlorogenic acid isomers and chemical changes in coffee brew that affect antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ningjian; Xue, Wei; Kennepohl, Pierre; Kitts, David D

    2016-12-15

    Coffee bean source and roasting conditions significantly (pcoffee. CGA isomer content was positively correlated (pcoffee to reduce nitric oxide and scavenge Frémy's salt. Indices of browning in roasted coffee were positively correlated (pcoffee corresponded to intracellular antioxidant capacity measured in Caco-2 intestinal cells. This study concluded that the intracellular antioxidant capacity that best describes potential health benefits of coffee positively corresponds best with CGA content.

  20. Optimation of a Table Conveyor Type Grading Machine to Increase the Performance of Green Coffee Manual Sortation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Coffee consumers request a good quality of green coffee to get a good coffee cup taste. Defective beans e.g. black bean, brown bean and broken bean are associated to low coffee quality which give negative effects to final taste. To meet the standard export requirement, coffee beans have to be graded before being traded. Until now, grading process is generally carried out manually. The method gives better product, so the grading cost is very expensive about 40% of total processing cost. Meanwhile, shortage of skill workers is a limiting factor of the process. Therefore, improving the manual sorting by providing machine for grading of green coffee is good alternative to reduce the grading cost. Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute has designed a table conveyor type grading machine in order to improve the performance of the manual grading productivity and consistent quality and to reduce the grading cost. The conveyor belt has a dimension of 5700 mm of length, 610 mm of width and 6 mm of thickness. The rotating of belt conveyor powered by an electro motor 3 HP, 3 phase and 1420 rpm. The result showed that the optimum capacity of grading machine was 390 kg/hour reached when the speed 16 rpm and 3 kg/m 2 of green beans on belt conveyor with productivity 1870 kg/man-day compared to the productivity full manually process 743 kg/man-day. Percentage of product in outlet 1 was 4.2% as broken beans, 0.26% as brown beans, 0.68% as one hole in beans and 0.61% as more than one hole in beans. Percentage of product in outlet 2 was 39.54% as broken beans, 4.23% as brown beans 7.19% as black beans, 4.47% as one hole in beans and 4.43% as more than one hole in beans. Cost of grading process per kg of green coffee is Rp20,-. Key words : Coffee, Grading, Conveyor table, Quality

  1. Simple Sequence Repeat Analysis of Selected NSIC-registered Coffee Varieties in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy May C. Santos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Coffee (Coffea sp. is an important commercial crop worldwide. Three species of coffee are used as beverage, namely Coffea arabica, C. canephora, and C. liberica. Coffea arabica L. is the most cultivated among the three coffee species due to its taste quality, rich aroma, and low caffeine content. Despite its inferior taste and aroma, C. canephora Pierre ex A. Froehner, which has the highest caffeine content, is the second most widely cultivated because of its resistance to coffee diseases. On the other hand, C. liberica W.Bull ex Hierncomes is characterized by its very strong taste and flavor. The Philippines used to be a leading exporter of coffee until coffee rust destroyed the farms in Batangas, home of the famous Kapeng Barako. The country has been attempting to revive the coffee industry by focusing on the production of specialty coffee with registered varieties on the National Seed Industry Council (NSIC. Correct identification and isolation of pure coffee beans are the main factors that determine coffee’s market value. Local farms usually misidentify and mix coffee beans of different varieties, leading to the depreciation of their value. This study used simple sequence repeat (SSR markers to evaluate and distinguish Philippine NSIC-registered coffee species and varieties. The neighbor-joining tree generated using PAUP showed high bootstrap support, separating C. arabica, C. canephora, and C. liberica from each other. Among the twenty primer pairs used, seven were able to distinguish C. arabica, nine for C. liberica, and one for C. canephora.

  2. Coffee seeds isotopic composition as a potential proxy to evaluate Minas Gerais, Brazil seasonal variations during seed maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Carla; Maia, Rodrigo; Brunner, Marion; Carvalho, Eduardo; Prohaska, Thomas; Máguas, Cristina

    2010-05-01

    Plant seeds incorporate the prevailing climate conditions and the physiological response to those conditions (Rodrigues et al., 2009; Rodrigues et al., submitted). During coffee seed maturation the biochemical compounds may either result from accumulated material in other organs such as leafs and/or from new synthesis. Accordingly, plant seeds develop in different stages along a particular part of the year, integrating the plant physiology and seasonal climatic conditions. Coffee bean is an extremely complex matrix, rich in many products derived from both primary and secondary metabolism during bean maturation. Other studies (De Castro and Marraccini, 2006) have revealed the importance of different coffee plant organs during coffee bean development as transfer tissues able to provide compounds (i.e. sugars, organic acids, etc) to the endosperm where several enzymatic activities and expressed genes have been reported. Moreover, it has been proved earlier on that green coffee bean is a particularly suitable case-study (Rodrigues et al., 2009; Rodrigues et al., submitted), not only due to the large southern hemispheric distribution but also because of this product high economic interest. The aim of our work was to evaluate the potential use of green coffee seeds as a proxy to seasonal climatic conditions during coffee bean maturation, through an array of isotopic composition determinations. We have determined carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur isotopic composition (by IRMS - Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) as well as strontium isotope abundance (by MC-ICP-MS; Multicollector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry), of green coffee beans harvested at different times at Minas Gerais, Brazil. The isotopic composition data were combined with air temperature and relative humidity data registered during the coffee bean developmental period, and with the parent rock strontium isotopic composition. Results indicate that coffee seeds indeed integrate the interactions

  3. Bioethanol Quality Improvement of Coffee Fruit Leather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edahwati Luluk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Indonesia’s dependence on petroleum is to be reduced and even eliminated. To overcome the problem of finding the needed alternative materials that can produce ethanol, in this case as a substitute material or a transport fuel mix, boosting the octane number, and gasoline ethanol (gasohol can be conducted. In the red coffee processing (cooking that will produce 65% and 35% of coffee beans, coffee leather waste is a source of organic material with fairly high cellulose content of 46.82%, 3.01% of pectin and 7.68% of lignin. In this case, its existence is abundant in Indonesia and optimally utilized. During the coffee fruit peeling, the peel waste is only used as a mixture of animal feed or simply left to rot. The purpose of this study was to produce and improve the quality of the fruit skin of bioethanol from coffee cellulose. However, to improve the quality of bioethanol, the production of the lignin content in the skin of the coffee fruit should be eliminated or reduced. Hydrolysis process using organosolve method is expected to improve the quality of bioethanol produced. In particular, the use of enzyme Saccharomyces and Zymmomonas will change the resulting sugar into bioethanol. On one hand, by using batch distillation process for 8 hours with Saccharomyces, bioethanol obtains high purity which is 39.79%; on the other hand, by using the same batch distillation process with Zymmomonas, the bioethanol obtains 38.78%.

  4. The role of dissolved cations in coffee extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendon, Christopher H; Colonna-Dashwood, Lesley; Colonna-Dashwood, Maxwell

    2014-05-28

    The flavorsome compounds in coffee beans exist in the form of aprotic charge neutral species, as well as a collection of acids and conjugate salts. The dissolution and extraction of these organic molecules is a process dependent on the dissolved mineral content of the water. It is known that different rates and compositions of coffee extraction are achieved through the control of the water "impurities", Na(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+), which coordinate to nucleophilic motifs in coffee. Using density functional theory, we quantify the thermodynamic binding energies of five familiar coffee-contained acids, caffeine, and a representative flavor component, eugenol. From this, we provide insight into the mechanism and ideal mineral composition of water for extraction of flavorsome compounds in coffee.

  5. Coffee Adulteration: More than Two Decades of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toci, Aline Theodoro; Farah, Adriana; Pezza, Helena Redigolo; Pezza, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is a ubiquitous food product of considerable economic importance to the countries that produce and export it. The adulteration of roasted coffee is a strategy used to reduce costs. Conventional methods employed to identify adulteration in roasted and ground coffee involve optical and electron microscopy, which require pretreatment of samples and are time-consuming and subjective. Other analytical techniques have been studied that might be more reliable, reproducible, and widely applicable. The present review provides an overview of three analytical approaches (physical, chemical, and biological) to the identification of coffee adulteration. A total of 30 published articles are considered. It is concluded that despite the existence of a number of excellent studies in this area, there still remains a lack of a suitably sensitive and widely applicable methodology able to take into account the various different aspects of adulteration, considering coffee varieties, defective beans, and external agents.

  6. Investigation of CO2 precursors in roasted coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuju; Lim, Loong-Tak

    2017-03-15

    Two CO2 formation pathways (chlorogenic acid (CGA) degradation and Maillard reaction) during coffee roasting were investigated. CGA is shown not a major contributor to CO2 formation, as heating of this compound under typical roasting conditions did not release a large quantity of CO2. However, heating of a CGA moiety, caffeic acid, resulted in high yield of CO2 (>98%), suggesting that CGA hydrolysis could be the rate limiting step for CO2 formation from CGA. A large amount of CO2 was detected from glycine-sucrose model system under coffee roasting conditions, implying the importance of Maillard reactions in CO2 formation. Further studies on the heating of various components isolated from green coffee beans showed that CO2 was generated from various green coffee components, including water insoluble proteins and polysaccharides. Around 50% of CO2 was formed from thermal reactions of lower molecular weight compounds that represent ∼25% by weight in green coffee.

  7. Sustainability for Growth and Productivity of Arabica Coffee in Lowland Regions of Bengkulu Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnopri Alnopri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arabica coffee usually grows well at the latitude of more than 700 m above sea level, but in Bengkulu Province, Indonesia the highland regions are mainly located in the conserved areas and prohibited for agricultural cultivation. These subsequent studies aimed to result in the most adaptive genotype of arabica coffee to the lowland environtment and the best planting gap of shading trees for improved coffee productivity.  Two types of technology included in these studies were grafting of arabica and robusta as entress and understump, respectively, and enviromental engineering at a lowland area by planting shading trees at different distances.  Four arabica entresses of S-1934, Kartika, Sigararutang and Andung Sari varieties were grafted with robusta understumps to produce so called four “robbika” genotypes.  The robbika stumps were grown in the lowland region under shading trees of legume species which were pre-planted with varous planting distances.  Results showed that four genotypes of robbika coffee grew better in the lowland region compared to all genotypes of arabica coffee as shown by parameters of growth, physiological characters and yield potential.  Environmental engineering treatments showed that the 2.5 x 2.0 m planting distance resulted in the best soil and microclimate conditions in the robbika plantation areas.

  8. A revision of the Anastrepha robusta species group (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Anastrepha robusta species group is revised to include the following 29 species: A. amaryllis Tigrero (Ecuador), A. amazonensis, n. sp. (Brazil: Amazonas), A. bella, n. sp. (Panamá), A. binodosa Stone (Colombia, Brazil: Amazonas, Pará), A. concava Greene (Costa Rica to Ecuador and Brazil: Amazon...

  9. Estabilización robusta de sistemas lineales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio Leyva Castellanos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se muestra un conjunto de resultados que permiten abordar el problema de la estabilización robusta de una familia de sistemas lineales positivos. Se describen dos nuevas aplicaciones en la teoría de control positivo para sistemas compartimentales y se muestra la aplicación de un teorema de robustez para tales sistemas

  10. PLAINS GERBILS (GERBILLISCUS ROBUSTA) AS FOOD OF THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    Its major food in the 1970's was found to be Gerbilliscus robusta ... Senzota – Plains Gerbils as Food of the Barn Owl in the Serengeti Plains … 102 reflected as ..... Magazine. March 04. And http://www.growingproduce.com/article/. 181150 ...

  11. Microbial ecology and starter culture technology in coffee processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinícius de Melo Pereira, Gilberto; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Neto, Ensei; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2017-09-02

    Coffee has been for decades the most commercialized food product and most widely consumed beverage in the world, with over 600 billion cups served per year. Before coffee cherries can be traded and processed into a final industrial product, they have to undergo postharvest processing on farms, which have a direct impact on the cost and quality of a coffee. Three different methods can be used for transforming the coffee cherries into beans, known as wet, dry, and semi-dry methods. In all these processing methods, a spontaneous fermentation is carried out in order to eliminate any mucilage still stuck to the beans and helps improve beverage flavor by microbial metabolites. The microorganisms responsible for the fermentation (e.g., yeasts and lactic acid bacteria) can play a number of roles, such as degradation of mucilage (pectinolytic activity), inhibition of mycotoxin-producing fungi growth, and production of flavor-active components. The use of starter cultures (mainly yeast strains) has emerged in recent years as a promising alternative to control the fermentation process and to promote quality development of coffee product. However, scarce information is still available about the effects of controlled starter cultures in coffee fermentation performance and bean quality, making it impossible to use this technology in actual field conditions. A broader knowledge about the ecology, biochemistry, and molecular biology could facilitate the understanding and application of starter cultures for coffee fermentation process. This review provides a comprehensive coverage of these issues, while pointing out new directions for exploiting starter cultures in coffee processing.

  12. Evaluation of spent coffee obtained from the most common coffeemakers as a source of hydrophilic bioactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Jimena; Juániz, Isabel; Monente, Carmen; Caemmerer, Bettina; Kroh, Lothar W; De Peña, M Paz; Cid, Concepción

    2012-12-26

    The main hydrophilic antioxidant compounds (3-, 4-, and 5-monocaffeoylquinic and 3,4-, 3,5-, and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acids, caffeine, and browned compounds, including melanoidins) and the antioxidant capacity (Folin-Ciocalteu, ABTS, DPPH, Fremy's salt, and TEMPO) were evaluated in Arabica and Robusta spent coffee obtained from the preparation of coffee brews with the most common coffeemakers (filter, espresso, plunger, and mocha). All spent coffee grounds, with the exception of those from the mocha coffeemaker, had relevant amounts of total caffeoylquinic acids (6.22-13.24 mg/g of spent coffee), mainly dicaffeoylquinic acids (3.31-5.79 mg/g of spent coffee), which were 4-7-fold higher than in their respective coffee brews. Caffeine ranged from 3.59 to 8.09 mg/g of spent coffee. The antioxidant capacities of the aqueous spent coffee extracts were 46.0-102.3% (filter), 59.2-85.6% (espresso), and coffee brews. This study obtained spent coffee extracts with antioxidant properties that can be used as a good source of hydrophilic bioactive compounds.

  13. Packaging Attributes of Antioxidant-Rich Instant Coffee and Their Influence on the Purchase Intent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinês P. Corso

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to identify the most important packaging attributes for purchasing a product not currently on the Brazilian market: antioxidant-rich instant coffee, a blend of roasted coffee and green coffee. Five package types of the same brand of instant antioxidant-rich coffee marketed in different countries were evaluated through a focus group. The attributes’ glass shape, glass lid color and label, information and brand were selected for the quantitative study. The purchase intent for the packaging images was evaluated with conjoint analysis. In general, an increased purchase intent was verified for more modern packages and browner labels that indicated roasted coffee. The consumers preferred the image of green and roasted coffee beans next to the cup of coffee and valued information about the product’s differentiation (the origin, type, quantity and functions of antioxidants that was presented in the form of explanatory charts on the back of the packaging.

  14. Selection of discriminant markers for authentication of Asian palm civet coffee (Kopi Luwak): a metabolomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumhawan, Udi; Putri, Sastia Prama; Yusianto; Marwani, Erly; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2013-08-21

    Kopi Luwak, an exotic Indonesian coffee, is made from coffee berries that have been eaten by the Asian palm civet ( Paradoxurus hermaphroditus ). Despite being known as the world's most expensive coffee, there is no reliable, standardized method for determining its authenticity. GC-MS-based multimarker profiling was employed to explore significant metabolites as discriminant markers for authentication. Extracts of 21 coffee beans ( Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora ) from three cultivation areas were analyzed and subjected to multivariate analyses, principal component analysis, and orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis. Citric acid, malic acid, and the inositol/pyroglutamic acid ratio were selected for further verification by evaluating their differentiating abilities against various commercial coffee products. The markers demonstrated potential application in the differentiation of original, fake Kopi Luwak, regular coffee, and coffee blend samples with 50 wt % Kopi Luwak content. This is the first report to address the selection and successful validation of discriminant markers for the authentication of Kopi Luwak.

  15. Comparative study of polyphenols and caffeine in different coffee varieties affected by the degree of roasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hečimović, Ivana; Belščak-Cvitanović, Ana; Horžić, Dunja; Komes, Draženka

    2011-12-01

    The bioactive composition of coffee, as one of the most popular beverages in the world, has attracted interest as a potential source of beneficial bioactive compounds, especially polyphenols and caffeine. Since the content of these compounds is affected by the processing conditions, the objective of this study was to determine the content of polyphenolic compounds and caffeine in four different coffee varieties: Minas and Cioccolatato (Coffea arabica), and Cherry and Vietnam (Coffea canephora syn. Coffea robusta), roasted by three varying degrees (light, medium and dark). The content of the polyphenolic compounds and the antioxidant capacity of coffees were determined using UV/Vis spectrophotometric methods, while the content of chlorogenic acid derivatives was determined using HPLC analysis. The caffeine content was determined by means of two spectrophotometric methods, as well as HPLC analysis. Additionally, raw caffeine was also obtained by an isolation procedure with chloroform. Cherry coffee, a variety of C. canephora exhibited the highest overall content of total phenols (42.37mg GAE/g), followed by Minas coffee, while Cioccolatato contained the lowest TPC (33.12mg GAE/g). Cherry coffee also exhibited the highest content of individual classes of polyphenols (flavan-3-ols, procyanidins and tannins), while the highest content of chlorogenic acid (CQA) derivatives was determined in Minas and Cioccolatato coffees (C. arabica). The highest content of total and individual polyphenolic compounds was determined in coffees roasted in both light and medium roasting conditions, which was also observed for the content of CQA derivatives and antioxidant capacity of roasted coffees. The highest caffeine content in the coffee samples was determined by employing the HPLC analysis (0.06-2.55%). Light roasted Cherry coffee contained the highest overall content of caffeine among all coffees, which exhibited a decrease with intensified roasting.

  16. High-throughput metabolic profiling of diverse green Coffea arabica beans identified tryptophan as a universal discrimination factor for immature beans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiki Setoyama

    Full Text Available The maturity of green coffee beans is the most influential determinant of the quality and flavor of the resultant coffee beverage. However, the chemical compounds that can be used to discriminate the maturity of the beans remain uncharacterized. We herein analyzed four distinct stages of maturity (immature, semi-mature, mature and overripe of nine different varieties of green Coffea arabica beans hand-harvested from a single experimental field in Hawaii. After developing a high-throughput experimental system for sample preparation and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS measurement, we applied metabolic profiling, integrated with chemometric techniques, to explore the relationship between the metabolome and maturity of the sample in a non-biased way. For the multivariate statistical analyses, a partial least square (PLS regression model was successfully created, which allowed us to accurately predict the maturity of the beans based on the metabolomic information. As a result, tryptophan was identified to be the best contributor to the regression model; the relative MS intensity of tryptophan was higher in immature beans than in those after the semi-mature stages in all arabica varieties investigated, demonstrating a universal discrimination factor for diverse arabica beans. Therefore, typtophan, either alone or together with other metabolites, may be utilized for traders as an assessment standard when purchasing qualified trading green arabica bean products. Furthermore, our results suggest that the tryptophan metabolism may be tightly linked to the development of coffee cherries and/or beans.

  17. Translocação e compartimentalização de Zn aplicado via ZnSO4 e ZnEDTA nas folhas de cafeeiro e feijoeiro Translocation and compartmentation of zinc by ZnSO4 e ZnEDTA applied on coffee and bean seedlings leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Alencar de Lima Franco

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a translocação e a compartimentalização de Zn, aplicado via foliar nas formas de ZnSO4 e ZnEDTA, foram conduzidos dois ensaios em solução nutritiva, em casa de vegetação, utilizando-se mudas de cafeeiro e feijoeiro, em condições de suficiência e deficiência de Zn. O delineamento experimental foi o de blocos ao acaso com quatro repetições em esquema fatorial (2 x 3, correspondendo a dois níveis de Zn na solução nutritiva (suficiência e deficiência e três formas de suprimento de Zn às plantas (ZnSO4 e ZnEDTA a 14mmol L-1 de Zn, ambos em pincelamento na folha, e testemunha sem receber aplicação de Zn. Em ambas as espécies, o ZnSO4 foi mais adsorvido à cutícula da folha do que o ZnEDTA, demonstrando ser a retenção cuticular de Zn importante barreira na sua absorção. O estado nutricional do feijoeiro em Zn afetou o aproveitamento do Zn aplicado via foliar. Tanto a folha pincelada como a planta inteira de feijoeiro adquiriram maior quantidade de Zn do que as do cafeeiro. Em condição de inadequada nutrição em Zn, em ambas as espécies, a utilização de ZnEDTA foi mais eficiente na translocação do Zn. Quando foi aplicado ZnSO4 às folhas de cafeeiro crescidas em solução nutritiva não contendo Zn, houve acúmulo de Zn no caule, indicando que há grande afinidade do Zn2+ do sulfato com as cargas livres existentes nos vasos condutores.Two experiments were conducted aiming to evaluate translocation and compartmentation of ZnSO4 and ZnEDTA applied on leaves of coffee and bean seedlings previously grown under Zn sufficiency or deficiency in nutritive solution in greenhouse. The treatments applied were 14mmol L-1 ZnSO4, ZnEDTA and test without zinc applied on leaves. In both species, ZnSO4 was more retained on leaf cuticle, indicating cuticular zinc retention to be an important barrier in its uptake. The nutritional status of bean plants had a significant effect upon zinc utilization when it was

  18. Coffee and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hoon Bae

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Most people start their day with a cup of coffee. Many people would also finish their daily work with coffee. As such, coffee drinking is an important part of modern daily life. It has been told that coffee is a driving force for humans to develop science, because it has an alerting effect on the human brain. However, some people report experiencing irregular heartbeat or headaches and are thus reluctant to drink coffee, which suggests individual variation to coffee intolerance. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the effects of coffee on human health.

  19. Interactions between volatile and nonvolatile coffee components. 1. Screening of nonvolatile components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles-Bernard, Marielle; Kraehenbuehl, Karin; Rytz, Andreas; Roberts, Deborah D

    2005-06-01

    This study is the first of two publications that investigate the phenomena of coffee nonvolatiles interacting with coffee volatile compounds. The purpose was to identify which coffee nonvolatile(s) are responsible for the interactions observed between nonvolatile coffee brew constituents and thiols, sulfides, pyrroles, and diketones. The overall interaction of these compounds with coffee brews prepared with green coffee beans roasted at three different roasting levels (light, medium, and dark), purified nonvolatiles, and medium roasted coffee brew fractions (1% solids after 1 or 24 h) was measured using a headspace solid-phase microextraction technique. The dark roasted coffee brew was slightly more reactive toward the selected compounds than the light roasted coffee brew. Selected pure coffee constituents, such as caffeine, trigonelline, arabinogalactans, chlorogenic acid, and caffeic acid, showed few interactions with the coffee volatiles. Upon fractionation of medium roasted coffee brew by solid-phase extraction, dialysis, size exclusion chromatography, or anion exchange chromatography, characterization of each fraction, evaluation of the interactions with the aromas, and correlation between the chemical composition of the fractions and the magnitude of the interactions, the following general conclusions were drawn. (1) Low molecular weight and positively charged melanoidins present significant interactions. (2) Strong correlations were shown between the melanoidin and protein/peptide content, on one hand, and the extent of interactions, on the other hand (R = 0.83-0.98, depending on the volatile compound). (3) Chlorogenic acids and carbohydrates play a secondary role, because only weak correlations with the interactions were found in complex matrixes.

  20. Influence of growing altitude, shade and harvest period on quality and biochemical composition of Ethiopian specialty coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolessa, Kassaye; D'heer, Jolien; Duchateau, Luc; Boeckx, Pascal

    2017-07-01

    Coffee quality is a key characteristic for the international market, comprising cup quality and chemical bean constituents. In Ethiopia, using total specialty cup scores, coffees are grouped into Q1 (specialty 1) ≥ 85 and Q2 (80-84.75). This classification results in market segmentation and higher prices. Although different studies have evaluated the effects of altitude and shade on bean quality, optimum shade levels along different altitudinal ranges are not clearly indicated. Information on effects of harvest periods on coffee quality is also scanty. The present study examined the influences of these factors and their interactions on Ethiopian coffee quality RESULTS: Coffee from high altitude with open or medium shade and early to middle harvest periods had a superior bean quality. These growing conditions also favoured the production of beans with lower caffeine. An increasing altitude, from mid to high, at approximately 400 m, decreased caffeine content by 10%. At high altitude, dense shade decreased Q1 coffee by 50%. Compared to late harvesting, early harvesting increased the percentage from 27% to 73%. At mid altitude, > 80% is Q2 coffee. Changes of quality scores driven by altitude, shade and harvest period are small, although they may induce dramatic switches in the fraction Q1 versus Q2 coffee. The latter affects both farmers' profits and competitiveness in international markets. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Coffee Oil Consumption Increases Plasma Levels of 7alpha-Hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekschoten, M.V.; Hofman, M.K.; Buytenhek, R.; Schouten, E.G.; Princen, H.M.G.; Katan, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    Unfiltered coffee brews such as French press and espresso contain a lipid from coffee beans named cafestol that raises serum cholesterol in humans. Cafestol decreases the expression and activity of cholesterol 7-hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the classical pathway of bile acid synthesis, i

  2. Inibição da tripsina de bicho-mineiro do cafeeiro por um fator não-protéico presente em extratos de folhas de mamona Coffee leaf miner trypsin inhibition with castor bean leaf extracts mediated by a non-protein agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Duarte Rossi

    2010-04-01

    insects is a control form whose efficacy was verified by different authors. In order to observe the efficiency of castor bean leaf extracts in inhibiting trypsin-like enzymes of the coffee leaf miner, an experiment was carried out with the purpose of observing an "in vitro" inhibition phenomenon. The results of the trypsin inhibition tests with normal and boiled with and without β-mercaptoethanol 0.2% (v/v castor bean leaf extracts and the results of the acetone precipitation process indicated that the inhibitor is a heat-resistant molecule and it is not a protein. This way, the purification process was made by adsorption chromatography with later analysis in mass spectrometer. The reached results indicated that the presence of a trypsin inhibitor of the coffee leaf miner in the castor bean leaf extracts is capable of inhibiting 2.48 + 0.15 UTI, which stands for about 40% of inhibition. Tests performed with bovine trypsin indicated that the castor bean leaf extract have no inhibiting power on this enzyme.

  3. Simultaneous determination of 6 phenolic acids in coffee beans by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography%反相高效液相色谱法同时测定咖啡豆中的6种酚酸类化合物

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙文静; 张盛; 袁玲; 李银花; 刘仲华

    2011-01-01

    A method of reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detection ( HPLC-DAD ) was established for the simultaneous determination of 6 phenolic acids in green coffee beans. These phenolic acids are caffeic acid, 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid and 4,5-Odicaffeoylquinic acid. The separation was achieved using a Kromasil C18 column (200 mm ×4. 6 mm, 5 μm) under the gradient elution with the mobile phases of acetonitrile and 0. 1% (v/v) formic acid/water. The 6 phenolic acids were well separated within 45 min. The recoveries were from 90. 76% to 104. 73% with the relative standard deviations between 0. 7% and 3.9%.The method is simple, rapid and highly sensitive, suitable for the simultaneous determination of 6 phenolic acids and quality control of coffee beans.%建立了同时测定咖啡豆中6种酚酸类化合物(咖啡酸、3-咖啡酰奎尼酸、4-咖啡酰奎尼酸、5-咖啡酰奎尼酸、3,5-二咖啡酰奎尼酸、4,5-二咖啡酰奎尼酸)的反相高效液相色谱测定方法.采用Kromasil C柱(200 mm×4.6mm,5 μm),以乙腈和0.1%甲酸水溶液为流动相进行梯度洗脱,二极管阵列检测器检测,45 min内可对6种目标物进行同时检测,且各化合物都能达到基线分离.经测定,样品中6种酚酸类化合物的加标回收率为90.76%~104.73%,相对标准偏差为0.7%~3.9%.该法简便、快速、灵敏度高,适用于咖啡豆中6种酚酸类化合物的同时分析以及咖啡豆原料与制品的质量控制和综合评价.

  4. Coffee Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋涵毅

    2010-01-01

    天还是冷冷的,爸爸妈妈下班回家,我们可以为他们做些什么呢?My Mommy‘s favorite就是a cup of coffee。妈妈说每次我端出香香的咖啡给她的时候,她的寒意就完全没有啦。Well,今天就是我们的coffee time,让我给大家转述一下妈妈告诉我的咖啡故事吧。

  5. Coffee melanoidins: structures, mechanisms of formation and potential health impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Ana S P; Nunes, Fernando M; Domingues, M Rosário; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2012-09-01

    During the roasting process, coffee bean components undergo structural changes leading to the formation of melanoidins, which are defined as high molecular weight nitrogenous and brown-colored compounds. As coffee brew is one of the main sources of melanoidins in the human diet, their health implications are of great interest. In fact, several biological activities, such as antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticariogenic, anti-inflammatory, antihypertensive, and antiglycative activities, have been attributed to coffee melanoidins. To understand the potential of coffee melanoidin health benefits, it is essential to know their chemical structures. The studies undertaken to date dealing with the structural characterization of coffee melanoidins have shown that polysaccharides, proteins, and chlorogenic acids are involved in coffee melanoidin formation. However, exact structures of coffee melanoidins and mechanisms involved in their formation are far to be elucidated. This paper systematizes the available information and provides a critical overview of the knowledge obtained so far about the structure of coffee melanoidins, mechanisms of their formation, and their potential health implications.

  6. Activity of some isoenzymatic systems in stored coffee grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reni Saath

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Considering the worldwide consumption of coffee, it is natural that throughout the history many people have dedicated the research to markers that contribute somehow on gauging its quality. This research aimed to evaluate the biochemical performance of arabica coffee during storage. Coffee in beans (natural and in parchment (pulped dried in concrete terrace and in dryer with heated air were packed in jute bags and stored in not controlled environmental conditions. Enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase, polyphenoloxidase, esterase and lipoxygenase in coffee grains were evaluated at zero, three, six, nine and twelve months by means of electrophoresis. Independently of the drying method, the activity of isoenzymatic complexes highlighted deteriorative processes in stored grains of coffee. The treatments 60/40º C and 60º C used to reduce the water content imposed a greater stress condition, accelerated metabolism of natural coffee in the storage with decreased activity of defense mechanisms due to latent damage in these grains. Natural coffees are more sensible to high drying temperatures and its quality reduces faster than pulped coffee in the storage.

  7. Climate and Pest-Driven Geographic Shifts in Global Coffee Production: Implications for Forest Cover, Biodiversity and Carbon Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrach, Ainhoa; Ghazoul, Jaboury

    2015-01-01

    Coffee is highly sensitive to temperature and rainfall, making its cultivation vulnerable to geographic shifts in response to a changing climate. This could lead to the establishment of coffee plantations in new areas and potential conflicts with other land covers including natural forest, with consequent implications for biodiversity and ecosystem services. We project areas suitable for future coffee cultivation based on several climate scenarios and expected responses of the coffee berry borer, a principle pest of coffee crops. We show that the global climatically-suitable area will suffer marked shifts from some current major centres of cultivation. Most areas will be suited to Robusta coffee, demand for which could be met without incurring forest encroachment. The cultivation of Arabica, which represents 70% of consumed coffee, can also be accommodated in the future, but only by incurring some natural forest loss. This has corresponding implications for carbon storage, and is likely to affect areas currently designated as priority areas for biodiversity. Where Arabica coffee does encroach on natural forests, we project average local losses of 35% of threatened vertebrate species. The interaction of climate and coffee berry borer greatly influences projected outcomes.

  8. Climate and Pest-Driven Geographic Shifts in Global Coffee Production: Implications for Forest Cover, Biodiversity and Carbon Storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainhoa Magrach

    Full Text Available Coffee is highly sensitive to temperature and rainfall, making its cultivation vulnerable to geographic shifts in response to a changing climate. This could lead to the establishment of coffee plantations in new areas and potential conflicts with other land covers including natural forest, with consequent implications for biodiversity and ecosystem services. We project areas suitable for future coffee cultivation based on several climate scenarios and expected responses of the coffee berry borer, a principle pest of coffee crops. We show that the global climatically-suitable area will suffer marked shifts from some current major centres of cultivation. Most areas will be suited to Robusta coffee, demand for which could be met without incurring forest encroachment. The cultivation of Arabica, which represents 70% of consumed coffee, can also be accommodated in the future, but only by incurring some natural forest loss. This has corresponding implications for carbon storage, and is likely to affect areas currently designated as priority areas for biodiversity. Where Arabica coffee does encroach on natural forests, we project average local losses of 35% of threatened vertebrate species. The interaction of climate and coffee berry borer greatly influences projected outcomes.

  9. Induction of AhR-mediated gene transcription by coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Toshio; Takahashi, Satoshi; Morita, Koji; Okinaga, Hiroko; Teramoto, Tamio

    2014-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is classically known to be activated by xenobiotics such as dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although it has been reported that PAHs are contained in roasted coffee beans, in general coffee beverages are not considered to be AhR activators. We tested whether exposure to coffee would activate AhR in cultured cells. HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene were treated with coffee samples. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was quantitated by RT-PCR and Western blotting in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells, after treatment with coffee. In order to obtain sensitive and reproducible results, all the experiments were performed with the cells placed in either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or pure serum, instead of routinely-used culture medium, whose intrinsic AhR-stimulating activity turned out to be so strong as to interfere with the analyses. All the coffee samples tested robustly stimulated AhR-mediated transcription in the reporter gene assays. Of note, to what extent coffee and other AhR agonists activated AhR was different, depending on whether the experiments were done in PBS or serum. CYP1A1 mRNA was induced by coffee, in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells placed in either PBS or serum. CYP1A1 protein expression, which was not detected in these cells incubated in PBS, was also increased by coffee in cells placed in serum. By using culture medium-free experimental settings, we have shown that coffee is a strong AhR activator. Our observation may help elucidate as-yet-unrecognized effects of coffee on human health.

  10. Induction of AhR-mediated gene transcription by coffee.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Ishikawa

    Full Text Available Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR is classically known to be activated by xenobiotics such as dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. Although it has been reported that PAHs are contained in roasted coffee beans, in general coffee beverages are not considered to be AhR activators. We tested whether exposure to coffee would activate AhR in cultured cells.HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene were treated with coffee samples. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was quantitated by RT-PCR and Western blotting in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells, after treatment with coffee. In order to obtain sensitive and reproducible results, all the experiments were performed with the cells placed in either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS or pure serum, instead of routinely-used culture medium, whose intrinsic AhR-stimulating activity turned out to be so strong as to interfere with the analyses.All the coffee samples tested robustly stimulated AhR-mediated transcription in the reporter gene assays. Of note, to what extent coffee and other AhR agonists activated AhR was different, depending on whether the experiments were done in PBS or serum. CYP1A1 mRNA was induced by coffee, in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells placed in either PBS or serum. CYP1A1 protein expression, which was not detected in these cells incubated in PBS, was also increased by coffee in cells placed in serum.By using culture medium-free experimental settings, we have shown that coffee is a strong AhR activator. Our observation may help elucidate as-yet-unrecognized effects of coffee on human health.

  11. Potential of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for analyzing the quality of unroasted and ground coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tiago Varão; Hubinger, Silviane Zanni; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta; Milori, Débora Marcondes Bastos Pereira; Ferreira, Ednaldo José; Ferreira, Edilene Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Coffee is an important commodity and a very popular beverage around the world. Its economic value as well as beverage quality are strongly dependent of the quality of beans. The presence of defective beans in coffee blends has caused a negative impact on the beverage Global Quality (GQ) assessed by cupping tests. The main defective beans observed in the productive chain has been those Blacks, Greens and Sours (BGS). Chemical composition of BGS has a damaging impact on beverage GQ. That is why analytical tools are needed for monitoring and controlling the GQ in coffee agro-industry. Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) has been successfully applied for assessment of coffee quality. Another potential technique for direct, clean and fast measurement of coffee GQ is Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). Elements and diatomic molecules commonly present in organic compounds (structure) can be assessed by using LIBS. In this article is reported an evaluation of LIBS for the main interferents of GQ (BGS defects). Results confirm the great potential of LIBS for discriminating good beans from those with BGS defects by using emission lines of C, CN, C2 and N. Most importantly, some emission lines presented strong linear correlation (r > 0.9) with NIRS absorption bands assigned to proteins, lipids, sugar and carboxylic acids, suggesting LIBS potential to estimate these compounds in unroasted and ground coffee samples.

  12. Value-added and Supporting - Inhibiting Factors for the Wet Processing of Coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Hariyati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is one of the annual crops which are widely favored by coffee enjoyers. SidomulyoVillage is one of the fourth largest coffee producing villages in District of Silo with a land area of 180 ha in 2009. Coffee experiences a process of harvest and post harvest; one of the activities of post-harvest is coffee processing. Coffee processing is divided into two; wet processing and dry processing. The majority of farmers in SidomulyoVillage do dry processing; about 75% of farmers do dry processing and 25% of farmers do wet processing. This research was intended to: (1 to find out the value added coffee processed,(2 to identify supporting and inhibiting factors the farmers to do wet processing, and (3 to identify the income differences of farmers undertakingthe wet and dry processing. This research was carried out on purpose (purposive method in the Sidomulyo Village, District of Silo, by taking samples; that is the total sampling of farmer group of Sidomulyo 1. Data analysis used including value added, Force Field and financial analysis. The research results showed that: (1 value added of coffee beans processing turn to HS coffee was IDR 975,- whereas coffee beans processing turn to ose coffee was IDR 529,-. (2 The strongest supporting factor of wet processing was the ability to absorb workers, while the strongest inhibiting factor of wet processing was less adequate water facilities; (3 The coffee farmer incomescarrying out wet processing and dry processing were different. PerHa coffee income of wet processing was IDR 11,228,805,- and that of dry processing per ha was IDR 7,901,249,-

  13. Quality of Opuntia robusta and its use in development of mayonnaise-like product

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardino-Nicanor, Aurea; Hinojosa-Hernández, Emma Noemí; Juárez-Goiz, José Mayolo Simitrio; Montañez-Soto, José Luis; Ramírez-Ortiz, María Eugenia; González-Cruz, Leopoldo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize Opuntia robusta parenchyma and mucilage as foodstuffs. Solute absorption of Opuntia robusta parenchyma was studied, mucilage was used to develop a mayonnaise-like product as substitute emulsifier alternative to egg yolk and oil substitute. Shelf life of mayonnaise-like product was evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that oxalate calcium crystal were present in the Opuntia robusta parenchyma and mucilage with druses morphology; whereas...

  14. Differentiation of market coffee and its infusions in view of their mineral composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grembecka, Malgorzata; Malinowska, Ewa; Szefer, Piotr. E-mail: pszef@amg.gda.pl

    2007-09-20

    The concentrations of 14 elements (Ca, Mg, K, Na, P, Co, Mn, Fe, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, Cd, Pb) were determined in market coffee samples after dry mineralisation of both dry samples and infusions evaporated to dryness. The total metal contents were analysed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F-AAS) using deuterium-background correction. Phosphorus was determined in the form of phosphomolybdate by spectrophotometric method. Reliability of the procedure was checked by the analysis of the certified reference materials Tea (NCS DC 73351), Cabbage (IAEA-359) and Spinach leaves (NIST-1570). It was concluded, based on RDA calculated for essential metals, that coffee infusions are not an important source of bioelements in human diet. In the case of toxic elements Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake (PTWI) was estimated and there is no health hazard associated with exposure to Cd and Pb via coffee consumption. Significant correlation coefficients (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 and p < 0.05) were found between concentrations of some metals in coffee. Factor analysis and canonical analysis were applied to the data processing in order to characterise the market coffee samples. The 12 metals determined were considered as chemical descriptors of each sample. Based on the mineral composition, it was possible to differentiate chemometrically particular types of coffee distinguishing arabica from robusta, ground from instant coffee, and their infusions.

  15. Authentication of Italian Espresso coffee blends through the GC peak ratio between kahweol and 16-O-methylcafestol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacetti, Deborah; Boselli, Emanuele; Balzano, Michele; Frega, Natale G

    2012-12-01

    Since the price of Arabica is currently more than twice higher than Robusta, a rapid and reliable method for the determination of the roasted coffee blend composition is fundamental for the authentication of commercial blends used for the Italian Espresso coffee. A GC-FID method based on the ratio between the integrated peak areas of kahweol (K) divided by the sum of K and 16-O-methylcafestol (16MCF) was developed. No internal/external standard was used. Moreover, the quantitation of the unsaponifiable compounds is not necessary, as well as the calculation of any response factors. The percentage of Robusta in 34 samples of coffee blends with known composition, and in 48 samples of pure varieties was used to build a cubic polynomial function with R(2)=0.998. The roasting conditions did not affect the results. Considering eight commercial blends (ranging 0-90% Robusta), no significant difference (two-tailed P=0.817) was registered between the claimed and the predicted composition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Smashing CoffeeScript

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Brew the perfect code with CoffeeScript If you're familiar with JavaScript and the often-frustrating process of creating complex applications, a nice cup of CoffeeScript can help. CoffeeScript is a programming language that compiles into JavaScript and simplifies the entire development process. Now you can tap the full power of CoffeeScript with Smashing CoffeeScript. This full-color, practical book explains CoffeeScript language, syntax, and processes, and will soon have you producing concise and quality code. Ultimately, you'll create RIAs and mobile apps faster, with less

  17. Coffee and health

    OpenAIRE

    Jae-Hoon Bae; Jae-Hyung Park; Seung-Soon Im; Dae-Kyu Song

    2014-01-01

    Most people start their day with a cup of coffee. Many people would also finish their daily work with coffee. As such, coffee drinking is an important part of modern daily life. It has been told that coffee is a driving force for humans to develop science, because it has an alerting effect on the human brain. However, some people report experiencing irregular heartbeat or headaches and are thus reluctant to drink coffee, which suggests individual variation to coffee intolerance. The aim of th...

  18. Freezing as a treatment to prevent the spread of Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Robert C; Jang, Eric B; Follett, Peter A

    2013-04-01

    Coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) is the most serious insect pest of coffee around the world. Although it is already present in most of the world's major coffee growing regions, it is important to delay further spread and to prevent reintroductions that might include hyperparasites or improve the genetic base of existing populations. Green coffee is shipped around the world for custom blending and roasting and such shipments carry the risk of spreading H. hampei. We used heavily infested coffee berries as a surrogate for green coffee to test the freezing tolerance of H. hampei. After freezing, all life stages of H. hampei were dissected from coffee berries and mortality was assessed. Counting all life stages, > 15,000 insects were measured in this study. A temperature of approximately -15 degrees C (range, -13.9 to -15.5) for 48 h provided 100% control of all life stages. A logit regression model predicted coffee might be more economical and acceptable compared with fumigation with methyl bromide, especially for small-scale and organic growers and millers in Hawaii who ship green coffee beans to other islands for custom roasting. Freezing treatments could also be used to kill H. hampei in coffee seeds before export with minimal effects on seed germination if coffee seeds are first dried to critical water content levels in accordance with published methods.

  19. The influence of peeling and type of drying on chemical and sensorial analysis of organic coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima Caixeta Fernandes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Organic coffee is characterized by being produced without the use of chemical products and by having a similar or superior quality in comparison to that of coffee produced by traditional methods. The production of organic coffee does not include the use of highly soluble nutrients, which makes consumers concerned with environmental issues and healthy eating habits realize its true value. This paper aims to analyze the influence of harvesting, peeling and drying on the quality of organic coffee, in order to present the best way of producing high quality coffee. Samples of organic coffee were harvested by both conventional and selective ways, and some were peeled. They were then dried on concrete patio and on suspended terraces. The beans were analyzed for potassium leaching, electrical conductivity, titratable acidity, and submitted to coffee cupping-test. The results obtained indicated that the selective harvesting of the peeled or unpeeled cherry coffee dried on concrete terrace is feasible for production of fine coffees. This type of processing effectively influenced the final quality of the organic coffee, thus being an alternative to improve the quality and market value of the product, especially for small producers, cooperatives, and associations of coffee producers.

  20. Decaffeination process characteristic of Robusta coffee in single column reactor using ethyl acetate solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis experiment aims to know the solar energy efficiency of four clones of cocoa that cultivated under three different shading plants. This experiment has been done from September until December 2013 located at Kaliwining Experiment Farm with characteristic 45 m above sea level, soil type is low humic gley, soil texture is silty clay loam, and climate classification type D based on Scmidht and Fergusson Classification. This experiment used Nested Design as Experimental Design with species of shading plant as main plot which are Teak (Tectona grandis L., Krete (Cassia surattensis (Burm. F., Lamtoro (Leucaena leucocephala L. and Cocoa clones as sub plot which are Sulawesi 1, Sulawesi 2, KKM 22, KW 165. The observation of solar energy efficiency consists of daily solar radiation intensity, solar radiation intensity above plant, solar radiation intensity under plant, and also plant total dry weight. The experimental result showed that there is differences (heterogenity between shading location based on homogenity test by Bartlett Method. There are some interaction between the kind of shading plant and clones in parameter of interception efficiency, absorbtion efficiency, the efficiency of solar energy that caught by plant, and solar energy conversion efficiency. The efficiency of solar energy that caught by plant will affect the solar energy conversion efficiency with R2 = 0,86.  Keywords : Solar Energy Efficiency, Cocoa Clones, Shading Plant, Nested Design, Bartlett Method

  1. In-line monitoring of the coffee roasting process with near infrared spectroscopy: Measurement of sucrose and colour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, João Rodrigo; Viegas, Olga; Páscoa, Ricardo N M J; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O; Rangel, António O S S; Lopes, João Almeida

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a real-time and in-situ analytical tool based on near infrared spectroscopy is proposed to predict two of the most relevant coffee parameters during the roasting process, sucrose and colour. The methodology was developed taking in consideration different coffee varieties (Arabica and Robusta), coffee origins (Brazil, East-Timor, India and Uganda) and roasting process procedures (slow and fast). All near infrared spectroscopy-based calibrations were developed resorting to partial least squares regression. The results proved the suitability of this methodology as demonstrated by range-error-ratio and coefficient of determination higher than 10 and 0.85 respectively, for all modelled parameters. The relationship between sucrose and colour development during the roasting process is further discussed, in light of designing in real-time coffee products with similar visual appearance and distinct organoleptic profile.

  2. Potential of volatile compounds produced by fungi to influence sensory quality of coffee beverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iamanaka, B. T.; Teixeira, A. A.; Teixeira, A. R. R.

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are known producers of a large number of volatile compounds (VCs). Several VCs such as 2,4,6 trichloroanisole (TCA), geosmin and terpenes have been found in coffee beverages, and these compounds can be responsible for off-flavor development. However, few studies have related the fungal...... contamination of coffee with the sensory characteristics of the beverage. The aim of this research was to investigate the production of VCs by fungi isolated from coffee and their potential as modifiers of the sensory coffee beverage quality. Three species were isolated from coffee from the southwest of São...... Paulo state and selected for the study: Penicillium brevicompactum, Aspergillus luchuensis (belonging to section Nigri) and Penicillium sp. nov. (related to Penicillium crustosum). VCs produced by the fungal inoculated in raw coffee beans were extracted and tentatively identified by SPME...

  3. Exergoeconomic evaluation of real processes for coffee roasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučković Goran D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Exergoeconomic methods provide an effective approach for identifying, evaluating and reducing thermodynamic inefficiencies and costs in an energy system. The aim of this paper is to show the potential for cost reduction on the demand side, using the exergoeconomic method in the example of real processes for coffee roasting. More than 6.5•109 kg of coffee beans is roasted worldwide annually, mostly in batch roasters. Near the end of the roast, roasting coffee emits volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide and other pollutants, which in many industrialized countries have to be oxidized in afterburners. Afterburners release exhaust gases with a temperature of 250-450°C, depending on the roasting process and the method of exhaust gas cleaning. The aim of this paper is to use exergy analysis and exergoeconomic performance evaluation to determine the energy use for coffee roasting and the afterburning process, and evaluate the way to utilize waste heat and reduce costs in the factory. For roasters with the capacity of up to 4 tons of green coffee beans per hour, the potential of heat recovery is 1.1 MW and the possibility to save money is around 60,000 € per year. This case study is similar to many others worldwide, and the results of this analysis could lead to more general conclusions.

  4. Preservation of roasted and ground coffee during storage Part 1: Moisture content and repose angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo C. Corrêa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study evaluates the influence of the level of roasting and the grind size on the moisture content and repose angle of coffee during storage. Raw coffee beans (Coffea canephora and Coffea arabica, hulled and dried, were roasted to two different levels: medium light (SCAA#65 and moderately dark (SCAA#45. The beans were then ground into three different grind sizes: fine (0.59 mm, medium (0.84 mm and coarse (1.19 mm. An additional coffee lot was kept whole. Following grinding, samples were stored at two different temperatures (10 and 30 ºC and analyzed after five different storage durations (0, 30, 60, 120 and 180 days. The moderately dark roast was found to have a lower moisture content. Finely ground samples had higher angles of repose. It is concluded that the grind size, level of roasting and duration of storage significantly affect the moisture content and angle of repose of coffee.

  5. Recovery and Reutilization of Waste Matter from Coffee Preparation. An Experiment for Environmental Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orecchio, Santino

    2001-12-01

    This work is designed as an experience for organic and analytical chemistry laboratories in environmental science courses. Coffee grounds were chosen because they are easily available, they are a fine example of a waste product, and the students are familiar with them. The coffee bean is a source of a number of by-products. By comparing the physicochemical characteristics of coffee oil (from the grounds) with those of common oils, it is found that coffee oil shows similarity to palm oil. We hydrolysed the coffee oil and obtained a soap that had good detergent and foaming properties similar to olive oil soap or commercial products. Another beneficial aspect of the coffee bean results from the high content in organic matter (C = 48.9%) of the degreased coffee grounds, which allows their utilization to improve the fertility of soils. The total nitrogen content of the residue is higher than that of many composts and is similar to the nitrogen content of some commercial products employed for house plants. The economical, technical, and environmental advantages that frequently can derive from the recovery of some by-products of foods and beverages, such as the coffee grounds in this example, are evident.

  6. Wound healing activity of ethanolic extract of Shorea robusta Gaertn. f. resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, T A; Chandrashekara, H H; Kumar, D; Prasad, R; Gopal, A; Sardar, K K; Tandan, S K; Kumar, D

    2012-04-01

    The ethanolic extract of S. robusta resin (10 and 30 % w/w applied locally in excised and incised wounds) produced a dose-dependent acceleration in wound contraction and increased hydroxyproline content and tensile strength of wounds in rats. The results demonstrate wound healing activity of ethanolic extract of S. robusta resin.

  7. Inhibitory effect of a hot water extract of coffee "silverskin" on hyaluronidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Mina; Narita, Yusaku; Iwai, Kazuya; Fukunaga, Taiji; Nakagiri, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    Coffee "silverskin" (CS) is a by-product of the roasting procedure for coffee beans. A CS extract (CS-ext) was found to have a high inhibitory effect against hyaluronidase. It seems that the higher-molecular-weight substances in CS-ext contributed most to the hyaluronidase inhibition, while acidic polysaccharides mainly composed of uronic acid played a major role in this hyaluronidase inhibition by CS-ext.

  8. Coffee, its roasted form, and their residues cause birth failure and shorten lifespan in dengue vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieng, Hamady; Ellias, Salbiah Binti; Satho, Tomomitsu; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Abang, Fatimah; Ghani, Idris Abd; Noor, Sabina; Ahmad, Hamdan; Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Morales Vargas, Ronald E; Morales, Noppawan P; Hipolito, Cirilo N; Attrapadung, Siriluck; Noweg, Gabriel Tonga

    2017-06-01

    In dengue mosquitoes, successful embryonic development and long lifespan are key determinants for the persistence of both virus and vector. Therefore, targeting the egg stage and vector lifespan would be expected to have greater impacts than larvicides or adulticides, both strategies that have lost effectiveness due to the development of resistance. Therefore, there is now a pressing need to find novel chemical means of vector control. Coffee contains many chemicals, and its waste, which has become a growing environmental concern, is as rich in toxicants as the green coffee beans; these chemicals do not have a history of resistance in insects, but some are lost in the roasting process. We examined whether exposure to coffee during embryonic development could alter larval eclosion and lifespan of dengue vectors. A series of bioassays with different coffee forms and their residues indicated that larval eclosion responses of Aedes albopictus and Ae. aegypti were appreciably lower when embryonic maturation occurred in environments containing coffee, especially roasted coffee crude extract (RCC). In addition, the lifespan of adults derived from eggs that hatched successfully in a coffee milieu was reduced, but this effect was less pronounced with roasted and green coffee extracts (RCU and GCU, respectively). Taken together, these findings suggested that coffee and its residues have embryocidal activities with impacts that are carried over onto the adult lifespan of dengue vectors. These effects may significantly reduce the vectorial capacity of these insects. Reutilizing coffee waste in vector control may also represent a realistic solution to the issues associated with its pollution.

  9. The Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Puerto Rico: Distribution, Infestation, and Population per Fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Victor J.; García, José M.; Verle Rodrigues, José C.; García, Noelia M.; Bayman, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The coffee berry borer (CBB) (Hypothenemus hampei: Ferrar) was first detected in Puerto Rico in 2007. Its distribution since then has been extensive, but not extensively documented. An island-wide survey was carried out from August to November 2014 (the coffee production season) to assess CBB distribution, infestation, and population per fruit. The CBB was well-established throughout the coffee-growing area of Puerto Rico, but was not evenly distributed. Infestation (or percentages of fruits perforated) in sites sampled ranged from 0 to 95%, and CBB number per infested fruit varied from 1 to 34 individuals. CBB infestation and total population per fruit were positively correlated with altitude. Highest infestation and total population were observed in sites located >400 masl; most of the coffee-producing area in Puerto Rico is above this altitude. Coffea arabica (L.) had higher CBB infestation and population per fruit than Coffea canephora (Pierre ex A. Froehner) (robusta coffee). Based on these results, management tools should be implemented to mitigate the severe damage that CBB is causing in Puerto Rico. These management tools should include the removal of all fruits that remain on the plants after harvest and the use of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Balls.) Vuill. for biocontrol, especially on coffee farms at higher elevations.

  10. Differentiation of market coffee and its infusions in view of their mineral composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grembecka, Małgorzata; Malinowska, Ewa; Szefer, Piotr

    2007-09-20

    The concentrations of 14 elements (Ca, Mg, K, Na, P, Co, Mn, Fe, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, Cd, Pb) were determined in market coffee samples after dry mineralisation of both dry samples and infusions evaporated to dryness. The total metal contents were analysed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F-AAS) using deuterium-background correction. Phosphorus was determined in the form of phosphomolybdate by spectrophotometric method. Reliability of the procedure was checked by the analysis of the certified reference materials Tea (NCS DC 73351), Cabbage (IAEA-359) and Spinach leaves (NIST-1570). It was concluded, based on RDA calculated for essential metals, that coffee infusions are not an important source of bioelements in human diet. In the case of toxic elements Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake (PTWI) was estimated and there is no health hazard associated with exposure to Cd and Pb via coffee consumption. Significant correlation coefficients (pcoffee. Factor analysis and canonical analysis were applied to the data processing in order to characterise the market coffee samples. The 12 metals determined were considered as chemical descriptors of each sample. Based on the mineral composition, it was possible to differentiate chemometrically particular types of coffee distinguishing arabica from robusta, ground from instant coffee, and their infusions.

  11. Quantification of Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora var. robusta concentration in blends by means of synchronous fluorescence and UV-Vis spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankowska, A; Domagała, A; Kowalewski, W

    2017-09-01

    The potential of fluorescence, UV-Vis spectroscopies as well as the low- and mid-level data fusion of both spectroscopies for the quantification of concentrations of roasted Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora var. robusta in coffee blends was investigated. Principal component analysis was used to reduce data multidimensionality. To calculate the level of undeclared addition, multiple linear regression (PCA-MLR) models were used with lowest root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC) of 3.6% and root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV) of 7.9%. LDA analysis was applied to fluorescence intensities and UV spectra of Coffea arabica, canephora samples, and their mixtures in order to examine classification ability. The best performance of PCA-LDA analysis was observed for data fusion of UV and fluorescence intensity measurements at wavelength interval of 60nm. LDA showed that data fusion can achieve over 96% of correct classifications (sensitivity) in the test set and 100% of correct classifications in the training set, with low-level data fusion. The corresponding results for individual spectroscopies ranged from 90% (UV-Vis spectroscopy) to 77% (synchronous fluorescence) in the test set, and from 93% to 97% in the training set. The results demonstrate that fluorescence, UV, and visible spectroscopies complement each other, giving a complementary effect for the quantification of roasted Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora var. robusta concentration in blends. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dipstick test for DNA-based food authentication. Application to coffee authenticity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trantakis, Ioannis A; Spaniolas, Stelios; Kalaitzis, Panagiotis; Ioannou, Penelope C; Tucker, Gregory A; Christopoulos, Theodore K

    2012-01-25

    This paper reports DNA-based food authenticity assays, in which species identification is accomplished by the naked eye without the need of specialized instruments. Strongly colored nanoparticles (gold nanoparticles) are employed as reporters that enable visual detection. Furthermore, detection is performed in a low-cost, disposable, dipstick-type device that incorporates the required reagents in dry form, thereby avoiding multiple pipetting and incubation steps. Due to its simplicity, the method does not require highly qualified personnel. The procedure comprises the following steps: (i) PCR amplification of the DNA segment that flanks the unique SNP (species marker); (ii) a 15 min extension reaction in which DNA polymerase extends an allele-specific primer only if it is perfectly complementary with the target sequence; (iii) detection of the products of the extension reaction within a few minutes by the naked eye employing the dipstick. No purification is required prior to application of the extension products to the dipstick. The method is general and requires only a unique DNA sequence for species discrimination. The only instrument needed is a conventional thermocycler for PCR, which is common equipment in every DNA laboratory. As a model, the method was applied to the discrimination of Coffea robusta and arabica species in coffee authenticity assessment. As low as 5% of Robusta coffee can be detected in the presence of Arabica coffee.

  13. Characterisation of AC1: a naturally decaffeinated coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Benjamim Benatti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared the biochemical characteristics of the beans of a naturally decaffeinated Arabica coffee (AC1 discovered in 2004 with those of the widely grown Brazilian Arabica cultivar "Mundo Novo" (MN. Although we observed differences during fruit development, the contents of amino acids, organic acids, chlorogenic acids, soluble sugars and trigonelline were similar in the ripe fruits of AC1 and MN. AC1 beans accumulated theobromine, and caffeine was almost entirely absent. Tests on the supply of [2-14C] adenine and enzymatic analysis of theobromine synthase and caffeine synthase in the endosperm of AC1 confirmed that, as in the leaves, caffeine synthesis is blocked during the methylation of theobromine to caffeine. The quality of the final coffee beverage obtained from AC1 was similar to that of MN.

  14. Coffee and liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriel, Pablo; Arauz, Jonathan

    2010-07-01

    Coffee consumption is worldwide spread with few side effects. Interestingly, coffee intake has been inversely related to the serum enzyme activities gamma-glutamyltransferase, and alanine aminotransferase in studies performed in various countries. In addition, epidemiological results, taken together, indicate that coffee consumption is inversely related with hepatic cirrhosis; however, they cannot demonstrate a causative role of coffee with prevention of liver injury. Animal models and cell culture studies indicate that kahweol, diterpenes and cafestol (some coffee compounds) can function as blocking agents by modulating multiple enzymes involved in carcinogenic detoxification; these molecules also alter the xenotoxic metabolism by inducing the enzymes glutathione-S-transferase and inhibiting N-acetyltransferase. Drinking coffee has been associated with reduced risk of hepatic injury and cirrhosis, a major pathogenic step in the process of hepatocarcinogenesis, thus, the benefit that produces coffee consumption on hepatic cancer may be attributed to its inverse relation with cirrhosis, although allowance for clinical history of cirrhosis did not completely account for the inverse association. Therefore, it seems to be a continuum of the beneficial effect of coffee consumption on liver enzymes, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. At present, it seems reasonable to propose experiments with animal models of liver damage and to test the effect of coffee, and/or isolated compounds of this beverage, not only to evaluate the possible causative role of coffee but also its action mechanism. Clinical prospective double blind studies are also needed. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Performance of coffee origin and genotype in organoleptic and physical quality of arabica coffee in North Sumatra Province of Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malau, Sabam; Siagian, Albiner; Sirait, Bilter; Pandiangan, Samse

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this research was to determine effect of coffee origin and genotype on organoleptic and physical quality of Arabica coffea L. growing in North Sumatra. Seven districts treated as origins and 28 genotypes were chosen. The research was conducted with nested design with 3 factors. Organoleptic parameters were fragrance/aroma, flavor, aftertaste, acidity, body, uniformity, balance, clean cup, sweetness, overall and total score. Physical quality was green bean weight. The results revealed that origins affected significantly organoleptic quality. Coffee from Dairi showed the highest total score (90,82). Genotypes were significantly different in organoleptic quality. Genotype Da17, Da18, Da19, Da20 and Hu4 had the best total score (89,85 -91,68). Total score did not correlate with green bean weight but had positive correlation with altitude. Among organoleptic parameters, acidity was more significant for total score (r2 = 0,836). Altitude had more effect on acidity (r2 = 0,486).

  16. Determination of volatile marker compounds of common coffee roast defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ni; Liu, Chujiao; Liu, Xingkun; Degn, Tina Kreuzfeldt; Munchow, Morten; Fisk, Ian

    2016-11-15

    Coffee beans from the same origin were roasted using six time-temperature profiles, in order to identify volatile aroma compounds associated with five common roast coffee defects (light, scorched, dark, baked and underdeveloped). Thirty-seven volatile aroma compounds were selected on the basis that they had previously been identified as potent odorants of coffee and were also identified in all coffee brew preparations; the relative abundance of these aroma compounds was then evaluated using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with headspace solid phase micro extraction. Some of the 37 key aroma compounds were significantly changed in each coffee roast defect and changes in one marker compound was chosen for each defect type, that is, indole for light defect, 4-ethyl-2-methoxyphenol for scorched defect, phenol for dark defect, maltol for baked defect and 2,5-dimethylfuran for underdeveloped defect. The association of specific changes in aroma profiles for different roast defects has not been shown previously and could be incorporated into screening tools to enable the coffee industry quickly identify if roast defects occur during production.

  17. KAJIAN CIDER SEBAGAI ALTERNATIF PENGANEKARAGAMAN PRODUK KOPI Study of Cider as Alternative Product Diversivication from Coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suharyono Apno Sugito

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is an important export commodity from Indonesia. There are not many processed product from coffee, and sincecoffee is a delightful refreshing beverage, it is interesting to make product diversivication from coffee. An alternative processing could be a cider. Coffee used in this research were decaffeinated, Robusta and Arabica coffee. The amount of added sugar were 15 %, 20 %, and 25 %. Natural cultures, combination of Sacharomyces cerevisiae and Acetobacter xylinum, combination of Sacharomyces ludwigii and Acetobacter xylinum, combination of  S. cerevisiae, S. ludwigii, and A. xylinum were used as starters. The parameters observed included: reducing sugar content, alcohol, total tertitrasi acid, pH and Organoleptic Test (color, aroma, taste, clarity, and general acceptance. Coffee cider with the highest overall acceptance score was made from decaffeinated coffee, with 20 % sugar addition and combination of S. ludwigii and A. xylinum as starter.The result of correlation analysis showed a negative significant correlation between reducing sugar content and aroma of coffee cider. Positive significant correlation were found between total titrable acidity and aroma, taste and overall acceptance of coffee cider. ABSTRAK Kopi merupakan komoditas ekspor penting   Indonesia. Tidak banyak produk olahan dari kopi, yang lebih dikenalsebagai minuman menyegarkan dan menyenangkan, sehingga menarik untuk membuat diversifikasi produk kopi. Salah satu alternatif adalah pengolahan cider. Kopi yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah kopi tanpa kafein, Robusta dan Arabika. Jumlah gula yang ditambahkan adalah 15 %, 20 %, dan 25 %. Kultur alami, kombinasi Sacharomyces cerevisea dan Acetobacter xylinum, kombinasi Sacharomyces Ludwigii dan Acetobacter xylinum, kombinasi S. cerevisiae, S.Ludwigii , dan A.xylinum digunakan sebagai starter. Parameter yang diamati meliputi: kadar gula pereduksi, alkohol, total asam tertitrasi, pH dan Uji Organoleptik (warna

  18. Identification of two metallothioneins as novel inhalative coffee allergens cof a 2 and cof a 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Peters

    Full Text Available Dust of green coffee beans is known to be a relevant cause for occupational allergic disorders in coffee industry workers. Recently, we described the first coffee allergen (Cof a 1 establishing an allergenic potential of green coffee dust.Our aim was to identify allergenic components of green coffee in order to enhance inhalative coffee allergy diagnosis.A Coffea arabica pJuFo cDNA phage display library was created and screened for IgE binding with sera from allergic coffee workers. Two further coffee allergens were identified by sequence analysis, expressed in E. coli, and evaluated by Western blots. The prevalence of sensitization to recombinant Cof a 1, Cof a 2, and Cof a 3 and to commercially available extract was investigated by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay respectively CAP (capacity test screening in 18 sera of symptomatic coffee workers.In addition to the previously described chitinase Cof a 1, two Coffea arabica cysteine-rich metallothioneins of 9 and 7 kDa were identified and included in the IUIS Allergen Nomenclature as Cof a 2 and Cof a 3. Serum IgE antibodies to at least one of the recombinant allergens were found in 8 out of 18 symptomatic coffee workers (44%. Only 2 of the analysed sera (11% had reacted previously to the commercial allergy test.In addition to the previously described Cof a 1 we have identified two further coffee proteins to be type I coffee allergens (Cof a 2 and Cof a 3 which may have a relevant potential for the specific diagnosis and/or therapy of coffee allergy.

  19. Identification of two metallothioneins as novel inhalative coffee allergens cof a 2 and cof a 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ulrike; Frenzel, Karsten; Brettschneider, Reinhold; Oldenburg, Marcus; Bittner, Cordula

    2015-01-01

    Dust of green coffee beans is known to be a relevant cause for occupational allergic disorders in coffee industry workers. Recently, we described the first coffee allergen (Cof a 1) establishing an allergenic potential of green coffee dust. Our aim was to identify allergenic components of green coffee in order to enhance inhalative coffee allergy diagnosis. A Coffea arabica pJuFo cDNA phage display library was created and screened for IgE binding with sera from allergic coffee workers. Two further coffee allergens were identified by sequence analysis, expressed in E. coli, and evaluated by Western blots. The prevalence of sensitization to recombinant Cof a 1, Cof a 2, and Cof a 3 and to commercially available extract was investigated by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) respectively CAP (capacity test) screening in 18 sera of symptomatic coffee workers. In addition to the previously described chitinase Cof a 1, two Coffea arabica cysteine-rich metallothioneins of 9 and 7 kDa were identified and included in the IUIS Allergen Nomenclature as Cof a 2 and Cof a 3. Serum IgE antibodies to at least one of the recombinant allergens were found in 8 out of 18 symptomatic coffee workers (44%). Only 2 of the analysed sera (11%) had reacted previously to the commercial allergy test. In addition to the previously described Cof a 1 we have identified two further coffee proteins to be type I coffee allergens (Cof a 2 and Cof a 3) which may have a relevant potential for the specific diagnosis and/or therapy of coffee allergy.

  20. Processed coffee alleviates DSS-induced colitis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd L. Fiebich

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBackground: Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world and it has been demonstrated that it has important therapeutic activities not only because of its caffeine content but also owing to the presence of other biologically active small molecules such as chlorogenic acid, trigonelline and cyclopentadiones. However, chlorogenic acid is degraded into catechol, pyrogallol and hydroxyhydroquinone, which are thought to induce irritation of the gastric mucosa. To reduce the content of irritant compounds processing methods have been developed prior to roasting the coffee beans.Objectives: The aim of this study was to study the anti-inflammatory and gastro-protective effects of processed coffee (Idee-Kaffee on in LPS-treated human primary monocytes and in a murine model of colon inflammation (IBD model.Results: In this study we have analyzed the effects on inflammatory events in cultured cells and in mice drinking a commercially available processed coffee. The processed coffee inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF, IL-6 and IL-8, and other inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandin (PGE2 and 8-isoprostane in cultured human primary monocytes. Oral administration of dissolved processed coffee, i.e., in its usual beverage form, improved greatly the adverse macroscopic and histological features of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced colitis in mice in a dose-dependent manner. Processed coffee not only largely prevented DSS-induced colitis but also dramatically suppressed in vivo NF-B and STAT3 activities through inhibition of IB and STAT3 phosphorylation. Furthermore, this solubleFunctional Foods in Health and Disease 2013; 3(5:133-145coffee bean extract reduced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNF, IL-11, and IL-6 and the expression of cyclooxygenase (COX-2 in colonic tissues.Conclusions: This work identified

  1. Characterization of polysaccharides extracted from spent coffee grounds by alkali pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Lina F; Cerqueira, Miguel A; Teixeira, José A; Mussatto, Solange I

    2015-01-01

    Spent coffee grounds (SCG), obtained during the processing of coffee powder with hot water to make soluble coffee, are the main coffee industry residues and retain approximately seventy percent of the polysaccharides present in the roasted coffee beans. The purpose of this study was to extract polysaccharides from SCG by using an alkali pretreatment with sodium hydroxide at 25°C, and determine the chemical composition, as well as the antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of the extracted polysaccharides. Galactose (60.27%mol) was the dominant sugar in the recovered polysaccharides, followed by arabinose (19.93%mol), glucose (15.37%mol) and mannose (4.43%mol). SCG polysaccharides were thermostable, and presented a typical carbohydrate pattern. Additionally, they showed good antioxidant activity through different methods and presented high antimicrobial percent inhibition against Phoma violacea and Cladosporium cladosporioides (41.27% and 54.60%, respectively). These findings allow identifying possible applications for these polysaccharides in the food industry.

  2. Application of artificial neural engineering and regression models for forecasting shelf life of instant coffee drink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Goyal

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Coffee as beverage is prepared from the roasted seeds (beans of the coffee plant. Coffee is the second most important product in the international market in terms of volume trade and the most important in terms of value. Artificial neural engineering and regression models were developed to predict shelf life of instant coffee drink. Colour and appearance, flavour, viscosity and sediment were used as input parameters. Overall acceptability was used as output parameter. The dataset consisted of experimentally developed 50 observations. The dataset was divided into two disjoint subsets, namely, training set containing 40 observations (80% of total observations and test set comprising of 10 observations (20% of total observations. The network was trained with 500 epochs. Neural network toolbox under Matlab 7.0 software was used for training the models. From the investigation it was revealed that multiple linear regression model was superior over radial basis model for forecasting shelf life of instant coffee drink.

  3. Understanding the fate of chlorogenic acids in coffee roasting using mass spectrometry based targeted and non-targeted analytical strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Rakesh; Matei, Marius F; Golon, Agnieszka; Witt, Matthias; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2012-09-01

    Coffee is one of mankind's most popular beverages obtained from green coffee beans by roasting. Much effort has been expended towards the chemical characterisation of the components of the roasted coffee bean, frequently termed melanoidines, which are dominated byproducts formed from its most relevant secondary metabolites - chlorogenic acids. However, impeded by a lack of suitable authentic reference standards and analytical techniques sufficiently powerful for providing insight into an extraordinarily complex enigmatic material, unsurprisingly little structural and mechanistic information about the products of coffee roasting is available. Here we report on the characterisation of low molecular weight melanoidine fractions of roasted coffee using a conceptually novel combination of targeted and non-targeted mass spectrometrical techniques. We provide an unprecedented account of the chemical composition of roasted coffee beans. Using a targeted analytical approach we show for the first time, by comparison to authentic reference standards obtained by chemical synthesis, that chlorogenic acids follow four distinct reaction pathways including epimerization, acyl migration, lactonisation and dehydration. The analytical strategy employed in a non-targeted approach uses high resolution mass spectrometry to identify the most abundant molecular formulas present in roasted coffee samples and model roasts followed by van Krevelen and homologous series analysis. We identified the molecular formulas formed from reactions of chlorogenic acids, carbohydrates and proteins, both between classes of compounds and within same classes of compounds. Furthermore, we identified two new classes of compounds formed from chlorogenic acids during roasting, chlorogenic acid acetates and O-phenolic quinoyl and shikimoyl esters of chlorogenic acids.

  4. Variabilidade genética do rendimento intrínseco de grãos em germoplasma de Coffea Genetic variability for bean outturn in Coffea germplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana de Gaspari-Pezzopane

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available O rendimento intrínseco do café, relação percentual entre a massa de dois grãos normais tipo chato e do respectivo fruto que os contém, foi estudado em seis grupos de germoplasma de Coffea, com o objetivo de se conhecer a variabilidade genética para essa característica. Investigou-se o rendimento intrínseco de Coffea arabica em um grupo de cinco cultivares de porte baixo, em outro contendo 22 cultivares e seleções e, ainda, em outro grupo com 79 cultivares, variedades e formas botânicas, mutantes e acessos da Etiópia. Em C. canephora, foram analisados três acessos da variedade kouilou e 10 acessos da variedade robusta. Investigaram-se ainda, outras oito espécies do gênero Coffea. Observou-se considerável variabilidade genética tanto entre representantes de C. arabica quanto de C. canephora, assim como entre as diferentes espécies do gênero Coffea. A amplitude de variação nos valores de rendimento intrínseco referente ao último grupo foi bem maior que a de qualquer outro grupo estudado. A magnitude das variações observadas e as implicações econômicas do rendimento intrínseco indicam que essa característica pode ser utilizada como um critério adicional de seleção no melhoramento de C. arabica e C. canephora.The intrinsic coffee bean outturn, percent weight ratio of two normal flat beans and the respective whole fruit, was studied in six Coffea germplasm groups in order to investigate the genetic variability for this characteristic. It was evaluated in C. arabica a group of five short stature cultivars, another group composed of 22 cultivars and selections yet a third group of 79 items comprising cultivars, botanical varieties and types, mutations and accessions from Ethiopia. In C. canephora it were studied three acessions of var. kouilou and ten of var. robusta. It were investigated also eight other species of the genus Coffea. Considerable genetic variability was detected within C. arabica and C. canephora and

  5. [Coffee and diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Kerstin; Martin, Stephan

    2010-12-01

    Lack of physical activity and high caloric diet are main causes for increasing diabetes prevalence. Thus, it is possible to influence blood glucose levels by lifestyle modifications. Coffee is an important lifestyle factor in Germany with a mean consumption of about 150 litres per inhabitant. It is important to know that coffee cannot be equated with caffeine. Scientific investigations have shown that caffeine can temporarily have a negative impact on cardiovascular risk factors but does not promote development of cardiovascular events. On the other hand, several international prospective studies demonstrate a protective effect of coffee on the development of type 2 diabetes as coffee consumption can reduce glucose uptake. Coffee components, e.g. chlorogenic acid, play a central role, as they can inhibit oxidative stress and inflammation in addition. In the context of lifestyle tasks coffee consumption therefore is an additional option for modifying diabetes risk.

  6. Quantification of caffeine, trigonelline and nicotinic acid in espresso coffee: the influence of espresso machines and coffee cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprioli, Giovanni; Cortese, Manuela; Maggi, Filippo; Minnetti, Caterina; Odello, Luigi; Sagratini, Gianni; Vittori, Sauro

    2014-06-01

    Caffeine, trigonelline and nicotinic acid are important bioactive constituents of coffee. In this work, the combination of different water temperatures and pressures in the settings of the espresso coffee (EC) machine was evaluated, to assess how these factors influence how effectively caffeine, trigonelline and nicotinic acid are extracted from both Arabica and Robusta samples. The proposed analytical method, based on a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system coupled to a variable wavelength detector (VWD), showed good linearity (R²> 0.9985) and good recoveries (71-92%); after validation for three monitored compounds, the method was used to analyze 20 commercial samples. The combination of a temperature of 92 °C and pressure at 7 or 9 bar seems to be the ideal setting for the most efficient extraction of these compounds and consequently for their intake; the compound extracted in the greatest quantity was caffeine, which was in the range of 116.87-199.68 mg in a 25 ml cup of coffee.

  7. Coffee's country of origin determined by NMR: the Colombian case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, V A; Medina, J; Alarcon, R; Moreno, E; Heintz, L; Schäfer, H; Wist, J

    2015-05-15

    The determination of the origin of coffee beans by NMR fingerprinting has been shown promising and classification has been reported for samples of different countries and continents. Here we show that this technique can be extended and applied to discriminate coffee samples from one country against all others, including its closest neighbors. Very high classification rates are reported using a large number of spectra (>300) acquired over a two-year period. As original aspects it can be highlighted that this study was performed in fully automatic mode and with non-deuterated coffee extracts. This is achieved using a series of experiments to procure a robust suppression of the solvent peaks. As is, the method represents a cost effective opportunity for countries to protect their national productions.

  8. Cellular Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Coffee Extracts with Different Roasting Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Soohan; Kim, Min Hyung; Park, Jae Hee; Jeong, Yoonhwa; Ko, Kwang Suk

    2017-06-01

    During roasting, major changes occur in the composition and physiological effects of coffee beans. In this study, in vitro antioxidant effects and anti-inflammatory effects of Coffea arabica green coffee extracts were investigated at different roasting levels corresponding to Light, Medium, City, and French roast. Total caffeine did not show huge difference according to roasting level, but total chlorogenic acid contents were higher in light roasted coffee extract than other roasted groups. In addition, light roasted coffee extract had the highest antioxidant activity in the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. To determine the in vitro antioxidant property, coffee extracts were used to treat AML-12 cells. Intracellular glutathione (GSH) concentration and mRNA expression levels of genes related to GSH synthesis were negatively related to roasting levels. The anti-inflammatory effects of coffee extracts were investigated in lipopolysaccharide-treated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. The cellular antioxidant activity of coffee extracts exhibited similar patterns as the AML-12 cells. The expression of mRNA for tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 was decreased in cells treated with the coffee extracts and the expression decreased with increasing roasting levels. These data suggest that coffee has physiological antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities and these effects are negatively correlated with roasting levels in the cell models.

  9. Coffee and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Bodil Hammer

    the effect of caffeine on mean birth weight and gestational age in a randomised controlled double-blinded trial with 1,207 women randomised to either caffeinated or decaffeinated instant coffee. We found no difference in mean birth weight or gestational age between children of mothers randomised...... to caffeinated or women randomised to decaffeinated coffee. Women who smoked more than 10 cigarettes per day and were randomised to caffeinated coffee gave birth to children with an average adjusted birth weight of 263 gram (95 % CI: 97,430) less than women randomised to decaffeinated coffee. In a nested case...

  10. [Coffee in Cancer Chemoprevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwirthová, J; Gál, B; Smilek, P; Urbánková, P

    Coffee consumption is associated with a reduced risk of several diseases including cancer. Its chemopreventive effect has been studied in vitro, in animal models, and more recently in humans. Several modes of action have been proposed, namely, inhibition of oxidative stress and damage, activation of metabolizing liver enzymes involved in carcinogen detoxification processes, and anti-inflammatory effects. The antioxidant activity of coffee relies partly on its chlorogenic acid content and is increased during the roasting process. Maximum antioxidant activity is observed for medium-roasted coffee. The roasting process leads to the formation of several components, e.g., melanoidins, which have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Coffee also contains two specific diterpenes, cafestol and kahweol, which have anticarcinogenic properties. Roasted coffee is a complex mixture of various chemicals. Previous studies have reported that the chemopreventive components present in coffee induce apoptosis, inhibit growth and metastasis of tumor cells, and elicit antiangiogenic effects. A meta-analysis of epidemiological studies showed that coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of developing various malignant tumors. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms and the experimental and epidemiological evidence supporting the chemopreventive effect of coffee.Key words: coffee - chemoprevention - antioxidative enzyme - detoxification enzyme - anti-inflammatory effect The authors declare they have no potential conflicts of interest concerning drugs, products, or services used in the study. The Editorial Board declares that the manuscript met the ICMJE recommendation for biomedical papers.Submitted: 11. 9. 2016Accepted: 24. 11. 2016.

  11. Too much coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Olesen, Birgitte Ravn

    coffee can be motivated to drink less coffee. The ethnomethodological perspective reveals how the participants’ different common-sense and hierarchical perceptions of a normative theory and its meaning in practice appears to guide the talk about how to motivate the patient to drink less coffee....... The negotiation between the researchers’ and practitioners’ approach to the coffee drinking patient facilitate a more profound understanding of how different knowledge forms can be at play in other ways than expected. In conclusion the findings show that dialogue and interplay between different knowledge forms...

  12. Too much coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Olesen, Birgitte Ravn

    coffee can be motivated to drink less coffee. The ethnomethodological perspective reveals how the participants’ different common-sense and hierarchical perceptions of a normative theory and its meaning in practice appears to guide the talk about how to motivate the patient to drink less coffee....... The negotiation between the researchers’ and practitioners’ approach to the coffee drinking patient facilitate a more profound understanding of how different knowledge forms can be at play in other ways than expected. In conclusion the findings show that dialogue and interplay between different knowledge forms...

  13. Peppery Hot Bean Curd

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    Peppery Hot Bean Curd is a famous dish that originated in Chengdu,Sichuan Province.Dating back to the year under the reign of Emperor Tongzhi during the Qing Dynasty(1862-1875),a woman chef named Chen created this dish.In Chinese it is called Mapo Bean Curd. Ingredients:Three pieces of bean curd,100 grams lean pork,25 grams green soy beans or garlic

  14. Genetic characterization of an elite coffee germplasm assessed by gSSR and EST-SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missio, R F; Caixeta, E T; Zambolim, E M; Pena, G F; Zambolim, L; Dias, L A S; Sakiyama, N S

    2011-10-06

    Coffee is one of the main agrifood commodities traded worldwide. In 2009, coffee accounted for 6.1% of the value of Brazilian agricultural production, generating a revenue of US$6 billion. Despite the importance of coffee production in Brazil, it is supported by a narrow genetic base, with few accessions. Molecular differentiation and diversity of a coffee breeding program were assessed with gSSR and EST-SSR markers. The study comprised 24 coffee accessions according to their genetic origin: arabica accessions (six traditional genotypes of C. arabica), resistant arabica (six leaf rust-resistant C. arabica genotypes with introgression of Híbrido de Timor), robusta (five C. canephora genotypes), Híbrido de Timor (three C. arabica x C. canephora), triploids (three C. arabica x C. racemosa), and racemosa (one C. racemosa). Allele and polymorphism analysis, AMOVA, the Student t-test, Jaccard's dissimilarity coefficient, cluster analysis, correlation of genetic distances, and discriminant analysis, were performed. EST-SSR markers gave 25 exclusive alleles per genetic group, while gSSR showed 47, which will be useful for differentiating accessions and for fingerprinting varieties. The gSSR markers detected a higher percentage of polymorphism among (35% higher on average) and within (42.9% higher on average) the genetic groups, compared to EST-SSR markers. The highest percentage of polymorphism within the genetic groups was found with gSSR markers for robusta (89.2%) and for resistant arabica (39.5%). It was possible to differentiate all genotypes including the arabica-related accessions. Nevertheless, combined use of gSSR and EST-SSR markers is recommended for coffee molecular characterization, because EST-SSRs can provide complementary information.

  15. Produtividade do cafeeiro Mundo Novo enxertado e submetido à adubação verde antes e após recepa da lavoura Productivity of grafted coffee during intercropping with five leguminous species in the western region of São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison Martins Paulo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudaram-se a produção e o crescimento do cafeeiro Mundo Novo (Coffea arabica L. enxertado sobre o Apoatã IAC 2258 (Coffea canephora Pierre ex Froehner submetido à adubação verde com as seguintes espécies leguminosas: crotalária espectábilis (Crotalaria spectabilis Roth., crotalária júncea (Crotalaria juncea L., guandu [Cajanus cajan (L. Millsp.], mucuna anã (Stizolobium deeringeanum Bort. e soja IAC 9 [Glycine max (L. Merril] e um tratamento testemunha sem plantas leguminosas. As leguminosas foram semeadas a 50 cm da projeção da copa dos cafeeiros e incorporadas no florescimento. O experimento foi desenvolvido no Pólo Regional de Desenvolvimento Tecnológico dos Agronegócios da Alta Paulista, em Adamantina, no período de 1989 a 1995. Adotou-se o delineamento estatístico de blocos ao acaso com seis tratamentos e cinco repetições. Os adubos verdes crotalária espectábilis, crotalária júncea, mucuna anã e soja, durante o período experimental, e a crotalária espectábilis após a recepa, não diminuíram a produção do cafeeiro. O guandu, embora tenha aumentado o teor de matéria orgânica do solo, foi a única leguminosa que diminuiu a produção e o diâmetro do caule dos cafeeiros. O guandu e a crotalária júncea, respectivamente, produziram as maiores quantidades de fitomassa seca. A produção do café se correlacionou inversamente com a fitomassa seca das leguminosas e positivamente com altura e diâmetro do caule do cafeeiro.Yield of arabica coffee (Coffea arabica of grafted onto robusta coffee (Coffea canephora Pierre ex Froehner Apoatã IAC 2258 was evaluated during six years of intercropping with five leguminous species: sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L., Crotalaria spectabilis Roth., dwarf velvet bean (Stizolobium deeringeanum Bort., soybean Glycine max (L. Merryl] and pigeon pea [Cajanus cajan (L. Millsp.] in the Western region of São Paulo State, Brazil, from 1989 to 1995. Leguminous species were sown 50 cm

  16. Biogas Technology on Supporting “Sustainable” Coffee Farmers in North Sumatera Province, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginting, N.

    2017-03-01

    A study has been conducted in an area of coffee plantation in Samosir District, North Sumatera Province. The study was conducted in August until September 2016. The objective of this study is to investigate the benefits of using biogas technology in supporting coffee farmers’ productivity to be sustainable, i.e. methane as energy source for coffee roasting proceed instead of fired wood and slurry as organic fertilizer. Coffee cherry causes environmental problem when it is dumped openly, hence it is used to mix with buffalo feces in biodigesters to produce methane and organic fertilizer. Five biodigesters were used with 5 differents designs of composition: T1) 100% buffalo feces, T2) 75% buffalo feces + 25% coffee cherry, T3) 50% buffalo feces + 50% coffee cherry, T4) 25% buffalo feces + 75% coffee cherry, and T5) 100% coffee cherry. The key parameters measured were methane production and slurry chemical compositions including NPK, pH, and C/N. It is found that designs T1 and T2 were superior in methane production, and about 400 liters of methane were used in roasting 3 kg coffee bean as opposed to 6,6 kg fired wood. Designs T1 and T2 were also better in slurry chemical compositions than the other 3 designs. It is recommeded that local coffee farmers utilize coffee cherry based biogas technology in order for their productivity to be sustainable. It is noteworthy that this study is continued with the next one in which the resulting slurries are implemented to foster the growth of the coffee plants during the period of October until December 2016.

  17. Complementary Coffee Cups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchoff, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    What may have been the birth of a new calculus problem took place when the author noticed that two coffee cups, one convex and one concave, fit nicely together, and he wondered which held more coffee. The fact that their volumes were about equal led to the topic of this article: complementary surfaces of revolution with equal volumes.

  18. Mainstreaming sustainable coffee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.

    2013-01-01

    This overview article examines the various dimensions of sustainable coffee as well as the actors involved and their perceptions of how to advance the market from niche to mainstream. The issues at hand are very complex, with different types of coffee producers, manufacturing/roasting companies and

  19. Molecular characterization of arabica and Conilon coffee plants genotypes by SSR and ISSR markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludymila Brandão Motta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The molecular characterization of ten genotypes of the Coffea arabica plants and of seven genotypes of C. canephora having interesting features for coffee breeding programs was carried to select the parents for breeding. A total of 40 SSR and 29 ISSR primers were used. The primers generated a total of 331 (307 polymorphic and 24 monomorphic bands. Analysis of genetic diversity presented dissimilarity intervals ranging from 0.22 to 0.44 between the Conilon genotypes, from 0.02 to 0.28 between the Arabica genotypes, and from 0.49 to 0.60 between the genotypes of the two species in the joint analysis. Four groups were formed: I = genotypes of C. arabica, II = four progenies of C. canephora, Conilon group, and one non defined C. canephora (Conilon or Robusta, III = one progeny of un-defined C. canephora (Conilon or Robusta and IV = one progeny of C. canephora of Robusta group. The grouping formed was consistent with the origins of each group. High stabilities of the bifurcations were found by bootstrap analysis. The use of molecular markers of the SSR and ISSR types in the diversity study was efficient in distinguishing genotypes between and within C. arabica and C. canephora.

  20. Can good coffee prices increase smallholder revenue?

    OpenAIRE

    Pinard, Fabrice; Aithal, Anand

    2011-01-01

    The global coffee market is currently plagued by 2 paradoxes, a coffee boom in consuming countries, and a coffee crisis in producing countries (over supply of low quality coffee and shortage of high quality coffee) which is actually driving the coffee market (Daviron and Ponte, 2005). After the termination of the International Coffee Agreement between producing and consuming countries in 1989, the coffee market has been in a flux, with market forces and over supply bringing down the coffee pr...

  1. Can good coffee prices increase smallholder revenue?

    OpenAIRE

    Pinard, Fabrice; Aithal, Anand

    2011-01-01

    The global coffee market is currently plagued by 2 paradoxes, a coffee boom in consuming countries, and a coffee crisis in producing countries (over supply of low quality coffee and shortage of high quality coffee) which is actually driving the coffee market (Daviron and Ponte, 2005). After the termination of the International Coffee Agreement between producing and consuming countries in 1989, the coffee market has been in a flux, with market forces and over supply bringing down the coffee pr...

  2. Extracting oil from coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkin Mauricio López Fontal

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes oil being extracted from toasted coffee by the extrusion method; two products are obtained from this process: coffee oil and pulp. Toasted coffee was used which has a high amount of sensorial compounds. It should be noted that a significant criterion in evaluating the quality of coffee lies in its aroma. When extracting oil from coffee, a significant part of toasted coffee’s aromatic content leaves with it, varying according to the extraction method. A fixed oil having a high volatile load is thus obtained, presenting favourable sensory characteristics. The pulp was physically and chemically analysed to show its benefit and particular properties and, according to the results so obtained, it is a product having potential usefulness.

  3. Brazilian Coffee Production as Function of Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, A. M. H. D.; Pinto, H. S.; Alfonsi, E. L., Sr.; Alfonsi, W. M. V.; Pereira, V. R.

    2016-12-01

    According to the Brazilian Government the actual area of coffee production in the country is close to 2.25 million hectares. The sector involves 290.000 of farmers with a production of 44 million of 60 Kg bags in 2015. The Arabica Coffee specie is cultivated in the country where the climate condition are characterized by a year mean temperatures between 18°C and 22°C. Temperatures higher than 33°C can cause abortion of flowers during the spring season and reduce the production while lower than 18°C can be affected by frost during winter when the minimum temperature can be lower than 2°C in the shelter. For a better quality of the final product the winter, between July and August, must be dry with rainfall lower than 50 mm/month. The Ministry of Agriculture defines those conditions for the Official Coffee Climatic Risk Zoning. In 2002, a partnership with the British Embassy and 2 Brazilian institutions, i. e. the State University of Campinas - UNICAMP and the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa, published the study "Global Warming and the New Geography of Agricultural Production in Brazil" (Pinto and Assad, 2002). This study was based on the PRECIS/Hadley Centre Regional Climate Model future projections. The crop simulations indicated a decrease in the grain production due to temperature rise. Later in 2012, a new study was developed in cooperation with the World Bank to evaluate the future of nine main commodities in Brazil under climate change, including the Arabica coffee. The worst scenario considering any mitigation and adaptation action indicated that the two most affected crops would be the soybean and coffee, with a reduction of 22% and 6.7 % in the yield respectively. Field surveys to evaluate the historical spatial dynamic and migration of Arabica coffee cultivated areas confirmed the results of the previous studies and indicated a recent increase in the search for cooler altitude areas to plant coffee. Also the field observations

  4. The Appreciation of Coffee Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹慧玲

    2010-01-01

    As a unique culture in human history,the coffee culture originated with a magic story.This paper first tells the origin of coffee culture.Then it illustrates some typical coffee cultures in the world.Moreover,the paper specially describes the Chinese coffee culture before making a conclusion.

  5. Survey on ochratoxin A in Indian green coffee destined for export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinandhan, T N; Kannan, G S; Panneerselvam, P; Velmourougane, K; Raghuramulu, Y; Jayarama, J

    2008-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a toxic metabolite, produced by Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium verrucosum, that is nephrotoxic and possibly carcinogenic to humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate OTA contamination in batches of green coffee destined for export. Analysis of 80 green coffee samples indicated that, although a high incidence (74%) of OTA contamination (0.2-13.5 ng g⁻¹) was recorded, the overall mean OTA level (2.17 ± 2.45 ng g⁻¹) was low. The highest recorded OTA concentration was 13.5 ng g⁻¹ in a robusta cherry sample and only five samples had OTA above 5 ng g⁻¹ level. The mean OTA level was higher in cherry (range: 1.63 ± 0.97-4.8 ± 3.90) than parchment (0.56 ± 0.35-1.10 ± 0.28), indicating a correlation between processing method and OTA contamination.

  6. Effect of roasting on the carbohydrate composition of Coffea arabica beans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterveld, A.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Schols, H.A.

    2003-01-01

    Coffee beans (arabica) with different degrees of roast were sequentially extracted with water (90 °C, 1 h), water (170 °C, 30 min), and 0.05 M NaOH (0 °C, 1 h). The amount and composition of polysaccharides, oligosaccharides and monosaccharides in the extracts and residues were analyzed. The results

  7. Effect of roasting on the carbohydrate composition of Coffea arabica beans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterveld, A.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Schols, H.A.

    2003-01-01

    Coffee beans (arabica) with different degrees of roast were sequentially extracted with water (90 °C, 1 h), water (170 °C, 30 min), and 0.05 M NaOH (0 °C, 1 h). The amount and composition of polysaccharides, oligosaccharides and monosaccharides in the extracts and residues were analyzed. The results

  8. Flavoring components of raw monsooned arabica coffee and their changes during radiation processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variyar, Prasad S; Ahmad, Rasheed; Bhat, Rajeev; Niyas, Zareena; Sharma, Arun

    2003-12-31

    Volatile aroma principles, nonvolatile taste constituents (caffeine and chlorogenic and caffeic acids), and glycosidically bound aroma compounds of monsooned and nonmonsooned raw arabica coffee were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Among the most potent odor active constituents known to contribute to the aroma of the green beans, 3-isopropyl-2-methoxypyrazine, 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine, 4-vinylguaiacol, beta-damascenone, (E)-2-nonenal, trans,trans-2,4-decadienal, phenylacetaldehyde, and 3-methylbutyric acid were detected by GC-MS in both samples. A decrease in content of methoxypyrazines and an increase in 4-vinylguaiacol and isoeugenol resulted in a dominant spicy note of monsooned coffee. These phenolic compounds exist partly as their glycosides, and their release from the bound precursors during monsooning accounted for their higher content in monsooned coffee. A considerable decrease in astringent chlorogenic acid as a consequence of hydrolysis to bitter caffeic acid was noted in monsooned coffee. Radiation processing of nonmonsooned beans at a dose of 5 kGy resulted in an increased rate of monsooning. At this dose a quantitative increase in most of the aroma active components could be observed in all samples studied. Hydrolysis of chlorogenic acid to caffeic acid was noted in radiation-processed monsooned coffee beans irrespective of whether the treatment was carried out before or after monsooning. These changes were, however, not observed in irradiated, nonmonsooned coffee beans, suggesting an enzymatic rather than a radiolytic cleavage of chlorogenic acid. A rationale behind the mechanism of monsooning and radiation-induced enhancement of the monsooning process is discussed.

  9. Effect of coffee extracts on plasma fibrinolysis and platelet aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Sawa; Yatagai, Chieko; Maruyama, Masugi; Sumi, Hiroyuki

    2011-04-01

    We have previously reported on study results showing that certain types of coffee have the activity to enhance fibrinolysis. This report covers the activity of 10 types of hot water extracts of coffee on human tissue-type plasminogen activator producing cells. Particularly strong activity (29-35 times the control amount) was observed for Blue Mountain, Yunnan and Kilimanjaro beans. It was found that the hot water extracts have anti-thrombin activity, and that coffee components have anti-platelet aggregation activity, although weak. It was revealed that there is no activity affecting tissue-type plasminogen activator producing cells in the coffee components chlorogenic acid, caffeine, quinic acid, trigonelline hydrochloride, 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furfuryl and caffeic acid. It was also revealed that there is activity in fractions with a molecular weight of 10,000 or less. This could also be inferred from the fact that oral administration of such fractions of coffee to human subjects resulted in a shortening of their plasma ELT (p<0.05).

  10. Potential antioxidant response to coffee — A matter of genotype?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Hassmann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In a human intervention study, coffee combining natural green coffee bean constituents and dark roast products was identified as a genotype-dependent inducer of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, significantly affecting Nrf2 gene expression and downstream GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription. The observed transcriptional changes correlated with the presence of specific Nrf2 genotypes suggesting their influence on both Nrf2 and subsequent ARE-dependent GST1A1 and UGT1A1 transcription. While the presence of the −653 SNP seems to be advantageous, resulting in higher Nrf2, GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription following coffee consumption, in contrast, the presence of the −651 SNP significantly down-regulated the response to the study coffee. Furthermore, the presence of the B/B genotype in GST1A1 along with the frequency of the [TA]6/6 and [TA]7/7 polymorphisms in UGT1A1 appeared to significantly increase sensitivity toward coffee-induced gene transcription. This data suggests that when examining the role of the Nrf2/ARE pathway in the regulation of antioxidative and chemopreventive phase II efficacy, individual genotypes should be included when considering the potency of bioactive food/food constituents and their therapeutic potential.

  11. PERBANDINGAN KARAKTERISTIK KIMIA KOPI LUWAK DAN KOPI BIASA DARI JENIS KOPI ARABIKA (Cafeea arabica. L) DAN ROBUSTA (Cafeea canephora. L)

    OpenAIRE

    Israyanti, -

    2012-01-01

    Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui perbandingan jumlah kafein, karakteristik proksimat (protein dan lemak) dan rasa dan aroma antara kopi luwak dan kopi biasa dari jenis arabika (Cafeea arabica. L) dan robusta (Cafeea canephora. L). Perlakuan penelitian yakni A1 (luwak robusta), A2 (luwak arabika), B1 (robusta biasa) dan B2 (arabika biasa). Parameter penelitian yaitu pengujian organoleptik pada rasa (metode hedonik) dan aroma (metode ranking), analisa kafein dan uji proksimat berupa ...

  12. Fermentation of pulp from coffee production; Vergaerung von Pulpa aus der Kaffee-Produktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofman, M.; Baier, U.

    2003-07-01

    Harvesting of coffee berries and production of dried coffee beans produces large amounts of solid wastes. Per ton of consumable coffee beans, roughly 2 tons of spent coffee pulp are wasted at the production facilities. Coffee pulp represents a valuable source of energy and can be used for anaerobic biogas production. In this study it was shown that coffee pulp can be anaerobically digested as a sole carbon source without further addition of co-substrates. No nutrient limitations and only a very moderate substrate inhibition have been found in concentrated pulp. The mesophilic biogas formation potential was found to be 0.38 m{sup 3} biogas per kg of organic matter. The anaerobic degradability was higher than 70%. In semi-continuously operated biogas reactors a high degradation of organics and a subsequent biogas production was shown at hydraulic detention times of 16 days. Methanization of fresh pulp is technically feasible in fully mixed tank reactors as well as in plug flow reactors. Due to the presence of easily degradable carbon sources, fresh pulp will quickly show microbiological growth. Storage in the presence of ambient oxygen will result in aerobic degradation of organics in parallel with energy loss. Additionally, anaerobic zones with methane emission will quickly occur. Therefore, it is recommended to store fresh pulp under oxygen free, lactic acid conditions (silage) until anaerobic treatment in the biogas reactor. (author)

  13. Physical, Chemicals and Flavors of Some Varieties of Arabica Coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusianto .

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Export of Arabica coffee was 28,100 tons/year or 8.28% total export of Indonesian coffee, most of them are specialty coffee. Beside their origin, variety and determine the of physical, chemical and flavors characters. The promising clones or varieties i.e. BP 416A, BP 418A, BP 430A, BP 431A, BP 432A, BP 507A, BP 508A, BP 509A, BP 511A, BP 513A, BP 516A, BP 517A and BP 518A still not be determined their quality This research was conducted to analyze their physicals, chemicals and flavors during 2 periods of harvesting (2004 and 2005, using AS 1, S 795 and USDA 762 as the control. Mature coffee berry was harvested, sorted manually, and depulped, cleaned manually and then fermented in plastic sacks during 36 hours. The fermented parchment was washed, and then sun dried, dehulled to get green coffee. Observations wre conducted on green coffee yield, husk content, color of green coffee, distribution of size, bulk density of green and roasted coffee, roasting characters, color of roasted beans, and pH, acidity and flavors. The results showed (a The lowest content of husk was BP 432A and the highest was USDA 762. The control varieties of AS 1, S 795 and USDA 762, showed husk content >15%, while those potential varieties were < 15% except BP 416A. (b Beans size >6,5 mm and more than 80% were BP 416A, BP 430A, BP 432A, BP 509A, P 88 and S 795. Green coffee of BP 430A, BP 432A and BP 509A were uniform, but S 795 was not uniform. AS 1 and BP 416A and P 88 was one group; S 795 was one group with BP 542A; BP 509 was a group with BP 432A; but BP4 30A and USDA 762 were the other groups. (c Green coffee of USDA 762 was the palest color, but BP 542A was the darkest color. AS 1 and S 795 were a group with all potential varieties, except BP 542A. (d Roasted coffee of USDA 762 was the palest color and AS 1 was the darkest. In this case, AS 1 was a group with BP 430A, BP 509A and P 88, while S 795 was a group with BP 416A and BP 432A, but USDA 762 and BP 542A were

  14. [Coffee as hepatoprotective factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szántová, Mária; Ďurkovičová, Zuzana

    The mind about the coffee did change upon the recent studies and metaanalysis of the last years. Consensual protective effect of coffee on the progression of chronic liver diseases (NASH, viral hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, hepatocelullar carcinoma) was detected in experimental, clinical and large population studies together with decrease of mortality. Antioxidant, antifibrotic, insulinsensitizing and anticarcinogenic effect of coffee were detected. Modulation of genetic expression of key enzymes of fatty acid synthesis, modulation of mRNA included in autophagia, reduction of stress of endoplasmatic reticulum together with decrease of proinflammatory cytokines and decrease of fibrogenesis are main mechanisms. Chlorogenic acids, diterpens (cafestol, kahweol), caffein, polyfenols and melanoidins are key protective components of coffee. Inverse dose-dependent correlation of coffee consumption with liver diseases was found in clinical and population studies. Coffee is non-pharmacological tool of primary and secondary prevention of chronic liver diseases. Review of published data together with supposed mechanisms of hepatoprotection are given.Key words: coffee - hepatoprotective effect - metaanalysis.

  15. Coffee and liver health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisco, Filomena; Lembo, Vincenzo; Mazzone, Giovanna; Camera, Silvia; Caporaso, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely used beverages in the world. It includes a wide array of components that can have potential implications for health. Several epidemiological studies associate coffee consumption with a reduced incidence of various chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases. Over the past 20 years, an increasing number of epidemiological and experimental studies have demonstrated the positive effects of coffee on chronic liver diseases. Coffee consumption has been inversely associated with the activity of liver enzymes in subjects at risk, including heavy drinkers. Coffee favours an improvement in hepatic steatosis and fibrosis, and a reduction in cirrhosis and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. The mechanisms of action through which it exerts its beneficial effects are not fully understood. Experimental studies show that coffee consumption reduces fat accumulation and collagen deposition in the liver and promotes antioxidant capacity through an increase in glutathione as well as modulation of the gene and protein expression of several inflammatory mediators. Animal and in vitro studies indicate that cafestol and kahweol, 2 diterpens, can operate by modulating multiple enzymes involved in the detoxification process of carcinogens causing hepatocellular carcinoma. It is unclear whether the benefits are significant enough to "treat" patients with chronic liver disease. While we await clarification, moderate daily unsweetened coffee use is a reasonable adjuvant to therapy for these patients.

  16. Activity-guided fractionation to characterize a coffee beverage that effectively down-regulates mechanisms of gastric acid secretion as compared to regular coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubach, Malte; Lang, Roman; Skupin, Carola; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2010-04-14

    In some individuals, the consumption of coffee beverages is related to symptoms of gastric irritation. Hot water steam-treatment of raw coffee beans is hypothesized to reduce the contents of stomach irritating compounds, and products to which this technology is applied are launched as stomach-friendly coffee. However, data on the effect of steam-treated coffee on gastric acid secretion are conflicting and it has not been proven yet as to which coffee components act as pro- or antisecretory stimulants. The work presented here aimed at the characterization of a coffee beverage that effectively down-regulates mechanisms of proton secretion in human gastric cells (HGT-1). At first, a regular coffee beverage was fractionated by using solvents of different polarity: water, ethylacetate, dichloromethane, and pentane. Functional assays on the proton secretory activity (PSA) of these solvent fractions revealed the least pronounced effect for the water fraction, for which quantitative analyses demonstrated the highest distribution of chlorogenic acid (95%), (beta)N-alkanoyl-5-hydroxytryptamides (55%), and N-methylpyridinium (N-MP, >99%) among all fractions. Following experiments demonstrated that HGT-1 cells treated with regular coffee fortified with N-MP at a concentration of about 20 mg/mL N-MP showed a significantly decreased PSA as compared to cells which were exposed to coffee beverages containing higher (32-34 mg/L) or lower (5 mg/L) N-MP concentrations. Results from cellular pathway analyses of transcription (ATF-1 and Akt1) and signaling (cAMP and EGFr) factors and kinases (ERK1/2), and experiments on the gene expression of pro (histamine-HRH2 and acetylcholine-CHRM3)- and anti (somatostatin-SSTR1)-secretory receptors and H(+),K(+)-ATPase verified this antisecretory activity of N-MP in coffee beverages.

  17. Too much coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Birgitte Ravn

    and ethnomethodology we – researchers - decided to study the interplay between practitioners and researchers negotiating on how a psychiatric patient who drinks too much coffee can be motivated to drink less coffee. The ethnomethodological perspective reveals how the interlocutors’ different common......-sense and hierarchical perceptions of a normative theory and its meaning in practice appears to guide the talk about how to motivate the patient to drink less coffee. Moreover, the examination of the dialogue between these show how important it is to respect multivocality in order to be sensitive to how different...

  18. Improved green coffee oil antioxidant activity for cosmetical purpose by spray drying microencapsulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna B.F.L. Nosari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe oil extracted by cold pressing unroasted coffee beans, known as green coffee oil, has been widely used for cosmetic purposes. The objective of this work was to prepare and characterize microcapsules containing green coffee oil and to verify its antioxidant activity under the effect of light, heat and oxygen. The encapsulating material was arabic gum and the microcapsules were obtained by spray drying an oil-in-water emulsion containing green coffee oil. The characterization of the microcapsules was performed by laser diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and the antioxidant activity. The antioxidant activity was determined by a modified active oxygen method with light irradiation, heating and oxygen flux. The microparticles were effectively produced by the proposed spray drying method, which resulted in green coffee oil loads of 10 and 30%. The morphological evaluation of microcapsules showed spherical shape with smooth and non-porous surfaces, demonstrating the adequacy of arabic gum as encapsulating material. Calorimetric analysis of individual components and microcapsules with 10 and 30% green coffee oil showed diminished degradation temperatures and enthalpy, suggesting a possible interaction between arabic gum and green coffee oil. The antioxidant activities for pure green coffee oil and its microcapsules with loads of 10 and 30% showed high activity when compared to the reference antioxidant alfa-tocopherol. Microcapsules containing 10 and 30% of oil showed 7-fold and 3-fold increase in antioxidant activity when compared to pure green coffee oil. The new method for antioxidant activity determination proposed here, which applies heat, light and oxygen simultaneously, suggests a high improvement in encapsulated green coffee oil when compared to this active alone. The results showed herein indicate a promising industrial application of this microencapsulated green coffee oil.

  19. Arabica Coffee Farming and Marketing Chain Analysis in Manggarai and EastManggarai Districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiany. Faila Sophia Hartatri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Arabica coffee has a unique flavour and very potential market. The purpose of this study was to analyse Arabica coffee farming and to investigate its performance of marketing chains in Manggarai and East Manggarai Districts, Flores, East Nusa Tenggara Province. This research was conducted in 2008-2010 by interviewing coffee farmers and coffee buyers; using open and close questions. The number of respondents were 100 people in each district. The result showed that land holding per household farmer in Manggarai and East Manggarai were 0.84 ha and 0.92 ha, respectively. Farmers in both districts were within the range of productive age, the farmers who were members of farmer groups in both study sites was £ 50%. Arabica coffee cultivation was still done in a traditional way. Fertilizing and controlling of pest and diseases had not been carried out inten sively. Arabica coffee farming in both district was feasible. BCR, NPV and IRR values in Manggarai were 4.2, Rp8,530,105, and 70.76% respectively, while BCR, NPV, and IRR value in East Manggarai district were 8.1, Rp2,465,833, and 27%, respectively. BEP production and coffee price in Manggarai were 94.2 kg/ha/th and Rp15,913/kg respectively, whereas BEP production and coffee price in East Manggarai were 78,2 kg/ha/th and Rp10,134/kg, respectively. In general, farmers sold their coffee in green bean form. In general, the marketing chains of Arabica coffee in both districts was farmer – collector - trader - exporter.Key words: Arabica coffee, potential market, farming analysis, feasible, marketing chains.

  20. Gibberella xylarioides (anamorph: Fusarium xylarioides), a causative agent of coffee wilt disease in Africa, is a previously unrecognized member of the G. fujikuroi species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, David M; Ivey, Melanie L Lewis; Hakiza, Georgina; Juba, Jean H; Miller, Sally A

    2005-01-01

    Tracheomycosis or coffee wilt has emerged as a major disease of robusta coffee in Uganda in the past 10 years. Coffee wilt historically has been associated with Fusarium xylarioides Steyaert (teleomorph Gibberella xylarioides Heim and Sacc.), a species that has been classified as a member of Fusarium section Lateritium. We investigated the molecular phylogenetics of fusarial coffee wilt isolates by generating partial DNA sequences from two protein coding regions, translation elongation factor 1-alpha and beta-tubulin, in 36 isolates previously identified as F. xylarioides and related fusaria from coffee and other woody hosts, as well as from 12 isolates associated with a current coffee wilt outbreak in Uganda. These isolates fell into two morphologically and phylogenetically distinct groups. The first group was found to represent previously unidentified members of the Gibberella fujikuroi species complex (GFC), a clade that replaces the artificial Fusarium section Liseola. This group of isolates fit the original description of F. xylarioides, thus connecting it to the GFC. The second group, which was diverse in its morphology and DNA sequences, comprised four distinct lineages related to Fusarium lateritium. Our finding of unrelated species associated with coffee wilt disease has important implications regarding its epidemiology, etiology and control.

  1. Coffee and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Bodil Hammer

    Background: Coffee consumption in Denmark is high also among pregnant women and it is presumably their main source of caffeine intake. Coffee or caffeine intake during pregnancy has been linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes such as spontaneous abortion, stillbirth and reduced fetal growth. However...... a review of the literature indicates that further studies are needed to test the hypothesis of an effect of coffee or caffeine on the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes.The aim of the thesis was to study the relation between coffee and the risk of fetal death and the relation between caffeine intake...... non-case study in DNBC with 141 cases (stillbirth) and 157 controls (singleton live birth) we examined if slow metabolisers of caffeine had higher risk of stillbirth and whether genotype related to oxidative stress was associated with the risk of stillbirth. Slow metabolisers of caffeine had no higher...

  2. Isotopic and Elemental Composition of Roasted Coffee as a Guide to Authenticity and Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, James F; Yates, Hans S A; Tinggi, Ujang

    2015-06-24

    This study presents the stable isotopic and elemental compositions of single-origin, roasted coffees available to retail consumers. The δ(13)C, δ(15)N, and δ(18)O compositions were in agreement with those previously reported for green coffee beans. The δ(15)N composition was seen to be related to organic cultivation, reflected in both δ(2)H and δ(18)O compositions. The δ(13)C composition of extracted caffeine differed little from that of the bulk coffee. Stepwise discriminant analysis with jackknife tests, using isotopic and elemental data, provided up to 77% correct classification of regions of production. Samples from Africa and India were readily classified. The wide range in both isotopic and elemental compositions of samples from other regions, specifically Central/South America, resulted in poor discrimination between or within these regions. Simpler X-Y and geo-spatial plots of the isotopic data provided effective visual means to distinguish between coffees from different regions.

  3. Kinetic modeling of water sorption by roasted and ground coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Machado Baptestini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to model the kinetics of water sorption in roasted and ground coffee. Crude Arabica coffee beans with an initial moisture content of 0.1234 kgwkgdm-1 were used. These beans were roasted to a medium roast level (SCCA # 55 and ground at three particle sizes: coarse (1.19 mm, medium (0.84 mm and fine (0.59 mm. To obtain the water sorption isotherms and the isosteric heat, different conditions of temperature and relative humidity were analyzed using the dynamic method at 25ºC (0.50, 0.60, 0.70, and 0.80 of RH and 30°C (0.30, 0.40, 0.50, 0.60, 0.70, and 0.80 of RH and using the static method at 25ºC (0.332 and 0.438 of RH. The GAB model best represented the hygroscopic equilibrium of roasted coffee at every particle size. Isosteric heat of sorption for the fine particle size increased with increments of equilibrium moisture content, indicating a strong bond energy between water molecules and the product components. The Gibbs free energy decreased with the increase in equilibrium moisture content and with temperature.

  4. Influence of the degree of roasting on the antioxidant capacity and genoprotective effect of instant coffee: contribution of the melanoidin fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pino-García, Raquel; González-SanJosé, María L; Rivero-Pérez, María D; Muñiz, Pilar

    2012-10-24

    The roasting process induces chemical changes in coffee beans that strongly affect the antioxidant activity of coffee. In this study, the polyphenol and melanoidin contents and the antioxidant activity of three instant coffees with different roasting degrees (light, medium, and dark) were assessed. Coffee brews were separated into fractions, and the potential biological activity of the melanoidins was evaluated by simulating their gastrointestinal digestion. Total antioxidant capacity, hydroxyl radical scavenger activity, lipid peroxidation inhibition capacity, and protection against DNA oxidative damage (in vitro and ex vivo genoprotective effects) were determined. We report that instant coffee has a high total antioxidant capacity and protective effect against certain oxidative stress biomarkers (lipids and DNA), although this capacity decreases with the roasting degree. Our study confirms the hypothesis that several of the polyphenols present in coffee may become part of the melanoidins generated during roasting. Furthermore, the elevated genoprotective effect of melanoidin-digested fractions is noteworthy.

  5. Teores de compostos bioativos em cafés torrados e moídos comerciais Levels of bioactive compounds in commercial roasted and ground coffees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romilaine Mansano Nicolau de Souza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The amounts of nicotinic acid, trigonelline, 5-CQA, caffeine, kahweol and cafestol in 38 commercial roasted coffees ranged from 0.02 to 0.04; 0.22 to 0.96; 0.14 to 1.20; 1.00 to 2.02; 0.10 to 0.80 and 0.25 to 0.55 g/100 g, respectively. Evaluation of color and content of thermo-labile compounds indicated similarity in roasting degree. Differences in the levels of diterpenes and caffeine, components less influenced by the roasting degree, could be mainly explained by the species used (arabica and robusta. Gourmet coffees showed high concentrations of diterpenes, trigonelline and 5-CQA and low levels of caffeine, indicating high proportion of arabica coffee.

  6. Identification of aroma active compounds of cereal coffee brew and its roasted ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majcher, Małgorzata A; Klensporf-Pawlik, Dorota; Dziadas, Mariusz; Jeleń, Henryk H

    2013-03-20

    Cereal coffee is a coffee substitute made mainly from roasted cereals such as barley and rye (60-70%), chicory (15-20%), and sugar beets (6-10%). It is perceived by consumers as a healthy, caffeine free, non-irritating beverage suitable for those who cannot drink regular coffee made from coffee beans. In presented studies, typical Polish cereal coffee brew has been subjected to the key odorants analysis with the application of gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). In the analyzed cereal coffee extract, 30 aroma-active volatiles have been identified with FD factors ranging from 16 to 4096. This approach was also used for characterization of key odorants in ingredients used for the cereal coffee production. Comparing the main odors detected in GC-O analysis of roasted cereals brew to the odor notes of cereal coffee brew, it was evident that the aroma of cereal coffee brew is mainly influenced by roasted barley. Flavor compound identification and quantitation has been performed with application of comprehensive multidimentional gas chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-ToFMS). The results of the quantitative measurements followed by calculation of the odor activity values (OAV) revealed 17 aroma active compounds of the cereal coffee brew with OAV ranging from 12.5 and 2000. The most potent odorant was 2-furfurylthiol followed by the 3-mercapto-3-methylbutyl formate, 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine and 2-ethyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazine, 2-thenylthiol, 2,3-butanedione, 2-methoxy phenol and 2-methoxy-4-vinyl phenol, 3(sec-butyl)-2-methoxypyrazine, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 3-(methylthio)-propanal, 2,3-pentanedione, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3-(2H)-furanone, (E,E)-2,4-decadienal, (Z)-4-heptenal, phenylacetaldehyde, and 1-octen-3-one.

  7. Coffee Silverskin Extract Protects against Accelerated Aging Caused by Oxidative Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaia Iriondo-DeHond

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, coffee beans are almost exclusively used for the preparation of the beverage. The sustainability of coffee production can be achieved introducing new applications for the valorization of coffee by-products. Coffee silverskin is the by-product generated during roasting, and because of its powerful antioxidant capacity, coffee silverskin aqueous extract (CSE may be used for other applications, such as antiaging cosmetics and dermaceutics. This study aims to contribute to the coffee sector’s sustainability through the application of CSE to preserve skin health. Preclinical data regarding the antiaging properties of CSE employing human keratinocytes and Caenorhabditis elegans are collected during the present study. Accelerated aging was induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH in HaCaT cells and by ultraviolet radiation C (UVC in C. elegans. Results suggest that the tested concentrations of coffee extracts were not cytotoxic, and CSE 1 mg/mL gave resistance to skin cells when oxidative damage was induced by t-BOOH. On the other hand, nematodes treated with CSE (1 mg/mL showed a significant increased longevity compared to those cultured on a standard diet. In conclusion, our results support the antiaging properties of the CSE and its great potential for improving skin health due to its antioxidant character associated with phenols among other bioactive compounds present in the botanical material.

  8. Added Value Improvement on Arabica Coffee Wet Process MethodUsing Model Kemitraan Bermediasi (Motramed on Unit Pengolahan Hasil at Ngada Residence - NTT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djoko Soemarno

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Ngada Residence is main producen region Arabica coffee in Nusa Tenggara Timur province. There are scattered on district of Bajawa and Golewa, that all of them effort by farmers and low quality, so farmers get low price and coffee development slowly than other coffee region in Indonesia. But, on the other hand, Arabica coffee from this region have potential special taste to be export quality coffee beans. One of way to solve to develop this quality is implementation coffee processing by Wet Process methode and support marketing system better by Model Kemitraan Bermediasi (Motramed. This research started from June until October 2007 at two centre district of Arabica coffee, there are district Bajawa are UPH Fa Masa on Beiwali village, UPH Wonga Wali on Susu village, UPH Papa Taki on Bomari village, UPH Suka Maju on Ubedolumolo village and Kecamatan Golewa are UPH Papa Wiu on Mangulewa village, UPH Meza Mogo on Rakateda II village and UPH Ate Riji on Were I village. This research want to know added value, cost efficiency, and profit on Arabica coffee processing used wet process methode on Unit Pengolahan Hasil (UPH at Ngada Residence. Data was analysed by approximation added value, R-C Ratio analisys and t-One Sample Test. The result showed that Arabica coffee wet process could improved phisic and taste quality, lower of beans size, higher quality grade, smaller defect beans, moisture content lower, had special taste and very few taste defect. Those quality improvement improved price market to be higher, the added value about Rp4,390,- per kg and improved profit for farmers.Key words : Arabica coffee, wet process, quality, added value, efisiency, revenue.

  9. Coffee cysteine proteinases and related inhibitors with high expression during grain maturation and germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepelley Maud

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cysteine proteinases perform multiple functions in seeds, including participation in remodelling polypeptides and recycling amino acids during maturation and germination. Currently, few details exist concerning these genes and proteins in coffee. Furthermore, there is limited information on the cysteine proteinase inhibitors which influence the activities of these proteinases. Results Two cysteine proteinase (CP and four cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI gene sequences have been identified in coffee with significant expression during the maturation and germination of coffee grain. Detailed expression analysis of the cysteine proteinase genes CcCP1 and CcCP4 in Robusta using quantitative RT-PCR showed that these transcripts accumulate primarily during grain maturation and germination/post germination. The corresponding proteins were expressed in E. coli and purified, but only one, CcCP4, which has a KDDL/KDEL C-terminal sequence, was found to be active after a short acid treatment. QRT-PCR expression analysis of the four cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes in Robusta showed that CcCPI-1 is primarily expressed in developing and germinating grain and CcCPI-4 is very highly expressed during the late post germination period, as well as in mature, but not immature leaves. Transcripts corresponding to CcCPI-2 and CcCPI-3 were detected in most tissues examined at relatively similar, but generally low levels. Conclusions Several cysteine proteinase and cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes with strong, relatively specific expression during coffee grain maturation and germination are presented. The temporal expression of the CcCP1 gene suggests it is involved in modifying proteins during late grain maturation and germination. The expression pattern of CcCP4, and its close identity with KDEL containing CP proteins, implies this proteinase may play a role in protein and/or cell remodelling during late grain germination, and that it is

  10. Coffee cysteine proteinases and related inhibitors with high expression during grain maturation and germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepelley, Maud; Amor, Mohamed Ben; Martineau, Nelly; Cheminade, Gerald; Caillet, Victoria; McCarthy, James

    2012-03-01

    Cysteine proteinases perform multiple functions in seeds, including participation in remodelling polypeptides and recycling amino acids during maturation and germination. Currently, few details exist concerning these genes and proteins in coffee. Furthermore, there is limited information on the cysteine proteinase inhibitors which influence the activities of these proteinases. Two cysteine proteinase (CP) and four cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI) gene sequences have been identified in coffee with significant expression during the maturation and germination of coffee grain. Detailed expression analysis of the cysteine proteinase genes CcCP1 and CcCP4 in Robusta using quantitative RT-PCR showed that these transcripts accumulate primarily during grain maturation and germination/post germination. The corresponding proteins were expressed in E. coli and purified, but only one, CcCP4, which has a KDDL/KDEL C-terminal sequence, was found to be active after a short acid treatment. QRT-PCR expression analysis of the four cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes in Robusta showed that CcCPI-1 is primarily expressed in developing and germinating grain and CcCPI-4 is very highly expressed during the late post germination period, as well as in mature, but not immature leaves. Transcripts corresponding to CcCPI-2 and CcCPI-3 were detected in most tissues examined at relatively similar, but generally low levels. Several cysteine proteinase and cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes with strong, relatively specific expression during coffee grain maturation and germination are presented. The temporal expression of the CcCP1 gene suggests it is involved in modifying proteins during late grain maturation and germination. The expression pattern of CcCP4, and its close identity with KDEL containing CP proteins, implies this proteinase may play a role in protein and/or cell remodelling during late grain germination, and that it is likely to play a strong role in the programmed cell death

  11. Development of a mechanical homogenizer coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Magalhães Gomes Moreira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The crop Coffee demands investments to the machines development, which it enables the processes ofpost-harvesting, becoming them faster, meanwhile improving the working. The use of stationary layer dryers are responsible for good results at drying and product quality, but it requires a constant revolving, in order to homogenize the grain mass and improve the air distribution inside the drying chamber. The shortage of workmanship, associated to the need of constant revolving and the heavy working conditions, it becomes it indispensable to mechanize, in some way, this step. The agricultural machine design is considered of great complexity, regarding it must be concerned with the interactions among the operator, machine and environment. When designing a machine, the experience and the dominion of several standpoints have to be interpreted clearly. With the increasing competitiveness on the consumer market and agricultural machines, several companies have joined the research centers, because in general, do not make use of systematic procedures during the project, which can result in failures during operation. This article aimed to design and build a semi-mechanized revolving prototype used to mix the coffee beans. The revolving prototype with the helical screw principles proved to be able to performing the grains transport efficiently.

  12. Contribution of methylated exudate flavonoids to the anti-inflammatory activity of Grindelia robusta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, Liselotte; Wollenweber, Eckhard; Steyrleuthner, Katja; Görick, Cornelia; Melzig, Matthias F

    2009-07-01

    The flavonoid pattern of an acetonic extract of Grindelia robusta Nutt. was investigated in detail. The flavonoids were enriched by CC. In addition to twelve known methylated exudate flavonols four compounds were identified for the first time in G. robusta. Several substances of the flavonoid complex, among them the main compounds quercetin-3-methylether and 6-OH-kaempferol-3,6-dimethylether, were tested for their activity to inhibit neutrophil elastase. Quercetin-3-methylether was shown to be most active with an IC(50) of 19 microM, thus obviously contributing to the anti-inflammatory activity of the drug.

  13. Description of Lutzomyia (Pifanomyia robusta n. sp. (Diptera, Psychodidae, Phlebotominae from Peruvian Equadorean interandean areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice A. Bianchi Galati

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Description of Lutzomyia robusta, n. sp. (Diptera, Psychodidae, Phlebotominae from interandean areas of Peru and Equador. Lutzomyia robusta, n. sp., probable vector of human bartonellosis and cutaneous leishmaniasis, is described and illustrated. This species presents strong affinity with L. serrana (Damasceno & Arouck, 1949 but they can be distinguished by variance analysis of four male characteristics and only one female characteristic. In the variance analysis, populations of L. serrana, of Amazonian areas of Brazil, Peru and Bolivia, the coast of Equador and other areas of Brazil were studied. The synonymy of Lutzomyia guayasi (Rodriguez and L. serrana was corroborated.

  14. [Coffee tree cultivation and the social history of onchocerciasis in Soconusco, Chiapas state, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Castellanos, J L

    1991-01-01

    Due to the social and ecological changes that have taken place in the region of Soconusco, Chiapas, Mexico, the coffee tree growth economy (established in the latter part of the last century) has been an important factor in the transmission of onchocerciasis. The optimum ecological conditions for the growth of the coffee tree coincide with those of the disease's growth rate vector; the mobilization of migrant workers for the cultivation and gathering of coffee beans, plus changes in the natural environment, are elements which explain the disease's distribution in the different regions. The origin of the disease in Chiapas may be due to the migration of coffee plantation workers from Guatemala in search of land in which to settle. Social changes occurring after the Agrarian Distribution (land distributions that occurred in 1918 and 1940) caused an intensification and modernization in the areas of cultivation which in turn caused a decline in the disease's growth rate vector. This, together with standard of living improvements and control measures against the disease, explain why the problem in these regions has decreased considerably. The use of ivermectin as a new therapy paves the way for better disease control in the future. Nevertheless, in the smaller locations occupied by middle and poor class farmers, where coffee bean cultivation is just commencing and still in a rudimentary form, onchocerciasis and other diseases continue to present serious health problems.

  15. Quality and Flavor Profiles of Arabica Coffee Processed by Some Fermentation Treatments: Temperature, Containers, and Fermentation Agents Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusianto .

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Coffee fermentation is a step of wet processing. In fact, some microorganisms naturally exist on the surface of coffee cherry. Using a starter culture of microorganisms may change equilibrium of microorganism population. Among some safe fermentation agents are present in “ragi tape” (yeast, “ragi tempe”, and fermented milk. A fermentor machine equipped with eating-control and stirrer had been designed, and tested before. Some treatments investigated were fermentation containers (fermentor machine and plastic sacks; fermentation agents (fresh cage-luwakcoffee, “ragi tape”, “ragi tempe”, and fermented milk; temperature of fermentation (room, 30 C, 35 C, and 40 C; and duration of fermentation (6, 12, and 18 hours. The experiment were replicated three times. Wet-coffee parchments were washed and sundried until moisture content reached 12%. The dried parchment was hulled and examined for the bean quality and flavors. The experiment indicated that 40 C fermentation in fermentor machine resulted in higher content of “full sour defect”. Fermentation agents significanly influenced bean size. Temperature treatment significanly influenced bulk density and bean size. The best flavor profile was obtained from fermentation in plastic sack at ambient temperature. Bacteria of fermented milk and “fresh luwak coffee” as fermentation agents resulted up to excellent flavor. Twelve hours fermentation produced best flavor of Arabica coffee compared to 6 and 18 hours. Key words: Arabica coffee, fermentation, flavour, fermentation agents